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Sample records for chromium ions

  1. Defect transformation in GSGG crystals during chromium ion activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absorption and induced absorption spectra, dose dependence of induced absorption, thermoluminescence of GSGG crystals, nominally pure and activated with chromium and neodymium ions in different concentrations, are investigated. It is shown that it is chromium ion presence in large concentration that decreases the induced coloration in GSGG crystals after γ-irradiation at 300 K. Optimum concentration of chromium ions for the minimum of induced coloration are found. The mechanism of decrease of induced coloration consisting in Fermi level displacement by chromium ion activation is established. Defect concentration and localization and recombination possibilities of electrons and holes in GSGG crystals are estimated by computer simulation

  2. Chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health risks of too much chromium? Chromium and medication interactions Supplemental sources of chromium Chromium and Healthful Diets References Disclaimer What foods provide chromium? Chromium is widely distributed in the ...

  3. Effects of UV light and chromium ions on wood flavonoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The individual and simultaneous effect of UV light and chromium ions was investigated by spectrophotometric methods on inert surfaces impregnated with quercetin or robinetin. The UV-VIS spectra of the silica gel plates impregnated with these flavonoids were modified characteristically after irradiating ultraviolet light. Even a half an hour of irradiation has caused irreversible changes in the molecule structure. A certain chemical - presumably complexation - was concluded from the change of spectral bands assigned to flavonoids when impregnated with chromic ions. Hexavalent chromium caused more complex changes in the absorption spectra. The differences in the spectra could indicate either the oxidation and decomposition of flavonoids, or some kind of coordination process and the reduction of hexavalent chromium. The simultaneous application of UV light and chromium ions caused more pronounced effects. The complexation process between chromium(III) and flavonoid was completed

  4. Chromium plating pollution source reduction by plasma source ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is growing concern over the environmental toxicity and workers' health issues due to the chemical baths and rinse water used in the hard chromium plating process. In this regard the significant hardening response of chromium to nitrogen ion implantation can be environmentally beneficial from the standpoint of decreasing the thickness and the frequency of application of chromium plating. In this paper the results of a study of nitrogen ion implantation of chrome plated test flats using the non-line-of-sight Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII) process, are discussed. Surface characterization was performed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), and Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA). The surface properties were evaluated using a microhardness tester, a pin-on-disk wear tester, and a corrosion measurement system. Industrial field testing of nitrogen PSII treated chromium plated parts showed an improvement by a factor of two compared to the unimplanted case

  5. Possibility of sorption purification of chromium comprising waste waters of galvanic production by inorganic ion exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present work is devoted to possibilities of sorption purification of chromium comprising waste waters of galvanic production by inorganic ion exchangers. Thus, the comparative study of sorption of chromium ions on anion exchanger A B-17 and on inorganic ion exchangers on the basis of hydrated titanium and zirconium dioxides in static and dynamic conditions is conducted. The influence of chromium ions concentration, solutions acidity (ph=1÷12) and presence of base electrolyte on sorption is studied. The state of chromium ions sorbed by inorganic ion exchangers is studied by means of infrared spectroscopy and spectroscopy. It is defined that inorganic sorbents could be used for chromium extraction from different solutions.

  6. Plasma source ion implantation of ammonia into electroplated chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammonia gas (NH3) has been used as a nitrogen source for plasma source ion implantation processing of electroplated chromium. No evidence was found of increased hydrogen concentrations in the bulk material, implying that ammonia can be used without risking hydrogen embrittlement. The retained nitrogen dose of 2.1 x 1017 N-at/cm2 is sufficient to increase the surface hardness of electroplated Cr by 24% and decrease the wear rate by a factor of 4

  7. Studies on the ion-exchange behaviour of chromium ferrocyanide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sorption of univalent, bivalent and trivalent ions has been studied on chromium ferrocyanide gel. The distribution of various metal cations were determined by shaking the exchanger (0.1 g) and 20 ml of 0.005M metal ion solution of pH 2-3, till equilibrium was attained. The concentration of Pb2+, Cu2+, Mn2+, Ni2+, Mg2+ and Al3+ were determined by EDTA, ZrO2+, Th4+, UO2+ and Fe2+ were estimated spectrophotometrically and radiometric methods were used for Rb+, Cs+, Tl+, Ag+, Zn2+, Co2+, Cd2+, Hg2+ and Fe3+ metal ions. The distribution coefficients of various univalent, bivalent and trivalent metal ions (0.002M) were also determined as a function of NH4NO3 and HNO3 concentrations and pH. The studies reveal a high sorption capacity for Cs+, Tl+, Ag+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, Fe3+ and Th4+. The sorption of monovalent cations show purely ion exchange mechanism while the uptake of bivalent and trivalent cations is non-equivalent in nature. Single elution of Rb+, Cs+ and Tl+ has been performed from the columns of this exchanger and the recovery is almost complete in all the cases. Cu2+ and Ag+ get completely adsorbed on the gel column and their elution is not possible probably due to the formation of some new solid phases. Depending on the Ksub(d) values of the metal ions, a large number of separations of radiochemical as well as analytical importance can be performed on the columns of this exchanger material. It is apparent from the Ksub(d) values that a number of separations as Hg2+ from Mg2+, Ca2+ and Pb2+; Mg2+ from Mn2+: Fe3+ from Al3+; and Th4+ from ZrO2+ can be performed on the columns of this exchanger. (T.G.)

  8. Development of electrochemical ion exchange electrodes for the treatment of wastes containing chromium or cesium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays, environmental preservation using technologies that do not attack it, generating non-toxic residues and reduced volumes, has been discussed. Hazardous effluents, containing metals, as chromium, have been poured in the soils and rivers, degrading the water. Not different are the problems originated from some nuclear activities that generate wastes, as in chemical research laboratories. Although those wastes are not poured in the environment, sometimes they are inadequately stored, what can cause serious accidents. With the purpose of solving this problem, there are some techniques to waste treatment, between them there is the electrochemical ion exchange (EIX). EIX is an advanced process that has advantages over traditional ion exchange and the fact of using the electron as the only reagent, reduces the volume of the solution to be treated. This technique consists of development of an electrode, where an ion exchanger is physically incorporated in an electrode structure with a binder. In this study, cationic resin Amberlite CG-50 and zirconium phosphate have been chosen for the separation of chromium and cesium from waste, respectively. They were chosen because they present high chemical stability in oxidizing media and at ionizing radiation. The quantity of charcoal, graphite and binder used in formulation of electrode have been studied either. Before choosing the best electrode, it was verified sorption percentage of 99,3% for chromium and 99,8% for cesium. The greater advantage of this process is the total elution of chromium as much as cesium, without reagents addition, being possible to reuse the electrode without losing its capacity. Beside on the results, a continuous process for the wastes containing Cr and Cs, using a flux electrolytic cell (CELFLUX) of high retention capacity, was presented. The high efficiency of this cell for both retention and elution, leading to an important reduction of waste volume, and, every more, making possible the

  9. A REVIEW OF BIOSORPTION OF CHROMIUM IONS BY MICROORGANISMS

    OpenAIRE

    Inga Zinicovscaia

    2012-01-01

    Due to its widespread industrial use, chromium has become a serious pollutant in diverse environmental settings. The main source of chromium pollution including the Republic o Moldova is industry. It is a great need to develop new eco-friendly methods of chromium removal. Biosorption of heavy metals is a most promising technology involved in the removal of toxic metals from industrial waste streams and natural waters. This article is an extended abstract of a communication presented at the...

  10. Corrosion resistance enhancement of SAE 1020 steel after Chromium implantation by nitrogen ion recoil

    OpenAIRE

    Geraldo Francisco Gomes; Mario Ueda; Antonio Fernando Beloto; Roberto Zenhei Nakazato; Helfried Reuther

    2005-01-01

    SAE 1020 construction steel is widely used as mortar reinforcement and small machine parts, but aside good surface properties as high ductility, hardness and wear resistance, its surface is prone to severe corrosion. As it is known, Chromium in amount over 12%-13% in the Fe alloys renders them resistance to several corrosive attacks. SAE 1020 samples were recovered with Chromium film and then bombarded either by nitrogen Ion Beam (IB) or Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) to recoil impl...

  11. Removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution by barium ion cross-linked alginate beads

    OpenAIRE

    Uzaşçı Sesil; Tezcan Filiz; Bedia Erim F.

    2014-01-01

    Barium ion cross-linked alginate beads have shown great affinity to toxic hexavalent chromium ions in aqueous solution, contrary to the traditional calcium alginate beads. The adsorption experiments were carried out by the batch contact method. The optimal pH for removal was found to be pH 4. The equilibrium was established in 4 h and the removal efficiency of chromium (VI) was found as 95%. The adsorption data fit well with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The maximum chromium (VI) adsorpt...

  12. Effect of Chromium Ion Implantation on the Oxidation Rate of Iron andSteel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research discussed about the effect of chromium ion implantation onthe oxidation rate of iron (Fe 95.5 %) and steel (AISI 304). The measurementof oxidation resistance of the samples was carried out in dry oxygen mediumat high temperature conditions and the time of observation was varied. Theoxidation resistance can be analyzed by the changing of weight before andafter the process. The result showed that for iron materials (Fe 95.5 %)implanted chromium ion at energy 100 keV and ion dose 5 x 1017 ion/cm2increase the oxidation resistance in order of 28.68 %. But for AISI 304 steelimplanted chromium ion at the same conditions, the oxidation resistancedecreased. This phenomena is caused by the fact that the content of chromiummaybe already exceed the solubility of base material and it will create thepossibility of the formation of oxid spinel which less protective. (author)

  13. A REVIEW OF BIOSORPTION OF CHROMIUM IONS BY MICROORGANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Zinicovscaia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to its widespread industrial use, chromium has become a serious pollutant in diverse environmental settings. The main source of chromium pollution including the Republic o Moldova is industry. It is a great need to develop new eco-friendly methods of chromium removal. Biosorption of heavy metals is a most promising technology involved in the removal of toxic metals from industrial waste streams and natural waters. This article is an extended abstract of a communication presented at the Conference Ecological Chemistry 2012

  14. Determination of hexavalent chromium in cosmetic products by ion chromatography and postcolumn derivatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Eun Kyung; Lee, Somi; Park, Jin-Hee; Joo, Kyung-Mi; Jeong, Hye-Jin; Chang, Ih Seop

    2006-05-01

    Chromium hydroxide green [Cr(2)O(OH)(4)] and chromium oxide green (Cr(2)O(3)) are colouring agents for use in cosmetic products. These colourants may contain chromium (VI), which cause skin allergies through percutaneous adsorption on the skin. Eye shadow is a representative cosmetic product in which significant colourants are used. We analysed the chromium (VI) in the eye shadows by ion chromatography and post column derivatization. We optimize conditions of chromium (VI) analysis in eye shadows. During the pretreatment procedure, there are no exchange of chromium (III) to chromium (VI). This method has a limit of quantification for chromium (VI) of 1.0 microg l(-1), recovery rate of 100 +/- 3% and analysis time less than 10 min. This result is 300 times more sensitive than the high-performance liquid chromatography method. We applied the optimized method to analyse 22 eye shadows and 6 colouring agents. 2 out of 22 of the products contained more than 5 mg l(-1). In our previous work, 5 mg l(-1) of Cr represented a threshold level. There was much more Cr(VI) in the colouring agents. The Cr(VI) in one of the colouring agents was 97.6 mg l(-1). PMID:16689807

  15. Removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution by barium ion cross-linked alginate beads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzaşçı Sesil

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Barium ion cross-linked alginate beads have shown great affinity to toxic hexavalent chromium ions in aqueous solution, contrary to the traditional calcium alginate beads. The adsorption experiments were carried out by the batch contact method. The optimal pH for removal was found to be pH 4. The equilibrium was established in 4 h and the removal efficiency of chromium (VI was found as 95%. The adsorption data fit well with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The maximum chromium (VI adsorption capacity determined from Langmuir isotherm was 36.5 mg/g dry alginate beads. Our study suggests that barium alginate beads can be used as cost-effective and efficient adsorbents for the removal of chromium (VI from contaminated waters.

  16. Simultaneous determination of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) in aqueous solutions by ion chromatography and chemiluminescence detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Jøns, O; Nielsen, B

    1992-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of chromium(iii) and chromium(vi) in a flow system based on chemiluminescence was developed. A Dionex cation-exchange guard column was used to separate chromium(iii) from chromium(vi), and chromium(vi) was reduced by potassium sulfite, whereupon both sp....... The detection limit was 0.5 micrograms l-1 for both species. Data were in agreement with Zeeman-effect background corrected atomic absorption spectrometry measurements....

  17. Magnetic properties of manganites doped with gallium, iron, and chromium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnetization and the crystal structure of the La0.7Sr0.3Mn1−xMxO3 (M = Ga, Fe, Cr; x ≤ 0.3) systems are studied. The substitution of gallium and chromium is shown to cause phase separation into antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic phases, whereas the substitution of iron for manganese stabilizes a spinglass state. The ferromagnetic phase in the chromium-substituted compositions is much more stable than that in the case of substitution by iron ions or diamagnetic gallium ions. The magnetic properties are explained in terms of the model of superexchange interactions and the localization of most eg electrons of manganese. The stabilization of ferromagnetism in the chromium-substituted compositions can be caused by the fact that the positive and negative contributions to the superexchange interaction between Mn3+ and Cr3+ ions are close to each other but the antiferromagnetic part of the exchange is predominant. Moreover, some chromium ions are in the tetravalent state, which maintains the optimum doping conditions

  18. Magnetic properties of manganites doped with gallium, iron, and chromium ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troyanchuk, I. O., E-mail: troyan@physics.by; Bushinsky, M. V.; Tereshko, N. V. [National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Scientific and Practical Materials Research Center (Belarus); Dobryanskii, V. M. [Belarussian State Agrarian Technical University (Belarus); Sikolenko, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Többens, D. M. [Helmholtz Center (Germany)

    2015-05-15

    The magnetization and the crystal structure of the La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}Mn{sub 1−x}M{sub x}O{sub 3} (M = Ga, Fe, Cr; x ≤ 0.3) systems are studied. The substitution of gallium and chromium is shown to cause phase separation into antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic phases, whereas the substitution of iron for manganese stabilizes a spinglass state. The ferromagnetic phase in the chromium-substituted compositions is much more stable than that in the case of substitution by iron ions or diamagnetic gallium ions. The magnetic properties are explained in terms of the model of superexchange interactions and the localization of most e{sub g} electrons of manganese. The stabilization of ferromagnetism in the chromium-substituted compositions can be caused by the fact that the positive and negative contributions to the superexchange interaction between Mn{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 3+} ions are close to each other but the antiferromagnetic part of the exchange is predominant. Moreover, some chromium ions are in the tetravalent state, which maintains the optimum doping conditions.

  19. Intensity and energy distributions of neutral chromium clusters sputtered by low-energy argon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technique of sputtered neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS) was used to study energy distributions of neutral chromium dimers (Cr2) and yield distributions of neutral chromium dimers and trimers (Cr3) sputtered from a polycrystalline chromium target by normally incident singly charged argon ions (Ar+) with energies from 200 to 900 electron volts. The argon ions were generated in a thermionically sustained, magnetically confined AR plasma operating at a pressure of approximately 2 x 10-3 torr. The plasma also served as a means of efficiently positioning the sputtered neutral cluster. The slopes of high energy tails of the sputtered chromium dimer energy distributions were calculated and were found to give results consistent with a statistical recombination model of neutral cluster formation. The yield distribution of the neutral Cr2 molecules was also found to be in agreement with the predicted dependence of dimer yield on total sputtering yield for the recombination model, i.e., that the dimer yield should be proportional to the square of the total sputtering yield for chromium. The neutral Cr3 molecules observed were estimated to be less than 10-5 of the total sputtering yield

  20. Recovery of Chromium Ions From Electroplating Wastewater by Flotation, Gamma Irradiation and Adsorption onto Hydrogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present, the wastewater treatment facilities in many plating plants are approaching their time for replacement. On this occasion there is a strong requirement to re-evaluate the wastewater treatment measures from the point of view of treatment technology. Laboratory investigation was undertaken on the flotation of Cr (VI) from aqueous suspension over whole ph range, aiming at the separation of chromium by flotation. The cationic surfactant (hexadecyl triethyl ammonium bromide) was applied as a collector. Surface properties, in particular the critical micelle concentration, the effectiveness of surface tension reduction, efficiency, surface excess and the minimum surface area were measured at 30 μ C. The electro-flotation was applied with and without the collector at different times for the removal of chromium (VI). The results were discussed in term of surface properties of the collectors at the solution/air interface. Further work took place by irradiating the water samples by gamma- irradiation to reduce the highly toxic Cr(VI) to the much less toxic and less soluble Cr1 in water; therefore, there is a potential for the complete removal of chromium from aqueous solutions. The possibility of using hydrogels for the uptake of irradiated chromium solutions by different hydrogels was investigated. The structure of the hydrogels was estimated by using FT1R and the pore structure of the hydrogels before and after dictating with chromium ions was monitored by SEM. The adsorption studies show that, it is ph dependent. Lowering of the chromium concentration below the maximum permissible value have been achieved after the treatment of chromium solution by flotation, gamma irradiation and adsorption onto hydrogels

  1. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] removal by the electrochemical ion-exchange process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharnaik, Amit Shivputra; Ghosh, Pranab Kumar

    2014-01-01

    In the present investigation, the performance of a laboratory-scale plate and frame-type electrochemical ion-exchange (EIX) cell on removal ofhexavalent chromium from synthetic wastewater containing 5 mg/l of Cr(VI) was evaluated under varying applied voltages. Ruthenium dioxide-coated titanium plate (RuO2/Ti) was used as anode and stainless steel plates as cathode. The EIX cell was run at different hydraulic retention time (HRT). Before using in the electrochemical cell, the capacity of ion-exchange resin was evaluated through kinetic and isotherm equilibrium tests in batch mode. The batch kinetic study result showed that the equilibrium time for effective ion exchange with resin is 2 h. The isotherm equilibrium data fit well to both Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms. Maximum capacity (qm) of resin calculated from Langmuir isotherm was 71.42 mg/g. Up to 99% of chromium removal was noticed in the EIX cell containing fresh resin at applied voltages of 10 V and higher. Migration of chromium ion to anode chamber was not noticed while performing the experiment with fresh resin. As high as 50% removal of chromium was observed from the middle chamber containing exhausted resin at an applied voltage of 25 V when the influent flow rate was maintained at 45 min of HRT. The performance of the reactor was increased to 72% when the influent flow rate was decreased to maintain at 90 min of HRT. Build-up of chromium in the anode chamber took place when exhausted resin was used in the process. PMID:25145180

  2. Removal of chromium and toxic ions present in mine drainage by Ectodermis of Opuntia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera, Hector [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Facultad de Quimica, Paseo Colon interseccion Paseo Tollocan S/N, C.P. 50120, Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Urena-Nunez, Fernando [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P.18-1027, Col. Escandon, Delegacion Miguel Hidalgo, C.P. 11801, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Bilyeu, Bryan [University of North Texas, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, P.O. Box 305310, Denton, TX 76203-5310 (United States); Barrera-Diaz, Carlos [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Facultad de Quimica, Paseo Colon interseccion Paseo Tollocan S/N, C.P. 50120, Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: cbarrera@uaemex.mx

    2006-08-25

    This work presents conditions for hexavalent and trivalent chromium removal from aqueous solutions using natural, protonated and thermally treated Ectodermis of Opuntia. A removal of 77% of Cr(VI) and 99% of Cr(III) can be achieved. The sorbent material is characterized using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, before and after the contact with the chromium containing aqueous media. The results obtained from the characterization techniques indicate that the metal ion remains on the surface of the sorbent material. The percentage removal is found to depend on the initial chromium concentration and pH. The Cr(VI) and Cr(III) uptake process is maximum at pH 4, using 0.1 g of sorbent per liter of aqueous solution. The natural Ectodermis of Opuntia showed a chromium adsorption capacity that was adequately described by the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Finally, an actual mine drainage sample that contained Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe Zn, Ni and Pb was tested under optimal conditions for chromium removal and Ectodermis of Opuntia was found to be a suitable sorbent material. The use of this waste material for the treatment of metal-containing aqueous solutions as well as mine drainage is effective and economical.

  3. Chromium redistribution in ion-implanted GaAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper an attempt is made to find systematic differences between the annealing conditions for ion implanted GaAs where Cr is observed to redistribute and the conditions where it does not. For samples where Cr redistribution was observed, electrical and chemical and/or strain interactions were separated. The results indicate that electrical interactions are at least a limiting factor and in most cases a dominant factor in Cr redistribution. For this reason it appears that Cr redistribution in ion implanted samples can be minimized or eliminated by annealing at temperatures such that the background free carrier concentration screens out any internal electric fields. (author)

  4. Chromium and cobalt ion concentrations in blood and serum following various types of metal-on-metal hip arthroplasties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jantzen, Christopher; Jørgensen, Henrik L; Duus, Benn R;

    2013-01-01

    Widely different metal ion concentrations in blood and serum have been reported with metal-on-metal (MoM) implants. We reviewed the literature on blood and serum ion concentrations of chromium (Cr) and cobalt (Co) following various MoM hip arthroplasties.......Widely different metal ion concentrations in blood and serum have been reported with metal-on-metal (MoM) implants. We reviewed the literature on blood and serum ion concentrations of chromium (Cr) and cobalt (Co) following various MoM hip arthroplasties....

  5. Determination of Chromium(III), Chromium(VI), and Chromium(III) acetylacetonate in water by ion-exchange disk extraction/metal furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamakura, Nao, E-mail: minnie04_tb@yahoo.co.jp; Inui, Tetsuo; Kitano, Masaru; Nakamura, Toshihiro

    2014-03-01

    A new method for the separate determination of Chromium(III) (Cr(III)), Chromium(VI) (Cr(VI)), and Cr(III) acetylacetonate (Cr(acac){sub 3}) in water was developed using a cation-exchange extraction disk (CED) and an anion-exchange extraction disk (AED) combined with metal furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (MFAAS). A 100-mL water sample was adjusted to pH 5.6 and passed through the CED placed on the AED. Cr(acac){sub 3} and Cr(III) were adsorbed on the CED, and Cr(VI) was adsorbed on the AED. The adsorbed Cr(acac){sub 3} was eluted with 50 mL of carbon tetrachloride, followed by the elution of Cr(III) with 50 mL of 3 mol L{sup −1} nitric acid. Cr(VI) was eluted with 50 mL of 3 mol L{sup −1} nitric acid. The chemical species of Cr eluted from the CED with carbon tetrachloride was identified as Cr(acac){sub 3} using infrared spectroscopy. The eluate of Cr(acac){sub 3} was diluted to 100 mL with carbon tetrachloride, and those of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) were diluted to 100 mL with deionized water. All of the solutions were subsequently analyzed by MFAAS. The calibration curve for the Cr(acac){sub 3} aqueous solutions exhibited good linearity in the range of 0.1 to 1 ng. The detection limit of Cr, which corresponded to three times the standard deviation (n = 10) of the blank values, was 20 pg. The recovery test for Cr(III), Cr(VI), and Cr(acac){sub 3} exhibited desirable results (96.0%–107%) when 5 μg of each species (50 μg L{sup −1}) was added to 100 mL water samples (i.e., tap water, rainwater, and bottled drinking water). In a humic acid solution, Cr(acac){sub 3} was quantitatively recovered (103%), but Cr(III) and Cr(VI) exhibited poor recoveries (i.e., 84.8% and 78.4%, respectively). - Highlights: • A determination method of Cr(III), Cr(VI), and Cr(III) acetylacetonate in water was developed. • The combination of ion-exchange resin disks with metal furnace AAS was used. • No effect of humic acid on the recovery of Cr(III) acetylacetonate was

  6. Determination of Chromium(III), Chromium(VI), and Chromium(III) acetylacetonate in water by ion-exchange disk extraction/metal furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method for the separate determination of Chromium(III) (Cr(III)), Chromium(VI) (Cr(VI)), and Cr(III) acetylacetonate (Cr(acac)3) in water was developed using a cation-exchange extraction disk (CED) and an anion-exchange extraction disk (AED) combined with metal furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (MFAAS). A 100-mL water sample was adjusted to pH 5.6 and passed through the CED placed on the AED. Cr(acac)3 and Cr(III) were adsorbed on the CED, and Cr(VI) was adsorbed on the AED. The adsorbed Cr(acac)3 was eluted with 50 mL of carbon tetrachloride, followed by the elution of Cr(III) with 50 mL of 3 mol L−1 nitric acid. Cr(VI) was eluted with 50 mL of 3 mol L−1 nitric acid. The chemical species of Cr eluted from the CED with carbon tetrachloride was identified as Cr(acac)3 using infrared spectroscopy. The eluate of Cr(acac)3 was diluted to 100 mL with carbon tetrachloride, and those of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) were diluted to 100 mL with deionized water. All of the solutions were subsequently analyzed by MFAAS. The calibration curve for the Cr(acac)3 aqueous solutions exhibited good linearity in the range of 0.1 to 1 ng. The detection limit of Cr, which corresponded to three times the standard deviation (n = 10) of the blank values, was 20 pg. The recovery test for Cr(III), Cr(VI), and Cr(acac)3 exhibited desirable results (96.0%–107%) when 5 μg of each species (50 μg L−1) was added to 100 mL water samples (i.e., tap water, rainwater, and bottled drinking water). In a humic acid solution, Cr(acac)3 was quantitatively recovered (103%), but Cr(III) and Cr(VI) exhibited poor recoveries (i.e., 84.8% and 78.4%, respectively). - Highlights: • A determination method of Cr(III), Cr(VI), and Cr(III) acetylacetonate in water was developed. • The combination of ion-exchange resin disks with metal furnace AAS was used. • No effect of humic acid on the recovery of Cr(III) acetylacetonate was observed. • The proposed method enabled the determination of three Cr

  7. Biosorption of chromium(VI) ion from aqueous solutions using walnut, hazelnut and almond shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehlivan, Erol; Altun, Türkan

    2008-06-30

    The potential to remove Cr(VI) ion from aqueous solutions through biosorption using, the shells of Walnut (WNS) (Juglans regia), Hazelnut (HNS) (Corylus avellana) and Almond (AS) (Prunus dulcis) was investigated in batch experiments. The equilibrium adsorption level was determined to be a function of the solution contact time and concentration. Kinetic experiments revealed that the dilute chromium solutions reached equilibrium within 100 min. The biosorptive capacity of the shells was dependent on the pH of the chromium solution, with pH 3.5 being optimal. Adsorption of Cr(VI) ion uptake is in all cases pH-dependent showing a maximum at equilibrium pH values between 2.0 and 3.5, depending on the biomaterial, that correspond to equilibrium pH values of 3.5 for (WNS), 3.5 for (HNS) and 3.2 for (AS). The adsorption data fit well with the Langmuir isotherm model. The sorption process conformed to the Langmuir isotherm with maximum Cr(VI) ion sorption capacities of 8.01, 8.28, and 3.40 mg/g for WNS, HNS and AS, respectively. Percentage removal by WNS, HNS and AS was 85.32, 88.46 and 55.00%, respectively at a concentration of 0.5 mM. HNS presented the highest adsorption capacities for the Cr(VI) ion. PMID:18179865

  8. Interaction of the wood surface with metal ions. Part 3: The effects of light on chromium impregnated wood surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    UV-light changes of untreated and chromium impregnated wood surface were investigated by absorption spectrophotometric methods. The properties of indifferent silicagel and celulose layers were to the behaviour of poplar and black locust surface. Chromic-ion-impregnation had no significant effect on the absorption spectra of these layers. On the other hand, hexavalent chromium was reduced and UV-light caused irreversible wood degradation. Surface treatment caused considerable modification in black locust

  9. Removal of cadmium and chromium ions by using slag media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was carried out to investigate the feasibility and removal efficiency of Cd (II) and Cr(III) ions removal from the simulated wastewater solution by using slag media type filter. The results of the slag filter were compared to conventional sand filter at the point of view of effluent quality and removal performance. The obtained effective size and coefficient uniformity were 0.45mm and 1.67 in slag, 0.46mm and 1.35 in sand respectively. At pH 7, imulated wastewater, 100mg Cd/l was passed through both filter columns. The slag filter showed 60 to 80 percent removal efficiency of the initial Cd concentration, while the sand filter showed only 5 to 10 percent. Optimum pH value for Cd removal showed 7, obtained optimum back wash frequency of slag column was 1.5 times less than of sand. With the simulated wastewater having ionic concentration of pH 7 the removal efficiency of the slag column and metal concentration of 100ml/l revealed 99.7 percent during 62 hrs, while that of the sand column was 28.5 percent. (Author)

  10. Electrokinetic migration studies on removal of chromium and uranyl ions from 904-A trench soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes a laboratory-scale study, in which electrokinetic migration technology was used to remove chromium and uranium, as well as other ions, from soil taken from a bore hole adjacent to the 904-A trench at the Savannah River Technology Center. Imposition of an electric current on humid (not saturated) soil successfully caused cations to migrate through the pore water of the soil to the cathode, where they were captured in an ISOLOCKTm polymer matrix and in a cation exchange resin incorporated in the polymer. Chemicals circulated through the anode/polymer and cathode/polymer were able to control pH excursions in the electrokinetic-cells by reacting with the H+ and OH- generated at the anode and cathode, respectively. The study indicates that ions adsorbed on the surface of the soil as well as those in the pores of soil particles can be caused to migrate through the soil to an appropriate electrode. After 10 days of operation at 20--25 V and 2 mA, approximately 65% of the chromium was removed from two 3.5 kg soil samples. A 57% removal of uranium was achieved. The study shows that electrokinetic migration, using the ISOLOCK trademark polymer will be effective as an in situ treatment method for the removal of metal ion contaminants in soil adjacent to the 904-A trench

  11. Electrokinetic migration studies on removal of chromium and uranyl ions from 904-A trench soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bibler, J.P.; Meaker, T.F.; O`Steen, A.B.

    1992-09-30

    This report describes a laboratory-scale study, in which electrokinetic migration technology was used to remove chromium and uranium, as well as other ions, from soil taken from a bore hole adjacent to the 904-A trench at the Savannah River Technology Center. Imposition of an electric current on humid (not saturated) soil successfully caused cations to migrate through the pore water of the soil to the cathode, where they were captured in an ISOLOCKTm polymer matrix and in a cation exchange resin incorporated in the polymer. Chemicals circulated through the anode/polymer and cathode/polymer were able to control pH excursions in the electrokinetic-cells by reacting with the H{sup +} and OH{sup {minus}} generated at the anode and cathode, respectively. The study indicates that ions adsorbed on the surface of the soil as well as those in the pores of soil particles can be caused to migrate through the soil to an appropriate electrode. After 10 days of operation at 20--25 V and 2 mA, approximately 65% of the chromium was removed from two 3.5 kg soil samples. A 57% removal of uranium was achieved. The study shows that electrokinetic migration, using the ISOLOCK{trademark} polymer will be effective as an in situ treatment method for the removal of metal ion contaminants in soil adjacent to the 904-A trench.

  12. Temperature dependence of the luminescence spectra of garnet crystals doped with chromium ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orucu, Humeyra; Ozen, Gonul; Collins, John; Di Bartolo, Baldassare

    2009-05-01

    We have investigated the spectral behavior of a number of garnet crystals doped with chromium ions in a range of temperatures from 25 to 800 K. The crystals we considered are, in order of decreasing crystalline field, Y3Al5O12 (YAG), Gd3Ga5O12 (GGG) and Gd3Sc2Ga3O12 (GSGG). By investigating their luminescence spectra, including their vibronic spectra, over a very broad range of temperatures, we attempt to obtain a fuller picture of the processes following excitation.

  13. Application of dolochar in the removal of cadmium and hexavalent chromium ions from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Dolochar - a waste material from sponge iron industry, is put to test as an adsorbent for removal of cadmium and hexavalent chromium ions from aqueous solutions. The sample consists of lots of voids and pores. Batch adsorption experiments have indicated that, higher pH and temperature enhances sorption for cadmium ions. The adsorption for chromium is found better at acidic pH in comparison to alkaline pH. The adsorption is well fitted to Langmuir isotherm model compared to the Freundlich model indicating monolayer adsorption. The kinetics of adsorption better fit to pseudo second order model.. Display Omitted Highlights: → Dolochar, a waste material is generated during the production of sponge iron. → Dolochar consists of metallic iron, carbon, and lime bearing phases along with lots of voids and pores. → It was found to be an good adsorbent for the removal of cadmium and hexavalent chromium ions from aqueous solutions. → The adsorption follows Langmuir isotherm and kinetics of adsorption better fit of pseudo second order model. - Abstract: Dolochar, a waste material generated in sponge iron industry, is processed and put to test as an adsorbent for removal of Cd(II) and Cr(VI) ions from aqueous solutions. The dolochar samples were characterised to determine the different phases and their distribution by reflection microscopy. The analysis indicated that the sample consists of metallic iron, fused carbon, and Ca-Mg bearing phases (Ca-Mg-silicate-oxide) along with lots of voids and pores. The fixed carbon (FC) content of the material is 13.8% with a Langmuir surface area of 81.6 m2/g and micropore area of 34.1 m2/g. Batch adsorption experiments have been conducted to study the sorption behaviour of Cd(II) and Cr(VI) ions on dolochar as a function of particle size, contact time, adsorbent dosages, pH and temperature. It is observed that higher pH and temperature enhances sorption of Cd(II) ions. In contrast, the adsorption for Cr(VI) is

  14. Corrosion resistance enhancement of SAE 1020 steel after Chromium implantation by nitrogen ion recoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Francisco Gomes

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available SAE 1020 construction steel is widely used as mortar reinforcement and small machine parts, but aside good surface properties as high ductility, hardness and wear resistance, its surface is prone to severe corrosion. As it is known, Chromium in amount over 12%-13% in the Fe alloys renders them resistance to several corrosive attacks. SAE 1020 samples were recovered with Chromium film and then bombarded either by nitrogen Ion Beam (IB or Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII to recoil implant Cr atoms in the Fe matrix. Samples treated by 100 keV N+ IB showed irregular, thin Cr profile, remaining a part of the film on the surface, to about 10 nm. Samples treated by 40 kV N PIII presented Cr layer of about 18% at., ranging to around 90 nm. Cr of the film was implanted in the Fe matrix in an almost flat profile. Results of corrosion test showed good performance of the PIII treated sample. The IB treated sample showed some enhancement over the non-treated reference and the only Cr film deposited sample showed no modification on the corrosion behavior as compared to the non-treated reference sample.

  15. Annealing of chromium oxycarbide coatings deposited by plasma immersion ion processing (PIIP) for aluminum die casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromium oxycarbide coatings have been investigated for use as non-wetting coatings for aluminum die casting. This paper examines Cr-C-O coating stability and non-wetability at elevated temperatures for extended periods. Coatings were deposited onto 304 stainless steel from chromium carbonyl [Cr(CO)6] by plasma immersion ion processing. The coatings were annealed in air at an aluminum die casting temperature of 700 deg. C up to 8 h. Coatings were analyzed using resonant ion backscattering spectroscopy, nanoindentation and pin-on-disk tribometry. Molten aluminum was used to determine coating wetting and contact angle. Results indicate that the surface oxide layer reaches a maximum thickness of 900 nm. Oxygen concentrations in the coatings increased from 24% to 34%, while the surface concentration rose to almost 45%. Hardness values ranged from 22.1 to 6.7 GPa, wear coefficients ranged from 21 to 8x10-6 mm3/Nm and contact angles ranged from 156 deg. to 127 deg

  16. Annealing of chromium oxycarbide coatings deposited by plasma immersion ion processing (PIIP) for aluminum die casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, A. M.; He, X. M.; Trkula, M.; Nastasi, M.

    2001-04-01

    Chromium oxycarbide coatings have been investigated for use as non-wetting coatings for aluminum die casting. This paper examines Cr-C-O coating stability and non-wetability at elevated temperatures for extended periods. Coatings were deposited onto 304 stainless steel from chromium carbonyl [Cr(CO) 6] by plasma immersion ion processing. The coatings were annealed in air at an aluminum die casting temperature of 700°C up to 8 h. Coatings were analyzed using resonant ion backscattering spectroscopy, nanoindentation and pin-on-disk tribometry. Molten aluminum was used to determine coating wetting and contact angle. Results indicate that the surface oxide layer reaches a maximum thickness of 900 nm. Oxygen concentrations in the coatings increased from 24% to 34%, while the surface concentration rose to almost 45%. Hardness values ranged from 22.1 to 6.7 GPa, wear coefficients ranged from 21 to 8×10 -6 mm3/ Nm and contact angles ranged from 156° to 127°.

  17. Site-selective spectroscopy of garnet crystals doped with chromium ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Örücü, Hümeyra; Özen, Gönül; Di Bartolo, Baldassare; Collins, John

    2012-09-01

    Site-selective spectroscopy is a tool that can be used to uncover the presence of multiple sites available to optically active ions in host lattices. In this Article, we present techniques that can be applied to appraise the different sites that may occur in systems where charge compensation is required or in systems where such compensation is not present. We then consider some garnet crystals doped with chromium ions. For the Cr-doped garnets (YAG, GGG, GSGG, and CYMGG), we present luminescence and lifetime data over a wide temperature range, and infer not only the presence of different centers, but also the interaction among them as a function of temperature. PMID:22867053

  18. Recovery and reuse of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solutions by a hybrid technique of electrodialysis and ion exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Gayathri

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The chrome plating industry is one of the highly polluting industries whose effluent mainly consists of chromium(VI. This compound is highly toxic to aquatic life and human health. The rinse water constituents reflect the chrome plating bath characteristics; generally dead tank wash water contains about 1% of the plating bath concentration. Other metals and metal compounds usually considered as toxic can be precipitated out by suitably adjusting the pH of the wastewaters. However, Cr(VI is soluble in almost all pH ranges and therefore an efficient treatment is required for the removal and recovery of chromium, and also for the reuse of wastewaters. The present study aims to recover the chromium by a hybrid technique of electrodialysis and ion exchange for the removal and concentration of chromate ions from the effluent. The different modes of operation like batch recirculation process, batch recirculation process with continuous dipping and continuous process were carried out to remove and recover the chromium from the effluent and the percentage reductions of chromium were found to be 98.69%, 99.18% and 100%, respectively.

  19. Electrokinetic migration studies on removal of chromium and uranyl ions from 904-A trench soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bibler, J.P.; Meaker, T.F.; O' Steen, A.B.

    1992-09-30

    This report describes a laboratory-scale study, in which electrokinetic migration technology was used to remove chromium and uranium, as well as other ions, from soil taken from a bore hole adjacent to the 904-A trench at the Savannah River Technology Center. Imposition of an electric current on humid (not saturated) soil successfully caused cations to migrate through the pore water of the soil to the cathode, where they were captured in an ISOLOCKTm polymer matrix and in a cation exchange resin incorporated in the polymer. Chemicals circulated through the anode/polymer and cathode/polymer were able to control pH excursions in the electrokinetic-cells by reacting with the H[sup +] and OH[sup [minus

  20. Application of silica hydrogel and silica gel comprising chromium(III) ions for synthesis of organo mineral cation exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present article is devoted to application of silica hydrogel and silica gel comprising chromium(III) ions for synthesis of organo mineral cation exchangers. Thus, the polymerization of methacrylic acid on the surface of porous silica is studied. Porous sorbents are obtained by polymerizing of methacrylic acid in the medium of precipitated silica hydrogel treated by Cr(III) salts. The dependence of sorbents porosity on different factors, including conditions of hydrogel precipitation, its treatment by chromium salts, its ageing in the medium of methacrylic acid, quantity of methacrylic acid is studied as well.

  1. Synergy between hexavalent chromium ions and TiO2 nanoparticles inside TUD-1 in the photocatalytic oxidation of propane, a spectroscopic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdy, Mohamed S.

    2016-02-01

    Siliceous TUD-1 mesoporous material was bi-functionalized by titanium dioxide nanoparticles and hexavalent chromium ions. The synthesis was carried out by one-pot procedure based on sol-gel technique. The photocatalytic performance of the prepared material was evaluated in the oxidation of propane under the illumination of ultraviolet light (wavelength = 360 nm) and monitored by in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activity of the prepared material exhibited an extra-ordinary activity than the reference samples that contain either hexavalent chromium ions or titanium dioxide nanoparticles only, confirming the true synergy between hexavalent chromium and tetravalent titanium ions of titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

  2. Colloidal gold nanoparticle probe-based immunochromatographic assay for the rapid detection of chromium ions in water and serum samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An immunochromatographic assay (ICA) using gold nanoparticles coated with monoclonal antibody (McAb) for the detection of chromium ions (Cr) in water and serum samples was developed, optimized, and validated. Gold nanoparticles coated with affinity- purified monoclonal antibodies against isothiocyanobenzyl-EDTA (iEDTA)-chelated Cr3+ were used as the detecting reagent in this completive immunoassay-based one- step test strip. The ICA was investigated to measure chromium speciation in water samples. Chromium standard samples of 0-80 ng/mL in water were determined by the test strips. The results showed that the visual lowest detection limit (LDL) of the test strip was 50.0 ng/mL. A portable colorimetric lateral flow reader was used for the quantification of Cr. The results indicated that the linear range of the ICA with colorimetric detection was 5-80 ng/mL. The ICA was also validated for the detection of chromium ions in serum samples. The test trips showed high stability in that they could be stored at at 37 C for at least 12 weeks without significant loss of activity. The test strip also showed good selectivity for Cr detection with negligible interference from other heavy metals. Because of its low cost and short testing time (within 5 min), the test strip is especially suitable for on-site large- scale screening of Cr-polluted water samples, biomonitoring of Cr exposure, and many other field applications.

  3. Colloidal gold nanoparticle probe-based immunochromatographic assay for the rapid detection of chromium ions in water and serum samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xi; Xiang, Jun-Jian; Tang, Yong; Zhang, Xiao-Li; Fu, Qiang-Qiang; Zou, Jun-Hui; Lin, Yuehe

    2012-09-01

    An immunochromatographic assay (ICA) using gold nanoparticles coated with monoclonal antibody (McAb) for the detection of chromium ions (Cr) in water and serum samples was developed, optimized, and validated. Gold nanoparticles coated with affinity- purified monoclonal antibodies against isothiocyanobenzyl-EDTA (iEDTA)-chelated Cr3+ were used as the detecting reagent in this completive immunoassay-based one- step test strip. The ICA was investigated to measure chromium speciation in water samples. Chromium standard samples of 0-80 ng/mL in water were determined by the test strips. The results showed that the visual lowest detection limit (LDL) of the test strip was 50.0 ng/mL. A portable colorimetric lateral flow reader was used for the quantification of Cr. The results indicated that the linear range of the ICA with colorimetric detection was 5-80 ng/mL. The ICA was also validated for the detection of chromium ions in serum samples. The test trips showed high stability in that they could be stored at at 37 C for at least 12 weeks without significant loss of activity. The test strip also showed good selectivity for Cr detection with negligible interference from other heavy metals. Because of its low cost and short testing time (within 5 min), the test strip is especially suitable for on-site large- scale screening of Cr-polluted water samples, biomonitoring of Cr exposure, and many other field applications.

  4. Reactions of the excited state of polypyridyl chromium(III) ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steffan, C.

    1990-09-21

    There has been much recent interest in the photochemistry and photophysics of transition metal polypyridine complexes due to the possibility of their use in solar energy conversion systems. The excited state of these compounds are known to undergo useful electron transfer and energy transfer reactions. This work attempts to elucidate the mechanism of the quenching of *CrL{sub 3}{sup 3+} (where L = 2,2{prime}-bipyridine, 4,4{prime}-dimethyl-2,2{prime}-bipyridine, 1,10-phenanthroline, 5-chloro-1,10-phenanthroline, 5-methyl-1,10-phenanthroline) by oxalate ions in neutral pH. Evidence suggests an ion-pairing pre-equilibrium followed by rate limiting electron transfer to produce CrL{sub 3}{sup 2+} and CO{sub 2}{sup {minus}} can then react with ground state chromium(III) species to produce another mole of the reduced product or it can produce a secondary transient as in the case of phenanthroline and substituted phenanthroline complexes. The secondary transient reacts to produce CrL{sub 3}{sup 2+} in a subsequent reaction. 85 refs., 24 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. Effect of triple ion beam irradiation on mechanical properties of high chromium austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high-chromium austenitic stainless steel has been developed for an advanced fuel cladding tube considering waterside corrosion and irradiation embrittlement. The candidate material was irradiated in triple ion (Ni, He, H) beam modes at 573 K up to 50 dpa to simulate irradiation damage by neutron and transmutation product. The change in hardness of the very shallow surface layer of the irradiated specimen was estimated from the slope of load/depth-depth curve which is in direct proportion to the apparent hardness of the specimen. Besides, the Swift's power low constitutive equation (σ=A(ε0 + ε)n, A: strength coefficient, ε0: equivalent strain by cold rolling, n: strain hardening exponent) of the damaged parts was derived from the indentation test combined with an inverse analysis using a finite element method (FEM). For comparison, Type304 stainless steel was investigated as well. Though both Type304SS and candidate material were also hardened by ion irradiation, the increase in apparent hardness of the candidate material was smaller than that of Type304SS. The yield stress and uniform elongation were estimated from the calculated constitutive equation by FEM inverse analysis. The irradiation hardening of the candidate material by irradiation can be expected to be lower than that of Type304SS. (author)

  6. Effect of the Chromium Ion Adsorption on the Photoluminescent Properties of Titanium Dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Shimanovska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the photoluminescence (PL of nanocrystalline titanium dioxide (TiO2, synthesized by the thermal hydrolysis in the form of anatase (A or rutile (R, the surface of which has been modified by adsorption of chromium ions (Cr3+. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence, Raman spectroscopy and optical absorption. PL spectra were excited by a nitrogen UV laser. It was found that the processes of the PL emission and optical absorption near the band gap edge of anatase and rutile TiO2 occur with the same electronic transitions. In the Cr3+-doped R/TiO2, the process of nonradiative Auger recombination leads to the quenching of the PL intensity. The Cr3+ ion doping in А/TiO2 leads to short-wave and long-wave shifts of the PL peaks due to the Burstein-Moss effect and due to the contribution of radiation "tails" of the electron density of states, respectively. PL intensity of the Cr3+-doped A/TiO2 at low concentration of Cr3+ (up to 0.5 at. % increases in comparison with the undoped A/TiO2 due to the formation of additional centers of radiative recombination of carriers. With increasing concentration of Cr3+ (~ 1.0 at. %, the TiO2 PL intensity decreases due to the concentration quenching.

  7. Preparation of Silk Sericin/Lignin Blend Beads for the Removal of Hexavalent Chromium Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Hyo Won; Shin, Munju; Yun, Haesung; Lee, Ki Hoon

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, novel adsorbents having high adsorption capability and reusability were prepared using agricultural by-products: silk sericin and lignin. Silk sericin and lignin blend beads were successfully prepared using simple coagulation methods for the removal of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) from aqueous solution. A 1 M lithium chloride (LiCl)/dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solvent system successfully dissolved both sericin and lignin and had sufficient viscosity for bead preparation. Compared to the conventional sericin bead adsorbent, sericin/lignin blend beads showed higher Cr(VI) adsorption capacity. The amount of lignin added to the adsorbent greatly affected the adsorption capacity of the beads, and a 50:50 sericin/lignin blend ratio was optimal. Adsorption behavior followed the Freundlich isotherm, which means the adsorption of Cr(VI) occurred on the heterogeneous surface. Cr(VI) adsorption capability increased with temperature because of thermodynamic-kinetic effects. In addition, over 90% of Cr(VI) ions were recovered from the Cr(VI) adsorbed sericin/lignin beads in a 1 M NaOH solution. The adsorption-desorption recycling process was stable for more than seven cycles, and the recycling efficiency was 82%. It is expected that the sericin/lignin beads could be successfully applied in wastewater remediation especially for hazardous Cr(VI) ions in industrial wastewater. PMID:27598142

  8. Removal of chromium (VI) ions from aqueous solution by adsorption onto two marine isolates of Yarrowia lipolytica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The removal of chromium (VI) ions from aqueous solutions by the biomass of two marine strains of Yarrowia lipolytica (NCIM 3589 and 3590) was studied with respect to pH, temperature, biomass, sea salt concentration, agitation speed, contact time and initial concentration of chromium (VI) ions. Maximum biosorption was observed at pH 1.0 and at a temperature of 35 deg. C. Increase in biomass and sea salts resulted in a decreased metal uptake. With an agitation speed of 130 rpm, equilibrium was attained within 2 h. Under optimum conditions, biosorption was enhanced with increasing concentrations of Cr (VI) ions. NCIM 3589 and 3590 displayed a specific uptake of Cr (VI) ions of 63.73 ± 1.3 mg g-1 at a concentration of 950 ppm and 46.09 ± 0.23 mg g-1 at 955 ppm, respectively. Scatchard plot analysis revealed a straight line allowing the data to be fitted in the Langmuir model. The adsorption data obtained also fitted well to the Freundlich isotherm. The surface sequestration of Cr (VI) by Y. lipolytica was investigated with a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS) as well as with ED-X-ray fluorescence (ED-XRF). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy revealed the involvement of carboxyl, hydroxyl and amide groups on the cell surfaces in chromium binding.

  9. Removal of chromium (VI) ions from aqueous solution by adsorption onto two marine isolates of Yarrowia lipolytica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bankar, Ashok V.; Kumar, Ameeta R. [Institute of Bioinformatics and Biotechnology, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India); Zinjarde, Smita S., E-mail: smita@unipune.ernet.in [Institute of Bioinformatics and Biotechnology, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India)

    2009-10-15

    The removal of chromium (VI) ions from aqueous solutions by the biomass of two marine strains of Yarrowia lipolytica (NCIM 3589 and 3590) was studied with respect to pH, temperature, biomass, sea salt concentration, agitation speed, contact time and initial concentration of chromium (VI) ions. Maximum biosorption was observed at pH 1.0 and at a temperature of 35 deg. C. Increase in biomass and sea salts resulted in a decreased metal uptake. With an agitation speed of 130 rpm, equilibrium was attained within 2 h. Under optimum conditions, biosorption was enhanced with increasing concentrations of Cr (VI) ions. NCIM 3589 and 3590 displayed a specific uptake of Cr (VI) ions of 63.73 {+-} 1.3 mg g{sup -1} at a concentration of 950 ppm and 46.09 {+-} 0.23 mg g{sup -1} at 955 ppm, respectively. Scatchard plot analysis revealed a straight line allowing the data to be fitted in the Langmuir model. The adsorption data obtained also fitted well to the Freundlich isotherm. The surface sequestration of Cr (VI) by Y. lipolytica was investigated with a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS) as well as with ED-X-ray fluorescence (ED-XRF). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy revealed the involvement of carboxyl, hydroxyl and amide groups on the cell surfaces in chromium binding.

  10. THE IMPACT OF ACID ACTIVATION PARAMETERS OF DARK BROWN LOAM ON ITS SORPTION PROPERTIES TO CHROMIUM (III IONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Є.О. Бовсуновський

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available  Today the purification of waste water from heavy metals is an actual environmental problem, which is due to the existence of these different forms of pollution (in the form of salts, oxides etc.. The using of environmentally safe materials can be the direction of solution of this problem. One of them is a common natural sorbent - dark brown loam.  Large reserves of this material, cheapness, very high adsorption, ion exchange and filtration properties provide the practical and economic feasibility of its use in the process of purification of waste water from chromium (III ions. The experimental results on improving of sorption properties of dark brown loam by acid activation of sewage treatment from chromium (III ions have been presented. The optimal conditions for acid activation of the sorbent, at which provides the maximum degree of purification of water from pollution have been defined. Analysis of researches has confirmed the effectiveness of using dark brown loam, modified by sulfuric acid activation, as the sorbent of chromium (III ions from waste waters.

  11. Improvement on simultaneous determination of chromium species in aqueous solution by ion chromatography and chemiluminescence detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Liao, Y.P.; Jons, O.

    sulphite, whereupon both species were detected by use of the luminol-hydrogen peroxide chemiluminescence system. Parameters affecting retention times and resolution of the separator columns, such as eluent pH, eluent composition, reductant pH and concentration, and flow rates were optimized. Furthermore......, the stabilities of reductant and luminol solutions were studied. The linear range of the calibration curve for chromium(III) and chromium(VI) was 1-400 mu g l(-1). The detection limit was 0.12 mu g l(-1) for chromium(III) and 0.09 mu g l(-1) for chromium(VI), respectively. The precision at the 20 mu g...

  12. Corrosion, ion release and Mott–Schottky probe of chromium oxide coatings in saline solution with potential for orthopaedic implant applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogwu, A. A.; Oje, A. M.; Kavanagh, J.

    2016-04-01

    We report our investigation on chromium oxide thin film coatings that show a negligible ion release during electrochemical corrosion testing in saline solution. The chemical constituents of the films prepared by reactive magnetron sputtering were identified to be predominantly Cr2O3 based on Raman spectroscopy anti-symmetric stretching vibration modes for CrIII–O and other peaks and an FTIR spectroscopy E u vibrational mode at 409 cm‑1. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, multiplet fitting for 2P 3/2 and 2P 1/2 states also confirmed the predominantly Cr2O3 stoichiometry in the films. The prepared chromium oxide coatings showed superior pitting corrosion resistance compared to the native chromium oxide films on bare uncoated stainless steel when tested under open circuit potential, potentiodynamic polarisation and cyclic voltammetry in saline solution. The chromium ion released into solution during the corrosion testing of stainless steel substrates coated with chromium oxide coatings was found to be negligibly small based on atomic absorption spectroscopy measurements. Our Mott–Schottky analysis investigation showed that the negligibly small ion release from the chromium oxide coated steel substrates is most likely due to a much lower defect density on the surface of the deposited coatings compared to the native oxide layer on the uncoated steel substrates. This opens up the opportunity for using chromium oxide surface coatings in hip, knee and other orthopaedic implants where possible metal ion release in vivo still poses a great challenge.

  13. Determination of Chromium(III), Chromium(VI), and Chromium(III) acetylacetonate in water by ion-exchange disk extraction/metal furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamakura, Nao; Inui, Tetsuo; Kitano, Masaru; Nakamura, Toshihiro

    A new method for the separate determination of Chromium(III) (Cr(III)), Chromium(VI) (Cr(VI)), and Cr(III) acetylacetonate (Cr(acac)3) in water was developed using a cation-exchange extraction disk (CED) and an anion-exchange extraction disk (AED) combined with metal furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (MFAAS). A 100-mL water sample was adjusted to pH 5.6 and passed through the CED placed on the AED. Cr(acac)3 and Cr(III) were adsorbed on the CED, and Cr(VI) was adsorbed on the AED. The adsorbed Cr(acac)3 was eluted with 50 mL of carbon tetrachloride, followed by the elution of Cr(III) with 50 mL of 3 mol L- 1 nitric acid. Cr(VI) was eluted with 50 mL of 3 mol L- 1 nitric acid. The chemical species of Cr eluted from the CED with carbon tetrachloride was identified as Cr(acac)3 using infrared spectroscopy. The eluate of Cr(acac)3 was diluted to 100 mL with carbon tetrachloride, and those of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) were diluted to 100 mL with deionized water. All of the solutions were subsequently analyzed by MFAAS. The calibration curve for the Cr(acac)3 aqueous solutions exhibited good linearity in the range of 0.1 to 1 ng. The detection limit of Cr, which corresponded to three times the standard deviation (n = 10) of the blank values, was 20 pg. The recovery test for Cr(III), Cr(VI), and Cr(acac)3 exhibited desirable results (96.0%-107%) when 5 μg of each species (50 μg L- 1) was added to 100 mL water samples (i.e., tap water, rainwater, and bottled drinking water). In a humic acid solution, Cr(acac)3 was quantitatively recovered (103%), but Cr(III) and Cr(VI) exhibited poor recoveries (i.e., 84.8% and 78.4%, respectively).

  14. Evaluation of Nickel and Chromium Ion Release During Fixed Orthodontic Treatment Using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometer: An In Vivo Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Rabindra S; Khanna, Bharti; Pasha, Azam; Vinay, K; Narayan, Anjali; Chaitra, K

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fixed orthodontic appliances with the use of stainless steel brackets and archwires made of nitinol have a corrosive potential in the oral environment. Nickel and chromium ions released from these appliances act as allergens apart from being cytotoxic, mutagenic and carcinogenic in smaller quantities in the range of nanograms. This study was done to evaluate the release of nickel and chromium ions from orthodontic appliances in the oral cavity using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). Materials and Methods: Saliva samples from 30 orthodontic patients undergoing treatment with 0.022″ MBT mechanotherapy were collected prior to commencement of treatment, after initial aligning wires and after 10-12 months of treatment. Salivary nickel and chromium ion concentration was measured in parts per billion (ppb) using ICP-MS. Results: Mean, standard deviation and range were computed for the concentrations of ions obtained. Results analyzed using ANOVA indicated a statistically significant increase of 10.35 ppb in nickel ion concentration and 33.53 ppb in chromium ion concentration after initial alignment. The ionic concentration at the end of 10-12 months of treatment showed a statistically significant increase in of 17.92 ppb for chromium and a statistically insignificant decrease in nickel ion concentration by 1.58 ppb. Pearson’s correlation coefficient showed a positive correlation for an increase in nickel concentration after aligning, but not at the end of 10-12 months. A positive correlation was seen for an increase in chromium ion concentration at both time intervals. Conclusion: Nickel and chromium ion concentration in saliva even though below the recommended daily allowance should not be ignored in light of the new knowledge regarding effects of these ions at the molecular level and the allergic potential. Careful and detailed medical history of allergy is essential. Nickel free alternatives should form an essential part of an

  15. X-ray elastic constants of chromium nitride films deposited by arc-ion plating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin films have been successfully utilized to improve the property of mechanical components. However, it is generally known that mechanical properties, such as elastic constants and tensile strength of thin films, are different from those of bulk material, and they are not known in the present state. In many times, x-ray stress measurement revealed a very high compressive residual stress state in the film when bulk elastic constants were used in the stress calculation. The purpose of this research is to investigate the elastic constants of chromium nitride (CrN) films. The film was deposited on austenitic stainless steel (JIS: SUS304) substrates by the arc-ion-plating (AIP) method under the following conditions: the pressure of nitrogen atmosphere was maintained at 2.63 Pa, the substrate temperature of about 573 K, the arc discharge current of 100 A, the bias voltage between -300 and -100 V, and the substrate rotating rate at 3 rpm. The lattice strain of CrN films was measured by x-ray method at various loading stages and the x-ray elastic constants of CrN films were evaluated

  16. Coordination and ion-ion interactions of chromium centers in alkaline earth zinc borate glasses probed by electron paramagnetic resonance and optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumalatha, B.; Omkaram, I.; Rajavardana Rao, T.; Linga Raju, Ch

    2013-05-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), optical absorption and FT-IR studies have been carried out on chromium ions incorporated in alkaline earth zinc borate glasses. The EPR spectra exhibit two resonance signals with effective g values at g ≈ 1.99 and ≈1.97. The resonance signal at g ≈ 1.99 is attributed to the contribution from both the exchange coupled Cr3+-Cr3+ ion pairs and the isolated Cr3+ ions and the resonance signal at g ≈ 1.97 is due to Cr5+ ions. The paramagnetic susceptibility (χ) was calculated from the EPR data at various (123-303 K) temperatures and the Curie temperature (θp) was calculated from the 1/χ-T graph. The optical absorption spectra exhibit three bands at ˜360 nm, ˜440 nm and a broad band at ˜615 nm characteristic of Cr3+ ions in an octahedral symmetry. From the observed band positions, the crystal-field splitting parameter Dq and the Racah parameters (B and C) have been evaluated. From the ultraviolet edges, the optical band gap energies (Eopt) and Urbach energy (ΔE) are calculated. The theoretical optical basicity (Λth) of these glasses has also been evaluated. Chromium ions doped alkaline earth zinc borate glasses show BO3 and BO4 structural units in the FT-IR studies.

  17. Evaluation of effect of galvanic corrosion between nickel-chromium metal and titanium on ion release and cell toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jung-Jin; Song, Kwang-Yeob; Ahn, Seung-Geun; Choi, Jung-Yun; Seo, Jae-Min; Park, Ju-Mi

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate cell toxicity due to ion release caused by galvanic corrosion as a result of contact between base metal and titanium. MATERIALS AND METHODS It was hypothesized that Nickel (Ni)-Chromium (Cr) alloys with different compositions possess different corrosion resistances when contacted with titanium abutment, and therefore in this study, specimens (10×10×1.5 mm) were fabricated using commercial pure titanium and 3 different types of Ni-Cr alloys (T3...

  18. Hydrophobic Poly(ionic liquid) for Highly Effective Separation of Methyl Blue and Chromium Ions from Water

    OpenAIRE

    Jie Kong; Hao Mi; Zhiguo Jiang

    2013-01-01

    The hydrophobic poly(ionic liquid) of poly(3-ethyl-1-vinylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide) (PVI-TFSI) containing imidazolium cations and bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide anions was synthesized for the separation of methyl blue and chromium ions [Cr(VI)] from water. The adsorption of methyl blue and Cr(VI) in PVI-TSFI/water system reached equilibrium stage within 60 min and 12 h, and the maximum adsorbed percentage for methyl blue and Cr(VI) was 97.6% and 98.0%, respectively. ...

  19. Amorphous-silicon@silicon oxide/chromium/carbon as an anode for lithium-ion batteries with excellent cyclic stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A new amorphous-Si@SiOx/Cr/carbon anode composite for lithium-ion batteries is synthesized by a simple method. • At a current density of 100 mA g−1, this as-prepared composite exhibit a stable discharge capacity of about 810 mAh g−1 with good capacity retention up to 200 cycles. Even at a current density of 800 mA g−1, a stable discharge capacity of 570 mAh g−1 can be obtained. • This work creates a new method to improve the electrochemical performance of SiO-based electrode materials. - Abstract: A new amorphous-Si@SiOx/Cr/carbon (a-Si@SiOx/Cr/C) anode composite for lithium-ion batteries is synthesized, using SiO, chromium powder and graphite as starting materials. X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) are employed to characterize the composition, morphology and microstructure of the composite. Coin-type cells are assembled to investigate the electrochemical behaviors of the as-prepared composites by constant current charge–discharge technique, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results show that chromium facilitates the crush of Si@SiOx and graphite during milling, and thus improves their mutual dispersion in the composite. When cycled at 100 mA g−1, the a-Si@SiOx/Cr/C exhibits a stable discharge capacity of about 810 mAh g−1 (calculated on the mass of a-Si@SiOx/Cr/C) with good capacity retention up to 200 cycles. The improved electrochemical performance is attributed to the reduced particle size of a-Si@SiOx and the synergistic effect of carbon and chromium

  20. Release of Chromium from Orthopaedic Arthroplasties

    OpenAIRE

    Afolaranmi, G.A.; Tettey, J; Meek, R.M.D; Grant, M.H

    2008-01-01

    Many orthopaedic implants are composed of alloys containing chromium. Of particular relevance is the increasing number of Cobalt Chromium bearing arthroplasies being inserted into young patients with osteoarthritis. Such implants will release chromium ions. These patients will be exposed to the released chromium for over 50 years in some cases. The subsequent chromium ion metabolism and redistribution in fluid and tissue compartments is complex. In addition, the potential biological effects o...

  1. Implantation of titanium, chromium, yttrium, molybdenum, silver, hafnium, tantalum, tungsten and platinum ions generated by a metal vapor vacuum ion source into 440C stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titanium, yttrium, molybdenum, silver, chromium, hafnium, tantalum, tungsten and platinum ions generated by a metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) ion source were implanted into 440C stainless steel in the dose region 1017 ions cm-2 with extraction voltages of up to 70 kV. Glow discharge spectroscopy (GDS), friction coefficient, and Vickers microhardness of the specimens were studied. Grooves made by friction tests were investigated by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). GDS showed incorporation of carbon in the yttrium, hafnium, tantalum, tungsten and platinum implanted specimens, as well as titanium implanted samples. A large amount of oxygen was observed in the yttrium implanted specimen. The friction coefficient was measured by reciprocating sliding of an unimplanted 440C ball without lubricant at a load of 0.245 N. The friction decreased and achieved a stable state after implantation of titanium, hafnium and tantalum. The friction coefficient of the platinum implanted specimen showed a gradual decrease after several cycles of sliding at high friction coefficient. The yttrium implanted sample exhibited a decreased but slightly unstable friction coefficient. Results from EPMA showed that the implanted elements, which gave decreased friction, remained even after sliding of 200 cycles. Implantation of chromium, molybdenum, silver and tungsten did not provide a decrease in friction and the implants were gone from the wear grooves after the sliding tests. (orig.)

  2. Transformation of valence states and luminescence of chromium ions in the YAG:Cr, Mg and GGG:Cr, Mg single crystalline films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharko, Ya. M.; Luchechko, A. P.; Syvorotka, I. M.; Syvorotka, I. I.; Ubizskii, S. B.; Melnyk, S. S.

    2005-01-01

    Peculiarities of absorption spectra and recombination luminescence of Y3Al5O12 (YAG) and Cd3Ga5O12 (GGG) single crystalline films co-doped with chromium and magnesium have been studied. The change of impurities concentration and annealing of samples in the reducing atmosphere have an influence on absorption in the visible and UV range. Using the results on absorption coefficient measurements in the band of 480 nm and in the absorption bands of Cr3+ ions, it was determined, that near 50% of the chromium ions located in octahedral sites are in the Cr4+ state in films with high chromium concentration. The investigation of thermostimulated luminescence confirms the existence of Cr2+ trap centres in the irradiated films caused by the magnesium dopant.

  3. Transformation of valence states and luminescence of chromium ions in the YAG:Cr, Mg and GGG:Cr, Mg single crystalline films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peculiarities of absorption spectra and recombination luminescence of Y3Al5O12 (YAG) and Cd3Ga5O12 (GGG) single crystalline films co-doped with chromium and magnesium have been studied. The change of impurities concentration and annealing of samples in the reducing atmosphere have an influence on absorption in the visible and UV range. Using the results on absorption coefficient measurements in the band of 480 nm and in the absorption bands of Cr3+ ions, it was determined, that near 50% of the chromium ions located in octahedral sites are in the Cr4+ state in films with high chromium concentration. The investigation of thermostimulated luminescence confirms the existence of Cr2+ trap centres in the irradiated films caused by the magnesium dopant. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. Comparative Biosorption Studies of Hexavalent Chromium Ion onto Raw and Modified Palm Branches

    OpenAIRE

    Mona A. Shouman; Nady A. Fathy; Soheir A. Khedr; Amina A. Attia

    2013-01-01

    The waste of palm branches (PB) was tested for its ability to remove chromium (VI) from aqueous solution by batch and column experiments. Palm branches chemically modified with an oxidizing agent (sulphuric acid) then coated with chitosan and surfactant (hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide surfactant, HDTMA), respectively, were carried out to improve the removal performance of PB. The results of their Cr (VI) removal performances are pH dependent. The adsorption data could be well interprete...

  5. Binary iron-chromium oxide as negative electrode for lithium-ion micro-batteries - spectroscopic and microscopic characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Bingbing; Światowska, Jolanta; Maurice, Vincent; Zanna, Sandrine; Seyeux, Antoine; Marcus, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    (Fe,Cr)-binary oxide thin film electrodes were prepared as negative electrode material for lithium-ion micro-batteries by thermal growth on a stainless steel (AISI 410, FeCr12.5) current collector. The mechanisms of lithiation/delithiation were investigated by means of electrochemical (CV, galvanostatic cycling), spectroscopic (XPS, ToF-SIMS) and microscopic (SEM, AFM) analytical techniques. The as-prepared (Fe, Cr)-binary oxide electrodes exhibit a good cycling performance except the first discharge/charge cycle where a high irreversible capacity is observed due to formation of a solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer. The influence of substituting an oxidized iron by an oxidized chromium (CrxFe2-xO3 phase) was evaluated. The data show that the inferior electrochemical conversion activity of substituted oxidized chromium results in hindering lithium transport in the bulk thin film electrode. It was observed that the irreversible morphology modifications together with SEI evolution are critical to capacity degradation while retaining good coulombic efficiency.

  6. Efficiencies and Optimization of Weak Base Anion Ion-Exchange Resin for Groundwater Hexavalent Chromium Removal at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) contractor, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, has successfully converted a series of groundwater treatment facilities to use a new treatment resin that is delivering more than $3 million in annual cost savings and efficiency in treating groundwater contamination at the DOE Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. During the production era, the nuclear reactors at the Hanford Site required a continuous supply of high-quality cooling water during operations. Cooling water consumption ranged from about 151,417 to 378,541 L/min (40,000 to 100,000 gal/min) per reactor, depending on specific operating conditions. Water from the Columbia River was filtered and treated chemically prior to use as cooling water, including the addition of sodium dichromate as a corrosion inhibitor. Hexavalent chromium was the primary component of the sodium dichromate and was introduced into the groundwater at the Hanford Site as a result of planned and unplanned discharges from the reactors starting in 1944. Groundwater contamination by hexavalent chromium and other contaminants related to nuclear reactor operations resulted in the need for groundwater remedial actions within the Hanford Site reactor areas. Beginning in 1995, groundwater treatment methods were evaluated, leading to the use of pump-and-treat facilities with ion exchange using Dowex 21K, a regenerable, strong-base anion exchange resin. This required regeneration of the resin, which was performed offsite. In 2008, DOE recognized that regulatory agreements would require significant expansion for the groundwater chromium treatment capacity. As a result, CH2M HILL performed testing at the Hanford Site in 2009 and 2010 to demonstrate resin performance in the specific groundwater chemistry at different waste sites. The testing demonstrated that a weak-base anion, single-use resin, specifically ResinTech SIR-700 ®, was effective at removing chromium, had a significantly higher

  7. Efficiencies and Optimization of Weak Base Anion Ion-Exchange Resin for Groundwater Hexavalent Chromium Removal at Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesham, Dean O.; Ivarson, Kristine A.; Hanson, James P.; Miller, Charles W.; Meyers, P.; Jaschke, Naomi M.

    2014-02-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) contractor, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, has successfully converted a series of groundwater treatment facilities to use a new treatment resin that is delivering more than $3 million in annual cost savings and efficiency in treating groundwater contamination at the DOE Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. During the production era, the nuclear reactors at the Hanford Site required a continuous supply of high-quality cooling water during operations. Cooling water consumption ranged from about 151,417 to 378,541 L/min (40,000 to 100,000 gal/min) per reactor, depending on specific operating conditions. Water from the Columbia River was filtered and treated chemically prior to use as cooling water, including the addition of sodium dichromate as a corrosion inhibitor. Hexavalent chromium was the primary component of the sodium dichromate and was introduced into the groundwater at the Hanford Site as a result of planned and unplanned discharges from the reactors starting in 1944. Groundwater contamination by hexavalent chromium and other contaminants related to nuclear reactor operations resulted in the need for groundwater remedial actions within the Hanford Site reactor areas. Beginning in 1995, groundwater treatment methods were evaluated, leading to the use of pump-and-treat facilities with ion exchange using Dowex™ 21K, a regenerable, strong-base anion exchange resin. This required regeneration of the resin, which was performed offsite. In 2008, DOE recognized that regulatory agreements would require significant expansion for the groundwater chromium treatment capacity. As a result, CH2M HILL performed testing at the Hanford Site in 2009 and 2010 to demonstrate resin performance in the specific groundwater chemistry at different waste sites. The testing demonstrated that a weak-base anion, single-use resin, specifically ResinTech SIR-700 ®, was effective at removing chromium, had a significantly

  8. Glutamine-containing “turn-on” fluorescence sensor for the highly sensitive and selective detection of chromium (III) ion in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Meili; Ma, Liguo; Zhang, Min; Cao, Weiguang; Yang, Liting; Ma, Li-Jun

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we reported a new fluorescence sensor for chromium (III) ion, dansyl-L-glutamine (1). The sensor displayed a unique selective fluorescence “turn-on” response to Cr3+ over other common metal ions in water. Notably, 1 still showed a ratiometric response to Cr3+ in UV-vis absorption spectra. The binding mechanism of 1 to Cr3+ was further clarified by using NMR and ESI-MS spectra. The experiment results indicated that the dual-responses of 1 to Cr3+ should attribute to the coordination of deprotonated sulfonamide group with Cr3+ and the protonation of the dimethylamino group due to the coordination of Cr3+ for 1. In addition, two chloride ions also coordinated to the complex of sensor-chromium (III) ion, which further strengthened the conformation of 1-Cr3+.

  9. Removal of chromium (VI) ions from aqueous solutions by using Kiwi shell

    OpenAIRE

    KHAJESADEGH, Maryam; SABERMAHANİ, Fatemeh; MADADİ MAHANİ, Nosrat

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Kiwi shell, an waste material, was investigated as an adsorbent for the removal of Cr(IV) toxic metal from aqueous solutions. Batch experiments have been performed as a function of pH, contact time, dose of sorbent, initial Cr(IV) concentration, strength ionic and temperature. The experiments showed that the adsorption process was quick and the equilibrium attained within 20 min. Evaluation using Langmuir gave sorption capacity 6.23 mg g-1. Chromium uptake by Kiwi shell was best des...

  10. Effect of the chromium content on the mechanical properties and microstructural evolution of ion-irradiated Fe-Cr model alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: Effect on the chromium content on the hardness changes and microstructural evolution in irradiated Fe-Cr model alloys (Fe-5, 9, 12 and 15 wt%) before and after a post-irradiation heat treatment at 673 K or 773 K is investigated using a nano-indentor and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Ion-irradiation experiments (up to 12 dpa) were preformed with 8 MeV Fe+ ions accelerated at room temperature. TRIM calculation and TEM observation indicated that the depth of maximum displacement damage layer of ion-irradiated regions was about 1.7 μm. nano-indentation with a continuous stiffness measurement (CSM) technique was used to measure a change of the relative hardness of thin ion-irradiated regions. Hardness measurement of the ion-irradiated Fe-Cr alloys before a post-irradiation heat treatment showed that an increase of the hardness by an ion irradiation rises linearly with the chromium content at a low dose level. However, Fe-9wt%Cr showed a reduced irradiation-induced the increase of hardness with the level of a dose. Fine ion-irradiation induced dislocation loops were observed by a weak beam dark field TEM imaging. These fine dislocation loops had Burgers vectors of and 1/2, which were distinguished with actual TEM images. TEM analysis showed that the size of the dislocation loops increased and the population of the dislocation loops with a Burgers vector of increased with the chromium additions. After a post-irradiation heat treatment, the hardness measurement of irradiated Fe-Cr alloys showed that the reduction of the hardness by a heat treatment decreased with the chromium additions. An interesting feature is that as the chromium content is lowered in Fe-Cr model alloys, the size of the ion-irradiation induced dislocation loops increases significantly after a post-irradiation heat treatment, whereas it decreases before a post-irradiation heat treatment. Based on the present experimental results, we discuss in detail the

  11. Influence of chloride ions on the open circuit potentials of chromium in deaerated sulfuric acid solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BORE JEGDIC

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Open circuit potential measurements and cyclic voltammetry of chromium in deaerated aqueous H2SO4 solution of pH 1 without and containing NaCl in the concentration range 0.5 – 4 M revealed that chromium exhibits two stable open circuit potentials having the character of a Wagner–Traud corrosion potential. One, Ecorr.1, was established on the passive surface formed by exposing Cr previously to air or passivated potentiostacially in a controlled manner, and the second one, Ecorr.2, at the bare Cr surface obtained by prolonged cathodic activation. There is a small difference in the Ecorr.1 values as a function of the passive layer properties. Addition of NaCl accelerates the hydrogen evolution reaction on the passive surface to some extent, while the same reaction on the bare surface was not affected by NaCl. On the other hand, presence of NaCl accelerates the anodic reaction on the bare surface, and it activates the dissolution of the passive layer so that the passive currents increase with addition of NaCl. This effect is so large that at concentration of NaCl larger than 3 M, the destruction of the passive layer was so fast that in a matter of seconds the Cr was activated, and the only one stable corrosion potential observed was Ecorr.2. No pitting of Cr in the presence of NaCl was observed up to the transpassive potentials.

  12. Comparative Biosorption Studies of Hexavalent Chromium Ion onto Raw and Modified Palm Branches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona A. Shouman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The waste of palm branches (PB was tested for its ability to remove chromium (VI from aqueous solution by batch and column experiments. Palm branches chemically modified with an oxidizing agent (sulphuric acid then coated with chitosan and surfactant (hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide surfactant, HDTMA, respectively, were carried out to improve the removal performance of PB. The results of their Cr (VI removal performances are pH dependent. The adsorption data could be well interpreted by the Langmuir, Freundlich, and Flory-Huggins isotherm models. The maximum adsorption capacity obtained from the Langmuir model for the chitosan coated oxidized palm branches is 55 mg/mg. The adsorption process could be described by pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The intraparticle diffusion study revealed that film diffusion might be involved. The biosorbents were successfully regenerated using 1 M HCL solution.

  13. Solvent extraction of seven trivalent metal ions in aqueous perchlorate solutions with trioctylphosphine oxide in hexane and rapid extraction of chromium(III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solvent extraction of scandium(III), yttrium(III), lanthanum(III), europium(III), gallium(III), indium(III), and chromium(III) in weakly acidified 1 mol dm-3 NaClO4 solutions with trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO) in hexane was studied. The extraction equilibrium was established by the two phase agitation for within 3 min and the extracted species except chromium(III) were found to be M(TOPO)43+(ClO4-)3. The extraction of chromium(III) was also achieved by the two phase agitation for only a short time but, from the dependence of the extraction on the TOPO concentration, the extracted species was assumed to be Cr(TOPO)63+(ClO4-)3. Since the inert Cr(H2O)63+ was so rapidly extracted and the solvation number was higher than that of the other metal ions, the TOPO molecules were assumed to combine with the hydrating water molecules by hydrogen bonds which can be formed in a short time even when the metal ion was inert. The chromium(III) was also extracted rapidly from 1 mol dm-3 NaSCN, NaNO3, NaBr, and NaCl solutions with TOPO in hexane and the extraction was better from NaSCN solution than from NaClO4 solution but it was not effective from the solutions of other salts. (author)

  14. Hydrophobic Poly(ionic liquid for Highly Effective Separation of Methyl Blue and Chromium Ions from Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Kong

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The hydrophobic poly(ionic liquid of poly(3-ethyl-1-vinylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonylimide (PVI-TFSI containing imidazolium cations and bis(trifluoromethanesulfonylimide anions was synthesized for the separation of methyl blue and chromium ions [Cr(VI] from water. The adsorption of methyl blue and Cr(VI in PVI-TSFI/water system reached equilibrium stage within 60 min and 12 h, and the maximum adsorbed percentage for methyl blue and Cr(VI was 97.6% and 98.0%, respectively. The adsorption regi me of either methyl blue or Cr(VI for PVI-TFSI was in correspondence with the Langmuir adsorption model. The maximum adsorption capacity of PVI-TFSI for methyl blue and Cr(VI was determined as 476.2 and 17.9 mg/g, respectively. The hydrophobic poly(ionic liquid with a remarkable adsorbent capacity of methyl blue and Cr(VI can be conveniently synthesized and shows potential in water treatment for the effective separation of organic dyes or heavy metal ions.

  15. Lithium chromium pyrophosphate as an insertion material for Li-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichardt, Martin; Sallard, Sébastien; Novák, Petr; Villevieille, Claire

    2015-12-01

    Lithium chromium pyrophosphate (LiCrP2O7) and carbon-coated LiCrP2O7 (LiCrP2O7/C) were synthesized by solid-state and sol-gel routes, respectively. The materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and conductivity measurements. LiCrP2O7 powder has a conductivity of ~ 10(-8) S cm(-1), ~ 10(4) times smaller than LiCrP2O7/C (~ 10(-4) S cm(-1)). LiCrP2O7/C is electrochemically active, mainly between 1.8 and 2.2 V versus Li(+)/Li (Cr(3+)/Cr(2+) redox couple), whereas LiCrP2O7 has limited electrochemical activity. LiCrP2O7/C delivers a reversible specific charge up to ~ 105 mAh g(-1) after 100 cycles, close to the theoretical limit of 115 mAh g(-1). Operando XRD experiments show slight peak shifts between 2.2 and 4.8 V versus Li(+)/Li, and a reversible amorphization between 1.8 and 2.2 V versus Li(+)/Li, suggesting an insertion reaction mechanism. PMID:26634722

  16. Electronic structure and Fano antiresonance of chromium Cr(III) ions in alkali silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optical properties of the Cr3+ doped in alkali silicate glasses X2O–SiO2 with different modifier cations X=Li, Na and K have been investigated by Villian et al. This work investigates a theoretical crystal-field analysis of the electronic energy levels of Cr3+ in these glasses. This analysis based on the Racah theory was carried out for the Chromium (III) center with an Oh site symmetry. The objective of this study is to determine the effect of glass matrix modifier on the Racah B, C and crystal-field Dq parameters. The effect of the glass matrix environment on these parameters is also reported by comparison with alkali cadmium borosulphate, phosphate and borate glasses. The interference dips observed in the broad band 4T2g(4F) result from interaction with the 2Eg(2G) and 2T1g(2G) sharp levels are known as the Fano antiresonance model. This feature is qualitatively studied using the adiabatic potential surfaces for the quartet 4T2g(4F) and doublet 2Eg(2G) levels. - Highlights: • The electronic structure of Cr3+ in alkali silicate glasses X2O–SiO2 (X=Li,Na,K) was performed. • The theoretical study, based on Racah theory, permits us to deduce the energy levels. • The observed interference dip in absorption spectra is related to Fano antiresonance

  17. Bioremediation of Chromium ions with filamentous Yeast Trichosporon cutaneum R57

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Chandra Bajgai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metal pollution is a serious environmental issue today. Recognizing the ability of microorganisms and biological materials to remove them from the polluted sites makes it cheaper method of heavy metal remediation. Microorganisms remove metals as a result of biosorption and bioaccumulation. In the present work, filamentous yeast Trichosporon cutaneum R57 was cultivated on batch in Andreev medium containing biotin, thiamine and glucose. Metal chromium was added in concentration ranging from 0-10mM (K2Cr2O7.7H2O to the culture during the stationary phase of the culture growth. Viability, glucose consumption and removal efficiency of the strain was studied. 1.5mM of K2Cr2O7.7H2O was found to be lethal to the strain, consumes maximum glucose at 5mM and removes maximum at 1mM concentration. Removal efficiency decreases with increase in metal concentration.

  18. Electronic structure and Fano antiresonance of chromium Cr(III) ions in alkali silicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taktak, Olfa, E-mail: taktak.olfa@gmail.com; Souissi, Hajer; Souha, Kammoun

    2015-05-15

    The optical properties of the Cr{sup 3+} doped in alkali silicate glasses X{sub 2}O–SiO{sub 2} with different modifier cations X=Li, Na and K have been investigated by Villian et al. This work investigates a theoretical crystal-field analysis of the electronic energy levels of Cr{sup 3+} in these glasses. This analysis based on the Racah theory was carried out for the Chromium (III) center with an O{sub h} site symmetry. The objective of this study is to determine the effect of glass matrix modifier on the Racah B, C and crystal-field Dq parameters. The effect of the glass matrix environment on these parameters is also reported by comparison with alkali cadmium borosulphate, phosphate and borate glasses. The interference dips observed in the broad band {sup 4}T{sub 2g}({sup 4}F) result from interaction with the {sup 2}E{sub g}({sup 2}G) and {sup 2}T{sub 1g}({sup 2}G) sharp levels are known as the Fano antiresonance model. This feature is qualitatively studied using the adiabatic potential surfaces for the quartet {sup 4}T{sub 2g}({sup 4}F) and doublet {sup 2}E{sub g}({sup 2}G) levels. - Highlights: • The electronic structure of Cr{sup 3+} in alkali silicate glasses X{sub 2}O–SiO{sub 2} (X=Li,Na,K) was performed. • The theoretical study, based on Racah theory, permits us to deduce the energy levels. • The observed interference dip in absorption spectra is related to Fano antiresonance.

  19. Ultrasensitive photoelectrochemical determination of chromium(VI) in water samples by ion-imprinted/formate anion-incorporated graphitic carbon nitride nanostructured hybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Tian; Yang, Xiaomin; Zhang, Lizhi; Gong, Jingming

    2016-07-15

    A rapid and highly sensitive photoelectrochemical (PEC) method has been proposed for the determination of trace amounts of chromium in water samples under visible-light irradiation. Here, a unique nanostructured hybrid of formate anion incorporated graphitic carbon nitride (F-g-C3N4) is smartly integrated with a Cr(VI) ion-imprinted polymer (IIP) as a photoactive electrode (denoted as IIP@F-g-C3N4). The nanohybrid of F-g-C3N4 exhibits an enhanced charge separation with substantially improved PEC responses versus g-C3N4. The newly designed IIP@F-g-C3N4 PEC sensor exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity for the determination of Cr(VI) because it offers efficient photogenerated electron reduction toward Cr(VI). The PEC analysis is highly linear over Cr(VI) concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 100.00ppb with a detection limit of 0.006ppb (S/N=3). Our approach can be used to detect Cr(VI), Cr(III) and the total chromium level in aqueous solution through oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI) and the determination of the total chromium as Cr(VI). In practical applications, this low-cost and sensitive assay has been successfully applied for speciation determination of chromium in environmental water samples. PMID:27017396

  20. Coordination and ion–ion interactions of chromium centers in alkaline earth zinc borate glasses probed by electron paramagnetic resonance and optical spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), optical absorption and FT-IR studies have been carried out on chromium ions incorporated in alkaline earth zinc borate glasses. The EPR spectra exhibit two resonance signals with effective g values at g ≈ 1.99 and ≈1.97. The resonance signal at g ≈ 1.99 is attributed to the contribution from both the exchange coupled Cr3+–Cr3+ ion pairs and the isolated Cr3+ ions and the resonance signal at g ≈ 1.97 is due to Cr5+ ions. The paramagnetic susceptibility (χ) was calculated from the EPR data at various (123–303 K) temperatures and the Curie temperature (θp) was calculated from the 1/χ–T graph. The optical absorption spectra exhibit three bands at ∼360 nm, ∼440 nm and a broad band at ∼615 nm characteristic of Cr3+ ions in an octahedral symmetry. From the observed band positions, the crystal-field splitting parameter Dq and the Racah parameters (B and C) have been evaluated. From the ultraviolet edges, the optical band gap energies (Eopt) and Urbach energy (ΔE) are calculated. The theoretical optical basicity (Λth) of these glasses has also been evaluated. Chromium ions doped alkaline earth zinc borate glasses show BO3 and BO4 structural units in the FT-IR studies. (paper)

  1. Determination of hexavalent chromium in sludge incinerator emissions using ion chromatography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arar, E.J.; Long, S.E. (Technology Applications, Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States)); Martin, T.D.; Gold, S. (Environmental Monitoring Systems Lab., Cincinnati, OH (United States))

    1992-10-01

    A unique approach is described using ion chromatography (IC) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for the determination of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] in wastewater sludge incinerator emissions. Quartz fiber filters, spiked with an isotopically enriched ([sup 50]Cr or [sup 53]Cr) chromate salt, were used to collect emission particulates. The enriched Cr(VI) isotope was used to monitor the reduction of Cr(IV) during sample collection using a pseudo-first-order reaction model and to calculate the rate of deposition of native Cr(VI) on the filters. At the end of the sampling period, the Cr(VI) was extracted from the filters with 0.1 N sodium hydroxide and determined by IC using postcolumn derivatization with 1,5-diphenylcarbohydrazide. To determine the ratio of enriched Cr(VI) to the native Cr(VI) emitted from the incinerator, an additional aliquot of the sample extract was preconcentrated by IC and the isotopic composition of the Cr(VI) fraction determined by ICP-MS. 21 refs., 4 figs., 3 figs.

  2. Chromium enrichment on the habit plane of dislocation loops in ion-irradiated high-purity Fe–Cr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reduced activation high-chromium ferritic/martensitic steels are candidate materials for Generation IV fission and fusion reactors. To gain knowledge about the radiation resistance of these steels in such environments, the first step is to study the Fe–Cr matrix of this material. For that purpose and to understand ballistic damage by neutrons, self-ion irradiations, with and without simultaneous He injection, were performed on a series of high-purity Fe–Cr binary alloys at 773 K. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis revealed “displacement fringe contrast” inside the dislocation loops. This was attributed to the presence of Cr-enriched zones on their habit plane, which is a defect-free region for body-centered cubic Fe-based alloys. A plausible mechanism is discussed to explain the phenomenon, the first step of which would be the radiation-induced segregation of Cr atoms on the dislocation loop core. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in scanning TEM mode and atom probe tomography (APT) gave a coherent quantitative estimate of the Cr concentration in these enriched areas. APT study showed that the enrichment was heterogeneous on the loop plane. Upon in situ annealing up to 900 K, the loops and the fringes disappeared completely, without leaving a secondary-phase particle, such as carbide, at their position. Fringes were present until the loop disappeared

  3. Removal of hexavalent chromium ions using CuO nanoparticles for water purification applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vinod Kumar; Chandra, Ramesh; Tyagi, Inderjeet; Verma, Monu

    2016-09-15

    Copper(II) oxide nanoparticles were synthesized at low temperature using cold finger assisted magnetron sputtering technique and were applied as adsorbent for the rapid removal of noxious Cr(VI) ions from the solvent phase. The average size of CuO nanoparticles from TEM analysis was found to be 8nm in addition to this the BET surface area (84.327m(2)/g) was found to be significantly high in comparison to the previously CuO nanoparticles synthesized via green route. The synthesized CuO nanoparticles is crystalline in nature and exhibits monoclinic phase, which was confirmed using various analytical techniques such as SAED, XRD and Raman analysis. The impact of influential parameters including pH, adsorbent dose, contact time, stirring speed, initial Cr(VI) ions concentration, and temperature were optimized using batch adsorption method in order to obtain maximum removal of Cr(VI) ions. From the thermodynamic parameters, the positive value of enthalpy (ΔH) and negative value of Gibbs free energy (ΔG) indicate the endothermic and spontaneous nature of Cr(VI) ions adsorption, respectively. The adsorption kinetics data was well fitted and found to be in good agreement with the pseudo second order kinetic behaviour. PMID:27285779

  4. Determination of molybdenum, chromium and vanadium by ion-pair high-pressure liquid chromatography based on precolumn chelation with 4-(2-pyridylazo)resorcinol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reversed-phase ion-pair liquid chromatography-spectrophotometric detection system for the separation and simultaneous determination of molybdenum, chromium and vanadium is described. The chelates of the metal ions with 4-(2-pyridylazo)resorcinol are separated on a Zorbax CN column with 1 x 10-3M tetrabutylammonium iodide and 0.01M KH2P04-Na2HP04 buffer (pH 7.50) in 30:70 v/v methanol-water mixture as the mobile phase, at a flow rate of 1.0 ml/min. The chelates are detected spectrophotometrically at 540 nm. (author)

  5. Determination of Hexavalent Chromium (Cr(VI)) Concentrations via Ion Chromatography and UV-Vis Spectrophotometry in Samples Collected from Nacogdoches Wastewater Treatment Plant, East Texas (USA)

    OpenAIRE

    Onchoke, Kefa K.; Sasu, Salomey A.

    2016-01-01

    The concentration of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), a toxic environmental pollutant and carcinogen, was determined in samples collected from Nacogdoches Wastewater Treatment Plant (NWWTP) using ion chromatography and UV-visible spectrophotometry (IC, UV-Vis). On reaction with 1,5-diphenylcarbazide (DPC) Cr+6 forms a 1,5-diphenylcarbazide-Cr(VI) complex, which is then analyzed at 530 nm and 540 nm, respectively. Via ion chromatography Cr(VI) concentrations were in the range of 0.00190±0.0020 an...

  6. Transformation of valence states and luminescence of chromium ions in the YAG:Cr, Mg and GGG:Cr, Mg single crystalline films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakharko, Ya.M.; Luchechko, A.P. [Faculty of Electronics, Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, 107 Tarnavskogo St., Lviv 79017 (Ukraine); Syvorotka, I.M.; Syvorotka, I.I.; Melnyk, S.S. [Institute for Materials SRC ' ' Carat' ' , 202 Stryjska St., Lviv 79031 (Ukraine); Ubizskii, S.B. [Institute for Materials SRC ' ' Carat' ' , 202 Stryjska St., Lviv 79031 (Ukraine); Institute for Telecommunication, Radioelectronics and Electronic Engineering, Lviv Polytechnic National University, 12 Bandera St., Lviv 79013 (Ukraine)

    2005-01-01

    Peculiarities of absorption spectra and recombination luminescence of Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} (YAG) and Cd{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}O{sub 12} (GGG) single crystalline films co-doped with chromium and magnesium have been studied. The change of impurities concentration and annealing of samples in the reducing atmosphere have an influence on absorption in the visible and UV range. Using the results on absorption coefficient measurements in the band of 480 nm and in the absorption bands of Cr{sup 3+} ions, it was determined, that near 50% of the chromium ions located in octahedral sites are in the Cr{sup 4+} state in films with high chromium concentration. The investigation of thermostimulated luminescence confirms the existence of Cr{sup 2+} trap centres in the irradiated films caused by the magnesium dopant. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Atom probe field ion microscopy investigation of boron containing martensitic 9 Pct chromium steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, P.; Miller, M. K.; Babu, S. S.; David, S. A.; Cerjak, H.

    2000-03-01

    The chemical compositions of the ferrite matrix and various other phases in an Fe-0.17 C-9 Cr-1.55 Mo-0.27 V-0.015 N-0.01B (mass pct) steel in as-received and crept conditions were measured with atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM). The results showed the presence of some residual boron within the ferrite matrix. Analyses showed that boron was distributed within M23C6, M6C, MX, and Laves phases. Phosphor atoms were detected at the M23C6-ferrite interface in the crept condition. The results are compared to predictions from thermodynamic calculations.

  8. Kappaphycus alvarezii waste biomass: A potential biosorbent for chromium ions removal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Oon Lee Kang; Nazaruddin Ramli; Mamot Said; Musa Ahmad; Suhaimi Md Yasir; Arbakariya Ariff

    2011-01-01

    The Cr(Ⅲ) sorption experiments onto Kappaphycus alvarezii waste biomass were conducted at different pH values (2-6) under the conditions of initial metal concentration of 10-50 mg/L and the chemical compositions of Cr-Cu and Ct-Cd.The Cr(Ⅲ) sorption capacities were slightly dependent on pH, and the maximum sorption capacity was 0.86 mg/g at pH 3.The sorption capacities increased with increase in the initial metal concentration, whereas it was suppressed by the presence of Cu(Ⅱ) and Cd(Ⅲ) in the solution.The Cr(Ⅲ) sorption equilibrium was evaluated using Langmuir, Freundlich and BET isotherms.The sorption mechanisms were characterised using scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.The main mechanisms were ion exchange coupled with a complexation mechanism.Kappaphycus alvarezii waste biomass represents a potential for Ct(Ⅲ) ion removal from aqueous solution.

  9. The electrochemical performance of nickel chromium oxide as a new anode material for lithium ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • NiCr2O4 is fabricated and used as a new anode material for lithium ion batteries. • NiCr2O4 electrode is prepared via a facile and low cost way. • the NiCr2O4 electrode undergoes a novel electrochemical reconstruction in cycling. • the NiCr2O4 electrode exhibits good electrochemical performance. - Abstract: NiCr2O4 is successfully prepared via hydrothermal pretreatment and subsequent sintering, which shows excellent electrochemical performance as a new anode material for lithium ion batteries with natural graphite adding and sodium alginate binder. At a specific current of 70 mA g−1, it delivers charge and discharge capacities of 465.5 and 919.8 mAh g−1 in the initial cycle, which gradually increases along with cycle number owing to an electrochemical reconstruction in cycling. After 100 cycles, the charge and discharge capacities are 582.9 and 592.5 mAh g−1, respectively. Furthermore, it is testified that natural graphite adding can effectively improve the electronic conductivity of the NiCr2O4 electrode, and an appropriate amount of natural graphite is beneficial to improve the specific capacity and cycle stability of the electrode owing to a coordinated electrochemical reconstruction between NiCr2O4 and natural graphite in cycling

  10. Box-Behnken experimental design for chromium(VI) ions removal by bacterial cellulose-magnetite composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoica-Guzun, Anicuta; Stroescu, Marta; Jinga, Sorin Ion; Mihalache, Nicoleta; Botez, Adriana; Matei, Cristian; Berger, Daniela; Damian, Celina Maria; Ionita, Valentin

    2016-10-01

    In this study bacterial cellulose-magnetite composites were synthesised for the removal of chromium(VI) from aqueous solutions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the bacterial cellulose-magnetite composites and to reveal the uniform dispersion of nanomagnetite in the BC matrix. Magnetic properties were also measured to confirm the magnetite immobilization on bacterial cellulose membrane. The effects of initial Cr(VI) concentration, solution pH and solid/liquid ratio upon chromium removal were examined using the statistical Box-Behnken Design. Because of the possibility of magnetite dissolution during chromium(VI) adsorption, the degree of iron leaching was also analysed in the same conditions as Cr(VI) adsorption. From the factors affecting chromium(VI) adsorption the most important was solution pH. The highest Cr(VI) removal efficiency was observed at pH 4, accompanied by the lowest iron leaching in the solution. The adsorption experiments also indicated that the adsorption process of chromium(VI) is well described by Freundlich adsorption model. Our results proved that the BC-magnetite composites could be used for an efficient removal of chromium(VI) from diluted solutions with a minimum magnetite dissolution during operation. PMID:27343705

  11. Effect of ion irradiation on the microstructure of an iron--nickel--chromium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Void and disloation structures in an Fe-25Ni-15Cr alloy were studied following irradiation with 2.8 MeV 58Ni+ ions at temperatures between 600 and 7500C (1112 and 13820F) to maximum damage levels up to 80 displacements per atom (dpa). Void formation was observed at all the temperatures investigated, with the maximum swelling between 650 and 7000C (1202 and 12920F). The swelling versus dose relations exhibited an incubation dose followed by swelling at a rate that increased with increasing damage level. These data were consistent with previous swelling results for austenitic alloys irradiated with charged particles, which indicate that the swelling should become linear with irradiation dose at higher damage levels. Tangled dislocation networks were observed to form at low doses and to be fairly stable up to the highest damage levels examined. With the assumption of the observed stable dislocation networks, the dose dependence of swelling could be explained by a general form of the chemical rate theory for swelling due to void growth

  12. Accumulation of Heavy Metal Ions from Tanneries Wastes: An Approach For Chromium Removal Using Activated Charcoal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    *H. Tahir

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The environment is under increasing pressure from solid and liquid wastes emanating from the leather industry. These are inevitable by-products of the leather manufacturing process and causes significant pollution unless treated in some way prior to discharge. The tanneries wastes samples were collected from Lahore Pakistan. The samples were digested by wet oxidation method and the concentrations of metals: Cr, Co, Cu, Cd, Mn, Zn, Ni and Pb were estimated in sediments and liquid waste samples by atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The results show that the concentrations of these metals were higher than the values given by the national environmental quality standards. Selective separation of Cr ion from other metals was investigated in sediment sample TS2 by adsorption method using low cost natural adsorbent activated charcoal. The adsorption studies were carried out under the optimized conditions of adsorption like pH, shaking time and amount of adsorbent. The concentration of Cr after removal was determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The adsorption equilibrium data were fitted in adsorption isotherm equations like: Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich equations at temperatures ranges from 303 to 318 K. Thermodynamic parameters ∆H, ∆S and ∆G were also calculated. The values of sorption free energy were estimated by employing D-R equation. The percent removal data show that about 99% removal was achieved by employing low cost adsorbent. This method can be employed on industrial scale for the treatment of solid and liquid waste before discharge into the main streams.

  13. Influence of ion implantation on structural and tribological properties of chromium nitride layers of non-stoichiometric composition CrN0.4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structural and tribological properties of nitrogen-implanted 1.4 μm thick layers of non-stoichiometric chromium nitride CrN0.4 were studied using GXRD, AES, ball-on-flat wear/friction test and microscratching test. The results of structural investigations revealed the amorphous structure of as-deposited layers and the formation of crystalline Cr2N and CrN phases after ion implantation. A significant reduction of wear was observed as a result of ion implantation; the wear reduction is similar for the all implanted samples. The surface damage caused by scratch test of the surface of ion-implanted samples is also reduced. (author)

  14. Impact of incorporation of chromium on electrochemical properties of LiFePO4/C for Li-ion batteries

    OpenAIRE

    Naik Amol; Zhou Jian; Gao Chao; Liu Guizhen; Wang Lin

    2015-01-01

    LiFe0.95Cr0.05PO4/C was successfully synthesized by one-step solid-state reaction using a single mode microwave reactor. The effect of incorporation of chromium on LiFePO4 lattice parameters was systematically investigated by X-ray diffraction. Surface analysis was done by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The ratio of amorphous to graphitic carbon was determined from Raman spectroscopic data. The influence of chromium incorporation on electrochemical properti...

  15. The effect of chromium picolinate on serum cholesterol and apolipoprotein fractions in human subjects.

    OpenAIRE

    Press, R. I.; Geller, J.; Evans, G. W.

    1990-01-01

    Chromium has been implicated as a cofactor in the maintenance of normal lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. A deficiency of chromium results from diets low in biologically available chromium. Picolinic acid, a metabolite of tryptophan, forms stable complexes with transitional metal ions, which results in an improved bioavailability of the metal ion chromium. To determine whether or not chromium picolinate is effective in humans, 28 volunteer subjects were given either chromium tripicolinate (3...

  16. Removal of hexavalent chromium ions by Yarrowia lipolytica cells modified with phyto-inspired Fe0/Fe3O4 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Ashit; Bankar, Ashok; Kumar, Ameeta Ravi; Gosavi, Suresh; Zinjarde, Smita

    2013-03-01

    The removal of hexavalent chromium [Cr (VI)], an important ground water pollutant by phyto-inspired Fe0/Fe3O4 nanocomposite-modified cells of Yarrowia lipolytica (NCIM 3589 and NCIM 3590), was investigated. Electron microscopy and magnetometer studies indicated an effective modification of yeast cell surfaces by the nanocomposites. The effect of pH, temperature, agitation speed, contact time and initial metal ion concentration on the removal of Cr (VI) was determined. The specific uptake values at pH 2.0 were 186.32 ± 3.17 and 137.31 ± 4.53 mg g- 1 for NCIM 3589 and NCIM 3590, respectively, when 1000 mg L- 1 of metal ion concentrations were used. The equilibrium data fitted to Scatchard, Langmuir and linearized Freundlich models suggesting that adsorption played a role in the removal of Cr (VI) ions. The surface modified yeast cells displayed higher values of Langmuir and Scatchard coefficients than the unmodified cells indicating that the former were more efficient in Cr (VI) removal. The enhanced detoxification of Cr (VI) ions by this composite material could be attributed to the reductive power of the Fe0/Fe3O4 nanocomposites as well the yeast cell surface functional groups.

  17. Impact of incorporation of chromium on electrochemical properties of LiFePO4/C for Li-ion batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naik Amol

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available LiFe0.95Cr0.05PO4/C was successfully synthesized by one-step solid-state reaction using a single mode microwave reactor. The effect of incorporation of chromium on LiFePO4 lattice parameters was systematically investigated by X-ray diffraction. Surface analysis was done by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The ratio of amorphous to graphitic carbon was determined from Raman spectroscopic data. The influence of chromium incorporation on electrochemical properties was studied by recording charge/discharge cycles combined with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS and cyclic voltammetry. It was found that Cr incorporation significantly enhanced the electrochemical performance of LiFePO4 at all current densities up to 10 C. LiFe0.95Cr0.05PO4/C prepared exhibited the best performance with an initial specific discharge capacity of 157.7, 144.8, 138.3, 131.0, 124.1 and 111.1 mAh·g−1 at 0.1 C, 0.5 C, 1.0 C, 2.0 C, 5 C and 10 C, respectively. The doped sample displayed excellent capacity retention, which was substantially superior than that of pristine LiFePO4/C at a higher current rate.

  18. An Investigation on the Extraction and Quantitation of a Hexavalent Chromium in Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene Copolymer (ABS) and Printed Circuit Board (PCB) by Ion Chromatography Coupled with Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI)) is one of the hazardous substances regulated by the RoHS. The determination of Cr (VI) in various polymers and printed circuit board (PCB) has been very important. In this study, the three different analytical methods were investigated for the determination of a hexavalent chromium in Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene copolymer (ABS) and PCB. The results by three analytical methods were obtained and compared. An analytical method by UV-Visible spectrometer has been generally used for the determination of Cr (VI) in a sample, but a hexavalent chromium should complex with diphenylcarbazide for the detection in the method. The complexation did make an adverse effect on the quantitative analysis of Cr (VI) in ABS. The analytical method using diphenylcarbazide was also not applicable to printed circuit board (PCB) because PCB contained lots of irons. The irons interfered with the analysis of hexavalent chromium because those also could complex with diphenylcarbazide. In this study, hexavalent chromiums in PCB have been separated by ion chromatography (IC), then directly and selectively detected by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The quantity of Cr (VI) in PCB was 0.1 mg/kg

  19. The effects of alkaline earth metal ions and halogen ions on the chromium oxide activities in alkaline earth metal oxide-halide-Cr2O3 system fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lian-Fu; Jiang, Mao-Fa; Wang, Wen-Zhong; Chen, Zhao-Ping

    2000-06-01

    The solid electrolyte cell — Mo|Cr + Cr2O3‖ZrO2(MgO)‖{Cu-Cr}alloy + (Cr2O3)fluxes|Mo+ is used at 1673 K to determine Cr2O3 activities in MO-MX 2-Cr2O3 (M = Ca2+, Ba2-, X = F- or Cl-) ternary fluxes, which are in equilibrium with the copper-chromium binary alloy. The ternary isothermal phase diagrams of CaO-CaF2-Cr2O3 and BaO-BaCl2-Cr2O3 system fluxes are inferred on the basis of the experimental results and binary phase diagrams. The results indicate that Cr2O3 activities in all fluxes always decrease with the increase of the X MO /X MX2 ratio. Partial replacement of BaO in BaO-BaF2-Cr2O3 fluxes by CaO is acceptable for economy and efficiency considerations. At the same time, partial substitution of BaO for CaO in CaO-CaF2-Cr2O3 fluxes is advantageous for phosphorus removal and chromium retention as a result of the increased Cr2O3 activities, increased basicities, and widening of the liquid zones. Compared to those in BaO-BaF2-Cr2O3 fluxes, Cr2O3 activities in CaO-CaF2-Cr2O3 fluxes approximately follow the same curve as the former, although the position and the width of the liquid zones are considerably different, and activities in BaO-BaCl2-Cr2O3 fluxes are higher at the lower Cr2O3 content, or vice versa. The activity coefficients of Cr2O3 in the fluxes decrease with the increase of the X MO /X MX 2 ratios.

  20. Removal of chromium(VI) from saline wastewaters by

    OpenAIRE

    AKSU, Zümriye

    2002-01-01

    Some industrial wastewaters contain higher quantities of salts besides chromium(VI) ions so the effect of these salts on the biosorption of chromium(VI) should be investigated. The biosorption of chromium (VI) from saline solutions on two strains of living Dunaliella algae were tested under laboratory conditions as a function of pH, initial metal ion and salt (NaCl) concentrations in a batch system. The biosorption capacity of both Dunaliella strains strongly de...

  1. Synthesis of hydrophobic cross-linked polyzwitterionic acid for simultaneous sorption of Eriochrome black T and chromium ions from binary hazardous waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Tawfik A; Muhammad, Auwal M; Ali, Shaikh A

    2016-04-15

    Hydrophobic cross-linked polyzwitterionic acid (HCPZA) containing long chain (C18) hydrophobes and residues of a glutamic acid having unquenched nitrogen valency was synthesized. Exploiting the chelating ability of the amino acid residues to scavenge toxic metals and the hydrophobic surface to scoop up the organic contaminants, the resin HCPZA was evaluated for simultaneous removal of chromium and Eriochrome black T (EBT) from wastewaters. The structure and morphology of the polymer before and after sorption were characterized by using FTIR, TGA, EDX and SEM. The effect of various parameters such as contact time, pH and initial concentrations were investigated to arrive at optimum conditions. The adsorption of Eriochrome black T and Cr (III) on HCPZA reached equilibrium in 30 min. The mechanism of adsorption was investigated using kinetic, diffusion and isotherm models. The adsorption kinetic data were described well by the pseudo-second order model and by the Freundlich isotherm model. EDX analysis confirmed the adsorption of Cr (III) and EBT on the polymer. The hydrophobic resin exhibited a remarkable simultaneous adsorption capacity for EBT and Cr (III) and thus demonstrated its potential to be a promising adsorbent for removal of dyes and heavy metal ions from wastewaters. PMID:26854746

  2. Speciation Analysis of Chromium in Cromium Slag and Adsorption of Chromium Ions on Activated Carbon%铬渣中铬的形态分析及活性炭对铬吸附影响因素的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖伯凯; 张玉贵; 聂翠微; 毛磊; 童仕唐

    2013-01-01

    Speciation of Cr in Chromium slag was evaluated using a short three-step sequential extraction procedure with CaCl2, DTPA and TEA as leaching agent. In addition, the effects of the amount of activated carbon, the type of activated carbon, pH values of leaching agent, the temperature and time of adsorption on the adsorption of chromium were studied. The results showed that Chromium in the chromium slag mainly exists in the form of residual and mobilized fractions. The optimal adsorption conditions are as follows: the temperature is 20℃, pH value is 4, the amount of nitric acid modified activated carbon is 0.3 g / 3 g chromium slag, and adsorption time is 60 minutes.%以CaCl2,二乙基三胺五乙酸(DTPA)和三乙胺TEA(TEA)作为提取剂,用简化的3步连续提取法对铬渣中铬的形态进行分析,研究了活性炭的用量、活性炭的类型、浸提液pH值、吸附温度以及吸附时间对浸提液中的铬吸附的影响.结果表明,铬渣中的铬主要以可活动态和残渣态的形式存在.处理3 g铬渣,硝酸改性活性炭用量为0.3 g,在20℃,pH值为4,吸附时间为60 min时活性炭对铬的吸附效果最佳.

  3. THE IMPACT OF ACID ACTIVATION PARAMETERS OF DARK BROWN LOAM ON ITS SORPTION PROPERTIES TO CHROMIUM (III) IONS

    OpenAIRE

    Бовсуновський, Є.О.; Національний авіаційний університет; Рябчевський, О.В.; Національний авіаційний університет; Годовська, Ю.Я.; Національний авіаційний університет; Личманенко, О.Г.; Національний авіаційний університет

    2012-01-01

     Today the purification of waste water from heavy metals is an actual environmental problem, which is due to the existence of these different forms of pollution (in the form of salts, oxides etc.). The using of environmentally safe materials can be the direction of solution of this problem. One of them is a common natural sorbent - dark brown loam.  Large reserves of this material, cheapness, very high adsorption, ion exchange and filtration properties provide the practical and economic feasi...

  4. Heterogeneous chromium catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a heterogeneous chromium catalyst system for the polymerisation of ethylene and/or alpha olefins prepared by the steps of: (a) providing a silica-containing support, (b) treating the silica-containing support with a chromium compound to form a chromium-based silica-containing support, (c) activating the chromium-based silica-containing support, (d) chemically reducing the activated chromium-based silica-containing support to produce a precursor catalyst, (e) r...

  5. Chromium (VI) ion adsorption features of chitosan film and its chitosan/zeolite conjugate 13X film

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Teresa Tavares; Galba M. de Campos-Takaki; Villanueva, Emílio R.; Rosa Valéria S. Amorim; Anabelle C. L. Batista

    2011-01-01

    This research evaluated the importance of the adsorption properties of chitosan a chitosan/zeolite conjugate film for the removal of Cr(VI) ions from solutions in the 5–260 mg/L concentration range, when the pH was adjusted to 4.0 and 6.0. The uptake capacities of the films formed by chitosan and by the chitosan/zeolite conjugate were calculated by mass balance. The equilibrium isotherms were fitted to the Langmuir, Freundlich and Redlich-Peterson models. The chitosan film seems to be a good ...

  6. Hexavalent Chromium Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is developing an updated IRIS assessment of hexavalent chromium. This assessment will evaluate the potential health effects of hexavalent chromium from oral and inhalation exposures. An important component of determining the cancer causing potential of ingested hexavalent chr...

  7. Analysis of molybdenum, chromium, vanadium and iron by polarographic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of direct current Tast polarograph, differential pulse polarography and phase-selective alternative current Tast polarography to the problem of determining molybdenum, chromium, vanadium and iron in various supporting electrolytes is reported. The effect of the supporting electrolyte on the wave/peak potential and sensitivity of the metal ion have been examined. The polarographic methods were applied for simultaneous determination of chromium (3)/chromium (6), vanadium (4), vanadium (5) and iron (2)/iron (3) in different supporting electrolytes

  8. Chromium and Genomic Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Wise, Sandra S.; Wise, John Pierce

    2011-01-01

    Many metals serve as micronutrients which protect against genomic instability. Chromium is most abundant in its trivalent and hexavalent forms. Trivalent chromium has historically been considered an essential element, though recent data indicate that while it can have pharmacological effects and value, it is not essential. There are no data indicating that trivalent chromium promotes genomic stability and, instead may promote genomic instability. Hexavalent chromium is widely accepted as high...

  9. Experimental skin deposition of chromium on the hands following handling of samples of leather and metal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P.; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl;

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chromium is an important skin sensitizer. Exposure to it has been regulated in cement, and recently in leather. Studies on the deposition of chromium ions on the skin as a result of handling different chromium-containing materials are sparse, but could improve the risk assessment of...... contact sensitization and allergic contact dermatitis caused by chromium. Objectives: To determine whether the handling of chromium-containing samples of leather and metal results in the deposition of chromium onto the skin. Methods: Five healthy volunteers participated. For 30 min, they handled samples...... of leather and metal known to contain and release chromium. Skin deposition of chromium was assessed with the acid wipe sampling technique. Results: Acid wipe sampling of the participants' fingers showed chromium deposition on the skin in all participants who had been exposed to leather (range 0...

  10. Chromium (VI) adsorption on boehmite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granados-Correa, F. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apartado Postal 18-1027 Col., Escandon, Delegacion Miguel Hidalgo, C.P. 11801 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: fgc@nuclear.inin.mx; Jimenez-Becerril, J. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apartado Postal 18-1027 Col., Escandon, Delegacion Miguel Hidalgo, C.P. 11801 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2009-03-15

    Boehmite was synthesized and characterized in order to study the adsorption behavior and the removal of Cr(VI) ions from aqueous solutions as a function of contact time, initial pH solution, amount of adsorbent and initial metal ion concentration, using batch technique. Adsorption data of Cr(VI) on the boehmite were analyzed according to Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) adsorption models. Thermodynamic parameters for the adsorption system were determinated at 293, 303, 313 and 323 K temperatures. The kinetic values and thermodynamic parameters from the adsorption process show that the Cr(VI) ions adsorption on boehmite is an endothermic and spontaneous process. These results show that the boehmite could be considered as a potential adsorbent for chromium ions in aqueous solutions.

  11. Oxidation of chromium telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors study the interaction between chromium telluride and oxygen at elevated temperatures in view of its application in semiconductor technology. Thermodynamic analysis of the oxidation process and experimental data showed that the alloys of chromium telluride suffer oxidation in the presence of even traces of oxygen in a gaseous medium. Chromium telluride oxidation is a complex process that gives rise to various oxides and is accompanied by partial sublimation

  12. Oxidation of chromium telluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pakhomovskaya, N.S.; Iorga, E.V.; Sheveleva, T.F.; Solov' eva, A.E.

    1986-03-01

    The authors study the interaction between chromium telluride and oxygen at elevated temperatures in view of its application in semiconductor technology. Thermodynamic analysis of the oxidation process and experimental data showed that the alloys of chromium telluride suffer oxidation in the presence of even traces of oxygen in a gaseous medium. Chromium telluride oxidation is a complex process that gives rise to various oxides and is accompanied by partial sublimation.

  13. Synthesis and study of physicochemical properties of Be3Al2[Si6O18] beryl monocrystals activated by neodymium and chromium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the results of spectral and luminescent studies, the principal possibility of the synthesis of single crystals of beryl activated by Nd3+ and Cr3+ by solution-melt method is shown. Neodymium and chromium are introduced as oxides in an amount of 2wt.% and 0.5 wt.%, respectively. The crystals prepared measure 0.1x0.2 mm, they are a light green colour, hexagonal prisms in shape. It is found from the results of X-ray phase analysis that the single crystals prepared fully meet the hexagonal structure of beryl

  14. In Vitro Analyses of the Toxicity, Immunological, and Gene Expression Effects of Cobalt-Chromium Alloy Wear Debris and Co Ions Derived from Metal-on-Metal Hip Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga M. Posada

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Joint replacement has proven to be an extremely successful and cost-effective means of relieving arthritic pain and improving quality of life for recipients. Wear debris-induced osteolysis is, however, a major limitation and causes orthopaedic implant aseptic loosening, and various cell types including macrophages, monocytes, osteoblasts, and osteoclasts, are involved. During the last few years, there has been increasing concern about metal-on-metal (MoM hip replacements regarding adverse reactions to metal debris associated with the MoM articulation. Even though MoM-bearing technology was initially aimed to extend the durability of hip replacements and to reduce the requirement for revision, they have been reported to release at least three times more cobalt and chromium ions than metal-on-polyethylene (MoP hip replacements. As a result, the toxicity of metal particles and ions produced by bearing surfaces, both locally in the periprosthetic space and systemically, became a concern. Several investigations have been carried out to understand the mechanisms responsible for the adverse response to metal wear debris. This   review aims at summarising in vitro analyses of the toxicity, immunological, and gene expression effects of cobalt ions and wear debris derived from MoM hip implants.

  15. Hair chromium concentration and chromium excretion in tannery workers.

    OpenAIRE

    Saner, G; Yüzbasiyan, V; Cigdem, S

    1984-01-01

    Hair and urine samples were collected from 34 male tannery workers and from 12 normal adults. Eighteen of the workers dealt directly with chromium and the remaining 16 (controls) worked in the offices and kitchen of the same factory. All were found to be clinically healthy. Chromium was determined by flameless atomic absorption spectroscopy. When compared with normal adult values, urinary chromium concentration, Cr/Creatinine ratio, daily chromium excretion, and hair chromium, concentrations ...

  16. High-Purity Chromium Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Rudoy, A.; Milman, Yu.; Korzhova, N.

    1995-01-01

    A procedure for producing large-scale chromium ingots by means of induction-arc melting was developed. From the high-purity, low-alloyed chromium ingots obtained, chromium targets were produced by of thermoplastic treatment techniques. The method of electron-beam evaporation of high-purity chromium was also used for production of targets.

  17. Microstructural characterisation of chromium slags

    OpenAIRE

    Burja, J.; F. Tehovnik; Vode, F.; Arh, B.

    2015-01-01

    In this chromium slags that form during melting of chromium alloyed steels are examined. During melting and oxidation of these steel grades a considerable amount of chromium is lost, and gained back with slag reduction. Laboratory experiments were performed to study the mechanism of chromium oxide reduction by silicon. Slags chemistry and phase composition have a strong effect on the steelmaking process. Phase analysis revealed two types of chromium oxides, calcium chromites and chromite spin...

  18. The removal of toxic metals from liquid effluents by ion exchange resins. Part I: Chromium(VI/Sulphate/Dowex 1x8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alguacil, F. J.

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available The removal of chromium (VI from sulphuric acid solutions using the Dowex 1x8 resin has been investigated. The influence of several variables such as the stirring speed, temperature, the sulphuric acid and metal concentrations in the aqueous phase and the variation of the amount of resin added has been studied. Various aqueous solutions were used for the elution of the metal. Although concentrated nitric acid elutes chromium, this can be best accomplished using hydrazine sulphate solutions which at the same time reduce the toxic Cr (VI to the less toxic trivalent chromium state. Results obtained from batch experiments were applied to a continuous system using vertical columns. Moreover, an analytical application of the system in the determination of Cr (VI presents in the leachate of an EAF dust was investigated by transfering the methodology to an on-line flow injection system.

    Se estudia la eliminación de cromo(VI presente en disoluciones de ácido sulfúrico mediante la resina Dowex 1x8. Las variables experimentales estudiadas fueron: velocidad de agitación, temperatura, las concentraciones de metal y ácido sulfúrico en el medio acuoso y la cantidad de resina añadida. Se utilizaron diversas disoluciones acuosas para eluir al metal. Aunque el ácido nítrico se puede utilizar como eluyente, la operación de elución parece ser más eficiente cuando se emplean disoluciones de sulfato de hidracina que, al mismo tiempo, reduce el cromo(VI a cromo(III. Los resultados obtenidos en los ensayos en discontinuo se han experimentado en sistemas en continuo, utilizando mini-columnas. Por último, se ha aplicado el sistema a la determinación analítica del cromo(VI presente en los lixiviados de un polvo de horno de arco eléctrico, transfiriendo la tecnología a un sistema on-line con inyección de flujo.

  19. Kinetic and mechanism of the oxidation of chromium(III) complex with anthranil- N, N-diacetic acid by periodate ion in acidic aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ismat H.

    2015-06-01

    The kinetics of oxidation of [CrIII(atda)(H2O)2] (atda = anthranil- N, N-diacetato) complex by IO{4/-} was studied spectrophotometrically in aqueous solutions with pH range 2.20-3.34, 0.30 M ionic strength and in 20.0-40.0°C temperature range. The rate law of the reaction exhibited saturation kinetics. Values of the rate constant for the electron transfer process, the equilibrium constant for dissociation of [CrIII (atda)(H2O)2] to [CrIII (atda) (H2O)OH]+ + H+ and the pre-equilibrium formation constant were calculated. The thermodynamic activation parameters are reported. It is proposed that electron transfer proceeds through an inner-sphere mechanism via coordination of the IVII to chromium(III).

  20. Substoichiometric extraction of chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Substoichiometric extraction of chromium with tetraphenylarsonium chloride (TPACl), tri-n-octylamine (TNOA), diethylammonium diethyldithiocarbamate (DDDC) and ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) was examined in detail. Chromium can be extracted substoichiometrically in a pH range, which is 1.1-2.6 for the TPACl compound, 0.6-2.3 for the TNOA compound, 5.1-6.4 for the DDDC chelate and 3.9-4.9 for the APDC chelate. Chromium in high-purity calcium carbonate, Orchard Leaves (NBS SRM-1571) and Brewers Yeast (NBS SRM-1569) was determined by neutron activation analysis combined with substoichiometric extraction by DDDC and APDC. The values of 2.0+-0.02 ppm and 2.6+-0.2 ppm were obtained for Brewers Yeast and Orchard Leaves, respectively. These values were in good agreement with those reported by NBS. The reaction mechanism and the reaction ratio between hexavalent chromium and dithiocarbamate are also discussed. (author)

  1. Chromium in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chromium deficiency may be seen as impaired glucose tolerance. It occurs in older people with type 2 ... PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Minerals Browse the Encyclopedia ...

  2. The carcinogenicity of chromium

    OpenAIRE

    Norseth, Tor

    1981-01-01

    The carcinogenicity of chromium compounds is reviewed with specific attention to the gaps in knowledge for risk estimation and research needs. The most important problems at present are whether trivalent chromium compounds cause cancer, and whether there is a difference in cancer causing effects between the soluble and the slightly soluble hexavalent compounds in the practical exposure situation. Dose estimates for risk estimation based on epidemiological investigations are also lacking. Pres...

  3. 重金属铬离子对胎鼠及仔鼠发育的影响%Analysis on reproductive and developmental effects on pregnant mice and fetals after maternal exposure to chromium ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张文彬; 刘璠

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of chromium ions on embryos of pregnant ICR mouse and the development of offspring,and to provide experimental basis Mr the possible impact on pregnancy of chromium ions after hip surface replacement. Methods 56 pregnant female ICR mice were divided into high,medium and low-dose groups as well as control group,14 mice in each group.The experimental groups were fed with different doses of potassium dichromate and treated.While the control group were fed with distilled water. 36 mice were sacrificed on the 19th day of pregnant. Implantation, luteal number, total litter birth weight, placental weight, number of living births, and stillbirths number were measured. As for the other 20 female Wistar mice, living birth number of offspring, sex ratio, body weight, body length, and tail length were observed and recorded. On the 42nd day, pups were sacrificed; the content of chromium in liver and serum was determined, and the liver tissue was taken for pathological examination. Results With the dose increased, the total number of implantation in the high dose group tended to decrease, compared with the control group. The high dose group had a lower embryo survival rate and higher embryo mortality than control group. Chromium content of serum and liver was higher in the high dose group than in the low dose group, and the difference was significant (P <0. 01) . Large particles appeared in the lipid droplets of liver cells in high dose group offspring, as well as chromosome concentration, and mitochondrial number reducing. Conclusion This study suggested low-dose chromium has no effect on offspring growth, high-dose chromium ions have more significant impact on pregnant mice and the development of offspring, and as for the offspring, the toxic effects still exist in vivo.%目的 探讨重金属铬离子对孕ICR小鼠胚胎以及仔鼠的发育影响,为行人工全髋关节表面置换术后重金属铬离子对妊娠机体可能产生的

  4. Fabrication, Validation, and Performance Evaluation of a New Sampling System for the In-Situ Chemical Speciation of Chromium Ions in Groundwater Using Supported Liquid Membranes (SLMs)

    OpenAIRE

    Owens, Lesley Shantell

    2013-01-01

    A sampler has been fabricated to facilitate the in-situ speciation of Cr. Teflon® was selected as the material for the samplers because of its inert chemical nature. The design of the sampler is based on the Supported Liquid Membrane (SLM) extraction technique, which utilizes charged organic carrier molecules loaded onto a polymeric (Teflon®) support membrane and the principles of electrostatics to selectively transport Cr ions through an ion-pairing mechanism. Cr ions in the feed solution th...

  5. Determination of chromium(VI) in water by PIXE analysis using ion exchange paper. Limit of detection and interference by coexisting anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concerning the PIXE analysis of Cr(VI) in water using ion-exchange filters, the limit of detection (LOD) and the influence of matrix anions were investigated. In order to look for the experimental condition for obtaining the minimum LOD, we measured the Cr-Kα X-ray counts and background counts under the Kα X-ray peak as a function of the incident proton energy and the thickness of the Mylar absorber foil in front of the detector. To investigate the interference by coexisting anions, each of PO43-, SO42-, NO3-, Cl-, and F- ions and Cr(VI) ions were mixed in aqueous solutions and adsorbed on DE81-DEAE cellulose paper, a weakly basic anion exchanger with diethylaminoethyl functional groups. Then the filter samples were measured by PIXE using 2.5 MeV proton beams. We obtained a LOD of 0.16 μg or 8 ppb for 20 mL samples at a proton energy of 2.5 MeV and a Mylar film thickness of 50 or 100 μm. The experimental results on the mixed solutions indicated that NO3-, Cl-, and F- as coexisting ions didn't interfere significantly with determination of a 50 μg/L Cr(VI) concentration for 40 mL total solution volume, despite the total amount of anions was about 90% of ion exchange capacity of a filter. On the other hand, slight interferences by PO43- ions were observed. However, under the same condition, we found that if the total amount of SO42- ions was higher than 20% of ion exchange capacity, they induced significant interferences in determining Cr(VI). (author)

  6. Obtaining decorative chromium plating from trivalent chromium solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Óscar Javier Suárez García

    2010-01-01

    The present work was aimed at a qualitative evaluation, in the laboratory, of different alternatives for assembling and operating a trivalent chromium bath for decorative chromium plating. Different chromium concentration solutions and different complexing agents were used. The initial result of this analysis was that chloride, formate and acetate solutions produced the best results. Solution preparation conditions were evaluated: temperature, chromium III complex formation time and also ...

  7. Influence of nitrogen on the structure and properties of chromium, chromium-molybdenum and chromium-manganese steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phase transformations, precipitation processes and properties of the chromium, chromium-molybdenum and chromium-manganese steels with a high content of nitrogen as the dependence on thermal treatment were investigated. In case of Fe-0.08C-18Cr-18Mn-N and Fe-0.08C-18Cr-18Mn-2Mo-N steels the samples in the state after solution at temperature 1050oC and 1150oC and 1250oC and after subsequent annealing in 600oC and 800oC were investigated. heat treatment of the Fe-0.5C-10Cr-N and Fe-0.5C-10Cr-1Mo-N steels included austenitizment from 1000oC with air cooling and hardening from 1000oC with oil cooling and tempering in 650oC and 750oC in two hours with cooling in the air. These investigations show that the influence of nitrogen as an alloy element on the phase transformations, precipitation processes, mechanical and corrosion properties is connected with the presence of molybdenum and chromium in the steel. Nitrogen with these elements creates complex ions with the coordinate number 6. This statement is formed on the base of both calculations and investigation results. (author)

  8. The analytical biochemistry of chromium.

    OpenAIRE

    Katz, S A

    1991-01-01

    The essentiality and carcinogenicity of chromium depend on its chemical form. Oxidation state and solubility are particularly important in determining the biological effects of chromium compounds. For this reason, total chromium measurements are of little value in assessing its nutritional benefits or its toxicological hazards. Aqueous sodium carbonate-sodium hydroxide solutions have been successfully used for extracting hexavalent chromium from a variety of environmental and biological matri...

  9. Chromium in potatoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromium concentration in potatoes was determined, and tubes were labeled either intrinsically or extrinsically with radioactive chromate (51Cr). A labeled chromium complex was isolated from preparations of raw, baked, or fried potatoes and chromatographed on gel permeation media. Potato pulp and peel contained 1.63 and 2.70 μg of Cr/g tissue, respectively. There was no correlation between the two, nor did they respond similarly to changes of variety or locations. No significant differences were apparent in relative migration of the isolated complexes except between raw and cooked extrinsically labeled preparations

  10. Chromium and aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aging is associated with increased blood glucose, insulin, blood lipids, and fat mass, and decreased lean body mass leading to increased incidences of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Improved chromium nutrition is associated with improvements in all of these variables. Insulin sensitivity de...

  11. Radiochemical Study on the Separation of Chromium-51 from the Irradiated Target by Using Commercial and/or Synthesized Ion Exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work involves the following steps:1- Preparation of Triton X-100 Cerium(IV) Phosphate (TX-100CeP) as a surface active ion exchanger or organometallic molecules. 2- Characterization of the TX-100CeP by different methods (i.e. IR, TGA/DTA X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence and elemental analysis). 3- Development a method for separation and quantification of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) by using high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). 4- Separation of 51Cr(III) from Cr(VI) in the target of K2CrO4 on TX-100CeP and Permutit as a commercial ion exchanger. 5- Quality control on the separated 51Cr(III).

  12. Competitive Biosorption of Chromium(VI), Iron(III) and Copper(II) Ions From Binary Metal Mixtures By R.arrhizus and C. vulgaris

    OpenAIRE

    SAĞ, Yeşim; AÇIKEL, Ünsal; AKSU, Zümriye; KUTSAL, Tülin

    1998-01-01

    In this study, the simultaneous adsorption process of Cr(VI), Fe(III) by R. arrhizus and C. vulgaris and Cu(II) in pairs of metal mixtures were investigated and compared to single component systems. The capabilities of the fungal and the algal biomass to bind two metals simultaneously in solution are shown as a function of pH, metal combinations and levels of metal concentration. The effects of the co-presence of Cr(VI)-Fe(III) and Cr(VI)-Cu(II) ions together in aquatic solutions on the bi...

  13. Ion nitriding post-oxidation as an alternative technique to electrolytic chromium; Nitruracion post-oxidacion ionica como tecnica alternativa al cromado electrolitico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz-Guillen, J. C.; Granda-Gutierrez, E.E.; Campa-Castilla, A.; Perez-Aguilar, S.I.; Garza-Gomez, A.; Candelas-Ramirez, J.; Mendez-Mendez, R. [COMIMSA. Corporacion Mexicana de Investigacion en Materiales S.A. de C.V., Saltillo, Coahuila (Mexico)]. E-mail: jcarlos@comimsa.com

    2010-11-15

    The effect of temperature and processing time during post-oxidation on hardness and corrosion resistance of AISI 1045 samples treated through nitriding and post-oxidation in a pulsed plasma discharge is evaluated in this paper. Also, a comparative analysis of the mechanical properties obtained with the dual nitriding - post oxidation process versus those properties of typical hard chrome coatings was performed with an aim to propose an alternative technique to the processes of galvanic coatings. The latter revealed that the process of ion nitriding and post-oxidation provides similar properties in hardness and improves the corrosion resistance compared to the hard chrome case. It is conclude that the technique of ion nitriding and post-oxidation is a non environmental harmful technology with strong potential to replace highly polluting electroplating techniques for application of hard chrome coatings. [Spanish] En el presente trabajo se evalua el efecto del tiempo y la temperatura de post-oxidacion sobre las propiedades de dureza y resistencia a la corrosion de muestras de acero AISI 1045 sometido al proceso de nitruracion post-oxidacion ionica en plasmas pulsados. Asi mismo, con el objetivo de fundamentar la propuesta de utilizacion de la nitruracion post-oxidacion ionica como una tecnica alternativa a los procesos galvanicos para aplicacion de recubrimientos de cromo duro, se realizo un analisis comparativo de propiedades, evidenciando que, mediante el proceso nitruracion postoxidacion ionica, es posible obtener caracteristicas similares en dureza y mejores en resistencia a la corrosion que las tipicas obtenidas para el cromo duro. Los resultados obtenidos permiten postular una tecnica que no dana al medio ambiente, como lo es la nitruracion post-oxidacion ionica, como candidata potencial para sustituir las tecnicas galvanicas altamente contaminantes para aplicacion de cromo duro.

  14. Studies of chromium gettering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary results have shown that hydrogen pumping by chromium is a surface effect. Unlike with titanium, the getter material used in many present day tokamaks, there is no significant diffusion into the bulk. Additional experiments have been carried out to measure the basic characteristics of chromium films for gases of interest in tokamak research. These gases include deuterium, oxygen and nitrogen. A vacuum system is described which allowed precise control of the test gas, a constant wall temperature and determination of the projected getter surface area. A quadrupole mass spectrometer, rather than simply a total pressure gauge, was utilized to measure the partial pressure of the test gas as well as the residual gas composition in the system. A quartz crystal monitor was used to measure film thickness. Pumping speeds and sticking coefficients are given as a function of surface coverage for each test gas. A comparison will be made with titanium films deposited in the same vacuum system and under similar conditions

  15. A simple route to synthesize conductive stimuli-responsive polypyrrole nanocomposite hydrogel particles with strong magnetic properties and their performance for removal of hexavalent chromium ions from aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Hasan; Rahman, Mohammad Mostafizar; Ali, Mohammad Azgar; Minami, Hideto; Tauer, Klaus; Gafur, Mohammad Abdul; Rahman, Mohammad Mahbubor

    2016-08-01

    A combination of maghemite polypyrrole (PPy/γ-Fe2O3) and stimuli-responsive properties in the same hydrogel microspheres is expected to enhance their application potential in various fields such as tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, biosensors, biomedical applications and removal of heavy metals from waste water, catalysis etc. In this investigation a simple two step process is used to prepare conductive stimuli-responsive polypyrrole (PPy) composite hydrogel particles with strong magnetic properties. Poly(styrene-methacrylic acid-N-isopropylacrylamide-polyethelene glycol methacrylate) or P(S-NIPAM-MAA-PEGMA) hydrogel seed particles are first prepared by soap-free precipitation copolymerization. The copolymer hydrogel particles exhibited both temperature- and pH-responsive volume phase transition. Conductive P(S-NIPAM-MAA-PEGMA)/PPy/γ-Fe2O3 nanocomposite hydrogel particles are then prepared by seeded chemical oxidative polymerization of pyrrole in the presence of P(S-NIPAM-MAA-PEGMA) hydrogel seed particles using FeCl3 as a oxidant and p-toluene sulfonic acid (p-TSA) as a dopant. In the reaction system FeCl3 functioned as a source of Fe(III) for the formation of γ-Fe2O3. This reaction also requires the initial presence of Fe(II) provided by the addition of FeCl2. The size and size distribution, surface structure, and morphology of the prepared conductive composite hydrogel particles are confirmed by FTIR, electron micrographs, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and UV-visible spectroscopy. The performance of nanocomposite hydrogel particles has been evaluated for the removal of hexavalent chromium (Cr) ions from water.

  16. Catalytic Spectrophotometric Determination of Chromium

    OpenAIRE

    STOYANOVA, Angelina Miltcheva

    2005-01-01

    The catalytic effect of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) on the oxidation of sulfanilic acid by hydrogen peroxide was studied. The reaction was followed spectrophotometrically by measuring the absorbance of the reaction product at 360 nm. Under the optimum conditions 2 calibration graphs (for chromium(III) up to 100 ng mL-1, and for chromium(VI) up to 200 ng mL-1) were obtained, using the ``fixed time'' method with detection limits of 4.9 ng mL-1 and 3.8 ng mL-1, respectively...

  17. Performance of Laterite Soil Grains as Adsorbent in the Removal of Chromium

    OpenAIRE

    Syama I J; Arun Kumar Thalla; Manu D S

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to examine the efficiency of laterite grains (LG) and acid activated laterite grains (AALG) as an adsorbent for removal hexavalent chromium and ferric ion from synthetic wastewater, under laboratory conditions. Adsorption of hexavalent chromium and ferric ion from synthetic wastewater is examined by batch and column studies wherein it is found to be dependent on pH, Contact time, adsorbent dosage and initial adsorbate concentration. Percentage removal enhances with the ...

  18. Effect of low X-ray dose irradiation on properties triglycine sulfate doped by chromium

    CERN Document Server

    Kamysheva, L N; Golitsyna, O M

    2002-01-01

    One studied effect of X-ray low dose on pulse re-polarization in triglycine sulfate crystals (TGS) with various concentration of chromium ions. It is shown that within 20.0 deg C-T sub c temperature range alpha activation field values depend unambiguously on radiation dose for various polarity switching current pulses. One detected decrease of unipolarity of TGS crystal caused by chromium ions due to interaction of radiation defects with impurity ones

  19. Dimensionally Controlled Lithiation of Chromium Oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fister, Tim T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hu, Xianyi [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Esbenshade, Jennifer [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Chen, Xiao [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Wu, Jinsong [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Dravid, Vinayak [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Bedzyk, Michael [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Long, Brandon [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gewirth, Andrew A. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Shi, Bing [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Schlepütz, Christian M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Fenter, Paul [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-01-12

    Oxide conversion reactions are an alternative approach for high capacity lithium ion batteries but are known to suffer from structural irreversibility associated with the phase separation and reconstitution of reduced metal species and Li2O. In particular, the morphology of the reduced metal species is thought to play a critical role in the electrochemical properties of a conversion material. Here we use a model electrode with alternating layers of chromium and chromium oxide to better understand and control these phase changes in real-time and at molecular length scales. Despite lacking crystallinity at the atomic scale, this superstructure is observed (with X-ray reflectivity, XR) to lithiate and delithiate in a purely one-dimensional manner, preserving the layered structure. The XR data show that the metal layers act as nucleation sites for the reduction of chromium in the conversion reaction. Irreversibility during delithiation is due to the formation of a ternary phase, LiCrO2, which can be further delithiated at higher potentials. The results reveal that the combination of confining lithiation to nanoscale sheets of Li2O and the availability of reaction sites in the metal layers in the layered structure is a strategy for improving the reversibility and mass transport properties that can be used in a wide range of conversion materials.

  20. Biosorption and biotransformation of chromium by Serratia sp. isolated from tannery effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Shaili; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2012-01-01

    A bacterium isolated from soil and sediment ofa leather tanning mill's effluent was identified as Serratia sp. by the analysis of 16S rDNA. Scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to assess morphological changes and confirm chromium biosorption in Serratia sp. both in a shake-flask culture containing chromium and in a tannery wastewater. The SEMEDX and the elemental analysis of the chromate-containing samples confirmed the binding of chromium with the bacterial biomass. The TEM exhibited chromium accumulation throughout the bacterial cell, with some granular deposits in the cell periphery and in the cytoplasm. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) was used to quantify the chromium and to determine the chemical nature of the metal-microbe interaction. The XRD data showed the crystalline character of the precipitates, which consisted of mainly calcium chromium oxide, chromium fluoride phosphate and related organo-Cr(III) complex crystals. The XRD data also revealed a strong involvement of cellular carboxyl and phosphate groups in chromium binding by the bacterial biomass. The results of the study indicated that a combined mechanism of ion-exchange, complexation, croprecipitation and immobilization was involved in the biosorption of chromium by bacterial cells in contaminated environments. PMID:22519094

  1. CHROMIUM, METABOLIC SYNDROME AND DIABESITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suboptimal intakes of the essential nutrient, chromium, are characterized by elevated blood glucose, insulin resistance, obesity, hypertriglyceridemia, and low HDL. These are also signs and symptoms of the metabolic syndrome. Improvements due to increased intake of chromium are related to the degr...

  2. Electrodeposited tungsten-nickel-boron: A replacement for hexavalent chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromium, deposited from acidic solutions of its hexavalent ion, has been the rule for wear resistant, corrosion resistant coatings for many years. Although chromium coatings are durable, the plating process generates air emissions, effluent rinse waters, and process solutions that are toxic, suspected carcinogens, and a risk to human health and the environment. Tungsten-nickel-boron (W-Ni-B) alloy deposition is a potential substitute for hexavalent chrome. It has excellent wear, corrosion, and mechanical properties and also may be less of an environmental risk. This study examines the electroplating process and deposit properties of W-Ni-B and compares them with those of hexavalent chrome

  3. Groundwater contaminant by hexavalent chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, C. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Oxidation of trivalent chromium to hexavalent chromium has been investigated as a function of total manganese in soils as well as various incubation conditions. Chromium and manganese contents were analyzed by atomic absorption (graphite furnace and flame emission respectively) following acid digestion. Total hexavalent chromium generation capacity was determined by addition of 0.001 M CrCL3, incubation, and analysis by s-diphenyl carbazide. Samples were then leached with CaSO{sub 4} and MgSO{sub 4} and incubated in various environments (oven, freeze-drier, field moist, ultrafreeze) to test for geogenic generation of Cr(IV). The degree of geogenic generation of hexavalent chromium was compared with total Mn and Cr content as well as hexavalent generational capacity.

  4. Role of paramagnetic chromium in chromium(VI)-induced damage in cultured mammalian cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Sugiyama, M

    1994-01-01

    Chromium(VI) compounds are known to be potent toxic and carcinogenic agents. Because chromium(VI) is easily taken up by cells and is subsequently reduced to chromium(III), the formation of paramagnetic chromium such as chromium(V) and chromium(III) is believed to play a role in the adverse biological effects of chromium(VI) compounds. The present report, uses electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy; the importance of the role of paramagnetic chromium in chromium(VI)-induced damage in intac...

  5. A study of the process of desorption of hexavalent chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.B. Amorim

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work the process of desorption of hexavalent chromium, a toxic metal ion, from the marine algae Sargassum sp, following biosorption experiments 2³ factorial design was studied. A technique was applied to three eluents: HCl, H2SO4 and EDTA. Three factors of importance were evaluated: concentration of eluent, the ratio between mass of biosorbent and volume of eluent (S/L and process time. A statistical analysis of the experimental results showed that the three variables evaluated are significant for all three eluents. The models for chromium desorption were validated, as the results agreed well with the observed values. Through use of the response surface methodology, a factorial design based optimization technique; it was possible to identify the most suitable eluent and the interval of values for the process variables that resulted in the most significant desorption of chromium, which is relevant information for work aiming at process optimization.

  6. Special features of joint chromium and molybdenum electrocrystallization surface morphology of physicomechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vashchenko, S.V.; Adzhiev, B.U.; Solov' eva, Z.A.

    1987-10-01

    The authors studied the effect of molybdenum on the surface structure and certain physicomechanical properties of the electrolytic chromium produced by Cr-Mo electrodeposition from CrO/sub 3/ solutions with added SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ and SiF/sub 6//sup 2 -/ ions. The results indicate that the changes in hardness, hydrogenation, and internal stresses of the chromium coatings which occur upon alloying with molybdenum are chiefly due to structural changes, while the incorporation of Mo into chromium by itself does not markedly affect these characteristics. The structural changes of chromium which occur following the codeposition of molybdenum evidently are due, not only to a change in the relative concentration of anions in the cathodic film, particularly a decrease in the content of catalytic anions in the film, but also to special features in chromium electrocrystallization, an aspect which requires special consideration involving methods of investigating fine structure and surface composition.

  7. Electron transfer. 75. Reduction of carboxylato-bound chromium(V) with vanadium(IV). Intervention of chromium(IV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chelated (carboxylato)chromium(V) anion bis(2-hydroxy-2-ethylbutyrato)oxochromate(V) (I), [(Lig)2Cr(O)]-, reacts with oxovanadium(IV) to form a strongly absorbing species (lambda/sub max/ = 515 nm; epsilon = 1.7 x 103 M-1) in the presence of 2-hydroxy-2-ethylbutyric acid buffers (pH 2-4). EPR data support 1:1 stoichiometry with VO2+ in deficiency, indicating the formation of a chromium(IV) species by reduction. With excess VO2+ a chromium(III) product was obtained. Spectral and ion-exchange properties of this product correspond to those observed for the titanium(III) and iron(II) reductions of chromium(V) and are consistent with the formulation of the product as a bis(hydroxycarboxylate) chelate of (H2O)2Cr/sup III/. With excess vanadium(IV), the reaction exhibits triphasic kinetics. The remaining step of the reaction is the reduction of the chromium(IV) intermediate with VO2+. Rates for all steps increase with decreasing [H+] and level off at low [H+]. The limiting rate constants for the formation of the chromium(IV) intermediate by the (Lig)3Cr(O)2- and (Lig)2Cr(O)- pathways are 2.8 x 103 and 2.2 x 102 M-1s-1. The bimolecular limiting rate constant for the reduction of chromium(IV) is computed to be 7.7 x 102 M-1 s-1. 33 references, 7 tables

  8. 自动电位滴定法测定工业铬酸酐中氯离子含量方法研究%The Research Method to Determine Chloride Ion Content in Chromium Trioxide for Industrial Use with Automatic Potentiometric Titration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡清启; 孙宁

    2015-01-01

    用乙醇作还原剂,将铬酸酐中CrO42-还原为Cr3+,再用硝酸银标准溶液滴定,以电位变化率最大点确定反应终点,求出氯离子含量。就精密度和加标回收进行实验,并对方法展开分析与讨论,该方法的建立对工业生产铬酸酐中氯离子指标的控制具有指导意义。%Reduce the CrO42+to Cr3+in chromium trioxide with ethanol as the reductant ,then determine the content of chloride ion using AgNO3 standard solution to titrate to the end point that has a biggest change of potential. Conduct an experiment for calculating the precision and standard addition recovery of the method,and then analysis and discuss about the method.This method has a guiding significance for controlling the content of chloride ion in the industrial production of chromium trioxide.

  9. Highly efficient and recyclable triple-shelled Ag@Fe3O4@SiO2@TiO2 photocatalysts for degradation of organic pollutants and reduction of hexavalent chromium ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jianwei; Zhang, Yunxia; Xu, Sichao; Wang, Shuan; Ding, Hualin; Pan, Shusheng; Wang, Guozhong; Li, Guanghai; Zhao, Huijun

    2014-04-01

    Herein, we demonstrate the design and fabrication of the well-defined triple-shelled Ag@Fe3O4@SiO2@TiO2 nanospheres with burr-shaped hierarchical structures, in which the multiple distinct functional components are integrated wonderfully into a single nanostructure. In comparison with commercial TiO2 (P25), pure TiO2 microspheres, Fe3O4@SiO2@TiO2 and annealed Ag@Fe3O4@SiO2@TiO2 nanocomposites, the as-obtained amorphous triple-shelled Ag@Fe3O4@SiO2@TiO2 hierarchical nanospheres exhibit a markedly enhanced visible light or sunlight photocatalytic activity towards the photodegradation of methylene blue and photoreduction of hexavalent chromium ions in wastewater. The outstanding photocatalytic activities of the plasmonic photocatalyst are mainly due to the enhanced light harvesting, reduced transport paths for both mass and charge transport, reduced recombination probability of photogenerated electrons/holes, near field electromagnetic enhancement and efficient scattering from the plasmonic nanostructure, increased surface-to-volume ratio and active sites in three dimensional (3D) hierarchical porous nanostructures, and improved photo/chemical stability. More importantly, the hierarchical nanostructured Ag@Fe3O4@SiO2@TiO2 photocatalysts could be easily collected and separated by applying an external magnetic field and reused at least five times without any appreciable reduction in photocatalytic efficiency. The enhanced photocatalytic activity and excellent chemical stability, in combination with the magnetic recyclability, make these multifunctional nanostructures promising candidates to remediate aquatic contaminants and meet the demands of future environmental issues.Herein, we demonstrate the design and fabrication of the well-defined triple-shelled Ag@Fe3O4@SiO2@TiO2 nanospheres with burr-shaped hierarchical structures, in which the multiple distinct functional components are integrated wonderfully into a single nanostructure. In comparison with commercial TiO2

  10. Fate and transport of chromium through soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromium chemistry relevant to the problem facing state of New Jersey (Usa) was examined. Transport of chromium through soil depends on its chemical forms. Transformation of chromium within bulk of soil depends on soil constituents, soil condition, such as pH, Eh and organic compounds applied onto soil or present in soil. Total chromium in soil can be determined. Speciation of chromium based on ionization, hydrolysis, complex formation, redox reactions and adsorption is predicted using MINIQ program

  11. Chromium isotope variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Arcy, Joan Mary

    Chromium (Cr) stable isotopes are a useful tracer of changes in redox conditions because changes in its oxidation state are accompanied by an isotopic fractionation. For this reason the Cr isotope system is being developed as a potential tool for paleo-redox reconstruction. Dissolved Cr in seawater...... is incorporated into carbonates. Hence, ancient carbonates can potentially record the Cr isotopic composition (δ53Cr ‰) of seawater in the geological past. Reliable application and interpretation of this proxy requires a detailed knowledge about processes that fractionate Cr on the Earth’s surface......, and the quantification the Cr isotope composition of major Cr fluxes into and out of ocean. This thesis adds to the current knowledge of the Cr isotope system and is divided into two studies. The focus of the first study was to determine what processes control the Cr isotopic compositionof river...

  12. Removal of toxic chromium from wastewater using green alga Ulva lactuca and its activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biosorption of heavy metals can be an effective process for the removal of toxic chromium ions from wastewater. In this study, the batch removal of toxic hexavalent chromium ions from aqueous solution, saline water and wastewater using marine dried green alga Ulva lactuca was investigated. Activated carbon prepared from U. lactuca by acid decomposition was also used for the removal of chromium from aqueous solution, saline water and wastewater. The chromium uptake was dependent on the initial pH and the initial chromium concentration, with pH ∼1.0, being the optimum pH value. Langmuir, Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson and Koble-Corrigan isotherm models were fitted well the equilibrium data for both sorbents. The maximum efficiencies of chromium removal were 92 and 98% for U. lactuca and its activated carbon, respectively. The maximum adsorption capacity was found to be 10.61 and 112.36 mg g-1 for dried green alga and activated carbon developed from it, respectively. The adsorption capacities of U. lactuca and its activated carbon were independent on the type of solution containing toxic chromium and the efficiency of removal was not affected by the replacing of aqueous solution by saline water or wastewater containing the same chromium concentration. Two hours were necessary to reach the sorption equilibrium. The chromium uptake by U. lactuca and its activated carbon form were best described by pseudo second-order rate model. This study verifies the possibility of using inactivated marine green alga U. lactuca and its activated carbon as valuable material for the removal of chromium from aqueous solutions, saline water or wastewater

  13. Trivalent chromium removal from aqueous solutions by a sol–gel synthesized silica adsorbent functionalized with sulphonic acid groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Gonzalez, Sergio Efrain [Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Universidad de Guadalajara, Blvd. Marcelino García Barragán # 1421, esq. Calzada Olímpica, C.P. 44430 Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico); Carbajal-Arizaga, Gregorio Guadalupe [Departamento de Química, CUCEI, Universidad de Guadalajara, Blvd. Marcelino García Barragán # 1421, esq. Calzada Olímpica, C.P. 44430 Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico); Manriquez-Gonzalez, Ricardo [Departamento de Madera, Celulosa y Papel, CUCEI, Universidad de Guadalajara, Km 15.5, carretera Guadalajara-Nogales, Las Agujas, C.P. 45020 Zapopan, Jalisco (Mexico); De la Cruz-Hernandez, Wencel [Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Km 107 carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, C.P. 22830 Ensenada, Baja California (Mexico); Gomez-Salazar, Sergio, E-mail: sergio.gomez@cucei.udg.mx [Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Universidad de Guadalajara, Blvd. Marcelino García Barragán # 1421, esq. Calzada Olímpica, C.P. 44430 Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Corpuscular sulphonic acid-functionalized silica holds improved uptake of chromium. • Mesopores on adsorbent facilitate (CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2}Cr{sup +} ion uptake on sulphonate sites. • Formation of chromium acetate sulphonate complex proposed from XPS results. • Fixed bed chromium uptake results suggest potential industrial use. - Abstract: A high capacity hybrid silica adsorbent was synthesized via sol–gel processing with sulphonic acid groups as trivalent chromium complex ions chelators from aqueous solutions. The synthesis included co-condensation of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) with 3-(mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane (MPS), and oxidation of thiol to sulphonic acid groups. Chromium uptake kinetic, batch and fixed-bed experiments were performed to assess the removal of this metal from aqueous solutions. {sup 13}C, {sup 29}Si CPMAS NMR, FTIR, XPS were used to characterize the adsorbent structure and the nature of chromium complexes on the adsorbent surface. Chromium maximum uptake was obtained at pH 3 (72.8 mg/g). Elemental analysis results showed ligand density of 1.48 mmol sulphonic groups/g. About 407 mL of Cr(III) solution (311 mg/L) were treated to breakthrough point reaching ≤0.06 mg/L at the effluent. These results comply with USEPA regulation for chromium concentration in drinking water (≤0.1 mg/L). The adsorbent shows potential to be used in chromium separations to the industrial level.

  14. Trivalent chromium removal from aqueous solutions by a sol–gel synthesized silica adsorbent functionalized with sulphonic acid groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Corpuscular sulphonic acid-functionalized silica holds improved uptake of chromium. • Mesopores on adsorbent facilitate (CH3COO)2Cr+ ion uptake on sulphonate sites. • Formation of chromium acetate sulphonate complex proposed from XPS results. • Fixed bed chromium uptake results suggest potential industrial use. - Abstract: A high capacity hybrid silica adsorbent was synthesized via sol–gel processing with sulphonic acid groups as trivalent chromium complex ions chelators from aqueous solutions. The synthesis included co-condensation of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) with 3-(mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane (MPS), and oxidation of thiol to sulphonic acid groups. Chromium uptake kinetic, batch and fixed-bed experiments were performed to assess the removal of this metal from aqueous solutions. 13C, 29Si CPMAS NMR, FTIR, XPS were used to characterize the adsorbent structure and the nature of chromium complexes on the adsorbent surface. Chromium maximum uptake was obtained at pH 3 (72.8 mg/g). Elemental analysis results showed ligand density of 1.48 mmol sulphonic groups/g. About 407 mL of Cr(III) solution (311 mg/L) were treated to breakthrough point reaching ≤0.06 mg/L at the effluent. These results comply with USEPA regulation for chromium concentration in drinking water (≤0.1 mg/L). The adsorbent shows potential to be used in chromium separations to the industrial level

  15. Chromium trace determination in inorganic, organic and aqueous samples with isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetz, A.; Heumann, K.G.

    1988-06-01

    It is shown that chromium traces in different inorganic, organic and aqueous samples can be determined over a wide concentration range with isotope dilution mass spectrometry. Electrolytic or chromatographic isolation steps are added to a system of sample preparation units for oligo-element determinations to analyse chromium besides other heavy metals. The isotope ratio /sup 52/Cr//sup 53/Cr is measured in a thermal quadrupole mass spectrometer using a single-filament ion source with additions of silica gel and boric acid. In water samples, which contain humic substances, chromium concentrations of a few ng/g and less can be determined with relative standard deviations of about 1% and better. A differentiation is possible into the total chromium content and into chromium species which carry out isotope exchange reactions and those which are inert for an isotope exchange reaction. The chromium concentrations of four standard reference materials (two plants BCR 60 and 61, one tissue BCR 278, one sewage sludge BCR 144), which are not certified for chromium, are determined to be 29.4 ..mu..g/g, 534 ..mu..g/g, 0.78 ..mu..g/g, and 466.1 ..mu..g/g, respectively. In three different sediments total chromium concentrations between 100 ..mu..g/g and 180 ..mu..g/g are analysed with relative standard deviations of 0.6%-1.2%.

  16. Chromium reduction in Pseudomonas putida.

    OpenAIRE

    Ishibashi, Y.; Cervantes, C; Silver, S

    1990-01-01

    Reduction of hexavalent chromium (chromate) to less-toxic trivalent chromium was studied by using cell suspensions and cell-free supernatant fluids from Pseudomonas putida PRS2000. Chromate reductase activity was associated with soluble protein and not with the membrane fraction. The crude enzyme activity was heat labile and showed a Km of 40 microM CrO4(2-). Neither sulfate nor nitrate affected chromate reduction either in vitro or with intact cells.

  17. Chromium reduction in Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Y; Cervantes, C; Silver, S

    1990-01-01

    Reduction of hexavalent chromium (chromate) to less-toxic trivalent chromium was studied by using cell suspensions and cell-free supernatant fluids from Pseudomonas putida PRS2000. Chromate reductase activity was associated with soluble protein and not with the membrane fraction. The crude enzyme activity was heat labile and showed a Km of 40 microM CrO4(2-). Neither sulfate nor nitrate affected chromate reduction either in vitro or with intact cells. PMID:2389940

  18. Development of a hexavalent chromium ISFET sensor with a polymeric membrane including tributylphosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a first report on chromium ISFET (ion-sensitive field effect transistor) based on a polymeric membrane (siloprene) including an ionophore (tributylphosphate) sensitive for hexavalent chromium. The sensor sensitivity as a function of the pH was studied; its value is minimum in a pH interval from 5.5 to 7.5. The sensitivity for hexavalent chromium was found to be 15 mV/loga Cr6+ in the range of 10-4 to 10-2 M. The detection limit was found to be 10-5 M. The studied interfering ions are Pb(II) and Cd(II) that do not represent a great perturbation upon the response for hexavalent chromium

  19. Special features of joint chromium-molybdenum electrocrystallization surface composition of the deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vashchenko, S.V.; Makarychev, Yu.B.; Adzhiev, B.U.; Solov' eva, Z.A.

    1987-11-01

    It had been found previously that a codeposition of molybdenum with chromium leads to lower inhibition of metal crystallization, which to an appreciable degree is due to the lower fraction of catalytic anions found in the cathodic film when molybdate irons are incorporated into it. In this work x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to study the chemical composition of the surface and the vertical composition profiles as functions of the amount of codeposited chromium and of electrolysis time, and thus to elucidate the influence of the specific features of MoO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ ion reduction on chromium crystallization.

  20. Role of Iron Anode Oxidation on Transformation of Chromium by Electrolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sarahney, Hussam; Mao, Xuhui; Alshawabkeh, Akram N.

    2012-01-01

    The potential for chemical reduction of hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) in contaminated water and formation of a stable precipitate by Zero Valent Iron (ZVI) anode electrolysis is evaluated in separated electrodes system. Oxidation of iron electrodes produces ferrous ions causing the development of a reducing environment in the anolyte, chemical reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) and formation of stable iron-chromium precipitates. Cr(VI) transformation rates are dependent on the applied electric curre...

  1. NEW BIO-SORBENTS IN THE CONTROL OF CHROMIUM (VI) POLLUTION IN WASTE WATERS

    OpenAIRE

    K. P.C. Sekha; R. V. Vishnu Babu; T. Rohini,; K. Ravindhranath

    2012-01-01

    The sorption abilities of leaves powders of Bhringraj, Aerva lanata,TrianthemaportulacastrumL for extracting Chromium (VI) from polluted waters have been studied with respect tovarious physicochemical parameters such as pH, sorption dosage and equilibrium time. The conditions formaximum removal of Chromium (VI) have been optimized. Ten fold excess of common cation ions present innatural waters, viz., Ca2+,Mg2+, Cu2+, Zn2+,Ni2+and Fe2+have synergistic effect in increasing the % removalof Chrom...

  2. Efficacy of Agricultural Wastes in the Removal of Hexavalent Chromium- A Review.

    OpenAIRE

    N Muthulakshmi Andal; S. Charulatha

    2013-01-01

    Hexavalent Chromium is a major pollutant released during several industrial operations. It is also reported as one of the metals known to be carcinogenic and has an adverse potential to modify the DNA transcription process. The removal of hexavalent chromium has been studied by various authors employing adsorbents developed from waste agro by-products to assess their adsorption characteristics. This paper focuses on the comparison of some agro based products in the removal of Cr(VI) ions. An ...

  3. Removal of chromium complex dye from aqueous solutions using strongly basic and weakly basic anion exchangers

    OpenAIRE

    Kauspediene, D.; Kazlauskiene E.; Selskiene, A.

    2010-01-01

    Removal of chromium complex dye from aqueous solutions by sorption onto a weakly basic, acrylic matrix anion exchanger Purolite A845 and a strongly basic, polystyrene matrix anion exchanger Purolite A 500P has been investigated under various experimental conditions: the initial dye concentration, pH and temperature. The sorption of chromium complex dye proceeds as a result of miscellaneous interactions between the dye and anion exchanger: ion exchange and physical sorption. The removal effici...

  4. Hydrogen permeation through chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steady state and non-steady state measurements of hydrogen permeation through metallic chromium are reported. The experiments have been conducted by use of hydrogen and deuterium within a pressure range of 10-8 - 1 bar and temperatures between 600 - 8000C. Numerical values for the physical quantities permeability, diffusion constant and solubility could be derived. At an upstream pressure above around 10-3 bar classical Sieverts-low was found (permeation rate proportional √p) with activation energies Qsub(perm) = 65 kJoule/mole, Qsub(Diff) = 4-8 kJoule/mole, Qsub(Sol) = 57-61 kJoule/mole for the respective processes involved. The isotopic effect between H and D of the permeabilities could be represented by a factor of 1,5 independence on temperature. All non steady-state measurements could be approximated reasonably well by classical diffusion kinetics. Below up-stream pressures of approx.= 10-7 bar the kinetics was no longer diffusion controlled, the dependence on up-stream pressure changed from √p -> p, the activation energy for permetation increased to 127 kJoule/mole and the isotopic factor resulted in about 2-3. (orig.)

  5. ADVANCES IN HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM REMOVAL AT HANFORD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NESHEM DO; RIDDELLE J

    2012-01-30

    At the Hanford Site, chromium was used as a corrosion inhibitor in the reactor cooling water and was introduced into the groundwater as a result of planned and unplanned discharges from reactors during plutonium production since 1944. Beginning in 1995, groundwater treatment methods were evaluated leading to the use of pump and treat facilities with ion exchange using Dowex 21 K, a regenerable strong base anion exchange resin. This required regeneration of the resin, which is currently performed offsite. Resin was installed in a 4 vessel train, with resin removal required from the lead vessel approximately once a month. In 2007, there were 8 trains (32 vessels) in operation. In 2008, DOE recognized that regulatory agreements would require significant expansion in the groundwater chromium treatment capacity. Previous experience from one of the DOE project managers led to identification of a possible alternative resin, and the contractor was requested to evaluate alternative resins for both cost and programmatic risk reductions. Testing was performed onsite in 2009 and 2010, using a variety of potential resins in two separate facilities with groundwater from specific remediation sites to demonstrate resin performance in the specific groundwater chemistry at each site. The testing demonstrated that a weak base anion single-use resin, ResinTech SIR-700, was effective at removing chromium, had a significantly higher capacity, could be disposed of efficiently on site, and would eliminate the complexities and programmatic risks from sampling, packaging, transportation and return of resin for regeneration. This resin was installed in Hanford's newest groundwater treatment facility, called 100-DX, which began operations in November, 2010, and used in a sister facility, 100-HX, which started up in September of 2011. This increased chromium treatment capacity to 25 trains (100 vessels). The resin is also being tested in existing facilities that utilize Dowex 21 K for

  6. Selective Chromium(VI) Ligands Identified Using Combinatorial Peptoid Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Abigail S.; Zhou, Effie Y.; Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Francis, Matthew B.

    2013-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is a world-wide water contaminant that is currently without cost-effective and efficient remediation strategies. This is in part due to a lack of ligands that can bind it amid an excess of innocuous ions in aqueous solution. We present herein the design and application of a peptoid-based library of ligand candidates for toxic metal ions. A selective screening process was used to identify members of the library that can bind to Cr(VI) species at neutral pH and in the presence of a large excess of spectator ions. Eleven sequences were identified, and their affinities were compared using titrations monitored with UV-Vis spectroscopy. To identify the interactions involved in coordination and specificity, we evaluated the effects of sequence substitutions and backbone variation in the highest affinity structure. Additional characterization of the complex formed between this sequence and Cr(VI) was performed using NMR spectroscopy. To evaluate the ability of the developed sequences to remediate contaminated solutions, the structures were synthesized on a solid-phase resin and incubated with environmental water samples that contained simulated levels of chromium contamination. The synthetic structures demonstrated the ability to reduce the amount of toxic chromium to levels within the range of the EPA contamination guidelines. In addition to providing some of the first selective ligands for Cr(VI), these studies highlight the promise of peptoid sequences as easily-prepared components of environmental remediation materials. PMID:24195610

  7. Trivalent chromium sorption on alginate beads

    OpenAIRE

    Araújo, M. Manuela; Teixeira, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    The applicability of trivalent chromium removal from aqueous solutions using calcium alginate beads was studied. The equilibrium isotherms were plotted at two temperatures. The relationship between the chromium sorbed and the calcium released was determined as well as the effect of alginate amount and initial pH on the equilibrium results. Chromium sorption kinetics were evaluated as a function of chromium initial concentration and temperature. Transport properties of trival...

  8. On texture formation of chromium electrodeposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian Bergenstof; Leisner, Peter; Horsewell, Andy

    1998-01-01

    The microstructure, texture and hardness of electrodeposited hard, direct current (DC) chromium and pulsed reversed chromium has been investigated. These investigations suggest that the growth and texture of hard chromium is controlled by inhibition processes and reactions. Further, it has been...

  9. Stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in primary water of PWR: study of chromium diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alloy 600 (Ni-15%Cr-10%Fe) is known to be susceptible to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) in primary water of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). Recent studies have shown that chromium diffusion is a controlling rate step in the comprehension of SCC mechanism. In order to improve the understanding and the modelling of SCC of Alloy 600 in PWR primary medium the aim of this study was to collect data on kinetics diffusion of chromium. Volume and grain boundary diffusion of chromium in pure nickel and Alloy 600 (mono and poly-crystals) has been measured in the temperature range 678 K to 1060 K by using Secondary Ions Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) and Glow Discharge-Optical Spectrometry (GD-OES) techniques. A particular emphasis has been dedicated to the influence of plastic deformation on chromium diffusion in nickel single crystals (orientated <101>) for different metallurgical states. The experimental tests were carried out in order to compare the chromium diffusion coefficients in free lattice (not deformed), in pre-hardening specimens (4% and 20%) and in dynamic deformed tensile specimens at 773 K. It has been found that chromium diffusivity measured in dynamic plastic deformed creep specimens were six orders of magnitude greater than those obtained in not deformed or pre-hardening specimens. The enhancement of chromium diffusivity can be attributed to the presence of moving dislocations generated during plastic deformation. (author)

  10. Chromium Salen Mediated Alkene Epoxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kaare Brandt; Norrby, Per-Ola; Daly, Adrian M.; Gilheany, Declan G.

    2002-01-01

    The mechanism of alkene epoxidation by chromium(v) oxo salen complexes has been studied by DFT and experimental methods. The reaction is compared to the closely related Mn-catalyzed process in an attempt to understand the dramatic difference in selectivity between the two systems. Overall, the......-spin surface. The low-spin addition of metal oxo species to an alkene leads to an intermediate which forms epoxide either with a barrier on the low-spin surface or without a barrier after spin inversion. Supporting evidence for this intermediate was obtained by using vinylcyclopropane traps. The chromium...

  11. Removal of chromium from aqueous solutions by adsorption on activated alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing contamination of urban and industrial wastewaters by toxic metal ions causes significant environmental pollution. All over the world, chromium is abundantly available in nature (rocks, soil, plants); it is present in aqueous solutions mainly in Cr III and Cr VI oxidation states which are commonly used in various industrial processes. Chromium especially in its VI oxidation state is considered as a very toxic ion; thus, its elimination from aqueous solutions should be considered an environmental primary target. The removal of chromium VI from aqueous solutions by activated alumina has been investigated as a function of solution pH, initial chromium concentration, adsorbent dose of alumina and temperature. The pH and the adsorbent dose of activated alumina are the most significant parameter affecting chromium VI adsorption. The Freundlich and Langmuir models have been applied and the equilibrium adsorption was found to best fit the Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption isotherm. A comparison of kinetic models applied to the adsorption of chromium VI on activated alumina was evaluated for the pseudo first-order and the pseudo second-order models respectively. Results show that the pseudo second-order kinetic model was found to correlate the experimental data well.

  12. Chromium content of selected Greek foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratakos, Michael S; Lazos, Evangelos S; Bratakos, Sotirios M

    2002-05-01

    The total chromium content of a wide variety of Greek foods was determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (GFAAS). Meat, fish and seafood, cereals and pulses were rich sources of chromium (>0.100 microg/g). Fruits, milk, oils and fats and sugar were poor sources. Differences in chromium content were found between different food classes from Greece and those from some other countries. Based on available food consumption data and chromium levels in this study, it was estimated that the chromium intake of Greeks is 143 microg/day, with vegetables, cereals and meat being the main contributors. PMID:12083715

  13. Study of Physical modifications induced by chromium doping of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Improvement of nuclear fuel performances requires reducing fission gas release. Doping uranium dioxide with chromium is the improvement axis considered in this work. Indeed, chromium fastens crystal growth in UO2, and thus enables a significant increase of the grain size. This work aims at the identification of defects produced by chromium addition in UO2, and their impact on properties of interest of the material. First, defects existing in doped fuel directly after sintering have been studied. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy allowed the identification of the environment of solubilised chromium in UO2. Chromium atoms are roughly substituting for uranium atoms, but generate a complete reorganisation of neighbouring oxygen atoms, and distortion of uranium sublattice. Characterisation of transport properties (electrical conductivity and oxygen self-diffusion) have shown that because of charge balance, chromium plays a leading role on such properties. A model of point defects in UO2 has been proposed, showing how complex the involved phenomena are. Observations by Transmission Electron Microscopy of ion-irradiated thin foils have shown that chromium makes the coalescence of irradiation defects easier. This behaviour can be explained by a stabilisation of defect clusters due to precipitation of chromium. Finally, study of thermal diffusion of helium in doped UO2, performed by Nuclear Reaction Analysis, has confirmed this interaction between chromium atoms and irradiation defects. Indeed, μ-NRA measures have shown no fast gas diffusion close to grain boundaries, in contrast with standard UO2 behaviour, which is associated with defects recovery in grain boundaries. (author)

  14. Determination of chromium combined with DNA, RNA and protein in chromium-rich brewer's yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contents of chromium in the DNA, RNA and protein fractions separated from chromium-rich and normal brewer's yeast were determined with the neutron activation analysis in order to study the combination of Cr with DNA, RNA and protein in chromium-rich brewer's yeast. The results showed that the extracting rats and concentrations of DNA, RNA and protein had no significant difference in two types of yeast, but the chromium contents of DNA, RNA and protein in the chromium-rich yeast were significantly higher than those in the normal. In addition, the content of chromium in DNA was much higher than that in RNA and protein, which indicated that the inorganic chromium compounds entered into the yeast cell, during the yeast cultivation in the culture medium containing chromium were converted into organic chromium compounds combined with DNA, RNA and protein

  15. BWR chromium chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report addresses the concern about higher total specific conductivity in the reactor recirculation loop water due to the chromate ion. This concern is particularly high at plants where all other ionic species have been reduced through careful attention to makeup and condensate polisher operations. An EPRI Chromate Workshop was held in November 1990 to consider the issues raised by observed levels of chromate ion (generally 5 to 50 ppB). While BWRs on normal water chemistry were the only ones observing chromate, even plants on hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) observe sharp spikes of conductivity due to chromate whenever the hydrogen supply was interrupted after a reasonably long HWC operational period. The consensus of the workshop attendees was that chromate was not a concern as an agent causing pipe cracking compared to the more common species such as chloride and sulfate. However, the data are somewhat ambiguous for levels of chromate above 50 ppB. Adjustments to the weighing factors for the various ionic species in the industry chemistry performance index are suggested to allow for the known relative higher aggressiveness of other species relative to that of chromate

  16. Tissues and urinary chromium concentrations in rats fed high-chromium diets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Chromium is an essential trace elements and enhances the function of insulin as a form of chromodulin. In the subjects with a certain type of diabetics, 200 to 1,000 μg/d of chromium is administered to reduced the symptoms of diabetics. However, although there are not any health-promotive effects of chromium-administration in healthy subjects, various types of chromium supplements are commercially available in many countries; the adverse effects caused by an excessive chromium intake are feared. In the present study, to clarify the tolerable upper limit of chromium, tissue and urinary chromium concentrations, liver function and iron status were examined in rats fed high-chromium diets. Thirty-six male 4-weeks Wistar rats were divided into six groups and fed casein-based diets containing 1, 10 or 100 μg/g of chromium as chromium chloride (CrCl3) or chromium picolinate (CrPic) for 4 weeks. After the feeding, chromium concentrations in liver, kidney, small intestine and tibia were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. In addition, urine samples were collected on 3rd to 4th week and their chromium concentrations were also determined. Chromium concentrations in liver, kidney, small intestine and tibia were elevated with increase of dietary chromium concentration. Urinary chromium excretion was also elevated with the increase of dietary chromium and the rate of urinary chromium excretion was less than 2% to dietary chromium intake in all the experimental groups. In the administration of 100 μg/g of chromium, rats given CrCl3 showed significantly higher tibia chromium concentration and lower urinary chromium excretion than those given CrPic. There were not any differences in iron status among the experimental groups. Activities of serum aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase in rats fed diet containing 100 μg/g of chromium as CrPic were significantly higher than those in rats fed other diets.

  17. Influence of chromium concentration on the electron magnetic resonance linewidth of Cr3+ in SrTiO3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Sergio de Biasi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Electron magnetic resonance (EMR spectra of Cr3+ ions in samples of chromium-doped strontium titanate (SrTiO3 have been studied at room temperature for chromium concentrations between 0.20 and 1.00 mol%. According to previous studies, chromium substitutes Ti4+ sites in the lattice and its preferred valence state is Cr4+, which is EMR silent in the X-band, but the trivalent state can be produced by illumination or codoping with Nb. In the present work, the codoping method was used; the results show the electron magnetic resonance linewidth of the Cr3+ spectrum increases with increasing chromium concentration and that the range of the exchange interaction between Cr3+ ions is about 0.96 nm.

  18. Food Chromium Contents, Chromium Dietary Intakes And Related Biological Variables In French Free-Living Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromium (Cr III), an essential trace element, functions in potentiating insulin sensitivity, regulating glucose homeostasis, improving lipid profile, and maintaining lean body mass. Glucose intolerance and chromium deficiency increase with age, and could be aggravating factors of the metabolic synd...

  19. Soils contaminated with hexavalent chromium

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca, Bruna Catarina da Silva

    2011-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento em Engenharia Química e Biológica The interest in environmental soil science has been growing in the last years due to the continuous degradation of this major natural resource. With this in mind, and because chromium and lead are two of the most toxic heavy metals frequently detected as soil contaminants in the Portuguese territory, the study and development of few remediation techniques and the indissociable description of the sorption and migration of...

  20. Carbon, chromium and molybdenum contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes solidification experiments on white cast iron, with 15 and 20% of chromium, 2.3, 3.0 and 3.6 % of carbon and 0.0, 1.5 and 2.5 % of molybdenum in test de samples with 30 mm diameter. Measurements were performed on the austenite and eutectic formation arrests, the number of the eutectic carbide particles relative to the total and the eutectic volumes, and the volume fraction of the primary austenite

  1. Chromium Waste Treatment from Leather Manufacture Using Electron Beam Radiation Technic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leather manufacture chromium waste treatment using chemical methods have an essential disadvantage, because of the production of the secondary contamination of wastes and separated sediments used by reagents. Therefore, a new technique is needed to solve this problem. The aim of the research to learn the advantages of electron beam radiation for chromium waste treatment. Water radiolysis can be produced by the interaction between electron beam and water or liquid substances. This phenomenon produces many reducing agents and ions that could reduce chromium concentrations in the liquid waste. Ethyl alcohol as a scavenger was added in the waste samples, then the pH of varied from 1, 4, 8 to 12, then were irradiated. Irradiation were done by Electron Beam Machine with dose 15, 25, and 35 kGy. After irradiation, chromium concentration in the samples were analyzed by AAS and UV-vis spectrophotometer. The results had shown that chromium could be reduced by high dose electron beam. The optimum reduction of chromium was achieved at liquid waste pH 8 and irradiation dose 35 kGy. (author)

  2. REMOVAL OF LEAD AND CHROMIUM FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTION BY BACILLUS CIRCULANS BIOFILM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Khanafari, S. Eshghdoost, A. Mashinchian

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The different methods are used for the removal of heavy metals as important contaminants in water and wastewater. Biosorption is an alternative to traditional physicochemical in removing toxic metals from wastewaters and groundwater resources. In this study biosorption of lead and chromium ions from solution was studied using Bacillus circulans isolated from Anzali wetland in batch and biofilter modes and optimum conditions were determined. The experimental results showed 900-950 mg/L and 1050-1100 mg/L, for minimum bactericidal concentration and minimum inhibitory concenteration for lead and chromium, respectively. Results of metal concentration in solution containing 500 mg/L in batch culture showed a reduction about 65% and 48% in five and four days for lead and chromium, respectively. The highest value of lead and chromium uptake in solution with 500 mg/L was 78% and 40% in biofilter mode, respectively. The biosorption of lead and chromium were increased up to pH=5.5, 6, 5.5 and 7, respectively. In the other hand, maximum sorption occurred at neutral pH. There was a significant decreasing of biosorption levels by lowering pH fewer than 3. Accumulation of lead and chromium was determined by scanning electron microscopy analysis of the biofilm exposed to 500 mg/L metal concentration. Based on this analysis, the highest metal concentrations were observed in regions with including bacteria.

  3. A novel surface cleaning method for chemical removal of fouling lead layer from chromium surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most products especially metallic surfaces require cleaning treatment to remove surface contaminations that remain after processing or usage. Lead fouling is a general problem which arises from lead fouling on the chromium surfaces of bores and other interior parts of systems which have interaction with metallic lead in high temperatures and pressures. In this study, a novel chemical solution was introduced as a cleaner reagent for removing metallic lead pollution, as a fouling metal, from chromium surfaces. The cleaner aqueous solution contains hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as oxidizing agent of lead layer on the chromium surface and acetic acid (CH3COOH) as chelating agent of lead ions. The effect of some experimental parameters such as acetic acid concentration, hydrogen peroxide concentration and temperature of the cleaner solution during the operation on the efficiency of lead cleaning procedure was investigated. The results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that using this procedure, the lead pollution layer could be completely removed from real chromium surfaces without corrosion of the original surface. Finally, the optimum conditions for the complete and fast removing of lead pollution layer from chromium surfaces were proposed. The experimental results showed that at the optimum condition (acetic acid concentration 28% (V/V), hydrogen peroxide 8% (V/V) and temperature 35 deg. C), only 15-min time is needed for complete removal of 3 g fouling lead from a chromium surface.

  4. The Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity of Hexavalent Chromium in Steller Sea Lion Lung Fibroblasts Compared to Human Lung Fibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Wise, John Pierce; Wise, Sandra S.; Holmes, Amie L.; LaCerte, Carolyne; Shaffiey, Fariba; Aboueissa, AbouEl-Makarim

    2010-01-01

    In this study we directly compared soluble and particulate chromate cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in human (Homo sapiens) and sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) lung fibroblasts. Our results show that hexavalent chromium induces increased cell death and chromosome damage in both human and sea lion cells with increasing intracellular chromium ion levels. The data further indicate that both sodium chromate and lead chromate are less cytotoxic and genotoxic to sea lion cells than human cells, based o...

  5. Preparation and Characterization of Nanocrystalline Hard Chromium Coatings Using Eco-Friendly Trivalent Chromium Bath

    OpenAIRE

    V. S. Protsenko; V. O Gordiienko; Danilov, F. I.; Kwon, S.C.

    2011-01-01

    A new aqueous sulfate trivalent chromium bath is described. The chromium bath contains formic acid and carbamide as complexing agents. Chromium was deposited at a temperature of 30÷40 oC and a cathode current density of 10÷25 A dm-2. The bath allows obtaining thick (up to several hundred micrometers) hard chromium coatings with nanocrystalline structure. The electrodeposition rate reaches 0.8÷0.9 µm min-1.

  6. REMOVAL OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM FROM DRINKING WATER

    OpenAIRE

    A. R. Asgari ، F. Vaezi ، S. Nasseri ، O. Dördelmann ، A. H. Mahvi ، E. Dehghani Fard

    2008-01-01

    Removal of chromium can be accomplished by various methods but none of them is cost-effective in meeting drinking water standards. For this study, granular ferric hydroxide was used as adsorbent for removal of hexavalent chromium. Besides, the effects of changing contact time, pH and concentrations of competitive anions were determined for different amounts of granular ferric hydroxide. It was found that granular ferric hydroxide has a high capacity for adsorption of hexavalent chromium from ...

  7. Inoculation of chromium white cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kopyciński

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been proved that an addition of boron carbide introduced as an inoculant to the chromium white cast iron changes the structureof castings. Castings after inoculation revealed a different structure with numerous grains. Primary precipitates of chromium carbide also appeared, reducing the mechanical properties of as-cast parts. Properly established heat treatment regime makes chromium iron castings regain their, originally high, mechanical properties.

  8. Inoculation of chromium white cast iron

    OpenAIRE

    D. Kopyciński

    2009-01-01

    It has been proved that an addition of boron carbide introduced as an inoculant to the chromium white cast iron changes the structureof castings. Castings after inoculation revealed a different structure with numerous grains. Primary precipitates of chromium carbide also appeared, reducing the mechanical properties of as-cast parts. Properly established heat treatment regime makes chromium iron castings regain their, originally high, mechanical properties.

  9. Removal of hexavalent chromium in carbonic acid solution by oxidizing slag discharged from steelmaking process in electric arc furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Seiji; Okazaki, Kohei; Sasano, Junji; Izaki, Masanobu

    2014-02-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is well-known to be a strong oxidizer, and is recognized as a carcinogen. Therefore, it is regulated for drinking water, soil, groundwater and sea by the environmental quality standards all over the world. In this study, it was attempted to remove Cr(VI) ion in a carbonic acid solution by the oxidizing slag that was discharged from the normal steelmaking process in an electric arc furnace. After the addition of the slag into the aqueous solution contained Cr(VI) ion, concentrations of Cr(VI) ion and total chromium (Cr(VI) + trivalent chromium (Cr(III)) ions decreased to lower detection limit of them. Therefore, the used slag could reduce Cr(VI) and fix Cr(III) ion on the slag. While Cr(VI) ion existed in the solution, iron did not dissolve from the slag. From the relation between predicted dissolution amount of iron(II) ion and amount of decrease in Cr(VI) ion, the Cr(VI) ion did not react with iron(II) ion dissolved from the slag. Therefore, Cr(VI) ion was removed by the reductive reaction between Cr(VI) ion and the iron(II) oxide (FeO) in the slag. This reaction progressed on the newly appeared surface of iron(II) oxide due to the dissolution of phase composed of calcium etc., which existed around iron(II) oxide grain in the slag.

  10. BIOSORPTION OF CHROMIUM(Ⅵ) IONS FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTION BY A NOVEL BACTERIAL EXOPOLYMERS%细菌胞外高聚物对水中六价铬的生物吸附特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王竞; 陶颖; 周集体; 宫小燕

    2001-01-01

    Biosorption of Chromium(Ⅵ) was investigated by a Novel Bacterial exopolymers from Pseudomonas sp GX4-1. It was found that the optimum initial pH for Cr(Ⅵ) biosorption is 0.5-2.0; the biosorption process may be divided into the following phases:1)a fast biosorption phase with 75% Cr(Ⅵ) uptaken within 5 min: 2)first-order kinetics phase from 10 to 40min; 3)equilibrium phase; and biosorption process is fit for Languir model.%本文研究了一新型细胞外聚合物WJ-I对水中重金属Cr(Ⅵ)的吸附特性。结果表明,WJ-I对Cr(Ⅵ)吸附的最佳pH为0.5~2.0。Cr(Ⅵ)的吸附可分为三个阶段;快速吸附阶段(5min);一级动力学吸附阶段(10~40min);吸附平衡阶段(50min以后)。整个吸附过程符合langmuir吸附模型。

  11. Fabrication of chitosan-magnetite nanocomposite strip for chromium removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureshkumar, Vaishnavi; Kiruba Daniel, S. C. G.; Ruckmani, K.; Sivakumar, M.

    2016-02-01

    Environmental pollution caused by heavy metals is a serious threat. In the present work, removal of chromium was carried out using chitosan-magnetite nanocomposite strip. Magnetite nanoparticles (Fe3O4) were synthesized using chemical co-precipitation method at 80 °C. The nanoparticles were characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction spectrometer, atomic force microscope, dynamic light scattering and vibrating sample magnetometer, which confirm the size, shape, crystalline nature and magnetic behaviour of nanoparticles. Atomic force microscope revealed that the particle size was 15-30 nm and spherical in shape. The magnetite nanoparticles were mixed with chitosan solution to form hybrid nanocomposite. Chitosan strip was casted with and without nanoparticle. The affinity of hybrid nanocomposite for chromium was studied using K2Cr2O7 (potassium dichromate) solution as the heavy metal solution containing Cr(VI) ions. Adsorption tests were carried out using chitosan strip and hybrid nanocomposite strip at different time intervals. Amount of chromium adsorbed by chitosan strip and chitosan-magnetite nanocomposite strip from aqueous solution was evaluated using UV-visible spectroscopy. The results confirm that the heavy metal removal efficiency of chitosan-magnetite nanocomposite strip is 92.33 %, which is higher when compared to chitosan strip, which is 29.39 %.

  12. Permeation of chromium salts through human skin in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Fullerton, A; Avnstorp, C;

    1992-01-01

    of the dichromate solution. Chromium skin levels increased with increasing concentrations of applied chromium salts up to 0.034 M Cr. The amount of chromium in recipient phase and skin layers increased with increasing pH when the applied solution contained potassium dichromate. This was ascribed to a decreased skin...... barrier function of the skin. The amount of chromium found in all skin layers after application of chromium chloride decreased with increasing pH due to lower solubility of the salt. The % of chromium found in the recipient phase as chromium(VI) increased with increasing total chromium concentration...... indicating a limited reduction ability of the skin in vitro....

  13. Structural, morphological and optical properties of chromium oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babukutty, Blessy; Parakkal, Fasalurahman; Bhalero, G. M.; Aravind, P. B.; Nair, Swapna S.

    2015-06-01

    Chromium oxide nanoparticles are synthesized by reduction route from chloride precursors with surfactant, trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO). Structural and morphological characterization are analyzed using X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Transmission Electron micrographs show that the average grain size lies in the range 5nm to 10nm. Optical characterization has been done by UV-VIS spectrophotometer. Distinct optical absorptions of Cr3+ ions show hinting towards the presence of Cr2O3. Presence of oxygen is also confirmed from Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) studies.

  14. Structural, morphological and optical properties of chromium oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babukutty, Blessy; Parakkal, Fasalurahman; Nair, Swapna S., E-mail: swapna.s.nair@gmail.com [School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Department of Physics, Central University of Kerala, Kasaragod 671314 (India); Bhalero, G. M. [UGC-DAE, IGCAR, Kalpakkam, TamilNadu (India); Aravind, P. B. [Cochin University of Science and Technology(CUSAT), Cochin (India)

    2015-06-24

    Chromium oxide nanoparticles are synthesized by reduction route from chloride precursors with surfactant, trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO). Structural and morphological characterization are analyzed using X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Transmission Electron micrographs show that the average grain size lies in the range 5nm to 10nm. Optical characterization has been done by UV-VIS spectrophotometer. Distinct optical absorptions of Cr{sup 3+} ions show hinting towards the presence of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Presence of oxygen is also confirmed from Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) studies.

  15. Structural, morphological and optical properties of chromium oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromium oxide nanoparticles are synthesized by reduction route from chloride precursors with surfactant, trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO). Structural and morphological characterization are analyzed using X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Transmission Electron micrographs show that the average grain size lies in the range 5nm to 10nm. Optical characterization has been done by UV-VIS spectrophotometer. Distinct optical absorptions of Cr3+ ions show hinting towards the presence of Cr2O3. Presence of oxygen is also confirmed from Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) studies

  16. Chromium in aqueous nitrate plutonium process streams: Corrosion of 316 stainless steel and chromium speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was undertaken to determine if chromium(+6) could exist in plutonium process solutions under normal operating conditions. Four individual reactions were studied: the rate of dissolution of stainless steel, which is the principal source of chromium in process solutions; the rate of oxidation of chromium(+3) to chromium(+6) by nitric acid; and the reduction of chromium(+6) back to chromium(+3) by reaction with stainless steel and with oxalic acid. The stainless steel corrosion rate was found to increase with increasing nitric acid concentration, increasing hydrofluoric acid concentration, and increasing temperature. Oxidation of chromium(+3) to chromium(+6) was negligible at room temperature and only became significant in hot concentrated nitric acid. The rate of reduction of chromium(+6) back to chromium(+3) by reaction with stainless steel or oxalic acid was found to be much greater than the rate of the reverse oxidation reaction. Based on these findings and taking into account normal operating conditions, it was determined that although there would be considerable chromium in plutonium process streams it would rarely be found in the (+6) oxidation state and would not exist in the (+6) state in the final process waste solutions

  17. Alkane dehydrogenation over supported chromium oxide catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Schoonheydt, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The dehydrogenation of alkanes over supported chromium oxide catalysts in the absence of oxygen is of high interest for the industrial production of propene and isobutene. In this review, a critical overview is given of the current knowledge nowadays available about chromium-based dehydrogenation ca

  18. Application of the Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy for Chromium Effect Investigation in Binary Fe-Cr Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sojak, S.; Krsjak, V.; Slugen, V.; Stancek, S.; Petriska, M.; Vitazek, K.; Stacho, M. [Department of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Slovak University of Technology, Ilkovicova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2008-07-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) is one of the non-destructive techniques applied with advantage for evaluation of the radiation treated materials microstructure. In this work, the PAS was used for study of different Fe-Cr alloys implanted by ions of helium. Investigation was focused on the chromium effect and the radiation defects resistance. In particular, the vacancy type defects (mono-vacancies, vacancy clusters) have been studied. The results show that the specific content of chromium has important influence on the size and distribution of induced defects. (authors)

  19. Evaluation of NaX and NaY packed beds for chromium uptake from multicomponent solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Angélica Simões Dornellas de Barros

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the removal of chromium from Cr/Ca/Mg/K and Cr/Ca/Mg/K/Na solutions was investigated in NaX and NaY packed beds. The breakthrough curves presented some overshooting phenomena where chromium ions displaced the previous exchanged cations. Length of unused bed, overall mass transfer coefficient, operational ratio and dimensionless variance were obtained. According to such mass transfer parameters it was concluded that the chromium uptake is influenced by the competition and interaction of the entering ions. Such influences were verified through some differences in the dynamic selectivity obtained for each system. NaY seemed to have a higher affinity towards Cr3+ and its sites were more efficiently used in the ion exchange process.

  20. Studies on chromium(III removal from aqueous solutions by sorption on Sphagnum moss peat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MATEI MACOVEANU

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Batch sorption experiments were performed for the removal of chromium(III ions from aqueous solutions using Romanian Sphagnum moss peat (untreated and treated with NaCl solution as sorbent. In order to establish the best conditions for the sorption of chromium(III, the influence of initial pH, contact time, peat dose and metal ion concentration was investigated. The Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin–Radushkevich models were applied to describe the sorption isotherms and to calculate its constants. The experimental data fitted well to the Langmuir model with a maximum sorption capacity of 18.6 mg Cr(III/g of peat. The mean free energy of sorption suggests that the binding of Cr(III on peat occurred through an ion exchange mechanism. The kinetic data evaluated by pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order kinetic models showed that the sorption of chromium onto the peat followed a pseudo-second order rate equation. The chromium(III could be easily eluted from the loaded peat using 0.10 M HCl and the peat may be reused in several sorption/desorption cycles. The experimental results indicated the potential of Sphagnum moss peat for removal of Cr(III from wastewaters.

  1. Neutron scattering and models: Chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Differential neutron elastic-scattering cross sections of elemental chromium are measured from 4.5 ∼ 10 MeV in steps of ∼ 0.5 MeV and at ≥ 40 scattering angles distributed between ∼ 17 degree--160 degree. Concurrently differential cross sections for the inelastic neutron excitation of the yrast 2+ (1.434 MeV) level in d52Cr are determined. In addition, broad inelastically-scattered neutron groups are observed corresponding to composite excitation of levels up to ∼ 5.5 MeV in the various chromium isotopes. These experimental results are combined with low-energy values previously reported from this laboratory, with recent ∼ 8 → 15 MeV data measured at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt and with a 21.6 MeV result from the literature to form an extensive neutron-scattering data base which is interpreted in the context of spherical-optical and coupled-channels (rotational and vibrational) models. These models reasonably describe the observables but indicate rather large energy-dependent parameter trends at low energies similar to those previously reported near the peak of the So strength function in studies at this laboratory. The physical implications of the measurements and models are discussed including deformation, coupling, dispersive and asymmetry effects

  2. KINETIC STUDY OF CHROMIUM (III – PVP COMPLEX BY USING RADIO-TRACER TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayan Das

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Complexes of metal ions with organic ligands play an important role in many fields of our life. These metal complexes are widely used in medical diagnosis and therapeutic analysis. These complexes are very familiar with radioisotopes exerting precise chemical and physical properties. Generally, chromium is considered as toxic and essential element depending on its oxidation state in the biological system. Here the dynamic dissociation constants of the complex of Chromium (III with excellent biocompatible polymer PVP (poly-N-vinylpyrolidone have been determined. The dissociation constants will give us the idea about the stability of the said complexes. As PVP is a good ligand with different metals within a wide range of pH. Ingestion techniques of radioisotopes to the biological systems may be nicely polished with the knowledge of this kinetic study with chromium. Green methods have been carried out during the whole period of the experiments to maintain the environmental friendly aspects.

  3. Chromium containing silica: effect of ultrasonic and purification methods on color products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromium containing silica has numerous applications, such as: fiber-optics, luminescent materials, catalysts and pigments. In paint and ceramic pigments, chromate and dichromate ions, and silica are largely used. In this paper, it has been investigated the effect of pH, heating methods, and ultrasonic stirring on chromium oxidation states coprecipitated with silica. The material has been obtained from the coprecipitation of an aqueous diluted sodium silicate solution and acid chromium nitrate solution, purified by extractions and dialysis, and dried with microwave oven. Products have been characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, infrared vibrational spectroscopy and nitrogem adsorption isotherm (BET). Coprecipitates are non cristalline and the specific surface area value for sample obtained by conventional heating is smaller than the one for sample obtained by ultrasonic method. It is possible to obtain silica with different colors from blue due to the Cr(III), to yellow due to the Cr (VI), depending on the precipitation, purification and drying methods. (author)

  4. Chemical Stability of Chromium Carbide and Chromium Nitride Powders Compared with Chromium Metal in Synthetic Biological Solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Tao Jiang; Inger Odnevall Wallinder; Gunilla Herting

    2012-01-01

    Chromium carbide (Cr-C) and chromium nitride (Cr-N) powders were compared with a chromium metal powder (Cr-metal) to evaluate their chemical stability in solution. All three powders were exposed in five different synthetic biological solutions of varying pH and chemical composition simulating selected human exposure conditions. Characterisation of the powders, using GI-XRD, revealed that the predominant bulk crystalline phases were Cr7C3 and Cr2N for Cr-C and Cr-N respectively. The outermost ...

  5. Low-chromium reduced-activation chromium-tungsten steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Maziasz, P.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Bainitic microstructures formed during continuous cooling can differ from classical upper and lower bainite formed during isothermal transformation. Two types of non-classical bainite were observed depending on the cooling rate: carbide-free acicular bainite at rapid cooling rates and granular bainite at slower cooling rates. The Charpy impact toughness of the acicular ferrite was found to be considerably better than for the granular bainite. It was postulated that alloying to improve the hardenability of the steel would promote the formation of acicular bainite, just as increasing the cooling rate does. To test this, chromium and tungsten were added to the 2 1/4Cr-2W and 2 1/4Cr-2WV steel compositions to increase their hardenability, and the microstructures and mechanical properties were examined.

  6. Bainitic chromium-tungsten steels with 3 pct chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous work on 3Cr-1.5MoV (nominally Fe-3Cr-2.5Mo-0.25V-0.1C), 2.25Cr-2W (Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.1C), and 2.25Cr-2WV (Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.25V-0.1C) steels indicated that the impact toughness of these steels depended on the microstructure of the bainite formed during continuous cooling from the austenization temperature. Microstructures formed during continuous cooling can differ from classical upper and lower bainite formed during isothermal transformation. Two types of nonclassical microstructures were observed depending on the cooling rate: carbide-free acicular bainite at rapid cooling rates and granular bainite at slower cooling rates. The Charpy impact toughness of the acicular ferrite was considerably better than for the granular bainite. It was postulated that alloying to improve the hardenability of the steel would promote the formation of acicular bainite, just as increasing the cooling rate does. To test this, chromium and tungsten were added to the 2.25Cr-2W and 2.25Cr-2WV steel compositions to increase their hardenability. Charpy testing indicated that the new 3Cr-W and 3Cr-WV steels had improved impact toughness, as demonstrated by lower ductile-brittle transition temperatures and higher upper-shelf energies. This improvement occurred with less tempering than was necessary to achieve similar toughness for the 2.25Cr steels and for high-chromium (9 to 12 pct Cr) Cr-W and Cr-Mo steels

  7. Structural effects of metallic chromium on its electrochemical behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VELIMIR RADMILOVIC

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Chromium dissolution in aqueous sulfuric acid solution of pH 1 was studied electrochemically on chromium electrodes with different crystallographic structures. A slow potentiodynamic method was used for the electrochemical measurements in deaerated solutions (purgedwith nitrogen,while the Cr(III ions in the solution after the corrosion were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. Three electrode materials with a very dominant crystallite orientation resembling single crystal structures (i.e., 111 and 110 confirmed by the electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD, were used in the experiments. The (111 structures were somewhat more active electrochemically (both anodic and cathodic than the (110 structure. However, Cr electrochemically deposited in standard plating bath, assumed from literature data to has also the (111 structure, was more than 4 times active for anodic dissolution and, by the same number, less active for cathodic hydrogen evolution. The concentrations of Cr(III ions determined in the solution after definite times of corrosion of all the materials showed almost two times larger dissolution rates than observed electrochemically by three different electrochemical methods (Wagner–Traud, Stern–Geary, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. This is explained by the simultaneous occurrence of potential independent chemical dissolution of Cr, by a direct reaction of metallic Cr with H2O molecules, proposed a long time ago by Kolotyrkin and coworkers.

  8. Reproductive toxicological aspects of chromium in males

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To expand our present understanding of the effects of chromium on male fertility a number of studies were designed to achieve this through the use of chromium intoxicated experimental animals and through investigation of sexual hormones and sperm quality in welders. Also in view of the lack of an experimental model for effects of noxious substance on the epididymal spermatozoa the main objectives of the series of studies reviewed here were: A. To establish a model for evaluation of epididymal sperm count and motility in the rat. B. To investigate and compare the effects of tri- and hexavalent chromium on epididymal spermatozoa. Further to describe the effects of low-dose long-time exposure of rats to the most toxicological interesting chromium oxidative state - hexavalent chromium. C. By the use of autoradiography and γ-countinuing to expand the present knowledge on the distribution of chromium in the body with special reference to the male reproductive organs. D. To describe the effects of exposure to hexavalent chromium in welding fume on levels of sexual hormones and semen parameters in welders. (EG)

  9. Optical and structural properties of chromium impurities in niobium–gallium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the optical properties of the gallium–niobium oxide doped with chromium ions were investigated. The samples were obtained by wet chemical and solid-state methods, investigated by X-ray powder diffraction and the data were refined by Rietveld methods. The morphology was determined by scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. The photoluminescence, excitation and photoacoustic measurements showed broad and intense bands in the red region of the spectrum, associated with energy transitions of chromium ions in octahedral sites. From the optical spectra and using the crystal field theory, the energy parameters were obtained. - Highlights: • Cr3+ doped niobium–gallium oxides were prepared by solid state reaction and wet chemical method. • We show bands in red region. • Spectra are associated to Cr3+ ions in octahedral sites

  10. Spectroscopic and biological activity studies of the chromium-binding peptide EEEEGDD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Hirohumi; Kandadi, Machender R; Panzhinskiy, Evgeniy; Belmore, Kenneth; Deng, Ge; Love, Ebony; Robertson, Preshus M; Commodore, Juliette J; Cassady, Carolyn J; Nair, Sreejayan; Vincent, John B

    2016-06-01

    While trivalent chromium has been shown at high doses to have pharmacological effects improving insulin resistance in rodent models of insulin resistance, the mechanism of action of chromium at a molecular level is not known. The chromium-binding and transport agent low-molecular-weight chromium-binding substance (LMWCr) has been proposed to be the biologically active form of chromium. LMWCr has recently been shown to be comprised of a heptapeptide of the sequence EEEEDGG. The binding of Cr(3+) to this heptapeptide has been examined. Mass spectrometric and a variety of spectroscopic studies have shown that multiple chromic ions bind to the peptide in an octahedral fashion through carboxylate groups and potentially small anionic ligands such as oxide and hydroxide. A complex of Cr and the peptide when administered intravenously to mice is able to decrease area under the curve in intravenous glucose tolerance tests. It can also restore insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in myotubes rendered insulin resistant by treating them with a high-glucose media. PMID:26898644

  11. REMOVAL OF CHROMIUM FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTION USING LOCALLY AVAILABLE INEXPENSIVE TARO AND WATER HYACINTH AS BIOSORBENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahjalal Khandaker

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation, locally available and inexpensive Taro and Water Hyacinth were used as biosorbents to remove chromium from synthetic wastewater. The removal of this metal ion from water in the batch and column method have been studied and discussed. Adsorption kinetics and equilibrium isotherm studies were also carried out. The material exhibits good adsorption capacity and the data follow both Freundlich and Langmuir models. Scanning Electronic Microscopic image was also used to understand the surface characteristics of biosorbent before and after biosorption studies. Effects of various factors such as pH, adsorbent dose, adsorbate initial concentration, particle size etc. were analyzed. The initial concentrations of chromium were considered 5-30mgL-1 in batch method and only 4mgL-1 in column method. The maximum chromium adsorbed was 1.64 mgg-1 and 4.44 mgg-1 in Batch method and 1.15 mgg-1 and 0.75 mgg-1 in Column method. Batch and Column desorption and regeneration studies were conducted. Column desorption studies indicated that both of these biosorbents could be reused for removing heavy metals. Results of the laboratory experiments show that the performance of Taro and Water Hyacinth prove that they can effectively be used as low cost biosorbents for the removal of chromium from wastewater.KEYWORDS:   adsorption; chromium removal; Taro; water hyacinth; batch method; column studies

  12. Removal and Recovery of Chromium from Solutions Simulating Tannery Wastewater by Strong Acid Cation Exchanger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulten Cetin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The process in this study was conducted on removal of chromium(III in a solution simulating a typical spent chrome tanning bath by the resin having matrix of styrene-divinylbenzene-based macroporous sulphonate, Amberjet 1200Na. The column experiments were carried out with the bed volumes of the resin as 751 mL and 1016 mL for different installation systems of the laboratory-scale pilot plant. The feeding solutions in the bed volumes of 200 and 190 were used for each installation system. The regeneration behaviour of the resin was determined by using reverse regeneration procedure with the solution of hydrogen peroxide in alkaline. The regeneration kinetics of the exhausted resin was examined with a range of the solutions having different concentration series of the alkaline hydrogen peroxide. The solutions of the basic chromium sulphate were recycled for each installation system following the regeneration cycles. The chromium ions in effluent were quantitatively eluted, and satisfactory removal of chromium(III and recovery of chromium(VI were achieved.

  13. Simultaneously Recovering High-Purity Chromium and Removing Organic Pollutants from Tannery Effluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromium pollution is a serious issue because of carcinogenic toxicities of the pollutants and low recovery rate of chromium because of the presence of organic, such as protein and fat. In this work, high recovery rate and high purity of the chromium ion were successfully prepared by the way of acid enzyme, flocculant, and Fenton oxidation. The experiments were characterized by TG, TOC, UV-VIS, and SEM. In the work, the tannery waste chrome liquor was used as experimental material. The results showed that the percentage of reduction of TOC in the tannery waste chrome liquor by method of Fenton oxidation, acid enzyme, and the flocculant was 71.15%, 65.26%, and 22.05%, respectively. Therefore, the organism content of chrome tanning waste liquid was greatly reduced through the pretreatment. And the application experiment showed that the properties and grain surface and fibers of the tanned leather with commercial chromium powder and chrome tanning agent prepared from the chromium waste liquid treated with Fenton are nearly the same.

  14. Synthesis of Chromium (Ⅲ) 5-aminosalicylate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wei; HAO Er-jun; JIANG Yu-qin

    2004-01-01

    As we all known that diabetes is a chronic disease with major health consequences.Research has revealed that the occurrence of diabetes have great thing to do with the chromium deficient. Almost 40 years after the first report of glucose tolerance factor(GTF) [1], no conclusive evidence for an isolable ,biologically active form of chromium exited. Three materials have been proposed to be the biologically active form of chromium: "glucose tolerance factor", chromium Picolinate and low-molecular-weight chromium-binding substance (LWMCr) [2] . So there is potential for the design of new chromium drugs .5-Aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) is identified as an active component in the therapy of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis . The therapeutic action of 5-ASA is believed to be coupled to its ability to act as a free radical scavenger [3-4],acting locally on the inflamed colonic mucosa [5-7]. However, the clinical use of 5-ASA is limited, since orally administered 5-ASA is rapidly and completely absorbed from the upper gastrointestinal tract and therefore the local therapeutic effects of 5-ASA in the colon is hardly expected.In this paper, we report the synthesis of chromium(Ⅲ)5-aminosalicylate from 5-ASA and CrCl3. 6H2O.The synthesis route is as follow:The complex has been characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectra, X-ray powder diffractionand TG-DTA . They indicate that the structure is tris(5-ASA) Chromium . Experiments show that thecomplex has a good activity for supplement tiny dietary chromium, lowering blood glucose levels,lowering serum lipid levels and in creasing lean body mass .

  15. A Study of Chromium Adsorption on Natural Goethite Biomineralized with Iron Bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Zhenya; ZHU Chunshui; HUANG Jiangbo; GONG Wenqi; CHEN Hesheng; MU Shanbin

    2006-01-01

    Goethite, especially biogenic goethite, has high specific surface area and great capacity for the adsorption of many contaminants including metal ions and organic chelates. Chromium is a redox actively toxic metal ion that exists as either CrⅢ or CrⅥ in nature, and as such it is essential to understand its behavior of adsorption on natural goethite mineralized by iron bacteria, as Gallionella and Leptothrix in water body. The adsorption of Cr3+ and CrⅥ on naturally biomineralized goethite is studied in this paper. The results show that both Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isothermal models are able to accurately describe the adsorption of these two ions. Investigation of SEM/EDS,TEM/EDS indicates that the two ions do not adsorb homogeneously on goethite owing to the different microstructures of goethite, and that the microspherical goethite has a greater adsorption capacity for chromium ions than the helical one. XPS data show that redox reaction of chromium on the surface of biomineralized goethite takes place in the adsorption of both Cr3+ and CrⅥ. The CrⅥ adsorbed on biogoethite is much easier to transform into CrⅢ than the oxidization of CrⅢ on the bio-goethite.

  16. Chromium in leather footwear-risk assessment of chromium allergy and dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Strandesen, Maria; Poulsen, Pia B;

    2012-01-01

    Background. Chromium-tanned leather footwear, which releases >3 ppm hexavalent Cr(VI), may pose a risk of sensitizing and eliciting allergic dermatitis. Objectives. To determine the content and potential release of chromium in leather footwear and to discuss the prevention of chromium contact...... allergy and dermatitis. Methods. Sixty pairs of leather shoes, sandals and boots (20 children's, 20 men's, and 20 women's) were purchased in Copenhagen and examined with X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. Chromium was extracted according to the International Standard, ISO 17075. The detection level for Cr......(VI) was 3 ppm. Results. Chromium was identified in 95% of leather footwear products, the median content being 1.7% (range 0-3.3%). No association with store category or footwear category was found. A tendency for there to be a higher chromium content in footwear with high prices was shown (p(trend) = 0...

  17. Characteristics of chromium-allergic dermatitis patients prior to regulatory intervention for chromium in leather

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P; Zachariae, Claus;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chromium-tanned leather articles currently constitute the most important cause of contact allergy to chromium in Denmark. A regulation on the content of hexavalent chromium in leather was adopted in November 2013 by the EU member states. OBJECTIVES: To characterize patients with...... chromium allergy and their disease, to serve as a baseline for future studies on the potential effect of the new regulation on chromium in leather. METHODS: A questionnaire case-control study was performed on 155 dermatitis patients with positive patch test reactions to potassium dichromate and a matched...... control group of 621 dermatitis patients. Comparisons were made by use of a χ(2) -test and the Mann-Whitney U-test. Logistic regression analyses were used to test for associations. RESULTS: Sixty-six per cent of chromium-allergic patients had a positive history of contact dermatitis caused by leather...

  18. Chromium intensification of a processed dental radiograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was undertaken to determine (1) the usefulness of chromium intensifier to improve the diagnostic quality of light radiograph; (2) the effect of chromium intensifier on density contrast; and (3) the effect of various chemical concentrations on density. The following results obtained: 1. CHROMIUM INTENSIFIER is useful for intensifying and improving the diagnostic quality of a light dental radiograph. 2. The degree of intensification can be controlled by varying bleaching time, repeating the processing, varying the proportions of the potassium bicarbonate and hydrochloric acid solutions. 3. The image produced is black and permanent. 4. The intensifier increases density and contrast

  19. Chromium – An essential mineral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merlin D Lindemann

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The status of chromium (Cr is not a new question. Cr is clearly an essential nutrient; this is a position that has been held for over three decades by individual scientists, groups of scientists, and governmental committees. The most uniform response across species with regard to Cr deficiency symptoms that are responsive to Cr supplementation are alterations in glucose metabolism with special reference to peripheral tissue sensitivity to insulin. Because the body’s ability to control blood glucose is critical to many life functions, and loss of ability to adequately control blood glucose can lead to many health debilitations, a consequence of Cr supplementation can be improved health and reproductive outcomes as well as improved survival rate or life span.

  20. Occupational asthma due to chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroyer, C; Dewitte, J D; Bassanets, A; Boutoux, M; Daniel, C; Clavier, J

    1998-01-01

    We describe a 28-year-old subject employed as a roofer in a construction company since the age of 19, who developed work-related symptoms of a cough, shortness of breath, wheezing, rhinitis and headaches. A description of a usual day at work suggested that the symptoms worsened while he was sawing corrugated fiber cement. Baseline spirometry was normal, and there was a mild bronchial hyperresponsiveness to carbachol. A skin patch test to chromium was negative. A specific inhalation challenge showed a boderline fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) after exposure to fiber cement dust. Exposure to nebulization of potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7), at 0.1 mg.ml-1 for 30 min, was followed by an immediate fall by 20% FEV1. Simultaneously, a significant increase in bronchial hyperresponsiveness was demonstrated. PMID:9782225

  1. Chromium isotope uptake in carbonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodler, Alexandra

    Chromium (Cr) is a redox sensitive element potentially capable of tracing fine-scale fluctuations of the oxygenation of Earth’s early surface environments and seawater. The Cr isotope composition of carbonates could perhaps be used as paleo-redox proxy to elucidate changes in the geological past....... Processes that potentially fractionate Cr isotopes, perhaps during deposition, burial and alteration need to be constrained.Previous studies have shown that Cr isotopes are fractionated during oxidative weathering on land, where heavy Cr isotopes are preferentially removed with Cr(VI) while residual soils...... retain an isotopically light Cr signature. Cr(VI) enriched in heavy Cr isotopes is then transported via river waters to the oceans and sequestered into marine sediments. Marine chemical sediments such asbanded iron formations and modern marine carbonates have proven useful in recording the Cr isotope...

  2. AEROSOL BEHAVIOR IN CHROMIUM WASTE INCINERATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suyuan Yu

    2003-01-01

    Cr2O3 is considered as the dominant incineration product during the combustion disposal of chromium waste. A hydrogen/air diffusion flame was employed to simulate the industrial process of incineration. Cr2O3 aerosols were generated inside the flame by the gas phase reaction of chromium and oxygen. Chromium came from the rapid decomposition of chromium hexacarbonyl (Cr(CO)6) at room temperature and was carried into the combustion chamber by hydrogen. Aerosol and clusters can then be easily formed in the flame by nucleation and coagulation. A two dimensional Discrete-Sectional Model (DSM) was adopted to calculate the Cr2O3 aerosol behavior. The experimental measurement method was Dynamic Light Scattering. The numerically predicted results agreed well with those of the experimental measurement. Both results show that the Cr2O3 aerosol size reached about 70 nanometers at the flame top.

  3. Potentiometry: A Chromium (III) -- EDTA Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, J. I.; Howell, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an experiment that involves the preparation of a chromium (III)-EDTA compound, a study of its infrared spectrum, and the potentiometric determination of two successive acid dissociation constants. (Author/GS)

  4. Bioremediation of chromium solutions and chromium containing wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaviya, Piyush; Singh, Asha

    2016-08-01

    Cr(VI) represents a serious threat to human health, living resources and ecological system as it is persistent, carcinogenic and toxic, whereas, Cr(III), another stable oxidation state of Cr, is less toxic and can be readily precipitated out of solution. The conventional methods of Cr(VI) removal from wastewaters comprise of chemical reduction followed by chemical precipitation. However, these methods utilize large amounts of chemicals and generate toxic sludge. This necessitates the need for devising an eco-technological strategy that would use the untapped potential of the biological world for remediation of Cr(VI) containing wastewaters. Among several viable approaches, biotransformation of Cr(VI) to relatively non-toxic Cr(III) by chromium resistant bacteria offers an economical- and environment-friendly option for its detoxification. Various studies on use of Cr(VI) tolerant viable bacterial isolates for treatment of Cr(VI) containing solutions and wastewater have been reported. Therefore, a detailed account of mechanisms and processes involved in bioreduction of Cr(VI) from solutions and wastewaters by bacterial isolates are the focus of this review article in addition to a discussion on toxicity of Cr(VI) on bacterial strains and various factors affecting Cr(VI) bioreduction. PMID:25358056

  5. Removal of High Concentration Chromium by a Foam-separating Technique Using Casein Proteins as a Foaming Reagent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Futoshi

    Foam separation of high concentration chromium in leather tanning wastewater was investigated using casein protein as a foaming reagent5mL of5w/v% ammonium acetate buffer was added to the sample chromium water. After adjusting the pH to 9.0,4g/L concentrations of casein and gelatin solution were added to recovery the coagulating flocs of chromium resulting foam separation. The sample water containing chromium flocs was incased in reactor, then mixed with distilled water and 1mL of ethanol to sum 200mL total. The foam separation was performed at time intervals of 3min with an air flow rate of 300mL/min. With casein reagent, the removal rate of chromium was not influenced by the presence of NaCl, however, the rate decreased tendency using with the use of gelatin. The proposed method, utilizing 4g/L of casein solution with water, was not influenced by the presence of calcium (<34mM), magnesium (<1mM), carbonate (<0.5mM), bicarbonate (<1.2mM) nor sulfate (<350mM) ions, and is ideal for foam separation in chromium concentrations of about 100mgCr/L.

  6. Diminishing Chromium Use on Combined Chromium-Gambier Tanning Process Upon the Characteristics of Tanned Leather

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kasim

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The research was aimed to investigate the influence of minimizing chromium use on combined chromium-gambier process upon the characteristics of tanned leather. At the first stage of tanning process, chromium was used and in the second stage it was replaced by gambier. The raw material used was dried saline-preserved goat skin. The treatments applied on the tanning process were the different concentrations of chromium ranging from the highest level of 6% to the lowest level of 1% which was then re-tanned by using 8% concentration of gambier. The examination parameters included chemical and physical properties as well as visual investigation on the tanned leather in accordance with SNI-06-0463-1989-A. The result showed that the tanning process by using 2% chromium in the first step and 8% gambier in the second step was a treatment combination producing tanned leather that met the standard. The examination on tanned leather resulted from such treatment showed 56.33% rawhide, 17.45% of bound tannin, 31.22% of tanning level, tensile strength 386.30 kg/cm2, flexibility 31.91%, leather width 1.3 mm, density 0.75 g/cm3, the leather was quite elastic with light brownish color. In conclusion, minimizing the use of chromium in the combined tanning process of chromium and gambier can be implemented to the lowest of 2% chromium concentration and 8% gambier in the first and second step, respectively.

  7. Chromium removal through biosorption and bioaccumulation by bacteria from tannery effluents contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Mohammad Zubair [Department of Agricultural Microbiology, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh (India); Ahmad, Shamim [Microbiology Division, Institute of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine, J.N. Medical College, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh (India)

    2011-03-15

    Four bacterial isolates (two resistant and two sensitive to chromium) were isolated from soil contaminated with tannery effluents at Jajmau (Kanpur), India, and were identified by 16S rDNA gene sequencing as Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Exiguobacterium sp., Pantoea sp., and Aeromonas sp. Biosorption of chromium by dried and living biomasses was determined in the resistant and sensitive isolates. The effect of pH, initial metal concentration, and contact time on biosorption was studied. At pH 2.5 the living biomass of chromium resistant isolate Exiguobacterium sp. ZM-2 biosorbed maximum amount of Cr{sup 6+} (29.8 mg/g) whereas the dried biomass of this isolate biosorbed 20.1 mg/g at an initial concentration of 100 mg/L. In case of chromate sensitive isolates, much difference was not observed in biosorption capacities between their dried and living biomasses. The maximum biosorption of Cr{sup 3+} was observed at pH 4.5. However, biosorption was identical in resistant and sensitive isolates. The data on chromium biosorption were analyzed using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm model. The biosorption data of Cr{sup 6+} and Cr{sup 3+} from aqueous solution were better fitted in Langmuir isotherm model compared to Freundlich isotherm model. Metal recovery through desorption was observed better with dried biomasses compared to the living biomasses for both types of chromium ions. Bioaccumulation of chromate was found higher in chromate resistant isolates compared to the chromate sensitive isolates. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed the accumulation of chromium in cytoplasm in the resistant isolates. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Lateral stress evolution in chromium sulfide cermets with varying excess chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petel, O. E.; Appleby-Thomas, G. J.; Wood, D. C.; Capozzi, A.; Nabavi, A.; Goroshin, S.; Frost, D. L.; Hazell, P. J.

    2016-04-01

    The shock response of chromium sulfide-chromium, a cermet of potential interest as a matrix material for ballistic applications, has been investigated at two molar ratios. Using a combustion synthesis technique allowed for control of the molar ratio of the material, which was investigated under near-stoichiometric (cermet) and excess chromium (interpenetrating composite) conditions, representing chromium:sulfur molar ratios of 1.15:1 and 4:1, respectively. The compacts were investigated via the plate-impact technique, which allowed the material to be loaded under a one-dimensional state of strain. Embedded manganin stress gauges were employed to monitor the temporal evolution of longitudinal and lateral components of stress in both materials. Comparison of these two components has allowed assessment of the variation of material shear strength both with impact pressure/strain-rate and time for the two molar ratio conditions. The two materials exhibited identical material strength despite variations in their excess chromium contents.

  9. Wet digestion and differential pulse stripping voltammetry determination of total chromium in the millet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaqin LIU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The chromium content of millet is measured by HNO3-H2O2 digestion and electrochemical method. In the DTPA-HAc-NaAc system, the oxidation peak current of amalgam formed by hexavalent chrome ion is obtained in the plating mercury electrode, and the pre-treatment technology of wet digestion can meet the electrochemical determination. The optimized detection condition of electrochemical method for hexavalent chrome ion is 130 ℃ of digestion solution, 10 mL hydrogen peroxide, 38 mL nitric acid, and neutral of pH. The linear correlation coefficient of electrochemical method is 0.99, and the recovery of standard addition is 90%~110%. This method can be used to trace chromium (Ⅵ determination in millet.

  10. Cadmium and Chromium Toxicity to Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Microcystis aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzelei Rodgher

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The toxicity of cadmium and chromium to Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Microcystis aeruginosa was evaluated through algal growth rate during 96h exposure bioassays. Free metal ion concentrations were obtained using MINEQL+ 4.61 and used for IC50 determination. Metal accumulations by the microorganisms were determined and they were found to be dependent on the concentration of Cd2+ and Cr6+. IC50 for P. subcapitata were 0.60 µmol L-1 free Cd2+ and 20 µmol L-1 free Cr6+, while the IC50 values for M. aeruginosa were 0.01 µmol L-1 Cd2+ and 11.07 µmol L-1 Cr6+ . P. subcapitata accumulated higher metal concentrations (0.001 -0.05 µmol Cd mg-1 dry wt. and 0.001 -0.04 µmol Cr mg-1 dry wt than the cyanobacteria (0.001 -0.01 µmol Cd mg-1 dry wt and 0.001 -0.02 µmol Cr mg-1 dry wt. Cadmium was more toxic than chromium to both the microorganisms.

  11. Assessment of chromium(VI) release from 848 jewellery items by use of a diphenylcarbazide spot test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Johansen, Jeanne D.; Hamann, Dathan;

    2016-01-01

    We recently evaluated and validated a diphenylcarbazide(DPC)-based screening spot test that can detect the release of chromium(VI) ions (≥0.5 ppm) from various metallic items and leather goods (1). We then screened a selection of metal screws, leather shoes, and gloves, as well as 50 earrings, and...

  12. Preconcentration and speciation of chromium(III) in waters by using 5-palmitoyl-8-hydroxyquinoline immobilized on a nonpolar adsorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for the quantitative separation and preconcentration of trace amount Cr(III) in real samples has been developed. It is based on the sorption of Cr(III) ions onto a column of Amberlite XAD-2 resin functionalized with 5-palmitoyl-8-hydroxyquinoline reagent. The resin was used for speciation and preconcentration of chromium because this functionalized resin is selective for Cr(III) ions. The effect of pH, flow-rate, sorption capacity, reusability and effect of various metal cations and salt anions on the sorption on to the resin were investigated. The sorption is quantitative in the pH range of 4.5-7.0, and Cr (III) ion was desorbed by using hydrochloric acid. The amount of metal ion in the eluate was determined by a flame atomic absorption spectrometer. Total chromium was obtained by an efficient reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) by hydroxylamine. The procedure has been applied to the determination and speciation of chromium in lake water, and in the chromium-plating baths. (author)

  13. A chromium nitride/carbon nitride containing graphitic carbon nanocapsule hybrid as a Pt-free electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lu; Wang, Lei; Yu, Peng; Zhao, Dongdong; Tian, Chungui; Feng, He; Ma, Jing; Fu, Honggang

    2015-08-11

    Chromium nitride nanoparticles supported on graphitic carbon nanocapsules containing carbon nitride (CrN/GC) have been synthesized by a solvothermal-assisted ion-exchange route. As a Pt-free catalyst, the CrN/GC hybrid exhibits superior activity, stability, methanol immunity and a dominant 4-electron pathway towards oxygen reduction reaction. PMID:26145711

  14. Accurate definition of structure and laser properties of rhombic chromium containing LiNbGeO5 crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LiNbGeO5 crystals with chromium ions, characterized by optical perfection, were grown by Czochralski method. Their structure was specified. The first experiments on excitation of tunable stimulated emission of their activator in the near IR spectrum region (1.32-1.43μm) at ∼110 K with laser pumping were conducted

  15. Chromium poisoning in (La,Sr)MnO3 cathode: Three-dimensional simulation of a solid oxide fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Kota; Iwai, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Masashi; Saito, Motohiro; Yoshida, Hideo

    2016-09-01

    A three-dimensional numerical model of a single solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) considering chromium poisoning on the cathode side has been developed to investigate the evolution of the SOFC performance over long-term operation. The degradation model applied in the simulation describes the loss of the cathode electrochemical activity as a decrease in the active triple-phase boundary (TPB) length. The calculations are conducted for two types of cell: lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM)/yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)/Ni-YSZ and LSM-YSZ/YSZ/Ni-YSZ. Their electrode microstructures are acquired by imaging with a focused ion beam scanning-electron microscope (FIB-SEM). The simulation results qualitatively reproduce the trends of chromium poisoning reported in the literature. It has been revealed that the performance degradation by chromium is primarily due to an increase in the cathode activation overpotential. In addition, in the LSM-YSZ composite cathode, TPBs in the vicinity of the cathode-electrolyte interface preferentially deteriorate, shifting the active reaction site towards the cathode surface. This also results in an increase in the cathode ohmic loss associated with oxide ion conduction through the YSZ phase. The effects of the cell temperature, the partial pressure of steam at the chromium source, the cathode microstructure, and the cathode thickness on chromium poisoning are also discussed.

  16. Chromium, chromium isotopes and selected trace elements, western Mojave Desert, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izbicki, J.A.; Ball, J.W.; Bullen, T.D.; Sutley, S.J.

    2008-01-01

    Chromium(VI) concentrations in excess of the California Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of 50 ??g/L occur naturally in alkaline, oxic ground-water in alluvial aquifers in the western Mojave Desert, southern California. The highest concentrations were measured in aquifers eroded from mafic rock, but Cr(VI) as high as 27 ??g/L was measured in aquifers eroded from granitic rock. Chromium(VI) concentrations did not exceed 5 ??g/L at pH < 7.5 regardless of geology. ??53Cr values in native ground-water ranged from 0.7 to 5.1??? and values were fractionated relative to the average ??53Cr composition of 0??? in the earth's crust. Positive ??53Cr values of 1.2 and 2.3??? were measured in ground-water recharge areas having low Cr concentrations, consistent with the addition of Cr(VI) that was fractionated on mineral surfaces prior to entering solution. ??53Cr values, although variable, did not consistently increase or decrease with increasing Cr concentrations as ground-water flowed down gradient through more oxic portions of the aquifer. However, increasing ??53Cr values were observed as dissolved O2 concentrations decreased, and Cr(VI) was reduced to Cr(III), and subsequently removed from solution. As a result, the highest ??53Cr values were measured in water from deep wells, and wells in discharge areas near dry lakes at the downgradient end of long flow paths through alluvial aquifers. ??53Cr values at an industrial site overlying mafic alluvium having high natural background Cr(VI) concentrations ranged from -0.1 to 3.2???. Near zero ??53Cr values at the site were the result of anthropogenic Cr. However, mixing with native ground-water and fractionation of Cr within the plume increased ??53Cr values at the site. Although ??53Cr was not necessarily diagnostic of anthropogenic Cr, it was possible to identify the extent of anthropogenic Cr at the site on the basis of the ??53Cr values in conjunction with major-ion data, and the ??18O and ??D composition of water from wells.

  17. REMOVAL OF LEAD AND CHROMIUM FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTION BY BACILLUS CIRCULANS BIOFILM

    OpenAIRE

    A. Khanafari, S. Eshghdoost, A. Mashinchian

    2008-01-01

    The different methods are used for the removal of heavy metals as important contaminants in water and wastewater. Biosorption is an alternative to traditional physicochemical in removing toxic metals from wastewaters and groundwater resources. In this study biosorption of lead and chromium ions from solution was studied using Bacillus circulans isolated from Anzali wetland in batch and biofilter modes and optimum conditions were determined. The experimental results showed 900-950 mg/L and 105...

  18. The enriched chromium neutrino source for GALLEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preparation and study of an intense source of neutrinos in the form of neutron irradiated materials which are enriched in Cr-50 for use in the GALLEX solar neutrino experiment are discussed. Chromyl fluoride gas is enriched in the Cr-50 isotope by gas centrifugation and subsequently converted to a very stable form of chromium oxide. The results of neutron activation analyses of such chromium samples indicate low levels of any long-lived activities, but show that short-lived activities, in particular Na-24, may be of concern. These results show that irradiating chromium oxide enriched in Cr-50 is preferable to irradiating either natural chromium or argon gas as a means of producing a neutrino source to calibrate the GALLEX detector. These results of the impurity level analysis of the enriched chromyl fluoride gas and its conversion to the oxide are also of interest to work in progress by other members of the Collaboration investigating an alternative conversion of the enriched gas to chromium metal. 35 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs

  19. Serum chromium levels in gestational diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P G Sundararaman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To measure serum chromium level in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM from Chennai, South India. Materials and Methods: Thirty women with gestational diabetes, 60 age matched controls. Inclusion criteria: Gestational age 22-28 weeks, age group 20-35 years. Exclusion Criteria: Gestational age beyond 28 weeks, malnutrition or presence of infection. Serum chromium was measured using inductive couple plasma emission spectrometer. Results: Serum chromium levels of women with GDM, 1.59+/-0.02 ng/ml (range: 0.16-4.0 ng/ml were lower than in controls (4.58+/-0.62 ng/ml; range 0.82-5.33 ng/ml (P < 0.001. However, there were no significant differences among cases and controls when subdivided by parity. Conclusions: Women with GDM from a South Indian city had lower levels of serum chromium compared to pregnant women without GDM. Studies may be done whether chromium supplementation is useful in this group of women.

  20. Occupational exposure to chromium(VI compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Skowroń

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the effect of chromium(VI (Cr(VI on human health under conditions of acute and chronic exposure in the workplace. Chromium(VI compounds as carcinogens and/or mutagens pose a direct danger to people exposed to them. If carcinogens cannot be eliminated from the work and living environments, their exposure should be reduced to a minimum. In the European Union the proposed binding occupational exposure limit value (BOELV for chromium(VI of 0.025 mg/m³ is still associated with high cancer risk. Based on the Scientific Commitee of Occupational Exposure Limits (SCOEL document chromium(VI concentrations at 0.025 mg/m³ increases the risk of lung cancer in 2–14 cases per 1000 exposed workers. Exposure to chromium(VI compounds expressed in Cr(VI of 0.01 mg Cr(VI/m3 is responsible for the increased number of lung cancer cases in 1–6 per 1000 people employed in this condition for the whole period of professional activity. Med Pr 2015;66(3:407–427

  1. [Occupational exposure to chromium(VI) compounds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowroń, Jolanta; Konieczko, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the effect of chromium(VI) (Cr(VI)) on human health under conditions of acute and chronic exposure in the workplace. Chromium(VI) compounds as carcinogens and/or mutagens pose a direct danger to people exposed to them. If carcinogens cannot be eliminated from the work and living environments, their exposure should be reduced to a minimum. In the European Union the proposed binding occupational exposure limit value (BOELV) for chromium(VI) of 0.025 mg/m³ is still associated with high cancer risk. Based on the Scientific Commitee of Occupational Exposure Limits (SCOEL) document chromium(VI) concentrations at 0.025 mg/m³ increases the risk of lung cancer in 2-14 cases per 1000 exposed workers. Exposure to chromium(VI) compounds expressed in Cr(VI) of 0.01 mg Cr(VI)/m3; is responsible for the increased number of lung cancer cases in 1-6 per 1000 people employed in this condition for the whole period of professional activity. PMID:26325053

  2. Cycling Performance of the Iron-Chromium Redox Energy Storage System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahn, R. F.; Hagedorn, N. H.; Johnson, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Extended charge-discharge cycling of this electrochemical storage system at 65 C was performed on 14.5 sq cm single cells and a four cell, 867 sq cm bipolar stack. Both the anolyte and catholyte reactant fluids contained 1 molar concentrations of iron and chromium chlorides in hydrochloric acid and were separated by a low-selectivity, cation-exchange membrane. The effect of cycling on the chromium electrode and the cation-exchange membrane was determined. Bismuth and bismuth-lead catalyzed chromium electrodes and a radiation-grafted polyethylene membrane were evaluated by cycling between 5 and 85 percent state-of-charge at 80 mA/sq cm and by periodic charge-discharge polarization measurements to 140 mA/sq cm. Gradual performance losses were observed during cycling but were recoverable by completely discharging the system. Good scale-up to the 867 sq cm stack was achieved. The only difference appeared to be an unexplained resistive-type loss which resulted in a 75 percent W-hr efficiency (at 80 mA/sq cm versus 81 percent for the 14.5 sq cm cell). A new rebalance cell was developed to maintain reactant ionic balance. The cell successfully reduced ferric ions in the iron reactant stream to ferrous ions while chloride ions were oxidized to chlorine gas.

  3. Flashlamp-pumped lasing of chromium-doped GSG garnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The implications for the practical use of chromium:GSGG in lamp-pumped tunable lasers are discussed in this paper. The authors report here some major improvements in the performance of the flashlamp-pumped chromium:GSGG laser

  4. Surface Chemistry and Spectroscopy of Chromium in Inorganic Oxides

    OpenAIRE

    Weckhuysen, B. M.; Wachs, I.E.; Schoonheydt, R. A.

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on the surface chemistry and spectroscopy of chromium in inorganic oxides. Characterization of the molecular structures of chromium; Mechanics of hydrogenation-dehydrogenation reactions; Mobility and reactivity on oxidic surfaces.

  5. Identification of autoionizing states of atomic chromium for resonance photo-ionization at the ISOLDE-RILIS

    OpenAIRE

    Goodacre, T Day; Chrysalidis, K; Fedorovc, D; Fedosseev, V. N.; Marsh, B A; Molkanov, P; Rossel, R.E.; Rothe, S.; Seiffert, C.

    2015-01-01

    The resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) is the principal ion source of the ISOLDE radioactive beam facility based at CERN. Using the method of in-source resonance ionization spectroscopy, an optimal three-step, three-resonance photo-ionization scheme has been developed for chromium. The scheme uses an ionizing transition to one of the 14 newly observed autoionizing states. This work increases the range of ISOLDE-RILIS ionized beams to 32 chemical elements. Details of the spectroscop...

  6. Application of zeolite-Arthrobacter viscosus system for the removal of heavy metal and dye : chromium and azure B

    OpenAIRE

    Rosales, E.; Pazos, M.; Sanromán, M. A.; Tavares, M. T.

    2012-01-01

    A hybrid system combining the ion-exchange properties of a NaY zeolite and the characteristics of the bacterium Arthrobacter viscosus was investigated to treat polluted effluents with dye and toxic metals. In this study, the dye and the metal ion employed were a thiazine dye, Azure B, and chromium (VI), respectively. Initially, the removal of dye by the zeolite was tested. The analysis of dye equilibrium isotherms data was done using Langmuir, Freundlich, Sips and Redlich–Peterson models. Red...

  7. Local structure of chromium incorporated into electrodeposited nickel hydroxide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have utilized X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopy to investigate the local structure of Cr (III) and Cr (VI) ions incorporated into α-Ni(OH)2 films. The films were prepared by cathodic co-deposition of Cr and Ni at a constant current from aqueous solutions of nickel nitrate, chromium nitrate and potassium chromate. XAFS measurements show that in films formed from 0.1 M Ni(NO3)2 + 0.0005 M Cr(NO3)3, Cr (III) is incorporated into the Ni lattice sites of alpha-Ni(OH)2. In contrast, co-deposition from a 0.1 M Ni(NO3)2 + 0.001 M K2CrO4 solution results in Cr (VI) occupying the interlamellar sites of the brucite structure. (au)

  8. Studies of Some Novel Chromium Pyridine Dicarboxylate Complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Chauhan Jayprakash S; Patel Rameshchandra P; Pandya Ajit V

    2014-01-01

    Chromium pyridine di-carboxylate complexes are synthesized from Chromium (III) with pyridine 2, 6- dicarboxylic acid, pyridine 2, 3 and 2, 5- dicarboxylic acids. Chromium forms colored complexes. Chromium (III) forms a violate complex with pyridine 2, 6- dicarboxylic acid and purple violate complex with pyridine 2, 3 and 2, 5- dicarboxylic acids. The job’s method indicates metal ligand ratio to be 1:2. The interpretation of UV-VIS spectra indicates octahedral geometry and IR spectra give clue...

  9. Operation and routine maintenance of the automatic monitor for hexavalent chromium in Columbia River water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alton, D.W.

    1969-01-20

    A Technicon Autoanalyzer for hexavalent chromium has been installed at the Automatic Columbia River Monitoring Station located along the west bank of the Columbia River. The sample water is delivered to the building by a deep well jet pump for continuous monitoring for gross gamma, {sup 131}I, hexavalent chromium, and for emergency water samples. An alarm system indicates unusually high activity levels. The unit was installed to detect hexavalent chromium which reaches the river as a result of cooling water treatment for the production reactors upstream, and via groundwater as a result of waste disposal practices at the 300 Area. The detection of the Cr{sup +6} ion is based upon its reaction with diphenylcarbazide to produce a reddish-violet color in slightly acid solutions. The degree of color is indicated by light absorption in the calorimeter which is plotted on the recorder and is directly related to the concentration of hexavalent chromium in the river water. Although designed to operate continuously and automatically, routine inspection is required to assure proper functioning of all components and to perform the required maintenance and pick up of recorded data. The following data is to provide general information relevant to the operation and maintenance of the system.

  10. Removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution by agricultural waste biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study adsorption of Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions onto different agricultural wastes, viz., sugarcane bagasse, maize corn cob and Jatropha oil cake under various experimental conditions has been studied. Effects of adsorbent dosage, Cr(VI) concentration, pH and contact time on the adsorption of hexavalent chromium were investigated. The concentration of chromium in the test solution was determined spectrophotometrically. FT-IR spectra of the adsorbents (before use and after exhaustion) were recorded to explore number and position of the functional groups available for the binding of chromium ions on to studied adsorbents. SEMs of the adsorbents were recorded to explore the morphology of the studied adsorbents. Maximum adsorption was observed in the acidic medium at pH 2 with a contact time of 60 min at 250 rpm stirring speed. Jatropha oil cake had better adsorption capacity than sugarcane bagasse and maize corn cob under identical experimental conditions. The applicability of the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms was tested. The results showed that studied adsorbents can be an attractive low cost alternative for the treatment of wastewaters in batched or stirred mode reactors containing lower concentrations of chromium

  11. Concentration profiles and electrochemical properties of chromium and nickel implanted iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentration profiles of chromium and nickel implanted in pure iron were measured with a secondary ion mass analyzer. The electrochemical properties of implanted iron were investigated by means of a cyclic voltammetry in 0.5 M acetate buffer solution (pH = 5.0 +- 0.1). Chromium, nickel and argon ion implantations have been carried out with doses of 1 x 1016 -- 1 x 1017 ions/cm2 at an energy of 150 keV. The target temperature during ion implantation rised to --1800C from room temperature by the heating effect of ion beam itself. The profile of Cr implanted in pure iron has two peaks; the first peak near the surface and the second peak near the depth predicted by the range theory. However, the first peak was not found in the specimen 1 st-implanted with Ni. The electrochemical properties of Cr implanted iron approach to that of Fe-18% Cr bulk alloy (SUS 430), as the dose increases. The polarization curve of Cr implanted iron with 1 x 1017 ions/cm2 is almost the same as that of SUS 430. The polarization curve of Ni and Cr implanted iron is similar to that of Fe-18%Cr-8%Ni bulk alloy (SUS 304) after annealing at --3000C for 20 min. These results show that Cr and Ni implanted surface layer is useful for the improvement of corrosion resistance of iron. (author)

  12. Synthesis and characterization of polyaniline/zeolite nanocomposite for the removal of chromium(VI from aqueous solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulsalam A. Shyaa

    2015-01-01

    Batch adsorption experiments were used to investigate the effect of various experimental parameters on the equilibrium adsorption of chromium(VI on PANI/zeolite nanocomposite. The adsorption characteristics of the composite toward Cr(VI in dilute aqueous solution were followed spectrophotometrically. The effect of contact time, size of the sorbent and the concentration of Cr(VI in solution on the metal uptake behavior of the composite were studied. It has been observed that the capacity of chromium adsorption on PANI/zeolite increases with initial metal concentration, the metal ion adsorption on surfactant is well represented by the Freundlich isotherm.

  13. Determination of chromium combined with DNA, RNA and proteins in chromium-rich brewer's yeast by NAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The content of chromium in the DNA, RNA and protein fractions separated from chromium-rich and normal brewer's yeast was determined by neutron activation analysis (NAA). Our results show that the extracted relative amounts and concentrations of DNA, RNA and proteins have no significant difference for two types of yeast, but the chromium content in DNA, RNA and proteins fractions extracted from the chromium-rich yeast are substantially higher than those from the normal. In addition, the concentration of chromium in DNA is much higher than that in RNA and proteins. It is evident that the inorganic chromium compounds can enter the yeast cell during the yeast cultivation in the chromium-containing culture medium and are converted into organic chromium species, which are combined with DNA, RNA and proteins. (author)

  14. Chromium allergy and dermatitis: prevalence and main findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Johansen, Jeanne D.; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl;

    2015-01-01

    The history of chromium as an allergen goes back more than a century, and includesan interventional success with national legislation that led to significant changes inthe epidemiology of chromium allergy in construction workers. The 2015 EU Leather Regulation once again put a focus on chromium...

  15. 21 CFR 73.1326 - Chromium hydroxide green.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium hydroxide green. 73.1326 Section 73.1326... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1326 Chromium hydroxide green. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive chromium hydroxide green is principally hydrated chromic sesquioxide...

  16. 21 CFR 73.2326 - Chromium hydroxide green.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium hydroxide green. 73.2326 Section 73.2326... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2326 Chromium hydroxide green. (a) Identity and specifications.The color additive chromium hydroxide green shall conform in identity and specifications to...

  17. Thermodynamic properties of chromium bearing slags and minerals. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao Yanping; Holappa, L.

    1996-12-31

    In this report, the thermodynamic properties of chromium bearing slags and minerals were reviewed based on the available information in the literature. It includes the analysing methods for oxidation state of chromium in slags, oxidation state of chromium and activities of chromium oxides in slags and minerals. The phase diagrams of chromium oxide systems and chromium distributions between slag and metal phases are also covered ill this review. Concerning the analysing methods, it was found that most of the available approaches are limited to iron free slag systems and the sample preparation is very sensitive to the analysing results. In silicate slags under reducing atmosphere, divalent and trivalent chromium co-exist in the slags. It is agreed that the fraction of divalent chromium to total chromium increases with higher temperature, lower slag basicity and oxygen potential. For the slags under oxidising atmosphere, trivalent, pentavalent and hexavalent states were reported to be stable. The activities of CrO and CrO{sub 1.5} were concluded to have positive deviation from ideal solution. Slag basicity has a positive effect and temperature has a negative effect on the activities of chromium oxides. The phase diagrams of the Cr-O, binary, and ternary chromium containing oxide systems have been examined systematically. The analysis shows that the data on the quaternary and quinary systems are insufficient, and require further investigation. The most important features of the chromium containing silicate slags are the large miscibility gaps and the stability of the chromite spinel. (orig.) (76 refs.)

  18. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining...

  19. Hexavalent and trivalent chromium in leather: What should be done?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretto, Angelo

    2015-11-01

    Trivalent chromium compounds are used for leather tanning, and chromium may be released during use of leather goods. In certain instances, small amounts of hexavalent chromium can be formed and released. Both trivalent and hexavalent chromium can elicit allergic skin reaction in chromium sensitised subjects, the latter being significantly more potent. Induction of sensitisation only occurs after exposure to hexavalent chromium. A minority of subjects are sensitised to chromium, and in a fraction of these subjects allergic skin reaction have been described after wearing leather shoes or, less frequently, other leather goods. The evidence that in all these cases the reaction is related to hexavalent chromium is not always strong. The content of hexavalent chromium in leather is regulated in European Union, but rate of release rather than content is relevant for allergic skin reaction. The role of trivalent chromium appear much less relevant if at all. Modern tanning procedure do not pose significant risk due to either hexavalent or trivalent chromium. Dismissing bad quality and worn-off leather goods is relevant in reducing or eliminating the skin reaction. It should also be pointed out that shoe components or substances other than chromium in leather may cause allergic/irritative skin reactions. PMID:26361854

  20. SAFETY OF TRIVALENT CHROMIUM COMPLEXES USED IN NUTRIENT SUPPLEMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toxicity studies regarding trivalent chromium have often been completed under conditions that are not designed to reflect conditions that would be encountered under normal physiological conditions. We have shown that the incorporation of chromium into tissues of rats from chromium chloride and chro...

  1. Strategies for chromium bioremediation of tannery effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Satyendra Kumar; Tripathi, Manikant; Srinath, Thiruneelakantan

    2012-01-01

    Bioremediation offers the possibility of using living organisms (bacteria, fungi, algae,or plants), but primarily microorganisms, to degrade or remove environmental contaminants, and transform them into nontoxic or less-toxic forms. The major advantages of bioremediation over conventional physicochemical and biological treatment methods include low cost, good efficiency, minimization of chemicals, reduced quantity of secondary sludge, regeneration of cell biomass, and the possibility of recover-ing pollutant metals. Leather industries, which extensively employ chromium compounds in the tanning process, discharge spent-chromium-laden effluent into nearby water bodies. Worldwide, chromium is known to be one of the most common inorganic contaminants of groundwater at pollutant hazardous sites. Hexavalent chromium poses a health risk to all forms of life. Bioremediation of chromium extant in tannery waste involves different strategies that include biosorption, bioaccumulation,bioreduction, and immobilization of biomaterial(s). Biosorption is a nondirected physiochemical interaction that occurs between metal species and the cellular components of biological species. It is metabolism-dependent when living biomass is employed, and metabolism-independent in dead cell biomass. Dead cell biomass is much more effective than living cell biomass at biosorping heavy metals, including chromium. Bioaccumulation is a metabolically active process in living organisms that works through adsorption, intracellular accumulation, and bioprecipitation mechanisms. In bioreduction processes, microorganisms alter the oxidation/reduction state of toxic metals through direct or indirect biological and chemical process(es).Bioreduction of Cr6+ to Cr3+ not only decreases the chromium toxicity to living organisms, but also helps precipitate chromium at a neutral pH for further physical removal,thus offering promise as a bioremediation strategy. However, biosorption, bioaccumulation, and

  2. Collisional properties of trapped cold chromium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Pavlovich, Z; Côté, R; Sadeghpour, H R; Pavlovic, Zoran; Roos, Bjoern O.; Côté, Robin

    2004-01-01

    We report on calculations of the elastic cross section and thermalization rate for collision between two maximally spin-polarized chromium atoms in the cold and ultracold regimes, relevant to buffer-gas and magneto-optical cooling of chromium atoms. We calculate ab initio potential energy curves for Cr2 and the van der Waals coefficient C6, and construct interaction potentials between two colliding Cr atoms. We explore the effect of shape resonances on elastic cross section, and find that they dramatically affect the thermalization rate. Our calculated value for the s-wave scattering length is compared in magnitude with a recent measurement at ultracold temperatures.

  3. Bis(toluene)chromium(I) [1,2,5]thiadiazolo[3,4-c][1,2,5]thiadiazolidyl and [1,2,5]thiadiazolo[3,4-b]pyrazinidyl: new heterospin (S1 = S2 = ½) radical-ion salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, Nikolay A; Pushkarevsky, Nikolay A; Suturina, Elizaveta A; Chulanova, Elena A; Kuratieva, Natalia V; Bogomyakov, Artem S; Irtegova, Irina G; Vasilieva, Nadezhda V; Konstantinova, Lidia S; Gritsan, Nina P; Rakitin, Oleg A; Ovcharenko, Victor I; Konchenko, Sergey N; Zibarev, Andrey V

    2013-06-01

    Bis(toluene)chromium(0), Cr(0)(η(6)-C7H8)2 (3), readily reduced [1,2,5]thiadiazolo[3,4-c][1,2,5]thiadiazole (1) and [1,2,5]thiadiazolo[3,4-b]pyrazine (2) in a tetrahydrofuran solvent with the formation of heterospin, S1 = S2 = ½, radical-ion salts [3](+)[1](-) (4) and [3](+)[2](-) (5) isolated in high yields. The salts 4 and 5 were characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD), solution and solid-state electron paramagnetic resonance, and magnetic susceptibility measurements in the temperature range 2-300 K. Despite the formal similarity of the salts, their crystal structures were very different and, in contrast to 4, in 5 anions were disordered. For the XRD structures of the salts, parameters of the Heisenberg spin Hamiltonian were calculated using the CASSCF/NEVPT2 and broken-symmetry density functional theory approaches, and the complex magnetic motifs featuring the dominance of antiferromagnetic (AF) interactions were revealed. The experimental χT temperature dependences of the salts were simulated using the Van Vleck formula and a diagonalization of the matrix of the Heisenberg spin Hamiltonian for the clusters of 12 paramagnetic species with periodic boundary conditions. According to the calculations and χT temperature dependence simulation, a simplified magnetic model can be suggested for the salt 4 with AF interactions between the anions ([1](-)···[1](-), J1 = -5.77 cm(-1)) and anions and cations ([1](-)···[3](+), J2 = -0.84 cm(-1)). The magnetic structure of the salt 5 is much more complex and can be characterized by AF interactions between the anions, [2](-)···[2](-), and by both AF and ferromagnetic (FM) interactions between the anions and cations, [2](-)···[3](+). The contribution from FM interactions to the magnetic properties of the salt 5 is in qualitative agreement with the positive value of the Weiss constant Θ (0.4 K), whereas for salt 4, the constant is negative (-7.1 K). PMID:23687983

  4. Use of Ethylenediaminetetraacetic Acid as a Scavenger for Chromium from “Wet Blue” Leather Waste: Thermodynamic and Kinetics Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José E. Resende

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One serious consequence of the current consumer society is the transformation of the environment into a waste receptacle arising from human activities. Because of the potential toxic effects of chromium solid waste containing this metal there are grounds for serious concern for the tanning and leather processing industry. The application of tannery waste as organic fertilizer has led to extensive contamination by chromium in agricultural areas and may cause the accumulation of this metal in soils and plants. This work evaluated the extraction of Cr+3 and Cr+6 contained in solid waste from the leather industry through density functional theory (DFT calculations. The Gibbs free energy calculations reveal that the chelator ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA forms more stable complexes with metal ions of chromium compared with the structures of the complexes [Cr(NTA(H2O2] and [Cr-collagen], the latter used to simulate the protein bound chrome leather.

  5. Electrodeposition of black chromium thin films from trivalent chromium-ionic liquid solution

    OpenAIRE

    Eugénio, S.; Vilar, Rui; C. M. Rangel; Baskaran, I.

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, black chromium thin films were electrodeposited from a solution of 1-butyl-3- methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIm][BF4] ionic liquid containing trivalent chromium (Cr(III)). Homogeneous and well adherent coatings have been obtained on nickel, copper and stainless steel substrates. The nucleation and growth of the films were investigated by cyclic voltammetry and current-density/time transient techniques. SEM/EDS, XPS and XRD were used to study the morphology, chem...

  6. Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium by Viable Cells of Chromium Resistant Bacteria Isolated from Chromite Mining Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Satarupa Dey; Baishali Pandit; A. K. Paul

    2014-01-01

    Environmental contamination of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is of serious concern for its toxicity as well as mutagenic and carcinogenic effects. Bacterial chromate reduction is a cost-effective technology for detoxification as well as removal of Cr(VI) from polluted environment. Chromium resistant and reducing bacteria, belonging to Arthrobacter, Pseudomonas, and Corynebacterium isolated from chromite mine overburden and seepage samples of Orissa, India, were found to tolerate 12–18 mM Cr(VI...

  7. Reduction of Chromium-VI by Chromium Resistant Lactobacilli: A Prospective Bacterium for Bioremediation

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Ritesh; Sinha, Vartika; Kannan, Ambrose; Upreti, Raj K.

    2012-01-01

    Chromium is a toxic heavy metal, which primarily exists in two inorganic forms, Cr (VI) and Cr (III). Highly soluble hexavalent chromium is carcinogenic due to its oxidizing nature. It is well established that the intestinal bacteria including Lactobacilli have regulatory effect on intestinal homeostasis and a breakdown in the relationship between intestinal cells and bacteria results in the manifestation of gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. In this study Cr (VI) resistance was developed in La...

  8. Mechanical properties of metal-ceramic systems from nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Mirković Nemanja

    2007-01-01

    Background/Aim. Metal-ceramic bond strength and alloys' elastic modulus clearly determine the potential of alloy application, because the ceramic integrity during mastication depends on these two characteristics. The aim of this study was to evaluate metal-ceramic bond strength and elastic modulus of cobalt-chromium alloys in making porcelainfused- to-metal restorations, regarding the application of the most frequent nickel-chromium alloy. Methods. The research was performed as an experimenta...

  9. Chromium-manganese steels of transition class

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Possibilities of nickel replacing by manganese and preparing the same level of mechanical properties as in chromium-nickel steels due to γ-α transformations taking place during property tests, are studied. Chromium-manganese steels with the composition of 0.05-0.1%C, 13-14%Cr, 5.0-6.5%Mn, 0.2-0.5%Si, 0.03-0.13%N, 0.05-0.01%Al and additionally alloyed 0.3-2.0%Cu, 0.05-0.6%V, 0.3-1.0%Mo, 0.02-0.05%Ca in various combinations have been melted. It is shown, that using alloying and heat treatment one can control the phase composition, austenite resistance to martensite transformation during loading and mechanical properties of chromium-manganese steels of the transition class. The use of the phase transformation in the process of testing determines the level of mechanical properties. The optimum development of the transformation accompanied by a sufficient development of processes of hardening and microstresses relaxation permits to obtain a high level of mechanical properties: σsub(B)=1500 MPa, σsub(0.2)-1130MPa, delta=15%, psi=37%, asub(H)=1000 kJ/msup(2) which exceeds the level for chromium-nickel steels. Steels have a lower cost and do not require any complecated heat treatment regime

  10. Defect structure of electrodeposited chromium layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy was applied to study the effects of pre-treatment and composition of substrates on the quality and defect structure of electrodeposited thick chromium coatings. The results show that both parameters are important, and a scenario is proposed why the mechanically polished substrate gives more defective film than the electro polished one.

  11. Defect structure of electrodeposited chromium layers

    CERN Document Server

    Marek, T; Vertes, A; El-Sharif, M; McDougall, J; Chisolm, C U

    2000-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy was applied to study the effects of pre-treatment and composition of substrates on the quality and defect structure of electrodeposited thick chromium coatings. The results show that both parameters are important, and a scenario is proposed why the mechanically polished substrate gives more defective film than the electro polished one.

  12. Flashlamp-pumped lasing of chromium: GSGG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasing action in chromium-doped gadolinium scandium gallium garnet (Cr:GSGG) is well established for both CW/sup (1)/ and flashlamp/sup (2)/ pumping. This paper describes an investigation of flashlamp-pumped Cr:GSGG lasers and indicates some of the factors which limit performance

  13. Trace Elements Excluding Iron - Chromium and Zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    The percentage of middle-aged US adults who are participating in leisure-time physical activities is growing. These adults also seek credible information about specific supplements that the public press routinely describes as necessary to enable increases in physical performance. Chromium and zinc a...

  14. HEALTH ASSESSMENT DOCUMENT FOR CHROMIUM. FINAL REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The full document represents a comprehensive data base that considers all sources of chromium in the environment, the likelihood for its exposure to humans, and the possible consequences to man and lower organisms from its absorption. This information is integrated into a format ...

  15. 29 CFR 1926.1126 - Chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR 1926.51 Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide washing facilities in conformance with 29 CFR 1926.51. Eating and drinking areas provided by the employer shall also... requirements of the Hazard Communication Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1200. (3) Cleaning and replacement. (i)...

  16. 29 CFR 1910.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR 1910.141. Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide washing facilities in conformance with 29 CFR 1910.141. Eating and drinking areas provided by the employer shall also... requirements of the Hazard Communication Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1200. (3) Cleaning and replacement. (i)...

  17. 29 CFR 1915.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR 1910.141. Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide washing facilities in conformance with 29 CFR 1915.97. Eating and drinking areas provided by the employer shall also... requirements of the Hazard Communication Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1200. (3) Cleaning and replacement. (i)...

  18. Chromium(III) and chromium(VI) surface treated galvanized steel for outdoor constructions: environmental aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, David; Hedberg, Yolanda; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger

    2010-06-01

    The long-term degradation of chromium(III) (Zn-Cr(III)) and chromium(VI)-based (Zn-Cr(VI)) surface treatments on galvanized steel and their capacities to hinder the release of zinc induced by atmospheric corrosion at nonsheltered urban and marine exposure conditions for 2 years are investigated. Compared to bare zinc sheet, both surface treatments revealed high corrosion protection abilities and capacities to hinder the release of zinc, still evident after 2 years of exposure. The zinc barrier properties of the thinner Zn-Cr(VI) (10 nm) treatment were during the first 100 days of urban exposure slightly improved compared with Zn-Cr(III) (35 nm). However, their long-term protection capacities were inverse. Released concentrations of total chromium correspond to annual release rates less than 0.000032 (Zn-Cr(III)) and 0.00014 g Cr m(-2) yr(-1) (Zn-Cr(VI)) after 1 year of urban exposure. Aging by indoor storage of the surface treatments prior to outdoor exposure reduced the released Cr concentrations from the surface treatments. No Cr(VI) was released from the aged surfaces but from the freshly exposed Zn-Cr(VI). Marine exposure conditions resulted in a faster reduction of chromate to chromium(III)oxide compared with urban conditions, and a significantly lower amount of both chromium(III) and chromium(VI) released from Zn-Cr(VI) at the marine site compared with the urban site. PMID:20462267

  19. Biological groundwater treatment for chromium removal at low hexavalent chromium concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamais, Daniel; Noutsopoulos, Constantinos; Kavallari, Ioanna; Nyktari, Eleni; Kaldis, Apostolos; Panousi, Eleni; Nikitopoulos, George; Antoniou, Kornilia; Nasioka, Maria

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this work is to develop and evaluate biological groundwater treatment systems that will achieve hexavalent chromium reduction and total chromium removal from groundwater at hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) groundwater concentrations in the 0-200 μg/L range. Three lab-scale units operated, as sequencing batch reactors (SBR) under aerobic, anaerobic and anaerobic-aerobic conditions. All systems received groundwater with a Cr(VI) content of 200 μg/L. In order to support biological growth, groundwater was supplemented with milk, liquid cheese whey or a mixture of sugar and milk to achieve a COD concentration of 200 mg/L. The results demonstrate that a fully anaerobic system or an anaerobic-aerobic system dosed with simple or complex external organic carbon sources can lead to practically complete Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(III). The temperature dependency of maximum Cr(VI) removal rates can be described by the Arrhenius relationship. Total chromium removal in the biological treatment systems was not complete because a significant portion of Cr(III) remained in solution. An integrated system comprising of an anaerobic SBR followed by a sand filter achieved more than 95% total chromium removal thus resulting in average effluent total and dissolved chromium concentrations of 7 μg/L and 3 μg/L, respectively. PMID:26971177

  20. Nephrotoxic and hepatotoxic effects of chromium compounds in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laborda, R.; Diaz-Mayans, J.; Nunez, A.

    1986-03-01

    The nephrotoxic, hepatotoxic and cardiotoxic actions of hexavalent chromium compounds, as well as their effects on lung, blood and circulation may contribute to the fatal outcome of chromium intoxication. Although trivalent chromium have been regarded as relatively biologically inert, there are a few salts of chromium III that have been found to be carcinogenic when inhaled, ingested or brought in contact with the tissues. Sensitive persons and industry workers have been subjects of dermatitis, respiratory tract injuries and digestive ulcers due to chromium compounds. In this work, the authors have studied the effect of trivalent and hexavalent chromium compounds on rats measuring the transaminases (GOT and GPT), urea and creatinine levels in serum of chromium poisoned animals at different times.

  1. A Kinetic Model of Chromium in a Flame

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Chromium has been identified as a carcinogenic metal.Incineration is the useful method for disposal of toxic chromium hazard waste and a chromium kinetic model in a flame is very important to study chromium oxidation.Chromium chemical kinetics over a range of temperatures of a hydrogen/air flame is proposed.Nine chromium compounds and fifty-eight reversible chemical reactions were considered The forward reaction rates are calculated based on the molecular collision approach for unknown ones and Arrhenius's Law for known ones.The backward reaction rates were calculated according to forward reaction rates, the equilibrium constants and chemical thermodynamics.It is verified by several equilibrium cases and is tested by a hydrogen/air diffusion flame.The results show that the kinetic model could be used in cases in which the chromium kinetics play an important role in a flame

  2. The Chromium is an essential element in the human

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chromium is an essential element for human and animals, because it a preponderant function in the insulin metabolism as a glucose tolerance factor (GTF). The deficiency of chromium engenders a deterioration in the glucose metabolism due to bad efficiency of insulin. Because the importance of this element an exhaustive reference review was made and this presents some studies realized in laboratory animals and in human beings where it is prove with resuits the effect of chromium over the improvement of patients with non-insulin dependant diabetes. Three substances are presented as chromium active biological forms: a material rich in chromium known as glucose tolerance factor, chromium picolinate and a substance of low molecular weight LMWCr in its forms of apo and holo that contains chromium and it links the insulin receptor and improves its activity. Also this paper presents information about the condition of diabetes in Costa Rica. (Author)

  3. The soda-ash roasting of chromite ore processing residue for the reclamation of chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, M. P.; Tathavadkar, V. D.; Calvert, C. C.; Jha, A.

    2001-12-01

    Sodium chromate is produced via the soda-ash roasting of chromite ore with sodium carbonate. After the reaction, nearly 15 pct of the chromium oxide remains unreacted and ends up in the waste stream, for landfills. In recent years, the concern over environmental pollution from hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) from the waste residue has become a major problem for the chromium chemical industry. The main purpose of this investigation is to recover chromium oxide present in the waste residue as sodium chromate. Cr2O3 in the residue is distributed between the two spinel solid solutions, Mg(Al,Cr)2O4 and γ-Fe2O3. The residue from the sodium chromate production process was analyzed both physically and chemically. The compositions of the mineral phases were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The influence of alkali addition on the overall reaction rate is examined. The kinetics of the chromium extraction reaction resulting from the residue of the soda-ash roasting process under an oxidizing atmosphere is also investigated. It is shown that the experimental results for the roasting reaction can be best described by the Ginstling and Brounshtein (GB) equation for diffusion-controlled kinetics. The apparent activation energy for the roasting reaction was calculated to be between 85 and 90 kJ·mol-1 in the temperature range 1223 to 1473 K. The kinetics of leaching of Cr3+ ions using the aqueous phase from the process residue is also studied by treating the waste into acid solutions with different concentrations.

  4. Liquid-liquid extraction of chromium (VI) from sulfuric acid solutions using tri-n-dodecylamine/kerosene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extraction of chromium (VI) from sulfuric acid solutions with tri-n-dodecylamine containing octanol-1 as a modifier in kerosene was investigated. All parameters influencing the extraction of chromium (VI) (time of agitation, concentrations of chromium (VI), sulfuric acid, tri-n-dodecylamine and temperature) were studied. Forst of all, tri-n-dodecylamine reacts with sulfuric acid to form tri-n-dodecylamine sulfate and bisulfate salts, then, dichromate ions is extracted by amine bisulfate. The mathematical treatment of the obtained date enabled us to calculate the formation of equilibrium constant of (TDAH)2SO4 TDAHHSO4 and (TDAH)2 Cγ2O7 at 25 Centigrade and have been found to be K1=109.642(14/mol4), K2= 10-0.899(L/mol) and Kex 1010.55 respectively. Stripping of more than 99% of chromium (VI) from the organic phase of tri-n-dodecylamine/kerosene can be easily achieved in two stages using 0.05 M sodium carbonate solution. The synergistic effect of tri-n-butylphosphate and tri-n-octylphosphine oxide on the extraction of chromium (VI) were also studied. (author)

  5. Reaction of chromium(VI) with glutathione or with hydrogen peroxide: identification of reactive intermediates and their role in chromium(VI)-induced DNA damage.

    OpenAIRE

    Aiyar, J; Berkovits, H J; Floyd, R A; Wetterhahn, K E

    1991-01-01

    The types of reactive intermediates generated upon reduction of chromium(VI) by glutathione or hydrogen peroxide and the resulting DNA damage have been determined. In vitro, reaction of chromium(VI) with glutathione led to formation of two chromium(V) complexes and the glutathione thiyl radical. When chromium(VI) was reacted with DNA in the presence of glutathione, chromium-DNA adducts were obtained, with no DNA strand breakage. The level of chromium-DNA adduct formation correlated with chrom...

  6. Adsorption of Chromium(VI from Aqueous Solutions by Coffee Polyphenol-Formaldehyde/Acetaldehyde Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khudbudin Mulani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Removal of chromium(VI from wastewater is essential as it is toxic. Thus, removal of chromium(VI was performed using coffee polyphenol-formaldehyde/acetaldehyde resins as adsorbents. Adsorbent resins were prepared by condensation of decaffeinated coffee powder with formaldehyde/acetaldehyde and used for the removal of Cr(VI ions from aqueous solutions. A simple and sensitive solid phase extraction procedure was applied for the determination of chromium at trace levels by spectroscopic method using 1,5-diphenylcarbazide reagent. The adsorption of Cr(VI on the coffee polyphenol-formaldehyde/acetaldehyde resins was monitored by FTIR and EDX analysis. The metal adsorption parameters such as contact time, pH, Cr(VI ion concentration, and adsorbent dose were investigated. For Cr(VI, the maximum adsorption capacity of coffee polyphenol-formaldehyde resins was 98% at pH 2. The experimental results showed that Cr(VI bound strongly with coffee polyphenol-formaldehyde/acetaldehyde resins and utilization of resins could be improved greatly by reuse.

  7. Cr3+ NMR for Multiferroic Chromium spinel ZnCr2Se4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sejun; Kwon, Sangil; Lee, Soonchil; Khim, Seunghyun; Bhoi, Dilip Kumar; Kim, Kee Hoon

    Multiferroic systems including ZnCr2Se4, the chromium spinel with helical spin structure, have been in huge interest for decades due to its physical variety and applicability. In the temperature range between 21K and 80K, this material shows negative thermal expansion. Due to the bond frustration, the spins of the chromium ions order helically below the transition temperature, 21K, though the exchange constant tends to make a ferro-order. The anomalous 1storder-like magnetic transition is yet clarified and still an interesting topic. To probe microscopic origin of these features, we measured zero-field NMR of Cr3+ ions having nuclear spin 3/2. Six peaks were observed revealing Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance(NQR) and anisotropic hyperfine field at chromium sites. The NQR spectrum reveals that the structure is highly distorted below the magnetic transition temperature where the normal Jahn-Teller distortion is absent. Temperature dependence of the spectrum is also measured to obtain the magnetization as a function of temperature.

  8. Design and performance of chromium mist generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirgar Aram

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromium mist generator is an essential tool for conducting researches and making science-based recommendations to evaluate air pollution and its control systems. The purpose of this research was to design and construct a homogenous chromium mist generator and the study of some effective factors including sampling height and distances between samplers in side-by-side sampling on chromium mist sampling method. A mist generator was constructed, using a chromium electroplating bath in pilot scale. Concentration of CrO3 and sulfuric acid in plating solution was 125 g L-1 and 1.25 g L-1, respectively. In order to create permanent air sampling locations, a Plexiglas cylindrical chamber (75 cm height, 55 cm i.d was installed the bath overhead. Sixty holes were produced on the chamber in 3 rows (each 20. The distance between rows and holes was 15 and 7.5 cm, respectively. Homogeneity and effective factors were studied via side-by-side air sampling method. So, 48 clusters of samples were collected on polyvinyl chloride (PVC filters housed in sampling cassettes. Cassettes were located in 35, 50, and 65 cm above the solution surface with less than 7.5 and/or 7.5-15 cm distance between heads. All samples were analyzed according to the NIOSH method 7600. According to the ANOVA test, no significant differences were observed between different sampling locations in side-by-side sampling (P=0.82 and between sampling heights and different samplers distances (P=0.86 and 0.86, respectively. However, there were notable differences between means of coefficient of variations (CV in various heights and distances. It is concluded that the most chromium mist homogeneity could be obtained at height 50 cm from the bath solution surface and samplers distance of < 7.5 cm.

  9. Mössbauer study of the iron atom state in modified chromium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarevskii, S. I.; Eremin, V. V.; Panchuk, V. V.; Semenov, V. G.; Osmolovsky, M. G.

    2016-01-01

    Powders of modified chromium dioxide produced by the hydrothermal method were studied using 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy at a temperature of 298 K. The content of the modifier, i.e., 57Fe compound, was varied from 2 to 10 mmol/mol Cr at a Sb content of 2.2 and 10 mmol/mol Cr. It was shown that, independently of concentrations, Fe3+ ions are distributed between three magnetic solid solutions (sextets): based on CrO2 (bulk material and iron-enriched surface layer), based on Cr2O3, and surface β-CrOOH (doublet). In this case, chromium atoms were not substituted in the CrSbO4 nucleation (12 nm in size) phase with an accuracy up to the Mössbauer factor. It was assumed that the powder coercivity, in addition to the size factor, is controlled by the iron concentration in the CrO2 surface layer.

  10. Using microalgae scenedesmus obliquus in the removal of chromium present in plating wastewaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumping wastewaters from plating industry with a high content in chromium is a potential hazard for people and environment. It is known that some metals, including the heavy metals, at low concentrations participate in different metabolic routes, but at high concentration are toxic for many living organisms. Some microorganism taking the heavy metals from the environment are capable of concentrating and accumulating large quantities of them in different citiplasmatic structures with no-toxic effects. Microalgaehave affinity by the polyvalent metals making possible their use as depollutant agent in waters that contains dissolved metallic ions as alternative methods when others methods of recycle are unusable. In this report a chromium removal study from a plating wastewater, using scenedesmus obliquus culture was made. The removal efficiency of Cr (VI) was 12% and Cr (III) was 27% and for condition of algae's immobilization removal of Cr (III) was 95%. (Author) 19 refs

  11. Removal of hexavalent chromium by new quaternized crosslinked poly(4-vinylpyridines)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New quaternized crosslinked poly(4-vinylpyridines) prepared by nucleophilic substitution reactions of 4-vinylpyridine: divinylbenzene copolymers of gel and porous structure with halogenated compounds such as benzyl chloride and 2-chloracetone, were used to remove Cr(VI) from the aqueous solution. Batch adsorption studies were carried out to determine the effect of the initial concentration of Cr(VI), pH, temperature and the presence of sulfate anions. The process was found to be pH and concentration dependent. The adsorption capacities increase with the increase of the initial concentration of Cr(VI) and both resins exhibited the degrees of usage of the exchange capacities higher than 90% and good efficiency in the chromium removal. Equilibrium modeling of the process of Cr(VI) removal was carried out by using the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The experimental data obeyed these isotherm models. The thermodynamic parameters (free energy change ΔG, enthalpy change ΔS and entropy change ΔH) for the adsorption have been evaluated and therefore, it was showed the spontaneous and endothermic process of the adsorption of Cr(VI) on the pyridine resins. In the competitive adsorption studies, chromate/sulfate revealed the selectivity of the pyridine adsorbents towards chromium ions. At acidic pH the synthesized pyridine resins offer much greater chromate removal capacities compared to alkaline pH. In the competitive adsorption studies, chromate/sulfate revealed the selectivity of the pyridine adsorbents towards chromium ions due to the formation a sandwich arrangement with the chromium anion and functional groups attached to the quaternary nitrogen atom.

  12. Chromium supplementation improved post-stroke brain infarction and hyperglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Ying; Mao, Frank Chiahung; Liu, Chia-Hsin; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Lai, Nai-Wei; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2016-04-01

    Hyperglycemia is common after acute stroke and is associated with a worse outcome of stroke. Thus, a better understanding of stress hyperglycemia is helpful to the prevention and therapeutic treatment of stroke. Chromium is an essential nutrient required for optimal insulin activity and normal carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Beyond its nutritional effects, dietary supplement of chromium causes beneficial outcomes against several diseases, in particular diabetes-associated complications. In this study, we investigated whether post-stroke hyperglycemia involved chromium dynamic mobilization in a rat model of permanent focal cerebral ischemia and whether dietary supplement of chromium improved post-stroke injury and alterations. Stroke rats developed brain infarction, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance. Post-stroke hyperglycemia was accompanied by elevated secretion of counter-regulatory hormones including glucagon, corticosterone, and norepinephrine, decreased insulin signaling in skeletal muscles, and increased hepatic gluconeogenesis. Correlation studies revealed that counter-regulatory hormone secretion showed a positive correlation with chromium loss and blood glucose increased together with chromium loss. Daily chromium supplementation increased tissue chromium levels, attenuated brain infarction, improved hyperglycemia, and decreased plasma levels of glucagon and corticosterone in stroke rats. Our findings suggest that stroke rats show disturbance of tissue chromium homeostasis with a net loss through urinary excretion and chromium mobilization and loss might be an alternative mechanism responsible for post-stroke hyperglycemia. PMID:26477944

  13. Efficacy of mangrove leaf powder for bioremediation of chromium (VI) from aqueous solutions: kinetic and thermodynamic evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathish, Thadikamala; Vinithkumar, N. V.; Dharani, G.; Kirubagaran, R.

    2014-03-01

    Biosorption of heavy metals by bio-materials has been posited as a potential alternative to the existing physicochemical technologies for detoxification and recovery of toxic and valuable metals from wastewaters. In this context, the role of mangrove leaf powder (MLP) as biosorbent for chromium removal was investigated. In the present study, the effect of process parameters such as particle size, solution pH, initial concentration of Cr(VI) ion and adsorbent dose on chromium removal by MLP was investigated. The maximum sorption was observed at particle size 0.5 mm and pH 2.0. The adsorption data follow the pseudo second-order kinetics model. The isotherms denote that Langmuir model is the best fitted than Freundlich model. The maximum adsorption capacity (Q 0) of 60.24 mg/g of Cr(VI) at 30 min on MLP was determined using the Langmuir model. The adsorption isotherm model indicates that the chromium is adsorbing as monolayer on the surface of MLP with heterogeneous energetic distribution of active sites. Various thermodynamic parameters, such as Gibb's free energy (∆G °), enthalpy (∆H °) and entropy (∆S °) have been calculated. The thermodynamic data revealed that the adsorption of chromium ions onto MLP is endothermic in nature and a spontaneous process. The results of the present study suggest that MLP is an effective bioremediation measure for removal of high concentration of Cr(VI) in waste waters.

  14. Selective extraction of chromium (VI) from multicomponent acidic solutions by emulsion liquid membranes using tributhylphosphate as carrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The facilitated extraction of Cr(VI) through an emulsion liquid membrane (ELM) was investigated, using tributyl phosphate (TBP) as mobile carrier. The emulsion liquid membrane phase consists of kerosene as diluent, TBP as carrier, SPAN 80 as surfactant and (NH4)2CO3 solution as stripping phase. The extraction of chromium (VI) has been studied under various experimental conditions and have been determined the influences of surfactant concentration, extractant concentration, stripping solution base concentration, mixing speed, phase ratio, treatment ratio, chromium (VI) and HCl concentrations of the feed solution. It was observed that the extraction rate of Cr(VI) was affected by changes of surfactant concentration, extractant concentration, stripping solution base concentration, and mixing speed. The results obtained showed that by appropriate selection of the extraction and stability conditions, nearly all of chromium (VI) ions present in the feed solution were extracted within 2-4 min. The separation factors of chromium (VI) with respect to cobalt, nickel, copper, cadmium and zinc ions, based on initial feed concentration, have experimentally determined.

  15. Incorporation of chromium into TiO2 nanopowders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Nanopowders of TiO2:Cr with different amount of Cr dopant were obtained by flame spray synthesis, FSS. • Increase in the optical absorption and a shift of the absorption edge were observed upon Cr doping. • HERFD-XANES measurements indicated that the average valence state of titanium ions was preserved. • Increasing magnetic susceptibility of a paramagnetic character was observed upon Cr doping. - Abstract: The paper reports on the results of a study of optical, electronic and magnetic properties of TiO2 nanopowders doped with Cr ions. Diffused reflectance spectra reveal an increase in the optical absorption and a shift of the absorption edge towards lower energies upon Cr doping. Direct information on the Ti electronic state and the symmetry of its nearest environment is obtained from XANES Ti K-edge spectra. Magnetic behaviour is probed by means of the temperature dependence of DC magnetic susceptibility. Increasing magnetic susceptibility of a paramagnetic character is observed upon increasing chromium doping. The Curie constant of TiO2:10 at.% Cr sample (0.12 emu K/mol Oe) is lower than that expected for Cr3+ (0.1875 emu K/mol Oe) possibly due to the appearance of Cr4+ or the presence of the orbital contribution to the magnetic moment

  16. Elementary surface processes during reactive magnetron sputtering of chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The elementary surface processes occurring on chromium targets exposed to reactive plasmas have been mimicked in beam experiments by using quantified fluxes of Ar ions (400–800 eV) and oxygen atoms and molecules. For this, quartz crystal microbalances were previously coated with Cr thin films by means of high-power pulsed magnetron sputtering. The measured growth and etching rates were fitted by flux balance equations, which provided sputter yields of around 0.05 for the compound phase and a sticking coefficient of O2 of 0.38 on the bare Cr surface. Further fitted parameters were the oxygen implantation efficiency and the density of oxidation sites at the surface. The increase in site density with a factor 4 at early phases of reactive sputtering is identified as a relevant mechanism of Cr oxidation. This ion-enhanced oxygen uptake can be attributed to Cr surface roughening and knock-on implantation of oxygen atoms deeper into the target. This work, besides providing fundamental data to control oxidation state of Cr targets, shows that the extended Berg's model constitutes a robust set of rate equations suitable to describe reactive magnetron sputtering of metals

  17. Removal of Hexavalent Chromium from Aqueous Solutions Using Magnetic Nanoparticles Coated with Alumina and Modified by Cetyl Trimethyl Ammonium Bromide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Malakootian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The development of an effective method regarding chromium removal from the environment is of great importance. Therefore, the present study aimed to examiner magnetic nanoparticles coated with alumina modified by Cetyl Trimethyl Ammonium Bromide (CTAB in the removal of Cr6+ through magnetic solid phase extraction method. Materials & Methods: At first, iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized, coated with alumina, modified with CTAB and characterized with suitable instruments. The factors affecting the process of chromium removal were investigated, including the concentration of CTAB, the pH, the amount of nanoparticles, the sample volume, a proper eluent, the adsorption and desorption time, and the effect of interfering ions. Moreover, the chromium concentration was determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometric (FAAS technique. The adsorption isotherm, adsorption capacity, and recoverability of the adsorbent were further examined. Results: The modified magnetic nanoparticles were demonstrated to be homogeneous, spherical, with a size lower than 20 nanometer having a magnetic property. The optimal conditions for chromium removal entailed 7*10-6 mol/L concentration of CTAB, pH range of 6-8, 0.1 g of the nanoparticles, 10 mL volume of the chromium sample (5 μg mL-1, nitric acid 2 M as a suitable eluent, 15 minutes of adsorption and desorption, and no interference of interfering ions in the process of chromium separation. The process efficiency under optimal conditions was determined to be over 95%, which this process followed the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The adsorption capacity proved to be 23.8 mg/g. Reusing after four times of adsorbent recovering was effective in the chromium removal (80%. The method accuracy for five measurement times was 4.155% and the method’s LOD was 0.081 mg/L. Conclusion: The method enjoys the benefits of convenient preparation of the adsorbent, high selectivity, high accuracy, short process

  18. Cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy causes metal accumulation and metallothionein up-regulation in rat liver and kidney

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Stig Storgaard; Danscher, Gorm; Stoltenberg, Meredin; Larsen, Agnete; Mygind, Tina; Bruun, Jens M; Kemp, Kaare; Søballe, Kjeld

    2007-01-01

    Cobalt-chromium-molybdenum (CoCrMo) metal-on-metal hip prosthesis has had a revival due to their excellent wear properties. However, particulate wear debris and metal ions liberated from the CoCrMo alloys might cause carcinogenicity, hypersensitivity, local and general tissue toxicity, genotoxicity...... metallohionein I/II were elevated in liver tissue. The present data do not tell whether kidney and liver are the primary target organs or what possible toxicological effect the different metal ions might have, but they show that metal ions are liberated from CoCrMo alloys that are not subjected to mechanical...

  19. Femtosecond laser surface structuring and oxidation of chromium thin coatings: Black chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotsedi, L., E-mail: Kotsedi@tlabs.ac.za [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Nuru, Z.Y. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Mthunzi, P. [National Laser Centre, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, 0001 Pretoria (South Africa); Muller, T.F.G. [University of the Western Cape, Physics Department, Bellville, 7535 Cape Town (South Africa); Eaton, S.M. [Physics Department, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Julies, B. [University of the Western Cape, Physics Department, Bellville, 7535 Cape Town (South Africa); Manikandan, E. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Ramponi, R. [Physics Department, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Maaza, M. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa)

    2014-12-01

    Highlights: • Oxidation of the chromium thin film to chromium oxide by femtosecond laser with a fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm. • Solar absorber from chromium oxide that low percentage reflectance. • Femtosecond laser oxidation, with a de-focused laser. • Chromium oxide formation by femtosecond laser in normal ambient. - Abstract: In view of their potential applications as selective solar absorbers, chromium coatings on float glass substrates were nano/micro structured by femtosecond laser in air. Raman and X-rays diffraction investigations confirmed the formation of an ultra-porous α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer at the surface; higher is the input laser power, enhanced is the crystallinity of the α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer. The α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer with the Cr underneath it in addition to the photo-induced porosity acted as a classical ceramic–metal nano-composite making the reflectance to decrease significantly within the spectral range of 190–1100 nm. The average reflectance decreased from 70 to 2%.

  20. Femtosecond laser surface structuring and oxidation of chromium thin coatings: Black chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Oxidation of the chromium thin film to chromium oxide by femtosecond laser with a fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm. • Solar absorber from chromium oxide that low percentage reflectance. • Femtosecond laser oxidation, with a de-focused laser. • Chromium oxide formation by femtosecond laser in normal ambient. - Abstract: In view of their potential applications as selective solar absorbers, chromium coatings on float glass substrates were nano/micro structured by femtosecond laser in air. Raman and X-rays diffraction investigations confirmed the formation of an ultra-porous α-Cr2O3 layer at the surface; higher is the input laser power, enhanced is the crystallinity of the α-Cr2O3 layer. The α-Cr2O3 layer with the Cr underneath it in addition to the photo-induced porosity acted as a classical ceramic–metal nano-composite making the reflectance to decrease significantly within the spectral range of 190–1100 nm. The average reflectance decreased from 70 to 2%

  1. Production of basic chromium sulfate by using recovered chromium from ashes of thermally treated leather.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmer, Aline; Nunes, Keila Guerra Pacheco; Gutterres, Mariliz; Marcílio, Nilson Romeu

    2010-04-15

    Leather wastes tanned with chromium are generated during the production process of leather, hence the wastes from hand crafted goods and footwear industries are a serious environmental problem. The thermal treatment of leather wastes can be one of the treatment options because the wastes are rich in chromium and can be used as a raw material for sodium chromate production and further to obtain several chromium compounds. The objective of this study was to utilize the chromium from leather wastes via basic chromium sulfate production to be subsequently applied in a hide tanning. The obtained results have shown that this is the first successful attempt to achieve desired base properties of the product. The result was achieved when the following conditions were applied: a molar ratio between sodium sulfite and sodium dichromate equal to 6; reaction time equal to 5 min before addition of sulfuric acid; pH of sodium dichromate solution equal to 2. Summarizing, there is an opportunity to utilize the dangerous wastes and reused them in the production scheme by minimizing or annulling the environmental impact and to attend a sustainable process development concept. PMID:20031309

  2. A novel hydrolysis method to synthesize chromium hydroxide nanoparticles and its catalytic effect in the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Synthesis of Cr(OH)3 nanoparticles in Cr3+–F− aqueous solution. ► The F− ion tailors coagulated materials, Cr(OH)3 nanoparticles are obtained. ► Adding nanosized Cr(OH)3, AP thermal decomposition temperature decreases to 200 °C. ► The nanosized Cr(OH)3 catalyzes NH3 oxidation, accelerating AP thermal decomposition. - Abstract: A procedure for the preparation of spherical Cr(OH)3 nanoparticles was developed based on the aging of chromium nitrate aqueous solutions in the presence of sodium fluoride, urea, and polyvinylpyrrolidone. Using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy, the morphological characteristics of Cr(OH)3 were controlled by altering the molar ratio of fluoride ion to chromium ion, as well as the initial pH and chromium ion concentration. The prepared nanosized Cr(OH)3 decreased the temperature required to decompose ammonium perchlorate from 450 °C to about 250 °C as the catalyst. The possible catalytic mechanism of the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate was also discussed.

  3. Inelastic Scattering of Neutrons in Chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phonon spectrum of chromium has been studied by neutron inelastic scattering. The dispersion curves are very similar, in form to those of tungsten and molybdenum, indicating similar interionic force constants. The neutron groups broaden but do not shift appreciably when the temperature is raised. No effect has been observed which can be attributed to the interaction between the phonons and the crystal magnetization in the antiferromagnetic phase. (author)

  4. Observational Approach to Chromium Site Remediation - 13266

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Production reactors at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, required massive quantities of water for reactor cooling and material processing. To reduce corrosion and the build-up of scale in pipelines and cooling systems, sodium dichromate was added to the water feedstock. Spills and other releases at the makeup facilities, as well as leaks from miles of pipelines, have led to numerous areas with chromium-contaminated soil and groundwater, threatening fish populations in the nearby Columbia River. Pump-and-treat systems have been installed to remove chromium from the groundwater, but significant contamination remain in the soil column and poses a continuing threat to groundwater and the Columbia River. Washington Closure Hanford, DOE, and regulators are working on a team approach that implements the observational approach, a strategy for effectively dealing with the uncertainties inherent in subsurface conditions. Remediation of large, complex waste sites at a federal facility is a daunting effort. It is particularly difficult to perform the work in an environment of rapid response to changing field and contamination conditions. The observational approach, developed by geotechnical engineers to accommodate the inherent uncertainties in subsurface conditions, is a powerful and appropriate method for site remediation. It offers a structured means of quickly moving into full remediation and responding to the variations and changing conditions inherent in waste site cleanups. A number of significant factors, however, complicate the application of the observational approach for chromium site remediation. Conceptual models of contamination and site conditions are difficult to establish and get consensus on. Mid-stream revisions to the design of large excavations are time-consuming and costly. And regulatory constraints and contract performance incentives can be impediments to the flexible responses required under the observational

  5. Stainless chromium-nickel steels. Chapter I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical composition is tabulated of 90 chromium-nickel stainless steels and alloys given in volume %. The values are also given of the corrosion resistance of the steels and alloys. The tables show data on the surface condition or the methods of material working, types and chemical composition of the medium where corrosion resistance tests were carried out, temperature, pressure, time of tests, corrosion rates, corrosion types, and literature references. A total of 35 references is given. (J.B.)

  6. Loading chromium atoms in a magnetic guide

    OpenAIRE

    Greiner, A; Sebastian, J.; Rehme, P.; Aghajani-Talesh, A.; Griesmaier, A.; Pfau, T.

    2007-01-01

    We have realized a magnetic guide for ultracold chromium atoms by continuously loading atoms directly from a Zeeman slower into a horizontal guide. We observe an atomic flux of $2 \\cdot 10^7$ atoms/s and are able to control the mean velocity of the guided atoms between 0 m/s and 3 m/s. We present our experimental results on loading and controlling the mean velocity of the guided atoms and discuss the experimental techniques that are used.

  7. Photocatalytic Removal of Hexavalet Chromium and Divalent Nickel fromAqueous Solution by UV Irradiation in the Presence of Titanium Dioxide Vanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R Samarghandi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available "n "n "nBackgrounds and Objectives: Industrial wastewater included the heavy metal is one of the important sources of environmental pollution. Hexavalent chromiumand divalent nickel are founded in plating wastewater which is harmful for human health and environment. Therefore, the purpose of this research is investigation of photocatalytic removal of hexavalent chromium and divalent nickel from aqueous solution using UV/TiO2 process in a batch system."nMaterials andMethods: At first, reactor was designed. Then, optimumdosage of TiO2 was obtained equal to 1 g/L, with variation TiO2 dosage at constant pH and initial concentrations of hexavalent chromium and divalent nickel. The effect of pH, contact time and initial concentration of hexavalent chromium was studied at the constant amount of TiO2 (1gr/L."nResults: The result showed that photocatalytic removal efficiency increased with increasing reaction time and TiO2 dosage. In addition, it was found that removal efficiency of hexavalent chromium was decreased by increasing initial chromium concentration and pH. But, photocatalytic removal efficiency of nickel ion was increased and decreased by increasing of pH and initial nickel concentration, respectively."nConclusion: The results showed that UV/TiO2 was an effective method in removal of hexavalent chromium and divalent nickel from aqueous solutions

  8. X-616 Chromium Sludge Lagoons pictorial overview, Piketon, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant uses large quantities of water for process cooling. The X-616 Liquid Effluent Control Facility was placed in operation in December 1976 to treat recirculation cooling water blowdown from the process cooling system. A chromium-based corrosion inhibitor was used in the cooling water system. A chromium sludge was produced in a clarifier to control chromium levels in the water. Chromium sludge produced by this process was stored in two surface impoundments called the X-616 Chromium Sludge Lagoons. The sludge was toxic due to its chromium concentration and therefore required treatment. The sludge was treated, turning it into a sanitary waste, and buried in an Ohio EPA approved landfill. The plant's process cooling water system has changed to a more environmentally acceptable phosphate-based inhibitor. Closure activities at X-616 began in August 1990, with all construction activities completed in June 1991, at a total cost of $8.0 million

  9. Chromium oxidation state mapping in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, R.; Fayard, B.; Salomé, M.; Devès, G.; Susini, J.

    2003-03-01

    The widespread use of chromium in industrial applications such as chemical production of pigments, refractory brick production, tanning, metallurgy, electroplating, and combustion of fuels has lead to human occupational exposure and to its increased introduction into the environment. Hexavalent chromium compounds are established carcinogens but their mechanism of cell transformation is not known. Up to now, no microanalytical technique was sensitive enough to allow the observation of chromium distribution, and oxidation state identification, within isolated cells at carcinogenic concentrations. In this experiment, we used successfully the ID-21 X-ray microscope to map Cr(VI) and total Cr distributions in cells exposed in vitro to soluble, and insoluble, Cr(VI) compounds. Exposure to soluble compounds, weak carcinogens, resulted in a homogeneous intracellular distribution of Cr, confirming by in situ measurement that Cr is present in the cell nucleus. Cr(VI) was never detected in cells which suggests a mechanism of rapid intracellular reducticn. On the other hand, exposure to insoluble compounds, strong carcinogens, also resulted in a homogeneous distribution of reduced forms of Cr in cells, and their nucleus. However, in this case, Cr(VI)-rich structures were observed into the cells suggesting that carcinogenicity is enhanced when oxidation reactions due to Cr(VI) chronic exposure are associated to Cr-DNA alterations.

  10. Chromium--a material for fusion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to their low neutron-induced radioactivity chromium based materials are considered to be candidates for structure materials in fusion technology. In this paper investigations are presented of unirradiated chromium with a purity of 99.96% (DUCROPUR) and a dispersion strengthened chromium alloy Cr5Fe1Y2O3 (DUCROLLOY). Both materials have been produced in a powder metallurgical route. Mechanical tests of smooth and pre-cracked specimens have been performed in a wide temperature range. Below 280 deg. C the fracture toughness values of DUCROPUR are very low (1/2), above the transition temperature they exceed 500 MPa m1/2. Large plastic deformations have been observed. DUCROLLOY does not indicate such a significant increase of fracture toughness in the tested temperature range. But above 400 deg. C large plastic deformations can be obtained in bending samples, too. The fatigue crack propagation behaviour of DUCROPUR at 300 deg. C is similar to that of a ductile metal

  11. CHROMIUM INDUCED CYTOTOXICITY IN BLACKGRAM (VIGNA MUNGO L.)

    OpenAIRE

    A. Chidambaram ، P. Sundaramoorthy ، A. Murugan ، K. Sankar Ganesh ، L. Baskaran

    2009-01-01

    Chromium is known to be highly toxic to biological systems. This study was designed to determine the mutagenic effects of different concentrations (0, 10, 25, 50, 100 and 200 mg/L) of hexavalent chromium on root tip cells of blackgram (Vigna mungo L. Hepper). The blackgram seeds were equi-spacially arranged in sterilized petriplates lined with filter paper and they were treated with different concentrations of chromium solution. In germination studies, the morphological growth parameters such...

  12. Processes affecting the remediation of chromium-contaminated sites.

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, C.D.; Wittbrodt, P R

    1991-01-01

    The remediation of chromium-contaminated sites requires knowledge of the processes that control the migration and transformation of chromium. Advection, dispersion, and diffusion are physical processes affecting the rate at which contaminants can migrate in the subsurface. Heterogeneity is an important factor that affects the contribution of each of these mechanisms to the migration of chromium-laden waters. Redox reactions, chemical speciation, adsorption/desorption phenomena, and precipitat...

  13. Production of a chromium Bose-Einstein condensate

    OpenAIRE

    Griesmaier, Axel; Stuhler, Jürgen; Pfau, Tilman

    2005-01-01

    The recent achievement of Bose-Einstein condensation of chromium atoms [1] has opened longed-for experimental access to a degenerate quantum gas with long-range and anisotropic interaction. Due to the large magnetic moment of chromium atoms of 6 {$\\mu$}B, in contrast to other Bose- Einstein condensates (BECs), magnetic dipole-dipole interaction plays an important role in a chromium BEC. Many new physical properties of degenerate gases arising from these magnetic forces have been predicted in ...

  14. Increase of chromium utilization in stainless steel melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The processes of deoxidizing when melting stainless 18-10 steels in electric are furnaces by the method of remelting with wastes are investigated. The dependences of amount of reduced chromium on silicon consumption are made more precise. It is shown that it is useful to apply aluminium for deoxidation of acid high-chromium slags. Based on the data on pilot melts the extent to which aluminium can be used as a reducing agent for chromium is estimated. 3 refs., 2 figs

  15. Role of L-Histidine in Preventing the Toxicological effects Induced by Chromium or Nickel Metals in Male Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    -histidine treatment returned these values near to control value. Spleen of rats treated by chromium revealed lymphatic necrosis while nickel group revealed a presence of megakaryocytes. L-Histidine treatment lowered the effect of these metals in spleen. Iron and Cu were increased significantly in chromium and nickel groups while Zn was decreased significantly in chromium and increased non-significantly in nickel group. These effects are due to ability to replace other metal ions in enzymes. Feeding on L-histidine increased the concentration of Zn and decreased Cu levels while L-histidine has a less effect on Fe especially in chromium treated group. For kidney function, urea and creatinine were increased significantly in chromium and nickel groups while creatinine clearance was decreased indicating low glomerular function. After treatment by L-histidine, urea and creatinine levels became lower which reduced the renal damage. Albumin, total protein and globulin were decreased significantly in Cr and Ni groups. L-Histidine ameliorates these effects especially in nickel group. Triiodothyronine and thyroxine were decreased significantly in chromium and nickel groups while T4 was increased in nickel group. These effects led to thyroid related problems while L-histidine feeding regulates thyroid hormones secretion. The levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) were increased while levels of the total antioxidant capacity were decreased. These findings may be due to chromium hexavalent (VI) and nickel chloride induce oxidative stress, increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxidation and changes in antioxidant enzymes activities. L-Histidine feeding decreased lipid peroxidation and increased antioxidant capacity. It could be concluded that L-histidine increased the haematopiotic system, decreased impairing the metabolism of protein and also regulates thyroid status. The amino acid histidine have various mechanisms which may serve for realization of

  16. Scientific Opinion on ChromoPrecise® cellular bound chromium yeast added for nutritional purposes as a source of chromium in food supplements and the bioavailability of chromium from this source

    OpenAIRE

    EFSA Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food (ANS)

    2012-01-01

    The Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food (ANS) provides a scientific opinion re-evaluating the safety of ChromoPrecise® cellular bound chromium yeast added for nutritional purposes as a source of chromium in food supplements and the bioavailability of chromium from this source. ChromoPrecise® is a yeast preparation with an enriched trivalent chromium content, obtained by culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the presence of chromium chloride. A daily intake of 100 µg ch...

  17. Chromium depletion from stainless steels during vacuum annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behaviour of chromium during selective evaporation by high temperature vacuum annealing has been investigated by means of energy dispersive X-ray analysis and by neutron activation analysis. It was established that the rate of chromium loss from austenitic stainless steels 316 and 321 is controlled by chromium inter-diffusion rather than tracer diffusion in the alloy. Two important parameters in selective removal of chromium from alloy steels are the variation in the chromium surface concentration with time and the depletion profile in the alloy. The present work gives support for the model in which loss of chromium is dependent on its diffusivity in the alloy and on an interface transfer coefficient. The results showed that the surface concentration of chromium decreased with increasing vacuum annealing time. The chromium depletion profile in the metal was in accord with the previous derived model, apart from an anomalous near surface region. Here the higher resolution of a neutron activation technique indicated a region within approximately 2 microns of the surface where the chromium concentration decreased more steeply than expected. (author)

  18. Stabilization and solidification of chromium-contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherne, C.A.; Thomson, B.M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Civil Engineering Dept.; Conway, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-11-01

    Chromium-contaminated soil is a common environmental problem in the United States as a result of numerous industrial processes involving chromium. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is the species of most concern because of its toxicity and mobility in groundwater. One method of diminishing the environmental impact of chromium is to reduce it to a trivalent oxidation state [Cr(III)], in which it is relatively insoluble and nontoxic. This study investigated a stabilization and solidification process to minimize the chromium concentration in the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) extract and to produce a solidified waste form with a compressive strength in the range of 150 to 300 pounds per square inch (psi). To minimize the chromium in the TCLP extract, the chromium had to be reduced to the trivalent oxidation state. The average used in this study was an alluvium contaminated with chromic and sulfuric acid solutions. The chromium concentration in the in the in situ soil was 1212 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) total chromium and 275 mg/kg Cr(VI). The effectiveness of iron, ferrous sulfate to reduce Cr(VI) was tested in batch experiments.

  19. Method of trivalent chromium concentration determination by atomic spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reheulishvili, Aleksandre N.; Tsibakhashvili, Neli Ya.

    2006-12-12

    A method is disclosed for determining the concentration of trivalent chromium Cr(III) in a sample. The addition of perchloric acid has been found to increase the atomic chromium spectrometric signal due to Cr(III), while leaving the signal due to hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) unchanged. This enables determination of the Cr(III) concentration without pre-concentration or pre-separation from chromium of other valences. The Cr(III) concentration may be measured using atomic absorption spectrometry, atomic emission spectrometry or atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

  20. Tribological Characteristics of Chromium-active Carbon Electroplated Composite Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUKa-fi; HUAMeng; Yi-min

    2004-01-01

    A process of chromium electroplating using a standard bath with additives and active carbon particles was reported, and the tribological behaviors of the composite coatings using the pin-on-disk tester and the table wear tester were i nvestig(aed. Experimental results indicate that the electroplated chromium-active carbon composite coatings exhibited the low friction coefficient anti excellent anti-wear properties whets coffered with the normal chromium electroplated ones. The formation of active carbon particles within the chromium matrices can be explained by SEM analysis and the mechanis of wear resistance of the composite coatings were studied.

  1. Oral bioavailability of chromium from a specific site.

    OpenAIRE

    Witmer, C M; Harris, R.; Shupack, S I

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of soil from a specific site in New Jersey indicated a low level of sodium and chromium present as a calcium compound. Chromium was then administered orally to young, mature male rats at a level of 240 micrograms/kg for 14 days as chromium-contaminated soil, as CaCrO4, and as an equimolar mixture of the soil and calcium salts for 14 days. The rats were sacrificed 24 hr after the last dosing, and tissues were taken immediately for chromium analysis. Blood, muscle, and liver contained ...

  2. MICRO-SEGREGATION OF CHROMIUM IN Fe-Cr ALLOY

    OpenAIRE

    Igata, N.; Sato, S; ANDO, T.; H. Doi; Nishikawa, O.; Shibata, M.

    1984-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to clarify the behavior of chromium atoms in iron-5at.% chromium alloy. When the specimens were quenched after soultion annealing at 1150°C for 1hr, FIM image was only a bright area, but when they were tempered from 450°C to 650°C, both bright areas and dark areas were observed in the FIM image. In these quenched specimens there was microsegregation of chromium atoms : In bright areas the chromium concentration was lower, and in dark areas it was higher ...

  3. Influence of Chelating Agents on Chromium Fate in Sediment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGXIAOCHANG; SUNJINHE; 等

    1996-01-01

    A laboratory investigation on reaction between chelating agents and chromium was conducted to evaluate the effect of chelating agents on the adsorption and desorption of chromium in sediment.The amount of adsorbed chromium(VI) in sediment decreased slightly by 5%-10% because of addition of chelating agents.Chelating agents inhibited the removal of Cr(Ⅲ)by sediment from solutions and the inhibiting effect was in the order:citric acid>tartaric acid>EDTA,Salicylic acid.No effect of chelating agents on desorption of chromium in sediment was observed.

  4. Analysing the chromium-chromium multiple bond using multiconfigurational quantum chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Brynda, Marcin; Gagliardi, Laura; Roos, Björn O.

    2009-01-01

    This Letter discusses the nature of the chemical bond between two chromium atoms in different di-chromium complexes with the metal atoms in different oxidation states. Starting with the Cr diatom, with its formally sextuple bond and oxidation number zero, we proceed to analyse the bonding in some Cr(I)–Cr(I) XCrCrX complexes with X varying from F, to Phenyl, and Aryl. The bond distance in these complexes varies over a large range: 1.65–1.83 Å and we suggest explanations for these variations. ...

  5. Anti corrosion layer for stainless steel in molten carbonate fuel cell - comprises phase vapour deposition of titanium nitride, aluminium nitride or chromium nitride layer then oxidising layer in molten carbonate electrolyte

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Forming an anticorrosion protective layer on a stainless steel surface used in a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) - comprises the phase vapour deposition (PVD) of a layer comprising at least one of titanium nitride, aluminium nitride or chromium nitride and then forming a protective layer in situ...... by replacement of the nitride ions with oxide ions in the molten carbonate electrolyte....

  6. Investigation of alternative phosphating treatments for nickel and hexavalent chromium elimination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    obtained with passivation treatment in niobium containing solution could be considered as a promising alternative to replace passivation with hexavalent chromium ions. Despite of the promising results, adjustments in the baths to obtain stability are still needed and should guide the next steps of the subject of this research. (author)

  7. HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM REMOVAL FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS BY PLEUROTUS OSTREATUS SPENT BIOMASS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.CAROL

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Pleurotus ostreatus spent biomass after the harvest, is a waste which was used as a potential sorbent after coating it with chitosan an deacetylated derivative from chitin the most abundant carbohydratesecond to cellulose .The study is an attempt to elaborate and justify the optional utility of Spent Pleurotus ostreatus biomass for hexavalent chromium removal from aqueous industrial effluents. The effect of experimental parameters such as pH, biosorbent dosage, biosorbent dosage, initial metal concentration, temperature and sorption time is very striking from the obtained results .The Freundlich isotherm and Langmuir isotherm fitted well to the data of Cr (VI sorption capacity of Spent Pleurotus biomass. The intraparticle diffusion plot suggest that the sorption process proceeds by surface adsorption alone in case of activated spentbiomass but when coated with chitosan the process is sorption along with intra particle diffusion or pore diffusion. The overall adsorption process was endothermic and spontaneous innature.EDX analysis indicated the presence of hexavalent chromium ions on the surface of chitosan coated spent Pleurotus biomass. The resultssuggest that the enhanced spent biomass could be employed as an efficient adsorbent for the removal of hexavalent chromium from industrial effluents as well as from contaminated water sources.

  8. Removal of trivalent chromium from aqueous solution using aluminum oxide hydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedemo, Agaje; Chandravanshi, Bhagwan Singh; Zewge, Feleke

    2016-01-01

    Water is second most essential for human being. Contamination of water makes it unsuitable for human consumption. Chromium ion is released to water bodies from various industries having high toxicity which affects the biota life in these waters. In this study aluminum oxide hydroxide was tested for its efficiency to remove trivalent chromium from aqueous solutions through batch mode experiments. Chromium concentrations in aqueous solutions and tannery waste water before and after adsorption experiments were determined using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The effects of pH, contact time, initial concentration and adsorbent dosage on the adsorption of Cr(III) were studied. The study revealed that more than 99 % removal of Cr(III) was achieved over wide range of initial pH (3-10). The optimum conditions for the removal of Cr(III) were found to be at pH 4-6 with 40 g/L adsorbent dose at 60 min of contact time. The adsorption capacity was assessed using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The equilibrium data at varying adsorbent dose obeyed the two isotherms. The adsorbent was found to be efficient for the removal of Cr(III) from tannery waste effluent. PMID:27547663

  9. Determination of chromium, cobalt and nickel in tissue samples by radiochemical activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiochemical neutron activation analysis method for the determination of chromium, cobalt and nickel in tissue samples. A radiochemical neutron activation analysis method for the determination of chromium, cobalt and nickel has been developed. The destruction device used consisted of a combined wet-ashing-distillation and ion-exchange system. Six samples could be treated at the same time. The samples were wet-ashed with H*L2SO*L4-H*L2O*L2 mixture. Volatile elements were distilled as bromide compounds with HBr*H-. The distillation residue in 8M HCl was passed through hydrated antimony pentoxide (HAP) in order to remove disturbing *H2*H4Na-activity and through a Dowex 2 x 8 column so as to retain *H6*H0Co (formed from *H5*H8Ni). Chromium was elutriated from the column and precipitated as Cr(OH)*L3 for the removal of disturbing *H3*H2P-activity. The standards and samples were treated in a similar manner each so that the yield determination is not necessarily needed. The yields by tracer experiments were (43 +- 5) % for Cr, (93 +- 4) % for Co and (88 +- 14) % for Ni. The precision and accuracy of the method were studied by using reference materials of the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

  10. Chromium reduces the in vitro activity and fidelity of DNA replication mediated by the human cell DNA synthesome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) is known to be a carcinogenic metal ion, with a complicated mechanism of action. It can be found within our environment in soil and water contaminated by manufacturing processes. Cr(VI) ion is readily taken up by cells, and is recognized to be both genotoxic and cytotoxic; following its reduction to the stable trivalent form of the ion, chromium(Cr(III)), within cells. This form of the ion is known to impede the activity of cellular DNA polymerase and polymerase-mediated DNA replication. Here, we report the effects of chromium on the activity and fidelity of the DNA replication process mediated by the human cell DNA synthesome. The DNA synthesome is a functional multiprotein complex that is fully competent to carry-out each phase of the DNA replication process. The IC50 of Cr(III) toward the activity of DNA synthesome-associated DNA polymerases α, δ and ε is 15, 45 and 125 μM, respectively. Cr(III) inhibits synthesome-mediated DNA synthesis (IC50 = 88 μM), and significantly reduces the fidelity of synthesome-mediated DNA replication. The mutation frequency induced by the different concentrations of Cr(III) ion used in our assays ranges from 2-13 fold higher than that which occurs spontaneously, and the types of mutations include single nucleotide substitutions, insertions, and deletions. Single nucleotide substitutions are the predominant type of mutation, and they occur primarily at GC base-pairs. Cr(III) ion produces a lower number of transition and a higher number of transversion mutations than occur spontaneously. Unlike Cr(III), Cr(VI) ion has little effect on the in vitro DNA synthetic activity and fidelity of the DNA synthesome, but does significantly inhibit DNA synthesis in intact cells. Cell growth and proliferation is also arrested by increasing concentrations of Cr(VI) ion. Our studies provide evidence indicating that the chromium ion induced decrease in the fidelity and activity of synthesome mediated DNA replication

  11. Chromium Biosorption from Cr(VI) Aqueous Solutions by Cupressus lusitanica Bark: Kinetics, Equilibrium and Thermodynamic Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Alma Rosa Netzahuatl-Muñoz; María del Carmen Cristiani-Urbina; Eliseo Cristiani-Urbina

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamics of chromium (Cr) ion biosorption from Cr(VI) aqueous solutions by Cupressus lusitanica bark (CLB). CLB total Cr biosorption capacity strongly depended on operating variables such as initial Cr(VI) concentration and contact time: as these variables rose, total Cr biosorption capacity increased significantly. Total Cr biosorption rate also increased with rising solution temperature. The pseudo-second-order model describ...

  12. Mass spectrometric investigations of the kinetic stability of chromium and copper complexes with humic substances by isotope-labelling experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marx, G.; Heumann, K.G. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische Chemie und Analytische Chemie

    1999-07-01

    Isotope-labelling exchange experiments were carried out to investigate the kinetic stability of Cr(III) complexes with humic substances (HS). To compare the results with those of an ion, not expected to form kinetically stable HS complexes with respect to its electron configuration, Cu(II) was investigated under the same conditions. HS solutions of different origin were therefore spiked with {sup 53}Cr(III) or {sup 65}Cu(II) after saturation of HS with chromium and copper of natural isotopic composition. In fractions of metal/HS complexes with different molecular weight, obtained by ultrafiltration and HPLC/ICP-MS using size exclusion chromatography (SEC), respectively, the isotope ratios of chromium and copper were determined by ICP and thermal ionisation mass spectrometry. Distinct differences in the isotopic composition of chromium were found in the permeate of the ultrafiltration compared with the corresponding unseparated solution, which indicates kinetically stable Cr(III)/HS complexes. On the other hand, the copper isotopic composition was identical in the permeate and the unseparated solution, which shows that a total exchange of Cu{sup 2+} ions took place between free and HS complexed copper ions. The SEC/ ICP-MS experiments also resulted in a different isotopic distribution of chromium in the chromatographically separated complexes whereas the copper complexes, separated by SEC, showed identical isotopic composition. The kinetic stability of Cr(III)/HS complexes could be explained by the d{sup 3} electron configuration of Cr{sup 3+} ions, a fact which is well known from classical Cr(III) complexes, and influences substantially the mobility of this heavy metal in the environment. (orig.) With 4 figs., 4 tabs., 10 refs.

  13. The Effect of Chromium Added into Basal Diet on Serum Total Protein, Urea, Triglyceride, Cholesterol and Serum and Tissue Chromium, Zinc, Copper Levels in Rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    *, Kâzim ŞAHİN; *, Talat GÜLER; +, N. ŞAHİN; *, O. N. ERTAS; +, N. ERKAL

    1999-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of supplemantal dietary chromium on serum total protein, urea, triglycerides, cholesterol, and serum and tissue chromium, zinc, and copper contents of pregnant rabbits, their offspring and their young rabbits. Treatment groups consisted of chromium level as follows: Control Group no supplementation chromium into basal diet, Treatment I (200 ppb Group) contained 200 ppb of supplemental chromium into basal diet, and Treatment II (400 ppb Group...

  14. Optical spectroscopy of trivalent chromium in sol-gel lithium niobate

    OpenAIRE

    Krebs, J. K.; Happek, U.

    2005-01-01

    We report on the characterization of sol-gel derived lithium niobate via trivalent chromium probe ions, a study that is motivated by recent reports on the synthesis of high quality sol-gel lithium niobate (LiNbO$_3$). In order to assess the quality of sol-gel derived LiNbO$_3$, we incorporate Cr$^{3+}$ during the hydrolysis stage of the sol-gel process. A comparison of the Cr$^{3+}$ emission and photo-excitation data on both sol-gel and melt-grown LiNbO$_3$ shows that the sol-gel derived mate...

  15. Oxygen and chromium self-diffusion in Cr sub(2)O sub(3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oxygen and chromium diffusivities in Cr sub(2)O sub(3) single crystals and polycrystals were determined by ion implantation, thick film methods, and isotopic exchange, using the sup(54)Cr, sup(5)Cr and sup(18)O isotopes. Depth profiling was made by SIMS, and the diffusion coefficients were computed using a general solution of the Fick's law taking into account evaporation and exchange at the surface. Lattice and grain boundary self-diffusion coefficients were determined as a function of temperature and oxygen pressure. (author)

  16. Mechanisms of color centor formation in chromium-containing scandium garnet crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mekhanisms of absorption induced by UV pumping radiation in chromium-containing crystals of scandium garnets (GSGG:Cr3+; GSGG:Cr3+, Nd3+; ISGG:Cr3+) are revealed. It is experimentally ascertained that color center formation processes in two-activated crystals are sufficiently suppressed. This is conditioned by a reduction of contribution to the process of coloring of charges released by shortwave pumping radiation from Cr3+ ion metastable level, the population of which in a two-activated crystal is low due to efficient Cr3+→Nd3+ energy transfer

  17. Biosorption of hexavalent chromium based on modified Y zeolites obtained by alkali-treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Figueiredo, Hugo de; Silva, Bruna Andreia Nogueira Airosa; Quintelas, C.; Pereira, M.F.R.; Neves, Isabel C.; Tavares, M. T.

    2010-01-01

    The structural modification of external surface of NaY was investigated in order to enhance efficient biosorption systems consisting of a bacterial biofilm, Arthrobacter viscosus, supported on that zeolite, for removing hexavalent chromium from aqueous solutions. The supported bacterial biofilm reduces Cr(VI) to Cr(III) and this cation is then retained in the zeolite by ion exchange. NaY zeolite was modified by alkali-treatments using NaOH 2.0 M, with two different contact periods of...

  18. cis-Difluoridobis(1,10-phenanthroline)chromium(III) perchlorate monohydrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birk, Torben; Bendix, Jesper; Weihe, Högni

    2008-01-01

    The title complex, [CrF(2)(C(12)H(8)N(2))(2)]ClO(4)·H(2)O, displays a slightly distorted octa-hedral coordination geometry around the central chromium(III) ion. The Cr environment is composed of a cis arrangement of two 1,10-phenanthroline [average Cr(III)-N = 2.0726 (10) Å] and two fluoride...... [average Cr(III)-F = 1.8533 (6) Å] ligands. The water molecule forms a hydrogen bond to fluorine in a neighbouring cation....

  19. Packed-bed column biosorption of chromium(VI) and nickel(II) onto Fenton modified Hydrilla verticillata dried biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Ashutosh; Tripathi, Brahma Dutt; Rai, Ashwani Kumar

    2016-10-01

    The present study represents the first attempt to investigate the biosorption potential of Fenton modified Hydrilla verticillata dried biomass (FMB) in removing chromium(VI) and nickel(II) ions from wastewater using up-flow packed-bed column reactor. Effects of different packed-bed column parameters such as bed height, flow rate, influent metal ion concentration and particle size were examined. The outcome of the column experiments illustrated that highest bed height (25cm); lowest flow rate (10mLmin(-1)), lowest influent metal concentration (5mgL(-1)) and smallest particle size range (0.25-0.50mm) are favourable for biosorption. The maximum biosorption capacity of FMB for chromium(VI) and nickel(II) removal were estimated to be 89.32 and 87.18mgg(-1) respectively. The breakthrough curves were analyzed using Bed Depth Service Time (BDST) and Thomas models. The experimental results obtained agree to both the models. Column regeneration experiments were also carried out using 0.1M HNO3. Results revealed good reusability of FMB during ten cycles of sorption and desorption. Performance of FMB-packed column in treating secondary effluent was also tested under identical experimental conditions. Results demonstrated significant reduction in chromium(VI) and nickel(II) ions concentration after the biosorption process. PMID:27400422

  20. STABILITY AND ABSORPTION OF CHROMIUM AND ABSORPTION OF CHROMIUM HISTIDINE BY HUMANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increased intake of chromium has been shown to lead to improvements in glucose, insulin, lipids, and related variables in studies involving humans, experimental and farm animals. However, the results are often variable depending not only upon the selection of subjects, but also dietary conditions a...

  1. Near-anode focusing phenomenon caused by the high anolyte concentration in the electrokinetic remediation of chromium(VI)-contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Dong, E-mail: lidongbayan@cqu.edu.cn [School of Resources and Environmental Science, Chongqing University, Chongqing, 400030 (China); Xiong, Zhen; Nie, Yang; Niu, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Li [School of Resources and Environmental Science, Chongqing University, Chongqing, 400030 (China); Liu, Yuan-Yuan [School of Urban Construction and Environmental Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing, 400030 (China)

    2012-08-30

    Graphical abstract: Mechanism illustration of the focusing band by ion-induced potential gradient well trapping effect (IIPGWTE), Cr(VI) denotes the CrO{sub 4}{sup 2-}/HCrO{sub 4}{sup -} ions; ION denotes all other ions except Cr(VI) ions. The potential gradient (Ea) and ions' velocity (v{sub a}) in the soil near the anode was lower than that in other parts (Ec, v{sub c}) forming a potential gradient well, because of invasion of anolytes (from the left end). Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High anolyte concentration causes focusing phenomena in soil near anode. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low pH value aggravates the focusing phenomenon. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Focusing phenomenon significantly increase the remediation duration and energy consumption. - Abstract: The effects of the concentration and the low pH value of anolyte on the electrokinetic remediation (EKR) of chromium-contaminated soil were investigated using chromium-spiked kaolin-gypsum soil. Results of visual observation and X-ray fluorescence analysis show that high anolyte concentrations could cause an ion-induced potential gradient well trapping effect on the soil near the anode, and consequently cause a focusing phenomenon (FP) without chemical precipitation. This FP significantly prolonged the remediation duration and reduced chromium removal. The low pH value of soil aggravated the FP, resulting in a quasi-dead zone near the anode caused by the reduction in soil resistance, rather than the adsorption of chromium (VI) ions. The high anolyte concentration also resulted in high energy consumption. The FP and low pH value collectively decreased the energy efficiency by more than 96%. This kind of FP can be predicted via the online monitoring of the potential gradient profiles of the soil between the electrodes in the EKR.

  2. Chromium and Polyphenols From Cinnamon Improve Insulin Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naturally occurring compounds that have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity include chromium and polyphenols found in cinnamon. These compounds also have similar effects on insulin signaling and glucose control. The signs of chromium deficiency are similar to those for the metabolic syndrome ...

  3. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium (2010 External Review Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [UPDATE] New Schedule for IRIS Hexavalent Chromium Assessment In Feb 2012, EPA developed a new schedule for completing the IRIS hexavalent chromium assessment. Based on the recommendations of the external peer review panel, which met in May 2011 to review the dra...

  4. Composition and structure of plasma sprayed chromium steel powders

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schneeweiss, O.; Voleník, Karel; Kolman, Blahoslav Jan

    Praha, 2005, s. 105-111. ISBN 1899072 18 7. [EURO Powder Metallurgy Congress & Exhibition. Prague (CZ), 02.10.2005-05.10.2005] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : chromium steel * plasma spraying * chromium depletion * Mössbauer spectroscopy Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  5. Safety, absorption, and antioxidant effects of chromium histidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supplemental chromium has been shown to be involved in the alleviation of the metabolic syndrome, glucose intolerance, polycystic ovary syndrome, depression, excess body fat, and gestational, steroid-induced, and type 2 diabetes. Chromium amino acid complexes that contained histidine displayed cons...

  6. Toxicity and adaptation of Dictyosphaerium chlorelloides to extreme chromium contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Fortún, Sebastián; López-Rodas, Victoria; Navarro, Macarena; Marvá, Fernando; D'ors, Ana; Rouco, Mónica; Haigh-Florez, David; Costas, Eduardo

    2009-09-01

    Metals are often spilled by industries into inland water environments, with adverse consequences. Numerous papers have reported that heavy metals produce massive destruction of algae. Nevertheless, algal populations seem to become tolerant when they have had previous exposures to heavy metals. Because the mechanisms allowing heavy metal tolerance of algae are not yet known, the present study analyzed the effect of hexavalent chromium on growth and photosynthetic performance of Dictyosphaerium chlorelloides, stressing on the adaptation mechanisms to chromium contamination. Growth and photosynthetic performance of algal cells were inhibited by Cr(VI) at 10 mg/L, and the 72-h median inhibition concentration was established as 1.64 and 1.54 mg/L, respectively. However, after further incubation for a three month period in an environment with 25 mg/L of chromium, some rare, chromium-resistant cells occasionally were found. A Luria-Delbrück fluctuation analysis was performed to distinguish between resistant algae arising from rare, spontaneous mutations and resistant algae arising from physiological adaptation and other adaptive mechanisms. Resistant cells arose only by spontaneous mutations before the addition of chromium, with a rate of 1.77 x 10(-6) mutants per cell division. From a practical point of view, the use of both chromium-sensitive and chromium-resistant genotypes could make possible a specific algal biosensor for chromium. PMID:19323601

  7. Residual Chromium in Leather by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Okoh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Most tanning processes employ the use of chromium sulphate. For chromium tanned leather, finished products may contain high amount of residual chromium. This may pose some health hazards, since chromium is known to be toxic at elevated concentration. This justifies the need for the study. Approach: Various samples of leather were collected from a tannery, a leather crafts market, a leather dump site and from local tanners all in Kano, Nigeria in 2009. The samples were irradiated for 6 h in the inner site of the Nigerian Research Reactor (NIRR-1 at a flux of 5×1011 ncm-2 sec-1. Results: After evaluating the spectrum, the mean results for chromium in the samples were determined as 2.33±0.3, 2.23±0.3 and 2.93±0.4% for samples from the tannery, leather crafts market and leather dump sites respectively. Chromium concentration in samples collected from local tanners who use tannins from Acacia nilotica as tanning agent was below the detection limit of Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA technique used in the study. Conclusion: Although, the concentrations of chromium in the analysed samples were not much higher than what were obtained in literature, they may be enough to sensitize the population that is allergic to chromium.

  8. AMORPHOUS ALLOY SURFACE COATINGS FOR HARD CHROMIUM REPLACEMENT - PHASE I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hard chromium coatings (0.25 to10 mil thick) are used extensively for imparting wear and erosion resistance to components in both industrial and military applications. The most common means of depositing hard chromium has been through the use of chromic acid baths containing ...

  9. Chromium-doped silica optical fibres : influence of the core composition on the Cr oxidation states and crystal field

    CERN Document Server

    Felice, Valérie; Jones, Julian K; Monnom, Gérard; Ostrowsky, Daniel B

    2013-01-01

    We have made chromium-doped, silica-based preforms and optical fibres by Modified Chemical Vapour Deposition and have studied the influence of the chemical composition of the doped region on the Cr-oxidation states and the spectroscopic properties of the samples. Chromium, introduced initially as Cr3+, is partially or totally oxidized during the fabrication process, and is stabilized in the core of the preforms and fibres as Cr3+ in octahedral coordination, and/or as Cr4+ in distorded tetrahedral coordination (Cs). Small concentrations (~1-2 mol%) of codopants in silica, such as germanium or aluminium, suffice to promote a particular oxidation state. Particularly, 1 mol % of aluminium stabilizes all present chromium into Cr4+. The ligand field parameters, Dq, B and Dq/B, for Cr3+ and Cr4+ are derived. It is shown that the chromium ions in our samples are in low to intermediate ligand field and that Dq and Dq/B decrease when the aluminium content increases. The absorption cross sections of Cr3+ are similar to ...

  10. Chromium-Makes stainless steel stainless

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropschot, S.J.; Doebrich, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Chromium, a steely-gray, lustrous, hard metal that takes a high polish and has a high melting point, is a silvery white, hard, and bright metal plating on steel and other material. Commonly known as chrome, it is one of the most important and indispensable industrial metals because of its hardness and resistance to corrosion. But it is used for more than the production of stainless steel and nonferrous alloys; it is also used to create pigments and chemicals used to process leather.

  11. The electronic structure of antiferromagnetic chromium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1981-01-01

    The author has used the local spin density formalism to perform self-consistent calculations of the electronic structure of chromium in the non-magnetic and commensurate antiferromagnetic phases, as a function of the lattice parameter. A change of a few per cent in the atomic radius brings...... the calculated ground state properties into agreement with experiment. The magnetisation is studied as function of volume in several models, and it is shown that a Stoner picture provides an extremely accurate description of the full calculation provided the sp-d hybridisation is taken into account. It is found...

  12. Peculiarities of luminescence of nanostructured aluminum oxide with chromium impurity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparative study of Cr3+ ions photo-, X-ray- and cathodoluminescence in R-lines region in monocrystal and nanostructural aluminium oxide samples with different phase composition is conducted. Peculiarities of chromium impurity inclusion into Al2O3 nanocrystal lattices at high-temperature thermal treatment of Al2O3 and Cr2O3 nanopowders mixture are revealed. It is shown that aluminium oxides nanostructuring can result in formation of complicated aggregate complexes which include anion vacancies and impurity cations. It is marked that the most likely cause of quenching of R-lines luminescence and their broadening at Al2O3 crystal symmetry decrease in α → θ → δ → γ series is anion sublattice disordering while action of crystal field is responsible for levels displacement. It is established that thermal treatment at 1200 deg C doesn't result in complete transformation of nanostructural Al2O3 into α-form as it takes place in macro state

  13. Specific extraction of chromium(VI) using supercritical fluid extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foy, G P; Pacey, G E

    2000-02-01

    In some situations, it is no longer sufficient to give a total concentration of a metal. Instead, what is required to understand the potential toxicity of a sample is the concentration of metal species or oxidation state. When developing species specific methods, the major concern is that the integrity of the species ratio is not changed. In other words, the sample preparation or the analytical method will not convert metal ions from one oxidation state to another. Normal extraction techniques and chromatography methods have shown some tendencies to change species ratios. An ideal extraction method would extract the metal efficiently while retaining the metal's oxidation state. The properties of supercritical fluids should approach the ideal of retention of oxidation states. For example, the need for speciation of chromium is obvious since Cr(III) is considered an essential element while Cr(VI) is thought to be toxic and carcinogenic. This paper presents the results of a species specific extraction of Cr(VI) using two different carbamate derivatives as the chelator. Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) coupled with a fluorinated dithiocarbamate and a methanol modifier allows extraction of 1 ppm Cr(VI) from a solid matrix with a recovery level of 88.4+/-2.57% using the NIST standard sample. The optimized conditions using the HP 7680 supercritical fluid extractor were: 0.1 ml of methanol, 0.05 ml of pure water, and 0.01 g of chelate via a saturation chamber. PMID:18967865

  14. Tetravalent chromium doped laser materials and NIR tunable lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfano, Robert R. (Inventor); Petricevic, Vladimir (Inventor); Bykov, Alexey (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A method is described to improve and produce purer Cr.sup.4+-doped laser materials and lasers with reduced co-incorporation of chromium in any other valence states, such as Cr.sup.3+, Cr.sup.2+, Cr.sup.5+, and Cr.sup.6+. The method includes: 1) certain crystals of olivine structure with large cation (Ca) in octahedral sites such as Cr.sup.4+:Ca.sub.2GeO.sub.4, Cr.sup.4+:Ca.sub.2SiO.sub.4, Cr.sup.4+:Ca.sub.2Ge.sub.xSi.sub.1-xO.sub.4 (where 0ion in crystalline host that makes these materials suitable for compact high power (thin disk/wedge) NIR laser applications.

  15. CHROMIUM BIOACCUMULATION FROM COMPOSTS AND VERMICOMPOSTS BASED ON TANNERY SLUDGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof GONDEK

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Storage of waste substances is not indifferent to ecological equilibrium in the environment therefore should not be the ultimate way to limit waste arduousness. Therefore, the conducted investigations aimed to determine the effect of tannery composts and vermicomposts loaded with chromium on this element bioaccumulation in earthworm bodies and biomass of selected plants. Chromium in composts and vermicomposts based on tannery sludges occurred in small quantities and easily soluble compounds. Chromium concentrations in redworm biomass points to this metal accumulation in Eisenia fetida body tissues. This element content in redworm biomass was signifi cantly positively correlated with its content in composts. Chromium content in plants was diversifi ed and on treatments was generally smaller than on mineral treatment or farmyard manure. Chromium absorbed by plants was stored mainly in the root systems, and over the norm content of this element found in vermicomposts did not cause its excessive accumulation in plant biomass.

  16. Biosorption potency of Aspergillus niger for removal of chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Shaili; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2006-09-01

    Aspergillus niger isolated from soil and effluent of leather tanning mills had higher activity to remove chromium. The potency of Aspergillus niger was evaluated in shake flask culture by absorption of chromium at pH 6 and temperature 30 degrees C. The results of the study indicated removal of more than 75% chromium by Aspergillus niger determined by diphenylcarbazide colorimetric assay and atomic absorption spectrophotometry after 7 days. Study of microbial Cr(VI) reduction and identification of reduction intermediates has been hindered by the lack of analytical techniques that can identify the oxidation state with subcellular spatial resolution. Therefore, removal of chromium was further substantiated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), which indicated an accumulation of chromium in the fungal mycelium. PMID:16874547

  17. Specific features of the electrocrystallization of chromium together with molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made on molybdenum effect on surface structure and some physicomechanical properties of electrolytic chromium during Cr-Mo electrodeposition from CrO3 solutions with additions of SO42- and SiFe62- anions. Cr-Mo deposition was conducted at 55 deg C and 0.5 A/cm2 current density which corresponds to conditions of hard chromizing. It is shown that the change hardness, hydridation and internal stresses of chromium coatings during their alloying with molybdenum is conditioned by structure change. Mo introduction into chromium is not manifested clearly in these characteristics. The change of chromium structure during deposition with molybdenum is probably related both with change of anion relation in cathode film (decrease of catalytic anion content in it) and peculiarities of chromium electrocrystallization. This requires special study with application of methods for investigation into fine and surface structure

  18. Studies on the process aspects related to chemical decontamination of chromium-containing alloys with redox processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presence of chromium in the oxide layer makes oxidative pre-treatment with oxidizing agents such as potassium permanganate (KMnO4) a must for the decontamination of stainless steels and other chromium containing alloys. The effectiveness of pre-treatment with oxidizing reagent varies with the conditions of treatment such as temperature, concentration and whether the medium is acidic or alkaline. A comparative study of the two acidic oxidizing agents, i.e., nitric acid-permanganate and permanganic acid was made. The dissolution behavior of copper and its oxide in permanganic acid was found to be comparable to that of chromium oxide. Citric acid and ascorbic acid were investigated as alternatives to oxalic acid for the reduction/decomposition of permanganate left over after the oxidizing pre-treatment step. It has been established that the reduction of chromate by citric acid is instantaneous only in presence of Mn2+ ions. It has also been established that reduction of residual permanganate can be achieved with ascorbic acid and with minimum chemical requirement. The capabilities of nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)-ascorbic acid mixture for the dissolution of hematite have been explored. This study would help to choose the suitable oxidizing agent, the reducing agent used for decomposition of permanganate and to optimize the concentration of reducing formulation so that the process of decontamination is achieved with a minimum requirement of chemicals. The generation of radioactive ion exchange resin as waste is therefore held at a minimum. Ion exchange studies with metal ion complexes of relevance to decontamination were carried out with a view to choose a suitable type of ion exchanger. It has been established that treatment of the ion exchange resin with brine solution can solve the problem of leaching out of non-ionic organics from the resin. (orig.)

  19. Chemodynamics of chromium reduction in soils: Implications to bioavailability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Examined the effects of sorption, pH and C sources on Cr(VI) reduction and toxicity. • The rate of Cr(VI) reduction decreased with an increase in Cr(VI) adsorption and pH. • The proton dynamics in Cr(VI) reduction was assessed in relation to remediation. • A novel black carbon showed the highest reduction rate of Cr(VI) in soils. • Black carbon decreased the bioavailability and phytotoxicity of Cr(VI) in soils. -- Abstract: Chromium toxicity in soils can be mitigated by reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) which is influenced by the presence of free Cr(VI) species in soil solution, and the supply of protons and electrons. In this study, the effects of Cr(VI) adsorption (i.e. availability of free Cr(VI) species in soil solution), soil pH (i.e. supply of protons) and three electron donor carbon sources [black carbon (BC), chicken manure biochar (CMB) and cow manure (CM)] on the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) in soils were investigated. The results indicated that the rate of Cr(VI) reduction decreased with an increase in Cr(VI) adsorption and soil pH, which is attributed to decreased supply of free Cr(VI) ions and protons, respectively. Among the three different amendments tested, BC showed the highest rate of Cr(VI) reduction followed by CM and CMB. Furthermore, addition of BC, CM and CMB decreased the bioavailability of Cr(VI) in contaminated soils. The high efficiency of BC on Cr(VI) reduction was due to the electron donor's functional groups such as phenolic, hydroxyl, carbonyl and amides. The study demonstrated that free form of Cr(VI) ions in soil solution and carbon amendments enriched with acidic functional groups favored the reduction of Cr(VI), thereby mitigating its bioavailability and toxicity in contaminated soils

  20. Determination of chromium(III), chromium(VI), manganese(II) and manganese(VII) by EDXRF method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes EDXRF, a quick, sensitive and selective method for determining Cr(III), Cr(VI), Mn(II) and Mn(VII) in environmental and industrial liquid samples via preconcentration with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). The effect of pH in the range of 3-11 on the recovery of Cr(III), Cr(VI), Mn(II) and Mn(VII) was investigated separately and in combination. The influence of organic matter, carbonate species and elements V and Fe was also tested on the recovery of each chromium and manganese species (separately/in combination) over the whole pH range in order to simulate conditions in natural waters that usually contain a certain amount of dissolved organic matter and carbonate ions. Characteristic of different species to create complexes with APDC and DTPA in the different pH ranges makes possible to separate those two species. All created complexes of Cr(III), Cr(VI), Mn(II) and Mn(VIII) with APDC and DTPA were characterised by IR spectroscopy.(author)

  1. Selenium protection from cadmium and chromium poisoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of selenium with cadmium and chromium was studied in 168 chicken-broilers (DWCxWR) divided into four equal groups. Eight-week old control animals received an intravenous dose of /sup 115m/Cd Chloride 370 KBq/Kg (Group I), or 51Cr Chloride 370 KBq/Kg (Group II). The kinetics of these isotopes were studied by scintillation spectrometry (NaI/TI) carried out for whole blood, plasma, plasma proteins, urine, feces and homogenates of all organs at various time intervals. Animals in Groups III and IV received eight subcutaneous doses of sodium selenate (5ug) at 8-week intervals prior to /sup 115m/Cd or 51Cr. The kinetics of these elements were studied as in the previous two groups. It was found that selenium affected those kinetics in two ways: (a) by increasing the excretion of Cd by 11 +/- 3% (P < 0.001) and that of Cr by 7 +/- 1% (P < 0.001); and (b) by favoring redistribution of those elements, with significant (P < 0.001) reductions in liver, endocrine glands and kidney and increases (P < 0.01) in bone. The study suggests that selenium protects the animals' vital organs from environmental pollutants, such as cadmium and chromium

  2. The hydrogen anode in chromium electrowinning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of a hydrogen anode for electrowinning of chromium from an ammonium chromium sulfate electrolyte (chrome alum process) was investigated in a laboratory-scale cell equipped with a diaphragm. The composition of the solution and the temperature followed industrial practice. Current density, pH, and anolyte flow rate through the diaphragm were varied and optimized for the cell. For a cathodic current density of 915 A/m2 at 50oC, the optimum initial pH was 2.37. The hydrogen anode was made of a platinized Toray carbon paper (0.35 mg Pt per cm2) supplied by E-TEK. The hydrogen pressure was maintained at 2 cm H20 above ambient atmosphere. The potential of the hydrogen anode was about 1 V lower than that of a Pb-Ag anode (1%Ag) in a similar cell. As expected, no Cr+6 was generated in the anolyte. The cathodic current efficiency was slightly lower with the hydrogen anode than with the Pb-Ag anode. (author)

  3. Biliary excretion of chromium in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relative amount of chromium excreted in rat bile after injection of Cr-III is much less than after injection of Cr-VI, about 0.1% and from 6-8% during 5 hours respectively, for corresponding dose levels. The liver to bile ratio was 50-100 for Cr-III injection for Cr-VI the ratio was 2-3. With doses up to 18 μmol Cr/kg, only Cr-III was found in bile even after injection of CR-VI.Glutathione depletion of the liver with cyclohexene oxide decreased chromium excretion in bile. Such treatment also decresed the reduction of Cr-VI to Cr-III in the liver cell as only Cr-VI was found in bile. A different distribution of Cr-III in the liver dependent on whether derived from Cr-VI or taken up by the liver as such must be assumed. Taking into account the usual low penetration of biological membranes by Cr-III, a possible active transport mechanism or a specific diffusable Cr-III compound must be postulated. (author)

  4. Identification of autoionizing states of atomic chromium for resonance photo-ionization at the ISOLDE-RILIS

    CERN Document Server

    Goodacre, T Day; Fedorovc, D; Fedosseev, V N; Marsh, B A; Molkanov, P; Rossel, R E; Rothe, S; Seiffert, C

    2015-01-01

    The resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) is the principal ion source of the ISOLDE radioactive beam facility based at CERN. Using the method of in-source resonance ionization spectroscopy, an optimal three-step, three-resonance photo-ionization scheme has been developed for chromium. The scheme uses an ionizing transition to one of the 14 newly observed autoionizing states. This work increases the range of ISOLDE-RILIS ionized beams to 32 chemical elements. Details of the spectroscopic studies are described and the new ionization scheme is summarized. A link to the complete version of this document will be added here following publication:

  5. Ion beams replace chrome plating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metal ion implantation is the process of altering surface properties by bombarding with high-energy metal ions. Because the process does not produce a coating, dimensions and bulk properties of the part remain unchanged, and implanted surfaces have no problems with adhesion, residual stress, or poor microstructure. Implanted surfaces can provide wear and/or corrosion resistance comparable with, or superior to, chrome plating. Furthermore, it is a relatively low-temperature process, which enables treatment of materials such as plastics, aluminum, and low-alloy steel. Furthermore, the performance of coatings can be improved by bombarding with ions during or after the coating process. Specifically, high-energy ions applied during deposition have been shown to reduce the required temperature for physical vapor deposition (PVD) systems, overcoming one of the major obstacles to replacing chromium plating with PVD coatings. This article will review the latest advances in metal-ion implantation equipment, with particular reference to economics and applications

  6. Near-anode focusing phenomenon caused by the high anolyte concentration in the electrokinetic remediation of chromium(VI)-contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Mechanism illustration of the focusing band by ion-induced potential gradient well trapping effect (IIPGWTE), Cr(VI) denotes the CrO42−/HCrO4− ions; ION denotes all other ions except Cr(VI) ions. The potential gradient (Ea) and ions’ velocity (va) in the soil near the anode was lower than that in other parts (Ec, vc) forming a potential gradient well, because of invasion of anolytes (from the left end). Highlights: ► High anolyte concentration causes focusing phenomena in soil near anode. ► Low pH value aggravates the focusing phenomenon. ► Focusing phenomenon significantly increase the remediation duration and energy consumption. - Abstract: The effects of the concentration and the low pH value of anolyte on the electrokinetic remediation (EKR) of chromium-contaminated soil were investigated using chromium-spiked kaolin-gypsum soil. Results of visual observation and X-ray fluorescence analysis show that high anolyte concentrations could cause an ion-induced potential gradient well trapping effect on the soil near the anode, and consequently cause a focusing phenomenon (FP) without chemical precipitation. This FP significantly prolonged the remediation duration and reduced chromium removal. The low pH value of soil aggravated the FP, resulting in a quasi-dead zone near the anode caused by the reduction in soil resistance, rather than the adsorption of chromium (VI) ions. The high anolyte concentration also resulted in high energy consumption. The FP and low pH value collectively decreased the energy efficiency by more than 96%. This kind of FP can be predicted via the online monitoring of the potential gradient profiles of the soil between the electrodes in the EKR.

  7. In situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction study of the effect of chromium additions to the steel and solution on CO2 corrosion of pipeline steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •We studied the effect of chromium on CO2 corrosion processes. •Chromium addition accelerates the onset of siderite and chukanovite precipitation. •One of the key effects is to decrease the critical supersaturation for siderite nucleation. -- Abstract: We demonstrate the important effects of chromium in the steel composition and of Cr3+ ions in solution on the nucleation and growth of corrosion layers in a CO2 environment. We propose that high-valent metal cations in solution (within the boundary layer) catalyse the nucleation of siderite, which otherwise has a high critical supersaturation for precipitation. One of the key effects of small alloy additions to the steel is to put into the local solution species that decrease the critical supersaturation for siderite and modify the growth rate of the scale, thereby promoting the formation of an adherent and protective scale

  8. Transmission electron microscope study of fusion-environment radiation damage in iron and iron-chromium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, L.L.S.

    1982-07-01

    A transmission electron microscopy study of radiation damage microstructures in iron and iron-chromium alloys has been performed. This study consisted of both qualitative and quantitative characterization of the dislocation and cavity microstructures, including determination of vacancy/interstitial character and Burgers vectors for dislocation loops and analysis of the cavity morphology. The effects of irradiation temperature, fluence, helium implantation, and chromium content were investigated. Neutron irradiation (iron specimens, 1 dpa, 455 to 1000 K) and triple-beam ion irradiation (Fe-10% Cr specimens, 10 dpa, 725 to 950 K; Fe-10% Cr specimens, 850 K, 0.3 to 100 dpa; and Fe, Fe-5% Cr, Fe-10% Cr specimens, 850 K, 10 dpa) were employed. In the triple-beam ion irradiation procedure, simultaneous bombardment with 4 MeV Fe/sup + +/ ions and energetic He/sup +/ and D/sub 2//sup +/ ions was used to simulate the fusion environment (10 at. ppM He/dpa and 41 at. ppM D/dpa). In addition, single-beam 4 MeV Fe/sup + +/ ion irradiations of Fe-10% Cr both with and without pre-injection of helium and deuterium were performed.

  9. Transmission electron microscope study of fusion-environment radiation damage in iron and iron-chromium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A transmission electron microscopy study of radiation damage microstructures in iron and iron-chromium alloys has been performed. This study consisted of both qualitative and quantitative characterization of the dislocation and cavity microstructures, including determination of vacancy/interstitial character and Burgers vectors for dislocation loops and analysis of the cavity morphology. The effects of irradiation temperature, fluence, helium implantation, and chromium content were investigated. Neutron irradiation (iron specimens, 1 dpa, 455 to 1000 K) and triple-beam ion irradiation (Fe-10% Cr specimens, 10 dpa, 725 to 950 K; Fe-10% Cr specimens, 850 K, 0.3 to 100 dpa; and Fe, Fe-5% Cr, Fe-10% Cr specimens, 850 K, 10 dpa) were employed. In the triple-beam ion irradiation procedure, simultaneous bombardment with 4 MeV Fe++ ions and energetic He+ and D2+ ions was used to simulate the fusion environment (10 at. ppM He/dpa and 41 at. ppM D/dpa). In addition, single-beam 4 MeV Fe++ ion irradiations of Fe-10% Cr both with and without pre-injection of helium and deuterium were performed

  10. Workshop on effects of chromium coating on Nb3Sn superconductor strand: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the following topics: Chromium coating on superconductor strand -- an overview; technology of chromium plating; comparison of wires plated by different platers; search for chromium in copper; strand manufactures' presentations; chromium plating at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; a first look at a chromium plating process development project tailored for T.P.X. and I.T.E.R. strand; and influence of chromium diffusion and related phenomena on the reference ratios of bare and chromium plated Nb3Sn strand

  11. Role of Iron Anode Oxidation on Transformation of Chromium by Electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarahney, Hussam; Mao, Xuhui; Alshawabkeh, Akram N

    2012-12-30

    The potential for chemical reduction of hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) in contaminated water and formation of a stable precipitate by Zero Valent Iron (ZVI) anode electrolysis is evaluated in separated electrodes system. Oxidation of iron electrodes produces ferrous ions causing the development of a reducing environment in the anolyte, chemical reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) and formation of stable iron-chromium precipitates. Cr(VI) transformation rates are dependent on the applied electric current density. Increasing the electric current increases the transformation rates; however, the process is more efficient under lower volumetric current density (for example 1.5 mA L(-1) in this study). The transformation follows a zero order rate that is dependent on the electric current density. Cr(VI) transformation occurs in the anolyte when the electrodes are separated as well as when the electrolytes (anolyte/catholyte) are mixed, as used in electrocoagulation. The study shows that the transformation occurs in the anolyte as a result of ferrous ion formation and the product is a stable Fe(15)Cr(5)(OH)(60) precipitate. PMID:23284182

  12. Studies on atomic absorption spectrophotometric analysis of hexavalent chromium in waste water by solvent extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic absorption spectrophotometric(AAS) determination of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] in a waste water was studied. Cr(VI) was extracted with p-xylene from the wastewater, in the way of ion pair formation with anion exchanger aliquat-336(tri-caprylmethyl ammonium chloride). 100ml waste water, after organic materials were extracted out with toluene, was acidified with conc. HCl adjusting the medium to pH 0.5 and 20ml of p-xylene containing 0.01M aliguat-336 was used to extract Cr(VI) from the acidified solution. The absorbance of chromium was measured with air-acetylene flame at 357.9nm. Standard addition method was used in the determining concentration of Cr(VI) extracted. No interference has been found in the extraction of Cr(VI) by the Al(III), Fe(III) and Cr(III) ion presented. However, Fe(II) decreased the absorbance of Cr(VI), due to the fact Fe(II) reduces Cr(VI) to Cr(III). The contained organic material was removed prior to extracting process, since it may reduced the absorbance of Cr(VI). The recovery of added Cr(VI) was over 96%, which seems to be promising and the relative standard deviation was 3.95%. (Author)

  13. Crystal field parameters and energy levels scheme of trivalent chromium doped BSO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this paper is to give an analysis of crystal field parameters and energy levels schemes for the above doped material, in order to give a reliable explanation for experimental data. The crystal field parameters have been modeled in the frame of Exchange Charge Model (ECM) of the crystal field theory, taken into account the geometry of systems, with actually site symmetry of the impurity ions. The effect of the charges of the ligands and covalence bonding between chromium cation and oxygen anions, in the cluster approach, also were taken into account. With the obtained values of the crystal field parameters we simulated the scheme of energy levels of chromium ions by diagonalizing the matrix of the Hamiltonian of the doped crystal. The obtained energy levels and estimated Racah parameters B and C were compared with the experimental spectroscopic data and discussed. Comparison with experiment shows that the results are quite satisfactory which justify the model and simulation scheme used for the title system

  14. Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium Using L-Cysteine Capped Nickel Nanocatalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razium Ali Soomro

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to reduce the highly toxic hexavalent chromium Cr(VI into less toxic chromium Cr(III species by using nickel nanoparticles (Ni NPs as catalysts in order to provide safety to the aqueous environment. In the first phase Ni NPs were synthesized in ethylene glycol and capped with l-cysteine by a modified microwave irradiation method using NaOH as the accelerator. The formed Ni NPs were characterized by various techniques such as UV-Visible spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infra-red (FTIR spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. In the second phase the formed Ni NPs were immobilized on glass surfaces and employed as catalyst for the reduction of Cr(VI ions. According to observations, 99% reduction of Cr(VI ions was achieved in the presence of 0.5 mg of Ni NPs catalyst in just five minutes as compared to nickel powder that showed only 16% reduction in 15 minutes. The study has a great impact on the aqueous pollution control of Cr(VI especially caused by the discharge of waste water from several industries utilizing Cr(VI containing salt as one of the essential gradients.

  15. WATER HYACINTH BIOMASS (WHB FOR THE BIOSORPTION OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM: OPTIMIZATION OF PROCESS PARAMETERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Hadi Hasan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes biomass has been used for many years for the remediation of heavy metals. The present study successfully utilizes the dried powdered biomass of the aerial part (stem and leaves of water hyacinth for biosorption of hexavalent chromium. The effect of various parameters (viz. pH, initial metal ion concentration and temperature on the removal of Cr(VI was studied by conducting only 15 sets of sorption runs using Box-Behnken Design (BBD. The pH had a negative and temperature and concentration had positive effects on uptake of chromium. The predicted results (obtained using an empirical linear polynomial model were found to be in good agreement (R2 = 99.8% with the experimental results. The predicted maximum removal of Cr(VI (91.5181 mg/g can be achieved at pH 2.0, initial metal ion concentration 300 mg/L, and temperature 40 °C. The sorption capacity of sorbent was also calculated using a Langmuir sorption isotherm model and was found to be 101 mg/g at 40 C and pH 2.0.

  16. High-temperature dissolution of nickel chromium ferrites by oxalic acid and nitrilotriacetic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the dissolution of a number of spinel-type oxides containing iron(III) ions by oxalic acid and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) is reported. Increasing the chromium content of oxides of general composition Nisub(0.6)Crsub(x)Fesub(2.4-x)O4 (x = 0.3 to 1.5) brought about a marked reduction in dissolution rate, and it is suggested that this arises by a mechanism involving a change from kink-site attack to ledge-site attack as the former become 'blocked' by less reactive chromium(III) ions. The Nisub(0.6)Crsub(0.6)Fesub(1.8)O4 oxide was investigated in more detail. The concentration dependences determined suggest that both oxalic acid and NTA are adsorbed at surface sites prior to dissolution. NTA brings about dissolution simply by 'complexing' attack, but with oxalic acid it was not possible to distinguish directly between complexing and reductive attack. The divalent cation also plays a role, for in the dissolution of a number of ferrites, AFe2O4 (A = Co, Fe, Mn, Ni), in oxalic acid appreciable differences in dissolution rate were found, the order of reactivity being Fe > Mn > Co > Ni. The reasons for this are discussed. (author)

  17. Identifying genes and gene networks involved in chromium metabolism and detoxification in Crambe abyssinica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zulfiqar, Asma, E-mail: asmazulfiqar08@yahoo.com [Department of Plant, Soil, and Insect Sciences, 270 Stockbridge Road, University of Massachusetts Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Paulose, Bibin, E-mail: bpaulose@psis.umass.edu [Department of Plant, Soil, and Insect Sciences, 270 Stockbridge Road, University of Massachusetts Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Chhikara, Sudesh, E-mail: sudesh@psis.umass.edu [Department of Plant, Soil, and Insect Sciences, 270 Stockbridge Road, University of Massachusetts Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Dhankher, Om Parkash, E-mail: parkash@psis.umass.edu [Department of Plant, Soil, and Insect Sciences, 270 Stockbridge Road, University of Massachusetts Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Chromium pollution is a serious environmental problem with few cost-effective remediation strategies available. Crambe abyssinica (a member of Brassicaseae), a non-food, fast growing high biomass crop, is an ideal candidate for phytoremediation of heavy metals contaminated soils. The present study used a PCR-Select Suppression Subtraction Hybridization approach in C. abyssinica to isolate differentially expressed genes in response to Cr exposure. A total of 72 differentially expressed subtracted cDNAs were sequenced and found to represent 43 genes. The subtracted cDNAs suggest that Cr stress significantly affects pathways related to stress/defense, ion transporters, sulfur assimilation, cell signaling, protein degradation, photosynthesis and cell metabolism. The regulation of these genes in response to Cr exposure was further confirmed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Characterization of these differentially expressed genes may enable the engineering of non-food, high-biomass plants, including C. abyssinica, for phytoremediation of Cr-contaminated soils and sediments. - Highlights: > Molecular mechanism of Cr uptake and detoxification in plants is not well known. > We identified differentially regulated genes upon Cr exposure in Crambe abyssinica. > 72 Cr-induced subtracted cDNAs were sequenced and found to represent 43 genes. > Pathways linked to stress, ion transport, and sulfur assimilation were affected. > This is the first Cr transcriptome study in a crop with phytoremediation potential. - This study describes the identification and isolation of differentially expressed genes involved in chromium metabolism and detoxification in a non-food industrial oil crop Crambe abyssinica.

  18. Adsorption and desorption characteristics of imidazole-modified silica for chromium(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imidazole-modified silica adsorbent with chloride as counter ion (SilprIm-Cl) was synthesized and characterized by scanning electron microscope, infrared spectra, thermogravimetric analysis, elemental analysis and BET analysis. The adsorption of chromium(VI) from aqueous solutions onto the SilprIm-Cl was investigated at varying pH, contact time, initial Cr(VI) concentration, adsorbent amount and temperature. The experimental results showed that the modification of silica with imidazole enhanced significantly the adsorption capacity for Cr(VI). The SilprIm-Cl was of primary anion-exchange adsorption nature, pH and excess Cl− ions in solutions affected significantly the adsorption of chromium(VI). The adsorption isotherms would be well defined with Langmuir model instead of Freundlich model. The adsorption process follows the pseudo-second-order kinetics. The maximum adsorption capacity of Cr(VI) of 47.79 mg g−1 with an initial Cr(VI) concentration of 150 mg L−1 was achieved at pH of 2.0. The adsorption–desorption experiments of the SilprIm-Cl exhibited that the adsorbent could be regenerated and reused eight times at least by simple washings with NaCl and water in turn.

  19. Adsorption and desorption characteristics of imidazole-modified silica for chromium(VI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhike, E-mail: wzk@htu.cn; Ye, Cunling; Wang, Xueyuan; Li, Juan

    2013-12-15

    Imidazole-modified silica adsorbent with chloride as counter ion (SilprIm-Cl) was synthesized and characterized by scanning electron microscope, infrared spectra, thermogravimetric analysis, elemental analysis and BET analysis. The adsorption of chromium(VI) from aqueous solutions onto the SilprIm-Cl was investigated at varying pH, contact time, initial Cr(VI) concentration, adsorbent amount and temperature. The experimental results showed that the modification of silica with imidazole enhanced significantly the adsorption capacity for Cr(VI). The SilprIm-Cl was of primary anion-exchange adsorption nature, pH and excess Cl{sup −} ions in solutions affected significantly the adsorption of chromium(VI). The adsorption isotherms would be well defined with Langmuir model instead of Freundlich model. The adsorption process follows the pseudo-second-order kinetics. The maximum adsorption capacity of Cr(VI) of 47.79 mg g{sup −1} with an initial Cr(VI) concentration of 150 mg L{sup −1} was achieved at pH of 2.0. The adsorption–desorption experiments of the SilprIm-Cl exhibited that the adsorbent could be regenerated and reused eight times at least by simple washings with NaCl and water in turn.

  20. Stabilization of chromium salt in ordinary portland cement

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Damir Barbir; Pero Dabić; Petar Krolo

    2012-12-01

    Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) samples containing the chromium salt have been investigated using differential microcalorimetry, conductometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis. The effect of chromium on OPC hydration was evaluated by continuous observing of early hydration. The microcalorimetrical results show that with increasing the share of chromium salt, heat maximums assume lower values and the occurrence of the maximum registered in the earlier hydration times. Conductometrical measurements show that with increasing addition of chromium salt, curve did not show any specific shape, immediate drop in specific conductivity is noticed and the maximum is reached earlier. This coincides with microcalorimetrical results. It can be concluded that the addition of chromium does not affect the mechanism of the hydration process, but it does affect the kinetic parameters and dynamics of the cement hydration process. It was found that chromium salt addition to the cement–water system is acceptable up to 2 wt.%. According to standard EN 196-3 for OPC, the beginning of binding time should occur after 60 minutes. Increased amount of chromium over 2 wt.% significantly accelerate the beginning of binding time and for the system it is not acceptable.

  1. Chromium speciation in rainwater: temporal variability and atmospheric deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieber, R.J.; Willey, J.D.; Zvalaren, S.D. [University of North Carolina at Wilmington, Wilmington, NC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2002-12-15

    Chromium is released into the atmosphere by a variety of anthropogenic activities which include steel manufacturing, leather tanning, wood presentation and fossil fuel combustion. The concentrations of the various chromium species were determined in 89 rainwater samples collected in Wilmington, NC from October 1, 1999 to December 31, 2001. Volume weighted annual average concentrations of Cr{sub total}, particulate Cr, Cr(III)(aq), and Cr(VI)(aq) were 4.6, 2.2, 0.8 and 1.2 nM, respectively. There was distinct seasonal and diurnal variability in the concentrations of the various chromium species. Chromium emissions to the global atmosphere by both natural and anthropogenic sources are estimated to be 2.2 x 10{sup 9} mol/yr. Using rainwater concentration data along with other published rainwater Cr concentrations and an estimate for total global annual rain, the total global flux of chromium removed from the atmosphere via wet deposition is 2.1 x 10{sup 9} mol/yr. This represents complete removal of Cr and indicates that essentially all chromium released into the global atmosphere is removed via rain. About half this chromium is dissolved with roughly equal concentrations of toxic Cr(VI) and relatively harmless Cr(III) species. 48 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Bioavailability of a potato chromium complex to the laboratory rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research objectives were to study the effect of food source, preparation method and chemical form on bioavailability of chromium. Chromium concentration in potatoes was determined and tubers labeled either intrinsically or extrinsically with radioactive chromate. A labeled chromium complexes was isolated from preparations of raw, baked or fried potatoes and chromatographed on gel permeation media. Availability of the potato chromium complex to the rat was examined in three feeding studies. Animals were dosed with radioactive extrinsically or intrinsically labeled potato extract or with chromate. A labeled chromium complex was isolated from gastrointestinal contents of rats and chromatographed. Potato pulp and peel contained 1.63 and 2.70 μg Cr/g tissue respectively. True and apparent absorption from extrinsically labeled feedings were 33.4 +/- 4.7 and 29.8 +/- 11.2% respectively, and no differences existed between absorption from raw and cooked potatoes. Absorption from the extrinsic labeled potatoes differed significantly from absorption of inorganic chromatium. Apparent absorption of raw (11.1 +/- 7.9%) and cooked (-0.7 +/- 2.8%) intrinsically labeled feedings differed significantly. Absorption of inorganic chromium was 17.8% (true) and 11.5% (apparent). Examination of the chromium complex isolated from gastrointestinal tract contents showed enlargement of the complex in the stomach after consumption

  3. Chromium-induced membrane damage: protective role of ascorbic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Importance of chromium as environmental toxicant is largely due to impact on the body to produce cellular toxicity. The impact of chromium and their supplementation with ascorbic acid was studied on plasma membrane of liver and kidney in male Wistar rats (80 - 100gbody weight). It has been observed that the intoxication with chromium ( i. p. ) at the dose of 0.8 mg/100g body weight per day for a period of 28 days causes significant increase in the level of cholesterol and decrease in the level of phospbolipid of both liver and kidney. The alkaline pbosphatase, total ATPase and Na + -K + -ATPase activities were significantly decreased in both liver and kidney after chromium treatment,except total ATPase activity of kidney. It is suggested that chromium exposure at the present dose and duration induce for the alterations of structure and function of both liver and kidney plasma membrane. Ascorbic acid ( i.p. at the dose of 0.5 mg,/100g body weight per day for period of 28 days) supplementation can reduce these structural changes in the plasma membrane of liver and kidney. But the functional changes can not be completely replenished by the ascorbic acid supplementation in response to chromium exposure. So it is also suggested that ascorbic acid (nutritional antioxidant) is useful free radical scavenger to restrain the chromium-induced membrane damage.

  4. Chromium liquid waste inertization in an inorganic alkali activated matrix: Leaching and NMR multinuclear approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponzoni, Chiara, E-mail: chiara.ponzoni@unimore.it [University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Department of Engineering “Enzo Ferrari”, Modena (Italy); Lancellotti, Isabella; Barbieri, Luisa [University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Department of Engineering “Enzo Ferrari”, Modena (Italy); Spinella, Alberto; Saladino, Maria Luisa [University of Palermo CGA-UniNetLab, Palermo (Italy); Martino, Delia Chillura [University of Palermo, Department STEBICEF, Palermo (Italy); Caponetti, Eugenio [University of Palermo CGA-UniNetLab, Palermo (Italy); University of Palermo, Department STEBICEF, Palermo (Italy); Armetta, Francesco [University of Palermo, Department STEBICEF, Palermo (Italy); Leonelli, Cristina [University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Department of Engineering “Enzo Ferrari”, Modena (Italy)

    2015-04-09

    Highlights: • Inertization of chromium liquid waste in aluminosilicate matrix. • Water less inertization technique exploiting the waste water content. • Liquid waste inertization without drying step. • Long term stabilization study through leaching test. • SEM analysis and {sup 29}Si and {sup 27}Al MAS NMR in relation with long curing time. - Abstract: A class of inorganic binders, also known as geopolymers, can be obtained by alkali activation of aluminosilicate powders at room temperature. The process is affected by many parameters (curing time, curing temperature, relative humidity etc.) and leads to a resistant matrix usable for inertization of hazardous waste. In this study an industrial liquid waste containing a high amount of chromium (≈2.3 wt%) in the form of metalorganic salts is inertized into a metakaolin based geopolymer matrix. One of the innovative aspects is the exploitation of the water contained in the waste for the geopolymerization process. This avoided any drying treatment, a common step in the management of liquid hazardous waste. The evolution of the process - from the precursor dissolution to the final geopolymer matrix hardening - of different geopolymers containing a waste amount ranging from 3 to 20% wt and their capability to inertize chromium cations were studied by: i) the leaching tests, according to the EN 12,457 regulation, at different curing times (15, 28, 90 and 540 days) monitoring releases of chromium ions (Cr(III) and Cr(VI)) and the cations constituting the aluminosilicate matrix (Na, Si, Al); ii) the humidity variation for different curing times (15 and 540 days); iii) SEM characterization at different curing times (28 and 540 days); iv) the trend of the solution conductivity and pH during the leaching test; v) the characterization of the short-range ordering in terms of T−O−T bonds (where T is Al or Si) by {sup 29}Si and {sup 27}Al solid state magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (ss MAS NMR) for

  5. Chromium liquid waste inertization in an inorganic alkali activated matrix: Leaching and NMR multinuclear approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Inertization of chromium liquid waste in aluminosilicate matrix. • Water less inertization technique exploiting the waste water content. • Liquid waste inertization without drying step. • Long term stabilization study through leaching test. • SEM analysis and 29Si and 27Al MAS NMR in relation with long curing time. - Abstract: A class of inorganic binders, also known as geopolymers, can be obtained by alkali activation of aluminosilicate powders at room temperature. The process is affected by many parameters (curing time, curing temperature, relative humidity etc.) and leads to a resistant matrix usable for inertization of hazardous waste. In this study an industrial liquid waste containing a high amount of chromium (≈2.3 wt%) in the form of metalorganic salts is inertized into a metakaolin based geopolymer matrix. One of the innovative aspects is the exploitation of the water contained in the waste for the geopolymerization process. This avoided any drying treatment, a common step in the management of liquid hazardous waste. The evolution of the process - from the precursor dissolution to the final geopolymer matrix hardening - of different geopolymers containing a waste amount ranging from 3 to 20% wt and their capability to inertize chromium cations were studied by: i) the leaching tests, according to the EN 12,457 regulation, at different curing times (15, 28, 90 and 540 days) monitoring releases of chromium ions (Cr(III) and Cr(VI)) and the cations constituting the aluminosilicate matrix (Na, Si, Al); ii) the humidity variation for different curing times (15 and 540 days); iii) SEM characterization at different curing times (28 and 540 days); iv) the trend of the solution conductivity and pH during the leaching test; v) the characterization of the short-range ordering in terms of T−O−T bonds (where T is Al or Si) by 29Si and 27Al solid state magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (ss MAS NMR) for geopolymers containing

  6. Acetabular bone density and metal ions after metal-on-metal versus metal-on-polyethylene total hip arthroplasty; short-term results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, Wierd P.; van der Veen, Hugo C.; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Zee, Mark J. M.; Bulstra, Sjoerd K.; van Raay, Jos J. A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Information on periprosthetic acetabular bone density is lacking for metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasties. These bearings use cobalt-chromium instead of titanium acetabular components, which could lead to stress shielding and hence periprosthetic bone loss. Cobalt and chromium ions have detriment

  7. Fertilizers and Mixed Crop Cultivation of Chromium Tolerant and Sensitive Plants under Chromium Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    B. Dheeba; Sampathkumar, P; Kannan, K.

    2015-01-01

    Zea mays (maize) and Vigna radiata (green gram) are found to be the chromium (Cr) tolerant and sensitive plants, respectively. In the present paper, we investigate the reduction of the toxicity of Cr in the sensitive plants by the mixed crop cultivation in the field using various amendments. Further, the potassium dichromate was used as the source of hexavalent Cr. The results indicated that Cr adversely affects both the growth and yield of plants. The soil properties vary with Cr and differe...

  8. The effect of crystal orientation on damage accumulation in chromium-implanted Al2O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromium-implantation of single crystal aluminium oxide (Al2O3) has been shown to be anisotropic with respect to damage accumulation. Ultra-low load indentation and Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS) have been used to demonstrate the dependence of radiation damage on fluence and crystal orientation. Single crystal Al2O3 specimens of c-axis ([0001] normal to the surface) and a-axis ([1120] normal to the surface) orientations were ion-implanted simultaneously and found to possess different near-surface mechanical properties. Subsequent RBS-ion channeling examination indicated different amounts of disorder in both the aluminum and oxygen sublattices for the two orientations. These results imply a higher amorphization threshold in terms of implantation fluence for the a-axis oriented samples. 15 refs., 6 figs

  9. Microbial Diversity of Chromium-Contaminated Soils and Characterization of Six Chromium-Removing Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhiguo; Hu, Yuting; Yin, Zhen; Hu, Yuehua; Zhong, Hui

    2016-06-01

    Three soil samples obtained from different sites adjacent to a chromium slag heap in a steel alloy factory were taken to examine the effect of chromium contamination on soil bacterial diversity as determined by construction of 16S rDNA clone libraries and sequencing of selected clones based on restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Results revealed that Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Alphaproteobacteria occurred in all three soil samples, although the three samples differed in their total diversity. Sample 1 had the highest microbial diversity covering 12 different classes, while Sample 3 had the lowest microbial diversity. Strains of six different species were successfully isolated, one of which was identified as Zobellella denitrificans. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a strain belonging to the genus Zobellella able to resist and reduce chromium. Among all isolates studied, Bacillus odysseyi YH2 exhibited the highest Cr(VI)-reducing capability, with a total removal of 23.5 % of an initial Cr(VI) concentration of 350 mg L-1.

  10. Chromium removal from tannery wastewater by using of flying ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple and economic method to chromium removal from tannery wastewater by means of flying ash is presented. The chromium removal operation is a discontinuous process that involve the mass of flying ash, time of contact and temperature or ph as variables, their which are optimized through Box-Wilson type experimental design. The results were successful: From an initial fluid whit chromium concentration of 1850m ppm, final concentrations of 0.008 ppm and 0.5 ppm of Cr+3 and Cr+6 respectively were achieved. These post-treatment concentrations are into the approved range definite by Government's Laws to this waste type

  11. Thermal incorporation behavior during the reduction and stabilization of chromium wastes

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Jun; 楊駿

    2015-01-01

    The possibility of employing periclase to stabilize chromium in chromium wastes into spinel-based ceramics through thermal method was investigated by heating mixture of simulated chromium waste and magnesium oxide. Different types of magnesium oxide precursors were introduced to incorporate chromium oxide into magnesiochromite (MgCr2O4) ranging from 550 ºC to 1350 ºC. Magnesium oxide precursors of both types can effectively incorporate chromium oxide but via different mechanisms. Three main f...

  12. Effects of Supplemental Dietary Chromium on Yield and Nutrient Digestibility of Laying Hens Under Low Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    ŞAHİN, Kazım; ERTAŞ, O. Nihat; GÜLER, Talat; ÇİFTÇİ, Mehmet

    2001-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of chromium picolinate (CrPi) added into diet containing 710.3 ppb chromium on yield and nutrient digestibility of laying hens at low temperature. Forty-six-week-old laying hens were randomly assigned to four groups of 30 hens per group. Treatment groups were fed different supplemental dietary chromium levels. Thus, hens were fed diets with no supplemental chromium (Control Group), 100 ppb of supplemental chromium (100 Group), 200 ppb of s...

  13. Evaluation of the comprehensiveness and reliability of the chromium composition of foods in the literature ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Thor, Mayly Y.; Harnack, Lisa; King, Denise; Jasthi, Bhaskarani; Pettit, Janet

    2011-01-01

    In the early 1960s, trivalent chromium Cr3+ became recognized as an essential trace element due to its potential metabolic and cardiovascular benefits. No comprehensive chromium database currently exists; thus a thorough review of the literature was conducted to examine the availability and reliability of chromium data for foods. A number of key issues were identified that challenge the feasibility of adding chromium to a food and nutrient database. Foremost, dietary chromium data reported in...

  14. Chromium(III) complexation to natural organic matter : Mechanisms and modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Gustafsson, Jon Petter; Persson, I.; Oromieh, A. G.; Van Schaik, J. W. J.; Sjöstedt, Carin; Kleja, D. B.

    2014-01-01

    Chromium is a common soil contaminant, and it often exists as chromium(III). However, limited information exists on the coordination chemistry and stability of chromium(III) complexes with natural organic matter (NOM). Here, the complexation of chromium(III) to mor layer material and to Suwannee River Fulvic Acid (SRFA) was investigated using EXAFS spectroscopy and batch experiments. The EXAFS results showed a predominance of monomeric chromium(III)-NOM complexes at low pH (<5), in which o...

  15. Abatement of Chromium Emissions from Steelmaking Slags - Cr Stabilization by Phase Separation

    OpenAIRE

    Albertsson, Galina

    2013-01-01

    Chromium is an important alloying element in stainless steel but also environmentally harmful element. A number of mineralogical phases present in the slag matrix can contain chromium and lead to chromium leaching. Chromium in slag if not stabilized, could oxidize to the cancerogenic hexavalent state, and leach out if exposed to acidic and oxygen rich environment. Other environmental concerns are slag dusting and chromium escape to the atmosphere. Despite the fact that there is a certain risk...

  16. The oxidation and reduction of chromium of stainless steels in an eletric arc furnace

    OpenAIRE

    Arh, B.; F. Tehovnik

    2011-01-01

    The oxidation of chromium during the elaboration of stainless steels occurs with oxygen in solution blown inthe melt and with oxides in the slag. A higher content of silicon in the furnace charge decreases the extent of oxidation of chromium, however, the efficient reduction of chromium from the slag is of essential importance for a minimal loss of chromium. In this survey, the theory of the oxidation of chromium, its reduction from the slag and the conditions for the formation of foaming sla...

  17. Chromium accumulation, microorganism population and enzyme activities in soils around chromium-containing slag heap of steel alloy factory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Shun-hong; PENG Bing; YANG Zhi-hui; CHAI Li-yuan; ZHOU Li-cheng

    2009-01-01

    The environmental risk of chromium pollution is pronounced in soils adjacent to chromate industry. It is important to investigate the functioning of soil microorganisms in ecosystems exposed to long-term contamination by chromium. 45 soil samples obtained from different places of the slag heap in a steel alloy factory were analyzed for chromium contamination level and its effect on soil microorganisms and enzyme activities. The results show that the average concentrations of total Cr in the soil under the slag heap, adjacent to the slag heap and outside the factory exceed the threshold of Secondary Environmental Quality Standard for Soil in China by 354%, 540% and 184%, respectively, and are 15, 21 and 9 times higher than the local background value, respectively. Elevated chromium loadings result in changes in the activity of the soil microbe, as indicated by the negative correlations between soil microbial population and chromium contents. Dehydrogenase activity is greatly depressed by chromium in the soil. The results imply that dehydrogenase activity can be used as an indicator for the chromium pollution level in the area of the steel alloy factory.

  18. Evaluation of chromium in red blood cells as an indicator of exposure to hexavalent chromium: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devoy, Jérôme; Géhin, Antoine; Müller, Samuel; Melczer, Mathieu; Remy, Aurélie; Antoine, Guillaume; Sponne, Isabelle

    2016-07-25

    Chromium(VI) compounds are classified as carcinogenic to humans. Whereas chromium measurements in urine and whole blood (i.e., including plasma) are indicative of recent exposure, chromium in red blood cells (RBC) is attributable specifically to Cr(VI) exposure. Before recommending Cr in RBC as a biological indicator of Cr(VI) exposure, in-vitro studies must be undertaken to assess its reliability. The present study examines the relationship between the chromium added to a blood sample and that subsequently found in the RBC. After incubation of total blood with chromium, RBC were isolated, counted and their viability assessed. Direct analysis of chromium in RBC was conducted using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. Hexavalent, but not trivalent Cr, was seen to accumulate in the RBC and we found a strong correlation between the Cr(VI) concentration added to a blood sample and the amount of Cr in RBC. This relationship appears to be independent of the chemical properties of the human blood samples (e.g., different blood donors or different reducing capacities). Even though in-vivo studies are still needed to integrate our understanding of Cr(VI) toxicokinetics, our findings reinforce the idea that a single determination of the chromium concentration in RBC would enable biomonitoring of critical cases of Cr(VI) exposure. PMID:27178267

  19. The fate of chromium during tropical weathering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berger, Alfons; Frei, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We performed a mineral, geochemical and Cr–Sr–Pb isotope study on a laterite profile developed on ca. 540 Ma old tonalitic bedrock in Madagascar with special emphasis on the behavior of chromium during tropical weathering. The observed strong depletions of Ca, Si, and P, and enrichment of Fe and Al...... weathering profile. The negatively fractionated δ53Cr values measured in the weathering profile relative to the unaltered tonalitic bedrock characterized by a high temperature magmatic inventory Cr isotope signature are consistent with loss of a positively fractionated Cr(VI) pool formed during weathering...... highly oxidative conditions, which in well drained sulfide-bearing parent bedrocks potentially lead to both, acid dissolution of sulfide-hosted Cr and redox-promoted mobilization of Cr(VI) from silicates during later stages of weathering under basic pH conditions....

  20. Neutron capture by the chromium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capture cross sections of the chromium isotopes have been measured at neutron energies up to 350 keV using the capture cross section facility at the 40 m station of the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator. Parameters have been derived for 180 resonances. A moderate correlation [rho(gamma-n-0,gamma-gamma) approximately 0.45] is observed between reduced neutron widths and radiative widths for s-wave resonances. Calculations of valence widths show that valence capture can only account for the correlated component of the observed radiative widths. An additional mechanism such as a 2p-1h doorway state must therefore be occurring to explain the uncorrelated component. (author)

  1. Utilization of Water Hyacinth (Eichhorniacrassipes for Phytoremediation of Hexavalent Chromium in Simulated Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhonalyn V. Maulion

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common sources of contamination in surface water is the discharge of waste water containing heavy metals from different industrial applications.Methods in the removal of contaminants like hexavalent chromium, Cr+6 ,that are available nowadays are too costly and difficult to operate efficiently. A new approach to solve such problem is Phytoremediation or the use of green plants in the removal of contaminants from wastewater that contains heavy metals.In this study, the effectiveness of water hyacinth (Eichhorniacrassipes was evaluated for its capability in removing hexavalent chromium from simulated wastewater.The effect of a co-ion, specifically Cu2+ ions, on the percentage removal of Cr6+ was also studied. Diphenyl carbazide colorimetric method was used to quantify the amount of Cr6+ left after treatment with water hyacinth.The percentage removal of Cr6+ was determined under varying conditions. The parameters varied were concentration of Cr6+ (3, 6, & 9 mg/L, contact time (4, 8, and 12 days and concentration of Cu2+ (0, 4, and 8 mg/L. Results showed that the percentage removal of Cr6+ is directly proportional to the initial concentration of Cr6+ and contact time but inversely proportional to the concentration of co-ions which is Cu2+ ions. Results and statistical data showed that the optimum condition for phytoremediation of Cr6+ using water hyacinth is 12 days of contact time, and initial concentrations of 9 mg/L and 4 mg/L of Cr6+ and Cu2+ respectively.Overall results indicated that Eichhorniacrassipes can be used for phytoremediation of Cr+6contaminated wastewater.

  2. Interdiffusion and growth of chromium silicide at the interface of Cr/Si(As) system during rapid thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the solid-state reaction between a thin film of chromium and silicon has been studied using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and the sheet resistance measurements. The thickness of 100 nm chromium layer has been deposited by electronic bombardment on Si (100) substrates, part of them had previously been implanted with arsenic ions of 1015 at/cm2 doses and an energy of 100 keV. The samples were heat treated under rapid thermal annealing at 500 oC for time intervals ranging from 15 to 60 s. The rapid thermal annealing leads to a reaction at the interface Cr/Si inducing the formation and the growth of the unique silicide CrSi2, but no other phase can be detected. For samples implanted with arsenic, the saturation value of the sheet resistance is approximately 1.5 times higher than for the non-implanted case.

  3. Sorptive removal of trivalent and hexavalent chromium from binary aqueous solutions by composite alginate-goethite beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazaridis, N K; Charalambous, Ch

    2005-11-01

    In this study, the removal of hexavalent and trivalent chromium ions from binary aqueous solutions by composite alginate-goethite beads was investigated in a batch mode. Equilibrium sorption experiments were carried out at different temperatures and pH values. The data were correlated with Langmuir and Freundlich equations. The thermodynamic parameters calculated were: change in free energy, in enthalpy, in entropy and the heat of adsorption. The influence of mixing rate, sorbent concentration and sorbent particle size was studied at kinetic runs. The effective diffusion coefficients were evaluated by employing the homogeneous diffusion model and the shrinking core model for hexavalent and trivalent chromium, respectively. Desorption experiments were conducted by employing various eluants showed that the loaded material could be regenerated satisfactorily. PMID:16233908

  4. Optical emission from laser-produced chromium and magnesium plasma under the effect of two sequential laser pulses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V N Rai; F Y Yueh; J P Singh

    2005-12-01

    Parametric study of optical emission from two successive laser pulses produced chromium and magnesium plasma is presented. The line emission from chromium and magnesium plasma showed an increase by more than six times for double laser pulse excitation than for single-pulse excitation. An optimum increase in emission intensity was noted for inter-pulse delay of ∼ 2–3 s for all the elements. The experimental observations were qualitatively explained on the basis of absorption of second laser pulse in the pre-formed (by first laser) coronal plasma by inverse Bremsstrahlung process, which were found responsible for the excitation of more ions and atoms in the plasma. This process starts as the plasma scale length becomes greater than the laser wavelength. This study further indicated the suitability of this technique in the field of elemental analysis.

  5. Observed transitions in n = 2 ground configurations of copper, nickel, iron, chromium and germanium in tokamak discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of spectrum lines of highly ionized copper, nickel, iron, chromium, and germanium have been observed and the corresponding transitions identified. The element under study is introduced into the discharge of the PLT Tokamak by means of rapid ablation by a laser pulse. The ionization state is generally distinguishable from the time behavior of the emitted light. New identifications of transitions are based on predicted wavelengths (from isoelectronic extrapolation and other data) and on approximate expected intensities. All the transitions pertain to the ground configurations of the respective ions, which are the only states strongly populated at tokamak plasma conditions. These lines are expected to be useful for spectroscopic plasma diagnostics in the 1-3 keV temperature range, and they provide direct measurement of intersystem energy separations from chromium through copper in the oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon isoelectronic sequences

  6. Chromium and Polyphenols from Cinnamon and Insulin Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Factors that improve insulin sensitivity usually lead to improvements in risk factors associated with the metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. Naturally occurring bioactive compounds that have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity include chromium and polyphenols found in ...

  7. Contingency plans for chromium utilization. Publication NMAB-335

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States depends entirely on foreign sources for the critical material, chromium, making it very vulnerable to supply disruptions. This vulnerability results because chromium is essential for the fabrication of corrosion-resisting steels and high-temperature, oxidation-resisting alloys in applications that are vital to the nation's technological well-being; because no substitutes are known for these materials in those applications; and because the known, substantial deposits of chromite ore are only in a few geographical locations that could become inaccessible to the United States as a result of political actions. The effectiveness of programs such as stockpiling, conservation, and research and development for substitutes to reduce the impact of disruption of imports of chromite and ferrochromium are discussed. Alternatives for decreasing chromium consumption also are identified for chromium-containing materials in the areas of design, processing, and substitution

  8. Synthesis and characterization of novel chromium pillared clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New chromium pillared clays of basal spacing 2.45 nm were synthesized and characterized. The chromium oligomers used for intercalation were prepared by quick addition of base and acid to Cr(III) monomeric solutions followed by reflux. The synthesized clays exhibit increased BET surface area and higher micropore volume compared to clays with lower galleries, pillared either by smaller Cr(III) oligomers or by Cr(III) monomers. Important parameters affecting the d001 basal spacing were studied, e.g. the pH of the pillaring solution, the intercalation time, the chromium concentration and the counter-anion present in the chromium solutions. Scanning electron micrographs were acquired to demonstrate changes of the clay texture before and after pillaring. The thermal behavior of the synthesized clays was also examined

  9. Adsorption Properties of Chromium (VI by Chitosan Coated Montmorillonite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahe Fan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of chromium (VI by Chitosan Coated Montmorillonite (CCM from aqueous solution was studied. To evaluate the adsorption capacity, the effects of pH, initial concentration and temperature on the adsorption were investigated. The isothermal data was applied to Langmuir linear and the Freundlich linear isotherm equation and the thermodynamic parameters (ΔH, ΔG, ΔS were calculated according to the values of binding Langmuir constant, KL. Results indicated that the adsorption between CCM and chromium (VI was significantly physical, the negative ΔH constant at lower temperature confirmed that the more chromium (VI was adsorbed by chitosan coated montmorillonite at lower temperature. The kinetics of the sorption process of chromium (VI on chitosan coated montmorillonite were investigated using the pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order kinetics, results showed that the pseudo-second order equation model provided the best correlation with the experimental results.

  10. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium (Peer Review Plan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is conducting a peer review of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of hexavalent chromium that will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database.

  11. Fabrication of high rate chromium getter sources for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design and fabrication techniques are described for the manufacture of large-capacity chromium getter sources, analogous to the commercially available titanium getter source known as Ti-Ball, manufactured by Varian Associates

  12. Detecting Grain-Boundary Chromium Depletion in Inconel 600

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airey, G. P.; Vaia, A. R.; Pessall, N.; Aspden, R. G.

    1981-11-01

    Techniques to evaluate grain-boundary chromium depletion in Inconel Alloy 600 were investigated. Procedures studied were a modified Huey test, reactivation polarization, magnetic permeability measurements, and eddy current measurements. Results from these tests were correlated with susceptibility to stress-assisted intergranular cracking in polythionic acid. Thermally treated Inconel Alloy 600 steam generator tubing was the principal source of material evaluated, but experimental heats of Ni-Cr-Fe alloys with 8-18 wt.% Cr were prepared to determine the critical chromium level below which stress-assisted intergranular cracking occurs; this critical chromium content was found to be between 9.8 and 11.7 wt.%. All four techniques were considered suitable to evaluate grain-boundary chromium depletion; the modified Huey test and reactivation polarization technique showed a greater sensitivity than the magnetic permeability and eddy current measurements.

  13. The diffusion of chromium in a duplex alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffusion of chromium in a duplex stainless steel containing approximately 8% ferrite has been investigated in the temperature range 600 to 10000C using the standard serial sectioning technique. The resulting concentration profiles exhibited up to four distinct regions. The two main regions are attributed to volume diffusion in the austenite and ferrite phases, the other zones being due to short circuiting paths. Volume diffusion in the austenite phase is in good agreement with chromium diffusion in Type 316 steel. The chromium diffusion coefficient in the ferrite phase of approximate composition 25 wt % Cr, 5 wt % Ni is given by: Dsub(α) = (6.0(+11,-3)) x 10-6 exp - ((212+-5)/RT) m2s-1 the activation energy being expressed in kJ.mol-1. Little evidence was found for enhanced chromium diffusion along austenite/ferrite interface boundaries. (author)

  14. New Chromium Carbonyl Catalysts for [6+2] Cycloaddition Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Kundig, Ernst Peter; Robvieux, Fabrice; Kondratenko, Mikhail

    2002-01-01

    The complexes, (benzene)chromiumdicarbonyl(methyl acrylate) and chromiumdicarbonylbis(cyclohexadiene), are precursors for the highly coordinatively unsaturated chromium dicarbonyl fragment 3, a catalyst for the cycloaddition of activated olefins to cycloheptatriene.

  15. Near-anode focusing phenomenon caused by the high anolyte concentration in the electrokinetic remediation of chromium(VI)-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong; Xiong, Zhen; Nie, Yang; Niu, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Li; Liu, Yuan-Yuan

    2012-08-30

    The effects of the concentration and the low pH value of anolyte on the electrokinetic remediation (EKR) of chromium-contaminated soil were investigated using chromium-spiked kaolin-gypsum soil. Results of visual observation and X-ray fluorescence analysis show that high anolyte concentrations could cause an ion-induced potential gradient well trapping effect on the soil near the anode, and consequently cause a focusing phenomenon (FP) without chemical precipitation. This FP significantly prolonged the remediation duration and reduced chromium removal. The low pH value of soil aggravated the FP, resulting in a quasi-dead zone near the anode caused by the reduction in soil resistance, rather than the adsorption of chromium (VI) ions. The high anolyte concentration also resulted in high energy consumption. The FP and low pH value collectively decreased the energy efficiency by more than 96%. This kind of FP can be predicted via the online monitoring of the potential gradient profiles of the soil between the electrodes in the EKR. PMID:22738769

  16. Coals as sorbents for the removal and reduction of hexavalent chromium from aqueous waste streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakatos, J.; Brown, S.D.; Snape, C.E. [University of Miskolc, Miskolc (Hungary). Dept. of Analytical Chemistry

    2002-03-01

    The aim of this study is to demonstrate the potential of coals as a low-cost reactive barrier material for environmental protection applications, with the ability to prevent leaching of toxic Cr(VI) and other transition metals. Depending upon the type of ion and the surface functionalities, the uptake can involve ion sorption, ion exchange, chelation and redox mechanisms with the surface functionalities being considered as partners in electron transfer processes. The capacity for Cr(VI) uptake of low rank coals and oxidized bituminous coals has been found to lie within the range 02-0.6 mM g{sup -1}. Air oxidation of bituminous coals can increase their Cr(VI) removal capacities. The effect of air oxidation of coals on uptake capacity was more pronounced for Cr(VI) than Cr(III) but less than for Hg(II) and the other ions (Ca{sup 2+}, Ba{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2}) investigated. As previously found for Hg(II), redox mechanisms plays an important role in Cr(VI) uptake, with resultant Cr(III) is exchanged back into solution by hydrogen ions, but some of the sorbed chromium is irreversibly bound to the coal. The reduction of Cr(VI) alone is often considered a satisfactory solution in view of Cr(III) being essentially nontoxic. 56 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Biosorption of Chromium (VI) from Aqueous Solutions onto Fungal Biomass

    OpenAIRE

    Ismael Acosta R.; Xöchitl Rodríguez; Conrado Gutiérrez; Ma. de Guadalupe Moctezuma

    2004-01-01

    The biosorption of chromium (VI) on eighteen different natural biosorbents: Natural sediment, chitosan, chitin, Aspergillus flavus I-V, Aspergillus fumigatus I-ll, Helmintosporium sp, Cladosporium sp, Mucor rouxii mutant, M. rouxii IM-80, Mucor sp-I and 2, Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans was studied in this work. It was found that the biomass of C. neoformans, natural sediment, Helmintosporium sp and chitosan was more efficient to remove chromium (VI) (determined spectrophotometr...

  18. Stainless Steel Leaches Nickel and Chromium into Foods During Cooking

    OpenAIRE

    Kamerud, Kristin L.; Hobbie, Kevin A.; Anderson, Kim A.

    2013-01-01

    Toxicological studies show that oral doses of nickel and chromium can cause cutaneous adverse reactions such as dermatitis. Additional dietary sources, such as leaching from stainless steel cookware during food preparation, are not well characterized. This study examined stainless steel grades, cooking time, repetitive cooking cycles, and multiple types of tomato sauces for their effects on nickel and chromium leaching. Trials included three types of stainless steels and a stainless steel sau...

  19. Genetic Predisposition for Dermal Problems in Hexavalent Chromium Exposed Population

    OpenAIRE

    Priti Sharma; Vipin Bihari; Agarwal, Sudhir K.; Goel, Sudhir K.

    2012-01-01

    We studied the effect of genetic susceptibility on hexavalent chromium induced dermal adversities. The health status of population was examined from the areas of Kanpur (India) having the elevated hexavalent chromium levels in groundwater. Blood samples were collected for DNA isolation to conduct polymorphic determination of genes, namely: NQO1 (C609T), hOGG1 (C1245G), GSTT1, and GSTM1 (deletion). Symptomatic exposed subjects (n = 38) were compared with asymptomatic exposed subjects (n = 108)...

  20. Chromium (V) compounds as cathode material in electrochemical power sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delnick, F.M.; Guidotti, R.A.; McCarthy, D.K.

    A cathode for use in a thermal battery, comprising a chromium (V) compound. The preferred materials for this use are Ca/sub 5/(CrO/sub 4/)/sub 3/Cl, Ca/sub 5/(CrO/sub 4/)OH, and Cr/sub 2/O/sub 5/. The chromium (V) compound can be employed as a cathode material in ambient temperature batteries when blended with a suitably conductive filler, preferably carbon black.

  1. SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ACTIVITIES FOR CHROMIUM IN THE 100 AREAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PETERSEN SW

    2009-07-02

    {sm_bullet} Primary Objective: Protect the Columbia River - Focus is control and treatment of contamination at or near the shoreline, which is influenced by bank storage {sm_bullet} Secondary Objective: Reduce hexavalent chromium to <48 parts per billion (ppb) in aquifer (drinking water standard) - Large plumes with isolated areas of high chromium concentrations (> 40,000 ppb), - Unknown source location(s); probably originating in reactor operation areas

  2. DANGER OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM AND STRATEGY FOR THE REMEDITATION

    OpenAIRE

    Aniruddha Roy; Ayan Das; Nirmal Paul

    2013-01-01

    Some metals as micronutrients have a major role in the life and growth process of plants and animals. However, certain forms of some metals may also act as toxic material even in relatively small quantities. Chromium is such a metal, whose concentration above a certain limit may cause a serious problem to the health of living organisms. Chromium (Cr) may occur in several chemical forms in organic and inorganic systems. In biological systems only Cr (III) and Cr (VI) are signifi...

  3. Stereology of carbide phase in modified hypereutectic chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Suchoń

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In paper are presented results of studies of carbide phase stereology modified hypereutectic wear resistance chromium cast iron which contains carbon about 3,5% and chromium about 25%. Three substances were applied to the modification: boron carbide (B4C, ferroniobium (FeNb and mixture of ferroniobium and rare-earth (RE. The measurements of geometrical features of carbides were conducted on microsection taken from castings wich were cooled with various velocities.

  4. Stereology of carbide phase in modified hypereutectic chromium cast iron

    OpenAIRE

    J. Suchoń; A. Studnicki; M. Przybył

    2010-01-01

    In paper are presented results of studies of carbide phase stereology modified hypereutectic wear resistance chromium cast iron which contains carbon about 3,5% and chromium about 25%. Three substances were applied to the modification: boron carbide (B4C), ferroniobium (FeNb) and mixture of ferroniobium and rare-earth (RE). The measurements of geometrical features of carbides were conducted on microsection taken from castings wich were cooled with various velocities.

  5. Chromium reduction from slag on electromelting of stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specific features of chromium reduction from the slag on electromelting of stainless steel type Kh18N10T according to one- or two-slag procedure were studied. It was shown that one-slag melting technology allows double decrease of chromium losses in the form of incompletely reduced oxides. This occurs due to additional chemical reactions between metal and slag on their combined pouring into the ladle. 1 ref.; 3 figs

  6. 40 CFR Appendix Xii to Part 266 - Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery Furnaces XII Appendix XII to Part 266... FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. XII Appendix XII to Part 266—Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may...

  7. Enhancing collagen stability through nanostructures containing chromium(III) oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangeetha, Selvam; Ramamoorthy, Usha; Sreeram, Kalarical Janardhanan; Nair, Balachandran Unni

    2012-12-01

    Stabilization of collagen for various applications employs chemicals such as aldehydes, metal ions, polyphenols, etc. Stability against enzymatic, thermal and mechanical degradation is required for a range of biomedical applications. The premise of this research is to explore the use of nanoparticles with suitable functionalization/encapsulation to crosslink with collagen, such that the three dimensional architecture had the desired stability. Collagen solution prepared as per standard protocols is treated with chromium(III) oxide nanoparticules encapsulated within a polymeric matrix (polystyrene-block-polyacrylic acid copolymer). Selectivity towards encapsulation was ensured by the reaction in dimethyl sulfoxide, where the PS groups popped out and encapsulated the Cr(2)O(3). Subsequently when immersed in aqueous solution, PAA units popped up to react with functional groups of collagen. The interaction with collagen was monitored through techniques such as CD, FTIR, viscosity measurements, stress analysis. CD studies and FTIR showed no degradation of collagen. Thermal stability was enhanced upon interaction of nanostructures with collagen. Self-assembly of collagen was delayed but not inhibited, indicating a compete binding of the metal oxide encapsulated polymer to collagen. Metal oxide nanoparticles encapsulated within a polymeric matrix could provide thermal and mechanical stability to collagen. The formed fibrils of collagen could serve as ideal material for various smart applications such as slow/sustained drug release. The study is also relevant to the leather industry in that the nanostructures can diffuse through the highly networked collagen fibre bundles in skin matrix easily, thus overcoming the rate limiting step of diffusion. PMID:22766281

  8. Evaluating trivalent chromium toxicity on wild terrestrial and wetland plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukina, A O; Boutin, C; Rowland, O; Carpenter, D J

    2016-11-01

    Elevated chromium levels in soil from mining can impact the environment, including plants. Mining of chromium is concentrated in South Africa, several Asian countries, and potentially in Northern Ontario, Canada, raising concerns since chromium toxicity to wild plants is poorly understood. In the first experiment, concentration-response tests were conducted to evaluate effects of chromium on terrestrial and wetland plants. Following established guidelines using artificial soil, seeds of 32 species were exposed to chromium (Cr(3+)) at concentrations simulating contamination (0-1000 mg kg(-1)). This study found that low levels of chromium (250 mg kg(-1)) adversely affected the germination of 22% of species (33% of all families), while higher levels (500 and 1000 mg kg(-1)) affected 69% and 94% of species, respectively, from 89% of the families. Secondly, effects on seedbanks were studied using soil collected in Northern Ontario and exposed to Cr(3+) at equivalent concentrations (0-1000 mg kg(-1)). Effects were less severe in the seedbank study with significant differences only observed at 1000 mg kg(-1). Seeds exposed to Cr(3+) during stratification were greatly affected. Seed size was a contributing factor as was possibly the seed coat barrier. This study represents an initial step in understanding Cr(3+) toxicity on wild plants and could form the basis for future risk assessments. PMID:27543852

  9. Wear resistance of chromium cast iron – research and application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Studnicki

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: A short characteristic of wear resistance chromium cast iron has been presented as well as possibilities of this material researches realization in Foundry Department have been discussed.Design/methodology/approach: Main attention was given on research process of crystallization and analysis of chromium cast iron microstructure and its resistance on erosion wears. Separate part of paper was devoted to discuss the bimetallic castings with chromium cast iron layer as well as typical applications of chromium cast iron castings in minig, proccesing, metallurgical and power industry.Findings: The new method of crystallization process research with three testers (DTA-K3 was found in the work. The method makes possible to characterize sensitivity of chromium cast iron on cooling kinetic.Research limitations/implications: DTA-K3 method can be used for research of crystallization proccess of cast materials particularly for abrasion-resisting alloy.Practical implications: Wide scope researches of chromium cast iron in Foundry Department enable extending applications its material in many industries.Originality/value: Value of the paper is the presentation of researches possibilities which undertaken in Foundry Department within the range of wear resistant materials.

  10. Survey of Nano filtration Performance for Hexavalent Chromium Removal fromWater Containing Sulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gh.R Moussavi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available "n "n "nBackgrounds and Objectives: Geological situation and/or anthropogenic contamination contain an increased concentration of ions such as hexavalent chromium as well as some other dissolved components such as sulfate in the upper of the establishedMCLs (50µg/L. In this paper, simultaneous removal of Cr (VI and sulfate from water was investigated using nanofiltration as a promising method for reaching drinking water standards."nMaterials and Methods: For varying pressure, pH , anion and cation solution effect, Sulfate and Cr (VI concentration which have chosen were levels found in drinking water sources (Cr=0.1- 0.5mg/L and (SO4-2= 100-800mg/L.Experiments were performed using NaCl, Na2SO4,K2 Cr2O7and anhydrous CrCl3. 6H2O which prepared with de mineralized water on procedure detailed in standard methods. All salts were purchased from Merck Corporation with purity over 99'."nResults: The results for hexavalent chromium experiments showed that when the concentration decreases, the chromate anions were given a better retention to 4 bars (96'. But when the concentration increases, concentration polarization led to increased removal of Cr (VI (98'. For Cr (III the influences of the ionic strength as well as the concentrations were strongly dependant on rejection but operating pressure were found weak. In addition, with increasing total dissolved solids, perfect rejection of chromium was seen. The effect of pH showed that better retention was obtained at natural and basic pH."nConclusion: This study indicates that the nature of anions and cations, driven pressure and pH have significant effect on nano filtration operation. Research findings show that it seems nano filtration is a very good promising method of simultaneous removal of Cr (VI and sulfate from water.

  11. Application of artificial neural network (ANN in Biosorption modeling of Chromium (VI from aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Mohammadi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: In this work, biosorption of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution with excess municipal sludge was studied. Moreover, the performance of neural networks to predict the biosorption rate was investigated. Materials and Methods: The effect of operational parameters including initial metal concentration, initial pH, agitation speed, adsorbent dosage, and agitation time on the biosorption of chromium was assessed in a batch system. A part of the experimental results was modeled using Feed-Forward Back propagation Neural Network (FFBP-ANN. Another part of the test results was simulated to assess the model accuracy. Transfer function in the hidden layers and output layers and the number of neurons in the hidden layers were optimized. Results: The maximum removal of chromium obtained from batch studies was more than 96% in 90 mg/L initial concentration, pH 2, agitation speed 200 rpm and adsorbent dosage 4 g/L. Maximum biosorption capacity was 41.69 mg/g. Biosorption data of Cr(VI are described well by Freundlich isotherm model and adsorption kinetic followed pseudo-second order model.  Tangent sigmoid function determined was the most appropriate transfer function in the hidden and output layer. The optimal number of neurons in hidden layers was 13. Predictions of model showed excellent correlation (R=0.984 with the target vector. Simulations performed by the developed neural network model showed good agreement with experimental results. Conclusion: Overall, it can be concluded that excess municipal sludge performs well for the removal of Cr ions from aqueous solution as a biological and low cost biosorbent. FFBP-ANN is an appropriate technique for modeling, estimating, and prediction of biosorption process If the Levenberg-Marquardt training function, tangent sigmoid transfer function in the hidden and output layers and the number of neurons is between 1.6 to 1.8 times the input data, proper predication results could be

  12. Remanent life assessment of creep resistant modified 12% chromium steels: microstructural analysis and microstructural development models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundin, L.; Andren, H.O. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Physics; Norell, M.; Nyborg, L. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Engineering Metals

    1996-09-01

    In this report, an overview of the current status of the development work, physical metallurgy and creep properties of 9-12% chromium steels is given. These steels find their application mainly in the power generating industry, at high temperatures. In Sweden, a co-operation between research groups specialized at microanalysis and modelling of 9-12% chromium steels has been initiated. This co-operation is outlined in this report, as well as the most important results achieved so far. The microstructure of four different alloys have been studied in detail with different analytical methods including atom-probe field-ion microscopy, electron microscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy. The role of different elements on precipitation processes and the composition of all relevant phases have been studied. Furthermore, segregation of impurity elements to creep cavities and creep fracture surfaces have been studied for two of the alloys. Models for the microstructural development of 9-12% chromium steels during heat treatment and creep testing are currently being produced. The work has been focused on modelling the nucleation and growth of MN and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitates during tempering, and the first results from these studies are currently being compared to microscopy observation. In addition, equilibrium phase calculations have been made and been found to predict existing phases to a high degree. A complete description of the creep properties of these steels must also include a model of the relationship between microstructure and creep behaviour. However, the microstructural development models will form an important basis for complete models of this kind. 57 refs

  13. Ion implantation for combating wear and corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion implantation provides a means of introducing chosen atomic species into the surface layers of a material or component without the need for heating. Atoms which form strong interatomic bonds, such as nitrogen or carbon, will harden a metal surface and improve wear resistance. Species which impart protection against corrosion, such as nickel, chromium or rare earths can be implanted. Various mechanisms result in a protective layer which far exceeds in thickness the range of implanted ions. Ion implantation is not a coating technique: there is no interface which could form a plane of weakness, nor are there dimensional changes. It is applied to finished components using equipment which will be described. (author)

  14. Effect of recasting on the thickness of metal-ceramic interface of nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Mirković Nemanja; Draganjac Miroslav; Stamenković Dragoslav; Ristić Ljubiša

    2008-01-01

    Introduction/Aim. This research was done to establish recasting effects of nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys on the thickness of their metal-ceramic interface in making fixed partial dentures. Metal-ceramic interface determines their functional integrity and prevents damages on ceramics during mastication. Investigation of metal-ceramic samples is supposed to show if base metal alloys for metalceramics are successfully recycled without any risk of reduction of metal-ceramic interface...

  15. USE OF TWO DIGESTION METHODS IN THE EVALUATION OF CHROMIUM CONTENT IN CATTLE'S MEAT SUPPLEMENTED WITH CHROMIUM CHELATES

    OpenAIRE

    R. L. T. Andrade; P.S.A. Moreira; R. Arruda; F. J. Lourenço; C. Palhari, F. F. Faria, V. B. Arevalo; Faria, F. F.; V. B. Arevalo

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to analyze the chromium content in beef using two digestion methods. There were used samples from 24 18-month-old male cattle, and twelve of them were supplemented and twelve were not supplemented with chromium chelate. These samples were evaluated by atomic absorption spectroscopy, previously submitted to digestion method using nitric acid (65%) with hydrogen peroxide (35%) and to digestion method, using solution of nitric perchloric acid in the proportion 3:1. Immedi...

  16. Activation of bentonite to remove the chromium from waste water produced by panning industry, and studying the chromium recovery efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fast development of tanning industry led to an increase in environmental problems resulting from discharging its wastes to the surrounding environment. Thus solving this problem became one of the most important aims that the researchers work on. The chromium content of the industrial water wastes of the tanning industry considered as the main pollutant for the environment. The Aleppo Bentonite is used in early research to remove the chromium from the industrial waste water.The current research aims to find a method to activate the Aleppo Bentonite in order to increase the effective removal of chromium from the industrial waste water which is produced by tanning industry, as well as to specify the optimal conditions for chromium recovery.This study used the Aleppo Bentonite, whose origin is Tal Ajar-Aleppo to study the activation aspects using Sulfuric Acid, Hydrochloric Acid and Nitric Acid, in addition to study the recovery aspects using the same acids and hydrogen peroxide and to specify the optimal conditions for chromium recovery through applying some experiments based on three main factors: concentration, settling time and temperature.It was observed from the applied experiments that it is possible to recover chromium from Bentonite efficiently up to (80% - 90%) by treating the Bentonite with hydrogen peroxide(33% concentration) at room temperature, or by treating it with hydrogen peroxide(8.25% concentration) at 75oC, while the settling time factor proved that full recovery of chromium is obtained during the first hour, and increasing the time factor does not affect the efficiency of chromium recovery. (author)

  17. Chemodynamics of chromium reduction in soils: Implications to bioavailability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choppala, Girish [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, Building-X, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, South Australia 5095 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment, PO Box 486, Salisbury, South Australia 5106 (Australia); Bolan, Nanthi, E-mail: Nanthi.Bolan@unisa.edu.au [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, Building-X, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, South Australia 5095 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment, PO Box 486, Salisbury, South Australia 5106 (Australia); Seshadri, Balaji [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, Building-X, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, South Australia 5095 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment, PO Box 486, Salisbury, South Australia 5106 (Australia)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Examined the effects of sorption, pH and C sources on Cr(VI) reduction and toxicity. • The rate of Cr(VI) reduction decreased with an increase in Cr(VI) adsorption and pH. • The proton dynamics in Cr(VI) reduction was assessed in relation to remediation. • A novel black carbon showed the highest reduction rate of Cr(VI) in soils. • Black carbon decreased the bioavailability and phytotoxicity of Cr(VI) in soils. -- Abstract: Chromium toxicity in soils can be mitigated by reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) which is influenced by the presence of free Cr(VI) species in soil solution, and the supply of protons and electrons. In this study, the effects of Cr(VI) adsorption (i.e. availability of free Cr(VI) species in soil solution), soil pH (i.e. supply of protons) and three electron donor carbon sources [black carbon (BC), chicken manure biochar (CMB) and cow manure (CM)] on the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) in soils were investigated. The results indicated that the rate of Cr(VI) reduction decreased with an increase in Cr(VI) adsorption and soil pH, which is attributed to decreased supply of free Cr(VI) ions and protons, respectively. Among the three different amendments tested, BC showed the highest rate of Cr(VI) reduction followed by CM and CMB. Furthermore, addition of BC, CM and CMB decreased the bioavailability of Cr(VI) in contaminated soils. The high efficiency of BC on Cr(VI) reduction was due to the electron donor's functional groups such as phenolic, hydroxyl, carbonyl and amides. The study demonstrated that free form of Cr(VI) ions in soil solution and carbon amendments enriched with acidic functional groups favored the reduction of Cr(VI), thereby mitigating its bioavailability and toxicity in contaminated soils.

  18. Scientific Opinion on chromium(III) lactate tri-hydrate as a source of chromium added for nutritional purposes to foodstuff

    OpenAIRE

    EFSA Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food (ANS)

    2012-01-01

    The Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food provides a scientific opinion on the safety and bioavailability of chromium(III) lactate tri-hydrate as a source of chromium(III) added for nutritional purposes to foodstuffs. The safety of chromium itself, in terms of the amounts that may be consumed, is outside the remit of this Panel. No new data have been provided as regards the safety and bioavailability of chromium from chromium(III) lactate tri-hydrate. The Panel c...

  19. Creep deformation of TD--nickel chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The creep behavior of thoria dispersed nickel-chromium (TD-NiCr) was examined at 10930C. Major emphasis was placed on 1) the effects of the material and the test related variables (grain size, temperature, stress, strain and strain rate) on the deformation characteristics, and 2) the evaluation of single crystal TD-NiCr material produced by a directional recrystallization technique. Creep activation enthalpies were found to increase with increasing grain size reaching maximum values for the single crystal TD-NiCr. Stress exponent of the steady state creep rate was also significantly higher for the single crystal material as compared with that determined for the polycrystalline TD-NiCr. The elevated temperature deformation of TD-NiCr was analyzed in terms of two parallel-concurrent processes: 1) diffusion controlled grain boundary sliding and 2) dislocation motion. The characteristics of the dislocation motion deformation mode (as observed in the single crystal TD-NiCr) suggest that strong particle-dislocation interactions are present. The relative contributions of dislocation motion and grain boundary sliding in TD-NiCr were estimated. In creep, grain boundary sliding was found to predominate for the small, equiaxed grain structures, whereas the dislocation deformation mode became significant for only the large grain TD-NiCr and the single crystal material

  20. Low energy spin excitations in chromium metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pynn, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Azuah, R.T. [Hahn-Meitner-Inst., Berlin (Germany); Stirling, W.G. [Univ. of Liverpool (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Kulda, J. [Inst. Laue Langevin, Grenoble (France)

    1997-12-31

    Neutron scattering experiments with full polarization analysis have been performed with a single crystal of chromium to study the low-energy spin fluctuations in the transverse spin density wave (TSDW) state. A number of remarkable results have been found. Inelastic scattering observed close to the TSDW satellite positions at (1 {+-} {delta},0,0) does not behave as expected for magnon scattering. In particular, the scattering corresponds to almost equally strong magnetization fluctuations both parallel and perpendicular to the ordered moments of the TSDW phase. As the Neel temperature is approached from below, scattering at the commensurate wavevector (1,0,0) increases in intensity as a result of critical scattering at silent satellites (1,0, {+-} {delta}) being included within the spectrometer resolution function. This effect, first observed by Sternlieb et al, does not account for all of the inelastic scattering around the (1,0,0) position, however, Rather, there are further collective excitations, apparently emanating from the TSDW satellites, which correspond to magnetic fluctuations parallel to the ordered TSDW moments. These branches have a group velocity that is close to that of (1,0,0) longitudinal acoustic (LA) phonons, but assigning their origin to magneto-elastic scattering raises other unanswered questions.

  1. A Rare Terminal Dinitrogen Complex of Chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mock, Michael T.; Chen, Shentan; Rousseau, Roger J.; O' Hagan, Molly J.; Dougherty, William G.; Kassel, W. S.; DuBois, Daniel L.; Bullock, R. Morris

    2011-10-12

    The reduction of dinitrogen to ammonia from N2 and H2 is currently carried out by the Haber-Bosch process, an energy intensive process that requires high pressures and high temperatures and accounts for the production of millions of tons of ammonia per year. The development of a catalytic, energy-efficient process for N2 reduction is of great interest and remains a formidable challenge. In this communication, we are reporting the preparation, characterization and computational electronic structure analysis of a rare 'Chatt-type' ((P-P)2M(N2)2, P-P = diphosphine ligand) complex of chromium, cis-[Cr(N2)2(PPh2NBn2)2] and its reactivity with CO. This complex is supported by the diphosphine ligand PPh2NBn2, containing non-coordinating pendant amine bases, to serve as proton relays. Future studies for this complex are aimed at answering fundamental questions regarding the role of proton relays in the second coordination sphere in their ability to facilitate proton movement from an external acid to metal-bound dinitrogen ligands in the challenging multi-proton/electron reduction of N2 to ammonia.

  2. A Rare Terminal Dinitrogen Complex of Chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reduction of dinitrogen to ammonia from N2 and H2 is currently carried out by the Haber-Bosch process, an energy intensive process that requires high pressures and high temperatures and accounts for the production of millions of tons of ammonia per year. The development of a catalytic, energy-efficient process for N2 reduction is of great interest and remains a formidable challenge. In this communication, we are reporting the preparation, characterization and computational electronic structure analysis of a rare 'Chatt-type' ((P-P)2M(N2)2, P-P = diphosphine ligand) complex of chromium, cis-(Cr(N2)2(PPh2NBn2)2) and its reactivity with CO. This complex is supported by the diphosphine ligand PPh2NBn2, containing non-coordinating pendant amine bases, to serve as proton relays. Future studies for this complex are aimed at answering fundamental questions regarding the role of proton relays in the second coordination sphere in their ability to facilitate proton movement from an external acid to metal-bound dinitrogen ligands in the challenging multi-proton/electron reduction of N2 to ammonia.

  3. Impact of environmental stress on biochemical parameters of bacteria reducing chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rida Batool

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Chromium pollution is produced in connection with industrial processes like in tanneries. It has been suggested that bioremediation could be a good option for clean up. The stress effect of variable chromate levels, pHs and growth temperatures on biochemical parameters of two Cr(VI reducing bacterial strains Pseudomonas aeruginosa Rb-1 and Ochrobactrum intermedium Rb-2 was investigated. Transmission electrone microscopy (TEM was performed to study the intracellular distribution of Cr(VI. It was observed that initial stress of 1000 µgmL-1 caused significant enhancement of all studied biochemical parameters at pH 7.0 and growth temperature of 37 °C showing great bioremediation potential of the strains. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the distribution of chromium precipitates was not uniform as they were distributed in the cytoplasm as well as found associated with the periplasm and outer membrane. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed the possible involvement of carboxyl, amino, sulpohonate and hydroxyl groups present on the bacterial cell surface for the binding of Cr(VI ions. Cr(VI stress brought about changes in the distridution of these functional groups. It can be concluded that the investigated bacterial strains adjust well to Cr(VI stress in terms of biochemical parameters and along that exhibited alteration in morphology.

  4. Efficacy of Agricultural Wastes in the Removal of Hexavalent Chromium- A Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Muthulakshmi Andal

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Hexavalent Chromium is a major pollutant released during several industrial operations. It is also reported as one of the metals known to be carcinogenic and has an adverse potential to modify the DNA transcription process. The removal of hexavalent chromium has been studied by various authors employing adsorbents developed from waste agro by-products to assess their adsorption characteristics. This paper focuses on the comparison of some agro based products in the removal of Cr(VI ions. An extensive list of agricultural based products such as Coconut Coir, Prunus amygdalus, Cissus quadrangularis, Soapnut Acacia, Justicia adhatoda, Bhringraj, Aerva lanata, Trianthema portulacastrum, Tephrosia purpurea, Solanum nigrum, Datura metel, Cleome viscose, Asparagus racemosus for the removal of Cr(VI from aqueous solutions and the discharged effluents from industries are reviewed in this work. As chemically modified adsorbents exhibit higher adsorption capacity, a number of chemicals have been utilized for the required modifications of the adsorbent materials in the research articles. The results declared by the authors have been compared and summarized for further probe into the extensive utilization of the employed materials.

  5. Two fold modified chitosan for enhanced adsorption of hexavalent chromium from simulated wastewater and industrial effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahu, S S; Shekhawat, A; Saravanan, D; Jugade, R M

    2016-08-01

    Ionic solid (Ethylhexadecyldimethylammoniumbromide) impregnated phosphated chitosan (ISPC) was synthesized and applied for enhanced adsorption of hexavalent chromium from industrial effluent. The compound obtained was extensively characterized using instrumental techniques like FT-IR, TGA-DTA, XRD, SEM, BET and EDX. ISPC showed high adsorption capacity of 266.67mg/g in accordance with Langmuir isotherm model at pH 3.0 due to the presence of multiple sites which contribute for ion pair and electrostatic interactions with Cr(VI) species. The sorption kinetics and thermodynamic studies revealed that adsorption of Cr(VI) followed pseudo-second-order kinetics with exothermic and spontaneous behaviour. Applicability of ISPC for higher sample volumes was discerned through column studies. The real chrome plating industry effluent was effectively treated with total chromium recovery of 94%. The used ISPC was regenerated simply by dilute ammonium hydroxide treatment and tested for ten adsorption-desorption cycles with marginal decrease in adsorption efficiency. PMID:27112874

  6. Performance enhancement of iron-chromium redox flow batteries by employing interdigitated flow fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Y. K.; Zhou, X. L.; Zeng, L.; Yan, X. H.; Zhao, T. S.

    2016-09-01

    The catalyst for the negative electrode of iron-chromium redox flow batteries (ICRFBs) is commonly prepared by adding a small amount of Bi3+ ions in the electrolyte and synchronously electrodepositing metallic particles onto the electrode surface at the beginning of charge process. Achieving a uniform catalyst distribution in the porous electrode, which is closely related to the flow field design, is critically important to improve the ICRFB performance. In this work, the effects of flow field designs on catalyst electrodeposition and battery performance are investigated. It is found that compared to the serpentine flow field (SFF) design, the interdigitated flow field (IFF) forces the electrolyte through the porous electrode between the neighboring channels and enhances species transport during the processes of both the catalyst electrodeposition and iron/chromium redox reactions, thus enabling a more uniform catalyst distribution and higher mass transport limitation. It is further demonstrated that the energy efficiency of the ICRFB with the IFF reaches 80.7% at a high current density (320 mA cm-2), which is 8.2% higher than that of the ICRFB with the SFF. With such a high performance and intrinsically low-cost active materials, the ICRFB with the IFF offers a great promise for large-scale energy storage.

  7. The role of intergranular chromium carbides on intergranular oxidation of nickel based alloys in pressurized water reactors primary water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaslain, F. O. M.; Le, H. T.; Duhamel, C.; Guerre, C.; Laghoutaris, P.

    2016-02-01

    Alloy 600 is used in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) but is susceptible to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC). Intergranular chromium carbides have been found beneficial to reduce PWSCC. Focussed ion beam coupled with scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM) 3D tomography has been used to reconstruct the morphology of grain boundary oxide penetrations and their interaction with intergranular Cr carbides in Alloy 600 subjected to a PWR environment. In presence of intergranular Cr carbides, the intergranular oxide penetrations are less deep but larger than without carbide. However, the intergranular oxide volumes normalized by the grain boundary length for both samples are similar, which suggest that intergranular oxidation growth rate is not affected by carbides. Analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows that the intergranular oxide consists mainly in a spinel-type oxide containing nickel and chromium, except in the vicinity of Cr carbides where Cr2O3 was evidenced. The formation of chromium oxide may explain the lower intergranular oxide depth observed in grain boundaries containing Cr carbides.

  8. Influence of chromium salts on increased lipid peroxidation and differential pattern in antioxidant metabolism in Pistia stratiotes L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RishiKesh Upadhyay

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the changing effect of different concentrations (0, 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10mM of hexavalent and trivalent chromium on different biochemical parameters along with antioxidant enzymes was investigated on water lettuce (Pistia stratiotes L. in order to know the possible involvement of this metal in oxidative injury, besides the activities of antioxidant enzymes leading to biochemical and oxidative aberration induced by elevated concentrations. Both in roots and shoots, Cr produced a significant increase in enzymic and non-enzymic antioxidants, except in catalase (CAT activity where a strong accumulation of hydrogen peroxide was indicated, suggesting an imposition of oxidative stress. The observation showed an uptake of chromium by P. stratiotes L. as well as increase in activity of antioxidants, as the concentrations and their duration of treatment increased. The activity of antioxidative enzymes determined the steady-state levels of ROS in the cell. The augmentation of antioxidative defense plays a key role in regulating the oxidative stress. This pointed to the possibility in induction of oxidative stress, with the increasing lipid peroxidation, followed by a differential pattern in antioxidant metabolisms by chromium ions in P. stratiotes L.

  9. Chromium liquid waste inertization in an inorganic alkali activated matrix: leaching and NMR multinuclear approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponzoni, Chiara; Lancellotti, Isabella; Barbieri, Luisa; Spinella, Alberto; Saladino, Maria Luisa; Martino, Delia Chillura; Caponetti, Eugenio; Armetta, Francesco; Leonelli, Cristina

    2015-04-01

    A class of inorganic binders, also known as geopolymers, can be obtained by alkali activation of aluminosilicate powders at room temperature. The process is affected by many parameters (curing time, curing temperature, relative humidity etc.) and leads to a resistant matrix usable for inertization of hazardous waste. In this study an industrial liquid waste containing a high amount of chromium (≈ 2.3 wt%) in the form of metalorganic salts is inertized into a metakaolin based geopolymer matrix. One of the innovative aspects is the exploitation of the water contained in the waste for the geopolymerization process. This avoided any drying treatment, a common step in the management of liquid hazardous waste. The evolution of the process--from the precursor dissolution to the final geopolymer matrix hardening--of different geopolymers containing a waste amount ranging from 3 to 20%wt and their capability to inertize chromium cations were studied by: i) the leaching tests, according to the EN 12,457 regulation, at different curing times (15, 28, 90 and 540 days) monitoring releases of chromium ions (Cr(III) and Cr(VI)) and the cations constituting the aluminosilicate matrix (Na, Si, Al); ii) the humidity variation for different curing times (15 and 540 days); iii) SEM characterization at different curing times (28 and 540 days); iv) the trend of the solution conductivity and pH during the leaching test; v) the characterization of the short-range ordering in terms of TOT bonds (where T is Al or Si) by (29)Si and (27)Al solid state magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (ss MAS NMR) for geopolymers containing high amounts of waste (10-20%wt). The results show the formation of a stable matrix after only 15 days independently on the waste amount introduced; the longer curing times increase the matrices stabilities and their ability to immobilize chromium cations. The maximum amount of waste that can be inertized is around 10 wt% after a curing time of 28 days

  10. Hexavalent Chromium Reduction and Its Distribution in the Cell and Medium by Chromium Resistant Fusarium solani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousumi Sen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, batch biosorption of Cr(VI was studied using the fungal strain isolated from soil. The fungal strain was characterized as Fusarium solani. The total Cr distribution in the biomass (fungus and in the media obtained from the experiment conducted at 500 mg l -1 initial Cr(VI concentration and pH 5.0. The results indicated both intracellular and extracellular accumulation and enzymatic reduction of Cr(VI and this was supported by the Transmission Electron Microscopic (TEM observation at the same Cr(VI concentration and pH value. Chromium elution from Fusarium solani containing Cr was then tried out using a number of chromium eluting reagents and a maximum Cr could be eluted using 0.5N sodium hydroxide solution without destructing the biomass structure. The total Cr was recovered by pH adjustment from both biomass and media was found to be 44% of the initial Cr(VI concentration (500 mg l-1.

  11. Metal ion levels and lymphocyte counts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penny, Jeannette Ø; Varmarken, Jens-Erik; Ovesen, Ole;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Wear particles from metal-on-metal arthroplasties are under suspicion for adverse effects both locally and systemically, and the DePuy ASR Hip Resurfacing System (RHA) has above-average failure rates. We compared lymphocyte counts in RHA and total hip arthroplasty (THA) and...... investigated whether cobalt and chromium ions affected the lymphocyte counts. METHOD: In a randomized controlled trial, we followed 19 RHA patients and 19 THA patients. Lymphocyte subsets and chromium and cobalt ion concentrations were measured at baseline, at 8 weeks, at 6 months, and at 1 and 2 years....... RESULTS: The T-lymphocyte counts for both implant types declined over the 2-year period. This decline was statistically significant for CD3(+)CD8(+) in the THA group, with a regression coefficient of -0.04 × 10(9)cells/year (95% CI: -0.08 to -0.01). Regression analysis indicated a depressive effect of...

  12. Speciation of Chromium in Water Samples with Homogeneous Liquid-Liquid Extraction and Determination by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel method was developed for the speciation of chromium in natural water samples based on homogeneous liquid-liquid extraction and determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). In this method, Cr(III) reacts with a new Schiff's base ligand to form the hydrophobic complex, which is subsequently entrapped in the sediment phase, whereas Cr(VI) remained in aqueous phase. The Cr(VI) assay is based on its reduction to Cr(III) by the addition of sodium sulfite to the sample solution. Thus, separation of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) could be realized. Homogeneous liquid-liquid extraction based on the pH-independent phase-separation process was investigated using a ternary solvent system (water-tetrabutylammonium ion (TBA+)-chloroform) for the preconcentration of chromium. The phase separation phenomenon occurred by an ion-pair formation of TBA and perchlorate ion. Then sedimented phase was separated using a 100 μL micro-syringe and diluted to 1.0 mL with ethanol. The sample was introduced into the flame by conventional aspiration. After the optimization of complexation and extraction conditions such as pH = 9.5, [ligand] = 1.0 x 10-4 M, [TBA+] = 2.0 x 10-2 M, [CHCl3] = 100.0 μL and [ClO4-] = 2.0 x 10-2 M, a preconcentration factor (Va/Vs) of 100 was obtained for only 10 mL of the sample. The relative standard deviation was 2.8% (n = 10). The limit of detection was sufficiently low and lie at ppb level. The proposed method was applied for the extraction and determination of chromium in natural water samples with satisfactory results

  13. Inhibition of CO poisoning on Pt catalyst coupled with the reduction of toxic hexavalent chromium in a dual-functional fuel cell

    OpenAIRE

    Dong Young Chung; Hyoung-il Kim; Young-Hoon Chung; Myeong Jae Lee; Sung Jong Yoo; Alok D. Bokare; Wonyong Choi; Yung-Eun Sung

    2014-01-01

    We propose a method to enhance the fuel cell efficiency with the simultaneous removal of toxic heavy metal ions. Carbon monoxide (CO), an intermediate of methanol oxidation that is primarily responsible for Pt catalyst deactivation, can be used as an in-situ reducing agent for hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI)) with reactivating the CO-poisoned Pt catalyst. Using electro-oxidation measurements, the oxidation of adsorbed CO molecules coupled with the concurrent conversion of Cr (VI) to Cr (III) was...

  14. Biosorption system produced from biofilms supported on Faujasite (FAU) zeolite, process for obtaining it and its usage for removal of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI))

    OpenAIRE

    Tavares, M. T.; Neves, Isabel C.

    2008-01-01

    The present invention refers to a biosorption system composed of a bacterial biofilm supported in synthetic zeolites, for usage in various types of industry for the removal of hexavalent chromium, through the retention of metal ions in the biofilm, in solutions with concentrations between 50 and 250 mgCr/L, process for obtaining it and respective usages. This process consists in obtaining a bacterial biofilm of Arthrobacter viscosus, supported on a faujasite (FAU) zeolite. The biofilm promote...

  15. Effect Of Oxidation On Chromium Leaching And Redox Capacity Of Slag-Containing Waste Forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rate of oxidation is important to the long-term performance of reducing salt waste forms because the solubility of some contaminants, e.g., technetium, is a function of oxidation state. TcO4- in the salt solution is reduced to Tc(IV) and has been shown to react with ingredients in the waste form to precipitate low solubility sulfide and/or oxide phases [Shuh, et al., 1994, Shuh, et al., 2000, Shuh, et al., 2003]. Upon exposure to oxygen, the compounds containing Tc(IV) oxidize to the pertechnetate ion, Tc(VII)O4-, which is very soluble. Consequently the rate of technetium oxidation front advancement into a monolith and the technetium leaching profile as a function of depth from an exposed surface are important to waste form performance and ground water concentration predictions. An approach for measuring contaminant oxidation rate (effective contaminant specific oxidation rate) based on leaching of select contaminants of concern is described in this report. In addition, the relationship between reduction capacity and contaminant oxidation is addressed. Chromate was used as a non-radioactive surrogate for pertechnetate in simulated waste form samples. Depth discrete subsamples were cut from material exposed to Savannah River Site (SRS) ''field cured'' conditions. The subsamples were prepared and analyzed for both reduction capacity and chromium leachability. Results from field-cured samples indicate that the depth at which leachable chromium was detected advanced further into the sample exposed for 302 days compared to the sample exposed to air for 118 days (at least 50 mm compared to at least 20 mm). Data for only two exposure time intervals is currently available. Data for additional exposure times are required to develop an equation for the oxidation front progression. Reduction capacity measurements (per the Angus-Glasser method, which is a measurement of the ability of a material to chemically reduce Ce(IV) to Ce(III) in solution) performed on depth

  16. Effect Of Oxidation On Chromium Leaching And Redox Capacity Of Slag-Containing Waste Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almond, P. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Stefanko, D. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Langton, C. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2013-03-01

    The rate of oxidation is important to the long-term performance of reducing salt waste forms because the solubility of some contaminants, e.g., technetium, is a function of oxidation state. TcO4- in the salt solution is reduced to Tc(IV) and has been shown to react with ingredients in the waste form to precipitate low solubility sulfide and/or oxide phases [Shuh, et al., 1994, Shuh, et al., 2000, Shuh, et al., 2003]. Upon exposure to oxygen, the compounds containing Tc(IV) oxidize to the pertechnetate ion, Tc(VII)O4-, which is very soluble. Consequently the rate of technetium oxidation front advancement into a monolith and the technetium leaching profile as a function of depth from an exposed surface are important to waste form performance and ground water concentration predictions. An approach for measuring contaminant oxidation rate (effective contaminant specific oxidation rate) based on leaching of select contaminants of concern is described in this report. In addition, the relationship between reduction capacity and contaminant oxidation is addressed. Chromate was used as a non-radioactive surrogate for pertechnetate in simulated waste form samples. Depth discrete subsamples were cut from material exposed to Savannah River Site (SRS) field cured conditions. The subsamples were prepared and analyzed for both reduction capacity and chromium leachability. Results from field-cured samples indicate that the depth at which leachable chromium was detected advanced further into the sample exposed for 302 days compared to the sample exposed to air for 118 days (at least 50 mm compared to at least 20 mm). Data for only two exposure time intervals is currently available. Data for additional exposure times are required to develop an equation for the oxidation front progression. Reduction capacity measurements (per the Angus-Glasser method, which is a measurement of the ability of a material to chemically reduce Ce(IV) to Ce

  17. Chromium propionate enhances adipogenic differentiation of bovine intramuscular adipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca eTokach

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In vitro experiments were performed to determine the effects of increasing concentrations of chromium propionate on mRNA and protein abundance of different enzymes and receptors. Intramuscular and subcutaneous preadipocytes and bovine satellite cells were isolated from the longissimus muscle to determine the effect of treatment on glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ mRNA and GLUT4 protein abundance. Preadipocyte cultures were treated with differentiation media plus either sodium propionate or different concentrations of chromium propionate (CrPro for 96, 120, and 144 h before harvest. This study indicated adipogenesis of the bovine intramuscular adipocytes were more sensitive to the treatment of chromium propionate as compared to subcutaneous adipocytes. Enhancement of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and GLUT4 mRNA by CrPro treatment may enhance glucose uptake in intramuscular adipocytes. Chromium propionate decreased GLUT4 protein levels in muscle cell cultures suggesting those cells have increased efficiency of glucose uptake due to exposure to increased levels of CrPro. In contrast, each of the two adipogenic lines had opposing responses to the CrPro. It appeared that CrPro had the most stimulative effect of GLUT4 response in the intramuscular adipocytes as compared to subcutaneous adipocytes. These findings indicated opportunities to potentially augment marbling in beef cattle fed chromium propionate during the finishing phase.

  18. Anthropogenic chromium emissions in china from 1990 to 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hongguang; Zhou, Tan; Li, Qian; Lu, Lu; Lin, Chunye

    2014-01-01

    An inventory of chromium emission into the atmosphere and water from anthropogenic activities in China was compiled for 1990 through to 2009. We estimate that the total emission of chromium to the atmosphere is about 1.92×10⁵ t. Coal and oil combustion were the two leading sources of chromium emission to the atmosphere in China, while the contribution of them showed opposite annual growth trend. In total, nearly 1.34×10⁴ t of chromium was discharged to water, mainly from six industrial categories in 20 years. Among them, the metal fabrication industry and the leather tanning sector were the dominant sources of chromium emissions, accounting for approximately 68.0% and 20.0% of the total emissions and representing increases of 15.6% and 10.3% annually, respectively. The spatial trends of Cr emissions show significant variation based on emissions from 2005 to 2009. The emission to the atmosphere was heaviest in Hebei, Shandong, Guangdong, Zhejiang and Shanxi, whose annual emissions reached more than 1000t for the high level of coal and oil consumption. In terms of emission to water, the largest contributors were Guangdong, Jiangsu, Shandong and Zhejiang, where most of the leather production and metal manufacturing occur and these four regions accounted for nearly 47.4% of the total emission to water. PMID:24505309

  19. Anthropogenic chromium emissions in china from 1990 to 2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongguang Cheng

    Full Text Available An inventory of chromium emission into the atmosphere and water from anthropogenic activities in China was compiled for 1990 through to 2009. We estimate that the total emission of chromium to the atmosphere is about 1.92×10⁵ t. Coal and oil combustion were the two leading sources of chromium emission to the atmosphere in China, while the contribution of them showed opposite annual growth trend. In total, nearly 1.34×10⁴ t of chromium was discharged to water, mainly from six industrial categories in 20 years. Among them, the metal fabrication industry and the leather tanning sector were the dominant sources of chromium emissions, accounting for approximately 68.0% and 20.0% of the total emissions and representing increases of 15.6% and 10.3% annually, respectively. The spatial trends of Cr emissions show significant variation based on emissions from 2005 to 2009. The emission to the atmosphere was heaviest in Hebei, Shandong, Guangdong, Zhejiang and Shanxi, whose annual emissions reached more than 1000t for the high level of coal and oil consumption. In terms of emission to water, the largest contributors were Guangdong, Jiangsu, Shandong and Zhejiang, where most of the leather production and metal manufacturing occur and these four regions accounted for nearly 47.4% of the total emission to water.

  20. Enhancement of chromium uptake in tanning using oxazolidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundarapandiyan, S; Brutto, Patrick E; Siddhartha, G; Ramesh, R; Ramanaiah, B; Saravanan, P; Mandal, A B

    2011-06-15

    Monocyclic and bicyclic oxazolidines were offered at three different junctures of chrome tanning process viz. prior to BCS offer, along with BCS and after basification. It was found that oxazolidine when offered after basification brought about better chromium uptake and reduction of chromium load in the wastewater. Offer of oxazolidine was also varied. Increase in offer of oxazolidine from 0.25% to 1% was found to enhance the chromium uptake and decrease the chromium load in wastewater. But the increase in uptake was not proportionate to the increase in oxazolidine offer more than 0.75%. Offer of 1% Zoldine ZA 78 (monocyclic oxazolidine) and Zoldine ZE (bicyclic oxazolidine) after basification brought about 63.4% and 73.1% enhancement in chrome content in leather compared to control where oxazolidine was not offered. The tone of the wetblue was found to be altered moderately. However this did not call for any process adjustments in wet-finishing. The oxazolidine treated leathers were found to be immensely fuller and tighter. It was found experimentally that offer of 1% of oxazolidine facilitated reduction in the offer of syntans administered for filling and grain tightening by around 46%. Oxazolidine could bring about significant reduction in cost of chemicals apart from resulting environmental benefits due to enhancement of chromium uptake during tanning. PMID:21536383

  1. Low-chromium reduced-activation ferritic steels for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Kenik, E.A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Development of reduced-activation ferritic steels has concentrated on high-chromium (8-10 wt% Cr) steels. However, there are advantages for a low-chromium steel, and initial ORNL studies on reduced-activation steels were on compositions with 2.25 to 12% Cr. Those studies showed an Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.25V-0.1C (2 1/4Cr-2WV) steel to have the highest strenglth of the steels studied. Although this steel had the best strength, Charpy impact properties were inferior to those of an Fe-9Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C (9Cr-2WVTa) and an Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.1C (2 1/4Cr-2W) steel. Therefore, further development of the low-chromium Cr-W steels was required. These results indicate that it is possible to develop low-chromium reduced-activation ferritic steels that have tensile and impact properties as good or better than those of high-chromium (7-9% Cr) steels. Further improvement of properties should be possible by optimizing the composition.

  2. Self-assembly modified-mushroom nanocomposite for rapid removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution with bubbling fluidized bed

    OpenAIRE

    Fei Xu; Xu Liu; Yijiao Chen; Ke Zhang; Heng Xu

    2016-01-01

    A self-assembled modified Pleurotus Cornucopiae material (SMPM) combined with improved Intermittent Bubbling Fluidized Bed (IBFB) was investigated to remove the hexavalent chromium ions in aqueous solution. After the modification, the powder-like raw material gradually self-assembled together to SMPM, which had crinkly porous structure, improved the Cr-accommodation ability in a sound manner. Optimized by Taguchi method, Cr(VI) removal efficiency was up to 75.91% and 48.01% for 100 mg/L and 5...

  3. Chelating regularities in the series of chelating polymer sorbents and their complexes with vanadium, manganese, and chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physicochemical properties of new synthesized polymer chelation sorbents - substituted polystyrene-azo-salicylic acid are investigated. Correlations between pKCOOH of functional groups of sorbents with chelation pH50 and vanadium, manganese and chromium lgstab are established with the aim of studying interactions in the ion of element - sorbent system. Established correlations suggest physicochemical properties of the sorbents and sorption parameters of cations of metals with the aim of concentration and separation of V(5), Mn(2) and Cr(3) microamounts from natural and technical objects including environmental ones

  4. Effect of partial pressure of reactive gas on chromium nitride and chromium oxide deposited by arc ion plating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ming-sheng; FENG Chang-jie; WANG Fu-hui

    2006-01-01

    The effects of reactive gas partial pressure on droplet formation,deposition rate and change of preferred orientation of CrN and Cr2O3 coatings were studied. For CrN coatings,as nitrogen partial pressure increases,the number and size of droplets increases,the deposition rate initially increases obviously and then slowly,and the preferred orientation of CrN changes from high-index plane to low-index one. For Cr2O3 coatings,with the increase of oxygen partial pressure,the number and size of droplets decreases,the deposition rate decreases and the (300) becomes the preferred orientation. These differences are ascribed to the formation of CrN (with a lower melting point) and Cr2O3 (with a higher melting point) on the surface of Cr target during the deposition of CrN and Cr2O3. Complete coatings CrN or Cr2O3 film can be formed when reactive gas partial pressure gets up to 0.1 Pa. The optimized N2 partial pressure for CrN deposition is about 0.1-0.2 Pa in order to suppress the formation of droplets and the suitable O2 partial pressure for Cr2O3 deposition is approximately 0.1 Pa for the attempt to prevent the peel of the coating.

  5. The role of Chromium III in the organism and its possible use in diabetes and obesity treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sławomir Lewicki

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available introduction. Diabetes and obesity are diseases characterized by their increasing incidence every year. When comparing with healthy subjects, the serum levels of chromium (Cr are lowered in these two diseases. Several studies conducted in laboratory animals with experimentally- induced diabetes demonstrated that supplementation with chromium ions (III decreased glucose concentration in the blood, reduced the probability of atherosclerosis and heart attack, lowered the levels of cholesterol and low density lipoprotein (LDL. The Importance of chromium is actually challenged due to lack of clear manifestations of Cr deficiency in humans and animals. objective. The aim of this review was to present current knowledge about Cr its role in the organism and possible mechanisms of its action also in metabolic disorders such as diabetes or obesity. state of knowledge. In the last decade, Cr was established to be rather a beneficial than essential trace element in mammals, and has gained popularity as a nutritional supplement and a component of many multivitamin/mineral formulations, fortified food and energy drinks. Cr supplements are widespread for diabetes and obesity treatment, despite conflicting reports on its efficacy. It was suggested that Cr shows a beneficial influence upon glucose and lipid disturbances. conclusions. The recent clinical trials provided evidence both in favor and against the importance of Cr in healthy and ill organisms. Unfortunately, also the molecular mechanism by which chromium affects glucose and lipid metabolism is still unclear. Beneficial effects of diet supplementation with different sources of Cr 3+ can be potentially explained by rather pharmacological than nutritional effects.

  6. FORMATION AND DESTRUCTION OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM IN A LABORATORY SWIRL FLAME INCINERATOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The partitioning of chromium (Cr) in combustion systems was investigated theoretically and experimentally. Theoretical predictions were based on chemical equilibrium and suggested that hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] was favored by the presence of chlorine (Cl) and diminished by the...

  7. Treatability Test Report For The Removal Of Chromium From Groundwater At 100-D Area Using Electrocoagulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has committed to accelerate cleanup of contaminated groundwater along the Columbia River. The current treatment approach was driven by a series of Interim Action Records of Decision (IAROD) issued in the mid-1990s. Part of the approach for acceleration involves increasing the rate of groundwater extraction for the chromium plume north of the 100-D Reactor and injecting the treated water in strategic locations to hydraulically direct contaminated groundwater toward the extraction wells. The current treatment system uses ion exchange for Cr(VI) removal, with off-site regeneration of the ion exchange resins. Higher flow rates will increase the cost and frequency of ion exchange resin regeneration; therefore, alternative technologies are being considered for treatment at high flow rates. One of these technologies, electrocoagulation (EC), was evaluated through a pilot-scale treatability test. The primary purpose of the treatability study was to determine the effectiveness of Cr(VI) removal and the robustness/implementability of an EC system. Secondary purposes of the study were to gather information about derivative wastes and to obtain data applicable to scaling the process from the treatability scale to full-scale. The treatability study work plan identified a performance objective and four operational objectives. The performance objective for the treatability study was to determine the efficiency (effectiveness) of hexavalent chromium removal from the groundwater, with a desired concentration of (le) 20 micrograms per liter ((micro)g/L) Cr(VI) in the effluent prior to re-injection. Influent and effluent total chromium and hexavalent chromium data were collected using a field test kit for multiple samples per week, and from off-site laboratory analysis of samples collected approximately monthly. These data met all data quality requirements. Two of three effluent chromium samples analyzed in the off-site (that is, fixed) laboratory

  8. TREATABILITY TEST REPORT FOR THE REMOVAL OF CHROMIUM FROM GROUNDWATER AT 100-D AREA USING ELECTROCOAGULATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PETERSEN SW

    2009-09-24

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has committed to accelerate cleanup of contaminated groundwater along the Columbia River. The current treatment approach was driven by a series of Interim Action Records of Decision (IAROD) issued in the mid-1990s. Part of the approach for acceleration involves increasing the rate of groundwater extraction for the chromium plume north of the 100-D Reactor and injecting the treated water in strategic locations to hydraulically direct contaminated groundwater toward the extraction wells. The current treatment system uses ion exchange for Cr(VI) removal, with off-site regeneration of the ion exchange resins. Higher flow rates will increase the cost and frequency of ion exchange resin regeneration; therefore, alternative technologies are being considered for treatment at high flow rates. One of these technologies, electrocoagulation (EC), was evaluated through a pilot-scale treatability test. The primary purpose of the treatability study was to determine the effectiveness of Cr(VI) removal and the robustness/implementability of an EC system. Secondary purposes of the study were to gather information about derivative wastes and to obtain data applicable to scaling the process from the treatability scale to full-scale. The treatability study work plan identified a performance objective and four operational objectives. The performance objective for the treatability study was to determine the efficiency (effectiveness) of hexavalent chromium removal from the groundwater, with a desired concentration of {le} 20 micrograms per liter ({micro}g/L) Cr(VI) in the effluent prior to re-injection. Influent and effluent total chromium and hexavalent chromium data were collected using a field test kit for multiple samples per week, and from off-site laboratory analysis of samples collected approximately monthly. These data met all data quality requirements. Two of three effluent chromium samples analyzed in the off-site (that is, fixed) laboratory

  9. Chromium solubility in anhydrous Phase B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindi, Luca; Sirotkina, Ekaterina A.; Bobrov, Andrey V.; Nestola, Fabrizio; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2016-02-01

    The crystal structure and chemical composition of a crystal of (Mg14- x Cr x )(Si5- x Cr x )O24 ( x ≈ 0.30) anhydrous Phase B (Anh-B) synthesized in the model system MgCr2O4-Mg2SiO4 at 12 GPa and 1600 °C have been investigated. The compound was found to be orthorhombic, space group Pmcb, with lattice parameters a = 5.900(1), b = 14.218(2), c = 10.029(2) Å, V = 841.3(2) Å3 and Z = 2. The structure was refined to R 1 = 0.065 using 1492 independent reflections. Chromium was found to substitute for both Mg at the M3 site (with a mean bond distance of 2.145 Å) and Si at the octahedral Si1 site (mean bond distance: 1.856 Å), according to the reaction Mg2+ + Si4+ = 2Cr3+. Such substitutions cause a reduction in the volume of the M3 site and an increase in the volume of the Si-dominant octahedron with respect to the values typically observed for pure Anh-B and Fe2+-bearing Anh-B. Taking into account that Cr3+ is not expected to be Jahn-Teller active, it appears that both the Cr3+-for-Mg and Cr3+-for-Si substitutions in the Anh-B structure decrease the distortion of the octahedra. Electron microprobe analysis gave the Mg13.66(8)Si4.70(6)Cr0.62(4)O24 stoichiometry for the studied phase. The successful synthesis of this phase provides new information for the possible mineral assemblages occurring in the Earth's deep upper mantle and shed new light on the so-called X discontinuity that has been observed at 275-345 km depth in several subcontinental and subduction zone environments.

  10. Characterization of TBP containing polysiloxane membrane/insulator/semiconductor structures for hexavalent chromium detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zazoua, A. [Universite de Jijel, BP 98, Ouled Aissa, 18000 Jijel (Algeria); Universite de Annaba, BP 12, El-Hadjar, Annaba (Algeria); Kherrat, R.; Samar, M.H. [Universite de Annaba, BP 12, El-Hadjar, Annaba (Algeria); Errachid, A. [Laboratori de Nanobioenginyeria-IBEC, CIBER, Parc Cientific de Barcelona (PCB)-Departament d' Electronica. Universitat de Barcelona, C/Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Jaffrezic-Renault, N. [LSA - UMR 5180 CNRS - Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France)], E-mail: nicole.jaffrezic@univ-lyon1.fr; Bessueille, F.; Leonard, D. [LSA - UMR 5180 CNRS - Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France)

    2008-07-01

    A hexavalent chromium-sensitive EMIS sensor (electrolyte membrane insulator semiconductor sensor) is prepared by deposition of a tributylphosphate (TBP) ionophore-containing siloprene membrane on a Si/SiO{sub 2}/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} structure. The developed EMIS sensor was studied by means of impedance spectroscopy, capacitance-voltage, X-ray photoelectron spectrometry and FT-IR spectroscopy. From the flat-band shift of the EMIS structure, the nersntian response to the anionic species Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7}{sup -} was demonstrated. The linear range of detection is 10{sup -4} M to 10{sup -1} M and the detection limit is 10{sup -5} M. Sulfate and chloride anions are shown not to be interfering whereas carbonate ions present a pK{sup pot} equal to 0.19.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of polyurethane-cellulose acetate blend membrane for chromium (VI) removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Tabinda; Ahmad, Adnan; Saleemi, Sidra; Adrees, Muhammad; Jamshed, Fahad; Hai, Abdul Moqeet; Jamil, Tahir

    2016-11-20

    Blended membranes of polyurethane and cellulose acetate were prepared, characterized and investigated for their performance. Various ratios of cellulose acetate were employed to prepare four different blend membranes. The characteristics of both pure and blend membranes were investigated and results were compared to distinguish their properties. Functional group analysis was carried out by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) of pure and blend samples. Contact angle measurement and water content were evaluated to determine the membrane hydrophilicity. Moreover, the membrane morphology was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The membrane permeation properties and ability to reject chromium (VI) ions were tested at various pH and pressure by utilizing different salt concentrations. PMID:27561531

  12. Cadmium and chromium removal kinetics from solution by two aquatic macrophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suñe, N; Sánchez, G; Caffaratti, S; Maine, M A

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine chromium and cadmium bioaccumulation processes of two free-floating macrophytes commonly used in wetlands for water treatment: Salvinia herzogii and Pistia stratiotes. Metal removal from the solution involves two stages: a fast one and a slow one. The fast stage of the Cd uptake is significantly different for each species, while it is not significantly different in Cr uptake. The most important processes of Cd uptake are biological ones in S. herzogii and adsorption, chelation and ionic exchange are in P. stratiotes. The main processes of Cr uptake in both macrophytes are adsorption, chelation and ion exchange. The slow stage is different for each species and metal. Cr precipitation induced by roots occurs in P. stratiotes. Cr uptake through leaves is probably the main cause of the increase of Cr in the aerial parts of S. herzogii. PMID:16815611

  13. Scientific Opinion on chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate as a source of chromium added for nutritional purposes to foodstuff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food (ANS

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available

    The Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food provides a scientific opinion on the safety and bioavailability of chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate as a source of chromium(III added for nutritional purposes to foodstuffs. The safety of chromium itself, in terms of the amounts that may be consumed, is outside the remit of this Panel. No new data have been provided as regards the safety and bioavailability of chromium from chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate. The Panel concurs with its earlier views stating that no evidence was provided supporting the bioavailability of chromium from chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate. Chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate is claimed to be freely soluble in water, however, chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate exists as a weak complex that may influence the bioavailability of chromium(III in the gastrointestinal tract. The Panel re-iterates that because of the complex chemistry of chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate in aqueous solutions and its limited solubility at pH >5, the bioavailability of chromium(III from chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate is low. Based on a conservative exposure estimate, the Panel calculated the combined intake of chromium(III from supplements and from foods fortified with chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate, for both adults and children, to be approximately 240 μg chromium(III/day, which is below the value of 250 µg/day established by the WHO for supplemental intake of chromium that should not be exceeded. The Panel noted that the use of chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate in the form of a premix with lactose, added to foods, would result in an exposure at the mean for adults of approximately 7-37 mg lactose/day (0.12-0.62 μg lactose/kg bw/day and to 36-192 μg lactate/day (0.60-3.20 μg/kg bw/day. Given that subjects with lactose maldigestion will tolerate up to 12 g of lactose with no or minor symptoms, these levels are not of safety concern.

  14. Biosorption of hexavalent chromium in a tannery industry wastewater using fungi species

    OpenAIRE

    Sivakumar, D.

    2016-01-01

    The isolated fungi species of different kinds from chromium contaminated soil sites located in Nagalkeni, Chennai were used for reducing chromium(VI) in a tannery industry wastewater of Nagalkeni, Chennai.  The experiments were conducted to know biosorption potential of isolated fungi species for removing chromium(VI) in a tannery industry wastewater against the different pH, fungi biomass and chromium(VI) concentration (dilution ratio).  The results of this study indicated that the order of ...

  15. Investigation of hexavalent chromium removal from Synthetic wastewater by using Peaganum

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Akbar Taghizadeh; Maryam khodadadi; Taher Shahriary; Hadighe Dorri; mahla zaferanieh; rasoul khosravi

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aim: Discharge of industrial wastewater containing hexavalent chromium into the environment can have harmful effects to the types of organisms. So, chromium should remove before discharging to the environment with an effective method. The purpose of this study of is hexavalent chromium removed with Peganum harmala granular seeds(PGS).   Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, The removal of hexavalent chromium with using PGS, with changes in time, pH, adsorbent dose,...

  16. Chromium Exposure and Hygienic Behaviors in Printing Workers in Southern Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Somsiri Decharat

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The main objective of this study was to assess the chromium exposure levels in printing workers. The study evaluated the airborne, serum, and urinary chromium levels and determines any correlation between level of chromium in specimen and airborne chromium levels. Material and Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 75 exposed and 75 matched nonexposed subjects. Air breathing zone was measured by furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Serum and urine samples were...

  17. Structure and morphology studies of chromium film at elevated temperature in hypersonic environment

    OpenAIRE

    Hegde, GM; Kulkarni, V; Nagaboopathy, M; Reddy, KPJ

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the after shock heated structural and morphological studies of chromium film coated on hypersonic test model as a passive drag reduction element. The structural changes and the composition of phases of chromium due to shock heating (2850 K) are characterized using X-ray diffraction studies. Surface morphology changes of chromium coating have been studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) before and after shock heating. Significant amount of chromium ablation and sub...

  18. Cutaneous absorption of trivalent chromium: tissue levels and treatment by exchange transfusion

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, W F; Ackrill, P; Day, J P; O'Hara, Maureen; Tye, C T; Burton, I.; Orton, C.; Harris, M.

    1982-01-01

    ABSTRACT A man was accidentally immersed in hot acidic trivalent chromium sulphate solution but none was swallowed. The clinical course was dominated by burns, intravascular haemolysis, and acute renal failure. Blood concentrations of chromium were measured during treatment and tissue concentrations were measured at death. Exchange transfusion reduced blood chromium concentrations by two-thirds. The total quantities of chromium absorbed and removed by various routes were calculated. In-vitro ...

  19. The risk to groundwater from wastewater irrigation using high chromium tannery effluent

    OpenAIRE

    Stuart, M E; Milne, C. J.

    2001-01-01

    Wastewater from Leon containing high concentrations of chromium from the tanning industry is used to irrigate agricultural land overlying an aquifer used for to supply potable water. Chromium from irrigation water is accumulating in agricultural soils, and in the lagoon and canal sediments, but groundwater appears to be unaffected and chromium concentrations remain low. A limited area of very high chromium concnetrations in groundwater was confirmed to be derived from a factory supplying the ...

  20. Liver Toxicity Resulted From Ingestion of Chromium Picolinate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baltacı D et al.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Herein, liver toxicity resulted from chronic ingestion of chromium picolinate, recommended daily allowance of over-the-counter (OTC have been presented. A woman of 32 years-old presented with pruritis since three days. On physical examination, she had no skin rashes, discoloration and urticarial lesions. With detailed inquiry of the patient, it has been determined that she had been using over-the-counter medicine containing chromium picolinate to enhance weight loss and increase lean body mass. On blood test examination follows: ALT: 484 U/I, AST: 182, Total/direct Bilirubin: 0,43/0,88 mg/dl. Complete Blood Count (CBC was normal. Chromium supplements may cause serious liver function impairment although when ingested within normal doses. Medication histories should include attention to the use of OTC nutritional supplements.

  1. Influence of chromium, oxygen, carbon and nitrogen on iron viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinetic viscosity of 70 beforehand melted iron samples with additions of chromium (up to 2%) and carbon (up to 1%) has been investigated. Different conditions of melting brought about differences in oxygen and nitrogen contents. Viscosity of most samples has been determined in the 1550-1650 deg C temperature range. It is stated that small additions to pure iron of each of the investigated elements (O, Cr, C, N) decrease its viscosity. Combined effect of these additions on viscosity is inadditive. Simultaneous introduction of oxygen and carbon may result in increase of melt viscosity. The same fact is observed at combined introduction of chromium and nitrogen. Simultaneous introduction of other impurities-chromium with oxygen or carbon, nitrogen with oxygen causes amplification of their individual effect. Reasons for the observed regularities result from changes in energies of interparticle interactions in the melt and therefore rebuilding of structure of its short-range order

  2. Structural and magnetic properties of chromium doped zinc ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinc chromium ferrites with chemical formula ZnCrxFe2−xO4 (x = 0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0) were prepared by Sol - Gel technique. The structural as well as magnetic properties of the synthesized samples have been studied and reported here. The structural characterizations of the samples were analyzed by using X – Ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). The single phase spinel cubic structure of all the prepared samples was tested by XRD and FTIR. The particle size was observed to decrease from 18.636 nm to 6.125 nm by chromium doping and induced a tensile strain in all the zinc chromium mixed ferrites. The magnetic properties of few samples (x = 0.0, 0.4, 1.0) were investigated using Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM)

  3. Chromium Resistant Bacteria: Impact on Plant Growth in Soil Microcosm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayel Hanane

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Three chromium resistant bacterial strains, Pseudomonas fluorescens PF28, Enterobacter amnigenus EA31 and Enterococcus gallinarum S34 isolated from tannery waste contaminated soil were used in this study. All strains could resist a high concentration of K2Cr2O7 that is up to 300 mg/L. The effect of these strains on clover plants (Trifolium campestre in the presence of two chromium salts CrCl3 and K2Cr2O7 was studied in soil microcosm. Application of chromium salts adversely affected seed germination, root and shoot length. Bacterial inoculation improved the growth parameters under chromate stress when compared with non inoculated respective controls. There was observed more than 50% reduction of Cr(VI in inoculated soil microcosms, as compared to the uninoculated soil under the same conditions. The results obtained in this study are significant for the bioremediation of chromate pollution.

  4. Studies of removal of chromium by model constructed wetland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mant

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Chromium is a pollutant present in tannery wastewater, its removal is necessary for protection of the environment. Penisetum purpureum, Brancharia decumbens and Phragmites australis were grown hydroponically in experimental gravel beds to determine their potential for the phytoremediation of solutions containing 10 and 20 mg Cr dm-3. These concentrations, similar to tannery wastewater after initial physico-chemical treatment were used with the aim of developing an economic secondary treatment to protect the environment. All the systems achieved removal efficiencies of 97 - 99.6% within 24 hours. P. purpureum and B. decumbens removed 78.1% and 68.5% respectively within the first hour. Both P. purpureum and B. decumbens were tolerant of the concentrations of chromium applied, but P. purpureum showed the greatest potential because its faster growth and larger biomass achieved a much greater chromium removal over the whole length of time of the experiment.

  5. On the rational alloying of structural chromium-nickel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made on the influence of chromium nickel, phosphorus on the critical brittleness temperature of Cr-Ni-Mo-V structural steels. It is shown that the critical brittleness temperature of these steels increases at chromium content more over than 2% and nickel content more than 2% in the result of carbide transformations during tempering. Increase of nickel content in Cr-Ni-Mo-V-steels strengthens the tendency to embrittlement during slow cooling, from tempering temperature owing to development of process of phosphorus grain-boundary segregation. Two mentioned mechanisms of embrittlement determine principles of rational steel alloying. The extreme dependence of the critical brittleness temperature on chromium and nickel content, which enables to choose the optimum composition of Cr-Ni-Mo-V-steels, was established

  6. Identifying genes and gene networks involved in chromium metabolism and detoxification in Crambe abyssinica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromium pollution is a serious environmental problem with few cost-effective remediation strategies available. Crambe abyssinica (a member of Brassicaseae), a non-food, fast growing high biomass crop, is an ideal candidate for phytoremediation of heavy metals contaminated soils. The present study used a PCR-Select Suppression Subtraction Hybridization approach in C. abyssinica to isolate differentially expressed genes in response to Cr exposure. A total of 72 differentially expressed subtracted cDNAs were sequenced and found to represent 43 genes. The subtracted cDNAs suggest that Cr stress significantly affects pathways related to stress/defense, ion transporters, sulfur assimilation, cell signaling, protein degradation, photosynthesis and cell metabolism. The regulation of these genes in response to Cr exposure was further confirmed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Characterization of these differentially expressed genes may enable the engineering of non-food, high-biomass plants, including C. abyssinica, for phytoremediation of Cr-contaminated soils and sediments. - Highlights: → Molecular mechanism of Cr uptake and detoxification in plants is not well known. → We identified differentially regulated genes upon Cr exposure in Crambe abyssinica. → 72 Cr-induced subtracted cDNAs were sequenced and found to represent 43 genes. → Pathways linked to stress, ion transport, and sulfur assimilation were affected. → This is the first Cr transcriptome study in a crop with phytoremediation potential. - This study describes the identification and isolation of differentially expressed genes involved in chromium metabolism and detoxification in a non-food industrial oil crop Crambe abyssinica.

  7. Chromium accumulation by the hyperaccumulator plant Leersia hexandra Swartz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue-Hong; Liu, Jie; Huang, Hai-Tao; Chen, Jun; Zhu, Yi-Nian; Wang, Dun-Qiu

    2007-04-01

    Leersia hexandra Swartz (Gramineae), which occurs in Southern China, has been found to be a new chromium hyperaccumulator by means of field survey and pot-culture experiment. The field survey showed that this species had an extraordinary accumulation capacity for chromium. The maximum Cr concentration in the dry leaf matter was 2978 mg kg(-1) on the side of a pond near an electroplating factory. The average concentration of chromium in the leaves was 18.86 times as that in the pond sediment, and 297.41 times as that in the pond water. Under conditions of the nutrient solution culture, it was found that L. hexandra had a high tolerance and accumulation capacity to Cr(III) and Cr(VI). Under 60 mg l(-1) Cr(III) and 10 mg l(-1) Cr(VI) treatment, there was no significant decrease of biomass in the leaves of L. hexandra (p>0.05). The highest bioaccumulation coefficients of the leaves for Cr(III) and Cr(VI) were 486.8 and 72.1, respectively. However, L. hexandra had a higher accumulation capacity for Cr(III) than for Cr(VI). At the Cr(III) concentration of 10 mg l(-1) in the culture solution, the concentration of chromium in leaves was 4868 mg kg(-1), while at the same Cr(VI) concentration, the concentration of chromium in leaves was only 597 mg kg(-1). These results confirmed that L. hexandra is a chromium hyperaccumulator which grows rapidly with a great tolerance to Cr and broad ecological amplitude. This species could provide a new plant resource that explores the mechanism of Cr hyperaccumulation, and has potential for usage in the phytoremediation of Cr-contaminated soil and water. PMID:17207838

  8. Heat resistance of carbon steel with chromium-based gas-thermal sprayed coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heat resistance of steel with chromium-base plasma sprayed coating is studied in comparison with chromium coating and base material. The specimens were oxidized at the air under 1250 K during 48 h. Investigations into steel-chromium coating interface were carried out and the structure of cinder was studied. Refs. 7, figs. 2

  9. Evaluation of flexural bond strength of porcelain to used nickel-chromium alloy in various percentages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VNV Madhav

    2012-01-01

    Fresh nickel-chromium alloy shows the greatest porcelain adherence.There is no significant change in bond strength of ceramic to alloy with up to 75% of used nickel-chromium alloy.At least 25%- of new alloy should be added when recycled nickel-chromium alloy is being used for metal ceramic restorations.

  10. 75 FR 60454 - Draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    ... AGENCY Draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the..., ``Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk..., 2010. The listening session on the draft assessment for hexavalent chromium will be held on November...

  11. 76 FR 20349 - Draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-12

    ... AGENCY Draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the..., ``Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk... workshop on the draft assessment for Hexavalent Chromium will be held on May 12, 2011, beginning at 8:30...

  12. 77 FR 61431 - Hexavalent Chromium Standards; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) Approval...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-09

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Hexavalent Chromium Standards; Extension of the Office of...) approval of the information collection requirements specified in the Hexavalent Chromium Standards for... requirements specified in the Hexavalent Chromium (Cr(VI)) Standards for General Industry (29 CFR...

  13. 21 CFR 73.3110a - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.3110a Section... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3110a Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide (Pigment Blue 36) (CAS Reg....

  14. Speciation dependent radiotracer studies on chromium preconcentration using iron doped calcium alginate biopolymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work aims to study the differential attitude of Ca-alginate (CA) and Fe-doped calcium alginate (Fe-CA) and towards Cr(III) and Cr (IV) so that, depending on the oxidation state of chromium effluent, environmentally sustainable methodologies can be prescribed for removal of chromium. Throughout the experiment 51Cr has been used as the precursor of stable chromium

  15. 40 CFR 749.68 - Hexavalent chromium-based water treatment chemicals in cooling systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Cooling Systems § 749.68 Hexavalent chromium-based water treatment chemicals in cooling systems. (a... distribution in commerce of hexavalent chromium-based water treatment chemicals for use in cooling systems. (d... holds hexavalent chromium-based water treatment chemicals for use in cooling systems. (6) Cooling...

  16. Chromium supplementation alters both glucose and lipid metabolism in feedlot cattle during the receiving period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossbred steers (n = 20; 235 +/- 4 kg) were fed 53 days during a receiving period to determine if supplementing chromium (Cr; KemTRACE®brandChromium Propionate 0.04%, Kemin Industries) would alter the glucose or lipid metabolism of newly received cattle. Chromium premixes were supplemented to add 0...

  17. Enhancement of the acute phase response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge in steers supplemented with chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The study examined the effect of chromium supplementation on the response of steers to an LPS challenge. Twenty steers received a premix that added 0 (control) or 0.2 mg/kg of chromium (KemTRACE®brandChromiumProprionate 0.04%, Kemin Industries) to the total diet on a dry matter basis for 55 d. Steer...

  18. Chromium supplementation alters the glucose and lipid metabolism of feedlot cattle during the receiving period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossbreed steers (n = 20; 235 ± 4 kg) were fed 53 d during a receiving period to determine if supplementing chromium (Cr; KemTRACE®brand Chromium Propionate 0.04%, Kemin Industries) would alter the glucose or lipid metabolism of newly received cattle. Chromium premixes were supplemented to add 0 (C...

  19. Soil dehydrogenase activity in the presence of chromium (III) and (VI)

    OpenAIRE

    Wolińska A.; Stępniewska Z.

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents the influence of chromium forms (III) and (VI) on the soil dehydrogenase activity. Enzyme activities can be considered effective indicators of soil quality changes resulting from environmental stress or management practices. It was found that chromium compounds have detrimental effects on soil dehydrogenase activity. After the addition of chromium, a rapid and significant decrease in enzymatic activities was observed.

  20. 40 CFR 721.981 - Substituted naphtholoazo-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex. 721.981 Section 721.981 Protection of Environment...-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex. (a) Chemical substance and significant new... naphtholoazo-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex (PMN P-93-1631) is subject...