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Sample records for chromium hydroxides

  1. Oxidative leaching of chromium from layered double hydroxides: Mechanistic studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A V Radha; P Vishnu Kamath

    2004-08-01

    The layered double hydroxide (LDH) of Zn with Cr on treatment with a hypochlorite solution releases chromate ions as a result of oxidative leaching by a dissolution–reprecipitation mechanism. The residue is found to be -Zn(OH)2. The LDH of Mg with Cr on the other hand is resistant to oxidative leaching. In contrast, a X-ray amorphous gel of the coprecipitated hydroxides of Mg and Cr yields chromate ions. These results suggest that the oxidation potential of Cr(III) in LDHs is determined by the nature of the divalent ion and the crystallinity of the phase while being unaffected by the nature of the intercalated anions.

  2. A XAFS study of plain and composite iron(III) and chromium(III) hydroxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papassiopi, N; Pinakidou, F; Katsikini, M; Antipas, G S E; Christou, C; Xenidis, A; Paloura, E C

    2014-09-01

    Reduction of hexavalent Cr(VI) to the trivalent state is the common strategy for remediation of Cr(VI) contaminated waters and soils. In the presence of Fe the resulting compounds are usually mixed Fe(III)-Cr(III) phases, while, under iron-free conditions, reduction leads to formation of plain Cr(III) hydroxides. Environmental stability of these compounds depends on their structure and is important to understand how different precipitation conditions affect the local atomic order of resulting compounds and thus their long term stability. In current study, typical Cr(VI) environmental remediation products, i.e. plain and mixed Fe(III)-Cr(III) hydroxides, were synthesized by hydrolysis and redox reactions and their structure was studied by X ray diffraction and X ray absorption fine structure techniques. Plain Cr(III) hydroxide was found to correspond to the molecular formula Cr(OH)3·3H2O and was identified as crystalline in XRD. However, the same compound when examined by EXAFS did not exhibit any clear local order in the range of EXAFS detectable distances, i.e. between 0 and 5Å. Namely, EXAFS spectroscopy detected only contribution from the first nearest neighboring (Cr-O) shell, suggesting that CrO6 octahedra interconnection is loose, in accordance with the suggested anti-bayerite structure of this compound. Mixed Fe(III)-Cr(III) systems resembled 2-line ferrihydrite irrespective of the synthesis route. Analysis of Fe-K-EXAFS and Cr-K-EXAFS spectra indicated that FeO6 octahedra are bonded by sharing both edges and corners, while CrO6 octahedra seem to prefer edge sharing linkage. EXAFS data also suggest that Fe-Cr hydroxide produced by hydrolysis presents a better arrangement of CrO6 octahedra compared to the redox product.

  3. Precursor preparation for Ca-Al layered double hydroxide to remove hexavalent chromium coexisting with calcium and magnesium chlorides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Lihua; He, Xiaoman; Qu, Jun; Li, Xuewei; Lei, Zhiwu; Zhang, Qiwu; Liu, Xinzhong

    2017-01-01

    Al(OH)3 and Ca(OH)2 powders are co-ground to prepare a precursor which hydrates into a layered double hydroxide (LDH) phase by agitation in aqueous solution with target hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) at room temperature, to achieve an obvious improvement in removal efficiency of Cr(VI) through an easy incorporation into the structure. Although the prepared precursor transforms into LDH phases also when agitated in the solutions of calcium and magnesium chlorides, it incorporates Cr(VI) preferentially to the chloride salts when they coexist. The adsorption isotherm and kinetic studies show that the phenomena occurring on the Al-Ca precursor fit a pseudo-second-order kinetics with a Langmuir adsorption capacity of 59.45 mg/g. Besides, characterizations of the prepared precursor and the samples after adsorption are also performed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), Transmission electron microscope (TEM) to understand the reason of the preferential incorporation of Cr(VI) to the coexisting chloride salts during the LDH phase formation.

  4. Chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intern Med 1991;115:917-24. Abraham AS, Brooks BA, Eylath U. The effects of chromium supplementation on serum glucose and lipids in patients with and without non-insulin-dependent diabetes. Metabolism 1992;41:768-71. Hermann J, Arquitt A. ...

  5. Magnesium Hydroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnesium hydroxide is used on a short-term basis to treat constipation.This medication is sometimes prescribed ... Magnesium hydroxide come as a tablet and liquid to take by mouth. It usually is taken as ...

  6. Sodium hydroxide poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodium hydroxide is a very strong chemical. It is also known as lye and caustic soda. This ... poisoning from touching, breathing in (inhaling), or swallowing sodium hydroxide. This article is for information only. Do ...

  7. Development of a coprecipitation system for the speciation/preconcentration of chromium in tap waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karatepe, Aslihan, E-mail: karatepea@gmail.com [Nevsehir University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Department of Chemistry, 50000 Nevsehir (Turkey); Korkmaz, Esra [Bozok University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Department of Chemistry, Yozgat (Turkey); Soylak, Mustafa [Erciyes University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Chemistry Department, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Elci, Latif [Pamukkale University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Department of Chemistry, 20020 Denizli (Turkey)

    2010-01-15

    A method for the speciation of chromium(III), chromium(VI) and determination of total chromium based on coprecipitation of chromium(III) with dysprosium hydroxide has been investigated and applied to tap water samples. Chromium(III) was quantitatively recovered by the presented method, while the recovery values for chromium(VI) was below 10%. The influences of analytical parameters including amount of dysprosium(III), pH, centrifugation speed and sample volume for the quantitative precipitation were examined. No interferic effects were observed from alkali, earth alkali and some transition metals for the analyte ions. The detection limits (k = 3, N = 15) were 0.65 {mu}g/L for chromium(III) and 0.78 {mu}g/L for chromium(VI). The validation of the presented method was checked by the analysis of certified reference materials.

  8. New technology for comprehensive utilization of aluminum-chromium residue from chromium salts production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-bin; QI Tian-gui; JIANG Xin-min; ZHOU Qiu-sheng; LIU Gui-hua; PENG Zhi-hong; HAN Deng-lun; ZHANG Zhong-yuan; YANG Kun-shan

    2008-01-01

    Colloidal aluminum-chromium residue(ACR) was mass-produced in chromate production process, and the large energy consumption and high recovery cost existed in traditional methods of utilizing such ACR. To overcome those problems, a new comprehensive method was proposed to deal with the ACR, and was proven valid in industry. In the new process, the chromate was separated firstly from the colloidal ACR by ripening and washing with additives, by which more than 95% hexavalent chromium was recovered. The chromium-free aluminum residue(CFAR), after properly dispersed, was digested at 120-130 ℃ and more than 90% alumina can be recovered. And then the pregnant aluminate solution obtained from digestion was seeded to precipitate aluminum hydroxide. This new method can successfully recover both alumina and sodium chromate, and thus realize the comprehensive utilization of ACR from chromate industry.

  9. Chromium in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    The best source of chromium is brewer's yeast. However, many people do not use brewer's yeast because it causes bloating ( abdominal distention ) and nausea . Other good sources of chromium include ...

  10. Heterogeneous chromium catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a heterogeneous chromium catalyst system for the polymerisation of ethylene and/or alpha olefins prepared by the steps of: (a) providing a silica-containing support, (b) treating the silica-containing support with a chromium compound to form a chromium-based silica-c

  11. Microbial exudate promoted dissolution and transformation of chromium containing minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, E. M.; Sun, J.; Tang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Because of its utility in many industrial processes, chromium has become the second most common metal contaminant in the United States. The two most common oxidation states of chromium in nature are Cr(III), which is highly immobile, and Cr(VI), which is highly mobile and toxic. In both natural and engineered environments, the most common remediation of Cr(VI) is through reduction, which results in chromium sequestration in the low solubility mixed Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxide phases. Consequently, the stability of these minerals must be examined to assess the fate of chromium in the subsurface. We examined the dissolution of mixed Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides in the presence of common microbial exudates, including the siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB; a common organic ligand secreted by most microbes with high affinity for ferric iron and other trivalent metal ions) and oxalate (a common organic acid produced by microbes). The solids exhibited incongruent dissolution with preferential leaching of Fe from the solid phase. Over time, this leads to a more Cr rich mineral, which is known to be more soluble than the corresponding mixed mineral phase. We are currently investigating the structure of the reacted mineral phases and soluble Cr(III) species, as well as the potential oxidation and remobilization of the soluble Cr species. Results from this study will provide insights regarding the long term transport and fate of chromium in the natural environment in the presence of microbial activities.

  12. INFLUENCE OF HEAVY METALS HYDROXIDES ON WATER DISSOCIATION IN BIPOLAR MEMBRANE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheldeshov N. V.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of study of bipolar membrane – analogue of MB-2, modified with chemically introduced chromium (III, iron (III and nickel (II hydroxides by the method of frequency spectrum of electrochemical impedance, by infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy in combination with X-ray spectrum analysis are presented. It is shown, that sequential treatment of cation-exchanger, contained in cationexchange membrane, with metal salt solution and alkali solution does not result in formation of complex compounds of these metals with ionic groups of ion exchanger. It was found that in these conditions the presence of heavy metals in the phase of cationexchanger confirmed by X-ray analysis, however, crystals of hydroxides of heavy metals are not detected in the size range of 1000 nm to 20 nm. These heavy metal compounds are thermally unstable and their catalytic activity in the reaction of dissociation of water molecules decreases with increasing temperature during heat treatment. The introduction of low-soluble hydroxides of d-metals (chromium (III, iron (III, nickel(II by chemical method can significantly improve the electrochemical characteristics of a bipolar membrane. The most effective catalysts in water dissociation reaction are the hydroxides of chromium (III and iron (III and, as a consequence, membranes with these hydroxides have a lower value of overpotential compared with original membrane at the same current density

  13. Highly improved chromium (III uptake capacity in modified sugarcane bagasse using different chemical treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Cristina Gonçalves Dos Santos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper focuses on improving chromium (III uptake capacity of sugarcane bagasse through its chemical modification with citric acid and/or sodium hydroxide. The chemical modifications were confirmed by infrared spectroscopy, with an evident peak observed at 1730 cm-1, attributed to carbonyl groups. Equilibrium was reached after 24 h, and the kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order model. The highest chromium (III maximum adsorption capacity (MAC value was found when using sugarcane bagasse modified with sodium hydroxide and citric acid (58.00 mg g-1 giving a MAC value about three times greater (20.34 mg g-1 than for raw sugarcane bagasse.

  14. Environmental biochemistry of chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losi, M E; Amrhein, C; Frankenberger, W T

    1994-01-01

    Chromium is a d-block transitional element with many industrial uses. It occurs naturally in various crustal materials and is discharged to the environment as industrial waste. Although it can occur in a number of oxidation states, only 3+ and 6+ are found in environmental systems. The environmental behavior of Cr is largely a function of its oxidation state. Hexavalent Cr compounds (mainly chromates and dichromates) are considered toxic to a variety of terrestrial and aquatic organisms and are mobile in soil/water systems, much more so than trivalent Cr compounds. This is largely because of differing chemical properties: Hexavalent Cr compounds are strong oxidizers and highly soluble, while trivalent Cr compounds tend to form relatively inert precipitates at near-neutral pH. The trivalent state is generally considered to be the stable form in equilibrium with most soil/water systems. A diagram of the Cr cycle in soils and water is given in Fig. 6 (Bartlett 1991). This illustration provides a summary of environmentally relevant reactions. Beginning with hexavalent Cr that is released into the environment as industrial waste, there are a number of possible fates, including pollution of soil and surface water and leaching into groundwater, where it may remain stable and, in turn, can be taken up by plants or animals, and adsorption/precipitation, involving soil colloids and/or organic matter. Herein lies much of the environmental concern associated with the hexavalent form. A portion of the Cr(VI) will be reduced to the trivalent form by inorganic electron donors, such as Fe2+ and S2-, or by bioprocesses involving organic matter. Following this conversion, Cr3+ can be expected to precipitate as oxides and hydroxides or to form complexes with numerous ligands. This fraction includes a vast majority of global Cr reserves. Soluble Cr3+ complexes, such as those formed with citrate, can undergo oxidation when they come in contact with manganese dioxide, thus reforming

  15. Lime enhanced chromium removal in advanced integrated wastewater pond system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadesse, I; Isoaho, S A; Green, F B; Puhakka, J A

    2006-03-01

    The removal of trivalent chromium from a combined tannery effluent in horizontal settling tanks and subsequent Advanced Integrated Wastewater Pond System (AIWPS) reactors was investigated. The raw combined effluent from Modjo tannery had pH in the range of 11.2-12. At this pH, a trivalent chromium removal of 46-72% was obtained in the horizontal settling tanks after a one-day detention time. Trivalent chromium precipitated as chromium hydroxide, Cr(OH)3. 58-95% Cr(III) was removed in the advanced facultative pond (AFP) where the water column pH of 7.2-8.4 was close to pH 8, which is the optimum precipitation pH for trivalent chromium. Chromium removals in the secondary facultative pond (SFP) and maturation pond (MP) were 30-50% and 6-16%, respectively. With Cr(III) concentration of 0.2-0.8 mg/l in the final treated effluent, the AIWPS preceded by horizontal settling tanks produced effluent that could easily meet most of the current Cr(III) discharge limits to receive water bodies.

  16. Extraction of Chromium from Carbon Ferrochromium Residual Wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarevskiy, P. P.; Gizatulin, R. A.; Romanenko, Yu E.; Valuev, D. V.; Valueva, A. V.; Serikbol, A.

    2015-09-01

    This work reports the problem of processing residual wastes after producing carbon ferrochrome by recycling dust using a hydrometallurgical method with the purpose of extracting the basic component - chromium, The X-ray diffraction analysis results, chemical and granulometric compositions of dust from the carbon ferrochrome production are given, The method for the production of chemical-enrichment concentrate (CEC) by processing ferrous dust is described, with obtaining a middling product - sodium mono-chromate with its further reduction to chromium hydroxide, followed by autoclave leaching, and resulting in the production of chemically enriched chrome concentrate, The plant used for autoclave leaching and filtering is schematically depicted, The smelting process of metallic chromium using the ladle aluminothermic method is described,

  17. Novel synthesis of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) from zinc hydroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zilin; Zhang, Yihe; Zhang, Qian; Chen, Xue; Liu, Leipeng; Komarneni, Sridhar; Lv, Fengzhu

    2017-02-01

    The most common synthesis methods for layered double hydroxides (LDHs) are co-precipitation and reconstruction, which can have some limitations for application. Here, we report a novel synthesis method for LDHs. We use zinc hydroxide as the precursor to synthesize LDHs phase through a simple transformation process of zinc hydroxide phase. For this transformation process, aluminum can enter into zinc hydroxide and replace zinc quickly to transform it into LDH by creating positive charges in the zinc hydroxide solid phase. The mechanism of LDH formation was through Al3+ reaction first with zinc hydroxide followed by recrystallization of the original structure of zinc hydroxide. Thus, the new process of LDH formation involves a reaction of Al to substitute for Zn and recrystallization leading to LDH and the final pH influences the crystallization of LDHs by this process. In addition, Cr3+ was employed as a trivalent cation for LDH formation to react with zinc hydroxide, which also led to LDH structure.

  18. Spectroscopic analysis of chromium bioremediation products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadharajan, C.; Nico, P. S.; Yang, L.; Marcus, M. A.; Steefel, C.; Larsen, J. T.; Beller, H. R.; Brodie, E. L.

    2010-12-01

    Remediation of chromium contamination frequently involves reducing the toxic and soluble hexavalent form, Cr(VI), to the relatively harmless and mostly immobile trivalent state, Cr(III). The objective of this study is to identify the biogeochemical reactions that control in situ chromium reduction in the presence of different dominant electron acceptors, i.e., NO3-, Fe(III), and SO42-. It was hypothesized that indirect, abiotic reduction of Cr(VI) by reduced metabolic products [Fe(II) and sulfides] would dominate over direct enzymatic reduction by denitrifying, iron-reducing, or sulfate-reducing bacteria. It is further hypothesized that the enzymatic reduction of Cr(VI) would produce relatively pure chromium hydroxide precipitates, whereas indirect reduction would result in mixed Cr-Fe hydroxide solid phases. Flow-through columns containing homogenized sediments from the 100H site at Hanford, WA were subjected to nitrate-, sulfate- or iron-reducing conditions in the presence of 5 µM Cr(VI) and 5 mM lactate. Cr(VI) was depleted in the effluent solutions from the nitrate- and sulfate-reducing columns; however only a small amount of Cr(VI) was removed under iron-reducing conditions. Preliminary analysis of micro X-ray absorption spectra indicate that the untreated and iron-reducing column sediments contained pre-existing Cr in the form of primary minerals, e.g. chromite and/or Cr-bearing micas. However, there was an increase in the relative abundance of mixed-phase Cr-Fe hydroxides, i.e., Cr1-xFex(OH)3 in the nitrate- and sulfate-treated columns. A possible explanation for the observations is that the production of Fe(II) was enhanced under the nitrate- and sulfate- reducing conditions, and was most likely sulfide-driven in the latter case. The Fe(II) was subsequently available for reduction of Cr(VI) resulting in the mixed-phase precipitates. The results from the spectroscopic analysis support the hypothesis that Fe(II)-mediated Cr reduction prevails over direct

  19. Chromium (III Removal and Recovery from Tannery Wastewater by Precipitation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abass Esmaeili

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromium (III salts are the most widely used chemicals for tanning processes, but 60-70% of total chromium salts reacts with the hides. In the other word, about 30-40% of the chromium amount remains in the solids and liquid wastes (especially spent tanning solutions. Therefore, the removal and recovery of the chromium content of these wastewaters are necessary for environmental protection and economic reasons. Removal and recovery of chromium were carried out by using precipitation process. For this purpose, three precipitating agents calcium hydroxide, sodium hydroxide and magnesium oxide were used. The effects of pH, stirring time, settling rate and sludge volume were studied in batch experiments. Results show that the optimum pH is 8-9 and the good sludge with high settling rate and lower volume obtain by the MgO precipitating agent. Hence the MgO is a good precipitating agent for removal and recovery of chromium from tanning wastewater.

  20. Iron-rich Oklahoma clays as a natural source of chromium in monitoring wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Dane; Apblett, Allen; Materer, Nicholas F

    2011-12-01

    Water samples, drawn from groundwater monitoring wells located southeast of Oklahoma City, OK, were found to contain elevated concentrations of total chromium with an apparent source localized to the area surrounding each well. Since these monitoring wells are located in areas with no historic chromium usage, industrial sources of chromium were ruled out. Water testing was performed on twelve monitoring wells in the area that historically had elevated total chromium concentrations ranging from 10-4900 micrograms per litre. Filtered water samples were found to be free of chromium contamination, indicating that the source of the chromium is the suspended solids. Analysis of these solids by acid digestion and a sequential extraction technique revealed that the chromium was primarily associated with iron-containing solids. X-ray diffraction identified goethite, an iron oxide hydroxide, as the dominant iron-containing phase in the suspended solids. The mineralogy in this region is dominated by interbedded red-bed sandstone and mudstone whose mineral content includes mixed-layer illite-smectite, hematite, goethite, gypsum and dolomite. Elemental analysis of soil samples collected as a function of depth in the locale of the monitoring wells indicated that the iron rich clays contain a natural source of chromium. The elevated levels of total chromium are most likely due to the dissolution of silica and alumina from the chromium containing iron clays in the basic well water, resulting in the release of fine suspended solids that naturally have high chromium concentrations. These results should be applicable to other areas containing iron-rich clays.

  1. Synthesis, characterization and stability of Cr(III) and Fe(III) hydroxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papassiopi, N; Vaxevanidou, K; Christou, C; Karagianni, E; Antipas, G S E

    2014-01-15

    Chromium is a common contaminant of soils and aquifers and constitutes a major environmental problem. In nature, chromium usually exists in the form of two oxidation states, trivalent, Cr(III), which is relatively innocuous for biota and for the aquatic environment, and hexavalent, Cr(VI) which is toxic, carcinogenic and very soluble. Accordingly, the majority of wastewater and groundwater treatment technologies, include a stage where Cr(VI) is reduced to Cr(III), in order to remove chromium from the aqueous phase and bind the element in the form of environmentally stable solid compounds. In the absence of iron the final product is typically of the form Cr(OH)3·xH2O whereas in the presence of iron the precipitate is a mixed Fe(1-x)Crx(OH)3 phase. In this study, we report on the synthesis, characterisation and stability of mixed (Fex,Cr1-x)(OH)3 hydroxides as compared to the stability of Cr(OH)3. We established that the plain Cr(III) hydroxide, abiding to the approximate molecular formula Cr(OH)3·3H2O, was crystalline, highly soluble, i.e. unstable, with a tendency to transform into the stable amorphous hydroxide Cr(OH)3(am) phase. Mixed Fe0.75Cr0.25(OH)3 hydroxides were found to be of the ferrihydrite structure, Fe(OH)3, and we correlated their solubility to that of a solid solution formed by plain ferrihydrite and the amorphous Cr(III) hydroxide. Both our experimental results and thermodynamic calculations indicated that mixed Fe(III)-Cr(III) hydroxides are more effective enhancers of groundwater quality, in comparison to the plain amorphous or crystalline Cr(III) hydroxides, the latter found to have a solubility typically higher than 50μg/l (maximum EU permitted Cr level in drinking water), while the amorphous Cr(OH)3(am) phase was within the drinking water threshold in the range 5.7hydroxides studied were of extended stability in the 4.8

  2. Evaluation of layered zinc hydroxide nitrate and zinc/nickel double hydroxide salts in the removal of chromate ions from solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Henrique Bortolaz; Wypych, Fernando

    2016-11-01

    Layered zinc hydroxide nitrate (ZnHN) and Zn/Ni layered double hydroxide salts were synthesized and used to remove chromate ions from solutions at pH 8.0. The materials were characterized by many instrumental techniques before and after chromate ion removal. ZnHN decomposed after contact with the chromate solution, whereas the layered structure of Zn/Ni hydroxide nitrate (Zn/NiHN) and Zn/Ni hydroxide acetate (Zn/NiHA) remained their layers intact after the topotactic anionic exchange reaction, only changing the basal distances. ZnHN, Zn/NiHN, and Zn/NiHA removed 210.1, 144.8, and 170.1 mg of CrO42-/g of material, respectively. Although the removal values obtained for Zn/NiHN and Zn/NiHA were smaller than the values predicted for the ideal formulas of the solids (194.3 and 192.4 mg of CrO42-/g of material, respectively), the measured capacities were higher than the values achieved with many materials reported in the literature. Kinetic experiments showed the removal reaction was fast. To facilitate the solid/liquid separation process after chromium removal, Zn/Ni layered double hydroxide salts with magnetic supports were also synthesized, and their ability to remove chromate was evaluated.

  3. MODELING THE RATE-CONTROLLED SORPTION OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, D.B.; Stollenwerk, K.G.

    1985-01-01

    Sorption of chromium VI on the iron-oxide- and hydroxide-coated surface of alluvial material was numerically simulated with rate-controlled reactions. Reaction kinetics and diffusional processes, in the form of film, pore, and particle diffusion, were simulated and compared with experimental results. The use of empirically calculated rate coefficients for diffusion through the reacting surface was found to simulate experimental data; pore or particle diffusion is believed to be a possible rate-controlling mechanism. The use of rate equations to predict conservative transport and rate- and local-equilibrium-controlled reactions was shown to be feasible.

  4. Hexavalent Chromium Reduction and Its Distribution in the Cell and Medium by Chromium Resistant Fusarium solani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousumi Sen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, batch biosorption of Cr(VI was studied using the fungal strain isolated from soil. The fungal strain was characterized as Fusarium solani. The total Cr distribution in the biomass (fungus and in the media obtained from the experiment conducted at 500 mg l -1 initial Cr(VI concentration and pH 5.0. The results indicated both intracellular and extracellular accumulation and enzymatic reduction of Cr(VI and this was supported by the Transmission Electron Microscopic (TEM observation at the same Cr(VI concentration and pH value. Chromium elution from Fusarium solani containing Cr was then tried out using a number of chromium eluting reagents and a maximum Cr could be eluted using 0.5N sodium hydroxide solution without destructing the biomass structure. The total Cr was recovered by pH adjustment from both biomass and media was found to be 44% of the initial Cr(VI concentration (500 mg l-1.

  5. Laboratory scale studies on removal of chromium from industrial wastes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Chromium being one of the major toxic pollutants is discharged from electroplating and chrome tanning processes and is also found in the effluents of dyes, paint pigments, manufacturing units etc. Chromium exists in aqueous systems in both trivalent (Cr 3+) and hexavalent (Cr 6+) forms. The hexavalent form is carcinogenic and toxic to aquatic life, whereas Cr3+ is however comparatively less toxic. This study was undertaken to investigate the total chromium removal from industrial effluents by chemical means in order to achieve the Pakistan NEQS level of 1 mg/L by the methods of reduction and precipitation. The study was conducted in four phases.In phase I, the optimum pH and cost effective reducing agent among the four popular commercial chemicals was selected. As a result, pH of 2 was found to be most suitable and sodium meta bisulfate was found to be the most cost effective reducing agent respectively. Phase II showed that lower dose of sodium meta bisulfate was sufficient to obtain 100 % efficiency in reducing Cr6+ to Cr3+, and it was noted that reaction time had no significance in the whole process. A design curve for reduction process was established which can act as a tool for treatment of industrial effluents.Phase III studies indicated the best pH was 8.5 for precipitation of Cr 3+ to chromium hydroxide by using lime. An efficiency of 100 % was achievable and a settling time of 30 minutes produced clear effluent. Finally in Phase IV actual waste samples from chrome tanning and electroplating industries, when precipitated at pH of 12 gave 100 % efficiency at a settling time of 30 minutes and confirmed that chemical means of reduction and precipitation is a feasible and viable solution for treating chromium wastes from industries.

  6. 21 CFR 184.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... hydration of reactive grades of magnesium oxide. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the Food... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium hydroxide. 184.1428 Section 184.1428 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH)2,...

  7. Contribution to the knowledge of nickel hydroxide electrodes. 5. Analysis and electrochemical behavior of cadmium nickel hydroxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, H.; Dennstedt, W.

    1981-01-01

    Electrochemical experiments performed at sintered and bulk electrodes show that beta nickel hydroxide contains an electrochemically inactive proportion of cadmium hydroxide of up to 10%. The electrochemically ineffective cadmium hydroxide is homogeneously dissolved in beta nickel hydroxide.

  8. Analysis of barium hydroxide and calcium hydroxide slurry carbonation reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patch, K.D.; Hart, R.P.; Schumacher, W.A.

    1980-05-01

    The removal of CO/sub 2/ from air was investigated by using a continuous-agitated-slurry carbonation reactor containing either barium hydroxide (Ba(OH)/sub 2/) or calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)/sub 2/). Such a process would be applied to scrub /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ from stack gases at nuclear-fuel reprocessing plants. Decontamination factors were characterized for reactor conditions which could alter hydrodynamic behavior. An attempt was made to characterize reactor performance with models assuming both plug flow and various degrees of backmixing in the gas phase. The Ba(OH)/sub 2/ slurry enabled increased conversion, but apparently the process was controlled under some conditions by phenomena differing from those observed for carbonation by Ca(OH)/sub 2/. Overall reaction mechanisms are postulated.

  9. Study on anaerobic treatment of wastewater containing hexavalent chromium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yan-bin; XIAO Hua-hua; SUN Shui-yu

    2005-01-01

    A self-made anaerobic bio-filter bed which was inoculated with special sludge showed high efficiency in removing hexavalent chromium. When pump flow was 47 ml/min and CODCr ofwastewater was about 140 mg/L, it took 4 h to decrease the Cr6+ concentrations from about 60 mg/L to under 0.5 mg/L, compared with 14 h without carbon source addition. Cr6+ concentrations ranged from 64.66 mg/L to 75.53 mg/L, the system efficiency was excellent. When Cr6+ concentration reached 95.47 mg/L,the treatment time was prolonged to 7.5 h. Compared with the contrast system, the system with trace metals showed clear superiority in that the Cr6+ removal rate increased by 21.26%. Some analyses also showed that hexavalent chromium could probably be bio-reduced to trivalent chromium, and that as a result, the chrome hydroxide sediment was formed on the surface of microorganisms.

  10. Adsorptive stripping voltammetric determination of chromium in gallium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palrecha, M M; Mathur, P K

    1997-12-19

    The electroanalytical chemistry of trace metals has progressed strongly with the development of cathodic stripping voltammetry (CSV) preceded by adsorption collection of organic metal complexes. A sensitive method for the determination of trace amount of chromium in gallium is described. Gallium is dissolved in sodium hydroxide containing hydrogen peroxide. The method is based on the catalytic activity of nitrate ions on the reduction of Cr(III)TTHA (triethylene tetramine-N,N,N',N'',N''',N'''-hexaacetic acid) complex. The sensitivity of this method is further improved by adsorption preconcentration of Cr(III)TTHA complex at a hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE). The Cr(III) formed at the electrode surface by the reduction of Cr(VI), which is present in the bulk solution, is immediately complexed by TTHA. The adsorbed complex is then reduced at a peak potential of - 1.26 V, and the peak height of Cr(III) reduction is measured. The determination limit was restricted by the amount of chromium present in the reagent blank solution. The method is suitable for the determination of chromium at level as low as 0.2 mug g(-1) (with about 50 mg of sample) and a relative standard deviation of 15%.

  11. Study on anaerobic treatment of wastewater containing hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan-bin; Xiao, Hua-hua; Sun, Shui-yu

    2005-06-01

    A self-made anaerobic bio-filter bed which was inoculated with special sludge showed high efficiency in removing hexavalent chromium. When pump flow was 47 ml/min and COD(Cr) of wastewater was about 140 mg/L, it took 4 h to decrease the Cr6+ concentrations from about 60 mg/L to under 0.5 mg/L, compared with 14 h without carbon source addition. Cr6+ concentrations ranged from 64.66 mg/L to 75.53 mg/L, the system efficiency was excellent. When Cr6+ concentration reached 95.47 mg/L, the treatment time was prolonged to 7.5 h. Compared with the contrast system, the system with trace metals showed clear superiority in that the Cr6+ removal rate increased by 21.26%. Some analyses also showed that hexavalent chromium could probably be bio-reduced to trivalent chromium, and that as a result, the chrome hydroxide sediment was formed on the surface of microorganisms.

  12. Study on anaerobic treatment of wastewater containing hexavalent chromium*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan-bin; Xiao, Hua-hua; Sun, Shui-yu

    2005-01-01

    A self-made anaerobic bio-filter bed which was inoculated with special sludge showed high efficiency in removing hexavalent chromium. When pump flow was 47 ml/min and CODCr of wastewater was about 140 mg/L, it took 4 h to decrease the Cr6+ concentrations from about 60 mg/L to under 0.5 mg/L, compared with 14 h without carbon source addition. Cr6+ concentrations ranged from 64.66 mg/L to 75.53 mg/L, the system efficiency was excellent. When Cr6+ concentration reached 95.47 mg/L, the treatment time was prolonged to 7.5 h. Compared with the contrast system, the system with trace metals showed clear superiority in that the Cr6+ removal rate increased by 21.26%. Some analyses also showed that hexavalent chromium could probably be bio-reduced to trivalent chromium, and that as a result, the chrome hydroxide sediment was formed on the surface of microorganisms. PMID:15909347

  13. Layered double hydroxide stability. 2. Formation of Cr(III)-containing layered double hydroxides directly from solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boclair, J. W.; Braterman, P. S.; Jiang, J.; Lou, S.; Yarberry, F.

    1999-01-01

    Solutions containing divalent metal [M(II) = Mg2+, Zn2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Mn2+] chlorides and CrCl3 6H2O were titrated with NaOH to yield, for M(II) = Zn, Co, and Ni, hydrotalcite-like layered double hydroxides (LDHs), [[M(II)]1-z[Cr(III)]z(OH)2][Cl]z yH2O, in a single step, without intermediate formation of chromium hydroxide. Analysis of the resultant titration curves yields solubility constants for these compounds. These are in the order Zn < Ni approximately Co, with a clear preference for formation of the phase with z = 1/3. With Mg2+ as chloride, titration gives a mixture of Cr(OH)3 and Mg(OH)2, but the metal sulfates give Mg2Cr(OH)6 1/2(SO4) by a two-step process. Titrimetric and spectroscopic evidence suggests short-range cation order in the one-step LDH systems.

  14. Groundwater contaminant by hexavalent chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, C. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Oxidation of trivalent chromium to hexavalent chromium has been investigated as a function of total manganese in soils as well as various incubation conditions. Chromium and manganese contents were analyzed by atomic absorption (graphite furnace and flame emission respectively) following acid digestion. Total hexavalent chromium generation capacity was determined by addition of 0.001 M CrCL3, incubation, and analysis by s-diphenyl carbazide. Samples were then leached with CaSO{sub 4} and MgSO{sub 4} and incubated in various environments (oven, freeze-drier, field moist, ultrafreeze) to test for geogenic generation of Cr(IV). The degree of geogenic generation of hexavalent chromium was compared with total Mn and Cr content as well as hexavalent generational capacity.

  15. Supermolecular layered dou- ble hydroxides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Research progresses in the layered double hydroxides ·mH2O intercalated with metal coordinate ions or oxometalates in the last ten years are reviewed. These layered double hydroxides are mainly intercalated with polyoxometalate (POM) ions, a LiAl-LDH photochemical assembly containing TiO2 and CH3(CH2)12COO- anions, together with Zn(TPPC) (porphy-rin derivate) and macrocyclic ligand-containing porphyrin derivate anions. Emphasis is put on the synthesis methods for intercalation of the anions into the interlayer regions, the characterization techniques and structures for the layered compounds and the newest research progress in the fields such as catalysis. The review also forecasts the prospects of the field.

  16. On texture formation of chromium electrodeposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian Bergenstof; Leisner, Peter; Horsewell, Andy

    1998-01-01

    The microstructure, texture and hardness of electrodeposited hard, direct current (DC) chromium and pulsed reversed chromium has been investigated. These investigations suggest that the growth and texture of hard chromium is controlled by inhibition processes and reactions. Further, it has been...... established that codeposition of Cr2O3 nanoparticles is a general feature of DC chromium electrodeposition....

  17. Hydroxide precursors to produce nanometric YCrO{sub 3}: Characterization and conductivity analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durán, A., E-mail: dural@cnyn.unam.mx [Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnología, Km. 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, Apartado Postal 14, C.P. 22800, Ensenada, B.C. (Mexico); Meza F, C. [Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnología, Km. 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, Apartado Postal 14, C.P. 22800, Ensenada, B.C. (Mexico); Arizaga, Gregorio Guadalupe Carbajal, E-mail: gregoriocarbajal@yahoo.com.mx [Departamento de Química, Universidad de Guadalajara, Marcelino García Barragán 1421, C.P. 44430, Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico)

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: ► Y/Cr mixed hydroxide was precipitated with gaseous ammonia. ► The hydroxide treated at 1373 K formed YCrO{sub 3} crystals with 20 nm diameter. ► Electrical properties were different than those found in other methods of synthesis. ► E{sub act} suggests small-polarons as conduction mechanisms. -- Abstract: A precursor to produce perovskite-type YCrO{sub 3} was precipitated by bubbling gaseous ammonia into an yttrium/chromium salts solution. X-ray diffraction showed that the as-prepared powders were amorphous. Thermal treatment between 1273 and 1373 K, leads to formation of polycrystalline YCrO{sub 3} with crystal sizes around 20 nm. High resolution X-ray photoelectron spectra showed uniform chemical environment for yttrium and chromium in the amorphous hydroxide and crystalline YCrO{sub 3}. Shifts between Y 3d{sub 5/2} and Cr 2p{sub 3/2} binding energy suggest redistribution or charge transfer between yttrium and chromium ions in the YCrO{sub 3} structure. The electrical properties of YCrO{sub 3}, whose precursors were precipitated with gaseous ammonia are different than those prepared by combustion synthesis. Electrical conductivity presents a sudden increase at ∼473 K, which is associated to the grain size and morphology of the crystallites. The redistribution of charge between Y(III) and Cr(III) is thermally activated by the hopping of small-polarons, which are characterized by the Arrhenius law as the conductive mechanism.

  18. Innovative soil treatment process design for removal of trivalent chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stallings, J.H. [Air Force, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH (United States). Aeronautical Systems Center; Durkin, M.E. [Hughes Missile Systems Co., Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A soil treatment process has been developed as part of a US Air Force environmental compliance project at Air Force Plant 44, Tucson, AZ for treating soil contaminated with heavy metals including trivalent chromium, cadmium, copper, and nickel. The process was designed to treat a total of 133,000 tons of soil in a 400 ton per day facility. Features of the soil treatment process include physical treatment and separation, and a chemical treatment process of the remaining fines using a hypochlorite leach allowing chromium to be solubilized at a high pH. After treating, fines are washed in three stage countercurrent thickeners and chromium hydroxide cake is recovered as a final produce from the leach solution. Treatability studies were conducted, laboratory and a pilot plant was built. Process design criteria and flow sheet, material balances, as well as preliminary equipment selection and sizing for the facility have been completed. Facility was designed for the removal of Cr at a concentration of an average of 1230 mg/kg from the soil and meeting a risk based clean-closure limit of 400 mg/kg of Cr. Capital costs for the 400 tpd plant were estimated at 9.6 million with an operating and maintenance cost of $54 per ton As process is most economic for large quantities of soil with relatively low concentrations of contaminants, it was not used in final closure when the estimated volume of contaminated soil removed dropped to 65,000 tons and concentration of chromium increased up to 4000 mg/kg. However, the process could have application in situations where economics and location warrant.

  19. Chromium VI adsorption on cerium oxide nanoparticles and morphology changes during the process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Recillas, Sonia; Colon, Joan [Department of Chemical Engineering, Engineering School, Autonomous University of Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Casals, Eudald; Gonzalez, Edgar [Catalan Institute of Nanotechnology, Autonomous University of Barcelona Campus, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Puntes, Victor [Catalan Institute of Nanotechnology, Autonomous University of Barcelona Campus, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Catalan Institute of Research and Advanced Studies, Passeig Lluis Companys, 23, 08010 Barcelona (Spain); Sanchez, Antoni, E-mail: antoni.sanchez@uab.cat [Department of Chemical Engineering, Engineering School, Autonomous University of Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Font, Xavier [Department of Chemical Engineering, Engineering School, Autonomous University of Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain)

    2010-12-15

    In this study, suspended cerium oxide nanoparticles stabilized with hexamethylenetetramine were used for the removal of dissolved chromium VI in pure water. Several concentrations of adsorbent and adsorbate were tested, trying to cover a large range of possible real conditions. Results showed that the Freundlich isotherm represented well the adsorption equilibrium reached between nanoparticles and chromium, whereas adsorption kinetics could be modeled by a pseudo-second-order expression. The separation of chromium-cerium nanoparticles from the medium and the desorption of chromium using sodium hydroxide without cerium losses was obtained. Nanoparticles agglomeration and morphological changes during the adsorption-desorption process were observed by TEM. Another remarkable result obtained in this study is the low toxicity in the water treated by nanoparticles measured by the Microtox commercial method. These results can be used to propose this treatment sequence for a clean and simple removal of drinking water or wastewater re-use when a high toxicity heavy metal such as chromium VI is the responsible for water pollution.

  20. Synthesis, characterization and stability of Cr(III) and Fe(III) hydroxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papassiopi, N.; Vaxevanidou, K.; Christou, C.; Karagianni, E.; Antipas, G.S.E., E-mail: gantipas@metal.ntua.gr

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • Fe(III)–Cr(III) hydroxides enhance groundwater quality better than pure Cr(III) compounds. • Crystalline Cr(OH){sub 3}·3H{sub 2}O was unstable, with a solubility higher than 50 μg/l. • Amorphous Cr(OH){sub 3}(am) was stable with a solubility lower than 50 μg/l in the range 5.7 < pH < 11. • For mixed Fe{sub 0.75}Cr{sub 0.25}(OH){sub 3}, the stability region was extended to 4.8 < pH < 13.5. -- Abstract: Chromium is a common contaminant of soils and aquifers and constitutes a major environmental problem. In nature, chromium usually exists in the form of two oxidation states, trivalent, Cr(III), which is relatively innocuous for biota and for the aquatic environment, and hexavalent, Cr(VI) which is toxic, carcinogenic and very soluble. Accordingly, the majority of wastewater and groundwater treatment technologies, include a stage where Cr(VI) is reduced to Cr(III), in order to remove chromium from the aqueous phase and bind the element in the form of environmentally stable solid compounds. In the absence of iron the final product is typically of the form Cr(OH){sub 3}·xH{sub 2}O whereas in the presence of iron the precipitate is a mixed Fe{sub (1−x)}Cr{sub x}(OH){sub 3} phase. In this study, we report on the synthesis, characterisation and stability of mixed (Fe{sub x},Cr{sub 1−x})(OH){sub 3} hydroxides as compared to the stability of Cr(OH){sub 3}. We established that the plain Cr(III) hydroxide, abiding to the approximate molecular formula Cr(OH){sub 3}·3H{sub 2}O, was crystalline, highly soluble, i.e. unstable, with a tendency to transform into the stable amorphous hydroxide Cr(OH){sub 3}(am) phase. Mixed Fe{sub 0.75}Cr{sub 0.25}(OH){sub 3} hydroxides were found to be of the ferrihydrite structure, Fe(OH){sub 3}, and we correlated their solubility to that of a solid solution formed by plain ferrihydrite and the amorphous Cr(III) hydroxide. Both our experimental results and thermodynamic calculations indicated that mixed Fe

  1. CHROMIUM STATUS IN DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshavarz

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available Fasting serum chromium, total cholesterol HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, triacytglycerot and blood sugar were determined in fifty two diabetic patients with no other organic diseases anil compared with those obtained from a control group including fourty two healthy volunteers matched for age, sex ami body mass irutex (BMI. Fasting serum chromium and HDL-cholesterol were significantly lower in patients than in controls (p<0.0001 and p<0.001 respectively, but the mean triacytglycerot concentration was significantly higher in patients than in controls (p<002. Mean total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol values were not significantly different in the two groups. Mean intake of energy, proteins, fats and chromium, estimated by the 24 hr dietary recall method were not significantly different in the two groups. We demonstrated that despite an adequate intake of chromium, the fasting serum chromium was lower in diabetic patients than in control subjects. Chromium deficiency in diabetic patients may act as a contributing factor in aggravating the disease's complications.

  2. Galvanic cells including cobalt-chromium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjerdet, N R

    1980-01-01

    Galvanic cells may be created when dentures made of cobalt-chromium alloys are placed on teeth with metallic restorations. The power of such cells was evaluated in an in vitro galvanic using amalgams, gold alloy, and nickel-chromium alloys. The amalgams and one of the nickel-chromium alloys revealed high corrosion currents when placed in contact with cobalt-chromium alloy, the conventional amalgam showing the highest values. The gold alloy and another nickel-chromium alloy exhibited low corrosion currents and they were noble with respect to cobalt-chromium.

  3. Pharmacokinetic Profile of Oral Magnesium Hydroxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolberg, Mette Konow Bøgebjerg; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Dahl, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Despite the presumption of a beneficial effect of magnesium (Mg) supplementation on various diseases, little is known concerning the pharmacokinetics of Mg hydroxide. This study was designed to provide a pharmacokinetic profile of Mg hydroxide after a single oral dose. Ten healthy male adults...

  4. Chromium at High Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Rafael

    2012-02-01

    Chromium has long served as the archetype of spin density wave magnetism. Recently, Jaramillo and collaborators have shown that Cr also serves as an archetype of magnetic quantum criticality. Using a combination of x-ray diffraction and electrical transport measurements at high pressures and cryogenic temperatures in a diamond anvil cell, they have demonstrated that the N'eel transition (TN) can be continuously suppressed to zero, with no sign of a concurrent structural transition. The order parameter undergoes a broad regime of exponential suppression, consistent with the weak coupling paradigm, before deviating from a BCS-like ground state within a narrow but accessible quantum critical regime. The quantum criticality is characterized by mean field scaling of TN and non mean field scaling of the transport coefficients, which points to a fluctuation-induced reconstruction of the critical Fermi surface. A comparison between pressure and chemical doping as means to suppress TN sheds light on different routes to the quantum critical point and the relevance of Fermi surface nesting and disorder at this quantum phase transition. The work by Jaramillo et al. is broadly relevant to the study of magnetic quantum criticality in a physically pure and theoretically tractable system that balances elements of weak and strong coupling. [4pt] [1] R. Jaramillo, Y. Feng, J. Wang & T. F. Rosenbaum. Signatures of quantum criticality in pure Cr at high pressure. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 107, 13631 (2010). [0pt] [2] R. Jaramillo, Y. Feng, J. C. Lang, Z. Islam, G. Srajer, P. B. Littlewood, D. B. McWhan & T. F. Rosenbaum. Breakdown of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer ground state at a quantum phase transition. Nature 459, 405 (2009).

  5. Chromium Salen Mediated Alkene Epoxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kaare Brandt; Norrby, Per-Ola; Daly, Adrian M.;

    2002-01-01

    The mechanism of alkene epoxidation by chromium(v) oxo salen complexes has been studied by DFT and experimental methods. The reaction is compared to the closely related Mn-catalyzed process in an attempt to understand the dramatic difference in selectivity between the two systems. Overall......, the studies show that the reactions have many similarities, but also a few critical differences. In agreement with experiment, the chromium system requires a change from low- to high-spin in the catalytic cycle, whereas the manganese system can proceed either with spin inversion or entirely on the high......-spin surface. The low-spin addition of metal oxo species to an alkene leads to an intermediate which forms epoxide either with a barrier on the low-spin surface or without a barrier after spin inversion. Supporting evidence for this intermediate was obtained by using vinylcyclopropane traps. The chromium...

  6. Properties of oxide-hydroxide sintered ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levkov, R. V.; Kulkov, S. N.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper the study of porous ceramics obtained from aluminum hydroxide with gibbsite modification is presented. It was shown that aluminum hydroxide may be used for pore formation and pore volume in the sintered ceramics can be controlled by varying the aluminum hydroxide concentration and sintering temperature. It was shown that compressive strength of alumina ceramics increases by 40 times with decreasing the pore volume from 65 to 15%. Based on these results one can conclude that the obtained structure is very close to inorganic bone matrix and can be used as promising material for bone implants production.

  7. Thermodynamics of Volatile Silicon Hydroxides Studied

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copland, Evan H.; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    2001-01-01

    Silicon-based ceramics are promising candidate structural materials for heat engines. The long-term stability of these materials to environmental degradation is dependent on the formation and retention of a protective SiO2 layer. It is well known that SiO2 forms stable volatile hydroxides in the presence of water vapor at elevated temperatures. Combustion conditions, which characteristically are at high velocities, contain significant water vapor pressures, and high temperatures tend to promote continuous formation of these hydroxides with resulting material degradation. For the degradation of silicon-based ceramics to be predicted, accurate thermodynamic data on the formation of silicon hydroxides are needed.

  8. Selective Leaching of Chromium from Hanford Tank Sludge 241-U-108

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapko, Brian M.; Vienna, John D.

    2002-09-09

    This study evaluated the oxidants permanganate, MnO4-, and peroxynitrite, ONOO-, as selective chromium-leaching agents from washed 241-U-108 tank sludge under varying conditions of hydroxide concentration, temperature, and time. The mass changes and final sludge compositions were evaluated using glass-property models to ascertain the relative impacts of the various oxidative alkaline leach conditions on the amount of borosilicate glass required to immobilize a given amount of washed 241-U-108 Hanford tank sludge. Only permanganate leaching removes sufficient chromium to make the chromium concentration in the oxidatively alkaline leached solids non-limiting. In the absence of added oxidants, continued washing or caustic leaching have no beneficial effects. Peroxynitrite addition reduces the amount of glass required to immobilize a given amount of washed 241-U-108 tank sludge by approximately a factor of two. Depending on the leach conditions and the exact chromium concentration limits, contact with alkaline permanganate solutions reduces the amount of immobilized high-level waste glass by a factor of 10 to 30.

  9. The use of trivalent chromium bath to obtain a solar selective black chromium coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Survilienė, S.; Češūnienė, A.; Juškėnas, R.; Selskienė, A.; Bučinskienė, D.; Kalinauskas, P.; Juškevičius, K.; Jurevičiūtė, I.

    2014-06-01

    Black chromium coatings were electrodeposited from a trivalent chromium bath using a ZnO additive as a second main component. Black chromium was electrodeposited on steel and copper plates and substrates plated with bright nickel prior to black chromium electrodeposition. The black chromium coatings were characterized by XRD and SEM. The XRD data suggest that the phase structure of black chromium may be defined as a zinc solid solution in chromium or a chromium solid solution in zinc depending on the chromium/zinc ratio in the deposit. The role of substrate finish was evaluated through the corrosion resistance and reflectance of black chromium. According to corrosion tests the samples plated with bright nickel prior to black chromium deposition have shown the highest corrosion resistance. The electrodeposited black chromium possesses good optical properties for the absorption of solar energy. The absorption coefficient of black chromium was found to be over 0.99 for the samples obtained without the Ni undercoat and below 0.99 for those obtained with the use of Ni undercoat. However, the use of nickel undercoat before black chromium plating is recommended because it remarkably improves the corrosion resistance of samples.

  10. Nickel hydroxide precipitation from aqueous sulfate media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sist, Cinziana; Demopoulos, George P.

    2003-08-01

    Hydrometallurgical processing of laterite ores constitutes a major industrial and R&D activity in extractive metallurgy. In some of the process flowsheets, nickel hydroxide precipitation is incorporated. For these operations, the optimization of nickel hydroxide precipitation is important to assure efficiency and product quality. The main objective of this investigation was to study and improve the precipitation characteristics of Ni(OH)2 in a sulfate system using supersaturation controlled precipitation.

  11. Simultaneous determination of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) in aqueous solutions by ion chromatography and chemiluminescence detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Jøns, O; Nielsen, B

    1992-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of chromium(iii) and chromium(vi) in a flow system based on chemiluminescence was developed. A Dionex cation-exchange guard column was used to separate chromium(iii) from chromium(vi), and chromium(vi) was reduced by potassium sulfite, whereupon both...

  12. Sonoassisted microbial reduction of chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathiravan, Mathur Nadarajan; Karthick, Ramalingam; Muthu, Naggapan; Muthukumar, Karuppan; Velan, Manickam

    2010-04-01

    This study presents sonoassisted microbial reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) using Bacillus sp. isolated from tannery effluent contaminated site. The experiments were carried out with free cells in the presence and absence of ultrasound. The optimum pH and temperature for the reduction of Cr(VI) by Bacillus sp. were found to be 7.0 and 37 degrees C, respectively. The Cr(VI) reduction was significantly influenced by the electron donors and among the various electron donors studied, glucose offered maximum reduction. The ultrasound-irradiated reduction of Cr(VI) with Bacillus sp. showed efficient Cr(VI) reduction. The percent reduction was found to increase with an increase in biomass concentration and decrease with an increase in initial concentration. The changes in the functional groups of Bacillus sp., before and after chromium reduction were observed with FTIR spectra. Microbial growth was described with Monod and Andrews model and best fit was observed with Andrews model.

  13. Inoculation of chromium white cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kopyciński

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been proved that an addition of boron carbide introduced as an inoculant to the chromium white cast iron changes the structureof castings. Castings after inoculation revealed a different structure with numerous grains. Primary precipitates of chromium carbide also appeared, reducing the mechanical properties of as-cast parts. Properly established heat treatment regime makes chromium iron castings regain their, originally high, mechanical properties.

  14. Aluminium hydroxide-induced granulomas in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valtulini, S; Macchi, C; Ballanti, P

    2005-01-01

    The effect of intramuscular injection of 40 mg/2 ml aluminium hydroxide in the neck of pigs was examined in a number of ways. The investigation followed repeated slaughterhouse reports, according to which 64.8% of pigs from one particular farm were found at slaughter to have one or more nodules...... in the muscles of the neck (group slaughtered). The pigs had been injected with a vaccine containing 40 mg/2 ml dose of aluminium hydroxide as adjuvant. Research consisted of two phases: first, an epidemiological study was carried out, aimed at determining the risk factors for the granulomas. The results...... and adjuvant) to pigs inoculated twice with apyrogenic bi-distilled water (group water) and to pigs inoculated once with the adjuvant and once with apyrogenic bi-distilled water (group adjuvant/water). Both studies agreed in their conclusions, which indicate that the high amount of aluminium hydroxide...

  15. Surface Acidity of Amorphous Aluminum Hydroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. FUKUSHI; K. TSUKIMURA; H. YAMADA

    2006-01-01

    The surface acidity of synthetic amorphous Al hydroxide was determined by acid/base titration with several complementary methods including solution analyses of the reacted solutions and XRD characterization of the reacted solids. The synthetic specimen was characterized to be the amorphous material showing four broad peaks in XRD pattern. XRD analyses of reacted solids after the titration experiments showed that amorphous Al hydroxide rapidly transformed to crystalline bayerite at the alkaline condition (pH>10). The solution analyses after and during the titration experiments showed that the solubility of amorphous aluminum hydroxide, Ksp =aAl3+/a3H+,was 1010.3,The amount of consumption of added acid or base during the titration experiment was attributed to both the protonation/deprotonation of dissolved Al species and surface hydroxyl group. The surface acidity constants, surface hydroxyl density and specific surface area were estimated by FITEQL 4.0.

  16. Hexavalent chromium reduction in contaminated soil: A comparison between ferrous sulphate and nanoscale zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Palma, L; Gueye, M T; Petrucci, E

    2015-01-01

    Iron sulphate (FeSO4) and colloidal nano zero-valent iron (nZVI) as reducing agents were compared, with the aim of assessing their effectiveness in hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] removal from a contaminated industrial soil. Experiments were performed on soil samples collected from an industrial site where a nickel contamination, caused by a long-term productive activity, was also verified. The influence of reducing agents amount with respect to chromium content and the effectiveness of deoxygenation of the slurry were discussed. The soil was fully characterized before and after each test, and sequential extractions were performed to assess chemico-physical modifications and evaluate metals mobility induced by washing. Results show that both the reducing agents successfully lowered the amount of Cr(VI) in the soil below the threshold allowed by Italian Environmental Regulation for industrial reuse. Cr(VI) reduction by colloidal nZVI proved to be faster and more effective: the civil reuse of soil [Cr(VI)hydroxide fraction, thus confirming a mechanism of chromium-iron hydroxides precipitation. In addition, a decrease of nickel (Ni) and lead (Pb) content in soil was also observed when acidic conditions were established.

  17. Layered double hydroxide stability. 1. Relative stabilities of layered double hydroxides and their simple counterparts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boclair, J. W.; Braterman, P. S.

    1999-01-01

    Solutions containing di- and trivalent metal chlorides [M(II) = Mg2+, Zn2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Mn2+; M(III) = Al3+, Fe3+] were titrated with NaOH to yield hydrotalcite-like layered double hydroxides (LDH), [[M(II)]1-x[M(III)]x(OH)2][Cl]x yH2O, by way of M(III) hydroxide/hydrous oxide intermediates. Analysis of the resultant titration curves yields nominal solubility constants for the LDH. The corresponding LDH stabilities are in the order Mg hydroxides/hydrous oxides is discussed.

  18. Electrodeposition of chromium from trivalent chromium urea bath containing sulfate and chloride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The reduction of Cr( Ⅲ) to Cr( Ⅱ ) on copper electrode in trivalent chromium urea bath containing chromium sulfate and chromium chloride as chromium source has been investigated by potentiodynamic sweep. The transfer coefficient α for reduction of Cr( Ⅲ ) to Cr( Ⅱ ) on copper electrode was calculated as 0.46. The reduction is a quasi-reversible process. J-t responses at different potential steps showed that the generation and adsorption characteristics of carboxylate bridged oligomer are relevant to cathode potential. The interface behavior between electrode and solution for Cr( Ⅲ ) complex is a critical factor influencing sustained electrode position of chromium. The hypotheses of the electro-inducing polymerization of Cr( Ⅲ ) was proposed. The potential scope in which sustained chromium deposits can be prepared is from- 1.3 V to- 1.7 V (vs SCE) in the urea bath. Bright chromium deposits with thickness of 30 μm can be prepared in the bath.

  19. Structural transformation of nickel hydroxide films during anodic oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crocker, R.W.; Muller, R.H.

    1992-05-01

    The transformation of anodically formed nickel hydroxide/oxy-hydroxide electrodes has been investigated. A mechanism is proposed for the anodic oxidation reaction, in which the reaction interface between the reduced and oxidized phases of the electrode evolves in a nodular topography that leads to inefficient utilization of the active electrode material. In the proposed nodular transformation model for the anodic oxidation reaction, nickel hydroxide is oxidized to nickel oxy-hydroxide in the region near the metal substrate. Since the nickel oxy-hydroxide is considerably more conductive than the surrounding nickel hydroxide, as further oxidation occurs, nodular features grow rapidly to the film/electrolyte interface. Upon emerging at the electrolyte interface, the reaction boundary between the nickel hydroxide and oxy-hydroxide phases spreads laterally across the film/electrolyte interface, creating an overlayer of nickel oxy-hydroxide and trapping uncharged regions of nickel hydroxide within the film. The nickel oxy-hydroxide overlayer surface facilitates the oxygen evolution side reaction. Scanning tunneling microscopy of the electrode in its charged state revealed evidence of 80 {endash} 100 Angstrom nickel oxy-hydroxide nodules in the nickel hydroxide film. In situ spectroscopic ellipsometer measurements of films held at various constant potentials agree quantitatively with optical models appropriate to the nodular growth and subsequent overgrowth of the nickel oxy-hydroxide phase. A two-dimensional, numerical finite difference model was developed to simulate the current distribution along the phase boundary between the charged and uncharged material. The model was used to explore the effects of the physical parameters that govern the electrode behavior. The ratio of the conductivities of the nickel hydroxide and oxy-hydroxide phases was found to be the dominant parameter in the system.

  20. 29 CFR 1915.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... system dysfunction; any history of asthma, dermatitis, skin ulceration, or nasal septum perforation; and... is present or is likely to be present from skin or eye contact with chromium (VI), the employer shall... cleaned in a manner that minimizes skin or eye contact with chromium (VI) and effectively prevents...

  1. 29 CFR 1926.1126 - Chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... system dysfunction; any history of asthma, dermatitis, skin ulceration, or nasal septum perforation; and... is present or is likely to be present from skin or eye contact with chromium (VI), the employer shall... cleaned in a manner that minimizes skin or eye contact with chromium (VI) and effectively prevents...

  2. 29 CFR 1910.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... activity involving chromium cannot release dusts, fumes, or mists of chromium (VI) in concentrations at or... currents that prevent the LEVs from performing efficiently. The use of fans has a similar effect. Industry... and positioning of cross drafts, fans, doors, windows, partitions and process equipment that...

  3. Single sheet metal oxides and hydroxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Lizhi

    The synthesis of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) provides a relatively easy and traditional way to build versatile chemical compounds with a rough control of the bulk structure. The delamination of LDHs to form their single host layers (2D nanosheets) and the capability to reassemble them offer ...

  4. Hydroxide catalysis bonding of silicon carbide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veggel, A.A. van; Ende, D.A. van den; Bogenstahl, J.; Rowan, S.; Cunningham, W.; Gubbels, G.H.M.; Nijmeijer, H.

    2008-01-01

    For bonding silicon carbide optics, which require extreme stability, hydroxide catalysis bonding is considered [Rowan, S., Hough, J. and Elliffe, E., Silicon carbide bonding. UK Patent 040 7953.9, 2004. Please contact Mr. D. Whiteford for further information: D.Whiteford@admin.gla.ac.uk]. This techn

  5. Polysulfide intercalated layered double hydroxides for metal capture applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Ma, Shulan

    2017-04-04

    Polysulfide intercalated layered double hydroxides and methods for their use in vapor and liquid-phase metal capture applications are provided. The layered double hydroxides comprise a plurality of positively charged host layers of mixed metal hydroxides separated by interlayer spaces. Polysulfide anions are intercalated in the interlayer spaces.

  6. [Bioremediation of chromium (VI) contaminated site by reduction and microbial stabilization of chromium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jia-Chuan; Zhang, Jian-Rong; Liu, Xi-Wen; Xu, Qian; Shi, Wei-Lin

    2014-10-01

    Chromium (VI) contaminated soil samples were collected from a chemical plant in Suzhou. Firstly, the reduced soil was prepared by adding reagent (Stone-sulfure reagent) into polluted soil to transfer most chromium (VI) into chromium (III), then a nutrient solution was introduced into the reduced soil, and the stabilized soil was obtained after 60 days culturing. The chromium (VI) content of the three kinds of soil was analyzed. The results showed that the chromium (VI) content in toxicity characteristic leaching liquid (TCLL) dropped by 96. 8% (from 8.26 mg · L(-1) to 0.26 mg · L(-1)), and the total chromium content dropped by 95.7% (from 14.66 mg · L(-1) to 0.63 mg · L(-1)) after bioremediation in 5% nutrient solution. Additionally, the durability of chromium stabilization was tested by potassium permanganate oxidation and sterilization of microbe-treated soil. After oxidation, the chromium (VI) content in TCLL of the reduced soil was increased from 8.26 mg · L(-1) to 14.68 mg · L(-1). However, the content after bioremediation was decreased to 2.68 mg · L(-1). The results of sterilization demonstrated that the death of microbe had no significant effect on the stabilization of chromium. Consequently, the research in this paper demonstrated the feasibility of bioremediation of chromium (VI) polluted soil through reduction followed by stabilization/soilidification, and provided a technique with low cost but high efficiency.

  7. Low-chromium reduced-activation chromium-tungsten steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Maziasz, P.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Bainitic microstructures formed during continuous cooling can differ from classical upper and lower bainite formed during isothermal transformation. Two types of non-classical bainite were observed depending on the cooling rate: carbide-free acicular bainite at rapid cooling rates and granular bainite at slower cooling rates. The Charpy impact toughness of the acicular ferrite was found to be considerably better than for the granular bainite. It was postulated that alloying to improve the hardenability of the steel would promote the formation of acicular bainite, just as increasing the cooling rate does. To test this, chromium and tungsten were added to the 2 1/4Cr-2W and 2 1/4Cr-2WV steel compositions to increase their hardenability, and the microstructures and mechanical properties were examined.

  8. Kinetics of hexavalent chromium reduction by iron metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huijing QIAN; Yanjun WU; Yong LIU; Xinhua XU

    2008-01-01

    The kinetics of Cr(Ⅵ) reduction to Cr(Ⅲ) by metallic iron (Fe0) was studied in batch reactors for a range of reactant concentrations, pH and temperatures. Nearly 86.8% removal efficiency for Cr(Ⅵ) was achieved when Fe0 concentration was 6 g/L (using commercial iron powder (200 mesh) I n 120 min). The reduction ofhexavalent chro-mium took place on the surface of the iron particles following pseudo-first order kinetics. The rate of Cr(Ⅵ) reduction increased with increasing Fe0 addition and temperature but inversely with initial pH. The pseudo-first-order rate coeffi-cients (kobs) were determined as 0.0024, 0.010, 0.0268 and 0.062 8 min-1 when iron powder dosages were 2, 6, 10 and 14 g/L at 25℃ and pH 5.5, respectively. According to the Arrehenius equation, the apparent activation energy of 26.5 kJ/mol and pre-exponential factor of 3 330 min-1 were obtained at the temperature range of 288-308 K. Different Fe0 types were compared in this study. The reactivity was in the order starch-stabilized Fe0 nanoparticlesFe0 nano-particlesFe0 powderFe0 filings. Electrochemical analysis of the reaction process showed that Cr(Ⅲ) and Fe(Ⅲ) hydroxides should be the dominant final products.

  9. Synthesis of Chromium (Ⅲ) 5-aminosalicylate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wei; HAO Er-jun; JIANG Yu-qin

    2004-01-01

    As we all known that diabetes is a chronic disease with major health consequences.Research has revealed that the occurrence of diabetes have great thing to do with the chromium deficient. Almost 40 years after the first report of glucose tolerance factor(GTF) [1], no conclusive evidence for an isolable ,biologically active form of chromium exited. Three materials have been proposed to be the biologically active form of chromium: "glucose tolerance factor", chromium Picolinate and low-molecular-weight chromium-binding substance (LWMCr) [2] . So there is potential for the design of new chromium drugs .5-Aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) is identified as an active component in the therapy of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis . The therapeutic action of 5-ASA is believed to be coupled to its ability to act as a free radical scavenger [3-4],acting locally on the inflamed colonic mucosa [5-7]. However, the clinical use of 5-ASA is limited, since orally administered 5-ASA is rapidly and completely absorbed from the upper gastrointestinal tract and therefore the local therapeutic effects of 5-ASA in the colon is hardly expected.In this paper, we report the synthesis of chromium(Ⅲ)5-aminosalicylate from 5-ASA and CrCl3. 6H2O.The synthesis route is as follow:The complex has been characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectra, X-ray powder diffractionand TG-DTA . They indicate that the structure is tris(5-ASA) Chromium . Experiments show that thecomplex has a good activity for supplement tiny dietary chromium, lowering blood glucose levels,lowering serum lipid levels and in creasing lean body mass .

  10. Characteristics of chromium-allergic dermatitis patients prior to regulatory intervention for chromium in leather

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P; Zachariae, Claus;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chromium-tanned leather articles currently constitute the most important cause of contact allergy to chromium in Denmark. A regulation on the content of hexavalent chromium in leather was adopted in November 2013 by the EU member states. OBJECTIVES: To characterize patients...... with chromium allergy and their disease, to serve as a baseline for future studies on the potential effect of the new regulation on chromium in leather. METHODS: A questionnaire case-control study was performed on 155 dermatitis patients with positive patch test reactions to potassium dichromate and a matched...... control group of 621 dermatitis patients. Comparisons were made by use of a χ(2) -test and the Mann-Whitney U-test. Logistic regression analyses were used to test for associations. RESULTS: Sixty-six per cent of chromium-allergic patients had a positive history of contact dermatitis caused by leather...

  11. Chromium in leather footwear-risk assessment of chromium allergy and dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Strandesen, Maria; Poulsen, Pia B;

    2012-01-01

    Background. Chromium-tanned leather footwear, which releases >3 ppm hexavalent Cr(VI), may pose a risk of sensitizing and eliciting allergic dermatitis. Objectives. To determine the content and potential release of chromium in leather footwear and to discuss the prevention of chromium contact...... allergy and dermatitis. Methods. Sixty pairs of leather shoes, sandals and boots (20 children's, 20 men's, and 20 women's) were purchased in Copenhagen and examined with X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. Chromium was extracted according to the International Standard, ISO 17075. The detection level for Cr......(VI) was 3 ppm. Results. Chromium was identified in 95% of leather footwear products, the median content being 1.7% (range 0-3.3%). No association with store category or footwear category was found. A tendency for there to be a higher chromium content in footwear with high prices was shown (p(trend) = 0...

  12. Leaching of chromium from chromium contaminated soil: Speciation study and geochemical modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anđelković Darko H.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Distribution of chromium between soil and leachate was monitored. A natural process of percolating rainwater through the soil was simulated in the laboratory conditions and studied with column leaching extraction. Migration of chromium in the soil is conditioned by the level of chromium soil contamination, the soil organic matter content, and rainwater acidity. Chromium (III and chromium(VI were determined by spectrophotometric method with diphenilcarbazide in acidic media. Comparing the results of chromium speciation in leachate obtained by experimental model systems and geochemical modelling calculations using Visual MINTEQ model, a correlation was observed regarding the influence of the tested parameters. Leachate solutions showed that the concentration of Cr depended on the organic matter content. The influence of pH and soil organic matter content is in compliance after its definition through experimental and theoretical way. The computer model - Stockholm Humic Model used to evaluate the leaching results corresponded rather well with the measured values.

  13. Layered Double Hydroxide as Cordycepin Delivery Nanocarrier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin Zheng YANG; Jing YANG; Chang Kai ZHANG

    2006-01-01

    Layered double hydroxide was investigated as cordycepin delivery nanocarrier for the first time in this study. Negatively charged biomolecule-cordycepin was intercalated in the gallery spaces of [Mg-Al-NO3], which was confirmed by the results of X-ray diffraction and electrophoretic mobility. Cell experiment suggested that the new bio-LDH nanohybrid could prevent cordycepin decomposition by adenosine deaminase. This new formulation could possibly be used as a novel form cordycepin intravenous injection.

  14. Thermal behaviour of hydroxides, hydroxysalts and hydrotalcites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Parthasarathi Bera; Michael Rajamathi; M S Hegde; P Vishnu Kamath

    2000-04-01

    Mass spectrometric analysis of gases evolved during thermal decomposition of divalent metal hydroxides, hydroxysalts and hydrotalcites show that all these compounds undergo dehydration in the temperature range 30 < T < 220°C followed by decomposition at temperatures above 250°C. The latter step involves simultaneous deanation and dehydroxylation of the layers. Our observations conclusively prove that alternative mechanisms which envisage CO2 evolution due to deanation at lower temperatures proposed by Kanezaki to be wrong.

  15. Nickel hydroxide modified electrodes for urea determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Henrique Dall´Antonia

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Nickel hydroxide films were prepared by electrodeposition from a solution Ni(NO32 0,05 mol L ?¹ on ITO electrodes (Tin oxide doped with Indium on PET-like plastic film, applying a current of - 0,1 A cm ?² during different time intervals between 1800 and 7200 s. The electrochemical behavior of the nickel hydroxide electrode was investigated through a cyclic voltammogram, in NaOH 1,0 mol L ?¹, where it was observed two peaks in the profile in 0,410 and 0,280 V, corresponding to redox couple Ni(II/Ni(III. A sensor for urea presenting a satisfactory answer can be obtained when, after the deposit of the film of Ni(OH2 on the electrode of nickel, it is immersed in a solution of NaOH 1,0 mol L ?¹ and applying a potential of + 0,435 V, where the maximum of the anodic current occurs in the cyclic voltammogram. Analyzing the results it can be observed that, for a range of analite concentration between 5 to 50 m mol L ?¹, the behavior is linear and the sensibility found was of 20,3 mA cm?² (mol L?¹?¹, presenting reproducibility confirming the nickel hydroxide electrodes utilization for the determination of urea.

  16. Chromium isotope uptake in carbonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodler, Alexandra

    composition of contemporaneous seawater. Marine carbonates are ubiquitous throughout Earth’s rock record rendering them a particularly interesting archive for constraining past changes in ocean chemistry. This thesis includes an investigation of the fractionation behavior of Cr isotopesduring coprecipitation......Chromium (Cr) is a redox sensitive element potentially capable of tracing fine-scale fluctuations of the oxygenation of Earth’s early surface environments and seawater. The Cr isotope composition of carbonates could perhaps be used as paleo-redox proxy to elucidate changes in the geological past...... related to the rise of oxygen and the evolution of the biosphere. However, before the Cr isotopesystem can be applied to faithfully delineate paleo-environmental changes, careful assessment of the signal robustness and a thorough understanding of the Cr cycle in Earth system processes is necessary...

  17. Chromium (VI) adsorption on boehmite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granados-Correa, F. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apartado Postal 18-1027 Col., Escandon, Delegacion Miguel Hidalgo, C.P. 11801 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: fgc@nuclear.inin.mx; Jimenez-Becerril, J. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apartado Postal 18-1027 Col., Escandon, Delegacion Miguel Hidalgo, C.P. 11801 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2009-03-15

    Boehmite was synthesized and characterized in order to study the adsorption behavior and the removal of Cr(VI) ions from aqueous solutions as a function of contact time, initial pH solution, amount of adsorbent and initial metal ion concentration, using batch technique. Adsorption data of Cr(VI) on the boehmite were analyzed according to Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) adsorption models. Thermodynamic parameters for the adsorption system were determinated at 293, 303, 313 and 323 K temperatures. The kinetic values and thermodynamic parameters from the adsorption process show that the Cr(VI) ions adsorption on boehmite is an endothermic and spontaneous process. These results show that the boehmite could be considered as a potential adsorbent for chromium ions in aqueous solutions.

  18. Mechanical properties of metal-ceramic systems from nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirković Nemanja

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Metal-ceramic bond strength and alloys' elastic modulus clearly determine the potential of alloy application, because the ceramic integrity during mastication depends on these two characteristics. The aim of this study was to evaluate metal-ceramic bond strength and elastic modulus of cobalt-chromium alloys in making porcelainfused- to-metal restorations, regarding the application of the most frequent nickel-chromium alloy. Methods. The research was performed as an experimental study. Six metalceramic samples were made from nickel-chromium alloy (Wiron 99 and cobalt-chromium alloy (Wirobond C, according to the manufactures manuals and instructions from ISO 9693: 1996. Three-point bending test was performed up to the ceramic fracture. The fracture load was measured on an universal testing machine (Zwick, type 1464, with cross-head speed of 0,05mm/min. Results. The results of this study confirmed the significant differences between the metal-ceramic bond strength (p < 0.01 and elastic modulus (p < 0.001 of nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys, where cobalt-chromium alloys showed higher values for both tested parameters. Conclusion. Cobalt-chromium metal-ceramic alloys can successfully replace nickel-chromium alloys, especially for fabrication of long-span metal-ceramic bridges due to the great flexural strength.

  19. Effect of three different calcium hydroxide mixtures (calcium hydroxide with glycerine, normal saline and distilled water on root dentin microhardness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasheminia SM

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: During root canal therapy, it is necessary to remove as many bacteria as possible from the root canal. The use of medicaments is recommended to reduce the microbial population prior to root filling. Calcium hydroxide pastes have been used because of their antibacterial effects and the ability of tissue dissolving. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of calcium hydroxide/glycerine mixture, calcium hydroxide/normal saline mixture and calcium hydroxide/distilled water mixture on root dentin microhardness in storage times of 7 and 14 days.Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, fifteen extracted maxillary canines and central incisors were selected. The crowns of the teeth were removed and the canals were prepared. Teeth were sectioned transversally to produce a total of 30 dentin discs from the middle third of the roots. Specimens were divided into three groups of 10 discs each. Dentin samples were subjected to calcium hydroxide/glycerine, calcium hydroxide/normal saline and calcium hydroxide/distilled water mixtures for 7 and 14 days. Dentin microhardness was measured by a Vickers indenter with a load of 200 g for 15 seconds. Data were analyzed using ANOVA, Paired t-test and LSD with p<0.05 as the level of significance.Results: Statistical analysis showed that all three mixtures decreased dentin microhardness. After 7 days, reduction in dentin microhardness by calcium hydroxide/glycerine combination was significantly higher than calcium hydroxide/normal saline and calcium hydroxide/distilled water combinations. After 14 days, reduction in dentin microhardness by calcium hydroxide/distilled water combination was significantly higher than the other two groups.Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, the use of calcium hydroxide combinations for intracanal dressing reduces dentin microhardness. After 7 days calcium hydroxide/glycerine combination and after 14 days calcium hydroxide/distilled water

  20. AEROSOL BEHAVIOR IN CHROMIUM WASTE INCINERATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suyuan Yu

    2003-01-01

    Cr2O3 is considered as the dominant incineration product during the combustion disposal of chromium waste. A hydrogen/air diffusion flame was employed to simulate the industrial process of incineration. Cr2O3 aerosols were generated inside the flame by the gas phase reaction of chromium and oxygen. Chromium came from the rapid decomposition of chromium hexacarbonyl (Cr(CO)6) at room temperature and was carried into the combustion chamber by hydrogen. Aerosol and clusters can then be easily formed in the flame by nucleation and coagulation. A two dimensional Discrete-Sectional Model (DSM) was adopted to calculate the Cr2O3 aerosol behavior. The experimental measurement method was Dynamic Light Scattering. The numerically predicted results agreed well with those of the experimental measurement. Both results show that the Cr2O3 aerosol size reached about 70 nanometers at the flame top.

  1. Localized Corrosion of Chromium Coated Steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, X.; Beentjes, P.; Mol, A.; Terryn, H.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the studies of the local corrosion behaviour of chromium-coated ultra low carbon steel in NaCl solution using polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and SVET.

  2. CHROMIUM CONCENTRATION IN TEHRAN ELECTROPLATING PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghiasseddin

    1988-12-01

    Full Text Available Hazards of soluable hexa and trivalent chromium have been documented by many investigators. But there was no information regarding safety of about 5000 workers at exposure risk to chromium in 600 primitive electroplating work shops of Tehran. During this study more than 70% of work shops were inactive due to some of their own problems. Out of active plants those that were relatively more cooperative 43 manual and 3 semi automatic were investigated for chromium concentration both by personal and environmental Sampling. The Samples were analyzed by AAS and cholormetry. In 30% of personal and 40% of environmental samples both total and Cr+6 were higher than ACGIH’S TLV. In one of semiautomatic plant Cr=6 was as high as 0.71 mg/m.3.Regarding injuries, following observations were made: Nasal wound 85%, skin irritation 73% , Dermatitis 35% and some other chromium related injuries including 2 cases of Septum perforations.

  3. Potentiometry: A Chromium (III) -- EDTA Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, J. I.; Howell, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an experiment that involves the preparation of a chromium (III)-EDTA compound, a study of its infrared spectrum, and the potentiometric determination of two successive acid dissociation constants. (Author/GS)

  4. Standard Specification for Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Copper, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tantalum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten, and Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium Alloy Plate, Sheet, and Strip

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2015-01-01

    Standard Specification for Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Copper, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tantalum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten, and Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium Alloy Plate, Sheet, and Strip

  5. Standard Specification for Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium, Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium-Tantalum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Copper, and Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten Alloy Rod

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2015-01-01

    Standard Specification for Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium, Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium-Tantalum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Copper, and Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten Alloy Rod

  6. Permeation of chromium salts through human skin in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Fullerton, A; Avnstorp, C

    1992-01-01

    Chromium permeation studies were performed on full thickness human skin in diffusion cells. All samples were analysed for the total chromium content by graphite furnace Zeeman-corrected atomic absorption spectrometry. Some samples were analysed by an ion chromatographic method permitting...... the simultaneous determination of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) as well. The amounts of chromium found in all skin layers were significantly higher when potassium dichromate was applied to the skin compared with chromium chloride or chromium nitrate. Chromium could only be detected in the recipient phase after application...... of the dichromate solution. Chromium skin levels increased with increasing concentrations of applied chromium salts up to 0.034 M Cr. The amount of chromium in recipient phase and skin layers increased with increasing pH when the applied solution contained potassium dichromate. This was ascribed to a decreased skin...

  7. Pulp response to a novel adhesive calcium hydroxide based cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, A; Paterson, R C; Cohen, B D; Combe, E C

    1994-09-01

    This study compares pulp responses to 3 formulations of calcium hydroxide, namely: a) An experimental adhesive calcium hydroxide cement containing polyacrylic acid, b) Dycal (L.D> Caulk Co, Milford, Delaware) Batch Nos 176970/176990, c) "Analar" calcium hydroxide mixed with sterile distilled water. After 28 days dentine bridges were present in 77% of teeth capped with the test material, 64% of teeth treated with Dycal and in 62% of teeth capped with calcium hydroxide and water. Inflammatory infiltrates were observed in a number of teeth remote from the bridges. Bacteria were detected in these specimens. Exposed rat molar pulp responses to an experimental adhesive calcium hydroxide cement were similar to to those observed with 2 other calcium hydroxide formulations.

  8. Polytypic transformations of aluminum hydroxide: A mechanistic investigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thimmasandra Narayan Ramesh

    2012-01-01

    The diffusion of ammonia vapors into a solution of aluminum nitrate or ferric nitrate results in the precipitation of their respective hydroxides and oxyhydroxides.Polymorphic phase formation of aluminum hydroxide is controlled by the rate of crystallization.The PXRD patterns of products obtained via vapor phase diffusion revealed that poorly ordered aluminum hydroxide is formed during the initial stages of crystallization.After 8 days,the formation of the bayerite phase of aluminum hydroxide was observed.Upon prolonged exposure to ammonia vapors,bayerite was transformed into gibbsite.The infrared spectrum of the product confirmed the presence of different polytypic phases of aluminum hydroxide.The results demonstrated that the crystal structure of metal hydroxides is controlled by the rate of crystallization,nature of the metal ion,site selectivity and specificity and preparative conditions.

  9. Direct access to macroporous chromium nitride and chromium titanium nitride with inverse opal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weitian; DiSalvo, Francis J

    2015-03-21

    We report a facile synthesis of single-phase, nanocrystalline macroporous chromium nitride and chromium titanium nitride with an inverse opal morphology. The material is characterized using XRD, SEM, HR-TEM/STEM, TGA and XPS. Interconversion of macroporous CrN to Cr2O3 and back to CrN while retaining the inverse opal morphology is also demonstrated.

  10. The Key Technique of Manufacture of Dense Chromium Sesquioxide Refractories

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIMaoqiang; ZHANGShuying; 等

    1998-01-01

    Dense chromium sesquioxide refractories have widely been used in the kilns for making alkai-free and anti-alkali glass fibers due to their excellent re-sistance to molten glasses.Densifications of chromium sesquioxide during sintering can be blocked by evaporation of chromium trioxide derived from oxidation at high temperature,In this paper the mech-anism of sintering chromium oxide and the process-ing technique for making dense chromium sesquiox-ide refractories are discussed .A process in laboratory scale for making dense chromium sesquioxide bricks is demonstrated.

  11. Stabilization of arsenic and chromium polluted soils using water treatment residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sanne Skov

    water and can be used as a soil amendment to decrease the mobility of CCA in contaminated soil. Stabilization with Fe-WTR was tested at the Collstrop site in Hillerød, Denmark. The site has been polluted with a wide range of wood impregnation agents including CCA during 40 years of wood impregnating...... of contaminants. Arsenic, chromium and copper cannot be degraded and existing methods for cleaning the soil are rarely used as they are expensive and technically demanding. Chemical stabilization of polluted soil is an alternative method for soil remediation, especially metal contamination, and consists in adding...... or other sorbents. Iron water treatment residues mainly consist of ferrihydrite, an oxidized iron oxy-hydroxide with a high reactivity and a large specific surface area with a high capacity for adsorption. Iron water treatment residues (Fe-WTR) are a by-product from treatment of groundwater to drinking...

  12. Cellulose derivatives modified by sodium tellurate and a chromium(III) tellurate complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Ian S; El-Sherbeny, Heba Allah M; Kenawy, Ibrahim; Mostafa, Sahar I

    2016-07-01

    A novel cellulose (Cell) derivative, sodium-tellurato (Cell-TeO(OH)4(ONa)/Cell-Cl), has been synthesized from the reaction of 6-chloro-6-deoxycellulose (Cell-Cl) with telluric acid in the presence of sodium hydroxide. The subsequent reaction of this polymeric material with chromium(III) in aqueous solution yields the [Cr(Cell-TeO3(OH)3/Cell-Cl)(Cell-TeO2(OH)4/Cell-Cl)(H2O)3] complex. The molecular structures and morphology of the new polymer and the Cr(III) complex have been examined using elemental analysis, solid-state (13)C NMR, UV-vis, XRD and FTIR spectroscopy, and SEM-EDX, TGA and magnetic measurements. The results are considered to be consistent with the formulations proposed. The deprotonation constants of the modified cellulose and the stability constant of the Cr(III) complex have been determined by pH-metric measurements.

  13. Characterization and recovery of hexavalent chromium salts of an environmental liability; Caracterizacion y recuperacion de sales de cromo hexavalente de un pasivo ambiental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangel C, A. A.; Isarain C, E. [Centro de Innovacion Aplicada en Tecnologias Competitivas, Omega 201, Fracc. Industrial Delta, 37545 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Maldonado V, M., E-mail: r.cordova.alexander@gmail.com [Hospital Regional de Alta Especialidad del Bajio, Bulevard Milenio No. 130, San Carlos la Roncha, 37660 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine a diverse group of washing solutions for its use in the recovery of the industrial waste hexavalent chromium, in compliance with the Mexican regulation NOM-147-SEMARNAT/SSA1-2004. The recovery process consisted of a simple random sampling and a physical-chemical characterization with consideration to the high solubility of hexavalent chromium compounds. A test was performed which implemented five different washing solutions (water, sulfuric acid, citric acid, sodium hydroxide, calcium and hydroxide). This was followed by a factorial experimental design to optimize resources with a removal efficiency of 80% and hence a recovery of 33 g/kg as CaCrO{sub 4} (calcium chromate). Chromium hexavalent concentration in the leachate was quantified using UV-Vis spectrometry at a wavelength λ = 540 nm, while the salts recovered by evaporation were characterized using X-ray fluorescence analysis, leading to the conclusion that precipitate can be used as raw material, the main elements are Cr, Ca, Fe and Mg, and their concentration depends on the washing solution. (Author)

  14. Synthesis of a new complex Chromium (Ⅲ) 2-mercaptonicotinate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wei; HAO Er-jun; JIANG Yu-qin

    2004-01-01

    Chromium is an essential trace element for mammals[1-3].Diabetes is a chronic disease with major health consequence. Studies show that the occurrence of diabetes have great thing to do with the chromium deficient. Almost 40 years after the first report of glucose tolerance factor(GTF)[4]no conclusive evidence for an isolable ,biologically active form of chromium exited. Three materials have been proposed to be the biologically active form of chromium: "glucose tolerance factor", chromium Picolinate and low-molecular-weight chromium-binding substance (LWMCr)[5]So there is potential for the design of new chromium drugs[6].Chromium compounds have been used in medicine for centuries and there is potential for the design of new chromium drugs.2-Mercaptonicotinic acid(MN) displays the interesting biological activity. Chromium( Ⅲ )2-mercaptonicotinate is a common and effective biologically active form of Chromium. The test of biological activity indicated that may be useful in treating of diabetes. In this paper, we reported the The synthesis route is as follow:The structure of the complex has been characterized by IR, elemental analysis, MS,atomic absorption spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction and TG-DTA analysis.They indicate that the structure of Chromium 2-mercaptonicotinate.HPLC is used for determination of the purity. Studies show that the complex has a good biological activity for supplement tiny dietary chromium,lowering blood glucose levels, lowering serum lipid levels and increasing lean body mass.

  15. Serum chromium levels in gestational diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P G Sundararaman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To measure serum chromium level in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM from Chennai, South India. Materials and Methods: Thirty women with gestational diabetes, 60 age matched controls. Inclusion criteria: Gestational age 22-28 weeks, age group 20-35 years. Exclusion Criteria: Gestational age beyond 28 weeks, malnutrition or presence of infection. Serum chromium was measured using inductive couple plasma emission spectrometer. Results: Serum chromium levels of women with GDM, 1.59+/-0.02 ng/ml (range: 0.16-4.0 ng/ml were lower than in controls (4.58+/-0.62 ng/ml; range 0.82-5.33 ng/ml (P < 0.001. However, there were no significant differences among cases and controls when subdivided by parity. Conclusions: Women with GDM from a South Indian city had lower levels of serum chromium compared to pregnant women without GDM. Studies may be done whether chromium supplementation is useful in this group of women.

  16. Surface Chemistry and Spectroscopy of Chromium in Inorganic Oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Wachs, I.E.; Schoonheydt, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on the surface chemistry and spectroscopy of chromium in inorganic oxides. Characterization of the molecular structures of chromium; Mechanics of hydrogenation-dehydrogenation reactions; Mobility and reactivity on oxidic surfaces.

  17. Residual Chromium in Leather by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    S. Okoh; I. O. Okunade; D. J. Adeyemo; Ahmed, Y A; A. A. Audu; E. Amali

    2012-01-01

    Problem statement: Most tanning processes employ the use of chromium sulphate. For chromium tanned leather, finished products may contain high amount of residual chromium. This may pose some health hazards, since chromium is known to be toxic at elevated concentration. This justifies the need for the study. Approach: Various samples of leather were collected from a tannery, a leather crafts market, a leather dump site and from local tanners all in Kano, Nigeria in 2009. The samples were irrad...

  18. Role of Calcium Hydroxide in Endodontics: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Arun A; Sangameshwar Sajjanshetty; Deepak Jain; Saujanya KP; Mohammed Mustafa; Laxmi Uppin; Mahnoor Kadri

    2012-01-01

    Calcium hydroxide is a multipurpose agent, and there have been an increasing number of indications for its use in endodontics. Some of its indications include inter-appointment intracanal medicaments, endodontic sealers, pulp capping agents, apexification, pulpotomy and weeping canals. The purpose of this article is to review the properties, advantages, disadvantages and various indications for the use of calcium hydroxide in endodontics.

  19. FIBRED MAGNESIUM HYDROXIDE AND FLAME-RESISTANT POLYENE MATERIAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The fibred mangesiun hydroxide from the bracite was treated with a surface active agent. The modified fibred magesium hydroxide as f lame-retardant,boric acid, barium stearate, polydimethyl siloxane fluid,vinyltr iethoxysilane as synergists of the flame-retardant were added to polyene resin. The flame-resistance polyene material prepared meets the requirements of EWCZ -6287-1.

  20. 21 CFR 872.3250 - Calcium hydroxide cavity liner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3250 Calcium hydroxide cavity liner. (a) Identification. A calcium hydroxide cavity liner is a device material intended to be applied to the interior of a prepared cavity before insertion of restorative material, such as amalgam, to protect the pulp of a...

  1. Electrokinetic removal of chromium and copper from contaminated soils by lactic acid enhancement in the catholyte

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Dong-mei; Alshawabkeh Akram N; DENG Chang-fen; CANG Long; SI You-bin

    2004-01-01

    The electrokinetic removal of chromium and copper from contaminated soils by adding lactic acid in cathode chamber as an enhancing reagent was evaluated. Two sets of duplicate experiments with chromium contaminated kaolinite and with a silty soil sampled from a superfund site in California of USA and polluted by Cr and Cu, were carried out in a constant current mode. Changes of soil water content and soil pH before and after the electrokinetic experiments, and variations of voltage drop and electroosmosis flow during the treatments were examined. The results indicated that Cr, spiked as Cr(Ⅵ) in the kaolinite, was accumulated mainly in the anode chamber, and some of Cr and metal hydroxides precipitated in the soil sections in contact with the cathode, which significantly increased electrical energy consumption. Treatment of the soil collected from the site showed accumulation of large amounts of Cr and Cu in the anode chamber while none was detected in the cathode one. The results suggested that the two metals either complexed with the injected lactic acid at the cathode or existed as negatively charged complex, and electromigrated toward the anode under a voltage gradient.

  2. Hexavalent and trivalent chromium in leather: What should be done?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretto, Angelo

    2015-11-01

    Trivalent chromium compounds are used for leather tanning, and chromium may be released during use of leather goods. In certain instances, small amounts of hexavalent chromium can be formed and released. Both trivalent and hexavalent chromium can elicit allergic skin reaction in chromium sensitised subjects, the latter being significantly more potent. Induction of sensitisation only occurs after exposure to hexavalent chromium. A minority of subjects are sensitised to chromium, and in a fraction of these subjects allergic skin reaction have been described after wearing leather shoes or, less frequently, other leather goods. The evidence that in all these cases the reaction is related to hexavalent chromium is not always strong. The content of hexavalent chromium in leather is regulated in European Union, but rate of release rather than content is relevant for allergic skin reaction. The role of trivalent chromium appear much less relevant if at all. Modern tanning procedure do not pose significant risk due to either hexavalent or trivalent chromium. Dismissing bad quality and worn-off leather goods is relevant in reducing or eliminating the skin reaction. It should also be pointed out that shoe components or substances other than chromium in leather may cause allergic/irritative skin reactions.

  3. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining...

  4. Hydroxide depletion in dilute supernates stored in waste tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D.T.

    1985-10-10

    Free hydroxide ion in dilute supernates are depleted by reaction with atmospheric carbon dioxide to form bicarbonate and carbonate species and by reaction with acidic compounds formed by the radiolytic decomposition of tetraphenylborate salts. A model of the kinetics and thermodynamics of absorption of carbon dioxide in the waste tanks has been developed. Forecasts of the rate of hydroxide depletion and the requirements for sodium hydroxide to maintain technical standards have been made for the washed sludge and washed precipitate storage tanks. Hydroxide depletion is predicted to have a minimal impact on sludge processing operations. However, in-tank precipitation and downstream DWPF operations are predicted to be significantly affected by hydroxide depletion in Tank 49H. The installation of a carbon dioxide scrubber on Tank 49H may be justified in view of the decrease in alkali content and variation in the melter feed.

  5. Standard Specification for Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Columbium Alloy (UNS N06625), Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Silicon Alloy (UNS N06219), and Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten Alloy (UNS N06650) Rod and Bar

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2014-01-01

    Standard Specification for Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Columbium Alloy (UNS N06625), Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Silicon Alloy (UNS N06219), and Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten Alloy (UNS N06650) Rod and Bar

  6. Dehydrogenation of propane in the presence of carbon dioxide over chromium and gallium oxides catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapidus, A.L.; Agafonov, Yu.A.; Gaidai, N.A.; Nekrasov, N.V.; Menshova, M.V.; Kunusova, R.M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). N.D. Zelinsky Inst. of Organic Chemistry

    2011-07-01

    Effective chromium and gallium oxides supported catalysts were prepared and tested in longduration experiments for propane dehydrogenation in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The optimal concentrations of active metals were found. It was shown that the activity, selectivity and stability of chromium oxides catalysts were higher than these parameters for gallium ones. Mechanism of propane oxidative dehydrogenation was studied over both catalysts using unstationary and spectroscopic methods. The employment of these methods allowed to establish the differences in process mechanism. It was shown that surface hydroxides took participation in propene formation over Cr-catalysts and hydrides - over Ga-ones. Propane and carbon dioxide participated in the reaction from the adsorbed state over both catalysts but they were differed by the adsorption capacity of the reaction components: CO2 was tied more firmly than C{sub 3}H{sub 6} over both catalysts, CO{sub 2} and C{sub 3}H{sub 6} were tied more strongly with Cr-catalysts than with Ga-ones. It was shown that CO{sub 2} took active participation in reverse watergas shift reaction and in oxidation of catalyst surface over chromium oxides catalysts. The main role of CO{sub 2} in propane dehydrogenation over gallium catalysts consisted in a decrease of coke formation. Step-schemes of propene and cracking products formation were proposed on the basis of literature and obtained data: via the redox mechanism over Cr-catalysts and through a heterolytic dissociation reaction pathway over Ga-ones. (orig.)

  7. Studying chromium biosorption using arabica coffee leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Carlos Florez García

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This work was aimed at providing an alternative for removing heavy metals such as chromium from waste water (effluent from the leather industry and galvanoplasty (coating with a thin layer of metal by electrochemical means, using coffee leaves as bio- mass. Using arabica coffee (Castle variety leaves led to 82% chromium removal efficiency for 1,000 mg/L synthetic dissolutions in 4 pH dissolution operating conditions, 0 rpm agitation, 0.149 mm diameter biomass particle size and 0.85 g/ml biomass / dissolution volume ratio.

  8. New mixed aluminium–chromium diarsenate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Alem Bouhassine

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Potassium chromium aluminium diarsenate, KCr1/4Al3/4As2O7, was prepared by solid-state reaction. The structure consists of (Cr1/4/Al3/4O6 octahedra and As2O7 diarsenate groups sharing corners to build up a three-dimensional anionic framework. The potassium cations are located in wide channels running along the c-axis direction. The crystal structure is isostructural with the triclinic AIMIIIX2O7 (AI = alkali metal; MIII = Al, Cr, Fe; X = As, P compounds. However, the MIII octahedrally coordinated site is 25% partially occupied by chromium and 75% by aluminium.

  9. Strategies for chromium bioremediation of tannery effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Satyendra Kumar; Tripathi, Manikant; Srinath, Thiruneelakantan

    2012-01-01

    Bioremediation offers the possibility of using living organisms (bacteria, fungi, algae,or plants), but primarily microorganisms, to degrade or remove environmental contaminants, and transform them into nontoxic or less-toxic forms. The major advantages of bioremediation over conventional physicochemical and biological treatment methods include low cost, good efficiency, minimization of chemicals, reduced quantity of secondary sludge, regeneration of cell biomass, and the possibility of recover-ing pollutant metals. Leather industries, which extensively employ chromium compounds in the tanning process, discharge spent-chromium-laden effluent into nearby water bodies. Worldwide, chromium is known to be one of the most common inorganic contaminants of groundwater at pollutant hazardous sites. Hexavalent chromium poses a health risk to all forms of life. Bioremediation of chromium extant in tannery waste involves different strategies that include biosorption, bioaccumulation,bioreduction, and immobilization of biomaterial(s). Biosorption is a nondirected physiochemical interaction that occurs between metal species and the cellular components of biological species. It is metabolism-dependent when living biomass is employed, and metabolism-independent in dead cell biomass. Dead cell biomass is much more effective than living cell biomass at biosorping heavy metals, including chromium. Bioaccumulation is a metabolically active process in living organisms that works through adsorption, intracellular accumulation, and bioprecipitation mechanisms. In bioreduction processes, microorganisms alter the oxidation/reduction state of toxic metals through direct or indirect biological and chemical process(es).Bioreduction of Cr6+ to Cr3+ not only decreases the chromium toxicity to living organisms, but also helps precipitate chromium at a neutral pH for further physical removal,thus offering promise as a bioremediation strategy. However, biosorption, bioaccumulation, and

  10. Chromium allergy and dermatitis: prevalence and main findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Johansen, Jeanne D.; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl;

    2015-01-01

    The history of chromium as an allergen goes back more than a century, and includesan interventional success with national legislation that led to significant changes inthe epidemiology of chromium allergy in construction workers. The 2015 EU Leather Regulation once again put a focus on chromium...... allergy, emphasizing that the investigation of chromium allergy is still far from complete. Our review article on chromium focuses on the allergen’s chemical properties, its potential exposure sources, and the allergen’s interaction with the skin, and also provides an overview of the regulations...

  11. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Trivalent and Hexavalent Chromium Based on Ingestion and Inhalation of Soluble Chromium Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    be largely Cr(III) although some Cr(VI) exposure probably also occurs. Stainless-steel welders are exposed to nickel as well as to chromium compounds...welders are equivocal with respect to involvement of chromium, particularly since nickel in some chemical forms is an established lung carcinogen (Stern...microglobulin (Lindberg and Vesterberg, 1983), retinol-binding protein (Franchini and Mutti , 1988), B-glucuronidase ( Mutti et al., 1979), and kidney brush border

  12. Biological groundwater treatment for chromium removal at low hexavalent chromium concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamais, Daniel; Noutsopoulos, Constantinos; Kavallari, Ioanna; Nyktari, Eleni; Kaldis, Apostolos; Panousi, Eleni; Nikitopoulos, George; Antoniou, Kornilia; Nasioka, Maria

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this work is to develop and evaluate biological groundwater treatment systems that will achieve hexavalent chromium reduction and total chromium removal from groundwater at hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) groundwater concentrations in the 0-200 μg/L range. Three lab-scale units operated, as sequencing batch reactors (SBR) under aerobic, anaerobic and anaerobic-aerobic conditions. All systems received groundwater with a Cr(VI) content of 200 μg/L. In order to support biological growth, groundwater was supplemented with milk, liquid cheese whey or a mixture of sugar and milk to achieve a COD concentration of 200 mg/L. The results demonstrate that a fully anaerobic system or an anaerobic-aerobic system dosed with simple or complex external organic carbon sources can lead to practically complete Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(III). The temperature dependency of maximum Cr(VI) removal rates can be described by the Arrhenius relationship. Total chromium removal in the biological treatment systems was not complete because a significant portion of Cr(III) remained in solution. An integrated system comprising of an anaerobic SBR followed by a sand filter achieved more than 95% total chromium removal thus resulting in average effluent total and dissolved chromium concentrations of 7 μg/L and 3 μg/L, respectively.

  13. The electronic structure of antiferromagnetic chromium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1981-01-01

    The author has used the local spin density formalism to perform self-consistent calculations of the electronic structure of chromium in the non-magnetic and commensurate antiferromagnetic phases, as a function of the lattice parameter. A change of a few per cent in the atomic radius brings...

  14. On-column nitrosation of amines observed in liquid chromatography impurity separations employing ammonium hydroxide and acetonitrile as mobile phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, David P; Hetrick, Evan M; Liang, Zhongming; Hadden, Chad E; Bandy, Steven; Kemp, Craig A; Harris, Thomas M; Baertschi, Steven W

    2013-12-06

    The availability of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) columns capable of operation at pH values up to 12 has allowed a greater selectivity space to be explored for method development in pharmaceutical analysis. Ammonium hydroxide is of particular value in the mobile phase because it is compatible with direct interfacing to electrospray mass spectrometers. This paper reports an unexpected N-nitrosation reaction that occurs with analytes containing primary and secondary amines when ammonium hydroxide is used to achieve the high pH and acetonitrile is used as the organic modifier. The nitrosation reaction has generality. It has been observed on multiple columns from different vendors and with multiple amine-containing analytes. Ammonia was established to be the source of the nitroso nitrogen. The stainless steel column frit and metal ablated from the frit have been shown to be the sites of the reactions. The process is initiated by removal of the chromium oxide protective film from the stainless steel by acetonitrile. It is hypothesized that the highly active, freshly exposed metals catalyze room temperature oxidation of ammonia to NO but that the actual nitrosating agent is likely N(2)O(3).

  15. A Kinetic Model of Chromium in a Flame

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Chromium has been identified as a carcinogenic metal.Incineration is the useful method for disposal of toxic chromium hazard waste and a chromium kinetic model in a flame is very important to study chromium oxidation.Chromium chemical kinetics over a range of temperatures of a hydrogen/air flame is proposed.Nine chromium compounds and fifty-eight reversible chemical reactions were considered The forward reaction rates are calculated based on the molecular collision approach for unknown ones and Arrhenius's Law for known ones.The backward reaction rates were calculated according to forward reaction rates, the equilibrium constants and chemical thermodynamics.It is verified by several equilibrium cases and is tested by a hydrogen/air diffusion flame.The results show that the kinetic model could be used in cases in which the chromium kinetics play an important role in a flame

  16. Electrochemical Properties of Nanocomposite Nanoporous Carbon / Nickel Hydroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.M. Hemiy

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical properties of composite nanoporous carbon / nickel hydroxide as electrode material for hybrid supercapacitors were investigated. Fast reversible faradaic reactions flow was determined in connection with chemical makeup of the -Ni(OH2/С composite. It is shown that increase of nickel hydroxide concentration can intensify reactions. It is found that clean -Ni(OH2 has 238 F/g of specific capacity, but -Ni(OH2/С nanocomposite with 90 % nickel hydroxide has 292 F/g. Such capacity value can be considered as a maximum for these composites.

  17. HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF CMP PULP USING MAGNESIUM HYDROXIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Zeinaly

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Conventional bleaching of hardwood CMP pulp with magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH2 show significant benefits over bleaching with sodium hydroxide (NaOH under various conditions. Magnesium hydroxide bleaching generate higher optical properties, higher pulp yield and lower effluent COD at the same chemical charge, but the physical properties were found to be similar for both processes. The initial freeness of the bleached pulps and refining value to reach a target freeness (about 350 ml. CSF were more for the Mg(OH2-based process. The residual peroxide of filtrate from the Mg(OH2-based process was very high as compared to conventional bleaching.

  18. Nickel hydroxide/cobalt-ferrite magnetic nanocatalyst for alcohol oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Pooja B; Inam, Fawad; Bhat, Badekai Ramachandra

    2014-08-11

    A magnetically separable, active nickel hydroxide (Brønsted base) coated nanocobalt ferrite catalyst has been developed for oxidation of alcohols. High surface area was achieved by tuning the particle size with surfactant. The surface area of 120.94 m2 g(-1) has been achieved for the coated nanocobalt ferrite. Improved catalytic activity and selectivity were obtained by synergistic effect of transition metal hydroxide (basic hydroxide) on nanocobalt ferrite. The nanocatalyst oxidizes primary and secondary alcohols efficiently (87%) to corresponding carbonyls in good yields.

  19. The reduction of chromate ions by Fe(II layered hydroxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Loyaux-Lawniczak

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The reduction of chromate ions by Fe(OH2 and the iron (II-iron (III hydroxysulphate green rust, GR(SO42-, was studied to evaluate whether such synthetic layered hydroxides and the corresponding natural green rust mineral could be involved in the natural attenuation of contaminated environments. The resulting Cr (III bearing phases, which would govern the subsequent behaviour of chromium, were clearly characterised. Both compounds proved to be very reactive and oxidised instantaneously while chromate ions were reduced to Cr (III as evidenced by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Mass balance (ICP-AES demonstrated that the Fe/Cr ratio inside the solid end product was equal to the initial Fe/Cr ratio. The solid phases, analysed by X-ray diffraction, Raman and Mossbauer spectroscopies were identified as Cr-substituted poorly crystallised iron (III oxyhydroxides in both cases, more precisely δ-FeOOH when starting with Fe(OH2 and ferrihydrite when starting with GR(SO42-.

  20. Homogeneous Precipitation of Nickel Hydroxide Powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bora Mavis

    2003-12-12

    Precipitation and characterization of nickel hydroxide powders were investigated. A comprehensive precipitation model incorporating the metal ion hydrolysis, complexation and precipitation reactions was developed for the production of the powders with urea precipitation method. Model predictions on Ni{sup 2+} precipitation rate were confirmed with precipitation experiments carried out at 90 C. Experimental data and model predictions were in remarkable agreement. Uncertainty in the solubility product data of nickel hydroxides was found to be the large contributor to the error. There were demonstrable compositional variations across the particle cross-sections and the growth mechanism was determined to be the aggregation of primary crystallites. This implied that there is a change in the intercalate chemistry of the primary crystallites with digestion time. Predicted changes in the concentrations of simple and complex ions in the solution support the proposed mechanism. The comprehensive set of hydrolysis reactions used in the model described above allows the investigation of other systems provided that accurate reaction constants are available. the fact that transition metal ions like Ni{sup 2+} form strong complexes with ammonia presents a challenge in the full recovery of the Ni{sup 2+}. On the other hand, presence of Al{sup 3+} facilitates the complete precipitation of Ni{sup 2+} in about 3 hours of digestion. A challenge in their predictive modeling studies had been the fact that simultaneous incorporation of more than one metal ion necessitates a different approach than just using the equilibrium constants of hydrolysis, complexation and precipitation reactions. Another limitation of using equilibrium constants is that the nucleation stage of digestion, which is controlled mainly by kinetics, is not fully justified. A new program released by IBM Almaden Research Center (Chemical Kinetics Simulator{trademark}, Version 1.01) lets the user change the order of

  1. USING COLLOIDAL LAYERED DOUBLE HYDROXIDES AS CATIONICMICROPARTICULATE COMPONENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SonglinWang; WenxiaLiu

    2004-01-01

    Layered double hydroxides consisting of layers withcationic charges may be potential candidates ofcationic microparticles forming synergetic retentioneffect with anionic polyacrylamide. In this work, thelayered double hydroxides with various molar ratiosof Mg/AI were synthesized by co-precipitation ofmagnesium chloride and aluminum chloride and pep-tized by intense washing with water. The chemicalformula, particle size, Zeta potential of the layereddouble hydroxide were analyzed. It was found thatpositively charged magnesium aluminum hydroxidewith particle diameter in nanoparticle size could beprepared. The Zeta potential and particle size varywith the feed molar ratio of Mg/A1 and the peptizingprocess, respectively. The Zeta potential is also pHdependent. The retention experiments carried out onDDJ show that when used together with anionic poly-acrylamide, the positively charged colloidal doublehydroxide greatly improves the retention of reedpulps. The chemical formula, particle size and Zetapotential of the colloidal double hydroxide all affectits retention behavior.

  2. Tertiary dentinogenesis with calcium hydroxide: a review of proposed mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangwan, P; Sangwan, A; Duhan, J; Rohilla, A

    2013-01-01

    Calcium hydroxide has been used extensively in dentistry for a century. Despite its widespread use as a pulp-capping agent, its mechanisms of action still remain ambiguous. Understanding its modes of action will lead to a broader understanding of the mechanisms associated with induced dentinogenesis and help in optimizing the currently available agents to target specific regenerative processes to obtain the best possible clinical outcomes. A literature search relating to mechanisms of dentinogenesis of calcium hydroxide up to December 2011 was carried out using pubmed and MEDLINE database searches as well as manual searching of cross-references from identified studies. Resulting suggestions regarding dentinogenic mechanisms of calcium hydroxide range from direct irritating action of the material to induction of release of biologically active molecules. The purpose of this article is to discuss various mechanisms through which calcium hydroxide may induce tertiary dentinogenesis in the light of observations made in included studies.

  3. 77 FR 6627 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Hard and Decorative Chromium...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-08

    ... aluminum to provide resistance to corrosion. The chromium anodizing process is used to coat aircraft parts... Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Hard and Decorative Chromium Electroplating and Chromium Anodizing Tanks... Pollutant Emissions: Hard and Decorative Chromium Electroplating and Chromium Anodizing Tanks; and...

  4. CHROMIUM INDUCED CYTOTOXICITY IN BLACKGRAM (VIGNA MUNGO L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chidambaram ، P. Sundaramoorthy ، A. Murugan ، K. Sankar Ganesh ، L. Baskaran

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromium is known to be highly toxic to biological systems. This study was designed to determine the mutagenic effects of different concentrations (0, 10, 25, 50, 100 and 200 mg/L of hexavalent chromium on root tip cells of blackgram (Vigna mungo L. Hepper. The blackgram seeds were equi-spacially arranged in sterilized petriplates lined with filter paper and they were treated with different concentrations of chromium solution. In germination studies, the morphological growth parameters such as germination percentage, root length, shoot length fresh weight and dry weight of blackgram seedlings were decreased with increasing dose of chromium concentrations. No germination of blackgram seeds was recorded at 300mg/l chromium concentration. Chromosome aberration assay was used to determine the mitotic indices and rate of chromosome aberration in blackgram root tip cells due to chromium treatment. The results showed that the mitotic indices were complicated due to different concentrations of chromium. However, the increase in chromium concentration has led to a gradual increase in the percentage of chromosomal aberration and mitotic index. The chromosome length, absolute chromosome length and average chromosome lengths were gradually found to decrease. There was no considerable change in 2n number of chromosome with the increase in chromium concentrations. It is concluded that the hexavalent chromium has significant mutagenic effect on the root tip cells of blackgram.

  5. Hydrothermal synthesis of lanthanide (hydr)oxide micro/nanorods in presence of tetrabutylammonium hydroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李银艳; 徐时清

    2016-01-01

    Uniform and well-defined lanthanide hydroxide and oxide micro/nanorods Ln(OH)3(Ln=La, Pr, Sm, Eu, Gd, Er) and Gd(OH)3:Eu3+, Gd2O3:Eu3+ were successfully synthesized through a green and facile hydrothermal method. Tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (TBAH) and lanthanide nitrides were used as the hydrothermal precursors without the addition of any templates/surfactants. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and photoluminescence (PL) spectra. The result demonstrated that lanthanide hydroxide micro/nanorods with 20–80 nm in diameter and 50–450 in length were obtained. The size of the Ln(OH)3 (Ln=La, Pr, Sm, Eu, Gd, Er) rods increased with the increase of the atomic number. The size of the Gd(OH)3:Eu3+ rods decreased with the increase of pH value by modulating the amount of the TBAH solution. The as-formed product via the hydrothermal process, Gd(OH)3:Eu3+, could be transformed to Gd2O3:Eu3+ with the same morphology and a slight shrinking in size after a post annealing process. It is a facial method to synthesize photoluminescent nanomaterial of Gd2O3:Eu3+. The Gd2O3:Eu3+ microrods exhibited strong red emission corresponding to5D0→7F2 transition (610 nm) of Eu3+ under UV light excitation (257 nm).

  6. Role of Calcium Hydroxide in Endodontics: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun A

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium hydroxide is a multipurpose agent, and there have been an increasing number of indications for its use in endodontics. Some of its indications include inter-appointment intracanal medicaments, endodontic sealers, pulp capping agents, apexification, pulpotomy and weeping canals. The purpose of this article is to review the properties, advantages, disadvantages and various indications for the use of calcium hydroxide in endodontics.

  7. Structure and properties of porous ceramics obtained from aluminum hydroxide

    OpenAIRE

    Levkov, R.; Kulkov, Sergey Nikolaevich

    2016-01-01

    In this paper the study of porous ceramics obtained from aluminum hydroxide with gibbsite modification is presented. The dependence of porosity and mechanical characteristics of the material sintered at different temperatures was studied. It was shown that compressive strength of alumina ceramics increases by 40 times with decreasing the pore volume from 65 to 15%. It was shown that aluminum hydroxide may be used for pore formation and pore volume in the sintered ceramics can be controlled by...

  8. USING COLLOIDAL LAYERED DOUBLE HYDROXIDES AS CATIONIC MICROPARTICULATE COMPONENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Songlin Wang; Wenxia Liu

    2004-01-01

    Layered double hydroxides consisting of layers with cationic charges may be potential candidates of cationic microparticles forming synergetic retention effect with anionic polyacrylamide. In this work, the layered double hydroxides with various molar ratios of Mg/Al were synthesized by co-precipitation of magnesium chloride and aluminum chloride and peptized by intense washing with water. The chemical formula, particle size, Zeta potential of the layered double hydroxide were analyzed. It was found that positively charged magnesium aluminum hydroxide with particle diameter in nanoparticle size could be prepared. The Zeta potential and particle size vary with the feed molar ratio of Mg/Al and the peptizing process, respectively. The Zeta potential is also pH dependent. The retention experiments carried out on DDJ show that when used together with anionic polyacrylamide, the positively charged colloidal double hydroxide greatly improves the retention of reed pulps. The chemical formula, particle size and Zeta potential of the colloidal double hydroxide all affect its retention behavior.

  9. Femtosecond laser surface structuring and oxidation of chromium thin coatings: Black chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotsedi, L., E-mail: Kotsedi@tlabs.ac.za [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Nuru, Z.Y. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Mthunzi, P. [National Laser Centre, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, 0001 Pretoria (South Africa); Muller, T.F.G. [University of the Western Cape, Physics Department, Bellville, 7535 Cape Town (South Africa); Eaton, S.M. [Physics Department, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Julies, B. [University of the Western Cape, Physics Department, Bellville, 7535 Cape Town (South Africa); Manikandan, E. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Ramponi, R. [Physics Department, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Maaza, M. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa)

    2014-12-01

    Highlights: • Oxidation of the chromium thin film to chromium oxide by femtosecond laser with a fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm. • Solar absorber from chromium oxide that low percentage reflectance. • Femtosecond laser oxidation, with a de-focused laser. • Chromium oxide formation by femtosecond laser in normal ambient. - Abstract: In view of their potential applications as selective solar absorbers, chromium coatings on float glass substrates were nano/micro structured by femtosecond laser in air. Raman and X-rays diffraction investigations confirmed the formation of an ultra-porous α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer at the surface; higher is the input laser power, enhanced is the crystallinity of the α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer. The α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer with the Cr underneath it in addition to the photo-induced porosity acted as a classical ceramic–metal nano-composite making the reflectance to decrease significantly within the spectral range of 190–1100 nm. The average reflectance decreased from 70 to 2%.

  10. Production of basic chromium sulfate by using recovered chromium from ashes of thermally treated leather.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmer, Aline; Nunes, Keila Guerra Pacheco; Gutterres, Mariliz; Marcílio, Nilson Romeu

    2010-04-15

    Leather wastes tanned with chromium are generated during the production process of leather, hence the wastes from hand crafted goods and footwear industries are a serious environmental problem. The thermal treatment of leather wastes can be one of the treatment options because the wastes are rich in chromium and can be used as a raw material for sodium chromate production and further to obtain several chromium compounds. The objective of this study was to utilize the chromium from leather wastes via basic chromium sulfate production to be subsequently applied in a hide tanning. The obtained results have shown that this is the first successful attempt to achieve desired base properties of the product. The result was achieved when the following conditions were applied: a molar ratio between sodium sulfite and sodium dichromate equal to 6; reaction time equal to 5 min before addition of sulfuric acid; pH of sodium dichromate solution equal to 2. Summarizing, there is an opportunity to utilize the dangerous wastes and reused them in the production scheme by minimizing or annulling the environmental impact and to attend a sustainable process development concept.

  11. Interactions of chromium with microorganisms and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, C; Campos-García, J; Devars, S; Gutiérrez-Corona, F; Loza-Tavera, H; Torres-Guzmán, J C; Moreno-Sánchez, R

    2001-05-01

    Chromium is a highly toxic non-essential metal for microorganisms and plants. Due to its widespread industrial use, chromium (Cr) has become a serious pollutant in diverse environmental settings. The hexavalent form of the metal, Cr(VI), is considered a more toxic species than the relatively innocuous and less mobile Cr(III) form. The presence of Cr in the environment has selected microbial and plant variants able to tolerate high levels of Cr compounds. The diverse Cr-resistance mechanisms displayed by microorganisms, and probably by plants, include biosorption, diminished accumulation, precipitation, reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III), and chromate efflux. Some of these systems have been proposed as potential biotechnological tools for the bioremediation of Cr pollution. In this review we summarize the interactions of bacteria, algae, fungi and plants with Cr and its compounds.

  12. Ageing behaviour of unary hydroxides in trivalent metal salt solutions: Formation of layered double hydroxide (LDH)-like phases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Michael Rajamathi; P Vishnu Kamath

    2000-10-01

    The hydroxides of Mg, Ni, Cu and Zn transform into layered double hydroxide (LDH)-like phases on ageing in solutions of Al or Cr salts. This reaction is similar to acid leaching and proceeds by a dissolution–reprecipitation mechanism offering a simple method of LDH synthesis, with implications for the accepted theories of formation of LDH minerals in the earth’s crust.

  13. Effect of polyethylene glycol on electrochemically deposited trivalent chromium layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joo-Yul LEE; Man KIM; Sik-Chol KWON

    2009-01-01

    The structural characteristics of the trivalent chromium deposits and their interfacial behavior in the plating solution with and without polyethylene glycol molecules were observed by using various electrochemical methods such as cyclic voltammetry, open circuit potential transition, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectrometry. It is shown that the polyethylene glycol molecules make the reductive current density lower in the trivalent chromium plating system and promote a hydrogen evolution reaction through their adsorption on the electrode surface. And the trivalent chromium layer formed from the polyethylene glycol-containing solution has somewhat higher density of cracks on its surface and results in a lower film resistance, lower polarization resistance, and higher capacitance in a corrosive atmosphere. It is also revealed that the formation of chromium carbide layer is facilitated in the presence of polyethylene glycol, which means easier electrochemical codeposition of chromium and carbon, not single chromium deposition.

  14. Speciation and recovery of chromium from chromite ore processing residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreeram, K J; Ramasami, T

    2001-10-01

    The processing of chromite ore is associated with the generation of large quantities of solid wastes containing chromium, which have been disposed of as landfill for many years. The mobilization and operational speciation of chromium contained in soils contaminated with metal salts are important in terms of the environment. Several methods have been employed for the extraction and recovery of solid wastes. Chromium contained in contaminated soils and solid wastes can be categorized as exchangeable, oxidizable, carbonate-bound, reducible and residual. The results from this study indicate a need for efficient leaching methodologies in chromite ore processing plants to decrease the non-detrital fractions of chromium in the residue. Aggressive methodologies are required to recover chromium from the detrital fractions. The potential benefits of employing sodium peroxide for the complete recovery of chromium from chromite residue have been demonstrated, and the need to ensure the safety of the process has been emphasized.

  15. The Effects of Aluminium Hydroxide and Magnesium Hydroxide on the Mechanical Properties of Thermoplastic Polyurethane Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkin Akdoğan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Thermoplastic polyurethane materials are widely used in automotive, clothing, electrical and electronics, medical, construction, machine industry due to excellent physical and chemical properties. Thermoplastic polyurethane materials combustion and resistance to high temperature characteristics are poor. Additives and fillers are added into the polyurethane matrix to improve those properties. Particularly adding these agents as a flame retardant are affect mechanical properties of polyurethane materials. Therefore, it is important to determinate the mechanical properties of these materials. In this study, 5% by weight of the thermoplastic polyurethane material, aluminium tri hydroxide (ATH, (Al2O3 3H2O and magnesium hydroxide (MgOH, (Mg(OH2 were added. Ammonium polyphosphate (APP as an intumescent flame retardant with inorganic flame retardants were added to increase the flame resistance of produced composite structure. Tensile test, tear test, hardness and Izod impact tests were made and compared of those produced composites. As a result of experiments the addition of ATH has lowered the tensile strength and tear strength contrast to this the addition of MgOH has improved those properties. Hardness and Izod impact test results were showed that both of the additives have no negative effect.

  16. Chromium Toxicity: Reductive Enzymes in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    internal organs (e.g. lungs, liver, kidneys) [24,27,64], pulmonary fibrosis and chronic bronchitis [2], skin ulcers and allergic dermatitis [2], and...cross the skin [2] and are readily transported across cell membranes [18] via an anion carrier [6]. Cr compounds are also mutagenic [67], and the bulk of...reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase- dependent chromium(VI) reduction. Analyst 120:935-938. 42. Miura, A

  17. Dimensionally Controlled Lithiation of Chromium Oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fister, Tim T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hu, Xianyi [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Esbenshade, Jennifer [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Chen, Xiao [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Wu, Jinsong [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Dravid, Vinayak [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Bedzyk, Michael [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Long, Brandon [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gewirth, Andrew A. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Shi, Bing [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Schlepütz, Christian M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Fenter, Paul [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-01-12

    Oxide conversion reactions are an alternative approach for high capacity lithium ion batteries but are known to suffer from structural irreversibility associated with the phase separation and reconstitution of reduced metal species and Li2O. In particular, the morphology of the reduced metal species is thought to play a critical role in the electrochemical properties of a conversion material. Here we use a model electrode with alternating layers of chromium and chromium oxide to better understand and control these phase changes in real-time and at molecular length scales. Despite lacking crystallinity at the atomic scale, this superstructure is observed (with X-ray reflectivity, XR) to lithiate and delithiate in a purely one-dimensional manner, preserving the layered structure. The XR data show that the metal layers act as nucleation sites for the reduction of chromium in the conversion reaction. Irreversibility during delithiation is due to the formation of a ternary phase, LiCrO2, which can be further delithiated at higher potentials. The results reveal that the combination of confining lithiation to nanoscale sheets of Li2O and the availability of reaction sites in the metal layers in the layered structure is a strategy for improving the reversibility and mass transport properties that can be used in a wide range of conversion materials.

  18. Processes affecting the remediation of chromium-contaminated sites.

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, C.D.; Wittbrodt, P R

    1991-01-01

    The remediation of chromium-contaminated sites requires knowledge of the processes that control the migration and transformation of chromium. Advection, dispersion, and diffusion are physical processes affecting the rate at which contaminants can migrate in the subsurface. Heterogeneity is an important factor that affects the contribution of each of these mechanisms to the migration of chromium-laden waters. Redox reactions, chemical speciation, adsorption/desorption phenomena, and precipitat...

  19. Stabilization and solidification of chromium-contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherne, C.A.; Thomson, B.M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Civil Engineering Dept.; Conway, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-11-01

    Chromium-contaminated soil is a common environmental problem in the United States as a result of numerous industrial processes involving chromium. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is the species of most concern because of its toxicity and mobility in groundwater. One method of diminishing the environmental impact of chromium is to reduce it to a trivalent oxidation state [Cr(III)], in which it is relatively insoluble and nontoxic. This study investigated a stabilization and solidification process to minimize the chromium concentration in the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) extract and to produce a solidified waste form with a compressive strength in the range of 150 to 300 pounds per square inch (psi). To minimize the chromium in the TCLP extract, the chromium had to be reduced to the trivalent oxidation state. The average used in this study was an alluvium contaminated with chromic and sulfuric acid solutions. The chromium concentration in the in the in situ soil was 1212 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) total chromium and 275 mg/kg Cr(VI). The effectiveness of iron, ferrous sulfate to reduce Cr(VI) was tested in batch experiments.

  20. Tribological Characteristics of Chromium-active Carbon Electroplated Composite Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUKa-fi; HUAMeng; Yi-min

    2004-01-01

    A process of chromium electroplating using a standard bath with additives and active carbon particles was reported, and the tribological behaviors of the composite coatings using the pin-on-disk tester and the table wear tester were i nvestig(aed. Experimental results indicate that the electroplated chromium-active carbon composite coatings exhibited the low friction coefficient anti excellent anti-wear properties whets coffered with the normal chromium electroplated ones. The formation of active carbon particles within the chromium matrices can be explained by SEM analysis and the mechanis of wear resistance of the composite coatings were studied.

  1. REINFORCEMENT OF NICKEL CHROMIUM ALLOYS WITH SAPPHIRE WHISKERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SAPPHIRE, COMPOSITE MATERIALS, CERAMIC FIBERS , CERAMIC FIBERS , TITANIUM COMPOUNDS, ZIRCONIUM COMPOUNDS, HYDRIDES, ADDITIVES, CHROMIUM ALLOYS, FIBER METALLURGY, IRON COMPOUNDS, ENCAPSULATION, DENSITY, SURFACE TENSION.

  2. Chromium recycling of tannery waste through microbial fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsifas, E A; Giannoutsou, E; Lambraki, M; Barla, M; Karagouni, A D

    2004-02-01

    An Aspergillus carbonarius isolate, selected from an established microbial culture collection, was used to study the biodegradation of chromium shavings in solid-state fermentation experiments. Approximately 97% liquefaction of the tannery waste was achieved and the liquid obtained from long-term experiments was used to recover chromium. The resulting alkaline chromium sulfate solution was useful in tanning procedures. A proteinaceous liquid was also obtained which has potential applications as a fertilizer or animal feed additive and has several other industrial uses. The A. carbonarius strain proved to be a very useful tool in tannery waste-treatment processes and chromium recovery in the tanning industries.

  3. Influence of Chelating Agents on Chromium Fate in Sediment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGXIAOCHANG; SUNJINHE; 等

    1996-01-01

    A laboratory investigation on reaction between chelating agents and chromium was conducted to evaluate the effect of chelating agents on the adsorption and desorption of chromium in sediment.The amount of adsorbed chromium(VI) in sediment decreased slightly by 5%-10% because of addition of chelating agents.Chelating agents inhibited the removal of Cr(Ⅲ)by sediment from solutions and the inhibiting effect was in the order:citric acid>tartaric acid>EDTA,Salicylic acid.No effect of chelating agents on desorption of chromium in sediment was observed.

  4. Chromium extraction with organic solvents. Part 3. Application to the treatment of polymetallic industrial residues; Extraction de cromo con disolventes organicos. III parte. Aplicacion al tratamiento de residuos polimetalicos industriales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juan, D. de; Meseguer, V.; Lozano, L. J. [Universidad de Murcia. (Spain)

    1998-12-31

    The use of Primene 81R as extraction agent of chromium present in solid wastes containing nickel, iron and copper has been studied. The waste was leached with a sulphuric acid solution up to pH3 and oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI) with Caro acid was also studied. Because of the negative result of oxidation, the treatment was applied on Cr(III) directly. Extraction/scrubbing/stripping process was studied in the leach. The composition of organic phase used in the extraction step was 10% v/v Primene 81R, 10% iso decanol and kerosene. All the iron, 91% Cr, 10% Ni and large part of the copper contained in the initial leach solution are recovered in the organic phase. In the scrubbing stage (with a sulphuric acid solution at pH 1,4), all the copper and nickel and 30% Cr go to the washing liquor, while all the iron and 70% Cr remained in the organic phase. In the stripping stage (with a 2N NH{sub 4}OH or 2N NaOH solution) all the iron and chromium are recovered as a precipitate of highly absorbent hydroxides. After the treatment mentioned, 63% Cr and 100% Fe are recovered as a mixture of hydroxides, and 28% of the initial chromium, all the nickel and the copper are found in the washing liquor. (Author) 4 refs.

  5. The citotoxicity of calcium hydroxide intracanal dressing by MTT assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanik Zubaidah

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Calcium hydroxide had been used as the intracanal dressing in endodontic treatment due to its high alkaline and high antimicrobial capacity. It also be able to dissolve the necrotic tissue, prevent the root resorbtion and regenerate a new hard tissue. The aim of this study is to identify the concentration of calcium hydroxide that has the lowest citotoxicity. There are 5 groups, each group had 8 samples with different concentration of calcium hydroxide. Group I: 50%, Group II: 55%, Group III: 60%, Group IV: 65% and Group V: 70%. The citotoxicity test by using enzymatic assay of MTT [3-(4.5- dimethylthiazol-2yl ]-2.5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide, against fibroblast cell (BHK-21. The result of susceptibility test was showed by the citotoxicity detection of the survive cell of fibroblast that was measured spectrophotometrically using 595 nm beam. The data was analyzed using One-Way ANOVA test with significant difference α = 0.05 and subsequently LSD test. The result showed that in concentration 50%, 55%, 60%, 65%, and 70% calcium hydroxide had low toxicity, but calcium hydroxide 60%, had the lowest toxicity.

  6. Photo-oxidation of EPDM/layered double hydroxides composites: Influence of layered hydroxides and stabilizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The photo-oxidation of ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM/ layered double hydroxide (LDH composites as well as EPDM/LDH with stabilizers is studied under accelerated UV irradiation (λ≥290 nm at 60°C for different time intervals. The development of functional groups during oxidation was monitored by FT-IR spectroscopy. The photodegradation of the pristine polymer and composites take place and the increase in hydroxyl and carbonyl groups with irradiation times, was estimated. EPDM filled LDH showed higher degradation rate than pristine EPDM, while in acidic medium EPDM/LDH showed almost equal degradation as in isolated conditions. These results show the advantages of LDHs as a filler as well as an acid killer. The effect of stabilizers is very less because of their concentration in comparison of LDH.

  7. Diffusion of hexavalent chromium in chromium-containing slag as affected by microbial detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunyan; Yang, Zhihui; Chai, Liyuan; Zhao, Kun

    2009-09-30

    An electrochemical method was used to determine the diffusion coefficient of chromium(VI) in chromium-containing slag. A slag plate was prepared from the original slag or the detoxified slag by Achromobacter sp. CH-1. The results revealed that the apparent diffusion coefficient of Cr(VI) was 4.4 x 10(-9)m(2)s(-1) in original slag and 2.62 x 10(-8)m(2)s(-1) in detoxified slag. The results implied that detoxification of chromium-containing slag by Achromobacter sp. CH-1 could enhance Cr(VI) release. Meanwhile, the results of laboratory experiment showed that the residual total Cr(VI) in slag decreased from an initial value of 6.8 mg g(-1) to 0.338 mg g(-1) at the end of the detoxification process. The Cr(VI) released from slag was also reduced by Achromobacter sp. CH-1 strain since water soluble Cr(VI) in the leachate was not detected after 4 days. Therefore, Achromobacter sp. CH-1 has potential application for the bio-detoxification of chromium-containing slag.

  8. ANTIBACTERIAL EFFECT OF CALCIUM HYDROXIDE IN DIFFER ENT VEHICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: AIM: This study evaluated the antibacterial effect of ca lcium hydroxide in different vehicles in an in vitro model. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Calcium hydroxide paste prepared with two conventionally used vehicles namely, campho rated monochlophenol, distilled water and also propylene glycol. The antibacterial activity of these paste were tested against five micro- organisms that can commonly occur in the inf ected root canals. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: The results of the study indicate that a paste of ca lcium hydroxide made with propylene glycol exerts significant antibacterial act ion. Hence, it can be recommended for use as an intracanal medicament in preference to a paste prepa red with a tissue toxic phenolic compound like camphorated mono chlorophenol

  9. Structure and properties of porous ceramics obtained from aluminum hydroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levkov, R.; Kulkov, S.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper the study of porous ceramics obtained from aluminum hydroxide with gibbsite modification is presented. The dependence of porosity and mechanical characteristics of the material sintered at different temperatures was studied. It was shown that compressive strength of alumina ceramics increases by 40 times with decreasing the pore volume from 65 to 15%. It was shown that aluminum hydroxide may be used for pore formation and pore volume in the sintered ceramics can be controlled by varying the aluminum hydroxide concentration and sintering temperature. Based on these results one can conclude that the obtained structure is very close to inorganic bone matrix and can be used as promising material for bone implants production.

  10. ALUMINUM AND CHROMIUM LEACHING WORKSHOP WHITEPAPER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCabe, D; Jeff Pike, J; Bill Wilmarth, B

    2007-04-25

    A workshop was held on January 23-24, 2007 to discuss the status of processes to leach constituents from High Level Waste (HLW) sludges at the Hanford and Savannah River Sites. The objective of the workshop was to examine the needs and requirements for the HLW flowsheet for each site, discuss the status of knowledge of the leaching processes, communicate the research plans, and identify opportunities for synergy to address knowledge gaps. The purpose of leaching of non-radioactive constituents from the sludge waste is to reduce the burden of material that must be vitrified in the HLW melter systems, resulting in reduced HLW glass waste volume, reduced disposal costs, shorter process schedules, and higher facility throughput rates. The leaching process is estimated to reduce the operating life cycle of SRS by seven years and decrease the number of HLW canisters to be disposed in the Repository by 1000 [Gillam et al., 2006]. Comparably at Hanford, the aluminum and chromium leaching processes are estimated to reduce the operating life cycle of the Waste Treatment Plant by 20 years and decrease the number of canisters to the Repository by 15,000-30,000 [Gilbert, 2007]. These leaching processes will save the Department of Energy (DOE) billions of dollars in clean up and disposal costs. The primary constituents targeted for removal by leaching are aluminum and chromium. It is desirable to have some aluminum in glass to improve its durability; however, too much aluminum can increase the sludge viscosity, glass viscosity, and reduce overall process throughput. Chromium leaching is necessary to prevent formation of crystalline compounds in the glass, but is only needed at Hanford because of differences in the sludge waste chemistry at the two sites. Improving glass formulations to increase tolerance of aluminum and chromium is another approach to decrease HLW glass volume. It is likely that an optimum condition can be found by both performing leaching and improving

  11. Safety, absorption, and antioxidant effects of chromium histidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supplemental chromium has been shown to be involved in the alleviation of the metabolic syndrome, glucose intolerance, polycystic ovary syndrome, depression, excess body fat, and gestational, steroid-induced, and type 2 diabetes. Chromium amino acid complexes that contained histidine displayed cons...

  12. Mechanisms of bacterial resistance to chromium compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Díaz, Martha I; Díaz-Pérez, César; Vargas, Eréndira; Riveros-Rosas, Héctor; Campos-García, Jesús; Cervantes, Carlos

    2008-06-01

    Chromium is a non-essential and well-known toxic metal for microorganisms and plants. The widespread industrial use of this heavy metal has caused it to be considered as a serious environmental pollutant. Chromium exists in nature as two main species, the trivalent form, Cr(III), which is relatively innocuous, and the hexavalent form, Cr(VI), considered a more toxic species. At the intracellular level, however, Cr(III) seems to be responsible for most toxic effects of chromium. Cr(VI) is usually present as the oxyanion chromate. Inhibition of sulfate membrane transport and oxidative damage to biomolecules are associated with the toxic effects of chromate in bacteria. Several bacterial mechanisms of resistance to chromate have been reported. The best characterized mechanisms comprise efflux of chromate ions from the cell cytoplasm and reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). Chromate efflux by the ChrA transporter has been established in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Cupriavidus metallidurans (formerly Alcaligenes eutrophus) and consists of an energy-dependent process driven by the membrane potential. The CHR protein family, which includes putative ChrA orthologs, currently contains about 135 sequences from all three domains of life. Chromate reduction is carried out by chromate reductases from diverse bacterial species generating Cr(III) that may be detoxified by other mechanisms. Most characterized enzymes belong to the widespread NAD(P)H-dependent flavoprotein family of reductases. Several examples of bacterial systems protecting from the oxidative stress caused by chromate have been described. Other mechanisms of bacterial resistance to chromate involve the expression of components of the machinery for repair of DNA damage, and systems related to the homeostasis of iron and sulfur.

  13. Observational Approach to Chromium Site Remediation - 13266

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Myers, R. [Washington Closure Hanford, 2620 Fermi, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Production reactors at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, required massive quantities of water for reactor cooling and material processing. To reduce corrosion and the build-up of scale in pipelines and cooling systems, sodium dichromate was added to the water feedstock. Spills and other releases at the makeup facilities, as well as leaks from miles of pipelines, have led to numerous areas with chromium-contaminated soil and groundwater, threatening fish populations in the nearby Columbia River. Pump-and-treat systems have been installed to remove chromium from the groundwater, but significant contamination remain in the soil column and poses a continuing threat to groundwater and the Columbia River. Washington Closure Hanford, DOE, and regulators are working on a team approach that implements the observational approach, a strategy for effectively dealing with the uncertainties inherent in subsurface conditions. Remediation of large, complex waste sites at a federal facility is a daunting effort. It is particularly difficult to perform the work in an environment of rapid response to changing field and contamination conditions. The observational approach, developed by geotechnical engineers to accommodate the inherent uncertainties in subsurface conditions, is a powerful and appropriate method for site remediation. It offers a structured means of quickly moving into full remediation and responding to the variations and changing conditions inherent in waste site cleanups. A number of significant factors, however, complicate the application of the observational approach for chromium site remediation. Conceptual models of contamination and site conditions are difficult to establish and get consensus on. Mid-stream revisions to the design of large excavations are time-consuming and costly. And regulatory constraints and contract performance incentives can be impediments to the flexible responses required under the

  14. Atom Lithography with a Chromium Atomic Beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wen-Tao; LI Tong-Bao

    2006-01-01

    @@ Direct write atom lithography is a new technique in which resonant light is used to pattern an atomic beam and the nanostructures are formed when the atoms deposit on the substrate. We design an experiment setup to fabricate chromium nanolines by depositing an atomic beam of 52 Cr through an off-resonant laser standing wave with the wavelength of 425.55 nm onto a silicon substrate. The resulting nanolines exhibit a period of 215 ± 3 nm with height of 1 nm.

  15. The fate of chromium during tropical weathering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berger, Alfons; Frei, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We performed a mineral, geochemical and Cr–Sr–Pb isotope study on a laterite profile developed on ca. 540 Ma old tonalitic bedrock in Madagascar with special emphasis on the behavior of chromium during tropical weathering. The observed strong depletions of Ca, Si, and P, and enrichment of Fe and Al......, in the soil, relative to bedrock and underlying saprolite, are the characteristic features pertinent to laterites. The enrichment of Fe in topsoil horizon can be correlated with enrichment of P, and the redox sensitive elements Mn and Cr, and indicates redistribution of these elements related to oxidation...

  16. Bioleaching of chromium from tannery sludge by indigenous Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan-Shan; Pan, Zhi-Yan; Lang, Jian-Min; Xu, Jian-Miao; Zheng, Yu-Guo

    2007-08-17

    Chromium in tannery sludge will cause serious environmental problems and is toxic to organisms. The acidophilic sulfur-oxidizing Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans can leach heavy metals form urban and industrial wastes. This study examined the ability of an indigenous sulfur-oxidizing A. thiooxidans to leach chromium from tannery sludge. The results showed that the pH of sludge mixture inoculated with the indigenous A. thiooxidans decreased to around 2.0 after 4 days. After 6 days incubation in shaking flasks at 30 degrees C and 160 rpm, up to 99% of chromium was solubilized from tannery sludge. When treated in a 2-l bubble column bioreactor for 5 days at 30 degrees C and aeration of 0.5 vvm, 99.7% of chromium was leached from tannery sludge. The results demonstrated that chromium in tannery sludge can be efficiently leached by the indigenous A. thiooxidans.

  17. The Theory for the Mechanism of Chromium Plating: The Theory for the Physical Characteristics of Chromium Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    1947-01-01

    deposits arc pro- duced as the coll potential is successively raised. The sulfato ion "hus has an extremely important effect in the chromium plating...and sulfato iDU in the bath wore then used in an attempt to obtain more satisfactory hexagonal chromium deposits. The data obtained are summarUod

  18. From Zn-Al layered double hydroxide to ZnO nanostructure:Gradually etching by sodium hydroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang Qiang Wan; Dong Xiang Li; Chun Fang Li; Jie Xu; Wan Guo Hou

    2012-01-01

    Zn-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) was used as precursor to produce ZnO nanostructures through dissolution of aluminum hydroxide in caustic soda.The Zn-Al LDH could transform into different nanostructures of ZnO on LDH nanosheets and even pure ZnO nanorods under various NaOH concentration.The formed ZnO nanorods vertically aligned on both LDH sides.UV-vis diverse reflectance spectra show that the obtained ZnO nanorods have a band gap of approximately 3.05 eV.Such ZnO/LDH nanostructures might be used as photocatalyst in the organic pollutant decomposition.

  19. Dissolution of chromium in sulfuric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. POPIC

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available By combining electrochemical corrosion rate measurements and spectrophotometric analysis of the electrolyte it was shown that at room temperature chromium dissolves in deaerated 0.1 M Na2SO4 + H2SO4 (pH 1 solution as Cr(II and Cr(III ions in he ratio Cr(II : Cr(III @ 7 : 1. This process was stable over 4 h without any detectable change. The total corrosion rate of chromium calculated from the analytical data is about 12 times higher, than that determined electrochemically by cathodic Tafel line extrapolation to the corrosion potential. This finding was confirmed by applying the weight-loss method for the determination of the corrosion rate. This enormous difference between these experimentally determined corrosion rates can be explained by the rather fast, “anomalous” dissolution process proposed by Kolotyrkin and coworkers (chemical reaction of Cr with H2O molecules occurring simultaneously with the electrochemical corrosion process.

  20. Electrochemical modification of chromium surfaces using 4-nitro- and4-fluorobenzenediazonium salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinge, Mogens; Cecatto, Marcel; Kingshott, Peter;

    2009-01-01

    Chromium surfaces can be electrografted with organic surface films using 4-nitro- or 4-fluorobenzenediazonium salts, despite the fact that the surfaces are covered with a protective chromium oxide layer......Chromium surfaces can be electrografted with organic surface films using 4-nitro- or 4-fluorobenzenediazonium salts, despite the fact that the surfaces are covered with a protective chromium oxide layer...

  1. Standard Specification for Pressure Consolidated Powder Metallurgy Iron-Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum (UNS N08367), Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Columbium (Nb) (UNS N06625), Nickel-Chromium-Iron Alloys (UNS N06600 and N06690), and Nickel-Chromium-Iron-Columbium-Molybdenum (UNS N07718) Alloy Pipe Flanges, Fittings, Valves, and Parts

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2015-01-01

    Standard Specification for Pressure Consolidated Powder Metallurgy Iron-Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum (UNS N08367), Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Columbium (Nb) (UNS N06625), Nickel-Chromium-Iron Alloys (UNS N06600 and N06690), and Nickel-Chromium-Iron-Columbium-Molybdenum (UNS N07718) Alloy Pipe Flanges, Fittings, Valves, and Parts

  2. Recent progress in polymer/layered double hydroxide nanocomposites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Peng; CHEN Wei; QU Baojun

    2006-01-01

    New developments in the studies of nanocomposites based on polymer matrixes and layered double hydroxides (LDHs)in recent years are reviewed combining our relative research work, among which the synthesis techniques, the physicochemical characterizations, and the improved material properties are especially discussed. The possible application of polymer/LDH nanocomposites is also proposed.

  3. Sorptive stabilization of organic matter by amorphous Al hydroxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P.W. Schneider; T. Scheel; R. Mikutta; P. van Hees; K. Kaiser; K. Kalbitz

    2010-01-01

    Amorphous Al hydroxides (am-Al(OH)(3)) strongly sorb and by this means likely protect dissolved organic matter (OM) against microbial decay in soils. We carried out batch sorption experiments (pH 4.5; 40 mg organic C L-1) with OM extracted from organic horizons under a Norway spruce and a European b

  4. Dewatering of alumino-humic sludge: impacts of hydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bache, D H; Papavasilopoulos, E N

    2003-08-01

    The paper draws together information on factors which influence the conditioning and dewatering behaviour of an alum sludge gained from the coagulation of a low-turbidity coloured water. A principal focus is the potential impact of aluminium hydroxide on the sludge character. Background information is provided on the composition of the source floc for the domain pH 6.0-6.5 and Al>2.0mg/l. From this, there were many pointers to the presence of Al(OH)(3)(s) within the floc. A series of comparisons were made between an alum sludge and a hydroxide suspension at a concentration equivalent to the coagulant fraction within the sludge. The parameters studied included floc size, floc density, polymer adsorption and dewatering behaviour at different time-scales. In all cases, there were strong similarities in the behaviour of the two suspensions-indicating the potential impact of the hydroxide. There was also evidence of common features being displayed by both the organic fractions and the hydroxide. It was suggested that some of the behavioural features might emanate from a common fractal structure within the source floc, the fractal dimension (approximately 1) being insensitive to composition.

  5. 21 CFR 73.1010 - Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). 73.1010 Section 73.1010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1010 Alumina (dried...

  6. Workshop on effects of chromium coating on Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductor strand: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-12

    This report discusses the following topics: Chromium coating on superconductor strand -- an overview; technology of chromium plating; comparison of wires plated by different platers; search for chromium in copper; strand manufactures` presentations; chromium plating at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; a first look at a chromium plating process development project tailored for T.P.X. and I.T.E.R. strand; and influence of chromium diffusion and related phenomena on the reference ratios of bare and chromium plated Nb{sub 3}Sn strand.

  7. DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) HYDROXIDE DEPLETION MODEL FOR CARBON DIOXIDE ABSORPTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OGDEN DM; KIRCH NW

    2007-10-31

    This document generates a supernatant hydroxide ion depletion model based on mechanistic principles. The carbon dioxide absorption mechanistic model is developed in this report. The report also benchmarks the model against historical tank supernatant hydroxide data and vapor space carbon dioxide data. A comparison of the newly generated mechanistic model with previously applied empirical hydroxide depletion equations is also performed.

  8. Bioavailability of a potato chromium complex to the laboratory rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, H.K.

    1985-01-01

    Research objectives were to study the effect of food source, preparation method and chemical form on bioavailability of chromium. Chromium concentration in potatoes was determined and tubers labeled either intrinsically or extrinsically with radioactive chromate. A labeled chromium complexes was isolated from preparations of raw, baked or fried potatoes and chromatographed on gel permeation media. Availability of the potato chromium complex to the rat was examined in three feeding studies. Animals were dosed with radioactive extrinsically or intrinsically labeled potato extract or with chromate. A labeled chromium complex was isolated from gastrointestinal contents of rats and chromatographed. Potato pulp and peel contained 1.63 and 2.70 ..mu..g Cr/g tissue respectively. True and apparent absorption from extrinsically labeled feedings were 33.4 +/- 4.7 and 29.8 +/- 11.2% respectively, and no differences existed between absorption from raw and cooked potatoes. Absorption from the extrinsic labeled potatoes differed significantly from absorption of inorganic chromatium. Apparent absorption of raw (11.1 +/- 7.9%) and cooked (-0.7 +/- 2.8%) intrinsically labeled feedings differed significantly. Absorption of inorganic chromium was 17.8% (true) and 11.5% (apparent). Examination of the chromium complex isolated from gastrointestinal tract contents showed enlargement of the complex in the stomach after consumption.

  9. Chromium Content in the Human Hip Joint Tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Barbara Brodziak-Dopiera; Jerzy Kwapuliski; Krzysztof Sobczyk; Danuta Wiechua

    2015-01-01

    Objective Chromium has many important functions in the human body. For the osseous tissue, its role has not been clearly defined. This study was aimed at determining chromium content in hip joint tissues. Methods A total of 91 hip joint samples were taken in this study, including 66 from females and 25 from males. The sample tissues were separated according to their anatomical parts. The chromium content was determined by the AAS method. The statistical analysis was performed with U Mann-Whitney's non-parametric test, P≤0.05. Results The overall chromium content in tissues of the hip joint in the study subjects was as follows:5.73 µg/g in the articular cartilage, 5.33 µg/g in the cortical bone, 17.86 µg/g in the cancellous bone, 5.95 µg/g in the fragment of the cancellous bone from the intertrochanteric region, and 1.28 µg/g in the joint capsule. The chromium contents were observed in 2 group patients, it was 7.04 µg/g in people with osteoarthritis and 12.59 µg/g in people with fractures. Conclusion The observed chromium content was highest in the cancellous bone and the lowest in the joint capsule. Chromium content was significantly different between the people with hip joint osteoarthritis and the people with femoral neck fractures.

  10. Mode of occurrence of chromium in four US coals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Frank E.; Shah, N.; Huffman, G.P.; Kolker, A.; Crowley, S.; Palmer, C.A.; Finkelman, R.B.

    2000-01-01

    The mode of occurrence of chromium in three US bituminous coals and one US subbituminous has been examined using both X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy and a selective leaching protocol supplemented by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron microprobe measurements. A synthesis of results from both methods indicates that chromium occurs principally in two forms in the bituminous coals: the major occurrence of chromium is associated with the macerals and is not readily leached by any reagent, whereas a second, lesser occurrence, which is leachable in hydrofluoric acid (HF), is associated with the clay mineral, illite. The former occurrence is believed to be a small particle oxyhydroxide phase (CrO(OH)). One coal also contained a small fraction (<5%) of the chromium in the form of a chromian magnetite, and the leaching protocol indicated the possibility of a similar small fraction of chromium in sulfide form in all three coals. There was little agreement between the two techniques on the mode of occurrence of chromium in the subbituminous coal; however, only a limited number of subbituminous coals have been analyzed by either technique. The chromium in all four coals was trivalent as no evidence was found for the Cr6+ oxidation state in any coal.

  11. Removal of chromium from tannery effluents by adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadali, O A; Magdy, Y H; Daifullah, A A M; Ebrahiem, E E; Nassar, M M

    2004-01-01

    Tannery effluent is characterized not only by heavy loads but also with toxic heavy metals especially chromium ions. Chromium is considered an important source of contamination due to large volume of exhaust liquid discharged and solid sludge produced. Details on adsorption studies were carried out using synthetic chromium salts (chromium chloride) as adsorbate, and cement kiln dust (a waste from white cement industry) as adsorbent. Equilibrium isotherms have been determined for the adsorption of chromium ions on cement kiln dust. Kinetic study provided that the adsorption process is diffusion controlled. The experimental results have been fitted using Freundlich, Langmuir, and Redlich Peterson isotherms. The maximum adsorption capacity of cement kiln dust was found to be 33 mg/g. Industrial tannery effluent (22-mg/L chromium and COD 952 mg/L) was also treated by cement dust. The treated effluent (using 20 g cement dust per 1 L) contains only 0.6 mg/L chromium and COD 200 mg/L.

  12. Chromium-induced membrane damage: protective role of ascorbic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Importance of chromium as environmental toxicant is largely due to impact on the body to produce cellular toxicity. The impact of chromium and their supplementation with ascorbic acid was studied on plasma membrane of liver and kidney in male Wistar rats (80 - 100gbody weight). It has been observed that the intoxication with chromium ( i. p. ) at the dose of 0.8 mg/100g body weight per day for a period of 28 days causes significant increase in the level of cholesterol and decrease in the level of phospbolipid of both liver and kidney. The alkaline pbosphatase, total ATPase and Na + -K + -ATPase activities were significantly decreased in both liver and kidney after chromium treatment,except total ATPase activity of kidney. It is suggested that chromium exposure at the present dose and duration induce for the alterations of structure and function of both liver and kidney plasma membrane. Ascorbic acid ( i.p. at the dose of 0.5 mg,/100g body weight per day for period of 28 days) supplementation can reduce these structural changes in the plasma membrane of liver and kidney. But the functional changes can not be completely replenished by the ascorbic acid supplementation in response to chromium exposure. So it is also suggested that ascorbic acid (nutritional antioxidant) is useful free radical scavenger to restrain the chromium-induced membrane damage.

  13. Stabilization of chromium salt in ordinary portland cement

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Damir Barbir; Pero Dabić; Petar Krolo

    2012-12-01

    Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) samples containing the chromium salt have been investigated using differential microcalorimetry, conductometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis. The effect of chromium on OPC hydration was evaluated by continuous observing of early hydration. The microcalorimetrical results show that with increasing the share of chromium salt, heat maximums assume lower values and the occurrence of the maximum registered in the earlier hydration times. Conductometrical measurements show that with increasing addition of chromium salt, curve did not show any specific shape, immediate drop in specific conductivity is noticed and the maximum is reached earlier. This coincides with microcalorimetrical results. It can be concluded that the addition of chromium does not affect the mechanism of the hydration process, but it does affect the kinetic parameters and dynamics of the cement hydration process. It was found that chromium salt addition to the cement–water system is acceptable up to 2 wt.%. According to standard EN 196-3 for OPC, the beginning of binding time should occur after 60 minutes. Increased amount of chromium over 2 wt.% significantly accelerate the beginning of binding time and for the system it is not acceptable.

  14. Mutagenic and carcinogenic actions of chromium and its compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamyrbaev, Arstan Abdramanovich; Dzharkenov, Timur Agataevich; Imangazina, Zina Amangalievna; Satybaldieva, Umit Abulkhairovna

    2015-05-01

    Numerous experimental observations have been made on microorganisms and culture of the cells of mammals as well as the accounting of the chromosomal aberrations in the bone marrow cells of the mammals and of human cells displayed that the chromium and its compounds possess a pronounced mutagenic effect. Translocation test, induction record of DNA damage and repair systems in the mammalian and human cells with greater precision proves the presence of the mutagenic effect of the chromium and its compounds, which in turn is dependent on dose and time of this metal intoxication. Chromium and its compounds have pronounced mutagenic effect, on increased admission to organism of mammals and protozoa.

  15. Microbial biotechnology for remediation of aquatic habitats polluted with chromium

    OpenAIRE

    Viorica Coşier; I. Valentin Petrescu-Mag

    2008-01-01

    Chromium may occur in nine different forms of oxidation ranging from ?II to +VI, with forms II, III and VI as the most commonly encountered. In Cluj county, chromium pollution dates well back in time and has caused important dysfunction to the mechanical-biological wastewater purification station of the city of Cluj (Coşier & Diţă 1996). The purpose of this study was to develop one microbial method able to reduce hexavalent chromium (mobile, permeable to cell membrane, carcinogenic and mutage...

  16. Microbial Diversity of Chromium-Contaminated Soils and Characterization of Six Chromium-Removing Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhiguo; Hu, Yuting; Yin, Zhen; Hu, Yuehua; Zhong, Hui

    2016-06-01

    Three soil samples obtained from different sites adjacent to a chromium slag heap in a steel alloy factory were taken to examine the effect of chromium contamination on soil bacterial diversity as determined by construction of 16S rDNA clone libraries and sequencing of selected clones based on restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Results revealed that Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Alphaproteobacteria occurred in all three soil samples, although the three samples differed in their total diversity. Sample 1 had the highest microbial diversity covering 12 different classes, while Sample 3 had the lowest microbial diversity. Strains of six different species were successfully isolated, one of which was identified as Zobellella denitrificans. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a strain belonging to the genus Zobellella able to resist and reduce chromium. Among all isolates studied, Bacillus odysseyi YH2 exhibited the highest Cr(VI)-reducing capability, with a total removal of 23.5 % of an initial Cr(VI) concentration of 350 mg L-1.

  17. [Blood and urine chromium: compared values between chromium exposed workers and common people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenzani, A; Verso, M G; Picciotto, D

    2008-01-01

    Aim of present study is the valutation and quantification of chromium in blood and urine. We compared 3 groups of persons formed by building workers, in particular masons, because cement contains potassium chromate that is dangerous for health, and by common people: urban population and outside the town population. In fact, exposure to CrVI risk is high for people who live near chromate industries. We maked a medical examination, blood and instrumental tests, chromium measuring in blood (recent exposure indicator) and urine (recent and previous indicator). Then we used statistical methods to estimate obtained values of blood and urine chromium among professional exposed people and common people. At the end we think that preventive measures in working environment reduced exposure to CrVI but environmental exposure (for example road dust from catalytic converter erosion, from brake lining erosion, cement dust and tobacco smoke), in the last years, has increased. So there are no difference between urban population and outside the town population and there are also no difference with professional exposed people for work prevention according to law in force, that let down professional risk using safe limits.

  18. Chromium accumulation, microorganism population and enzyme activities in soils around chromium-containing slag heap of steel alloy factory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Shun-hong; PENG Bing; YANG Zhi-hui; CHAI Li-yuan; ZHOU Li-cheng

    2009-01-01

    The environmental risk of chromium pollution is pronounced in soils adjacent to chromate industry. It is important to investigate the functioning of soil microorganisms in ecosystems exposed to long-term contamination by chromium. 45 soil samples obtained from different places of the slag heap in a steel alloy factory were analyzed for chromium contamination level and its effect on soil microorganisms and enzyme activities. The results show that the average concentrations of total Cr in the soil under the slag heap, adjacent to the slag heap and outside the factory exceed the threshold of Secondary Environmental Quality Standard for Soil in China by 354%, 540% and 184%, respectively, and are 15, 21 and 9 times higher than the local background value, respectively. Elevated chromium loadings result in changes in the activity of the soil microbe, as indicated by the negative correlations between soil microbial population and chromium contents. Dehydrogenase activity is greatly depressed by chromium in the soil. The results imply that dehydrogenase activity can be used as an indicator for the chromium pollution level in the area of the steel alloy factory.

  19. Possible adverse effect of chromium in occupational exposure of tannery workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornhauser, Carlos; Wróbel, Katarzyna; Wróbel, Kazimierz; Malacara, Juan Manuel; Nava, Laura Eugenia; Gómez, Leobardo; González, Rita

    2002-04-01

    Our aim was to investigate the adverse effects of occupational exposure to trivalent chromium. We measured chromium and iron levels in serum and urine and hemoglobin levels in tannery workers and unexposed persons. We studied three groups of subjects. Group 1 included 15 non-smoking male tannery workers highly exposed to chromium from tanning and retanning departments. Group 2 included 14 non-smoking male tannery workers with moderate chromium exposure from dying, drying and finishing departments. Group 3 included 11 healthy, non-smoking male subjects without direct chromium exposure. Higher serum chromium levels were observed in groups 1 and 2 with respect to group 3 (mean values respectively: 0.43; 0.25 and 0.13 microg x l(-1)). Urine chromium levels in group 1 were higher than those in controls (mean values: 1.78 and 1.35 microg x l(-1)). In group 1 an inverse association was found between serum chromium and urine iron (-0.524), urine chromium and hemoglobin (-0.594) and between the urine chromium to iron ratio and hemoglobin (-0.693, p<0.05). The results suggest a chromium adverse effect on iron metabolism, possibly associated with excessive body chromium accumulation. In conclusion, chromium urine test could be recommended for diagnosis of chromium adverse effect on iron metabolism. Further studies are needed to quantify the relationship between urine chromium and hemoglobin metabolism.

  20. Scientific Opinion on ChromoPrecise® cellular bound chromium yeast added for nutritional purposes as a source of chromium in food supplements and the bioavailability of chromium from this source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food (ANS

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food (ANS provides a scientific opinion re-evaluating the safety of ChromoPrecise® cellular bound chromium yeast added for nutritional purposes as a source of chromium in food supplements and the bioavailability of chromium from this source. ChromoPrecise® is a yeast preparation with an enriched trivalent chromium content, obtained by culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the presence of chromium chloride. A daily intake of 100 µg chromium(III. There are limited data on the nature and identity of the organic chromium(III compounds contained in chromium-enriched yeast and on their toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic behaviour in the body. Overall, the Panel concluded that the bioavailability in man of chromium from chromium-enriched yeast is potentially up to approximately ten times higher than that of chromium from chromium chloride. A NOAEL of 2500 mg/kg bw/day ChromoPrecise® was identified in a 90-day feeding study in rats; no evidence of adverse effects of chromium yeasts were reported in other animal studies investigating the effects of dietary supplementation with chromium yeast. ChromoPrecise® chromium yeast was non-genotoxic in a range of in vitro genotoxicity studies. Although no information was available on the chronic toxicity, carcinogenicity or reproductive toxicity of ChromoPrecise® chromium yeast, the ANS Panel has previously concluded that trivalent chromium is not carcinogenic, and limited data on other chromium yeasts provide no evidence of an effect on reproductive endpoints. No adverse effects have been reported in clinical efficacy trials with chromium yeasts. The Panel concluded that the use of ChromoPrecise® chromium yeast in food supplements is not of concern, despite the lack of data on the nature and identity of the organic chromium(III compounds contained in the product, provided that the intake does not exceed 250 μg/day, as recommended by the WHO.

  1. Thermal stability and oil absorption of aluminum hydroxide treated by dry modification with phosphoric acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The dry modification of aluminum hydroxide powders with phosphoric acid and the effects of modification of technological conditions on thermal stability, morphology and oil absorption of aluminum hydroxide powders were investigated. The results show that the increase of mass ratio of phosphoric acid to aluminum hydroxide, the decrease of mass concentration of phosphoric acid and prolongation of mixing time are favorable to the improvement of thermal stability of aluminum hydroxide; when the mass ratio of phosphoric acid to aluminum hydroxide is 5:100, the mass concentration of phosphoric acid is 200 g/L and the mixing time is 10 min, the initial temperature of loss of crystal water in aluminum hydroxide rises from about 192.10 to 208.66 ℃2,but the dry modification results in the appearance of agglomeration and macro-aggregate in the modified powders, and the oil absorption of modified powders becomes higher than that of original aluminum hydroxide.

  2. High performance NiFe layered double hydroxide for methyl orange dye and Cr(VI) adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi; Jiang, Bin; Fang, Liang; Ling, Faling; Gao, Jiemei; Wu, Fang; Zhang, Xihua

    2016-06-01

    The NiFe layered double hydroxides (LDHs) with different mole ratio of Ni/Fe (4:1, 3:1, 7:3 and 1:1) were prepared by a simple coprecipitation method. The adsorption performance were evaluated by the removal of methyl orange (MO) dye and hexavalent chromium(VI) heavy metal ion. It is found that Ni4Fe1-LDH can remove more than 92% of MO in 10 min at the 10 mg/L MO initial concentration, and 97% of Cr(VI) in 1 h at 4 mg/L Cr2O7(2-) initial concentration. The saturated adsorption capacity of Ni4Fe1-LDH is found to be as large as 205.76 mg/g for MO and 26.78 mg/g for Cr(VI). The adsorption behavior of this new adsorbent is fitted well with Langmuir isotherm and the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, indicative of a monolayer and chemical adsorption that synergistically originates from exchangeable anions mechanism and layer charge density. Due to the excellent removal capacity of MO and Cr(VI), the NiFe-LDHs could be a promising adsorbent for wastewater treatment.

  3. Thermodynamic Equilibrium Diagrams of Sulphur-Chromium System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The chemical and electrochemical equilibria in the presence of gaseous phase were investigated. Many substances, which consisted of sulphur and chromium, were considered. Various thermodynamic equilibria were calculated in different pressures. Calculation results were shown as log p―1/T and E―T diagrams. These diagrams may be used to study the corrosion of chromium in sulphur-containing circumstances. The diagrams are also used to thermodynami-cally determine the existence area of various substances and so on.

  4. Stereology of carbide phase in modified hypereutectic chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Suchoń

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In paper are presented results of studies of carbide phase stereology modified hypereutectic wear resistance chromium cast iron which contains carbon about 3,5% and chromium about 25%. Three substances were applied to the modification: boron carbide (B4C, ferroniobium (FeNb and mixture of ferroniobium and rare-earth (RE. The measurements of geometrical features of carbides were conducted on microsection taken from castings wich were cooled with various velocities.

  5. SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ACTIVITIES FOR CHROMIUM IN THE 100 AREAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PETERSEN SW

    2009-07-02

    {sm_bullet} Primary Objective: Protect the Columbia River - Focus is control and treatment of contamination at or near the shoreline, which is influenced by bank storage {sm_bullet} Secondary Objective: Reduce hexavalent chromium to <48 parts per billion (ppb) in aquifer (drinking water standard) - Large plumes with isolated areas of high chromium concentrations (> 40,000 ppb), - Unknown source location(s); probably originating in reactor operation areas

  6. Chromium Ions Improve Moisure Resistance of Epoxy Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Clair, A. K.; St. Clair, T. L.; Stoakley, D. M.; Singh, J. J.; Sprinkle, D. R.

    1986-01-01

    Broad spectrum of thermosetting epoxy resins used on commercial and military aircraft, primarily as composite matrices and adhesives. In new technique, chromium-ion containing epoxy with improved resistance to moisture produced where chromium ions believed to prevent absorption of water molecules by coordinating themselves to hydroxyl groups on epoxy chain. Anticipated that improved epoxy formulation useful as composite matrix resin, adhesive, or casting resin for applications on commercial and advanced aircraft. Improvement made without sacrifice in mechanical properties of polymer.

  7. Performance of chromium nitride based coatings under plastic processing conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Cunha, l.; Andritschky, M.; Pischow, K.; Wang, Z.(Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing, China); Zarychta, A.; Miranda, A. S.; A.M. Cunha

    2000-01-01

    Chromium nitride based coatings were produced in the form of monolithic and multilayer coatings, by DC and RF reactive magnetron sputtering. These coatings were deposited onto stainless steel and tool steel substrates. Chromium nitride coatings have;proved to be wear and corrosion resistant. The combination of these characteristics was necessary to protect surfaces during plastic processing. In order to select the best coatings, some mechanical and tribological tests were performed. Har...

  8. 40 CFR Appendix Xii to Part 266 - Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery Furnaces XII Appendix XII to Part 266... FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. XII Appendix XII to Part 266—Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may...

  9. Immobilization of laccase on hybrid layered double hydroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Isidoro Camacho Córdova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Crystals of Mg/Al layered double hydroxide were synthesized by alkaline precipitation and treated in an aqueous solution of glutamic acid. The glutamate ions were not intercalated into the interlayer space, but were detected in the material by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, suggesting that only the external surfaces of crystals were modified with glutamate ions. The resulting hybrid material was tested as a support for immobilization of the enzyme laccase (Myceliophthora thermophila. The immobilized enzyme preparation was characterized by electronic paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and by assays of catalytic activity. The activity of the immobilized laccase was 97% of the activity in the free enzyme. Layered double hydroxide is a suitable support for use in remediation of soil studies.

  10. CALCIUM HYDROXIDE IN ENDODONTIC TREATMENT OF PERIAPICALLY INFECTED TEETH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmi Alma Farah Adang

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available An inadequate endodontic treatment may affect the root canal system and spread beyond its apical foramina that elicit periodontal tissue developing into abscess, granuloma and radicular cyst. Periodical lesions can be treated with non surgical endodontic treatment using calcium hydroxide dressing. This case study is reporting teeth 11 with periodical lesions and infection. Evidence of a clinical healing and radiographic assessments were followed by a non surgical endodontic therapy. Successful treatment outcome is related to the elimination of infection agents from the root canal. This can activate a stimulation zone to promote regeneration. Calcium hydroxide used as a root canal dressing may promote alkalinity at the adjacent tissue , create favourable environmental condition in which hard tissue formation can occur, interfere the bactericidal activity, increase mineralization, and induce healing.

  11. Leaching kinetics of gibbsitic bauxite with sodium hydroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Aal El-Sayed A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the results of a leaching kinetics study of bauxite ore with sodium hydroxide are presented. The effect of ore particle size, sodium hydroxide concentration and reaction temperature on the Al2O3 extraction rate was determined. The results obtained showed that 99% of Al2O3 was leached out using −200+270 mesh ore particle size at a reaction temperature of 105 °C for 60 min reaction time with 250 g/L NaOH. The solid-to-liquid ratio was maintained constant at 1:20. The results indicated that leaching of bauxite is the rate controlling process. The activation energy was determined to be 46.04 kJ/mole, which was characteristic for a chemically controlled process.

  12. Experimental skin deposition of chromium on the hands following handling of samples of leather and metal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P.; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl;

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chromium is an important skin sensitizer. Exposure to it has been regulated in cement, and recently in leather. Studies on the deposition of chromium ions on the skin as a result of handling different chromium-containing materials are sparse, but could improve the risk assessment...... of contact sensitization and allergic contact dermatitis caused by chromium. Objectives: To determine whether the handling of chromium-containing samples of leather and metal results in the deposition of chromium onto the skin. Methods: Five healthy volunteers participated. For 30 min, they handled samples...... of leather and metal known to contain and release chromium. Skin deposition of chromium was assessed with the acid wipe sampling technique. Results: Acid wipe sampling of the participants' fingers showed chromium deposition on the skin in all participants who had been exposed to leather (range 0.01–0.20 µg...

  13. Adsorption behavior of condensed phosphate on aluminum hydroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Xiao-hong; CHEN Guang-hao; SHANG Chii

    2007-01-01

    Sodium pyrophosphate(pyro-P,Na4P207),sodium tripolyphosphate(tripoly-P,NasP3010),and sodium hexametaphosphate(metaP,(NaP03)6)were selected as the model compounds of condensed phosphate to investigate the adsorption behavior of condensed phosphate on aluminum hydroxide.The adsorption was found to be endothermic and divisible into two stages:(1)fast adsorption within 1 h:and(2)slow adsorption between 1 and 24 h.The modified Freundlich model simulated the fast adsorption stage well;the slow adsorption stage was described well by the first-order kinetics.The activation energies of pyro-P,tripoly-P,and meta-P adsorption on aluminum hydroxide were determined to be 20.2,22.8 and 10.9 kJ/mol P adsorbed,respectively,in the fast adsorption stage and to be 66.3.53.5 and 72.5 kJ/tool P adsorbed,respectively,in the slow adsorption stage.The adsorption increased the negative charge of the aluminum hydroxide surface.Transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis analyses provided evidence that the adsorption was not uniform on the surface and that the small crystals contfibuted more to the fast adsorption than the normal sites did.The results from X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy tests also revealed the uneven adsorption of condensed phosphate as a function of the penetration depth.More condensed phosphates were adsorbed on the outer surface of aluminum hydroxide than in its inner parts.

  14. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Ni/Al Layered Double Hydroxide Nanorods

    OpenAIRE

    Yun Zhao; Fenfei Xiao; Qingze Jiao

    2011-01-01

    Ni/Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanorods were successfully synthesized by the hydrothermal reaction. The crystal structure of the products was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The morphology of the products was observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The influences of reaction time and pH value on the morphology of the Ni/Al LDHs were investigated. The result showed that the well-crystallized nanorods of Ni/Al ...

  15. [Chromium content in foods and dietary intake estimation in the Northwest of Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grijalva Haro, M I; Ballesteros Vázquez, M N; Cabrera Pacheco, R M

    2001-03-01

    Chromium is an indispensable nutrient for the carbohydrates and lipids metabolism. In this study the chromium content in the twenty main foods of the diet from Northwestern Mexico was determined, as well as the daily mean intake which was estimated based on the food intake basket of this region. Chromium content was analyzed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry using the graphite furnace technique and previous digestion of foods in microwave oven. The chromium mean intake was estimated considering the chromium daily mean intake for person per day and the chromium content of the foods analyzed in this study. The range chromium content in the foods analyzed was between 0.0004 and 0.1641 microgram/g dry weight. White cheese showed the highest chromium content followed by pasta soup, wheat tortilla, bread and meat. The main foods chromium contributors in the diet were: wheat tortilla (20%), white cheese (11%), corn tortilla (11%), pasta soup (10%), milk (10%), meat (9%) and white bread (8%). The daily chromium intake was 30.43 +/- 1.6 micrograms/d. Chromium values obtained in the food analyzed are considered low. Moreover, chromium intake obtained from the diet is not enough to meet the safety and adequate daily chromium intake. Therefore, the population from the Northwestern Mexico has a suboptimal dietary chromium intake.

  16. Oxidation of Dodecanoate Intercalated Iron(II)–Iron(III) Layered Double Hydroxide to Form 2D Iron(III) (Hydr)oxide Layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Li‐Zhi; Ayala‐Luis, Karina B.; Fang, Liping;

    2013-01-01

    A planar trioctahedral iron(II)–iron(III) hydroxide (green rust, GR) intercalated with dodecanoate (GRC12) has been oxidized by dioxygen to produce the corresponding planar iron(III) (hydr)oxide. The formulae of GRC12 and the final iron(III) product (oxGRC12) were determined to be FeII2.00FeIII1...

  17. Chromium-chromium interaction in a binuclear mixed-valent Cr(I)-Cr(II) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzamly, Ahmed; Gorelsky, Serge I; Gambarotta, Sandro; Korobkov, Ilia; Le Roy, Jennifer; Murugesu, Muralee

    2014-11-03

    A mixed-valent Cr(I)-Cr(II) binuclear complex, {κ(1),κ(2),κ(3)-N,P,P-cyclo[(Ph)PCH2N(CH2Ph)CH2]}2(CrCl2)[Cr(μ-Cl)(AlClMe2)]·4toluene (1), of a P2N2 cyclic ligand was obtained upon treatment of the chromium precursor with alkylaluminum. Complex 1 was accessible from either its trivalent or divalent precursors, and density functional theory calculations revealed the presence of only σ- and π-orbital interactions in the Cr-Cr bond.

  18. Application of recovered magnesium hydroxide from a flue gas desulfurization system for wastewater treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, P.L.; Wu, Q.; Keener, T.; Zhuang, L.A.; Gurusamy, R.; Pehkonen, S.

    1999-07-01

    Magnesium hydroxide, reclaimed from the flue gas desulfurization system (FGD) at the Zimmer Power Plant, Cincinnati, Ohio, is a weak base, in the form of either a slurry or powder. It has many potential applications for wastewater treatment. The objectives of this research are (1) to characterize the reclaimed magnesium hydroxide, e.g., purity, particle size distribution, dissolution kinetics; (2) to evaluate neutralization capacity and buffering intensity of the reclaimed magnesium hydroxide; (3) to study the efficacy of the reclaimed magnesium hydroxide for nutrient removal in wastewater treatment processes; (4) to investigate whether and how the magnesium hydroxide influences the characteristics of the activated sludge floc; (5) to determine whether magnesium hydroxide improves the anaerobic sludge digestion process and associated mechanisms; and (6) to conduct a cost-benefit analysis for the application of the reclaimed magnesium hydroxide in wastewater treatment and the possibility of marketing this product. Research results to date show that the purity of the reclaimed magnesium hydroxide depends largely on the recovery hydroxide slurry. This product proved to be very effective for wastewater neutralization, compared with other commonly used chemicals, both for its neutralization capacity and its buffering intensity. Due to its relatively low solubility in water and its particle size distribution characteristics, magnesium hydroxide behaves like a weak base, which will be very beneficial for process control. The authors also found that nitrogen and phosphorus could be removed from the wastewater using magnesium hydroxide due to their complexation and precipitation as magnesium ammonium phosphate (struvite). Magnesium hydroxide also greatly enhanced the settleability of the activated sludge. Intensive research on the mechanisms associated with these phenomena reveals that sweep flocculation and magnesium ion bridging between exopolymeric substances (EPS) of

  19. CALVES GROWTH INFANT OF BREED NELLORE SUPPLEMENTED WITH CHROMIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. C. Lima

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated the growth of nursling Nelore calves supplemented with chromium during creep feeding. The study was conducted using 131 Nelore calves with an average age of 60 days and average adjusted initial weight of 75 kg; considering that all calves were accompanied by their mothers. Therefore, the experimental groups were defined as T1: 35 males supplemented with chromium; T2: 34 males without chromium, T3: 30 females supplemented with chromium and T4: 32 females supplemented without chromium. The experimental period lasted from 60 days of age to 210 days (weaning, the animals were kept in two pickets of Panicum maximum cv. Mombasa provided with troughs for the creep feeding system, which permitted calves exclusive access to the concentrate formula based on 75% of TDN and 20% of crude protein, with 35% of soybean meal, 63% of corn and 2% of mineral nucleus containing 10 mg of chromium chelate for each kg of the product. The data were subjected to the analysis of variance, using the software R (R Development Core Team, 2013. In the evaluation of the live weight at 150 days of age, no significant difference was found in the use of chromium in males and females (regardless of sex. However, in the analysis between sexes, females’ live weights were lower than males’ live weight (p = 0.04, being 131.1 kg and 138.1 kg respectively. In the evaluation of live weight at 210 days there was no significant difference between males and females (p = 0.07, but there was a difference (p = 0.03 in the use of chrome in the evaluated treatments. So, it could be concluded that the creep feeding system with chrome chelate supplementation promoted an improvement in male and females calves’ growth for average daily weight gain and weaning weight, with a positive influence on the weight of cows.

  20. Nitridation of chromium powder in ammonia atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Li; Qiang Zhen; Rong Li

    2015-01-01

    CrN powder was synthesized by nitriding Cr metal in ammonia gas flow, and its chemical reaction mechanism and nitridation process were studied. Through thermodynamic calculations, the Cr−N−O predominance diagrams were constructed for different tempera-tures. Chromium nitride formed at 700−1200°C under relatively higher nitrogen and lower oxygen partial pressures. Phases in the products were then investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), and the Cr2N content varied with reaction temperature and holding time. The results indicate that the Cr metal powder nitridation process can be explained by a diffusion model. Further, Cr2N formed as an intermediate product because of an incomplete reaction, which was observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). After nitriding at 1000°C for 20 h, CrN powder with an average grain size of 63 nm was obtained, and the obtained sample was analyzed by using a scanning electron microscope (SEM).

  1. Chromium increases pancreatic metallothionein in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis-Heredia, M J; Quintanilla-Vega, B; Sierra-Santoyo, A; Hernández, J M; Brambila, E; Cebrián, M E; Albores, A

    2000-01-03

    The ability of chromium (Cr) salts to increase metallothionein (MT) levels in rat liver, kidney and pancreas, and its relationship with the presence of toxic effects are reported here. Rats were injected subcutaneously with 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, or 50 mg K2Cr2O7/kg and sacrificed 24 h later. Total Cr accumulation followed a dose-dependent pattern, levels in kidney being higher than those in liver or pancreas, suggesting different tissue bioavailabilities and accumulation patterns. Cr(IV) administration resulted in a tissue-specific MT induction: pancreas and liver showed five- and 3.5-fold MT increases, respectively; no increase was observed in the kidney. A positive correlation was observed between zinc and MT concentrations in liver, and between total Cr and MT concentrations in pancreas. Serum alpha-amylase activity showed a dose-dependent increase starting from 20 mg/kg, whereas serum glucose levels increased at doses higher than 30 mg/kg. Serum aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase activities were increased in a dose-dependent manner, from 20 and 30 mg/kg, respectively. Our results showed that treatment with Cr(VI) can induce MT synthesis in pancreas and suggests a subsequent binding of Cr to MT. Also, pancreas is a target organ for Cr toxicity, and the usefulness of alpha-amylase activity as a sensitive biomarker of Cr toxicity in human exposed populations merits further study.

  2. Can elevated chromium induce somatopsychic responses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovrincevic, I; Leung, F Y; Alfieri, M A; Grace, D M

    1996-01-01

    The possible somatopsychological effects of chromium (Cr) was investigated in a population of patients, from a surgical ward of our hospital, who required total parenteral nutrition (TPN) solutions, and who became exposed to various amounts of this metal from this treatment. The study involved a questionnaire as well as biochemical tests which included serum Cr and other selected trace metals. The renal status for all eligible patients was within normal parameters. The patient population varied in age, pathology, surgical treatment, and duration on TPN. The results showed that every patient who received TPN had an increased serum Cr level; some increases were up to 50-fold above the normal reference level for serum Cr. Although statistical analysis failed to show any significant statistical relationship between an increased serum Cr and the investigated somatopsychological disturbances, this effect cannot be ruled out since one case did show all the dream disturbances. Considering these cases, the action of sedative medications that may suppress the effects of Cr, cannot be ruled out. As Cr(III) may be potentially genotoxic at high concentrations, infusion of this metal over long time periods should be avoided. Supplementation of Cr in TPN solutions appears to be unnecessary for short-term TPN because this metal is a known contaminant of these solutions. Efforts are required to find TPN nutrients with low or no Cr contamination.

  3. Geochemical Processes Controlling Chromium Transport in the Vadose Zone and Regional Aquifer, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longmire, P.; Ding, M.; Rearick, M.; Vaniman, D.; Katzman, D.

    2008-12-01

    The environmental aqueous geochemistry of Cr is of considerable interest to physical scientists and toxicologists in quantifying the fate and transport of this metal in surface and subsurface environments. Chromium(VI) solutions were released from cooling towers to a stream channel within Sandia Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM from 1956 to 1971. These solutions have migrated 293 m depth through the vadose zone, containing several saturated zones, to the regional water table. Concentrations of total dissolved Cr, mainly as Cr(VI), in the regional aquifer range between 0.17 to 8.46 mM. The regional aquifer is characterized by calcium-sodium-bicarbonate solution, contains dissolved oxygen (0.09 to 0.22 mM), and has a circumneutral pH (6.8 to 8.3). Geochemical processes controlling the fate and transport of Cr in groundwater at Los Alamos include a combination of adsorption and precipitation reactions within aquifer systems. Vadose zone material containing hydrous ferric oxide, smectite, silica glass, and calcite widely range in their ability to adsorb Cr(VI) under basic pH conditions. Overall, the vadose zone at Los Alamos is relatively oxidizing, however, basalt flows are locally reducing with respect to Fe. Ferrous iron concentrated within the Cerros del Rio basalt has been shown through batch experiments to reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III) resulting in precipitation of chromium(III) hydroxide. Regional aquifer material, consisting of silicates, oxides, and calcite, vary in the amount of Fe(II) available in reactive minerals to effectively reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III). The results of our studies (1) directly assess the relationship between mineralogical characterization and transport behavior of Cr using site-specific hydrogeologic material and (2) provide site-specific adsorption and precipitation parameters obtained through the experiments to refine the fate and transport modeling of Cr within the vadose zone and regional aquifer. Natural attenuation of Cr at Los

  4. Spectroscopic study for a chromium-adsorbed montmorillonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurtay, Maidina ·; Tuersun, Maierdan ·; Cai, Yuanfeng; Açıkgöz, Muhammed; Wang, Hongtao; Pan, Yuguan; Zhang, Xiaoke; Ma, Xiaomei

    2017-02-01

    Samples of purified montmorillonite with trace amounts of quartz were subjected to different concentrations of chromium sulphate solutions for one week to allow cation exchange. The chromium-bearing montmorillonites were verified and tested using powder X-ray diffractometry (XRD), X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometry and Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to explore the occupation sites of the chromium. The ESR spectra recorded before and after the chromium exchange show clear differences: a strong and broad resonance with two shoulders at the lower magnetic field side was present to start, and its intensity as well as that of the ferric iron resonance, increased with the concentration of added chromium. The signals introduced by the chromium, for example at g = 1.975 and 2.510 etc., suggested that the chromium had several occupational sites. The ESR peak with g = 2.510 in the second derivative spectrum suggested that Cr3+ was weakly bounded to TOT with the form of [Cr(H2O)3]3+ in hexagonal cavities. This was verified by comparing the FTIR spectra of the pure and modified montmorillonite. The main resonance centred at g = 1.975 indicated that the majority of Cr3+ occupied the interlayer region as [Cr(H2O)6]3+. The substitution of Ca2 + by Cr3+ also greatly affected the vibration of the hydrogens associate to water, ranged from 3500 to 2600 cm-1 in FTIR. Furthermore, the presence of two diffraction lines in the XRD results (specifically those with d-values of 1.5171 and 1.2673 nm) and the calculations of the size of the interlayer space suggested the presence of two types of montmorillonite with different hydration cations in the sample exposed to 0.2 M chromium sulphate. The two diffraction lines were assigned to [Cr(H2O)6]3+ and [Cr(H2O)3O3]3+, respectively. This also suggested that the species of hydration cation was constrained by the concentration of the chromium solution.

  5. A possible role for chromium(III) in genotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snow, E.T. (New York Univ. Medical Center, Tuxedo (United States))

    1991-05-01

    Chromium is found in the environment in two major forms: reduced Cr{sup III} and Cr{sup VI}, or chromate. Chromate, the most biologically active species, is readily taken up by living cells and reduced intracellularly, via reactive intermediates, to stable Cr{sup III} species. Cr{sup III}, the most abundant form of chromium in the environment, does not readily cross cell membranes and is relatively inactive in vivo. However, intracellular Cr{sup III} can react slowly with both nucleic acids and proteins and can be genotoxic. The authors have investigated the genotoxicity of Cr{sup III} in vitro using a DNA replication assay and in vivo by CaCl{sub 2}-mediated transfection of chromium-treated DNA into Escherichia coli. These results suggest that Cr{sup III} alters the interaction between the DNA template and the polymerase such that the binding strength of the DNA polymerase is increased and the fidelity of DNA replication is decreased. These interactions may contribute to the mutagenicity of chromium ions in vivo and suggest that Cr{sup III} can contribute to chromium-mediated carcinogenesis.

  6. Low-chromium reduced-activation ferritic steels for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Kenik, E.A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Development of reduced-activation ferritic steels has concentrated on high-chromium (8-10 wt% Cr) steels. However, there are advantages for a low-chromium steel, and initial ORNL studies on reduced-activation steels were on compositions with 2.25 to 12% Cr. Those studies showed an Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.25V-0.1C (2 1/4Cr-2WV) steel to have the highest strenglth of the steels studied. Although this steel had the best strength, Charpy impact properties were inferior to those of an Fe-9Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C (9Cr-2WVTa) and an Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.1C (2 1/4Cr-2W) steel. Therefore, further development of the low-chromium Cr-W steels was required. These results indicate that it is possible to develop low-chromium reduced-activation ferritic steels that have tensile and impact properties as good or better than those of high-chromium (7-9% Cr) steels. Further improvement of properties should be possible by optimizing the composition.

  7. Enhancement of chromium uptake in tanning using oxazolidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundarapandiyan, S; Brutto, Patrick E; Siddhartha, G; Ramesh, R; Ramanaiah, B; Saravanan, P; Mandal, A B

    2011-06-15

    Monocyclic and bicyclic oxazolidines were offered at three different junctures of chrome tanning process viz. prior to BCS offer, along with BCS and after basification. It was found that oxazolidine when offered after basification brought about better chromium uptake and reduction of chromium load in the wastewater. Offer of oxazolidine was also varied. Increase in offer of oxazolidine from 0.25% to 1% was found to enhance the chromium uptake and decrease the chromium load in wastewater. But the increase in uptake was not proportionate to the increase in oxazolidine offer more than 0.75%. Offer of 1% Zoldine ZA 78 (monocyclic oxazolidine) and Zoldine ZE (bicyclic oxazolidine) after basification brought about 63.4% and 73.1% enhancement in chrome content in leather compared to control where oxazolidine was not offered. The tone of the wetblue was found to be altered moderately. However this did not call for any process adjustments in wet-finishing. The oxazolidine treated leathers were found to be immensely fuller and tighter. It was found experimentally that offer of 1% of oxazolidine facilitated reduction in the offer of syntans administered for filling and grain tightening by around 46%. Oxazolidine could bring about significant reduction in cost of chemicals apart from resulting environmental benefits due to enhancement of chromium uptake during tanning.

  8. Bioaccumulation and biosorption of chromium by Aspergillus niger MTCC 2594.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandana Mala, John Geraldine; Unni Nair, Balachandran; Puvanakrishnan, Rengarajulu

    2006-06-01

    Chromium toxicity is of prime concern due to chrome tanning processes in the leather sector. Chrome tanning results in the discharge of toxic levels of chromium causing pollution hazards. Chromium levels of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) were high above permissible limits in chrome samples after chrome tanning. The potential of Aspergillus niger MTCC 2594 to accumulate chromium as well as its biosorption capacity is investigated in this study. Bioaccumulation of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in the spent chrome liquor has resulted in a 75-78% reduction of the initial Cr content in 24-36 h. A. niger biomass is found to be very effective in the biosorption of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in spent chrome liquor. Maximum adsorption of 83% for biosorption of Cr(III) at 48 h and 79% of Cr(VI) at 36 h in spent chrome liquor is observed. The biosorption characteristics fit well with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms and the adsorption parameters are evaluated. The biosorption of Cr also follows Lagergren kinetics. A. niger biomass is effectively used for the biosorption of chromium with 79-83% Cr removal in 36-48 h.

  9. Direct ethanol fuel cell using hydrotalcite clay as a hydroxide ion conductive electrolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadanaga, Kiyoharu; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Hayashi, Akitoshi; Tatsumisago, Masahiro

    2010-10-15

    An alkaline-type direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) using a natural clay electrolyte with non-platinum catalysts is proposed. So-called hydrotalcite clay, Mg–Al layered double hydroxide intercalated with CO₃²⁻, is shown to be a hydroxide ion conductor. An alkaline-type DEFC using this natural clay as the electrolyte and aqueous solution of ethanol and potassium hydroxide as a source of fuel exhibits excellent electrochemical performance from room temperature to 80 °C.

  10. Hydroxide ion concentration at an interface between concrete and a self-levelling flooring compound

    OpenAIRE

    Anderberg, Anders; Wadsö, Lars

    2007-01-01

    This article presents results from measurements of hydroxide ion transport between a concrete and a floor screed of a lower alkalinity than the concrete. As many floor coverings and floor adhesives are sensitive to high alkaline conditions it is important to know how hydroxide ions are transported to be able to evaluate the long-term function of floor constructions. It was found that only minor transport of hydroxide ions occurs in the hygroscopic moisture range. One conclusion is therefore t...

  11. Effective bioleaching of chromium in tannery sludge with an enriched sulfur-oxidizing bacterial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jing; Gou, Min; Tang, Yue-Qin; Li, Guo-Ying; Sun, Zhao-Yong; Kida, Kenji

    2016-10-01

    In this study, a sulfur-oxidizing community was enriched from activated sludge generated in tannery wastewater treatment plants. Bioleaching of tannery sludge containing 0.9-1.2% chromium was investigated to evaluate the effectiveness of the enriched community, the effect of chromium binding forms on bioleaching efficiency, and the dominant microbes contributing to chromium bioleaching. Sludge samples inoculated with the enriched community presented 79.9-96.8% of chromium leaching efficiencies, much higher than those without the enriched community. High bioleaching efficiencies of over 95% were achieved for chromium in reducible fraction, while 60.9-97.9% were observed for chromium in oxidizable and residual fractions. Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, the predominant bacteria in the enriched community, played an important role in bioleaching, whereas some indigenous heterotrophic species in sludge might have had a supporting role. The results indicated that A. thiooxidans-dominant enriched microbial community had high chromium bioleaching efficiency, and chromium binding forms affected the bioleaching performance.

  12. Process for improving moisture resistance of epoxy resins by addition of chromium ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    St.clair, A. K.; Stoakley, D. M.; St.clair, T. L.; Singh, J. J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A process for improving the moisture resistance properties of epoxidized TGMDA and DGEBA resin system by chemically incorporating chromium ions is described. The addition of chromium ions is believed to prevent the absorption of water molecules.

  13. CHROMIUM ELECTROANALYSIS AT SCREEN PRINTED ELECTRODE MODIFIED BY THIN FILMS OF NICKEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    A rapid and potentially cost-effective electrochemical method is reported for analysis of chromium (VI) and Chromium(III) using a nickel modified screen printed carbon ink electrode. Electrochemical characteristics of nickel modified electrode as well voltammetric behavior f...

  14. Antimicrobial activity of calcium hydroxide and chlorhexidine on intratubular Candida albicans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ronan Jacques Rezende Delgado; Thaís Helena Gasparoto; Carla Renata Sipert; Claudia Ramos Pinheiro; Ivaldo Gomes de Moraes; Roberto Brandāo Garcia; Marco Antonio Hungaro Duarte; Clóvis Monteiro Bramante; Sérgio Aparecido Torres; Gustavo Pompermaier Garlet; Ana Paula Campanelli; Norberti Bernardineli

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of calcium hydroxide and chlorhexidine gel for the elimination of intratubular Candida albicans (C. albicans). Human single-rooted teeth contaminated with C. albicans were treated with calcium hydroxide, 2% chlorhexidine gel, calcium hydroxide plus 2% chlorhexidine gel, or saline (0.9% sodium chloride) as a positive control. The samples obtained at depths of 0-100 and 100-200 μm from the root canal system were analyzed for C. albicans load by counting the number of colony forming units and for the percentage of viable C. albicans using fluorescence microscopy. First, the antimicrobial activity of calcium hydroxide and the 2% chlorhexidine gel was evaluated by counting the number of colony forming units. After 14 days of intracanal medication, there was a significant decrease in the number of C. albicanscolony forming units at a depth of 0-100 lzm with chlorhexidine treatment either with or without calcium hydroxide compared with the calcium hydroxide only treatment. However, there were no differences in the number of colony forming units at the 100-200 μm depth for any of the medications investigated. C. albicans viability was also evaluated by vital staining techniques and fluorescence microscopy analysis. Antifungal activity against C. albicans significantly increased at both depths in the chlorhexidine groups with and without calcium hydroxide compared with the groups treated with calcium hydroxide only. Treatments with only chlorhexidine or chlorhexidine in combination with calcium hydroxide were effective for elimination of C. albicans.

  15. Effects of salinity and humic acid on the sorption of Hg on Fe and Mn hydroxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Peng; Li, Yi-Chun; Zhang, Chan; Wu, Sheng-Chun; Cui, Hao-Jie; Yu, Shen; Wong, Ming H

    2013-01-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of humic acid (HA) and salinity on adsorption of Hg on the amorphous and crystalline of iron and manganese hydroxides. The results show that the adsorption of Hg(2+) on Fe and Mn hydroxides was inhibited in marine system due to the formation of stable, nonsorbing aqueous HgCl(2) complexes in solution. Moreover, Cl(-) inhibited the Hg(2+) adsorption more severely on amorphous than crystalline hydroxides. The addition of HA inhibited Hg(2+) adsorption on Fe and Mn hydroxides in freshwater system might be attributed to the competition between Hg(2+) and HA on adsorption to Fe and Mn hydroxides. In contrast, the addition of HA promoted Hg(2+) adsorption on Fe and Mn hydroxides in the marine system, which might be due to the addition of humic acid resulted in the reaction between Cl(-) and HA, and therefore the reducing of Cl(-) promoted more Hg(2+) on Fe and Mn hydroxides. In addition, the influence of HA on Hg(2+) adsorption on Fe and Mn hydroxides are more visible for crystalline than amorphous hydroxides.

  16. Effective Production of Sorbitol and Mannitol from Sugars Catalyzed by Ni Nanoparticles Supported on Aluminium Hydroxide

    OpenAIRE

    Rodiansono Rodiansono; Shimazu Shogo

    2013-01-01

    Effective production of hexitols (sorbitol and mannitol) was achieved from sugars by means of nickel nanoparticles supported on aluminium hydroxide (NiNPs/AlOH) catalyst. NiNPs/AlOH catalyst was prepared by a simple and benign environmentally procedure using less amount of sodium hydroxide. ICP-AES and XRD analyses confirmed that the NiNPs/AlOH catalysts comprised a large amount of remained aluminium hydroxide (i.e. bayerite and gibbsite). The presence of aluminium hydroxide caused a high dis...

  17. Reduction of chromium oxide from slags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutiérrez-Paredes, J.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Experimental and theoretical work were performed to estimate the effect of slag basicity and amount of reducing agents on the reduction of chromium oxide from the slag which interacted with molten steel at 1,600 °C. The slag system contained CaO, MgO, SiO2, CaF2 and Cr2O3 together with Fe-alloys (Fe-Si and Fe-Si-Mg. The CaF2 and MgO contents in the slags were 10 mass % each; Cr2O3 was 25%. The amount of the ferroalloys ranged from 12.5 to 50 g per 100 g of slag. The (CaO+MgO/SiO2 ratio was held at 1 and 2. The Cr yield was determined using both Fe-alloys as reducing agents. Some estimations were made to determine the theoretical effect of temperature, slag basicity, (CaO+MgO/SiO2, and amount of reducing agents in the slag on the chromium recovery. The FACT (Facility for the Analysis of Chemical Thermodynamics computational package is used to determine the equilibrium between the slag and molten steel.

    En el presente trabajo se realiza un estudio teórico y experimental para determinar el efecto de la basicidad de la escoria y la cantidad de agentes reductores sobre la reducción de óxidos de cromo contenidos en la escoria, la cual está en contacto con acero líquido a 1.600 °C. La escoria se prepara con los reactivos CaO, MgO, SiO2, CaF2 y ferroaleaciones (Fe-Si y Fe-Si-Mg. Los contenidos de CaF2 y MgO en la escoria son de 10 %, cada uno, y el de Cr2O3 es 25 %. La cantidad de la ferroaleación varía de 12,5 a 50 g por cada 100 g de escoria. La relación (CaO+MgO/SiO2 tiene los valores de 1 y 2. Se determina la eficiencia de recuperación de cromo empleando los dos tipos de ferroaleaciones. Se realizaron cálculos para determinar el efecto teórico de la temperatura, la basicidad de la escoria, (CaO+MgO/SiO2, y la cantidad de agentes reductores sobre la reducci

  18. Effects of irradiation on chromium's behavior in ferritic/martensitic FeCr alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinfu HE; Wen YANG; Zhehao QU; Sheng FAN

    2009-01-01

    The effects of irradiation on chromium performance under different temperatures in Fe-20at%Cr were modeled by modified Marlowe code. Chromium precipitation was observed in FeCr alloy after irradiation; interstitial Chromium atoms are the preferred formation of mixed FeCr dumbbells in the direction ofand; interstitial chromium atoms congregated on {111} and {110} plane. The results are compared with experiment observations and are useful to understanding the irradiation performances of FeCr alloy.

  19. Kinetics of sorption of oil products by hydroxide precipitates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrova, N.A.; Dubrovskaya, G.E.; Berezyuk, V.G.; Pushkarev, V.V.

    1976-01-01

    Study of the kinetics of sorption of oils (palm and coriander oils, Genrex-26, Emulsol E-2(B)) under static conditions by aluminum and iron hydroxide precipitates (with FeSO/sub 4/, FeCl/sub 3/, and AlCl/sub 3/ as coagulants) showed that an increase of temperature to 40 to 50/sup 0/C raises the sorption rate substantially. The kinetic relations can be represented by equations for first-order reactions. The calculated rate constants and the values of the empirical activation energies are evidence of physical sorption with diffusion as the controlling step.

  20. Kinetics of gibbsite leaching in sodium hydroxide aqueous solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović Ljubica J.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the kinetics and mechanism of the reaction, laboratory leaching was carried out with industrially produced gibbsite γ-Al(OH3 in aqueous solutions containing an excess of sodium hydroxide. The results obtained reaction temperature, duration and base concentration varied. The basic kinetic parameters were determined from: the reaction rate constant k=8.72·107 exp (-74990/RT and the process activation energy in the range Ea=72.5-96.81 kJ/mol.

  1. The photoluminescence of Co-Al-layered double hydroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    We report a new optical behaviour of pure Co-Al-layered double hydroxide (LDH). It was found that the Co-Al-LDH sample could emit fluorescence without any fluorescent substances intercalated. Its excitation spectrum shows a maximum peak near the wavelength 370 nm, the maximum emission peak appears at 430 nm and the photoluminescence colour of the Co-Al-LDH sample is blue. This new optical property will be expected to extend the potential applications of LDHs in optical materials field.

  2. LAYERED DOUBLE HYDROXIDES: NANOMATERIALS FOR APPLICATIONS IN AGRICULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luíz Paulo Figueredo Benício

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The current research aims to introduce Layered Double Hydroxides (LDH as nanomaterials to be used in agriculture, with particular reference to its use as storage and slow release matrix of nutrients and agrochemicals for plant growing. Structural characteristics, main properties, synthesis methods and characterization of LDH were covered in this study. Moreover, some literature data have been reported to demonstrate their potential for storage and slow release of nitrate, phosphate, agrochemicals, besides as being used as adsorbent for the wastewater treatment. This research aims to expand, in near future, the investigation field on these materials, with application in agriculture, increasing the interface between chemistry and agronomy.

  3. A study of the process of desorption of hexavalent chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.B. Amorim

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work the process of desorption of hexavalent chromium, a toxic metal ion, from the marine algae Sargassum sp, following biosorption experiments 2³ factorial design was studied. A technique was applied to three eluents: HCl, H2SO4 and EDTA. Three factors of importance were evaluated: concentration of eluent, the ratio between mass of biosorbent and volume of eluent (S/L and process time. A statistical analysis of the experimental results showed that the three variables evaluated are significant for all three eluents. The models for chromium desorption were validated, as the results agreed well with the observed values. Through use of the response surface methodology, a factorial design based optimization technique; it was possible to identify the most suitable eluent and the interval of values for the process variables that resulted in the most significant desorption of chromium, which is relevant information for work aiming at process optimization.

  4. Bioabsorption of chromium from retan chrome liquor by cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandi, M; Shashirekha, V; Swamy, Mahadeswara

    2009-01-01

    The bioaccumulation of chromium from retan chrome liquor by Spirulina fusiformis was investigated under laboratory as well as field conditions. At the optimal conditions, metal ion uptake increased with initial metal ion concentration up to 300mg/l. The effect on various physico-chemical parameters like total solids (TS), total dissolved solids (TDS), total suspended solids (TSS), chlorides, sulphates, phenols, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biochemical studies related to biomass, chlorophyll-a and protein were also carried out. The present study indicates that S. fusiformis is very effective in removal of chromium (93-99%) besides removing other toxicants from retan chrome liquor. The sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and FTIR studies indicate the interaction/complexation between Cr and alga. The mechanism involved in bioaccumulation of chromium is also discussed. The process when upgraded can be applied for detoxification of tannery effluents.

  5. Studies of removal of chromium by model constructed wetland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mant

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Chromium is a pollutant present in tannery wastewater, its removal is necessary for protection of the environment. Penisetum purpureum, Brancharia decumbens and Phragmites australis were grown hydroponically in experimental gravel beds to determine their potential for the phytoremediation of solutions containing 10 and 20 mg Cr dm-3. These concentrations, similar to tannery wastewater after initial physico-chemical treatment were used with the aim of developing an economic secondary treatment to protect the environment. All the systems achieved removal efficiencies of 97 - 99.6% within 24 hours. P. purpureum and B. decumbens removed 78.1% and 68.5% respectively within the first hour. Both P. purpureum and B. decumbens were tolerant of the concentrations of chromium applied, but P. purpureum showed the greatest potential because its faster growth and larger biomass achieved a much greater chromium removal over the whole length of time of the experiment.

  6. Electron magnetic resonance investigation of chromium diffusion in yttria powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biasi, R.S. de, E-mail: rsbiasi@ime.eb.b [Secao de Engenharia Mecanica e de Materiais, Instituto Militar de Engenharia, Pr. General Tiburcio, 80, 22290-270 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Grillo, M.L.N., E-mail: mluciag@uerj.b [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, 20550-013 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2010-03-01

    The electron magnetic resonance (EMR) technique was used to investigate the diffusion of chromium in yttria (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) powders. The EMR absorption intensity was measured for several annealing times and three different temperatures of isothermal annealing: 1273, 1323 and 1373 K. The activation temperature for diffusion, calculated from the experimental data using a theoretical model based on the Fick equation, was found to be E{sub A}=342+-5 kJ mol{sup -1}. This value is larger than the activation energy for the diffusion of chromium in rutile (TiO{sub 2}), periclase (MgO) and cobalt monoxide (CoO) and smaller than the activation energy for the diffusion of chromium in chrysoberyl (BeAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}).

  7. Chromium Resistant Bacteria: Impact on Plant Growth in Soil Microcosm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayel Hanane

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Three chromium resistant bacterial strains, Pseudomonas fluorescens PF28, Enterobacter amnigenus EA31 and Enterococcus gallinarum S34 isolated from tannery waste contaminated soil were used in this study. All strains could resist a high concentration of K2Cr2O7 that is up to 300 mg/L. The effect of these strains on clover plants (Trifolium campestre in the presence of two chromium salts CrCl3 and K2Cr2O7 was studied in soil microcosm. Application of chromium salts adversely affected seed germination, root and shoot length. Bacterial inoculation improved the growth parameters under chromate stress when compared with non inoculated respective controls. There was observed more than 50% reduction of Cr(VI in inoculated soil microcosms, as compared to the uninoculated soil under the same conditions. The results obtained in this study are significant for the bioremediation of chromate pollution.

  8. Improvement on simultaneous determination of chromium species in aqueous solution by ion chromatography and chemiluminescence detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Liao, Y.P.; Jons, O.

    1997-01-01

    A sensitive method for the simultaneous determination of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) was chromatography and chemiluminescence detection. Two Dionex ion-exchange guard columns in series, CG5 and AG7, were used to separate chromium(III) from chromium(VI). Chromium(VI) was reduced by potassium......, the stabilities of reductant and luminol solutions were studied. The linear range of the calibration curve for chromium(III) and chromium(VI) was 1-400 mu g l(-1). The detection limit was 0.12 mu g l(-1) for chromium(III) and 0.09 mu g l(-1) for chromium(VI), respectively. The precision at the 20 mu g l(-1) level...... was 1.4% for chromium(III) and 2.5% for chromium(VI), respectively. The accuracy of the chromium(III) determination was determined by analysis of the NIST standard reference material 1643c, Trace elements in water with the result 19.1 +/- 1.0 mu g Cr(III) l(-1) (certified value 19.0 +/- 0.6 mu g Cr...

  9. 21 CFR 73.3110a - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.3110a Section... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3110a Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide (Pigment Blue 36) (CAS Reg....

  10. Experimental study on 830 MPa grade pipeline steel containing chromium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Ren; Shuai Zhang; Shuang Wang; Wen-yue Liu

    2009-01-01

    The diversity of microstructure and properties of 830 Mpa grade pipeline steel containing chromium was investigated by optical microscope and transmission electron microscopy. The main microstructures were multiple configurations, containing lath bainite and granule bainite. Mechanical properties test results showed that the yield strength and tensile strength improved with in-creasing chromium content. The toughness and elongation decreased at the same time, so temper process was introduced. Appling proper temper parameters, the values of toughness and elongation were improved dramatically, and the strength decreased slightly.

  11. Fractionation behavior of chromium isotopes during coprecipitation with calcium carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodler, Alexandra; Sánchez-Pastor, Nuria; Fernández-Díaz, Lurdes;

    2015-01-01

    Interest in chromium (Cr) isotope incorporation into carbonates arises from the observation that Cr isotopic composition of carbonates could be used as a paleoclimate proxy to elucidate past fluctuations of oxygen contents in atmosphere and hydrosphere. The use of Cr isotopes to track paleoenviro......Interest in chromium (Cr) isotope incorporation into carbonates arises from the observation that Cr isotopic composition of carbonates could be used as a paleoclimate proxy to elucidate past fluctuations of oxygen contents in atmosphere and hydrosphere. The use of Cr isotopes to track...

  12. Use of chitosan for chromium removal from exhausted tanning baths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaro, Raffaele; Fabbricino, Massimiliano; Lanzetta, Rosa; Mancino, Anna; Naviglio, Biagio; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Sartorio, Roberto; Tomaselli, Michele; Tortora, Gelsomina

    2008-01-01

    A novel approach, based on chitosan heavy-metal sequestrating ability, is proposed for chromium(III) removal from spent tanning liquor. Experimental results, obtained at lab-scale using real wastewater, are presented and discussed. Resulting efficiencies are extremely high, and strongly dependent on chitosan dose and pH value. Comparative analyses with other polysaccharides is also carried out showing that amine groups are more efficient than carboxyl and sulphate ones. Chromium recovery from sorption complexes and chitosan regeneration is finally proposed to optimize the whole process.

  13. Primary and secondary crystallization of modified hypoeutectic chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Studnicki

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents investigations of crystallization of modified hypoeutectic wear resistant chromium cast iron which contains carbon about 2% and chromium on three levels (12%, 18% and 25%. Three substances were applied to the modification ( boron carbide (B4C, ferroniobium (FeNb and mixture of ferroniobium and mischmetal (RE. The investigations of crystallization were conducted the DTA method in DTA-C and DTA-Is testers. The influence on the course of the process of primary and secondary crystallization was observed.

  14. Urinary levels of nickel and chromium associated with dental restoration by nickel-chromium based alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo; Xia, Gang; Cao, Xin-Ming; Wang, Jue; Xu, Bi-Yao; Huang, Pu; Chen, Yue; Jiang, Qing-Wu

    2013-03-01

    This paper aims to investigate if the dental restoration of nickel-chromium based alloy (Ni-Cr) leads to the enhanced excretions of Ni and Cr in urine. Seven hundred and ninety-five patients in a dental hospital had single or multiple Ni-Cr alloy restoration recently and 198 controls were recruited to collect information on dental restoration by questionnaire and clinical examination. Urinary concentrations of Ni and Cr from each subject were measure by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Compared to the control group, the urinary level of Ni was significantly higher in the patient group of dental restoration. Potential short- and long-term effects of Ni-Cr alloy restoration need to be investigated.

  15. Fertilizers and Mixed Crop Cultivation of Chromium Tolerant and Sensitive Plants under Chromium Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Dheeba

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Zea mays (maize and Vigna radiata (green gram are found to be the chromium (Cr tolerant and sensitive plants, respectively. In the present paper, we investigate the reduction of the toxicity of Cr in the sensitive plants by the mixed crop cultivation in the field using various amendments. Further, the potassium dichromate was used as the source of hexavalent Cr. The results indicated that Cr adversely affects both the growth and yield of plants. The soil properties vary with Cr and different fertilizer amendments and the yield of both plants were affected by Cr. We conclude that metal accumulation of seeds of green gram was higher than corn and the application of single fertilizer either farm yard manure (FYM or nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium (NPK enhances the growth and yield of both the tolerant and sensitive plants in the mixed crop cultivations.

  16. Ions in water: the microscopic structure of concentrated hydroxide solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imberti, S; Botti, A; Bruni, F; Cappa, G; Ricci, M A; Soper, A K

    2005-05-15

    Neutron-diffraction data on aqueous solutions of hydroxides, at solute concentrations ranging from 1 solute per 12 water molecules to 1 solute per 3 water molecules, are analyzed by means of a Monte Carlo simulation (empirical potential structure refinement), in order to determine the hydration shell of the OH- in the presence of the smaller alkali metal ions. It is demonstrated that the symmetry argument between H+ and OH- cannot be used, at least in the liquid phase at such high concentrations, for determining the hydroxide hydration shell. Water molecules in the hydration shell of K+ orient their dipole moment at about 45 degrees from the K+-water oxygen director, instead of radially as in the case of the Li+ and Na+ hydration shells. The K+-water oxygen radial distribution function shows a shallower first minimum compared to the other cation-water oxygen functions. The influence of the solutes on the water-water radial distribution functions is shown to have an effect on the water structure equivalent to an increase in the pressure of the water, depending on both ion concentration and ionic radius. The changes of the water structure in the presence of charged solutes and the differences among the hydration shells of the different cations are used to present a qualitative explanation of the observed cation mobility.

  17. Selectivity of Crystal Growth Direction in Layered Double Hydroxides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵芸; 梁吉; 李峰; 段雪

    2004-01-01

    Investigation of selectivity of crystal growth direction in layered double hydroxides is helpful to control their particle sizes in different directions. Mg-Al layered double hydroxides (LDHs) were synthesized using a coprecipitation method. The influences of aging temperature, aging time, and Mg/Al molar ratio on the crystal structure, the LDHs particle size, and the selectivity of crystal growth in different directions were investigated. The results show that the size of the crystallites in the a direction is larger than that in the c direction for all experimental conditions, indicating faster crystal growth in the a direction than in the c direction. The crystallite sizes in the a and c directions both increase with decreasing Mg/Al molar ratio but with less difference between the sizes in the two directions. Therefore, the crystal growth rate in the c direction increases more than that in the a direction as the Mg/Al molar ratio decreases. The influence of the aging time, aging temperature, and Mg/Al molar ratio on the selectivity of the crystal growth direction can be used to prepare LDHs with selected sizes in the a and c directions.

  18. Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Volatile Metal Hydroxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Dwight L.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    2015-01-01

    Modern superalloys used in the construction of turbomachinery contain a wide range of metals in trace quantities. In addition, metal oxides and silicon dioxide are used to form Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBC) to protect the underlying metal in turbine blades. Formation of volatile hydroxides at elevated temperatures is an important mechanism for corrosion of metal alloys or oxides in combustion environments (N. Jacobson, D. Myers, E. Opila, and E. Copland, J. Phys. Chem. Solids 66, 471-478, 2005). Thermodynamic data is essential to proper design of components of modern gas turbines. It is necessary to first establish the identity of volatile hydroxides formed from the reaction of a given system with high temperature water vapor, and then to determine the equilibrium pressures of the species under operating conditions. Theoretical calculations of reaction energies are an important check of experimental results. This presentation reports results for several important systems: Si-O-H, Cr-O-H, Al-O-H, Ti-O-H, and ongoing studies of Ta-O-H.

  19. Cation ordering and superstructures in natural layered double hydroxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivovichev, Sergey V; Yakovenchuk, Victor N; Zolotarev, Andrey A; Ivanyuk, Gregory N; Pakhomovsky, Yakov A

    2010-01-01

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) constitute an important group of materials with many applications ranging from catalysis and absorption to carriers for drug delivery, DNA intercalation and carbon dioxide sequestration. The structures of LDHs are based upon double brucite-like hydroxide layers [M(2+)(n)M(3+)(m)(OH)(2(m+n)](m+), where M(2+) = Mg(2+), Fe(2+), Mn(2+), Zn(2+), etc.; M(3+) = Al(3+), Fe(3+), Cr(3+), Mn(3+), etc. Structural features of LDHs such as cation ordering, charge distribution and polytypism have an immediate influence upon their properties. However, all the structural studies on synthetic LDHs deal with powder samples that prevent elucidation of such fine details of structure architecture as formation of superstructures due to cation ordering. In contrast to synthetic materials, natural LDHs are known to form single crystals accessible to single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis, which provides a unique possibility to investigate 3D cation ordering in LDHs that results in formation of complex superstructures, where 2D cation order is combined with a specific order of layer stacking (polytypism). Therefore LDH minerals provide an indispensable source of structural information for modeling of structures and processes happening in LDHs at the molecular and nanoscale levels.

  20. Spatial distribution of chromium in soils contaminated by chromium-containing slag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Shun-hong; PENG Bing; YANG Zhi-hui; CHAI Li-yuan; XU You-ze; SU Chang-qing

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the metal chromium (Cr) contamination of soil at a chromium-containing slag site by ferrochromium production, the contaminated sites, under slag heap, in the vicinity of slag heap and arable soils near the outlet of sewer channel, and unpolluted site 5 km away from one ferroalloy plant in Hunan Province, China, were selected. The concentrations of total Cr and water soluble Cr in bulk soil samples and profile depth samples were determined. The results show that the soils in the vicinity of slag heap have the highest total Cr content followed by the soils under the slag heap and near the outlet of sewer channel of the factory. The mean concentrations of total Cr in the top soils at above three contaminated locations exceed the critical level of Secondary Environmental Quality Standard for Soil in China by 3.5, 5.4 and 1.8 times. In most Cr polluted soils, total Cr has a relative accumulation in soil depth of 40-60 cm, but this trend is not found in unpolluted soils. The average concentrations of water soluble Cr (Ⅵ) in top soils under slag heap and in the vicinity of slag heap are 176.9 times and 52.7 times higher than that in the uncontaminated soils, respectively. However, water soluble Cr (Ⅵ) contents in soils near sewer channel are all low and the values are close to that in the uncontaminated soils. Although water soluble Cr (Ⅵ) content in soil profiles decreases with soil depths, it in soils under slag heap maintains a high level even at a depth of 100-150 cm. The results imply that the transportation of Cr (Ⅵ) can result in a potential risk of groundwater system in this area.

  1. Physiological, biochemical and histometric responses of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus L.) by dietary organic chromium (chromium picolinate) supplementation

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Chromium has been recognized as a new and important micro-nutrient, essential for both human and animal nutrition. This study was conducted to evaluate the appropriateness and/or the use of safety level of dietary chromium picolinate (Cr-Pic), and its effects on the physiological responses, the histometric characteristics, and the chemical analysis of dorsal muscles of mono-sex Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus. A total of 420 fingerlings (28.00 ± 0.96 g) were randomly distributed into 21 f...

  2. Chromium(VI) release from leather and metals can be detected with a diphenylcarbazide spot test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Johansen, Jeanne D.; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2015-01-01

    Along with chromium, nickel and cobalt are the clinically most important metal allergens. However, unlike for nickel and cobalt, there is no validated colorimetric spot test that detects chromium. Such a test could help both clinicians and their patients with chromium dermatitis to identify culprit...... at 0.5 ppm without interference from other pure metals, alloys, or leather. A market survey using the test showed no chromium(VI) release from work tools (0/100). However, chromium(VI) release from metal screws (7/60), one earring (1/50), leather shoes (4/100) and leather gloves (6/11) was observed. We...

  3. Reactor target from metal chromium for "pure" high-intensive artificial neutrino source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrin, V. N.; Kozlova, Yu. P.; Veretenkin, E. P.; Logachev, A. V.; Logacheva, A. I.; Lednev, I. S.; Okunkova, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents the first results of development of manufacturing technology of metallic chromium targets from highly enriched isotope 50Cr for irradiation in a high flux nuclear reactor to obtain a compact high intensity neutrino source with low content of radionuclide impurities and minimum losses of enriched isotope. The main technological stages are the hydrolysis of chromyl fluoride, the electrochemical reduction of metallic chromium, the hot isostatic pressing of chromium powder and the electrical discharge machining of chromium bars. The technological stages of hot isostatic pressing of chromium powder and of electrical discharge machining of Cr rods have been tested.

  4. The oxidation and reduction of chromium of stainless steels in an eletric arc furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Arh

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The oxidation of chromium during the elaboration of stainless steels occurs with oxygen in solution blown inthe melt and with oxides in the slag. A higher content of silicon in the furnace charge decreases the extent of oxidation of chromium, however, the efficient reduction of chromium from the slag is of essential importance for a minimal loss of chromium. In this survey, the theory of the oxidation of chromium, its reduction from the slag and the conditions for the formation of foaming slag are discussed.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of laurate-intercalated Mg–Al layered double hydroxide prepared by coprecipitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerds, Nathalie Christiane; Katiyar, Vimal; Koch, Christian Bender

    2012-01-01

    Effective utilization of layered double hydroxides (LDH) for industrial applications requires the synthesis of pure and well-defined LDH phases. In the present study, dodecanoate (laurate) anions were intercalated into Mg–Al-layered double hydroxide (LDH-C12) by coprecipitation in the presence of...

  6. Mg/Al Ordering in Layered Double Hydroxides Revealed by Multinuclear NMR Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulla Gro; Grey, Clare P.; Sideris, Paul J.

    2008-01-01

    The anion- exchange ability of layered double hydroxides ( LDHs) has been exploited to create materials for use in catalysis, drug delivery, and environmental remediation. The specific cation arrangements in the hydroxide layers of hydrotalcite- like LDHs, of general formula Mg1-x2+Alx3+OH2(Anion...

  7. Assessment of ion diffusion from a calcium hydroxide-propolis paste through dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina Corazza Montero

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the ability of ions from a non-alcoholic calcium hydroxide-propolis paste to diffuse through dentinal tubules. Thirty-six single-rooted bovine teeth were used. The tooth crowns were removed, and the root canals were instrumented and divided into 3 groups: Group 1 - calcium hydroxide-propylene glycol paste; Group 2 - calcium hydroxide-saline solution paste; Group 3 - calcium hydroxide-propolis paste. After the root canal dressings were applied, the teeth were sealed and placed in containers with deionized water. The pH of the water was measured after 3, 24, 72 and 168 hours to determine the diffusion of calcium hydroxide ions through the dentinal tubules. All of the pastes studied promoted the diffusion of calcium hydroxide ions through the dentinal tubules. Associating propolis to calcium hydroxide resulted in a pH increase, which occurred with greater intensity after 72 hours. The calcium hydroxide-propolis paste was able to diffuse in dentin.

  8. Chromium(VI) transport and fate in unsaturated zone and aquifer: 3D Sandbox results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xingmin; Sobecky, Patricia A; Zhao, Lanpo; Crawford, Patrice; Li, Mingtang

    2016-04-01

    The simulation of Cr(VI) behavior in an unsaturated zone and aquifer, using a 3D experimental set-up were performed to illustrate the distribution, transport and transformation of Cr(VI), and further to reveal the potential harm of Cr(VI) after entering the groundwater. The result indicated that chromium(VI) was transported in the vertical direction, meanwhile, was transported in the horizontal direction under the influence of groundwater flow. The direction and distance away from the pollution source zone had great effect on the chromium(VI) concentration. At the sampling sites near the pollution source zone, there was a sudden increase of chromium(VI) concentration. The concentration of chromium(III) concentration in some random effluent samples was not detected. Chromium had not only transported but also had fraction and specie transformation in the unsaturated zone and aquifer. The relative concentration of residue fraction chromium was decreased with time. The content of Fe-Mn oxide fraction chromium was increased with time. The relative content of exchangeable and carbonate-bound fraction chromium was lower and the content variations were not obvious. Chromium(VI) (91-98%) was first reduced to chromium(III) rapidly. The oxidation reaction occurred later and the relative content of chromium(VI) was increased again. The presence of manganese oxides under favorable soil conditions can promote the reoxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI).

  9. Comparison of calcium hydroxide and zinc oxide and eugenol pulpectomies in primary teeth of dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, J A; Jeansonne, B G; Dummett, C O; Burrell, W

    1982-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare calcium hydroxide with zinc oxide and eugenol (ZOE) as root canal obturants in the pulpectomy procedure for irreversibly inflamed primary pulps of dogs. Clinical, radiographic, and histologic comparisons of calcium hydroxide and ZOE root canal filling materials were made in forty-two primary premolars of seven mongrel puppies. When the animals were 6 weeks of age, the pulps of all samples teeth were extirpated and the canals left open to the oral environment. The root canals were assigned to calcium hydroxide, ZOE, and control groups, instrumented, and filled 2 weeks later. The animals were killed 1 day, 1 week, 4 weeks, and 12 weeks after filling. Statistical analysis of all categories for comparison at 4 weeks indicated that calcium hydroxide gave significantly more favorable results than ZOE. Canals treated with calcium hydroxide exhibited less inflammation, less resorption, and more hard-tissue apposition than ZOE-treated and control groups.

  10. The Deactivation of Nickel Hydroxide to Hypophosphite Electrooxidation on a Nickel Electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue ZENG; Min MO; Jian Long YI; Xin Jun TANG; Hui Xian WANG

    2004-01-01

    The deactivation of nickel hydroxide to the electrooxidation of hypophosphite on a nickel electrode was studied by means of in situ UV-Vis subtractive reflectance spectroscopy. The experimental results show that when the potential is lower than -1.0 V (SCE), the surface on nickel electrode is free of nickel hydroxide, on which hypophosphite is active. When the potential moves positively to about-0.75V, two absorbency bands around 300 nm and 550 nm, which were ascribed to the formation of α-nickel hydroxide, were observed, nickel is oxidized to α-nickel hydroxide.Severe deactivation of the surface occurs when the nickel surface is covered with nickel hydroxide,which separates the hypophosphite ion from nickel substrate.

  11. Synthesis and structure refinement of layered double hydroxides of Co, Mg and Ni with Ga

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G V Manohara; P Vishnu Kamath

    2010-06-01

    Homogeneous precipitation by urea hydrolysis results in the formation of highly ordered layered double hydroxides of divalent metal ions (Co, Mg, Ni) and Ga. Structure refinement shows that these carbonate containing layered hydroxides crystallize with rhombohedral symmetry (space group -3) in the structure of the 31 polytype. An analysis of the structure shows that, coulombic attraction between the layer and interlayer remains invariant in different layered hydroxides, whereas the strength of hydrogen bonding varies. The Ni–Ga LDH has the weakest hydrogen bonding and Co–Ga, the strongest, as reflected by the layer–interlayer oxygen–oxygen distances. The poor polarity of the OH bond in the Ni–Ga hydroxide points to the greater covalency of the (2+}/′3+)-oxygen bond in this compound as opposed to the Co–Ga hydroxide. These observations are supported by IR spectra.

  12. 75 FR 67100 - Superalloy Degassed Chromium From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    ... superalloy degassed chromium from Japan (70 FR 76030). The Commission is conducting a review to determine..., subparts A, D, E, and F (19 CFR part 207), as most recently amended at 74 FR 2847 (January 16, 2009). \\1... rule 201.15(b)(19 CFR 201.15(b)), 73 FR 24609 (May 5, 2008). This advice was developed in...

  13. 76 FR 8773 - Superalloy Degassed Chromium From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ... applicable deadline.'' (75 FR 80457). Accordingly, pursuant to section 751(c) of the Tariff Act of 1930 (19 U... COMMISSION Superalloy Degassed Chromium From Japan AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission... Japan would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material injury. On December 22,...

  14. Effects of chromium picolinate supplementation in type 2 diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niladê Rosinski Rocha

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The effects of chromium picolinate in Type 2 diabetic patients are investigated.  Seventeen Type 2 diabetic patients were randomly divided into two groups. The experimental group received fiber-rich hypocaloric diet and chromium picolinate whereas the control group received fiber-rich hypocaloric diet and placebo. The chromium picolinate was offered twice a day at the dose of 100 μg. Anthropometric data such as blood pressure, fasting glycemia and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c were measured and these parameters were evaluated again after 90 days. No difference was reported in rates of body weight, waist, hip, body mass index, blood pressure and fasting glycemia (Control vs. Experimental groups after treatment. However, a decrease (p = 0.0405 of HbA1c occurred in the experimental group when the pre- and post-treatment rates were compared. HbA1c data showed that chromium picolinate improved the glycemic control in Type 2 diabetes.

  15. Cobalt chromium stents versus stainless steel stents in diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Ahmed Tantawy

    2014-03-01

    Conclusions: We concluded that no significant statistical difference was found between the two stents (cobalt-chromium alloy bare metal stent versus conventional bare metal stainless steel stent in diabetic patients regarding (initial procedural success, in-hospital complications, the incidence of ISR at follow up, event-free survival at follow up.

  16. Intestinal absorption of chromium as affected by wheat bran

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keim, K.S.; Holloway, C.L.; Hegsted, M.

    1986-03-01

    This study was designed to investigate the influence of dietary fiber, as found in wheat bran, on the absorption of chromium. Twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups of 10. The control was fed a semi-purified diet containing casein, methionine, cornstarch, sucrose, corn oil, mineral and vitamin mix, and choline bitartrate. The experimental group was fed the same diet but with soft red winter wheat bran added to a level of 35% of the diet at the expense of sucrose. To determine chromium absorption and uptake by selected tissues, rats were fasted for 24 hr, fed 5 g of the respective diet, 2 hr later intubated with 100..mu..Ci of Cr-51of sacrificed 24 hr later. The rats wee housed in metabolic cages after the Cr-51 intubation. The addition of wheat brand to the diet did not significantly affect chromium absorption as measured by percent dose of Cr-51 in the 24 hr urine. The percent dose in the control group was 0.68 +/- 0.20% (mean +/- SEM) and in the experimental group 0.63 +/- 0.24% (mean +/-SEM) (N.S.). The cr-51 uptake of liver, spleen, jejunum, and blood was not statistically different between groups. These results indicate that dietary fiber as found in wheat bran does not impair intestinal absorption of chromium.

  17. Domestic Production Issues in Chromium and Platinum-Group Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    Protection Agency. OPA 87-005. Washington: Government Printing Office, May 1987. 16. Foley, Jeffrey Y. and James C. Barker . Chromite Deposits Along...Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers, 1976. 52. Stowe, Clive W. Evolution of Chromium Ore Fields. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold Company

  18. Spin-wave and critical neutron scattering from chromium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage; Axe, J.D.; Shirane, G.

    1971-01-01

    Chromium and its dilute alloys are unique examples of magnetism caused by itinerant electrons. The magnetic excitations have been studied by inelastic neutron scattering using a high-resolution triple-axis spectrometer. Spin-wave peaks in q scans at constant energy transfer ℏω could, in general, ...

  19. New alloys to conserve critical elements. [replacing chromium in steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Previous studies and surveys on availability of domestic reserves have shown that chromium is a most critical element within the U.S. metal industry. More precisely, the bulk of chromium is consumed in the production of stainless steels, specifically Type 304 stainless steel (304SS) which contains 18% Cr. The present paper deals with means of reducing chromium in commercial stainless steels by substituting more abundant or less expensive elements with the intent of maintaining the properties of 304SS. The discussion focuses on some of the oxidation and corrosion properties of new substitute stainless steels with only 12% Cr, which represents a potential saving of 33% of the chromium consumed in the production of 304SS. The alloying elements substituted for Cr in 304SS are selected according to their potential for protective oxide formation during high-temperature oxidation; these are Al, Si, Ti, Y, and misch metal which is 99.7% rare-earth metals containing 50 to 55% cerium. Other alloying elements to impart corrosion resistance are Mn, Mo, and V.

  20. Microbial biotechnology for remediation of aquatic habitats polluted with chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viorica Coşier

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Chromium may occur in nine different forms of oxidation ranging from ?II to +VI, with forms II, III and VI as the most commonly encountered. In Cluj county, chromium pollution dates well back in time and has caused important dysfunction to the mechanical-biological wastewater purification station of the city of Cluj (Coşier & Diţă 1996. The purpose of this study was to develop one microbial method able to reduce hexavalent chromium (mobile, permeable to cell membrane, carcinogenic and mutagenic (Ishikawa et al 1994 to the trivalent form (insoluble and an essential element for humans (Song et al 2006. Different sources of chromium-reducing bacteria and many sources of carbon and energy added to the Kvasnikov mineral basal medium (Komori et al 1990 with increasing amount of chromate (200- 1000 mg/l were tested. Two bacterial strains, able to reduce even 1000 mg chromate/l, were isolated in pure culture. For one of these bacterial strains, we determined the optimum conditions for the reduction of Cr (VI.

  1. Oxidation resistant, thoria-dispersed nickel-chromium-aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranow, S.; Klingler, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Modified thoria-dispersed nickel-chromium alloy has been developed that exhibits greatly improved resistance to high-temperature oxidation. Additions of aluminum have been made to change nature of protective oxide scale entirely and to essentially inhibit oxidation at temperatures up to 1260 C.

  2. DANGER OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM AND STRATEGY FOR THE REMEDITATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniruddha Roy

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Some metals as micronutrients have a major role in the life and growth process of plants and animals. However, certain forms of some metals may also act as toxic material even in relatively small quantities. Chromium is such a metal, whose concentration above a certain limit may cause a serious problem to the health of living organisms. Chromium (Cr may occur in several chemical forms in organic and inorganic systems. In biological systems only Cr (III and Cr (VI are significant. Among these two states, trivalent chromium (Cr-III is considered as an essential component, while hexavalent Chromium (Cr-VI in biological system has been detected as responsible for so many diseases, even some specific forms of cancer. This paper intends to present the adverse effect of Cr(VI on environment as well as on human beings and also try to find a way out to dissolve the problem by a newly developed efficient and cost effective technique.

  3. FEATURES OF CHROMIUM DOPING OF WEAR-RESISTANT CAST IRON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Netrebko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work analysis of the influence of chromium on the process of carbide formation, changes in chemical composition of the metal substrate in the areas adjacent to the carbides and at the hardness of iron while economy nickel and manganesealloying.

  4. Structure and morphology studies of chromium film at elevated temperature in hypersonic environment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G M Hegde; V Kulkarni; M Nagaboopathy; K P J Reddy

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents the after shock heated structural and morphological studies of chromium film coated on hypersonic test model as a passive drag reduction element. The structural changes and the composition of phases of chromium due to shock heating (2850 K) are characterized using X-ray diffraction studies. Surface morphology changes of chromium coating have been studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) before and after shock heating. Significant amount of chromium ablation and sublimation from the model surface is noticed from SEM micrographs. Traces of randomly oriented chromium oxides formed along the coated surface confirm surface reaction of chromium with oxygen present behind the shock. Large traces of amorphous chromium oxide phases are also observed.

  5. Preparation and Characterization of Plasma-Sprayed Ultrafine Chromium Oxide Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Feng; JIANG Xianliang; YU Yueguang; ZENG Keli; REN Xianjing; LI Zhenduo

    2007-01-01

    Ultrafine chromium oxide coatings were prepared by plasma spraying with ultrafine feedstock. Processing parameters of plasma spraying were optimized. Optical microscope (OM) was used to observe the microstructure of the ultrafine chromium oxide coatings. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the morphology and particle size of ultrafine powder feedstock as well as to examine the microstructure of the chromium oxide coating. In addition, hardness and bonding strength of the ultrafine chromium oxide coatings were measured.The results showed that the optimized plasma spraying parameters were suitable for ultrafine chromium oxide coating and the properties and microstructure of the optimized ultrafine chromium oxide coating were superior compared to conventional chromium oxide wear resistant coatings.

  6. Investigations on the fracture toughness of austempered ductile iron alloyed with chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, P. Prasad; Putatunda, Susil K

    2003-04-15

    An investigation was carried out to examine the influence of chromium content on the plane strain fracture toughness of austempered ductile iron (ADI). ADIs containing 0, 0.3 and 0.5 wt.% chromium were austempered over a range of temperatures to produce different microstructures. The microstructures were characterized by optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Plane strain fracture toughness of all these materials was determined and correlated with microstructure and chromium content. The chromium content was found to influence the fracture toughness through its influence on the processing window. Since the chromium addition shifts the processing window to shorter durations, the higher chromium alloys at higher austempering temperatures tend to fall outside of the processing window, resulting in less than optimum microstructure and inferior fracture toughness. A small chromium addition of 0.3 wt.% was found to be beneficial for the fracture toughness of ADI.

  7. Ailanthus Altissima and Phragmites Australis for chromium removal from a contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, Ezio; Fratino, Umberto; Petrella, Andrea; Torretta, Vincenzo; Rada, Elena Cristina

    2016-08-01

    The comparative effectiveness for hexavalent chromium removal from irrigation water, using two selected plant species (Phragmites australis and Ailanthus altissima) planted in soil contaminated with hexavalent chromium, has been studied in the present work. Total chromium removal from water was ranging from 55 % (Phragmites) to 61 % (Ailanthus). After 360 days, the contaminated soil dropped from 70 (initial) to 36 and 41 mg Cr/kg (dry soil), for Phragmites and Ailanthus, respectively. Phragmites accumulated the highest amount of chromium in the roots (1910 mg Cr/kg(dry tissue)), compared with 358 mg Cr/kg(dry tissue) for Ailanthus roots. Most of chromium was found in trivalent form in all plant tissues. Ailanthus had the lowest affinity for Cr(VI) reduction in the root tissues. Phragmites indicated the highest chromium translocation potential, from roots to stems. Both plant species showed good potentialities to be used in phytoremediation installations for chromium removal.

  8. Weathering and transport of chromium and nickel from serpentinite in the Coast Range ophiolite to the Sacramento Valley, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Jean M.; Goldhaber, Martin B.; Mills, Christopher T.; Breit, George N.; Hooper, Robert L.; Holloway, JoAnn M.; Diehl, Sharon F.; Ranville, James F.

    2015-01-01

    A soil geochemical study in northern California was done to investigate the role that weathering and transport play in the regional distribution and mobility of geogenic Cr and Ni, which are both potentially toxic and carcinogenic. These elements are enriched in ultramafic rocks (primarily serpentinite) and the soils derived from them (1700–10,000 mg Cr per kg soil and 1300–3900 mg Ni per kg soil) in the Coast Range ophiolite. Chromium and Ni have been transported eastward from the Coast Range into the western Sacramento Valley and as a result, valley soil is enriched in Cr (80–1420 mg kg−1) and Ni (65–224 mg kg−1) compared to median values of U.S. soils of 50 and 15 mg kg−1, respectively. Nickel in ultramafic source rocks and soils is present in serpentine minerals (lizardite, antigorite, and chrysotile) and is more easily weathered compared to Cr, which primarily resides in highly refractory chromite ([Mg,Fe2+][Cr3+,Al,Fe3+]2O4). Although the majority of Cr and Ni in soils are in refractory chromite and serpentine minerals, the etching and dissolution of these minerals, presence of Cr- and Ni-enriched clay minerals and development of nanocrystalline Fe (hydr)oxides is evidence that a significant fractions of these elements have been transferred to potentially more labile phases.

  9. Arsenic and chromium topsoil levels and cancer mortality in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Olivier; Fernández-Navarro, Pablo; Martín-Méndez, Iván; Bel-Lan, Alejandro; Locutura, Juan F; López-Abente, Gonzalo

    2016-09-01

    Spatio-temporal cancer mortality studies in Spain have revealed patterns for some tumours which display a distribution that is similar across the sexes and persists over time. Such characteristics would be common to tumours that shared risk factors, including the chemical soil composition. The objective of the present study is to assess the association between levels of chromium and arsenic in soil and the cancer mortality. This is an ecological cancer mortality study at municipal level, covering 861,440 cancer deaths in 7917 Spanish mainland towns from 1999 to 2008. Chromium and arsenic topsoil levels (partial extraction) were determined by ICP-MS at 13,317 sampling points. To estimate the effect of these concentrations on mortality, we fitted Besag, York and Mollié models, which included, as explanatory variables, each town's chromium and arsenic soil levels, estimated by kriging. In addition, we also fitted geostatistical-spatial models including sample locations and town centroids (non-aligned data), using the integrated nested Laplace approximation (INLA) and stochastic partial differential equations (SPDE). All results were adjusted for socio-demographic variables and proximity to industrial emissions. The results showed a statistical association in men and women alike, between arsenic soil levels and mortality due to cancers of the stomach, pancreas, lung and brain and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL). Among men, an association was observed with cancers of the prostate, buccal cavity and pharynx, oesophagus, colorectal and kidney. Chromium topsoil levels were associated with mortality among women alone, in cancers of the upper gastrointestinal tract, breast and NHL. Our results suggest that chronic exposure arising from low levels of arsenic and chromium in topsoil could be a potential risk factor for developing cancer.

  10. Activated carbon adsorption for chromium treatment and recovery; Adsorbimento di cromo su carboni attivi a scopo di recupero e decontaminazione

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baroncelli, F.; Castelli, S.; De Francesco, M. [ENEA, Casaccia (Italy). Area Energia e Innovazione

    1994-05-01

    The capability of actived carbon systems to adsorb chromium from wastewater of galvanic industry is valued. Batch tests and column tests are carried out with good results. An activated carbon with acidic surface oxides can adsorb both chromate and chromium (III); chromate is reduced in situ and then adsorbed as chromium (III). Chromium can be desorbed from carbon by an acid or basic treatment obtaining respectively chromium (III) or chromate solutions. Carbon can be regenerated many times without evident signs of deterioration.

  11. Application of Hydrosoluble Polymers to Preparation of Nanoscale Calcium Hydroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jing; CHEN Qing-hua; QIAN Qing-rong

    2004-01-01

    Calcium hydroxide with uniform diameters about 50-100 nm was firstly prepared under moderate condition by adding different kinds of hydrosoluble polymers. From the results of TEM and IR, the polymers were proved not only to improve the agglomeration of the nanoparticles but also to be used as a template to control the formation of the special structure and the needed size of Ca (OH)2 by changing the concentration of the polymers. The experimental results of TG-DTA indicate that the Ca(OH)2 can absorb most of the acid gases released during the decomposition of polymers. So this kind of nano-Ca(OH)2 can be used as a useful additive of environmental friendly plastics.

  12. Layered Double Hydroxide-Based Nanocarriers for Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Bi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Biocompatible clay materials have attracted particular attention as the efficient drug delivery systems (DDS. In this article, we review developments in the use of layered double hydroxides (LDHs for controlled drug release and delivery. We show how advances in the ability to synthesize intercalated structures have a significant influence on the development of new applications of these materials. We also show how modification and/or functionalization can lead to new biotechnological and biomedical applications. This review highlights the most recent progresses in research on LDH-based controlled drug delivery systems, focusing mainly on: (i DDS with cardiovascular drugs as guests; (ii DDS with anti-inflammatory drugs as guests; and (iii DDS with anti-cancer drugs as guests. Finally, future prospects for LDH-based drug carriers are also discussed.

  13. Synthesis of tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide by cell diaphragm electrolytic method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Under the conditions of tetramethyl ammonia chloride (TMAC) used as starting material, Ti-based Dimensionally Stable Anode (DSA), stainless steel used as cathode and Nafion 900 cation membrane as cell diaphragm, this paper studies the synthesis of tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide (TMAH) by cell diaphragm electrolytic method, examining not only the effects of current density, concentration of starting material and cell temperature, on the product purity and current efficiency, but also the effects of electrolyte circulation rate on the service life of Ti-based DSA.The experiment puts forward an optimum processing condition, and experimental findings show that preparing TMAH by using this technique can obtain a current efficiency 74.7 % and get product with a purity greater than 99.9%.

  14. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Ni/Al Layered Double Hydroxide Nanorods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Zhao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ni/Al layered double hydroxide (LDH nanorods were successfully synthesized by the hydrothermal reaction. The crystal structure of the products was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD. The morphology of the products was observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM and field emission scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The influences of reaction time and pH value on the morphology of the Ni/Al LDHs were investigated. The result showed that the well-crystallized nanorods of Ni/Al LDHs could be obtained when the pH value was about 10.0 with a long reaction time (12–18 h at 180°C.

  15. Hydroxide as general base in the saponification of ethyl acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Segreda, Julio F

    2002-03-13

    The second-order rate constant for the saponification of ethyl acetate at 30.0 degrees C in H(2)O/D(2)O mixtures of deuterium atom fraction n (a proton inventory experiment) obeys the relation k(2)(n) = 0.122 s(-1) M(-1) (1 - n + 1.2n) (1 - n + 0.48n)/(1 - n + 1.4n) (1 - n + 0.68n)(3). This result is interpreted as a process where formation of the tetrahedral intermediate is the rate-determining step and the transition-state complex is formed via nucleophilic interaction of a water molecule with general-base assistance from hydroxide ion, opposite to the direct nucleophilic collision commonly accepted. This mechanistic picture agrees with previous heavy-atom kinetic isotope effect data of Marlier on the alkaline hydrolysis of methyl formate.

  16. Biological evaluation of layered double hydroxides as efficient drug vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Yan; Liu Dan; Chang Qing; Liu Dandan; Xia Ying; Liu Shuwen; Peng Nanfang; Yang Xu [Hubei Key Laboratory of Genetic Regulation and Integrative Biology, College of Life Science, Huazhong Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Ai Hanhua [College of Physical Science and Technology, Huazhong Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Xi Zhuge, E-mail: yangxu@mail.ccnu.edu.cn [Tianjin Institutes of Health and Environmental Medicine, Tianjin 300050 (China)

    2010-03-12

    Recently there has been a rapid expansion of the development of bioinorganic hybrid systems for safe drug delivery. Layered double hydroxides (LDH), a variety of available inorganic matrix, possess great promise for this purpose. In this study, an oxidative stress biomarker system, including measurement of reactive oxygen species, glutathione content, endogenous nitric oxide, carbonyl content in proteins, DNA strand breaks and DNA-protein crosslinks, was designed to evaluate the biocompatibility of different concentrations of nano-Zn/Al-LDH with a Hela cell line. The drug delivery activity of the LDH-folic-acid complex was also assessed. The resulting data clearly demonstrated that nano-LDH could be applied as a relatively safe drug vehicle with good delivery activity, but with the caveat that the effects of high dosages observed here should not be ignored when attempting to maximize therapeutic activity by increasing LDH concentration.

  17. Electronic spectra of anions intercalated in layered double hydroxides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Radha; P Vishnu Kamath

    2013-10-01

    Transition metal complexes intercalated in layered double hydroxides have a different electronic structure as compared to their free state owing to their confinement within the interlayer gallery. UV–Vis absorptions of the intercalated complex anions show a significant shift as compared to their free state. The ligand to metal charge transfer transitions of the ferricyanide anion show a red shift on intercalation. The ferrocyanide ion shows a significant blue shift of – bands due to the increased separation between 2g and g levels on intercalation. MnO$^{-}_{4}$ ion shows a blue shift in its ligand to metal charge transfer transition since the non-bonding 1 level of oxygen from which the transition arises is stabilized.

  18. Polymerization reaction in restricted space of layered double hydroxides (LDHs)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SI Lichun; WANG Ge; CAI Fuli; WANG Zhiqiang; DUAN Xue

    2004-01-01

    This paper reported the preparation of styrene sulfonate intercalated layered double hydroxides (LDHs) material, SS-LDHs by coprecipitation method, followed by in-situ polymerization of the monomers in the interlayer space of LDHs. The polymerization reaction was monitored by UV and NMR. It is confirmed that when the reaction occurred at 100℃ for 24 h, part of monomers did not react .When the reaction was carried out at 150℃, the polymeriza tion of the intercalated monomers is complete to afford the polymer intercalated product PSS-LDHs. During the polymerization process, the layered structure remains well. At thesame time the gallery height increases with the lengthening of reaction time. This is preliminarily because that the PSS becomes more swelling with the amount of water it absorbs due to its hygroscopicity property.

  19. The kinetic parameters of carbonaceous materials activated with potassium hydroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yong, Z.; Han, B.X.

    2000-07-01

    On the basis of microspore formation in carbonaceous materials, the activation energy for the potassium hydroxide activation of Chinese petroleum coke and coal has been deduced theoretically as dB(O)/dt = A exp(-E(a)) is an element of/RT), where is an element of is the formation energy for the metastable solid formed at the activation temperature. The kinetic parameters (frequency factor, A, and apparent activation energy, E(a) were calculated from this equation as being 5.319 mg/(g min), 36.51 kJ/mol and 6.64 mg/(g min), 49.46 kJ/mol, respectively, for the two carbonaceous materials studied.

  20. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by ferrous iron: A process of chromium isotope fractionation and its relevance to natural environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing, Lasse Nørbye; Dideriksen, Knud; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane;

    2011-01-01

    Stable chromium (Cr) isotopes can be used as a tracer for changing redox conditions in modern marine systems and in the geological record. We have investigated isotope fractionation during reduction of Cr(VI)aq by Fe(II)aq. Reduction of Cr(VI)aq by Fe(II)aq in batch experiments leads to significant...

  1. Raman spectroscopy of supported chromium oxide catalysts : determination of chromium-oxygen bond distances and bond orders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Wachs, I.E.

    1996-01-01

    An empirical correlation is described for relating Raman stretching frequencies of chromium—oxygen (Cr—O) bonds to their bond lengths in chromium oxide reference compounds. An exponential fit of crystallographically determined Cr—O bond lengths to Cr—O Raman symmetric stretching frequencies (800–130

  2. Structural characterisation of a layered double hydroxide nanosheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funnell, Nicholas P.; Wang, Qiang; Connor, Leigh; Tucker, Matthew G.; O'Hare, Dermot; Goodwin, Andrew L.

    2014-06-01

    We report the atomic-scale structure of a Zn2Al-borate layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanosheet, as determined by reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) modelling of X-ray total scattering data. This study involves the extension of the RMC method to enable structural refinement of two-dimensional nanomaterials. The refined LDH models show the intra-layer geometry in this highly-exfoliated phase to be consistent with that observed in crystalline analogues, with the reciprocal-space scattering data suggesting a disordered arrangement of the Zn2+ and Al3+ cations within the nanosheet. The approach we develop is generalisable and so offers a method of characterising the structures of arbitrary nanosheet phases, including systems that support complex forms of disorder within the nanosheets themselves.We report the atomic-scale structure of a Zn2Al-borate layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanosheet, as determined by reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) modelling of X-ray total scattering data. This study involves the extension of the RMC method to enable structural refinement of two-dimensional nanomaterials. The refined LDH models show the intra-layer geometry in this highly-exfoliated phase to be consistent with that observed in crystalline analogues, with the reciprocal-space scattering data suggesting a disordered arrangement of the Zn2+ and Al3+ cations within the nanosheet. The approach we develop is generalisable and so offers a method of characterising the structures of arbitrary nanosheet phases, including systems that support complex forms of disorder within the nanosheets themselves. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01265h

  3. An Aluminum Magnesium Hydroxide Stearate-based Skin Barrier Protection Cream Used for the Management of Eczematous Dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhambri, Sanjay; Michaels, Brent

    2008-01-01

    Eczematous dermatoses can often be very difficult to treat. An aluminum magnesium hydroxide stearate-based cream has recently become available for clinical use. Aluminum magnesium hydroxide stearate-based cream provides an alternative option in treating these dermatoses while providing barrier protection against external allergens and irritants. This article reviews various studies evaluating aluminum magnesium hydroxide stearate-based cream. PMID:21212843

  4. Chromium, chromium isotopes and selected trace elements, western Mojave Desert, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izbicki, John A. [U.S. Geological Survey, 4165 Spruance Road, Suite O, San Diego, CA 92123 (United States)], E-mail: jaizbick@usgs.gov; Ball, James W. [U.S. Geological Survey, 3215 Marine Street, Boulder, Colorado, CO 80303 (United States); Bullen, Thomas D. [U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road, Building 15, McKelvey Building, MS-420, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Sutley, Stephen J. [Denver Federal Center, P.O. Box 25046, MS-964, Denver, CO 80225-0046 (United States)

    2008-05-15

    Chromium(VI) concentrations in excess of the California Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of 50 {mu}g/L occur naturally in alkaline, oxic ground-water in alluvial aquifers in the western Mojave Desert, southern California. The highest concentrations were measured in aquifers eroded from mafic rock, but Cr(VI) as high as 27 {mu}g/L was measured in aquifers eroded from granitic rock. Chromium(VI) concentrations did not exceed 5 {mu}g/L at pH < 7.5 regardless of geology. {delta}{sup 53}Cr values in native ground-water ranged from 0.7 to 5.1 per mille and values were fractionated relative to the average {delta}{sup 53}Cr composition of 0 per mille in the earth's crust. Positive {delta}{sup 53}Cr values of 1.2 and 2.3 per mille were measured in ground-water recharge areas having low Cr concentrations, consistent with the addition of Cr(VI) that was fractionated on mineral surfaces prior to entering solution. {delta}{sup 53}Cr values, although variable, did not consistently increase or decrease with increasing Cr concentrations as ground-water flowed down gradient through more oxic portions of the aquifer. However, increasing {delta}{sup 53}Cr values were observed as dissolved O{sub 2} concentrations decreased, and Cr(VI) was reduced to Cr(III), and subsequently removed from solution. As a result, the highest {delta}{sup 53}Cr values were measured in water from deep wells, and wells in discharge areas near dry lakes at the downgradient end of long flow paths through alluvial aquifers. {delta}{sup 53}Cr values at an industrial site overlying mafic alluvium having high natural background Cr(VI) concentrations ranged from -0.1 to 3.2 per mille . Near zero {delta}{sup 53}Cr values at the site were the result of anthropogenic Cr. However, mixing with native ground-water and fractionation of Cr within the plume increased {delta}{sup 53}Cr values at the site. Although {delta}{sup 53}Cr was not necessarily diagnostic of anthropogenic Cr, it was possible to identify the extent

  5. A computational investigation of boron-doped chromium and chromium clusters by density functional theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The geometries,stabilities and electronic properties of Crn and CrnB(n=2-9) clusters have been systematically investigated by density functional theory.The results suggest that the lowest energy structures for CrnB clusters can be obtained by substituting one Cr atom in Crn+1 clusters with B atom.The geometries of CrnB clusters are similar to that of Crn+1 clusters except for local structural distortion.The second-order difference and fragmentation energy show Cr4,Cr6,Cr8,Cr3B,Cr5B and Cr8B cluster are the most stable among these studied clusters.The impurity B increases the stabilities of chromium cluster.When B is doped on the Crn clusters,cluster geometry does dominate positive role in enhancing their stability.The doped B atom does not change the coupling way of the Cr site in Crn clusters,but breaks the symmetry and the Cr atoms are no longer equivalent.The doped B atom increases the total magnetic moments of Crn in most cases.

  6. Urinary levels of nickel and chromium associated with dental restoration by nickel-chromium based alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Chen; Gang Xia; Xin-Ming Cao; Jue Wang; Bi-Yao Xu; Pu Huang; Yue Chen; Qing-Wu Jiang

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate if the dental restoration of nickel-chromium based alloy (Ni-Cr) leads to the enhanced excretions of Ni and Cr in urine. Seven hundred and ninety-five patients in a dental hospital had single or multiple Ni-Cr alloy restoration recently and 198 controls were recruited to collect information on dental restoration by questionnaire and clinical examination. Urinary concentrations of Ni and Cr from each subject were measure by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Compared to the control group, the urinary level of Ni was significantly higher in the patient group of 〈 1 month of the restoration duration, among which higher Ni excretions were found in those with either a higher number of teeth replaced by dental alloys or a higher index of metal crown not covered with the porcelain. Urinary levels of Cr were significantly higher in the three patient groups of 〈1, 1 to 〈3 and 3 to 〈6 months, especially in those with a higher metal crown exposure index. Linear curve estimations showed better relationships between urinary Ni and Cr in patients within 6-month groups. Our data suggested significant increased excretions of urinary Ni and Cr after dental restoration. Potential short- and long-term effects of Ni-Cr alloy restoration need to be investigated.

  7. A metastable chromium carbide powder obtained by carburization of a metastable chromium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loubiere, S. [Univ. Paul-Sabatier, Toulouse (France). Lab. de Chimie des Materiaux Inorganique; Laurent, C. [Univ. Paul-Sabatier, Toulouse (France). Lab. de Chimie des Materiaux Inorganique; Bonino, J.P. [Univ. Paul-Sabatier, Toulouse (France). Lab. de Chimie des Materiaux Inorganique; Rousset, A. [Univ. Paul-Sabatier, Toulouse (France). Lab. de Chimie des Materiaux Inorganique

    1996-10-15

    A metastable Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2-x} carbide powder is prepared by carburization of a metastable chromium oxide in H{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} atmosphere under the appropriate conditions (temperature, dwell time and CH{sub 4} content). A very high specific surface area (greater than 210 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}) of the starting oxide is necessary to avoid the formation of the sole stable Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} phase. The transformation from the stable Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} to the metastable Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2-x} is observed for the first time. The driving force could be an epitaxial effect between Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2-x} and the surrounding graphite layer. This is consistent with the observation that the formation of graphite layers by CH{sub 4} cracking is easier in the Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2-x}-containing powders. (orig.)

  8. Chromium(VI) but not chromium(III) species decrease mitoxantrone affinity to DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicka, Anna M; Stojek, Zbigniew; Hepel, Maria

    2013-01-31

    Binding of mitoxantrone (MXT) to double-stranded DNA has been investigated as a model drug-DNA binding system to evaluate the effects of various forms of chromium on the binding properties. We have found that Cr(III), which binds strongly to DNA, does not affect the MXT affinity to DNA. In contrast, Cr(VI), in the form of chromate ions CrO(4)(2-), decreases the MXT affinity to DNA despite electrostatic repulsions with phosphate-deoxyribose chains of DNA. The MXT-DNA binding constant was found to decrease from (1.96 ± 0.005) × 10(5) to (0.77 ± 0.018) × 10(5) M(-1) for Cr(VI) concentration changing from 0 to 30 μM. The influence of Cr(VI) on MXT-DNA binding has been attributed to the oxidation of guanine residue, thus interrupting the intercalation of MXT into the DNA double helix at the preferential CpG intercalation site. This supposition is corroborated by the observed increase in the MXT binding site size from 2 bp (base pairs) to 4-6 bp in the presence of Cr(VI). The measurements of the MXT-DNA binding constant and the MXT binding site size on a DNA molecule have been carried out using spectroscopic, voltammetric, and nanogravimetric techniques, providing useful information on the mechanism of the interactions.

  9. Evaluation of antibacterial effects of different calcium hydroxide compositions on planktonic Enterococcus faecalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Tabrizizadeh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Calcium hydroxide has a pronounced antimicrobial activity against most of the bacterial species found in infected root canals and endodontic infections. It is one of the most frequently used intracanal medications in endodontic therapy. The objective of this study was to determine the antimicrobial efficacy of six calcium hydroxide formulations (mixed with saline, lidocaine 2%, chlorhexidine 2%, chlorhexidine 0.2%, Iodine Potassium iodide (IKI 2%, and glycerin on Enterococcus faecalis using agar diffusion test.Materials and Methods: Twelve culture plates were incubated with Enterococcus faecalis. Five cavities were made in each plate with 5 mm diameter and 4 mm depth. Two plates were randomly considered for each calcium hydroxide formulation and filled completely with creamy mixture of tested materials. The plates were incubated at 37ºC for 48 hours. The diameter of inhibition zone around each well was recorded in millimetres and data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey tests.Results: The results of this study showed that all tested calcium hydroxide pastes had good antimicrobial activity. The antimicrobial activity of calcium hydroxide mixed with lidocaine, chlorhexidine 2% and IKI 2% were significantly greater than that of calcium hydroxide mixed with saline (P0.01.Conclusion: Considering the results of this study, lidocaine 2%, chlorhexidine 2% and IKI 2% are suggested to be used for preparation of calcium hydroxide paste. Further studies with different methods are needed for confirming these results.

  10. Maximum availability and mineralogical control of chromium released from AOD slag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junguo; Liu, Bao; Zeng, Yanan; Wang, Ziming; Gao, Zhiyuan

    2017-03-01

    AOD (argon oxygen decarburization) slag is the by-product in the stainless steel refining process. Chromium existing in AOD slag can leach out and probably poses a serious threat to the environment. To assess the leaching toxicity of chromium released from AOD slag, the temperature-dependent maximum availability leaching test was performed. To determine the controlling mineralogical phases of chromium released from AOD slag, a Visual MINTEQ simulation was established based on Vminteq30 and the FactSage 7.0 database. The leaching tests indicated that the leaching availability of chromium was slight and mainly consisted of trivalent chromium. Aging of AOD slag under the atmosphere can oxidize trivalent chromium to hexavalent chromium, which could be leached out by rainwater. According to the simulation, the chromium concentration in leachates was controlled by the freely soluble pseudo-binary phases in the pH = 7.0 leaching process and controlled by the Cr2O3 phase in the pH = 4.0 leaching process. Chromium concentrations were underestimated when the controlling phases were determined to be FeCr2O4 and MgCr2O4. Facilitating the generation of the insoluble spinel-like phases during the cooling and disposal process of the molten slag could be an effective approach to decreasing the leaching concentration of chromium and its environmental risk.

  11. Finished leather waste chromium acid extraction and anaerobic biodegradation of the products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Maria J; Almeida, Manuel F; Pinho, Sílvia C; Santos, Isabel C

    2010-06-01

    Due to the amounts of chromium in the leachate resulting from leather leaching tests, chromium sulfate tanned leather wastes are very often considered hazardous wastes. To overcome this problem, one option could be recovering the chromium and, consequently, lowering its content in the leather scrap. With this objective, chromium leather scrap was leached with sulfuric acid solutions at low temperature also aiming at maximizing chromium removal with minimum attack of the leather matrix. The effects of leather scrap dimension, sulfuric acid and sodium sulfate concentration in the solutions, as well as extraction time and temperature on chromium recovery were studied, and, additionally, organic matrix degradation was evaluated. The best conditions found for chromium recovery were leather scrap conditioning using 25mL of concentrated H(2)SO(4)/L solution at 293 or 313K during 3 or 6days. Under such conditions, 30-60+/-5% of chromium was recovered and as low as 3-6+/-1% of the leather total organic carbon (TOC) was dissolved. Using such treatment, the leather scrap area and volume are reduced and the residue is a more brittle material showing enhanced anaerobic biodegradability. Although good recovery results were achieved, due to the fact that the amount of chromium in eluate exceeded the threshold value this waste was still hazardous. Thus, it needs to be methodically washed in order to remove all the chromium de-linked from collagen.

  12. Black and green pigments based on chromium-cobalt spinels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliziario, Sayonara A., E-mail: sayonaraea@iq.unesp.br [Departamento de Fisico-Quimica, Instituto de Quimica, UNESP - Univ Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Quimica, CCEN, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Campus I, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Andrade, Jeferson M. de [Departamento de Quimica, CCEN, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Campus I, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Lima, Severino J.G. [Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, CT, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Campus I, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Paskocimas, Carlos A. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, CT, Natal, RN (Brazil); Soledade, Luiz E.B. [Departamento de Quimica, CCEN, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Campus I, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Hammer, P.; Longo, E. [Departamento de Fisico-Quimica, Instituto de Quimica, UNESP - Univ Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Souza, Antonio G.; Santos, Ieda M.G. [Departamento de Quimica, CCEN, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Campus I, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {yields} Co(Co{sub 2-x}Cr{sub x})O{sub 4} powders with different chromium concentrations (x = 0, 0.25 and 1) were prepared by the polymeric precursor method. {yields} Co(CoCr)O{sub 4} and Co(Co{sub 1.75}Cr{sub 0.25})O{sub 4} displayed a dark color and CoCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} was green. {yields} The colors were related to the different oxidation states of Cr and Co. {yields} Cobalt enrichment result in an increasing presence of Co(III) and a decrease amount of Cr(VI). - Abstract: Chromium and cobalt oxides are widely used in the manufacture of industrial pigments. In this work, the Co(Co{sub 2-x}Cr{sub x})O{sub 4} powders with different chromium concentrations (x = 0, 0.25 and 1) were synthesized by the polymeric precursor method, heat treatment between 600 and 1000 deg. C. These powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, colorimetry, UV-vis absorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. Even with the addition of chromium, the XRD patterns revealed that all powders crystallize in a single spinel cubic structure. The spinels with higher cobalt amount, Co(CoCr)O{sub 4} and Co(Co{sub 1.75}Cr{sub 0.25})O{sub 4}, displayed a dark color, without the Co{sup 3+} reduction observed in Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} between 900 and 950 deg. C. The spinel with higher chromium amount, CoCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}, was green. The colors were directly related to the occupation of tetrahedral and octahedral sites by the chromophores, as well as to the different oxidation states of chromium and cobalt. The different optical band gap values estimated from UV-vis spectra suggested the existence of intermediary energy levels within the band gap. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed an increasing presence of Co(III) and a decreasing amount of Cr(VI) with cobalt enrichment.

  13. Reactive transport modeling at uranium in situ recovery sites: uncertainties in uranium sorption on iron hydroxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Raymond H.; Tutu, Hlanganani; Brown, Adrian; Figueroa, Linda; Wolkersdorfer, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Geochemical changes that can occur down gradient from uranium in situ recovery (ISR) sites are important for various stakeholders to understand when evaluating potential effects on surrounding groundwater quality. If down gradient solid-phase material consists of sandstone with iron hydroxide coatings (no pyrite or organic carbon), sorption of uranium on iron hydroxides can control uranium mobility. Using one-dimensional reactive transport models with PHREEQC, two different geochemical databases, and various geochemical parameters, the uncertainties in uranium sorption on iron hydroxides are evaluated, because these oxidized zones create a greater risk for future uranium transport than fully reduced zones where uranium generally precipitates.

  14. Study on the modulating effect of polysaccharide upon the mineralization of iron hydroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Jiangbo; SUN Zhenya

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the modulating effect of polysaccharide upon the mineralization of iron hydroxide, a series of simulative biomineralization experiments using dextran and chitosan as organic substrates were conducted in this paper. The results showed that iron hydroxide gel nucleated and grew in polysaccharide molecules, with the self-assemble effect of dextran or chitosan, the nanometer-sized akaganeite was formed. The shape, size and crystal structural type of iron oxyhydroxide formed from iron hydroxide gel depend on the type of polysaccharide and its concentrations.

  15. Removal of Chromium with The Complexing Agents from Industrial Effluents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Prameena Sheeja

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Human activities and consequent developments have brought about the spectre of an overwhelming degradation of all facets of the natural environment-physical, chemical, biological and social. Environmental pollution, especially by chemicals, is one of the most significant factors in the degradation of the biosphere components. Among all chemical contaminants, heavy metals are believed to be of special ecological, biological and health significance. Unlike organic pollutants, the majority of which are susceptible to biological degradation, metal ions do not degrade into harmless end products. Chemical precipitation is a simple and economical method, and hence, has been widely used. The reduction of chromium (VI to chromium (III can be done with the help of ferrous sulphate. The precipitation was carried out in the presence and absence of complexing agents such as ammonium chloride, tartrate and citrate.

  16. Internal Friction In The PFN Ceramics With Chromium Dopand

    OpenAIRE

    Zachariasz R.; Bochenek D.; Bruś B.

    2015-01-01

    An aim of this work was to determine an influence of an admixture, the chromium (for x from 0.01 to 0.06), on the mechanical properties of the PFN ceramics. The ceramics with chemical composition Pb(Fe0.5−xCrxNb0.5)O3 was synthesized in two steps from simple oxides PbO, Fe2O3, Nb2O5, Cr2O3. The first stage was based on obtaining the FeNbO4 from the Fe2O3 and Nb2O5 simple oxides. At this stage an admixture in a form the Cr2O3 chromium oxide was added to the solution. In the second stage the Pb...

  17. Preparation of Silica Modified with 2-Mercaptoimidazole and its SorptionProperties of Chromium(III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Budiman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Modified silica gel was prepared to remove the heavy metal of chromium(III from water sample. Silica gel was used as supporting material and the 2-mercaptoimidazole was immobilized onto surface silica so that the silica would have selective properties to adsorb the heavy metal chromium(III through the formation of coordination compound between the 2-mercaptoimidazole and chromium(III. The characterization of modified silica gel was carried out by analyzing the Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrum of this material in order to ensure the immobilization of 2-mercaptoimidazole onto the surface. The effect of pH solution, initial concentration of chromium(III, and interaction time were investigated in batch mode to find the adsorption properties of chromium(III onto modified silica. The condition optimum of these parameters was applied to determine the removal percentage of chromium(III in water sample using the modified silica gel

  18. Determination of Chromium(III) Picolinate Using High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Ultraviolet Spectrophotometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Il; Woo, Dong Jin; Kang, Dae Kyung [EASY BIO System, Inc, Chonan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Myung Hee [Pollin, Inc, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Gun Jo [Korea Food and Drug Administration, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Ki Won [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-10-15

    Cr-(pic){sub 3} has been widely used as food additives, drugs, and feed additives. Accordingly, its determination method should be established. In the present paper, we have studied the determination method of chromium(III) picolinate accurately using ESI-MS on-lined with HPLC. Chromium(III) picolinate in feed products was determined successfully. Chromium(III) is very well known as an essential mineral. It is suggested as a cofactor in the maintenance of both normal lipid and carbohydrate metabolism by assisting the action of insulin on a cell membrane. According to the National Research Council, the daily recommended intake of chromium(III) is 50-200 μg. Several organic chromium(III) complexes have been reported to have significantly higher absorption and tissue incorporation activity than inorganic salts such as chromium(III) chloride.

  19. Biological monitoring of occupational exposure to different chromium compounds at various valency states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutti, A.; Pedroni, C.; Arfini, G.; Franchini, I.; Minoia, C.; Micoli, G.; Baldi, C.

    1984-01-01

    Chromium concentrations in the air were measured in seven different workroom environments, where exposure to water soluble hexavalent or trivalent compounds was expected. Urinary excretion of chromium was measured before and after the same arbitrarily chosen working day. End-of-shift urinary chromium and its increase above pre-exposure levels were closely related to the concentration of water soluble chromium (VI) in the air. The values corresponding to 50 micrograms m-3 in the air, which is the current threshold limit value in most countries, were 29.8 and 12.2 micrograms g-1 of creatinine, respectively. Urinary chromium in workers exposed to water insoluble chromates or to water soluble chromic (III) sulphate was definitely higher than that observed in subjects not occupationally exposed to chromium compounds, but it cannot be recommended as short-term exposure test for evaluation of the job-related hazard.

  20. Bioconcentration of chromium in edible mushrooms: influence of environmental and genetic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, M A; Alonso, J; Melgar, M J

    2013-08-01

    Chromium concentrations were determined in 167 samples of wild edible mushrooms, collected from three different sites (urban, traffic and pastureland areas) in Lugo (NW Spain). The hymenophore (H) and the rest of the fruiting body (RFB) were analysed separately. The analyses were performed using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The highest mean chromium levels (mg/kg dry weight) of 3.5 and 8.0, 4.5 and 6.2, and 6.2 and 4.3 were found in Lycoperdon utriforme, Coprinus comatus and Agaricus campestris in H and RFB, respectively. The highest concentrations of chromium were observed in terrestrial saprophytic species in relation to mycorrhizal species. With respect to the underlying substrates, chromium concentration was lowest in the pastureland area (24.6 mg/kg dw). All mushroom species were bioexclusors of chromium (BCFmushrooms harvested from the areas investigated poses no toxicological risk to human health due to chromium.

  1. Chromium speciation in solid matrices and regulation: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unceta, N. [University of the Basque Country, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Vitoria-Gasteiz (Spain); Seby, F. [Ultra Traces Analyses Aquitaine (UT2A), Helioparc Pau-Pyrenees, Pau (France); Malherbe, J.; Donard, O.F.X. [Universite de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour, Helioparc Pau-Pyrenees, Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique Bio-Inorganique et Environnement, IPREM, UMR CNRS 5254, Pau (France)

    2010-06-15

    In recent years, the extensive use of chromium in industrial processes has led to the promotion of several directives and recommendations by the European Union, that try to limit and regulate the presence of Cr(VI) in the environment and to protect industrial workers using chromium and end-users of manufactured products. As a consequence, new standard methods and analytical procedures have been published at the EU level for Cr(VI) determination in soil, sludge, sediment, and similar waste materials, workplace atmospheres, cement, packaging materials, industrially produced samples, and corrosion-protection layers on some components of vehicles and electrical and electronic equipment. The objective of this article is to summarize the different directives and recommendations and to critically review the currently existing standard methods and the methods published in the literature for chromium speciation in the above mentioned solid matrices, putting the emphasis on the different extraction procedures which have been developed for each matrix. Particular attention has been paid to Cr(III) and Cr(VI) inter-conversions that can occur during extraction and efforts to minimize these unwanted reactions. Although the use of NaOH-Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solutions with hot plate extraction seems to be the more widespread procedure, species transformation can still occur and several studies suggest that speciated isotope-dilution mass spectrometry (SIDMS) could be a suitable tool for correction of these interconversions. Besides, recent studies have proved the role of Cr(III) in chromium toxicology. As a consequence, the authors suggest an update of standard methods in the near future. (orig.)

  2. Technology Demonstration of the Zero Emissions Chromium Electroplating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    blanket technology for electroplating tanks. When no liquid blanket is used, evaporation of water, especially during warm weather conditions, requires...0.007 0.004 0.002 Tank 12A had noticeable blobs floating on the surface and also at the interfacial layer of PRD fluid and the chromium acid solution...Tank 12B did not have any such blobs . All the parts removed after plating looked fairly good. There were no visible streaks, water breaks, etc. The

  3. Recovery of Chromium from Waste Taning Liquors by Magnesium Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood M. Barbooti

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This is a case study of AL-Za’afaraniya tanning factory, 15 km to the south of Baghdad, to spot light on simple chemical treatment of the discharged water to solve the environmental problems associated with its chromium content management. The treatment was extended to the recovery and reuse of chromium. Chromium was precipitated by the addition of magnesium oxide which also aid as a neutralizer for the acidic effluent. The laboratory treatment was carried out to find the optimum conditions. The wastewater samples were taken from the outline area of the tannery. Box-Wilson method was adopted to find useful relationships between the operating variables (temperature, mixing period and magnesium oxide dose and the pH and chromium content of effluent. The experimental data were successfully fitted to second order polynomial mathematical models for the treatment. The most favorable operating conditions for the treatment were: temperature, 30 ºC; mixing period, 50 min and magnesium oxide concentration, 3000 mg/L. On using the optimum conditions a mathematical model simulating the operation for the treatment was obtained as follows:Cr = 6.0848 – 0.001839 X11 – 0.105334 X12 – 0.041038 X13pH = 10.29086 – 0.001223 X11 – 0.140043 X12 – 0.00953 X13Experimentally Cr concentration was decreased to about (0.5 mg/L in wastewater after raising the pH value to (7.35 by adding magnesium oxide.

  4. THE WEAR RESISTANCE INCREASE OF CHROMIUM CAST IRON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Ilyushenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the tests on the wear resistance of chromium cast irons of different compositions obtained in sand forms. It has been shown that increase of the wear resistance and mechanical properties of the cast iron is possible to obtain using the casting in metal molds. A further increase in wear resistance of parts produced in metal molds is possible by changing the technological parameters of casting and alloying by titanium.

  5. Evidence of weak ferromagnetism in chromium(III) oxide particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez-Vazquez, Carlos E-mail: qfmatcvv@usc.es; Banobre-Lopez, Manuel; Lopez-Quintela, M.A.; Hueso, L.E.; Rivas, J

    2004-05-01

    The low temperature (4chromium(III) oxide particles have been studied. A clear evidence of the presence of weak ferromagnetism is observed below 250 K. The magnetisation curves as a function of the applied field show coercive fields due to the canted antiferromagnetism of the particles. Around 55 K a maximum is observed in the zero-field-cooled curves; this maximum can be assumed as a blocking temperature, similarly to ultrafine ferromagnetic particles.

  6. Chromium related degradation of solid oxide fuel cells; Chrom-bezogene Degradation von Festoxid-Brennstoffzellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, Anita

    2011-05-04

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) offer a high potential for application as an auxiliary power unit (APU) for heavy goods vehicles as well as combined heat and power (CHP) systems. SOFCs are especially attractive due to their high efficiencies and the use of different fuel types. However, optimization in terms of long term stability and costs are still necessary. This work characterized the degradation of SOFCs with lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) cathodes under chromium influence. Galvanostatic cell tests were carried out at 800 C with operation times from 250 - 3000 h and variation of the chromium source and current density. The current densities of j = 0 (A)/(cm{sup 2}), j = 0,3 (A)/(cm{sup 2}) and j = 0,5 (A)/(cm{sup 2}) were applied. The high temperature ferritic alloy Crofer22APU was used as a chromium source. Variation of the chromium source was realized by coating the Crofer22APU insert with the chromium retention layer Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} and the cathode contact layer LCC10. Cell degradation was analyzed with regard to cell voltage, current density and area specific resistance (ASR). Microstructural alterations of the cathode as well as chromium content and distribution across the cell were investigated after completion of the cell tests. For cells with a chromium source present and operation with a nonzero current density, the course of cell degradation was divided into three phases: a run-in, weak linear degradation and strong linear degradation. A decrease of the chromium release rate by means of different coatings stretched the course of degradation along the timescale. Strong degradation, which is characterized by a significant increase in ASR as well as a decrease of current density at the operating point, was only observed when a chromium source in the setup was comb ined with operation of the cell with a non-zero current density. Operation of the cell with a chromium source but no current density caused a degradation of current density at the

  7. The chromium site in doped glassy lithium tetraborate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, T.D. [Department of Engineering Physics, Air Force Institute of Technology, 2950 Hobson Way, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433 (United States); Echeverria, E.; Beniwal, Sumit [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 855 North 16th Street, Theodore Jorgensen Hall, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588-0299 (United States); Adamiv, V.T.; Burak, Ya. V.; Enders, Axel [Institute of Physical Optics, 23 Dragomanov Street, Lviv 79005 (Ukraine); Petrosky, J.C.; McClory, J.W. [Department of Engineering Physics, Air Force Institute of Technology, 2950 Hobson Way, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433 (United States); Dowben, P.A., E-mail: pdowben1@unl.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 855 North 16th Street, Theodore Jorgensen Hall, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588-0299 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, we find that Cr substitutes primarily in the Li{sup +} site as a dopant in lithium tetraborate Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} glasses, in this case 98.4Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}–1.6Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} or nominally Li{sub 1.98}Cr{sub 0.025}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}. This strong preference for a single site is nonetheless accompanied by site distortions and some site disorder, helping explain the optical properties of chromium doped Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} glasses. The resulting O coordination shell has a contraction of the Cr–O bond lengths as compared to the Li–O bond lengths. There is also an increase in the O coordination number. - Graphical abstract: Lithium tetraborate: labeled are the B1 and B2 sites, where the latter correspond to BO{sub 3} and BO{sub 4} structures respectively. - Highlights: • Adoption of the Li + site for chromium dopants in lithium tetraborate identified. • Increased oxygen coordination for glass over the crystalline lithium tetraborate. • Distortions about the doping chromium characterized. • Local bond order is preserved in spite of the glassy nature.

  8. Chromium and manganese interactions in streptozocin-diabetic rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, M.L.; Jarrett, C.R.; Adeleye, B.O.; Stoecker, B.J. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater (United States))

    1991-03-15

    Weanling male rats were fed casein-based diets low in chromium and manganese ({minus}Cr-MN) or supplemented with 1 ppm chromium as chromium chloride (+Cr) and/or 55 ppm manganese as manganous carbonate in a factorial design. After 7 weeks on the experimental diets, half of the rats in each group were injected on 2 consecutive days with 55 mg/kg streptozocin (STZ) in citrate buffer pH 4. Four weeks after injection, serum glucose in the diabetic group supplement with both Cr and Mn was not different from non-diabetic animals; however, diabetic animals in {minus}Cr groups or in the +Cr-Mn group had significantly elevated serum glucose. Serum insulin was reduced by STZ. A significant interaction between Mn and diabetes affected serum cortisol concentrations. More new tissue was formed on a polyvinyl sponge inserted under the skin in +Mn animals. In this study, the STZ animals were more sensitive than the control animals to dietary Cr and Mn concentrations.

  9. Magnesium, zinc, and chromium nutriture and physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukaski, H C

    2000-08-01

    Magnesium, zinc, and chromium are mineral elements required in modest amounts to maintain health and optimal physiologic function. For physically active persons, adequate amounts of these micronutrients are needed in the diet to ensure the capacity for increased energy expenditure and work performance. Most physically active individuals consume diets that provide amounts of magnesium and zinc sufficient to meet population standards. Women tend to consume less of these minerals than is recommended, in part because they eat less food than men. Inadequate intakes of magnesium and zinc have been reported for participants in activities requiring restriction of body weight. Dietary chromium is difficult to estimate because of a lack of appropriate reference databases. Acute, intense activity results in short-term increases in both urine and sweat losses of minerals that apparently diminish during recovery in the days after exercise. Supplemental magnesium and zinc apparently improve strength and muscle metabolism. However, evidence is lacking as to whether these observations relate to impaired nutritional status or a pharmacologic effect. Chromium supplementation of young men and women does not promote muscle accretion, fat loss, or gains in strength. Physically active individuals with concerns about meeting guidelines for nutrient intake should be counseled to select and consume foods with high nutrient densities rather than to rely on nutritional supplements. The indiscriminate use of mineral supplements can adversely affect physiologic function and impair health.

  10. Fabrication of chitosan-magnetite nanocomposite strip for chromium removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureshkumar, Vaishnavi; Kiruba Daniel, S. C. G.; Ruckmani, K.; Sivakumar, M.

    2016-02-01

    Environmental pollution caused by heavy metals is a serious threat. In the present work, removal of chromium was carried out using chitosan-magnetite nanocomposite strip. Magnetite nanoparticles (Fe3O4) were synthesized using chemical co-precipitation method at 80 °C. The nanoparticles were characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction spectrometer, atomic force microscope, dynamic light scattering and vibrating sample magnetometer, which confirm the size, shape, crystalline nature and magnetic behaviour of nanoparticles. Atomic force microscope revealed that the particle size was 15-30 nm and spherical in shape. The magnetite nanoparticles were mixed with chitosan solution to form hybrid nanocomposite. Chitosan strip was casted with and without nanoparticle. The affinity of hybrid nanocomposite for chromium was studied using K2Cr2O7 (potassium dichromate) solution as the heavy metal solution containing Cr(VI) ions. Adsorption tests were carried out using chitosan strip and hybrid nanocomposite strip at different time intervals. Amount of chromium adsorbed by chitosan strip and chitosan-magnetite nanocomposite strip from aqueous solution was evaluated using UV-visible spectroscopy. The results confirm that the heavy metal removal efficiency of chitosan-magnetite nanocomposite strip is 92.33 %, which is higher when compared to chitosan strip, which is 29.39 %.

  11. Foam separation of chromium (Ⅵ) from aqueous solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAO Cai-shan; DING Yan

    2009-01-01

    Removal of chromium (Ⅵ) dissolved in water by intermittent foam separation was implemented with cetyl trimethy-ammonium bromide as surfactant. The influence of various factors on removal efficiency was systematically studied. The removal efficiency has a maximum value near pH 4.0; thus, most experiments were carried out at pH 4.0. The orthogonal experiment was conducted to confirm the optimal operating parameters. The orthogonal experimental results show that when the liquid feed concentration is 10 mg/L, the pH value of feed solution is 4.00, air flow rates 0.9 L/min, surfactant dosage is 300 mg/L, the maximum removal efficiency of chromium (Ⅵ) reaches 97.80%, and condense multiple reaches 1711. The kinetic test indicates that the foam separation of chromium is a first-order process. The equivalent rate constant calculated from the slope is 0.406 4, and the equivalent rate equation is obtained.

  12. Fabrication of Carbon Nanotube - Chromium Carbide Composite Through Laser Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ze; Gao, Yibo; Liang, Fei; Wu, Benxin; Gou, Jihua; Detrois, Martin; Tin, Sammy; Yin, Ming; Nash, Philip; Tang, Xiaoduan; Wang, Xinwei

    2016-03-01

    Ceramics often have high hardness and strength, and good wear and corrosion resistance, and hence have many important applications, which, however, are often limited by their poor fracture toughness. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may enhance ceramic fracture toughness, but hot pressing (which is one typical approach of fabricating CNT-ceramic composites) is difficult to apply for applications that require localized heat input, such as fabricating composites as surface coatings. Laser beam may realize localized material sintering with little thermal effect on the surrounding regions. However, for the typical ceramics for hard coating applications (as listed in Ref.[1]), previous work on laser sintering of CNT-ceramic composites with mechanical property characterizations has been very limited. In this paper, research work has been reported on the fabrication and characterization of CNT-ceramic composites through laser sintering of mixtures of CNTs and chromium carbide powders. Under the studied conditions, it has been found that laser-sintered composites have a much higher hardness than that for plasma-sprayed composites reported in the literature. It has also been found that the composites obtained by laser sintering of CNTs and chromium carbide powder mixtures have a fracture toughness that is ~23 % higher than the material obtained by laser sintering of chromium carbide powders without CNTs.

  13. Response of soil catalase activity to chromium contamination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zofia St(e)pniewska; Agnieszka Woli(n)ska; Joanna Ziomek

    2009-01-01

    The impact of chromium (III) and (VI) forms on soil catalase activity is presented.The Orthic Podzol, Haplic Phaeozem and Mollic Gleysol from different depths were used in the experiment.The soil samples were amended with solution of Cr(III) using CrCl3, and with Cr(VI) using K2Cr2O7 in the concentration range from 0 to 20 mg/kg, whereas the samples without the addition of chromium served as control.Catalase activity was assayed by one of the commonly used spectrophotometric methods.As it is demonstrated in the experiment, both Cr(III) and Cr(VI) forms have ability to reduce soil catalase activity.A chromium dose of 20 mg/kg caused the inhibition of catalase activity and the corresponding contamination levels ranged from 75% to 92% for Cr(III) and 68% to 76% for Cr(VI), with relation to the control.Catalase activity reached maximum in the soil material from surface layers (0-25 cm), typically characterized by the highest content of organic matter creating favorable conditions for microorganisms.

  14. Achieving Zero Stress in Iridium, Chromium, and Nickle Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadway, David M.; Weimer, Jeffrey; Gurgew, Danielle; Lis, Tomasz; Ramsey, Brian D.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Ames, A.; Bruni, R.

    2015-01-01

    We examine a method for achieving zero intrinsic stress in thin films of iridium, chromium, and nickel deposited by magnetron sputter deposition. The examination of the stress in these materials is motivated by efforts to advance the optical performance of light-weight x-ray space telescopes into the regime of sub-arc second resolution that rely on control of the film stress to values within 10-100 MPa. A characteristic feature of the intrinsic stress behavior in chromium and nickel is their sensitivity to the magnitude and sign of the intrinsic stress with argon gas pressure, including the existence of a critical pressure that results in zero film stress. This critical pressure scales linearly with the film's density. While the effect of stress reversal with argon pressure has been previously reported by Hoffman and others for nickel and chromium, we have discovered a similar behavior for iridium. Additionally, we have identified zero stress in iridium shortly after island coalescence. This feature of film growth is used for achieving a total internal stress of -2.89 MPa for a 15.8 nm thick iridium film. The surface roughness of this low-stress film was examined using scanning probe microscopy (SPM) and x-ray reflectivity (XRR) at CuKa and these results presented and discussed.

  15. Simultaneously Recovering High-Purity Chromium and Removing Organic Pollutants from Tannery Effluent

    OpenAIRE

    Jie Zong; Yan-Chun Li; Kang Hu

    2016-01-01

    Chromium pollution is a serious issue because of carcinogenic toxicities of the pollutants and low recovery rate of chromium because of the presence of organic, such as protein and fat. In this work, high recovery rate and high purity of the chromium ion were successfully prepared by the way of acid enzyme, flocculant, and Fenton oxidation. The experiments were characterized by TG, TOC, UV-VIS, and SEM. In the work, the tannery waste chrome liquor was used as experimental material. The result...

  16. Adsorption of Chromium(VI) from Aqueous Solutions by Coffee Polyphenol-Formaldehyde/Acetaldehyde Resins

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Removal of chromium(VI) from wastewater is essential as it is toxic. Thus, removal of chromium(VI) was performed using coffee polyphenol-formaldehyde/acetaldehyde resins as adsorbents. Adsorbent resins were prepared by condensation of decaffeinated coffee powder with formaldehyde/acetaldehyde and used for the removal of Cr(VI) ions from aqueous solutions. A simple and sensitive solid phase extraction procedure was applied for the determination of chromium at trace levels by spectroscopic meth...

  17. Antimicrobial effect of calcium hydroxide as endo intracanal dressing on Streptococcus viridans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanik Zubaidah

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Calcium hydroxide had been used as the intra-canal dressing in endodontic treatment due to its high alkaline and antimicrobial capacity. It can also dissolve the necrotic tissue, prevent dental root resorbtion and regenerate a new hard tissue. The aim of this study was to determine the concentration of calcium hydroxide which had the highest antimicrobial effect on Streptococcus viridans. Samples were divided into 5 groups; each group consisted of 8 samples with different concentration of calcium hydroxide. Group I: 50%, group II: 55, Group III: 60%, Group IV: 65%, Group V: 70%. The antimicrobial testing was performed using diffusion method against Streptococcus viridans. The result of susceptibility test was showed by the inhibition zone diameter which measured with caliper (in millimeter. We analyzed the data using One-Way ANOVA test with significant difference 0.05 and subsequently LSD test. The study showed that calcium hydroxide with concentration 60% has the highest antimicrobial effect.

  18. A Ni-Fe Layered Double Hydroxide-Carbon Nanotube Complex for Water Oxidation

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Ming; Wang, Hailiang; Liang, Yongye; Wu, Justin Zachary; Zhou, Jigang; Wang, Jian; Regier, Tom; Wei, Fei; Dai, Hongjie

    2013-01-01

    Highly active, durable and cost-effective electrocatalysts for water oxidation to evolve oxygen gas hold a key to a range of renewable energy solutions including water splitting and rechargeable metal-air batteries. Here, we report the synthesis of ultrathin nickel iron layered double hydroxide nanoplates on mildly oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes. Incorporation of Fe into the nickel hydroxide induced the formation of NiFe-layered double hydroxide. The nanoplates were covalently attached to a network of nanotubes, affording excellent electrical wiring to the nanoplates. The ultra-thin Ni-Fe layered double hydroxide nanoplates/carbon nanotube complex was found to exhibit unusually high electro-catalytic activity and stability for oxygen evolution and outperformed commercial precious metal Ir catalysts.

  19. USE OF TWO DIGESTION METHODS IN THE EVALUATION OF CHROMIUM CONTENT IN CATTLE'S MEAT SUPPLEMENTED WITH CHROMIUM CHELATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. L. T. de Andrade

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to analyze the chromium content in beef using two digestion methods. There were used samples from 24 18-month-old male cattle, and twelve of them were supplemented and twelve were not supplemented with chromium chelate. These samples were evaluated by atomic absorption spectroscopy, previously submitted to digestion method using nitric acid (65% with hydrogen peroxide (35% and to digestion method, using solution of nitric perchloric acid in the proportion 3:1. Immediately after the slaughter, the carcasses were sent to sanitary maturation. After 24 hours, samples between 12th and 13th rib in the muscle Longissimus Thoracis were taken. For evaluation, it was used completely randomized design (Die and analysis of variance (ANOVA at 5% of significance level. The results didn't evidenced any significant difference (p>0,05 between the (cromo content, regardless the supplementation. The same happened with the digestion methods used.

  20. Waste metal hydroxide sludge as adsorbent for a reactive dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sílvia C R; Vílar, Vítor J P; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2008-05-30

    An industrial waste sludge mainly composed by metal hydroxides was used as a low-cost adsorbent for removing a reactive textile dye (Remazol Brilliant Blue) in solution. Characterization of this waste material included chemical composition, pH(ZPC) determination, particle size distribution, physical textural properties and metals mobility under different pH conditions. Dye adsorption equilibrium isotherms were determined at 25 and 35 degrees C and pH of 4, 7 and 10 revealing reasonably fits to Langmuir and Freundlich models. At 25 degrees C and pH 7, Langmuir fit indicates a maximum adsorption capacity of 91.0mg/g. An adsorptive ion-exchange mechanism was identified from desorption studies. Batch kinetic experiments were also conducted at different initial dye concentration, temperature, adsorbent dosage and pH. A pseudo-second-order model showed good agreement with experimental data. LDF approximation model was used to estimate homogeneous solid diffusion coefficients and the effective pore diffusivities. Additionally, a simulated real effluent containing the selected dye, salts and dyeing auxiliary chemicals, was also used in equilibrium and kinetic experiments and the adsorption performance was compared with aqueous dye solutions.

  1. Reactions of cumene hydroperoxide mixed with sodium hydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Hung-Yi; Shu, Chi-Min; Tsai, Tung-Lin

    2008-04-15

    Decomposition of cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) was undertaken in a free radical chain reaction. The peroxyl group is very active and unstable, while the remainder of the molecule is inert. CHP reacted with various concentrations of dilute sodium hydroxide as a catalyst to cleave at ambient and decomposition temperature. The products were verified by GC/MS, and were quantitatively analyzed by chromatography. CHP cleaved heterolytic with NaOH at 250 degrees C, whose major product was dimethylphenyl carbinol (DMPC); however, the main products become acetophenone and alpha-methylstyrene by cleaved homolytic pathway. The catalytic concentrations of NaOH significantly affected the branch ratios of DMPC under decomposition. Based on the experimental results, a radical cleavage mechanism was proposed. To sum up, the reaction parameters, such as temperature, Lewis base, etc., could affect the incompatibilities and decomposition pathways for proper CHP cleavage process. In addition, exothermic onset temperatures (T0) and heat of decomposition (Delta Hd) of incompatible mixtures and CHP itself were studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Comparisons of T0, Delta Hd and peak power were assessed to corroborate the severity of thermal hazards. From the decay rate of CHP concentration, the reaction order was determined to be 0.5, and the Arrhenius parameters were measured as Ea=92.1 kJ/mol and frequency factor A=2.42 x 10(10)min(-1).

  2. Layered-double-hydroxide-modified electrodes: electroanalytical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonelli, Domenica; Scavetta, Erika; Giorgetti, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional inorganic solids, such as layered double hydroxides (LDHs), also defined as anionic clays, have open structures and unique anion-exchange properties which make them very appropriate materials for the immobilization of anions and biomolecules that often bear an overall negative charge. This review aims to describe the important aspects and new developments of electrochemical sensors and biosensors based on LDHs, evidencing the research from our own laboratory and other groups. It is intended to provide an overview of the various types of chemically modified electrodes that have been developed with these 2D layered materials, along with the significant advances made over the last several years. In particular, we report the main methods used for the deposition of LDH films on different substrates, the conductive properties of these materials, the possibility to use them in the development of membranes for potentiometric anion analysis, the early analytical applications of chemically modified electrodes based on the ability of LDHs to preconcentrate redox-active anions and finally the most recent applications exploiting their electrocatalytic properties. Another promising application field of LDHs, when they are employed as host structures for enzymes, is biosensing, which is described considering glucose as an example.

  3. Mechanochemical synthesis of low-fluorine doped aluminum hydroxide fluorides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalise, V.; Scholz, G.; Kemnitz, E.

    2016-11-01

    Different aluminum hydroxide fluorides with varying Al/F molar ratios from 1:1.5 up to 1:0.05 were successfully synthesized by mechanochemical reactions. The characterization of the products by XRD, 27Al and 19F MAS NMR, thermal analysis, nitrogen adsorption and zeta potential techniques allows a detailed understanding of the structure and surface properties of the products. Using γ-Al(OH)3 and β-AlF3·3H2O as OH- and F-sources, respectively, strongly disordered products were obtained with an Al: F molar ratio higher than 1:0.25. The fluorination degree has affected the amount of 4- and 5-fold coordinated Al sites, not present in the reactants. An evolution of the sub-coordinated Al-species has been detected also as a consequence of annealing processes. Obviously, these species affect the phase transition to alumina, by decreasing the transition temperature of the formation of α-Al2O3. Synthesis conditions (milling time, fluorination degree) play a crucial role for the product composition.

  4. Surface modification of magnesium hydroxide using vinyltriethoxysilane by dry process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Shengjie; Li, Lijuan; Xu, Defang; Zhu, Donghai; Liu, Zhiqi; Nie, Feng

    2016-09-01

    In order to improve the compatibility between magnesium hydroxide (MH) and polymer matrix, the surface of MH was modified using vinyltriethoxysilane (VTES) by dry process and the interfacial interaction between MH and VTES was also studied. Zeta potential measurements implied that the MH particles had better dispersion and less aggregation after modification. Sedimentation tests showed that the surface of MH was transformed from hydrophilic to hydrophobic, and the dispersibility and the compatibility of MH particles significantly improved in the organic phase. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) analyses showed that a thin layer had formed on the surface of the modified MH, but did not alter the material's crystalline phase. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) and Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) showed that the VTES molecules bound strongly to the surface of MH after modification. Chemical bonds (Sisbnd Osbnd Mg) formed by the reaction between Si-OC2H5 and hydroxyl group of MH, also there have physical adsorption effect in the interface simultaneously. A modification mechanism of VTES on the MH surface by dry process was proposed, which different from the modification mechanism by wet process.

  5. Atomistic Simulations of Uranium Incorporation into Iron (Hydr)Oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Ilton, Eugene S.

    2011-04-29

    Atomistic simulations were carried out to characterize the coordination environments of U incorporated in three Fe-(hydr)oxide minerals: goethite, magnetite, and hematite. The simulations provided information on U-O and U-Fe distances, coordination numbers, and lattice distortion for U incorporated in different sites (e.g., unoccupied versus occupied sites, octahedral versus tetrahedral) as a function of the oxidation state of U and charge compensation mechanisms (i.e., deprotonation, vacancy formation, or reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II)). For goethite, deprotonation of first shell hydroxyls enables substitution of U for Fe(III) with a minimal amount of lattice distortion, whereas substitution in unoccupied octahedral sites induced appreciable distortion to 7-fold coordination regardless of U oxidation states and charge compensation mechanisms. Importantly, U-Fe distances of ~3.6 Å were associated with structural incorporation of U and cannot be considered diagnostic of simple adsorption to goethite surfaces. For magnetite, the octahedral site accommodates U(V) or U(VI) with little lattice distortion. U substituted for Fe(III) in hematite maintained octahedral coordination in most cases. In general, comparison of the simulations with available experimental data provides further evidence for the structural incorporation of U in iron (hydr)oxide minerals.

  6. Enhanced aerobic sludge granulation with layered double hydroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jizhi Zhou

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aerobic granular sludge technology has been developed for the biochemical treatment of wastewater in the present study. A fast cultivation of aerobic granular sludge was realized in Sequencing Batch Reactor (SBR, where Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH was used as a carrier for granules growth. In comparison, the sludge particle size with LDH addition was bigger than those without LDH, with more than 50% of compact granular sludge >1.4 mm in size. This indicatestheLDH improved the growth ofthegranular sludge. The frequency of LDH addition had little effect on the granule growth. Moreover, the formation of granules led to the low sludge volume index (SVI and high mixed liquid suspended solids (MLSS in SBR reactor. With the formation of granular sludge, more than 80% of COD was removed in SBR reactor. The high COD removal efficiency of wastewater was observed regardless of various COD loading strength. The results suggest that the growth of granular sludge with LDH as a carrier enhanced the treatment efficiency. Therefore, our results have provided a promising way to prepare the granular sludge for wastewater treatment.

  7. Lithium adsorption on amorphous aluminum hydroxides and gibbsite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos P. Prodromou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lithium (Li adsorption on both amorphous aluminum hydroxides and gibbsite was studied. For the amorphous Al(OH3 the adsorption was found to be pH dependent. Generally, 1.6 times more Li was adsorbed at initial pH value 8.0 compared with pH value 6.50. Gibbsite adsorbed 11.6 to 45.5 times less Li quantities compared with amorphous Al(OH3. Lithium adsorption was not depended on equilibrium times. It remained stable for all equilibrium times used. Lithium quantities extracted with 1N CH3COONH4 pH 7 , represent the physical adsorption, while the remaining Li that was adsorbed on Al(OH3, represents the chemical adsorption. During the desorption process 19% of Li extracted with NH4+, represents the physical adsorption, while the remaining 81% of Li, which was adsorbed represents the chemical adsorption. In gibbsite, 9.6% of Li represents the physical adsorption and 90.4% the chemical one. The experimental data conformed well to Freundlich isotherm equation.

  8. Defluoridation from aqueous solutions by granular ferric hydroxide (GFH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Eva; Bhatnagar, Amit; Ji, Minkyu; Jung, Woosik; Lee, Sang-Hun; Kim, Sun-Joon; Lee, Giehyeon; Song, Hocheol; Choi, Jae-Young; Yang, Jung-Seok; Jeon, Byong-Hun

    2009-02-01

    This research was undertaken to evaluate the feasibility of granular ferric hydroxide (GFH) for fluoride removal from aqueous solutions. Batch experiments were performed to study the influence of various experimental parameters such as contact time (1 min-24h), initial fluoride concentration (1-100 mgL(-1)), temperature (10 and 25 degrees C), pH (3-12) and the presence of competing anions on the adsorption of fluoride on GFH. Kinetic data revealed that the uptake rate of fluoride was rapid in the beginning and 95% adsorption was completed within 10 min and equilibrium was achieved within 60 min. The sorption process was well explained with pseudo-first-order and pore diffusion models. The maximum adsorption capacity of GFH for fluoride removal was 7.0 mgg(-1). The adsorption was found to be an endothermic process and data conform to Langmuir model. The optimum fluoride removal was observed between pH ranges of 4-8. The fluoride adsorption was decreased in the presence of phosphate followed by carbonate and sulphate. Results from this study demonstrated potential utility of GFH that could be developed into a viable technology for fluoride removal from drinking water.

  9. Immobilization of Penicillin G Acylase on Calcined Layered Double Hydroxides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Ling-ling; HE Jing; Evans D. G.; DUAN Xue

    2003-01-01

    A hydrotalcite-like Mg2+/Al3+ layered double hydroxide(LDH) material was prepared by means of a modified coprecipitation method involving a rapid mixing step followed by a separate aging process. LDH calcined at 500 ℃, denoted as CLDH, was characterized by XRD, IR and BET surface area measurements. CLDH has a poor crystalline MgO-like structure with a high surface area and porosity. CLDH was used as a support for the immobilization of penicillin G acylase(PGA). The effect of varying the immobilization conditions, such as pH, contact time and the ratio of enzyme to support, on the activity of the immobilized enzyme in the hydrolysis of penicillin G has been studied. It was found that the activity of the immobilized enzyme decreased slightly with decreasing pH and reached a maximum after a contact time of 24 h. The activity of the immobilized enzyme increased with increasing the ratio of enzyme to support. It was found that the adsorption of PGA inhibited the expected reaction of CLDH with an aqueous medium to regenerate a LDH phase. Its original activity(36%) after 15 cycles of reuse of the immobilized enzyme was retained, but no further loss in the activity was observed.

  10. Thermochemistry of calcium oxide and calcium hydroxide in fluoride slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, S.; Mitchell, A.

    1990-08-01

    Calcium oxide activity in binary CaF2-CaO and ternary CaF2-CaO-Al2O3 and CaF2-CaO-SiO2 slags has been determined by CO2-slag equilibrium experiments at 1400 °C. The carbonate ca-pacity of these slags has also been computed and compared with sulfide capacity data available in the literature. The similarity in trends suggests the possibility of characterizing carbonate capacity as an alternative basicity index for fluoride-base slags. Slag-D2O equilibrium experi-ments are performed at 1400°C with different fluoride-base slags to determine water solubility at two different partial pressures of D2O, employing a new slag sampling technique. A novel isotope tracer detection technique is employed to analyze water in the slags. The water solubility data found show higher values than the previous literature data by an order of magnitude but show a linear relationship with the square root of water vapor partial pressure. The activity of hydroxide computed from the data is shown to be helpful in estimating water solubility in in-dustrial electroslag remelting (ESR) slags.

  11. In vivo toxicity studies of europium hydroxide nanorods in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Chitta Ranjan; Abdel Moneim, Soha S; Wang, Enfeng; Dutta, Shamit; Patra, Sujata; Eshed, Michal; Mukherjee, Priyabrata; Gedanken, Aharon; Shah, Vijay H; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2009-10-01

    Lanthanide nanoparticles and nanorods have been widely used for diagnostic and therapeutic applications in biomedical nanotechnology due to their fluorescence and pro-angiogenic properties to endothelial cells, respectively. Recently, we have demonstrated that europium (III) hydroxide [Eu(III)(OH)(3)] nanorods, synthesized by the microwave technique and characterized by several physico-chemical techniques, can be used as pro-angiogenic agents which introduce future therapeutic treatment strategies for severe ischemic heart/limb disease, and peripheral ischemic disease. The toxicity of these inorganic nanorods to endothelial cells was supported by several in vitro assays. To determine the in vivo toxicity, these nanorods were administered to mice through intraperitoneal injection (IP) everyday over a period of seven days in a dose dependent (1.25 to 125 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) and time dependent manner (8-60 days). Bio-distribution of europium elements in different organs was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). Short-term (S-T) and long-term (L-T) toxicity studies (mice euthanized on days 8 and 60 for S-T and L-T, respectively) show normal blood hematology and serum clinical chemistry with the exception of a slight elevation of liver enzymes. Histological examination of nanorod-treated vital organs (liver, kidney, spleen and lungs) showed no or only mild histological changes that indicate mild toxicity at the higher dose of nanorods.

  12. Methotrexate intercalated ZnAl-layered double hydroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Manjusha; Dasgupta, Sudip; Soundrapandian, Chidambaram; Chakraborty, Jui; Ghosh, Swapankumar; Mitra, Manoj K.; Basu, Debabrata

    2011-09-01

    The anticancerous drug methotrexate (MTX) has been intercalated into an ZnAl-layered double hydroxide (LDH) using an anion exchange technique to produce LDH-MTX hybrids having particle sizes in the range of 100-300 nm. X-ray diffraction studies revealed increases in the basal spacings of ZnAl-LDH-MTX hybrid on MTX intercalation. This was corroborated by the transmission electron micrographs, which showed an increase in average interlayer spacing from 8.9 Å in pristine LDH to 21.3 Å in LDH-MTX hybrid. Thermogravimetric analyses showed an increase in the decomposition temperature for the MTX molecule in the LDH-MTX hybrid indicating enhanced thermal stability of the drug molecule in the LDH nanovehicle. The cumulative release profile of MTX from ZnAl-LDH-MTX hybrids in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) at pH 7.4 was successfully sustained for 48 h following Rigter-Peppas model release kinetics via diffusion.

  13. Bionanocomposites based on layered double hydroxides as drug delivery systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda, Pilar; Alcântara, Ana C. S.; Ribeiro, Ligia N. M.; Darder, Margarita; Ruiz-Hitzky, Eduardo

    2012-10-01

    The present work introduces new biohybrid materials involving layered double hydroxides (LDH) and biopolymers to produce bionanocomposites, able to act as effective drug delivery systems (DDS). Ibuprofen (IBU) and 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) have been chosen as model drugs, being intercalated in a Mg-Al LDH matrix. On the one side, the LDHIBU intercalation compound prepared by ion-exchange reaction was blended with the biopolymers zein, a highly hydrophobic protein, and alginate, a polysaccharide widely applied for encapsulating drugs. On the other side, the LDH- 5-ASA intercalation compound prepared by co-precipitation was assembled to the polysaccharides chitosan and pectin, which show mucoadhesive properties and resistance to acid pH values, respectively. Characterization of the intercalation compounds and the resulting bionanocomposites was carried out by means of different experimental techniques: X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, chemical and thermal analysis, as well as optical and scanning electron microscopies. Data on the swelling behavior and drug release under different pH conditions are also reported.

  14. Surface modification of magnesium hydroxide by γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Wei; FENG Qi-ming; OU Le-ming; LIU Kun

    2008-01-01

    Magnesium hydroxide (MH), which is commonly used as a halogen-free flame retardant filler in composite materials, was modified by silanization reaction with γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (γ-APS) in aqueous solution at different pH values (pH range from 8.0 to 12.0). The surface properties of grafted γ-APS on MH surface as a function of solution pH value were studied using elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and zeta potential measurement. The results show that hydrolysis and condensation of γ-APS are activated in alkaline solution and lead to multilayer adsorption of γ-APS molecules on the surface of MH. The type of adsorption orientation of γ-APS on MH surface is a function of coverage density that is altered by changing solution pH value. At low coverage density (e.g.55nm-2), γ-APS molecules are preferentially adsorbed to the surface with the silicon moiety towards the surface, and increasing coverage density (e.g.90nm-2) leads to parallel orientation. At an even higher coverage density(e.g.115nm-2), γ-APS molecules bond to the surface with the amino moiety towards the surface.

  15. Advantages and Disadvantages of Chromium Salt%铬盐功过论(续)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王全杰

    2012-01-01

    对铬及其对人类的利害关系进行了详细的论述,包括铬与人体健康,铬在畜禽业中的应用,富铬农副产品的应用,铬鞣剂的不可取代性等。%Chromium as well as its advantages and disadvantages were introduced in detail,including chromium and human health,application in Livestock and Poultry Industry,Rich chromium agricultural and sideline products,Irreplaceable performance of chromium tanning agent,etc.

  16. Advantages and Disadvantages of Chromium Salt%铬盐功过论

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王全杰

    2012-01-01

    Chromium as well as its advantages and disadvantages were introduced in detail, including chromium and human health, application in Livestock and Poultry Industry, Rich chromium agricultural and sideline products, Irreplaceable performance of chromium tanning agent, etc.%对铬及其对人类的利害关系进行了详细的论述,包括铬与人体健康,铬在畜禽业中的应用,富铬农副产品的应用,铬鞣剂的不可取代性等。

  17. Determination of total chromium in tanned leather samples used in car industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiner, Michaela; Rezić, Iva; Ujević, Darko; Steffan, Ilse

    2011-03-01

    Despite the high competition of synthetic fibers leather is nowadays still widely used for many applications. In order to ensure a sufficient stability of the skin matrix against many factors, such as microbial degradation, heat and sweat, a tanning process is indispensable. Using chromium (III) for this purpose offers a multitude of advantages, thus this way of tanning is widely applied. During the use of chromium tanned leather as clothing material as well as for decoration/covering purposes, chromium is extracted from the leather and may then cause nocuous effects to human skin, e.g. allergic reactions. Thus the knowledge of the total chromium content of leather samples expected to come into prolonged touch with human skin is very important. In car industry leather is used as cover for seats, steering wheel and gearshift lever The chromium contents often chromium tanned leather samples used in car industry were determined. First all samples were dried at 65 degrees C overnight and then cut in small pieces using a ceramic knife, weighed and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma--optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) after acidic microwave assisted digestion. The total chromium amounts found were in the range from 19 mg/g up to 32 mg/g. The extraction yield of chromium from leather samples in sweat is approximately 2-7%. Thus especially during long journeys in summer chromium can be extracted in amounts which may cause nocuous effects for example on the palm of the hands or on the back.

  18. The regeneration and recycle of chromium etching solutions using concentrator cell membrane technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Abdul J; Ganguli, Bijita; Grimes, Susan M

    2006-02-01

    The regeneration of chromium (VI) and the recovery of etched copper from chromium etching solutions by electrodialysis is improved by the addition of a concentrator cell in the catholyte chamber. The concentrator media used are ion-exchange resins or activated carbon cloth. The maximum percentages for the regeneration of chromium and recovery of copper in these systems is however less than 80% and 90% respectively because of the competition between the processes of oxidation of Cr(III) and electrodeposition of copper. A novel combination of electrolysis with electrodialysis and concentrator cell technology is developed that achieves 92% chromium regeneration and 90% copper recovery.

  19. Chromium status and glucose tolerance in Saudi men with and without coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alissa, Eman M; Bahjri, Suhad M; Ahmed, Waqar H; Al-Ama, Nabeel; Ferns, Gordon A A

    2009-12-01

    Chromium deficiency is associated with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and dyslipidemia. Hence, the objective of the current study was to investigate chromium status among Saudi men with and without established cardiovascular disease (CVD) and its relationship to glucose tolerance, lipid profile and other established CVD risk factors. We measured serum and urine chromium concentrations, fasted lipid profile, plasma glucose, and serum lipid peroxide in 130 Saudi men with an established history of myocardial infarction and 130 age-matched controls without established CVD. Patients with established CVD had higher serum triglycerides (p < 0.05) and plasma glucose (p < 0.0001) and lower serum and urinary chromium concentrations (p < 0.0001) than controls. Serum chromium was inversely correlated with plasma glucose among cases and controls (r = -0.189, p < 0.05 and r = -0.354, p < 0.00001, respectively). Plasma glucose (OR 1.127, CI 1.0-1.269, p < 0.05), serum chromium (OR 0.99, CI 0.985-0.995, p < 0.0001), and urinary chromium (OR 0.988, CI 0.981-0.995, p < 0.001) were independently associated with the presence of established coronary disease applying this model. While chromium metabolism appears to be altered in individuals with CVD, it is unclear whether chromium supplementation would be effective in CVD prevention among patients with IGT. This would need to be tested in long-term outcome trials.

  20. The risk implications of the distribution of chromium forms in environmental media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, L.A.; Petroff, D.M.; Batey, J.C. [Eckenfelder Inc., Nashville, TN (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Chromium exhibits multiple oxidation (valence) states, ranging from ({minus}2) to (+6). Under natural conditions, however, chromium typically exists in the Cr(III) (trivalent) and/or Cr(VI) (hexavalent) form, with the hexavalent form exhibiting higher solubility and much greater toxicity than the trivalent form. Due to the large differences in toxicity, the distribution of chromium oxidation states (Cr(III) and Cr(VI)) in site media is potentially of great importance to the calculation of site risk levels, and thus ultimately to cleanup activities. Despite its importance, chromium oxidation states are often not available for media samples collected at waste sites. Typical assumptions regarding the chromium distribution in site media are presented. Actual chromium distribution data from media from baseline investigations of several waste sites are also presented for groundwater, surface water, and soil and compared in terms of background chromium levels and the nature of site wastes. The differences in toxicity of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) are briefly discussed. Risk estimates and risk-based cleanup levels generated using different assumptions for the distribution of chromium in site media for a selected example site are then given. These risk-based cleanup levels are compared to various state regulatory limits, MCLs, and Practical Quantitation Limits (PQLs) for chromium.

  1. The prevalence of chromium allergy in Denmark is currently increasing as a result of leather exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, J P; Jensen, P; Carlsen, B C;

    2009-01-01

    previously been demonstrated among Danish construction workers. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the development of chromium allergy among patients with dermatitis tested between 1985 and 2007 in Denmark. Furthermore, to determine causative exposures in patients with chromium allergy. PATIENTS AND METHODS......: A retrospective analysis of patch test data was performed (n = 16,228) and charts from patients with chromium allergy were reviewed. Comparisons were made using a chi(2) test. Logistic regression analyses were used to test for associations. RESULTS: The prevalence of chromium allergy decreased significantly from...

  2. Mixing Acid Salts and Layered Double Hydroxides in Nanoscale under Solid Condition

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The immobilization of potassium sorbate, potassium aspartate and sorbic acid in layered double hydroxide under solid condition was examined. By simply mixing two solids, immobilization of sorbate and aspartate in the interlayer space of nitrate-type layered double hydroxide, so called intercalation reaction, was achieved, and the uptakes, that is, the amount of immobilized salts and the interlayer distances of intercalation compounds were almost the same as those obtained in aqueous solution...

  3. Effects of aluminum hydroxide and calcium carbonate antacids on the bioavailability of ciprofloxacin.

    OpenAIRE

    Frost, R W; Lasseter, K C; Noe, A J; Shamblen, E C; Lettieri, J T

    1992-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the effects of an aluminum hydroxide antacid and a calcium carbonate antacid on the bioavailability of ciprofloxacin (Cipro). Cipro (750 mg) was administered orally to 12 healthy volunteers in a three-way randomized crossover design. The three treatments included Cipro alone, four 850-mg calcium carbonate tablets taken 5 min before Cipro, and three 600-mg aluminum hydroxide tablets taken 5 min before Cipro. The relative bioavailability of Cipro when given ...

  4. Coordination Structure of Aluminum in Magnesium Aluminum Hydroxide Studied by 27Al NMR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The coordination structure of aluminum in magnesium aluminum hydroxide was studiedby 27Al NMR. The result showed that tetrahedral aluminum (AlⅣ) existed in magnesiumaluminum hydroxide, and the contents of AlⅣ increased with the increase of the ratio of Al/Mg andwith the peptizing temperature. AlⅣ originated from the so-called Al13 polymer with the structureof one Al tetrahedron surrounded by twelve Al octahedrons.

  5. Layered double hydroxides as containers of inhibitors in organic coatings for corrosion protection of carbon steel

    OpenAIRE

    Hang, To Thi Xuan; Truc, Trinh Anh; Duong, Nguyen Thuy; Pébère, Nadine; Olivier, Marie-Georges

    2012-01-01

    International audience; The present work focuses on the use of layered double hydroxides (LDH) as containers for corrosion inhibitors in an epoxy coating. 2-Benzothiazolylthio-succinic acid (BTSA), used as corrosion inhibitor, was intercalated by co-precipitation in magnesium-aluminum layered double hydroxides. The obtained LDH-BTSA was characterized by infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. BTSA release from LDH-BTSA in NaCl solutions was investigated by U...

  6. Chromium Isotopes in Marine Carbonates - an Indicator for Climatic Change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, R.; Gaucher, C.

    2010-12-01

    Chromium (Cr) stable isotopes experience an increased interest as a tracer of Cr (VI) reduction in groundwater and thus showed their potential as a monitor of remediation of anthropogenic and natural contamination in water (Berna et al., 2009; Izbicki et al., 2008). Chromium stable isotopes in Fe-rich chemical sediments (BIFs and Fe-cherts) have recently also been used as a tracer for Earth's atmospheric oxygenation through time (Frei et al., 2009). We have applied the Cr isotope system to organic-rich carbonates from a late Ediacaran succession in Uruguay (Polanco Formation), from which we have previously analyzed BIFs with extremely fractionated (δ53Cr up to 5.0 ‰) Cr isotope signatures that are part of an underlying deep water clastic sediment (shale-dominated) sequence (Yerbal Formation) deposited in a glacio-marine environment (Gaucher et al.,2004). δ53Cr values of organic rich carbonates correlate with positive and negative carbon isotope excursions (δ13C PDB between -3 and +3 ‰) and with systematic changes in strontium isotope compositions, commonly interpreted as to reflect fluctuations in organic (photosynthetic algae) production related to fluctuations in atmospheric oxygen and weathering intensities, respectively. Slightly positively fractioned δ53Cr values (up to +0.25‰), paralleling positive (δ13C PDB and 87Sr/86Sr ratio excursions would thereby trace elevated atmospheric oxygen levels/pulses possibly related to glacier retreat/melting stages that caused bioproductivity to increase. While the causal link between these multiple isotopic tracers and the mechanisms of Cr stripping into carbonates has to be further investigated in detail, the first indications from this study point to a potentially promising use of stable Cr isotopes in organic-rich carbonates to monitor fluctuations of atmospheric oxygen, particularly over the Neoproterozoic and Phanerozoic ice age periods. E.C. Berna et al. (2010) Cr stable isotopes as indicators of Cr

  7. Parametric Effect of Sodium Hydroxide and Sodium Carbonate on the Potency of a Degreaser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babatope Abimbola Olufemi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE Experimental and statistical analysis was carried out on the comparative effect of sodium hydroxide and sodium carbonate on the potency of a laboratory produced degreaser in this work. The materials used include; octadecyl benzene sulphonic acid, sodium hydroxide, sodium carbonate, sodium metasilicate, carboxyl methyl cellulose (C.M.C, formadelhyde, perfume, colourant and distilled water. Different samples of degreaser were produced with varying composition of sodium hydroxide and sodium carbonate respectively. Statistical significance through methods like analysis of variance (ANOVA of some parameters on various concentrations of sodium hydroxide and sodium carbonate was investigated. The effect of the varying compositions of sodium hydroxide and sodium carbonate was also determined by using a gray scale (GS test, and also subjecting surfaces heavily stained with crude oil to determine and characterize the cleansing action of the degreaser. It was found that as the concentration of sodium hydroxide increases, the cleansing ability also increases, whereas the increase in concentration of sodium carbonate had no effect on the cleansing ability. The work would enable production of effective, useful and property controlled degreasers at moderate cost.

  8. Scientific Opinion on the safety and efficacy of sodium hydroxide for dogs, cats and ornamental fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available

    The additive consists, by specification, of a minimum of 98.0 % sodium hydroxide or alkali in the solid form, the content of solutions scaled accordingly, based on the stated or labelled concentration. No data have been provided that would support the specification of the solid form, only a 50.0 % w/w solution of sodium hydroxide in water, which is the final product of the production process described in the dossier. Sodium hydroxide is considered safe for the target animals, provided that the resulting total sodium concentration in feed does not compromise the overall electrolyte balance. Sodium hydroxide in solid form and in aqueous solution at concentrations > 8.0 % is corrosive. At lower concentrations it is irritant to skin and eyes (0.5 % and 0.2 %, respectively and the respiratory tract (0.5 %. Exposure via inhalation is likely to be minimal. Sodium hydroxide is not considered to be a skin sensitiser. As sodium hydroxide is used in food as an acidity regulator, and its function in feed is essentially the same as that in food, no further demonstration of efficacy is necessary.

  9. Adsorption of hydrated hydroxide and hydronium ions on Ag(1 1 1). A quantum mechanical investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrito, E. M.; Paredes-Olivera, P.

    2003-03-01

    In this paper we have studied comparatively the adsorption of hydroxide and hydronium ions, extending our previous study on hydronium adsorption [J. Phys. Chem. B. 105 (2001) 7227] and emphasizing the adsorption of hydroxide. The calculations were performed on the 111 surface of silver using ab initio quantum mechanical methods (Hartree-Fock+Moller-Plesset second order perturbation theory). The adsorption was investigated for the bare and the hydrated ions (up to three water molecules). Binding energies, equilibrium structures and charge transfer processes were investigated. While the successive hydration of hydronium detaches the ion from the surface, the hydrated hydroxide anion remains specifically adsorbed. Charge transfer processes between the adsorbates and the surface were studied using electron density difference plots and effective charges obtained from Mulliken populations and from surface-dipole moment curves. The energetics of the surface reactions leading to the formation of the hydrated hydronium and hydroxide ions from the bare adsorbed ions and water molecules was also investigated. Both reactions are exothermic mainly due to the formation of strong hydrogen bonds. The effect of an external homogeneous electric field perpendicular to the surface on different adsorbate properties was investigated for the bare and hydrated hydroxide ion in order to model the environment of the electrical double layer. The electric field affects the orientation of the water molecules on the surface and the hydroxide surface distance.

  10. Cadmium hydroxide and oxide nanoporous walls with high performance photocatalytic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yu-Cheng, E-mail: ychang0127@gmail.com

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Cd(OH){sub 2} nanowalls were directly grown on glass substrate by hydrothermal method. • The thicknesses of Cd(OH){sub 2} nanowalls can be effectively controlled by HMTA. • Cd(OH){sub 2} and CdO nanoporous walls exhibit very strong and broad emission properties. • Cd(OH){sub 2} and CdO nanoporous walls have exhibited very effective photocatalysts. • The two mixture nanoporous walls are beneficial for optoelectronic applications. - Abstract: Cadmium hydroxide nanowalls were directly grown on glass substrate by a hydrothermal method. The concentration of hexamethylenetetramine plays a crucial role for controlling the thicknesses of cadmium hydroxide nanowalls. A part of the cadmium hydroxide nanowalls can be converted to cadmium oxide nanoporous walls by annealing cadmium hydroxide in air at 350 °C for 1 h. Cadmium hydroxide and oxide nanoporous walls exhibited very strong and broad emission properties in the cathodoluminescence spectrum. Furthermore, cadmium hydroxide and oxide nanoporous walls can also provide a higher surface-to-volume ratio to result their higher photocatalytic performance in degradation of methylene blue.

  11. Process optimization of reaction of acid leaching residue of asbestos tailing and sodium hydroxide aqueous solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Silica is the major component of the acid leaching residue of asbestos tailing. The waterglass solution can be prepared by the reaction of the residue with sodium hydroxide aqueous solution. Compared to the high temperature reaction method, this process is environmental friendly and low cost. In this paper, the reaction process of the residue and the sodium hydroxide aqueous solution is optimized. The optimum reaction process parameters are as follows: the usage of sodium hydroxide is 26.4 g/100 g acid leaching residue, the reaction temperature is 90℃, the reaction time is 1 h, and the ratio of the liquid/solid is 2.0. The significance sequence of the process parameters to the alkali leaching reaction effect is the usage of sodium hydroxide > the ratio of the liquid/solid > the reaction time > the reaction temperature. The significance sequence to the leaching ratio of SiO2 is the ratio of the liquid/solid > the usage of sodium hydroxide > the reaction time > the reaction temperature. The significance sequence to the modulus of the sodium silicate is the ratio of the liquid/solid > the usage of sodium hydroxide > the reaction time > the reaction temperature. Under the optimum conditions, the leaching ratio of the SiO2 is 77.5%, and the modulus of the sodium silicate is 3.15. The XRD analysis result indicates that the major components of the alkali leaching residue are serpentine, talc, quartz and some albite.

  12. Elucidating Bioreductive Transformations within Physically Complex Media: Impact on the Fate and Transport of Uranium and Chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Fendorf; Chris Francis; Phil Jardine; Shawn Benner

    2009-03-01

    In situ stabilization (inclusive of natural attenuation) of toxic metals and radionuclides is an attractive approach for remediating many contaminated DOE sites. By immobilizing toxic metals and radionuclides in place, the removal of contaminated water to the surface for treatment as well as the associated disposal costs are avoided. To enhance in situ remediaton, microbiological reductive stabilization of contaminant metals has been, and continues to be, actively explored. It is likely that surface and subsurface microbial activity can alter the redox state of toxic metals and radionuclides, either directly or indirectly, so they are rendered immobile. Furthermore, anaerobic bacterial metabolic products will help to buffer pulses of oxidation, typically from fluxes of nitrate or molecular oxygen, and thus may stabilize reduced contaminants from oxidative mobilization. Uranium and chromium are two elements of particular concern within the DOE complex that, owing to their abundance and toxicity, appear well suited for biologically mediated reductive stabilization. Subsurface microbial activity can alter the redox state of toxic metals and radionuclides, rending them immobile. Imparting an important criterion on the probability that contaminants will undergo reductive stabilization, however, is the chemical and physical heterogeneity of the media. Our research first examined microbially induced transformation of iron (hydr)oxide minerals and their impact on contaminant attenuation. We revealed that in intricate cascade of geochemical reactions is induced by microbially produced Fe(II), and that during transformation contaminants such as U(VI) can be incorporated into the structure, and a set of Fe(II) bearing solids capable of reducing Cr(VI) and stabilizing resulting Cr(III). We also note, however, that common subsurface constituents such as phosphate can modify iron oxide transformation pathways and thus impact contaminant sequestration—affecting both Cr and U

  13. Final Report, Elucidating Bioreductive Transformations within Physically Complex Media: Impact on the Fate and Transport of Uranium and Chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benner, Shawn G.; Fendorf, Scott

    2009-01-01

    In situ stabilization (inclusive of natural attenuation) of toxic metals and radionuclides is an attractive approach for remediating many contaminated DOE sites. By immobilizing toxic metals and radionuclides in place, the removal of contaminated water to the surface for treatment as well as the associated disposal costs are avoided. To enhance in situ remediaton, microbiological reductive stabilization of contaminant metals has been, and continues to be, actively explored. It is likely that surface and subsurface microbial activity can alter the redox state of toxic metals and radionuclides, either directly or indirectly, so they are rendered immobile. Furthermore, anaerobic bacterial metabolic products will help to buffer pulses of oxidation, typically from fluxes of nitrate or molecular oxygen, and thus may stabilize reduced contaminants from oxidative mobilization. Uranium and chromium are two elements of particular concern within the DOE complex that, owing to their abundance and toxicity, appear well suited for biologically mediated reductive stabilization. Subsurface microbial activity can alter the redox state of toxic metals and radionuclides, rending them immobile. Imparting an important criterion on the probability that contaminants will undergo reductive stabilization, however, is the chemical and physical heterogeneity of the media. Our research first examined microbially induced transformation of iron (hydr)oxide minerals and their impact on contaminant attenuation. We revealed that in intricate cascade of geochemical reactions is induced by microbially produced Fe(II), and that during transformation contaminants such as U(VI) can be incorporated into the structure, and a set of Fe(II) bearing solids capable of reducing Cr(VI) and stabilizing resulting Cr(III). We also note, however, that common subsurface constituents such as phosphate can modify iron oxide transformation pathways and thus impact contaminant sequestration—affecting both Cr and U

  14. Production of Potassium and Calcium Hydroxide, Compost and Humic Acid from Sago (Metroxylon sagu Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. P. Auldry

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Agriculture waste such as Sago Waste (SW has a potential to cause pollution when the waste is discarded into rivers. In order to add value to SW, a study was conducted to produce potassium and calcium hydroxide, compost and Humic Acid (HA from SW. Approach: The SW was air-dried and some grinded. The grinded SW was incinerated at 600°C. Potassium and calcium hydroxide was extracted by dissolving the ash in distilled water at a ratio of 1:500 (ash: water, equilibrated for 24 h at 150 rpm using a mechanical shaker and filtered. The ungrinded SW was used for compost production. The compost was produced by mixing SW (80% + chicken feed (10% + chicken dung slurry (5% + molasses (5%. Results: The hydroxide extracted from ash of SW was used to isolate HA of composted SW. The molarity and pH of the hydroxide were 0.002M and 10 respectively. Calcium (42.88 mg kg-1 and potassium (29.51 mg kg-1 content were high in the hydroxide compared with other elements. The compost took about 60 days to mature. There was an increased in pH, ash, Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC and HA and a decreased in temperature, C/N ratio, C/P ratio and organic matter. The hydroxide was able to extract 1% of HA from the composted SW. A comparison between the yields of HA extracted from the composted SW using the hydroxide of the SW and that of the analytical grade showed no statistically difference. The chemical characteristics of HA from the composted SW were in standard range. Conclusion: Potassium and calcium hydroxide, compost and HA can be produced from sago waste. Low morality of the hydroxide is able to produce good quality of HA from composted sago waste. The HA can be reconstituted with K and Ca from potassium and calcium hydroxide to produce K-Ca-humate and this needs to be investigated as a form of organic based fertilizer.

  15. Development of polymer nanocomposites based on layered double hydroxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sipusic, J.

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric nanocomposites are commonly considered as systems composed of a polymeric matrix and - usually inorganic - filler. The types of nanofillers are indicated in Fig. 1. Beside wellknown layered silicate fillers, recent attention is attracted to layered double hydroxide fillers (LDH, mainly of synthetic origin. The structure of LDH is based on brucite, or magnesium hydroxide, Mg(OH2 and is illustrated in Fig. 2. The modification of LDHs is commonly done by organic anions, to increase the original interlayer distance and to improve the organophilicity of the filler, keeping in mind their final application as fillers for, usually hydrophobic, polymer matrices. We have used the modified rehydration procedure for preparing organically modified LDH. The stoichiometric quantities of Ca33Al2O6, CaO and benzoic (B (or undecenoic (U acid were mixed with water and some acetone. After long and vigorous shaking, the precipitated fillers were washed, dried and characterized. X-ray diffraction method (XRD has shown the increase of the original interlayer distance for unmodified LDH (OH–-saturated of 0.76 nm to the 1.6 nm in LDH-B or LDH-U fillers (Fig. 3. Infrared spectroscopy method (FTIR has confirmed the incorporation of benzoic anion within the filler layers (Fig. 4. For the preparation of LDH-B and LDH-U composites with polystyrene (PS, poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA and copolymer (SMMA matrices, a two-step in situ bulk radical polymerization was selected (Table 1 for recipes, azobisisobutyronitrile as initiator, using conventional stirred tank reactor in the first step, and heated mold with the movable wall (Fig. 6 in the second step of polymerization. All the prepared composites with LDH-U fillers were macroscopically phase-separated, as was the PMMA/LDH-B composite.PS/LDH-B and SMMA/LDH-B samples were found to be transparent and were further examined for deduction of their structure (Fig. 5 and thermal properties. FTIR measurements showed that

  16. Form and stability of aluminum hydroxide complexes in dilute solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hem, John David; Roberson, Charles Elmer

    1967-01-01

    Laboratory studies of solutions 4.53 x 10 -4 to 4.5 x 10 -5 molal (12.2-1.2 ppm) in aluminum, in 0.01 molal sodium perchlorate, were conducted to obtain information as to the probable behavior of aluminum in natural water. When the solutions were brought to pH 7.5-9.5 and allowed to stand for 24 hours, a precipitate was obtained which was virtually amorphous as shown by X-rays, and which had a solubility equivalent to that of boehmite. This precipitate had a hydrolysis constant (*Ks4) of 1.93 x 10 -13a. When solutions were allowed to stead at this pH range for 10 days, their precipitates gave the X-ray pattern of bayerite (*Ks4 = 1.11 > (10- 4). These hydrolysis constants were obtained at 25?C. and corrected to zero ionic strength and are in close agreement with other published values. The predominant dissolved form in this pH range is Al(OH) -4. Below neutral pH (7.0) the dissolved aluminum species consist of octahedral units in which each aluminum ion is surrounded by six water molecules or hydroxide ions. Single units such as Al(OH2)6 + 3 and AlOH(OH2)5+2 are most abundant below pH 5.0, and where the molar ratio (r) of combined hydroxide to total dissolved aluminum is low. When r is greater than 1.0, polymerization of the octahedral units occurs. When r is between 2.0 and 3.0, solutions aged for 10 days or more contained colloidal particles between 0.10 and 0.45 ? in diameter. Particles whose diameters were greater than 0.10 ? were identified by X-ray diffraction as gibbsite. Particles smaller than 0.10 ? were also present and were shown by means of the electron microscope to have a hexagonal crystal pattern. Structured material consisting of sheets of coalesced six-membered rings of aluminum ions held together by double OH bridges has a distinctive kinetic behavior. This property was used to determine amounts of polymerized material in solutions having r between 1.0 and 3.0 after aging times ranging from a few hours to more than 4 months. Aging increased the

  17. Preferential Intercalation of Pyridinedicarboxylates into Layered Double Hydroxides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李蕾; 莫丹; 陈大舟

    2005-01-01

    Intercalation of 2,3-,2,4-,2,5-,2,6-,3,4-,or3,5-pyridincdicarboxylate into the layered double hydroxide (LDH),[Mg0.73AIo.27(OH)2](CO3)0.14*1.34H2O was carried out by the reconstruction method in the molar ratio of organic acid: calcined LDH=3:8, in 80% alcoholic aqueous solution at 70℃. Selective reaction was observed in com-petitive experiments involving an equal concentration pairs of acids. The preference order of the organic acids intercalated into the Mg-Al-LDH was found to be in the order of 2,3-pyridinedicarboxylate>2,5-pyridinedicarboxylate>2,4-pyridinedicarboxylate>3,5-pyridinedicarboxylate>3,4-pyridinedicarboxylate>2,6-pyridinedic arboxylate. The structures of the intercalates formed by the reaction of six guests with Mg-Al-LDH were characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared and thermogravimetry techniques. And the charge density on the oxygens of each of the carboxylate groups for the six anions was investigated utilizing ab initio (HF/6-31G) method by G98w. From the X-ray diffraction data, the guest size and the charge density of the oxygens of the guest, the orientation of 2,3-,2,4-,2,5-,2,6-,3,4-, or 3,5-pyridinedicarboxylate anions between the layers was determined and the preferential intercalation mechanism was discussed. These results indicate the possibility of a molecular recognition ability of LDH and it would be exploited for the chemical separation of some anions from solution.

  18. Physical properties of fixed-charge layer double hydroxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, D. R.; Solin, S. A.; Costantino, Umberto; Nocchetti, Morena

    2000-05-01

    The physical properties of a series of layer double hydroxides (LDH) of the form [(CO3)0.195(1-x)Cl0.39x(H2O)y]:[Zn0.61Al0.39(OH)2], 0layer water molecules form a hydration ring which defines the height of the solvated, nested Cl anion. The water molecules can tilt around their C2v axis such that the height of the solvated Cl ion is a function of the number of molecules forming the hydration ring. The composition dependence of the basal spacing, determined from x-ray-diffraction powder patterns measured as a function of humidity and temperature for these materials, is a function of both the Cl concentration (x) and the number of guest layer water molecules (y). Distinct basal spacing curves are observed for fully hydrated, partially hydrated, and dehydrated materials. At x=1 the Cl end-member material exhibits a change in stacking sequence from a 3R polytype to a 2H polytype upon dehydration. The dehydrated form of this material also exhibits a (3×3)R30° superlattice ordering of the Cl ions. Due to the nesting of the Cl ion and the active nature of the water molecules, the basal spacing vs x curve for the dehydrated materials is the only curve that can be fit by the discrete finite layer rigidity model. The interlayer rigidity parameter for LDH materials has been determined to be p=4.84+/-0.06 indicating that these materials are stiffer than class-II layered solids but not as stiff as class-III layered solids.

  19. Effective Construction of High-quality Iron Oxy-hydroxides and Co-doped Iron Oxy-hydroxides Nanostructures: Towards the Promising Oxygen Evolution Reaction Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinyu; An, Li; Yin, Jie; Xi, Pinxian; Zheng, Zhiping; Du, Yaping

    2017-01-01

    Rational design of high efficient and low cost electrocatalysts for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) plays an important role in water splitting. Herein, a general gelatin-assisted wet chemistry method is employed to fabricate well-defined iron oxy-hydroxides and transitional metal doped iron oxy-hydroxides nanomaterials, which show good catalytic performances for OER. Specifically, the Co-doped iron oxy-hydroxides (Co0.54Fe0.46OOH) show the excellent electrocatalytic performance for OER with an onset potential of 1.52 V, tafel slope of 47 mV/dec and outstanding stability. The ultrahigh oxygen evolution activity and strong durability, with superior performance in comparison to the pure iron oxy-hydroxide (FeOOH) catalysts, originate from the branch structure of Co0.54Fe0.46OOH on its surface so as to provide many active edge sites, enhanced mass/charge transport capability, easy release oxygen gas bubbles, and strong structural stability, which are advantageous for OER. Meanwhile, Co-doping in FeOOH nanostructures constitutes a desirable four-electron pathway for reversible oxygen evolution and reduction, which is potentially useful for rechargeable metal−air batteries, regenerative fuel cells, and other important clean energy devices. This work may provide a new insight into constructing the promising water oxidation catalysts for practical clean energy application. PMID:28272443

  20. Effective Construction of High-quality Iron Oxy-hydroxides and Co-doped Iron Oxy-hydroxides Nanostructures: Towards the Promising Oxygen Evolution Reaction Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinyu; An, Li; Yin, Jie; Xi, Pinxian; Zheng, Zhiping; Du, Yaping

    2017-03-08

    Rational design of high efficient and low cost electrocatalysts for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) plays an important role in water splitting. Herein, a general gelatin-assisted wet chemistry method is employed to fabricate well-defined iron oxy-hydroxides and transitional metal doped iron oxy-hydroxides nanomaterials, which show good catalytic performances for OER. Specifically, the Co-doped iron oxy-hydroxides (Co0.54Fe0.46OOH) show the excellent electrocatalytic performance for OER with an onset potential of 1.52 V, tafel slope of 47 mV/dec and outstanding stability. The ultrahigh oxygen evolution activity and strong durability, with superior performance in comparison to the pure iron oxy-hydroxide (FeOOH) catalysts, originate from the branch structure of Co0.54Fe0.46OOH on its surface so as to provide many active edge sites, enhanced mass/charge transport capability, easy release oxygen gas bubbles, and strong structural stability, which are advantageous for OER. Meanwhile, Co-doping in FeOOH nanostructures constitutes a desirable four-electron pathway for reversible oxygen evolution and reduction, which is potentially useful for rechargeable metal-air batteries, regenerative fuel cells, and other important clean energy devices. This work may provide a new insight into constructing the promising water oxidation catalysts for practical clean energy application.

  1. Arsenic adsorption by iron-aluminium hydroxide coated onto macroporous supports: Insights from X-ray absorption spectroscopy and comparison with granular ferric hydroxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh Kumar, Prashanth; Flores, Roxana Quiroga; Sjöstedt, Carin; Önnby, Linda

    2016-01-25

    This paper evaluates the arsenic adsorption characteristics of a macroporous polymer coated with coprecipitated iron-aluminium hydroxides (MHCMP). The MHCMP adsorbent-composite fits best with a pseudo-second order model for As(III) and a pseudo-first order kinetic model for As(V). The MHCMP shows a maximum adsorption capacity of 82.3 and 49.6 mg As/g adsorbent for As(III) and As(V) ions respectively, and adsorption followed the Langmuir model. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure showed that binding of As(III) ions were confirmed to take place on the iron hydroxides coated on the MHCMP, whereas for As(V) ions the binding specificity could not be attributed to one particular metal hydroxide. As(III) formed a bidentate mononuclear complex with Fe sites, whereas As(V) indicated on a bidentate binuclear complex with Al sites or monodentate with Fe sites on the adsorbent. The column experiments were run in a well water spiked with a low concentration of As(III) (100 μg/L) and a commercially available adsorbent (GEH(®)102) based on granular iron-hydroxide was used for comparison. It was found that the MHCMP was able to treat 7 times more volume of well water as compared to GEH(®)102, maintaining the threshold concentration of less than 10 μg As/L, indicating that the MHCMP is a superior adsorbent.

  2. Effect of Operating Parameters and Chemical Additives on Crystal Habit and Specific Cake Resistance of Zinc Hydroxide Precipitates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alwin, Jennifer Louise [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States)

    1999-08-01

    The effect of process parameters and chemical additives on the specific cake resistance of zinc hydroxide precipitates was investigated. The ability of a slurry to be filtered is dependent upon the particle habit of the solid and the particle habit is influenced by certain process variables. The process variables studied include neutralization temperature, agitation type, and alkalinity source used for neutralization. Several commercially available chemical additives advertised to aid in solid/liquid separation were also examined in conjunction with hydroxide precipitation. A statistical analysis revealed that the neutralization temperature and the source of alkalinity were statistically significant in influencing the specific cake resistance of zinc hydroxide precipitates in this study. The type of agitation did not significantly effect the specific cake resistance of zinc hydroxide precipitates. The use of chemical additives in conjunction with hydroxide precipitation had a favorable effect on the filterability. The morphology of the hydroxide precipitates was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy.

  3. The Effect of Ultrafine Magnesium Hydroxide on the Tensile Properties and Flame Retardancy of Wood Plastic Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiping Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of ultrafine magnesium hydroxide (UMH and ordinary magnesium hydroxide (OMH on the tensile properties and flame retardancy of wood plastic composites (WPC were investigated by tensile test, oxygen index tester, cone calorimeter test, and thermogravimetric analysis. The results showed that ultrafine magnesium hydroxide possesses strengthening and toughening effect of WPC. Scanning electron micrograph (SEM of fracture section of samples provided the positive evidence that the tensile properties of UMH/WPC are superior to that of WPC and OMH/WPC. The limited oxygen index (LOI and cone calorimeter test illustrated that ultrafine magnesium hydroxide has stronger flame retardancy and smoke suppression effect of WPC compared to that of ordinary magnesium hydroxide. The results of thermogravimetric analysis implied that ultrafine magnesium hydroxide can improve the char structure which plays an important role in reducing the degradation speed of the inner matrix during combustion process and increases the char residue at high temperature.

  4. High temperature oxidation of iron-chromium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikkelsen, Lars

    2003-06-15

    The high temperature oxidation of the ferritic alloy Fe78Cr22 has been investigated in the present work. The effect of small alloying additions of cerium and/or silicon was also investigated. The alloys were oxidized at 973, 1173 and 1373 K in either air or a hydrogen/argon mixture. The various reaction atmospheres contained between 0.02 and 50% water vapour. The oxide scales formed on the various alloys at 973 K consisted of thin chromia layers. The oxide scales grown on the alloys at 1173 K also consisted of a chromia layer. The microstructure of the chromia scales was found to depend on the reaction atmosphere. The chromia scales grown in hydrogen/argon atmospheres formed oxide whiskers and oxide ridges at the surface of the scales, while the chromia scales grown in air formed larger oxide grains near the surface. This difference in oxide microstructure was due to the vaporization of chromium species from the chromia scales grown in air. Two different growth mechanisms are proposed for the growth of oxide whiskers. The growth rate of the chromia scales was independent of the oxygen activity. This is explained by a growth mechanism of the chromia scales, where the growth is governed by the diffusion of interstitial chromium. The addition of silicon to the iron-chromium alloy resulted in the formation of silica particles beneath the chromia scale. The presence of silicon in the alloy was found to decrease the growth rate of the chromia scale. This is explained by a blocking mechanism, where the silica particles beneath the chromia scale partly block the outwards diffusion of chromium from the alloy to the chromia scale. The addition of cerium to the iron-chromium alloy improved the adhesion of the chromia scale to the alloy and decreased the growth rate of chromia. It was observed that the minimum concentration of cerium in the alloy should be 0.3 at.% in order to observe an effect of the cerium addition. The effect of cerium is explained by the &apos

  5. Noncarcinogenic effects of chromium: Update to health-assessment document. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Victery, W.; Lee, S.D.; Mushak, P.; Piscator, M.

    1990-04-01

    The document updates the 1984 Health Assessment Document for Chromium by addressing issues regarding noncarcinogenic health effects of chromium: oxidation states and persistence of these states in the environment, sampling and analytical methodology to differentiate these oxidation states and amounts at submicrogram ambient air levels, the degree of human exposure to chromium in the environment, both short-term and long-term, in vivo reduction of Cr (VI) to Cr (III), and effects from environmentally relevant levels on pulmonary function and renal function. Trivalent chromium is chemically stable; Cr (VI) is readily reduced to Cr (III). Oxidation state of chromium in ambient air depends on proximity to sources emitting one form over the other. Reliable monitoring methods to speciate oxidation states at ambient air levels below 1 microgram/cu m are not available. Ambient levels of total chromium (obtained from EPA's National Air Data Branch) range from a high of 0.6 microgram/cu m to below the detection limit of 0.005 microgram/cu m. Reduction of hexavalent chromium in vivo occurs in several organ systems and therefore, small amounts of inhaled Cr (VI) will be reduced before systemic absorption can occur. Trivalent chromium is an essential trace metal which potentiates actions of insulin-mediated glucose transport.

  6. Measuring cytotoxicity by bioluminescence imaging outperforms the standard chromium-51 release assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mobin A Karimi

    Full Text Available The chromium-release assay developed in 1968 is still the most commonly used method to measure cytotoxicity by T cells and by natural killer cells. Target cells are loaded in vitro with radioactive chromium and lysis is determined by measuring chromium in the supernatant released by dying cells. Since then, alternative methods have been developed using different markers of target cell viability that do not involve radioactivity. Here, we compared and contrasted a bioluminescence (BLI-based cytotoxicity assay to the standard radioactive chromium-release assay using an identical set of effector cells and tumor target cells. For this, we stably transduced several human and murine tumor cell lines to express luciferase. When co-cultured with cytotoxic effector cells, highly reproducible decreases in BLI were seen in an effector to target cell dose-dependent manner. When compared to results obtained from the chromium release assay, the performance of the BLI-based assay was superior, because of its robustness, increased signal-to-noise ratio, and faster kinetics. The reduced/delayed detection of cytotoxicity by the chromium release method was attributable to the association of chromium with structural components of the cell, which are released quickly by detergent solubilization but not by hypotonic lysis. We conclude that the (BLI-based measurement of cytotoxicity offers a superior non-radioactive alternative to the chromium-release assay that is more robust and quicker to perform.

  7. The temperature gradient on section of casting in process of primary crystallization of chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Studnicki

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The methodology of defining in article was introduced the temperature gradient in process of primary crystallization during cooling the casting from chromium cast iron on basis of measurements of thermal field in test DTA-K3. Insert also the preliminary results of investigations of influence temperature gradient on structure of studied wear resistance chromium cast iron.

  8. Hexavalent chromium removal from wastewater using aniline formaldehyde condensate coated silica gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P Albino; Ray, Manabendra; Chakraborty, Saswati

    2007-05-08

    A resinous polymer, aniline formaldehyde condensate (AFC) coated on silica gel was used as an adsorbent in batch system for removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution by considering the effects of various parameters like reaction pH, dose of AFC coated silica gel, initial Cr(VI) concentration and aniline to formaldehyde ratio in AFC synthesis. The optimum pH for total chromium [Cr(VI) and Cr(III)] adsorption was observed as 3. Total chromium adsorption was second order and equilibrium was achieved within 90-120 min. Aniline to formaldehyde ratio of 1.6:1 during AFC synthesis was ideal for chromium removal. Total chromium adsorption followed Freundlich's isotherm with adsorption capacity of 65 mg/g at initial Cr(VI) 200mg/L. Total chromium removal was explained as combinations of electrostatic attraction of acid chromate ion by protonated AFC, reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) and bond formation of Cr(III) with nitrogen atom of AFC. Almost 40-84% of adsorbed chromium was recovered during desorption by NaOH, EDTA and mineral acids. AFC coated silica gel can be effectively used for treatment of chromium containing wastewaters as an alternative.

  9. Environmental optimization of chromium recovery from tannery sludge using a life cycle assessment approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiliç, Eylem; Puig, Rita; Baquero, Grau; Font, Joaquim; Colak, Selime; Gürler, Deniz

    2011-08-15

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) was used to evaluate the environmental impact of an oxidative chromium recovery method from tannery sludge, in comparison with the usual landfilling process. Three improvement options (water reduction, byproduct use and anaerobic sludge digestion) were considered. The results showed that the proposed chromium recovery process would be better environmentally than conventional landfilling in all the evaluated impact categories if the amount of chromium recovered was 43 kg per ton of sludge. This amount could be recovered if the chromium concentration was about 20 times higher than that considered in this study. Alternatively, a lower chromium concentration would produce a better result if the recovery method was optimized and implemented at industrial rather than laboratory scale, and if more accurate data were provided on environmental credits for avoiding the chromium production process. Thus, the recovery method is environmentally beneficial when tannery sludge contains a chromium concentration of about 100,000 ppm. According to the literature, such concentrations are not unusual. The results could serve as the basis for further environmental improvements in chromium recovery and tannery sludge management and should be used in decision-making processes, especially for end-of-pipe treatments.

  10. The temperature gradient on section of casting in process of primary crystallization of chromium cast iron

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The methodology of defining in article was introduced the temperature gradient in process of primary crystallization during cooling the casting from chromium cast iron on basis of measurements of thermal field in test DTA-K3. Insert also the preliminary results of investigations of influence temperature gradient on structure of studied wear resistance chromium cast iron.

  11. Tribological properties of the two-step thermally deposited chromium films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazauskas, A.; Baltrusaitis, J.; Grigaliunas, V.; Baltusnikas, A.; Abakeviciene, B.; Polcar, T.

    2013-01-01

    Chromium thin films were prepared on glass substrate via a two-step thermal deposition and their structural, chemical and tribological properties were determined. The X-ray diffraction pattern of the two-step thermally deposited chromium film showed the presence of well-defined body-centered cubic C

  12. Suppression of interference in the AAS determination of chromium by use of ammonium bifluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purushottam, A; Naidu, P P; Lal, S S

    1973-07-01

    Addition of 1% of ammonium bifluoride successfully suppresses interference by diverse ions in the atomic-absorption determination of chromium(VI). If the sample solutions also contain chromium(III) addition of 1% of ammonium bifluoride and 0.2% of sodium sulphate is recommended for the suppression.

  13. Leaching behavior of chromium in chrome shaving generated in tanning process and its stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Mehmet; Ozverdi, Arzu

    2008-08-15

    In this study, leaching properties and pollution potential of chromium in chrome shaving (CS), which is a solid residue of leather industry, containing 2.27% Cr were investigated and thermal stabilization procedure was applied to the CS for chromium immobilization. For this purpose, firstly, effects of the liquid/solid ratio, contact time, pH and sequential extraction on the leaching behavior of chromium in the CS were studied. It was determined that the CS-caused chromium pollution is a hazardous material for environment. Thermal stabilization procedure was applied to the CS in the temperature range of 250-500 degrees C for the chromium immobilization. Effective stabilization of chromium in the CS was achieved by heating of CS at 350 degrees C under CO(2) atmosphere. Leaching experiments were also carried out with the samples obtained from the stabilization process and the results compared with that of the CS. Also, TCLP test method was applied to the samples to determine pollution potentials and discharge situations of the CS and its stabilization products. While the chromium concentrations in the test solutions of all samples stabilized thermally at above 350 degrees C were below the USEPA regulatory limit of 5 mg/l, the concentration of chromium leached out from the CS was 30-fold bigger than the USEPA regulatory limit.

  14. Reduction of tetravalent chromium induced optical loss in Nd:Cr:GSGG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pertica, A.J.; Marion, J.E.; Stokowski, S.E. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (US))

    1989-10-20

    We report on methods for eliminating of optical absorption in neodymium, chromium doped gadolinium scandium gallium garnet (Nd;Cr:GSGG) due to tetravalent chromium at the laser wavelength. These methods include doping of the crystal melt with specific additive as well as post growth heat treatments.

  15. Kinetics of chromium ion absorption by cross-linked polyacrylate films

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    Three cross-linked ion exchange membranes were studied as to their ability to absorb chromium ion from aqueous chromium III nitrate solutions. Attention was given to the mechanism of absorption, composition of the absorbed product, and the chemical bonding. The membranes were: calcium polyacrylate, polyacrylic acid, and a copolymer of acrylic acid and vinyl alcohol. For the calcium polyacrylate and the copolymer, parabolic kinetics were observed, indicating the formation of a chromium polyacrylate phase as a coating on the membrane. The rate of absorption is controlled by the diffusion of the chromium ion through this coating. The product formed in the copolymer involves the formation of a coordination complex of a chromium ion with 6 carboxylic acid groups from the same molecule. The absorption of the chromium ion by the polyacrylic acid membranes appears to be more complicated, involving cross-linking. This is due to the coordination of the chromium ion with carboxylic acid groups from more than one polymer molecule. The absorption rate of the chromium ion by the calcium salt membrane was found to be more rapid than that by the free polyacrylic acid membrane.

  16. Redox Equilibria of Chromium in Calcium Silicate Base Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzayousef-Jadid, A.-M.; Schwerdtfeger, Klaus

    2009-08-01

    The oxidation state of chromium has been determined at 1600 °C in CaO-SiO2-CrO x melts with CaO/SiO2 ratios (mass pct) of 0.66, 0.93, and 1.10, and 0.15 to 3.00 pct Cr2O3 (initial). A few experiments were also carried out with CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-CrO x melts at 1430 °C. The slag samples were equilibrated with gas phases of controlled oxygen pressure. Two techniques were applied to determine the oxidation state: thermogravimetry and quenching of the samples with subsequent wet chemical analysis. In the low-oxygen pressure range, the chromium is mainly divalent. In the high-oxygen pressure range, it is trivalent and hexavalent. It was found that the Cr3+/Cr2+ and Cr6+/Cr3+ ratios depend on oxygen pressure at a constant CaO/SiO2 ratio and a constant content of total chromium, according to the ideal law of mass action. According to the respective chemical reactions, these ratios change proportional to p_{{{text{O}}2 }}{}^{1/4} or p_{{{text{O}}_{ 2} }}{}^{3/4}, respectively. They also increase with increasing basicity. The data are used to compute the fractions of the different ions in the melt. There is a certain range of oxygen pressure in which all three valence states, Cr2+, Cr3+, and Cr6+, coexist. The color of the solidified slag samples is described and is explained with the help of transmission spectra.

  17. Chromium speciation in coal and biomass co-combustion products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stam, Arthur F; Meij, Ruud; Te Winkel, Henk; Eijk, Ronald J van; Huggins, Frank E; Brem, Gerrit

    2011-03-15

    Chromium speciation is vital for the toxicity of products resulting from co-combustion of coal and biomass. Therefore, understanding of formation processes has been studied using a combination of X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy and thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. The influence of cofiring on Cr speciation is very dependent on the type of fuel. Cr(VI) contents in the investigated fly ash samples from coal and cofiring average around 7% of the total chromium. An exception is cofiring 7-28% wood for which ashes exhibited Cr(VI) concentrations of 12-16% of the total chromium. Measurements are in line with thermodynamic predictions: RE factors of Cr around 1 are in line with volatile Cr only above 1400 °C; lower Cr(VI) concentrations with lower oxygen content and Cr(III) dissolved in aluminosilicate glass. Stability of Cr(VI) below 700 °C does not correlate with Cr(VI) concentrations found in the combustion products. It is indicated that Cr(VI) formation is a high-temperature process dependent on Cr evaporation (mode of occurrence in fuel, promoted by organic association), oxidation (local oxygen content), and formation of solid chromates (promoted by presence of free lime (CaO) in the ash). CaCrO(4)(s) is a probable chemical form but, given different leachable fractions (varying from 25 to 100%), different forms of Cr(VI) must be present. Clay-bound Cr is likely to dissolve in the aluminosilicate glass phase during melting of the clay.

  18. Chromium(III) complexes of naturally occurring ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shahawi, M. S.

    1995-02-01

    Chromium(III) complexes prepared from CrCl 3Py 3 and anhydrous CrCl 3 with L(-)-threonine, nicotinic acid, glycine, D(-)-penicillamine, L(-)-cysteine and L(-)-cystine have been characterized. The magnetic moments (3.4-4.05 B.M.) are close to the spin only value for a d3 chromium(III) ion in octahedral or pseudo octahedral symmetry. In the electronic spectra two sharp peaks are observed at (15.9-19.8) × 10 3 and (22.0-26.7) × 10 3 cm -1 and are assigned to d-d transitions in the pseudo octahedral configuration. The parameters ( Dq, B, β35) and the interelectronic repulsion parameter with the ionic charge, Z∗, are calculated and place the ligand in the middle of the spectrochemical series. In the circular dichroism spectra three Cotton effects are observed in the forbidden band of the optically active chelates and are assigned to the 2E( 2Eg), 2A 2( 2T 1g) and2E( 2T 1g) while that in the spin allowed band are a result of the splitting of the 4A 2g( 4T 2g) to 4A 1( 4T 2g) and4E( 4T 2g) transitions. The structure of threonine, cystine and cysteine chelates are likely to be fac since strong and well defined Cotton effects are observed. The Cotton effects of penicillamine chelates are weak suggesting formation of the mer structure. Prolonged heating or bubbling air through the solution of CrCl 3Py 3 containing L(-)-threonine, glycine or nicotinic acid for several hours enhances chromium(VI) formation.

  19. Chromium Isotopes Record Fluctuations in Precambrian Biospheric Oxygenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, R.; Gaucher, C.; Poulton, S. W.; Canfield, D. E.

    2009-12-01

    There is a direct relationship between life, oxygen, and the surface chemistry of the Earth. Geochemical data suggest that oxygenation of the Earth's atmosphere occurred in two broad steps, near the beginning and the end of the Proterozoic Eon (2500 to 542 million years ago), but the details of this history are unclear. The geochemical behaviour of chromium (Cr) is highly sensitive to the redox state of the surface environment as oxidative weathering processes produce the oxidised hexavalent [Cr(VI)] form. Oxidation of reduced trivaltent [Cr(III)] chromium on land is accompanied by an isotopic fractionation, leading to enrichment of the mobile hexavalent form in the heavier isotope. The fractionated Cr isotope signature is then tranfered by riverine transport to the sea. Here, we use Cr stable isotopes from banded iron formations (BIFs) to track the presence of Cr(VI) in Precambrian oceans, providing a time-resolved picture of the oxygenation history of Earth’s atmosphere-hydrosphere system. Fractionated Cr isotopes indicate the accumulation of Cr(VI) in ocean surface waters ~2.8 to 2.6 billion years (Gyr) ago and a likely transient elevation in atmospheric and surface ocean oxygen prior to the first great rise of oxygen 2.45-2.2 Gyr ago (the Great Oxidation Event; GOE). In contrast, Cr isotopes in ~1.88 Gyr old BIFs are not fractionated, indicating a major decline in atmospheric oxygen and demonstrating that the GOE did not lead to a unidirectional stepwise increase in atmospheric oxygen. In the late Neoproterozoic, ~800 to 542 million years (Myr) ago, we observe strong positive fractionations in Cr isotopes (δ53Cr up to +4.9 ‰) providing independent support for increased surface oxygenation at this time. This may have stimulated rapid evolution of macroscopic multicellular life. Our chromium isotope data thus provide new insights into the oxygenation history of the Earth, and highlight its use as a powerful redox tracer in aquatic systems.

  20. Chromium removal from electroplating wastewater by coir pith.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suksabye, Parinda; Thiravetyan, Paitip; Nakbanpote, Woranan; Chayabutra, Supanee

    2007-03-22

    Coir pith is a by-product from padding used in mattress factories. It contains a high amount of lignin. Therefore, this study investigated the use of coir pith in the removal of hexavalent chromium from electroplating wastewater by varying the parameters, such as the system pH, contact time, adsorbent dosage, and temperature. The maximum removal (99.99%) was obtained at 2% (w/v) dosage, particle size <75microm, at initial Cr(VI) 1647mgl(-1), system pH 2, and an equilibrium time of 18h. The adsorption isotherm of coir pith fitted reasonably well with the Langmuir model. The maximum Cr(VI) adsorption capacity of coir pith at 15, 30, 45 and 60 degrees C was 138.04, 197.23, 262.89 and 317.65mgCr(VI)g(-1) coir pith, respectively. Thermodynamic parameters indicated an endothermic process and the adsorption process was favored at high temperature. Desorption studies of Cr(VI) on coir pith and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) suggested that most of the chromium bound on the coir pith was in Cr(III) form due to the fact that the toxic Cr(VI) adsorbed on the coir pith by electrostatic attraction was easily reduced to less toxic Cr(III). Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometry analysis indicated that the carbonyl (CO) groups and methoxy (O-CH(3)) groups from the lignin structure in coir pith may be involved in the mechanism of chromium adsorption. The reduced Cr(III) on the coir pith surface may be bound with CO groups and O-CH(3) groups through coordinate covalent bonding in which a lone pair of electrons in the oxygen atoms of the methoxy and carbonyl groups can be donated to form a shared bond with Cr(III).

  1. Chromium removal from electroplating wastewater by coir pith

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suksabye, Parinda [The Joint School of Energy and Environment, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, 91 Pracha-Utit Road, Bangmod, Thungkru, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand); Thiravetyan, Paitip [Division of Biotechnology, School of Bioresources and Technology, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, 83 Moo. 8 Thakham, Bangkhuntien, Bangkok 10150 (Thailand)]. E-mail: paitip.thi@kmutt.ac.th; Nakbanpote, Woranan [Pilot Plant Development and Training Institute, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, 83 Moo. 8 Thakham, Bangkhuntien, Bangkok 10150 (Thailand); Chayabutra, Supanee [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Silpaorn University, 6 Rajamankhanai Road, Amphoe Muang, Nakorn Pathom Province, Bangkok 73000 (Thailand)

    2007-03-22

    Coir pith is a by-product from padding used in mattress factories. It contains a high amount of lignin. Therefore, this study investigated the use of coir pith in the removal of hexavalent chromium from electroplating wastewater by varying the parameters, such as the system pH, contact time, adsorbent dosage, and temperature. The maximum removal (99.99%) was obtained at 2% (w/v) dosage, particle size <75 {mu}m, at initial Cr(VI) 1647 mg l{sup -1}, system pH 2, and an equilibrium time of 18 h. The adsorption isotherm of coir pith fitted reasonably well with the Langmuir model. The maximum Cr(VI) adsorption capacity of coir pith at 15, 30, 45 and 60 deg. C was 138.04, 197.23, 262.89 and 317.65 mg Cr(VI) g{sup -1} coir pith, respectively. Thermodynamic parameters indicated an endothermic process and the adsorption process was favored at high temperature. Desorption studies of Cr(VI) on coir pith and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) suggested that most of the chromium bound on the coir pith was in Cr(III) form due to the fact that the toxic Cr(VI) adsorbed on the coir pith by electrostatic attraction was easily reduced to less toxic Cr(III). Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometry analysis indicated that the carbonyl (C=O) groups and methoxy (O-CH{sub 3}) groups from the lignin structure in coir pith may be involved in the mechanism of chromium adsorption. The reduced Cr(III) on the coir pith surface may be bound with C=O groups and O-CH{sub 3} groups through coordinate covalent bonding in which a lone pair of electrons in the oxygen atoms of the methoxy and carbonyl groups can be donated to form a shared bond with Cr(III)

  2. MICROSTRUCTURE AND CORROSION RESISTANCE OF CHROMIUM NITRIDES OBTAINED BY VACUUM GAS NITRIDING OF ELECTROLYTIC CHROMIUM DEPOSITED ON AISI H13 STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Cifuentes

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this scientific research paper, the microstructure and corrosion resistance of chromium nitrides obtained from a duplex treatment consisting of an electroplated hard chromium coating applied on a steel AISI H13 follow by a thermochemical treatment in vacuum using NH3 as precursor gas of nitrogen, is evaluated. This type of duplex treatments combine the benefits of each individual treatment in order to obtain, with this synergic effect, compounds type CrxN more economic than those obtained by other kind of treatments e.g. physical vapor deposition (PVD. The results obtained by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD indicate the surface and subsurface transformation of the electrolytic hard chromium coating by formation of CrN and Cr2N phases. Likewise, potentiodynamic polarization tests indicate an increase in corrosion resistance of such kind of compounds in comparison with the obtained results with electroplated hard chromium.

  3. Chromium removal by zeolite-rich materials obtained from an exhausted FCC catalyst: Influence of chromium incorporation on the sorbent structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Maximiliano R; Pereyra, Andrea M; Torres Sánchez, Rosa M; Basaldella, Elena I

    2013-10-15

    A spent FCC catalyst was converted into a zeolitic mixture, and the product obtained was afterward used as trapping material for Cr(III) species frequently found in aqueous solutions. Eventual changes in the sorbent structure produced by Cr incorporation were studied by different characterization techniques such as point of zero charge determinations (PZC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), and infrared absorption (FTIR). The XRD and FTIR analyses indicated that chromium incorporation produces an amorphization of the material, and PZC measurements show no surface adsorption of charged chromium species. SEM and EDX analyses clearly show that after chromium sorption, the initial microspheroidal catalyst morphology was maintained, and the presence of chromium species was mainly detected in the outer microsphere surface, where the zeolite crystals were hydrothermally grown.

  4. Type 2 diabetic rats on diet supplemented with chromium malate show improved glycometabolism, glycometabolism-related enzyme levels and lipid metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Feng

    Full Text Available Our previous study showed that chromium malate improved the regulation of blood glucose in mice with alloxan-induced diabetes. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of chromium malate on glycometabolism, glycometabolism-related enzymes and lipid metabolism in type 2 diabetic rats. Our results showed that fasting blood glucose, serum insulin level, insulin resistance index and C-peptide level in the high dose group had a significant downward trend when compared with the model group, chromium picolinate group and chromium trichloride group. The hepatic glycogen, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glucokinase, Glut4, phosphor-AMPKβ1 and Akt levels in the high dose group were significantly higher than those of the model, chromium picolinate and chromium trichloride groups. Chromium malate in a high dose group can significantly increase high density lipoprotein cholesterol level while decreasing the total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels when compared with chromium picolinate and chromium trichloride. The serum chromium content in chromium malate and chromium picolinate group is significantly higher than that of the chromium trichloride group. The results indicated that the curative effects of chromium malate on glycometabolism, glycometabolism-related enzymes and lipid metabolism changes are better than those of chromium picolinate and chromium trichloride. Chromium malate contributes to glucose uptake and transport in order to improved glycometabolism and glycometabolism-related enzymes.

  5. Chromium Renderserver: Scalable and Open Source Remote RenderingInfrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Brian; Ahern, Sean; Bethel, E. Wes; Brugger, Eric; Cook,Rich; Daniel, Jamison; Lewis, Ken; Owen, Jens; Southard, Dale

    2007-12-01

    Chromium Renderserver (CRRS) is software infrastructure thatprovides the ability for one or more users to run and view image outputfrom unmodified, interactive OpenGL and X11 applications on a remote,parallel computational platform equipped with graphics hardwareaccelerators via industry-standard Layer 7 network protocolsand clientviewers. The new contributions of this work include a solution to theproblem of synchronizing X11 and OpenGL command streams, remote deliveryof parallel hardware-accelerated rendering, and a performance analysis ofseveral different optimizations that are generally applicable to avariety of rendering architectures. CRRSis fully operational, Open Sourcesoftware.

  6. Evaluating Foraminifera as an Archive for Seawater Chromium Isotopic Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Planavsky, N.; Hull, P. M.; Tripati, A.; Reinhard, C.; Zou, H.; Elder, L. E.; Henehan, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years there has been growing interest in using chromium isotopes (δ53Cr) as a proxy to investigate the redox evolution of Earth's ocean-atmosphere system throughout geological history. Potential archives for seawater δ53Cr that have been identified to date include iron formations and organic-rich siliciclastic sediments. However, these types of sediments are not common and they are discontinuous over geologic time. As a result, alternative types of archives are needed. Here we evaluate the utility of foraminifera tests as a recorder of seawater δ53Cr. Core-tops used were from different ocean basins. Mono-specific samples of Globigerinoides sacculifer, Orbulina universa, Pulleniatina obliquiloculata, Globoratalia crassula-crassaformis, Globoratalia truncatulinoides, and Globigerinella siphonifera were isolated to investigate inter-species isotope fractionation. Chromium concentrations were measured by isotope dilution method to be 0.1-0.3 μg/g. The δ53Cr values of these species range from 0.2‰ to 2.4‰, with an analytical uncertainty of 0.3‰ (95% confidence). Despite the high analytical uncertainty due to the extremely low levels of Cr present, there is still large detectable variation in foraminiferal δ53Cr values, which overlap presently available seawater values (Bonnand et al., 2013; Scheiderich et al., 2015). Possible explanations for such variations in foraminiferal δ53Cr values include heterogeneity of seawater δ53Cr in the modern oceans, and/or photobiochemical redox cycling of Cr in the surface oceans. Therefore, care should be taken when using foraminifera to reconstruct past seawater δ53Cr values. ReferencesBonnand, P., James, R., Parkinson, I., Connelly, D., Fairchild, I., 2013. The chromium isotopic composition of seawater and marine carbonates. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 382: 10-20. Scheiderich, K., Amini, M., Holmden, C., Francois, R., 2015. Global variability of chromium isotopes in seawater demonstrated by Pacific

  7. Adsorption of chromium ion (VI) by acid activated carbon

    OpenAIRE

    A. A. Attia; Khedr,S. A.; Elkholy,S. A.

    2010-01-01

    The activated carbon produced from olive stones was chemically activated using sulfuric acid, (OS-S), and utilized as an adsorbent for the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution in the concentration range 4-50 mg/L. Adsorption experiments were carried out in a batch process and various experimental parameters such as effect of contact time, initial chromium ion concentration, carbon dosage, and pH on percentage removal have been studied. Adsorption results obtained for activated carbon (OS-S...

  8. Study on anaerobic treatment of wastewater containing hexavalent chromium*

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Yan-Bin; Xiao, Hua-hua; Sun, Shui-yu

    2005-01-01

    A self-made anaerobic bio-filter bed which was inoculated with special sludge showed high efficiency in removing hexavalent chromium. When pump flow was 47 ml/min and CODCr of wastewater was about 140 mg/L, it took 4 h to decrease the Cr6+ concentrations from about 60 mg/L to under 0.5 mg/L, compared with 14 h without carbon source addition. Cr6+ concentrations ranged from 64.66 mg/L to 75.53 mg/L, the system efficiency was excellent. When Cr6+ concentration reached 95.47 mg/L, the treatment ...

  9. Structural, morphological and optical properties of chromium oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babukutty, Blessy; Parakkal, Fasalurahman; Nair, Swapna S., E-mail: swapna.s.nair@gmail.com [School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Department of Physics, Central University of Kerala, Kasaragod 671314 (India); Bhalero, G. M. [UGC-DAE, IGCAR, Kalpakkam, TamilNadu (India); Aravind, P. B. [Cochin University of Science and Technology(CUSAT), Cochin (India)

    2015-06-24

    Chromium oxide nanoparticles are synthesized by reduction route from chloride precursors with surfactant, trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO). Structural and morphological characterization are analyzed using X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Transmission Electron micrographs show that the average grain size lies in the range 5nm to 10nm. Optical characterization has been done by UV-VIS spectrophotometer. Distinct optical absorptions of Cr{sup 3+} ions show hinting towards the presence of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Presence of oxygen is also confirmed from Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) studies.

  10. Isocyanide and Phosphine Oxide Coordination in Binuclear Chromium Pacman Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Charlotte J; Nichol, Gary S; Arnold, Polly L; Love, Jason B

    2013-12-01

    The new binuclear chromium Pacman complex [Cr2(L)] of the Schiff base pyrrole macrocycle H4L has been synthesized and structurally characterized. Addition of isocyanide, C≡NR (R = xylyl, (t)Bu), or triphenylphosphine oxide donors to [Cr2(L)] gives contrasting chemistry with the formation of the new coordination compounds [Cr2(μ-CNR)(L)], in which the isocyanides bridge the two Cr(II) centers, and [Cr2(OPPh3)2(L)], a Cr(II) phosphine oxide adduct with the ligands exogenous to the cleft.

  11. CHROMIUM EXTRACTION BY MICROEMULSIONS IN TWO- AND THREE-PHASE SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. R. O. Melo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Microemulsion systems were used to remove chromium from an aqueous solution obtained from acid digestion of tannery sludge. The systems were composed by: coconut oil soap as surfactant, 1-butanol as cosurfactant, kerosene as the oil phase, and chromium solution as the aqueous phase. Two- and three-phase microemulsion extraction methods were investigated in the experiments. Viscosity, effective diameter of the droplets, and extraction and re-extraction efficiencies were evaluated for each system. Two- and three-phase systems showed small variations in droplet diameter, which can be attributed to the formation of micellar structures. Chromium recovery efficiencies for the studied systems were over 96%. The re-extraction step showed that the stripping solution used can release more than 96% of the chromium from the microemulsion phase. Experimental results confirm that chromium can be recovered efficiently using microemulsion systems.

  12. Detergents and bleaches are sources of chromium contact dermatitis in Israel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingber, A; Gammelgaard, Bente; David, M

    1998-01-01

    Total chromium levels were determined in 38 detergents and 12 bleaches on the market in Israel (45 locally produced, 5 imported). The samples were analyzed by Zeeman-corrected graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Chromium levels were higher than 5 ppm in 28 (56%) of the 50 products......, from 1 to 5 ppm in 16 (32%), and lower than 1 ppm in only 6 (12%). Among the 5 imported products, only 1 had a chromium level below 1 ppm and the other 4 (1 from Germany, 3 from the USA) had high levels. Since a most 90% of the detergents and bleaches examined contained chromium levels higher than 1...... ppm, it is concluded that these consumer products may be the cause of the high incidence of chromium sensitivity in Israel....

  13. Development of Alkaline Oxidative Dissolution Methods for Chromium (III) Compounds Present in Hanford Site Tank Sludges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NN Krot; VP Shilov; AM Fedoseev; NA Budantseva; MV Nikonov; AB Yusov; AYu Garnov; IA Charushnikova; VP Perminov; LN Astafurova; TS Lapitskaya; VI Makarenkov

    1999-07-02

    The high-level radioactive waste sludge in the underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site contains various chromium(III)solid phases. Dissolution and removal of chromium from tank waste sludges is desirable prior to high-level waste vitrification because increased volume is required to incorporate the residual chromium. Unfortunately, dissolution of chromium from the sludge to form Cr(OH){sub 4}{sup {minus}} through treatment with heated NaOH solution (also used to dissolve aluminum phases and metathesize phosphates to sodium salts) generally has been unsuccessful in tests with both simulated and genuine Hanford waste sludges. Oxidative dissolution of the Cr(III) compounds to form soluble chromate has been proposed as an alternative chromium solid phase dissolution method and results of limited prior testing have been reported.

  14. Bioremediation of the soils contaminated with cadmium and chromium, by the earthworm Eisenia fetida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Aseman

    2016-01-01

    Results: There was a significant correlation between the reduction of chromium and cadmium metals in the soils and the accumulation of chromium and cadmium metals in the worm’s body. A significant decline of chromium levels of the soil was observed in the days 21 and 42 during the study compared to the initial amount of 0.1 mg/g. On the other hand, chromium concentration of the soil decreased from 0.14 to 0.1 mg/g after 42 days. Conclusion: said the research indicated that increased mortality of worms in the soil at a concentration of 0.08 mg/g of chromium, using the worms for bioremediation is not recommended. Although, this method is effective to remove cadmium from the soils having cadmium with concentrations of 0.04 and 0.08 mg/g but it needs further investigation.

  15. Chromium related degradation of solid oxide fuel cells; Chrom-bezogene Degradation von Festoxid-Brennstoffzellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, Anita

    2011-05-04

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) offer a high potential for application as an auxiliary power unit (APU) for heavy goods vehicles as well as combined heat and power (CHP) systems. SOFCs are especially attractive due to their high efficiencies and the use of different fuel types. However, optimization in terms of long term stability and costs are still necessary. This work characterized the degradation of SOFCs with lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) cathodes under chromium influence. Galvanostatic cell tests were carried out at 800 C with operation times from 250 - 3000 h and variation of the chromium source and current density. The current densities of j = 0 (A)/(cm{sup 2}), j = 0,3 (A)/(cm{sup 2}) and j = 0,5 (A)/(cm{sup 2}) were applied. The high temperature ferritic alloy Crofer22APU was used as a chromium source. Variation of the chromium source was realized by coating the Crofer22APU insert with the chromium retention layer Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} and the cathode contact layer LCC10. Cell degradation was analyzed with regard to cell voltage, current density and area specific resistance (ASR). Microstructural alterations of the cathode as well as chromium content and distribution across the cell were investigated after completion of the cell tests. For cells with a chromium source present and operation with a nonzero current density, the course of cell degradation was divided into three phases: a run-in, weak linear degradation and strong linear degradation. A decrease of the chromium release rate by means of different coatings stretched the course of degradation along the timescale. Strong degradation, which is characterized by a significant increase in ASR as well as a decrease of current density at the operating point, was only observed when a chromium source in the setup was comb ined with operation of the cell with a non-zero current density. Operation of the cell with a chromium source but no current density caused a degradation of current density at the

  16. Synthesis of Zn–Fe layered double hydroxides via an oxidation process and structural analysis of products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morimoto, Kazuya, E-mail: kazuya.morimoto@aist.go.jp [Institute for Geo-Resources and Environment, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8567 (Japan); Tamura, Kenji [Environmental Remediation Materials Unit, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Anraku, Sohtaro [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Sato, Tsutomu [Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Suzuki, Masaya [Institute for Geo-Resources and Environment, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8567 (Japan); Yamada, Hirohisa [Environmental Remediation Materials Unit, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    The synthesis of Zn–Fe(III) layered double hydroxides was attempted, employing different pathways using either Fe(II) or Fe(III) species together with Zn as the initial reagents. The product derived from the synthesis employing Fe(II) was found to transition to a Zn–Fe(III) layered double hydroxides phase following oxidation process. In contrast, the product obtained with Fe(III) did not contain a layered double hydroxides phase, but rather consisted of simonkolleite and hydrous ferric oxide. It was determined that the valency of the Fe reagent used in the initial synthesis affected the generation of the layered double hydroxides phase. Fe(II) species have ionic radii and electronegativities similar to those of Zn, and therefore are more likely to form trioctahedral hydroxide layers with Zn species. - Graphical abstract: The synthesis of Zn–Fe(III) layered double hydroxides was attempted, employing different pathways using either Fe(II) or Fe(III) species together with Zn as the initial reagents. - Highlights: • Iron valency affected the generation of Zn–Fe layered double hydroxides. • Zn–Fe layered double hydroxides were successfully synthesized using Fe(II). • Fe(II) species were likely to form trioctahedral hydroxide layers with Zn species.

  17. Mixing Acid Salts and Layered Double Hydroxides in Nanoscale under Solid Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Nakayama

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The immobilization of potassium sorbate, potassium aspartate and sorbic acid in layered double hydroxide under solid condition was examined. By simply mixing two solids, immobilization of sorbate and aspartate in the interlayer space of nitrate-type layered double hydroxide, so called intercalation reaction, was achieved, and the uptakes, that is, the amount of immobilized salts and the interlayer distances of intercalation compounds were almost the same as those obtained in aqueous solution. However, no intercalation was achieved for sorbic acid. Although intercalation of sorbate and aspartate into chloride-type layered double hydroxide was possible, the uptakes for these intercalation compounds were lower than those obtained using nitrate-type layered double hydroxide. The intercalation under solid condition could be achieved to the same extent as for ion-exchange reaction in aqueous solution, and the reactivity was similar to that observed in aqueous solution. This method will enable the encapsulation of acidic drug in layered double hydroxide as nano level simply by mixing both solids.

  18. Vibrational dynamics of aqueous hydroxide solutions probed using broadband 2DIR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, Aritra [Department of Chemistry, James Franck Institute, and Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Tokmakoff, Andrei, E-mail: tokmakoff@uchicago.edu [Department of Chemistry, James Franck Institute, and Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2015-11-21

    We employed ultrafast transient absorption and broadband 2DIR spectroscopy to study the vibrational dynamics of aqueous hydroxide solutions by exciting the O–H stretch vibrations of the strongly hydrogen-bonded hydroxide solvation shell water and probing the continuum absorption of the solvated ion between 1500 and 3800 cm{sup −1}. We observe rapid vibrational relaxation processes on 150–250 fs time scales across the entire probed spectral region as well as slower vibrational dynamics on 1–2 ps time scales. Furthermore, the O–H stretch excitation loses its frequency memory in 180 fs, and vibrational energy exchange between bulk-like water vibrations and hydroxide-associated water vibrations occurs in ∼200 fs. The fast dynamics in this system originate in strong nonlinear coupling between intra- and intermolecular vibrations and are explained in terms of non-adiabatic vibrational relaxation. These measurements indicate that the vibrational dynamics of the aqueous hydroxide complex are faster than the time scales reported for long-range transport of protons in aqueous hydroxide solutions.

  19. Zimmer slipstream magnesium hydroxide recovery demonstration. Volume II of II. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    Dravo Lime has for many years supplied magnesium containing lime in the ranges of 3-6% MgO. Several years ago Dravo Lime realized the potential operating savings its FGD customers could benefit from if magnesium could be recovered from FGD waste streams. As a result, several different proprietary processes have been developed for the recovery of magnesium hydroxide. These recovery processes include steps for magnesium hydroxide separation, purification, and crystal growth. The process implemented at The Cincinnati Gas Electric Company`s Wm. H. Zimmer Station was piloted by Dravo Lime Company at Allegheny Power System`s Mitchell Station near Monongahela, PA during the fourth quarter in 1989 and first quarter in 1990. This pilot work was the foundation for further development of the ThioClear process at Dravo`s pilot plant at CG&E Miami Fort Station. The ThioClear process is a closed loop version of the magnesium hydroxide recovery process with the same unit operations and products but also including an absorber tower for scrubbing flue gas. Testing at Miami Fort of the ThioClear process led to improvements in separation of magnesium hydroxide from gypsum that are part of the magnesium hydroxide recovery process installed at Zimmer Station. This document contains the Appendices for this report.

  20. The Effect of Calcium Hydroxide As an Intracanal Medication of The Apical Microleakage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heshmat Mohajer AR

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Nowadays, calcium hydroxide is used as a dressing for canal sterilization and repair progression of apical lesions. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of calcium hydroxide as an intracanal medicament on the apical microleakage of root filling.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 46 extracted single-rooted human teeth were instrumented with step-back technique to master apical file (MAF size 35. Specimens were randomly divided into 2 groups (n = 20. In group 1, the specimens were treated with calcium hydroxide intracanal medication; and in group 2, the samples did not receive any medication. The teeth were incubated in 100% humidity at 37°C for one week. After that, calcium hydroxide was removed using irrigation with normal saline and reaming with MAF. The root canals were obturated with gutta- percha and AH26 sealer using lateral compaction technique. Specimens were incubated in 100% humility at 37°C for 72 hours and then immersed in India ink for 1 week. Finally, the teeth were cleared and the maximum linear dye penetration was measured under a stereomicroscope at 4X magnification. The data were analyzed by T-test and Chi-square.Results: There was no significant difference between the two experimental groups (P=0.068. Conclusion: The findings of this study indicated that using calcium hydroxide as an intracanal medicament did not influence the apical microleakage after final obturation of the root canal system.

  1. Relationship between sealing ability of Activ GP and Gutta Flow and methods of calcium hydroxide removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineeta Nikhil

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the effect of method of calcium hydroxide intracanal dressing removal, on sealing ability of Gutta Flow and Activ GP. Materials and Methods: Seventy extracted mandibular premolars were sectioned at CEJ and canals were prepared with profile 4% rotary file till #40. Canals were filled with calcium hydroxide, coronally sealed with Cavit G and stored at 37°C. After 7 days, samples were divided on the basis of calcium hydroxide removal method (Master apical file, Navi Tip FX, and F File and obturating material (Activ GP and Gutta Flow. Three coats of nail polish were applied except 2 mm around apical foramen and samples were immersed in India ink dye, sectioned, and observed under stereomicroscope for microleakage. Results: The results were statistically analyzed with one way ANOVA-F with Tukey HSD test with the null hypothesis set as 5%. Conclusions: The seal of the canal system was adversely impacted by residual calcium hydroxide when Activ GP and Gutta Flow were used as obturating material and the sealing ability of Activ GP and Gutta Flow was better when MAF was used for removal of calcium hydroxide than F file or Navi tip FX.

  2. Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045 and N06696), Nickel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) plate, sheet and strip

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045 and N06696), Nickel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) plate, sheet and strip

  3. Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045, and N06696), Nikel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) seamless pipe and tube

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045, and N06696), Nikel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) seamless pipe and tube

  4. Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045, and N06696), Nickel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) rod, bar, and wire

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045, and N06696), Nickel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) rod, bar, and wire

  5. Speciation of chromium in bread and breakfast cereals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathebula, Mpho Wendy; Mandiwana, Khakhathi; Panichev, Nikolas

    2017-02-15

    Bread and breakfast cereals are a major constituents of the human diet, yet their Cr(VI) content is not known. Chromium(VI) was determined in these products by high resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometer (HR-CS AAS) after leaching Cr(VI) with 0.10molL(-1) Na2CO3. The results showed that 33-73% of total Cr (58.17±5.12μgkg(-1)-156.1±6.66μgkg(-1)) in bread exist as Cr(VI) and the highest total Cr content was found in brown bread. It was shown that Cr(III) is oxidized to Cr(VI) during toasting of bread. Chromium(VI) content in breakfast cereals ranged between 20.4±4μgkg(-1) and 470.4±68μgkg(-1). Therefore, it can be concluded that bread and breakfast cereals contains Cr(VI) which does not exceed maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) of 0.003mgkg(-1)bw(-1)day(-1) through daily consumption of half a bowl (65g) of breakfast cereal and four slices of toasted (122g) or untoasted bread (160g).

  6. Biosorption of aqueous chromium(VI) by Tamarindus indica seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, G S; Bhuptawat, Hitendra Kumar; Chaudhari, Sanjeev

    2006-05-01

    The effectiveness of low cost agro-based materials namely, Tamarindus indica seed (TS), crushed coconut shell (CS), almond shell (AS), ground nut shell (GS) and walnut shell (WS) were evaluated for Cr(VI) removal. Batch test indicated that hexavalent chromium sorption capacity (q(e)) followed the sequence q(e)(TS) > q(e)(WS) > q(e)(AS) > q(e)(GS) > q(e)(CS). Due to high sorptive capacity, tamarind seed was selected for detailed sorption studies. Sorption kinetic data followed first order reversible kinetic fit model for all the sorbents. The equilibrium conditions were achieved within 150 min under the mixing conditions employed. Sorption equilibria exhibited better fit to Freundlich isotherms (R>0.92) than Langmuir isotherm (R approximately = 0.87). Hexavalent chromium sorption by TS decreased with increase in pH, and slightly reduced with increase in ionic strength. Cr(VI) removal by TS seems to be mainly by chemisorption. Desorption of Cr(VI) from Cr(VI) laden TS was quite less by distilled water and HCl. Whereas with NaOH, maximum desorption achieved was about 15.3%. When TS was used in downflow column mode, Cr(VI) removal was quite good but head loss increased as the run progressed and was stopped after 200 h.

  7. Structural effects of metallic chromium on its electrochemical behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VELIMIR RADMILOVIC

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Chromium dissolution in aqueous sulfuric acid solution of pH 1 was studied electrochemically on chromium electrodes with different crystallographic structures. A slow potentiodynamic method was used for the electrochemical measurements in deaerated solutions (purgedwith nitrogen,while the Cr(III ions in the solution after the corrosion were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. Three electrode materials with a very dominant crystallite orientation resembling single crystal structures (i.e., 111 and 110 confirmed by the electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD, were used in the experiments. The (111 structures were somewhat more active electrochemically (both anodic and cathodic than the (110 structure. However, Cr electrochemically deposited in standard plating bath, assumed from literature data to has also the (111 structure, was more than 4 times active for anodic dissolution and, by the same number, less active for cathodic hydrogen evolution. The concentrations of Cr(III ions determined in the solution after definite times of corrosion of all the materials showed almost two times larger dissolution rates than observed electrochemically by three different electrochemical methods (Wagner–Traud, Stern–Geary, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. This is explained by the simultaneous occurrence of potential independent chemical dissolution of Cr, by a direct reaction of metallic Cr with H2O molecules, proposed a long time ago by Kolotyrkin and coworkers.

  8. Pseudo-Stem Banana Fibers: Characterization and Chromium Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Becker

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, pseudo-stems of the banana tree were collected, characterized and used as adsorbent materials for the removal of the chromium ions from aqueous solution. The characterization of pseudo-stems by FTIR suggests the presence of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. The predominant groups were carbonyls (0.312 ± 0.010 mmol g–1 adsorbent, phenols (0.237 ± 0.021 mmol g–1 adsorbent, lactones (0.041 ± 0.003 mmol g–1 adsorbent and basic groups (0.096 ± 0.006 mmol g–1 adsorbent. The textural propriety of the adsorbent, surface area, pore volume and pore diameter were found to be 0.383 m2 g–1, 0.003525 cm3 g–1 and 368.3 Å, respectively. The pHpzc value was found 7.5 and so the adsorption assays of chromium removal from solution were more efficiently at acidic pH values. The experiments show that approximately 95% and 78% of the Cr (VI was removed from solution by untreated and treated fiber, respectively, in 300 minutes of the contact time.

  9. Internal Friction In The PFN Ceramics With Chromium Dopand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachariasz R.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available An aim of this work was to determine an influence of an admixture, the chromium (for x from 0.01 to 0.06, on the mechanical properties of the PFN ceramics. The ceramics with chemical composition Pb(Fe0.5−xCrxNb0.5O3 was synthesized in two steps from simple oxides PbO, Fe2O3, Nb2O5, Cr2O3. The first stage was based on obtaining the FeNbO4 from the Fe2O3 and Nb2O5 simple oxides. At this stage an admixture in a form the Cr2O3 chromium oxide was added to the solution. In the second stage the PbO lead oxide and the doped FeNbO4 (obtained earlier were synthetized. The sintering of ceramic samples PFCN type was carried out by free sintering method. Temperature measurements of the internal friction were conducted on a computer-controlled automatic resonant mechanical spectrometer (heating cycle with 3 deg/min.

  10. Study of effect of chromium on titanium dioxide phase transformation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Bellifa; L Pirault-Roy; C Kappenstein; A Choukchou-Braham

    2014-05-01

    MTi samples with different atomic chromium percentages were synthesized by sol–gel method and calcined at 400 °C under air. The effects of Cr and temperature on titanium dioxide phase transition were studied. In situ measurement showed the presence of anatase phase for all samples at temperature < 500 °C. Without Cr content, the anatase–rutile transition takes place at 600 °C and the rutile fraction increases with increase of temperature. In the presence of Cr content, rutile phase appeared at 700 °C. Cr2O3 phase was shown only in the case of CrTi20 content at 800 °C which indicates that the segregation remains modest. We have also studied the anatase–rutile transition kinetics by using in situ X-ray measurements. It was found that the anatase phase stability increases as the chromium content increases. Results confirm that the transformation of anatase–rutile is of first order.

  11. Chromium behavior during cement-production processes: A clinkerization, hydration, and leaching study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinyoung, Suthatip [Department of Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok, 10140 (Thailand); Songsiriritthigul, Prayoon [Synchrotron Light Research Institute, PO Box 93 Nakhon Ratchasima, 30000 (Thailand); School of Physics, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima, 30000 (Thailand); Asavapisit, Suwimol, E-mail: suwimol_s@hotmail.com [Environmental Technology, School of Energy and Materials, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok, 10140 (Thailand); National Center of Excellence for Environmental and Hazardous Waste Management, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok, 10140 (Thailand); Kajitvichyanukul, Puangrat, E-mail: puangratk@nu.ac.th [National Center of Excellence for Environmental and Hazardous Waste Management, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok, 10140 (Thailand); Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Naresuan University, Phitsanulok, 65000 (Thailand)

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: {yields} Behavior of chromium during cement-production processes. {yields} Formation of new chromium compounds in clinker with chromium oxidation states of +3, +4.6, +5, and +6. {yields} Addition of chromium altered the composition of the clinker phases, setting time, and compressive strength of hydrated mixes. {yields} Cr{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 6} were leached during leaching tests, whereas other species remained in the mortar. - Abstract: The behavior of chromium during the production of cement clinker, during the hydration of cement and during the leaching of cement mortars was investigated. The microstructures of clinker and mortar properties were investigated using free lime, XRD, SEM/EDS, and TG/DTA techniques. Chromium was found to be incorporated in the clinker phase. The formation of new chromium compounds such as Ca{sub 6}Al{sub 4}Cr{sub 2}O{sub 15}, Ca{sub 5}Cr{sub 3}O{sub 12}, Ca{sub 5}Cr{sub 2}SiO{sub 12}, and CaCr{sub 2}O{sub 7}, with chromium oxidation states of +3, +4.6, +5, and +6, respectively, was detected. After the hydration process, additional chromium compounds were identified in the mortar matrix, including Ca{sub 5}(CrO{sub 4}){sub 3}OH, CaCrO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O, and Al{sub 2}(OH){sub 4}CrO{sub 4}, with chromium oxidation states of +4.6, +6, and +6, respectively. Additionally, some species of chromium, such as Cr{sup 3+} from Ca{sub 6}Al{sub 4}Cr{sub 2}O{sub 15} and Cr{sup 6+} from CaCr{sub 2}O{sub 7}, CaCrO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O, and Al{sub 2}(OH){sub 4}CrO{sub 4}, were leached during leaching tests, whereas other species remained in the mortar. The concentrations of chromium that leached from the mortar following U.S. EPA Method 1311 and EA NEN 7375:2004 leaching tests were higher than limits set by the U.S. EPA and the Environment Agency of England and Wales related to hazardous waste disposal in landfills. Thus, waste containing chromium should not be allowed to mix with raw materials in the cement manufacturing process.

  12. An empirical model to estimate density of sodium hydroxide solution: An activator of geopolymer concretes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajamane, N. P.; Nataraja, M. C.; Jeyalakshmi, R.; Nithiyanantham, S.

    2016-02-01

    Geopolymer concrete is zero-Portland cement concrete containing alumino-silicate based inorganic polymer as binder. The polymer is obtained by chemical activation of alumina and silica bearing materials, blast furnace slag by highly alkaline solutions such as hydroxide and silicates of alkali metals. Sodium hydroxide solutions of different concentrations are commonly used in making GPC mixes. Often, it is seen that sodium hydroxide solution of very high concentration is diluted with water to obtain SHS of desired concentration. While doing so it was observed that the solute particles of NaOH in SHS tend to occupy lower volumes as the degree of dilution increases. This aspect is discussed in this paper. The observed phenomenon needs to be understood while formulating the GPC mixes since this influences considerably the relationship between concentration and density of SHS. This paper suggests an empirical formula to relate density of SHS directly to concentration expressed by w/w.

  13. Nickel-vanadium monolayer double hydroxide for efficient electrochemical water oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ke; Chen, Hong; Ji, Yongfei; Huang, Hui; Claesson, Per Martin; Daniel, Quentin; Philippe, Bertrand; Rensmo, Håkan; Li, Fusheng; Luo, Yi; Sun, Licheng

    2016-06-01

    Highly active and low-cost electrocatalysts for water oxidation are required due to the demands on sustainable solar fuels; however, developing highly efficient catalysts to meet industrial requirements remains a challenge. Herein, we report a monolayer of nickel-vanadium-layered double hydroxide that shows a current density of 27 mA cm-2 (57 mA cm-2 after ohmic-drop correction) at an overpotential of 350 mV for water oxidation. Such performance is comparable to those of the best-performing nickel-iron-layered double hydroxides for water oxidation in alkaline media. Mechanistic studies indicate that the nickel-vanadium-layered double hydroxides can provide high intrinsic catalytic activity, mainly due to enhanced conductivity, facile electron transfer and abundant active sites. This work may expand the scope of cost-effective electrocatalysts for water splitting.

  14. Nickel–vanadium monolayer double hydroxide for efficient electrochemical water oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ke; Chen, Hong; Ji, Yongfei; Huang, Hui; Claesson, Per Martin; Daniel, Quentin; Philippe, Bertrand; Rensmo, Håkan; Li, Fusheng; Luo, Yi; Sun, Licheng

    2016-01-01

    Highly active and low-cost electrocatalysts for water oxidation are required due to the demands on sustainable solar fuels; however, developing highly efficient catalysts to meet industrial requirements remains a challenge. Herein, we report a monolayer of nickel–vanadium-layered double hydroxide that shows a current density of 27 mA cm−2 (57 mA cm−2 after ohmic-drop correction) at an overpotential of 350 mV for water oxidation. Such performance is comparable to those of the best-performing nickel–iron-layered double hydroxides for water oxidation in alkaline media. Mechanistic studies indicate that the nickel–vanadium-layered double hydroxides can provide high intrinsic catalytic activity, mainly due to enhanced conductivity, facile electron transfer and abundant active sites. This work may expand the scope of cost-effective electrocatalysts for water splitting. PMID:27306541

  15. COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF THE ANTIBACTERIAL EFFECT OF CALCIUM HYDROXIDE PASTES USING FOUR DIFFERENT VEHIC LES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesh

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: AIM: The present study evaluated the antibacterial effec t of calcium hydroxide pastes using four different vehicles namely propylene glycol, glycerin, distilled water and camphorated phenol. MATERIAL AND METHOD: Calcium hydroxide pastes prepared with two commonly used vehicles namely distilled water and c amphorated phenol. The antibacterial activity of these pastes were tested against five a naerobic organism that can commonly occur in the infected root canal. The pastes were also prepare d using two chemicals such as propylene glycol and glycerin. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The result of this study show that calcium hydroxide paste made with propylene glycol gives enhan ced antibacterial action and sustains it for longer period of time. Propylene glycol being bi ological acceptable vehicle, it can be recommended for routine use as a vehicle over glyce rin

  16. A role for calcium hydroxide and dolomite in water: acceleration of the reaction under ultraviolet light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagase, Hiroyasu; Tsujino, Hidekazu; Kurihara, Daisuke; Saito, Hiroshi; Kawase, Masaya

    2014-04-01

    Organic environmental pollutants are now being detected with remarkably high frequency in the aquatic environment. Photodegradation by ultraviolet light is sometimes used as a method for removing organic chemicals from water; however, this method is relatively inefficient because of the low degradation rates involved, and more efficient methods are under development. Here we show that the removal of various organic pollutants can be assisted by calcined dolomite in aqueous solution under irradiation with ultraviolet light. It was possible to achieve substantial removal of bisphenol A, chlorophenols, alkylphenols, 1-naphthol and 17β-estradiol. The major component of dolomite responsible for the removal was calcium hydroxide. Our results demonstrate that the use of calcium hydroxide with ultraviolet light irradiation can be a very effective method of rapidly removing organic environmental pollutants from water. This is a new role for calcium hydroxide and dolomite in water treatment.

  17. The effect of crystal orientation on the cryogenic strength of hydroxide catalysis bonded sapphire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haughian, K.; Douglas, R.; van Veggel, A. A.; Hough, J.; Khalaidovski, A.; Rowan, S.; Suzuki, T.; Yamamoto, K.

    2015-04-01

    Hydroxide catalysis bonding has been used in gravitational wave detectors to precisely and securely join components of quasi-monolithic silica suspensions. Plans to operate future detectors at cryogenic temperatures has created the need for a change in the test mass and suspension material. Mono-crystalline sapphire is one candidate material for use at cryogenic temperatures and is being investigated for use in the KAGRA detector. The crystalline structure of sapphire may influence the properties of the hydroxide catalysis bond formed. Here, results are presented of studies of the potential influence of the crystal orientation of sapphire on the shear strength of the hydroxide catalysis bonds formed between sapphire samples. The strength was tested at approximately 8 K; this is the first measurement of the strength of such bonds between sapphire at such reduced temperatures. Our results suggest that all orientation combinations investigated produce bonds of sufficient strength for use in typical mirror suspension designs, with average strengths >23 MPa.

  18. Electroosmotic dewatering of chalk sludge, iron hydroxide sludge, wet fly ash and biomass sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, H.K.; Christensen, Iben Vernegren; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.;

    2003-01-01

    Electroosmotic dewatering has been tested in laboratory cells on four different porous materials: chalk sludge, iron hydroxide sludge, wet fly ash and biomass sludge from enzyme production. In all cases it was possible to remove water when passing electric DC current through the material. Casagra......Electroosmotic dewatering has been tested in laboratory cells on four different porous materials: chalk sludge, iron hydroxide sludge, wet fly ash and biomass sludge from enzyme production. In all cases it was possible to remove water when passing electric DC current through the material....... Casagrande's coefficients were determined for the four materials at different water contents. The experiments in this work showed that chalk could be dewatered from 40% to 79% DM (dry matter), fly ash from 75 to 82% DM, iron hydroxide sludge from 2.7 to 19% DM and biomass from 3 to 33% DM by electroosmosis...

  19. Large-scale Hydrothermal Synthesis and Characterization of Size-controlled Lanthanum Hydroxide Nanorods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YI,Ran; ZHANG,Ning; SHI,Rongrong; LI,Yongbo; QIU Guanzhou; LIU Xiaohe

    2009-01-01

    Uniform lanthanum hydroxide nanorods were successfully synthesized in large quantities through a facile hydrothermal synthetic method, in which soluble lanthanum nitrate was used to supply the lanthanum source and triethylamine (TEA) was used as both alkaline agent and complexing agent. The influences of triethylamine amount, surfactant, reaction temperature and time on the size and shape of lanthanum hydroxide nanorods were investigated in detail. Trivalent rare earth ion doped lanthanum hydroxide nanorods were also obtained in this paper. The phase structures and morphologies of the as-prepared products were investigated in detail by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and high-resolution transmis-sion electron microscopy (HRTEM). The probable formation mechanism was proposed based on the experimental results.

  20. Removal of Indigo Carmine Dye from Aqueous Solution Using Magnesium Hydroxide as an Adsorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thimmasandra Narayan Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium hydroxide is used as an adsorbent for the removal of indigo carmine dye from aqueous solution. We have investigated the effectiveness of removal of indigo carmine dye from aqueous solutions at pH 6-7 and 12-13 using magnesium hydroxide thereby varying the dose of the adsorbent, concentration of the dye, duration, and temperature. Structural transformations of adsorbent during the adsorption process at different pH values are monitored using powder X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. Different types of adsorption isotherm models were evaluated and it was found that Langmuir isotherm fits well at both pH values (6-7 and 12-13. Adsorption of indigo carmine onto magnesium hydroxide at pH 6-7/pH 12-13 follows pseudo-second order rate kinetics.

  1. Chromium treatment has no effect in patients with type 2 diabetes in a Western population : a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleefstra, N.; Houweling, S.T.; Bakker, S.J.; Gans, R.O.; Meyboom-de Jong, B.; Bilo, H.J.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Chromium treatment has been reported to improve glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. However, concern exists about the possible toxic effects of chromium picolinate. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of chromium treatment in the form of chromium yeast on glyc

  2. Chromium treatment has no effect in patients with type 2 diabetes in a western population - A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleefstra, Nanne; Gans, Rijk O. B.; Houweling, Sebastiaan T.; Meyboom-de Jong, Betty; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Bilo, Henk J. G.; Verhoeven, Simon

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - Chromium treatment has been reported to improve glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. However, concern exists about the possible toxic effects of chromium picolinate. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of chromium treatment in the form of chromium yeast on gly

  3. Aluminum phosphate shows more adjuvanticity than Aluminum hydroxide in recombinant hepatitis –B vaccine formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although a number of investigation have been carried out to find alternative adjuvants to aluminum salts in vaccine formulations, they are still extensively used due to their good track record of safety, low cost and proper adjuvanticity with a variety of antigens. Adsorption of antigens onto aluminum compounds depends heavily on electrostatic forces between adjuvant and antigen. Commercial recombinant protein hepatitis B vaccines containing aluminum hydroxide as adjuvant is facing low induction of immunity in some sections of the vaccinated population. To follow the current global efforts in finding more potent hepatitis B vaccine formulation, adjuvanticity of aluminum phosphate has been compared to aluminum hydroxide. Materials and methods: The adjuvant properties of aluminum hydroxide and aluminum phosphate in a vaccine formulation containing a locally manufactured hepatitis B (HBs surface antigen was evaluated in Balb/C mice. The formulations were administered intra peritoneally (i.p. and the titers of antibody which was induced after 28 days were determined using ELISA technique. The geometric mean of antibody titer (GMT, seroconversion and seroprotection rates, ED50 and relative potency of different formulations were determined. Results: All the adjuvanicity markers obtained in aluminum phosphate formulation were significantly higher than aluminum hydroxide. The geometric mean of antibody titer of aluminum phosphate was approximately three folds more than aluminum hydroxide. Conclusion: Aluminum phosphate showed more adjuvanticity than aluminum hydroxide in hepatitis B vaccine. Therefore the use of aluminum phosphate as adjuvant in this vaccine may lead to higher immunity with longer duration of effects in vaccinated groups.

  4. Process optimization of reaction of acid leaching residue of asbestos tailing and sodium hydroxide aqueous solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU GaoXiang; ZHENG ShuiLin; DING Hao

    2009-01-01

    Silica is the major component of the acid leaching residue of asbestos tailing. The waterglass solution can be prepared by the reaction of the residue with sodium hydroxide aqueous solution. Compared to the high temperature reaction method, this process is environmental friendly and low cost. In this paper, the reaction process of the residue and the sodium hydroxide aqueous solution is optimized. The op-timum reaction process parameters are as follows: the usage of sodium hydroxide is 26.4 g/100 g acid leaching residue, the reaction temperature is 90℃, the reaction time is 1 h, and the ratio of the liq-uid/solid is 2.0. The significance sequence of the process parameters to the alkali leaching reaction effect is the usage of sodium hydroxide > the ratio of the liquid/solid > the reaction time > the reaction temperature. The significance sequence to the leaching ratio of SiO2 is the ratio of the liquid/solid > the usage of sodium hydroxide > the reaction time > the reaction temperature. The significance sequence to the modulus of the sodium silicate is the ratio of the liquid/solid > the usage of sodium hydroxide > the reaction time > the reaction temperature. Under the optimum conditions, the leaching ratio of the SiO2 is 77.5%, and the modulus of the sodium silicate is 3.15. The XRD analysis result indicates that the major components of the alkali leaching residue are serpentine, talc, quartz and some albite.

  5. Preparation of hydroxide ion conductive KOH–layered double hydroxide electrolytes for an all-solid-state iron–air secondary battery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taku Tsuneishi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Anion conductive solid electrolytes based on Mg–Al layered double hydroxide (LDH were prepared for application in an all-solid-state Fe–air battery. The ionic conductivity and the conducting ion species were evaluated from impedance and electromotive force measurements. The ion conductivity of LDH was markedly enhanced upon addition of KOH. The electromotive force in a water vapor concentration cell was similar to that of an anion-conducting polymer membrane. The KOH–LDH obtained was used as a hydroxide ion conductive electrolyte for all-solid-state Fe–air batteries. The cell performance of the Fe–air batteries was examined using a mixture of KOH–LDH and iron-oxide-supported carbon as the negative electrode.

  6. Double-Shelled Nanocages with Cobalt Hydroxide Inner Shell and Layered Double Hydroxides Outer Shell as High-Efficiency Polysulfide Mediator for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jintao; Hu, Han; Li, Zhen; Lou, Xiong Wen David

    2016-03-14

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries have been considered as a promising candidate for next-generation electrochemical energy-storage technologies because of their overwhelming advantages in energy density. Suppression of the polysulfide dissolution while maintaining a high sulfur utilization is the main challenge for Li-S batteries. Here, we have designed and synthesized double-shelled nanocages with two shells of cobalt hydroxide and layered double hydroxides (CH@LDH) as a conceptually new sulfur host for Li-S batteries. Specifically, the hollow CH@LDH polyhedra with complex shell structures not only maximize the advantages of hollow nanostructures for encapsulating a high content of sulfur (75 wt %), but also provide sufficient self-functionalized surfaces for chemically bonding with polysulfides to suppress their outward dissolution. When evaluated as cathode material for Li-S batteries, the CH@LDH/S composite shows a significantly improved electrochemical performance.

  7. Antimycobacterial, antimicrobial, and biocompatibility properties of para-aminosalicylic acid with zinc layered hydroxide and Zn/Al layered double hydroxide nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saifullah, Bullo; El Zowalaty, Mohamed E; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Fakurazi, Sharida; Webster, Thomas J; Geilich, Benjamin M; Hussein, Mohd Zobir

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of tuberculosis by chemotherapy is complicated due to multiple drug prescriptions, long treatment duration, and adverse side effects. We report here for the first time an in vitro therapeutic effect of nanocomposites based on para-aminosalicylic acid with zinc layered hydroxide (PAS-ZLH) and zinc-aluminum layered double hydroxides (PAS-Zn/Al LDH), against mycobacteria, Gram-positive bacteria, and Gram-negative bacteria. The nanocomposites demonstrated good antimycobacterial activity and were found to be effective in killing Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. A biocompatibility study revealed good biocompatibility of the PAS-ZLH nanocomposites against normal human MRC-5 lung cells. The para-aminosalicylic acid loading was quantified with high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. In summary, the present preliminary in vitro studies are highly encouraging for further in vivo studies of PAS-ZLH and PAS-Zn/Al LDH nanocomposites to treat tuberculosis.

  8. Cobalt hydroxide/oxide hexagonal ring-graphene hybrids through chemical etching of metal hydroxide platelets by graphene oxide: energy storage applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nethravathi, C; Rajamathi, Catherine R; Rajamathi, Michael; Wang, Xi; Gautam, Ujjal K; Golberg, Dmitri; Bando, Yoshio

    2014-03-25

    The reaction of β-Co(OH)2 hexagonal platelets with graphite oxide in an aqueous colloidal dispersion results in the formation of β-Co(OH)2 hexagonal rings anchored to graphene oxide layers. The interaction between the basic hydroxide layers and the acidic groups on graphene oxide induces chemical etching of the hexagonal platelets, forming β-Co(OH)2 hexagonal rings. On heating in air or N2, the hydroxide hybrid is morphotactically converted to porous Co3O4/CoO hexagonal ring-graphene hybrids. Porous NiCo2O4 hexagonal ring-graphene hybrid is also obtained through a similar process starting from β-Ni0.33Co0.67(OH)2 platelets. As electrode materials for supercapacitors or lithium-ion batteries, these materials exhibit a large capacity, high rate capability, and excellent cycling stability.

  9. Investigation of total and hexavalent chromium in filtered and unfiltered groundwater samples at the Tucson International Airport Superfund Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman, Fred; McCleskey, R. Blaine; Hermosillo, Edyth

    2016-01-01

    Potential health effects from hexavalent chromium in groundwater have recently become a concern to regulators at the Tucson International Airport Area Superfund site. In 2016, the U.S. Geological Survey sampled 46 wells in the area to characterize the nature and extent of chromium in groundwater, to understand what proportion of total chromium is in the hexavalent state, and to determine if substantial differences are present between filtered and unfiltered chromium concentrations. Results indicate detectable chromium concentrations in all wells, over 75 % of total chromium is in the hexavalent state in a majority of wells, and filtered and unfiltered results differ substantially in only a few high-turbidity total chromium samples.

  10. Development of Drug Delivery Systems Based on Layered Hydroxides for Nanomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahnaz Barahuie

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Layered hydroxides (LHs have recently fascinated researchers due to their wide application in various fields. These inorganic nanoparticles, with excellent features as nanocarriers in drug delivery systems, have the potential to play an important role in healthcare. Owing to their outstanding ion-exchange capacity, many organic pharmaceutical drugs have been intercalated into the interlayer galleries of LHs and, consequently, novel nanodrugs or smart drugs may revolutionize in the treatment of diseases. Layered hydroxides, as green nanoreservoirs with sustained drug release and cell targeting properties hold great promise of improving health and prolonging life.

  11. Studies on Thorium Adsorption Characteristics upon Activated Titanium Hydroxide Prepared from Rosetta Ilmenite Concentrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gado, M, E-mail: parq28@yahoo.com; Zaki, S [Nuclear Materials Authority, P. O. Box 530 El Maadi, Cairo (Egypt)

    2016-01-01

    The titanium hydroxide prepared from Rosetta ilmenite concentrate has been applied for Th (IV) adsorption from its acid aqueous solutions. The prepared hydroxide is first characterized by both Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrum and thermogravimetric analysis. The relevant factors affecting the adsorption process have been studied. The obtained equilibrium data fits well with the Langmuir isotherm rather than Freundlich isotherm, while the adsorption kinetic data follow the pseudo-second order model. The different thermodynamic parameters have also been calculated and indicate that the adsorption process is spontaneous.

  12. Sulfur removal from Gediz lignite using aqueous sodium hydroxide solutions under mild oxidative conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaman, S.; Kuecuekbayrak, S. [Istanbul Technical Univ. (Turkey). Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering Faculty

    1999-11-01

    Sulfur removal from a high-sulfur Turkish lignite (Gediz) using aqueous sodium hydroxide solutions having dissolved oxygen was investigated under mild oxidative conditions. Effects of the parameters such as sodium hydroxide/lignite weight ratio, temperature, and partial pressure of oxygen were investigated within the ranges of 0.05--0.8, 423--498 K, and 1--2 MPa, respectively. Optimum values of these parameters were determined regarding sulfur removal and coal recovery. Influences of dry oxidation of the lignite sample as a pretreatment at 573 K and subsequent washing of some treated lignite samples with 1 N HCl were investigated.

  13. Synthesis and Characterization of Layered Double Hydroxides Containing Optically Active Transition Metal Ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, S. B.; Kharkwal, Aneeta; Nitu; Kharkwal, Mamta; Sharma, Raghunandan

    2017-01-01

    The acetate intercalated layered double hydroxides of Zn and Mn, have been synthesized by chimie douce method. The materials were characterized by XRD, TGA, CHN, IR, XPS, SEM-EDX and UV-visible spectroscopy. The photoluminescence properties was also studied. The optical properties of layered hydroxides are active transition metal ion dependent, particularly d1-10 system plays an important role. Simultaneously the role of host - guest orientation has been considered the basis of photoluminescence. Acetate ion can be exchanged with iodide and sulphate ions. The decomposed product resulted the pure phase Mn doped zinc oxide are also reported.

  14. Solid waste removes toxic liquid waste: adsorption of chromium(VI) by iron complexed protein waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathima, Nishtar Nishad; Aravindhan, Rathinam; Rao, Jonnalagadda Raghava; Nair, Balachandran Unni

    2005-04-15

    The leather processing industry generates huge amounts of wastes, both in solid and liquid form. Fleshing from animal hides/skins is one such waste that is high in protein content. In this study, raw fleshing has been complexed with iron and is used for removal of chromium(VI). The effect of pH and the initial concentration of chromium(VI) on the removal of Cr(IV) by iron treated fleshing is presented. Iron treatment is shown to greatly improve adsorption of the fleshing for hexavalent chromium. The ultimate adsorption capacity of iron treated fleshing is 51 mg of chromium(VI) per gram of fleshing. That of untreated fleshing is 9 mg/g such that iron treatment increases the adsorption capacity of fleshing by 10-fold. The measured adsorption kinetics is well described by a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The uptake of chromium(VI) by fleshing is best described by the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) studies show that the iron is incorporated into the protein matrix. Shifts in XPS spectra suggest that dichromate binding occurs with iron at active adsorption sites and that iron treated fleshing removes chromium(VI) without reducing it to chromium(III).

  15. Removal of chromium(VI) from aqueous solutions by polymer inclusion membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowski, Cezary A; Walkowiak, Wladyslaw

    2002-11-01

    The transport through polymer inclusion membranes (PIMs) was found as the effective and selective method of chromium(VI) anions removal from chloride acidic aqueous solutions. The optimal PIMs content was as follows: 41 wt% of cellulose triacetate as the support, 23 wt% of tri-n-octylamine as the ionic carrier, and 36 wt% of o-nitrophenyl pentyl ether as the plasticizer. The results obtained show a linear decrease of permeability coefficient and initial flux values with source phase pH increase. Also linear decrease of initial flux in log-log scale with chromium(VI) concentration increase was observed. Value of slope of this relationship was found to be 0.96 which indicates a first order of chromium(VI) reaction with tri-n-octylamine at membrane/aqueous source interface. Transport of chromium(VI) through PIMs reduces the concentration of chromium(VI) in source aqueous phase from 1.0 to 0.0028 ppm, which is below permissible limit in drinking water in Poland. Competitive transport of chromium(VI), cadmium(II), zinc(II), and iron(III) from acidic aqueous solution across PIMs was found to be efficient for chromium(VI) (99%), and cadmium(II) (99%).

  16. Reduction of chromium (VI by the indirect action of Thiobacillus thioparus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Donati

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available The microbial reduction of chromium(VI to chromium(III has been one of the most widely studied forms of metal bioremediation. Recently, we have found that Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Thiobacillus thiooxidans, growing on elemental sulphur, can indirectly promote chromium(VI reduction by producing reducing agents such as sulphite and thiosulphate, which abiotically reduce chromium(VI. Those species of Thiobacillus are acidophilic bacteria which grow optimally at pH values lower than 4. However, most of those reducing agents are stabilised at higher pH values. Thus, the present paper reports on the ability to reduce chromium(VI using another specie of Thiobacilli, Thiobacillus thioparus, which is able to grow at pH close to 7.0. T. thioparus cultures were carried out in a fermentation vessel containing medium and sulphur as the sole energy source and maintained at 30ºC and 400 rpm. The pH was adjusted to 6.0, 7.0 or 8.0 and maintained with the automatic addition of KOH. Our results show high chromium (VI reduction values (close to 100% at the end of bacterial growth at the three pH values. The results of these experiments are very promising for development of a microbiological process to be used in the detoxification of chromium(VI-polluted effluents.

  17. [In vitro percutaneous absorption of chromium powder and the effect of skin cleanser].

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostin, F; Crosera, M; Adami, G; Malvestio, A; Rosani, R; Bovenzi, M; Maina, G; Filon, F Larese

    2007-01-01

    Occupational chromium dermatitis occurs frequently among cement and metal workers, workers dealing with leather tanning and employees in the ceramic industry. The present study, using an in-vitro system, evaluated percutaneous absorption of chromium powder and the effect of rapid skin decontamination with a common detergent. Experiments were performed using the Franz diffusion cell method with human skin. Physiological solution was used as receiving phase and a suspension of chromium powder in synthetic sweat was used as donor phase. The tests were performed without or with decontamination using the cleanser 30 minutes after the start of exposure. The amount of chromium permeated through the skin was analysed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy and Electro Thermal Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. Speciation analysis and measurements of chromium skin content were also performed. We calculated a permeation flux of 0.843 +/- 0.25 ng cm(-2) h(-1) and a lag time of 1.1 +/- 0.7 h. The cleaning procedure significantly increased chromium skin content, whereas skin passage was not increased. These results showed that chromium powder can pass through the skin and that skin decontamination did not decrease skin absorption. Therefore, it is necessary to prevent skin contamination when using toxic agents.

  18. Efficiency of Removing Chromium from Plating Industry Wastewater using the Electrocoagulation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borghe-ei S.M.1 PhD,

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aims Chromium is one of the most important metallic pollutants in plating industry wastewater. This toxic metal is a serious threat to human health and to the environment due to its cumulative effects and non-degradability. This research intended to study the effects of pH, contact time, and voltage on the degree of chromium removal from wastewater of plating industry by using the electrocoagulation method. Materials & Methods This laboratory research conducted from late May to late November 2012. A 1000cc reactor at laboratory scale was used that included 4 aluminum electrodes of 90% purity, dimensions of 5 by 10cm, and thickness of 1mm, with parallel arrangement. Synthetic chromium-bearing wastewater was prepared at the initial concentration of 50mg/l. The process is done at pH values of 3, 7, and 9, electric potentials of 20, 30, and 40 volts contact durations of 20, 40, 60, and 80 minutes. Findings The degree of chromium reduction did not change linearly with time in the solution and strongly depended on the pH. The efficiency of chromium removal in the samples had an ascending trend with increases in voltage from 20 to 30 and 40 volts. The degree of chromium removal increased at longer contact times. Conclusion Lower pH, more contact time and higher voltages are effective factors in the chromium removal from wastewater by coagulation method.

  19. Chromium in water, suspended particles, sediments and biota in the Iraja River estuary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeiffer, W.C.; Fiszman, M.; de Lacerda, L.D.; van Weerfelt, M.; Carbonell, N.

    1982-11-01

    Analyses of chromium concentrations in waters, suspended particles, bottom sediments, fish (Poecilia reticulata), plants (Paspalum vaginatum, Sesuvium portulacastrum, Philoxeros vermicularis), soils and barnacles (Balanus sp.) were performed from August 1976 to September 1980 in samples collected from the Iraja River and inside its estuary in Guanabara Bay (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil). Sediments and water from the Iraja River showed chromium concentrations of 17536 and 23.39 ppm--a thousand times higher than the published data for freshwater systems. Chromium removed from solution by bottom sediments reaches Guanabara Bay linked to particulate matter. Fish and emergent grass inside the river concentrate chromium from water and/or sediment, returning the metal to the system as detritus. Soil and plants inside the estuary concentrate chromium thirty and ten times higher than in the control area. The vegetal community exhibits a concentration factor smaller than that related to soil and prevents the return of chromium to the estuarine waters. Inside the Guanabara Bay, Balanus sp. appears to be an effective biological monitor as it concentrates chromium in soft tissues 10/sup 3/ times higher than values found in suspended particles (0.012 ..mu..g ml/sup -1/).

  20. High Chromium Tolerant Bacterial Strains from Palar River Basin: Impact of Tannery Pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sundar

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The basic survey study on tanneries and its pollution in the Palar river basin of Vellore District showed that it has been contaminated with heavy metals especially chromium and salts. This study is to improve our understanding to find the Cr contamination level and the ecology of heavy metal tolerance of the native bacterial flora of our study area. Chromium tolerant strains were isolated from contaminated sediments, water and effluents of various tanneries. The minimum and maximum concentration of chromium sediments was in the range of 47.4 and 682.4 mg/L, with an average of 306.285 mg/L in the study area. Sixty-eight chromium resistant bacterial strains were isolated and Maximum Tolerance Concentration (MTC studies have indicated that the tolerance concentrations of the isolates were in the range of 100-3300 mg/L. These bacterial isolates were also checked for their resistance to other heavy metals like Ni, Pb, Zn, Fe and Cd. Eighty percent of the isolates showed resistance to Ni, Pb, Zn, Fe at 100 ppm level and 45% had shown resistance to Cd. The isolates also had shown tolerance to salt (NaCl up to 9%. Significant note was found in the concentration of chromium and in the chromium tolerance ability of the bacteria in the study area and these chromium tolerance bacteria can be used as the indicator for the Cr contamination.

  1. Large-scale simulations of layered double hydroxide nanocomposite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyveetil, Mary-Ann

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) have the ability to intercalate a multitude of anionic species. Atomistic simulation techniques such as molecular dynamics have provided considerable insight into the behaviour of these materials. We review these techniques and recent algorithmic advances which considerably improve the performance of MD applications. In particular, we discuss how the advent of high performance computing and computational grids has allowed us to explore large scale models with considerable ease. Our simulations have been heavily reliant on computational resources on the UK's NGS (National Grid Service), the US TeraGrid and the Distributed European Infrastructure for Supercomputing Applications (DEISA). In order to utilise computational grids we rely on grid middleware to launch, computationally steer and visualise our simulations. We have integrated the RealityGrid steering library into the Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS) 1 . which has enabled us to perform re mote computational steering and visualisation of molecular dynamics simulations on grid infrastruc tures. We also use the Application Hosting Environment (AHE) 2 in order to launch simulations on remote supercomputing resources and we show that data transfer rates between local clusters and super- computing resources can be considerably enhanced by using optically switched networks. We perform large scale molecular dynamics simulations of MgiAl-LDHs intercalated with either chloride ions or a mixture of DNA and chloride ions. The systems exhibit undulatory modes, which are suppressed in smaller scale simulations, caused by the collective thermal motion of atoms in the LDH layers. Thermal undulations provide elastic properties of the system including the bending modulus, Young's moduli and Poisson's ratios. To explore the interaction between LDHs and DNA. we use molecular dynamics techniques to per form simulations of double stranded, linear and plasmid DNA up

  2. Antimycobacterial, antimicrobial, and biocompatibility properties of para-aminosalicylic acid with zinc layered hydroxide and Zn/Al layered double hydroxide nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saifullah B

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Bullo Saifullah,1 Mohamed E El Zowalaty,2,3 Palanisamy Arulselvan,2 Sharida Fakurazi,2,4 Thomas J Webster,5,6 Benjamin M Geilich,5 Mohd Zobir Hussein1 1Materials Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory, Institute of Advanced Technology (ITMA, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia; 2Laboratory of Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics, Institute of Bioscience, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia; 3Department of Environmental Health, Faculty of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Jazan University, Jazan, Saudi Arabia; 4Department of Human Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia; 5Department of Chemical Engineering and Program in Bioengineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA; 6Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia Abstract: The treatment of tuberculosis by chemotherapy is complicated due to multiple drug prescriptions, long treatment duration, and adverse side effects. We report here for the first time an in vitro therapeutic effect of nanocomposites based on para-aminosalicylic acid with zinc layered hydroxide (PAS-ZLH and zinc-aluminum layered double hydroxides (PAS-Zn/Al LDH, against mycobacteria, Gram-positive bacteria, and Gram-negative bacteria. The nanocomposites demonstrated good antimycobacterial activity and were found to be effective in killing Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. A biocompatibility study revealed good biocompatibility of the PAS-ZLH nanocomposites against normal human MRC-5 lung cells. The para-aminosalicylic acid loading was quantified with high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. In summary, the present preliminary in vitro studies are highly encouraging for further in vivo studies of PAS-ZLH and PAS-Zn/Al LDH nanocomposites to treat tuberculosis.  Keywords: Zn/Al-layered double hydroxides, zinc layered hydroxides, tuberculosis, para

  3. Determination of Chromium(III), Chromium(VI), and Chromium(III) acetylacetonate in water by ion-exchange disk extraction/metal furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamakura, Nao, E-mail: minnie04_tb@yahoo.co.jp; Inui, Tetsuo; Kitano, Masaru; Nakamura, Toshihiro

    2014-03-01

    A new method for the separate determination of Chromium(III) (Cr(III)), Chromium(VI) (Cr(VI)), and Cr(III) acetylacetonate (Cr(acac){sub 3}) in water was developed using a cation-exchange extraction disk (CED) and an anion-exchange extraction disk (AED) combined with metal furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (MFAAS). A 100-mL water sample was adjusted to pH 5.6 and passed through the CED placed on the AED. Cr(acac){sub 3} and Cr(III) were adsorbed on the CED, and Cr(VI) was adsorbed on the AED. The adsorbed Cr(acac){sub 3} was eluted with 50 mL of carbon tetrachloride, followed by the elution of Cr(III) with 50 mL of 3 mol L{sup −1} nitric acid. Cr(VI) was eluted with 50 mL of 3 mol L{sup −1} nitric acid. The chemical species of Cr eluted from the CED with carbon tetrachloride was identified as Cr(acac){sub 3} using infrared spectroscopy. The eluate of Cr(acac){sub 3} was diluted to 100 mL with carbon tetrachloride, and those of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) were diluted to 100 mL with deionized water. All of the solutions were subsequently analyzed by MFAAS. The calibration curve for the Cr(acac){sub 3} aqueous solutions exhibited good linearity in the range of 0.1 to 1 ng. The detection limit of Cr, which corresponded to three times the standard deviation (n = 10) of the blank values, was 20 pg. The recovery test for Cr(III), Cr(VI), and Cr(acac){sub 3} exhibited desirable results (96.0%–107%) when 5 μg of each species (50 μg L{sup −1}) was added to 100 mL water samples (i.e., tap water, rainwater, and bottled drinking water). In a humic acid solution, Cr(acac){sub 3} was quantitatively recovered (103%), but Cr(III) and Cr(VI) exhibited poor recoveries (i.e., 84.8% and 78.4%, respectively). - Highlights: • A determination method of Cr(III), Cr(VI), and Cr(III) acetylacetonate in water was developed. • The combination of ion-exchange resin disks with metal furnace AAS was used. • No effect of humic acid on the recovery of Cr(III) acetylacetonate was

  4. Chromium behavior during cement-production processes: a clinkerization, hydration, and leaching study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinyoung, Suthatip; Songsiriritthigul, Prayoon; Asavapisit, Suwimol; Kajitvichyanukul, Puangrat

    2011-07-15

    The behavior of chromium during the production of cement clinker, during the hydration of cement and during the leaching of cement mortars was investigated. The microstructures of clinker and mortar properties were investigated using free lime, XRD, SEM/EDS, and TG/DTA techniques. Chromium was found to be incorporated in the clinker phase. The formation of new chromium compounds such as Ca(6)Al(4)Cr(2)O(15), Ca(5)Cr(3)O(12), Ca(5)Cr(2)SiO(12), and CaCr(2)O(7), with chromium oxidation states of +3, +4.6, +5, and +6, respectively, was detected. After the hydration process, additional chromium compounds were identified in the mortar matrix, including Ca(5)(CrO(4))(3)OH, CaCrO(4)·2H(2)O, and Al(2)(OH)(4)CrO(4), with chromium oxidation states of +4.6, +6, and +6, respectively. Additionally, some species of chromium, such as Cr(3+) from Ca(6)Al(4)Cr(2)O(15) and Cr(6+) from CaCr(2)O(7), CaCrO(4)·2H(2)O, and Al(2)(OH)(4)CrO(4), were leached during leaching tests, whereas other species remained in the mortar. The concentrations of chromium that leached from the mortar following U.S. EPA Method 1311 and EA NEN 7375:2004 leaching tests were higher than limits set by the U.S. EPA and the Environment Agency of England and Wales related to hazardous waste disposal in landfills. Thus, waste containing chromium should not be allowed to mix with raw materials in the cement manufacturing process.

  5. Portable x-ray fluorescence for the analysis of chromium in nail and nail clippings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, David E B; Ware, Chris S

    2017-03-01

    Assessment of chromium content in human nail or nail clippings could serve as an effective biomarker of chromium status. The feasibility of a new portable x-ray fluorescence (XRF) approach to chromium measurement was investigated through analysis of nail and nail clipping phantoms. Five measurements of 180s (real time) duration were first performed on six whole nail phantoms having chromium concentrations of 0, 2, 5, 10, 15, and 20µg/g. Using nail clippers, these phantoms were then converted to nail clippings, and assembled into different mass groups of 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100mg for additional measurements. The amplitude of the chromium Kα characteristic x-ray energy peak was examined as a function of phantom concentration for all measurement conditions to create a series of calibration lines. The minimum detection limit (MDL) for chromium was also calculated for each case. The chromium MDL determined from the whole nail intact phantoms was 0.88±0.03µg/g. For the clipping phantoms, the MDL ranged from 1.2 to 3.3µg/g, depending on the mass group analyzed. For the 40mg clipping group, the MDL was 1.2±0.1µg/g, and higher mass collections did not improve upon this result. This MDL is comparable to chromium concentration levels seen in various studies involving human nail clippings. Further improvements to the portable XRF technique would be required to detect chromium levels expected from the lower end of a typical population.

  6. A facile one-pot synthesis of ruthenium hydroxide nanoparticles on magnetic silica: Aqueous hydration of nitriles to amides

    Science.gov (United States)

    One-pot synthesis of ruthenium hydroxide nanoparticles on magnetic silica is described which involve the in situ generation of magnetic silica (Fe3O4@ SiO2) and ruthenium hydroxide immobilization; the hydration of nitriles occurs in high yield and excellent selectivity using this...

  7. Technological progress on detoxification and comprehensive utilization of chromium-containing slag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柴立元; 何德文; 于霞; 刘恢; 闵小波; 陈为亮

    2002-01-01

    Chromium salt is an important industrial material, but vast waste slag containing chrome(Ⅵ) is brought out in the process of its production. The slag is seriously harmful to environments and human health. The technologies on detoxification and comprehensive utilization of chromium-containing slag were summarized abroad and at home. And various methods were also described for the detoxification mechanism, technology process, and practical application effects in detail. A new concept for detoxification of chromium-containing slag, furthermore, was put forward by using microorganism.

  8. Analysis of Nanometer Structure for Chromium Atoms in Gauss Standing Laser Wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wen-Tao; ZHU Bao-Hua; XIONG Xian-Ming

    2010-01-01

    @@ The equation of motion of two-level chromium atoms in Gauss standing laser wave is discussed and the distribution of chromium atoms is given under different transverse velocity conditions.The results show that the focusing position of atoms will be affected by the transverse velocity of atoms.Based on the four-order Runge-Kutta method,the locus of chromium atoms in Gauss standing laser wave is simulated.The three-dimensional characteristics of nanometer structures are stimulated under perfect and emanative conditions.

  9. STUDY ON MORPHOLOGY OF CHROMIUM IN CHILLED Cu-0.14%-2.0%Cr ALLOYS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.W.Yang; Z.K.Fan

    2004-01-01

    The morphology of chromium in chilled Cu-Cr alloys with 0.14%-2.0% Cr has been studied. The results showed that eutectic Cr phase takes a fibrous shape, and pre-eutectic Cr is dendritic in the studied chilled Cu-Cr alloy. During solute treatment of the eutectic and super-eutectic Cu-Cr alloys, only part of chromium particles dissolved in copper phase,some fiber and dendritic chromium still remained. Forging before solute treatment can reduce the size of primary Cr particles, which benefits the aging structure.

  10. Peat and coconut fiber as biofilters for chromium adsorption from contaminated wastewaters

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Batch adsorption experiments were performed for the removal of chromium (III) and chromium (VI) ions from aqueous solutions using Canadian peat and coconut fiber. The Langmuir model was used to describe the adsorption isotherm. The maximum adsorption for peat reached 18.75 mg/g for Cr(III) and 8.02 mg/g for Cr(VI), whereas the value for fiber was slightly higher and reached 19.21 mg/g for Cr(III) and 9.54 mg/g for Cr(VI). Both chromium forms could be easily eluted from the materials. The adso...

  11. Growth of magnetic cobalt/chromium nano-arrays by atom-optical lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atoneche, F; Malik, D; Kirilyuk, A; Toonen, A J; Etteger, A F van; Rasing, Th, E-mail: f.atoneche@science.ru.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen, Institute for Molecules and Materials, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2011-07-06

    Arrays of magnetic cobalt/chromium (Co-Cr) nanolines are grown by depositing an atomic beam of Co-Cr alloy through a laser standing wave (SW) at {lambda}/2 = 212.8 nm onto a substrate. During deposition, only the chromium atoms are resonantly affected by the optical potential created by the SW, causing a periodic modulation of the chromium concentration and consequently of the magnetic properties. Magnetic force microscopy and magneto-optical Kerr effect studies reveal a patterned magnetic structure on the substrate surface.

  12. Growth of magnetic cobalt/chromium nano-arrays by atom-optical lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atoneche, F.; Malik, D.; Kirilyuk, A.; Toonen, A. J.; van Etteger, A. F.; Rasing, Th

    2011-07-01

    Arrays of magnetic cobalt/chromium (Co-Cr) nanolines are grown by depositing an atomic beam of Co-Cr alloy through a laser standing wave (SW) at λ/2 = 212.8 nm onto a substrate. During deposition, only the chromium atoms are resonantly affected by the optical potential created by the SW, causing a periodic modulation of the chromium concentration and consequently of the magnetic properties. Magnetic force microscopy and magneto-optical Kerr effect studies reveal a patterned magnetic structure on the substrate surface.

  13. Proposed adsorption-diffusion model for characterizing chromium(VI) removal using dried water hyacinth roots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, Debasish; Mukherjee, Paramartha; Bandyopadhyay, Amitava [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Calcutta, Kolkata (India); Das, Sudip Kumar [Department of Chemical Technology, University of Calcutta, Kolkata (India)

    2010-08-15

    Experiments have been carried out to characterize the adsorption of chromium(VI) in the aqueous phase onto dried roots of water hyacinth. Results revealed a very high degree of removal efficiency ({proportional_to}100%). Theoretical analyzes are also made for describing the sorption and diffusion processes. The effective pore diffusivity of chromium(VI) in the water hyacinth roots is determined by a suitable global optimization technique. The depth of penetration, on the other hand, has been estimated for various initial concentrations of chromium(VI). Theoretically predicted concentration profiles are in excellent agreement with the experimental values. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  14. Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of azo dye (Direct Blue 15) using solvothermally synthesized copper hydroxide nitrate as catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Yuzhong; Zhou, Xiang; Fu, Bei; Chen, Yiliang

    2011-03-15

    Copper hydroxide nitrate (Cu(2)(OH)(3)NO(3)) was synthesized solvothermally in anhydrous ethanol and characterized by XRD, FTIR, TG-DTA and SEM. The peroxide degradation of an azo dye (Direct Blue 15) on this material was evaluated by examining catalyst loading, initial pH, hydrogen peroxide dosage, initial dye concentration and temperature. The leaching of Cu from the copper hydroxide nitrate during the reaction was also measured. The copper hydroxide nitrate synthesized solvothermally, which was of a novel spherical morphology with complex secondary structures and contained high-dispersed Cu(2)O impurity, showed good performance for oxidation degradation of the azo dye, especially high catalytic activity, high utilization of hydrogen peroxide and a wide pH range, whereas the copper hydroxide nitrate synthesized by the direct reaction of copper nitrate and sodium hydroxide showed low catalytic activity.

  15. Utilization of Magnesium Hydroxide Produced by Magnesia Hydration as Fire Retardant for Nylon 6-6,6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocha Sônia D.F.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work investigates the use of magnesium hydroxide, produced by magnesia hydration, as a fire retardant in polymers. The hydration was carried out in an autoclave, at temperature of 130°C for 1 hour, and the product was further submitted to cominution in a jet mill. The solids were characterized with regard to their chemical composition, particle size distribution, surface area and morphology. The performance evaluation of the hydroxide as a flame retardant for a copolymer of nylon 6-6,6 was carried out according to the UL94 specifications for vertical burning tests. V-0 flammability rating at 1.6 mm (60% magnesium hydroxide-filled nylon composite and at 3.2 mm (40% magnesium hydroxide filled nylon composite were achieved. Mechanical properties were maintained at the desired values. These results indicate that the hydroxide obtained from magnesia hydration can be successfully employed as a fire retardant for nylon 6-6,6.

  16. 双(羟基)金属复合氧化物的表面改性%Surface Modification of Layered Double Hydroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯春瑶; 矫庆泽; 李蕾; 张春英; 段雪

    2001-01-01

    Mg/Al layered double hydroxide(LDH) was treated with stearic acid by a wet method. The modified double hydroxide showed good dispersion and floatation property with their layer structure being remained almost unchanged.

  17. 铬盐生产工艺中除铝方法的研究进展%Research development of aluminum removal in chromium compound production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏广叶; 曲景奎; 齐涛; 郑裕东; 郭强

    2013-01-01

      The solid phase method and liquid phase method for aluminum removal in the chromium compound production were reviewed. The special emphasis was placed on lime free roasting process. Magnesioferrite (Mg(Fe,Al)2O4), sodium aluminosilicate (NaAlSiO4), silicic acid, aluminum magnesium sodium salt(Na4MgAl2Si3O12) are the major phases of aluminum containing compound. Certain amounts of silica dioxide or aluminum oxide and such additives, depending on the chromium containing material, are added to control the molar ratio of SiO2 and Al2O3 in order to form aluminum containing compound. The liquid phase methods is relative to the alkali concentration. For decomposition of aluminates in low alkali solution, carbonate process benefit for the production of easy filterable aluminum hydroxide with little content of chromate. For decomposition of aluminates in high alkali solution, aluminum hydroxide is obtained by seed composition following by extraction of great amount of alkali metal hydroxide and decrease of alkali/aluminum ratio. Finally, the problems and development of aluminum removal process were pointed out and analyzed.%  主要从固相法和液相法两个方面介绍铬盐生产工艺中铝杂质的脱除方法,固相法重点介绍无钙焙烧法,无钙焙烧熟料中含铝固相产物有铁镁矿(Mg(Fe,Al)2O4)、铝硅酸钠(NaAlSiO4)和铝硅酸镁钠(Na4MgAl2Si3O12)。同时,根据铬矿成分的不同,添加含硅或含铝原料,控制SiO2和Al2O3摩尔比,使铬铁矿中的铝和硅在无钙焙烧过程中转化成为铝硅酸钠和铝硅酸镁钠。铬酸盐熟料浸出过程中,液相中铝化合物主要是铝酸盐。液相法脱除铝杂质与体系的碱浓度密切相关。低碱浓度时,碳分法有利于得到铬酸盐夹带少、易过滤的氢氧化铝;高碱浓度时,首先进行萃取脱碱,降低溶液中碱/铝比例,然后采用种分法得到氢氧化铝沉淀。综述了各种除铝方法的特点,并探

  18. Electrochemical reduction of hexavalent chromium in ground water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bansal, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Electrochemical reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr{sup +6}) to its trivalent state (Cr{sup +3}) is showing promising results in treating ground water at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) Main Site. An electrolytic cell using stainless-steel and brass electrodes has been found to offer the most efficient reduction while yielding the least amount of precipitate. Trials have successfully lowered concentrations of Cr{sup +6} to below 11 parts per billion (micrograms/liter), the California state standard. We ran several trials to determine optimal voltage for running the cell; each trial consisted of applying a voltage between 6V and 48V for ten minutes through samples obtained at Treatment Facility C(TFC). No conclusive data has been obtained yet.

  19. Fracture and Delamination of Chromium Thin Films on Polymer Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordill, M. J.; Taylor, A.; Schalko, J.; Dehm, G.

    2010-04-01

    New emerging technologies in the field of flexible electronic devices require that metal films adhere well and flex with polymer substrates. Common thin film materials used for these applications include copper (Cu) with an adhesion interlayer of chromium (Cr). Copper can be quite ductile and easily move with the polymer substrate. However, Cr is more brittle and fractures at lower strains than Cu. This study aims to examine the fracture and subsequent buckling and delamination of strained Cr films on polyimide (PI). In-situ scanning electron microscope (SEM) straining is used to systematically study the influence of film thickness on fracture and buckling strains. Film fracture and delamination depend on film thickness, and increases in crack and buckle density with decreasing thickness are explored by a shear lag model.

  20. Hexavalent Chromium Removal by Litchi chinensis Sonn Peel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismael Acosta-Rodriguez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: We studied the Chromium (VI removal capacity in aqueous solution by the litchi peel. Approach: We use the diphenylcarbazide method to evaluate the metal concentration. Results: The highest biosorption of the metal (50 mg L-1 occurs within 6 min, at pH of 1 and 28°C. According to temperature, the highest removal was observed at 40 and 50°C, in 45 min, when the metal (1 g L-1 was completely adsorbed. At the analyzed concentrations of Cr (VI, litchi peel, showed excellent removal capacity, besides it removes efficiently the metal in situ (100% removal, 5 days of incubation, 5 and 10 g of biomass. After 1 h of incubation the studied biomass reduces 1.0 g of Cr (VI with the simultaneous production of Cr (III. Conclusion: The shell can be used to eliminate it from industrial wastewater."

  1. Investigation of hexavalent chromium sorption in serpentine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpouras, Thanasis; Chrysochoou, Maria; Dermatas, Dimitris

    2017-02-01

    In this study the removal of hexavalent chromium (Cr6 +) by serpentine sediments was investigated in order to delineate Cr6 + sorption behavior in aquifers with ultramafic geologic background. Batch experiments were conducted in order to determine the influence of several parameters on Cr6 + removal, including the pH of the sediment solution, mineralogy, sediment's particle size and Cr6 + initial concentration. The results showed that Cr6 + removal was due to both adsorption and reduction phenomena. Reduction was attributed to the presence of a magnetic fraction in the sediment, mostly related to magnetite, which contributed almost 50% of the total removal in the pH range 3-7. Adsorption behavior was dominated by the finer sediment fraction (d transport modeling.

  2. Polyaniline coating with various substrates for hexavalent chromium removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Bin; Xu, Cuixia; Sun, Dezhi; Wang, Qiang; Gu, Hongbo; Zhang, Xin; Weeks, Brandon L.; Hopper, Jack; Ho, Thomas C.; Guo, Zhanhu; Wei, Suying

    2015-04-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) contamination is increasingly serious in surface water and groundwater, therefore, its removal attracts increasing attention due to its highly toxic to human health. The cost effective and sustainable adsorbents are urgently needed for the remediation of Cr(VI) pollution. Polyanline (PANI), a conductive polymer, has demonstrated a great performance on Cr(VI) removal. But the recycling is the challenge for its application due to its small size. The PANI coating with various substrates is an effective approach to solve this problem. The synthesis methods and applications of the PANI coated magnetic Fe3O4, carbon fabric and cellulose composites for the Cr(VI) removal were reviewed. Finally, this review analyzed the Cr(VI) removal mechanisms by the PANI composites considering the substrate and the PANI coating.

  3. Chromium Renderserver: scalable and open remote rendering infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Brian; Ahern, Sean; Bethel, E Wes; Brugger, Eric; Cook, Rich; Daniel, Jamison; Lewis, Ken; Owen, Jens; Southard, Dale

    2008-01-01

    Chromium Renderserver (CRRS) is software infrastructure that provides the ability for one or more users to run and view image output from unmodified, interactive OpenGL and X11 applications on a remote, parallel computational platform equipped with graphics hardware accelerators via industry-standard Layer 7 network protocols and client viewers. The new contributions of this work include a solution to the problem of synchronizing X11 and OpenGL command streams, remote delivery of parallel hardware accelerated rendering, and a performance analysis of several different optimizations that are generally applicable to a variety of rendering architectures. CRRS is fully operational, Open Source software. imagery and sending it to a remote viewer.

  4. Tuning ferromagnetism in zinc oxide nanoparticles by chromium doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Palvinder; Pandey, S. K.; Kumar, Sanjeev; Negi, N. S.; Chen, C. L.; Rao, S. M.; Wu, M. K.

    2015-11-01

    Zn1- x Cr x O nanoparticles with x = 0.0, 0.01, 0.03 and 0.05 were synthesized by the sol-gel technique. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies reveal that chromium (Cr) incorporates into the ZnO crystal lattice without disturbing the parent hexagonal (wurtzite) structure. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements show that the average size of these nanoparticles is in the range 15-25 nm. Optical absorption studies show that the band gap of ZnO nanoparticles varies with Cr doping. Photoluminescence (PL) studies depict the presence of defects in Cr-doped nanoparticles. Undoped ZnO exhibits diamagnetic behavior while Cr-doped ZnO samples exhibit weak ferromagnetism to anti-ferromagnetism depending on the Cr content.

  5. Nanotwin hardening in a cubic chromium oxide thin film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuma Suzuki

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available NaCl-type (B1 chromium oxide (CrO has been expected to have a high hardness value and does not exist as an equilibrium phase. We report a B1-based Cr0.67O thin film with a thickness of 144 nm prepared by pulsed laser deposition as an epitaxial thin film on a MgO single crystal. The thin film contained a number of stacking faults and had a nanotwinned structure composed of B1 with disordered vacancies and corundum structures. The Cr0.67O thin film had a high indentation hardness value of 44 GPa, making it the hardest oxide thin film reported to date.

  6. Identification Trial of Crystallization Parameters of Modified Chromium Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Studnicki

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In the paper results of researches of abrasion-resisting chromium cast iron inoculated with boron carbide B4C primary crystallization are presented. The main aim of work was make an attempt to identification of crystallization parameters that changed in reason of inoculation. Essential primary crystallization parameters, with the help of which, will be possible to evaluate the inoculation capacity were searched. It was found that in the result of inoculant actions characteristic temperatures were changed and time of primary crystallization was decreased. For tests the new broadened Derivative Thermal Analysis method, in which three samples with different solidification module were applied, was used. Thanks to this inoculation capacity in casts with significant diversified self-cooling ranges was possible to observe.

  7. Tetravalent chromium doped laser materials and NIR tunable lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfano, Robert R. (Inventor); Petricevic, Vladimir (Inventor); Bykov, Alexey (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A method is described to improve and produce purer Cr.sup.4+-doped laser materials and lasers with reduced co-incorporation of chromium in any other valence states, such as Cr.sup.3+, Cr.sup.2+, Cr.sup.5+, and Cr.sup.6+. The method includes: 1) certain crystals of olivine structure with large cation (Ca) in octahedral sites such as Cr.sup.4+:Ca.sub.2GeO.sub.4, Cr.sup.4+:Ca.sub.2SiO.sub.4, Cr.sup.4+:Ca.sub.2Ge.sub.xSi.sub.1-xO.sub.4 (where 0NIR laser applications.

  8. Semisolid Slurry Preparation of Die Steel with High Chromium Content

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO Wei-min; ZHAO Ai-min; ZHANG Li-juan; ZHONG Xue-you

    2004-01-01

    The semisolid slurry preparation of die steels Cr12 and Cr12MoV with high chromium content was studied. The results show that the semisolid slurry of both steels with solid of 40 %-60 % can be made by electromagnetic stirring method and is easy to be discharged from the bottom little hole of the stirring chamber. The sizes of the spherical primary austenite in the slurry of die steels Cr12 and Cr12MoV are 50-100 μm and 80-150 μm, respectively. The homogeneous temperature field and solute field for both steel melts are obtained. The strong temperature fluctuation in the melt with many fine primary austenite grains occurs and the remelting of the secondary arm roots at the same time is accelerated because of the electromagnetic stirring. These are the most important reasons for deposition of spherical primary austenite grains.

  9. Characterization of electrocoagulation for removal of chromium and arsenic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parga, J.R.; Valverde, V. [Institute of Technology of Saltillo, Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Science, V. Carranza 2400, Saltillo Coah., C.P. 25280 (Mexico); Cocke, D.L.; Gomes, J.A.G.; Kesmez, M.; Moreno, H. [Lamar University, Gill Chair of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Beaumont, TX 77710 (United States); Weir, M.; Mencer, D. [Wilkes University, Dept. of Chemistry, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18766 (United States)

    2005-05-01

    Protection of the global environment and, in particular, providing a sustainable source of clean water is a necessity for human survival. The wide use of heavy metals by modern industries has generated by-products containing heavy metals. Specifically, large quantities of chromium and arsenic containing compounds are being discharged into the environment. This study has been conducted to determine the feasibility of an electrocoagulation (EC) process using air injection to remove these inorganic elements with iron electrodes. Powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission Moessbauer spectroscopy were used to characterize the solid products formed at iron electrodes during EC. The results of this study suggest that magnetite particles and amorphous iron oxyhydroxides are present in the examined EC products. The field pilot-scale study demonstrated the removal of Cr(VI)/Cr(III) and As(III)/As(V) with an efficiency of more than 99 % from both wastewater and wells. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  10. Adsorption of hexavalent chromium by graphite–chitosan binary composite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    RAJENDRA S DONGRE

    2016-06-01

    Graphite chitosan binary (GCB) composite was prepared for hexavalent chromium adsorption from studied water. GCB was characterized by TGA, FTIR, SEM and X-ray diffraction techniques.Wide porous sorptive surface of 3.89 m$^2$ g$^{−1}$ and absorptive functionalities of GCB was due to 20% (w/w) graphite support on chitosan evidenced from FTIR and SEM that impart maximum adsorption at pH 4, agitation with 200 rpm for 180 min. Adsorption studies revealed intraparticle diffusion models and best-fitted kinetics was pseudo 2nd order one. A wellfitted Langmuir isotherm model suggested monolayer adsorption with an adsorption capacity ($q_m$) of 105.6 mg g$^{−1}$ and $R^2 = 0.945$. Sorption mechanisms based on metal ionic interactions, intrusion/diffusion and chemisorptions onto composite. This graphite chitosan binary composite improve sorbent capacity for Cr(VI).

  11. Microbial reduction of hexavalent chromium by landfill leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yarong; Low, Gary K-C; Scott, Jason A; Amal, Rose

    2007-04-02

    The reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in municipal landfill leachates (MLL) and a non-putrescible landfill leachate (NPLL) was investigated. Complete Cr(VI) reduction was achieved within 17 days in a MLL when spiked with 100 mg l(-1) Cr(VI) or less. In the same period, negligible Cr(VI) reduction was observed in NPLL. In MLL, Cr(VI) reduction was demonstrated to be a function of initial Cr(VI) concentration and bacterial biomass and organic matter concentrations. The bacteria were observed to tolerate 250 mg l(-1) Cr(VI) in MLL and had an optimal growth activity at pH 7.4 in a growth medium. The MLL also possessed an ability to sequentially reduce Cr(VI) over three consecutive spiking cycles.

  12. Chromium as resonant donor impurity in PbTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, M. D.; Levin, E. M.; Jaworski, C. M.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.; Heremans, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    We synthesize and perform structural, thermoelectric, magnetic, and 125Te NMR characterization measurements on chromium-doped PbTe. 125Te NMR and magnetic measurements show that Pb1-xCrxTe is a solid solution up to x = 0.4 at.% and forms an n-type dilute paramagnetic semiconductor. The Cr level is resonant and pins the Fermi level about 100 meV into the conduction band at liquid nitrogen temperatures and below, but it moves into the gap as the temperature increases to 300 K. 125Te NMR spectra exhibit a Knight shift that correlates well with Hall effect measurements and resolve peaks of Te near Cr. Magnetic behavior indicates that Cr exists mainly as Cr2+. No departure from the Pisarenko relation for PbTe is observed. Secondary Cr2Te3 and Cr3+δTe4 phases are present in samples with x > 0.4%.

  13. Chromium as Resonant Donor Impurity in PbTe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, M.D.; Levin, Evgenii; Jaworski, C.M.; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus; Heremans, J.P.

    2012-01-25

    We synthesize and perform structural, thermoelectric, magnetic, and 125Te NMR characterization measurements on chromium-doped PbTe. 125Te NMR and magnetic measurements show that Pb1−xCrxTe is a solid solution up to x = 0.4 at.% and forms an n-type dilute paramagnetic semiconductor. The Cr level is resonant and pins the Fermi level about 100 meV into the conduction band at liquid nitrogen temperatures and below, but it moves into the gap as the temperature increases to 300 K. 125Te NMR spectra exhibit a Knight shift that correlates well with Hall effect measurements and resolve peaks of Te near Cr. Magnetic behavior indicates that Cr exists mainly as Cr2+. No departure from the Pisarenko relation for PbTe is observed. Secondary Cr2Te3 and Cr3+δTe4 phases are present in samples with x > 0.4%.

  14. Ab initio calculation of chromium oxide containing Ti dopant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maldonado, Frank [Grupo de Fisicoquimica de Materiales, Universidad Tecnica Particular de Loja, Apartado 11-01-608, Loja (Ecuador); Novillo, Corina [Escuela de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Tecnica Particular de Loja, Apartado 11-01-608, Loja (Ecuador); Stashans, Arvids, E-mail: arvids@utpl.edu.ec [Grupo de Fisicoquimica de Materiales, Universidad Tecnica Particular de Loja, Apartado 11-01-608, Loja (Ecuador)

    2012-01-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructure changes in chromium oxide due to the Ti doping. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Discovery of magnetism in Ti-doped {alpha}-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Explanation of the origin of n-type electrical conductivity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Detailed analysis of electronic properties and density of states. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As to authors' knowledge, Ti-doped crystal is studied for the first time by the DFT. - Abstract: First-principles computations based on the density functional theory within the generalised gradient approximation and introduced intra-atomic interaction term for strongly correlated electrons (DFT + U method) has been used in this work. Ti impurity doping in the {alpha}-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystal has been carried out considering single defect model within the periodic crystalline structure. Atomic displacements, Bader charges on atoms have been computed showing that Ti dopant converts the chemical bonding in its neighbourhood into more ionic one. The defect-local microstructure is such as there exist general tendency of atomic rearrangements away with respect to the Ti imperfection. It is found that defect incorporation produces some local changes upon the band structure of the material and also induces a metallic state. That implies n-type electrical conductivity in the Ti-doped {alpha}-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystals and relates our work directly to a number of experimental studies in this area. Our results provide evidence over change in magnetic moments in the vicinity of defect, which means that the chromium oxide doped with Ti impurity might not act as an antiferromagnetic substance.

  15. Fluctuations in Precambrian atmospheric oxygenation recorded by chromium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Robert; Gaucher, Claudio; Poulton, Simon W.; Canfield, Don E.

    2009-09-01

    Geochemical data suggest that oxygenation of the Earth's atmosphere occurred in two broad steps. The first rise in atmospheric oxygen is thought to have occurred between ~2.45 and 2.2Gyr ago, leading to a significant increase in atmospheric oxygen concentrations and concomitant oxygenation of the shallow surface ocean. The second increase in atmospheric oxygen appears to have taken place in distinct stages during the late Neoproterozoic era (~800-542Myr ago), ultimately leading to oxygenation of the deep ocean ~580Myr ago, but details of the evolution of atmospheric oxygenation remain uncertain. Here we use chromium (Cr) stable isotopes from banded iron formations (BIFs) to track the presence of Cr(VI) in Precambrian oceans, providing a time-resolved picture of the oxygenation history of the Earth's atmosphere-hydrosphere system. The geochemical behaviour of Cr is highly sensitive to the redox state of the surface environment because oxidative weathering processes produce the oxidized hexavalent [Cr(VI)] form. Oxidation of reduced trivalent [Cr(III)] chromium on land is accompanied by an isotopic fractionation, leading to enrichment of the mobile hexavalent form in the heavier isotope. Our fractionated Cr isotope data indicate the accumulation of Cr(VI) in ocean surface waters ~2.8 to 2.6Gyr ago and a likely transient elevation in atmospheric and surface ocean oxygenation before the first great rise of oxygen 2.45-2.2Gyr ago (the Great Oxidation Event). In ~1.88-Gyr-old BIFs we find that Cr isotopes are not fractionated, indicating a decline in atmospheric oxygen. Our findings suggest that the Great Oxidation Event did not lead to a unidirectional stepwise increase in atmospheric oxygen. In the late Neoproterozoic, we observe strong positive fractionations in Cr isotopes (δ53Cr up to +4.9‰), providing independent support for increased surface oxygenation at that time, which may have stimulated rapid evolution of macroscopic multicellular life.

  16. Probing neutrino nature at Borexino detector with chromium neutrino source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobkow, W.; Blaut, A. [University of Wroclaw, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Wroclaw (Poland)

    2016-10-15

    In this paper, we indicate a possibility of utilizing the intense chromium source (∝370 PBq) in probing the neutrino nature in low energy neutrino experiments with the ultra-low threshold and background real-time Borexino detector located near the source (∝8 m). We analyse the elastic scattering of electron neutrinos (Dirac or Majorana, respectively) on the unpolarised electrons in the relativistic neutrino limit. We assume that the incoming neutrino beam is the superposition of left-right chiral states produced by the chromium source. Left chiral neutrinos may be detected by the standard V - A and non-standard scalar S{sub L}, pseudoscalar P{sub L}, tensor T{sub L} interactions, while right chiral ones partake only in the exotic V + A and S{sub R}, P{sub R}, T{sub R} interactions. Our model-independent study is carried out for the flavour (current) neutrino eigenstates. We compute the expected event number for the standard V - A interaction of the left chiral neutrinos using the current experimental values of standard couplings and in the case of left-right chiral superposition. We show that the significant decrement in the event number due to the interference terms between the standard and exotic interactions for the Majorana neutrinos may appear. We also demonstrate how the presence of the exotic couplings affects the energy spectrum of outgoing electrons, both for the Dirac and Majorana cases. The 90 % C.L. sensitivity contours in the planes of corresponding exotic couplings are found. The presence of interferences in the Majorana case gives the stronger constraints than for the Dirac neutrinos, even if the neutrino source is placed outside the detector. (orig.)

  17. High-valent imido complexes of manganese and chromium corroles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Nicola Y; Eikey, Rebecca A; Loring, Megan I; Abu-Omar, Mahdi M

    2005-05-16

    The oxidation reaction of M(tpfc) [M = Mn or Cr and tpfc = tris(pentafluorophenyl)corrole] with aryl azides under photolytic or thermal conditions gives the first examples of mononuclear imido complexes of manganese(V) and chromium(V). These complexes have been characterized by NMR, mass spectrometry, UV-vis, EPR, elemental analysis, and cyclic voltammetry. Two X-ray structures have been obtained for Mn(tpfc)(NMes) and Cr(tpfc)(NMes) [Mes = 2,4,6-(CH(3))(3)C(6)H(2)]. Short metal-imido bonds (1.610 and 1.635 Angstroms) as well as nearly linear M-N-C angles are consistent with triple M triple-bond NR bond formation. The kinetics of nitrene [NR] group transfer from manganese(V) corroles to various organic phosphines have been defined. Reduction of the manganese(V) corrolato complex affords phosphine imine and Mn(III) with reaction rates that are sensitive to steric and electronic elements of the phosphine substrate. An analogous manganese complex with a variant corrole ligand containing bromine atoms in the beta-pyrrole positions, Mn(Br(8)tpfc)(NAr), has been prepared and studied. Its reaction with PEt(3) is 250x faster than that of the parent tpfc complex, and its Mn(V/IV) couple is shifted by 370 mV to a more positive potential. The EPR spectra of chromium(V) imido corroles reveal a rich signal at ambient temperature consistent with Cr(V) triple-bond NR (d(1), S = 1/2) containing a localized spin density in the d(xy) orbital, and an anisotropic signal at liquid nitrogen temperature. Our results demonstrate the synthetic utility of organic aryl azides in the preparation of mononuclear metal imido complexes previously considered elusive, and suggest strong sigma-donation as the underlying factor in stabilizing high-valent metals by corrole ligands.

  18. Aqueous Ammonia or Ammonium Hydroxide? Identifying a Base as Strong or Weak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanger, Michael J.; Danner, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    When grocery stores sell solutions of ammonia, they are labeled "ammonia"; however, when the same solution is purchased from chemical supply stores, they are labeled "ammonium hydroxide". The goal of this experiment is for students to determine which name is more appropriate. In this experiment, students use several different experimental methods…

  19. Structure and properties of alizarin complex formed with alkali metal hydroxides in methanol solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeliński, Tomasz; Cysewski, Piotr

    2016-06-01

    Quantum chemical computations were used for prediction of the structure and color of alizarin complex with alkali metal hydroxides in methanolic solutions. The color prediction relying on the single Gaussian-like band once again proved the usefulness of the PBE0 density functional due to the observed smallest color difference between computed and experimentally derived values. It was found that the alkali metal hydroxide molecules can bind to the two oxygen atoms of both hydroxyl groups of alizarin or to one of these atoms and the oxygen atom from the keto group in a complex with three methanol molecules. This means that two electronic transitions need to be taken into account when considering the spectra of the studied complexes. The resulting bond lengths and angles are correlated with the properties of the alkali metal atoms. The molar mass, the atomic radius, and the Pauling electronegativity of studied metals are quite accurate predictors of the geometric properties of hydroxide complexes with alizarin in methanol solution. Graphical abstract The spectra of the neutral and monoanionic form of alizarin together with color changes resulting from addition of different metal hydroxides and represented in CIE color space.

  20. Ion Association versus Ion Interaction Models in Examining Electrolyte Solutions: Application to Calcium Hydroxide Solubility Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez, M. Isabel; Borge, Javier

    2014-01-01

    The heterogeneous equilibrium of the solubility of calcium hydroxide in water is used to predict both its solubility product from solubility and solubility values from solubility product when inert salts, in any concentration, are present. Accepting the necessity of including activity coefficients to treat the saturated solution of calcium…

  1. Migration of nanosized layered double hydroxide platelets from polylactide nanocomposite films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Bjørn; Katiyar, Vimal; Plackett, David

    2011-01-01

    Melt-extruded L-polylactide (PLA) nanocomposite films were prepared from commercially available PLA and laurate-modified Mg–Al layered double hydroxide (LDH-C12). Three films were tested for total migration as well as specific migration of LDH, tin, laurate and low molecular weight PLA oligomers ...... detected arises from the use of organotin catalysts in the manufacture of PLA....

  2. Preparation of magnesium hydroxide nanoflowers from boron mud via anti-drop precipitation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Xi [School of Materials Science and Technology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Blue Sky Technology Corporation, Beijing 100083 (China); Ma, Hongwen, E-mail: mahw@cugb.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Technology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Jiang, Xiaoqian [School of Materials Science and Technology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Jiang, Zhouqing [School of Materials Science and Technology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Blue Sky Technology Corporation, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • We use the anti-drop precipitation method for synthesis of magnesium hydroxide. • Boron mud which is solid waste from a borax factory is used as the magnesium source. • The magnesium hydroxide nanoflowers are prepared in a short time. • The as-prepared magnesium hydroxide can be used as an effective flame retardant. - Abstract: Using boron mud as the starting material, the flower-like magnesium hydroxide (MH) has been successfully prepared via anti-drop precipitation method. The effect of NH{sub 3}·H{sub 2}O concentration, aging time, and surfactant on the morphology of MH was investigated. The optimum precipitation conditions are dropping MgSO{sub 4} solution in 5% NH{sub 3}·H{sub 2}O solution, with 3% polyethylene glycol as surfactant, aging for 30 min. XRD, SEM, FI-IR, and TG/DTA have been employed to characterize the as-prepared samples. XRD reveals that MH with high purity has the brucite structure. SEM images show that the flower-like MH exists in the form of mono-disperse well uniform spherical aggregation with diameter of 3–5 μm. TG/DTA shows a total percentage of weight loss 33.6% with a well-defined endothermic peak near 381.3 °C corresponding to the decomposition of MH. Furthermore, it reports that the extremely fast primary nucleation is of significance for crystal growth of MH.

  3. Hydrothermal Synthesis and Characterization of 3R Polytypes of Mg-Al Layered Double Hydroxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Budhysutanto, W.N.

    2010-01-01

    Layered Double Hydroxides (LDH) is a unique group of clays that have an anionic exchange capability. This research explored the hydrothermal method as an alternative method to synthesize Mg-Al LDH. It is a simple and more environmentally friendly compared to the conventional method of co-precipitati

  4. Comparison of Calcium Hydroxide and Bioactive Glass after Direct Pulp Capping in Primary Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Haghgoo

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Bioactive glass is often used as a filler material for repair of dental bone defects.In different studies osteogenic potential of this material was proved, but its dentinogenesisproperty is in doubt. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the histological pulp responses of Calcium hydroxide and Bioactive glass placed directly on exposed pulp tissues.Materials and Methods: Twenty teeth to be extracted due to orthodontic reasons were selected. These teeth were divided into two groups and treated with direct pulp capping.Calcium hydroxide was used for 10 teeth and Bioactive glass for 10 teeth. After 60 daysthe teeth were extracted and prepared for histological evaluation. Finally the data was analyzed with exact Fisher test.Results: All teeth treated with Calcium hydroxide showed inflammation. Internal resorption was seen in six teeth, abscess in five teeth and dentinal bridge in two teeth. Inflammationwas seen in three Bioactive glass samples and dentinal bridge in seven teeth, but internal resorption and abscess were not seen.Conclusion: Bioactive glass appears to be superior to Calcium hydroxide as a pulp capping agent in primary teeth.

  5. Studies on Synthesis and Properties of Mg-Al-nitrate Layered Double Hydroxides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A positive Mg-Al-nitrate layered double hydroxides (LDHs) has been synthesized using a non-steady coprccipitation method. The shape, size, chemical composition, electrical property and anion exchange property of the positive nanoparticle were studied by SEM, XRD, FTIR,chemical analysis, spectroanalysis and measuring of electrophoretic mobilities. Preliminary results show the positive nanopartiele is a promising precursor ofpolymer/LDHs nanocomposite.

  6. Formation of nematic liquid crystals of sterically stabilized layered double hydroxide platelets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourad, M.C.D.; Devid, E.J.; van Schooneveld, M.M.; Vonk, Ch.; Lekkerkerker, H.N.W.

    2008-01-01

    Colloidal platelets of hydrotalcite, a layered double hydroxide, have been prepared by coprecipitation at pH 11−12 of magnesium nitrate and aluminum nitrate at two different magnesium to aluminum ratios. Changing the temperature and ionic strength during hydrothermal treatment, the platelets were ta

  7. Device to generate high purity hydroxide solution in-line for ion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masunaga, Hiroto; Higo, Yuji; Ishii, Mizuo; Maruyama, Noboru; Yamazaki, Shigeo

    2016-05-06

    Herein, we report a new device that generates a high-purity hydroxide solution in line. The device's container has three compartments that are isolated from each other by two cation exchange (CE) membranes. In each end of the container, an electrode is installed. The three compartments are filled with ion exchange resins. A bipolar boundary is a composite boundary comprising anion- and cation-exchangers. This device has two bipolar boundaries, which are used to separate the location of hydroxide solution generation from the location where water is electrolyzed. Therefore, it can produce high-purity hydroxide solutions that are free from gases and anionic impurities. The hydroxide solution is generated on the basis of an electrokinetic phenomenon at the surfaces of ion-exchange resins and membranes in an electric field; NaOH concentration can be controlled at rates from 0.01 to 100mM per 1mL/min by adjusting the electrical current (0-200mA) applied to the device. As the generated solution is used as an eluent for a suppressed anion chromatography, the electrical conductivity of the effluent from the suppressor is as low as that of ultra-pure water. Thus, the noise of the base-line electrical conductivity is improved, and so the detection limit of anions on the sub-ng/mL order can be achieved.

  8. Comparison of the Winograd method and chemical cauterization with 10% sodium hydroxide for treating ingrown toenails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nebahat Demet Akpolat

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: This study was performed to assess the therapeutic outcomes of the surgical method, described by Winograd and chemical cauterization with sodium hydroxide in patients with Heifetz stage 2 and 3 ingrown toenail (recurrence, complication, improvement and time to regain activity. Materials and Methods: One-hundred patients who presented to the outpatient clinics of orthopedics, general surgery and dermatology with the complaints of pain, redness and discharge in the toenail between January 2010 and January 2012 and who failed to respond to conservative treatment and were diagnosed with Heifetz stage 2 and 3 ingrown toenail. Fifty patients underwent chemical cauterization with sodium hydroxide while 50 underwent Winograd surgery. Results: The patients were followed up for a year at 2-month intervals. While no recurrence was observed in patients who received chemical cauterization, five patients who underwent Winograd surgery had recurrence (p=0.022. Three patients receiving Winograd surgery were found to have superficial wound side infection on postoperative follow-up (p=0.08. Patients, who underwent chemical cauterization with sodium hydroxide, were detected to improve and return to normal activity in a shorter period. Conclusion: Chemical cauterization of the germinal matrix with 10% sodium hydroxide is a convenient method with a low rate of complication and recurrence compared to the Winograd surgery in the treatment of ingrown toenails.

  9. The determination of hydroxide and carbonate in concentrated sodium chloride solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roolvink, W.B.; Bos, M.

    1980-01-01

    A computer method for the determination of carbonate and hydroxide in concentrated (2.89 M) sodium chloride solutions is described. The method is based on multiparametric curve-fitting and can also be applied to salts of dibasic acids with unknown equilibrium constants. The systematic error is not m

  10. The contribution of polyhydroxyl aromatic compounds to tetramethylammonium hydroxide lignin-based proxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filley, T.R.; Nierop, K.G.J.; Wang, Y.

    2006-01-01

    A problem inherent in analytical procedures where thermochemolyis or pyrolysis is coupled with in situ methylation by tetramethylammonium hydroxide is the inability to determine if an observed aromatic methoxyl group was originally present as a hydroxyl or a methoxyl functionality. This analytical i

  11. Flame retardancy effect of surface-modified metal hydroxides on linear low density polyethylene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Metal hydroxides (MAH) consisting of magnesium hydroxide and aluminum hydroxide with a mass ratio of 1:2 were surface-modified by γ-diethoxyphosphorous ester propyldiethoxymethylsilane,boric acid and diphenylsilanediol in xylene under dibutyl tin dilaurate catalyst at 140 ℃.Phosphorus,silicon and boron elements covalently bonded to metal hydroxide particles were detected by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.The degradation behavior of the surface-modified MAH was characterized by thermogravimetric analysis.The results show that linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE) composite,filled with 50% (mass fraction) of MAH modified by 5.0% (mass fraction) of modifiers,passes the V-O rating of UL-94 test and shows the limited oxygen index of 34%,and its heat release rate and average effective heat combustion in a cone calorimeter measurement decrease obviously;The mechanical properties of MAH can be improved by surface-modification.The uniform dispersion of particles and strong interfacial bonding between particles and matrix are obtained.

  12. Clinical Survey of Successfulness of DPC with MTA and Calcium Hydroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.Yasini

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: The pulp may be exposed during remove of caries or by traumatic and iatrogenicinjuries. The material used to DPC, must be biocompatible, scalable and prevent bacterial leakage.Furthermore, it is better to stimulate dentinogenesis. Calcium hydroxide is most usual material for DPC. But itcannot provide a suitablcbiologic seal. Mineral irioxide aggregate (MTA is also a suitable material for DPC.Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the clinical success of DPC done with MTA or calciumhydroxide cement.Materials and Methods: In this study eighteen posterior teeth without previous spontaneous pain thatinvolved mechanicaly exposure was randomly selected and capped with MTA or calcium hydroxide. These teeth were evaluated by clinical vitality test and radiograph after 3 and 12 months, and patients werequestioned about irritative or spontancus pain in this period. Statistical analysis was carried out by Usher exacttest (a-0.05.Results: This study showed that in calcium hydroxid groud three had irreversible pulpitis and two teeth had symptom and signs of reversible pulpitis. While, In MTA group all cases were normaL and no clinical sign was evident.Conclusion: MTA exhibited better results than calcium hydroxide cement for the capping of the pulp in human

  13. Different approaches to the analysis of small angle scattering experiments on porous aluminum-hydroxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, F.B.

    2001-01-01

    Different approaches to the analysis of Small Angle X-ray Scattering experiments on the porous aluminum-hydroxide pseudo-boehmite are compared. Experimental data is analyzed both as scattering from mass fractal aggregates and polydisperse collections of anisotropic particles. Both types of analys...

  14. Effect of the smear layer in the removal of calcium hydroxide from root canal walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Arslan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to investigate whether the smear layer influences the removal of calcium hydroxide from the root canal with manual or rotary instruments. Materials and Methods: The root canals of 48 freshly extracted single-rooted maxillary incisors were prepared to apical size 40 (n=40 and finally irrigated with sodium hypochlorite (group A, or ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA followed by sodium hypo chlorite (group B. 20 teeth were assigned to each group, while the remaining eight teeth served as positive and negative controls. Each group was divided into two subgroups of 10 teeth (subgroup I - calcium hydroxide was removed with master apical file; subgroup II - with profile file; and, in all removal procedures, citric acid was used for irrigation. The percentage of calcium hydroxide-[Ca(OH [Ca(OH 2 ] coated surface area was calculated by image processing analysis. Results: Considering the root canal as a whole, the removal of Ca(OH 2 from the dentinal walls in group B showed significantly better results (P<0.05 as compared to group A. Conclusions: Under the conditions of this study, it can be concluded that the smear layer is important in the removal of calcium hydroxide.

  15. Inhibition of pH fronts in corrosion cells due to the formation of cerium hydroxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soestbergen, M. van; Erich, S.J.F.; Huinink, H.P.; Adan, O.C.G.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of cerium-based corrosion inhibitors on the pH front between the alkaline cathode and acidic anode in corrosion cells has been studied. The cerium component of these inhibitors can affect the pH front since it precipitates in an alkaline environment as cerium hydroxide, which is important

  16. Synthesis of aluminum oxy-hydroxide nanofibers from porous anodic alumina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Himendra; Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Sakairi, Masatoshi; Takahashi, Hideaki

    2008-10-01

    A novel method for the synthesis of aluminum oxy-hydroxide nanofibers from a porous anodic oxide film of aluminum is demonstrated. In the present method, the porous anodic alumina not only acts as a template, but also serves as the starting material for the synthesis. The porous anodic alumina film is hydrothermally treated for pore-sealing, which forms aluminum oxy-hydroxide inside the pores of the oxide film as well as on the surface of the film. The hydrothermally sealed porous oxide film is immersed in the sodium citrate solution, which selectively etches the porous aluminum oxide from the film, leaving the oxy-hydroxide intact. The method is simple and gives highly uniform aluminum oxy-hydroxide nanofibers. Moreover, the diameter of the nanofibers can be controlled by controlling the pore size of the porous anodic alumina film, which depends on the anodizing conditions. Nanofibers with diameters of about 38-85 nm, having uniform shape and size, were successfully synthesized using the present method.

  17. Speciation of heavy metal ions as influenced by interactions with montmorillonite, Al hydroxide polymers and citrate.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, R.P.T.

    1995-01-01

    Clay minerals, metal-hydroxides and organic matter can bind metal ions; moreover they also interact with each other. These mutual interactions influence the metal binding to a significant extent. In this study, the speciation of the heavy metal ions Zn and Ph was investigated in model systems consis

  18. Molecular dynamic simulations of iron (II) hydroxide in high temperature and supercritical water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yuanliang

    In this study, the iron (II) hydroxide -- water system has been investigated at high temperatures by using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The simulation results reveal that at infinite dilution both Fe2+ cation and OH- anion have 6 water molecules within their first hydration shell and both types of ionic species experience a dramatic increase in their diffusion coefficients at near and supercritical conditions. The process of iron (II) hydroxide cluster formation has been simulated. The nano-clusters of larger sizes formed in supercritical water tend to be in an amorphous state. After having been quenched by an inert gas bath, iron (II) hydroxide nano-clusters with various structures have been produced. The geometries and associated binding energies of these species are given in detail. The vibrational spectra of iron (II) hydroxide clusters are also derived and compared with the spectrum of a bulk solid. The obtained results have a practical value for the analysis of potential corrosion products in supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) which is employed in the new generation nuclear power plant design (GEN IV). This work also illustrates the process of hydrothermal synthesis of oxide nano-particles.

  19. Electrocatalysis and electroanalysis of nickel, its oxides, hydroxides and oxyhydroxides toward small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yuqing; Ouyang, Lei; Zhou, Shilin; Xu, Lina; Yang, Zhuoyuan; Xiao, Mingshu; Ouyang, Ruizhuo

    2014-03-15

    The electrocatalysis toward small molecules, especially small organic compounds, is of importance in a variety of areas. Nickel based materials such as nickel, its oxides, hydroxides as well as oxyhydroxides exhibit excellent electrocatalysis performances toward many small molecules, which are widely used for fuel cells, energy storage, organic synthesis, wastewater treatment, and electrochemical sensors for pharmaceutical, medical, food or environmental analysis. Their electrocatalytic mechanisms are proposed from three aspects such as Ni(OH)2/NiOOH mediated electrolysis, direct electrocatalysis of Ni(OH)2 or NiOOH. Under exposure to air or aqueous solution, two distinct layers form on the Ni surface with a Ni hydroxide layer at the air-oxide interface and an oxide layer between the metal substrate and the outer hydroxide layer. The transformation from nickel or its oxides to hydroxides or oxyhydroxides could be further speeded up in the strong alkaline solution under the cyclic scanning at relatively high positive potential. The redox transition between Ni(OH)2 and NiOOH is also contributed to the electrocatalytic oxidation of Ni and its oxides toward small molecules in alkaline media. In addition, nickel based materials or nanomaterials, their preparations and applications are also overviewed here.

  20. Determination of Aluminium Content in Aluminium Hydroxide Formulation by FT-NIR Transmittance Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lai, Xuxin; Zheng, Yiwu; Søndergaard, Ib;

    2007-01-01

    A method for determining the aluminium content of an aluminium hydroxide suspension using near infrared (NIR) transmittance spectroscopy has been developed. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) was used as reference method. The factors influencing the NIR analysis...