WorldWideScience

Sample records for chromium fluorides

  1. Alkali metal cation complexation and solvent interactions by robust chromium(III) fluoride complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birk, T.; Magnussen, M.J.; Piligkos, Stergios;

    2010-01-01

    Interaction of robust chromium(III) fluoride complexes with sodium or lithium cations in solution lead to hypsochromic spectral shifts of increasing magnitude along the series: trans-[CrF2(py)(4)](+), mer-[CrF3(terpy)], and fac-[CrF3(Me(3)tacn)]. Crystalline products isolated from solution exhibi...

  2. Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluoride is used to prevent tooth decay. It is taken up by teeth and helps to strengthen ... and block the cavity-forming action of bacteria. Fluoride usually is prescribed for children and adults whose ...

  3. Fluoridated Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Prevention Overview–for health professionals Research Fluoridated Water On This Page What is fluoride, and where is it found? What is water fluoridation? When did water fluoridation begin in the ...

  4. 氟离子对两种不同工艺制作的钴铬合金耐腐蚀性能的影响%Effect of fluoride concentration on the corrosion behavior of cobalt-chromium alloy fabricated by two different technology processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨秋霞; 杨瑛; 徐晗; 吴迪; 郭恪

    2016-01-01

    目的:   在模拟口腔环境下研究氟离子对采用选择性激光熔覆(SLM)技术和传统铸造技术两种工艺制作的钴铬合金耐腐蚀性的影响。方法   选择具有相同材料成分的钴铬合金金属粉末和金属块,分别采用SLM(SLM组)和铸造技术(Cast组)各制作15个试件,置于含不同氟离子质量分数(0、0.05%、0.20%)的酸性人工唾液(pH值为5.0)中浸泡24 h进行电化学试验,采用动电位极化曲线法测试合金的自腐蚀电位Ecor、自腐蚀电流密度Icor和极化电阻Rp,同时结合扫描电子显微镜(SEM)观察,分析两组试件的耐腐蚀性能。结果   铸造工艺制作的钴铬合金在酸性人工唾液中的Ecor随着氟离子质量分数的升高而减小。当氟离子质量分数为0.20%时,两种工艺制作的钴铬合金的Ecor、Icor、Rp均有明显改变(P<0.05),SEM结果也显示合金表面均出现腐蚀现象。当氟离子质量分数为0.20%时,Cast组钴铬合金的Icor高于SLM组,而Ecor和Rp低于SLM组(P<0.05)。结论   氟离子可降低两种工艺制作的钴铬合金的耐腐蚀性,在氟离子质量分数较高(0.20%)时,SLM技术制作的钴铬合金的耐腐蚀性优于铸造工艺制作的钴铬合金。%Objective This study aims to determine the effect of fluoride concentration on the corrosion behavior of cobaltchromium alloy fabricated by two different technology processes in a simulated oral environment. Methods A total of 15 specimens were employed with selective laser melting (SLM) and another 15 for traditional casting (Cast) in cobalt-chromium alloy powders and blocks with the same material composition. The corrosion behavior of the specimens was studied by potentiodynamic polarization test under different oral environments with varying solubilities of fluorine (0, 0.05%, and 0.20% for each) in acid artificial saliva (pH=5.0). The specimens were soaked in

  5. Fluoridation of gaseous phase chlorinated hydrocarbons in presence of chromium oxide-based catalysts. Effect of doping substance addition; Fluoration d'hydrocarbures chlores en phase gazeuse en presence de catalyseurs a base d'oxyde de chrome. Effet de l'ajout de dopant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loustaunau, A.

    2003-11-01

    The preparation of various hydro-fluorocarbons (HFC), like CF{sub 3}CH{sub 2}F, CF{sub 3}CHF{sub 2} and CH{sub 2}F{sub 2}, has been studied at temperatures of 380 deg. C and 250 deg. C in gaseous phase by catalytic fluoridation of the corresponding chlorinated hydrocarbons. The addition of doping substances like zinc, nickel or magnesium to fluorinated alumina supported chromium oxide-based catalysts, has been particularly examined in order to favour the main fluoridation reaction (by simple Cl/F exchange) with respect to secondary reactions (de-hydro-fluoridation and Deacon). Only the addition of small amounts of Zn (Zn/(Zn+Cr) = 0.15) allows to promote the fluoridation reaction and to inhibit the secondary reactions. This effect is enhanced when the molecule is less reactive and when the quantity of matter at the surface of the fluorinated alumina is low. Therefore, the promoting effect is more important in presence of CF{sub 3}CH{sub 2}Cl than in presence of CF{sub 3}CHCl{sub 2} and CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}. This positive effect of zinc may result from the formation of a mixed ZnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} phase during the preparation of the catalyst (evidenced by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)) which may have modified the chemical properties of chromium atoms. Moreover, the XPS and electron microscopy characterizations indicate that the presence of zinc (contrary to nickel and magnesium) may allow a better dispersion of the active chromium atoms for Cl/F exchanges after fluoridation of the catalyst. Those may correspond to the presence of very fluorinated species, like 'Cr-F', and oxi-fluorinated like 'CrOF'. Thus, in the presence of a small amount of metals at the surface of the support, the formation of these different species is favoured. (J.S.)

  6. Bottled Water and Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fluoridation Journal Articles for Community Water Fluoridation Bottled Water Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Consumers drink ... questions about bottled water and fluoride. Does bottled water contain fluoride? Bottled water products may contain fluoride, ...

  7. Divalent fluoride doped cerium fluoride scintillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David F.; Sparrow, Robert W.

    1991-01-01

    The use of divalent fluoride dopants in scintillator materials comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. The preferred divalent fluoride dopants are calcium fluoride, strontium fluoride, and barium fluoride. The preferred amount of divalent fluoride dopant is less than about two percent by weight of the total scintillator. Cerium fluoride scintillator crystals grown with the addition of a divalent fluoride have exhibited better transmissions and higher light outputs than crystals grown without the addition of such dopants. These scintillators are useful in radiation detection and monitoring applications, and are particularly well suited for high-rate applications such as positron emission tomography (PET).

  8. Metal fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Systems formed by fluorides of alkali, alkali earth, rare earth elements, yttrium, zirconium, hafnium, bismuth, antimony are investigated with the aim of preparing new fluoride materials and studying their thermodynamic and other physical and chemical properties. The respective phase diagrams are plotted. On the basis of the research fluoroberyllate glasses with rare earth additions of improved qualities (moisture resistance, crystallization resistance, resistance against radiation up to 100 Mrad) are prepared. The rho-T-x phase diagrams of the systems studied show that many compounds are sublimated congruently at certain temperatures and incongruently - above them. The existence of congruently sublimated compounds and azeotropically sublimated compositions provides for the preparation of uniform optical films. In connection with the search for new materials-luminophores and matrices of optical quantum generators - the fluoride systems of alkali metals and lanthanides are studied; the formation of binary fluorides of M3LnF6, M2LnF5, MLnF4, MLn2F7, MLn3F10 compositions is established. To search for new solid electrolytes, the solid-phase interaction of Sb-and Bi trifluorides with their oxides and alakali metal fluorides is studied. The electric conductivity of the compounds obtained is studied

  9. Fluoridation Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... level in water is not enough to prevent tooth decay; however, some groundwater and natural springs can have ... the tooth’s surface, or enamel. Water fluoridation prevents tooth decay by providing frequent and consistent contact with low ...

  10. How Does Fluoride Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the mid-1940s, communities started to put more fluoride in their water supplies to protect people against tooth decay. Fluoride ... might suggest supplements — which are like vitamins containing fluoride. Just how effective is fluoridated water? Thanks to it, dentists say half of kids ...

  11. Chromium in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    The best source of chromium is brewer's yeast. However, many people do not use brewer's yeast because it causes bloating ( abdominal distention ) and nausea . Other good sources of chromium include ...

  12. Chromium and Genomic Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Wise, Sandra S.; Wise, John Pierce

    2011-01-01

    Many metals serve as micronutrients which protect against genomic instability. Chromium is most abundant in its trivalent and hexavalent forms. Trivalent chromium has historically been considered an essential element, though recent data indicate that while it can have pharmacological effects and value, it is not essential. There are no data indicating that trivalent chromium promotes genomic stability and, instead may promote genomic instability. Hexavalent chromium is widely accepted as high...

  13. Fluoride varnish or fluoride mouth rinse?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, M K; Klausen, B J; Twetman, S

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In many Danish communities, school-based fluoride programs are offered to children with high caries risk in adjunct to tooth brushing. The purpose of this field trial was to compare the caries-preventive effectiveness of two different fluoride programs in 6-12 year olds. BASIC RESEARCH...... different schools were enrolled after informed consent and their class unit was randomly allocated to one of two fluoride programs. INTERVENTIONS: One group received a semi-annual fluoride varnish applications (FV) and the other group continued with an existing program with fluoride mouth rinses once per...... in caries development over two years among children participating in a school-based fluoride varnish or mouth rinse program....

  14. Hair as Biomarker of Fluoride Exposure in a Fluoride Endemic Area and a Low Fluoridated Area

    OpenAIRE

    Parimi, Nalini; V. Viswanath; Kashyap, Bina; Patil, Pavan Uday

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to determine whether hair could be used as biomarker of fluoride exposure. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out on 30 people living in an endemically fluoridated area and a low fluoridated area. Samples of hair from the occipital were taken and subjected to fluoride analysis by a fluoride ion electrode. Results: Lower fluoride levels in water supplies correlated with lower levels of fluoride in hair and more over higher fluoride levels in wate...

  15. Fluoride in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diet - fluoride ... bones and teeth. Too much fluoride in the diet is very rare. Rarely, infants who get too ... of essential vitamins is to eat a balanced diet that contains a variety of foods from the ...

  16. Effect of fluoride dentifrices on salivary fluoride levels in children.

    OpenAIRE

    Paul S; Tandon S; Murthy K

    1993-01-01

    Fluoride dentifrices are well accepted for their caries preventive effects. The fluoride concentration in the oral fluids after tooth brushing with fluoride dentifrices may have an important relationship to the caries reducing capacity. The present study was aimed to clinically evaluate the salivary fluoride retention of dentifrices containing low fluoride concentration in 50 children, aged 7-9 years before, during and after the use of fluoride toothpaste. Estimation of fluoride in saliva was...

  17. Fluoride glass fiber optics

    CERN Document Server

    Aggarwal, Ishwar D

    1991-01-01

    Fluoride Glass Fiber Optics reviews the fundamental aspects of fluoride glasses. This book is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1 discusses the wide range of fluoride glasses with an emphasis on fluorozirconate-based compositions. The structure of simple fluoride systems, such as BaF2 binary glass is elaborated in Chapter 2. The third chapter covers the intrinsic transparency of fluoride glasses from the UV to the IR, with particular emphasis on the multiphonon edge and electronic edge. The next three chapters are devoted to ultra-low loss optical fibers, reviewing methods for purifying and

  18. New transition metal oxide fluorides with ReO3-type structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new niobium oxide fluorides MNbO2F4 [M = (Cr, Fe)], CrNb2O4F5, and Fe2Nb3O6F9 were prepared by treatment of chromium or iron nitrate with Nb-containing hydrofluoric acid solutions. Crystal structures were investigated by means of X-ray powder diffraction. All new compounds can be structurally refined in the cubic ReO3-type. The iron niobium oxide fluorides are reddish orange, and chromium containing phases exhibit a light green color. The niobium atoms are in the highest formal oxidation state.

  19. Fluoride levels and osteosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simmi Kharb

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Osteosarcoma is a rare malignant bone tumor, commonly occurring in the age group of 10 to 24 years. Recent reports have indicated that there is a link between fluoride exposure and osteosarcoma. Aims: The present study was planned to analyze serum levels of fluoride in patients of osteosarcoma and fluoride content of their drinking water. Settings and Design: The present study was carried out comparing 10 patients of osteosarcoma and 10 healthy volunteers (who served as controls. Materials and Methods: Serum and drinking water fluoride levels were estimated by ion selective electrode. Statistical analysis used: The data were computed as mean ± SD and Student′s t test was applied. Results: Both, the serum and drinking water fluoride levels, were significant by higher in patients with osteosarcoma as compared to controls (P < 0.05, P < 0.001, respectively. Conclusions: These results suggest a link between fluoride exposure and osteosarcoma.

  20. Fluoride and Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mullane, D M; Baez, R J; Jones, S; Lennon, M A; Petersen, P E; Rugg-Gunn, A J; Whelton, H; Whitford, G M

    2016-06-01

    The discovery during the first half of the 20th century of the link between natural fluoride, adjusted fluoride levels in drinking water and reduced dental caries prevalence proved to be a stimulus for worldwide on-going research into the role of fluoride in improving oral health. Epidemiological studies of fluoridation programmes have confirmed their safety and their effectiveness in controlling dental caries. Major advances in our knowledge of how fluoride impacts the caries process have led to the development, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of other fluoride vehicles including salt, milk, tablets, toothpaste, gels and varnishes. In 1993, the World Health Organization convened an Expert Committee to provide authoritative information on the role of fluorides in the promotion of oral health throughout the world (WHO TRS 846, 1994). This present publication is a revision of the original 1994 document, again using the expertise of researchers from the extensive fields of knowledge required to successfully implement complex interventions such as the use of fluorides to improve dental and oral health. Financial support for research into the development of these new fluoride strategies has come from many sources including government health departments as well as international and national grant agencies. In addition, the unique role which industry has played in the development, formulation, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of the various fluoride vehicles and strategies is noteworthy. This updated version of 'Fluoride and Oral Health' has adopted an evidence-based approach to its commentary on the different fluoride vehicles and strategies and also to its recommendations. In this regard, full account is taken of the many recent systematic reviews published in peer reviewed literature. PMID:27352462

  1. Application of barium fluoride for sulfur selective extraction at X-ray spectroscopic analysis of steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to increase the sensitivity of X-ray spectroscopic identification of sulphur in steels the application of barium fluoride for selective extraction of sulphate ions was proposed by authors of present work. The influence of concentration of sulphate ions, iron, nickel, chromium and titanium cations as well as acidity of solutions on the coefficient of distribution of sulphate ions in the system barium fluoride-water was studied. The distribution coefficients were calculated, the completeness of extraction was calculated as well. It is defined that sulphate ions from solutions containing cations of heavy metals and other anions can be extracted by means of barium fluoride.

  2. Biosorption and biotransformation of chromium by Serratia sp. isolated from tannery effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Shaili; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2012-01-01

    A bacterium isolated from soil and sediment ofa leather tanning mill's effluent was identified as Serratia sp. by the analysis of 16S rDNA. Scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to assess morphological changes and confirm chromium biosorption in Serratia sp. both in a shake-flask culture containing chromium and in a tannery wastewater. The SEMEDX and the elemental analysis of the chromate-containing samples confirmed the binding of chromium with the bacterial biomass. The TEM exhibited chromium accumulation throughout the bacterial cell, with some granular deposits in the cell periphery and in the cytoplasm. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) was used to quantify the chromium and to determine the chemical nature of the metal-microbe interaction. The XRD data showed the crystalline character of the precipitates, which consisted of mainly calcium chromium oxide, chromium fluoride phosphate and related organo-Cr(III) complex crystals. The XRD data also revealed a strong involvement of cellular carboxyl and phosphate groups in chromium binding by the bacterial biomass. The results of the study indicated that a combined mechanism of ion-exchange, complexation, croprecipitation and immobilization was involved in the biosorption of chromium by bacterial cells in contaminated environments. PMID:22519094

  3. Substoichiometric extraction of chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Substoichiometric extraction of chromium with tetraphenylarsonium chloride (TPACl), tri-n-octylamine (TNOA), diethylammonium diethyldithiocarbamate (DDDC) and ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) was examined in detail. Chromium can be extracted substoichiometrically in a pH range, which is 1.1-2.6 for the TPACl compound, 0.6-2.3 for the TNOA compound, 5.1-6.4 for the DDDC chelate and 3.9-4.9 for the APDC chelate. Chromium in high-purity calcium carbonate, Orchard Leaves (NBS SRM-1571) and Brewers Yeast (NBS SRM-1569) was determined by neutron activation analysis combined with substoichiometric extraction by DDDC and APDC. The values of 2.0+-0.02 ppm and 2.6+-0.2 ppm were obtained for Brewers Yeast and Orchard Leaves, respectively. These values were in good agreement with those reported by NBS. The reaction mechanism and the reaction ratio between hexavalent chromium and dithiocarbamate are also discussed. (author)

  4. Fluoride Rinses, Gels and Foams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twetman, Svante; Keller, Mette K

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this conference paper was to systematically review the quality of evidence and summarize the findings of clinical trials published after 2002 using fluoride mouth rinses, fluoride gels or foams for the prevention of dental caries. METHODS: Relevant papers were selected after...... (6 on fluoride mouth rinse, 10 on fluoride gel and 3 on fluoride foam); 6 had a low risk of bias while 2 had a moderate risk. All fluoride measures appeared to be beneficial in preventing crown caries and reversing root caries, but the quality of evidence was graded as low for fluoride mouth rinse......, moderate for fluoride gel and very low for acidulated fluoride foam. No conclusions could be drawn on the cost-effectiveness. CONCLUSIONS: This review, covering the recent decade, has further substantiated the evidence for a caries-preventive effect of fluoride mouth rinse, fluoride gel and foam...

  5. PRODUCTION OF THORIUM FLUORIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariasen, W.H.

    1959-08-11

    A process is presented for producing anhydrous thorium fluoride comprising the step of contacting a saturated aqueous solution of thorium nitrate with an aqueous solution of hydrofluoric acid having a concentration of about 45 to 50% by weight at a temperature above 70 deg C whereby anhydrous thorium fluoride precipitates.

  6. The carcinogenicity of chromium

    OpenAIRE

    Norseth, Tor

    1981-01-01

    The carcinogenicity of chromium compounds is reviewed with specific attention to the gaps in knowledge for risk estimation and research needs. The most important problems at present are whether trivalent chromium compounds cause cancer, and whether there is a difference in cancer causing effects between the soluble and the slightly soluble hexavalent compounds in the practical exposure situation. Dose estimates for risk estimation based on epidemiological investigations are also lacking. Pres...

  7. Fluoride varnishes and enamel caries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruyn, Hugo de

    1987-01-01

    Topical fluoride applications have the aim of increasing the fluoride uptake in enamel and consequently reducing caries. In the early ‘60s fluoride varnishes were introduced because they had a long contact period with the enamel which resulted in a higher fluoride uptake than from other topical appl

  8. Fluoride and Water (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Fluoride and Water KidsHealth > For Parents > Fluoride and Water Print A ... thirds of 16- to 19-year-olds continue Fluoride and the Water Supply For more than 60 years, water fluoridation ...

  9. Obtaining decorative chromium plating from trivalent chromium solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Óscar Javier Suárez García

    2010-01-01

    The present work was aimed at a qualitative evaluation, in the laboratory, of different alternatives for assembling and operating a trivalent chromium bath for decorative chromium plating. Different chromium concentration solutions and different complexing agents were used. The initial result of this analysis was that chloride, formate and acetate solutions produced the best results. Solution preparation conditions were evaluated: temperature, chromium III complex formation time and also ...

  10. The cariostatic mechanisms of fluoride

    OpenAIRE

    Kata Rošin-Grget; Kristina Peroš; Ivana Šutej; Krešimir Bašić

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the possible cariostatic mechanisms of the action of fluoride. In the past, fluoride inhibition of caries was ascribed to reduced solubility of enamel due to incorporation of fluoride (F–) into the enamel minerals. The present evidence from clinical and laboratory studies suggests that the caries-preventive mode of action of fluoride is mainly topical. There is convincing evidence that fluoride has a major effect on demineralisation and remineralisation of dental hard t...

  11. The analytical biochemistry of chromium.

    OpenAIRE

    Katz, S A

    1991-01-01

    The essentiality and carcinogenicity of chromium depend on its chemical form. Oxidation state and solubility are particularly important in determining the biological effects of chromium compounds. For this reason, total chromium measurements are of little value in assessing its nutritional benefits or its toxicological hazards. Aqueous sodium carbonate-sodium hydroxide solutions have been successfully used for extracting hexavalent chromium from a variety of environmental and biological matri...

  12. Fluoride toothpastes and fluoride mouthrinses for home use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Rugg-Gunn

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To provide a brief commentary review of fluoride-containing toothpastes and mouthrinses with emphasis on their use at home. Toothpastes and mouthrinses are just two of many ways of providing fluoride for the prevention of dental caries. The first investigations into incorporating fluoride into toothpastes and mouthrinses were reported in the middle 1940s. Unlike water fluoridation (which is ‘automatic fluoridation’, fluoride-containing toothpastes and fluoride-containing mouthrinses are, primarily, for home use and need to be purchased by the individual. By the 1960s, research indicated that fluoride could be successfully incorporated into toothpastes and clinical trials demonstrated their effectiveness. By the end of the 1970s, almost all toothpastes contained fluoride. The widespread use of fluoride-containing toothpastes is thought to be the main reason for much improved oral health in many countries. Of the many fluoride compounds investigated, sodium fluoride, with a compatible abrasive, is the most popular, although amine fluorides are used widely in Europe. The situation is similar for mouthrinses. Concentrations of fluoride (F, commonly found, are 1500 ppm (1500 μg F/g for toothpastes and 225 ppm (225 μg F/ml for mouthrinse. Several systematic reviews have concluded that fluoride-containing toothpastes and mouthrinses are effective, and that there is added benefit from their use with other fluoride delivery methods such as water fluoridation. Guidelines for the appropriate use of fluoride toothpastes and mouthrinses are available in many countries.Conclusion. Fluoride toothpastes and mouthrinses have been developed and extensive testing has demonstrated that they are effective and their use should be encouraged.

  13. Chromium in potatoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromium concentration in potatoes was determined, and tubes were labeled either intrinsically or extrinsically with radioactive chromate (51Cr). A labeled chromium complex was isolated from preparations of raw, baked, or fried potatoes and chromatographed on gel permeation media. Potato pulp and peel contained 1.63 and 2.70 μg of Cr/g tissue, respectively. There was no correlation between the two, nor did they respond similarly to changes of variety or locations. No significant differences were apparent in relative migration of the isolated complexes except between raw and cooked extrinsically labeled preparations

  14. Experimental evaluation of chromium-carbide-based solid lubricant coatings for use to 760 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellacorte, Christopher

    1987-01-01

    A research program is described which further developed and investigated chromium carbide based self-lubricating coatings for use to 760 C. A bonded chromium carbide was used as the base stock because of the known excellent wear resistance and the chemical stability of chromium carbide. Additives were silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic. The three coating components were blended in powder form, applied to stainless steel substrates by plasma spraying and then diamond ground to the desired coating thickness. A variety of coating compositions was tested to determine the coating composition which gave optimum tribological results. Coatings were tested in air, helium, and hydrogen at temperatures from 25 to 760 C. Several counterface materials were evaluated with the objective of discovering a satisfactory metal/coating sliding combination for potential applications, such as piston ring/cylinder liner couples for Stirling engines. In general, silver and fluoride additions to chromium carbide reduced the friction coefficient and increased the wear resistance relative to the unmodified coating. The lubricant additives acted synergistically in reducing friction and wear.

  15. Water Fluoridation Statistics - Percent of PWS population receiving fluoridated water

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2000-2014 Water Fluoridation Statistics is a biennial report of the percentage and number of people receiving fluoridated water from 2000 through 2014, originally...

  16. Luminescence in potential fluoride glass lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluoride glasses of the zirconium barium lanthanide type (invented Rennes, 1975) and lead gallium zinc (or manganese) type (invented Le Mans, 1979) show luminescence of lanthanide J-Levels situated at least 2000 cm-1 above the closest lower level (this limit is a few times larger in most other materials). Not only is the non-radiative de-excitation as weaK as in crystalline LaF3 (studied by Weber) but energy transfer between neodymium and ytterbium(III), or from manganese(II), and to some extent from chromium(III), to luminescent J-levels of neodymium(III), erbium(III) and thullium(III) is highly efficient even at low concentrations. One advantage for laser applications is that the lowest quartet state of manganese(II) has a life-time 10 to 15 milliseconds (like in many phosphate glasses and crystalline compounds) allowing energy transfer, extending by huge factors the average life-time of the emitting J-levels. Though the tera-watt lasers (Livermore, California, 1978) inducing deuterium-tritium fusion are silicate glass containing neodymium(III), fluoride glasses should be preferable for many purposes. The evaluation of laser parameters from small-scale experimentation is feasible

  17. Prediction for new magnetoelectric fluorides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nenert, G.; Palstra, T. T. M.

    2007-01-01

    We use symmetry considerations in order to predict new magnetoelectric fluorides. In addition to these magnetoelectric properties, we discuss which among these fluorides are the ones susceptible to present multiferroic properties. We emphasize that several materials exhibit ferromagnetic properties.

  18. MOLTEN FLUORIDE NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, C.J.; Grimes, W.R.

    1960-01-01

    Molten-salt reactor fuel compositions consisting of mixtures of fluoride salts are reported. In its broadest form, the composition contains an alkali fluoride such as sodium fluoride, zirconium tetrafluoride, and a uranium fluoride, the latter being the tetrafluoride or trifluoride or a mixture of the two. An outstanding property of these fuel compositions is a high coeffieient of thermal expansion which provides a negative temperature coefficient of reactivity in reactors in which they are used.

  19. Magnetic interactions through fluoride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kasper Steen; Sigrist, Marc; Weihe, Høgni;

    2014-01-01

    The nature of the magnetic interaction through fluoride in a simple, dinuclear manganese(III) complex (1), bridged by a single fluoride ion in a perfectly linear fashion, is established by experiment and density functional theory. The magnitude of the antiferromagnetic exchange interaction...... and the manganese(III) zero-field-splitting parameters are unambiguously determined by inelastic neutron scattering to yield J = 33.0(2) cm(-1) (Ĥ = JŜ1·Ŝ2 Hamiltonian definition) and single-ion D = -4.0(1) cm(-1). Additionally, high-field, high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance and magnetic measurements...... support the parameter values and resolve |E| ≈ 0.04 cm(-1). The exchange coupling constant (J) is 1 order of magnitude smaller than that found in comparable systems with linear oxide bridging but comparable to typical magnitudes through cyanide, thus underlining the potential of fluoride complexes...

  20. Fluoride retention by kaolin clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kau, P. M. H.; Smith, D. W.; Binning, Philip John

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the potential effectiveness of kaolin clay liners in storage of fluoride contaminated waste, an experimental study of the sorption and desorption behaviour of fluoride in kaolin clay was conducted. The degree of fluoride sorption by kaolin was found to depend on solution p......H and available fluoride concentration with equilibrium being achieved within 24 h. A site activation process involving the uptake of fluoride was also observed at the initial stages of sorption. This behaviour was attributed to a layer expansion process of the clay during sorption. The maximum fluoride sorption...... capacity was found to be 18.3 meq/100 g at pH 6 and 8.6 meq/100 g at pH 7. A competitive Langmuir sorption isotherm where sorption is dependant on both pH and fluoride concentration is employed to characterise the experimental sorption and desorption data. The sorption and desorption isotherms revealed...

  1. Other Fluoride Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in preventing tooth decay in people of all ages. Use the information listed below to compare the other fluoride products ... even among children younger than 6 years of age. Proper application technique ... cleared for marketing by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as ...

  2. cis-Difluoridobis(1,10-phenanthroline)chromium(III) perchlorate monohydrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birk, Torben; Bendix, Jesper; Weihe, Högni

    2008-01-01

    The title complex, [CrF(2)(C(12)H(8)N(2))(2)]ClO(4)·H(2)O, displays a slightly distorted octa-hedral coordination geometry around the central chromium(III) ion. The Cr environment is composed of a cis arrangement of two 1,10-phenanthroline [average Cr(III)-N = 2.0726 (10) Å] and two fluoride...

  3. Salt fluoridation and oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M. Marthaler

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to make known the potential of fluoridated salt in community oral health programs, particularly in South Eastern Europe. Since 1922, the addition of iodine to salt has been successful in Switzerland. Goiter is virtually extinct. By 1945, the cariesprotective effect of fluorides was well established. Based on the success of water fluoridation, a gynecologist started adding of fluoride to salt. The sale of fluoridated salt began in 1956 in the Swiss Canton of Zurich, and several other cantons followed suit. Studies initiated in the early seventies showed that fluoride, when added to salt, inhibits dental caries. The addition of fluoride to salt for human consumption was officially authorized in 1980-82. In Switzerland 85% of domestic salt consumed is fluoridated and 67% in Germany. Salt fluoridation schemes are reaching more than one hundred million in Mexico, Colombia, Peru and Cuba. The cost of salt fluoridation is very low, within 0.02 and 0.05 € per year and capita. Children and adults of the low socio-economic strata tend to have substantially more untreated caries than higher strata. Salt fluoridation is by far the cheapest method for improving oral health. Conclusions. Salt fluoridation has cariostatic potential like water fluoridation (caries reductions up to 50%. In Europe, meaningful percentages of users have been attained only in Germany (67% and Switzerland (85%. In Latin America, there are more than 100 million users, and several countries have arrived at coverage of 90 to 99%. Salt fluoridation is by far the cheapest method of caries prevention, and billions of people throughout the world could benefit from this method.

  4. New transition metal oxide fluorides with ReO{sub 3}-type structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakhal, Suliman; Lerch, Martin [Technische Universitaet Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Chemie

    2016-08-01

    The new niobium oxide fluorides MNbO{sub 2}F{sub 4} [M = (Cr, Fe)], CrNb{sub 2}O{sub 4}F{sub 5}, and Fe{sub 2}Nb{sub 3}O{sub 6}F{sub 9} were prepared by treatment of chromium or iron nitrate with Nb-containing hydrofluoric acid solutions. Crystal structures were investigated by means of X-ray powder diffraction. All new compounds can be structurally refined in the cubic ReO{sub 3}-type. The iron niobium oxide fluorides are reddish orange, and chromium containing phases exhibit a light green color. The niobium atoms are in the highest formal oxidation state.

  5. Health Effects Associated with Water Fluoridation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Virginia L.

    1979-01-01

    Discussion is presented concerning fluoridation of water supplies. Correlation between fluoride in drinking water and improved dental health is reviewed. Relationship is expressed between fluoridation and reduced tooth decay. Use of fluoride in treating skeletal disorders is discussed. Author advocates fluoridating water supplies. (SA)

  6. Water fluoridation and oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Máiréad Antoinette Harding

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Water fluoridation, is the controlled addition of fluoride to the water supply, with the aim of reducing the prevalence of dental caries. Current estimates suggest that approximately 370 million people in 27 countries consume fluoridated water, with an additional 50 million consuming water in which fluoride is naturally occurring. A pre-eruptive effect of fluoride exists in reducing caries levels in pit and fissure surfaces of permanent teeth and fluoride concentrated in plaque and saliva inhibits the demineralisation of sound enamel and enhances the remineralisation of demineralised enamel. A large number of studies conducted worldwide demonstrate the effectiveness of water fluoridation. Objections to water fluoridation have been raised since its inception and centre mainly on safety and autonomy. Systematic reviews of the safety and efficacy of water fluoridation attest to its safety and efficacy; dental fluorosis identified as the only adverse outcome. Conclusion: Water fluoridation is an effective safe means of preventing dental caries, reaching all populations, irrespective of the presence of other dental services. Regular monitoring of dental caries and fluorosis is essential particularly with the lifelong challenge which dental caries presents.

  7. Groundwater contaminant by hexavalent chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, C. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Oxidation of trivalent chromium to hexavalent chromium has been investigated as a function of total manganese in soils as well as various incubation conditions. Chromium and manganese contents were analyzed by atomic absorption (graphite furnace and flame emission respectively) following acid digestion. Total hexavalent chromium generation capacity was determined by addition of 0.001 M CrCL3, incubation, and analysis by s-diphenyl carbazide. Samples were then leached with CaSO{sub 4} and MgSO{sub 4} and incubated in various environments (oven, freeze-drier, field moist, ultrafreeze) to test for geogenic generation of Cr(IV). The degree of geogenic generation of hexavalent chromium was compared with total Mn and Cr content as well as hexavalent generational capacity.

  8. Magnesium fluoride recovery method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Richard L.; McKenzie, Donald E.

    1989-01-01

    A method of obtaining magnesium fluoride substantially free from radioactive uranium from a slag containing the same and having a radioactivity level of at least about 7000 pCi/gm. The slag is ground to a particle size of about 200 microns or less. The ground slag is contacted with an acid under certain prescribed conditions to produce a liquid product and a particulate solid product. The particulate solid product is separated from the liquid and treated at least two more times with acid to produce a solid residue consisting essentially of magnesium fluoride substantially free of uranium and having a residual radioactivity level of less than about 1000 pCi/gm. In accordance with a particularly preferred embodiment of the invention a catalyst and an oxidizing agent are used during the acid treatment and preferably the acid is sulfuric acid having a strength of about 1.0 Normal.

  9. Fluoride in dental erosion

    OpenAIRE

    Magalhães, A C; Wiegand, A.; Rios, D.; Buzalaf, M.A.R.; Lussi, A.

    2011-01-01

    Dental erosion develops through chronic exposure to extrinsic/intrinsic acids with a low pH. Enamel erosion is characterized by a centripetal dissolution leaving a small demineralized zone behind. In contrast, erosive demineralization in dentin is more complex as the acid-induced mineral dissolution leads to the exposure of collagenous organic matrix, which hampers ion diffusion and, thus, reduces further progression of the lesion. Topical fluoridation inducing the formation of a protective l...

  10. On texture formation of chromium electrodeposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian Bergenstof; Leisner, Peter; Horsewell, Andy

    1998-01-01

    The microstructure, texture and hardness of electrodeposited hard, direct current (DC) chromium and pulsed reversed chromium has been investigated. These investigations suggest that the growth and texture of hard chromium is controlled by inhibition processes and reactions. Further, it has been e...... established that codeposition of Cr2O3 nanoparticles is a general feature of DC chromium electrodeposition....

  11. Private Well Water and Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it is the responsibility of the homeowner to know and understand the quality of the water from their well. The U.S. ... or area. Additional information on testing well water quality in private wells ... do I need to know about fluoride and groundwater from a well? Fluoride ...

  12. Prediction for new magnetoelectric fluorides

    OpenAIRE

    Nenert, G.; Palstra, T. T. M.

    2007-01-01

    We use symmetry considerations in order to predict new magnetoelectric fluorides. In addition to these magnetoelectric properties, we discuss which among these fluorides are the ones susceptible to present multiferroic properties. We emphasize that several materials exhibit ferromagnetic properties. This ferromagnetism should enhance the interplay between the magnetic and dielectric properties in these materials.

  13. WET FLUORIDE SEPARATION METHOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaborg, G.T.; Gofman, J.W.; Stoughton, R.W.

    1958-11-25

    The separation of U/sup 233/ from thorium, protactinium, and fission products present in neutron-irradiated thorium is accomplished by dissolving the irradiated materials in aqueous nitric acid, adding either a soluble fluoride, iodate, phosphate, or oxalate to precipltate the thorium, separating the precipltate from the solution, and then precipitating uranlum and protactinium by alkalizing the solution. The uranium and protactinium precipitate is removcd from the solution and dissolved in nitric acid. The uranyl nitrate may then be extracted from the acid solution by means of ether, and the protactinium recovered from the aqueous phase.

  14. Chromium reduction in Pseudomonas putida.

    OpenAIRE

    Ishibashi, Y.; Cervantes, C; Silver, S

    1990-01-01

    Reduction of hexavalent chromium (chromate) to less-toxic trivalent chromium was studied by using cell suspensions and cell-free supernatant fluids from Pseudomonas putida PRS2000. Chromate reductase activity was associated with soluble protein and not with the membrane fraction. The crude enzyme activity was heat labile and showed a Km of 40 microM CrO4(2-). Neither sulfate nor nitrate affected chromate reduction either in vitro or with intact cells.

  15. Urinary Fluoride Concentration in Children with Disabilities Following Long-Term Fluoride Tablet Ingestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hsiu-Yueh; Chen, Jung-Ren; Hung, Hsin-Chia; Hsiao, Szu-Yu; Huang, Shun-Te; Chen, Hong-Sen

    2011-01-01

    Urine is the most commonly utilized biomarker for fluoride excretion in public health and epidemiological studies. Approximately 30-50% of fluoride is excreted from urine in children. Urinary fluoride excretion reflects the total fluoride intake from multiple sources. After administering fluoride tablets to children with disabilities, urinary…

  16. 49 CFR 173.163 - Hydrogen fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydrogen fluoride. 173.163 Section 173.163... Hydrogen fluoride. (a) Hydrogen fluoride (hydrofluoric acid, anhydrous) must be packaged as follows: (1) In... filling ratio of 0.84. (b) A cylinder removed from hydrogen fluoride service must be condemned...

  17. Synthesis and characterization of binder-free Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} coatings on nickel-based alloys for molten fluoride salt corrosion resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brupbacher, Michael C.; Zhang, Dajie [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Buchta, William M. [The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Graybeal, Mark L. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005 (United States); Rhim, Yo-Rhin [The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Nagle, Dennis C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Spicer, James B., E-mail: spicer@jhu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Under various conditions, chromium carbides appear to be relatively stable in the presence of molten fluoride salts and this suggests that their use in corrosion resistant coatings for fluoride salt environments could be beneficial. One method for producing these coatings is the carburization of sprayed Cr coatings using methane-containing gaseous precursors. This process has been investigated for the synthesis of binder-free chromium carbide coatings on nickel-based alloy substrates for molten fluoride salt corrosion resistance. The effects of the carburization process on coating microstructure have been characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in conjunction with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Both plasma-sprayed and cold-sprayed Cr coatings have been successfully converted to Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}, with the mechanism of conversion being strongly influenced by the initial porosity in the as-deposited coatings.

  18. Environmental exposure to arsenic and chromium in children is associated with kidney injury molecule-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas-González, M; Osorio-Yáñez, C; Gaspar-Ramírez, O; Pavković, M; Ochoa-Martínez, A; López-Ventura, D; Medeiros, M; Barbier, O C; Pérez-Maldonado, I N; Sabbisetti, V S; Bonventre, J V; Vaidya, V S

    2016-10-01

    Environmental hazards from natural or anthropological sources are widespread, especially in the north-central region of Mexico. Children represent a susceptible population due to their unique routes of exposure and special vulnerabilities. In this study we evaluated the association of exposure to environmental kidney toxicants with kidney injury biomarkers in children living in San Luis Potosi (SLP), Mexico. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 83 children (5-12 years of age) residents of Villa de Reyes, SLP. Exposure to arsenic, cadmium, chromium, fluoride and lead was assessed in urine, blood and drinking water samples. Almost all tap and well water samples had levels of arsenic (81.5%) and fluoride (100%) above the permissible levels recommended by the World Health Organization. Mean urine arsenic (45.6ppb) and chromium (61.7ppb) were higher than the biological exposure index, a reference value in occupational settings. Using multivariate adjusted models, we found a dose-dependent association between kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) across chromium exposure tertiles [(T1: reference, T2: 467pg/mL; T3: 615pg/mL) (p-trend=0.001)]. Chromium upper tertile was also associated with higher urinary miR-200c (500 copies/μl) and miR-423 (189 copies/μL). Arsenic upper tertile was also associated with higher urinary KIM-1 (372pg/mL). Other kidney injury/functional biomarkers such as serum creatinine, glomerular filtration rate, albuminuria, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and miR-21 did not show any association with arsenic, chromium or any of the other toxicants evaluated. We conclude that KIM-1 might serve as a sensitive biomarker to screen children for kidney damage induced by environmental toxic agents. PMID:27431456

  19. Galvanic cells including cobalt-chromium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjerdet, N R

    1980-01-01

    Galvanic cells may be created when dentures made of cobalt-chromium alloys are placed on teeth with metallic restorations. The power of such cells was evaluated in an in vitro galvanic using amalgams, gold alloy, and nickel-chromium alloys. The amalgams and one of the nickel-chromium alloys revealed high corrosion currents when placed in contact with cobalt-chromium alloy, the conventional amalgam showing the highest values. The gold alloy and another nickel-chromium alloy exhibited low corrosion currents and they were noble with respect to cobalt-chromium.

  20. Hydrogen permeation through chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steady state and non-steady state measurements of hydrogen permeation through metallic chromium are reported. The experiments have been conducted by use of hydrogen and deuterium within a pressure range of 10-8 - 1 bar and temperatures between 600 - 8000C. Numerical values for the physical quantities permeability, diffusion constant and solubility could be derived. At an upstream pressure above around 10-3 bar classical Sieverts-low was found (permeation rate proportional √p) with activation energies Qsub(perm) = 65 kJoule/mole, Qsub(Diff) = 4-8 kJoule/mole, Qsub(Sol) = 57-61 kJoule/mole for the respective processes involved. The isotopic effect between H and D of the permeabilities could be represented by a factor of 1,5 independence on temperature. All non steady-state measurements could be approximated reasonably well by classical diffusion kinetics. Below up-stream pressures of approx.= 10-7 bar the kinetics was no longer diffusion controlled, the dependence on up-stream pressure changed from √p -> p, the activation energy for permetation increased to 127 kJoule/mole and the isotopic factor resulted in about 2-3. (orig.)

  1. Molten fluoride fuel salt chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemistry of molten fluorides is traced from their development as fuels in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment with important factors in their selection being discussed. Key chemical characteristics such as solubility, redox behavior, and chemical activity are explained as they relate to the behavior of molten fluoride fuel systems. Fission product behavior is described along with processing experience. Development requirements for fitting the current state of the chemistry to modern nuclear fuel system are described. It is concluded that while much is known about molten fluoride behavior, processing and recycle of the fuel components is a necessary factor if future systems are to be established

  2. Corrosion Behavior of Alloys in Molten Fluoride Salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Guiqiu

    The molten fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature nuclear reactor (FHR) has been proposed as a candidate Generation IV nuclear reactor. This reactor combines the latest nuclear technology with the use of molten fluoride salt as coolant to significantly enhance safety and efficiency. However, an important challenge in FHR development is the corrosion of structural materials in high-temperature molten fluoride salt. The structural alloys' degradation, particularly in terms of chromium depletion, and the molten salt chemistry are key factors that impact the lifetime of nuclear reactors and the development of future FHR designs. In support of materials development for the FHR, the nickel base alloy of Hastelloy N and iron-chromium base alloy 316 stainless steel are being actively considered as critical structural alloys. Enriched 27LiF-BeF2 (named as FLiBe) is a promising coolant for the FHR because of its neutronic properties and heat transfer characteristics while operating at atmospheric pressure. In this study, the corrosion behavior of Ni-5Cr and Ni-20Cr binary model alloys, and Hastelloy N and 316 stainless steel in molten FLiBe with and without graphite were investigated through various microstructural analyses. Based on the understanding of the corrosion behavior and data of above four alloys in molten FLiBe, a long-term corrosion prediction model has been developed that is applicable specifically for these four materials in FLiBe at 700ºC. The model uses Cr concentration profile C(x, t) as a function of corrosion distance in the materials and duration fundamentally derived from the Fick's diffusion laws. This model was validated with reasonable accuracy for the four alloys by fitting the calculated profiles with experimental data and can be applied to evaluate corrosion attack depth over the long-term. The critical constant of the overall diffusion coefficient (Deff) in this model can be quickly calculated from the experimental measurement of alloys' weight

  3. Fluoride glass: Crystallization, surface tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doremus, R. H.

    1988-01-01

    Fluoride glass was levitated acoustically in the ACES apparatus on STS-11, and the recovered sample had a different microstructure from samples cooled in a container. Further experiments on levitated samples of fluoride glass are proposed. These include nucleation, crystallization, melting observations, measurement of surface tension of molten glass, and observation of bubbles in the glass. Ground experiments are required on sample preparation, outgassing, and surface reactions. The results should help in the development and evaluation of containerless processing, especially of glass, in the development of a contaminent-free method of measuring surface tensions of melts, in extending knowledge of gas and bubble behavior in fluoride glasses, and in increasing insight into the processing and properties of fluoride glasses.

  4. Method of aluminium fluoride manufacture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The manufacture of aluminium fluoride is based on waste processing in uranium hexafluoride conversion to uranium oxides within the fuel cycle. The conversion is the stoichiometric conversion of uranium hexafluoride with aluminium nitrate to uranyl nitrate. This is extracted from the water phase by phosphoric acid trialkyl ester to an organic solvent and further processed. The discharge water phase is solidified by evaporation to solid aluminium fluoride and nitric acid. (M.S.)

  5. Chromium(III) -- chromium(VI) interconversions in seawater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijden, C.H. van der; Reith, M.

    1982-01-01

    The stable form of dissolved chromium in oxygenated seawater is Cr(VI). But Cr(III)-species are also present at an analytically significant level. It is shown that Cr(III) is oxidized only slowly by dissolved oxygen, and that manganese oxide is a strong catalyst for such oxidation. However, the low

  6. FLUORIDE TOXICITY – A HARSH REALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bandlapalli Pavani

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available There are many incidents of fluoride toxicity whether it is acute or chronic. Fluoride toxicity is an environmental hazard which arises from the upper layers of geological crust and is dissolved in water. Prolonged drinking of such water causes chronic fluoride toxicity. Use of fluoride containing compounds for various purposes such as dental products, metal, glass, refrigerator and chemical industries act as a source of fluoride poisoning and increase the risk of toxicity. This review reflects the deleterious effects of fluorides on various organs in the physiological system.

  7. Determination of chromium combined with DNA, RNA and protein in chromium-rich brewer's yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contents of chromium in the DNA, RNA and protein fractions separated from chromium-rich and normal brewer's yeast were determined with the neutron activation analysis in order to study the combination of Cr with DNA, RNA and protein in chromium-rich brewer's yeast. The results showed that the extracting rats and concentrations of DNA, RNA and protein had no significant difference in two types of yeast, but the chromium contents of DNA, RNA and protein in the chromium-rich yeast were significantly higher than those in the normal. In addition, the content of chromium in DNA was much higher than that in RNA and protein, which indicated that the inorganic chromium compounds entered into the yeast cell, during the yeast cultivation in the culture medium containing chromium were converted into organic chromium compounds combined with DNA, RNA and protein

  8. Industrial fluoride pollution. Chronic fluoride poisoning in Cornwall Island cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krook, L; Maylin, G A

    1979-04-01

    An aluminum plant on the south bank of the St. Lawrence river, southwest of Cornwall Island, Ontario, Canada, has emitted 0.816 metric tons of fluoride daily since 1973; considerably higher amounts were emitted from 1959 to 1973. The plant has been designated as the "major source of fluoride emissions impacting on Cornwall Island." Chronic fluoride poisoning in Cornwall island cattle was manifested clinically by stunted growth and dental fluorosis to a degree of severe interference with drinking and mastication. Cows died at or were slaughtered after the third pregnancy. The deterioration of cows did not allow further pregnancies. Fluoride concentrations in ash of biopsied coccygeal vertebrae increased significantly with age and were dependent on distance from and direction to the aluminum plant. Fluoride in bone ash of a 7-month old-fetus exceeded 500 ppm; fluoride thus was passed transplacentally. Analyses of fluoride in ash of bones obtained at necropsy of cattle from 4 months of age to 4 to 5 years of age showed increased amounts with age. Cancellous bone retained far higher amounts than cortical bone, a reflection of the normally higher metabolic rate of cancellous bone. Concentrations exceeding 10,000 ppm fluoride were recorded in cancellous bone of a 4-to 5-year-old cow. The target cells for fluoride in chronic fluorosis were shown to be the ameloblasts, the dental pulp cells and the odontoblasts and, in bone, primarily the resorbing osteocytes and also the osteoblasts. Atrophy and necrosis of the ameloblasts were responsible for enamel defects. The existing enamel showed brown discoloration from fluoride deposits. The pulp cells underwent fibrous and osseous metaplasia and necrosis of the ectopic bone occurred. The odontoblasts were atrophic and the dentin showed brown discoloration. The resorbing osteocytes were inactive and osteosclerosis resulted. This was especially pronounced in areas of normally great apposition, i.e. in the metaphyses. The epiphyseal

  9. Fluoride level in saliva after bonding orthodontic brackets with a fluoride containing adhesive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ogaard, B; Arends, J; Helseth, H; Dijkman, G; vanderKuijl, M

    1997-01-01

    The fluoride level in saliva is considered an important parameter in caries prevention. Elevation of the salivary fluoride level by a fluoride-releasing orthodontic bonding adhesive would most likely be beneficial in the prevention of enamel caries. In this study, the fluoride level in saliva was me

  10. Fluoridering af drikkevandet i Danmark?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvin, Erik; Spliid, Henrik; Bruvo, M.;

    2010-01-01

    Første gang sammenhængen mellem caries (huller i tænderne) og fluoridindholdet i drikkevand blev diskuteret i vandværkskredse i Danmark var ved årsmødet i 1958. Her blev det oplyst, at fluorid i drikkevand beskytter mod caries, men man konstaterede også, at der nok ikke var stemning for fluorid......-tilsætning til drikkevandet (fluoridering). Siden da er emnet ikke taget op. Formålet med dette indlæg er at besvare spørgsmålene: 1. Er der behov for fluoridering af drikkevandet i Danmark? 2. Er der alternativer? Hvordan påvirker blødgøring af vand og andre vandbehandlingsmetoder dental caries hos børn og unge......? Som baggrund herfor vil vi redegøre for resultaterne af et netop afsluttet studium af sammenhængen mellem caries og drikkevandets sammensætning, specielt m.h.t. luoridindholdet og vandets calciumindhold (hårdhed). Undersøgelsen bekræfter, at fluorid i drikkevand i væsentlig grad beskytter mod caries...

  11. Acute toxicity of uranium hexafluoride, uranyl fluoride and hydrogen fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium hexafluoride (UF6) released into the atmosphere will react rapidly with moisture in the air to form the hydrolysis products uranyl fluoride (UO2F2) and hydrogen fluoride (HF). Uranium compounds such as UF6 and UO2F2 exhibit both chemical toxicity and radiological effects, while HF exhibits only chemical toxicity. This paper describes the development of a methodology for assessing the human health consequences of a known acute exposure to a mixture of UF6, UO2F2, and HF. 4 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs

  12. High-fluoride groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, N Subba

    2011-05-01

    Fluoride (F(-)) is essential for normal bone growth, but its higher concentration in the drinking water poses great health problems and fluorosis is common in many parts of India. The present paper deals with the aim of establishment of facts of the chemical characteristics responsible for the higher concentration of F(-) in the groundwater, after understanding the chemical behavior of F(-) in relation to pH, total alkalinity (TA), total hardness (TH), carbonate hardness (CH), non-carbonate hardness (NCH), and excess alkalinity (EA) in the groundwater observed from the known areas of endemic fluorosis zones of Andhra Pradesh that have abundant sources of F(-)-bearing minerals of the Precambrians. The chemical data of the groundwater shows that the pH increases with increase F(-); the concentration of TH is more than the concentration of TA at low F(-) groundwater, the resulting water is represented by NCH; the TH has less concentration compared to TA at high F(-) groundwater, causing the water that is characterized by EA; and the water of both low and high concentrations of F(-) has CH. As a result, the F(-) has a positive relation with pH and TA, and a negative relation with TH. The operating mechanism derived from these observations is that the F(-) is released from the source into the groundwater by geochemical reactions and that the groundwater in its flowpath is subjected to evapotranspiration due to the influence of dry climate, which accelerates a precipitation of CaCO(3) and a reduction of TH, and thereby a dissolution of F(-). Furthermore, the EA in the water activates the alkalinity in the areas of alkaline soils, leading to enrichment of F(-). Therefore, the alkaline condition, with high pH and EA, and low TH, is a more conducive environment for the higher concentration of F(-) in the groundwater.

  13. Organ-wise accumulation of fluoride in Prosopis juliflora and its potential for phytoremediation of fluoride contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Poonam; Khan, Suphiya; Baunthiyal, Mamta; Sharma, Vinay

    2012-10-01

    Fluoride (F) contamination is a global environmental problem, as there is no cure of fluorosis available yet. Prosopis juliflora is a leguminous perennial, phreatophyte tree, widely distributed in arid and semi-arid regions of world. It extensively grows in F endemic areas of Rajasthan (India) and has been known as a "green" solution to decontaminate cadmium, chromium and copper contaminated soils. This study aims to check the tolerance potential of P. juliflora to accumulate fluoride. For this work, P. juliflora seedlings were grown for 75 d on soilrite under five different concentrations of F viz., control, 25, 50, 75 and 100 mg NaF kg(-1). Organ-wise accumulation of F, bioaccumulation factor (BF), translocation factor (TF), growth ratio (GR) and F tolerance index (TI) were examined. Plant accumulated high amounts of F in roots. The organ-wise distribution showed an accumulation 4.41 mg kg(-1)dw, 12.97 mg kg(-1)dw and 16.75 mg kg(-1)dw F, in stem, leaves and roots respectively. The results indicated significant translocation of F from root into aerial parts. The bioaccumulation and translocation factor values (>1.0) showed high accumulation efficiency and tolerance of P. juliflora to F. It is concluded that P. juliflora is a suitable candidate for phytoremediation purpose and can be explored further for the decontamination of F polluted soils.

  14. Fluoride: its role in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Maria Andaló Tenuta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In spite of decades of research on fluoride and the recognition of its role as the cornerstone of dental caries reduction in the last fifty years, questions still arise on its use at community, self-applied and professional application levels. Which method of fluoride delivery should be used? How and when should it be used? How can its benefits be maximized and still reduce the risks associated with its use? These are only some of the challenging questions facing us daily. The aim of this paper is to present scientific background to understand the importance of each method of fluoride use considering the current caries epidemiological scenario, and to discuss how individual or combined methods can be used based on the best evidence available.

  15. Molten fluorides for nuclear applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie. Delpech

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The importance of pyrochemistry is being increasingly acknowledged and becomes unavoidable in the nuclear field. Molten salts may be used for fuel processing and spent fuel recycling, for heat transfer, as a homogeneous fuel and as a breeder material in fusion systems. Fluorides that are stable at high temperature and under high neutron flux are especially promising. Analysis of several field cases reveals that corrosion in molten fluorides is essentially due to the oxidation of metals by uranium fluoride and/or oxidizing impurities. The thermodynamics of this process are discussed with an emphasis on understanding the mass transfer in the systems, selecting appropriate metallic materials and designing effective purification methods.

  16. Fluoride in African groundwater: Occurrence and mitigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasak, S.; Griffioen, J.; Feenstra, L.

    2010-01-01

    Fluoride in groundwater has both natural and anthropogenic sources. Fluoride bearing minerals, volcanic gases and various industrial and agricultural activities can contribute to high concentrations. High intake of fluoride from drinking water is the main cause of fluorosis and may lead to many othe

  17. Synthesis of chromium containing pigments from chromium galvanic sludges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreola, F; Barbieri, L; Bondioli, F; Cannio, M; Ferrari, A M; Lancellotti, I

    2008-08-15

    In this work the screening results of the scientific activity conducted on laboratory scale to valorise chromium(III) contained in the galvanic sludge as chromium precursor for ceramic pigments are reported. The valorisation of this waste as a secondary raw material (SRM) is obtained by achievement of thermal and chemical stable crystal structures able to color ceramic material. Two different pigments pink CaCr(0.04)Sn(0.97)SiO(5) and green Ca(3)Cr(2)(SiO(4))(3) were synthesized by solid-state reactions using dried Cr sludge as chromium oxide precursor. The obtained pigments were characterized by X-ray diffraction and SEM analysis. Furthermore the color developed in a suitable ceramic glaze was investigated in comparison with the color developed by the pigments prepared from pure Cr(2)O(3). The characterization carried out corroborates the thermal and chemical stability of the synthesized pigments and, especially for the Cr-Sn pink pigment, the powders develop an intense color that is very similar to the color developed by the pigments obtained starting from pure Cr(2)O(3). PMID:18289775

  18. Synthesis of chromium containing pigments from chromium galvanic sludges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreola, F.; Barbieri, L. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dei Materiali e dell' Ambiente, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905, 41100 Modena (Italy); Bondioli, F. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dei Materiali e dell' Ambiente, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905, 41100 Modena (Italy)], E-mail: bondioli.federica@unimore.it; Cannio, M. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dei Materiali e dell' Ambiente, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905, 41100 Modena (Italy); Ferrari, A.M. [Dipartimento di Scienza e Metodi dell' Ingegneria, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Viale Amendola 2, 42100 Reggio Emilia (Italy); Lancellotti, I. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dei Materiali e dell' Ambiente, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905, 41100 Modena (Italy)

    2008-08-15

    In this work the screening results of the scientific activity conducted on laboratory scale to valorise chromium(III) contained in the galvanic sludge as chromium precursor for ceramic pigments are reported. The valorisation of this waste as a secondary raw material (SRM) is obtained by achievement of thermal and chemical stable crystal structures able to color ceramic material. Two different pigments pink CaCr{sub 0.04}Sn{sub 0.97}SiO{sub 5} and green Ca{sub 3}Cr{sub 2}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 3} were synthesized by solid-state reactions using dried Cr sludge as chromium oxide precursor. The obtained pigments were characterized by X-ray diffraction and SEM analysis. Furthermore the color developed in a suitable ceramic glaze was investigated in comparison with the color developed by the pigments prepared from pure Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The characterization carried out corroborates the thermal and chemical stability of the synthesized pigments and, especially for the Cr-Sn pink pigment, the powders develop an intense color that is very similar to the color developed by the pigments obtained starting from pure Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  19. METHOD OF PREPARING METAL FLUORIDES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, J.J.; Sheft, I.

    1959-08-11

    A method is presented for preparing the halides of elements which are relatively non-reactive with halogenating agents. The method involves reacting a mixture of an oxygen containing salt of a difficulty halogenated metal with an oxygen containing salt of an easily halogenated metal with a halogenating agent. Accordingly plutonium tetrafluoride is produced by reacting a mixture of plutonium dioxide and uranium octaoxide with bromine trifluoride. The reaction proceeds smoothly at moderate temperatures and the resulting plutonium trifluoride may be readily separated from many impurities which form volatile fluorides by volatilizing these volatile fluorides from the reaction chamber.

  20. Tissues and urinary chromium concentrations in rats fed high-chromium diets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Chromium is an essential trace elements and enhances the function of insulin as a form of chromodulin. In the subjects with a certain type of diabetics, 200 to 1,000 μg/d of chromium is administered to reduced the symptoms of diabetics. However, although there are not any health-promotive effects of chromium-administration in healthy subjects, various types of chromium supplements are commercially available in many countries; the adverse effects caused by an excessive chromium intake are feared. In the present study, to clarify the tolerable upper limit of chromium, tissue and urinary chromium concentrations, liver function and iron status were examined in rats fed high-chromium diets. Thirty-six male 4-weeks Wistar rats were divided into six groups and fed casein-based diets containing 1, 10 or 100 μg/g of chromium as chromium chloride (CrCl3) or chromium picolinate (CrPic) for 4 weeks. After the feeding, chromium concentrations in liver, kidney, small intestine and tibia were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. In addition, urine samples were collected on 3rd to 4th week and their chromium concentrations were also determined. Chromium concentrations in liver, kidney, small intestine and tibia were elevated with increase of dietary chromium concentration. Urinary chromium excretion was also elevated with the increase of dietary chromium and the rate of urinary chromium excretion was less than 2% to dietary chromium intake in all the experimental groups. In the administration of 100 μg/g of chromium, rats given CrCl3 showed significantly higher tibia chromium concentration and lower urinary chromium excretion than those given CrPic. There were not any differences in iron status among the experimental groups. Activities of serum aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase in rats fed diet containing 100 μg/g of chromium as CrPic were significantly higher than those in rats fed other diets.

  1. An exposure and risk assessment for fluoride and trace metals in black tea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sofuoglu, Sait C. [Izmir Institute of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Research Center, Guelbahce, Urla 35430 Izmir (Turkey)], E-mail: cemilsofuoglu@iyte.edu.tr; Kavcar, Pinar [Izmir Institute of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Research Center, Guelbahce, Urla 35430 Izmir (Turkey)], E-mail: pinarkavcar@iyte.edu.tr

    2008-10-30

    Exposure and associated health risks for fluoride and trace metals in black tea were estimated. Fifty participants were randomly recruited to supply samples from the tea that they drink, and self-administer a questionnaire that inquired about personal characteristics and daily tea intake. Analyzed trace metals included aluminum, arsenic, barium, cadmium, cobalt, chromium, copper, manganese, nickel, strontium, and zinc. Fluoride and four metals (Al, Cr, Mn, Ni) were detected in all samples while barium was detected only in one sample. The remaining metals were detected in >60% of the samples. Fluoride and aluminum levels in instant tea bag samples were greater than in loose tea samples (p < 0.05) while the differences in elemental concentrations of loose and pot bag tea samples were not significant. Median and 90th percentile daily tea intake rates were estimated as 0.35 and 1.1 l/day, respectively. Neither fluoride nor aluminum levels in black tea were found to associate with considerable risks of fluorosis and Alzheimer's disease, respectively. However, carcinogenic risk levels for arsenic were high; R > 1.0 x 10{sup -6} even at the median level. According to sensitivity analysis, daily tea intake was the most influencing variable to the risk except for arsenic for which the concentration distribution was of more importance.

  2. Soils contaminated with hexavalent chromium

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca, Bruna Catarina da Silva

    2011-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento em Engenharia Química e Biológica The interest in environmental soil science has been growing in the last years due to the continuous degradation of this major natural resource. With this in mind, and because chromium and lead are two of the most toxic heavy metals frequently detected as soil contaminants in the Portuguese territory, the study and development of few remediation techniques and the indissociable description of the sorption and migration of...

  3. Simultaneous determination of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) in aqueous solutions by ion chromatography and chemiluminescence detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Jøns, O; Nielsen, B

    1992-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of chromium(iii) and chromium(vi) in a flow system based on chemiluminescence was developed. A Dionex cation-exchange guard column was used to separate chromium(iii) from chromium(vi), and chromium(vi) was reduced by potassium sulfite, whereupon both sp...

  4. Inoculation of chromium white cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kopyciński

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been proved that an addition of boron carbide introduced as an inoculant to the chromium white cast iron changes the structureof castings. Castings after inoculation revealed a different structure with numerous grains. Primary precipitates of chromium carbide also appeared, reducing the mechanical properties of as-cast parts. Properly established heat treatment regime makes chromium iron castings regain their, originally high, mechanical properties.

  5. REMOVAL OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM FROM DRINKING WATER

    OpenAIRE

    A. R. Asgari ، F. Vaezi ، S. Nasseri ، O. Dördelmann ، A. H. Mahvi ، E. Dehghani Fard

    2008-01-01

    Removal of chromium can be accomplished by various methods but none of them is cost-effective in meeting drinking water standards. For this study, granular ferric hydroxide was used as adsorbent for removal of hexavalent chromium. Besides, the effects of changing contact time, pH and concentrations of competitive anions were determined for different amounts of granular ferric hydroxide. It was found that granular ferric hydroxide has a high capacity for adsorption of hexavalent chromium from ...

  6. Fluoride remediation using floating macrophytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naba Kumar Mondal

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Six aquatic macrophytes, such as Pistia stratiotes, Ceratophyllum demersum, Nymphoides indica, Lemna major, Azolla pinnata,and Eichhornia crassipes were considered for remove fluoride from aqueous solution. Five different concentrations (10, 30, 50, and 100 ppm of fluoride solution were taken in 1 L plastic container. Fixed weight (20 g of macrophytes along with 500 ml fluoride solution was taken in each plastic container for 72 hours observation. Results demonstrated all the macrophytes show highest fluoride removal during 24 h to 48 h, but after 72 h their efficiency reduced drastically. The species N. indica showed better removal efficiency than other experimental macrophytes. In general, pigment measurement data indicated higher concentration at 72 h. However, Pistia sp. showed higher concentration of pigmentation at intermediate time interval (48 h. Higher level of dry weight to fresh weight ratio was recorded for L. major and A. pinnata at all concentrations, excepting at 10 ppm. In addition, all macrophytes showed lower RGR at higher concentration. Isotherm study indicated that macrophyte C. demersum is a good fitted with Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm whereas L. major with Langmuir isotherm during 24 hours.

  7. Special Report: Fluoridation of Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hileman, Bette

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the controversy regarding water fluoridation in the United States during the last 50 years. Discusses the current status; benefits; and health risks including skeletal fluorosis, kidney disease, hypersensitivity, mutagenic effects, birth defects, and cancer. Presents statistics and anecdotal accounts. (CW)

  8. Alimentary fluoride intake in preschool children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lencova Erika

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The knowledge of background alimentary fluoride intake in preschool children is of utmost importance for introducing optimal and safe caries preventive measures for both individuals and communities. The aim of this study was to assess the daily fluoride intake analyzing duplicate samples of food and beverages. An attempt was made to calculate the daily intake of fluoride from food and swallowed toothpaste. Methods Daily alimentary fluoride intake was measured in a group of 36 children with an average age of 4.75 years and an average weight of 20.69 kg at baseline, by means of a double plate method. This was repeated after six months. Parents recorded their child's diet over 24 hours and collected duplicated portions of food and beverages received by children during this period. Pooled samples of food and beverages were weighed and solid food samples were homogenized. Fluoride was quantitatively extracted from solid food samples by a microdiffusion method using hexadecyldisiloxane and perchloric acid. The content of fluoride extracted from solid food samples, as well as fluoride in beverages, was measured potentiometrically by means of a fluoride ion selective electrode. Results Average daily fluoride intake at baseline was 0.389 (SD 0.054 mg per day. Six months later it was 0.378 (SD 0.084 mg per day which represents 0.020 (SD 0.010 and 0.018 (SD 0.008 mg of fluoride respectively calculated per kg bw/day. When adding the values of unwanted fluoride intake from the toothpaste shown in the literature (0.17-1.21 mg per day the estimate of the total daily intake of fluoride amounted to 0.554-1.594 mg/day and recalculated to the child's body weight to 0.027-0.077 mg/kg bw/day. Conclusions In the children studied, observed daily fluoride intake reached the threshold for safe fluoride intake. When adding the potential fluoride intake from swallowed toothpaste, alimentary intake reached the optimum range for daily fluoride intake

  9. Sputtered silver films to improve chromium carbide based solid lubricant coatings for use to 900 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Sliney, Harold E.; Deadmore, Daniel L.

    1988-01-01

    Thin silver films, 250 to 3500 A thick, were sputtered onto PS200, a plasma sprayed, chromium carbide based solid lubricant coating, to reduce run-in wear and improve tribological properties. The coating contains bonded chromium carbide as the wear resistant base stock with silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic added as low and high temperature lubricants, respectively. Potential applications for the PS200 coating are cylinder wall/piston ring lubrication for Stirling engines and foil bearing journal lubrication. In this preliminary program, the silver film overlay thickness was optimized based on tests using a pin-on-disk tribometer. The friction and wear studies were performed in a helium atmosphere at temperatures from 25 to 760 C with a sliding velocity of 2.7 m/s under a 4.9 N load. Films between 1000 and 1500 A provide the best lubrication of the counterface material. The films enrich the sliding surface with lubricant and reduce the initial abrasiveness of the as ground, plasma-sprayed coating surface, thus reducing wear.

  10. A novel hydrolysis method to synthesize chromium hydroxide nanoparticles and its catalytic effect in the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Synthesis of Cr(OH)3 nanoparticles in Cr3+–F− aqueous solution. ► The F− ion tailors coagulated materials, Cr(OH)3 nanoparticles are obtained. ► Adding nanosized Cr(OH)3, AP thermal decomposition temperature decreases to 200 °C. ► The nanosized Cr(OH)3 catalyzes NH3 oxidation, accelerating AP thermal decomposition. - Abstract: A procedure for the preparation of spherical Cr(OH)3 nanoparticles was developed based on the aging of chromium nitrate aqueous solutions in the presence of sodium fluoride, urea, and polyvinylpyrrolidone. Using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy, the morphological characteristics of Cr(OH)3 were controlled by altering the molar ratio of fluoride ion to chromium ion, as well as the initial pH and chromium ion concentration. The prepared nanosized Cr(OH)3 decreased the temperature required to decompose ammonium perchlorate from 450 °C to about 250 °C as the catalyst. The possible catalytic mechanism of the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate was also discussed.

  11. Permeation of chromium salts through human skin in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Fullerton, A; Avnstorp, C;

    1992-01-01

    of the dichromate solution. Chromium skin levels increased with increasing concentrations of applied chromium salts up to 0.034 M Cr. The amount of chromium in recipient phase and skin layers increased with increasing pH when the applied solution contained potassium dichromate. This was ascribed to a decreased skin...... barrier function of the skin. The amount of chromium found in all skin layers after application of chromium chloride decreased with increasing pH due to lower solubility of the salt. The % of chromium found in the recipient phase as chromium(VI) increased with increasing total chromium concentration...... indicating a limited reduction ability of the skin in vitro....

  12. Fluoride retention in saliva and in dental biofilm after different home-use fluoride treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Daniela Correia Cavalcante; Maltz, Marisa; Hashizume, Lina Naomi

    2014-01-01

    This single-blind, randomized, crossover study aimed at assessing the long-term fluoride concentrations in saliva and in dental biofilm after different home-use fluoride treatments. The study volunteers (n = 38) were residents of an area with fluoridated drinking water. They were administered four treatments, each of which lasted for one week: twice-daily placebo dentifrice, twice-daily fluoride dentifrice, twice-daily fluoride dentifrice and once-daily fluoride mouthrinse, and thrice-daily fluoride dentifrice. At the end of each treatment period, samples of unstimulated saliva and dental biofilm were collected 8 h after the last oral hygiene procedure. Fluoride concentrations in saliva and dental biofilm were analyzed using a specific electrode. The fluoride concentrations in saliva and dental biofilm 8 h after the last use of fluoride products did not differ among treatments. The results of this study suggest that treatments with home-use fluoride products have no long-term effect on fluoride concentrations in saliva and in dental biofilm of residents of an area with a fluoridated water supply.

  13. Chromium in aqueous nitrate plutonium process streams: Corrosion of 316 stainless steel and chromium speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was undertaken to determine if chromium(+6) could exist in plutonium process solutions under normal operating conditions. Four individual reactions were studied: the rate of dissolution of stainless steel, which is the principal source of chromium in process solutions; the rate of oxidation of chromium(+3) to chromium(+6) by nitric acid; and the reduction of chromium(+6) back to chromium(+3) by reaction with stainless steel and with oxalic acid. The stainless steel corrosion rate was found to increase with increasing nitric acid concentration, increasing hydrofluoric acid concentration, and increasing temperature. Oxidation of chromium(+3) to chromium(+6) was negligible at room temperature and only became significant in hot concentrated nitric acid. The rate of reduction of chromium(+6) back to chromium(+3) by reaction with stainless steel or oxalic acid was found to be much greater than the rate of the reverse oxidation reaction. Based on these findings and taking into account normal operating conditions, it was determined that although there would be considerable chromium in plutonium process streams it would rarely be found in the (+6) oxidation state and would not exist in the (+6) state in the final process waste solutions

  14. Electrodeposition of chromium from trivalent chromium urea bath containing sulfate and chloride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The reduction of Cr( Ⅲ) to Cr( Ⅱ ) on copper electrode in trivalent chromium urea bath containing chromium sulfate and chromium chloride as chromium source has been investigated by potentiodynamic sweep. The transfer coefficient α for reduction of Cr( Ⅲ ) to Cr( Ⅱ ) on copper electrode was calculated as 0.46. The reduction is a quasi-reversible process. J-t responses at different potential steps showed that the generation and adsorption characteristics of carboxylate bridged oligomer are relevant to cathode potential. The interface behavior between electrode and solution for Cr( Ⅲ ) complex is a critical factor influencing sustained electrode position of chromium. The hypotheses of the electro-inducing polymerization of Cr( Ⅲ ) was proposed. The potential scope in which sustained chromium deposits can be prepared is from- 1.3 V to- 1.7 V (vs SCE) in the urea bath. Bright chromium deposits with thickness of 30 μm can be prepared in the bath.

  15. Alkane dehydrogenation over supported chromium oxide catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Schoonheydt, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The dehydrogenation of alkanes over supported chromium oxide catalysts in the absence of oxygen is of high interest for the industrial production of propene and isobutene. In this review, a critical overview is given of the current knowledge nowadays available about chromium-based dehydrogenation ca

  16. Discovery of Interstellar Hydrogen Fluoride

    CERN Document Server

    Neufeld, D A; Schilke, P; Phillips, T G; Neufeld, David A.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Schilke, Peter; Phillips, Thomas G.

    1997-01-01

    We report the first detection of interstellar hydrogen fluoride. Using the Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS) of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), we have detected the 121.6973 micron J = 2 - 1 line of HF in absorption toward the far-infrared continuum source Sagittarius B2. The detection is statistically significant at the 13 sigma level. On the basis of our model for the excitation of HF in Sgr B2, the observed line equivalent width of 1.0 nm implies a hydrogen fluoride abundance of 3E-10 relative to H2. If the elemental abundance of fluorine in Sgr B2 is the same as that in the solar system, then HF accounts for ~ 2% of the total number of fluorine nuclei. We expect hydrogen fluoride to be the dominant reservoir of gas-phase fluorine in Sgr B2, because it is formed rapidly in exothermic reactions of atomic fluorine with either water or molecular hydrogen; thus the measured HF abundance suggests a substantial depletion of fluorine onto dust grains. Similar conclusions regarding depletion have previously...

  17. Ruthenium olefin metathesis catalysts containing fluoride

    OpenAIRE

    Guidone, Stefano; Songis, Olivier; Falivene, Laura; Nahra, Fady; Slawin, Alexandra Martha Zoya; Jacobsen, Heiko; Cavallo, Luigi; Cazin, Catherine S. J.

    2015-01-01

    The authors gratefully acknowledge the EC through the 7th framework program (grant CP-FP 211468-2 EUMET), the Royal Society (University Research Fellowship to CSJC) for financial support. The reaction of the ruthenium complex cis-Caz-1 with silver fluoride affords the first example of an active olefin metathesis pre-catalyst containing fluoride ligands. The cis geometry of the precursor complex is key to the successful fluoride exchange reaction. Computational studies highlight the stabili...

  18. Fluoride Importance in Controlling Caries and Fluorosis

    OpenAIRE

    Gaurav Solanki

    2012-01-01

    The use of fluorides for oral health has always involved a balance between the protective benefit against dental caries and the risk of developing fluorosis. The link between fluoride and dental health was established to determining the causes of dental fluorosis or enamel mottling. Fluorosis in Indian children was highly prevalent in the early 1990s. Policy were introduced to control fluoride exposure and to reduce the prevalence of fluorosis. The study aimed of describing the prevalence, se...

  19. FLUORIDATION CHEMISTRY: EQUILIBRIA AND KINETICS OF FLUORIDE AND FLUORO-COMPLEXES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The most common fluoridating agents used by major American waterworks are hexafluorosilicic acid (H2SiF6) and sodium hexxafluorosilicate (Na2SiF6). According to the 1992 Water Fluoridation Census where 10,002 utilities responded affirmatively to fluoridating their water, 59% ...

  20. Effect of titanium tetrafluoride, amine fluoride and fluoride varnish on enamel erosion in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vieira, A; Ruben, JL; Huysmans, MCDNJM

    2005-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the effect of 1 and 4% titanium tetrafluoride (TiF4) gels, amine fluoride (AmF) 1 and 0.25% and a fluoride varnish (FP) on the prevention of dental erosion. Two experimental groups served as controls, one with no pretreatment and another one pre-treated with a fluoride

  1. PRECIPITATION OF URANIUM PEROXIDE OF LOW FLUORIDE CONTENT FROM SOLUTIONS CONTAINING FLUORIDES

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, E.J.; Clark, H.M.

    1958-08-12

    S>A method is described for the preparation of fluoride free uraniunn peroxide precipitates, even though the solution from which the precipitation is made is contaminated with fluorides. This is accomplished by add ing aluminum ions to the solution, where they complex any fluoride present and prevent its precipitation with the uramum peroxide.

  2. High fluoride exposure in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, V A; Gitelman, H J

    1990-04-01

    The observation of higher plasma flouride levels in our hemodialysis (HD) patients than our continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients (4.0 +/- 0.5 mumol/L [n = 17] v 2.5 +/- 0.3 mumol/L [n = 17], P less than 0.005) prompted an evaluation of fluoride metabolism during HD. We found that serum fluoride was completely ultrafiltrable across cuprophane membranes (99% +/- 4%) and that HD produced acute changes in plasma fluoride levels that correlated well with the fluoride gradient between plasma and dialysis fluid at the start of dialysis. Our HD fluids contained significantly higher fluoride concentrations than were present in commercially prepared peritoneal dialysis fluid. Our fluids are prepared from fluoridated tap water that is purified by reverse osmosis (RO). We conclude that the different concentrations of fluoride in our dialysis fluids account for the differences in the plasma flouride concentrations between our dialysis groups. Since many HD units rely on RO systems to purify fluoridated tap water, it is likely that many HD patients are being exposed inadvertently to increased concentrations of fluoride.

  3. Fluoride in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with fluorosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Y H; Wu, S S

    1988-01-01

    The CSF fluoride level of individuals drinking water with normal fluoride content and of patients with endemic fluorosis were studied. For the purpose of studying the relationship between the dynamic equilibrium of the CSF fluoride and other body fluids, urine and blood fluoride were examined simultaneously. Fluoride was revealed in every CSF sample of the control group and its mean value was lower than that of the blood. The CSF fluoride concentration of patients with fluorosis was slightly ...

  4. 76 FR 2383 - Proposed HHS Recommendation for Fluoride Concentration in Drinking Water for Prevention of Dental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-13

    ... that provide fluoride now include mouthrinses, fluoride supplements, and professionally applied... fluoride toothpaste (if swallowed) and fluoride supplements, have become available. Fluoride intake from... pharyngeal cancers, and sports-related craniofacial injuries: a report on recommendations of the Task...

  5. [Bioremediation of chromium (VI) contaminated site by reduction and microbial stabilization of chromium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jia-Chuan; Zhang, Jian-Rong; Liu, Xi-Wen; Xu, Qian; Shi, Wei-Lin

    2014-10-01

    Chromium (VI) contaminated soil samples were collected from a chemical plant in Suzhou. Firstly, the reduced soil was prepared by adding reagent (Stone-sulfure reagent) into polluted soil to transfer most chromium (VI) into chromium (III), then a nutrient solution was introduced into the reduced soil, and the stabilized soil was obtained after 60 days culturing. The chromium (VI) content of the three kinds of soil was analyzed. The results showed that the chromium (VI) content in toxicity characteristic leaching liquid (TCLL) dropped by 96. 8% (from 8.26 mg · L(-1) to 0.26 mg · L(-1)), and the total chromium content dropped by 95.7% (from 14.66 mg · L(-1) to 0.63 mg · L(-1)) after bioremediation in 5% nutrient solution. Additionally, the durability of chromium stabilization was tested by potassium permanganate oxidation and sterilization of microbe-treated soil. After oxidation, the chromium (VI) content in TCLL of the reduced soil was increased from 8.26 mg · L(-1) to 14.68 mg · L(-1). However, the content after bioremediation was decreased to 2.68 mg · L(-1). The results of sterilization demonstrated that the death of microbe had no significant effect on the stabilization of chromium. Consequently, the research in this paper demonstrated the feasibility of bioremediation of chromium (VI) polluted soil through reduction followed by stabilization/soilidification, and provided a technique with low cost but high efficiency.

  6. Low-chromium reduced-activation chromium-tungsten steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Maziasz, P.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Bainitic microstructures formed during continuous cooling can differ from classical upper and lower bainite formed during isothermal transformation. Two types of non-classical bainite were observed depending on the cooling rate: carbide-free acicular bainite at rapid cooling rates and granular bainite at slower cooling rates. The Charpy impact toughness of the acicular ferrite was found to be considerably better than for the granular bainite. It was postulated that alloying to improve the hardenability of the steel would promote the formation of acicular bainite, just as increasing the cooling rate does. To test this, chromium and tungsten were added to the 2 1/4Cr-2W and 2 1/4Cr-2WV steel compositions to increase their hardenability, and the microstructures and mechanical properties were examined.

  7. Urinary fluoride output in children following the use of a dual-fluoride varnish formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Polido Kaneshiro Olympio

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the bioavailability of fluoride after topical application of a dual-fluoride varnish commercially available in Brazil, when compared to DuraphatTM. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The urinary fluoride output was evaluated in seven 5-year-old children after application of the fluoride varnishes, in two different phases. In the first phase (I, children received topical application of the fluoride varnish Duofluorid XII (2.92% fluorine, calcium fluoride + 2.71% fluorine, sodium fluoride, FGM TM. After 1-month interval (phase II, the same amount (0.2 mL of the fluoride varnish Duraphat (2.26% fluorine, sodium fluoride, ColgateTM was applied. Before each application all the volunteers brushed their teeth with placebo dentifrice for 7 days. Urinary collections were carried out 24 h prior up to 48 h after the applications. Fluoride intake from the diet was also estimated. Fluoride concentration in diet samples and urine was analyzed with the fluoride ion-specific electrode and a miniature calomel reference electrode coupled to a potentiometer. Data were tested by ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test (p<0.05. RESULTS: There were significant differences in the urinary fluoride output between phases I and II. The use of Duofluorid XII did not significantly increase the urinary fluoride output, when compared to baseline levels. The application of Duraphat caused a transitory increase in the urinary fluoride output, returning to baseline levels 48 h after its use. CONCLUSIONS: The tested varnish formulation, which has been shown to be effective in in vitro studies, also can be considered safe.

  8. Bainitic chromium-tungsten steels with 3 pct chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous work on 3Cr-1.5MoV (nominally Fe-3Cr-2.5Mo-0.25V-0.1C), 2.25Cr-2W (Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.1C), and 2.25Cr-2WV (Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.25V-0.1C) steels indicated that the impact toughness of these steels depended on the microstructure of the bainite formed during continuous cooling from the austenization temperature. Microstructures formed during continuous cooling can differ from classical upper and lower bainite formed during isothermal transformation. Two types of nonclassical microstructures were observed depending on the cooling rate: carbide-free acicular bainite at rapid cooling rates and granular bainite at slower cooling rates. The Charpy impact toughness of the acicular ferrite was considerably better than for the granular bainite. It was postulated that alloying to improve the hardenability of the steel would promote the formation of acicular bainite, just as increasing the cooling rate does. To test this, chromium and tungsten were added to the 2.25Cr-2W and 2.25Cr-2WV steel compositions to increase their hardenability. Charpy testing indicated that the new 3Cr-W and 3Cr-WV steels had improved impact toughness, as demonstrated by lower ductile-brittle transition temperatures and higher upper-shelf energies. This improvement occurred with less tempering than was necessary to achieve similar toughness for the 2.25Cr steels and for high-chromium (9 to 12 pct Cr) Cr-W and Cr-Mo steels

  9. Chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 6+), a toxic form that results from industrial pollution. This fact sheet focuses exclusively on trivalent (3+) ... 1 medium 1 Banana, 1 medium 1 Green beans, ½ cup 1 What are recommended intakes of ...

  10. Reproductive toxicological aspects of chromium in males

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To expand our present understanding of the effects of chromium on male fertility a number of studies were designed to achieve this through the use of chromium intoxicated experimental animals and through investigation of sexual hormones and sperm quality in welders. Also in view of the lack of an experimental model for effects of noxious substance on the epididymal spermatozoa the main objectives of the series of studies reviewed here were: A. To establish a model for evaluation of epididymal sperm count and motility in the rat. B. To investigate and compare the effects of tri- and hexavalent chromium on epididymal spermatozoa. Further to describe the effects of low-dose long-time exposure of rats to the most toxicological interesting chromium oxidative state - hexavalent chromium. C. By the use of autoradiography and γ-countinuing to expand the present knowledge on the distribution of chromium in the body with special reference to the male reproductive organs. D. To describe the effects of exposure to hexavalent chromium in welding fume on levels of sexual hormones and semen parameters in welders. (EG)

  11. Synthesis of Chromium (Ⅲ) 5-aminosalicylate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wei; HAO Er-jun; JIANG Yu-qin

    2004-01-01

    As we all known that diabetes is a chronic disease with major health consequences.Research has revealed that the occurrence of diabetes have great thing to do with the chromium deficient. Almost 40 years after the first report of glucose tolerance factor(GTF) [1], no conclusive evidence for an isolable ,biologically active form of chromium exited. Three materials have been proposed to be the biologically active form of chromium: "glucose tolerance factor", chromium Picolinate and low-molecular-weight chromium-binding substance (LWMCr) [2] . So there is potential for the design of new chromium drugs .5-Aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) is identified as an active component in the therapy of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis . The therapeutic action of 5-ASA is believed to be coupled to its ability to act as a free radical scavenger [3-4],acting locally on the inflamed colonic mucosa [5-7]. However, the clinical use of 5-ASA is limited, since orally administered 5-ASA is rapidly and completely absorbed from the upper gastrointestinal tract and therefore the local therapeutic effects of 5-ASA in the colon is hardly expected.In this paper, we report the synthesis of chromium(Ⅲ)5-aminosalicylate from 5-ASA and CrCl3. 6H2O.The synthesis route is as follow:The complex has been characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectra, X-ray powder diffractionand TG-DTA . They indicate that the structure is tris(5-ASA) Chromium . Experiments show that thecomplex has a good activity for supplement tiny dietary chromium, lowering blood glucose levels,lowering serum lipid levels and in creasing lean body mass .

  12. Characteristics of chromium-allergic dermatitis patients prior to regulatory intervention for chromium in leather

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P; Zachariae, Claus;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chromium-tanned leather articles currently constitute the most important cause of contact allergy to chromium in Denmark. A regulation on the content of hexavalent chromium in leather was adopted in November 2013 by the EU member states. OBJECTIVES: To characterize patients...... with chromium allergy and their disease, to serve as a baseline for future studies on the potential effect of the new regulation on chromium in leather. METHODS: A questionnaire case-control study was performed on 155 dermatitis patients with positive patch test reactions to potassium dichromate and a matched...... control group of 621 dermatitis patients. Comparisons were made by use of a χ(2) -test and the Mann-Whitney U-test. Logistic regression analyses were used to test for associations. RESULTS: Sixty-six per cent of chromium-allergic patients had a positive history of contact dermatitis caused by leather...

  13. Chromium in leather footwear-risk assessment of chromium allergy and dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Strandesen, Maria; Poulsen, Pia B;

    2012-01-01

    Background. Chromium-tanned leather footwear, which releases >3 ppm hexavalent Cr(VI), may pose a risk of sensitizing and eliciting allergic dermatitis. Objectives. To determine the content and potential release of chromium in leather footwear and to discuss the prevention of chromium contact...... allergy and dermatitis. Methods. Sixty pairs of leather shoes, sandals and boots (20 children's, 20 men's, and 20 women's) were purchased in Copenhagen and examined with X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. Chromium was extracted according to the International Standard, ISO 17075. The detection level for Cr......(VI) was 3 ppm. Results. Chromium was identified in 95% of leather footwear products, the median content being 1.7% (range 0-3.3%). No association with store category or footwear category was found. A tendency for there to be a higher chromium content in footwear with high prices was shown (p(trend) = 0...

  14. HOUSEHOLD PURIFICATION OF FLUORIDE CONTAMINATED MAGADI (TRONA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Joan Maj; Dahi, Elian

    1997-01-01

    Purification of fluoride contaminated magadi is studied using bone char sorption and calcium precipitation. The bone char treatment is found to be workable both in columns and in batches where the magadi is dissolved in water prior to treatment. The concentrations in the solutions were 89 g magadi...... treatment method. A procedure for purification of fluoride contaminated magadi at household level is described....

  15. A comparative assessment of fluoride concentration available in saliva using daily prescribed topical fluoride agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talwar, Manjit; Tewari, Amrit; Chawla, H. S.; Sachdev, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the availability of fluoride concentration in saliva following the use of fluoride mouthrinse and dentifrice. Materials and Methods: The experiment was carried out in 7–15 year-old school children of Chandigarh (n = 90). The children were nonfluoride users. Baseline saliva samples were collected. The subjects were exposed to two test agents, i.e., fluoride mouthrinse (0.05%, 225 ppm F) and dentifrice (1000 ppm F) for 7 days and on the day 8, saliva samples were collected over a 20 hrs period. Wash out period of 31/2 months was there before the subjects were exposed to the second test agent. Fluoride in saliva was estimated using fluoride ion-specific electrode. Written informed consent was taken. Statistical Analysis: Kolmogorov–Smirnov test was applied to test the normality of the variables. Mann–Whitney U-test was used to compare the fluoride concentration available in saliva at respective time intervals subsequent to use of the two test agents. Results: Fluoride concentration was elevated in saliva compared to baseline for both the test agents. Fluoride mouthrinse (0.05% sodium fluoride [NaF]) and dentifrice (1000 ppm monofluorophosphate [MFP]) showed a biphasic clearance. Peak in saliva occurred at 15 mins postuse. Night-time use resulted in higher concentration of fluoride in saliva compared to baseline. There was statistically significantly higher fluoride concentration available in saliva for the dentifrice at 5 hrs, 10 hrs, and 20 hrs postuse (P fluoride concentration in saliva remained elevated to a level of 0.12 ppm for mouthrinse and 0.14 ppm for dentifrice compared to baseline (0.03 ppm) up to 20 hrs postuse. The therapeutic window though not yet established but suggested is 0.1–1 ppm for prevention of demineralization, indicating that daily use of fluoride mouthrinse and dentifrice provides fluoride concentration in saliva for the prevention of demineralization. PMID:27433050

  16. Determination of fluoride content in drinking water and tea infusions using fluoride ion selective electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajković Miloš B.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Potentiometric analysis of fluoride content (as F- ion in solutions by using fluoride ion-selective electrode is simple, reliable and cheap. Very small concentrations of fluoride-ions (to 10-6 mol/dm3 can be determined by fluoride selective electrode, with regulation of ion strength of a solution and control of concentration of hydroxide ions and interfering ions of metals. The influence of pH and complexing ions of metals can be successfully regulated by the TISAB solution and by preserving pH value in the range from 5.00 to 7.00. The content of fluorides in the samples can be determined by the method of direct potentiometer, and in the case of very low concentration by standard addition method. In this paper it was analyzed the determination of fluoride ions concentration in bottled mineral waters and water from Belgrade plumbing in two Belgrade districts (Palilula and Novi Beograd and in tea, by using the fluoride selective electrode. It was determined that the content of fluoride ions in bottled mineral water significantly differs from values given on declaration, and that content of fluoride ions varies over a period of time. The content of fluoride ions in water from plumbing in two Belgrade districts at the time of analysis was significantly increased and exceeded values given in Regulation for drinking water quality. The received results from the analysis of fluorides in teas show that fluorides exist in teas in different concentrations. There are also differences between the same kinds of tea, which is noted with mint (Mentha piperitae folium, as a consequence of differences between soils where it was planted. As taking of fluorides, according to World Health Organisation recommendation (WHO, is limited in the range from 2 to 4 mg per day, it is necessary to give the content of fluorides on all products that are used in human consumption.

  17. Manufacture and properties of fluoride cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malata-Chirwa, Charles David

    This research work aimed at characterising composition, hydration and physical properties of fluoride cement, by studying samples of the cement obtained from Malawi, and comparing them to ordinary Portland cement. By confirming the suitable characteristics of fluoride cement through this work, the results of the research work provide a good basis for the wider adoption of fluoride cement as an alternative to ordinary Portland cement, especially in developing economies. Numerous accounts have been cited regarding the production and use of fluoride cement. Since there have not been conclusive agreement as to its properties, this study was limited to the theories of successful incorporation of fluoride compounds in the manufacture of fluoride cement. Hence, the properties and characteristics reported in this study relate to the cement currently manufactured in Malawi, and, on a comparative basis only, to that manufactured in other parts of the world. Samples of the fluoride cement used in the study were obtained by synthetic manufacture of the cement using common raw materials for the manufacture of fluoride cement that is limestone, silica sand, and fluorspar. These samples were subjected to several comparative tests used to characterise cements including examination under x-ray diffractometer, scanning electron microscopy and tests for setting time and compressive strength. Under similar laboratory conditions, it was possible to prove that fluoride cement hardens more rapidly than ordinary Portland cement. Also observed during the experimental work is that fluoride cement develops higher compressive strengths than ordinary Portland cement. The hardening and setting times are significantly different between the two cements. Also the nature of the hydration products, that is the microstructural development is significantly different in the two cements. The differences brought about between the two cements are because of the presence of fluorine during the clinkering

  18. Diethylenetriaminium hexafluoridotitanate(IV fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lhoste

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, (C6H21N4[TiF6]F, was synthesized by the reaction of TiO2, tris(2-aminoethylamine, HF and ethanol at 463 K in a microwave oven. The crystal structure consists of two crystallographically independent [TiF6]2− anions, two fluoride anions and two triply-protonated tris(2-aminoethylamine cations. The Ti atoms are coordinated by six F atoms within slightly distorted octahedra. The anions and cations are connected by intermolecular N—H...F hydrogen bonds.

  19. Corrosion behavior of Hastelloy-N alloys in molten salt fluoride in Ar gas or in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of air on the corrosion of Hastelloy-N alloys in molten salt coolant containing fission product elements were investigated to determine the safety of structural materials in high-temperature reactors cooled with fluoride salt. Corrosion tests of Hastelloy-N in the molten fluoride salt FLiNaK in an alumina crucible and a graphite crucible under argon gas or air were performed at 773–923 K for 100 h. The depth of corrosive attack, as well as the extent of chromium and molybdenum depletion, increased with increasing temperature. The extent of Hastelloy-N corrosion in molten salt under air was significantly greater than under argon gas. The effect of adding the impurity cesium iodide to molten salt containing nuclear waste fuel on the corrosion behavior was negligible. (author)

  20. Method of treating fluoride contaminated wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, P.K.; Kakaria, V.K.

    1988-04-05

    A method for treating spent aluminum smelting potliner material containing fluoride contaminants is described which comprises: adding silica to the material to form a mixture thereof; elevating the temperature of the mixture within the range of 1,000/sup 0/ to 1,700/sup 0/C. to form a slag; providing sufficient silica in the mixture and forming the slag in the presence of sufficient water for pyrohydrolysis conditions resulting in the volatilization of substantially all of the fluoride contaminants mostly in the form of hydrogen fluoride; and cooling the slag remaining after volatilizatiion of substantially all of the fluoride contaminants to produce an insoluble silicate glass-residue containing any remaining portion of the fluoride contaminants in an immobile state.

  1. Analysis of Equilibrium and Kinetics of Chromium-Fluoride Complexation from Spectroscopic Data via Chemometrics Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The complexation of Cr3+ with F- undergoes a multistep reversible process. An approach to research the involved equilibria and kinetics using suitable chemometrics methods to the online measured UV-Vis spectra is proposed. By investigating the equilibrium spectra of the complexes at different molar ratios of M to L(metal to ligand) and 50 ℃, the result of Principal Component Analysis(PCA) shows that three complexes, ML, ML2 and ML3, can be formed under the research conditions. The spectrum of each complex was then analyzed and the accumulated equilibrium constants were calculated by applying Target Testing Factor Analysis(TTFA). Meanwhile, a reactive intermediate was observed before the formation of MLx during the specific kinetic study at 15 ℃. The equilibrium constant and spectrum of the intermediate as well as the rate constants were all resolved by using TTFA.

  2. Potentiometry: A Chromium (III) -- EDTA Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, J. I.; Howell, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an experiment that involves the preparation of a chromium (III)-EDTA compound, a study of its infrared spectrum, and the potentiometric determination of two successive acid dissociation constants. (Author/GS)

  3. AEROSOL BEHAVIOR IN CHROMIUM WASTE INCINERATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suyuan Yu

    2003-01-01

    Cr2O3 is considered as the dominant incineration product during the combustion disposal of chromium waste. A hydrogen/air diffusion flame was employed to simulate the industrial process of incineration. Cr2O3 aerosols were generated inside the flame by the gas phase reaction of chromium and oxygen. Chromium came from the rapid decomposition of chromium hexacarbonyl (Cr(CO)6) at room temperature and was carried into the combustion chamber by hydrogen. Aerosol and clusters can then be easily formed in the flame by nucleation and coagulation. A two dimensional Discrete-Sectional Model (DSM) was adopted to calculate the Cr2O3 aerosol behavior. The experimental measurement method was Dynamic Light Scattering. The numerically predicted results agreed well with those of the experimental measurement. Both results show that the Cr2O3 aerosol size reached about 70 nanometers at the flame top.

  4. Localized Corrosion of Chromium Coated Steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, X.; Beentjes, P.; Mol, A.; Terryn, H.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the studies of the local corrosion behaviour of chromium-coated ultra low carbon steel in NaCl solution using polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and SVET.

  5. Synthesis and Characterization of Chromium Oxide Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Vivek Sheel Jaswal; Avnish Kumar Arora; Joginder Singh; Mayank Kinger; Vishnu Dev Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Chromium oxide nanoparticles (NPs)have been rapidly synthesized by precipitation method using ammomia as precipitating agent and are characterized by using X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Thermo Gravimetric Analysis (TGA), UV-Visible absorption (UV), Infrared Spectoscopy (IR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). XRD studies show that chromium oxide NP is formed as Cr2O3 and it has hexagonal structure. The shape and particle size of the synthesized Cr2O3 NP...

  6. Standard Specification for Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium, Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium-Tantalum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Copper, and Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten Alloy Rod

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2015-01-01

    Standard Specification for Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium, Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium-Tantalum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Copper, and Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten Alloy Rod

  7. Standard Specification for Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Copper, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tantalum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten, and Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium Alloy Plate, Sheet, and Strip

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2015-01-01

    Standard Specification for Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Copper, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tantalum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten, and Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium Alloy Plate, Sheet, and Strip

  8. Bioremediation of chromium solutions and chromium containing wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaviya, Piyush; Singh, Asha

    2016-08-01

    Cr(VI) represents a serious threat to human health, living resources and ecological system as it is persistent, carcinogenic and toxic, whereas, Cr(III), another stable oxidation state of Cr, is less toxic and can be readily precipitated out of solution. The conventional methods of Cr(VI) removal from wastewaters comprise of chemical reduction followed by chemical precipitation. However, these methods utilize large amounts of chemicals and generate toxic sludge. This necessitates the need for devising an eco-technological strategy that would use the untapped potential of the biological world for remediation of Cr(VI) containing wastewaters. Among several viable approaches, biotransformation of Cr(VI) to relatively non-toxic Cr(III) by chromium resistant bacteria offers an economical- and environment-friendly option for its detoxification. Various studies on use of Cr(VI) tolerant viable bacterial isolates for treatment of Cr(VI) containing solutions and wastewater have been reported. Therefore, a detailed account of mechanisms and processes involved in bioreduction of Cr(VI) from solutions and wastewaters by bacterial isolates are the focus of this review article in addition to a discussion on toxicity of Cr(VI) on bacterial strains and various factors affecting Cr(VI) bioreduction. PMID:25358056

  9. 21 CFR 175.270 - Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins. 175.270 Section 175... Substances for Use as Components of Coatings § 175.270 Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins. Poly(vinyl fluoride... the purpose of this section, poly(vinyl fluoride) resins consist of basic resins produced by...

  10. Fluoride Programs in the School Setting: Preventive Dental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebich, Theodore, Jr.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Two types of school-based programs that increase students' use of fluoride for preventive dental health are described. In fluoride mouthrinse programs, teachers give their students a fluoride solution once a week in a paper cup. In areas where the level of fluoride in the water supply is insufficient, the flouride tablet program is used. (JN)

  11. Fluoridation and Defluoridation. Training Module 2.230.2.77.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, L. D.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with fluoridation and fluoride feeding equipment. Enclosed are objectives, an instructor guide, student handouts and transparency masters. The module considers the principles and purposes of fluoridation, methods of feeding fluoride,…

  12. Evaluation of toxic action of fluorides on agricultural plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Grishko

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The toxicity of potassium fluoride, sodium fluoride and ammonium fluoride for pea, maize, oat and onion was studied. It was found that the level of the toxic influence had grown with increase of fluoride concentration in the media of growth (from 5 to 100 mg of F–/l. By increase of the toxic influence the agricultural crops are disposed in the following row: oat < onion < maize < pea. Ammonium fluoride demonstrates lesser toxicity, than potassium and sodium fluorides. Under low concentrations of fluoride compounds (5 and 10 mg of F–/l stimulation of roots growth is noted only for the oat.

  13. Physiologic Conditions Affect Toxicity of Ingested Industrial Fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Sauerheber

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of calcium ion and broad pH ranges on free fluoride ion aqueous concentrations were measured directly and computed theoretically. Solubility calculations indicate that blood fluoride concentrations that occur in lethal poisonings would decrease calcium below prevailing levels. Acute lethal poisoning and also many of the chronic effects of fluoride involve alterations in the chemical activity of calcium by the fluoride ion. Natural calcium fluoride with low solubility and toxicity from ingestion is distinct from fully soluble toxic industrial fluorides. The toxicity of fluoride is determined by environmental conditions and the positive cations present. At a pH typical of gastric juice, fluoride is largely protonated as hydrofluoric acid HF. Industrial fluoride ingested from treated water enters saliva at levels too low to affect dental caries. Blood levels during lifelong consumption can harm heart, bone, brain, and even developing teeth enamel. The widespread policy known as water fluoridation is discussed in light of these findings.

  14. Direct access to macroporous chromium nitride and chromium titanium nitride with inverse opal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weitian; DiSalvo, Francis J

    2015-03-21

    We report a facile synthesis of single-phase, nanocrystalline macroporous chromium nitride and chromium titanium nitride with an inverse opal morphology. The material is characterized using XRD, SEM, HR-TEM/STEM, TGA and XPS. Interconversion of macroporous CrN to Cr2O3 and back to CrN while retaining the inverse opal morphology is also demonstrated.

  15. Diminishing Chromium Use on Combined Chromium-Gambier Tanning Process Upon the Characteristics of Tanned Leather

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kasim

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The research was aimed to investigate the influence of minimizing chromium use on combined chromium-gambier process upon the characteristics of tanned leather. At the first stage of tanning process, chromium was used and in the second stage it was replaced by gambier. The raw material used was dried saline-preserved goat skin. The treatments applied on the tanning process were the different concentrations of chromium ranging from the highest level of 6% to the lowest level of 1% which was then re-tanned by using 8% concentration of gambier. The examination parameters included chemical and physical properties as well as visual investigation on the tanned leather in accordance with SNI-06-0463-1989-A. The result showed that the tanning process by using 2% chromium in the first step and 8% gambier in the second step was a treatment combination producing tanned leather that met the standard. The examination on tanned leather resulted from such treatment showed 56.33% rawhide, 17.45% of bound tannin, 31.22% of tanning level, tensile strength 386.30 kg/cm2, flexibility 31.91%, leather width 1.3 mm, density 0.75 g/cm3, the leather was quite elastic with light brownish color. In conclusion, minimizing the use of chromium in the combined tanning process of chromium and gambier can be implemented to the lowest of 2% chromium concentration and 8% gambier in the first and second step, respectively.

  16. A fluoride release-adsorption-release system applied to fluoride-releasing restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suljak, J P; Hatibovic-Kofman, S

    1996-09-01

    This investigation compared the initial fluoride release and release following refluoridation of three resin-modified glass-ionomer cements (Photac-Fil Applicap, Vitremer, and Fuji II LC) and a new polyacid-modified resin composite material (Dyract). After daily flouride release was measured for 8 days, specimens were refluoridated in 1,000-ppm solutions of fluoride ion for 10 minutes and fluoride release was measured for 5 days. Two further 5-day refluoridation-release periods were carried out. All materials released fluoride initially. Photac released the most; Dyract released the least. Initial release was greatest over the first few days. All materials released significantly more fluoride for 24 to 48 hours after refluoridation. Less fluoride was released with each successive refluoridation for the three glass-ionomer cements. The release from the Dyract compomer remained at a comparatively constant and significantly lower level following each refluoridation.

  17. A study of fluoride groundwater occurrence in Nathenje, Lilongwe, Malawi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Msonda, K. W. M.; Masamba, W. R. L.; Fabiano, E.

    A study was carried out to determine fluoride concentration in groundwaters of Nathenje area situated in Lilongwe District in the central region of Malawi. Water samples were collected from 176 boreholes and shallow wells during different months in 2001 and 2002. Samples were then analysed for fluoride by using a fluoride electrode and an ion selective meter. The results showed that fluoride concentrations for the rainy season varied from fluorosis in areas where the fluoride concentration was high.

  18. Physiologic Conditions Affect Toxicity of Ingested Industrial Fluoride

    OpenAIRE

    Richard Sauerheber

    2013-01-01

    The effects of calcium ion and broad pH ranges on free fluoride ion aqueous concentrations were measured directly and computed theoretically. Solubility calculations indicate that blood fluoride concentrations that occur in lethal poisonings would decrease calcium below prevailing levels. Acute lethal poisoning and also many of the chronic effects of fluoride involve alterations in the chemical activity of calcium by the fluoride ion. Natural calcium fluoride with low solubility and toxicity ...

  19. Lateral stress evolution in chromium sulfide cermets with varying excess chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petel, O. E.; Appleby-Thomas, G. J.; Wood, D. C.; Capozzi, A.; Nabavi, A.; Goroshin, S.; Frost, D. L.; Hazell, P. J.

    2016-04-01

    The shock response of chromium sulfide-chromium, a cermet of potential interest as a matrix material for ballistic applications, has been investigated at two molar ratios. Using a combustion synthesis technique allowed for control of the molar ratio of the material, which was investigated under near-stoichiometric (cermet) and excess chromium (interpenetrating composite) conditions, representing chromium:sulfur molar ratios of 1.15:1 and 4:1, respectively. The compacts were investigated via the plate-impact technique, which allowed the material to be loaded under a one-dimensional state of strain. Embedded manganin stress gauges were employed to monitor the temporal evolution of longitudinal and lateral components of stress in both materials. Comparison of these two components has allowed assessment of the variation of material shear strength both with impact pressure/strain-rate and time for the two molar ratio conditions. The two materials exhibited identical material strength despite variations in their excess chromium contents.

  20. PROCESS FOR TREATING VOLATILE METAL FLUORIDES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudge, A.J.; Lowe, A.J.

    1957-10-01

    This patent relates to the purification of uranium hexafluoride, made by reacting the metal or its tetrafluoride with fluorine, from the frequently contained traces of hydrofluoric acid. According to the present process, UF/sub 6/ containing as an impurity a small amount of hydrofluoric acid, is treated to remove such impurity by contact with an anhydrous alkali metal fluoride such as sodium fluoride. In this way a non-volatile complex containing hydrofluoric acid and the alkali metal fluoride is formed, and the volatile UF /sub 6/ may then be removed by distillation.

  1. The effect of fluoride impregnated dental floss on enamel fluoride uptake in vitro and streptococcus mutans colonization in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaet, R; Wei, S H

    1977-01-01

    The conclusions reached from this investigation can be summarized as follows: Fluoride can be incorporated into unwaxed dental floss. Placement of the fluoride impregnated dental floss in acid-buffer solution results in the release of most of the fluoride in the floss. Interproximal surfaces of teeth treated in vitro with fluoride impregnated dental floss acquired significantly (approximately three fold) more enamel fluoride than those treated with plain dental floss. The number of in vivo interproximal areas harboring Streptococcus mutans was reduced significantly after treatment with fluoride impregnated dental floss. Further studies should be done to establish the biological, physiochemical, manufacturing, and practical aspects of fluoride impregnated dental floss.

  2. Study of a New Chromium-Free Conversion Coating Formed on ZnAl Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG Jin-ming; GUO Zhong-cheng; HAN Xia-yun; YANG Ning

    2004-01-01

    A new chromium-free conversion film was obtained on surface of a ZnAl alloy by chemical conversion process.Influence of the additives in treating solution containing cerium salt on the corrosion protection of the conversion film formed on zinc alloy was investigated. Corrosion tests and electrochemical measurements in sodium chloride solution were performed. The microstructure and composition of the coatings were examined by means of SEM, EDS and XRD. It was found that the corrosion protection capabilities of the conversion film are markedly increased with the cerium nitride plus additives (hydrogen fluoride acid and an organic inhibitor) treating process. The modified conversion film is an organic/inorganic composite coating and is much more corrosion resistant than the conventional chromate conversion coating and the single cerium conversion coating.

  3. Study of a New Chromium-Free Conversion Coating Formed on ZnAl Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONGJin-ming; GUOZhong-cheng; HANXia-yun; YANGNing

    2004-01-01

    A new chromium-free conversion film was obtained on surface of a ZnA1 alloy by chemical conversion process. Influence of the additives in treating solution containing cerium salt on the corrosion protection of the conversion film formed on zinc alloy was investigated. Corrosion tests and electrochemical measurements in sodium chloride solution were performed. The microstructure and composition of the coatings were examined by means of SEM, EDS and XRD. It was found that the corrosion protection capabilities of the conversion film are markedly increased with the cerium nitride plus additives (hydrogen fluoride acid and an organic inhibitor) treating process. The modified conversion film is an organic/inorganic composite coating and is much more corrosion resistant than the conventional chromate conversion coating and the single cerium conversion coating.

  4. Dental fluorosis and skeletal fluoride content as biomarkers of excess fluoride exposure in marsupials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Death, Clare; Coulson, Graeme; Kierdorf, Uwe; Kierdorf, Horst; Morris, William K; Hufschmid, Jasmin

    2015-11-15

    Particulate and gaseous fluoride emissions contaminate vegetation near fluoride-emitting industries, potentially impacting herbivorous wildlife in neighboring areas. Dental fluorosis has been associated with consumption of fluoride-contaminated foliage by juvenile livestock and wildlife in Europe and North America. For the first time, we explored the epidemiology and comparative pathology of dental fluorosis in Australian marsupials residing near an aluminium smelter. Six species (Macropus giganteus, Macropus rufogriseus, Wallabia bicolor, Phascolarctos cinereus, Trichosurus vulpecula, Pseudocheirus peregrinus) demonstrated significantly higher bone fluoride levels in the high (n=161 individuals), compared to the low (n=67 individuals), fluoride areas (pfluorosis in eutherian mammals. Within the high-fluoride area, 67% of individuals across the six species showed dental enamel lesions, compared to 3% in the low-fluoride areas. Molars that erupted before weaning were significantly less likely to display pathological lesions than those developing later, and molars in the posterior portion of the dental arcade were more severely fluorotic than anterior molars in all six species. The severity of dental lesions was positively associated with increasing bone fluoride levels in all species, revealing a potential biomarker of excess fluoride exposure.

  5. The Adsorption of Hydrogen Fluoride and Fluoride Ion on a Water Treatment Sludge

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Taek-Keun; Saeki, Kazutoshi

    2009-01-01

    The hydrogen fluoride (HF) and fluoride ion (F^-) adsorption potentials of a water treatment sludge were investigated in a batch mode as a function of pH, contact time, initial fluoride concentrations, and other co-existing anions. The maximum removal of total fluoride was apparently observed at pH 5.1, whereas HF or F^- adsorptions showed nearly 100% in pH range from 2.2 to 4.3. The HF or F^- adsorption by the water treatment sludge has occurred rapidly during the initial 5.60 min and therea...

  6. Determination of fluoride content in drinking water and tea infusions using fluoride ion selective electrode

    OpenAIRE

    Rajković Miloš B.; Novaković Ivana D.

    2007-01-01

    Potentiometric analysis of fluoride content (as F- ion) in solutions by using fluoride ion-selective electrode is simple, reliable and cheap. Very small concentrations of fluoride-ions (to 10-6 mol/dm3) can be determined by fluoride selective electrode, with regulation of ion strength of a solution and control of concentration of hydroxide ions and interfering ions of metals. The influence of pH and complexing ions of metals can be successfully regulated by the TISAB solution and by preservin...

  7. Serum chromium levels in gestational diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P G Sundararaman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To measure serum chromium level in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM from Chennai, South India. Materials and Methods: Thirty women with gestational diabetes, 60 age matched controls. Inclusion criteria: Gestational age 22-28 weeks, age group 20-35 years. Exclusion Criteria: Gestational age beyond 28 weeks, malnutrition or presence of infection. Serum chromium was measured using inductive couple plasma emission spectrometer. Results: Serum chromium levels of women with GDM, 1.59+/-0.02 ng/ml (range: 0.16-4.0 ng/ml were lower than in controls (4.58+/-0.62 ng/ml; range 0.82-5.33 ng/ml (P < 0.001. However, there were no significant differences among cases and controls when subdivided by parity. Conclusions: Women with GDM from a South Indian city had lower levels of serum chromium compared to pregnant women without GDM. Studies may be done whether chromium supplementation is useful in this group of women.

  8. Flashlamp-pumped lasing of chromium-doped GSG garnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The implications for the practical use of chromium:GSGG in lamp-pumped tunable lasers are discussed in this paper. The authors report here some major improvements in the performance of the flashlamp-pumped chromium:GSGG laser

  9. Fluoride release and uptake capacities of fluoride-releasing restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attar, Nuray; Turgut, Melek D

    2003-01-01

    Many fluoride-releasing dental materials are being sold on the basis of their cariostatic properties. However, the amount fluoride release of these materials is still uncertain. This study investigated the fluoride release and uptake characteristics of four flowable resin composites (Heliomolar Flow, Tetric Flow, Wave, Perma Flo), one flowable compomer (Dyract flow), one conventional glass ionomer cement mixed with two different powder/liquid ratios (ChemFlex Syringeable and ChemFlex Condensable), one packable resin composite (SureFil), one ion-releasing composite (Ariston pHc) and one resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitremer). Seven discs (6-mm diameter and 1.5-mm height) were prepared for each material. Each disc was immersed in 3.5 ml of deionized water within a plastic vial and stored at 37 degrees C. The deionized water was changed every 24 hours and the release of fluoride was measured for 30 days. At the end of this period, the samples were recharged with 2 ml of 1.23% acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) gel for four minutes. Then, all samples were reassessed for an additional 10 days. The fluoride release of all samples was measured with a specific fluoride electrode and an ionanalyzer. Statistical analyses were conducted using two-way repeated measure ANOVA and Duncan's multiple range tests. For all tested materials, the greatest fluoride release was observed after the first day of the study (p0.05). Ariston pHc released the highest amount of fluoride, followed by ChemFlex Syringeable, Vitremer and ChemFlex Condensable. There were statistically significant differences among these materials (p<0.05). Fluoride release of all materials were significantly increased after the first day following refluoridation and Ariston pHc released the greatest among all materials (p<0.01). At the end of two days of refluoridation, the fluoride release rate for each material dropped quickly and stabilized within three days.

  10. Fluoride geochemistry of thermal waters in Yellowstone National Park: I. Aqueous fluoride speciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Y.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Blaine, McCleskey R.

    2011-01-01

    Thermal water samples from Yellowstone National Park (YNP) have a wide range of pH (1-10), temperature, and high concentrations of fluoride (up to 50mg/l). High fluoride concentrations are found in waters with field pH higher than 6 (except those in Crater Hills) and temperatures higher than 50??C based on data from more than 750 water samples covering most thermal areas in YNP from 1975 to 2008. In this study, more than 140 water samples from YNP collected in 2006-2009 were analyzed for free-fluoride activity by ion-selective electrode (ISE) method as an independent check on the reliability of fluoride speciation calculations. The free to total fluoride concentration ratio ranged from 99% at high pH. The wide range in fluoride activity can be explained by strong complexing with H+ and Al3+ under acidic conditions and lack of complexing under basic conditions. Differences between the free-fluoride activities calculated with the WATEQ4F code and those measured by ISE were within 0.3-30% for more than 90% of samples at or above 10-6 molar, providing corroboration for chemical speciation models for a wide range of pH and chemistry of YNP thermal waters. Calculated speciation results show that free fluoride, F-, and major complexes (HF(aq)0, AlF2+, AlF2+ and AlF30) account for more than 95% of total fluoride. Occasionally, some complex species like AlF4-, FeF2+, FeF2+, MgF+ and BF2(OH)2- may comprise 1-10% when the concentrations of the appropriate components are high. According to the simulation results by PHREEQC and calculated results, the ratio of main fluoride species to total fluoride varies as a function of pH and the concentrations and ratios of F and Al. ?? 2011.

  11. Well Waters Fluoride in Enugu, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EI Ugwuja

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal fluoride levels in drinking water have been associated with adverse health effects. To determine the fluoride content of well waters in Enugu, southeastern Nigeria, water samples from 50 artisan wells chosen by multistage sampling procedure from the 5 zones of Enugu municipality were analyzed in duplicates for their fluoride content. The zonal mean values were 0.60, 0.70, 0.62, 0.62, and 0.63 mg/L for Abakpa Nike, Achara Layout, Obiagu/ Ogui, Trans Ekulu and Uwani, respectively (p<0.05. The mean value for the whole city was 0.63 mg/L. Although, the mean level of fluoride recorded in this study is currently within safe limits (1.5 mg/L, WHO 2011, it is important to monitor continuously the fluoride content of well waters in the municipality in view of the increasing industrial activities going on in the city and heavy reliance on well water for domestic purposes and the widespread use of consumer products containing fluoride.

  12. Debating Water Fluoridation Before Dr. Strangelove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstairs, Catherine

    2015-08-01

    In the 1930s, scientists learned that small amounts of fluoride naturally occurring in water could protect teeth from decay, and the idea of artificially adding fluoride to public water supplies to achieve the same effect arose. In the 1940s and early 1950s, a number of studies were completed to determine whether fluoride could have harmful effects. The research suggested that the possibility of harm was small. In the early 1950s, Canadian and US medical, dental, and public health bodies all endorsed water fluoridation. I argue in this article that some early concerns about the toxicity of fluoride were put aside as evidence regarding the effectiveness and safety of water fluoridation mounted and as the opposition was taken over by people with little standing in the scientific, medical, and dental communities. The sense of optimism that infused postwar science and the desire of dentists to have a magic bullet that could wipe out tooth decay also affected the scientific debate. PMID:26066938

  13. Analysis of fluoride concentration in solutions prepared at dispensing pharmacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Pizzatto

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fluoride plays an important role in oral health promotion and is considered important in dental caries prevention both in children and adults. Fluoride is widely used at high-risk conditions of caries, when the use of fluoride-containing mouthwashes is recommended, considering that fluoride itself reduces the risk of dental caries. Objective: To evaluate the fluoride concentration in solutions prepared at different dispensing pharmacies in the city of Curitiba – PR, Brazil. Material and methods: The analysis of fluoride concentration was preformed through Ion Chromatography method (DIONEX. Results: The results obtained through this analysis showed that all solutions presented fluoride concentration above that required in the dentist’s prescription, varying between 5.48% and 24.02% more fluoride, at absolute concentration. Conclusion: This finding highlights the increasing risk of fluoride acute intoxication in cases of accidental ingestion of the solution.

  14. Degradation in performance of orthodontic wires caused by hydrogen absorption during short-term immersion in 2.0% acidulated phosphate fluoride solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Kazuyuki; Yokoyama, Ken'ichi; Moriyama, Keiji; Asaoka, Kenzo; Sakai, Jun'ichi

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the degradation in performance of four major alloys of orthodontic wires, namely nickel-titanium, beta titanium, stainless steel, and cobalt-chromium-nickel, caused by hydrogen absorption during short-term immersion in an acid fluoride solutions. The hydrogen-related degradation of orthodontic wires after immersion in 2.0% acidulated phosphate fluoride solution at 37 degrees C for 60 minutes was evaluated by a tensile test, scanning electron microscope observation, and hydrogen thermal desorption analysis. Upon immersion, the tensile strengths of the nickel-titanium and beta titanium wires decreased. Particularly, the nickel-titanium wire fractured before yielding, and the fracture mode changed from ductile to brittle. The amounts of absorbed hydrogen in the nickel-titanium and beta titanium wires were 200 and 100 mass ppm, respectively. On the other hand, the tensile strengths of the stainless steel and cobalt-chromium-nickel wires were only slightly affected by immersion. The results of this study suggest that degradation in performance of orthodontic wires of titanium alloys occurs because of hydrogen absorption even after a short-term immersion in fluoride solutions. PMID:15387026

  15. Determination of chromium combined with DNA, RNA and proteins in chromium-rich brewer's yeast by NAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The content of chromium in the DNA, RNA and protein fractions separated from chromium-rich and normal brewer's yeast was determined by neutron activation analysis (NAA). Our results show that the extracted relative amounts and concentrations of DNA, RNA and proteins have no significant difference for two types of yeast, but the chromium content in DNA, RNA and proteins fractions extracted from the chromium-rich yeast are substantially higher than those from the normal. In addition, the concentration of chromium in DNA is much higher than that in RNA and proteins. It is evident that the inorganic chromium compounds can enter the yeast cell during the yeast cultivation in the chromium-containing culture medium and are converted into organic chromium species, which are combined with DNA, RNA and proteins. (author)

  16. Hexavalent and trivalent chromium in leather: What should be done?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretto, Angelo

    2015-11-01

    Trivalent chromium compounds are used for leather tanning, and chromium may be released during use of leather goods. In certain instances, small amounts of hexavalent chromium can be formed and released. Both trivalent and hexavalent chromium can elicit allergic skin reaction in chromium sensitised subjects, the latter being significantly more potent. Induction of sensitisation only occurs after exposure to hexavalent chromium. A minority of subjects are sensitised to chromium, and in a fraction of these subjects allergic skin reaction have been described after wearing leather shoes or, less frequently, other leather goods. The evidence that in all these cases the reaction is related to hexavalent chromium is not always strong. The content of hexavalent chromium in leather is regulated in European Union, but rate of release rather than content is relevant for allergic skin reaction. The role of trivalent chromium appear much less relevant if at all. Modern tanning procedure do not pose significant risk due to either hexavalent or trivalent chromium. Dismissing bad quality and worn-off leather goods is relevant in reducing or eliminating the skin reaction. It should also be pointed out that shoe components or substances other than chromium in leather may cause allergic/irritative skin reactions.

  17. Chromium allergy and dermatitis: prevalence and main findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Johansen, Jeanne D.; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl;

    2015-01-01

    The history of chromium as an allergen goes back more than a century, and includesan interventional success with national legislation that led to significant changes inthe epidemiology of chromium allergy in construction workers. The 2015 EU Leather Regulation once again put a focus on chromium...

  18. Thermodynamic properties of chromium bearing slags and minerals. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao Yanping; Holappa, L.

    1996-12-31

    In this report, the thermodynamic properties of chromium bearing slags and minerals were reviewed based on the available information in the literature. It includes the analysing methods for oxidation state of chromium in slags, oxidation state of chromium and activities of chromium oxides in slags and minerals. The phase diagrams of chromium oxide systems and chromium distributions between slag and metal phases are also covered ill this review. Concerning the analysing methods, it was found that most of the available approaches are limited to iron free slag systems and the sample preparation is very sensitive to the analysing results. In silicate slags under reducing atmosphere, divalent and trivalent chromium co-exist in the slags. It is agreed that the fraction of divalent chromium to total chromium increases with higher temperature, lower slag basicity and oxygen potential. For the slags under oxidising atmosphere, trivalent, pentavalent and hexavalent states were reported to be stable. The activities of CrO and CrO{sub 1.5} were concluded to have positive deviation from ideal solution. Slag basicity has a positive effect and temperature has a negative effect on the activities of chromium oxides. The phase diagrams of the Cr-O, binary, and ternary chromium containing oxide systems have been examined systematically. The analysis shows that the data on the quaternary and quinary systems are insufficient, and require further investigation. The most important features of the chromium containing silicate slags are the large miscibility gaps and the stability of the chromite spinel. (orig.) (76 refs.)

  19. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining...

  20. Hexavalent and trivalent chromium in leather: What should be done?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretto, Angelo

    2015-11-01

    Trivalent chromium compounds are used for leather tanning, and chromium may be released during use of leather goods. In certain instances, small amounts of hexavalent chromium can be formed and released. Both trivalent and hexavalent chromium can elicit allergic skin reaction in chromium sensitised subjects, the latter being significantly more potent. Induction of sensitisation only occurs after exposure to hexavalent chromium. A minority of subjects are sensitised to chromium, and in a fraction of these subjects allergic skin reaction have been described after wearing leather shoes or, less frequently, other leather goods. The evidence that in all these cases the reaction is related to hexavalent chromium is not always strong. The content of hexavalent chromium in leather is regulated in European Union, but rate of release rather than content is relevant for allergic skin reaction. The role of trivalent chromium appear much less relevant if at all. Modern tanning procedure do not pose significant risk due to either hexavalent or trivalent chromium. Dismissing bad quality and worn-off leather goods is relevant in reducing or eliminating the skin reaction. It should also be pointed out that shoe components or substances other than chromium in leather may cause allergic/irritative skin reactions. PMID:26361854

  1. Chemisorption of uranium hexa-fluoride on sodium fluoride pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper comprises kinetics of chemical reaction or rather chemisorption of uranium hexafluoride gas on sodium fluoride pellets. The chemisorption is essentially irreversible at room temperature, while the process reverses at high temperature above 280 deg C. This chemisorption process was experimentally conducted in static condition at room temperature and its kinetics was studied. In the experiments, practically pure UF6 was used and the effects of gas pressure and weight of NaF pellets, were studied. In this heterogenous reaction, in which diffusion through ash layer is followed by chemical reaction, the reaction part is instantaneous and is first order with respect to gas concentration. Since the process of chemisorption is not only pure chemical reaction but also gas diffusion through ash layer, the rate constant depreciates with the percentage loading of UF6 on NaF pellets. The kinetic equation for the above process has been established for a particular size of NaF pellets and pellet porosity. (author)

  2. Collisional properties of trapped cold chromium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Pavlovich, Z; Côté, R; Sadeghpour, H R; Pavlovic, Zoran; Roos, Bjoern O.; Côté, Robin

    2004-01-01

    We report on calculations of the elastic cross section and thermalization rate for collision between two maximally spin-polarized chromium atoms in the cold and ultracold regimes, relevant to buffer-gas and magneto-optical cooling of chromium atoms. We calculate ab initio potential energy curves for Cr2 and the van der Waals coefficient C6, and construct interaction potentials between two colliding Cr atoms. We explore the effect of shape resonances on elastic cross section, and find that they dramatically affect the thermalization rate. Our calculated value for the s-wave scattering length is compared in magnitude with a recent measurement at ultracold temperatures.

  3. Studying chromium biosorption using arabica coffee leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Carlos Florez García

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This work was aimed at providing an alternative for removing heavy metals such as chromium from waste water (effluent from the leather industry and galvanoplasty (coating with a thin layer of metal by electrochemical means, using coffee leaves as bio- mass. Using arabica coffee (Castle variety leaves led to 82% chromium removal efficiency for 1,000 mg/L synthetic dissolutions in 4 pH dissolution operating conditions, 0 rpm agitation, 0.149 mm diameter biomass particle size and 0.85 g/ml biomass / dissolution volume ratio.

  4. Strategies for chromium bioremediation of tannery effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Satyendra Kumar; Tripathi, Manikant; Srinath, Thiruneelakantan

    2012-01-01

    Bioremediation offers the possibility of using living organisms (bacteria, fungi, algae,or plants), but primarily microorganisms, to degrade or remove environmental contaminants, and transform them into nontoxic or less-toxic forms. The major advantages of bioremediation over conventional physicochemical and biological treatment methods include low cost, good efficiency, minimization of chemicals, reduced quantity of secondary sludge, regeneration of cell biomass, and the possibility of recover-ing pollutant metals. Leather industries, which extensively employ chromium compounds in the tanning process, discharge spent-chromium-laden effluent into nearby water bodies. Worldwide, chromium is known to be one of the most common inorganic contaminants of groundwater at pollutant hazardous sites. Hexavalent chromium poses a health risk to all forms of life. Bioremediation of chromium extant in tannery waste involves different strategies that include biosorption, bioaccumulation,bioreduction, and immobilization of biomaterial(s). Biosorption is a nondirected physiochemical interaction that occurs between metal species and the cellular components of biological species. It is metabolism-dependent when living biomass is employed, and metabolism-independent in dead cell biomass. Dead cell biomass is much more effective than living cell biomass at biosorping heavy metals, including chromium. Bioaccumulation is a metabolically active process in living organisms that works through adsorption, intracellular accumulation, and bioprecipitation mechanisms. In bioreduction processes, microorganisms alter the oxidation/reduction state of toxic metals through direct or indirect biological and chemical process(es).Bioreduction of Cr6+ to Cr3+ not only decreases the chromium toxicity to living organisms, but also helps precipitate chromium at a neutral pH for further physical removal,thus offering promise as a bioremediation strategy. However, biosorption, bioaccumulation, and

  5. Daily Fluoride Intake from Iranian Green Tea: Evaluation of Various Flavorings on Fluoride Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Afshin; Daraei, Hiua; Mohammadi, Elham; Zandi, Shiva; Teymouri, Pari; Mahvi, Amir Hossien; Gharibi, Fardin

    2016-01-01

    With increased awareness of the health benefits of the compounds in green tea, especially polyphenols, its consumption is rising. The main purpose of this study is to determine the effect of different additives on the released fluoride into tea liquor and also daily fluoride intake. The concentrations of fluoride, nitrate, sulfate, and chloride were measured in 15 different flavored green teas (Refah-Lahijan). The fluoride and other anion concentrations were measured by ion chromatography method. The data were analyzed with Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 16.0. The results showed that the minimum and maximum concentrations of fluoride in the green tea infusions were 0.162 mg/L (cinnamon-flavored green tea) and 3.29 mg/L (bagged peach-flavored green tea), respectively. The mean concentration of fluoride in the green tea leaves was 52 mg/kg, and approximately 89% of the fluoride was released from the green tea leaves into the infusions after brewing. The fluoride concentrations varied significantly among the examined green teas (P 0.05). Finally, drinking of the studied green teas cannot make a significant contribution to the daily dietary intake of F for consumers. PMID:27042093

  6. Fluoride concentration in plaque in adolescents after topical application of different fluoride varnishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sköld-Larsson, K; Modéer, T; Twetman, S

    2000-03-01

    The aim of the study was to measure the fluoride (F) concentration in plaque after a single topical application of different fluoride varnishes with contrasting levels of F. Thirty adolescents (12-17 years) with fixed orthodontic appliances were randomly assigned to one of three groups: Bifluoride (6% F), Duraphat (2.23% F) and Fluor Protector (0.1% F). The varnishes were applied after professional cleaning in one upper quadrant, leaving the opposite quadrant untreated according to the split-mouth technique. Pooled plaque samples from each quadrant were collected at baseline and 3 days, 7 days and 30 days after the varnish treatment, and fluoride was analysed by microdiffusion. All fluoride varnishes increased the fluoride concentration in plaque compared with baseline, and the mean values varied between 23 and 138 ng F/mg after 3 days, depending on varnish F concentration. Compared with the control quadrant, statistically significant elevations were recorded for Bifluoride after 3 days and 7 days and Duraphat after 3 days, while no significant differences were revealed in the Fluor Protector group. The fluoride concentration in plaque was back to baseline levels for all participants in the Duraphat group after 7 days, while some individuals in the Bifluoride and Fluor Protector groups still registered slightly increased levels after 30 days. The results suggest that fluoride varnish treatments resulted in elevated fluoride levels in plaque adjacent to fixed orthodontic appliances for a period of up to 1 week, although different patterns was disclosed for the various brands.

  7. Standard Specification for Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Columbium Alloy (UNS N06625), Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Silicon Alloy (UNS N06219), and Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten Alloy (UNS N06650) Rod and Bar

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2014-01-01

    Standard Specification for Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Columbium Alloy (UNS N06625), Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Silicon Alloy (UNS N06219), and Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten Alloy (UNS N06650) Rod and Bar

  8. Determination of Fluoride in the Bottled Drinking Waters in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Amanlou, Massoud; Hosseinpour, Maedeh; Azizian, Homa; Khoshayand, Mohammad Reza; Navabpoor, Mojtaba; Souri, Effat

    2010-01-01

    Fluoride is recognized as an effective agent for dental caries prevention. Generally, the main source of fluoride intake is drinking water. In this study, fluoride content in 18 commercial brands of bottled waters was investigated. Six samples from each batch of 18 Iranian commercial brands of bottled waters were supplied. The fluoride content of samples was analyzed by Fluoride Ion Selective Electrode. The mean ± SD fluoride content of the bottled waters was 0.202 ± 0.00152 mg/L with a range...

  9. Caries inhibition by fluoride-releasing primers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerber, L J; Donly, K J

    1993-10-01

    This study evaluated the caries inhibition of dentin primers with the addition of fluoride. Two standardized Class V preparations were placed in 20 molars, the gingival margin placed below the cementoenamel junction and the occlusal margin placed in enamel. Two dentin primers (Syntac and ScotchPrep) were placed in equal numbers of 20 preparations, according to manufacturer's instructions. Ammonium fluoride (10% by weight) was then added to these primers and they were placed in the remaining 20 preparations, opposing the non-fluoridated primer of the same system. All teeth were then restored with a non-fluoridated resin composite. All teeth were subjected to an artificial caries challenge (pH 4.2) for 5 days. Sections of 100 microns were obtained, photographed under polarized light microscopy, then demineralized areas were quantitated by digitization. Results demonstrated the mean areas (mm2 +/- S.D.) demineralization at 0.25 mm, 0.5 mm and 1.0 mm from the restoration margin to be: Syntac/fluoride (1.44 +/- 0.49, 1.68 +/- 0.54, 3.72 +/- 0.74); Syntac (1.99 +/- 0.58, 1.50 +/- 0.35, 2.98 +/- 1.26); ScotchPrep/fluoride (1.23 +/- 0.68, 1.55 +/- 0.64, 3.08 +/- 1.16); ScotchPrep (1.90 +/- 0.83, 1.71 +/- .038, 3.36 +/- 0.62). A paired t-test indicated primers with fluoride to demonstrate significantly less demineralization 0.25 mm from the restoration margin (P < 0.07). PMID:7880460

  10. Fluoride release and uptake abilities of different fissure sealants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andenna, Gianluigi; Ceci, Matteo; Beltrami, Riccardo; Colombo, Marco; Cucca, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Background The long-term capability of resin sealants and glass ionomer cements to release fluoride is associated to a reduction in pit and fissure caries. The regular use of fluoride varnishes/toothpastes can result in the absorption of fluoride into the sealant. The objective of the present study was to assess the fluoride release/uptake capacities of different fissure sealants. Material and Methods Three different fissure sealants (Fuji Triage/GC, Fissurit FX/Voco and Grandio Seal/Voco) were examined. Ten discs of each material were prepared. Each disc was incubated with distilled water and then the solution analyzed for diluted for fluoride concentration, using a combination of fluoride electrode (OrionGP 1 S/N 13824, Orion Research Inc, Boston, MA, USA) connected to an expandable ion analyzer (Orion 720A, Orion Research Inc, Boston, MA, USA). Standard curves between 1 and 100 ppm F- were used to calibrate the electrode. Cumulative fluoride release was measured on days 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 21, 35 and 49, then two different fluoride varnishes/pastes (Profluorid Varnish/Voco, MI Paste Plus/GC), were applied to the sealants tested, and fluoride release (after reuptake) was measured on days 56, 70 and 84. Results Kruskal Wallis test confirmed significant differences in fluoride release between Fuji Triage/GC and Fissurit FX/Voco and Grandio Seal/Voco from day 1 (P fluoride varnish Profluorid Varnish enhanced the fluoride release for all sealants (P fluoride release for all sealants except for Fuji Triage/GC (P > 0.05). Conclusions The GIC-based sealant (Fuji Triage/GC) released significantly more fluoride than the resin sealants tested. The exposure to the fluoridated varnish (Profluorid Varnish) significantly recharged the sealants tested more than the CPP-ACPF toothpaste (MI Paste Plus). Key words:Fissure sealants, fluoride release, fluoride uptake, glass ionomer cements. PMID:27398179

  11. Electrodeposition of black chromium thin films from trivalent chromium-ionic liquid solution

    OpenAIRE

    Eugénio, S.; Vilar, Rui; C. M. Rangel; Baskaran, I.

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, black chromium thin films were electrodeposited from a solution of 1-butyl-3- methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIm][BF4] ionic liquid containing trivalent chromium (Cr(III)). Homogeneous and well adherent coatings have been obtained on nickel, copper and stainless steel substrates. The nucleation and growth of the films were investigated by cyclic voltammetry and current-density/time transient techniques. SEM/EDS, XPS and XRD were used to study the morphology, chem...

  12. Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium by Viable Cells of Chromium Resistant Bacteria Isolated from Chromite Mining Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Satarupa Dey; Baishali Pandit; A. K. Paul

    2014-01-01

    Environmental contamination of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is of serious concern for its toxicity as well as mutagenic and carcinogenic effects. Bacterial chromate reduction is a cost-effective technology for detoxification as well as removal of Cr(VI) from polluted environment. Chromium resistant and reducing bacteria, belonging to Arthrobacter, Pseudomonas, and Corynebacterium isolated from chromite mine overburden and seepage samples of Orissa, India, were found to tolerate 12–18 mM Cr(VI...

  13. Reduction of Chromium-VI by Chromium Resistant Lactobacilli: A Prospective Bacterium for Bioremediation

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Ritesh; Sinha, Vartika; Kannan, Ambrose; Upreti, Raj K.

    2012-01-01

    Chromium is a toxic heavy metal, which primarily exists in two inorganic forms, Cr (VI) and Cr (III). Highly soluble hexavalent chromium is carcinogenic due to its oxidizing nature. It is well established that the intestinal bacteria including Lactobacilli have regulatory effect on intestinal homeostasis and a breakdown in the relationship between intestinal cells and bacteria results in the manifestation of gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. In this study Cr (VI) resistance was developed in La...

  14. Synthesis, Spectroscopic and Ligand Field Properties of trans-Difluorobis(2,2-dimethylpropane-1,3-diamine)chromium(III) Perchlorate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jong Ha; Ryoo, Keon Sang [Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Hak [Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    The infrared and electronic spectroscopic properties of the newly prepared complex show that the chromium atom is an octahedral environment, coordinated by two bidentate Me{sub 2}tn ligands and two fluorine atoms in trans positions. The ligand field analysis shows that the fluoride is strong σ-and π-donor and the nitrogen atoms of the Me{sub 2}tn ligand also have a strong σ-donor properties toward the chromium(III). Current studies in our laboratory on this compound indicate that the suitable crystals for X-ray analysis are not isolated until now. The mass spectrum, 2D [{sup 1}H, {sup 13}C] HSQC spectrum and crystal structural work including magnetic and conductance data will be reported later.

  15. The electronic structure of antiferromagnetic chromium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1981-01-01

    The author has used the local spin density formalism to perform self-consistent calculations of the electronic structure of chromium in the non-magnetic and commensurate antiferromagnetic phases, as a function of the lattice parameter. A change of a few per cent in the atomic radius brings...

  16. Flashlamp-pumped lasing of chromium: GSGG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasing action in chromium-doped gadolinium scandium gallium garnet (Cr:GSGG) is well established for both CW/sup (1)/ and flashlamp/sup (2)/ pumping. This paper describes an investigation of flashlamp-pumped Cr:GSGG lasers and indicates some of the factors which limit performance

  17. Defect structure of electrodeposited chromium layers

    CERN Document Server

    Marek, T; Vertes, A; El-Sharif, M; McDougall, J; Chisolm, C U

    2000-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy was applied to study the effects of pre-treatment and composition of substrates on the quality and defect structure of electrodeposited thick chromium coatings. The results show that both parameters are important, and a scenario is proposed why the mechanically polished substrate gives more defective film than the electro polished one.

  18. 29 CFR 1910.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Enhancements In Lieu of LEV Retrofitting • Eductors. Many chemical baths are currently mixed via air agitation... requirements of the Hazard Communication Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1200. (3) Cleaning and replacement. (i) The... CFR 1910.141. Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide...

  19. Biological groundwater treatment for chromium removal at low hexavalent chromium concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamais, Daniel; Noutsopoulos, Constantinos; Kavallari, Ioanna; Nyktari, Eleni; Kaldis, Apostolos; Panousi, Eleni; Nikitopoulos, George; Antoniou, Kornilia; Nasioka, Maria

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this work is to develop and evaluate biological groundwater treatment systems that will achieve hexavalent chromium reduction and total chromium removal from groundwater at hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) groundwater concentrations in the 0-200 μg/L range. Three lab-scale units operated, as sequencing batch reactors (SBR) under aerobic, anaerobic and anaerobic-aerobic conditions. All systems received groundwater with a Cr(VI) content of 200 μg/L. In order to support biological growth, groundwater was supplemented with milk, liquid cheese whey or a mixture of sugar and milk to achieve a COD concentration of 200 mg/L. The results demonstrate that a fully anaerobic system or an anaerobic-aerobic system dosed with simple or complex external organic carbon sources can lead to practically complete Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(III). The temperature dependency of maximum Cr(VI) removal rates can be described by the Arrhenius relationship. Total chromium removal in the biological treatment systems was not complete because a significant portion of Cr(III) remained in solution. An integrated system comprising of an anaerobic SBR followed by a sand filter achieved more than 95% total chromium removal thus resulting in average effluent total and dissolved chromium concentrations of 7 μg/L and 3 μg/L, respectively. PMID:26971177

  20. Chromium(III) and chromium(VI) surface treated galvanized steel for outdoor constructions: environmental aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, David; Hedberg, Yolanda; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger

    2010-06-01

    The long-term degradation of chromium(III) (Zn-Cr(III)) and chromium(VI)-based (Zn-Cr(VI)) surface treatments on galvanized steel and their capacities to hinder the release of zinc induced by atmospheric corrosion at nonsheltered urban and marine exposure conditions for 2 years are investigated. Compared to bare zinc sheet, both surface treatments revealed high corrosion protection abilities and capacities to hinder the release of zinc, still evident after 2 years of exposure. The zinc barrier properties of the thinner Zn-Cr(VI) (10 nm) treatment were during the first 100 days of urban exposure slightly improved compared with Zn-Cr(III) (35 nm). However, their long-term protection capacities were inverse. Released concentrations of total chromium correspond to annual release rates less than 0.000032 (Zn-Cr(III)) and 0.00014 g Cr m(-2) yr(-1) (Zn-Cr(VI)) after 1 year of urban exposure. Aging by indoor storage of the surface treatments prior to outdoor exposure reduced the released Cr concentrations from the surface treatments. No Cr(VI) was released from the aged surfaces but from the freshly exposed Zn-Cr(VI). Marine exposure conditions resulted in a faster reduction of chromate to chromium(III)oxide compared with urban conditions, and a significantly lower amount of both chromium(III) and chromium(VI) released from Zn-Cr(VI) at the marine site compared with the urban site. PMID:20462267

  1. A Kinetic Model of Chromium in a Flame

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Chromium has been identified as a carcinogenic metal.Incineration is the useful method for disposal of toxic chromium hazard waste and a chromium kinetic model in a flame is very important to study chromium oxidation.Chromium chemical kinetics over a range of temperatures of a hydrogen/air flame is proposed.Nine chromium compounds and fifty-eight reversible chemical reactions were considered The forward reaction rates are calculated based on the molecular collision approach for unknown ones and Arrhenius's Law for known ones.The backward reaction rates were calculated according to forward reaction rates, the equilibrium constants and chemical thermodynamics.It is verified by several equilibrium cases and is tested by a hydrogen/air diffusion flame.The results show that the kinetic model could be used in cases in which the chromium kinetics play an important role in a flame

  2. Thermodynamic data-base for metal fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is aimed at collecting useful data of thermodynamic properties of various metal fluorides. Many thermodynamic data for metal fluorides are needed for the effective development, but no report of data-base was published. Accordingly, the objective of this report is to rearrange systematically the existing thermodynamic data based on metal fluorides and is to use it as basic data for the development of pyrochemical process. The physicochemical properties of various metal fluorides and metals were collected from literature and such existing data base as HSC code, TAPP code, FACT code, JANAF table, NEA data-base, CRC handbook. As major contents of the thermodynamic data-base, the physicochemical properties such as formation energy, viscosity, density, vapor pressure, etc. were collected. Especially, some phase diagrams of eutectic molten fluorides are plotted and thermodynamic data of liquid metals are also compiled. In the future, the technical report is to be used as basic data for the development of the pyrochemical process which is being carried out as a long-term nuclear R and D project

  3. Thermodynamic data-base for metal fluorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jae Hyung; Lee, Byung Gik; Kang, Young Ho and others

    2001-05-01

    This study is aimed at collecting useful data of thermodynamic properties of various metal fluorides. Many thermodynamic data for metal fluorides are needed for the effective development, but no report of data-base was published. Accordingly, the objective of this report is to rearrange systematically the existing thermodynamic data based on metal fluorides and is to use it as basic data for the development of pyrochemical process. The physicochemical properties of various metal fluorides and metals were collected from literature and such existing data base as HSC code, TAPP code, FACT code, JANAF table, NEA data-base, CRC handbook. As major contents of the thermodynamic data-base, the physicochemical properties such as formation energy, viscosity, density, vapor pressure, etc. were collected. Especially, some phase diagrams of eutectic molten fluorides are plotted and thermodynamic data of liquid metals are also compiled. In the future, the technical report is to be used as basic data for the development of the pyrochemical process which is being carried out as a long-term nuclear R and D project.

  4. Emissions of fluorides from welding processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewczyńska, Małgorzata; Pągowska, Emilia; Pyrzyńska, Krystyna

    2015-11-01

    The levels of fluoride airborne particulates emitted from welding processes were investigated. They were sampled with the patented IOM Sampler, developed by J. H. Vincent and D. Mark at the Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM), personal inhalable sampler for simultaneous collection of the inhalable and respirable size fractions. Ion chromatography with conductometric detection was used for quantitative analysis. The efficiency of fluoride extraction from the cellulose filter of the IOM sampler was examined using the standard sample of urban air particle matter SRM-1648a. The best results for extraction were obtained when water and the anionic surfactant N-Cetyl-N-N-N-trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) were used in an ultrasonic bath. The limits of detection and quantification for the whole procedure were 8μg/L and 24μg/L, respectively. The linear range of calibration was 0.01-10mg/L, which corresponds to 0.0001-0.1mg of fluorides per m(3) in collection of a 20L air sample. The concentration of fluorides in the respirable fraction of collected air samples was in the range of 0.20-1.82mg/m(3), while the inhalable fraction contained 0.23-1.96mg/m(3) of fluorides during an eight-hour working day in the welding room. PMID:26574102

  5. Removing Fluoride Ions with Continously Fed Activated Alumina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yeun C.; Itemaking, Isara Cholapranee

    1979-01-01

    Discussed is the mathematical basis for determining fluoride removal during water treatment with activated alumina. The study indicates that decreasing particle size decreases the pore diffusion effect and increases fluoride removal. (AS)

  6. Uranyl fluoride luminescence in acidic aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luminescence emission spectra and decay rates are reported for uranyl species in acidic aqueous solutions containing HF or added NaF. The longest luminescence lifetime, 0.269 ± 0.006 ms, was observed from uranyl in 1 M HF + 1 M HClO4 at 296 K and decreased with increasing temperature. Based on a luminescence dynamics model that assumes equilibrium among electronically excited uranyl fluoride species and free fluoride ion, this long lived uranyl luminescence in aqueous solution is attributed primarily to UO2F2. Studies on the effect of added LiNO3 or Na2WO4·2H2O showed relatively weak quenching of uranyl fluoride luminescence which suggests that high sensitivity determination of the UF6 content of WF6 gas should be feasible via uranyl luminescence analysis of hydrolyzed gas samples of impure WF6

  7. Cancer incidence and mortality in workers exposed to fluoride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandjean, P; Olsen, J H; Jensen, O M;

    1992-01-01

    Although a recent bioassay showed increased frequency of bone cancer in rats with high oral intake of fluoride, the data are reported as equivocal evidence of carcinogenicity. In humans, occupational fluoride exposure may cause skeletal fluorosis, and our earlier follow-up of fluoride...

  8. 40 CFR 180.575 - Sulfuryl fluoride; tolerances for residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sulfuryl fluoride; tolerances for... § 180.575 Sulfuryl fluoride; tolerances for residues. (a)(1) General. Tolerances are established for residues of sulfuryl fluoride in or on the following commodities from the postharvest fumigation...

  9. 21 CFR 177.2510 - Polyvinylidene fluoride resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. 177.2510 Section... as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2510 Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. Polyvinylidene fluoride resins may be safely used as articles or components of articles intended for repeated...

  10. COMPLEX FLUORIDES OF PLUTONIUM AND AN ALKALI METAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1960-08-01

    A method is given for precipitating alkali metal plutonium fluorides. such as KPuF/sub 5/, KPu/sub 2/F/sub 9/, NaPuF/sub 5/, and RbPuF/sub 5/, from an aqueous plutonium(IV) solution by adding hydrogen fluoride and alkali-metal- fluoride.

  11. 40 CFR 60.212 - Standard for fluorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for fluorides. 60.212 Section... Industry: Superphosphoric Acid Plants § 60.212 Standard for fluorides. (a) On and after the date on which... facility any gases which contain total fluorides in excess of 5.0 g/megagram (Mg) of equivalent P2O5...

  12. 40 CFR 60.222 - Standard for fluorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for fluorides. 60.222 Section... Industry: Diammonium Phosphate Plants § 60.222 Standard for fluorides. (a) On and after the date on which... facility any gases which contain total fluorides in excess of 30 g/megagram (Mg) of equivalent P2O5 feed...

  13. 40 CFR 60.242 - Standard for fluorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for fluorides. 60.242 Section... Industry: Granular Triple Superphosphate Storage Facilities § 60.242 Standard for fluorides. (a) On and... atmosphere from any affected facility any gases which contain total fluorides in excess of 0.25...

  14. 40 CFR 60.232 - Standard for fluorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for fluorides. 60.232 Section... Industry: Triple Superphosphate Plants § 60.232 Standard for fluorides. On and after the date on which the... gases which contain total fluorides in excess of 100 g/megagram (Mg) of equivalent P2O5 feed (0.20...

  15. Health effects of fluoride pollution caused by coal burning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, M.; Tadano, M.; Yamamoto, S.; Tamura, K.; Chen, X. [Regional Environment Division, National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, 305-0083 Ibaraki (Japan); Asanuma, S. [Japan Institute of Rural Medicine, Usuda, Nagano (Japan); Watanabe, T. [Saku Central Hospital, Usuda, Nagano (Japan); Kondo, T. [Matsumoto Dental College, Shiojiri, Nagano (Japan); Sakurai, S. [Otsuma Women' s University, Tama, Tokyo (Japan); Ji, R.; Liang, C.; Cao, S. [Institute of Environmental Health and Engineering, Beijing (China); Hong, Z. [Shanxi Maternity and Children' s Hospital, Taiyuan (China)

    2001-04-23

    Recently a huge amount of fluoride in coal has been released into indoor environments by the combustion of coal and fluoride pollution seems to be increasing in some rural areas in China. Combustion of coal and coal bricks is the primary source of gaseous and aerosol fluoride and these forms of fluoride can easily enter exposed food products and the human respiratory tract. Major human fluoride exposure was caused by consumption of fluoride contaminated food, such as corn, chilies and potatoes. For each diagnostic syndrome of dental fluorosis, a log-normal distribution was observed on the logarithm of urinary fluoride concentration in students in China. Urinary fluoride content was found to be a primary health indicator of the prevalence of dental fluorosis in the community. In the fluorosis areas, osteosclerosis in skeletal fluorosis patients was observed with a high prevalence. A biochemical marker of bone resorption, urinary deoxypyridinoline content was much higher in residents in China than in residents in Japan. It was suggested that bone resorption was stimulated to a greater extent in residents in China and fluoride may stimulate both bone resorption and bone formation. Renal function especially glomerular filtration rate was very sensitive to fluoride exposure. Inorganic phosphate concentrations in urine were significantly lower in the residents in fluorosis areas in China than in non-fluorosis area in China and Japan. Since airborne fluoride from the combustion of coal pollutes extensively both the living environment and food, it is necessary to reduce fluoride pollution caused by coal burning.

  16. Plasma processing of fluoride solutions of refractory rare metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutsol, A.F. [Institute of Chemistry and Technology of Less-Common Elements and Raw Materials, Murmanskaya oblast` (Russian Federation)

    1995-09-01

    Features of plasma processing of fluoride solutions of refractory metals were studied. It was shown that pyrohydrolysis of niobium, tantalum, and titanium fluorides occurs in the gas phase, thus providing fine oxide powders. The pyrohydrolysis of low-volatility zirconium fluoride occurs in the solid phase, yielding oxide particles corresponding to the size of initial droplets.

  17. Onderzoek naar de bepaling van fluoride in een doorstroomsysteem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neele J; Nagtegaal-Wouterse GWM; Reijnders HFR

    1989-01-01

    Een snelle methode voor de bepaling van fluoride in een doorstroomsysteem met potentiometrische detectie en een lage onderste analysegrens is ontwikkeld. De mate waarin fluoride uit fluoride-verbindingen wordt vrijgemaakt door complexvormende stoffen is gevolgd om vast te stellen hoeveel tijd hierv

  18. Synthesis of reagents for fluoride technologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gordienko; P.; S.; Kolzunov; V.; A.; Dostovalov; V.; A.; Kaidalova; T.; A.

    2005-01-01

    Growing demand for fluorinating reagents to be used in rare-metal industry has stimulated conducting research in the field of production for these reagents. That is why the fluorinating reagents production has recently formed an independent segment of industry. Main industrial fluorinating reagents include hydrofluoric acid, anhydrous hydrogen fluoride, technical ammonium hydrodifluoride, fluorosilicic acid and its salts. To produce technical etching acid, fluor-spar with calcium fluoride content at least 92% is used in most cases. To produce anhydrous hydrogen fluoride, fluor-spar with calcium fluoride content 96 %-97 % is necessary. The fluorine-containing raw materials refinement from silica by means of flotation makes the fluorinating reagents production substantially more expensive. In this work we have attempted to process unconcentrated raw materials by fluorine removal in the form of volatile silicon tetrafluoride. In this process silicon tetrafluoride was recovered by liquid ammonia with subsequent hydrolysis of the formed ammonia hexafluorosilicate. Hydrolysis occurred according to the reaction:(NH4)2 SiF6 + 4NH3 + 2 H2O= 6NH4F+ SiO2 The products of the ammonia hexafluorosilicate hydrolysis included ammonia fluoride and amorphous silica gel ("white soot") as by-product. This "white soot" was of high purity-with main component content 99.95% and total admixture content 0.05%. Silica gel is a superfine material with specific surface of 267.6 m2/g and is recommended as filler in the production of rubber, plastics and for other applications.Ammonia fluoride was transformed into ammonia hydrodifluoride (main processing product) according to the reaction:2NH4F→NH3+NH4 HF2 It was stated that the NH4F: NH4 HF2 ratio depends on boiling point temperature-with its increase the ammonia hydrofluoride concentration in solution increases as well.

  19. Enhanced fluoride sorption by mechanochemically activated kaolinites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meenakshi, S; Sundaram, C Sairam; Sukumar, Rugmini

    2008-05-01

    Kaolinite clay obtained from the mines was processed and studied for its fluoride sorption capacity. The surface area of the clay mineral was increased from 15.11 m(2)/g (raw) to 32.43 m(2)/g (activated) by mechanochemical activation. Batch adsorption studies were conducted to optimize various equilibrating conditions like the effect of contact time, dosage, pH for both raw and micronized kaolinites (RK and MK). The effect of other interfering anions on the defluoridation capacity (DC) of the sorbents was studied. Sorption of fluoride by the sorbents was observed over a wide pH range of 3-11. The studies revealed there is an enhanced fluoride sorption on MK. FTIR and XRD were used for the characterization of the sorbent. The surface morphology of the clay material was observed using SEM. The adsorption of fluoride was studied at three different temperatures, viz., 303, 313 and 323 K. The sorption data obtained at optimized conditions were subjected to Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms. Sorption intensity (1/n) (0.770-0.810) has been evaluated using Freundlich isotherm, whereas the values of sorption capacity Q(0) (0.609, 0.714 and 0.782 mg/g) and binding energy b (0.158, 0.145 and 0.133 L/mg) at three different temperatures have been estimated using Langmuir isotherm. Adsorption process was found to be controlled by both Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms. Thermodynamic studies revealed that the sorption of fluoride on MK is endothermic and a spontaneous process. The kinetic studies indicate that the sorption of fluoride on MK follows pseudo-first-order and intraparticle diffusion models.

  20. Enhanced fluoride sorption by mechanochemically activated kaolinites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meenakshi, S. [Department of Chemistry, Gandhigram Rural University, Gandhigram 624302, Tamilnadu (India)], E-mail: drs_meena@rediffmail.com; Sundaram, C. Sairam [Department of Science and Humanities, Karaikal Polytechnic College, Karaikal 609609, Puducherry (India); Sukumar, Rugmini [Chemical Sciences and Technologies, Regional Research Laboratory, Trivandrum 695019, Kerala (India)

    2008-05-01

    Kaolinite clay obtained from the mines was processed and studied for its fluoride sorption capacity. The surface area of the clay mineral was increased from 15.11 m{sup 2}/g (raw) to 32.43 m{sup 2}/g (activated) by mechanochemical activation. Batch adsorption studies were conducted to optimize various equilibrating conditions like the effect of contact time, dosage, pH for both raw and micronized kaolinites (RK and MK). The effect of other interfering anions on the defluoridation capacity (DC) of the sorbents was studied. Sorption of fluoride by the sorbents was observed over a wide pH range of 3-11. The studies revealed there is an enhanced fluoride sorption on MK. FTIR and XRD were used for the characterization of the sorbent. The surface morphology of the clay material was observed using SEM. The adsorption of fluoride was studied at three different temperatures, viz., 303, 313 and 323 K. The sorption data obtained at optimized conditions were subjected to Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms. Sorption intensity (1/n) (0.770-0.810) has been evaluated using Freundlich isotherm, whereas the values of sorption capacity Q{sup 0} (0.609, 0.714 and 0.782 mg/g) and binding energy b (0.158, 0.145 and 0.133 L/mg) at three different temperatures have been estimated using Langmuir isotherm. Adsorption process was found to be controlled by both Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms. Thermodynamic studies revealed that the sorption of fluoride on MK is endothermic and a spontaneous process. The kinetic studies indicate that the sorption of fluoride on MK follows pseudo-first-order and intraparticle diffusion models.

  1. Reconstructing temporal variation of fluoride uptake in eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) from a high-fluoride area by analysis of fluoride distribution in dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierdorf, Horst; Rhede, Dieter; Death, Clare; Hufschmid, Jasmin; Kierdorf, Uwe

    2016-04-01

    Trace element profiling in the incrementally formed dentine of mammalian teeth can be applied to reconstruct temporal variation of incorporation of these elements into the tissue. Using an electron microprobe, this study analysed fluoride distribution in dentine of first and third mandibular molars of free-ranging eastern grey kangaroos inhabiting a high-fluoride area, to assess temporal variation in fluoride uptake of the animals. Fluoride content in the early-formed dentine of first molars was significantly lower than in the late-formed dentine of these teeth, and was also lower than in both, the early and the late-formed dentine of third molars. As early dentine formation in M1 takes place prior to weaning, this finding indicates a lower dentinal fluoride uptake during the pre-weaning compared to the post-weaning period. This is hypothetically attributed to the action of a partial barrier to fluoride transfer from blood to milk in lactating females and a low bioavailability of fluoride ingested together with milk. Another factor contributing to lower plasma fluoride levels in juveniles compared to adults is the rapid clearance of fluoride from blood plasma in the former due to their intense skeletal growth. The combined action of these mechanisms is considered to explain why in kangaroos from high-fluoride areas, the (early-formed) first molars are not affected by dental fluorosis while the (later-formed) third and fourth molars regularly exhibit marked to severe fluorotic lesions. PMID:26736058

  2. CHROMIUM INDUCED CYTOTOXICITY IN BLACKGRAM (VIGNA MUNGO L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chidambaram ، P. Sundaramoorthy ، A. Murugan ، K. Sankar Ganesh ، L. Baskaran

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromium is known to be highly toxic to biological systems. This study was designed to determine the mutagenic effects of different concentrations (0, 10, 25, 50, 100 and 200 mg/L of hexavalent chromium on root tip cells of blackgram (Vigna mungo L. Hepper. The blackgram seeds were equi-spacially arranged in sterilized petriplates lined with filter paper and they were treated with different concentrations of chromium solution. In germination studies, the morphological growth parameters such as germination percentage, root length, shoot length fresh weight and dry weight of blackgram seedlings were decreased with increasing dose of chromium concentrations. No germination of blackgram seeds was recorded at 300mg/l chromium concentration. Chromosome aberration assay was used to determine the mitotic indices and rate of chromosome aberration in blackgram root tip cells due to chromium treatment. The results showed that the mitotic indices were complicated due to different concentrations of chromium. However, the increase in chromium concentration has led to a gradual increase in the percentage of chromosomal aberration and mitotic index. The chromosome length, absolute chromosome length and average chromosome lengths were gradually found to decrease. There was no considerable change in 2n number of chromosome with the increase in chromium concentrations. It is concluded that the hexavalent chromium has significant mutagenic effect on the root tip cells of blackgram.

  3. Chromium supplementation improved post-stroke brain infarction and hyperglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Ying; Mao, Frank Chiahung; Liu, Chia-Hsin; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Lai, Nai-Wei; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2016-04-01

    Hyperglycemia is common after acute stroke and is associated with a worse outcome of stroke. Thus, a better understanding of stress hyperglycemia is helpful to the prevention and therapeutic treatment of stroke. Chromium is an essential nutrient required for optimal insulin activity and normal carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Beyond its nutritional effects, dietary supplement of chromium causes beneficial outcomes against several diseases, in particular diabetes-associated complications. In this study, we investigated whether post-stroke hyperglycemia involved chromium dynamic mobilization in a rat model of permanent focal cerebral ischemia and whether dietary supplement of chromium improved post-stroke injury and alterations. Stroke rats developed brain infarction, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance. Post-stroke hyperglycemia was accompanied by elevated secretion of counter-regulatory hormones including glucagon, corticosterone, and norepinephrine, decreased insulin signaling in skeletal muscles, and increased hepatic gluconeogenesis. Correlation studies revealed that counter-regulatory hormone secretion showed a positive correlation with chromium loss and blood glucose increased together with chromium loss. Daily chromium supplementation increased tissue chromium levels, attenuated brain infarction, improved hyperglycemia, and decreased plasma levels of glucagon and corticosterone in stroke rats. Our findings suggest that stroke rats show disturbance of tissue chromium homeostasis with a net loss through urinary excretion and chromium mobilization and loss might be an alternative mechanism responsible for post-stroke hyperglycemia. PMID:26477944

  4. Improvement on simultaneous determination of chromium species in aqueous solution by ion chromatography and chemiluminescence detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Liao, Y.P.; Jons, O.

    1997-01-01

    A sensitive method for the simultaneous determination of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) was chromatography and chemiluminescence detection. Two Dionex ion-exchange guard columns in series, CG5 and AG7, were used to separate chromium(III) from chromium(VI). Chromium(VI) was reduced by potassium su...

  5. Comparative evaluation of fluoride release from PRG-composites and compomer on application of topical fluoride: An in-vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhull K

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objective: To determine the fluoride release from Giomer and Compomer, using different topical fluoride regimes, and to compare the amount of fluoride release from giomer with that of compomer. Materials and Method: Forty-eight specimens of each giomer and compomer were divided into four treatment groups, namely, control group, fluoridated dentifrice (500 ppm once daily group, fluoridated dentifrice (500 ppm twice daily group, fluoridated dentifrice (500 ppm once daily + fluoridated mouthwash (225 ppm group. Each specimen was suspended in demineralizing solution for six hours and remineralizing solution for 18 hours. Fluoride release was measured in both the demineralizing solution and remineralizing solution daily for seven days. Total daily fluoride release for each specimen was calculated by adding the amount released in the demineralizing solution to that released in remineralizing solution. Results and Conclusion: The fluoride release (ppm was found to be more in Giomer when compared to Compomer. The fluoride released from Giomer and Compomer was significantly greater in the acidic demineralizing solution than in the neutral remineralizing solution. It was found that increasing fluoride exposure significantly increased fluoride release from the giomer and compomer. It was found that the fluoride release from the subgroups of giomer and compomer was in the following order: fluoridated dentifrice twice daily > fluoridated dentifrice once daily + fluoridated mouthwash > fluoridated dentifrice once daily > control group. It was found that the giomer showed a greater fluoride uptake than the compomer.

  6. Some electronic and magnetic properties of Fluoride ion in Fluoride structure nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imtani, Ali Nasir

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of the environment potential around Fluoride ion on some important electronic and magnetic properties such as dipole polarisability, moment of oscillator strengths S(k) and magnetic susceptibility. The theoretical procedure is based on the variational-perturbation theory with two parameter trial functions incorporated in an ionic model. We estimate these properties in four cases for Fluoride ion; free ion, ion under different potentials, ion in the crystals and ion in nanocrystal, CdF2, CaF2, PbF2, SrF2 and BaF2. Our results indicate that these properties vary with ion environments and the free state of Fluoride ion has higher values and there is linearity behaviour of these properties with lattice constant. For Fluoride ion in nanocrystal, we have found that there is an extra parameter that can also affect the dipole polarisability, the number of ions in the structure.

  7. Fluoride in Drinking Water -Its Effects and Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Gopal

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available Occurrence of fluoride in water, its metabolism, excretion. effect oingestion in human and cattle system and methods of fluoridation and defluoridation have been discussed. The presence of fluoride in waters occurring in India, with special reference to Rajasthan desert has been reviewed. Based on the survey and physico-chemical analyses of about 2,700 water samples of Rajasthan, distribution of fluoride in this area has been discussed wrth reference to drinking water standards. A water resources map showing concentrations of fluoride in four arid districts of Rajasthan is also presented.

  8. Oral Fluoride Including Drinking Water in Prevention of Tooth Decay

    OpenAIRE

    Vitoria I

    2015-01-01

    Herein we present a review of the role of oral fluoride in the prevention of tooth decay, together with updated recommendations on fluoride supplements. Fluoridation of public drinking water is still considered effective, but the recommended level of fluoride is now 0.7 mg/L, compared with the previously recommended range of 0.7-1.2 mg/L. Oral fluoride supplements are currently not restricted to the children at high risk for tooth decay, but recommended initiate at 6 months&nbs...

  9. Fluoride: a risk factor for inflammatory bowel disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follin-Arbelet, Benoit; Moum, Bjørn

    2016-09-01

    Although the association between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and oral hygiene has been noticed before, there has been little research on prolonged fluoride exposure as a possible risk factor. In the presented cases, exposure to fluoride seems indirectly associated with higher incidence of IBD. Fluoride toxicology and epidemiology documents frequent unspecific chronic gastrointestinal symptoms and intestinal inflammation. Efflux genes that confer resistance to environmental fluoride may select for IBD associated gut microbiota and therefore be involved in the pathogenesis. Together these multidisciplinary results argue for further investigation on the hypothesis of fluoride as a risk factor for IBD. PMID:27199224

  10. Manufacture of high purity low arsenic anhydrous hydrogen fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process for manufacturing anhydrous hydrogen fluoride with reduced levels of arsenic impurity from arsenic contaminated anhydrous hydrogen fluoride is described which comprises: (a) contacting the anhydrous hydrogen fluoride with an effective amount of hydrogen peroxide to oxidize the arsenic impurity in the presence of a catalyst which comprises a catalytic amount of (i) molybdenum or an inorganic molybdenum compound and (ii) a phosphate compound, at a temperature and for a period of time sufficient to oxidize volatile trivalent arsenic impurities in the anhydrous hydrogen fluoride to non-volatile pentavalent arsenic compounds, and (b) distilling the resulting mixture and recovering anhydrous hydrogen fluoride with reduced levels of arsenic impurity

  11. Production of basic chromium sulfate by using recovered chromium from ashes of thermally treated leather.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmer, Aline; Nunes, Keila Guerra Pacheco; Gutterres, Mariliz; Marcílio, Nilson Romeu

    2010-04-15

    Leather wastes tanned with chromium are generated during the production process of leather, hence the wastes from hand crafted goods and footwear industries are a serious environmental problem. The thermal treatment of leather wastes can be one of the treatment options because the wastes are rich in chromium and can be used as a raw material for sodium chromate production and further to obtain several chromium compounds. The objective of this study was to utilize the chromium from leather wastes via basic chromium sulfate production to be subsequently applied in a hide tanning. The obtained results have shown that this is the first successful attempt to achieve desired base properties of the product. The result was achieved when the following conditions were applied: a molar ratio between sodium sulfite and sodium dichromate equal to 6; reaction time equal to 5 min before addition of sulfuric acid; pH of sodium dichromate solution equal to 2. Summarizing, there is an opportunity to utilize the dangerous wastes and reused them in the production scheme by minimizing or annulling the environmental impact and to attend a sustainable process development concept.

  12. Production of basic chromium sulfate by using recovered chromium from ashes of thermally treated leather.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmer, Aline; Nunes, Keila Guerra Pacheco; Gutterres, Mariliz; Marcílio, Nilson Romeu

    2010-04-15

    Leather wastes tanned with chromium are generated during the production process of leather, hence the wastes from hand crafted goods and footwear industries are a serious environmental problem. The thermal treatment of leather wastes can be one of the treatment options because the wastes are rich in chromium and can be used as a raw material for sodium chromate production and further to obtain several chromium compounds. The objective of this study was to utilize the chromium from leather wastes via basic chromium sulfate production to be subsequently applied in a hide tanning. The obtained results have shown that this is the first successful attempt to achieve desired base properties of the product. The result was achieved when the following conditions were applied: a molar ratio between sodium sulfite and sodium dichromate equal to 6; reaction time equal to 5 min before addition of sulfuric acid; pH of sodium dichromate solution equal to 2. Summarizing, there is an opportunity to utilize the dangerous wastes and reused them in the production scheme by minimizing or annulling the environmental impact and to attend a sustainable process development concept. PMID:20031309

  13. Femtosecond laser surface structuring and oxidation of chromium thin coatings: Black chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Oxidation of the chromium thin film to chromium oxide by femtosecond laser with a fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm. • Solar absorber from chromium oxide that low percentage reflectance. • Femtosecond laser oxidation, with a de-focused laser. • Chromium oxide formation by femtosecond laser in normal ambient. - Abstract: In view of their potential applications as selective solar absorbers, chromium coatings on float glass substrates were nano/micro structured by femtosecond laser in air. Raman and X-rays diffraction investigations confirmed the formation of an ultra-porous α-Cr2O3 layer at the surface; higher is the input laser power, enhanced is the crystallinity of the α-Cr2O3 layer. The α-Cr2O3 layer with the Cr underneath it in addition to the photo-induced porosity acted as a classical ceramic–metal nano-composite making the reflectance to decrease significantly within the spectral range of 190–1100 nm. The average reflectance decreased from 70 to 2%

  14. Femtosecond laser surface structuring and oxidation of chromium thin coatings: Black chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotsedi, L., E-mail: Kotsedi@tlabs.ac.za [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Nuru, Z.Y. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Mthunzi, P. [National Laser Centre, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, 0001 Pretoria (South Africa); Muller, T.F.G. [University of the Western Cape, Physics Department, Bellville, 7535 Cape Town (South Africa); Eaton, S.M. [Physics Department, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Julies, B. [University of the Western Cape, Physics Department, Bellville, 7535 Cape Town (South Africa); Manikandan, E. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Ramponi, R. [Physics Department, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Maaza, M. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa)

    2014-12-01

    Highlights: • Oxidation of the chromium thin film to chromium oxide by femtosecond laser with a fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm. • Solar absorber from chromium oxide that low percentage reflectance. • Femtosecond laser oxidation, with a de-focused laser. • Chromium oxide formation by femtosecond laser in normal ambient. - Abstract: In view of their potential applications as selective solar absorbers, chromium coatings on float glass substrates were nano/micro structured by femtosecond laser in air. Raman and X-rays diffraction investigations confirmed the formation of an ultra-porous α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer at the surface; higher is the input laser power, enhanced is the crystallinity of the α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer. The α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer with the Cr underneath it in addition to the photo-induced porosity acted as a classical ceramic–metal nano-composite making the reflectance to decrease significantly within the spectral range of 190–1100 nm. The average reflectance decreased from 70 to 2%.

  15. Synthesis and Characterization of Chromium Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Sheel Jaswal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Chromium oxide nanoparticles (NPshave been rapidly synthesized by precipitation method using ammomia as precipitating agent and are characterized by using X-ray Diffraction (XRD, Thermo Gravimetric Analysis (TGA, UV-Visible absorption (UV, Infrared Spectoscopy (IR, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM. XRD studies show that chromium oxide NP is formed as Cr2O3 and it has hexagonal structure. The shape and particle size of the synthesized Cr2O3 NPs is determined by SEM and TEM. The images showed that the size of NPs of Cr2O3 varied from 20 nm to 70 nm with average crystalline size 45 nm. UV-Visible absorption and IR spectoscopy confirm the formation of nanosized Cr2O3. TGA verifies that the Cr2O3 NPs are thermally stable upto 1000 °C.

  16. CHROMIUM(II) AMIDES - SYNTHESIS AND STRUCTURES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    EDEMA, JJH; GAMBAROTTA, S; MEETSMA, A; SPEK, AL; SMEETS, WJJ; CHIANG, MY

    1993-01-01

    A novel class of mono- and di-meric chromium(II) amides has been prepared and characterized. Reaction of [CrCl2(thf)2] (thf = tetrahydrofuran) with 2 equivalents of M(NR2) (R = C6H11, Pr(i), Ph, or phenothiazinyl; M = Li or Na) allowed the formation of the homoleptic amides [{Cr(mu-NR2)(NR2)}2] (R =

  17. Stainless chromium-nickel steels. Chapter I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical composition is tabulated of 90 chromium-nickel stainless steels and alloys given in volume %. The values are also given of the corrosion resistance of the steels and alloys. The tables show data on the surface condition or the methods of material working, types and chemical composition of the medium where corrosion resistance tests were carried out, temperature, pressure, time of tests, corrosion rates, corrosion types, and literature references. A total of 35 references is given. (J.B.)

  18. Total Fluoride Intake by Children from a Tropical Brazilian City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Carolina V; Cury, Jaime A; Vale, Glauber C; Lima, Marina D M; Moura, Lúcia de Fátima A D; Moura, Marcoeli Silva de

    2015-01-01

    The main sources of fluoride intake by children are fluoridated water and toothpaste. Little has been studied regarding fluoride intake from these sources in regions with tropical climates and high temperatures throughout the year. This study aimed to determine the amount of fluoride ingested from diet and tooth brushing by children who live in a city with a tropical climate. Sixty-seven children from Teresina, Piauí, Brazil, took part in this study. The city's water supply was optimally fluoridated. The duplicate-diet method was used to determine the fluoride intake from diet. The intake of fluoride from dentifrice was determined by subtracting the amount of fluoride placed on the toothbrush and that recovered after brushing. The concentration of fluoride was measured using an ion-specific electrode and is expressed as milligrams/kilogram of body weight/day. The mean (±SD) total amount was 0.071 ± 0.036 mg F/kg body weight/day, and the relative contributions of diet and toothpaste were 0.025 ± 0.010 and 0.046 ± 0.035, respectively. The factors associated with fluoride intake from toothpaste were: use of children's toothpaste (p = 0.003), use of large amounts of toothpaste (p fluorosis risk. The results suggest that the amount of fluoride ingested by most children who live in a Brazilian city with a tropical climate is considered safe in terms of the risk of dental fluorosis. PMID:26655142

  19. Estimation of atmospheric fluoride by limed filter papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The limed filter paper method of static sampling of atmospheric fluoride is reviewed in this report. Use of the technique, in conjunction with precise measurement of the absorbed fluoride and calibration with dynamic air sampling techniques, to estimate atmospheric fluoride levels, is considered to give only qualitative data (± 50%). The limed filter paper method is site specific due to variations in meteorological conditions. Its main value is to indicate seasonal and annual trends in fluoride exposure of vegetation. Subject to these considerations, the lower and upper limits of atmospheric fluoride exposure and the applicability to atmospheric fluoride estimation under routine or emergency fluoride release conditions are discussed, with special emphasis on the limiting factors

  20. FLUORIDE CONTENT OF COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE SOY MILK PRODUCTS IN THAILAND.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rirattanapong, Opas; Rirattanapong, Praphasri

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. In Thailand, the consumption of soy milk products is common but there is limited data about their fluoride content. The purpose of this study was to es- timate the fluoride content of soy milk products available in Thailand. Fluoride content was determined for 76 brands of soy milk using a F-ion-specific electrode. The fluoride concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 3.78 μg/ml. The fluoride content was not related to sugar content, soy bean content or the sterilization process. Among 3 brands of soy milk containing tea powder extract, the fluoride content was high (1.25 to 3.78 μg/ml). Most brands of soy milk tested in our study had fluoride content below the optimal daily intake but brands containing tea powder extract if consumed by children may increase their risk for fluorosis. PMID:27086437

  1. Fluoride in the prey of barn owls (Tyto alba).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, A G

    1987-01-01

    Bone fluoride in short-tailed voles (Microtus agrestis) and common shrews (Sorex araneus), the prey of barn owls (Tyto alba), was studied on Anglesey, North Wales. The average fluoride content of M. agrestis skulls obtained from a location 0.9 km from an aluminium reduction plant was significantly greater than that of skulls from another location 22 km from the source of industrial fluoride pollution. At both locations, mean fluoride levels of skulls extracted from owl pellets and those of voles trapped mechanically were broadly similar but important differences existed. Near the aluminium reduction plant, owls caught voles and shrews with a much wider range of fluoride levels than occurred at a single trapping site. However, there was no evidence for selection of heavily fluoridated prey. Within 1 km of the aluminium reduction plant, six trapping sites yielded S. araneus with a fourfold difference between the highest and lowest mean bone fluoride level. PMID:15092770

  2. Estimated Fluoride Doses from Toothpastes Should be Based on Total Soluble Fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime A. Cury

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The fluoride dose ingested by young children may be overestimated if based on levels of total fluoride (TF rather than levels of bioavailable fluoride (total soluble fluoride—TSF in toothpaste. The aim of the present study was to compare doses of fluoride intake based on TF and TSF. Fluoride intake in 158 Brazilian children aged three and four years was determined after tooth brushing with their usual toothpaste (either family toothpaste (n = 80 or children’s toothpaste (n = 78. The estimated dose (mg F/day/Kg of body weight of TF or TSF ingested was calculated from the chemical analysis of the toothpastes. Although the ingested dose of TF from the family toothpastes was higher than that from the children’s toothpastes (0.074 ± 0.007 and 0.039 ± 0.003 mg F/day/Kg, respectively; p 0.05. The fluoride dose ingested by children from toothpastes may be overestimated if based on the TF of the product. This finding suggests that the ingested dose should be calculated based on TSF. Dose of TSF ingested by children is similar whether family or children’s toothpaste is used.

  3. Solid electrolytes for fluoride ion batteries: ionic conductivity in polycrystalline tysonite-type fluorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rongeat, Carine; Reddy, M Anji; Witter, Raiker; Fichtner, Maximilian

    2014-02-12

    Batteries based on a fluoride shuttle (fluoride ion battery, FIB) can theoretically provide high energy densities and can thus be considered as an interesting alternative to Li-ion batteries. Large improvements are still needed regarding their actual performance, in particular for the ionic conductivity of the solid electrolyte. At the current state of the art, two types of fluoride families can be considered for electrolyte applications: alkaline-earth fluorides having a fluorite-type structure and rare-earth fluorides having a tysonite-type structure. As regard to the latter, high ionic conductivities have been reported for doped LaF3 single crystals. However, polycrystalline materials would be easier to implement in a FIB due to practical reasons in the cell manufacturing. Hence, we have analyzed in detail the ionic conductivity of La(1-y)Ba(y)F(3-y) (0 ≤ y ≤ 0.15) solid solutions prepared by ball milling. The combination of DC and AC conductivity analyses provides a better understanding of the conduction mechanism in tysonite-type fluorides with a blocking effect of the grain boundaries. Heat treatment of the electrolyte material was performed and leads to an improvement of the ionic conductivity. This confirms the detrimental effect of grain boundaries and opens new route for the development of solid electrolytes for FIB with high ionic conductivities. PMID:24444763

  4. Actinide measurements by AMS using fluoride matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornett, R. J.; Kazi, Z. H.; Zhao, X.-L.; Chartrand, M. G.; Charles, R. J.; Kieser, W. E.

    2015-10-01

    Actinides can be measured by alpha spectroscopy (AS), mass spectroscopy or accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). We tested a simple method to separate Pu and Am isotopes from the sample matrix using a single extraction chromatography column. The actinides in the column eluent were then measured by AS or AMS using a fluoride target matrix. Pu and Am were coprecipitated with NdF3. The strongest AMS beams of Pu and Am were produced when there was a large excess of fluoride donor atoms in the target and the NdF3 precipitates were diluted about 6-8 fold with PbF2. The measured concentrations of 239,240Pu and 241Am agreed with the concentrations in standards of known activity and with two IAEA certified reference materials. Measurements of 239,240Pu and 241Am made at A.E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory agree, within their statistical uncertainty, with independent measurements made using the IsoTrace AMS system. This work demonstrated that fluoride targets can produce reliable beams of actinide anions and that the measurement of actinides using fluorides agree with published values in certified reference materials.

  5. Dimensionally Controlled Lithiation of Chromium Oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fister, Tim T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hu, Xianyi [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Esbenshade, Jennifer [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Chen, Xiao [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Wu, Jinsong [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Dravid, Vinayak [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Bedzyk, Michael [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Long, Brandon [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gewirth, Andrew A. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Shi, Bing [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Schlepütz, Christian M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Fenter, Paul [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-01-12

    Oxide conversion reactions are an alternative approach for high capacity lithium ion batteries but are known to suffer from structural irreversibility associated with the phase separation and reconstitution of reduced metal species and Li2O. In particular, the morphology of the reduced metal species is thought to play a critical role in the electrochemical properties of a conversion material. Here we use a model electrode with alternating layers of chromium and chromium oxide to better understand and control these phase changes in real-time and at molecular length scales. Despite lacking crystallinity at the atomic scale, this superstructure is observed (with X-ray reflectivity, XR) to lithiate and delithiate in a purely one-dimensional manner, preserving the layered structure. The XR data show that the metal layers act as nucleation sites for the reduction of chromium in the conversion reaction. Irreversibility during delithiation is due to the formation of a ternary phase, LiCrO2, which can be further delithiated at higher potentials. The results reveal that the combination of confining lithiation to nanoscale sheets of Li2O and the availability of reaction sites in the metal layers in the layered structure is a strategy for improving the reversibility and mass transport properties that can be used in a wide range of conversion materials.

  6. Chromium--a material for fusion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to their low neutron-induced radioactivity chromium based materials are considered to be candidates for structure materials in fusion technology. In this paper investigations are presented of unirradiated chromium with a purity of 99.96% (DUCROPUR) and a dispersion strengthened chromium alloy Cr5Fe1Y2O3 (DUCROLLOY). Both materials have been produced in a powder metallurgical route. Mechanical tests of smooth and pre-cracked specimens have been performed in a wide temperature range. Below 280 deg. C the fracture toughness values of DUCROPUR are very low (1/2), above the transition temperature they exceed 500 MPa m1/2. Large plastic deformations have been observed. DUCROLLOY does not indicate such a significant increase of fracture toughness in the tested temperature range. But above 400 deg. C large plastic deformations can be obtained in bending samples, too. The fatigue crack propagation behaviour of DUCROPUR at 300 deg. C is similar to that of a ductile metal

  7. Chromium Enrichment on P11 Ferritic Steel by Pack Cementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fauzi F. A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The future thermal power plant is expected to operate at higher temperature to improve its efficiency and to reduce greenhouse gas emission. This target requires better corrosion properties of ferritic steels, which commonly used as materials for superheater and reheater of boiler tubes. In this work, chromium enrichment on the surface of ferritic steel is studied. The deposited chromium is expected to become a reservoir for the formation of chromia protective layer. Chromium was deposited on the substrate of steel by pack cementation process for two hours at the temperature of 850ºC, 950ºC and 1050ºC, respectively. XRD analysis indicated that chromium was successfully deposited at all temperatures. Somehow, SEM cross sectional image showed that continuous layer of chromium was not continuously formed at 850oC. Therefore, this research clarify that chromium enrichment by pack cementation may be conducted at the temperature above 950°C.

  8. Effect of polyethylene glycol on electrochemically deposited trivalent chromium layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joo-Yul LEE; Man KIM; Sik-Chol KWON

    2009-01-01

    The structural characteristics of the trivalent chromium deposits and their interfacial behavior in the plating solution with and without polyethylene glycol molecules were observed by using various electrochemical methods such as cyclic voltammetry, open circuit potential transition, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectrometry. It is shown that the polyethylene glycol molecules make the reductive current density lower in the trivalent chromium plating system and promote a hydrogen evolution reaction through their adsorption on the electrode surface. And the trivalent chromium layer formed from the polyethylene glycol-containing solution has somewhat higher density of cracks on its surface and results in a lower film resistance, lower polarization resistance, and higher capacitance in a corrosive atmosphere. It is also revealed that the formation of chromium carbide layer is facilitated in the presence of polyethylene glycol, which means easier electrochemical codeposition of chromium and carbon, not single chromium deposition.

  9. New technology for comprehensive utilization of aluminum-chromium residue from chromium salts production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-bin; QI Tian-gui; JIANG Xin-min; ZHOU Qiu-sheng; LIU Gui-hua; PENG Zhi-hong; HAN Deng-lun; ZHANG Zhong-yuan; YANG Kun-shan

    2008-01-01

    Colloidal aluminum-chromium residue(ACR) was mass-produced in chromate production process, and the large energy consumption and high recovery cost existed in traditional methods of utilizing such ACR. To overcome those problems, a new comprehensive method was proposed to deal with the ACR, and was proven valid in industry. In the new process, the chromate was separated firstly from the colloidal ACR by ripening and washing with additives, by which more than 95% hexavalent chromium was recovered. The chromium-free aluminum residue(CFAR), after properly dispersed, was digested at 120-130 ℃ and more than 90% alumina can be recovered. And then the pregnant aluminate solution obtained from digestion was seeded to precipitate aluminum hydroxide. This new method can successfully recover both alumina and sodium chromate, and thus realize the comprehensive utilization of ACR from chromate industry.

  10. Water fluoridation in 40 Brazilian cities: 7 year analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzely Adas Saliba MOIMAZ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Fluoride levels in the public water supplies of 40 Brazilian cities were analyzed and classified on the basis of risk/benefit balance. Material and Methods Samples were collected monthly over a seven-year period from three sites for each water supply source. The samples were analyzed in duplicate in the laboratory of the Center for Research in Public Health - UNESP using an ion analyzer coupled to a fluoride-specific electrode. Results A total of 19,533 samples were analyzed, of which 18,847 were artificially fluoridated and 686 were not artificially fluoridated. In samples from cities performing water fluoridation, 51.57% (n=9,720 had fluoride levels in the range of 0.55 to 0.84 mg F/L; 30.53% (n=5,754 were below 0.55 mg F/L and 17.90% (n=3,373 were above 0.84 mg F/L (maximum concentration=6.96 mg F/L. Most of the cities performing fluoridation that had a majority of samples with fluoride levels above the recommended parameter had deep wells and more than one source of water supply. There was some variability in the fluoride levels of samples from the same site and between collection sites in the same city. Conclusions The majority of samples from cities performing fluoridation had fluoride levels within the range that provides the best combination of risks and benefits, minimizing the risk of dental fluorosis while preventing dental caries. The conduction of studies about water distribution systems is suggested in cities with high natural fluoride concentrations in order to optimize the use of natural fluoride for fluoridation costs and avoid the risk of dental fluorosis.

  11. Effects of fluoridated milk on root dentin remineralization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang H Arnold

    Full Text Available The prevalence of root caries is increasing with greater life expectancy and number of retained teeth. Therefore, new preventive strategies should be developed to reduce the prevalence of root caries. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of fluoridated milk on the remineralization of root dentin and to compare these effects to those of sodium fluoride (NaF application without milk.Thirty extracted human molars were divided into 6 groups, and the root cementum was removed from each tooth. The dentin surface was demineralized and then incubated with one of the following six solutions: Sodium chloride NaCl, artificial saliva, milk, milk+2.5 ppm fluoride, milk+10 ppm fluoride and artificial saliva+10 ppm fluoride. Serial sections were cut through the lesions and investigated with polarized light microscopy and quantitative morphometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS. The data were statistically evaluated using a one-way ANOVA for multiple comparisons.The depth of the lesion decreased with increasing fluoride concentration and was the smallest after incubation with artificial saliva+10 ppm fluoride. SEM analysis revealed a clearly demarcated superficial remineralized zone after incubation with milk+2.5 ppm fluoride, milk+10 ppm fluoride and artificial saliva+10 ppm fluoride. Ca content in this zone increased with increasing fluoride content and was highest after artificial saliva+10 ppm fluoride incubation. In the artificial saliva+10 ppm fluoride group, an additional crystalline layer was present on top of the lesion that contained elevated levels of F and Ca.Incubation of root dentin with fluoridated milk showed a clear effect on root dentin remineralization, and incubation with NaF dissolved in artificial saliva demonstrated a stronger effect.

  12. Analysis of molybdenum, chromium, vanadium and iron by polarographic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of direct current Tast polarograph, differential pulse polarography and phase-selective alternative current Tast polarography to the problem of determining molybdenum, chromium, vanadium and iron in various supporting electrolytes is reported. The effect of the supporting electrolyte on the wave/peak potential and sensitivity of the metal ion have been examined. The polarographic methods were applied for simultaneous determination of chromium (3)/chromium (6), vanadium (4), vanadium (5) and iron (2)/iron (3) in different supporting electrolytes

  13. A REVIEW OF BIOSORPTION OF CHROMIUM IONS BY MICROORGANISMS

    OpenAIRE

    Inga Zinicovscaia

    2012-01-01

    Due to its widespread industrial use, chromium has become a serious pollutant in diverse environmental settings. The main source of chromium pollution including the Republic o Moldova is industry. It is a great need to develop new eco-friendly methods of chromium removal. Biosorption of heavy metals is a most promising technology involved in the removal of toxic metals from industrial waste streams and natural waters. This article is an extended abstract of a communication presented at the...

  14. CHROMIUM INDUCED CYTOTOXICITY IN BLACKGRAM (VIGNA MUNGO L.)

    OpenAIRE

    A. Chidambaram ، P. Sundaramoorthy ، A. Murugan ، K. Sankar Ganesh ، L. Baskaran

    2009-01-01

    Chromium is known to be highly toxic to biological systems. This study was designed to determine the mutagenic effects of different concentrations (0, 10, 25, 50, 100 and 200 mg/L) of hexavalent chromium on root tip cells of blackgram (Vigna mungo L. Hepper). The blackgram seeds were equi-spacially arranged in sterilized petriplates lined with filter paper and they were treated with different concentrations of chromium solution. In germination studies, the morphological growth parameters such...

  15. Processes affecting the remediation of chromium-contaminated sites.

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, C.D.; Wittbrodt, P R

    1991-01-01

    The remediation of chromium-contaminated sites requires knowledge of the processes that control the migration and transformation of chromium. Advection, dispersion, and diffusion are physical processes affecting the rate at which contaminants can migrate in the subsurface. Heterogeneity is an important factor that affects the contribution of each of these mechanisms to the migration of chromium-laden waters. Redox reactions, chemical speciation, adsorption/desorption phenomena, and precipitat...

  16. Production of a chromium Bose-Einstein condensate

    OpenAIRE

    Griesmaier, Axel; Stuhler, Jürgen; Pfau, Tilman

    2005-01-01

    The recent achievement of Bose-Einstein condensation of chromium atoms [1] has opened longed-for experimental access to a degenerate quantum gas with long-range and anisotropic interaction. Due to the large magnetic moment of chromium atoms of 6 {$\\mu$}B, in contrast to other Bose- Einstein condensates (BECs), magnetic dipole-dipole interaction plays an important role in a chromium BEC. Many new physical properties of degenerate gases arising from these magnetic forces have been predicted in ...

  17. Increase of chromium utilization in stainless steel melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The processes of deoxidizing when melting stainless 18-10 steels in electric are furnaces by the method of remelting with wastes are investigated. The dependences of amount of reduced chromium on silicon consumption are made more precise. It is shown that it is useful to apply aluminium for deoxidation of acid high-chromium slags. Based on the data on pilot melts the extent to which aluminium can be used as a reducing agent for chromium is estimated. 3 refs., 2 figs

  18. Fluoride uptake into the developing enamel and dentine of sheep incisors following daily ingestion of fluoridated milk or water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The caries preventive action of fluoride is common knowledge, although some of the mechanisms involved remain equivocal. At present, raised local levels of fluoride at, or in, the surface of tooth enamel is the most commonly accepted explanation of the anti-cariogenic action of fluoride. However, fluoride incorporated as fluorapatite into the tooth during its formation remains a possible alternative or complementary anti-cariogenic mechanism. If so, regular ingestion of fluoride during tooth formation is beneficial. Although use of fluoridated water is the preferred method in public health programmes, access to suitable potable water is required, and often this in not feasible. Fresh, preserved, or dried cow's milk products are widely used as nutritional and dietary items in most populations, particularly for young children. Milk is a practical, controllable means for regular delivery of fluoride. Processing of milk is commonly centralised and uses standardised conditions, allowing easy supplementation of fluoride for distribution to communities. The purpose of this study was to resolve the question of availability of fluoride ingested in milk compared with fluoride ingested in water by measuring fluoride deposition in the developing permanent incisors of young sheep. Incisors were analysed using a proton microprobe. (author). 18 refs., 1 tabs., 3 figs

  19. Water Fluoridation: A Critical Review of the Physiological Effects of Ingested Fluoride as a Public Health Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Peckham

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorine is the world’s 13th most abundant element and constitutes 0.08% of the Earth crust. It has the highest electronegativity of all elements. Fluoride is widely distributed in the environment, occurring in the air, soils, rocks, and water. Although fluoride is used industrially in a fluorine compound, the manufacture of ceramics, pesticides, aerosol propellants, refrigerants, glassware, and Teflon cookware, it is a generally unwanted byproduct of aluminium, fertilizer, and iron ore manufacture. The medicinal use of fluorides for the prevention of dental caries began in January 1945 when community water supplies in Grand Rapids, United States, were fluoridated to a level of 1 ppm as a dental caries prevention measure. However, water fluoridation remains a controversial public health measure. This paper reviews the human health effects of fluoride. The authors conclude that available evidence suggests that fluoride has a potential to cause major adverse human health problems, while having only a modest dental caries prevention effect. As part of efforts to reduce hazardous fluoride ingestion, the practice of artificial water fluoridation should be reconsidered globally, while industrial safety measures need to be tightened in order to reduce unethical discharge of fluoride compounds into the environment. Public health approaches for global dental caries reduction that do not involve systemic ingestion of fluoride are urgently needed.

  20. Chromium depletion from stainless steels during vacuum annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behaviour of chromium during selective evaporation by high temperature vacuum annealing has been investigated by means of energy dispersive X-ray analysis and by neutron activation analysis. It was established that the rate of chromium loss from austenitic stainless steels 316 and 321 is controlled by chromium inter-diffusion rather than tracer diffusion in the alloy. Two important parameters in selective removal of chromium from alloy steels are the variation in the chromium surface concentration with time and the depletion profile in the alloy. The present work gives support for the model in which loss of chromium is dependent on its diffusivity in the alloy and on an interface transfer coefficient. The results showed that the surface concentration of chromium decreased with increasing vacuum annealing time. The chromium depletion profile in the metal was in accord with the previous derived model, apart from an anomalous near surface region. Here the higher resolution of a neutron activation technique indicated a region within approximately 2 microns of the surface where the chromium concentration decreased more steeply than expected. (author)

  1. Stabilization and solidification of chromium-contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherne, C.A.; Thomson, B.M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Civil Engineering Dept.; Conway, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-11-01

    Chromium-contaminated soil is a common environmental problem in the United States as a result of numerous industrial processes involving chromium. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is the species of most concern because of its toxicity and mobility in groundwater. One method of diminishing the environmental impact of chromium is to reduce it to a trivalent oxidation state [Cr(III)], in which it is relatively insoluble and nontoxic. This study investigated a stabilization and solidification process to minimize the chromium concentration in the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) extract and to produce a solidified waste form with a compressive strength in the range of 150 to 300 pounds per square inch (psi). To minimize the chromium in the TCLP extract, the chromium had to be reduced to the trivalent oxidation state. The average used in this study was an alluvium contaminated with chromic and sulfuric acid solutions. The chromium concentration in the in the in situ soil was 1212 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) total chromium and 275 mg/kg Cr(VI). The effectiveness of iron, ferrous sulfate to reduce Cr(VI) was tested in batch experiments.

  2. Defect transformation in GSGG crystals during chromium ion activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absorption and induced absorption spectra, dose dependence of induced absorption, thermoluminescence of GSGG crystals, nominally pure and activated with chromium and neodymium ions in different concentrations, are investigated. It is shown that it is chromium ion presence in large concentration that decreases the induced coloration in GSGG crystals after γ-irradiation at 300 K. Optimum concentration of chromium ions for the minimum of induced coloration are found. The mechanism of decrease of induced coloration consisting in Fermi level displacement by chromium ion activation is established. Defect concentration and localization and recombination possibilities of electrons and holes in GSGG crystals are estimated by computer simulation

  3. Tribological Characteristics of Chromium-active Carbon Electroplated Composite Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUKa-fi; HUAMeng; Yi-min

    2004-01-01

    A process of chromium electroplating using a standard bath with additives and active carbon particles was reported, and the tribological behaviors of the composite coatings using the pin-on-disk tester and the table wear tester were i nvestig(aed. Experimental results indicate that the electroplated chromium-active carbon composite coatings exhibited the low friction coefficient anti excellent anti-wear properties whets coffered with the normal chromium electroplated ones. The formation of active carbon particles within the chromium matrices can be explained by SEM analysis and the mechanis of wear resistance of the composite coatings were studied.

  4. Method of trivalent chromium concentration determination by atomic spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reheulishvili, Aleksandre N.; Tsibakhashvili, Neli Ya.

    2006-12-12

    A method is disclosed for determining the concentration of trivalent chromium Cr(III) in a sample. The addition of perchloric acid has been found to increase the atomic chromium spectrometric signal due to Cr(III), while leaving the signal due to hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) unchanged. This enables determination of the Cr(III) concentration without pre-concentration or pre-separation from chromium of other valences. The Cr(III) concentration may be measured using atomic absorption spectrometry, atomic emission spectrometry or atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

  5. Influence of Chelating Agents on Chromium Fate in Sediment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGXIAOCHANG; SUNJINHE; 等

    1996-01-01

    A laboratory investigation on reaction between chelating agents and chromium was conducted to evaluate the effect of chelating agents on the adsorption and desorption of chromium in sediment.The amount of adsorbed chromium(VI) in sediment decreased slightly by 5%-10% because of addition of chelating agents.Chelating agents inhibited the removal of Cr(Ⅲ)by sediment from solutions and the inhibiting effect was in the order:citric acid>tartaric acid>EDTA,Salicylic acid.No effect of chelating agents on desorption of chromium in sediment was observed.

  6. Effective use of fluorides for the prevention of dental caries in the 21st century

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Lennon, Michael A

    2004-01-01

    , due to changing living conditions and dietary habits, and inadequate exposure to fluorides. Research on the oral health effects of fluoride started around 100 years ago; the focus has been on the link between water and fluorides and dental caries and fluorosis, topical fluoride applications, fluoride...

  7. Fluoride content of clay minerals and argillaceous earth materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J., Jr.; Glass, H.D.; White, W.A.; Trandel, R.M.

    1977-01-01

    A reliable method, utilizing a fluoride ion-selective electrode, is described for the determination of fluoride in clays and shales. Interference by aluminum and iron is minimal. The reproducibility of the method is about ??5% at different levels of fluoride concentration. Data are presented for various clay minerals and for the clays and shales. Fluoride values range from 44 ppm (0.0044%) for nontronite from Colfax, WA, to 51,800 ppm (5.18%) for hectorite from Hector, CA. In general, clays formed under hydrothermal conditions are relatively high in fluoride content, provided the hydrothermal waters are high in fluoride content. Besides hectorite, dickite from Ouray, CO, was found to contain more than 50 times as much fluoride (6700 ppm) as highly crystalline geode kaolinite (125 ppm). The clay stratum immediately overlying a fluorite mineralized zone in southern Illinois was found to have a higher fluoride content than the same stratum in a nonmineralized zone approximately 1 mile away. Nonmarine shales in contact with Australian coals were found to be lower in fluoride content than were marine shales in contact with Illinois coals. It is believed that, in certain instances, peak shifts on DTA curves of similar clay minerals are the result of significant differences in their fluoride content. ?? 1977.

  8. Arsenic from community water fluoridation: quantifying the effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Emily; Shapiro, Howard; Li, Ye; Minnery, John G; Copes, Ray

    2016-04-01

    Community water fluoridation is a WHO recommended strategy to prevent dental carries. One debated concern is that hydrofluorosilicic acid, used to fluoridate water, contains arsenic and poses a health risk. This study was undertaken to determine if fluoridation contributes to arsenic in drinking water, to estimate the amount of additional arsenic associated with fluoridation, and compare this to the National Sanitation Foundation/American National Standards Institute (NSF/ANSI) standard and estimates from other researchers. Using surveillance data from Ontario drinking water systems, mixed effects linear regression was performed to examine the effect of fluoridation status on the difference in arsenic concentration between raw water and treated water samples. On average, drinking water treatment was found to reduce arsenic levels in water in both fluoridated and non-fluoridated systems by 0.2 μg/L. However, fluoridated systems were associated with an additional 0.078 μg/L (95% CI 0.021, 0.136) of arsenic in water when compared to non-fluoridated systems (P = 0.008) while controlling for raw water arsenic concentrations, types of treatment processes, and source water type. Our estimate is consistent with concentrations expected from other research and is less than 10% of the NSF/ANSI standard of 1 μg/L arsenic in water. This study provides further information to inform decision-making regarding community water fluoridation.

  9. Caries prevention through the fluoridation of milk. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bánóczy, Jolán; Rugg-Gunn, Andrew J

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this review is to give an overview of 50 years experience of milk fluoridation and draw conclusions about the applicability of the method. Fluoridated milk was first investigated in the early 1950s, almost simultaneously in Switzerland, the USA and Japan. Stimulated by the favourable results obtained from these early studies, the establishment of The Borrow Dental Milk Foundation (subsequently The Borrow Foundation) in England gave an excellent opportunity for further research, both clinical and non-clinical, and a productive collaboration with the World Health Organization from the early 1980s onwards. Numerous peer-reviewed publications in international journals showed clearly the bioavailability of fluoride in milk, and increased concentrations of fluoride in saliva, dental plaque, dental enamel and dentine, and urine, after consumption of fluoridated milk. Clinical trials were initiated in the 1980s--some of these can be classed as randomised controlled trials, while most of the clinical studies were community preventive programs. These evaluations showed clearly that the optimal daily intake of fluoride in milk is effective in preventing dental caries. At present, milk fluoridation programs are running continuously in about ten countries of the world. Fluoridation of milk can be recommended as a caries preventive measure where the fluoride concentration in drinking water is suboptimal, caries experience in children is significant, and there is an existing school milk program. The program should aim to provide fluoridated milk for at least 200 days per year and should commence before the children are 4 years of age.

  10. Parabens do not increase fluoride uptake by dental enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Silva Tramontino

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate whether methylparaben and propylparaben, which present a similar chemical structure, increase fluoride uptake by demineralized dental enamel when present in buffered solutions. Methods: The study comprised an in vitro experiment using blocks of bovine dental enamel with artificial carious lesions. Enamel blocks were exposed to the following treatment (n=12: fluoride solution (200 ppm fluoride - control; solution containing fluoride and 13 mM methylparaben; solution containing fluoride and 13 mM propylparaben in 35% propylene glycol; solution containing fluoride in 35% propylene glycol. All solutions were buffered (0.01 M cacodilate and the pH was adjusted to 6.27. The blocks were exposed to the treatment solutions in the proportion of 2 ml per mm2 of exposed enamel area and fluoride formed was estimated after removing an enamel layer by acid etching. Fluoride extracted was determined by ion specific electrode and the amount of enamel removed was estimated by phosphorus analysis. ANOVA followed by Tukey’s test were used for statistical analysis, with significance level at 5%. Results: The dental blocks of treatment groups containing both parabens and the control group presented similar fluoride concentration in enamel and no statistical difference was observed among them (p>0.05. The dental blocks of treatment group containing fluoride and propylene glycol showed the lowest value of fluoride present in enamel, which was significantly different from the control and fluoride and methylparaben groups (p<0.05. Conclusion: Methyl and propylparaben in a buffered solution do not enhance fluoride uptake by demineralized dental enamel.

  11. Analysis of differentially expressed genes between fluoride-sensitive and fluoride-endurable individuals in midgut of silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Heying; Li, Gang; He, Qingling; Zhang, Huaguang; Xu, Anying

    2016-08-15

    Fluoride tolerance is an economically important trait of silkworm. Near-isogenic lines (NILs) of the dominant endurance to fluoride (Def) gene in Bombyx mori has been constructed before. Here, we analyzed the gene expression profiles of midgut of fluoride-sensitive and fluoride-endurable individuals of Def NILs by using high-throughput Illumina sequencing technology and bioinformatics tools, and identified differentially expressed genes between these individuals. A total of 3,612,399 and 3,567,631 clean tags for the libraries of fluoride-endurable and fluoride-sensitive individuals were obtained, which corresponded to 32,933 and 43,976 distinct clean tags, respectively. Analysis of differentially expressed genes indicates that 241 genes are differentially expressed between the two libraries. Among the 241 genes, 30 are up-regulated and 211 are down-regulated in fluoride-endurable individuals. Pathway enrichment analysis demonstrates that genes related to ribosomes, pancreatic secretion, steroid biosynthesis, glutathione metabolism, steroid biosynthesis, and glycerolipid metabolism are down-regulated in fluoride-endurable individuals. qRT-PCR was conducted to confirm the results of the DGE. The present study analyzed differential expression of related genes and tried to find out whether the crucial genes were related to fluoride detoxification which might elucidate fluoride effect and provide a new way in the fluorosis research. PMID:27106117

  12. Fluoride ion encapsulation by Mg2+ ions and phosphates in a fluoride riboswitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Aiming; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R; Patel, Dinshaw J

    2012-06-01

    Significant advances in our understanding of RNA architecture, folding and recognition have emerged from structure-function studies on riboswitches, non-coding RNAs whose sensing domains bind small ligands and whose adjacent expression platforms contain RNA elements involved in the control of gene regulation. We now report on the ligand-bound structure of the Thermotoga petrophila fluoride riboswitch, which adopts a higher-order RNA architecture stabilized by pseudoknot and long-range reversed Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen A•U pair formation. The bound fluoride ion is encapsulated within the junctional architecture, anchored in place through direct coordination to three Mg(2+) ions, which in turn are octahedrally coordinated to water molecules and five inwardly pointing backbone phosphates. Our structure of the fluoride riboswitch in the bound state shows how RNA can form a binding pocket selective for fluoride, while discriminating against larger halide ions. The T. petrophila fluoride riboswitch probably functions in gene regulation through a transcription termination mechanism. PMID:22678284

  13. Method for decontamination of nickel-fluoride-coated nickel containing actinide-metal fluorides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windt, Norman F.; Williams, Joe L.

    1983-01-01

    The invention is a process for decontaminating particulate nickel contaminated with actinide-metal fluorides. In one aspect, the invention comprises contacting nickel-fluoride-coated nickel with gaseous ammonia at a temperature effecting nickel-catalyzed dissociation thereof and effecting hydrogen-reduction of the nickel fluoride. The resulting nickel is heated to form a melt and a slag and to effect transfer of actinide metals from the melt into the slag. The melt and slag are then separated. In another aspect, nickel containing nickel oxide and actinide metals is contacted with ammonia at a temperature effecting nickel-catalyzed dissociation to effect conversion of the nickel oxide to the metal. The resulting nickel is then melted and separated as described. In another aspect nickel-fluoride-coated nickel containing actinide-metal fluorides is contacted with both steam and ammonia. The resulting nickel then is melted and separated as described. The invention is characterized by higher nickel recovery, efficient use of ammonia, a substantial decrease in slag formation and fuming, and a valuable increase in the service life of the furnace liners used for melting.

  14. The Effect of Calcium Pre-Rinse on Salivary Fluoride After 900 ppm Fluoride Mouthwash: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Ramazani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Calcium fluoride deposit during fluoride application. Uptake and retention of fluoride by saliva depends generally on the concentration of calcium. In this study, the ef-fect of calcium pre-rinse on salivary fluoride concentration after a 900 ppm fluoride mouthwash was investigated.Materials and Methods: This cross-over double-blind randomized clinical trial was con-ducted in a girls' dormitory in Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, southeast Iran. In this study, 42 female dental students were chosen using simple randomization. During the first phase, 21 subjects (group A used fluoride rinse (F regimen and the remaining (group B used calcium pre-rinse followed immediately by fluoride rinse (Ca + F regi-men. In the second phase, participants rinsed using the mouthwashes not previously used. Prior to each phase prophylaxis was performed and no fluoridated product was used dur-ing a two-week interval between the phases. Salivary samples were taken immediately be-fore (baseline, 1 and 12 hours after rinsing. The salivary fluoride concentration was de-termined using fluoride sensitive electrode. Repeated measures ANOVA was used for sta-tistical analysis and the significance level was set at P<0.05.Results: There was significant difference between fluoride concentrations at different time points (P< 0.001. Significant differences were observed when the different time points of two regimens were examined. In contrast to this, the baseline before using F regimen and the baseline before using Ca + F regimen did not show any significance (P= 0.070.Conclusion: Pre-rinsing with calcium before fluoride is recommended because of signifi-cant increases in salivary fluoride concentration.

  15. Fluoridation and tooth wear in Irish adults.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, F M

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of tooth wear in adults in Ireland and its relationship with water fluoridation. The National Survey of Adult Oral Health was conducted in 2000\\/2001. Tooth wear was determined using a partial mouth examination assessing the upper and lower anterior teeth. A total of 2456 subjects were examined. In this survey, increasing levels and severity of tooth wear were associated with ageing. Men were more affected by tooth wear and were more likely to be affected by severe tooth wear than women. It was found that age, and gender were significant predictors of tooth wear (P < 0.01). Overall, there was no significant relationship between fluoridation and tooth wear in this study.

  16. Revisiting the thermochemistry of chlorine fluorides

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez, H R

    2016-01-01

    In this work, accurate calculations of standard enthalpies of formation of chlorine fluorides (ClF$_n$, n=1--7; Cl$_2$F and Cl$_3$F$_2$) were performed through the isodesmic reactions scheme. It is argued that, for many chlorine fluorides, the gold standard method of quantum chemistry (CCSD(T)) is not capable to predict enthalpy values nearing chemical accuracy if atomization scheme is used. This is underpinned by a thorough analysis of total atomization energy results and the inspection of multireference features of these compounds. Other thermodynamic quantities were also calculated at different temperatures. In order to complement the energetic description, elimination curves were studied through density functional theory as a computationally affordable alternative to highly correlated wave function-based methods.

  17. Fluoride complexation of element 104, rutherfordium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba, Hiromitsu; Tsukada, Kazuaki; Asai, Masato; Toyoshima, Atsushi; Akiyama, Kazuhiko; Nishinaka, Ichiro; Hirata, Masaru; Yaita, Tsuyoshi; Ichikawa, Shin-Ichi; Nagame, Yuichiro; Yasuda, Ken-Ichiro; Miyamoto, Yutaka; Kaneko, Tetsuya; Goto, Shin-Ichi; Ono, Sawako; Hirai, Toshiyuki; Kudo, Hisaaki; Shigekawa, Mitsuru; Shinohara, Atsushi; Oura, Yasuji; Nakahara, Hiromichi; Sueki, Keisuke; Kikunaga, Hidetoshi; Kinoshita, Norikazu; Tsuruga, Naoya; Yokoyama, Akihiko; Sakama, Minoru; Enomoto, Shuich; Schädel, Matthias; Brüchle, Willy; Kratz, Jens V

    2004-04-28

    Fluoride complexation of element 104, rutherfordium (Rf), produced in the 248Cm(18O,5n)261Rf reaction has been studied by anion-exchange chromatography on an atom-at-a-time scale. The anion-exchange chromatographic behavior of Rf was investigated in 1.9-13.9 M hydrofluoric acid together with those of the group-4 elements Zr and Hf produced in the 18O-induced reactions on Ge and Gd targets, respectively. It was found that the adsorption behavior of Rf on anion-exchange resin is quite different from those of Zr and Hf, suggesting the influence of relativistic effects on the fluoride complexation of Rf.

  18. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium (2010 External Review Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [UPDATE] New Schedule for IRIS Hexavalent Chromium Assessment In Feb 2012, EPA developed a new schedule for completing the IRIS hexavalent chromium assessment. Based on the recommendations of the external peer review panel, which met in May 2011 to review the dra...

  19. Chromium and Polyphenols From Cinnamon Improve Insulin Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naturally occurring compounds that have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity include chromium and polyphenols found in cinnamon. These compounds also have similar effects on insulin signaling and glucose control. The signs of chromium deficiency are similar to those for the metabolic syndrome ...

  20. Safety, absorption, and antioxidant effects of chromium histidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supplemental chromium has been shown to be involved in the alleviation of the metabolic syndrome, glucose intolerance, polycystic ovary syndrome, depression, excess body fat, and gestational, steroid-induced, and type 2 diabetes. Chromium amino acid complexes that contained histidine displayed cons...

  1. Toxicity and adaptation of Dictyosphaerium chlorelloides to extreme chromium contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Fortún, Sebastián; López-Rodas, Victoria; Navarro, Macarena; Marvá, Fernando; D'ors, Ana; Rouco, Mónica; Haigh-Florez, David; Costas, Eduardo

    2009-09-01

    Metals are often spilled by industries into inland water environments, with adverse consequences. Numerous papers have reported that heavy metals produce massive destruction of algae. Nevertheless, algal populations seem to become tolerant when they have had previous exposures to heavy metals. Because the mechanisms allowing heavy metal tolerance of algae are not yet known, the present study analyzed the effect of hexavalent chromium on growth and photosynthetic performance of Dictyosphaerium chlorelloides, stressing on the adaptation mechanisms to chromium contamination. Growth and photosynthetic performance of algal cells were inhibited by Cr(VI) at 10 mg/L, and the 72-h median inhibition concentration was established as 1.64 and 1.54 mg/L, respectively. However, after further incubation for a three month period in an environment with 25 mg/L of chromium, some rare, chromium-resistant cells occasionally were found. A Luria-Delbrück fluctuation analysis was performed to distinguish between resistant algae arising from rare, spontaneous mutations and resistant algae arising from physiological adaptation and other adaptive mechanisms. Resistant cells arose only by spontaneous mutations before the addition of chromium, with a rate of 1.77 x 10(-6) mutants per cell division. From a practical point of view, the use of both chromium-sensitive and chromium-resistant genotypes could make possible a specific algal biosensor for chromium. PMID:19323601

  2. Residual Chromium in Leather by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Okoh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Most tanning processes employ the use of chromium sulphate. For chromium tanned leather, finished products may contain high amount of residual chromium. This may pose some health hazards, since chromium is known to be toxic at elevated concentration. This justifies the need for the study. Approach: Various samples of leather were collected from a tannery, a leather crafts market, a leather dump site and from local tanners all in Kano, Nigeria in 2009. The samples were irradiated for 6 h in the inner site of the Nigerian Research Reactor (NIRR-1 at a flux of 5×1011 ncm-2 sec-1. Results: After evaluating the spectrum, the mean results for chromium in the samples were determined as 2.33±0.3, 2.23±0.3 and 2.93±0.4% for samples from the tannery, leather crafts market and leather dump sites respectively. Chromium concentration in samples collected from local tanners who use tannins from Acacia nilotica as tanning agent was below the detection limit of Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA technique used in the study. Conclusion: Although, the concentrations of chromium in the analysed samples were not much higher than what were obtained in literature, they may be enough to sensitize the population that is allergic to chromium.

  3. Perspectives in the effective use of fluoride in Asia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, P E; Phantumvanit, P

    2012-01-01

    services, in particular, exposure to disease prevention programs (Petersen, 2003, 2008a). Benefits of fluoride for caries prevention have been substantiated in many countries (Petersen and Lennon, 2004; Jones et al., 2005). In the second half of the 20th century, this focus shifted to the development...... and evaluation of fluoride toothpastes and rinses and, to a lesser extent, to alternatives to water fluoridation, such as salt and milk fluoridation. Most recently, efforts have been made to summarize this extensive database through systematic reviews of fluoride administration (McDonagh et al., 2000; Marinho et...... al., 2003; Australian Government, 2007). The Asian workshop held in Phan-Nga, Thailand, during March 22-24, 2011, aimed to discuss current information on fluoride and dental caries, as well as to try identifying barriers and opportunities that countries of Asia may have for implementing such programs...

  4. Adsorption of Fluoride Ion by Inorganic Cerium Based Adsorbent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiao Zhongzhi(焦中志); Chen Zhonglin; Yang Min; Zhang Yu; Li Guibai

    2004-01-01

    Excess of fluoride in drinking water is harmful to human health, the concentration of F- ions must be maintained in the range of 0.5 to 1.5 mg/L. An inorganic cerium based adsorbent (CTA) is developed on the basis of research of adsorption of fluoride on cerium oxide hydrate. Some adsorption of fluoride by CTA adsorbent experiments were carried out, and results showed that CTA adsorbent has a quick adsorption speed and a large adsorption capacity. Adsorption follows Freundlich isotherm, and low pH value helps fluoride removal. Some physical-chemical characteristics of CTA adsorbent were experimented, fluoride removal mechanism was explored, and results showed that hydroxyl group of CTA adsorbent played an important role in the fluoride removal.

  5. Fluoride contamination in rain water of Sigrauli region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaurasia, S.; Mishra, S.K. [Mahatma Gandhi Chitrakoot Gramodaya, Chitrakoot (India)

    2007-07-01

    In this paper fluoride was monitored in rain water during rainy season at seven locations of Sigrauli region in 2004. The sampling location covered the impact of industrial complex of the area, and its impact on surface water sources monitored for the fluoride, pH, and electrical conductivity. The higher concentration of fluoride in rain water was observed 2.03 mg/L at Dudhar and in ponds water highest value was 3.14 mg/L. This suggested that serious fluoride pollution is occurring in Singrauli region posing a threat to the health and livelihood of the people of the region. Fluoride transported by the air route from coal burning emissions of large thermal power plants concentrate in small geographical area, and industries. Fluoride pollution in Singrauli area deserve intensive scientific studies and urgent attention. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Distribution of fluoride in ground water of West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathes, M.V.; Waldron, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the results of a study by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey, to evaluate the distribution of fluoride in ground water of West Virginia. Fluoride is a natural chemical constituent in domestic and public water supplies in West Virginia. Fluoride concentrations of about 1.0 milligram per liter in drinking water are beneficial to dental health. Concentrations greater than 2.0 milligrams per liter, however, could harm teeth and bones. Fluoride concentra- tions in ground water of West Virginia range from less than 0.1 to 12 milligrams per liter. Fluoride concentrations that exceed 2.0 milligrams per liter are found in wells drilled to all depths, wells drilled in all topographic settings, and wells drilled into most geologic units. Most fluoride concentrations that exceed 2.0 milligrams per liter are located at sites clustered in the northwestern part of the State.

  7. Viscosity estimation for slags containing calcium fluoride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qifeng Shu; Jiayun Zhang

    2005-01-01

    Based on recently published experimental data, the Riboud model was modified for viscosity estimation of the slags containing calcium fluoride. The estimated values were in good agreement with measured data. Reasonable estimation can be achieved using the modified Riboud model for mould fluxes and ESR (eletro slag remelting) slags. Especially for ESR slags, the modified Riboud model can provide much more precise values than the original Riboud model.

  8. Fluoride solid electrolytes containing rare earth elements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Viera Trnovcová; Pavel P. Fedorov; Ivan Furár

    2008-01-01

    Relations between the structure, ionic conductivity and dielectric properties of fluoride systems of different structures containing rare earth elements were presented. Superionic conductivities, by fluoride ions, of fluorite-structured (MF2-REF3, M=Ba, Pb, RE=La-Lu, Sc, Y), orthorhombic (REF3, RE=Tb-Er,Y), tysonite-structured (REF3-MF2, RE=La-Nd, M=Sr), monoclinic (BaRE2F8, RE=Ho-Yb, Y) fluoride single crystals and eutectic composites (LiF-REF3, RE=La-Gd,Y) were compared. Anisotropy of electrical properties of crystals with a lower symmetry was explained by modeling optimum ionic paths. For explanation of concentration dependences of fast ionic conductivity, models of aggregation of defects into clusters were proposed. In fluorite-structured crystals, the highest ionic conductivity was found for PbF2: 7 mol% ScF3 (at 500 K, σ500=0.13 S/cm). In tysonite-structured crystals, the highest ionic conductivity was found for LaF3: 3 mol% SrF2 (σ500=2.4×10-2 S/cm). Different types of coordination polyhedrons and their different linking in orthorhombic and tysonite structure explained large differences between conductivities in both structures. Eutectic systems, prepared as directionally solidified composites, enabled to study some orthorhombic fluoride phases (GdF3, SmF3), which cannot be prepared as single crystals. An influence of the orthorhombic-tysonite phase transition on the ionic conductivity was shown.

  9. Effect of fluoride toothpastes on enamel demineralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gintner Zeno

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It was the aim of this study to investigate the effect of four different toothpastes with differing fluoride compounds on enamel remineralization. Methods A 3 × 3 mm window on the enamel surface of 90 human premolars was demineralized in a hydroxyethylcellulose solution at pH 4.8. The teeth were divided into 6 groups and the lower half of the window was covered with varnish serving as control. The teeth were immersed in a toothpaste slurry containing: placebo tooth paste (group 1; remineralization solution (group 2; Elmex Anticaries (group 3; Elmex Sensitive (group 4; Blend-a-med Complete (group 5 and Colgate GRF (group 6. Ten teeth of each group were used for the determination of the F- content in the superficial enamel layer and acid solubility of enamel expressed in soluble phosphorus. Of 6 teeth of each group serial sections were cut and investigated with polarization light microscopy (PLM and quantitative energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX. Results The PLM results showed an increased remineralization of the lesion body in the Elmex Anticaries, Elmex Sensitive and Colgate GRF group but not in the Blend-a-med group. A statistically significant higher Ca content was found in the Elmex Anticaries group. The fluoride content in the superficial enamel layer was significantly increased in both Elmex groups and the Blend-a-med group. Phosphorus solubility was significantly decreased in both Elmex groups and the Blend-a-med group. Conclusion It can be concluded that amine fluoride compounds in toothpastes result in a clearly marked remineralization of caries like enamel lesions followed by sodium fluoride and sodium monofluorophosphate formulations.

  10. Health protection: Fluoridation and dental health.

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    Tooth decay, which affects 95 percent of Americans, is our most common health problem, costing an estimated +2 billion yearly for treatment. By the time children reach 17 years of age, 94 percent have experienced caries and 36 percent have lost one or more permanent teeth due to caries. Dental disease prevention embodies the spectrum of many activities from the fluoridation of community and school water supplies to the dental health education of the child and adult. At this stage of our knowl...

  11. Delivery Challenges for Fluoride, Chlorhexidine and Xylitol

    OpenAIRE

    Featherstone, John DB

    2006-01-01

    The progression or reversal of dental caries is determined by the balance between pathological and protective factors. It is well established that a) fluoride inhibits demineralization and enhances remineralization, b) chlorhexidine reduces the cariogenic bacterial challenge, and c) xylitol is non-cariogenic and has antibacterial properties. The challenge that we face is how best to deliver these anti-caries entities at true therapeutic levels, over time, to favorably tip the caries balance. ...

  12. STEMS AND THEIR ASHES OF SOME HERBAL PLANTS AS ADSORBENTS IN THE REMOVAL OF CHROMIUM (VI FROM WASTE WATERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Krishna Veni

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A thorough investigation is made to explore the surface sorption abilities of powders of stems and their ashes of some herbal plants in controlling the Chromium (VI pollution in waste waters. It is found that the powders of stems and their ashes of Achyranthes aspera, Mentha, Emblica officinalis, Hybiscus roja sinensis, Ocimum sanctum and Psidium guajava have strong affinity towards Chromate at low pH values. % of removal of Chromate is found to be pH sensitive and also depends on sorption concentration and time of equilibration. The conditions for the maximum extraction of Chromate at minimum dosage of sorbent and equilibration time have been optimized. More than 90.0% of removal of Chromate is found. Sorbent concentrations and time needed for the maximum removal of Chromate is less for the ashes of stems than with the raw stem powders. The presence of ten fold excesses of Cations : Ca2+, Mg2+ , Cu2, Zn2+ and Ni2 + and anions like NO3 - ,Chloride, Fluoride and Carbonate have marginally effected the % removal of Chromium (VI while Sulphate and Phosphate showed some interference with some sorbents but even with them, the % of extractability never comes down to 71.0%. The adoptability of the methodologies developed in this work are tested with respect to diverse waste water samples collected from industrial effluents and in natural lakes and found to be remarkably successful.

  13. Biological effects data: Fluoride and sulfur dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMechan, K.J. (ed.); Holton, R.L.; Ulbricht, R.J.; Morgan , J.B.

    1975-04-01

    The Alumax Pacific Aluminum Corporation has proposed construction of an aluminum reduction facility near Youngs Bay at Warrenton, Oregon. This report comprises one part of the final report to Alumax on a research project entitled, Physical, Chemical and Biological Studies of Youngs Bay.'' It presents data pertaining to the potential biological effects of fluoride and sulfur dioxide, two potentially hazardous plant-stack emissions, on selected aquatic species of the area. Companion volumes provide a description of the physical characteristics the geochemistry, and the aquatic animals present in Youngs Bay and adjacent ecosystems. An introductory volume provides general information and maps of the area, and summarizes the conclusions of all four studies. The data from the two phases of the experimental program are included in this report: lethal studies on the effects of selected levels of fluoride and sulfur dioxide on the survival rate of eleven Youngs Bay faunal species from four phyla, and sublethal studies on the effects of fluoride and sulfur dioxide on the rate of primary production of phytoplankton. 44 refs., 18 figs., 38 tabs.

  14. Bone scintigraphy in fluoride treated osteoporosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantitative bone scintigraphy was performed on 23 white females with post-menopausal osteoporosis and vertebral compression fractures. These patients were then entered into a randomized, double-blind clinical trial or sodium fluoride therapy (NaF=14, placebo=9) which included repeat bone scintigraphy every six months. Scintigraphic images were acquired for 500K counts per image over the total body with computer acquisition over the posterior thoracic and lumbar spine. Images were obtained on a wide field-of-view gamma camera two hours after injecting 15 mCi of Tc-99m MDP. Data analysis showed a significant reduction in the activity ratio of abnormal vertebral body to normal vertebral body in those patients treated with sodium fluoride (paired t-test p=0.0095). No significant change was observed in the control group of (p=0.142). These results suggest that sodium fluoride therapy promotes more rapid healing of osteoporotic vertebral fractures. They also demonstrate the utility of serial quantitative bone scintigraphy in assessing osteoporotic patients with vertebral compression fractures

  15. How and when to prescribe sodium fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shambaugh, G E

    1989-03-01

    Sodium fluoride has now been used for 24 years in an effort to slow down or arrest sensorineural hearing nerve deterioration in patients with stapedial otosclerosis or after stapedectomy, as well as in patients with pure cochlear otosclerosis. Extensive clinical experience in thousands of patients with this therapy has demonstrated its value in arresting previously progressive sensorineural hearing loss. For a long time there were those who objected to this therapy on the basis that it had not been adequately proven by double-blind, placebo-controlled studies. They have been answered by Bretlau's study in Denmark and Fisch's from Switzerland; both investigators confirmed on small groups the value of sodium fluoride by double-blind, placebo-controlled studies. Extensive research by Professor Petrovic of Strasbourg while at our tissue culture laboratory at Northwestern University demonstrated the action of sodium fluoride on bone. A nicely designed study with radioactive strontium by Linthicum, House, and Althaus demonstrated its value in promoting maturation of a spongiotic focus. Today there is no reason to hesitate in prescribing this useful, effective, and safe medication to promote maturation of otospongiotic lesions, and thus to slow down or to arrest progression in sensorineural hearing loss.

  16. Mortality and cancer morbidity after heavy occupational fluoride exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandjean, P; Juel, K; Jensen, Ole Møller

    1985-01-01

    A cohort of 431 male cryolite workers employed for at least six months between 1924 and 1961 was identified from personnel records at the Copenhagen cryolite factory. During this period, heavy fluoride exposure resulted in at least 74 cases of skeletal fluorosis. All workmen in the cohort were......, a possible residual effect of fluoride cannot be excluded. However, any major carcinogenic effect of heavy fluoride exposure would be very unlikely....

  17. 40 CFR 60.202 - Standard for fluorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for fluorides. 60.202 Section... Industry: Wet-Process Phosphoric Acid Plants § 60.202 Standard for fluorides. (a) On and after the date on... facility any gases which contain total fluorides in excess of 10.0 g/Mg of equivalent P2O5 feed (0.020...

  18. 40 CFR 60.192 - Standard for fluorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for fluorides. 60.192 Section... Plants § 60.192 Standard for fluorides. (a) On and after the date on which the initial performance test... total fluorides, as measured according to § 60.195, in excess of: (1) 1.0 kg/Mg (2.0 lb/ton) of...

  19. The status of community water fluoridation in the United States.

    OpenAIRE

    Easley, M W

    1990-01-01

    Community water fluoridation has served the American public extremely well as the cornerstone of dental caries prevention activities for 45 years. The dental and general health benefits associated with the ingestion of water-borne fluorides have been well known by researchers for an even longer period. Continued research has repeatedly confirmed the safety, effectiveness, and efficiency of community water fluoridation in preventing dental caries for Americans regardless of age, race, ethnicit...

  20. CHROMIUM BIOACCUMULATION FROM COMPOSTS AND VERMICOMPOSTS BASED ON TANNERY SLUDGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof GONDEK

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Storage of waste substances is not indifferent to ecological equilibrium in the environment therefore should not be the ultimate way to limit waste arduousness. Therefore, the conducted investigations aimed to determine the effect of tannery composts and vermicomposts loaded with chromium on this element bioaccumulation in earthworm bodies and biomass of selected plants. Chromium in composts and vermicomposts based on tannery sludges occurred in small quantities and easily soluble compounds. Chromium concentrations in redworm biomass points to this metal accumulation in Eisenia fetida body tissues. This element content in redworm biomass was signifi cantly positively correlated with its content in composts. Chromium content in plants was diversifi ed and on treatments was generally smaller than on mineral treatment or farmyard manure. Chromium absorbed by plants was stored mainly in the root systems, and over the norm content of this element found in vermicomposts did not cause its excessive accumulation in plant biomass.

  1. Bioleaching of chromium from tannery sludge by indigenous Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan-Shan; Pan, Zhi-Yan; Lang, Jian-Min; Xu, Jian-Miao; Zheng, Yu-Guo

    2007-08-17

    Chromium in tannery sludge will cause serious environmental problems and is toxic to organisms. The acidophilic sulfur-oxidizing Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans can leach heavy metals form urban and industrial wastes. This study examined the ability of an indigenous sulfur-oxidizing A. thiooxidans to leach chromium from tannery sludge. The results showed that the pH of sludge mixture inoculated with the indigenous A. thiooxidans decreased to around 2.0 after 4 days. After 6 days incubation in shaking flasks at 30 degrees C and 160 rpm, up to 99% of chromium was solubilized from tannery sludge. When treated in a 2-l bubble column bioreactor for 5 days at 30 degrees C and aeration of 0.5 vvm, 99.7% of chromium was leached from tannery sludge. The results demonstrated that chromium in tannery sludge can be efficiently leached by the indigenous A. thiooxidans.

  2. Biosorption potency of Aspergillus niger for removal of chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Shaili; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2006-09-01

    Aspergillus niger isolated from soil and effluent of leather tanning mills had higher activity to remove chromium. The potency of Aspergillus niger was evaluated in shake flask culture by absorption of chromium at pH 6 and temperature 30 degrees C. The results of the study indicated removal of more than 75% chromium by Aspergillus niger determined by diphenylcarbazide colorimetric assay and atomic absorption spectrophotometry after 7 days. Study of microbial Cr(VI) reduction and identification of reduction intermediates has been hindered by the lack of analytical techniques that can identify the oxidation state with subcellular spatial resolution. Therefore, removal of chromium was further substantiated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), which indicated an accumulation of chromium in the fungal mycelium. PMID:16874547

  3. LiFePO_4/C via fluoride doping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Non-stoichiometric compound fluoride-doped LiFePO4/C cathode materials were synthesized via solid-state reaction using MgF2 and AlF3 as dopant. The fluoride-doped LiFePO4/C samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and electrochemical testing. The results show that the materials are well crystallized and fluoride doping cannot change the space structure of LiFePO4. Slight amounts of Fe2O3 with no fluoride impurity were ...

  4. Sodium fluoride influences the expression of keratins in cultured keratinocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Prado, Euridice; Wurtz, Tilmann; Ferbus, Didier; Shabana, El-Hassan; FOREST, Nadine; Berdal, Ariane

    2010-01-01

    Epithelia in lung, skin, and kidney are often exposed to fluoride, and tissue damage in lung and kidney due to fluoride is well documented. Nevertheless, the biological effects of fluoride on epithelia are poorly investigated. In the present study, we report effects of sodium fluoride (NaF) on the differentiation of a human epithelial cell line, HaCaT. These cells may serve as a keratinocyte model, because they express a wide spectrum of keratins (Ks), and they associate into stratified tissu...

  5. Fluoride content in caffeinated, decaffeinated and herbal teas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, J T; Koh, S H

    1996-01-01

    The fluoride contents of infusions prepared from 44 different brands and types of teas were measured. Fluoride concentrations ranged from 0.34 to 3.71 ppm (mean = 1.50 ppm) in caffeinated tea infusions, 0.02-0.14 ppm (mean = 0.05 ppm) in herbal tea infusions, and 1.01-5.20 ppm (mean = 3.19) in decaffeinated tea infusions. This is the first report of the fluoride content of decaffeinated teas. The mean fluoride content of decaffeinated tea infusions is significantly (p decaffeination is the most likely explanation of the above observation.

  6. Effects of oral doses of fluoride on nestling European starlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, W.J.; Grue, C.E.; Schuler, C.A.; Bunck, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    Nestling European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris), raised and fed by free-living adults, were given daily oral doses of either distilled water, 193 mg sodium as Na2CO3 per kg of body weight (sodium control group), or 6, 10, 13, 17,23, 30, 40, 80, 160 mg of the fluoride ion as NaF in distilled water per kg of body weight (mg/kg). Dosing began when nestlings were 24-48 hr old and continued for 16 days. The 24-hr LD50 of fluoride for day-old starlings was 50 mg/kg. The 16-day LD50 was 17 mg/kg. The sodium control group did not differ from the water control group with respect to any of the measured variables. Growth rates were significantly reduced in the 13 and 17 mg of fluoride/kg groups; weights of birds given higher dose levels were omitted from growth comparisons because of high, fluoride-induced mortality. Although pre-fledging weights for the 10, 13, and 17 mg of fluoride/kg groups averaged 3.6 to 8.6% less than controls at 17 days, this difference was not significant. Feather and bone growth of the fluoride and control groups were not different, except for keel length measured at 17 days of age which averaged less in the fluoride groups. Liver and spleen weights were not affected by fluoride treatments. No histological damage related to fluoride treatments was found in liver, spleen, or kidney. The logarithm of bone fluoride and magnesium concentration increased with the logarithm of increasing fluoride treatment levels and were significantly correlated with each other. Fluoride treatments had no effect on percent calcium or phosphorus in bone or plasma alkaline phosphatase activity. Oral doses of fluoride appear to be more toxic than equivalent dietary levels. Most birds probably acquire fluoride through their diet. Therefore, the results of the study may overestimate the potential effects of fluorides on songbirds living in fluoride-contaminated environments.

  7. Oxidative stress in cases of chronic fluoride intoxication

    OpenAIRE

    Ailani, Vinita; R. C. Gupta; Gupta, Sunil Kumar; Gupta, Kapil

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to find out the level of oxidative stress and effect of supplementation of vitamin C, D and Calcium on levels of SOD, serum and urinary fluoride in children residing in endemic fluorosis area. For this the fluoride belt of Jaipur district was selected. The parameters selected were Super oxide dismutase, serum fluoride and urinary fluoride. The study was conducted on one hundred children, selected from four areas (25 from each area) consuming water containing 1.2, 2.4,...

  8. Total Fluoride Intake and Urinary Excretion in German Children Aged 3–6 Years

    OpenAIRE

    Haftenberger, Marjolein; Viergutz, Gabriele; Neumeister, Volker; Hetzer, Gisela

    2014-01-01

    There have only been few investigations comparing total fluoride intake and the fluoride proportion excreted in urine in pre–school children. In addition, the results of available studies are conflicting. Total fluoride intake was assessed in 11 healthy children aged 3–6 years on 2 consecutive days and urinary fluoride excretion was determined. The duplicate–diet approach was used for the assessment of fluoride intake from solid and liquid foods. Fluoride intake from toothbrushing was calcula...

  9. Cariostatic effect of fluoride-containing restorative materials associated with fluoride gels on root dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Tavares Borges

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Secondary caries is still the main cause of restoration replacement, especially on the root surface OBJECTIVE: This in vitro study evaluated the cariostatic effects of fluoride-containing restorative materials associated with fluoride gels, on root dentin. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A randomized complete block design was used to test the effects of the restorative systems, fluoride regimes and the interactions among them at different distances from restoration margins. Standardized cavities were prepared on 240 bovine root specimens and randomly assigned to 15 groups of treatments (n=16. Cavities were filled with the following restorative materials: Ketac-Fil (3M-ESPE; Vitremer (3M-ESPE; Dyract/Prime & Bond NT (Dentsply; Charisma/Gluma One Bond (Heraeus Kulzer and the control, Z250/Single Bond (3M-ESPE. The specimens were subjected to a pH-cycling model designed to simulate high-caries activity. During the cycles, 1.23% acidulated phosphate fluoride, 2.0% neutral sodium fluoride or deionized/distilled water (control was applied to the specimens for 4 min. The surface Knoop microhardness test was performed before (KHNi and after (KHNf the pH cycles at 100, 200 and 300 mm from the margins. Dentin microhardness loss was represented by the difference in initial and final values (KHNi - KHNf. Data were analyzed by Friedman's and Wilcoxon's tests, ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=5%. RESULTS: The interaction of restorative systems and topical treatments was not significant (p=0.102. Dentin microhardness loss was lowest closer to the restoration. Ketac-fil presented the highest cariostatic effect. Vitremer presented a moderate effect, while Dyract and Charisma did not differ from the control, Z250. The effects of neutral and acidulated fluoride gels were similar to each other and higher than the control. CONCLUSION: Conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cements as well as neutral and acidulated fluoride gels inhibit the progression of artificial caries

  10. Selenium protection from cadmium and chromium poisoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of selenium with cadmium and chromium was studied in 168 chicken-broilers (DWCxWR) divided into four equal groups. Eight-week old control animals received an intravenous dose of /sup 115m/Cd Chloride 370 KBq/Kg (Group I), or 51Cr Chloride 370 KBq/Kg (Group II). The kinetics of these isotopes were studied by scintillation spectrometry (NaI/TI) carried out for whole blood, plasma, plasma proteins, urine, feces and homogenates of all organs at various time intervals. Animals in Groups III and IV received eight subcutaneous doses of sodium selenate (5ug) at 8-week intervals prior to /sup 115m/Cd or 51Cr. The kinetics of these elements were studied as in the previous two groups. It was found that selenium affected those kinetics in two ways: (a) by increasing the excretion of Cd by 11 +/- 3% (P < 0.001) and that of Cr by 7 +/- 1% (P < 0.001); and (b) by favoring redistribution of those elements, with significant (P < 0.001) reductions in liver, endocrine glands and kidney and increases (P < 0.01) in bone. The study suggests that selenium protects the animals' vital organs from environmental pollutants, such as cadmium and chromium

  11. Determination of Fluoride in Toothpaste Using an Ion-Selective Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Truman S.; Cappuccino, Carleton C.

    1975-01-01

    Outlines the theory of chemical potentiometry, describes the experimental procedure for free fluoride determination, and presents sample data of fluoride concentration for various brands of toothpaste. (GS)

  12. PREPARATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF STRONTIUM FLUORIDE POWDERS ACTIVATED BY NEODYMIUM FLUORIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Kuznetsov

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Study. The paper deals with preparation processes of ultradisperse, homogeneous powder Sr1-хNdхF2+х (х= 0.003-0.2, with use of ammonium fluoride as the fluorinating agent taken over 114-120 % from stoichiometry. Method. Nitrate of strontium, neodymium nitrate hexahydrate, with the content equal to 99. 99 % of the basic substance and ammonium fluoride were used as the source of substances. Activated powders of strontium fluoride were obtained by the method of deposition from aqueous solutions by washing the precipitate with a solution of ammonium fluoride, taken over 114 - 120% from stoichiometry. The washed precipitate was centrifuged for 5-7 min, dried in the air at 30-350 C. Heat treatment of the dried precipitate was carried out in two stages: the first stage at the temperature of 200- 2500 C for 0.5-1 hour, the second one at 550- 6000 C for 2-3 hours. X-ray analysis of the synthesized samples was carried out on a Bruker D8 Advance diffractometer, radiation Cu K. The size and shape measuring of the particles of activated strontium fluoride was carried out by means of electron microscope Carl Zeiss NVision 40. The content of neodymium in activated powders of strontium fluoride was determined by the method of spectral emission analysis on the device LEA - S500. Chemical analysis for determination of ammonium ion (NH4+ content in the obtained samples was performed by the method of Kjeldahl. Calculations of lattice parameters, size of coherent scattering regions and the values of micro-deformations were carried out by TOPAS program. Main Results. Preparation processes of ultradisperse, homogeneous powder Sr1-хNdхF2+х (х= 0.003-0.2, with use of ammonium fluoride as the fluorinating agent taken over 114-120 % from stoichiometry, provides obtaining the firm solution Sr1-x-yNdx(NH4yF2+x-y of the cubic fluorite structure. It has been found out that the morphology and size of the resulting product depend on the quantity of

  13. Scientific Opinion on Dietary Reference Values for fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Following a request from the European Commission, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA derived Dietary Reference Values (DRVs for fluoride, which are provided as Adequate Intake (AI from all sources, including non-dietary sources. Fluoride is not an essential nutrient. Therefore, no Average Requirement for the performance of essential physiological functions can be defined. Nevertheless, the Panel considered that the setting of an AI is appropriate because of the beneficial effects of dietary fluoride on prevention of dental caries. The AI is based on epidemiological studies (performed before the 1970s showing an inverse relationship between the fluoride concentration of water and caries prevalence. As the basis for defining the AI, estimates of mean fluoride intakes of children via diet and drinking water with fluoride concentrations at which the caries preventive effect approached its maximum whilst the risk of dental fluorosis approached its minimum were chosen. Except for one confirmatory longitudinal study in US children, more recent studies were not taken into account as they did not provide information on total dietary fluoride intake, were potentially confounded by the use of fluoride-containing dental hygiene products, and did not permit a conclusion to be drawn on a dose-response relationship between fluoride intake and caries risk. The AI of fluoride from all sources (including non-dietary sources is 0.05 mg/kg body weight per day for both children and adults, including pregnant and lactating women. For pregnant and lactating women, the AI is based on the body weight before pregnancy and lactation. Reliable and representative data on the total fluoride intake of the European population are not available.

  14. Standard Specification for Pressure Consolidated Powder Metallurgy Iron-Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum (UNS N08367), Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Columbium (Nb) (UNS N06625), Nickel-Chromium-Iron Alloys (UNS N06600 and N06690), and Nickel-Chromium-Iron-Columbium-Molybdenum (UNS N07718) Alloy Pipe Flanges, Fittings, Valves, and Parts

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2015-01-01

    Standard Specification for Pressure Consolidated Powder Metallurgy Iron-Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum (UNS N08367), Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Columbium (Nb) (UNS N06625), Nickel-Chromium-Iron Alloys (UNS N06600 and N06690), and Nickel-Chromium-Iron-Columbium-Molybdenum (UNS N07718) Alloy Pipe Flanges, Fittings, Valves, and Parts

  15. 75 FR 65067 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Hard and Decorative Chromium...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-21

    ... Decorative Chromium Electroplating and Chromium Anodizing Tanks; Group I Polymers and Resins; Marine Tank...: Hard and Decorative Chromium Electroplating and Chromium Anodizing Tanks; Group I Polymers and Resins... Tanks. Group I Polymers and Resins Production.. Scott Throwe, (202) 564-7013,...

  16. Chromium-induced membrane damage: protective role of ascorbic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Importance of chromium as environmental toxicant is largely due to impact on the body to produce cellular toxicity. The impact of chromium and their supplementation with ascorbic acid was studied on plasma membrane of liver and kidney in male Wistar rats (80 - 100gbody weight). It has been observed that the intoxication with chromium ( i. p. ) at the dose of 0.8 mg/100g body weight per day for a period of 28 days causes significant increase in the level of cholesterol and decrease in the level of phospbolipid of both liver and kidney. The alkaline pbosphatase, total ATPase and Na + -K + -ATPase activities were significantly decreased in both liver and kidney after chromium treatment,except total ATPase activity of kidney. It is suggested that chromium exposure at the present dose and duration induce for the alterations of structure and function of both liver and kidney plasma membrane. Ascorbic acid ( i.p. at the dose of 0.5 mg,/100g body weight per day for period of 28 days) supplementation can reduce these structural changes in the plasma membrane of liver and kidney. But the functional changes can not be completely replenished by the ascorbic acid supplementation in response to chromium exposure. So it is also suggested that ascorbic acid (nutritional antioxidant) is useful free radical scavenger to restrain the chromium-induced membrane damage.

  17. Bioavailability of a potato chromium complex to the laboratory rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research objectives were to study the effect of food source, preparation method and chemical form on bioavailability of chromium. Chromium concentration in potatoes was determined and tubers labeled either intrinsically or extrinsically with radioactive chromate. A labeled chromium complexes was isolated from preparations of raw, baked or fried potatoes and chromatographed on gel permeation media. Availability of the potato chromium complex to the rat was examined in three feeding studies. Animals were dosed with radioactive extrinsically or intrinsically labeled potato extract or with chromate. A labeled chromium complex was isolated from gastrointestinal contents of rats and chromatographed. Potato pulp and peel contained 1.63 and 2.70 μg Cr/g tissue respectively. True and apparent absorption from extrinsically labeled feedings were 33.4 +/- 4.7 and 29.8 +/- 11.2% respectively, and no differences existed between absorption from raw and cooked potatoes. Absorption from the extrinsic labeled potatoes differed significantly from absorption of inorganic chromatium. Apparent absorption of raw (11.1 +/- 7.9%) and cooked (-0.7 +/- 2.8%) intrinsically labeled feedings differed significantly. Absorption of inorganic chromium was 17.8% (true) and 11.5% (apparent). Examination of the chromium complex isolated from gastrointestinal tract contents showed enlargement of the complex in the stomach after consumption

  18. Stabilization of chromium salt in ordinary portland cement

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Damir Barbir; Pero Dabić; Petar Krolo

    2012-12-01

    Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) samples containing the chromium salt have been investigated using differential microcalorimetry, conductometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis. The effect of chromium on OPC hydration was evaluated by continuous observing of early hydration. The microcalorimetrical results show that with increasing the share of chromium salt, heat maximums assume lower values and the occurrence of the maximum registered in the earlier hydration times. Conductometrical measurements show that with increasing addition of chromium salt, curve did not show any specific shape, immediate drop in specific conductivity is noticed and the maximum is reached earlier. This coincides with microcalorimetrical results. It can be concluded that the addition of chromium does not affect the mechanism of the hydration process, but it does affect the kinetic parameters and dynamics of the cement hydration process. It was found that chromium salt addition to the cement–water system is acceptable up to 2 wt.%. According to standard EN 196-3 for OPC, the beginning of binding time should occur after 60 minutes. Increased amount of chromium over 2 wt.% significantly accelerate the beginning of binding time and for the system it is not acceptable.

  19. Chromium speciation in rainwater: temporal variability and atmospheric deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieber, R.J.; Willey, J.D.; Zvalaren, S.D. [University of North Carolina at Wilmington, Wilmington, NC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2002-12-15

    Chromium is released into the atmosphere by a variety of anthropogenic activities which include steel manufacturing, leather tanning, wood presentation and fossil fuel combustion. The concentrations of the various chromium species were determined in 89 rainwater samples collected in Wilmington, NC from October 1, 1999 to December 31, 2001. Volume weighted annual average concentrations of Cr{sub total}, particulate Cr, Cr(III)(aq), and Cr(VI)(aq) were 4.6, 2.2, 0.8 and 1.2 nM, respectively. There was distinct seasonal and diurnal variability in the concentrations of the various chromium species. Chromium emissions to the global atmosphere by both natural and anthropogenic sources are estimated to be 2.2 x 10{sup 9} mol/yr. Using rainwater concentration data along with other published rainwater Cr concentrations and an estimate for total global annual rain, the total global flux of chromium removed from the atmosphere via wet deposition is 2.1 x 10{sup 9} mol/yr. This represents complete removal of Cr and indicates that essentially all chromium released into the global atmosphere is removed via rain. About half this chromium is dissolved with roughly equal concentrations of toxic Cr(VI) and relatively harmless Cr(III) species. 48 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Workshop on effects of chromium coating on Nb3Sn superconductor strand: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the following topics: Chromium coating on superconductor strand -- an overview; technology of chromium plating; comparison of wires plated by different platers; search for chromium in copper; strand manufactures' presentations; chromium plating at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; a first look at a chromium plating process development project tailored for T.P.X. and I.T.E.R. strand; and influence of chromium diffusion and related phenomena on the reference ratios of bare and chromium plated Nb3Sn strand

  1. Workshop on effects of chromium coating on Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductor strand: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-12

    This report discusses the following topics: Chromium coating on superconductor strand -- an overview; technology of chromium plating; comparison of wires plated by different platers; search for chromium in copper; strand manufactures` presentations; chromium plating at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; a first look at a chromium plating process development project tailored for T.P.X. and I.T.E.R. strand; and influence of chromium diffusion and related phenomena on the reference ratios of bare and chromium plated Nb{sub 3}Sn strand.

  2. Irradiation effects on microhardness of fluoridated and non-fluoridated bovine dentin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of irradiation on microhardness of dentin. Dentin blocks from the cervical region of bovine incisors were treated as follows: 1) no irradiation; 2) irradiation of specimens up to 60 Gy (2Gy/day, 5 days/week); 3) no irradiation, but fluoridation of specimens for 5 min/d; 4) irradiation of specimens and daily fluoridation. Knoop hardness number (KHN) of the control specimens was 62.63±14.75 (mean±SD). This was significantly different from the irradiated dentin samples (8.74±2.59 KHN). Hardness of the fluoridated dentin specimens was 11.19±1.95 KHN in the non-irradiated group and 10.03±2.75 KHN in the irradiated groups, respectively. Within the limitations of an in vitro study, it is concluded that dentin is severely affected by irradiation. This could be an explanation for the frequently observed side-effects of irradiation like loss of enamel, gap formation at the amelodentinal junction, and caries of the cervical region. Fluoridation with acidic gels decereases microhardness of dentin surface, and does not prevent softening due to radiation, when saliva is absent. (au)

  3. Synthesis and characterization of ruthenium fluorides and oxide fluorides with high oxidation states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The synthesis of ruthenium fluorides and oxide fluorides with high oxidation states was attempted from dioxide RuO2 and tetroxide RuO4. Three fluorinating agents were used: fluorine, chlorine trifluoride and krypton difluoride. The reactions were achieved in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride at room temperature. Thus, the reaction of RuO4 with CIF3 enabled us to prepare chloryl hexafluororuthenate (V), CIO2+ RuF6-, a new compound well identified by vibrational spectroscopy (infra-red and Raman), the structure of which was determined. The reaction of KrF2 with RuO4 gave the oxide tetrafluoride RuOF4, the previously published syntheses and properties of which were not in agreement with each other. This compound was definitely characterized here by chemical analysis, infra-red spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction. The product of thermal decomposition (700C) of RuOF4 is presumably RuF4 since only oxygen is liberated during this decomposition. At last, the reaction of KrF2 with RuO2 probably leads to the formation of the new oxide fluoride RuO2F4. Indeed, no oxygen is given off during this reaction, the chemical analysis of the red-orange coloured solid residue is almost in agreement with the one proposed and its infra-red absorption spectrum indicates the presence of ruthenium-oxygen and ruthenium-terminal and bridging fluorine bonds

  4. CAN FLUORIDATION AFFECT LEAD (II) IN POTABLE WATER? HEXAFLUOROSILICATE AND FLUORIDE EQUILIBRIA IN AQUEOUS SOLUTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent reports have attempted to show that fluoridating potable water is linked to increased levels of lead(II) in the blood. We examine these claims in light of the established science and critically evaluate their significance. The completeness of hexafluorosilicate hydrolysi...

  5. Fertilizers and Mixed Crop Cultivation of Chromium Tolerant and Sensitive Plants under Chromium Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    B. Dheeba; Sampathkumar, P; Kannan, K.

    2015-01-01

    Zea mays (maize) and Vigna radiata (green gram) are found to be the chromium (Cr) tolerant and sensitive plants, respectively. In the present paper, we investigate the reduction of the toxicity of Cr in the sensitive plants by the mixed crop cultivation in the field using various amendments. Further, the potassium dichromate was used as the source of hexavalent Cr. The results indicated that Cr adversely affects both the growth and yield of plants. The soil properties vary with Cr and differe...

  6. Multiple inorganic toxic substances contaminating the groundwater of Myingyan Township, Myanmar: arsenic, manganese, fluoride, iron, and uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacquart, Thomas; Frisbie, Seth; Mitchell, Erika; Grigg, Laurie; Cole, Christopher; Small, Colleen; Sarkar, Bibudhendra

    2015-06-01

    In South Asia, the technological and societal shift from drinking surface water to groundwater has resulted in a great reduction of acute diseases due to water borne pathogens. However, arsenic and other naturally occurring inorganic toxic substances present in groundwater in the region have been linked to a variety of chronic diseases, including cancers, heart disease, and neurological problems. Due to the highly specific symptoms of chronic arsenic poisoning, arsenic was the first inorganic toxic substance to be noticed at unsafe levels in the groundwater of West Bengal, India and Bangladesh. Subsequently, other inorganic toxic substances, including manganese, uranium, and fluoride have been found at unsafe levels in groundwater in South Asia. While numerous drinking water wells throughout Myanmar have been tested for arsenic, relatively little is known about the concentrations of other inorganic toxic substances in Myanmar groundwater. In this study, we analyzed samples from 18 drinking water wells (12 in Myingyan City and 6 in nearby Tha Pyay Thar Village) and 2 locations in the Ayeyarwaddy River for arsenic, boron, barium, beryllium, cadmium, cobalt, chromium, copper, fluoride, iron, mercury, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead, antimony, selenium, thallium, uranium, vanadium, and zinc. Concentrations of arsenic, manganese, fluoride, iron, or uranium exceeded health-based reference values in most wells. In addition, any given well usually contained more than one toxic substance at unsafe concentrations. While water testing and well sharing could reduce health risks, none of the wells sampled provide water that is entirely safe with respect to inorganic toxic substances. It is imperative that users of these wells, and users of other wells that have not been tested for multiple inorganic toxic substances throughout the region, be informed of the need for drinking water testing and the health consequences of drinking water contaminated with inorganic toxic

  7. Effects of alternating periods of high- and low- fluoride ingestion on dairy cattle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suttie, J.W.; Carlson, J.R.; Faltin, E.C.

    1972-01-01

    Two- and five-month old Holstein heifers were exposed to different intake patterns of dietary fluoride for 6 years. None of the fluoride treatments affected growth rate or reproduction. There was no consistent effect on milk production. Plasma fluoride concentrations closely followed current fluoride intake. Urinary fluoride concentrations varied with intake but remained elevated during low intake. Skeletal fluoride retention was directly related to total fluoride intake and not to pattern of intake. The degree of dental fluorosis was related to the amount of fluoride fed and to the plasma fluoride concentration at the time each incisor was developing. The most severe effects of fluoride ingestion were in high and low intake. These animals had severly worn molar teeth, extensive osteofluorosis, and they experienced periods of extreme lameness. Short periods of high fluoride intake balanced by periods of lower intake were more damaging to cattle than constant exposure to the same average yearly intake.

  8. Microbial Diversity of Chromium-Contaminated Soils and Characterization of Six Chromium-Removing Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhiguo; Hu, Yuting; Yin, Zhen; Hu, Yuehua; Zhong, Hui

    2016-06-01

    Three soil samples obtained from different sites adjacent to a chromium slag heap in a steel alloy factory were taken to examine the effect of chromium contamination on soil bacterial diversity as determined by construction of 16S rDNA clone libraries and sequencing of selected clones based on restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Results revealed that Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Alphaproteobacteria occurred in all three soil samples, although the three samples differed in their total diversity. Sample 1 had the highest microbial diversity covering 12 different classes, while Sample 3 had the lowest microbial diversity. Strains of six different species were successfully isolated, one of which was identified as Zobellella denitrificans. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a strain belonging to the genus Zobellella able to resist and reduce chromium. Among all isolates studied, Bacillus odysseyi YH2 exhibited the highest Cr(VI)-reducing capability, with a total removal of 23.5 % of an initial Cr(VI) concentration of 350 mg L-1.

  9. A REVIEW OF BIOSORPTION OF CHROMIUM IONS BY MICROORGANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Zinicovscaia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to its widespread industrial use, chromium has become a serious pollutant in diverse environmental settings. The main source of chromium pollution including the Republic o Moldova is industry. It is a great need to develop new eco-friendly methods of chromium removal. Biosorption of heavy metals is a most promising technology involved in the removal of toxic metals from industrial waste streams and natural waters. This article is an extended abstract of a communication presented at the Conference Ecological Chemistry 2012

  10. Computational investigation of the role of fluoride in Tamao oxidations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mader, Mary M.; Norrby, Per-Ola

    2002-01-01

    The Tamao oxidation of alkoxysilanes was investigated computationally to determine the role of fluoride. a key additive. in this reaction. A sequence of fluoride equilibria as well as possible transition states. mediated by basic and neutral peroxide, respectively, were examined, and a potential...

  11. Methods of controlling hydrogen fluoride pressure during chemical fabrication processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovyov, Vyacheslav; Wiesmann, Harold

    2009-11-24

    The present invention is a method for producing a crystalline end-product. The method comprising exposing a fluoride-containing precursor to a hydrogen fluoride absorber under conditions suitable for the conversion of the precursor into the crystalline end-product.

  12. 7 CFR 305.8 - Sulfuryl fluoride treatment schedules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sulfuryl fluoride treatment schedules. 305.8 Section 305.8 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... fluoride treatment schedules. Treatment schedule Pressure Temperature ( °F) Dosage rate(lb/1000 cubic...

  13. Fluoride uptake from restorative dental materials by human enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the study was to determine the uptake in vitro of fluoride from restorative materials by tooth enamel and whether prior etching of the enamel causes a change of uptake. The outermost layer of the labial surface of extracted canines was removed by grinding and the enamel was covered with five different fluoride-containing materials ; a silicate, a composite resin, an amalgam, a silicophosphate, and a polycarboxylate luting cement. The material was either removed immediately or after storing the tooth in distilled water. The fluoride content was determined using a sensitive physical method based on the 19F (p, αγ) 16O reaction. In addition, the fluoride content of enamel after etching for different periods of time and of etched enamel which had been in contact with silicate cement was determined. The mean fluoride content of uncovered interior enamel was 226 parts 106. All materials, except the composite, increased clearly the fluoride content of the underlying enamel. Etching of interior enamel also increased the fluoride values. No difference could be shown in fluoride uptake from silicate and composite resin between etched and unetched enamel. (author)

  14. KINETICS OF SORPTION OF FLUORIDE ON CALCINED MAGNESITE IN BATCH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singano, J. J.; Mashauri, D. A.; Mtalo, F. W.;

    1997-01-01

    A series of sorption of fluoride on calcined magnesite are obtained from thermostatic pH-chemostat and jar test experiments. The fluoride removal is observed not to start instantly, as normal, but after a lag time of up to ½ an hour of contact time. A model for sorption kinetics is developed, bas...

  15. Fluoride release by glass ionomer cements, compomer and giomer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed Mostafa Mousavinasab

    2009-01-01

    Conclusion:Fuji IX, Fuji VII, Fuji IX Extra, and Fuji II LC released higher amounts of fluoride compared to Beautifil and Dyract Extra in this study. It seems that the extent of the glass ionomer matrix plays an important role in determining the fluoride releasing ability of glass ionomer cement materials.

  16. Fluoride Analysis. Training Module 5.200.2.77.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with fluoride analysis procedures. Included are objectives, an instructor guide, student handouts, and a list of reference material. This module considers the determination of fluoride in water supplies using the SPANDS and electrode…

  17. Obstacles to extending fluoridation in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neenan, M E

    1996-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is two-fold: (1) to describe the current extent of water fluoridation in the United States; (2) to address the major obstacles to attaining 75 per cent fluoridation by the year 2000. While 62.1 per cent of the US population has access to fluoridated public water systems, more than 32 million people need to be added to the fluoridation census, primarily from the cities. The legal framework for implementing fluoridation is considered at the state level; a review of fluoridation actions at the local level is presented. The impact of forces affecting the extension of fluoridation in the United States is described: (1) demographic trends--urbanisation, race, ethnicity, language, immigration, age, education levels, housing, income and poverty levels; (2) external environmental forces/political climate; (3) media influence on public opinion and public policy; (4) voter apathy/lack of awareness of the benefits of fluoridation; (5) perceptions of risks vs. benefits; (6) lack of political campaign skills; and (7) legal issues.

  18. Mechanisms of action of fluoride for caries control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A.R. Buzalaf; J.P. Pessan; H.M. Honório; J.M. ten Cate

    2011-01-01

    Fluoride was introduced into dentistry over 70 years ago, and it is now recognized as the main factor responsible for the dramatic decline in caries prevalence that has been observed worldwide. However, excessive fluoride intake during the period of tooth development can cause dental fluorosis. In o

  19. Poisoning by coal smoke containing arsenic and fluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, D.; He, Y.G.; Hu, Q.X. [Guizhou Sanitary and Epidemiological Station, Guiyang (China)

    1997-02-01

    An investigation was made into a disease involving skin pigmentation, keratosis of the hands and feet, dental discoloration, and generalized bone and joint pain, stiffness and rigidity, in the village of Bazhi, Zhijin County, Ghizhou Province, People`s Republic of China. Measurements were made of the arsenic and fluoride levels of coal, water, air, food, urine and hair in Bazhi and a control village, Xinzhai, in which coal with a low arsenic content was used. Up to 188 people, including children, in Bazhi and 752 in Xinzhai, were examined for the presence of chronic arsenium, skeletal fluorosis, dental fluorosis and electrocardiogram abnormalities. The coal in Bazhi was found to contain high levels of arsenic and fluoride resulting, after burning in homes without an adequate chimney systems, in pollution of air and food with arsenic and fluoride. The coal in Xinzhai did not cause arsenic pollution but did produce a higher level of fluoride pollution. It was concluded that the endemic disease in Bazhi was caused by pollution by coal smoke containing arsenic and fluoride. It is suggested that arsenic may act synergistically with fluoride so that a lower level of fluoride may produce fluoride toxicity with dental and skeletal fluorosis.

  20. Fluoride inhibits the response of bone cells to mechanical loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.M.E. Willems; E.G.H.M. van den Heuvel; S. Castelein; J. Keverling Buisman; A.L.J.J. Bronckers; A.D. Bakker; J. Klein-Nulend

    2011-01-01

    The response of bone cells to mechanical loading is mediated by the cytoskeleton. Since the bone anabolic agent fluoride disrupts the cytoskeleton, we investigated whether fluoride affects the response of bone cells to mechanical loading, and whether this is cytoskeleton mediated. The mechano-respon

  1. Thermal incorporation behavior during the reduction and stabilization of chromium wastes

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Jun; 楊駿

    2015-01-01

    The possibility of employing periclase to stabilize chromium in chromium wastes into spinel-based ceramics through thermal method was investigated by heating mixture of simulated chromium waste and magnesium oxide. Different types of magnesium oxide precursors were introduced to incorporate chromium oxide into magnesiochromite (MgCr2O4) ranging from 550 ºC to 1350 ºC. Magnesium oxide precursors of both types can effectively incorporate chromium oxide but via different mechanisms. Three main f...

  2. Effects of Supplemental Dietary Chromium on Yield and Nutrient Digestibility of Laying Hens Under Low Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    ŞAHİN, Kazım; ERTAŞ, O. Nihat; GÜLER, Talat; ÇİFTÇİ, Mehmet

    2001-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of chromium picolinate (CrPi) added into diet containing 710.3 ppb chromium on yield and nutrient digestibility of laying hens at low temperature. Forty-six-week-old laying hens were randomly assigned to four groups of 30 hens per group. Treatment groups were fed different supplemental dietary chromium levels. Thus, hens were fed diets with no supplemental chromium (Control Group), 100 ppb of supplemental chromium (100 Group), 200 ppb of s...

  3. The fate of chromium during tropical weathering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berger, Alfons; Frei, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We performed a mineral, geochemical and Cr–Sr–Pb isotope study on a laterite profile developed on ca. 540 Ma old tonalitic bedrock in Madagascar with special emphasis on the behavior of chromium during tropical weathering. The observed strong depletions of Ca, Si, and P, and enrichment of Fe and Al...... of the soil profile relative to stage one altered saprolite. This gain in Cr is accompanied by decreasing δ53Cr values and can be explained by partial immobilization (possibly by adsorption/coprecipitation on/with Fe-oxy-hydroxides) of mobile Cr(III) during upward transport in the weathering profile....... The negatively fractionated δ53Cr values measured in the weathering profile relative to the unaltered tonalitic bedrock characterized by a high temperature magmatic inventory Cr isotope signature are consistent with loss of a positively fractionated Cr(VI) pool formed during weathering. The predicted existence...

  4. Evaluation of chromium in red blood cells as an indicator of exposure to hexavalent chromium: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devoy, Jérôme; Géhin, Antoine; Müller, Samuel; Melczer, Mathieu; Remy, Aurélie; Antoine, Guillaume; Sponne, Isabelle

    2016-07-25

    Chromium(VI) compounds are classified as carcinogenic to humans. Whereas chromium measurements in urine and whole blood (i.e., including plasma) are indicative of recent exposure, chromium in red blood cells (RBC) is attributable specifically to Cr(VI) exposure. Before recommending Cr in RBC as a biological indicator of Cr(VI) exposure, in-vitro studies must be undertaken to assess its reliability. The present study examines the relationship between the chromium added to a blood sample and that subsequently found in the RBC. After incubation of total blood with chromium, RBC were isolated, counted and their viability assessed. Direct analysis of chromium in RBC was conducted using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. Hexavalent, but not trivalent Cr, was seen to accumulate in the RBC and we found a strong correlation between the Cr(VI) concentration added to a blood sample and the amount of Cr in RBC. This relationship appears to be independent of the chemical properties of the human blood samples (e.g., different blood donors or different reducing capacities). Even though in-vivo studies are still needed to integrate our understanding of Cr(VI) toxicokinetics, our findings reinforce the idea that a single determination of the chromium concentration in RBC would enable biomonitoring of critical cases of Cr(VI) exposure. PMID:27178267

  5. Chromium accumulation, microorganism population and enzyme activities in soils around chromium-containing slag heap of steel alloy factory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Shun-hong; PENG Bing; YANG Zhi-hui; CHAI Li-yuan; ZHOU Li-cheng

    2009-01-01

    The environmental risk of chromium pollution is pronounced in soils adjacent to chromate industry. It is important to investigate the functioning of soil microorganisms in ecosystems exposed to long-term contamination by chromium. 45 soil samples obtained from different places of the slag heap in a steel alloy factory were analyzed for chromium contamination level and its effect on soil microorganisms and enzyme activities. The results show that the average concentrations of total Cr in the soil under the slag heap, adjacent to the slag heap and outside the factory exceed the threshold of Secondary Environmental Quality Standard for Soil in China by 354%, 540% and 184%, respectively, and are 15, 21 and 9 times higher than the local background value, respectively. Elevated chromium loadings result in changes in the activity of the soil microbe, as indicated by the negative correlations between soil microbial population and chromium contents. Dehydrogenase activity is greatly depressed by chromium in the soil. The results imply that dehydrogenase activity can be used as an indicator for the chromium pollution level in the area of the steel alloy factory.

  6. The status of community water fluoridation in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easley, M W

    1990-01-01

    Community water fluoridation has served the American public extremely well as the cornerstone of dental caries prevention activities for 45 years. The dental and general health benefits associated with the ingestion of water-borne fluorides have been well known by researchers for an even longer period. Continued research has repeatedly confirmed the safety, effectiveness, and efficiency of community water fluoridation in preventing dental caries for Americans regardless of age, race, ethnicity, religion, educational status, or socioeconomic level. Despite the obvious benefits associated with this proven public health measure, slow progress has been made toward achieving the 1990 national fluoridation objectives as listed in "Promoting Health/Preventing Disease: Objectives for the Nation." This paper documents the lagging pace of community fluoridation by reviewing and analyzing data reported in "Fluoridation Census, 1985," a document published in late 1988 by the Public Health Service's Centers for Disease Control. Failure to attain the 1990 objectives is attributable to a combination of circumstances, including their low priority within many local, State, and Federal health agencies, inadequate funding at all levels of government, lack of a coordinated and focused national fluoridation effort, failure of most States to require fluoridation, lack of Federal legislation mandating fluoridation, general apathy of most health professional organizations toward fluoridation, misconceptions by the public about effectiveness and safety and, finally, unrelenting opposition by a highly vocal minority of the lay public. In addition, fluoridation successes have not been consistent among States, with wide variation in accomplishments documented in the reported data.While fluoridation still is one of the most cost effective public health measures available to local,State, and Federal public health agencies, it remains significantly underused nearly a half century after its

  7. LUMINESCENCE IN POTENTIAL FLUORIDE GLASS LASERS

    OpenAIRE

    Jørgensen, C.

    1987-01-01

    Fluoride glasses of the zirconium barium lanthanide type (invented Rennes, 1975) and lead gallium zinc (or manganese) type (invented Le Mans, 1979) show luminescence of lanthanide J-Levels situated at least 2000 cm-1 above the closest lower level (this limit is a few times larger in most other materials). Not only is the non-radiative de-excitation as weak as incrystalline LaF3 (studied by Weber) but energy transfer between neodymium and ytterbium (III), or from manganese (II), and to some ex...

  8. Electrorecovery of tantalum in molten fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considering the privileged situation of Brazil as a productor of tantaliferous minerals, the authors have in view the development of a technology for production of metallic tantalum via molten salts electrolysis; this has the advantage of improving the aggregate value of exportation products, additionally to tantalum oxide and tantalum concentrates. Having in view the preliminary determintion of better conditions of temperature, electrolyte composition and current density for this process, electrolysis were conducted with a solvent composed of an eutetic mixture of lithium, sodium and potassium fluoride for dipotassium fluotantalate and occasionally for tantalum oxide. Current efficiencies as high as 83% were obtained in favoured conditions. (author)

  9. Fluoride microresonators for mid-IR applications

    CERN Document Server

    Grudinin, Ivan S; Yu, Nan

    2016-01-01

    We study crystalline fluoride microresonators for mid-infrared applications. Whispering gallery mode resonators were fabricated with BaF$_2$, CaF$_2$ and MgF$_2$ crystals. The quality factors were measured at wavelengths of 1.56 {\\mu}m and 4.58 {\\mu}m. The impacts of fabrication technique, impurities, multiphonon absorption and surface water are investigated. It is found that MgF2 resonators have room temperature Q factor of $8.3\\times 10^6$ at wavelength of 4.58 {\\mu}m, limited by multiphonon absorption.

  10. Caries prevention with fluoride toothpaste in children: an update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twetman, S

    2009-01-01

    AIM: The aim was to examine recent literature and review the caries-preventive effect of fluoride toothpaste in children. METHODS: Based on three comprehensive systematic reviews published in 2003, a broad search of the PubMed and Cochrane library databases was conducted for papers published 2002......-2008 using "fluoride toothpaste", "fluoride dentifrice" and "fluoride dental cream" as index terms. Relevant publications were identified after assessment of their abstracts. Papers were selected if they reported a prospective controlled design with caries data reported at baseline and at the end...... of the study. The targeted papers were critically assessed concerning design, methodology and performance according to a pre-determined checklist. RESULTS: The initial search revealed 179 papers of which 15 met the inclusion criteria. There was strong evidence that daily use of fluoride toothpaste has...

  11. Ion chromatography detection of fluoride in calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefler, Jamie E; Ivey, Michelle M

    2011-09-01

    Fluoride in aquatic systems is increasing due to anthropogenic pollution, but little is known about how this fluoride affects organisms that live in and around aquatic habitats. Fluoride can bioaccumulate in structures comprised of calcium carbonate, such as shells and skeletons of both freshwater and saltwater species as diverse as snails, corals, and coccolithophorid algae. In this article, ion chromatography (IC) techniques are developed to detect and quantify fluoride in a matrix of calcium carbonate. Solid samples are dissolved in hydrochloric acid, pretreated to remove the majority of the chloride ions, and then analyzed using IC. With these methods, the 3σ limit of detection is 0.2 mg of fluoride/kg of calcium carbonate. PMID:21859530

  12. Fluoride use in Controlling Dental Caries and Fluorosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Solanki

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Policy were introduced to control fluoride exposure and to reduce the prevalence of fluorosis. The study aimed of describing the prevalence, severity and risk factors for fluorosis, and to describe the trend of fluorosis among Indian children. The study also aimed of exploring the effect of the change in fluoride exposure on dental fluorosis and caries. Establishing an appropriate use of fluoride toothpaste could be successful in reducing fluorosis without a significant increase in caries experience. The use of fluorides for oral health has always involved a balance between the protective benefit against dental caries and the risk of developing fluorosis. The link between fluoride and dental health was established to determining the causes of dental fluorosis or enamel mottling. Fluorosis in Indian children was highly prevalent in the early 1990s.

  13. Assessment of groundwater quality with respect to fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salve, P R; Maurya, A; Kumbhare, P S; Ramteke, D S; Wate, S R

    2008-09-01

    The study was conducted in the summer season (April-May 2007). The fluoride concentration along with physico-chemical parameters in ground water samples was determined in various villages of Kadi tehsil at Mehsana district of Gujarat state (India), since in most of the villages it is the only source of drinking water. The fluoride concentrations in these villages varied from 0.94 to 2.81 mg/L (1.37+/-0.56) with highest fluoride level at Visalpur (2.08 mg/L) and lowest at Adaraj (0.91 mg/L). There was found a positive correlation of pH with fluoride and a negative relationship of fluoride with bicarbonate which is generally observed in deep ground water.

  14. Effects of Chromium(VI) and Chromium(III) on Desulfovibrio vulgaris Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.E. Clark; A. Klonowska; S.B. Thieman; B. Giles; J.D. Wall; and M.W. Fields

    2007-04-19

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris ATCC 29579 is a well studied sulfate reducer that has known capabilities of reducing heavy metals and radionuclides, like chromium and uranium. Cultures grown in a defined medium (i.e. LS4D) had a lag period of approximately 40 h when exposed to 50 μMof Cr(VI). Substrate analysis revealed that although chromium is reduced within the first 5 h, growth does not resume for another 35 h. During this time, small amounts of lactate are still utilized but the reduction of sulfate does not occur. Sulfate reduction occurs concurrently with the accumulation of acetate approximately 40 h after inoculation, when growth resumes. Similar amounts of hydrogen are produced during this time compared to hydrogen production by cells not exposed to Cr(VI); therefore an accumulation of hydrogen cannot account for the utilization of lactate. There is a significant decrease in the carbohydrate to protein ratio at approximately 25 h, and this result indicated that lactate is not converted to glycogen. Most probable number analysis indicated that cell viability decreased steadily after inoculation and reached approximately 6 x 104 cells/ml 20 h post-chromium exposure. Regeneration of reducing conditions during chromium exposure does not induce growth and in fact may make the growth conditions even more unfavorable. This result suggested that an increase in Eh was not solely responsible for the decline in viability. Cell pellets collected 10 h after chromium-exposure were unable to resume growth when suspended into fresh medium. Supernatants from these pellets were able to support cell growth upon re- inoculation. D. vulgaris cells treated with a non-dose dependent addition of ascorbate at the same time of Cr(VI) addition did not enter a lag period. Ascorbate added 3 h post-Cr(VI) exposure did not prevent the growth lag. These results indicated that Desulfovibrio utilized lactate to reduce Cr(VI) without the reduction of sulfate, that the decline in cell viability and

  15. Scientific Opinion on ChromoPrecise® cellular bound chromium yeast added for nutritional purposes as a source of chromium in food supplements and the bioavailability of chromium from this source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food (ANS

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food (ANS provides a scientific opinion re-evaluating the safety of ChromoPrecise® cellular bound chromium yeast added for nutritional purposes as a source of chromium in food supplements and the bioavailability of chromium from this source. ChromoPrecise® is a yeast preparation with an enriched trivalent chromium content, obtained by culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the presence of chromium chloride. A daily intake of 100 µg chromium(III. There are limited data on the nature and identity of the organic chromium(III compounds contained in chromium-enriched yeast and on their toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic behaviour in the body. Overall, the Panel concluded that the bioavailability in man of chromium from chromium-enriched yeast is potentially up to approximately ten times higher than that of chromium from chromium chloride. A NOAEL of 2500 mg/kg bw/day ChromoPrecise® was identified in a 90-day feeding study in rats; no evidence of adverse effects of chromium yeasts were reported in other animal studies investigating the effects of dietary supplementation with chromium yeast. ChromoPrecise® chromium yeast was non-genotoxic in a range of in vitro genotoxicity studies. Although no information was available on the chronic toxicity, carcinogenicity or reproductive toxicity of ChromoPrecise® chromium yeast, the ANS Panel has previously concluded that trivalent chromium is not carcinogenic, and limited data on other chromium yeasts provide no evidence of an effect on reproductive endpoints. No adverse effects have been reported in clinical efficacy trials with chromium yeasts. The Panel concluded that the use of ChromoPrecise® chromium yeast in food supplements is not of concern, despite the lack of data on the nature and identity of the organic chromium(III compounds contained in the product, provided that the intake does not exceed 250 μg/day, as recommended by the WHO.

  16. Milk fluoridation for the prevention of dental caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolán Bánóczy

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review is to give an overview of 55 years experience of milk fluoridation and draw conclusions about the applicability of the method. Fluoridated milk was first investigated in the early 1950s, almost simultaneously in Switzerland, the USA and Japan. Stimulated by the favourable results obtained from these early studies, the establishment of The Borrow Dental Milk Foundation (subsequently The Borrow Foundation in England gave an excellent opportunity for further research, both clinical and non-clinical, and a productive collaboration with the World Health Organization which began in the early 1980s. Numerous peer-reviewed publications in international journals showed clearly the bioavailability of fluoride in various types of milk. Clinical trials were initiated in the 1980s – some of these can be classed as randomised controlled trials, while most of the clinical studies were community preventive programmes. Conclusion. These evaluations showed clearly that the optimal daily intake of fluoride in milk is effective in preventing dental caries. The amount of fluoride added to milk depends on background fluoride exposure and age of the children: commonly in the range 0.5 to 1.0 mg per day. An advantage of the method is that a precise amount of fluoride can be delivered under controlled conditions. The cost of milk fluoridation programmes is low, about € 2 to 3 per child per year. Fluoridation of milk can be recommended as a caries preventive measure where the fluoride concentration in drinking water is suboptimal, caries experience in children is significant, and there is an existing school milk programme.

  17. Caries prevention through the fluoridation of milk. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bánóczy, Jolán; Rugg-Gunn, Andrew J

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this review is to give an overview of 50 years experience of milk fluoridation and draw conclusions about the applicability of the method. Fluoridated milk was first investigated in the early 1950s, almost simultaneously in Switzerland, the USA and Japan. Stimulated by the favourable results obtained from these early studies, the establishment of The Borrow Dental Milk Foundation (subsequently The Borrow Foundation) in England gave an excellent opportunity for further research, both clinical and non-clinical, and a productive collaboration with the World Health Organization from the early 1980s onwards. Numerous peer-reviewed publications in international journals showed clearly the bioavailability of fluoride in milk, and increased concentrations of fluoride in saliva, dental plaque, dental enamel and dentine, and urine, after consumption of fluoridated milk. Clinical trials were initiated in the 1980s--some of these can be classed as randomised controlled trials, while most of the clinical studies were community preventive programs. These evaluations showed clearly that the optimal daily intake of fluoride in milk is effective in preventing dental caries. At present, milk fluoridation programs are running continuously in about ten countries of the world. Fluoridation of milk can be recommended as a caries preventive measure where the fluoride concentration in drinking water is suboptimal, caries experience in children is significant, and there is an existing school milk program. The program should aim to provide fluoridated milk for at least 200 days per year and should commence before the children are 4 years of age. PMID:18078140

  18. Fluoride caused thyroid endocrine disruption in male zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jianjie, Chen; Wenjuan, Xue; Jinling, Cao; Jie, Song; Ruhui, Jia; Meiyan, Li

    2016-02-01

    Excessive fluoride in natural water ecosystem has the potential to detrimentally affect thyroid endocrine system, but little is known of such effects or underlying mechanisms in fish. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of fluoride on growth performance, thyroid histopathology, thyroid hormone levels, and gene expressions in the HPT axis in male zebrafish (Danio rerio) exposed to different determined concentrations of 0.1, 0.9, 2.0 and 4.1 M of fluoride to investigate the effects of fluoride on thyroid endocrine system and the potential toxic mechanisms caused by fluoride. The results indicated that the growth of the male zebrafish used in the experiments was significantly inhibited, the thyroid microtrastructure was changed, and the levels of T3 and T4 were disturbed in fluoride-exposed male fish. In addition, the expressional profiles of genes in HPT axis displayed alteration. The expressions of all studied genes were significantly increased in all fluoride-exposed male fish after exposure for 45 days. The transcriptional levels of corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroglobulin (TG), sodium iodide symporter (NIS), iodothyronine I (DIO1), and thyroid hormone receptor alpha (TRα) were also elevated in all fluoride-exposed male fish after 90 days of exposure, while the inconsistent expressions were found in the mRNA of iodothyronineⅡ (DIO2), UDP glucuronosyltransferase 1 family a, b (UGT1ab), transthyretin (TTR), and thyroid hormone receptor beta (TRβ). These results demonstrated that fluoride could notably inhibit the growth of zebrafish, and significantly affect thyroid endocrine system by changing the microtrastructure of thyroid, altering thyroid hormone levels and endocrine-related gene expressions in male zebrafish. All above indicated that fluoride could pose a great threat to thyroid endocrine system, thus detrimentally affected the normal function of thyroid of male zebrafish.

  19. 76 FR 37129 - Determination That SODIUM FLUORIDE F 18 (Sodium Fluoride F-18) Injection, 10 to 200 Millicuries...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-24

    ... Product List'' section of the Orange Book. In previous instances (see, e.g., 72 FR 9763, March 5, 2007; 61 FR 25497, May 21, 1996), the Agency has determined that, for purposes of Sec. Sec. 314.161 and 314... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Determination That SODIUM FLUORIDE F 18 (Sodium Fluoride...

  20. Contingency plans for chromium utilization. Publication NMAB-335

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States depends entirely on foreign sources for the critical material, chromium, making it very vulnerable to supply disruptions. This vulnerability results because chromium is essential for the fabrication of corrosion-resisting steels and high-temperature, oxidation-resisting alloys in applications that are vital to the nation's technological well-being; because no substitutes are known for these materials in those applications; and because the known, substantial deposits of chromite ore are only in a few geographical locations that could become inaccessible to the United States as a result of political actions. The effectiveness of programs such as stockpiling, conservation, and research and development for substitutes to reduce the impact of disruption of imports of chromite and ferrochromium are discussed. Alternatives for decreasing chromium consumption also are identified for chromium-containing materials in the areas of design, processing, and substitution

  1. Fabrication of high rate chromium getter sources for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design and fabrication techniques are described for the manufacture of large-capacity chromium getter sources, analogous to the commercially available titanium getter source known as Ti-Ball, manufactured by Varian Associates

  2. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium (Peer Review Plan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is conducting a peer review of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of hexavalent chromium that will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database.

  3. Chromium and Polyphenols from Cinnamon and Insulin Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Factors that improve insulin sensitivity usually lead to improvements in risk factors associated with the metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. Naturally occurring bioactive compounds that have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity include chromium and polyphenols found in ...

  4. The diffusion of chromium in a duplex alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffusion of chromium in a duplex stainless steel containing approximately 8% ferrite has been investigated in the temperature range 600 to 10000C using the standard serial sectioning technique. The resulting concentration profiles exhibited up to four distinct regions. The two main regions are attributed to volume diffusion in the austenite and ferrite phases, the other zones being due to short circuiting paths. Volume diffusion in the austenite phase is in good agreement with chromium diffusion in Type 316 steel. The chromium diffusion coefficient in the ferrite phase of approximate composition 25 wt % Cr, 5 wt % Ni is given by: Dsub(α) = (6.0(+11,-3)) x 10-6 exp - ((212+-5)/RT) m2s-1 the activation energy being expressed in kJ.mol-1. Little evidence was found for enhanced chromium diffusion along austenite/ferrite interface boundaries. (author)

  5. Polyvinylidene fluoride - a polymer as transducer material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyvinylidene fluoride or PVDF is a flexible, thin piezo film and long chain semicrystalline polymer containing repeated of CH/sub 2/ - CH/sub 2/. In order to obtain desired piezoelectric properties PVDF is poled by subjecting it to high electric field. In poled PVDF piezoelectric constants have different values for each axis and one constant per axis. PVDF polymer exhibits generator and motor action. Usually 1000 A /sup o/ thick vacuum-deposited aluminum electrodes are formed on both sides of the sheet. Polymer material of PVDF can be used as a sensing element with temperature range of -40 /sup 0/ C to 100 /sup 0/C and a frequency range of 10/sup -3/ to 10/sup -9/ Hz. This paper includes as experimental observation of exciting aluminium open-ended tube at its resonance using PVDF transducer and maintained in this condition using phase lock loop or PLL. The tube is free to resonate when 9-micrometer thin polyvinylidene fluoride transducer is energized. It is observed that a film of such material can easily be used to produced the requisite vibrations in the tube. (author)

  6. Lanthanum fluoride nanoparticles for radiosensitization of tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudinov, Konstantin; Bekah, Devesh; Cooper, Daniel; Shastry, Sathvik; Hill, Colin; Bradforth, Stephen; Nadeau, Jay

    2016-03-01

    Dense inorganic nanoparticles have recently been identified as promising radiosensitizers. In addition to dose enhancement through increased attenuation of ionizing radiation relative to biological tissue, scintillating nanoparticles can transfer energy to coupled photosensitizers to amplify production of reactive oxygen species, as well as provide UVvisible emission for optical imaging. Lanthanum fluoride is a transparent material that is easily prepared as nanocrystals, and which can provide radioluminescence at a number of wavelengths through simple substitution of lanthanum ions with other luminescent lanthanides. We have prepared lanthanum fluoride nanoparticles doped with cerium, terbium, or both, that have good spectral overlap with chlorine6 or Rose Bengal photosensitizer molecules. We have also developed a strategy for stable conjugation of the photosensitizers to the nanoparticle surface, allowing for high energy transfer efficiencies on a per molecule basis. Additionally, we have succeeded in making our conjugates colloidally stable under physiological conditions. Here we present our latest results, using nanoparticles and nanoparticle-photosensitizer conjugates to demonstrate radiation dose enhancement in B16 melanoma cells. The effects of nanoparticle treatment prior to 250 kVp x-ray irradiation were investigated through clonogenic survival assays and cell cycle analysis. Using a custom apparatus, we have also observed scintillation of the nanoparticles and conjugates under the same conditions that the cell samples are irradiated.

  7. Biosorption of Chromium (VI) from Aqueous Solutions onto Fungal Biomass

    OpenAIRE

    Ismael Acosta R.; Xöchitl Rodríguez; Conrado Gutiérrez; Ma. de Guadalupe Moctezuma

    2004-01-01

    The biosorption of chromium (VI) on eighteen different natural biosorbents: Natural sediment, chitosan, chitin, Aspergillus flavus I-V, Aspergillus fumigatus I-ll, Helmintosporium sp, Cladosporium sp, Mucor rouxii mutant, M. rouxii IM-80, Mucor sp-I and 2, Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans was studied in this work. It was found that the biomass of C. neoformans, natural sediment, Helmintosporium sp and chitosan was more efficient to remove chromium (VI) (determined spectrophotometr...

  8. Stereology of carbide phase in modified hypereutectic chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Suchoń

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In paper are presented results of studies of carbide phase stereology modified hypereutectic wear resistance chromium cast iron which contains carbon about 3,5% and chromium about 25%. Three substances were applied to the modification: boron carbide (B4C, ferroniobium (FeNb and mixture of ferroniobium and rare-earth (RE. The measurements of geometrical features of carbides were conducted on microsection taken from castings wich were cooled with various velocities.

  9. Thermodynamic Equilibrium Diagrams of Sulphur-Chromium System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The chemical and electrochemical equilibria in the presence of gaseous phase were investigated. Many substances, which consisted of sulphur and chromium, were considered. Various thermodynamic equilibria were calculated in different pressures. Calculation results were shown as log p―1/T and E―T diagrams. These diagrams may be used to study the corrosion of chromium in sulphur-containing circumstances. The diagrams are also used to thermodynami-cally determine the existence area of various substances and so on.

  10. Stereology of carbide phase in modified hypereutectic chromium cast iron

    OpenAIRE

    J. Suchoń; A. Studnicki; M. Przybył

    2010-01-01

    In paper are presented results of studies of carbide phase stereology modified hypereutectic wear resistance chromium cast iron which contains carbon about 3,5% and chromium about 25%. Three substances were applied to the modification: boron carbide (B4C), ferroniobium (FeNb) and mixture of ferroniobium and rare-earth (RE). The measurements of geometrical features of carbides were conducted on microsection taken from castings wich were cooled with various velocities.

  11. SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ACTIVITIES FOR CHROMIUM IN THE 100 AREAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PETERSEN SW

    2009-07-02

    {sm_bullet} Primary Objective: Protect the Columbia River - Focus is control and treatment of contamination at or near the shoreline, which is influenced by bank storage {sm_bullet} Secondary Objective: Reduce hexavalent chromium to <48 parts per billion (ppb) in aquifer (drinking water standard) - Large plumes with isolated areas of high chromium concentrations (> 40,000 ppb), - Unknown source location(s); probably originating in reactor operation areas

  12. Genetic Predisposition for Dermal Problems in Hexavalent Chromium Exposed Population

    OpenAIRE

    Priti Sharma; Vipin Bihari; Agarwal, Sudhir K.; Goel, Sudhir K.

    2012-01-01

    We studied the effect of genetic susceptibility on hexavalent chromium induced dermal adversities. The health status of population was examined from the areas of Kanpur (India) having the elevated hexavalent chromium levels in groundwater. Blood samples were collected for DNA isolation to conduct polymorphic determination of genes, namely: NQO1 (C609T), hOGG1 (C1245G), GSTT1, and GSTM1 (deletion). Symptomatic exposed subjects (n = 38) were compared with asymptomatic exposed subjects (n = 108)...

  13. Performance of chromium nitride based coatings under plastic processing conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Cunha, l.; Andritschky, M.; Pischow, K.; Wang, Z.(Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing, China); Zarychta, A.; Miranda, A. S.; A.M. Cunha

    2000-01-01

    Chromium nitride based coatings were produced in the form of monolithic and multilayer coatings, by DC and RF reactive magnetron sputtering. These coatings were deposited onto stainless steel and tool steel substrates. Chromium nitride coatings have;proved to be wear and corrosion resistant. The combination of these characteristics was necessary to protect surfaces during plastic processing. In order to select the best coatings, some mechanical and tribological tests were performed. Har...

  14. DANGER OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM AND STRATEGY FOR THE REMEDITATION

    OpenAIRE

    Aniruddha Roy; Ayan Das; Nirmal Paul

    2013-01-01

    Some metals as micronutrients have a major role in the life and growth process of plants and animals. However, certain forms of some metals may also act as toxic material even in relatively small quantities. Chromium is such a metal, whose concentration above a certain limit may cause a serious problem to the health of living organisms. Chromium (Cr) may occur in several chemical forms in organic and inorganic systems. In biological systems only Cr (III) and Cr (VI) are signifi...

  15. Chromium reduction from slag on electromelting of stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specific features of chromium reduction from the slag on electromelting of stainless steel type Kh18N10T according to one- or two-slag procedure were studied. It was shown that one-slag melting technology allows double decrease of chromium losses in the form of incompletely reduced oxides. This occurs due to additional chemical reactions between metal and slag on their combined pouring into the ladle. 1 ref.; 3 figs

  16. 21 CFR 355.70 - Testing procedures for fluoride dentifrice drug products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Testing procedures for fluoride dentifrice drug... Procedures § 355.70 Testing procedures for fluoride dentifrice drug products. (a) A fluoride dentifrice drug... tests: Enamel solubility reduction or fluoride enamel uptake. The testing procedures for...

  17. Removal of Chromium and Lead from Industrial Wastewater Using

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Hilal

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this research an attempt is made on the ability of aerobic treatment of synthetic solutions containing lead and chromium using effective microorganisms within the reactor. To achieve the desired objectives of the research, synthetic aqueous solutions of lead and chromium was used in the concentration of chromium and lead ions of 5, 10,50 and 100 mg / l .The work was done at constant pH equal to 4.5 and temperature of 30 ± 1 º C. Effective microorganisms solutions was added to the reactor at Vol.% of 1/50 ,1/100 ,1/500 and 1/1000, with retention time was 24 hours to measure the heavy metals concentration the atomic absorption device was used. The experimental results showed that each 1mg / l of lead and chromium ions need 24 mg of effective microorganisms to achieve removal of 92.0% and 82.60% for lead and chromium respectively. Increasing the concentration of effective microorganisms increases the surface of adsorption and thus increasing the removal efficiency. It is found that the microorganisms activity occur in the first five hours of processing and about 94% of adsorption capacity of biomass will take place. It is also found the selectivity of microorganisms to lead ions is higher than for chromium ions.

  18. Evaluating trivalent chromium toxicity on wild terrestrial and wetland plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukina, A O; Boutin, C; Rowland, O; Carpenter, D J

    2016-11-01

    Elevated chromium levels in soil from mining can impact the environment, including plants. Mining of chromium is concentrated in South Africa, several Asian countries, and potentially in Northern Ontario, Canada, raising concerns since chromium toxicity to wild plants is poorly understood. In the first experiment, concentration-response tests were conducted to evaluate effects of chromium on terrestrial and wetland plants. Following established guidelines using artificial soil, seeds of 32 species were exposed to chromium (Cr(3+)) at concentrations simulating contamination (0-1000 mg kg(-1)). This study found that low levels of chromium (250 mg kg(-1)) adversely affected the germination of 22% of species (33% of all families), while higher levels (500 and 1000 mg kg(-1)) affected 69% and 94% of species, respectively, from 89% of the families. Secondly, effects on seedbanks were studied using soil collected in Northern Ontario and exposed to Cr(3+) at equivalent concentrations (0-1000 mg kg(-1)). Effects were less severe in the seedbank study with significant differences only observed at 1000 mg kg(-1). Seeds exposed to Cr(3+) during stratification were greatly affected. Seed size was a contributing factor as was possibly the seed coat barrier. This study represents an initial step in understanding Cr(3+) toxicity on wild plants and could form the basis for future risk assessments. PMID:27543852

  19. Lime enhanced chromium removal in advanced integrated wastewater pond system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadesse, I; Isoaho, S A; Green, F B; Puhakka, J A

    2006-03-01

    The removal of trivalent chromium from a combined tannery effluent in horizontal settling tanks and subsequent Advanced Integrated Wastewater Pond System (AIWPS) reactors was investigated. The raw combined effluent from Modjo tannery had pH in the range of 11.2-12. At this pH, a trivalent chromium removal of 46-72% was obtained in the horizontal settling tanks after a one-day detention time. Trivalent chromium precipitated as chromium hydroxide, Cr(OH)3. 58-95% Cr(III) was removed in the advanced facultative pond (AFP) where the water column pH of 7.2-8.4 was close to pH 8, which is the optimum precipitation pH for trivalent chromium. Chromium removals in the secondary facultative pond (SFP) and maturation pond (MP) were 30-50% and 6-16%, respectively. With Cr(III) concentration of 0.2-0.8 mg/l in the final treated effluent, the AIWPS preceded by horizontal settling tanks produced effluent that could easily meet most of the current Cr(III) discharge limits to receive water bodies.

  20. Experimental skin deposition of chromium on the hands following handling of samples of leather and metal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P.; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl;

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chromium is an important skin sensitizer. Exposure to it has been regulated in cement, and recently in leather. Studies on the deposition of chromium ions on the skin as a result of handling different chromium-containing materials are sparse, but could improve the risk assessment...... of contact sensitization and allergic contact dermatitis caused by chromium. Objectives: To determine whether the handling of chromium-containing samples of leather and metal results in the deposition of chromium onto the skin. Methods: Five healthy volunteers participated. For 30 min, they handled samples...... of leather and metal known to contain and release chromium. Skin deposition of chromium was assessed with the acid wipe sampling technique. Results: Acid wipe sampling of the participants' fingers showed chromium deposition on the skin in all participants who had been exposed to leather (range 0.01–0.20 µg...

  1. High Fluoride Dentifrices for Elderly and Vulnerable Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekstrand, Kim Rud

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of this work is to present the available evidence that toothpastes containing >1,500 ppm fluoride (2,500-2,800 and 5,000 ppm F) provide an additional caries preventive effect on root caries lesions in elderly patients compared to traditional dentifrices (1,000-1,450 ppm F). The se......The primary aim of this work is to present the available evidence that toothpastes containing >1,500 ppm fluoride (2,500-2,800 and 5,000 ppm F) provide an additional caries preventive effect on root caries lesions in elderly patients compared to traditional dentifrices (1,000-1,450 ppm F......). The secondary aim of this paper is to discuss why high fluoride dentifrices in general should perform better than traditional F-containing toothpaste. When examining the few studies that have considered the preventive benefits of high fluoride products on root caries the relative risk appears to be around 0.......5, and the risk can thus be halved by exchanging traditional F-containing toothpaste for toothpaste containing 5,000 ppm F. There is reasonable evidence that high fluoride dentifrices significantly increase the fluoride concentration in saliva during the day and the fluoride concentration in plaque compared...

  2. The effective use of fluorides in public health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Sheila; Burt, Brian A; Petersen, Poul Erik;

    2005-01-01

    Dental caries remain a public health problem for many developing countries and for underprivileged populations in developed countries. This paper outlines the historical development of public health approaches to the use of fluoride and comments on their effectiveness. Early research and developm......Dental caries remain a public health problem for many developing countries and for underprivileged populations in developed countries. This paper outlines the historical development of public health approaches to the use of fluoride and comments on their effectiveness. Early research...... and development was concerned with waterborne fluorides, both naturally occurring and added, and their effects on the prevalence and incidence of dental caries and dental fluorosis. In the latter half of the 20th century, the focus of research was on fluoride toothpastes and mouth rinses. More recently......, systematic reviews summarizing these extensive databases have indicated that water fluoridation and fluoride toothpastes both substantially reduce the prevalence and incidence of dental caries. We present four case studies that illustrate the use of fluoride in modern public health practice, focusing on...

  3. Synthesis of nanocrystalline mixed metal fluorides in nonaqueous medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Neetu Tyagi; Epsita Ghanti; Nikesh Gupta; N P Lalla; Rajamani Nagarajan

    2009-12-01

    Synthesis of mixed metal fluorides of the general formula, KMF3 (M = Mg, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn), possessing perovskite structure was investigated in non-aqueous medium. The fluorides were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, FT–IR spectroscopy, thermal analysis, SEM and TEM. Monophasic cubic phases were obtained for the central metal ions such as Mg, Mn, Co, Ni, and Zn and a tetragonally distorted phase was observed for Cu. The usage of non-aqueous medium is advantageous for the bulk synthesis of these fluorides, since it eliminated the generation and handling of the hazardous HF that has usually been encountered during aqueous preparations. The average crystallite size of the fluorides obtained by this approach was estimated to be in the range of 9–30 nm. SEM micrographs of KZnF3 showed cubic morphology of perovskite phases. TEM studies on KCuF3 confirmed the presence of tetragonal distortion. The fluoride content was determined by titrimetry and found to be nearly stoichiometric. Some of these fluorides were found to be thermally stable up to 225°C in air. These fluorides were employed as fluorinating agents in organic fluorination reactions, thereby suggesting their possible utilization for selective fluorination of aliphatic and aromatic hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) that are industrially relevant.

  4. Fluoride Levels of Mothers' Breast Milk in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada, Z A Soliman and Tamer M M Saad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fluoride exists naturally in water sources and is derived from fluorine. It is well known that fluoride helps, prevent and even reverse the early stages of tooth decay. Aim: The aim of the present study was to determine the fluoride levels in plasma and breast milk of lactating mothers in Egypt (Cairo and Giza Governorate. Material and Methods: Two hundred healthy lactating mothers aged between 20-40 years old were asked to give plasma and milk samples voluntary. Breast milk samples were directly refrigerated until measurements. The fluoride concentrations of plasma, milk and drinking tap water were assessed using an ion-selective fluoride electrode combined with an ion analyzer. Results: The fluoride levels of plasma, breast milk and drinking tap water samples were 0.0207±0.012, 0.0111±0.0044 ppm, and 0.482±0.117 ppm, respectively. A significant direct correlation between fluoride content in breast milk and drinking tap water was found (r=0.858, p< 0.01.

  5. USE OF TWO DIGESTION METHODS IN THE EVALUATION OF CHROMIUM CONTENT IN CATTLE'S MEAT SUPPLEMENTED WITH CHROMIUM CHELATES

    OpenAIRE

    R. L. T. Andrade; P.S.A. Moreira; R. Arruda; F. J. Lourenço; C. Palhari, F. F. Faria, V. B. Arevalo; Faria, F. F.; V. B. Arevalo

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to analyze the chromium content in beef using two digestion methods. There were used samples from 24 18-month-old male cattle, and twelve of them were supplemented and twelve were not supplemented with chromium chelate. These samples were evaluated by atomic absorption spectroscopy, previously submitted to digestion method using nitric acid (65%) with hydrogen peroxide (35%) and to digestion method, using solution of nitric perchloric acid in the proportion 3:1. Immedi...

  6. Activation of bentonite to remove the chromium from waste water produced by panning industry, and studying the chromium recovery efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fast development of tanning industry led to an increase in environmental problems resulting from discharging its wastes to the surrounding environment. Thus solving this problem became one of the most important aims that the researchers work on. The chromium content of the industrial water wastes of the tanning industry considered as the main pollutant for the environment. The Aleppo Bentonite is used in early research to remove the chromium from the industrial waste water.The current research aims to find a method to activate the Aleppo Bentonite in order to increase the effective removal of chromium from the industrial waste water which is produced by tanning industry, as well as to specify the optimal conditions for chromium recovery.This study used the Aleppo Bentonite, whose origin is Tal Ajar-Aleppo to study the activation aspects using Sulfuric Acid, Hydrochloric Acid and Nitric Acid, in addition to study the recovery aspects using the same acids and hydrogen peroxide and to specify the optimal conditions for chromium recovery through applying some experiments based on three main factors: concentration, settling time and temperature.It was observed from the applied experiments that it is possible to recover chromium from Bentonite efficiently up to (80% - 90%) by treating the Bentonite with hydrogen peroxide(33% concentration) at room temperature, or by treating it with hydrogen peroxide(8.25% concentration) at 75oC, while the settling time factor proved that full recovery of chromium is obtained during the first hour, and increasing the time factor does not affect the efficiency of chromium recovery. (author)

  7. Amelioration of Fluoride Toxicity with the Use of Indigenous Inputs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maitra A.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available An assessment was undertaken to study the efficacy of bacterial consortia isolated from different sources viz. rhizosphere of rice plant, oil spill sites of a petrol pump and from the sludge of a pharmaceutical waste water drain against the impact of fluoride. The experiments were conducted with two crops. In this mung bean experiment Vigna radiata was selected as a test crop. The seeds were sown in the field with bacterial consortia, compost and reduced dose (25% less nitrogen than recommended dose of chemical fertilizer. After 30days of seed sowing (DAS, plants were collected from the field and dipped into the sodium fluoride solution with different concentrations for 48 hours. Thereafter, the impact of fluoride on chlorophyll, sugar, proline and relative water content (% were evaluated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM of the stem section was performed. SEM studies revealed that anatomical structure deformed with 1.5 mg/l sodium fluoride solution. It was observed that such treatment combination during the sowing of crops leads to combat the impact of lower doses of sodium fluoride (0.2 mg/l. Another experiment was also conducted within plastic pots with and without bacterial consortia isolated from rhizosphere of rice plant and oil spilled soil of petrol pump with the same field soil. Each pot was filled with 5 kg of soil + 2lt of water (on the basis of soil saturation. Oryza sativa seedlings were transplanted with different strength of sodium fluoride solution (25 mgNaF/kg, 50 mgNaF/kg, 100 mgNaF/kg and 500mgNaF/kg within the above pots. In second experiment, rice plants dried in all pots after 500 mgNaF/kg concentration of sodium fluoride. In this pot experiment bacterial strain are capable of reducing fluoride content in soil as noted by measuring fluoride in the pot soil after the experiment.

  8. Serum fluoride and sialic acid levels in osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, R; Lal, H; Kundu, Z S; Kharb, S

    2011-12-01

    Osteosarcoma is a rare malignant bone tumor most commonly occurring in children and young adults presenting with painful swelling. Various etiological factors for osteosarcoma are ionizing radiation, family history of bone disorders and cancer, chemicals (fluoride, beryllium, and vinyl chloride), and viruses. Status of fluoride levels in serum of osteosarcoma is still not clear. Recent reports have indicated that there is a link between fluoride exposure and osteosarcoma. Glycoproteins and glycosaminoglycans are an integral part of bone and prolonged exposure to fluoride for long duration has been shown to cause degradation of collagen and ground substance in bones. The present study was planned to analyze serum fluoride, sialic acid, calcium, phosphorus, and alkaline phosphatase levels in 25 patients of osteosarcoma and age- and sex-matched subjects with bone-forming tumours other than osteosarcoma and musculo-skeletal pain (controls, 25 each). Fluoride levels were analyzed by ISE and sialic acid was analyzed by Warren's method. Mean serum fluoride concentration was found to be significantly higher in patients with osteosarcoma as compared to the other two groups. The mean value of flouride in patients with other bone-forming tumors was approximately 50% of the group of osteosarcoma; however, it was significantly higher when compared with patients of group I. Serum sialic acid concentration was found to be significantly raised in patients with osteosarcoma as well as in the group with other bone-forming tumors as compared to the group of controls. There was, however, no significant difference in the group of patients of osteosarcoma when compared with group of patients with other bone-forming tumors. These results showing higher level of fluoride with osteosarcoma compared to others suggesting a role of fluoride in the disease.

  9. Pharmacokinetics of Fluoride in Toddlers After Application of 5% Sodium Fluoride Dental Varnish

    OpenAIRE

    Milgrom, Peter; Taves, Donald M.; Kim, Amy S.; Watson, Gene E; Jeremy A Horst

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of dental caries (tooth decay) among preschool children is increasing, driven partially by an earlier age of onset of carious lesions. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends application of 5% sodium fluoride varnish at intervals increasing with caries risk status, as soon as teeth are present. However, the varnishes are marketed for treatment of tooth sensitivity and are regulated as medical devices rather than approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for preventi...

  10. Fluoride varnishes with calcium glycerophosphate: fluoride release and effect on in vitro enamel demineralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Saads CARVALHO

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were (1 to assess the amount of fluoride (F released from varnishes containing calcium glycerophosphate (CaGP and (2 to assess the effect of the experimental varnishes on in vitro demineralization. Six test groups using 5 varnishes: base varnish (no active ingredients; Duraphat® (2.26% NaF; Duofluorid® (5.63% NaF/CaF2; experimental varnish 1 (1% CaGP/5.63% NaF/CaF2; experimental varnish 2 (5% CaGP/5.63% NaF/CaF2; and no varnish were set up. In stage 1, 60 acrylic blocks were randomly distributed into 6 groups (n = 10. Then 300 µg of each varnish was applied to each block. The blocks were immersed in deionized water, which was changed after 1, 8, 12, 24, 48 and 72 hours. Fluoride concentration in the water was analyzed using a fluoride electrode. In stage 2, 60 bovine enamel samples were distributed into 6 groups (n = 10, and treated with 300 µg of the respective varnish. After 6 h the varnish was removed and the samples were subjected to a 7-day in vitro pH cycle (6 h demineralization/18 h remineralization per day. The demineralization was measured using surface hardness. The results showed that both experimental varnishes released more fluoride than Duofluorid® and Duraphat® (p < 0.05, but Duraphat® showed the best preventive effect by decreasing enamel hardness loss (p < 0.05. Therefore, we conclude that even though (1 the experimental varnishes containing CaGP released greater amounts of F, (2 they did not increase in the preventive effect against enamel demineralization.

  11. Graphene Fluoride: A Stable Stoichiometric Graphene Derivative and its Chemical Conversion to Graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Zbořil, Radek; Karlický, František; Bourlinos, Athanasios B.; Steriotis, Theodore A.; Athanasios K. Stubos; Georgakilas, Vasilios; Šafářová, Klára; Jančík, Dalibor; Trapalis, Christos; Otyepka, Michal

    2010-01-01

    Stoichoimetric graphene fluoride monolayers are obtained in a single step by the liquid-phase exfoliation of graphite fluoride with sulfolane. Comparative quantum-mechanical calculations reveal that graphene fluoride is the most thermodynamically stable of five studied hypothetical graphene derivatives; graphane, graphene fluoride, bromide, chloride, and iodide. The graphene fluoride is transformed into graphene via graphene iodide, a spontaneously decomposing intermediate. The calculated ban...

  12. Solubility of fluorides of alkaline earth metals and some rare earths in anhydrous trifluoroacetic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solubility of fluorides of alkaline earth and some rare earth metals in anhydrous trifluoroacetic acid is studied. For each type of fluoride solubility depends on the ionic radius of the cation. Solubility of fluorides of alkaline earth metals grows from magnesium to barium. All the fluorides in anhydrous trifluoroacetic acid form solvates. Solvates of strontium and scandium fluorides are shown to decompose at 110 and 150 deg C respectively

  13. Fluoride and lead adsorption on carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shuguang; LI Yanhui

    2004-01-01

    The properties and applications of CNT have been studied extensively since Iijima discovered them in 1991[1,2]. They have exceptional mechanical properties and unique electrical property, highly chemical stability and large specific surface area. Thus far, they have widely potential applications in many fields. They can be used as reinforcing materials in composites[3], field emissions[4], hydrogen storage[5], nanoelectronic components[6], catalyst supports[7], adsorption material and so on. However, the study on the potential application of CNT, environmental protection field in particular, was hardly begun.Long[8] et al. reported that CNT had a significantly higher dioxin removal efficiency than that of activated carbon. The Langmuir adsorption constant is 2.7 × 1052, 1.3 × 1018 respectively. The results indicated that CNT is potential candidate for the removal of micro-organic pollutants. However, the reports on the CNT used as fluoride and heavy metal adsorbent are seldom.In this paper, A novel material, alumina supported on carbon nanotubes (Al2O3/CNT), was prepared from carbon nanotubes and Al(NO3)3. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra demonstrate that alumina is amorphous, and scanning electron microscope (SEM) images show that CNT and alumina are homogeneously mixed. Furthermore, the fluoride adsorption behavior on the surface of Al2O3/CNT has been investigated and compared with other adsorbents. The results indicate that Al2O3/CNT has a high adsorption capacity, with a saturation adsorption capacity of 39.4 mg/g. It is also found that the adsorption capacity of Al2O3/CNT is 3.0~4.5 times that of γ-Al2O3while almost equal to that of IRA-410 polymeric resin at 25 ℃. The adsorption isotherms of fluoride on Al2O3/CNT is fit the Freundlich equation well, optimal pH ranging from 5.0 to 9.0.Also in this paper, a novel material, modified carbon nanotubes (CNT), was prepared from carbon nanotubes and HNO3 under boiling condition. Infrared spectroscopy (IR

  14. Spectrophotometric determination of fluorides in water with Hach equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spectrophotometric method for the determination of the fluoride ion in water, demineralized water, raw waters, laundry waters and waters treated with ion exchange resins , using the technique and the SPADNS coloring indicated in the operation manual of the Hach equipment is described. This method covers the determination of the fluoride ion in the range from 0 to 2 mg/l on 25 ml. of radioactive base sample. These limits can be variable if the size of the used aliquot one is changed for the final determination of the fluoride ion. (Author)

  15. Nitrogen Trifluoride-Based Fluoride- Volatility Separations Process: Initial Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNamara, Bruce K.; Scheele, Randall D.; Casella, Andrew M.; Kozelisky, Anne E.

    2011-09-28

    This document describes the results of our investigations on the potential use of nitrogen trifluoride as the fluorinating and oxidizing agent in fluoride volatility-based used nuclear fuel reprocessing. The conceptual process uses differences in reaction temperatures between nitrogen trifluoride and fuel constituents that produce volatile fluorides to achieve separations and recover valuable constituents. We provide results from our thermodynamic evaluations, thermo-analytical experiments, kinetic models, and provide a preliminary process flowsheet. The evaluations found that nitrogen trifluoride can effectively produce volatile fluorides at different temperatures dependent on the fuel constituent.

  16. Determination of fluoride content in toothpaste using spectrophotometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanti Pudji Hastuti

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intake excessive fluoride in children’s teeth are generally marked with white and brown patches. Excessive fluoride of more than 4.0 mg/L can cause a person suffering from poisoning, fragility of the bones (osteoporosis, liver and kidney damage. Knowledge about the spectrophotometry for determination method of fluoride content in commercially available toothpaste is very few. Purpose: The purposes of study were to examine the suitable method for fluoride extraction and to determine out the accuracy, precision, linearity, and stability of the measurement method of fluoride content in toothpaste. Methods: The suitable F extraction method was determined by the comparison among 3 methods of extraction; e.g. the dried samples were immersed in (1 distilled water, (2 96% HCl, and (3 96% HNO3; and the validation methods of measurement were the maximum wavelength, standart curve, accuracy test, precision test, and stability test. Results: Result showed that the fluoride extraction by using the concentrated HNO3 was found to have the highest levels of fluoride, followed by hydrochloric acid dissolution (HCl and distilled water, while the method of validation showed that SPADNS revealed the acceptable accuracy. Precision has the RSD ≤ 2.00%. Furthermore the stability test result showed that the measurement of fluoride less than 2 hours was still reliable. Conclusion: The study suggested that the best result of fluoride extraction from toothpaste could be gained by using concentrate HNO3, and the spectrophotometer (UV-Vis Mini Shimadzu U-1240 and SPADNS have the acceptable accuracy.Latar Belakang: Pemasukan fluoride yang berlebihan pada gigi anak ditandai dengan bercak putih dan coklat. Fluoride lebih dari 4.0 mg / L dapat menyebabkan seseorang menderita keracunan , kerapuhan tulang (osteoporosis, kerusakan hati dan ginjal. Pengetahuan tentang spektrofotometri untuk metode penentuan kadar fluoride dalam pasta gigi yang tersedia secara

  17. Using High Fluoride Concentration Products in Public Policy: A Rapid Review of Current Guidelines for High Fluoride Concentration Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Gail V A; Ramsdale, Martin P; Vinall-Collier, Karen; Csikar, Julia I

    2016-01-01

    Despite improvements in dental caries levels since the widespread introduction of fluoride toothpastes, it is still a disease which is considered to be a priority in many countries around the world. Individuals at higher risk of caries can be targeted with products with a high fluoride concentration to help reduce the amount and severity of the disease. This paper compares guidance from around the world on the use of products with a high fluoride concentration and gives examples of how guidance has been translated into activity in primary care dental practice. A rapid review of electronic databases was conducted to identify the volume and variation of guidance from national or professional bodies on the use of products with a high fluoride concentration. Fifteen guidelines published within the past 10 years and in English were identified and compared. The majority of these guidelines included recommendations for fluoride varnish use as well as for fluoride gels, while a smaller number offered guidance on high fluoride strength toothpaste and other vehicles. Whilst there was good consistency in recommendations for fluoride varnish in particular, there was sometimes a lack of detail in other areas of recommendation for other vehicles with a high fluoride concentration. There are good examples within the UK, such as the Childsmile project and Delivering Better Oral Health, which highlight that the provision of evidence-based guidance can be influential in directing scarce resources towards oral health improvements. Policy can be influenced by evidence-based national recommendations and used to help encourage dental professionals and commissioners and third-party payers to adopt higher levels of practices aimed at oral health improvement. PMID:27100106

  18. Low energy spin excitations in chromium metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pynn, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Azuah, R.T. [Hahn-Meitner-Inst., Berlin (Germany); Stirling, W.G. [Univ. of Liverpool (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Kulda, J. [Inst. Laue Langevin, Grenoble (France)

    1997-12-31

    Neutron scattering experiments with full polarization analysis have been performed with a single crystal of chromium to study the low-energy spin fluctuations in the transverse spin density wave (TSDW) state. A number of remarkable results have been found. Inelastic scattering observed close to the TSDW satellite positions at (1 {+-} {delta},0,0) does not behave as expected for magnon scattering. In particular, the scattering corresponds to almost equally strong magnetization fluctuations both parallel and perpendicular to the ordered moments of the TSDW phase. As the Neel temperature is approached from below, scattering at the commensurate wavevector (1,0,0) increases in intensity as a result of critical scattering at silent satellites (1,0, {+-} {delta}) being included within the spectrometer resolution function. This effect, first observed by Sternlieb et al, does not account for all of the inelastic scattering around the (1,0,0) position, however, Rather, there are further collective excitations, apparently emanating from the TSDW satellites, which correspond to magnetic fluctuations parallel to the ordered TSDW moments. These branches have a group velocity that is close to that of (1,0,0) longitudinal acoustic (LA) phonons, but assigning their origin to magneto-elastic scattering raises other unanswered questions.

  19. Multiple inorganic toxic substances contaminating the groundwater of Myingyan Township, Myanmar: Arsenic, manganese, fluoride, iron, and uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In South Asia, the technological and societal shift from drinking surface water to groundwater has resulted in a great reduction of acute diseases due to water borne pathogens. However, arsenic and other naturally occurring inorganic toxic substances present in groundwater in the region have been linked to a variety of chronic diseases, including cancers, heart disease, and neurological problems. Due to the highly specific symptoms of chronic arsenic poisoning, arsenic was the first inorganic toxic substance to be noticed at unsafe levels in the groundwater of West Bengal, India and Bangladesh. Subsequently, other inorganic toxic substances, including manganese, uranium, and fluoride have been found at unsafe levels in groundwater in South Asia. While numerous drinking water wells throughout Myanmar have been tested for arsenic, relatively little is known about the concentrations of other inorganic toxic substances in Myanmar groundwater. In this study, we analyzed samples from 18 drinking water wells (12 in Myingyan City and 6 in nearby Tha Pyay Thar Village) and 2 locations in the Ayeyarwaddy River for arsenic, boron, barium, beryllium, cadmium, cobalt, chromium, copper, fluoride, iron, mercury, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead, antimony, selenium, thallium, uranium, vanadium, and zinc. Concentrations of arsenic, manganese, fluoride, iron, or uranium exceeded health-based reference values in most wells. In addition, any given well usually contained more than one toxic substance at unsafe concentrations. While water testing and well sharing could reduce health risks, none of the wells sampled provide water that is entirely safe with respect to inorganic toxic substances. It is imperative that users of these wells, and users of other wells that have not been tested for multiple inorganic toxic substances throughout the region, be informed of the need for drinking water testing and the health consequences of drinking water contaminated with inorganic toxic

  20. Multiple inorganic toxic substances contaminating the groundwater of Myingyan Township, Myanmar: Arsenic, manganese, fluoride, iron, and uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacquart, Thomas [Better Life Laboratories, Calais, VT (United States); Frisbie, Seth [Better Life Laboratories, Calais, VT (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Norwich University, Northfield, VT (United States); Mitchell, Erika [Better Life Laboratories, Calais, VT (United States); Grigg, Laurie [Department of Earth and Environmental Science, Norwich University, Northfield, VT (United States); Cole, Christopher [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Norwich University, Northfield, VT (United States); Small, Colleen [Vermont Department of Health Laboratory, Burlington, VT (United States); Sarkar, Bibudhendra, E-mail: bsarkar@sickkids.ca [Department of Molecular Structure and Function, The Research Institute of The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Biochemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-06-01

    In South Asia, the technological and societal shift from drinking surface water to groundwater has resulted in a great reduction of acute diseases due to water borne pathogens. However, arsenic and other naturally occurring inorganic toxic substances present in groundwater in the region have been linked to a variety of chronic diseases, including cancers, heart disease, and neurological problems. Due to the highly specific symptoms of chronic arsenic poisoning, arsenic was the first inorganic toxic substance to be noticed at unsafe levels in the groundwater of West Bengal, India and Bangladesh. Subsequently, other inorganic toxic substances, including manganese, uranium, and fluoride have been found at unsafe levels in groundwater in South Asia. While numerous drinking water wells throughout Myanmar have been tested for arsenic, relatively little is known about the concentrations of other inorganic toxic substances in Myanmar groundwater. In this study, we analyzed samples from 18 drinking water wells (12 in Myingyan City and 6 in nearby Tha Pyay Thar Village) and 2 locations in the Ayeyarwaddy River for arsenic, boron, barium, beryllium, cadmium, cobalt, chromium, copper, fluoride, iron, mercury, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead, antimony, selenium, thallium, uranium, vanadium, and zinc. Concentrations of arsenic, manganese, fluoride, iron, or uranium exceeded health-based reference values in most wells. In addition, any given well usually contained more than one toxic substance at unsafe concentrations. While water testing and well sharing could reduce health risks, none of the wells sampled provide water that is entirely safe with respect to inorganic toxic substances. It is imperative that users of these wells, and users of other wells that have not been tested for multiple inorganic toxic substances throughout the region, be informed of the need for drinking water testing and the health consequences of drinking water contaminated with inorganic toxic

  1. Cerium fluoride crystals for calorimetry at LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-resolution homogeneous calorimetry is fully justified for part of the physics program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The main design features of proposed CeF3 crystals for calorimetry for LHC are discussed. The severe constraints LHC imposes on detectors make the use of 'classical' crystals impossible. Therefore, a large R and D effort has been undertaken by the 'Crystal Clear' collaboration in order to find new, dense, fast and radiation hard crystals. A good candidate, cerium fluoride, has been identified and studied. It is interesting at this stage to review the specifications of scintillators for LHC and to see how well available data on CeF3 luminescence, decay time, light yield, optical transmission and resistance to radiation meet them. Milestones to reach before starting a large scale crystal production in view of the eventual construction of a calorimeter, are also discussed. (author) 15 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab

  2. Further results on cerium fluoride crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, S.; Auffray, E.; Aziz, T.; Baccaro, S.; Banerjee, S.; Bareyre, P.; Barone, L.E.; Borgia, B.; Boutet, D.; Burq, J.P.; Chemarin, M.; Chipaux, R.; Dafinei, I.; D' Atanasio, P.; De Notaristefani, F.; Dezillie, B.; Dujardin, C.; Dutta, S.; Faure, J.L.; Fay, J.; Ferrere, D.; Francescangeli, O.; Fuchs, B.A.; Ganguli, S.N.; Gillespie, G.; Goyot, M.; Gupta, S.K.; Gurtu, A.; Heck, J.; Herve, A.; Hillemanns, H.; Holdener, F.; Ille, B.; Joensson, L.; Kierstead, J.; Krenz, W.; Kway, W.; Le Goff, J.M.; Lebeau, M.; Lebrun, P.; Lecoq, P.; Lemoigne, Y.; Loomis, G.; Lubelsmeyer, K.; Madjar, N.; Majni, G.; El Mamouni, H.; Mangla, S.; Mares, J.A.; Martin, J.P.; Mattioli, M.; Mauger, G.J.; Mazumdar, K.; Mengucci, P.; Merlo, J.P.; Moine, B.; Nikl, N.; Pansart, J.P.; Pedrini, C.; Poinsignon, J.; Polak, K.; Raghavan, R.; Rebourgeard, P.; Rinaldi, D.; Rosa, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Sahuc, P.; Samsonov, V.; Sarkar, S.; Schegelski, V.; Schmitz, D.; Schneegans, M.; Seliverstov, D.; Stoll, S.; Sudhakar, K.; Sven; Crystal Clear Collaboration

    1993-08-15

    A systematic investigation of the properties of cerium fluoride monocrystals has been performed by the 'Crystal Clear' collaboration in view of a possible use of such crystals for the construction of high precision electromagnetic calorimeters for the future generation of high luminosity accelerators. A large sample of different crystals grown by several producers has been studied. The spectroscopic characteristics, the transmission, luminescence and excitation spectra and the decay time curves are analysed. The light yield of the different crystals is measured with photomultipliers and Si photodiodes and compared to reference standards like BGO and NaI(Tl). The radiation damage behaviour is then presented for [gamma] and neutron irradiations, at different doses and dose rates, including thermal and optical bleaching. (orig.)

  3. Hexavalent Chromium Reduction and Its Distribution in the Cell and Medium by Chromium Resistant Fusarium solani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousumi Sen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, batch biosorption of Cr(VI was studied using the fungal strain isolated from soil. The fungal strain was characterized as Fusarium solani. The total Cr distribution in the biomass (fungus and in the media obtained from the experiment conducted at 500 mg l -1 initial Cr(VI concentration and pH 5.0. The results indicated both intracellular and extracellular accumulation and enzymatic reduction of Cr(VI and this was supported by the Transmission Electron Microscopic (TEM observation at the same Cr(VI concentration and pH value. Chromium elution from Fusarium solani containing Cr was then tried out using a number of chromium eluting reagents and a maximum Cr could be eluted using 0.5N sodium hydroxide solution without destructing the biomass structure. The total Cr was recovered by pH adjustment from both biomass and media was found to be 44% of the initial Cr(VI concentration (500 mg l-1.

  4. A highly sensitive colorimetric and ratiometric sensor for fluoride ion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Wu Xu; Jin Tang; He Tian

    2008-01-01

    A new benzoimidazole-naphthalimide derivative 4 was synthesized and its photophysical properties were studied.This compound showed highly selectively and sensitive colorimetric and ratiometric sensing ability for fluoride anion.

  5. Preparation and Characterization of Rare Earth Doped Fluoride Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy A. DeVol

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the synthesis, structure and applications of metal fluoride nanoparticles, with particular focus on rare earth (RE doped fluoride nanoparticles obtained by our research group. Nanoparticles were produced by precipitation methods using the ligand ammonium di-n-octadecyldithiophosphate (ADDP that allows the growth of shells around a core particle while simultaneously avoiding particle aggregation. Nanoparticles were characterized on their structure, morphology, and luminescent properties. We discuss the synthesis, properties, and application of heavy metal fluorides; specifically LaF3:RE and PbF2, and group IIA fluorides. Particular attention is given to the synthesis of core/shell nanoparticles, including selectively RE-doped LaF3/LaF3, and CaF2/CaF2 core/(multi-shell nanoparticles, and the CaF2-LaF3 system.

  6. Estuarine response of fluoride - Investigations in Azhikode Estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Balachandran, K.K.; Joseph, T.; Sankaranarayanan, V.N.

    behaved conservatively during the postmonsoon season. However, during the premonsoon season 25% removal of fluoride was observed due to estuarine mixing. The possible mechanisms for the removal are explained....

  7. Potentiometric anion selectivity of polymer-membrane electrodes based on cobalt, chromium, and aluminum salens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badr, Ibrahim H.A. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, P.O. Box 11566, Cairo (Egypt)]. E-mail: ibadr1@yahoo.com

    2006-06-16

    Metallo-salens of cobalt(II) (Co-Sal), chromium(III) (Cr-Sal), and aluminum(III) (Al-Sal) are used as the active ionophores within plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) membranes. It is shown that central metal-ion plays a critical role in directing the ionophore selectivity. Polymer-membrane electrodes based on Co-Sal, Cr-Sal, and Al-Sal are demonstrated to exhibit enhanced responses and selectivity toward nitrite/thiocyanate, thiocyanate, and fluoride anions, respectively. The improved anion selectivity of the three ionophore systems is shown to deviate significantly from the classical Hofmeister pattern that is based only on ion lipophilicity. For example, optimized membrane electrodes for nitrite ion based on Co-Sal exhibit logK{sub Nitrite,Anion}{sup pot} values of -5.22, -4.66, -4.48, -2.5 towards bromide, perchlorate, nitrate, and iodide anions, respectively. Optimized membrane electrodes based on Co-Sal and Cr-Sal show near-Nernstian responses towards nitrite (-57.9+/-0.9mV/decade) and thiocyanate (-56.9+/-0.8mV/decade), respectively, with fast response and recovery times. In contrast, Al-Sal based membrane electrodes respond to fluoride ion in a super-Nernstian (-70+/-3mV/decade) and nearly an irreversible mode. The operative response mechanism of Co-Sal, Cr-Sal, and Al-Sal membrane electrodes is examined using the effect of added ionic sites on the potentiometric response characteristics. It is demonstrated that addition of lipophilic anionic sites to membrane electrodes based on the utilized metallo-salens enhances the selectivity towards the primary ion, while addition of cationic sites resulted in Hofmeister selectivity patterns suggesting that the operative response mechanism is of the charged carrier type. Electron spin resonance (ESR) data indicates that Co(II) metal-ion center of Co-Sal ionophore undergoes oxidation to Co(III). This process leads to formation of a charged anion-carrier that is consistent with the response behavior obtained for Co

  8. Quantitative measure for the "nakedness" of fluoride ion sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christe, Karl O; Jenkins, H Donald Brooke

    2003-08-01

    A quantitative measure for the donor strength or "nakedness" of fluoride ion donors is presented. It is based on the free energy change associated with the transfer of a fluoride ion from the donor to a given acceptor molecule. Born-Haber cycle calculations were used to calculate both the free energy and the enthalpy change for this process. The enthalpy change is given by the sum of the fluoride ion affinity of the acceptor (as defined in strict thermodynamic convention) and the lattice energy difference (DeltaU(POT)) between the fluoride ion donor and the salt formed with the acceptor. Because, for a given acceptor, the fluoride affinity has a constant value, the relative enthalpy (and also the corresponding free energy) changes are governed exclusively by the lattice energy differences. In this study, BF(3), PF(5), AsF(5), and SbF(5) were used as the acceptors, and the following seven fluoride ion donors were evaluated: CsF, N(CH(3))(4)F (TMAF), N-methylurotropinium fluoride (MUF), hexamethylguanidinium fluoride (HMGF), hexamethylpiperidinium fluoride (HMPF), N,N,N-trimethyl-1-adamantylammonium fluoride (TMAAF), and hexakis(dimethylamino)phosphazenium fluoride (HDMAPF). Smooth relationships between the enthalpy changes and the molar volumes of the donor cations were found which asymptotically approach constant values for infinitely large cations. Whereas CsF is a relatively poor F(-) donor [(U(POT)(CsF) - U(POT)(CsSbF(6))) = 213 kJ mol(-)(1)], when compared to N(CH(3))(4)F [(U(POT)(TMAF) - U(POT)(TMASbF(6))) = 69 kJ mol(-)(1)], a 4 times larger cation (phosphazenium salt) and an infinitely large cation are required to decrease DeltaU(POT) to 17 and 0 kJ mol(-)(1), respectively. These results clearly demonstrate that very little is gained by increasing the cation size past a certain level and that secondary factors, such as chemical and physical properties, become overriding considerations.

  9. Electron transfer. 75. Reduction of carboxylato-bound chromium(V) with vanadium(IV). Intervention of chromium(IV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chelated (carboxylato)chromium(V) anion bis(2-hydroxy-2-ethylbutyrato)oxochromate(V) (I), [(Lig)2Cr(O)]-, reacts with oxovanadium(IV) to form a strongly absorbing species (lambda/sub max/ = 515 nm; epsilon = 1.7 x 103 M-1) in the presence of 2-hydroxy-2-ethylbutyric acid buffers (pH 2-4). EPR data support 1:1 stoichiometry with VO2+ in deficiency, indicating the formation of a chromium(IV) species by reduction. With excess VO2+ a chromium(III) product was obtained. Spectral and ion-exchange properties of this product correspond to those observed for the titanium(III) and iron(II) reductions of chromium(V) and are consistent with the formulation of the product as a bis(hydroxycarboxylate) chelate of (H2O)2Cr/sup III/. With excess vanadium(IV), the reaction exhibits triphasic kinetics. The remaining step of the reaction is the reduction of the chromium(IV) intermediate with VO2+. Rates for all steps increase with decreasing [H+] and level off at low [H+]. The limiting rate constants for the formation of the chromium(IV) intermediate by the (Lig)3Cr(O)2- and (Lig)2Cr(O)- pathways are 2.8 x 103 and 2.2 x 102 M-1s-1. The bimolecular limiting rate constant for the reduction of chromium(IV) is computed to be 7.7 x 102 M-1 s-1. 33 references, 7 tables

  10. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY AND NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF FLUORIDE IN SAND

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hong-mei; SU Bao-yu

    2006-01-01

    The transport and transformation of fluoride in sand were studied by using soil tank test under the condition of saturated water in this article. Based on the analysis of the laboratory experiments, the rules of fluorine transportation and transformation were simulated in sand by solving the advection-diffusion equation. Through comparison between computed results and observed data , it is shown that the established model and determined parameters could be used to simulate the fluoride transport in sand.

  11. Preparation and Characterization of Rare Earth Doped Fluoride Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    DeVol, Timothy A.; Basak Yazgan-Kukouz; Baris Kokuoz; DiMaio, Jeffrey R.; Kevin B. Sprinkle; James, Tiffany L.; Kucera, Courtney J.; Jacobsohn, Luiz G.; John Ballato

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the synthesis, structure and applications of metal fluoride nanoparticles, with particular focus on rare earth (RE) doped fluoride nanoparticles obtained by our research group. Nanoparticles were produced by precipitation methods using the ligand ammonium di-n-octadecyldithiophosphate (ADDP) that allows the growth of shells around a core particle while simultaneously avoiding particle aggregation. Nanoparticles were characterized on their structure, morphology, and luminesc...

  12. Thermodynamic investigation of fluoride salts for nuclear energy production

    OpenAIRE

    Beilmann, Markus

    2013-01-01

    In this work thermodynamic properties of molten fluoride salts and salt mixtures are investigated. Fluoride salts have advantageous properties to be used in energy producing systems based on the conversion from heat to energy like i.e in Molten Salt Reactors. For this purpose it is very important to have detailed information about the heat capacity of the pure salts and salt mixtures. To get a better understanding about the heat capacity in mixtures drop calorimetry measurements of mixture...

  13. Fluoride-assisted synthesis of bimodal microporous SSZ-13 zeolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaochun; Kosinov, Nikolay; Hofmann, Jan P; Mezari, Brahim; Qian, Qingyun; Rohling, Roderigh; Weckhuysen, Bert M; Ruiz-Martínez, Javier; Hensen, Emiel J M

    2016-02-21

    The presence of small amount of fluoride in alkaline hydrothermal synthesis of SSZ-13 zeolite yields bimodal microporous particles with substantially improved performance in the methanol-to-olefins (MTO) reaction. Hydrocarbon uptake measurements and fluorescence microspectroscopy of spent catalysts demonstrate enhanced diffusion through micropores at the grain boundaries of nanocrystals running through the zeolite particles. Fluoride-assisted SSZ-13 synthesis is a cheap and scalable approach to optimize the performance of MTO zeolite catalysts. PMID:26810114

  14. Heterolysis of Dihydrogen by Silver Alkoxides and Fluorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Brandon K; Nguyen, Jenna T; Bacsa, John; Sadighi, Joseph P

    2015-07-01

    Alkoxide-bridged disilver cations react with dihydrogen to form hydride-bridged cations, releasing free alcohol. Hydrogenolysis of neutral silver fluorides affords hydride-bridged disilver cations as their bifluoride salts. These reactions proceed most efficiently when the supporting ligands are expanded N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs) derived from 6- and 7-membered cyclic amidinium salts. Kinetics studies show that silver fluoride hydrogenolysis is first-order in both silver and dihydrogen.

  15. The economic value of Quebec’s water fluoridation program

    OpenAIRE

    Tchouaket, Eric; Brousselle, Astrid; Fansi, Alvine; Dionne, Pierre Alexandre; Bertrand, Elise; Fortin, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Aim Dental caries is a major public health problem worldwide, with very significant deleterious consequences for many people. The available data are alarming in Canada and the province of Quebec. The water fluoridation program has been shown to be the most effective means of preventing caries and reducing oral health inequalities. This article analyzes the cost-effectiveness of Quebec’s water fluoridation program to provide decision-makers with economic information for assessing its usefulnes...

  16. Fluoride Concentration in Drinking Water Resources; North of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amouei A.I. PhD,

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aims Fluoride is one of the anions present in soil and water, and determining its level in drinking water is vital for preventing dental and bone diseases in societies. This research aimed to determine fluoride concentrations in drinking water sources of rural and urban areas of Babol City, Iran. Instrument & Methods This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in Babol City, Iran, in 2014. 384 water samples were taken from 43 wells and 3 springs in the rural areas, and from 20 wells, 3 water reservoirs, and the water distribution system in the urban areas. Fluoride concentrations of water samples were measured with a model DR2000 spectrophotometer using the standard SPADNS method. Data were entered to SPSS 16 software and were analyzed by ANOVA test. Findings The mean fluoride concentrations in the water samples of the deep wells were higher compared to those of the springs (p=0.01. The mean fluoride concentrations in the plains areas were higher compared to the mountainous regions (p=0.02. The mean fluoride concentrations in the wells of the urban areas, in the urban reservoirs, and in the urban water distribution system were 0.40±0.14, 0.39±0.15, and 0.40±0.15mg/l, respectively (p=0.07. Fluoride concentrations in water in urban areas during various seasons varied from 0.31 to 0.45mg/l (p=0.06. Conclusion Fluoride concentrations in all drinking water sources in urban and rural areas of Babol are less than the ranges recommended by WHO and Iranian national standards.

  17. Scientific Opinion on Dietary Reference Values for fluoride

    OpenAIRE

    EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA)

    2013-01-01

    Following a request from the European Commission, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) derived Dietary Reference Values (DRVs) for fluoride, which are provided as Adequate Intake (AI) from all sources, including non-dietary sources. Fluoride is not an essential nutrient. Therefore, no Average Requirement for the performance of essential physiological functions can be defined. Nevertheless, the Panel considered that the setting of an AI is appropriate because of the be...

  18. Corrosion behavior of zirconia in acidulated phosphate fluoride

    OpenAIRE

    Anie Thomas; Sathyanarayanan Sridhar; Shant Aghyarian; Pilanda Watkins-curry; Chan, Julia Y.; Alessandro Pozzi; Danieli C. Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The corrosion behavior of zirconia in acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) representing acidic environments and fluoride treatments was studied. Material and Methods Zirconia rods were immersed in 1.23% and 0.123% APF solutions and maintained at 37°C for determined periods of time. Surfaces of all specimens were imaged using digital microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Sample mass and dimensions were measured for mass loss determination. Samples were charac...

  19. Corrosion behavior of zirconia in acidulated phosphate fluoride

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Anie; Sridhar, Sathyanarayanan; Aghyarian, Shant; Watkins-Curry, Pilanda; Chan, Julia Y.; Pozzi, Alessandro; Danieli C. Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The corrosion behavior of zirconia in acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) representing acidic environments and fluoride treatments was studied. Material and Methods Zirconia rods were immersed in 1.23% and 0.123% APF solutions and maintained at 37°C for determined periods of time. Surfaces of all specimens were imaged using digital microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Sample mass and dimensions were measured for mass loss determination. Samples were characteri...

  20. Fluoride levels in commercial dentifrices and drinking Water in Algeria

    OpenAIRE

    MERGHACHE, D.; BELLOUT, B.; MERGHACHE, S.; BOUCHERIT-ATMANI, Z.

    2011-01-01

    More and more scientific evidence show that fluorides have a cariostatic action to the plaque-saliva-tooth interface during cariogenous dissolution. Fluorides slow down demineralization and enhance remineralization. Their action is optimal, in the oral environment, when used at low concentrations on a continuous basis. The use of the fluorinated toothpastes during brushing of the teeth is a simple, rational method of daily topics application of fluorine, largely used in the context of prevent...

  1. Low-chromium reduced-activation ferritic steels for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Kenik, E.A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Development of reduced-activation ferritic steels has concentrated on high-chromium (8-10 wt% Cr) steels. However, there are advantages for a low-chromium steel, and initial ORNL studies on reduced-activation steels were on compositions with 2.25 to 12% Cr. Those studies showed an Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.25V-0.1C (2 1/4Cr-2WV) steel to have the highest strenglth of the steels studied. Although this steel had the best strength, Charpy impact properties were inferior to those of an Fe-9Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C (9Cr-2WVTa) and an Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.1C (2 1/4Cr-2W) steel. Therefore, further development of the low-chromium Cr-W steels was required. These results indicate that it is possible to develop low-chromium reduced-activation ferritic steels that have tensile and impact properties as good or better than those of high-chromium (7-9% Cr) steels. Further improvement of properties should be possible by optimizing the composition.

  2. Bioaccumulation and biosorption of chromium by Aspergillus niger MTCC 2594.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandana Mala, John Geraldine; Unni Nair, Balachandran; Puvanakrishnan, Rengarajulu

    2006-06-01

    Chromium toxicity is of prime concern due to chrome tanning processes in the leather sector. Chrome tanning results in the discharge of toxic levels of chromium causing pollution hazards. Chromium levels of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) were high above permissible limits in chrome samples after chrome tanning. The potential of Aspergillus niger MTCC 2594 to accumulate chromium as well as its biosorption capacity is investigated in this study. Bioaccumulation of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in the spent chrome liquor has resulted in a 75-78% reduction of the initial Cr content in 24-36 h. A. niger biomass is found to be very effective in the biosorption of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in spent chrome liquor. Maximum adsorption of 83% for biosorption of Cr(III) at 48 h and 79% of Cr(VI) at 36 h in spent chrome liquor is observed. The biosorption characteristics fit well with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms and the adsorption parameters are evaluated. The biosorption of Cr also follows Lagergren kinetics. A. niger biomass is effectively used for the biosorption of chromium with 79-83% Cr removal in 36-48 h.

  3. Chromium propionate enhances adipogenic differentiation of bovine intramuscular adipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca eTokach

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In vitro experiments were performed to determine the effects of increasing concentrations of chromium propionate on mRNA and protein abundance of different enzymes and receptors. Intramuscular and subcutaneous preadipocytes and bovine satellite cells were isolated from the longissimus muscle to determine the effect of treatment on glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ mRNA and GLUT4 protein abundance. Preadipocyte cultures were treated with differentiation media plus either sodium propionate or different concentrations of chromium propionate (CrPro for 96, 120, and 144 h before harvest. This study indicated adipogenesis of the bovine intramuscular adipocytes were more sensitive to the treatment of chromium propionate as compared to subcutaneous adipocytes. Enhancement of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and GLUT4 mRNA by CrPro treatment may enhance glucose uptake in intramuscular adipocytes. Chromium propionate decreased GLUT4 protein levels in muscle cell cultures suggesting those cells have increased efficiency of glucose uptake due to exposure to increased levels of CrPro. In contrast, each of the two adipogenic lines had opposing responses to the CrPro. It appeared that CrPro had the most stimulative effect of GLUT4 response in the intramuscular adipocytes as compared to subcutaneous adipocytes. These findings indicated opportunities to potentially augment marbling in beef cattle fed chromium propionate during the finishing phase.

  4. Anthropogenic chromium emissions in china from 1990 to 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hongguang; Zhou, Tan; Li, Qian; Lu, Lu; Lin, Chunye

    2014-01-01

    An inventory of chromium emission into the atmosphere and water from anthropogenic activities in China was compiled for 1990 through to 2009. We estimate that the total emission of chromium to the atmosphere is about 1.92×10⁵ t. Coal and oil combustion were the two leading sources of chromium emission to the atmosphere in China, while the contribution of them showed opposite annual growth trend. In total, nearly 1.34×10⁴ t of chromium was discharged to water, mainly from six industrial categories in 20 years. Among them, the metal fabrication industry and the leather tanning sector were the dominant sources of chromium emissions, accounting for approximately 68.0% and 20.0% of the total emissions and representing increases of 15.6% and 10.3% annually, respectively. The spatial trends of Cr emissions show significant variation based on emissions from 2005 to 2009. The emission to the atmosphere was heaviest in Hebei, Shandong, Guangdong, Zhejiang and Shanxi, whose annual emissions reached more than 1000t for the high level of coal and oil consumption. In terms of emission to water, the largest contributors were Guangdong, Jiangsu, Shandong and Zhejiang, where most of the leather production and metal manufacturing occur and these four regions accounted for nearly 47.4% of the total emission to water. PMID:24505309

  5. Anthropogenic chromium emissions in china from 1990 to 2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongguang Cheng

    Full Text Available An inventory of chromium emission into the atmosphere and water from anthropogenic activities in China was compiled for 1990 through to 2009. We estimate that the total emission of chromium to the atmosphere is about 1.92×10⁵ t. Coal and oil combustion were the two leading sources of chromium emission to the atmosphere in China, while the contribution of them showed opposite annual growth trend. In total, nearly 1.34×10⁴ t of chromium was discharged to water, mainly from six industrial categories in 20 years. Among them, the metal fabrication industry and the leather tanning sector were the dominant sources of chromium emissions, accounting for approximately 68.0% and 20.0% of the total emissions and representing increases of 15.6% and 10.3% annually, respectively. The spatial trends of Cr emissions show significant variation based on emissions from 2005 to 2009. The emission to the atmosphere was heaviest in Hebei, Shandong, Guangdong, Zhejiang and Shanxi, whose annual emissions reached more than 1000t for the high level of coal and oil consumption. In terms of emission to water, the largest contributors were Guangdong, Jiangsu, Shandong and Zhejiang, where most of the leather production and metal manufacturing occur and these four regions accounted for nearly 47.4% of the total emission to water.

  6. Enhancement of chromium uptake in tanning using oxazolidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundarapandiyan, S; Brutto, Patrick E; Siddhartha, G; Ramesh, R; Ramanaiah, B; Saravanan, P; Mandal, A B

    2011-06-15

    Monocyclic and bicyclic oxazolidines were offered at three different junctures of chrome tanning process viz. prior to BCS offer, along with BCS and after basification. It was found that oxazolidine when offered after basification brought about better chromium uptake and reduction of chromium load in the wastewater. Offer of oxazolidine was also varied. Increase in offer of oxazolidine from 0.25% to 1% was found to enhance the chromium uptake and decrease the chromium load in wastewater. But the increase in uptake was not proportionate to the increase in oxazolidine offer more than 0.75%. Offer of 1% Zoldine ZA 78 (monocyclic oxazolidine) and Zoldine ZE (bicyclic oxazolidine) after basification brought about 63.4% and 73.1% enhancement in chrome content in leather compared to control where oxazolidine was not offered. The tone of the wetblue was found to be altered moderately. However this did not call for any process adjustments in wet-finishing. The oxazolidine treated leathers were found to be immensely fuller and tighter. It was found experimentally that offer of 1% of oxazolidine facilitated reduction in the offer of syntans administered for filling and grain tightening by around 46%. Oxazolidine could bring about significant reduction in cost of chemicals apart from resulting environmental benefits due to enhancement of chromium uptake during tanning. PMID:21536383

  7. Removal of fluoride from water using aluminium containing compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Karthikeyan; K. P. Elango

    2009-01-01

    Batch adsorption studies were undertaken to assess the suitability of aluminium titanate (AT) and bismuth aluminate (BA) to remove fluoride ions from water.The effect of pH,dose of adsorbent,contact time,initial concentration,co-ions and temperature on fluoride removal efficiency were studied.The amounts of fluoride ions adsorbed,at 30℃ from 4 mg/L of fluoride ion solution,by AT and BA are 0.85 and 1.55 mg/g,respectively.The experimental data fitted well to the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms.Thermodynamic parameters such as △H~0,△S~0 and △G~0 indicated that the removal of fluoride ions by AT is exothermic and non-spontaneous while that by BA is endothermic and spontaneous.Furrier transform infrared (FT-IR) analysis and X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of the adsorbent before and after adsorption indicated that fluoride ions are chemisorbed by these adsorbents.

  8. Preparation of mixed rare earths modified chitosan for fluoride adsorption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁鹏; 张艺; 汪东风; 徐莹; 罗斓

    2013-01-01

    This paper described the fluoride removal from water using a new adsorbent namely mixed rare earths modified chitosan (CR). Mixed rare earths mainly contained La followed by Ce which was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). La(III)-modified chitosan (CL) was also prepared as control. For the batch technique, the effects of various parameters such as contact time, pH, adsorbent dose, initial fluoride concentration and co-ions on fluoride adsorption were studied. Fourier trans-form infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize adsorbents. It was observed that the fluo-ride adsorption capacity of CR (3.72 mgF-/g) was higher than CL (3.16 mgF-/g) at 2 h. The presence of co-ions such as bicarbonate and carbonate greatly affected the fluoride adsorption from water. Characterization experiments indicated the successful chelation between mixed rare earths and chitosan. The possible fluoride adsorption mechanism of CR was explained by a chemical reaction.

  9. Phosphate reduction in a hydroxyapatite fluoride removal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egner, A.

    2012-12-01

    Fluorosis is a widespread disease that occurs as a result of excess fluoride consumption and can cause severe tooth and bone deformations. To combat fluorosis, several previous studies have examined the potential to replace traditional bone char filters with synthetic hydroxyapatite. Calcite particles with a synthetic hydroxyapatite coating have been shown to effectively removed fluoride, yet the low-cost method for forming these particles leaves high amounts of phosphate both in synthesis waste-water and in filter effluent. High phosphate in filter effluent is problematic because consumption of extremely high phosphate can leach calcium from bones, further exacerbating the fluoride effect. This study examines ways of reducing and reusing waste. In particular, a method of fluoride removal is explored in which fluorapatite coatings may be formed directly. In preliminary studies, batches of 4.1g of Florida limestone (<710 μm) were equilibrated with 100 mL of 10ppm fluoride. In a control batch containing lime but no added phosphate, 14% treatment was achieved, but with added phosphate, 100% treatment was achieved in all batches. Batches with lower levels of phosphate took longer to reach 100% treatment, ranging from less than 24 hours in the highest phosphate batches to approximately 42 hours in the lowest batches. The lower levels tested were well within reasonable levels for drinking water and reached 0ppm fluoride in 42 hours or less.

  10. Community Water Fluoridation and Intelligence: Prospective Study in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, Jonathan M; Thomson, W Murray; Ramrakha, Sandhya; Moffitt, Terrie E; Zeng, Jiaxu; Foster Page, Lyndie A; Poulton, Richie

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to clarify the relationship between community water fluoridation (CWF) and IQ. Methods. We conducted a prospective study of a general population sample of those born in Dunedin, New Zealand, between April 1, 1972, and March 30, 1973 (95.4% retention of cohort after 38 years of prospective follow-up). Residence in a CWF area, use of fluoride dentifrice and intake of 0.5-milligram fluoride tablets were assessed in early life (prior to age 5 years); we assessed IQ repeatedly between ages 7 to 13 years and at age 38 years. Results. No clear differences in IQ because of fluoride exposure were noted. These findings held after adjusting for potential confounding variables, including sex, socioeconomic status, breastfeeding, and birth weight (as well as educational attainment for adult IQ outcomes). Conclusions. These findings do not support the assertion that fluoride in the context of CWF programs is neurotoxic. Associations between very high fluoride exposure and low IQ reported in previous studies may have been affected by confounding, particularly by urban or rural status.

  11. Fluoride release from restorative materials coated with an adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Letícia Algarves; Weidlich, Patrícia; Samuel, Susana Maria Werner; Maltz, Marisa

    2002-01-01

    The retention of both fluoride resins and resin-modified glass ionomer cements to dental tissues can be improved by the association of an adhesive system which promotes the bonding between the resin component and dentin, forming a hybrid layer. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate if the presence of the adhesive, being part of the hybrid layer composition, interfered with the fluoride released to tooth tissues. The restorative materials studied were: Vitremer (3M), Heliomolar (Vivadent) and Z100 (3M) using an adhesive application (Scotch Bond MultiPurpose Plus--3M). Ten discs of each material were prepared: 5 were covered with the adhesive and 5 were not. The discs were immersed in individual flasks containing artificial saliva which was changed daily. Fluoride release was measured at days 1, 5, 10, 15 and 20 by a fluoride combined electrode (9609 BN--Orion) coupled to an ion analyzer (SA-720 Procyon). One-way ANOVA and the Student-Newman-Keuls test were applied to compare the materials. The results showed that the use of a dental adhesive significantly decreased the fluoride release of Vitremer and reduced the fluoride release of Heliomolar to undetectable levels with the methodology used. PMID:11870961

  12. Monitoring of fluoride in water samples using a smartphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Saurabh; Krishnan, Sunderrajan; Rajkumar, Samuel; Halery, Nischal; Balkunde, Pradeep

    2016-05-01

    In several parts of India, groundwater is the only reliable, year round source for drinking water. Prevention of fluorosis, a chronic disease resulting from excess intake of fluoride, requires the screening of all groundwater sources for fluoride in endemic areas. In this paper, the authors present a field deployable colorimetric analyzer based on an inexpensive smartphone embedded with digital camera for taking photograph of the colored solution as well as an easy-fit, and compact sample chamber (Akvo Caddisfly). Phones marketed by different smartphone makers were used. Commercially available zirconium xylenol orange reagent was used for determining fluoride concentration. A software program was developed to use with the phone for recording and analyzing the RGB color of the picture. Linear range for fluoride estimation was 0-2mgl(-1). Around 200 samples, which consisted of laboratory prepared as well as field samples collected from different locations in Karnataka, India, were tested with Akvo Caddisfly. The results showed a significant positive correlation between Ion Selective Electrode (ISE) method and Akvo Caddisfly (Phones A, B and C), with correlation coefficient ranging between 0.9952 and 1.000. In addition, there was no significant difference in the mean fluoride content values between ISE and Phone B and C except for Phone A. Thus the smartphone method is economical and suited for groundwater fluoride analysis in the field. PMID:26874766

  13. Fluoride and aluminum in teas and tea-based beverages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayacibara Mitsue Fujimaki

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate fluoride and aluminum concentration in herbal, black, ready-to-drink, and imported teas available in Brazil considering the risks fluoride and aluminum pose to oral and general health, respectively. METHODS: One-hundred and seventy-seven samples of herbal and black tea, 11 types of imported tea and 21 samples of ready-to-drink tea were divided into four groups: I-herbal tea; II-Brazilian black tea (Camellia sinensis; III-imported tea (Camellia sinensis; IV-ready-to-drink tea-based beverages. Fluoride and aluminum were analyzed using ion-selective electrode and atomic absorption, respectively. RESULTS: Fluoride and aluminum levels in herbal teas were very low, but high amounts were found in black and ready-to-drink teas. Aluminum found in all samples analyzed can be considered safe to general health. However, considering 0.07 mg F/kg/day as the upper limit of fluoride intake with regard to undesirable dental fluorosis, some teas exceed the daily intake limit for children. CONCLUSIONS: Brazilian and imported teas made from Camellia sinensis as well as some tea-based beverages are sources of significant amounts of fluoride, and their intake may increase the risk of developing dental fluorosis.

  14. Reduction of chromium oxide from slags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutiérrez-Paredes, J.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Experimental and theoretical work were performed to estimate the effect of slag basicity and amount of reducing agents on the reduction of chromium oxide from the slag which interacted with molten steel at 1,600 °C. The slag system contained CaO, MgO, SiO2, CaF2 and Cr2O3 together with Fe-alloys (Fe-Si and Fe-Si-Mg. The CaF2 and MgO contents in the slags were 10 mass % each; Cr2O3 was 25%. The amount of the ferroalloys ranged from 12.5 to 50 g per 100 g of slag. The (CaO+MgO/SiO2 ratio was held at 1 and 2. The Cr yield was determined using both Fe-alloys as reducing agents. Some estimations were made to determine the theoretical effect of temperature, slag basicity, (CaO+MgO/SiO2, and amount of reducing agents in the slag on the chromium recovery. The FACT (Facility for the Analysis of Chemical Thermodynamics computational package is used to determine the equilibrium between the slag and molten steel.

    En el presente trabajo se realiza un estudio teórico y experimental para determinar el efecto de la basicidad de la escoria y la cantidad de agentes reductores sobre la reducción de óxidos de cromo contenidos en la escoria, la cual está en contacto con acero líquido a 1.600 °C. La escoria se prepara con los reactivos CaO, MgO, SiO2, CaF2 y ferroaleaciones (Fe-Si y Fe-Si-Mg. Los contenidos de CaF2 y MgO en la escoria son de 10 %, cada uno, y el de Cr2O3 es 25 %. La cantidad de la ferroaleación varía de 12,5 a 50 g por cada 100 g de escoria. La relación (CaO+MgO/SiO2 tiene los valores de 1 y 2. Se determina la eficiencia de recuperación de cromo empleando los dos tipos de ferroaleaciones. Se realizaron cálculos para determinar el efecto teórico de la temperatura, la basicidad de la escoria, (CaO+MgO/SiO2, y la cantidad de agentes reductores sobre la reducci

  15. Electrochemical modification of chromium surfaces using 4-nitro- and4-fluorobenzenediazonium salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinge, Mogens; Cecatto, Marcel; Kingshott, Peter;

    2009-01-01

    Chromium surfaces can be electrografted with organic surface films using 4-nitro- or 4-fluorobenzenediazonium salts, despite the fact that the surfaces are covered with a protective chromium oxide layer...

  16. FORMATION AND DESTRUCTION OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM IN A LABORATORY SWIRL FLAME INCINERATOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The partitioning of chromium (Cr) in combustion systems was investigated theoretically and experimentally. Theoretical predictions were based on chemical equilibrium and suggested that hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] was favored by the presence of chlorine (Cl) and diminished by the...

  17. Effective bioleaching of chromium in tannery sludge with an enriched sulfur-oxidizing bacterial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jing; Gou, Min; Tang, Yue-Qin; Li, Guo-Ying; Sun, Zhao-Yong; Kida, Kenji

    2016-10-01

    In this study, a sulfur-oxidizing community was enriched from activated sludge generated in tannery wastewater treatment plants. Bioleaching of tannery sludge containing 0.9-1.2% chromium was investigated to evaluate the effectiveness of the enriched community, the effect of chromium binding forms on bioleaching efficiency, and the dominant microbes contributing to chromium bioleaching. Sludge samples inoculated with the enriched community presented 79.9-96.8% of chromium leaching efficiencies, much higher than those without the enriched community. High bioleaching efficiencies of over 95% were achieved for chromium in reducible fraction, while 60.9-97.9% were observed for chromium in oxidizable and residual fractions. Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, the predominant bacteria in the enriched community, played an important role in bioleaching, whereas some indigenous heterotrophic species in sludge might have had a supporting role. The results indicated that A. thiooxidans-dominant enriched microbial community had high chromium bioleaching efficiency, and chromium binding forms affected the bioleaching performance.

  18. CHROMIUM ELECTROANALYSIS AT SCREEN PRINTED ELECTRODE MODIFIED BY THIN FILMS OF NICKEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    A rapid and potentially cost-effective electrochemical method is reported for analysis of chromium (VI) and Chromium(III) using a nickel modified screen printed carbon ink electrode. Electrochemical characteristics of nickel modified electrode as well voltammetric behavior f...

  19. Using High Fluoride Concentration Products in Public Policy – A Rapid Review of Current Guidelines for High Fluoride Concentration products

    OpenAIRE

    Douglas, GVA; Ramsdale, M; Vinall, K.; Csikar, J

    2016-01-01

    Despite improvements in caries levels since widespread introduction of fluoride toothpastes it remains a priority in many countries around the world. Higher caries risk individuals can be targeted with products with a high fluoride concentration to help reduce the amount and severity of disease. This paper compares guidance from around the world on the use of such products and gives examples of how guidance has been translated into activity in primary care dental practice. A rapid review of e...

  20. Scientific Opinion on chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate as a source of chromium added for nutritional purposes to foodstuff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food (ANS

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available

    The Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food provides a scientific opinion on the safety and bioavailability of chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate as a source of chromium(III added for nutritional purposes to foodstuffs. The safety of chromium itself, in terms of the amounts that may be consumed, is outside the remit of this Panel. No new data have been provided as regards the safety and bioavailability of chromium from chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate. The Panel concurs with its earlier views stating that no evidence was provided supporting the bioavailability of chromium from chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate. Chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate is claimed to be freely soluble in water, however, chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate exists as a weak complex that may influence the bioavailability of chromium(III in the gastrointestinal tract. The Panel re-iterates that because of the complex chemistry of chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate in aqueous solutions and its limited solubility at pH >5, the bioavailability of chromium(III from chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate is low. Based on a conservative exposure estimate, the Panel calculated the combined intake of chromium(III from supplements and from foods fortified with chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate, for both adults and children, to be approximately 240 μg chromium(III/day, which is below the value of 250 µg/day established by the WHO for supplemental intake of chromium that should not be exceeded. The Panel noted that the use of chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate in the form of a premix with lactose, added to foods, would result in an exposure at the mean for adults of approximately 7-37 mg lactose/day (0.12-0.62 μg lactose/kg bw/day and to 36-192 μg lactate/day (0.60-3.20 μg/kg bw/day. Given that subjects with lactose maldigestion will tolerate up to 12 g of lactose with no or minor symptoms, these levels are not of safety concern.

  1. Biosorption of hexavalent chromium in a tannery industry wastewater using fungi species

    OpenAIRE

    Sivakumar, D.

    2016-01-01

    The isolated fungi species of different kinds from chromium contaminated soil sites located in Nagalkeni, Chennai were used for reducing chromium(VI) in a tannery industry wastewater of Nagalkeni, Chennai.  The experiments were conducted to know biosorption potential of isolated fungi species for removing chromium(VI) in a tannery industry wastewater against the different pH, fungi biomass and chromium(VI) concentration (dilution ratio).  The results of this study indicated that the order of ...

  2. Investigation of hexavalent chromium removal from Synthetic wastewater by using Peaganum

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Akbar Taghizadeh; Maryam khodadadi; Taher Shahriary; Hadighe Dorri; mahla zaferanieh; rasoul khosravi

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aim: Discharge of industrial wastewater containing hexavalent chromium into the environment can have harmful effects to the types of organisms. So, chromium should remove before discharging to the environment with an effective method. The purpose of this study of is hexavalent chromium removed with Peganum harmala granular seeds(PGS).   Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, The removal of hexavalent chromium with using PGS, with changes in time, pH, adsorbent dose,...

  3. Influence of chromium, oxygen, carbon and nitrogen on iron viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinetic viscosity of 70 beforehand melted iron samples with additions of chromium (up to 2%) and carbon (up to 1%) has been investigated. Different conditions of melting brought about differences in oxygen and nitrogen contents. Viscosity of most samples has been determined in the 1550-1650 deg C temperature range. It is stated that small additions to pure iron of each of the investigated elements (O, Cr, C, N) decrease its viscosity. Combined effect of these additions on viscosity is inadditive. Simultaneous introduction of oxygen and carbon may result in increase of melt viscosity. The same fact is observed at combined introduction of chromium and nitrogen. Simultaneous introduction of other impurities-chromium with oxygen or carbon, nitrogen with oxygen causes amplification of their individual effect. Reasons for the observed regularities result from changes in energies of interparticle interactions in the melt and therefore rebuilding of structure of its short-range order

  4. A study of the process of desorption of hexavalent chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.B. Amorim

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work the process of desorption of hexavalent chromium, a toxic metal ion, from the marine algae Sargassum sp, following biosorption experiments 2³ factorial design was studied. A technique was applied to three eluents: HCl, H2SO4 and EDTA. Three factors of importance were evaluated: concentration of eluent, the ratio between mass of biosorbent and volume of eluent (S/L and process time. A statistical analysis of the experimental results showed that the three variables evaluated are significant for all three eluents. The models for chromium desorption were validated, as the results agreed well with the observed values. Through use of the response surface methodology, a factorial design based optimization technique; it was possible to identify the most suitable eluent and the interval of values for the process variables that resulted in the most significant desorption of chromium, which is relevant information for work aiming at process optimization.

  5. Structural and magnetic properties of chromium doped zinc ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinc chromium ferrites with chemical formula ZnCrxFe2−xO4 (x = 0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0) were prepared by Sol - Gel technique. The structural as well as magnetic properties of the synthesized samples have been studied and reported here. The structural characterizations of the samples were analyzed by using X – Ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). The single phase spinel cubic structure of all the prepared samples was tested by XRD and FTIR. The particle size was observed to decrease from 18.636 nm to 6.125 nm by chromium doping and induced a tensile strain in all the zinc chromium mixed ferrites. The magnetic properties of few samples (x = 0.0, 0.4, 1.0) were investigated using Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM)

  6. Chromium Resistant Bacteria: Impact on Plant Growth in Soil Microcosm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayel Hanane

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Three chromium resistant bacterial strains, Pseudomonas fluorescens PF28, Enterobacter amnigenus EA31 and Enterococcus gallinarum S34 isolated from tannery waste contaminated soil were used in this study. All strains could resist a high concentration of K2Cr2O7 that is up to 300 mg/L. The effect of these strains on clover plants (Trifolium campestre in the presence of two chromium salts CrCl3 and K2Cr2O7 was studied in soil microcosm. Application of chromium salts adversely affected seed germination, root and shoot length. Bacterial inoculation improved the growth parameters under chromate stress when compared with non inoculated respective controls. There was observed more than 50% reduction of Cr(VI in inoculated soil microcosms, as compared to the uninoculated soil under the same conditions. The results obtained in this study are significant for the bioremediation of chromate pollution.

  7. Electron magnetic resonance investigation of chromium diffusion in yttria powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biasi, R.S. de, E-mail: rsbiasi@ime.eb.b [Secao de Engenharia Mecanica e de Materiais, Instituto Militar de Engenharia, Pr. General Tiburcio, 80, 22290-270 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Grillo, M.L.N., E-mail: mluciag@uerj.b [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, 20550-013 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2010-03-01

    The electron magnetic resonance (EMR) technique was used to investigate the diffusion of chromium in yttria (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) powders. The EMR absorption intensity was measured for several annealing times and three different temperatures of isothermal annealing: 1273, 1323 and 1373 K. The activation temperature for diffusion, calculated from the experimental data using a theoretical model based on the Fick equation, was found to be E{sub A}=342+-5 kJ mol{sup -1}. This value is larger than the activation energy for the diffusion of chromium in rutile (TiO{sub 2}), periclase (MgO) and cobalt monoxide (CoO) and smaller than the activation energy for the diffusion of chromium in chrysoberyl (BeAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}).

  8. High Temperature Fluoride Salt Test Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, Adam M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cunningham, Richard Burns [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Fugate, David L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Holcomb, David Eugene [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kisner, Roger A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Peretz, Fred J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wilson, Dane F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yoder, Jr, Graydon L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Effective high-temperature thermal energy exchange and delivery at temperatures over 600°C has the potential of significant impact by reducing both the capital and operating cost of energy conversion and transport systems. It is one of the key technologies necessary for efficient hydrogen production and could potentially enhance efficiencies of high-temperature solar systems. Today, there are no standard commercially available high-performance heat transfer fluids above 600°C. High pressures associated with water and gaseous coolants (such as helium) at elevated temperatures impose limiting design conditions for the materials in most energy systems. Liquid salts offer high-temperature capabilities at low vapor pressures, good heat transport properties, and reasonable costs and are therefore leading candidate fluids for next-generation energy production. Liquid-fluoride-salt-cooled, graphite-moderated reactors, referred to as Fluoride Salt Reactors (FHRs), are specifically designed to exploit the excellent heat transfer properties of liquid fluoride salts while maximizing their thermal efficiency and minimizing cost. The FHR s outstanding heat transfer properties, combined with its fully passive safety, make this reactor the most technologically desirable nuclear power reactor class for next-generation energy production. Multiple FHR designs are presently being considered. These range from the Pebble Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR) [1] design originally developed by UC-Berkeley to the Small Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (SmAHTR) and the large scale FHR both being developed at ORNL [2]. The value of high-temperature, molten-salt-cooled reactors is also recognized internationally, and Czechoslovakia, France, India, and China all have salt-cooled reactor development under way. The liquid salt experiment presently being developed uses the PB-AHTR as its focus. One core design of the PB-AHTR features multiple 20 cm diameter, 3.2 m long fuel channels

  9. Chromium accumulation by the hyperaccumulator plant Leersia hexandra Swartz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue-Hong; Liu, Jie; Huang, Hai-Tao; Chen, Jun; Zhu, Yi-Nian; Wang, Dun-Qiu

    2007-04-01

    Leersia hexandra Swartz (Gramineae), which occurs in Southern China, has been found to be a new chromium hyperaccumulator by means of field survey and pot-culture experiment. The field survey showed that this species had an extraordinary accumulation capacity for chromium. The maximum Cr concentration in the dry leaf matter was 2978 mg kg(-1) on the side of a pond near an electroplating factory. The average concentration of chromium in the leaves was 18.86 times as that in the pond sediment, and 297.41 times as that in the pond water. Under conditions of the nutrient solution culture, it was found that L. hexandra had a high tolerance and accumulation capacity to Cr(III) and Cr(VI). Under 60 mg l(-1) Cr(III) and 10 mg l(-1) Cr(VI) treatment, there was no significant decrease of biomass in the leaves of L. hexandra (p>0.05). The highest bioaccumulation coefficients of the leaves for Cr(III) and Cr(VI) were 486.8 and 72.1, respectively. However, L. hexandra had a higher accumulation capacity for Cr(III) than for Cr(VI). At the Cr(III) concentration of 10 mg l(-1) in the culture solution, the concentration of chromium in leaves was 4868 mg kg(-1), while at the same Cr(VI) concentration, the concentration of chromium in leaves was only 597 mg kg(-1). These results confirmed that L. hexandra is a chromium hyperaccumulator which grows rapidly with a great tolerance to Cr and broad ecological amplitude. This species could provide a new plant resource that explores the mechanism of Cr hyperaccumulation, and has potential for usage in the phytoremediation of Cr-contaminated soil and water. PMID:17207838

  10. 21 CFR 73.3110a - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.3110a Section... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3110a Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide (Pigment Blue 36) (CAS Reg....

  11. 75 FR 60454 - Draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    ... AGENCY Draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the..., ``Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk..., 2010. The listening session on the draft assessment for hexavalent chromium will be held on November...

  12. 76 FR 20349 - Draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-12

    ... AGENCY Draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the..., ``Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk... workshop on the draft assessment for Hexavalent Chromium will be held on May 12, 2011, beginning at 8:30...

  13. 77 FR 61431 - Hexavalent Chromium Standards; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) Approval...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-09

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Hexavalent Chromium Standards; Extension of the Office of...) approval of the information collection requirements specified in the Hexavalent Chromium Standards for... requirements specified in the Hexavalent Chromium (Cr(VI)) Standards for General Industry (29 CFR...

  14. Speciation dependent radiotracer studies on chromium preconcentration using iron doped calcium alginate biopolymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work aims to study the differential attitude of Ca-alginate (CA) and Fe-doped calcium alginate (Fe-CA) and towards Cr(III) and Cr (IV) so that, depending on the oxidation state of chromium effluent, environmentally sustainable methodologies can be prescribed for removal of chromium. Throughout the experiment 51Cr has been used as the precursor of stable chromium

  15. Evaluation of flexural bond strength of porcelain to used nickel-chromium alloy in various percentages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VNV Madhav

    2012-01-01

    Fresh nickel-chromium alloy shows the greatest porcelain adherence.There is no significant change in bond strength of ceramic to alloy with up to 75% of used nickel-chromium alloy.At least 25%- of new alloy should be added when recycled nickel-chromium alloy is being used for metal ceramic restorations.

  16. Fertilizers and Mixed Crop Cultivation of Chromium Tolerant and Sensitive Plants under Chromium Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dheeba, B; Sampathkumar, P; Kannan, K

    2015-01-01

    Zea mays (maize) and Vigna radiata (green gram) are found to be the chromium (Cr) tolerant and sensitive plants, respectively. In the present paper, we investigate the reduction of the toxicity of Cr in the sensitive plants by the mixed crop cultivation in the field using various amendments. Further, the potassium dichromate was used as the source of hexavalent Cr. The results indicated that Cr adversely affects both the growth and yield of plants. The soil properties vary with Cr and different fertilizer amendments and the yield of both plants were affected by Cr. We conclude that metal accumulation of seeds of green gram was higher than corn and the application of single fertilizer either farm yard manure (FYM) or nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium (NPK) enhances the growth and yield of both the tolerant and sensitive plants in the mixed crop cultivations. PMID:25709647

  17. Urinary levels of nickel and chromium associated with dental restoration by nickel-chromium based alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo; Xia, Gang; Cao, Xin-Ming; Wang, Jue; Xu, Bi-Yao; Huang, Pu; Chen, Yue; Jiang, Qing-Wu

    2013-03-01

    This paper aims to investigate if the dental restoration of nickel-chromium based alloy (Ni-Cr) leads to the enhanced excretions of Ni and Cr in urine. Seven hundred and ninety-five patients in a dental hospital had single or multiple Ni-Cr alloy restoration recently and 198 controls were recruited to collect information on dental restoration by questionnaire and clinical examination. Urinary concentrations of Ni and Cr from each subject were measure by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Compared to the control group, the urinary level of Ni was significantly higher in the patient group of dental restoration. Potential short- and long-term effects of Ni-Cr alloy restoration need to be investigated.

  18. Primary and secondary crystallization of modified hypoeutectic chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Studnicki

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents investigations of crystallization of modified hypoeutectic wear resistant chromium cast iron which contains carbon about 2% and chromium on three levels (12%, 18% and 25%. Three substances were applied to the modification ( boron carbide (B4C, ferroniobium (FeNb and mixture of ferroniobium and mischmetal (RE. The investigations of crystallization were conducted the DTA method in DTA-C and DTA-Is testers. The influence on the course of the process of primary and secondary crystallization was observed.

  19. Use of chitosan for chromium removal from exhausted tanning baths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaro, Raffaele; Fabbricino, Massimiliano; Lanzetta, Rosa; Mancino, Anna; Naviglio, Biagio; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Sartorio, Roberto; Tomaselli, Michele; Tortora, Gelsomina

    2008-01-01

    A novel approach, based on chitosan heavy-metal sequestrating ability, is proposed for chromium(III) removal from spent tanning liquor. Experimental results, obtained at lab-scale using real wastewater, are presented and discussed. Resulting efficiencies are extremely high, and strongly dependent on chitosan dose and pH value. Comparative analyses with other polysaccharides is also carried out showing that amine groups are more efficient than carboxyl and sulphate ones. Chromium recovery from sorption complexes and chitosan regeneration is finally proposed to optimize the whole process.

  20. Profile of Fluoride Release from a Nanohybrid Composite Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Assed Bezerra Silva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the amount and profile of fluoride release from a fluoride-containing nanohybrid composite resin (Tetric® N-Ceram by direct potentiometry. Thirty specimens (5 mm diameter x 3 mm high; n=10/material were made of Tetric® N-Ceram, Vitremer® resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC (positive control or Filtek® Z350 nanofill composite resin (negative control. The specimens were stored individually in plastic tubes containing 1 mL of artificial saliva at 37°C, which was daily renewed during 15 days. At each renewal of saliva, the amount of fluoride ions released in the solution was measured using a fluoride ion-selective electrode with ion analyzer, and the values obtained in mV were converted to ppm (µg/mL. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey’s post-hoc test at a significance level of 5%. The results showed that the resins Tetric® N-Ceram and Filtek® Z350 did not release significant amounts of fluoride during the whole period of evaluation (p>0.05. Only Vitremer® released significant amounts of fluoride ions during the 15 days of the experiment, with greater release in first 2 days (p0.05. In conclusion, the nanohybrid composite resin Tetric® N-Ceram did not present in vitro fluoride-releasing capacity throughout the 15 days of study.

  1. Compression of lithium fluoride to 92 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Haini; Dorfman, Susannah M.; Holl, Christopher M.; Meng, Yue; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; He, Duanwei; Duffy, Thomas S.

    2014-01-01

    The equation of state and compression behavior of lithium fluoride, LiF, have been determined to 92 GPa by X-ray diffraction in a diamond anvil cell. A neon pressure-transmitting medium was used to minimize the effect of differential stress on the sample. Consistent results using multiple pressure standards were obtained. By fitting the pressure-volume data to a Birch-Murnaghan equation of state, the isothermal bulk modulus and its corresponding pressure derivative at zero pressure were determined to be K0=70.1±0.7 GPa, and K‧0=4.3±0.1. If the bulk modulus is fixed at 66.2 GPa, a value well constrained by independent elasticity measurements, we obtain K‧0=4.6±0.1. The bulk modulus and its pressure derivative obtained from this work resolve the large discrepancy in previously reported values of K0 and K‧0 for this material. Consequently, the equation of state of LiF is now sufficiently well constrained to allow its use as a pressure calibrant in high pressure experiments.

  2. Characterization of cerium fluoride nanocomposite scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stange, Sy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Esch, Ernst I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Leif O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Couture, Aaron J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mckigney, Edward A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Muenchausen, Ross E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Del Sesto, Rico E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gilbertson, Robert D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mccleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reifarth, Rene [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of the neutron capture cross-sections of a number of short-lived isotopes would advance both pure and applied scientific research. These cross-sections are needed for calculation of criticality and waste production estimates for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, for analysis of data from nuclear weapons tests, and to improve understanding of nucleosynthesis. However, measurement of these cross-sections would require a detector with a faster signal decay time than those used in existing neutron capture experiments. Crystals of faster detector materials are not available in sufficient sizes and quantities to supply these large-scale experiments. Instead, we propose to use nanocomposite detectors, consisting of nanoscale particles of a scintillating material dispersed in a matrix material. We have successfully fabricated cerium fluoride (CeF{sub 3}) nanoparticles and dispersed them in a liquid matrix. We have characterized this scintillator and have measured its response to neutron capture. Results of the optical, structural, and radiation characterization will be presented.

  3. Magnetic separation of uranium from magnesium fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The attraction or repulsion of particles by a magnetic gradient, based on the respective susceptibilities, provides the basis for physical separation of particles that are comprised predominantly of uranium from those that are predominantly magnesium fluoride (MgF2). To determine the effectiveness of this approach, a bench-scale magnetic separator from the S.G. Frantz Co., Inc. was used. In the Frantz Model L-1, particles are fed through a funnel onto a vibration tray and through a magnetic field. The specific design of the Frantz magnet causes the magnetic field strength to vary along the width of the magnet, setting up a gradient. The tray in the magnetic field is split at a point about half way down its length so that the separated material does not recombine. A schematic is presented of Frantz Model L-1 CN - the same magnet configured for high gradient magnetic separation of liquid-suspended particles. Here different pole pieces create a uniform magnetic field, and stainless steel wood in the canister between the pole pieces creates the high gradient. 1 ref., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Characterization of cerium fluoride nanocomposite scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of the neutron capture cross-sections of a number of short-lived isotopes would advance both pure and applied scientific research. These cross-sections are needed for calculation of criticality and waste production estimates for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, for analysis of data from nuclear weapons tests, and to improve understanding of nucleosynthesis. However, measurement of these cross-sections would require a detector with a faster signal decay time than those used in existing neutron capture experiments. Crystals of faster detector materials are not available in sufficient sizes and quantities to supply these large-scale experiments. Instead, we propose to use nanocomposite detectors, consisting of nanoscale particles of a scintillating material dispersed in a matrix material. We have successfully fabricated cerium fluoride (CeF3) nanoparticles and dispersed them in a liquid matrix. We have characterized this scintillator and have measured its response to neutron capture. Results of the optical, structural, and radiation characterization will be presented.

  5. In vivo and in vitro studies of a cetylamine fluoride mouthrinse: evaluation of a device used for in vitro experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARVALHO Sílvia Magaly Sasso

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A mouthrinse containing cetylamine fluoride (230 ppm in fluoride was prepared for in vitro studies of fluoride clearance and adsorption by enamel and/or hydroxyapatite using a device that simulates the oral cavity. In vivo studies of fluoride clearance from this mouthrinse were conducted and compared with other fluoride sources. The amount of fluoride adsorbed to tooth blocks or powdered hydroxyapatite, both treated with this cetylamine fluoride mouthrinse once or twice a day, was determined. The results of these studies showed that it is possible to prepare a mouthrinse with cetylamine fluoride for alternative use by patients for the prevention and therapy of dental caries.

  6. Stabilization of fluoroindate glasses by magnesium fluoride and other heavy metal fluorides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. Costa

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Their extended transparency in the IR makes them attractive for use as optical fibers for CO laser power delivery and optical amplification. This paper firstly describes the spectacular stabilizing effect of MgF2 on the binary system InF3-BaF2. The investigation of the InF3-BaF2-MgF2 system led to samples up to 5mm in thickness. Further optimization of this system was achieved by incorporation of limited amounts of other fluorides and resulted in increased resistence to devitrification. The second approach of this work was concerned to the investigation of the pseudo-ternary system InF3-GdF3-GaF3 at constant concentrations of ZnF2-SrF2-BaF2-NaF. Several compositions were studied in this system. The samples presented a better thermal stability when compared to other families of fluoride glasses. Therefore, these glasses seem to be very promising for the fabrication of special optical fibers. Thermal data are reported.

  7. An Overview of Liquid Fluoride Salt Heat Transport Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Cetiner, Sacit M [ORNL

    2010-09-01

    Heat transport is central to all thermal-based forms of electricity generation. The ever increasing demand for higher thermal efficiency necessitates power generation cycles transitioning to progressively higher temperatures. Similarly, the desire to provide direct thermal coupling between heat sources and higher temperature chemical processes provides the underlying incentive to move toward higher temperature heat transfer loops. As the system temperature rises, the available materials and technology choices become progressively more limited. Superficially, fluoride salts at {approx}700 C resemble water at room temperature being optically transparent and having similar heat capacity, roughly three times the viscosity, and about twice the density. Fluoride salts are a leading candidate heat-transport material at high temperatures. Fluoride salts have been extensively used in specialized industrial processes for decades, yet they have not entered widespread deployment for general heat transport purposes. This report does not provide an exhaustive screening of potential heat transfer media and other high temperature liquids such as alkali metal carbonate eutectics or chloride salts may have economic or technological advantages. A particular advantage of fluoride salts is that the technology for their use is relatively mature as they were extensively studied during the 1940s-1970s as part of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's program to develop molten salt reactors (MSRs). However, the instrumentation, components, and practices for use of fluoride salts are not yet developed sufficiently for commercial implementation. This report provides an overview of the current understanding of the technologies involved in liquid salt heat transport (LSHT) along with providing references to the more detailed primary information resources. Much of the information presented here derives from the earlier MSR program. However, technology has evolved over the intervening years

  8. Recommendations for fluoride limits in drinking water based on estimated daily fluoride intake in the Upper East Region, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Laura; Lutz, Alexandra; Berry, Kate A; Yang, Wei

    2015-11-01

    Both dental and skeletal fluorosis caused by high fluoride intake are serious public health concerns around the world. Fluorosis is particularly pronounced in developing countries where elevated concentrations of naturally occurring fluoride are present in the drinking water, which is the primary route of exposure. The World Health Organization recommended limit of fluoride in drinking water is 1.5 mg F(-) L(-1), which is also the upper limit for fluoride in drinking water for several other countries such as Canada, China, India, Australia, and the European Union. In the United States the enforceable limit is much higher at 4 mg F(-) L(-1), which is intended to prevent severe skeletal fluorosis but does not protect against dental fluorosis. Many countries, including the United States, also have notably lower unenforced recommended limits to protect against dental fluorosis. One consideration in determining the optimum fluoride concentration in drinking water is daily water intake, which can be high in hot climates such as in northern Ghana. The results of this study show that average water intake is about two times higher in Ghana than in more temperate climates and, as a result, the fluoride intake is higher. The results also indicate that to protect the Ghanaian population against dental fluorosis, the maximum concentration of fluoride in drinking water for children under 6-8 years should be 0.6 mg F(-) L(-1) (and lower in the first two years of life), and the limit for older children and adults should be 1.0 mg F(-) L(-1). However, when considering that water treatment is not cost-free, the most widely recommended limit of 1.5 mg F(-) L(-1) - which is currently the limit in Ghana--may be appropriate for older children and adults since they are not vulnerable to dental fluorosis once the tooth enamel is formed.

  9. Recommendations for fluoride limits in drinking water based on estimated daily fluoride intake in the Upper East Region, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Laura; Lutz, Alexandra; Berry, Kate A; Yang, Wei

    2015-11-01

    Both dental and skeletal fluorosis caused by high fluoride intake are serious public health concerns around the world. Fluorosis is particularly pronounced in developing countries where elevated concentrations of naturally occurring fluoride are present in the drinking water, which is the primary route of exposure. The World Health Organization recommended limit of fluoride in drinking water is 1.5 mg F(-) L(-1), which is also the upper limit for fluoride in drinking water for several other countries such as Canada, China, India, Australia, and the European Union. In the United States the enforceable limit is much higher at 4 mg F(-) L(-1), which is intended to prevent severe skeletal fluorosis but does not protect against dental fluorosis. Many countries, including the United States, also have notably lower unenforced recommended limits to protect against dental fluorosis. One consideration in determining the optimum fluoride concentration in drinking water is daily water intake, which can be high in hot climates such as in northern Ghana. The results of this study show that average water intake is about two times higher in Ghana than in more temperate climates and, as a result, the fluoride intake is higher. The results also indicate that to protect the Ghanaian population against dental fluorosis, the maximum concentration of fluoride in drinking water for children under 6-8 years should be 0.6 mg F(-) L(-1) (and lower in the first two years of life), and the limit for older children and adults should be 1.0 mg F(-) L(-1). However, when considering that water treatment is not cost-free, the most widely recommended limit of 1.5 mg F(-) L(-1) - which is currently the limit in Ghana--may be appropriate for older children and adults since they are not vulnerable to dental fluorosis once the tooth enamel is formed. PMID:26058000

  10. The oxidation and reduction of chromium of stainless steels in an eletric arc furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Arh

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The oxidation of chromium during the elaboration of stainless steels occurs with oxygen in solution blown inthe melt and with oxides in the slag. A higher content of silicon in the furnace charge decreases the extent of oxidation of chromium, however, the efficient reduction of chromium from the slag is of essential importance for a minimal loss of chromium. In this survey, the theory of the oxidation of chromium, its reduction from the slag and the conditions for the formation of foaming slag are discussed.

  11. Aquaporin 5 Interacts with Fluoride and Possibly Protects against Caries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Anjomshoaa

    Full Text Available Aquaporins (AQP are water channel proteins and the genes coding for AQP2, AQP5, and AQP6 are clustered in 12q13. Since AQP5 is expressed in serous acinar cells of salivary glands, we investigated its involvement in caries. DNA samples from 1,383 individuals from six groups were studied. Genotypes of eight single nucleotide polymorphisms covering the aquaporin locus were tested for association with caries experience. Interaction with genes involved in enamel formation was tested. The association between enamel microhardness at baseline, after creation of artificial caries lesion, and after exposure to fluoride and the genetic markers in AQP5 was tested. Finally, AQP5 expression in human whole saliva, after exposure to fluoride in a mammary gland cell line, which is known to express AQP5, and in Wistar rats was also verified. Nominal associations were found between caries experience and markers in the AQP5 locus. Since these associations suggested that AQP5 may be inhibited by levels of fluoride in the drinking water that cause fluorosis, we showed that fluoride levels above optimal levels change AQP5 expression in humans, cell lines, and rats. We have shown that AQP5 is involved in the pathogenesis of caries and likely interacts with fluoride.

  12. Improved fluoride volatility reprocessing for MOX fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, M.; Fukasawa, T.; Sawa, T.; Yamashita, J.; Kamoshida, M.; Sasahira, A.; Kawamura, F. [Nuclear Systems Div., Hitachi, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    Several countries had stopped developing fluoride volatility reprocessing method in the 1970's due to difficulties in recovering pure Pu. Although, nuclear societies recently favor dirty Pu (MOX). which has high proliferation resistance and needs remote fuel fabrication technologies. This situation reminded the authors to re-evaluate the fluoride volatility process. Preliminary investigation clarified that conventional fluoride volatility process could be simplified to recover dirty MOX and pure U from spent LWR fuels. Pure U is suitable to transfer it to re-enrichment (LWR cycle again), to storage certain period for future FBRs, and to dispose with relatively simple barrier. The improved process also enables to prepare directly the dirty MOX particles which are suitable for remote fuel fabrication (vibration packing). This paper describes the system of improved fluoride volatility reprocessing, and compatibility of each elemental process such as thermal decladding, two stage fluorination of U and U+Pu, U purification, direct conversion. of mixed fluoride into oxide particles and vibration packing fuel fabrication. (authors)

  13. A Review on Adsorption of Fluoride from Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirna Habuda-Stanić

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Fluoride is one of the anionic contaminants which is found in excess in surface or groundwater because of geochemical reactions or anthropogenic activities such as the disposal of industrial wastewaters. Among various methods used for defluoridation of water such as coagulation, precipitation, membrane processes, electrolytic treatment, ion-exchange, the adsorption process is widely used. It offers satisfactory results and seems to be a more attractive method for the removal of fluoride in terms of cost, simplicity of design and operation. Various conventional and non-conventional adsorbents have been assessed for the removal of fluoride from water. In this review, a list of various adsorbents (oxides and hydroxides, biosorbents, geomaterials, carbonaceous materials and industrial products and by-products and its modifications from literature are surveyed and their adsorption capacities under various conditions are compared. The effect of other impurities on fluoride removal has also been discussed. This survey showed that various adsorbents, especially binary and trimetal oxides and hydroxides, have good potential for the fluoride removal from aquatic environments.

  14. Fluoride and aluminum release from restorative materials using ion chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Okte

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the amounts of fluoride and aluminum released from different restorative materials stored in artificial saliva and double-distilled water. Material and METHODS: Cylindrical specimens (10 x 1 mm were prepared from 4 different restorative materials (Kavitan Plus, Vitremer, Dyract Extra, and Surefil. For each material, 20 specimens were prepared, 10 of which were stored in 5 mL artificial saliva and 10 of which were stored in 5 mL of double-distilled water. Concentrations of fluoride and aluminum in the solutions were measured using ion chromatography. Measurements were taken daily for one week and then weekly for two additional weeks. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Duncan's multiple range tests (p<0.05. RESULTS: The highest amounts of both fluoride and aluminum were released by the resin-modified glass ionomer cement Vitremer in double-distilled water (p<0.05. All materials released significantly more fluoride in double-distilled water than in artificial saliva (p<0.05. In artificial saliva, none of the materials were observed to release aluminum. CONCLUSION: It was concluded that storage media and method of analysis should be taken into account when the fluoride and aluminum release from dental materials is assessed.

  15. Corrosion Behavior of Titanium Grade 7 in Fluoride-Containing NaCl Brines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lian, T; Whalen, M T; Wong, L

    2004-10-25

    The effects of fluoride on the corrosion behavior of Titanium Grade 7 (0.12-0.25% Pd) have been investigated. Up to 0.1 mol/L fluoride was added to the NaCl brines at 95 C, and three pH values of 4, 8, and 11 were selected for studying pH dependence of fluoride effects. It was observed that fluoride significantly altered the anodic polarization behavior, at all three pH values of 4, 8, and 11. Under acidic condition fluoride caused active corrosion. The corrosion of Titanium grade 7 was increased by three orders of magnitude when a 0.1 mol/L fluoride was added to the NaCl brines at pH 4, and the Pd ennoblement effect was not observed in acidic fluoride-containing environments. The effects of fluoride were reduced significantly when pH was increased to 8 and above.

  16. A NOVEL BIO-WASTE INCORPORATED ALGINATE SORBENT FOR DE-FLUORIDATION OF WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmalin Sophia Ayyappan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the feasibility of using tamarind (Tamarindus indica seed powder for de-fluoridation of fluoride contaminated water. Batch study confirmed that tamarind seeds in dry powder form could remove 87% of fluoride from water. This bio-sorbent can be used effectively in areas where fluoride concentrations are above the permissible limits of 1.5 mg·l-1 as per WHO Standard, 1984. Tamarind seed powder was incorporated in a matrix of sodium alginate and made into gel-beads. The beads were tested for de-fluoridation efficiency by conducting column studies. The effect of various factors, such as flow rate, retention time, and the number of runs on the efficacy of fluoride removal was also studied. The results revealed that flow rate did not seem to have much effect on the percentage fluoride removal but the fluoride concentration decreased drastically upon greater retention time and multiple runs.

  17. Caries status in 16 year-olds with varying exposure to water fluoridation in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mullen, J

    2012-12-01

    Most of the Republic of Ireland\\'s public water supplies have been fluoridated since the mid-1960s while Northern Ireland has never been fluoridated, apart from some small short-lived schemes in east Ulster.

  18. Tetrabutylammonium fluoride promoted regiospecific reactions of trimethylsilyl-o-carborane with aldehydes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trimethylsilyl-o-carborane serves as o-carborane carbanion upon fluoride ion promoted reaction with carbonyl compounds. Thus, in the presence of tetrabutylammonium fluoride, trimethylsilyl-o-carborane undergoes facile, unprecedented, carbodesilylation with aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes. (author)

  19. Community-oriented administration of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, P E; Baez, R J; Lennon, M A

    2012-01-01

    coverage. Participants acknowledged that automatic fluoridation through water, salt, and milk is the most effective and equitable strategy for the prevention of dental caries. Concerns were expressed that government-subsidized community fluoride prevention programs may face privatization. In addition...

  20. Analyse van fluoride en fosfaat in complexe milieumatrices met capillaire zone elektroforese

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staden JJ van; Hoop MAGT van den; LAC

    1996-01-01

    Dit onderzoek bestudeert de toepasbaarheid van een eerder ontwikkelde methode voor de analyse van fluoride en fosfaat op meer complexe matrices zoals oppervlaktewater, loogextracten, grondwater en stemflowwater. De storende waterstofcarbonaat-piek bij de bepaling van fluoride in loogextracten ko

  1. Friction and wear behavior of chromium carbide coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromium carbides, tungsten carbide, and chromium oxide have been tested and evaluated as coatings to protect high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) steam generator and other HTGR components from adhesion, galling associated with sliding wear or from fretting. Tests were performed in commercially-pure helium and in helium doped with various gaseous impurities (H2, H2O, CH4, CO) to simulate the primary coolant of an HTGR. Several types of chromium carbide coatings including Cr3C2, Cr7C3, and Cr23C6, were tested for wear resistance and resistance to long-term spalling. Tungsten carbide and chromium oxide coatings were tested in sliding wear tests. Cr23C6-NiCr coatings showed the best performance (from 400 to 8160C) whether they were applied by detonation gun or plasma gun spraying methods. The presence of the Cr23C6-NiCr coatings did not affect the creep rupture properties of Alloy 800H substrates at temperatures up to 7600C. Low-cycle fatigue life of similar specimens at 5930C was reduced to 10 to 20% when tested in the 1 to 0.6% strain range

  2. Porosity of detonation coatings on the base of chromium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porosity of detonation coatings on the base of chromium carbide is estimated by the hydrostatic weighing. The open porosity value dependence on the distance of spraying, depth of the charge, ratio and volume of the detonator barrie filing with gas components is established. Pore distribution in the cross section of a specimen tested for porosity is studied by the methods of metallographic analysis

  3. Intestinal absorption of chromium as affected by wheat bran

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keim, K.S.; Holloway, C.L.; Hegsted, M.

    1986-03-01

    This study was designed to investigate the influence of dietary fiber, as found in wheat bran, on the absorption of chromium. Twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups of 10. The control was fed a semi-purified diet containing casein, methionine, cornstarch, sucrose, corn oil, mineral and vitamin mix, and choline bitartrate. The experimental group was fed the same diet but with soft red winter wheat bran added to a level of 35% of the diet at the expense of sucrose. To determine chromium absorption and uptake by selected tissues, rats were fasted for 24 hr, fed 5 g of the respective diet, 2 hr later intubated with 100..mu..Ci of Cr-51of sacrificed 24 hr later. The rats wee housed in metabolic cages after the Cr-51 intubation. The addition of wheat brand to the diet did not significantly affect chromium absorption as measured by percent dose of Cr-51 in the 24 hr urine. The percent dose in the control group was 0.68 +/- 0.20% (mean +/- SEM) and in the experimental group 0.63 +/- 0.24% (mean +/-SEM) (N.S.). The cr-51 uptake of liver, spleen, jejunum, and blood was not statistically different between groups. These results indicate that dietary fiber as found in wheat bran does not impair intestinal absorption of chromium.

  4. Microbial biotechnology for remediation of aquatic habitats polluted with chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viorica Coşier

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Chromium may occur in nine different forms of oxidation ranging from ?II to +VI, with forms II, III and VI as the most commonly encountered. In Cluj county, chromium pollution dates well back in time and has caused important dysfunction to the mechanical-biological wastewater purification station of the city of Cluj (Coşier & Diţă 1996. The purpose of this study was to develop one microbial method able to reduce hexavalent chromium (mobile, permeable to cell membrane, carcinogenic and mutagenic (Ishikawa et al 1994 to the trivalent form (insoluble and an essential element for humans (Song et al 2006. Different sources of chromium-reducing bacteria and many sources of carbon and energy added to the Kvasnikov mineral basal medium (Komori et al 1990 with increasing amount of chromate (200- 1000 mg/l were tested. Two bacterial strains, able to reduce even 1000 mg chromate/l, were isolated in pure culture. For one of these bacterial strains, we determined the optimum conditions for the reduction of Cr (VI.

  5. 75 FR 67100 - Superalloy Degassed Chromium From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    ... superalloy degassed chromium from Japan (70 FR 76030). The Commission is conducting a review to determine..., subparts A, D, E, and F (19 CFR part 207), as most recently amended at 74 FR 2847 (January 16, 2009). \\1... rule 201.15(b)(19 CFR 201.15(b)), 73 FR 24609 (May 5, 2008). This advice was developed in...

  6. 76 FR 8773 - Superalloy Degassed Chromium From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ... applicable deadline.'' (75 FR 80457). Accordingly, pursuant to section 751(c) of the Tariff Act of 1930 (19 U... COMMISSION Superalloy Degassed Chromium From Japan AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission... Japan would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material injury. On December 22,...

  7. Intestinal absorption of chromium as affected by wheat bran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was designed to investigate the influence of dietary fiber, as found in wheat bran, on the absorption of chromium. Twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups of 10. The control was fed a semi-purified diet containing casein, methionine, cornstarch, sucrose, corn oil, mineral and vitamin mix, and choline bitartrate. The experimental group was fed the same diet but with soft red winter wheat bran added to a level of 35% of the diet at the expense of sucrose. To determine chromium absorption and uptake by selected tissues, rats were fasted for 24 hr, fed 5 g of the respective diet, 2 hr later intubated with 100μCi of Cr-51of sacrificed 24 hr later. The rats wee housed in metabolic cages after the Cr-51 intubation. The addition of wheat brand to the diet did not significantly affect chromium absorption as measured by percent dose of Cr-51 in the 24 hr urine. The percent dose in the control group was 0.68 +/- 0.20% (mean +/- SEM) and in the experimental group 0.63 +/- 0.24% (mean +/-SEM) (N.S.). The cr-51 uptake of liver, spleen, jejunum, and blood was not statistically different between groups. These results indicate that dietary fiber as found in wheat bran does not impair intestinal absorption of chromium

  8. Invariant coefficients of diffusion in iron-chromium-nickel system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokrov, A.P.; Akimov, V.K.; Golubev, V.G.

    1984-02-01

    The temperature and concentration dependences of the Dsub(c) coefficients in the ..gamma..-phase of iron-chromium-nickel system are determined. It is proposed to described mutual diffusion in multicomponent systems using invariant, i.e. independent of the choice of solvent, coefficients of diffusion. The assumption that their temperature dependence follows the Arrhenius law is confirmed by the experiment.

  9. Invariant coefficients of diffusion in iron-chromium-nickel system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temperature and concentration dependences of the Dsub(c) coefficients in the γ-phase of iron-chromium-nickel system are determined. It is proposed to described mutual diffusion in mul-- ticomponent systems using invariant, i. e. independent of the choice of solvent, coefficients of diffusion. The assumption that their temperature dependence follows the Arrhenius law is confirmed by the experiment

  10. Differents remediation methodos for lead, chromium and cadmium contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The usage of phosphates in the remediation of plots contaminated with heavy metals appears to be a good strategy to lessen the danger of these metals. This study analyses the effect of the mobilization of: Lead, chromium and cadmium by utilizing diverse forms of phosphates in contaminated soils of three different origins with ph modification and without it

  11. IRIS TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM (INTERAGENCY SCIENCE CONSULTATION DRAFT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    On Septemeber 30, 2010, the draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium and the charge to external peer reviewers were released for external peer review and public comment. The Toxicological Review and charge were reviewed internally by EPA and by other federal agenc...

  12. Chromium isotope fractionation during coprecipitation with calcium carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodler, Alexandra; Sánchez-Pastor, Nuria; Fernández-Díaz, Lurdes;

    The chromium (Cr) isotopic composition of carbonates can potentially be used as a paleoclimate proxy to elucidate past fluctuations of oxygen contents in atmosphere and hydrosphere. The use of Cr isotopes to track paleoenvironmental changes, for example related to the rise of oxygen during...

  13. Fractionation behavior of chromium isotopes during coprecipitation with calcium carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodler, Alexandra; Sánchez-Pastor, Nuria; Fernández-Díaz, Lurdes;

    2015-01-01

    Interest in chromium (Cr) isotope incorporation into carbonates arises from the observation that Cr isotopic composition of carbonates could be used as a paleoclimate proxy to elucidate past fluctuations of oxygen contents in atmosphere and hydrosphere. The use of Cr isotopes to track...

  14. Discovery of Chromium, Manganese, Nickel, and Copper Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Garofali, K.; Robinson, R; Thoennessen, M

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-seven chromium, twenty-five manganese, thirty-one nickel and twenty-six copper isotopes have so far been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  15. Chromium stable isotope fractionation in modern biogeochemical cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulukat, Cora Stefanie

    Chromium (Cr) is, due to its redox-sensitive properties, a powerful tracer for redox processes in environmental studies. Changes in its preferred oxidation state (III and VI) are accompanied by Crisotope fractionation. The Cr-isotope system is a promising tool to reconstruct the evolution of free...

  16. FEATURES OF CHROMIUM DOPING OF WEAR-RESISTANT CAST IRON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Netrebko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work analysis of the influence of chromium on the process of carbide formation, changes in chemical composition of the metal substrate in the areas adjacent to the carbides and at the hardness of iron while economy nickel and manganesealloying.

  17. Production performance of quails given chromium organic in ration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deden Sudrajat

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Egg production of quails depends on quality of ration. Nutrient manipulation by chromiun inclusion in ration is a possible way to improve production. It is known that chromium mineral in form of GTF in blood has a role not only in enhancement of glucose entering cells through improvement of insulin activity but also in metabolism of lipid and synthesis of protein and elimination of heat stress to improve egg production. This study aimed at assessing egg production of quails fed ration containing chromium-yeast. Sixty-four quails aged 40 days were used. A completely randomized design with 4 treatments and 4 replication was applied in this study. Treatment consisted of commercial ration + Cr 0 ppm (R1, commercial ration + Cr 0.5 ppm (R2, commercial ration + Cr 1 ppm (R3, and commercial ration+ Cr 1.5 ppm (R4. Measurements were taken on feed intake, egg weight, egg mass production, hen day, feed conversion rate, egg index, and egg shell thickness. Results showed that A ration containing organic chromium as much as 1,5 ppm did not affect feed intake, egg production, egg weight, and eggshell thickness, however lowered feed conversion rate by up to 32.25% from that of control. Supplementation of 0,5 ppm chromium in the ration lowered the value of eggs index in the fourth week.

  18. Chromium toxicity to nitrifying bacteria: implications to wastewater treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromium, a heavy metal that enters wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) through industrial discharges, can be toxic to microorganisms carrying out important processes within biological wastewater treatment systems. The effect of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) on ammonia dependent specific ox...

  19. DANGER OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM AND STRATEGY FOR THE REMEDITATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniruddha Roy

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Some metals as micronutrients have a major role in the life and growth process of plants and animals. However, certain forms of some metals may also act as toxic material even in relatively small quantities. Chromium is such a metal, whose concentration above a certain limit may cause a serious problem to the health of living organisms. Chromium (Cr may occur in several chemical forms in organic and inorganic systems. In biological systems only Cr (III and Cr (VI are significant. Among these two states, trivalent chromium (Cr-III is considered as an essential component, while hexavalent Chromium (Cr-VI in biological system has been detected as responsible for so many diseases, even some specific forms of cancer. This paper intends to present the adverse effect of Cr(VI on environment as well as on human beings and also try to find a way out to dissolve the problem by a newly developed efficient and cost effective technique.

  20. Effects of chromium picolinate supplementation in type 2 diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niladê Rosinski Rocha

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The effects of chromium picolinate in Type 2 diabetic patients are investigated.  Seventeen Type 2 diabetic patients were randomly divided into two groups. The experimental group received fiber-rich hypocaloric diet and chromium picolinate whereas the control group received fiber-rich hypocaloric diet and placebo. The chromium picolinate was offered twice a day at the dose of 100 μg. Anthropometric data such as blood pressure, fasting glycemia and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c were measured and these parameters were evaluated again after 90 days. No difference was reported in rates of body weight, waist, hip, body mass index, blood pressure and fasting glycemia (Control vs. Experimental groups after treatment. However, a decrease (p = 0.0405 of HbA1c occurred in the experimental group when the pre- and post-treatment rates were compared. HbA1c data showed that chromium picolinate improved the glycemic control in Type 2 diabetes.

  1. Chromium(VI) transport and fate in unsaturated zone and aquifer: 3D Sandbox results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xingmin; Sobecky, Patricia A; Zhao, Lanpo; Crawford, Patrice; Li, Mingtang

    2016-04-01

    The simulation of Cr(VI) behavior in an unsaturated zone and aquifer, using a 3D experimental set-up were performed to illustrate the distribution, transport and transformation of Cr(VI), and further to reveal the potential harm of Cr(VI) after entering the groundwater. The result indicated that chromium(VI) was transported in the vertical direction, meanwhile, was transported in the horizontal direction under the influence of groundwater flow. The direction and distance away from the pollution source zone had great effect on the chromium(VI) concentration. At the sampling sites near the pollution source zone, there was a sudden increase of chromium(VI) concentration. The concentration of chromium(III) concentration in some random effluent samples was not detected. Chromium had not only transported but also had fraction and specie transformation in the unsaturated zone and aquifer. The relative concentration of residue fraction chromium was decreased with time. The content of Fe-Mn oxide fraction chromium was increased with time. The relative content of exchangeable and carbonate-bound fraction chromium was lower and the content variations were not obvious. Chromium(VI) (91-98%) was first reduced to chromium(III) rapidly. The oxidation reaction occurred later and the relative content of chromium(VI) was increased again. The presence of manganese oxides under favorable soil conditions can promote the reoxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI).

  2. Structure and morphology studies of chromium film at elevated temperature in hypersonic environment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G M Hegde; V Kulkarni; M Nagaboopathy; K P J Reddy

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents the after shock heated structural and morphological studies of chromium film coated on hypersonic test model as a passive drag reduction element. The structural changes and the composition of phases of chromium due to shock heating (2850 K) are characterized using X-ray diffraction studies. Surface morphology changes of chromium coating have been studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) before and after shock heating. Significant amount of chromium ablation and sublimation from the model surface is noticed from SEM micrographs. Traces of randomly oriented chromium oxides formed along the coated surface confirm surface reaction of chromium with oxygen present behind the shock. Large traces of amorphous chromium oxide phases are also observed.

  3. Determination of Chromium in Beef Heifers Nellore Supplemented with Chelate Chrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.S.A Moreira

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to determine the amount of total chromium in beef heifers supplemented with chelated chromium in the rearing and finishing. We used 80 Nelore heifers at 12 months of age with mineral supplementation associated or not to chelate chromium, with average live weight of 220 kg. Were selected 36 heifer seach experimental group for analysis of meat samples. For the determination of chromium residue in the muscle tissue of the sample was1.5 g digested in a mixture of 5 ml 65% nitric acid and 1 ml of 30% hydrogen peroxide at 120° C for 12 hours block microdigestor. The total content of chromium was determined by spectrophotometry of atomic absorption flame. The experimental design was completely randomized and the results were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA at 5% significance. It is concluded that the inclusion of chromium in the chelate heifers mineral supplementation increased the chromium content in the meat

  4. Contribution of photoelectron spectrometry and infrared spectrometry to the study of various oxidised forms of chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Securate knowledge of internal surface of primary coolant circuits of PWR is required for an estimation of dissolution of used materials and for estimation of decontamination efficiency. The binding energies of various electron levels of chromium were determined by photoelectron spectrometry (ESCA), both for the metal and for certain compounds. Because of the intensities of the signals obtained the 2 p 3/2 level alone can be used for analytical purposes. Owing to a possible interference between this level due to hexavalent chromium and a satellite peak caused by trivalent chromium the method is not able to show up small amounts of chromium VI in chromium III. Simultaneous detection of the hexavalent and trivalent forms was achieved by infrared spectrometry. The problem of revealing traces of chromium VI in surface layers of trivalent chromium oxide has thus been solved

  5. Effect of sodium fluoride in maternal and offspring rats and its amelioration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SnehaPanchal; RamtejJ. Verma

    2014-01-01

    High fluoride content is known to cause dental and skeletal abnormalities. In addition, present review indicates that sodium fluoride consumption caused increased number of r=esorptions and dead foetuses. Various skeletal anomalies such as wavy ribs, presence of 14th ribs, lacking 6th sternebrae and incompete ossification of skull occur. All these changes could be due to oxidative stress caused by fluoride consumption. Fluoride-induced changes could be successfully ameliorated by cotreatment with vitamins and calcium.

  6. Highly Selective Fluoride Recognition by a Simple Carbazole-based Hydrozone Derivative

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Li-jun; ZHAO Guo-you; HUANG Zhen-long; WANG Nan-nan; GUO Jiao-jiao

    2013-01-01

    A simple carbazole hydrozone derivative(1) was synthesized and used as an optical probe for fluoride recognition in CH3CN.Receptor 1 exhibited colorimetric and fluorescent dual-channel response to fluoride anions.Addition of fluoride to a receptor 1 solution in CH3CN induced a distinct color change from yellow to magenta,the solution also displayed significant fluorescence blue shift.Thus receptor 1 exhibited dual-channel responses to fluoride with a high selectivity and sensitivity.

  7. Bioactivity of Sodium Free Fluoride Containing Glasses and Glass-Ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaojing Chen; Xiaohui Chen; Brauer, Delia S.; Rory M. Wilson; Hill, Robert G.; Natalia Karpukhina

    2014-01-01

    The bioactivity of a series of fluoride-containing sodium-free calcium and strontium phosphosilicate glasses has been tested in vitro. Glasses with high fluoride content were partially crystallised to apatite and other fluoride-containing phases. The bioactivity study was carried out in Tris and SBF buffers, and apatite formation was monitored by XRD, FTIR and solid state NMR. Ion release in solutions has been measured using ICP-OES and fluoride-ion selective electrode. The results show that...

  8. Effects of fluoride in drinking water on health of deciduous teeth

    OpenAIRE

    Blagojević Duška; Stojšin Ivana

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION High incidence of decayed deciduous teeth, as well as lack of adequate therapy, makes tooth decay prevention very important. One of the simplest ways to reduce tooth decay is fluoridation of drinking water. The optimal concentration of fluoride in drinking water is 1 ppm/l, and many waters naturally contain this quantity. Waters in Vojvodina are mainly poor in fluoride, except in a few regions. It has long been postulated that fluoride has a prophyilactic effect during intrauteri...

  9. Batch and Column Experiments on Fluoride Removal from Waters Using Modified Zeolite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    High fluoride groundwater occurs widely in China, presenting a quite serious environmental problem. Zeolite from Xinyang, China was tested as the fluoride-removing adsorbent. Batch and column experiments on fluoride removal using modified zeolites treated with hydrochloric acid,sodium hydroxide, sodium chloride and ferric chloride, respectively show that 0. 1 mol/L HCImodified zeolite can be used as an adsorbent for fluoride, with an adsorption capacity of 173. 16mg/kg.

  10. Effect of high fluoride concentration in drinking water on children’s intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Seraj B.; Shahrabi M; Falahzade M; Falahzade F; Akhondi N.

    2006-01-01

    Background and Aim: Human and animal studies linking fluoride with diminished intelligence have been published. Although adverse effects of high intake of fluoride on intelligence and mental acuity continue to be reported, they are still controversial. The aim of this research was to investigate the relationship between fluoride in drinking water and children's intelligence. Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional study, 41 children were selected from the high fluoride area with 2...

  11. Kinetic Analysis of 18F-Fluoride PET Images of Breast Cancer Bone Metastases

    OpenAIRE

    Doot, Robert K; Muzi, Mark; Peterson, Lanell M.; Schubert, Erin K; Gralow, Julie R.; Specht, Jennifer M.; Mankoff, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The most common site of metastasis for breast cancer is bone. Quantitative 18F-fluoride PET can estimate the kinetics of fluoride incorporation into bone as a measure of fluoride transport, bone formation, and turnover. The purpose of this analysis was to evaluate the accuracy and precision of 18F-fluoride model parameter estimates for characterizing regional kinetics in metastases and normal bone in breast cancer patients.

  12. Absorption, distribution and excretion of inhaled hydrogen fluoride in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, J.B.

    1979-01-01

    Rats were subjected to whole body HF exposure for 6 hrs or to nose-only HF exposure for 1 hr. Total and/or ionic fluoride concentrations in selected tissues were determined at various times following exposure. In rats sacrificed 6 hrs after whole body exposure, dose-dependent increases in lung, plasma, and kidney total and ionic fluoride concentration occurred. Rats excreted more fluoride in the urine after whole body exposure than could be explained by the amount of HF inhaled. Considerable evidence suggests that airborne HF deposits on fur and is then ingested due to preening activity. Urinary fluoride excretion was increased by nose-only exposure. The urinary fluoride excretion accounted for approximately twice the fluoride estimated to be inhaled during exposure. Tissue fluoride concentrations were elevated immediately after nose-only exposure. Fluoride concentrations in lung and kidney returned to control levels within 12 hrs. Plasma fluoride concentration was slightly elevated 24 hrs after the start of the 1 hr exposure but was at control levels at 96 hrs. Immediately following nose-only exposure, lung ionic fluoride concentrations were less than plasma ionic fluoride concentrations suggesting that the fluoride in the lung had reached that site via plasma transport rather than by inhalation. A dose-dependent increase in plasma ionic fluoride concentration occurred after upper respiratory tract HF exposure providing strong evidence that fluoride is absorbed systemically from that site. The plasma ionic fluoride concentration after upper respiratory tract exposure was of sufficient magnitude to account for the plasma fluoride concentrations observed in intact nose-only exposed rats. (ERB)

  13. Effect of sodium fluoride in maternal and offspring rats and its amelioration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sneha Panchal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available High fluoride content is known to cause dental and skeletal abnormalities. In addition, present review indicates that sodium fluoride consumption caused increased number of r=esorptions and dead foetuses. Various skeletal anomalies such as wavy ribs, presence of 14th ribs, lacking 6th sternebrae and incompete ossification of skull occur. All these changes could be due to oxidative stress caused by fluoride consumption. Fluoride-induced changes could be successfully ameliorated by cotreatment with vitamins and calcium.

  14. Fluorescent naphthalene-based benzene tripod for selective recognition of fluoride in physiological condition

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Barun kumar Datta; Chirantan Kar; Gopal Das

    2015-02-01

    Aluminium complex of a naphthalene-based benzene tripod ligand system has been reported for the selective recognition of fluoride in aqueous medium in physiological condition. The ligand can selectively recognize Al3+ through enhancement in the fluorescence intensity and this in situ formed aluminium complex recognizes fluoride through quenching of fluorescence. The receptor system detects fluoride in nanomolar range. The sensing property was extended for practical utility to sense fluoride in tap water, pond water and river water.

  15. Reducing Exposure to High Fluoride Drinking Water in Estonia—A Countrywide Study

    OpenAIRE

    Ene Indermitte; Astrid Saava; Enn Karro

    2014-01-01

    Fluoride is a naturally occurring contaminant in groundwater in Estonia. There are several regions in Estonia with fluoride contents in public water supplies as high as 7 mg/L. Long-term exposure to high-fluoride drinking water may have several adverse health effects, primarily dental fluorosis. The opportunities for exposure reduction rely highly on water treatment technologies. Since 2004 public water suppliers in Estonia have made efforts to diminish fluoride content in drinking water sys...

  16. The Effect of Acute Fluoride Poisoning on Nitric Oxide and Methemoglobin Formation in the Guinea pig

    OpenAIRE

    ŞİRELİ, Meltem

    2004-01-01

    To study the effect of acute fluoride poisoning on nitric oxide and methemoglobin formation, 250 mg/kg bw sodium fluoride was applied alone and verapamil was applied together with fluoride. Blood nitric oxide (Griess reaction) and calcium levels; hemoglobin, methemoglobin and hematocrit values; and erythrocyte counts were determined and compared with those of the controls. After the fluoride application it was found that there was a relative relationship between the increase in nitric oxide a...

  17. The Karlsruhe 4π barium fluoride detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new experimental approach has been implemented for accurate measurements of neutron capture cross sections in the energy range from 5 to 200 keV. The Karlsruhe 4π Barium Fluoride Detector consists of 42 crystals shaped as hexagonal and pentagonal truncated pyramids forming a spherical shell with 10 cm inner radius and 15 cm thickness. All crystals are supplied with reflector and photomultiplier, thus representing independent gamma-ray detectors. Each detector module covers the same solid angle with respect to a gamma-ray source located in the centre. The energy resolution of the 4π detector is 14% at 662 keV and 7% at 2.5 MeV gamma-ray energy, the overall time reslution is 500 ps and the peak efficiency 90% at 1 MeV. The detector allows to register capture cascades with 95% probability above a threshold energy of 2.5 MeV in the sum energy spectrum. Neutrons are produced via the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction using the pulsed proton beam of a Van de Graaff accelerator. The neutron spectrum can be taylored according to the experimental requirements in an energy range from 5 to 200 keV by choosing appropriate proton energies. A collimated neutron beam is passing through the detector and hits the sample in the centre. The energy of captured neutrons is determined via time of flight, the primary flight path being 77 cm. The combination of short primary flight path, a 10 cm inner radius of the spherical BaF2 shell, and the low capture cross section of barium allows to discriminate background due to capture of sample scattered neutrons in the scintillator by time of flight, leaving part of the neutron energy range completely undisturbed. (orig./HSI)

  18. Laboratory scale studies on removal of chromium from industrial wastes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Chromium being one of the major toxic pollutants is discharged from electroplating and chrome tanning processes and is also found in the effluents of dyes, paint pigments, manufacturing units etc. Chromium exists in aqueous systems in both trivalent (Cr 3+) and hexavalent (Cr 6+) forms. The hexavalent form is carcinogenic and toxic to aquatic life, whereas Cr3+ is however comparatively less toxic. This study was undertaken to investigate the total chromium removal from industrial effluents by chemical means in order to achieve the Pakistan NEQS level of 1 mg/L by the methods of reduction and precipitation. The study was conducted in four phases.In phase I, the optimum pH and cost effective reducing agent among the four popular commercial chemicals was selected. As a result, pH of 2 was found to be most suitable and sodium meta bisulfate was found to be the most cost effective reducing agent respectively. Phase II showed that lower dose of sodium meta bisulfate was sufficient to obtain 100 % efficiency in reducing Cr6+ to Cr3+, and it was noted that reaction time had no significance in the whole process. A design curve for reduction process was established which can act as a tool for treatment of industrial effluents.Phase III studies indicated the best pH was 8.5 for precipitation of Cr 3+ to chromium hydroxide by using lime. An efficiency of 100 % was achievable and a settling time of 30 minutes produced clear effluent. Finally in Phase IV actual waste samples from chrome tanning and electroplating industries, when precipitated at pH of 12 gave 100 % efficiency at a settling time of 30 minutes and confirmed that chemical means of reduction and precipitation is a feasible and viable solution for treating chromium wastes from industries.

  19. Arsenic and chromium topsoil levels and cancer mortality in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Olivier; Fernández-Navarro, Pablo; Martín-Méndez, Iván; Bel-Lan, Alejandro; Locutura, Juan F; López-Abente, Gonzalo

    2016-09-01

    Spatio-temporal cancer mortality studies in Spain have revealed patterns for some tumours which display a distribution that is similar across the sexes and persists over time. Such characteristics would be common to tumours that shared risk factors, including the chemical soil composition. The objective of the present study is to assess the association between levels of chromium and arsenic in soil and the cancer mortality. This is an ecological cancer mortality study at municipal level, covering 861,440 cancer deaths in 7917 Spanish mainland towns from 1999 to 2008. Chromium and arsenic topsoil levels (partial extraction) were determined by ICP-MS at 13,317 sampling points. To estimate the effect of these concentrations on mortality, we fitted Besag, York and Mollié models, which included, as explanatory variables, each town's chromium and arsenic soil levels, estimated by kriging. In addition, we also fitted geostatistical-spatial models including sample locations and town centroids (non-aligned data), using the integrated nested Laplace approximation (INLA) and stochastic partial differential equations (SPDE). All results were adjusted for socio-demographic variables and proximity to industrial emissions. The results showed a statistical association in men and women alike, between arsenic soil levels and mortality due to cancers of the stomach, pancreas, lung and brain and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL). Among men, an association was observed with cancers of the prostate, buccal cavity and pharynx, oesophagus, colorectal and kidney. Chromium topsoil levels were associated with mortality among women alone, in cancers of the upper gastrointestinal tract, breast and NHL. Our results suggest that chronic exposure arising from low levels of arsenic and chromium in topsoil could be a potential risk factor for developing cancer.

  20. Sorption of chromium in soils of the Cerrado Goias, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Welershon José de Castro

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Land application of tannery sludge, which usually contain high levels of chromium, and considerable amounts of organic matter, macronutrients and micronutrients may contribute to the improvement of soil fertility and plant nutrition, and constitutes a form of disposal residue in the environment. The objective of this work was to determine the sorption isotherms of metal chromium (Cr+3 in a Ultisol, Oxisol Typic Acrustox, Quartzipsamment and Kandic Oxisol, identify soil classes that are prone to chromium mobility, and characterize the potential of agricultural soils of Goiás that are subject to groundwater contamination by the potentially toxic metal. For the establishment of sorption isotherms, solutions were prepared at 1:10 in volume. Air dried samples of 5.0 cm3 of each class of soil were placed in triplicates in beakers of 250.0 cm3. A solution containing 50.0 cm3 of the potentially toxic metal was added to solution. The solutions were prepared in CaCl2.(2H2O (0.01 mol.L-1 as electrolyte support and employing the basic chromium sulphate as a source of metal. Adjustments were made to the polynomial regression between the concentrations of potentially toxic levels of metal contaminants in the solution depending on the concentration of metal in the filtered solution after equilibrium. The Quartzipsamment showed lower retention compared to other classes of soils. Therefore it is more vulnerable to groundwater contamination if industrial wastes containing trivalent chromium are used as fertilizer.