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Sample records for chromium carbides

  1. Stereology of carbide phase in modified hypereutectic chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Suchoń

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In paper are presented results of studies of carbide phase stereology modified hypereutectic wear resistance chromium cast iron which contains carbon about 3,5% and chromium about 25%. Three substances were applied to the modification: boron carbide (B4C, ferroniobium (FeNb and mixture of ferroniobium and rare-earth (RE. The measurements of geometrical features of carbides were conducted on microsection taken from castings wich were cooled with various velocities.

  2. Stereology of carbide phase in modified hypereutectic chromium cast iron

    OpenAIRE

    J. Suchoń; A. Studnicki; M. Przybył

    2010-01-01

    In paper are presented results of studies of carbide phase stereology modified hypereutectic wear resistance chromium cast iron which contains carbon about 3,5% and chromium about 25%. Three substances were applied to the modification: boron carbide (B4C), ferroniobium (FeNb) and mixture of ferroniobium and rare-earth (RE). The measurements of geometrical features of carbides were conducted on microsection taken from castings wich were cooled with various velocities.

  3. Friction and wear behavior of chromium carbide coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromium carbides, tungsten carbide, and chromium oxide have been tested and evaluated as coatings to protect high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) steam generator and other HTGR components from adhesion, galling associated with sliding wear or from fretting. Tests were performed in commercially-pure helium and in helium doped with various gaseous impurities (H2, H2O, CH4, CO) to simulate the primary coolant of an HTGR. Several types of chromium carbide coatings including Cr3C2, Cr7C3, and Cr23C6, were tested for wear resistance and resistance to long-term spalling. Tungsten carbide and chromium oxide coatings were tested in sliding wear tests. Cr23C6-NiCr coatings showed the best performance (from 400 to 8160C) whether they were applied by detonation gun or plasma gun spraying methods. The presence of the Cr23C6-NiCr coatings did not affect the creep rupture properties of Alloy 800H substrates at temperatures up to 7600C. Low-cycle fatigue life of similar specimens at 5930C was reduced to 10 to 20% when tested in the 1 to 0.6% strain range

  4. Porosity of detonation coatings on the base of chromium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porosity of detonation coatings on the base of chromium carbide is estimated by the hydrostatic weighing. The open porosity value dependence on the distance of spraying, depth of the charge, ratio and volume of the detonator barrie filing with gas components is established. Pore distribution in the cross section of a specimen tested for porosity is studied by the methods of metallographic analysis

  5. A Study of the High Temperature on Chromium Carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oxidation rates of chromium carbide have been measured at 900 to 1300 .deg. C and oxygen pressures between 2x10-2 8 x 10-2 Pa using thermogravimetric analysis method. Oxidation behavior of chromium carbide appeared to change very sensitively with both temperature and oxygen pressure. In case with the oxygen pressure lower than 8 x 10-2 Pa, the weight gain in the specimen due to the formation of chromium oxide occurred linearly with time at the every temperature studied, but when the oxygen pressure was increased up to 8 x 10-2Pa, the weight gain behavior versus time showed entirely different tendency. That is, in the temperature range of 900 .deg. C to 1000 .deg. C weight gain occurred, however in the range of 1000 .deg. C to 1300 .deg. C weight lost was observed. The reason for the observed linear kinetics could be inferred as follows. As the oxidation of carbide proceeded carbon monoxide would build up at the interface of the chromium oxide and carbide. If the equilibrium pressure of carbon monoxide at the interface exceeds the gas pressure at the outer specimen surface, the oxide scale formed on it might be cracked exposing new carbide sites on which oxidation could occur successively. Through a thermodynamic consideration it was judged that the above deduction was reasonable. On the other hand, the weight lost mentioned above was explained that it could occur mainly due to the further oxidation of Cr2O3 to the volatile CrO3 at the corresponding experimental conditions. Weight loss phenomenon mentioned before which was observed in the oxidation of chromium carbide was also clearified by X-ray diffraction method and SEM. That is, at 900 .deg. C stable oxide of chromium, (Cr2O3) was identified easily on the specimen surface. However, at 1300 .deg. C, only a few amount of this stable oxide could be found on to specimen surface, indicating Cr2O3 had been evaporated to CrO3 gas

  6. Chemical Stability of Chromium Carbide and Chromium Nitride Powders Compared with Chromium Metal in Synthetic Biological Solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Tao Jiang; Inger Odnevall Wallinder; Gunilla Herting

    2012-01-01

    Chromium carbide (Cr-C) and chromium nitride (Cr-N) powders were compared with a chromium metal powder (Cr-metal) to evaluate their chemical stability in solution. All three powders were exposed in five different synthetic biological solutions of varying pH and chemical composition simulating selected human exposure conditions. Characterisation of the powders, using GI-XRD, revealed that the predominant bulk crystalline phases were Cr7C3 and Cr2N for Cr-C and Cr-N respectively. The outermost ...

  7. Fabrication of Carbon Nanotube - Chromium Carbide Composite Through Laser Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ze; Gao, Yibo; Liang, Fei; Wu, Benxin; Gou, Jihua; Detrois, Martin; Tin, Sammy; Yin, Ming; Nash, Philip; Tang, Xiaoduan; Wang, Xinwei

    2016-03-01

    Ceramics often have high hardness and strength, and good wear and corrosion resistance, and hence have many important applications, which, however, are often limited by their poor fracture toughness. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may enhance ceramic fracture toughness, but hot pressing (which is one typical approach of fabricating CNT-ceramic composites) is difficult to apply for applications that require localized heat input, such as fabricating composites as surface coatings. Laser beam may realize localized material sintering with little thermal effect on the surrounding regions. However, for the typical ceramics for hard coating applications (as listed in Ref.[1]), previous work on laser sintering of CNT-ceramic composites with mechanical property characterizations has been very limited. In this paper, research work has been reported on the fabrication and characterization of CNT-ceramic composites through laser sintering of mixtures of CNTs and chromium carbide powders. Under the studied conditions, it has been found that laser-sintered composites have a much higher hardness than that for plasma-sprayed composites reported in the literature. It has also been found that the composites obtained by laser sintering of CNTs and chromium carbide powder mixtures have a fracture toughness that is ~23 % higher than the material obtained by laser sintering of chromium carbide powders without CNTs.

  8. Chromium carbide coatings obtained by the hybrid PVD methods

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    M. Richert

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: With the use of the Arc-PVD and Arc-EB PVD hybrid method, the chromium carbide coatings were deposited on steel substrate. Two kinds of coatings were obtained. The nanostructure coatings were formed by deposition of chromium carbide films by Arc PVD evaporation technique. The multilayer coatings were produced by Arc-EB PVD hybrid technology. In the second case the amorphous phase in majority was found in samples, identified by X-ray investigations.Design/methodology/approach: The Arc PVD and combination Arc-EB PVD methods were used for carbide coatings deposition. The special hybrid multisource device, produced in the Institute for Sustainable Technologies – National Research Institute (ITeE –PIB in Radom, was used for sample deposition. The microstructures of coatings were investigated by JEM 20101 ARP transmission electron microscopy (TEM, TESLA BS500 scanning electron microscopy (SEM and Olympus GX50 optical microscopy (MO. The X-ray diffraction was utilized to identify phase configuration in coatingsFindings: The microstructure of deposited coatings differs depending on the deposition method used. The Arc PVD deposition produced nanometric coatings with the Cr3C2, Cr23C6, Cr7C3 and CrC carbides built from nanometric in size clusters. In the case of the Arc-EB PVD hybrid technology in majority of cases the amorphous microstructure of coatings was found. The hybrid coatings consist of alternating layers of Ni/Cr-Cr3C2.Practical implications: The performed investigations provide information, which could be useful in the industrial practice for the production of wear resistant coatings on different equipments and tools.Originality/value: It was assumed that by using different kinds of PVD methods the different microstructures of coatings could be formed.

  9. Stereological parameters of carbides on section of casting made from modified chromium cast iron

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    A. Studnicki

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of stereological parameters of carbides on the section of the model castingmade from modified (the mixture FeNb+FeV+RE wear resistance chromium cast iron was introduced in the article. The jump change of some stereological parameters of carbides in certain distance from the surface of the casting was observed.

  10. The influence of chosen modifiers on stereological parameters of carbides of chromium cast iron

    OpenAIRE

    A. Studnicki; J. Suchoń

    2011-01-01

    The results of investigations of stereological carbides in the modified wear resistance chromium cast iron resistant were introduced in the article. There were following elements: boron, niobium, vanadium, cerium and lanthanum (RE), nitrogen in the composition of modifiers. The influence of used modifiers on such stereological parameters of carbides as: size, perimeter, shape coefficient and volume fraction was showed in tables and on diagrams.

  11. Effect of boron carbide on primary crystallization of chromium cast iron

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    A. Studnicki

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In the paper results of the influence of boron carbide (B4C as inoculant of abrasion-resisting chromium cast iron (about 2,8% carbon and 18% chromium on primary crystallization researches are presented. Boron carbide dispersion was introduced at the bottom of pouring ladle before tap of liquid cast iron. In this investigations were used three different quantities of inoculant in amounts 0,1%; 0,2% and 0,3% with relation to bath weight. It has been demonstrated that such small additions of boron carbide change primary crystallization parameters, particularly temperature characteristic of process, their time and kinetics.

  12. Reduction of chromium oxides with calcium carbide during thestainless steelmaking process

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    B. Arh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available An efficient reduction of chromium from slag requires an appropriate reduction agent for the given steelmaking technology. The usual slag reduction praxis consists of carbon injections and additions of ferrosilicon and aluminum.Reduction of chromium containing slags with calcium carbide is an appealing alternative. Calcium carbide is a strong reduction agent that unlike ferrosilicon and aluminum also provides the possibility of foaming slag formation.Experimental work regarding chromium slag reduction with calcium carbide towards usual slag reduction praxis is described in this work. The results show that higher reduction rates in the stage of refining period of the melt and higher level of overall chromium reduction from slag can be reached with the blowing of CaC2.

  13. Study on fragmentation and dissolution behavior of carbide in a hot-rolled hypereutectic high chromium cast iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The method to prepare Carbon steel/High chromium iron is totally new. • High chromium iron can achieve small plastic deformation during hot rolling process. • Carbides in high chromium irons are crushed, refined obviously and becoming isolated, which is benefit to improve the impact toughness. • The carbide fragmentation and dissolution behavior of the hot-rolled HCCI were analyzed. - Abstract: A sandwich-structured composite containing a hypereutectic high chromium cast iron (HCCI) and low carbon steel (LCS) claddings was newly fabricated by centrifugal casting, then the blank was hot-rolled into composite plate. The carbide fragmentation and dissolution behavior of the hot-rolled HCCI were analyzed. During hot rolling, significant refinement of carbides was discovered in hot-rolled HCCI specimens. The carbides were broken and partly dissolved into the austenite matrix. The results show that carbides are firstly dissolved under the action of stress. There are grooves appeared at the boundaries of the carbides. The grooves reduce the cross section of the carbide. When the cross section of the carbide reaches to the required minimum critical cross section, the carbide breaks through the tensile force. After break, carbides continue to dissolve since more interfaces between the matrix and carbides are generated. The secondary carbides precipitated due to the dissolution are index as fcc and stacking faults parallel to the {1 1 1} are observed

  14. Study on fragmentation and dissolution behavior of carbide in a hot-rolled hypereutectic high chromium cast iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Fei; Jiang, Yehua, E-mail: jiangyehua@kmust.edu.cn; Xiao, Han; Tan, Jun

    2015-01-05

    Highlights: • The method to prepare Carbon steel/High chromium iron is totally new. • High chromium iron can achieve small plastic deformation during hot rolling process. • Carbides in high chromium irons are crushed, refined obviously and becoming isolated, which is benefit to improve the impact toughness. • The carbide fragmentation and dissolution behavior of the hot-rolled HCCI were analyzed. - Abstract: A sandwich-structured composite containing a hypereutectic high chromium cast iron (HCCI) and low carbon steel (LCS) claddings was newly fabricated by centrifugal casting, then the blank was hot-rolled into composite plate. The carbide fragmentation and dissolution behavior of the hot-rolled HCCI were analyzed. During hot rolling, significant refinement of carbides was discovered in hot-rolled HCCI specimens. The carbides were broken and partly dissolved into the austenite matrix. The results show that carbides are firstly dissolved under the action of stress. There are grooves appeared at the boundaries of the carbides. The grooves reduce the cross section of the carbide. When the cross section of the carbide reaches to the required minimum critical cross section, the carbide breaks through the tensile force. After break, carbides continue to dissolve since more interfaces between the matrix and carbides are generated. The secondary carbides precipitated due to the dissolution are index as fcc and stacking faults parallel to the {1 1 1} are observed.

  15. The influence of chosen modifiers on stereological parameters of carbides of chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Studnicki

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The results of investigations of stereological carbides in the modified wear resistance chromium cast iron resistant were introduced in the article. There were following elements: boron, niobium, vanadium, cerium and lanthanum (RE, nitrogen in the composition of modifiers. The influence of used modifiers on such stereological parameters of carbides as: size, perimeter, shape coefficient and volume fraction was showed in tables and on diagrams.

  16. Experimental evaluation of chromium-carbide-based solid lubricant coatings for use to 760 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellacorte, Christopher

    1987-01-01

    A research program is described which further developed and investigated chromium carbide based self-lubricating coatings for use to 760 C. A bonded chromium carbide was used as the base stock because of the known excellent wear resistance and the chemical stability of chromium carbide. Additives were silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic. The three coating components were blended in powder form, applied to stainless steel substrates by plasma spraying and then diamond ground to the desired coating thickness. A variety of coating compositions was tested to determine the coating composition which gave optimum tribological results. Coatings were tested in air, helium, and hydrogen at temperatures from 25 to 760 C. Several counterface materials were evaluated with the objective of discovering a satisfactory metal/coating sliding combination for potential applications, such as piston ring/cylinder liner couples for Stirling engines. In general, silver and fluoride additions to chromium carbide reduced the friction coefficient and increased the wear resistance relative to the unmodified coating. The lubricant additives acted synergistically in reducing friction and wear.

  17. Microstructure characterisation of chromium carbides coatings deposited by thermal spraying processes

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    M.W. Richert

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The Cr3C2-NiCr coatings were deposited by plasma spraying (PS and high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF processes. The objective of the work concerns characterization of microstructure of sprayed coatings. In the investigated samples, apart from Cr3C2 carbide particles, the carbides Cr7C3 were also present according to the reported through X-ray diffraction analyses. It is likely that Cr7C3 carbides were formed thorough decarburization of Cr3C2. The microstructure of the thermal sprayed Cr3C2-NiCr coatings was characterized by optical (MO, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The fine-grained and nano-crystalline microstructure was found in the investigated coatings. The microhardness of coatings was measured. It was found that the coatings deposited in HVOF process have higher microhardnes than the plasma spraying one. The formation of chromium carbide phases in the coatings was discussed based on the microstructure observation results.Design/methodology/approach: The investigations of coating microstructure by optical microscopy (MO Olympus GX51, scanning electron microscopy STEREOSCAN 420 and transmission electron microscopy JEM2010 ARP (TEM were performed. The examination of phase consistence was determined by Brucker D8 Discover - Advance diffractometer with copper tubing. The microhardness of coatings was measured by Vickers method.Findings: The microstructures of Cr3C2-NiCr coatings were observed and analyzed. On the base of the microstructure investigations and contend of the chromium carbides the mechanism of thermal sprayed coating formation was discussed.Practical implications: The performed investigations contribute to the improvement of microstructure and properties of thermal spraying coatings used in the industrial applications.Originality/value: It was assumed that thermal spraying processes are able to form nano-crystalline microstructure of the chromium carbide coatings.

  18. Abrasive Performance of Chromium Carbide Reinforced Ni3Al Matrix Composite Cladding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shang-ping; LUO He-li; FENG Di; CAO Xu; ZHANG Xi-e

    2009-01-01

    The Microstructure and room temperature abrasive wear resistance of chromium carbide reinforced NiM3Al matrix composite cladding at different depth on nickel base alloy were investigated. The results showed that there is a great difference in microstructure and wear resistance of the Ni3 Al matrix composite at different depth. Three kinds of tests, designed for different load and abrasive size, were used to understand the wear behaviour of this material. Under all three wear conditions, the abrasion resistance of the composite cladding at the depth of 6 mm, namely NC-M2, was much higher than that of the composite cladding at the depth of 2 mm, namely NC-M1. In addition, the wear-resistant advantage of NC-M2 was more obvious when the size of the abrasive was small. The relative wear resistance of NC-M2 increased from 1.63 times to 2.05 times when the size of the abrasive decreased from 180 μm to 50μm. The mierostructure of the composite cladding showed that the size of chromium carbide particles, which was mainly influenced by cooling rate of melting pool, was a function of distance from the interface between the coating and substrate varied gradually. The chromium carbide particles near the interface were finer than that far from inter-face, which was the main reason for the different wear resistance of the composite cladding at different depth.

  19. Sliding wear studies of sprayed chromium carbide-nichrome coatings for gas-cooled reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromium carbide-nichrome coatings being considered for wear protection of some critical components in high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR's) were investigated. The coatings were deposited either by the detonation gun or the plasma-arc process. Sliding wear tests were conducted on specimens in a button-on-plate arrangement with sliding velocities of 7.1 x 10-3 and 7.9 mm/s at 8160C in a helium environment simulates HTGR primary coolant chemistry. The coatings containing 75 or 80 wt % chromium carbide exhibited excellent wear resistance. As the chromium carbide content decreased from either 80 or 75 to 55 wt %, with a concurrent decrease in coating hardness, wear-resistance deteriorated. The friction and wear behavior of the soft coating was similar to that of the bare metal--showing severe galling and significant amounts of wear debris. The friction characteristics of the hard coating exhibited a strong velocity dependence with high friction coefficients in low sliding velocity tests ad vice versa. Both the soft coating and bare metal showed no dependence on sliding velocity. The wear behavior observed in this study is of adhesive type, and the wear damage is believed to be controlled primarily by the delamination process

  20. Chromium and copper influence on the nodular cast iron with carbides microstructure

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    G. Gumienny

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper chromium to 1,00% and copper to 1,50% influence at constant molybdenum content of about 1,50% on the nodular cast ironwith carbides microstructure has been presented. It was found, that as a result of synergic addition of above-mentioned elements there isthe possibility obtaining an ausferrite in nodular cast iron with carbides castings. Conditions have been given, when in nodular cast iron with carbides at cooling at first in the form, then air-cooling austenite transformation to upper bainite, its mixture with lower bainite, martensite or ausferrite takes place. Transformations proceed during cooling and the crystallization of cast iron have been determined and the casting hardness has been presented.

  1. The role of intergranular chromium carbides on intergranular oxidation of nickel based alloys in pressurized water reactors primary water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaslain, F. O. M.; Le, H. T.; Duhamel, C.; Guerre, C.; Laghoutaris, P.

    2016-02-01

    Alloy 600 is used in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) but is susceptible to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC). Intergranular chromium carbides have been found beneficial to reduce PWSCC. Focussed ion beam coupled with scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM) 3D tomography has been used to reconstruct the morphology of grain boundary oxide penetrations and their interaction with intergranular Cr carbides in Alloy 600 subjected to a PWR environment. In presence of intergranular Cr carbides, the intergranular oxide penetrations are less deep but larger than without carbide. However, the intergranular oxide volumes normalized by the grain boundary length for both samples are similar, which suggest that intergranular oxidation growth rate is not affected by carbides. Analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows that the intergranular oxide consists mainly in a spinel-type oxide containing nickel and chromium, except in the vicinity of Cr carbides where Cr2O3 was evidenced. The formation of chromium oxide may explain the lower intergranular oxide depth observed in grain boundaries containing Cr carbides.

  2. Chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health risks of too much chromium? Chromium and medication interactions Supplemental sources of chromium Chromium and Healthful Diets References Disclaimer What foods provide chromium? Chromium is widely distributed in the ...

  3. Sputtered silver films to improve chromium carbide based solid lubricant coatings for use to 900 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Sliney, Harold E.; Deadmore, Daniel L.

    1988-01-01

    Thin silver films, 250 to 3500 A thick, were sputtered onto PS200, a plasma sprayed, chromium carbide based solid lubricant coating, to reduce run-in wear and improve tribological properties. The coating contains bonded chromium carbide as the wear resistant base stock with silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic added as low and high temperature lubricants, respectively. Potential applications for the PS200 coating are cylinder wall/piston ring lubrication for Stirling engines and foil bearing journal lubrication. In this preliminary program, the silver film overlay thickness was optimized based on tests using a pin-on-disk tribometer. The friction and wear studies were performed in a helium atmosphere at temperatures from 25 to 760 C with a sliding velocity of 2.7 m/s under a 4.9 N load. Films between 1000 and 1500 A provide the best lubrication of the counterface material. The films enrich the sliding surface with lubricant and reduce the initial abrasiveness of the as ground, plasma-sprayed coating surface, thus reducing wear.

  4. The development of carbides in the phase boundary between delta ferrite and martensite in 9-14% chromium steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Materials with a sufficient toughness have to be used for safety-relevant components. In martensitic 12% chromium steels delta ferrite may occur, at higher contents (>0,5%) the fracture toughness of the material may be reduced considerably. This means that the DBTT (ductile to brittle transition temperature) is shifted towards higher temperatures during impact tests. In two-phase steels consisting of delta-ferrite and martensite, this behavior of brittle fracture is found to be caused by the massive dendritic carbide surrounding the delta-ferrite. The generation of this carbide is described by means of CCT diagrams (continuous cooling transformation diagrams). Carbide formation depends on both the chromium content and the cooling velocity. (orig.)

  5. Evaluation of sprayed chromium carbide coatings for gas-cooled reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprayed chromium carbide-nichrome coatings are candidates for protection of faying and sliding surfaces of critical components of gas-cooled reactors from friction and wear damage. These coatings must provide protection throughout the reactor lifetime under high temperature exposure conditions. Extensive evaluation work to characterize these coatings is underway. The work includes studies of friction and wear behavior in helium; stability of the coatings in a low oxygen potential helium environment; impure helium corrosion of coated specimens; and the effect of the coatings on mechanical properties of the substrate alloy. Much of the work reported is on the evaluation of plasma-sprayed coatings. However, a brief discussion of the behavior of coatings applied by the detonation-gun process and high-energy plasma-gun processes is also included

  6. Influence of delta ferrite and dendritic carbides on the impact and tensile properties of a martensitic chromium steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martensitic chrome steels with a high content of chromium incline to form delta ferrite frequently accompanied by massive dendritic carbide precipitations. Both phases mostly influence the mechanical properties of this steel in countercurrent manner. The relatively soft delta ferrite causes an increase of ductility and toughness, whilst the brittle dendritic carbides decreases both. Both phases mostly decrease the strength of the steel. One or the other influence will be dominant in dependence of the quantitative relation of the two phases. This is the cause for very different statements in the literature. The dendritic carbides should be avoided using a cooling rate of more than 103 K/min after the austenitization, because this phase mostly impairs the mechanical properties of the steel. However, the delta ferrite without dendritic carbides can be tolerated mostly. (orig.)

  7. Performance of high-velocity oxy-fuel-sprayed chromium carbide-nickel chromium coating in an actual boiler environment of a thermal power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidhu, T.S.; Prakash, S.; Agrawal, R.D. [Industrial Technology Institute, Roorkee (India)

    2007-09-15

    The present study aims to evaluate the performance of a high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF)-sprayed Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr (chromium carbide-nickel chromium) coating on a nickel-based super-alloy in an actual industrial environment of a coal-fired boiler, with the objective to protect the boiler super-heater and reheater tubes from hot corrosion. The tests were performed in the platen super heater zone of a coal-fired boiler for 1,000 h at 900 degrees C under cyclic conditions. The Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr coating imparted the necessary protection to the nickel-based super alloy in the given environment. The dense and flat splat structure of the coating, and the formation of oxides of chromium and nickel and their spinels, might have protected the substrate super alloy from the inward permeation of corrosive species.

  8. Deposition of chromium nitrides, oxy-nitrides and titanium carbides on steel substrates by DC magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper deals with the deposition of chromium and titanium nitrides, oxynitrides, carbides and carbonitrides onto low carbon steel by reactive magnetron sputtering. The films were obtained by using different reactive gases (02, N2, CH4,). The process advancement and the corresponding film composition variations were investigated as a function of the specific reactivity of each gas. In addition, the cathode poisoning phenomena were studied. (author). 4 refs., 6 figs

  9. Effective load transfer by a chromium carbide nanostructure in a multi-walled carbon nanotube/copper matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) reinforced copper (Cu) matrix composites, which exhibit chromium (Cr) carbide nanostructures at the MWCNT/Cu interface, were prepared through a carbide formation using CuCr alloy powder. The fully densified and oriented MWCNTs dispersed throughout the composites were prepared using spark plasma sintering (SPS) followed by hot extrusion. The tensile strengths of the MWCNT/CuCr composites increased with increasing MWCNTs content, while the tensile strength of MWCNT/Cu composite decreased from that of monolithic Cu. The enhanced tensile strength of the MWCNT/CuCr composites is a result of possible load-transfer mechanisms of the interfacial Cr carbide nanostructures. The multi-wall failure of MWCNTs observed in the fracture surface of the MWCNT/CuCr composites indicates an improvement in the load-bearing capacity of the MWCNTs. This result shows that the Cr carbide nanostructures effectively transferred the tensile load to the MWCNTs during fracture through carbide nanostructure formation in the MWCNT/Cu composite. (paper)

  10. Effective load transfer by a chromium carbide nanostructure in a multi-walled carbon nanotube/copper matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seungchan; Kikuchi, Keiko; Kawasaki, Akira; Kwon, Hansang; Kim, Yangdo

    2012-08-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) reinforced copper (Cu) matrix composites, which exhibit chromium (Cr) carbide nanostructures at the MWCNT/Cu interface, were prepared through a carbide formation using CuCr alloy powder. The fully densified and oriented MWCNTs dispersed throughout the composites were prepared using spark plasma sintering (SPS) followed by hot extrusion. The tensile strengths of the MWCNT/CuCr composites increased with increasing MWCNTs content, while the tensile strength of MWCNT/Cu composite decreased from that of monolithic Cu. The enhanced tensile strength of the MWCNT/CuCr composites is a result of possible load-transfer mechanisms of the interfacial Cr carbide nanostructures. The multi-wall failure of MWCNTs observed in the fracture surface of the MWCNT/CuCr composites indicates an improvement in the load-bearing capacity of the MWCNTs. This result shows that the Cr carbide nanostructures effectively transferred the tensile load to the MWCNTs during fracture through carbide nanostructure formation in the MWCNT/Cu composite.

  11. Cathodic stripping voltammetric determination of chromium in coastal waters on cubic Nano-titanium carbide loaded gold nanoparticles modified electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitao eHan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The novel cubical nano-titanium carbide loaded gold nanoparticles modified electrode for selective and sensitive detection of trace chromium (Cr in coastal water was established based on a simple approach. Nano-titanium carbide is used as the typical cubical nanomaterial with wonderful catalytic activity towards the reduction of Cr(VI. Gold nanoparticles with excellent physical and chemical properties can facilitate electron transfer and enhance the catalytic activity of the modified electrode. Taking advantage of the synergistic effects of nano-titanium carbide and gold nanoparticles, the excellent cathodic signal responses for the stripping determination of Cr(VI can be obtained. The detection limit of this method is calculated as 2.08 μg L-1 with the linear calibration curve ranged from 5.2 to 1040 μg L-1. This analytical method can be used to detect Cr(VI effectively without using any complexing agent. The fabricated electrode was successfully applied for the detection of chromium in coastal waters collected from the estuary giving Cr concentrations between 12.48 and 22.88 μg L-1 with the recovery between 96% and 105%.

  12. Influence of a powder feed rate on the properties of the plasma sprayed chromium carbide- 25% nickel chromium coating

    OpenAIRE

    Mihailo R. Mrdak

    2014-01-01

    The plasma spray process is a leading technology of powder depositing in the production of coatings widely used in the aerospace industry for the protection of new parts and for the repair of worn ones. Cermet 75Cr3C2 - 25Ni(Cr) coatings based on Cr3C2 carbides are widely used to protect parts as they retain high values of hardness, strength and resistance to wear up to a temperature of 850°C. This paper discusses the influence of the parameters of the plasma spray deposition of 75Cr3C2 - 25...

  13. Effect of titanium on the morphology of primary M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbides in hypereutectic high chromium white iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Xiaojun [State Key Laboratory Mechanical Behavior of Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, 28 Xianning West Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi Province 710049 (China); Xing Jiandong [State Key Laboratory Mechanical Behavior of Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, 28 Xianning West Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi Province 710049 (China)], E-mail: jdxing@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Fu Hanguang [State Key Laboratory Mechanical Behavior of Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, 28 Xianning West Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi Province 710049 (China); Zhi Xiaohui [State Key Laboratory Mechanical Behavior of Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, 28 Xianning West Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi Province 710049 (China)

    2007-05-25

    This paper studies the effect of titanium concentration on the morphology of primary M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbides in hypereutectic high chromium white cast iron by means of the optical microscopy (OM), the scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the X-ray diffraction (XRD), the energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) and Leica image analyzer. Theoretical calculation shows that solute Ti atoms can react with carbon and form TiC particles under certain conditions in the melt of hypereutectic high chromium cast iron. The experimental results show that the morphology of primary M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbides can be improved by adding a suitable amount of Ti. This improvement correlated with the emergence of TiC particles. These particles can act as the substrates for heterogeneous nucleation of primary M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbides, which results in significant refinement of the final grain size.

  14. Influence of a powder feed rate on the properties of the plasma sprayed chromium carbide- 25% nickel chromium coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihailo R. Mrdak

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 The plasma spray process is a leading technology of powder depositing in the production of coatings widely used in the aerospace industry for the protection of new parts and for the repair of worn ones. Cermet 75Cr3C2 - 25Ni(Cr coatings based on Cr3C2 carbides are widely used to protect parts as they retain high values of hardness, strength and resistance to wear up to a temperature of 850°C. This paper discusses the influence of the parameters of the plasma spray deposition of 75Cr3C2 - 25Ni(Cr powder on the structure and mechanical properties of the coating. The powder is deposited using plasma spraying at atmospheric pressure (APS. The plasma gas is He, which is an inert gas and does not react with the powder; it produces dense plasma with lower heat content and less incorporated ambient air in the plasma jet thus reducing temperature decomposition and decarburization of Cr3C2 carbide.. In this study, three groups of coatings were deposited with three different powder feed rates of: 30, 45 and 60 g/min. The  coating with the best properties was deposited on the inlet flange parts of the turbo - jet engine TV2-117A to reduce the influence of vibrations and wear. The structures and the mechanical properties of 75Cr3C2 - 25Ni(Cr coatings are analyzed in accordance with the Pratt & Whitney standard. Studies have shown that powder feed rates have an important influence on the mechanical properties and structures of 75Cr3C2 - 25Ni(Cr coatings. 

  15. The Study of Heat Treatment Effects on Chromium Carbide Precipitation of 35Cr-45Ni-Nb Alloy for Repairing Furnace Tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakarin Srisuwan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a specific kind of failure in ethylene pyrolysis furnace tubes. It considers the case in which the tubes made of 35Cr-45Ni-Nb high temperature alloy failed to carburization, causing creep damage. The investigation found that used tubes became difficult to weld repair due to internal carburized layers of the tube. The microstructure and geochemical component of crystallized carbide at grain boundary of tube specimens were characterized by X-ray diffractometer (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM with back-scattered electrons mode (BSE, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS. Micro-hardness tests was performed to determine the hardness of the matrix and the compounds of new and used tube material. The testing result indicated that used tubes exhibited a higher hardness and higher degree of carburization compared to those of new tubes. The microstructure of used tubes also revealed coarse chromium carbide precipitation and a continuous carbide lattice at austenite grain boundaries. However, thermal heat treatment applied for developing tube weld repair could result in dissolving or breaking up chromium carbide with a decrease in hardness value. This procedure is recommended to improve the weldability of the 35Cr-45Ni-Nb used tubes alloy.

  16. Microstructure and Wear Resistance of Chromium Carbide Coating IN SITU Synthesized by VEB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Binfeng; Li, Liping; Lu, Fenggui; Tang, Xinhua

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, (Cr, Fe)7C3(M7C3)/γ-Fe composite layer has been in situ fabricated on a low carbon steel surface by vacuum electron beam irradiation (VEB). Three kinds of powder mixtures were placed on a low carbon steel substrate, which was then irradiated with electron beam in vacuum condition. The microstructure and wear resistance of the composite layers has been studied by means of optical microscope (OM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), microhardness tester and tribological tester. The chemical composition of all specimens were carefully analyzed using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX) technique. Depending on three different powder mixtures, hypereutectic and hypoeutectic microstructures were obtained on surface composite layers. No pores and cracks were found on the coatings. The amount of carbides formed in the surface composite layer was mainly determined by carbon concentration. The microstructure close to the fusion line was largely primary austenite dendrite. The hardness and wear resistance of the surface composite layer has been greatly improved due to the extensive distribution of carbides.

  17. Chromium carbide thin films deposited by ultra-short pulse laser deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsed laser deposition performed by a laser with a pulse duration of 250 fs has been used to deposit films from a Cr3C2 target. Due to the different processes involved in the laser ablation when it is performed by an ultra-short pulse source instead of a conventional short pulse one, it has been possible to obtain in vacuum films containing only one type of carbide, Cr3C2, as shown by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. On the other hand, Cr3C2 is not the only component of the films, since a large amount of amorphous carbon is also present. The films, deposited at room temperature, are amorphous and seem to be formed by the coalescence of a large number of particles with nanometric size. The film composition can be explained in terms of thermal evaporation from particles ejected from the target.

  18. Microstructure and abrasive wear properties of M(Cr,Fe7C3 carbides reinforced high-chromium carbon coating produced by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soner BUYTOZ

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, high-chromium ferrochromium carbon hypereutectic alloy powder was coated on AISI 4340 steel by the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW process. The coating layers were analyzed by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM, X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS. Depending on the gas tungsten arc welding pa-rameters, either hypoeutectic or hypereutectic microstructures were produced. Wear tests of the coatings were carried out on a pin-on-disc apparatus as function of contact load. Wear rates of the all coating layers were decreased as a function of the loading. The improvement of abrasive wear resistance of the coating layer could be attributed to the high hardness of the hypereutectic M7C3 carbides in the microstruc-ture. As a result, the microstructure of surface layers, hardness and abrasive wear behaviours showed different characteristics due to the gas tungsten arc welding parameters.

  19. Effect of NiCr Clad BaF2·CaF2 Addition on Wear Performance of Plasma Sprayed Chromium Carbide-Nichrome Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lingzhong; Huang, Chuanbing; Zhang, Weigang; Zhang, Jingmin; Liu, Wei

    2010-03-01

    NiCr clad BaF2·CaF2 fluoride eutectic powders were added into chromium carbide-nichrome feedstock to improve the tribological properties of NiCr-Cr3C2 coating, and the structures, mechanical, and ball-on-disk sliding wear performance of the coating were characterized. The results show that NiCr cladding can effectively decrease the density and thermophysical difference between the feedstock components, while alleviate the decarburization and oxidization of the constituent phases, and form the coating with a uniform and dense microstructure. However, the addition of BaF2·CaF2 has a negative effect on mechanical properties of the coating. When the temperature reaches 500 °C, the BaF2·CaF2 eutectic is soften by the heat and smeared by the counterpart, thus the low shear stress lubricating film forms between the contact surface, that improves the tribological properties dramatically. At this temperature, the dominant wear mechanisms also change from splats spallation and abrasive wear at room temperature to plastic deformation and plawing by the counterpart. Within the temperature range from 600 to 800 °C, the friction coefficient, the wear rates of NiCr/Cr3C2-10% BaF2·CaF2 coating and its coupled Si3N4 ball are 20%, 40%, and 75% lower than those of the NiCr/Cr3C2 coating, respectively. The NiCr/Cr3C2-BaF2·CaF2 coating shows superior wear performance to the NiCr/Cr3C2 coating without lubricant additive.

  20. Inoculation of chromium white cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kopyciński

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been proved that an addition of boron carbide introduced as an inoculant to the chromium white cast iron changes the structureof castings. Castings after inoculation revealed a different structure with numerous grains. Primary precipitates of chromium carbide also appeared, reducing the mechanical properties of as-cast parts. Properly established heat treatment regime makes chromium iron castings regain their, originally high, mechanical properties.

  1. Inoculation of chromium white cast iron

    OpenAIRE

    D. Kopyciński

    2009-01-01

    It has been proved that an addition of boron carbide introduced as an inoculant to the chromium white cast iron changes the structureof castings. Castings after inoculation revealed a different structure with numerous grains. Primary precipitates of chromium carbide also appeared, reducing the mechanical properties of as-cast parts. Properly established heat treatment regime makes chromium iron castings regain their, originally high, mechanical properties.

  2. The Influence Of Temperature Gradient On Stereological Parameters Of Carbide Phase On Cross-Section Of Abrasive Wear Resistant Chromium Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Studnicki A.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the paper analysis of temperature gradient and parameters of structure on casting cross-section of abrasive wear resistant chromium cast iron at carbon content of 2,5%wt. and chromium 17%wt. with nickel and molybdenum additives are presented. The castings were made with use of special tester ϕ100mm (method of temperature gradient and derivative analysis with temperature recording in many points from thermal centre to surface (to mould of casting. Registered cooling curves were used to describe the temperature gradient on cross-section of analyzed casting. On the basis of determined curves of temperature gradient measurement fields were selected to make the quantitative studies of structure. The results of studies show significant influence of temperature gradient on quantitative parameters of chromium cast iron structure. Moreover was affirmed that exists a critical temperature gradient for which is present rapid change of quantitative parameters of chromium cast iron structure.

  3. Microstructure and abrasive wear properties of M(Cr,Fe)7C3 carbides reinforced high-chromium carbon coating produced by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process

    OpenAIRE

    Buytoz, Soner; M.Mustafa YILDIRIM

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, high-chromium ferrochromium carbon hypereutectic alloy powder was coated on AISI 4340 steel by the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. The coating layers were analyzed by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Depending on the gas tungsten arc welding pa-rameters, either hypoeutectic or hypereutectic microstructures were produced. Wear tests of the coatings were c...

  4. Prospective, multi-center evaluation of a silicon carbide coated cobalt chromium bare metal stent for percutaneous coronary interventions: Two-year results of the ENERGY Registry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erbel, Raimund, E-mail: erbel@uk-essen.de [Department of Cardiology, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany); Eggebrecht, Holger [Cardioangiological Center Bethanien (CCB), Frankfurt (Germany); Roguin, Ariel [Department of Cardiology, Rambam Medical Center, Haifa (Israel); Schroeder, Erwin [Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Cliniques Universitaires de Mont-Godinne, Yvoir (Belgium); Philipp, Sebastian [Department Internal Medicine/Cardiology, Elbe Klinikum Stade, Stade (Germany); Heitzer, Thomas [Department of Cardiology, Heart Center Dortmund, Dortmund (Germany); Schwacke, Harald [Department of Internal Medicine, Diakonissen-Stiftungs- Krankenhaus Speyer (Germany); Ayzenberg, Oded [The Heart Institute, Kaplan Medical Center, Rehovot (Israel); Serra, Antonio [Servicio de Cardiología, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, España (Spain); Delarche, Nicolas [Cardiology unit, Pau General Hospital, Pau (France); Luchner, Andreas [Department of Internal Medicine/Cardiology, Universitätsklinikum Regensburg (Germany); Slagboom, Ton [Department of Cardiology, Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-11-15

    Background: Novel bare metal stents with improved stent design may become a viable alternative to drug-eluting stents in certain patient groups, particularly, when long-term dual antiplatelet therapy should be avoided. Purpose: The ENERGY registry aimed to assess the safety and benefits of a cobalt–chromium thin strut bare metal stent with a passive coating in a large series of patients under real-world conditions. Methods and materials: This prospective registry recruited 1016 patients with 1074 lesions in 48 centers from April to November 2010. The primary endpoint was the rate of major adverse cardiac events (MACEs), a composite of cardiac death, myocardial infarction and clinically driven target lesion revascularization. Results: More than half of the lesions (61.0%) were type A/B1 lesions, mean lesion length was 14.5 ± 6.5 mm and mean reference vessel diameter 3.2 ± 0.5 mm. MACE rates at 6, 12 and 24 months were 4.9%, 8.1% and 9.4%, target lesion revascularization rates 2.8%, 4.9% and 5.4% and definite stent thrombosis rates 0.5%, 0.6% and 0.6%. Subgroups showed significant differences in baseline and procedural characteristics which did not translate into significantly different clinical outcomes. Specifically, MACE rates at 24 months were 13.5% in diabetics, 8.6% in small stents and 9.6% in acute coronary syndrome patients. Conclusion: The population of ENERGY reflects real-world conditions with bare metal stents being mainly used in simple lesions. In this setting, percutaneous coronary intervention using a cobalt–chromium thin strut bare metal stent with a passive coating showed very good results up to 24 months. (ClinicalTrials.gov:NCT01056120) Summary for annotated table of contents: The ENERGY international registry evaluated the safety and benefits of a cobalt–chromium thin strut bare metal stent with passive coating in 1016 patients under real-world conditions until 2 years. Results were encouraging with a low composite rate of cardiac death

  5. Prospective, multi-center evaluation of a silicon carbide coated cobalt chromium bare metal stent for percutaneous coronary interventions: Two-year results of the ENERGY Registry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Novel bare metal stents with improved stent design may become a viable alternative to drug-eluting stents in certain patient groups, particularly, when long-term dual antiplatelet therapy should be avoided. Purpose: The ENERGY registry aimed to assess the safety and benefits of a cobalt–chromium thin strut bare metal stent with a passive coating in a large series of patients under real-world conditions. Methods and materials: This prospective registry recruited 1016 patients with 1074 lesions in 48 centers from April to November 2010. The primary endpoint was the rate of major adverse cardiac events (MACEs), a composite of cardiac death, myocardial infarction and clinically driven target lesion revascularization. Results: More than half of the lesions (61.0%) were type A/B1 lesions, mean lesion length was 14.5 ± 6.5 mm and mean reference vessel diameter 3.2 ± 0.5 mm. MACE rates at 6, 12 and 24 months were 4.9%, 8.1% and 9.4%, target lesion revascularization rates 2.8%, 4.9% and 5.4% and definite stent thrombosis rates 0.5%, 0.6% and 0.6%. Subgroups showed significant differences in baseline and procedural characteristics which did not translate into significantly different clinical outcomes. Specifically, MACE rates at 24 months were 13.5% in diabetics, 8.6% in small stents and 9.6% in acute coronary syndrome patients. Conclusion: The population of ENERGY reflects real-world conditions with bare metal stents being mainly used in simple lesions. In this setting, percutaneous coronary intervention using a cobalt–chromium thin strut bare metal stent with a passive coating showed very good results up to 24 months. (ClinicalTrials.gov:NCT01056120) Summary for annotated table of contents: The ENERGY international registry evaluated the safety and benefits of a cobalt–chromium thin strut bare metal stent with passive coating in 1016 patients under real-world conditions until 2 years. Results were encouraging with a low composite rate of cardiac death

  6. Processing Effects of Chromium Carbide/Nickel Chromate on Coating Performance: An in Depth Approach by Using Process Maps and in situ Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Salvatore T.

    There have been enormous advances in technologies for thermal spray over the past few decades. One such application is the replacement of electroplated hard chrome for aerospace and automotive industries. Hard chrome electroplating has been a valuable surface treatment for parts in corrosion and wear applications due to its high hardness, ability to passivate, as well as its low coefficient of friction. In the past two decades, there have been concerns due to limitations in hard chrome's performance as well as environmental effects due to hexavalent chromium produced during processing. High velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spray processing has been developed to produce exceptional coating quality due to the very dense microstructures formed with limited porosity. Cr3C2-NiCr has been shown to be a viable replacement to electroplated hard chrome when deposited by HVOF spray techniques. In order to produce optimized coatings with this technology, a process mapping methodology was implemented to understand the relationship between process variables. The variations of oxygen to fuel ratios as well as total volume flows of gases were examined to interrelate process variables with the particle state, stress evolution during deposition, and properties of the coatings. The performance of the coatings in aqueous corrosion and sliding wear environments were correlated back to the properties of the coatings. It has been demonstrated that monitoring the in-flight particles and evolution of stress can be directly correlated to the properties of the coating and in-directly to the coating performance. Cr3C2-NiCr property and performance was also compared to hard chrome and WC-CoCr coatings. It was shown that the optimized coatings of Cr3C2-NiCr outperformed hard chrome in both aqueous corrosion as well as sliding wear environments. Cr3C2-NiCr was outperformed by WC-CoCr in sliding wear applications due to its lower hardness, but outperformed WC-CoCr in aqueous corrosion due to the denser

  7. Nanosized Borides and Carbides for Electroplating. Metal-Matrix Coatings: Specifications, Performance Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galevskiy, G. V.; Rudneva, V. V.; Galevskiy, S. G.; Il’yashchenko, D. P.; Kartsev, D. S.

    2016-04-01

    This paper summarizes experience of application of nano-sized carbides and borides of titanium and chromium, silicon carbide as components of electro-depositable coating compositions based on nickel, zinc, and chromium. Basic physical and mechanical properties of the coatings are determined. Technological and economic evaluation is completed; practicability of high-cost nano-diamonds substitution for nano-sized borides and carbides is justified.

  8. FEATURES OF CHROMIUM DOPING OF WEAR-RESISTANT CAST IRON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Netrebko

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work analysis of the influence of chromium on the process of carbide formation, changes in chemical composition of the metal substrate in the areas adjacent to the carbides and at the hardness of iron while economy nickel and manganesealloying.

  9. Carbon, chromium and molybdenum contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes solidification experiments on white cast iron, with 15 and 20% of chromium, 2.3, 3.0 and 3.6 % of carbon and 0.0, 1.5 and 2.5 % of molybdenum in test de samples with 30 mm diameter. Measurements were performed on the austenite and eutectic formation arrests, the number of the eutectic carbide particles relative to the total and the eutectic volumes, and the volume fraction of the primary austenite

  10. A study of lubrication, processing conditions, and material combinations that affect the wear of micro-textured-carbide coated cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy surfaces used for artificial joints implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettienne-Modeste, Geriel A.

    Total joint replacement remains one of the most successful treatments for arthritis. The most common materials used for artificial joints are metals (e.g., cobalt-chrome alloys or titanium alloys), which articulate against ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene. Wear related failures of artificial joints may be reduced with the use of novel micro-textured carbide surfaces. The micro-textured carbide surfaces were deposited on a CoCrMo alloy using microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. Wear tests were conducted to determine wear mechanisms and properties of the micro-textured surfaces. The research presented in this thesis addresses: (1) rheolgoical behavior of bovine calf serum with and without antibacterial agents to determine whether they can be used as appropriate models for synovial fluid, (2) the wear behavior of the micro-textured CoCrMo surface system, and (3) the mechanical and material properties of the micro-textured CoCrMo alloy surface relevant to wear performance. The rheological studies showed that the apparent viscosity of bovine calf serum increased with an increase in concentration before and after the serum was used for wear testing. The wear analysis showed that the processing conditions (2hr deposition vs. 4hr deposition times) affected the wear properties. The 2hr carbide-on-carbide lubricated in 50% BCS produced the lowest wear factor and rate for the five wear couple systems containing the carbide disk or plate material. Greater wear was produced in serum without penicillin/streptomycin (P/S) compared to the serum containing P/S. A greater carbide coating thickness 10 (micrometers) was produced during the 4hr deposition time than for the 2hr deposition (˜3mum). The nano-hardness value was higher than the micro-hardness for both the 4hr and 2hr carbide surfaces. The micro-hardness results of the worn carbide surfaces showed that an increase in BCS concentration from 0% to 100% increased the micro-hardness (HV) for carbide

  11. Growth Simulation of Spheroidized Carbide in the Carbide-Dispersed Carburizing Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kouji; Ikehata, Hideaki; Nakanishi, Koukichi; Nishikawa, Tomoaki

    2008-06-01

    A simulation method that combines one-dimensional (1-D) diffusion models has been proposed for predicting the behaviors of carbide particles dispersed in the carburizing layer of high-carbon chromium steels. The first simulation was set for the heating stage prior to carburizing, using a microscopic model of a spherical carbide and surrounding austenite matrix. This revealed the undissolved status of the carbide even at carburizing temperatures, which was stored as the starting condition of the second simulation. Separately, in a planar model, the macroscopic carbon diffusion during the isothermal carburizing stage was calculated, and time functions of carbon activity were evaluated at the depth of interest. The change in activities was assumed to represent the boundary conditions of the local carbide/austenite region, and thus input to the restored spherical model to do the second simulation of carburizing stage. The simulation method linking these double-scale diffusion calculations has first been implemented using the DICTRA package, and applied to the carbide in multicomponent model steels. The carbide radius as well as volume fraction were successfully predicted for all stages in the carbide-dispersed carburizing (CDC) process. However, minor corrections were necessary because of the decrease in the number density of carbide particles and the discontinuity in carbon activity caused by the use of two different models.

  12. Hydrogen evolution activity and electrochemical stability of selected transition metal carbides in concentrated phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The hydrogen evolution activity (HER) on five transition metal carbides was studied in concentrated phosphoric acid at different temperatures. • Carbides of Group 6 metals (Cr, Mo, W) showed significant HER activity; the Volmer-Heyrovsky mechanism was proposed for the HER reaction on these materials. • The electrochemical stability towards oxidation was studied in concentrated phosphoric acid, with Cr, Ta and W carbides showing passivating behavior, while Nb and Mo carbides showed corrosion. - Abstract: Alternative catalysts based on carbides of Group 5 (niobium and tantalum) and 6 (chromium, molybdenum and tungsten) metals were prepared as films on the metallic substrates. The electrochemical activities of these carbide electrodes towards the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in concentrated phosphoric acid were investigated in a temperature range from 80 to 170 °C. A significant dependence of the activities on temperature was observed for all five carbide samples. Through the entire temperature range Group 6 metal carbides showed higher activity than that of the Group 5 metal carbides, attributable to the different electronic structures. Tungsten carbide among the studied electrode samples exhibited the highest HER activity. Upon anodic potential scans in the presence of oxygen, chromium, tantalum and tungsten carbides displayed passivation due to the formation of stable surface layers whereas niobium and molybdenum carbides seemed to undergo corrosion

  13. Control of Wear-Resistance Properties in Ti-added Hypereutectic High Chromium Cast Iron

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Qiang

    2012-01-01

    High chromium cast iron (HCCI) is considered as one of the most useful wear resistance materials and their usage are widely spread in industry. The wear resistance and mechanical properties of HCCI mainly depend on type, size, number, morphology of hard carbides and the matrix structure (γ or α). The Hypereutectic HCCI with large volume fractions of hard carbides is preferred to apply in wear applications. However, the coarser and larger primary M7C3 carbides will be precipitated during the s...

  14. Microstructure Evaluation and Wear-Resistant Properties of Ti-alloyed Hypereutectic High Chromium Cast Iron

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    High chromium cast iron (HCCI) is considered as one of the most useful wear resistance materials and their usage are widely spread in industry. The mechanical properties of HCCI mainly depend on type, size, number, morphology of hard carbides and the matrix structure (γ or α). The hypereutectic HCCI with large volume fractions of hard carbides is preferred to apply in wear applications. However, the coarser and larger primary M7C3 carbides will be precipitated during the solidification of the...

  15. Compatibility studies of irradiated carbide fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When the free energies of formation of mixed (U, Pu) monocarbide and sesquicarbide, the phases present in as-manufactured carbide fuel, are plotted on an Ellingham type diagram along with the free energies of formation of the carbides of the three main constituent elements of austenitic stainless steel, that is nickel, iron and chromium, it can readily be seen that chromium forms the most stable carbide. Mixed (U,Pu) carbides, therefore, are thermodynamically unstable in contact with stainless steel. In consequence, when mixed (U,Pu) carbides are heated in contact with stainless steel, carbon transfer from the fuel to the clad should occur at a rate dependent upon the kinetics of the actual mechanism of carbon transfer. The rate of carbon transfer increases in the presence of a medium such as a sodium bond, which can act as a transfer agent. In this instance the wetting of the steel surface provides a greater area of contact compared to the condition prevailing in the absence of such a bond and may explain the effectiveness of the transfer agent. The mixed (U,Pu) carbide as currently manufactured is less pure, is less well characterised and much less stable than oxide fuel. It is possible, therefore, to control stoichiometry only within broad limits and the method of manufacture, by carbon reduction of oxide, leaves an appreciable amount of residual oxygen in the lattice or as discrete particles of oxide. During fuel preparation, localised reaction between oxide (or oxygen) and carbide may lead to the appearance of free (U,Pu) metal which could in a fuel pin react with the clad. It has further been postulated that similar reactions occur in mixed (U, Pu) carbide pins of high centre temperature in the reactor and that although the free (U,Pu) metal so formed is mainly concentrated at the 1200 deg. C fuel isotherm, some of the free metal together with the carbon monoxide produced in the reaction migrates to the clad surface and reacts. The occurrence of these two

  16. Heterogeneous chromium catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a heterogeneous chromium catalyst system for the polymerisation of ethylene and/or alpha olefins prepared by the steps of: (a) providing a silica-containing support, (b) treating the silica-containing support with a chromium compound to form a chromium-based silica-containing support, (c) activating the chromium-based silica-containing support, (d) chemically reducing the activated chromium-based silica-containing support to produce a precursor catalyst, (e) r...

  17. The valve effect of the carbide interlayer of an electric resistance plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The welded electric resistance plug (ERP) usually contains a carbide interlayer at the plug-carbon material interface. The interlayer forms during welding the contact metallic alloy with the carbon material when the oxide films of the alloy are reduced on the interface surface by carbon to the formation of carbides and the surface layer of the plug material dissolves carbon to saturation. Subsequently, during solidification of the plug material it forms carbides with the alloy components. The structural composition of the carbide interlayer is determined by the chemical composition of the contact alloy. In alloys developed by the author and his colleagues the carbide forming elements are represented in most cases by silicon and titanium and, less frequently, by chromium and manganese. Therefore, the carbide interlayers in the ERP consisted mainly of silicon and titanium carbides

  18. Low-chromium reduced-activation chromium-tungsten steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Maziasz, P.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Bainitic microstructures formed during continuous cooling can differ from classical upper and lower bainite formed during isothermal transformation. Two types of non-classical bainite were observed depending on the cooling rate: carbide-free acicular bainite at rapid cooling rates and granular bainite at slower cooling rates. The Charpy impact toughness of the acicular ferrite was found to be considerably better than for the granular bainite. It was postulated that alloying to improve the hardenability of the steel would promote the formation of acicular bainite, just as increasing the cooling rate does. To test this, chromium and tungsten were added to the 2 1/4Cr-2W and 2 1/4Cr-2WV steel compositions to increase their hardenability, and the microstructures and mechanical properties were examined.

  19. Microstructure and wear resistance of high chromium cast iron containing niobium

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Zhiguo; Yang Chengkai; Zhang Peng

    2014-01-01

    In the paper, the effect of niobium addition on the microstructure, mechanical properties and wear resistance of high chromium cast iron has been studied. The results show that the microstructure of the heat-treated alloys is composed of M7C3 and M23C6 types primary carbide, eutectic carbide, secondary carbide and a matrix of martensite and retained austenite. NbC particles appear both inside and on the edge of the primary carbides. The hardness of the studied alloys maintains around 66 HRC, ...

  20. Hexavalent Chromium Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is developing an updated IRIS assessment of hexavalent chromium. This assessment will evaluate the potential health effects of hexavalent chromium from oral and inhalation exposures. An important component of determining the cancer causing potential of ingested hexavalent chr...

  1. Chromium and Genomic Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Wise, Sandra S.; Wise, John Pierce

    2011-01-01

    Many metals serve as micronutrients which protect against genomic instability. Chromium is most abundant in its trivalent and hexavalent forms. Trivalent chromium has historically been considered an essential element, though recent data indicate that while it can have pharmacological effects and value, it is not essential. There are no data indicating that trivalent chromium promotes genomic stability and, instead may promote genomic instability. Hexavalent chromium is widely accepted as high...

  2. Phase and substance transformations during carbothermic reduction of main elements in chromium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of thermodynamic analysis and the elaboration of chromium oxide metallizing and carbonization parameters the phase and substance transformations during carbothermic reduction of main elements are studied as applied to manufacturing chromium-bearing briquettes from the ore. The mechanism of transformations on the way to a final form of element presence is revealed. The initial briquette consists mainly of Cr2O3 and Fe2O3 oxides. Active interaction between chromium oxides and carbon is observed after drying and results in an essential amount of Cr7C3 and Cr23C6 carbides. Further thermal treatment is accompanied by intense carbide formation with the appearance of new carbides Cr3C2 and Fe3C

  3. Chemical composition and structural transformations of amorphous chromium coatings electrodeposited from Cr(III) electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safonova, Olga V. [Swiss-Norwegian Beamlines at European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Vykhodtseva, Ludmila N. [Department of Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Polyakov, Nikolai A. [A.N. Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Swarbrick, Janine C. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Sikora, Marcin [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Department of Solid State Physics, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH University of Science and Technology, Av. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Glatzel, Pieter [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Safonov, Viktor A., E-mail: safon@elch.chem.msu.r [Department of Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-12-15

    Amorphous chromium coatings were electrodeposited from Cr(III)-based solutions containing organic (HCOONa) or phosphorus-containing (NaH{sub 2}PO{sub 2}) additives. Their structure was studied by a combination of X-ray diffraction (XRD), valence-to-core X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Cr K-edge. Metalloid atoms (C or P) incorporated in electroplates structure are chemically bonded to chromium (i.e. are located in the first coordination shell). Upon annealing at elevated temperatures in vacuum, these amorphous coatings crystallize into a mixture of phases containing metallic chromium and chromium carbides or chromium phosphides. Quantitative analysis of valence-to-core XES data demonstrates that the average local structure of chromium in the amorphous coatings does not change significantly during crystallization.

  4. Primary and secondary crystallization of modified hypoeutectic chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Studnicki

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents investigations of crystallization of modified hypoeutectic wear resistant chromium cast iron which contains carbon about 2% and chromium on three levels (12%, 18% and 25%. Three substances were applied to the modification ( boron carbide (B4C, ferroniobium (FeNb and mixture of ferroniobium and mischmetal (RE. The investigations of crystallization were conducted the DTA method in DTA-C and DTA-Is testers. The influence on the course of the process of primary and secondary crystallization was observed.

  5. Mechanoactivation of chromium silicide formation in the SiC-Cr-Si system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlasova M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The processes of simultaneous grinding of the components of a SiC-Cr-Si mixture and further temperature treatment in the temperature range 1073-1793 K were studied by X-ray phase analysis, IR spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and X-ray microanalysis. It was established that, during grinding of the mixture, chromium silicides form. A temperature treatment completes the process. Silicide formation proceeds within the framework of the diffusion of silicon into chromium. In the presence of SiO2 in the mixture, silicide formation occurs also as a result of the reduction of silica by silicon and silicon carbide. The sintering of synthesized composite SiC-chromium silicides powders at a high temperature under a high pressure (T = 2073 K, P = 5 GPa is accompanied by the destruction of cc-SiC particles, the cc/3 transition in silicon carbide and deformation distortions of the lattices of chromium silicides.

  6. Effect of carbon content on carbide morphology and mechanical properties of A.R. white cast iron with 10-12% tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heydari, D. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Skandani, A. Alipour [Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Al Haik, M., E-mail: alhaik@vt.edu [Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2012-04-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of W and C variation in A.R. white cast iron was studied up to 12 wt% W. It never exceeded 10 wt% in previous investigations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbide morphologies with 2.2-3.2 wt% carbon shows that W has dominating effect on carbide morphology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New carbide microstructures (GA and IA) appear in some range of carbon and its volume fraction is function of carbon content. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer After heat treatment, new carbide morphology turns to continuous chromium carbide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wear resistance and hardness of the new alloys depends on both IA appearance presence and tungsten carbide precipitation. - Abstract: Carbide morphologies of white cast iron containing 22% Cr and 10-12% tungsten with different carbon contents (2.34-3.20 wt.%) were investigated. Results indicated that for the as-cast alloys with no heat treatments, the addition of carbon changes the morphology of carbides during air-cooling in the presence of tungsten. Light microscopy analysis revealed that for an alloy with 2.3 wt% carbon, chromium carbides possess coarse gray appearance (GA). Increasing the carbon content reduced the coarse GA zones volume fraction while a finer GA zones emerged. The coexistence of coarse and fine GA phases came to an end at 2.8 wt% carbon, at which only fine GA zones spread throughout the chromium carbide phase. Scaling up the carbon content to 3.2 wt% led to the formation of tungsten carbide and austenite in a eutectic reaction. Both fine and coarse GA zones vanished while the tungsten carbides acquired fishbone-like morphology. Upon heat treatment, the coarse GA zones vanished completely and turned into island appearance (IA) of chromium carbide. On the contrary, the finer GA zones remained unchanged after heat treatment and they coexisted with the IA. After heat treatment, the fishbone morphology shattered apart, however, the hyper chromium carbides

  7. Deformation site-specific nature of transgranular carbide precipitation in 304 stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research was developed to identify the nature of transgranular carbide precipitation and chromium-depletion in heavily deformed 304 SS, and to examine the correlation between carbide precipitation and strain-induced martensite in the SS. Observations have indicated that: (1) Transgranular carbides form on twin-fault intersections in 304 SS. This causes linear-TG attack within the SS. (2) There was no observed correlation between strain-induced martensite and TG carbides in this work, except that both form at micro-shear band intersections, but not at the same intersection. (3) Lath martensite and fine-austenite form during heat treatment of deformed, 304 SS. (4) Transgranular carbides precipitate on martensite lath/fine-austenite boundaries in 304 SS, and produce extensive, random TG attack in the SS. (5) Lattice imaging of carbides has shown the presence of dislocations within the carbides and at the carbide-matrix interface, and changes in the carbide lattice orientation across a boundary, which may be indicators of key mechanisms of carbide nucleation on grain boundaries in SS

  8. Silicon carbide bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A self-bonded silicon carbide body produced by siliconising a preformed mixture of particles (shaped by means other than slip-casting) of carbon and silicon carbide in the beta form has a mean grain size in the range of 0.1 to 5 microns. Such a body may be produced using silicon carbide particles having a mean surface area in the range 0.5 to 20 square metres per gram. The silicon carbide particles may be produced by heating a mixture of silica and silicon to generate silicon monoxide vapour and passing the vapour through a bed of particulate carbon. (author)

  9. Identification Trial of Crystallization Parameters of Modified Chromium Cast Iron

    OpenAIRE

    A. Studnicki

    2007-01-01

    In the paper results of researches of abrasion-resisting chromium cast iron inoculated with boron carbide B4C primary crystallization are presented. The main aim of work was make an attempt to identification of crystallization parameters that changed in reason of inoculation. Essential primary crystallization parameters, with the help of which, will be possible to evaluate the inoculation capacity were searched. It was found that in the result of inoculant actions characteristic temperatures ...

  10. Performance characteristics of mill rolls from graphite chromium cast iron

    OpenAIRE

    Lecomte-Beckers, Jacqueline; Terziev, L.; Breyer, J. P.

    2000-01-01

    The main requirements for the development of a new grade for the later finishing section of the mill are : good oxidation and thermal behaviour, high wear resistance, good resistance to rolling incidents. The approach of Marichal Ketin to improve the rolling performances in the last finishing stands is presented. The Hi-Cr cast iron possesses excellent wear resistance due to the presence of hard chromium carbides, but its thermal conductivity and sticking properties are fairly low. A graphite...

  11. Oxidation of chromium telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors study the interaction between chromium telluride and oxygen at elevated temperatures in view of its application in semiconductor technology. Thermodynamic analysis of the oxidation process and experimental data showed that the alloys of chromium telluride suffer oxidation in the presence of even traces of oxygen in a gaseous medium. Chromium telluride oxidation is a complex process that gives rise to various oxides and is accompanied by partial sublimation

  12. Oxidation of chromium telluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pakhomovskaya, N.S.; Iorga, E.V.; Sheveleva, T.F.; Solov' eva, A.E.

    1986-03-01

    The authors study the interaction between chromium telluride and oxygen at elevated temperatures in view of its application in semiconductor technology. Thermodynamic analysis of the oxidation process and experimental data showed that the alloys of chromium telluride suffer oxidation in the presence of even traces of oxygen in a gaseous medium. Chromium telluride oxidation is a complex process that gives rise to various oxides and is accompanied by partial sublimation.

  13. Bainitic chromium-tungsten steels with 3 pct chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous work on 3Cr-1.5MoV (nominally Fe-3Cr-2.5Mo-0.25V-0.1C), 2.25Cr-2W (Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.1C), and 2.25Cr-2WV (Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.25V-0.1C) steels indicated that the impact toughness of these steels depended on the microstructure of the bainite formed during continuous cooling from the austenization temperature. Microstructures formed during continuous cooling can differ from classical upper and lower bainite formed during isothermal transformation. Two types of nonclassical microstructures were observed depending on the cooling rate: carbide-free acicular bainite at rapid cooling rates and granular bainite at slower cooling rates. The Charpy impact toughness of the acicular ferrite was considerably better than for the granular bainite. It was postulated that alloying to improve the hardenability of the steel would promote the formation of acicular bainite, just as increasing the cooling rate does. To test this, chromium and tungsten were added to the 2.25Cr-2W and 2.25Cr-2WV steel compositions to increase their hardenability. Charpy testing indicated that the new 3Cr-W and 3Cr-WV steels had improved impact toughness, as demonstrated by lower ductile-brittle transition temperatures and higher upper-shelf energies. This improvement occurred with less tempering than was necessary to achieve similar toughness for the 2.25Cr steels and for high-chromium (9 to 12 pct Cr) Cr-W and Cr-Mo steels

  14. Silicon nano-carbide in strengthening and ceramic technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudneva, V. V.; Galevsky, G. V.; Kozyrev, N. A.

    2015-09-01

    Technological advantages and conditions of new quality assurance of coatings and products, provided by silicon nano-carbide, have been ascertained in the course of composite electrodeposition of coatings, structural ceramics patterning, and surface hardening of steels via electro-explosive alloying. Silicon nano-carbide has been recommended to be used as a component of wear and corrosion resistant chromium carbide electrodeposited coatings, which can be operated at high temperatures and used for strengthening tools and equipment including those with a complex microrelief of functional surfaces. Silicon nano-carbide as a component of composite “silicon carbide - boron - carbon” can be applied to produce ceramic half products via solid phase sintering in argon under pressure of 0.1 MPa and temperature 2273 K. Application of silicon nano-carbide in technology of tool steel surface hardening via electroexplosive alloying ensures obtaining of a high micro-hard, wear and heat resistant shielding layer which is about 20 μm deep.

  15. On the rational alloying of structural chromium-nickel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made on the influence of chromium nickel, phosphorus on the critical brittleness temperature of Cr-Ni-Mo-V structural steels. It is shown that the critical brittleness temperature of these steels increases at chromium content more over than 2% and nickel content more than 2% in the result of carbide transformations during tempering. Increase of nickel content in Cr-Ni-Mo-V-steels strengthens the tendency to embrittlement during slow cooling, from tempering temperature owing to development of process of phosphorus grain-boundary segregation. Two mentioned mechanisms of embrittlement determine principles of rational steel alloying. The extreme dependence of the critical brittleness temperature on chromium and nickel content, which enables to choose the optimum composition of Cr-Ni-Mo-V-steels, was established

  16. Influences of copper on solidification structure and hardening behavior of high chromium cast irons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jun; XIONG Ji; FAN Hong-yuan; SHEN Bao-luo; GAO Sheng-ji

    2008-01-01

    The influences of copper on microstructure and the hardening behavior of high chromium cast irons subjected to sub-critical treatment were investigated.The results show that the mierostructure of the as-cast high chromium cast irons consists of retained austenite,martensite and M7 C3 type eutectic carbide.When copper is added into high chromium cast irons,austenite and carbide contents are increased.The increased addition of copper content from 0%to 1.84%leads to the increase of austenite and carbide from 15.9%and 20.0% to 61.0%and 35.5%,respectively.In the process of sub-critical treatment,the retained austenite in the matrix can be precipitated into secondary carbides and then transforms into martensite in cooling process,which causes the secondary hardening of the alloy under sub-critical treatment.High chromium cast irons containing copper in sub-critical treatment appear the second hardening curve peak due to the precipitation of copper from supersaturated matrix.

  17. Hair chromium concentration and chromium excretion in tannery workers.

    OpenAIRE

    Saner, G; Yüzbasiyan, V; Cigdem, S

    1984-01-01

    Hair and urine samples were collected from 34 male tannery workers and from 12 normal adults. Eighteen of the workers dealt directly with chromium and the remaining 16 (controls) worked in the offices and kitchen of the same factory. All were found to be clinically healthy. Chromium was determined by flameless atomic absorption spectroscopy. When compared with normal adult values, urinary chromium concentration, Cr/Creatinine ratio, daily chromium excretion, and hair chromium, concentrations ...

  18. High-Purity Chromium Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Rudoy, A.; Milman, Yu.; Korzhova, N.

    1995-01-01

    A procedure for producing large-scale chromium ingots by means of induction-arc melting was developed. From the high-purity, low-alloyed chromium ingots obtained, chromium targets were produced by of thermoplastic treatment techniques. The method of electron-beam evaporation of high-purity chromium was also used for production of targets.

  19. Analysis of the structure of castings made from chromium white cast iron resistant to abrasive wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kopyciński

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available It has been proved that an addition of boron carbide and disintegrated steel scrap introduced as an inoculant to the chromium white cast iron changes the structure of castings. The said operation increases the number of crystallization nuclei for dendrites of the primary austenite. In this case, the iron particles act as substrates for the nucleation of primary austenite due to a similar crystallographic lattice. The more numerous are the dendrites of primary austenite and the structure more refined and the mechanical properties higher. Castings after B4C inoculation revealed a different structure of fine grained fracture. Primary precipitates of chromium carbide also appeared, reducing the mechanical properties of as-cast parts. Properly established heat treatment regime makes chromium iron castings regain their, originally high, mechanical properties.

  20. Microstructural characterisation of chromium slags

    OpenAIRE

    Burja, J.; F. Tehovnik; Vode, F.; Arh, B.

    2015-01-01

    In this chromium slags that form during melting of chromium alloyed steels are examined. During melting and oxidation of these steel grades a considerable amount of chromium is lost, and gained back with slag reduction. Laboratory experiments were performed to study the mechanism of chromium oxide reduction by silicon. Slags chemistry and phase composition have a strong effect on the steelmaking process. Phase analysis revealed two types of chromium oxides, calcium chromites and chromite spin...

  1. Zirconium carbide recrystallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanin, A.G.; Erin, O.N.; Sul' Yanov, S.N.; Turchin, V.N.

    1986-02-01

    This paper studies the primary recrystallization process of the sintered polycrystalline zirconium carbide with a composition of ZrC /SUB 0.98/ . The properties of zirconium carbide samples deformed under compression are presented; the selected degree of deformation ensures a lower scatter of grain sizes at relative error of +/- 5% in the final deformation measurement. The established mechanisms of structural changes in zirconium carbide during plastic deformation and subsequent high temperature treatment indicate the possibility of using thermomechanical methods for the direct control of the structure of these mechanical methods for the direct control of the structure of these and obviously othe group IV and V carbides obtained by powder metallurgical methods.

  2. Substoichiometric extraction of chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Substoichiometric extraction of chromium with tetraphenylarsonium chloride (TPACl), tri-n-octylamine (TNOA), diethylammonium diethyldithiocarbamate (DDDC) and ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) was examined in detail. Chromium can be extracted substoichiometrically in a pH range, which is 1.1-2.6 for the TPACl compound, 0.6-2.3 for the TNOA compound, 5.1-6.4 for the DDDC chelate and 3.9-4.9 for the APDC chelate. Chromium in high-purity calcium carbonate, Orchard Leaves (NBS SRM-1571) and Brewers Yeast (NBS SRM-1569) was determined by neutron activation analysis combined with substoichiometric extraction by DDDC and APDC. The values of 2.0+-0.02 ppm and 2.6+-0.2 ppm were obtained for Brewers Yeast and Orchard Leaves, respectively. These values were in good agreement with those reported by NBS. The reaction mechanism and the reaction ratio between hexavalent chromium and dithiocarbamate are also discussed. (author)

  3. Chromium in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chromium deficiency may be seen as impaired glucose tolerance. It occurs in older people with type 2 ... PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Minerals Browse the Encyclopedia ...

  4. The carcinogenicity of chromium

    OpenAIRE

    Norseth, Tor

    1981-01-01

    The carcinogenicity of chromium compounds is reviewed with specific attention to the gaps in knowledge for risk estimation and research needs. The most important problems at present are whether trivalent chromium compounds cause cancer, and whether there is a difference in cancer causing effects between the soluble and the slightly soluble hexavalent compounds in the practical exposure situation. Dose estimates for risk estimation based on epidemiological investigations are also lacking. Pres...

  5. Effect of molybdenum, vanadium, boron on mechanical properties of high chromium white cast iron in as-cast condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurjaman, F.; Sumardi, S.; Shofi, A.; Aryati, M.; Suharno, B.

    2016-02-01

    In this experiment, the effect of the addition carbide forming elements on high chromium white cast iron, such as molybdenum, vanadium and boron on its mechanical properties and microstructure was investigated. The high chromium white cast iron was produced by casting process and formed in 50 mm size of grinding balls with several compositions. Characterization of these grinding balls was conducted by using some testing methods, such as: chemical and microstructure analysis, hardness, and impact test. From the results, the addition of molybdenum, vanadium, and boron on high chromium white cast iron provided a significant improvement on its hardness, but reduced its toughness. Molybdenum induced fully austenitic matrix and Mo2C formation among eutectic M7C3 carbide. Vanadium was dissolved in the matrix and carbide. While boron was played a role to form fine eutectic carbide. Grinding balls with 1.89 C-13.1 Cr-1.32 Mo-1.36 V-0.00051 B in as-cast condition had the highest hardness, which was caused by finer structure of eutectic carbide, needle like structure (upper bainite) matrix, and martensite on its carbide boundary.

  6. Molecular dynamics investigation of the interaction of dislocations with carbides in BCC Fe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granberg, F.; Terentyev, D.; Nordlund, K.

    2015-06-01

    Different types of carbides are present in many steels used as structural materials. To safely use steel in demanding environments, like nuclear power plants, it is important to know how defects will affect the mechanical properties of the material. In this study, the effect of carbide precipitates on the edge dislocation movement is investigated. Three different types of carbides were investigated by means of molecular dynamics, with a Tersoff-like bond order interatomic potential by Henriksson et al. The obstacles were 4 nm in diameter and were of Fe3C- (cementite-), Fe23C6- and Cr23C6-type. The critical unpinning stress was calculated for each type at different temperatures, to get the temperature-dependent obstacle strength. The results showed a decreasing critical stress with increasing temperature, consistent with previous studies. The critical unpinning stress was seen to be dependent on the type of carbide, but the differences were small. A difference was also observed between the obstacles with the same structure, but with different composition. This study shows the relation between the existing Cr23C6 carbide and the experimentally non-existing Fe23C6 carbide, which needs to be used as a model system for investigations with interatomic potentials not able to describe the interaction of Cr in the Fe-C-system. We found the difference to be a between 7% and 10% higher critical unpinning stress for the chromium carbide, than for the iron carbide of the same type.

  7. MICROSTRUCTURE AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF ULTRAFINE WC/Co CEMENTED CARBIDES WITH CUBIC BORON NITRIDE AND Cr₃C₂ ADDITIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Genrong Zhang; Haiyan Chen; Dong Lihua; Yin,; Li Kun

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the microstructure and mechanical properties of ultrafine tungsten carbide and cobalt (WC/Co) cemented carbides with cubic boron nitride (CBN) and chromium carbide (Cr₃C₂) fabricated by a hot pressing sintering process. This study uses samples with 8 wt% Co content and 7.5 vol% CBN content, and with different Cr₃C₂ content ranging from 0 to 0.30 wt%. Based on the experimental results, Cr₃C₂ content has a significant influence on inhibiting abnormal grain growth and dec...

  8. Obtaining decorative chromium plating from trivalent chromium solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Óscar Javier Suárez García

    2010-01-01

    The present work was aimed at a qualitative evaluation, in the laboratory, of different alternatives for assembling and operating a trivalent chromium bath for decorative chromium plating. Different chromium concentration solutions and different complexing agents were used. The initial result of this analysis was that chloride, formate and acetate solutions produced the best results. Solution preparation conditions were evaluated: temperature, chromium III complex formation time and also ...

  9. Microstructure and wear resistance of high chromium cast iron containing niobium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Zhiguo; Yang Chengkai; Zhang Peng; Li Wei

    2014-01-01

    In the paper, the effect of niobium addition on the microstructure, mechanical properties and wear resistance of high chromium cast iron has been studied. The results show that the microstructure of the heat-treated aloys is composed of M7C3 and M23C6 types primary carbide, eutectic carbide, secondary carbide and a matrix of martensite and retained austenite. NbC particles appear both inside and on the edge of the primary carbides. The hardness of the studied alloys maintains around 66 HRC, not significantly affected by the Nb content within the selected range of 0.48%-0.74%. The impact toughness of the aloys increases with increasing niobium content. The wear resistance of the specimens presents little variation in spite of the increase of Nb content under a light load of 40 N. However, when heavier loads of 70 and 100 N are applied, the wear resistance increases with increasing Nb content.

  10. Microstructure and wear resistance of high chromium cast iron containing niobium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Zhiguo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, the effect of niobium addition on the microstructure, mechanical properties and wear resistance of high chromium cast iron has been studied. The results show that the microstructure of the heat-treated alloys is composed of M7C3 and M23C6 types primary carbide, eutectic carbide, secondary carbide and a matrix of martensite and retained austenite. NbC particles appear both inside and on the edge of the primary carbides. The hardness of the studied alloys maintains around 66 HRC, not significantly affected by the Nb content within the selected range of 0.48%-0.74%. The impact toughness of the alloys increases with increasing niobium content. The wear resistance of the specimens presents little variation in spite of the increase of Nb content under a light load of 40 N. However, when heavier loads of 70 and 100 N are applied, the wear resistance increases with increasing Nb content.

  11. Effect of potassium on as-cast microstructure of a hypereutectic high chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Qing

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The present work mainly evaluates the effect of potassium (K on as-cast microstructure of a hypereutectic high chromium cast iron by means of a field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM and an X-ray diffractometer using CuKα radiation with a 2θ range of 30-130°. Results showed that, with the addition of K-containing modifier, the large lath-like and/or rod-like primary M7C3 carbides can be modified to the hexagonal prisms, and the eutectic carbides can also be refined. In addition, the carbides are distributed much more homogeneously in the matrix. The modification effect of K is due to its aggregation at the liquid-solid interface and the adsorption on the relatively fast growing planes during the solidification, which influence the growth rates of different crystal planes and lead to the modification of the carbides.

  12. Silicon carbide thyristor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmond, John A. (Inventor); Palmour, John W. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The SiC thyristor has a substrate, an anode, a drift region, a gate, and a cathode. The substrate, the anode, the drift region, the gate, and the cathode are each preferably formed of silicon carbide. The substrate is formed of silicon carbide having one conductivity type and the anode or the cathode, depending on the embodiment, is formed adjacent the substrate and has the same conductivity type as the substrate. A drift region of silicon carbide is formed adjacent the anode or cathode and has an opposite conductivity type as the anode or cathode. A gate is formed adjacent the drift region or the cathode, also depending on the embodiment, and has an opposite conductivity type as the drift region or the cathode. An anode or cathode, again depending on the embodiment, is formed adjacent the gate or drift region and has an opposite conductivity type than the gate.

  13. Dry Sliding Wear Behaviours of Valve Seat Inserts Produced from High Chromium White Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyon, Ali; Özyürek, Dursun; Günay, Mustafa; Aztekin, Hasan

    2015-11-01

    In this present study, wear behaviours of high chromium white iron valve seat inserts and tappets used in the automotive sector were investigated. Wear behaviours of three different rates of high chromium white cast irons (containing 10, 12 and 14% chromium) were examined under heavy service conditions. For that purpose, the produced valve seat inserts were characterized through Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and hardness measurements. They were tested at a sliding speed of 1 ms-1, under 120 N load and for six different sliding distances (500, 1000, 1500, 2000, 2500, 3000 m) by using a standard wear apparatus (pin-on-disk type). The result showed that as the amount of Cr increased in the alloys, their hardness decreased. The decrease in the hardness were considered to be as the result of transformation of M7C3 carbides into M23C6 carbides in the structure. This decrease in hardness with increasing chromium content also increased the weight loss. Thus, it was determined that the white iron with 14% Cr (which had a greater amount of M23C6 carbides) was subjected to the highest wear.

  14. Recrystallization of zirconium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temperature and deformation rate are studied for their effect on the structure and mechanical properties of polycrystalline sintered zirconium carbide. A decrease of the deformation rate from 10-2 to 5x10-4 s-1 and an increase of the deformation temperature from 0.5 Tsub(melt.) to 0.65 Tsub(melt.) are shown to activate a formation of integranular cavities and to decrease a degree of the structure distortion due to the diminishing intragranular deformation. Kinetics of the initial recrystallization in zirconium carbide is studied after plastic deformation and subsequent high-temperature annealing beginning from 0.72 Tsub(melt.)

  15. The analytical biochemistry of chromium.

    OpenAIRE

    Katz, S A

    1991-01-01

    The essentiality and carcinogenicity of chromium depend on its chemical form. Oxidation state and solubility are particularly important in determining the biological effects of chromium compounds. For this reason, total chromium measurements are of little value in assessing its nutritional benefits or its toxicological hazards. Aqueous sodium carbonate-sodium hydroxide solutions have been successfully used for extracting hexavalent chromium from a variety of environmental and biological matri...

  16. Combinatorial optimization of carbide-free bainitic nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermodynamic calculations in combination with a neural network model are employed to predict the conditions under which nanostructured carbide-free bainite can be formed. The method recovers well the conditions under which the alloys reported in the literature display such features. Aluminium and silicon are shown to be equally effective in suppressing cementite. Manganese reduction appears to be the most effective means to accelerate bainite formation at low temperatures. A new low-manganese high-chromium steel grade capable of transforming into a nanostructured carbide-free structure is proposed, in which thermokinetic calculation and experiment show that low-temperature bainite forms faster and displays greater hardness than the alloys previously reported in the literature

  17. Chromium in potatoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromium concentration in potatoes was determined, and tubes were labeled either intrinsically or extrinsically with radioactive chromate (51Cr). A labeled chromium complex was isolated from preparations of raw, baked, or fried potatoes and chromatographed on gel permeation media. Potato pulp and peel contained 1.63 and 2.70 μg of Cr/g tissue, respectively. There was no correlation between the two, nor did they respond similarly to changes of variety or locations. No significant differences were apparent in relative migration of the isolated complexes except between raw and cooked extrinsically labeled preparations

  18. Evaluation of the role of reactive oxygen species in the interactive toxicity of carbide-cobalt mixtures on macrophages in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lison, D; Lauwerys, R

    1993-01-01

    The lung toxicity of a carbide-cobalt mixture is more important than that of each individual component; the mechanism of this interaction is not understood. The capacity of cobalt metal particles alone and mixed with different carbides to generate hydroxyl radicals was examined with the deoxyribose assay. In a chemical system, cobalt ions and cobalt metal particles (Co) were found to catalyse the degradation of deoxyribose in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Carbides were able to directly oxidize deoxyribose, but their respective activities did not support such a mechanism to explain the carbide-cobalt interactive toxicity, since there was no direct relationship between deoxyribose degradation ability and cytotoxicity toward macrophages. Tungsten, niobium, titanium and chromium carbides (interactive carbides) were only weak oxidants and conversely molybdenum, vanadium and silicon carbides (non-interactive carbides) were the most potent ones. The ability of cobalt metal to produce hydroxyl radicals in the presence of hydrogen peroxide was not increased by tungsten carbide. The role of reactive radical formation in the toxicity of these particles was further assessed in a macrophage culture model. Catalase (4000 U/ml), superoxide dismutase (300 U/ml), sodium azide (1 mM), sodium benzoate, mannitol, taurine and methionine (all 20 mM) were all unable to protect against the cytotoxic effects of cobalt ions and cobalt metal alone or mixed with tungsten carbide. In conclusion, no evidence was found that production of reactive oxygen species contributes to the elective toxicity of carbide-cobalt mixtures. PMID:8396391

  19. PECULIARITIES OF PROCESSES OF CARBIDE FORMATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF Cr, Mn AND Ni IN WHITE CAST IRONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Netrebko

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available During crystallization of castings from white cast iron, carbides Me3С, Me7С3, Me23С6 were formed depending on chromium and carbon content. Impeded chromium diffusion caused formation of thermodynamically unstable and non-uniform phases (carbides. During heat treatment process stable equilibrium phases were formed as a result of rearrangement of the carbides’ crystal lattice, replacement of iron, manganese, nickel and silicon atoms by chromium atoms. The allocated atoms concentrated, forming inclusions of austenite inside the carbides. Holding during 9 hours at 720 °С and annealing decreased the non-uniformity of chromium distribution in the metallic base of cast iron containing 11,5 % Cr, and increased it in the cast iron containing 21,5 % Cr. Holding during 4.5 hours at 1050 °С and normalization decreased the non-uniformity of chromium distribution in the metallic base of cast iron containing 21,5 % Cr, and increased it in cast iron containing 11,5 % Cr.

  20. The role of nitrogen in the preferential chromium segregation on the ferritic stainless steel (1 1 1) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temperature dependence on the segregation behavior of the ferritic stainless steel single crystal (1 1 1) surface morphology has been examined by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and low energy electron diffraction (LEED). AES clearly showed the surface segregations of chromium and nitrogen upon annealing. Nanoscale triangular chromium nitride clusters were formed around 650 deg. C and were regularly aligned in a hexagonal configuration. In contrast, for the ferritic stainless steel (1 1 1) surface with low-nitrogen content, chromium and carbon were found to segregate on the surface upon annealing and Auger spectra of carbon displayed the characteristic carbide peak. For the low-nitrogen surface, LEED identified a facetted surface with (2 x 2) superstructure at 650 deg. C. High-resolution STM identified a chromium carbide film with segregated carbon atoms randomly located on the surface. The facetted (2 x 2) superstructure changed into a (3 x 3) superstructure with no faceting upon annealing at 750 deg. C. Also, segregated sulfur seems to contribute to the reconstruction or interfacial relaxation between the ferritic stainless steel (1 1 1) substrate and chromium carbide film.

  1. Chromium and aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aging is associated with increased blood glucose, insulin, blood lipids, and fat mass, and decreased lean body mass leading to increased incidences of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Improved chromium nutrition is associated with improvements in all of these variables. Insulin sensitivity de...

  2. Abrasion Resistance of as-Cast High-Chromium Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pokusová Marcela

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available High chromium cast irons are widely used as abrasion resistant materials. Their properties and wear resistance depend on carbides and on the nature of the matrix supporting these carbides. The paper presents test results of irons which contain (in wt.% 18-22 Cr and 2-5 C, and is alloyed by 1.7 Mo + 5 Ni + 2 Mn to improve the toughness. Tests showed as-cast irons with mostly austenitic matrix achieved hardness 36-53 HRC but their relative abrasion-resistance was higher than the tool steel STN 19436 heat treated on hardness 60 HRC.

  3. Effects of carbon and molybdenum on the microstructures of high chromium white cast irons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of 3 levels of carbon and 1.5% Mo addition on the solidification structures of a 15% chromium white cast iron were studied. The volume fraction of primary austenite and of eutectic carbides, as well as the number of carbide particles per unit length and the mean secondary dendrite arm spacing were measured. By means of thermal analysis, thermal arrest corresponding to the formation of the primary austenite and of the eutectic were determined. The increase in the carbon content and the addition of Mo led to lowering of the thermal arrests and to coarsening of the particles. (author)

  4. Effect of potassium on as-cast microstructure of a hypereutectic high chromium cast iron

    OpenAIRE

    Liu Qing; Yang Hua; Ding Haimin

    2011-01-01

    The present work mainly evaluates the effect of potassium (K) on as-cast microstructure of a hypereutectic high chromium cast iron by means of a field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and an X-ray diffractometer using CuKα radiation with a 2θ range of 30-130°. Results showed that, with the addition of K-containing modifier, the large lath-like and/or rod-like primary M7C3 carbides can be modified to the hexagonal prisms, and the eutectic carbides can also be refined. In addition,...

  5. Effect of titanium on the as-cast microstructure and impact toughness of hypereutectic high-chromium cast iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Zhifu; Xing, Jiandong; Gao, Yimin; Zhi, Xiaohui [Xi' an Jiaotong Univ., Xi' an (China). State Key Lab. for Mechanical Behavior of Materials

    2012-05-15

    The effect of titanium on the as-cast microstructure of a hypereutectic high-chromium cast iron was investigated by means of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results indicate that the primary M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbides are refined and spheroidized with the addition of a suitable amount of titanium. TiC is found in the primary carbide by energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis. The mechanism of titanium modification on the microstructure of the alloy is also discussed. In addition, the impact test result indicates that, compared with the hypereutectic high-chromium cast iron without titanium addition, the impact toughness value of hypereutectic high-chromium cast iron with titanium additions is improved and approximately reaches 6.4 J . cm{sup -2}. (orig.)

  6. Hafnium carbide cermets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brožek, Vlastimil; Ctibor, Pavel; Dong-Ik, Ch.; Eun-Pyo, K.

    Praha: Czechoslovak association for crystal growth, 2008 - (Nitsch, K.; Rodová, M.), s. 8-9 ISBN 978-80-254-0864-3. [Development of Materials Science in Research and Education/18th./. Hnanice (CZ), 02.09.2008-05.09.2008] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Hafnium carbide * tungsten * cermets * plasma spraying * hot pressing, Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  7. Sintered silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sintered silicon carbide body having a predominantly equiaxed microstructure consists of 91 to 99.85% by weight of silicon carbide at least 95% of which is the alpha phase, up to 5.0% by weight carbonized organic material, 0.15 to 3.0% of boron, and up to 1.0% by weight additional carbon. A mixture of 91 to 99.85 parts by weight silicon carbide having a surface area of 1 to 100 m2/g, 0.67 to 20 parts of a carbonizable organic binder with a carbon content of at least 33% by weight, 0.15 to 5 parts of a boron source containing 0.15 to 3.0 parts by weight boron and up to 15 parts by weight of a temporary binder is mixed with a solvent, the mixture is then dried, shaped to give a body with a density of at least 1.60 g/cc and fired at 1900 to 22500C to obtain an equiaxed microstructure. (author)

  8. Studies of chromium gettering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary results have shown that hydrogen pumping by chromium is a surface effect. Unlike with titanium, the getter material used in many present day tokamaks, there is no significant diffusion into the bulk. Additional experiments have been carried out to measure the basic characteristics of chromium films for gases of interest in tokamak research. These gases include deuterium, oxygen and nitrogen. A vacuum system is described which allowed precise control of the test gas, a constant wall temperature and determination of the projected getter surface area. A quadrupole mass spectrometer, rather than simply a total pressure gauge, was utilized to measure the partial pressure of the test gas as well as the residual gas composition in the system. A quartz crystal monitor was used to measure film thickness. Pumping speeds and sticking coefficients are given as a function of surface coverage for each test gas. A comparison will be made with titanium films deposited in the same vacuum system and under similar conditions

  9. Influence of selected modifiers on crystallization curve of chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Studnicki

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In article was introduced the results of investigations of modified chromium cast iron crystallization process. It the cast iron about composition of basic elements C = 2,8 % and Cr = 18% was modified with five substances (boron carbide, ferrosilicon, ferrocalciumsilicon, ferroniobium and ferroniobium with ferrovanadium. Influence on course of primary and secondary crystallization process was observed. The investigations of crystallization was conducted DTA method in tester DTA - C.

  10. Catalytic Spectrophotometric Determination of Chromium

    OpenAIRE

    STOYANOVA, Angelina Miltcheva

    2005-01-01

    The catalytic effect of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) on the oxidation of sulfanilic acid by hydrogen peroxide was studied. The reaction was followed spectrophotometrically by measuring the absorbance of the reaction product at 360 nm. Under the optimum conditions 2 calibration graphs (for chromium(III) up to 100 ng mL-1, and for chromium(VI) up to 200 ng mL-1) were obtained, using the ``fixed time'' method with detection limits of 4.9 ng mL-1 and 3.8 ng mL-1, respectively...

  11. Process for microwave sintering boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of microwave sintering boron carbide comprises leaching boron carbide powder with an aqueous solution of nitric acid to form a leached boron carbide powder. The leached boron carbide powder is coated with a glassy carbon precursor to form a coated boron carbide powder. The coated boron carbide powder is consolidated in an enclosure of boron nitride particles coated with a layer of glassy carbon within a container for microwave heating to form an enclosed coated boron carbide powder. The enclosed coated boron carbide powder is sintered within the container for microwave heating with microwave energy

  12. Chemical Analysis Methods for Silicon Carbide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shen Keyin

    2006-01-01

    @@ 1 General and Scope This Standard specifies the determination method of silicon dioxide, free silicon, free carbon, total carbon, silicon carbide, ferric sesquioxide in silicon carbide abrasive material.

  13. TO SELECTION OF TECHNOLOGICAL SCHEME OF SOFTENING HEAT TREATMENT FOR HIGH CHROMIUM CAST IRON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Efremenko

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. High chromium cast irons with austenitic matrix have low machinability. The aim of work is search of new energy-saving modes of preliminary softening heat treatment enhancing the machinability of castings by forming an optimum microstructure. Methodology. Metallographic analysis, hardness testing and machinability testing are applied. Findings. It was found out that high temperature annealing with continuous cooling yields to martensite-austenite matrix in cast iron 270Х15Г2Н1MPhT, which abruptly affects the machinability of cast iron. Significant improvement of machinability is achieved by forming of structure "ferrite + granular carbides" and by decline of hardness to 37-39 HRC in the case of two-stage isothermal annealing in the subcritical temperature range or by the use of quenching and tempering (two-step or cyclic. Originality. It was found that the formation of the optimal structure of the matrix and achievement of desired hardness level needed for improving machinability of high chromium cast iron containing 3 % austenite-forming elements, can be obtained: 1 due to pearlite original austenite followed by spherodization eutectoid carbides, and 2 by getting predominantly martensite structure followed by the decay of martensite and carbides coagulation at high-temperature tempering. Practical value. The new energy-saving schemes of softening heat treatment to ensure the growth of machinability of high chromium cast iron, alloyed by higher quantity of austenite forming elements, are proposed.

  14. Nano-Disperse Borides and Carbides: Plasma Technology Production, Specific Properties, Economic Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galevskii, G. V.; Rudneva, V. V.; Galevskii, S. G.; Tomas, K. I.; Zubkov, M. S.

    2016-04-01

    The experience of production and study on properties of nano-disperse chromium and titanium borides and carbides, and silicon carbide has been generalized. The structure and special service aspects of utilized plasma-metallurgical complex equipped with a three-jet direct-flow reactor with a capacity of 150 kW have been outlined. Processing, heat engineering and service life characteristics of the reactor are specified. The synthesis parameters of borides and carbides, as well as their basic characteristics in nano-disperse condition and their production flow diagram are outlined. Engineering and economic performance of synthesizing borides in laboratory and industrial conditions is assessed, and the respective segment of the international market as well. The work is performed at State Siberian Industrial University as a project part of the State Order of Ministry of Science and Education of the Russian Federation No. 11.1531/2014/K.

  15. Characterization of Transition Metal Carbide Layers Synthesized by Thermo-reactive Diffusion Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Mads Brink; Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin;

    2015-01-01

    . In this study halide-activated pack cementation techniques were used on tool steel Vanadis 6 and martensitic stainless steel AISI 420 in order to produce hard layers of titanium carbide (TiC), vanadium carbide (V8C7) and chromium carbides (Cr23C6 and Cr7C3). Surface layers were characterized by...... tool steel produces thicker layers than AISI 420. X-ray diffraction analysis validates the formation of TiC and V8C7 layers on titanized and vanadized samples respectively, while chromized samples form both Cr23C6 and Cr7C3. It is shown that the two-phase layer of Cr23Cr6/Cr7C3 produced on Vanadis 6...

  16. Process of high temperature synthesis in producing composite carbide powders for thermally sprayed coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szymanski, K [Department of Materials Science, Silesian University of Technology, Krasinskiego 8, 40-019 Katowice (Poland); Formanek, B, E-mail: krzysztof.szymanski@polsl.pl, E-mail: boleslaw.formanek@polsl.pl

    2011-05-15

    The paper presents the characterization of powders containing hard phases of chromium carbides in a NiCr matrix, intended for thermal spraying coatings. The synthesized composite powder containing hard phases and plastic matrix, produced in high-temperature synthesis with chosen powder metallurgy processes has been presented. Commercial materials, such as NiCr- Cr{sub x}C{sub y}, are fabricated by means of agglomeration and sintering method. Processes of high temperature synthesis of Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}, Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3}, Cr{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides combined with NiCr powder mechanical alloying are presented in the article. Parameters of the carbides synthesis were determined in the reactive -protective atmosphere. In the rotation- vibration mill, processes were conducted using grinding and appropriate mechanical alloying at variable amplitude. The standard and synthesized powders were thermally sprayed by HVOF method in Jet Kote II and Diamond Jet system. The structure and phase composition of the powders and coatings were determined by: light and scanning microscopy, X-ray phase analysis (RTG) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The structure and wear properties of HVOF sprayed coatings containing chromium carbides has been presented. The thermally sprayed coatings are characterized of wear resistance in abrasion and erosion tests. The sprayed coatings characterized high resistance in wear conditions.

  17. Process of high temperature synthesis in producing composite carbide powders for thermally sprayed coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents the characterization of powders containing hard phases of chromium carbides in a NiCr matrix, intended for thermal spraying coatings. The synthesized composite powder containing hard phases and plastic matrix, produced in high-temperature synthesis with chosen powder metallurgy processes has been presented. Commercial materials, such as NiCr- CrxCy, are fabricated by means of agglomeration and sintering method. Processes of high temperature synthesis of Cr3C2, Cr7C3, Cr23C6 carbides combined with NiCr powder mechanical alloying are presented in the article. Parameters of the carbides synthesis were determined in the reactive -protective atmosphere. In the rotation- vibration mill, processes were conducted using grinding and appropriate mechanical alloying at variable amplitude. The standard and synthesized powders were thermally sprayed by HVOF method in Jet Kote II and Diamond Jet system. The structure and phase composition of the powders and coatings were determined by: light and scanning microscopy, X-ray phase analysis (RTG) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The structure and wear properties of HVOF sprayed coatings containing chromium carbides has been presented. The thermally sprayed coatings are characterized of wear resistance in abrasion and erosion tests. The sprayed coatings characterized high resistance in wear conditions.

  18. Process of high temperature synthesis in producing composite carbide powders for thermally sprayed coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymański, K.; Formanek, B.

    2011-05-01

    The paper presents the characterization of powders containing hard phases of chromium carbides in a NiCr matrix, intended for thermal spraying coatings. The synthesized composite powder containing hard phases and plastic matrix, produced in high-temperature synthesis with chosen powder metallurgy processes has been presented. Commercial materials, such as NiCr- CrxCy, are fabricated by means of agglomeration and sintering method. Processes of high temperature synthesis of Cr3C2, Cr7C3, Cr23C6 carbides combined with NiCr powder mechanical alloying are presented in the article. Parameters of the carbides synthesis were determined in the reactive -protective atmosphere. In the rotation- vibration mill, processes were conducted using grinding and appropriate mechanical alloying at variable amplitude. The standard and synthesized powders were thermally sprayed by HVOF method in Jet Kote II and Diamond Jet system. The structure and phase composition of the powders and coatings were determined by: light and scanning microscopy, X-ray phase analysis (RTG) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The structure and wear properties of HVOF sprayed coatings containing chromium carbides has been presented. The thermally sprayed coatings are characterized of wear resistance in abrasion and erosion tests. The sprayed coatings characterized high resistance in wear conditions.

  19. Effect of cerium modification on microstructure and properties of hypereutectic high chromium cast iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhi, Xiaohui, E-mail: mkmkzxh@hotmail.com [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shijiazhuang Tiedao University, Shijiazhuang 050043, Hebei Province (China); Liu, Jinzhi [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shijiazhuang Tiedao University, Shijiazhuang 050043, Hebei Province (China); Xing, Jiandong; Ma, Shengqiang [State Key Laboratory Mechanical Behavior of Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049, Shaanxi Province (China)

    2014-05-01

    The effect of cerium modification on the microstructure and properties of hypereutectic high chromium cast iron primarily containing 4.0 wt% C and 20.0 wt% Cr was studied by means of optical microscopy, transmission electron microscope, scanning electron microscope, and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry. The primary M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbides were refined obviously when cerium was added in the melt. Ce{sub 2}S{sub 3} was found in the primary M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbides and acted as the heterogeneous substrate of M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbides. The impact toughness of the specimen modified with 0.5 wt% cerium increased by 50% compared with the specimen without cerium modification. The hardness of the alloy modified with cerium increased slightly compared with the specimen without cerium modification.

  20. Effects of carbon, chromium and molybdenum contents on solidification and microstructure of 15 or 20% Cr white cast irons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solidification experiments were performed on 30 mm diameter test pieces of while irons containing 15 or 20% chromium and 2,3 3,0 and 3,6% carbon, with additions of zero, 1,5 or 2,5% molybdenum for each carbon content. Measurements were made of: austenite and eutectic temperature arrest; number of eutectic carbide particles relative to total volume and to eutectic volume; volume fraction of primary austenite. It was observed that increasing carbon contents caused lower austenite and eutectic formation temperature arrest, reduced number of carbide p;articles in eutectic volume and smaller volume fraction of primary austenite. The addition of molybdenum led to lower austenite and eutectic formation temperature arrests, less carbide particles in total and in eutectic volume, and larger volume fraction of primary austenite. As compared to 15% chromium alloys, the 20% chromium alloys showed higher eutectic temperature arrests, more carbide particles both in the total volume and in the eutectic volume, and smaller volume fraction of primary austenite. (author)

  1. CHROMIUM, METABOLIC SYNDROME AND DIABESITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suboptimal intakes of the essential nutrient, chromium, are characterized by elevated blood glucose, insulin resistance, obesity, hypertriglyceridemia, and low HDL. These are also signs and symptoms of the metabolic syndrome. Improvements due to increased intake of chromium are related to the degr...

  2. ENTIRELY AQUEOUS SOLUTION-GEL ROUTE FOR THE PREPARATION OF ZIRCONIUM CARBIDE, HAFNIUM CARBIDE AND THEIR TERNARY CARBIDE POWDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Changrui

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An entirely aqueous solution-gel route has been developed for the synthesis of zirconium carbide, hafnium carbide and their ternary carbide powders. Zirconium oxychloride (ZrOCl₂.8H₂O, malic acid (MA and ethylene glycol (EG were dissolved in water to form the aqueous zirconium carbide precursor. Afterwards, this aqueous precursor was gelled and transformed into zirconium carbide at a relatively low temperature (1200 °C for achieving an intimate mixing of the intermediate products. Hafnium and the ternary carbide powders were also synthesized via the same aqueous route. All the zirconium, hafnium and ternary carbide powders exhibited a particle size of ∼100 nm.

  3. Molecular dynamics investigation of the interaction of dislocations with carbides in BCC Fe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granberg, F., E-mail: fredric.granberg@helsinki.fi [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 43, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Terentyev, D. [Nuclear Materials Science Institute, SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Nordlund, K. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 43, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2015-06-01

    Different types of carbides are present in many steels used as structural materials. To safely use steel in demanding environments, like nuclear power plants, it is important to know how defects will affect the mechanical properties of the material. In this study, the effect of carbide precipitates on the edge dislocation movement is investigated. Three different types of carbides were investigated by means of molecular dynamics, with a Tersoff-like bond order interatomic potential by Henriksson et al. The obstacles were 4 nm in diameter and were of Fe{sub 3}C- (cementite-), Fe{sub 23}C{sub 6}- and Cr{sub 23}C{sub 6}-type. The critical unpinning stress was calculated for each type at different temperatures, to get the temperature-dependent obstacle strength. The results showed a decreasing critical stress with increasing temperature, consistent with previous studies. The critical unpinning stress was seen to be dependent on the type of carbide, but the differences were small. A difference was also observed between the obstacles with the same structure, but with different composition. This study shows the relation between the existing Cr{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide and the experimentally non-existing Fe{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide, which needs to be used as a model system for investigations with interatomic potentials not able to describe the interaction of Cr in the Fe–C-system. We found the difference to be a between 7% and 10% higher critical unpinning stress for the chromium carbide, than for the iron carbide of the same type.

  4. Groundwater contaminant by hexavalent chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, C. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Oxidation of trivalent chromium to hexavalent chromium has been investigated as a function of total manganese in soils as well as various incubation conditions. Chromium and manganese contents were analyzed by atomic absorption (graphite furnace and flame emission respectively) following acid digestion. Total hexavalent chromium generation capacity was determined by addition of 0.001 M CrCL3, incubation, and analysis by s-diphenyl carbazide. Samples were then leached with CaSO{sub 4} and MgSO{sub 4} and incubated in various environments (oven, freeze-drier, field moist, ultrafreeze) to test for geogenic generation of Cr(IV). The degree of geogenic generation of hexavalent chromium was compared with total Mn and Cr content as well as hexavalent generational capacity.

  5. Methods of producing continuous boron carbide fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnier, John E.; Griffith, George W.

    2015-12-01

    Methods of producing continuous boron carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a boron oxide gas within a temperature range of from approximately 1400.degree. C. to approximately 2200.degree. C. Continuous boron carbide fibers, continuous fibers comprising boron carbide, and articles including at least a boron carbide coating are also disclosed.

  6. Role of paramagnetic chromium in chromium(VI)-induced damage in cultured mammalian cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Sugiyama, M

    1994-01-01

    Chromium(VI) compounds are known to be potent toxic and carcinogenic agents. Because chromium(VI) is easily taken up by cells and is subsequently reduced to chromium(III), the formation of paramagnetic chromium such as chromium(V) and chromium(III) is believed to play a role in the adverse biological effects of chromium(VI) compounds. The present report, uses electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy; the importance of the role of paramagnetic chromium in chromium(VI)-induced damage in intac...

  7. Fivefold twinned boron carbide nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xin; Jiang, Jun; Liu, Chao; Yuan, Jun

    2009-09-01

    Chemical composition and crystal structure of fivefold twinned boron carbide nanowires have been determined by electron energy-loss spectroscopy and electron diffraction. The fivefold cyclic twinning relationship is confirmed by systematic axial rotation electron diffraction. Detailed chemical analysis reveals a carbon-rich boron carbide phase. Such boron carbide nanowires are potentially interesting because of their intrinsic hardness and high temperature thermoelectric property. Together with other boron-rich compounds, they may form a set of multiply twinned nanowire systems where the misfit strain could be continuously tuned to influence their mechanical properties. PMID:19687534

  8. Effects of Rare Earths and Al on Structure and Performance of High Chromium Cast Iron Containing Wolfram

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Erjun; Wang Liping; Huang Yongchang; Fu Yuanke

    2006-01-01

    Effects of RE and Al on the structure, impact toughness, hardness, and wear resistance of high chromium cast iron containing wolfram were investigated.The results show that without modification the volume fraction of austenite is high and the carbide appears to be thick lath and the grain size is relatively large;proper modification using RE combined with Al can reduce volume fraction of residual austenite in the as-cast structure obviously, refine grain size of primary austenite notably, and make the morphology of carbide changing from thick lath to thin lath, rosette, and feather-like modification can also increase hardness, wear resistance and impact toughness of cast iron.

  9. Microstructural Study of Titanium Carbide Coating on Cemented Carbide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vuorinen, S.; Horsewell, Andy

    1982-01-01

    Titanium carbide coating layers on cemented carbide substrates have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Microstructural variations within the typically 5µm thick chemical vapour deposited TiC coatings were found to vary with deposit thickness such that a layer structure could be...... delineated. Close to the interface further microstructural inhomogeneities were obsered, there being a clear dependence of TiC deposition mechanism on the chemical and crystallographic nature of the upper layers of the multiphase substrate....

  10. Fate and transport of chromium through soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromium chemistry relevant to the problem facing state of New Jersey (Usa) was examined. Transport of chromium through soil depends on its chemical forms. Transformation of chromium within bulk of soil depends on soil constituents, soil condition, such as pH, Eh and organic compounds applied onto soil or present in soil. Total chromium in soil can be determined. Speciation of chromium based on ionization, hydrolysis, complex formation, redox reactions and adsorption is predicted using MINIQ program

  11. Release of Chromium from Orthopaedic Arthroplasties

    OpenAIRE

    Afolaranmi, G.A.; Tettey, J; Meek, R.M.D; Grant, M.H

    2008-01-01

    Many orthopaedic implants are composed of alloys containing chromium. Of particular relevance is the increasing number of Cobalt Chromium bearing arthroplasies being inserted into young patients with osteoarthritis. Such implants will release chromium ions. These patients will be exposed to the released chromium for over 50 years in some cases. The subsequent chromium ion metabolism and redistribution in fluid and tissue compartments is complex. In addition, the potential biological effects o...

  12. Chromium isotope variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Arcy, Joan Mary

    Chromium (Cr) stable isotopes are a useful tracer of changes in redox conditions because changes in its oxidation state are accompanied by an isotopic fractionation. For this reason the Cr isotope system is being developed as a potential tool for paleo-redox reconstruction. Dissolved Cr in seawater...... is incorporated into carbonates. Hence, ancient carbonates can potentially record the Cr isotopic composition (δ53Cr ‰) of seawater in the geological past. Reliable application and interpretation of this proxy requires a detailed knowledge about processes that fractionate Cr on the Earth’s surface......, and the quantification the Cr isotope composition of major Cr fluxes into and out of ocean. This thesis adds to the current knowledge of the Cr isotope system and is divided into two studies. The focus of the first study was to determine what processes control the Cr isotopic compositionof river...

  13. Sliding wear of cemented carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cemented carbides are known to be very hard and wear resistant and are therefor often used in applications involving surface damage and wear. The wear rate of cemented carbides is often measured in abrasion. In such tests it has been shown that the wear rate is inversely dependent on the material hardness. The sliding wear is even more of a surface phenomenon than a abrasion, making it difficult to predict friction and wear from bulk properties. This paper concentrates on the sliding wear of cemented carbides and elucidates some wear mechanisms. It is especially shown that a fragmenting wear mechanism of WC is very important for the description of wear of cemented carbides. (author)

  14. Effect of Carbide Distribution on Corrosion Behavior of the Deep Cryogenically Treated 1.2080 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Kamran; Akhbarizadeh, Amin; Javadpour, Sirus

    2016-02-01

    Deep cryogenic heat treatment is a supplementary process performed on steels specifically tool steels before tempering to improve the wear resistance and hardness of these materials. The carbide distribution changes via the electric current flow or the application of a magnetic field during the deep cryogenic heat treatment. Hence, the electric current and the magnetic field were applied to the samples to investigate the corrosion behavior of the deep cryogenically treated samples by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization measurements. The results showed that increasing the carbide percentage and achieving a more homogenous carbide distribution during the deep cryogenic heat treatment will remarkably decrease the corrosion resistance due to a decrease in the solutionized chromium atoms in the structure as well as the increase in the martensite-carbide grain boundaries (the galvanic cell areas). Moreover, it was clarified that the electric current flow and magnetic fields reduce the carbide percentage, which leads to an increase in the corrosion resistance of these samples in comparison with the deep cryogenically treated samples.

  15. Structural tale of two novel (Cr, Mn)C carbides in steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromium (Cr), manganese (Mn) and carbon (C) are well known alloying elements used in technologically important alloy steels and advanced high strength steels. It is known that binary CrCx and MnCx carbides can be formed in steels, but in this study we reveal for the first time that Cr and Mn were found combined in novel ternary cementite type (Cr, Mn)C carbides. Electron diffraction experiments showed that Cr, Mn and C formed two distinct carbide phases possessing orthorhombic and monoclinic crystal structures. Density functional theory calculations were performed on these phases and excellent agreement was found between calculations and experiments on the lattice parameters and relative atomic positions. The calculations showed that the combination of Mn and Cr resulted in a very high thermodynamic stability of the (Cr, Mn)C carbides, and that local structural relaxations are associated with carbon additions. Possible implications of these ternary carbides for novel applications in steel design and manufacturing are discussed

  16. Interaction of dislocations with carbides in BCC Fe studied by molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granberg, F.; Terentyev, D.; Nordlund, K.

    2015-05-01

    In this study, the atomic processes involving the interaction of an edge dislocation with carbide precipitates in an iron matrix are investigated by molecular dynamics, utilizing two interatomic potentials (Hepburn, 2008 and Henriksson, 2013). The carbides investigated were Fe3 C and M23C6, where M was either Fe or Cr. The results from spherical precipitates were compared with rod shaped obstacles, to investigate the effect of climb in the unpinning process and the stress related to this process. The rod simulations showed a higher unpinning stress for all investigated sizes and temperatures, which indicates that climb will play a role in the unpinning phenomenon. The results showed, as previous studies, a decrease of the unpinning stress with increasing temperature and that a larger obstacle yields a higher unpinning stress. The Orowan process of dislocation unpinning was observed with both potentials as an increase in the needed unpinning stress in consecutive interactions with the same obstacle. The results showed that the structure of the obstacle does not affect the unpinning stress, as much as temperature, for obstacles ⩾ 2 nm. Comparison of obstacles with the same structure but with different composition, Fe23C6 and Cr23C6, showed that the small shearable chromium carbides were stronger than the corresponding iron carbides, pointing to the importance of the chemical composition of the carbide.

  17. Chromium reduction in Pseudomonas putida.

    OpenAIRE

    Ishibashi, Y.; Cervantes, C; Silver, S

    1990-01-01

    Reduction of hexavalent chromium (chromate) to less-toxic trivalent chromium was studied by using cell suspensions and cell-free supernatant fluids from Pseudomonas putida PRS2000. Chromate reductase activity was associated with soluble protein and not with the membrane fraction. The crude enzyme activity was heat labile and showed a Km of 40 microM CrO4(2-). Neither sulfate nor nitrate affected chromate reduction either in vitro or with intact cells.

  18. Chromium reduction in Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Y; Cervantes, C; Silver, S

    1990-01-01

    Reduction of hexavalent chromium (chromate) to less-toxic trivalent chromium was studied by using cell suspensions and cell-free supernatant fluids from Pseudomonas putida PRS2000. Chromate reductase activity was associated with soluble protein and not with the membrane fraction. The crude enzyme activity was heat labile and showed a Km of 40 microM CrO4(2-). Neither sulfate nor nitrate affected chromate reduction either in vitro or with intact cells. PMID:2389940

  19. Transmission electron microscope studies of the chromium cast iron modified at use of B4C addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Labisz

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Results of studies of the high alloy chromium cast iron with boron addition in form of the B4C phase powder are presented in this paper.The main field of interest is the identification of phases based on the transmission electron microscope study, occurred in this alloy aftersolidification process. The structure mainly consists of the austenite matrix and M7C3 carbide identified as the Cr7C3 phase.

  20. Wettability of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wettability of boron carbide has been examined by means of the sessile drop method, using the following candidate alloys: (96wt%AG-4wt%Ti), (Ag-26.5wt%Cu-3wt%Ti), (Sn-10wt%Ag-4wt%Ti), Sn(99.95wt%) and Al(99.99wt%). The results show that B4C is completely wetted by the Ag-based alloys. Sn-10wt%Ag-4wt%Ti alloy and pure Al partly wet the B4C surface, while pure Sn does not wet B4C at all. For all the alloys used, except pure Sn, a reaction layer was observed at the interface between the ceramic part and the metal drop. Although the spreading kinetics of the Al-drop was much slower compared with the Ti-containing alloys, the reaction rate was considerably higher in the former case. This suggests that aluminium is an attractive candidate material for brazing of B4C. Formation of the low melting B2O3 at the B4C surface may cause oxidation of the filler metal during joining, which, in turn, leads to a low bond strength

  1. Palladium interaction with silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the palladium interaction with silicon carbide is investigated by means of complementary analytical techniques such as thermogravimetry (TG), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Thermoscans were carried out on pellets of palladium, α-SiC and β-SiC high purity powders in the temperature range comprised between 293 K and 1773 K, in order to study the effect of temperature on the palladium-silicon carbide reaction. Thermoscans of α-SiC pellets containing 5 at.%Pd show that during differential calorimetry scans three exothermic peaks occurred at 773 K, 1144 K and 1615 K, while thermoscans of β-SiC pellets containing 3 at.%Pd and 5 at.%Pd do not show peaks. For the pellet α-SiC–5 at.%Pd XRD spectra reveal that the first peak is associated with the formation of Pd3Si and SiO2 phases, while the second peak and the third peak are correlated with the formation of Pd2Si phase and the active oxidation of silicon carbide respectively. Thermogravimetry scans show weight gain and weight loss peaks due to the SiO2 phase formation and the active oxidation. Additionally XPS fittings reveal the development of SiCxOy phase during the first exothermic peak up to the temperature of 873 K. The experimental data reveals that alpha silicon carbide is attacked by palladium at lower temperatures than beta silicon carbide and the reaction mechanism between silicon carbide and palladium is strongly affected by silicon carbide oxidation

  2. Palladium interaction with silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentile, M., E-mail: Marialuisa.Gentile@manchester.ac.uk [Centre for Nuclear Energy Technology (C-NET), School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Xiao, P. [Materials Science Centre, School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Abram, T. [Centre for Nuclear Energy Technology (C-NET), School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    In this work the palladium interaction with silicon carbide is investigated by means of complementary analytical techniques such as thermogravimetry (TG), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Thermoscans were carried out on pellets of palladium, α-SiC and β-SiC high purity powders in the temperature range comprised between 293 K and 1773 K, in order to study the effect of temperature on the palladium-silicon carbide reaction. Thermoscans of α-SiC pellets containing 5 at.%Pd show that during differential calorimetry scans three exothermic peaks occurred at 773 K, 1144 K and 1615 K, while thermoscans of β-SiC pellets containing 3 at.%Pd and 5 at.%Pd do not show peaks. For the pellet α-SiC–5 at.%Pd XRD spectra reveal that the first peak is associated with the formation of Pd{sub 3}Si and SiO{sub 2} phases, while the second peak and the third peak are correlated with the formation of Pd{sub 2}Si phase and the active oxidation of silicon carbide respectively. Thermogravimetry scans show weight gain and weight loss peaks due to the SiO{sub 2} phase formation and the active oxidation. Additionally XPS fittings reveal the development of SiC{sub x}O{sub y} phase during the first exothermic peak up to the temperature of 873 K. The experimental data reveals that alpha silicon carbide is attacked by palladium at lower temperatures than beta silicon carbide and the reaction mechanism between silicon carbide and palladium is strongly affected by silicon carbide oxidation.

  3. Palladium interaction with silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, M.; Xiao, P.; Abram, T.

    2015-07-01

    In this work the palladium interaction with silicon carbide is investigated by means of complementary analytical techniques such as thermogravimetry (TG), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Thermoscans were carried out on pellets of palladium, α-SiC and β-SiC high purity powders in the temperature range comprised between 293 K and 1773 K, in order to study the effect of temperature on the palladium-silicon carbide reaction. Thermoscans of α-SiC pellets containing 5 at.%Pd show that during differential calorimetry scans three exothermic peaks occurred at 773 K, 1144 K and 1615 K, while thermoscans of β-SiC pellets containing 3 at.%Pd and 5 at.%Pd do not show peaks. For the pellet α-SiC-5 at.%Pd XRD spectra reveal that the first peak is associated with the formation of Pd3Si and SiO2 phases, while the second peak and the third peak are correlated with the formation of Pd2Si phase and the active oxidation of silicon carbide respectively. Thermogravimetry scans show weight gain and weight loss peaks due to the SiO2 phase formation and the active oxidation. Additionally XPS fittings reveal the development of SiCxOy phase during the first exothermic peak up to the temperature of 873 K. The experimental data reveals that alpha silicon carbide is attacked by palladium at lower temperatures than beta silicon carbide and the reaction mechanism between silicon carbide and palladium is strongly affected by silicon carbide oxidation.

  4. Identification Trial of Crystallization Parameters of Modified Chromium Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Studnicki

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In the paper results of researches of abrasion-resisting chromium cast iron inoculated with boron carbide B4C primary crystallization are presented. The main aim of work was make an attempt to identification of crystallization parameters that changed in reason of inoculation. Essential primary crystallization parameters, with the help of which, will be possible to evaluate the inoculation capacity were searched. It was found that in the result of inoculant actions characteristic temperatures were changed and time of primary crystallization was decreased. For tests the new broadened Derivative Thermal Analysis method, in which three samples with different solidification module were applied, was used. Thanks to this inoculation capacity in casts with significant diversified self-cooling ranges was possible to observe.

  5. Experimental investigation and thermodynamic modeling of molybdenum and vanadium-containing carbide hardened iron-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Improvement of a carbide selective extraction method. ► Determination of experimental data on the Fe–C–Cr–Mo–V system for carbides above 900 °C: crystallographic structures and compositions of precipitates, matrix composition. ► High molybdenum solubility in FCC carbides. ► Improvement of thermodynamic databases from experimental results. ► Validation of the optimized database with different compositions steels. -- Abstract: A technique for the microstructural study of steels, based on the use of matrix dissolution to collect the very low number density precipitates formed in martensitic steels, has been considerably improved. This technique was applied to two different grades of alloy, characterized by high nickel and cobalt contents and varying chromium, molybdenum and vanadium contents. The technique was implemented at temperatures ranging between 900 °C and 1000 °C, in order to accurately determine experimental data including the crystallographic structure and chemical composition of the carbides, the carbide solvus temperatures, and variations in the chemical composition of the matrix. These experimental investigations reveal that the solubility of molybdenum in FCC carbides can be very high. These results have been compared with the behavior predicted by computational thermodynamics, and used to evaluate and improve the thermodynamic Matcalc steel database. This upgraded database has been validated on three other steels with different chemical compositions, characterized by the same Fe–Cr–Mo–V–C system

  6. Hydrogen permeation through chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steady state and non-steady state measurements of hydrogen permeation through metallic chromium are reported. The experiments have been conducted by use of hydrogen and deuterium within a pressure range of 10-8 - 1 bar and temperatures between 600 - 8000C. Numerical values for the physical quantities permeability, diffusion constant and solubility could be derived. At an upstream pressure above around 10-3 bar classical Sieverts-low was found (permeation rate proportional √p) with activation energies Qsub(perm) = 65 kJoule/mole, Qsub(Diff) = 4-8 kJoule/mole, Qsub(Sol) = 57-61 kJoule/mole for the respective processes involved. The isotopic effect between H and D of the permeabilities could be represented by a factor of 1,5 independence on temperature. All non steady-state measurements could be approximated reasonably well by classical diffusion kinetics. Below up-stream pressures of approx.= 10-7 bar the kinetics was no longer diffusion controlled, the dependence on up-stream pressure changed from √p -> p, the activation energy for permetation increased to 127 kJoule/mole and the isotopic factor resulted in about 2-3. (orig.)

  7. Porous silicon carbide (SIC) semiconductor device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, Joseph S. (Inventor); Kurtz, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Porous silicon carbide is fabricated according to techniques which result in a significant portion of nanocrystallites within the material in a sub 10 nanometer regime. There is described techniques for passivating porous silicon carbide which result in the fabrication of optoelectronic devices which exhibit brighter blue luminescence and exhibit improved qualities. Based on certain of the techniques described porous silicon carbide is used as a sacrificial layer for the patterning of silicon carbide. Porous silicon carbide is then removed from the bulk substrate by oxidation and other methods. The techniques described employ a two-step process which is used to pattern bulk silicon carbide where selected areas of the wafer are then made porous and then the porous layer is subsequently removed. The process to form porous silicon carbide exhibits dopant selectivity and a two-step etching procedure is implemented for silicon carbide multilayers.

  8. TEM investigations on the effect of chromium content and of stress relief treatment on precipitation in Alloy 82

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Slight change of the Cr content does not affect the microstructure of the butt welds. •Stress relief thermal treatment leads to the intergranular precipitation of Cr23C6. •The Cr23C6 carbides are supposed to improve the SCC resistance of the butt welds. -- Abstract: Nickel-base alloys are widely used in nuclear Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). Most of them have been found susceptible to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) in nominal PWR primary water. The time to initiation depends on the material and is longer for weld metals than for Alloy 600. This study will focus on Alloy 82, which is used in Dissimilar Metal Welds (DMWs). In service, DMWs are either in the as-welded state or have undergone a stress relief treatment. Previous SCC studies showed that the heat treatment reduces significantly the SCC susceptibility of the weld. In this context, this study focuses on the microstructure characterization of the weld in the as-welded state and in the heat-treated state. As chromium content is also a key factor for the SCC susceptibility, welds with low chromium content and medium chromium content were studied. The lower SCC susceptibility of the heat-treated welds was attributed to intergranular Cr23C6 resulting from a combined effect of heat treatment and chromium and carbon contents. These intergranular carbides could explain the better behavior of Alloy 82, compared to other nickel-base alloys

  9. The ternary iron aluminum carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Carbides present in ternary Fe-Al-C were investigated. → Presence of carbides Fe3C, M23C6, and/or κ-Fe3AlC depends on the Al and C concentration. → The existence of M23C6 ternary carbide in the Fe-Al-C system is recognized for first time. → Solubility of Al in M23C6 is low and negligible in the cementite. - Abstract: Carbides present in ternary Fe-Al-C were investigated by the combined utilization of an X-ray diffractometer and a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer. The alloys were prepared by arc melting and the microstructure was homogenised by a solution annealing treatment in the temperature range 950-1050 deg. C for 15 min. The diffraction patterns of resulting materials were analysed using a multiphase Rietveld refinement. The steel is composed of a ferritic matrix with carbides Fe3C, M23C6, and/or κ-Fe3AlC depending on the Al and C concentration. It is the first time that the existence of M23C6 ternary carbide in the Fe-Al-C system is recognized. Microprobe analyses performed revealed that the solubility of Al in M23C6 is low, with an Fe/Al ratio (in at.%) higher than 15. On the other hand, the amount of Al in the cementite is negligible and hence its lattice parameters do not depend on the Al concentration of the alloy.

  10. Transition metal carbide and boride abrasive particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrasive particles and their preparation are discussed. The particles consist essentially of a matrix of titanium carbide and zirconium carbide, at least partially in solid solution form, and grains of crystalline titanium diboride dispersed throughout the carbide matrix. These abrasive particles are particularly useful as components of grinding wheels for abrading steel. 1 figure, 6 tables

  11. Silicon carbide as platform for energy applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syväjärvi, Mikael; Jokubavicius, Valdas; Sun, Jianwu;

    Silicon carbide is emerging as a novel material for a range of energy and environmental technologies. Previously, silicon carbide was considered as a material mainly for transistor applications. We have initiated the use of silicon carbide material towards optoelectronics in general lighting and...

  12. Palladium interaction with silicon carbide

    OpenAIRE

    M. Gentile, P. Xiao, T. Abram

    2015-01-01

    In this work the palladium interaction with silicon carbide is investigated by means of complementary analytical techniques such as thermogravimetry (TG), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Thermoscans were carried out on pellets of palladium, α-SiC and β-SiC high purity powders in the temperature range comprised between 293 K and 1773 K, in order to study the effect of temperature on the palladium-silicon carbide...

  13. Thermal conductivity of boron carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, C.; Emin, D.; Gray, P. E.

    1985-01-01

    Knowledge of the thermal conductivity of boron carbide is necessary to evaluate its potential for high-temperature thermoelectric energy conversion applications. Measurements have been conducted of the thermal diffusivity of hot-pressed boron carbide BxC samples as a function of composition (x in the range from 4 to 9), temperature (300-1700 K), and temperature cycling. These data, in concert with density and specific-heat data, yield the thermal conductivities of these materials. The results are discussed in terms of a structural model that has been previously advanced to explain the electronic transport data. Some novel mechanisms for thermal conduction are briefly discussed.

  14. Trivalent chromium sorption on alginate beads

    OpenAIRE

    Araújo, M. Manuela; Teixeira, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    The applicability of trivalent chromium removal from aqueous solutions using calcium alginate beads was studied. The equilibrium isotherms were plotted at two temperatures. The relationship between the chromium sorbed and the calcium released was determined as well as the effect of alginate amount and initial pH on the equilibrium results. Chromium sorption kinetics were evaluated as a function of chromium initial concentration and temperature. Transport properties of trival...

  15. On texture formation of chromium electrodeposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian Bergenstof; Leisner, Peter; Horsewell, Andy

    1998-01-01

    The microstructure, texture and hardness of electrodeposited hard, direct current (DC) chromium and pulsed reversed chromium has been investigated. These investigations suggest that the growth and texture of hard chromium is controlled by inhibition processes and reactions. Further, it has been...

  16. Chromium Salen Mediated Alkene Epoxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kaare Brandt; Norrby, Per-Ola; Daly, Adrian M.; Gilheany, Declan G.

    2002-01-01

    The mechanism of alkene epoxidation by chromium(v) oxo salen complexes has been studied by DFT and experimental methods. The reaction is compared to the closely related Mn-catalyzed process in an attempt to understand the dramatic difference in selectivity between the two systems. Overall, the......-spin surface. The low-spin addition of metal oxo species to an alkene leads to an intermediate which forms epoxide either with a barrier on the low-spin surface or without a barrier after spin inversion. Supporting evidence for this intermediate was obtained by using vinylcyclopropane traps. The chromium...

  17. Heat treatment to improve the toughness of 12 percent chromium steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single austenitizing and double austenitizing heat treatments are shown to improve the toughness of 12 percent chromium steels. The double austenitizing heat treatment of 1 hour at 1300 K, oil quench, 1 hour at 1150 K, oil quench and temper for 8 h at 900 K, increased the room temperature toughness of some heats by up to a factor of 4, i.e., up to approximately 60 J, and was chosen as the 'optimum' heat treatment. The improvement is due to a redistribution of the carbide precipitate and the removal of coarse grain boundary carbides. Heat treatments on cylinders 225 mm OD and 75 mm ID show that this improvement can be obtained in thick sections. The improved heat treatments should now be tried on full size CANDU end fittings. (auth)

  18. Enhancing tensile properties of ultrafine-grained medium-carbon steel utilizing fine carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Tensile properties of UFG carbon steels were enhanced by imbedding fine carbides. → Thinner pearltic lamellae induced finer carbides after caliber-rolling process. → Superior tensile properties were attributed to the enhanced strain hardening rate. → Yield-point phenomenon in UFG steels resulted from stronger effect of particle growth. - Abstract: The aim of the present study is to evaluate the influence of nano-sized carbides upon tensile behavior in UFG medium-carbon steels and to develop a material with improved tensile properties. UFG medium-carbon steels with fine carbides were successfully fabricated by multi-pass caliber rolling at 773 K. Alloying chromium and molybdenum resulted in thinner pearlitic lamellae, which were transformed into finer particles after severe plastic deformation. The UFG steel containing the alloying elements exhibited superior tensile properties, which was attributed to the enhanced strain hardening rate by the imbedded finer particles. Subsequent annealing induced growth of grains and particles, which also recovered elongation at the expense of strength. All UFG steels investigated here showed a yield-point phenomenon due to the decreased hardening rate and lack of mobile dislocations and their sources. The deteriorating effect of particle growth overwhelmed the improving effect of grain growth after annealing of the UFG medium-carbon steel, leading to a reduced strain hardening rate. This resulted in a positive correlation between a grain size and Lueders elongation in the investigated UFG steels.

  19. Development of tungsten carbide hardmetals using iron-based binder alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main work was carried out on hardmetals with 20 wt.% of iron rich binder alloys; the cobalt and nickel content of the alloys was varied upto 50 wt.%. The properties of the WC-Fe, WC-Co and WC-Ni hardmetals were measured for comparison. The influence of the carbon content, heat treatment and alloying with chromium andor molybdenum carbide was also evaluated. In addition to this, the effect of changes in the binder content and the carbide grain size on the properties of the hardmetals was determined. The structure of the WC-hardmetals with Fe-Co-Ni binders is similar to that of WC-Co, but the carbide grain size is somewhat smaller. The carbon content of the hardmetals has to be above the stoichiometric value of the tungsten carbide in order to obtain optimal hardmetal properties. The mechanical properties of the WC-Fe/Co/Ni hardmetals are strongly dependent on the binder composition and can be varied in a wide range. The optimal WC-Fe/Co/Ni hardmetals have at comparable transverse rupture strengths higher room temperature and hot hardness values, better fracture toughness and abrasive strength than the WC-Co hardmetals. Hardmetals whose binder is mainly martensitic have the best combination of all measured mechanical properties. (orig./IHOE)

  20. Thermodynamical simulations of diffusion and carbide growth in dissimilar weld joints using DICTRA registered software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diffusion of carbon near dissimilar weld joints during post weld heat treatment (stress relief annealing) can lead to decarburization and to carbide growth in different phases of the weld, which may be initiation sites for mechanical failure. The present study shows the results of thermodynamical simulations of diffusion controlled phenomena in dissimilar weld joint during the stress relief annealing using the DICTRA software. The simulation of the solid state reactions during annealing is able to model the decarburization in the ferritic part and the carbide growth near the phase boundary, in the ferritic and austenitic sections, respectively, as well as their dependence on time and temperature. In addition to M23C6 carbides, the simulations confirmed the formation of M7C3 carbides, which are harder than M23C6 type. The comparison of the simulation results with the metallographic analysis showed a good agreement. All experimentally detected phases have been met in the simulation with realistic length scales along with the concentration profiles of the most important alloying elements like carbon and chromium

  1. A study on Z-phase nucleation in martensitic chromium steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golpayegani, Ardeshir; Andrén, Hans-Olof; Danielsen, Hilmar Kjartansson;

    2008-01-01

    9–12% chromium martensitic steels are liable to the precipitation of Z-phase, Cr(V,Nb)N, after long time exposure at 550–650 ◦C. This complex nitride consumes vanadium nitrides and causes the creep strength of the material to fall drastically after several thousand hours of exposure. In this work....... Furthermore, such a nucleation site would provide vanadium and nitrogen for the growth of Z-phase. The presence of niobium carbide has also been observed close to Z-phase nucleation sites, indicating niobium to be important for the nucleation and growth of Z-phase....

  2. Chromium content of selected Greek foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratakos, Michael S; Lazos, Evangelos S; Bratakos, Sotirios M

    2002-05-01

    The total chromium content of a wide variety of Greek foods was determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (GFAAS). Meat, fish and seafood, cereals and pulses were rich sources of chromium (>0.100 microg/g). Fruits, milk, oils and fats and sugar were poor sources. Differences in chromium content were found between different food classes from Greece and those from some other countries. Based on available food consumption data and chromium levels in this study, it was estimated that the chromium intake of Greeks is 143 microg/day, with vegetables, cereals and meat being the main contributors. PMID:12083715

  3. Determination of chromium combined with DNA, RNA and protein in chromium-rich brewer's yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contents of chromium in the DNA, RNA and protein fractions separated from chromium-rich and normal brewer's yeast were determined with the neutron activation analysis in order to study the combination of Cr with DNA, RNA and protein in chromium-rich brewer's yeast. The results showed that the extracting rats and concentrations of DNA, RNA and protein had no significant difference in two types of yeast, but the chromium contents of DNA, RNA and protein in the chromium-rich yeast were significantly higher than those in the normal. In addition, the content of chromium in DNA was much higher than that in RNA and protein, which indicated that the inorganic chromium compounds entered into the yeast cell, during the yeast cultivation in the culture medium containing chromium were converted into organic chromium compounds combined with DNA, RNA and protein

  4. Ultrasonic characterization of microwave joined silicon carbide/silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High frequency (50--150 MHz), ultrasonic immersion testing has been used to characterize the surface and interfacial joint conditions of microwave bonded, monolithic silicon carbide (SiC) materials. The high resolution ultrasonic C-scan images point to damage accumulation after thermal cycling. Image processing was used to study the effects of the thermal cycling on waveform shape, amplitude and distribution. Such information is useful for concurrently engineering material fabrication processes and suitable nondestructive test procedures

  5. Preparation and application of cellular and nanoporous carbides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchardt, Lars; Hoffmann, Claudia; Oschatz, Martin; Mammitzsch, Lars; Petasch, Uwe; Herrmann, Mathias; Kaskel, Stefan

    2012-08-01

    A tutorial review on cellular as well as nanoporous carbides covering their structure, synthesis and potential applications. Especially new carbide materials with a hierarchical pore structure are in focus. As a central theme silicon carbide based materials are picked out, but also titanium, tungsten and boron carbides, as well as carbide-derived carbons, are part of this review. PMID:22344324

  6. Laser micromachining of silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sciti, D.; Bellosi, A. [CNR-IRTEC, Faenza (Italy). Research Inst. for Ceramics Technology

    2002-07-01

    Two different laser processing procedures on silicon carbide are studied: i) surface treatment through a pulsed KrF excimer laser, with the aim of evaluating the surface microstructure modifications and variation the surface roughness in function of the processing parameters. In all the cases, the presence of a thin scale due to melting and solidification, crack formation and surface pores closure were observed. ii) A pulsed CO{sub 2} laser was used to form a micro-holes texture on the surface of silicon carbide. Holes dimensions in the range 80-100 {mu}m were obtained using a laser power of 0.5 kW and pulse duration of 1 ms. The possibility of producing a regular array of microholes was demonstrated. (orig.)

  7. Tissues and urinary chromium concentrations in rats fed high-chromium diets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Chromium is an essential trace elements and enhances the function of insulin as a form of chromodulin. In the subjects with a certain type of diabetics, 200 to 1,000 μg/d of chromium is administered to reduced the symptoms of diabetics. However, although there are not any health-promotive effects of chromium-administration in healthy subjects, various types of chromium supplements are commercially available in many countries; the adverse effects caused by an excessive chromium intake are feared. In the present study, to clarify the tolerable upper limit of chromium, tissue and urinary chromium concentrations, liver function and iron status were examined in rats fed high-chromium diets. Thirty-six male 4-weeks Wistar rats were divided into six groups and fed casein-based diets containing 1, 10 or 100 μg/g of chromium as chromium chloride (CrCl3) or chromium picolinate (CrPic) for 4 weeks. After the feeding, chromium concentrations in liver, kidney, small intestine and tibia were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. In addition, urine samples were collected on 3rd to 4th week and their chromium concentrations were also determined. Chromium concentrations in liver, kidney, small intestine and tibia were elevated with increase of dietary chromium concentration. Urinary chromium excretion was also elevated with the increase of dietary chromium and the rate of urinary chromium excretion was less than 2% to dietary chromium intake in all the experimental groups. In the administration of 100 μg/g of chromium, rats given CrCl3 showed significantly higher tibia chromium concentration and lower urinary chromium excretion than those given CrPic. There were not any differences in iron status among the experimental groups. Activities of serum aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase in rats fed diet containing 100 μg/g of chromium as CrPic were significantly higher than those in rats fed other diets.

  8. Thermally Sprayed Silicon Carbide Coating

    OpenAIRE

    Mubarok, Fahmi

    2014-01-01

    Thermal spraying of silicon carbide (SiC) material is a challenging task since SiC tends to decompose during elevated temperature atmospheric spraying process. The addition of metal or ceramic binders as a matrix phase is necessary to facilitate the bonding of SiC particles, allowing SiC coatings to be deposited. In the conventional procedure, the matrix phase is added through mechanical mixing or mechanical alloying of the powder constituents, making it difficult to achieve homogeneous distr...

  9. Conduction mechanism in boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, C.; Emin, D.

    1984-01-01

    Electrical conductivity, Seebeck-coefficient, and Hall-effect measurements have been made on single-phase boron carbides, B(1-x)C(x), in the compositional range from 0.1 to 0.2 X, and between room temperature and 1273 K. The results indicate that the predominant conduction mechanism is small-polaron hopping between carbon atoms at geometrically inequivalent sites.

  10. Sintering behavior of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pressureless sintering behavior of boron carbide (B4C) in argon was studied, with change in time and temperature, using carbon as sintering aid. Carbon was added via fenolic resin, acting also as a binder. After isostatic pressing the specimens were sintered in a graphite furnace at 19600C/1h, 21600C/15 minutes and 1h and 22000C/1h. The achieved density was 97% of the theoretical. Some mechanical properties and microstructural aspects have been evaluated. (author)

  11. Microwave sintering of boron carbide composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide is an important ceramic material because of its high hardness and low specific gravity. it is used for applications involving impact and wear resistance. The disadvantages of boron carbide materials are difficulty in fabrication and sensitivity to brittle fracture. These problems are significantly reduced by production of cermets based on boron carbide and aluminum or aluminum alloys. Microwave heating of boron carbide materials results in ultrarapid heating and high temperatures. Therefore, a finer microstructure is obtained. The objective of this work was to define a technology that would allow the manufacture of boron carbide ceramics having mechanical properties similar to those exhibited by hot-pressed specimens. microwave heating would be used for the densification step. Mixtures of boron carbide and aluminum were considered for this research because aluminum simultaneously acts as a sintering aid and introduces phases that contribute to toughness enhancement

  12. Method to manufacture tungsten carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The patent deals with an improved method of manufacturing tungsten carbide. An oxide is preferably used as initial product whose particle size and effective surface approximately corresponds to that of the endproduct. The known methods for preparing the oxide are briefly given. Carbon monoxide is passed over the thus obtained oxide particles whereby the reaction mixture is heated to a temperature at which tungsten oxide and carbon monoxide react and tungsten carbide is formed, however, below that temperature at which the tungsten-containing materials are caked or sintered together. According to the method the reaction temperature is about below 9000C. The tungsten carbide produced has a particle size of under approximately 100 A and an active surface of about 20 m2/g. It has sofar not been possible with the usual methods to obtain such finely divided material with such a large surface. These particles may be converted back to the oxide by heating in air at low temperature without changing particle size and effective surface. One thus obtains a tungsten oxide with smaller particle size and larger effective surface than the initial product. (IHOE)

  13. Advanced microstructure of boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werheit, Helmut; Shalamberidze, Sulkhan

    2012-09-26

    The rhombohedral elementary cell of the complex boron carbide structure is composed of B(12) or B(11)C icosahedra and CBC, CBB or B□B (□, vacancy) linear arrangements, whose shares vary depending on the actual chemical compound. The evaluation of the IR phonon spectra of isotopically pure boron carbide yields the quantitative concentrations of these components within the homogeneity range. The structure formula of B(4.3)C at the carbon-rich limit of the homogeneity range is (B(11)C) (CBC)(0.91) (B□B)(0.09) (□, vacancy); and the actual structure formula of B(13)C(2) is (B(12))(0.5)(B(11)C)(0.5)(CBC)(0.65)(CBB)(0.16) (B□B)(0.19), and deviates fundamentally from (B(12))CBC, predicted by theory to be the energetically most favourable structure of boron carbide. In reality, it is the most distorted structure in the homogeneity range. The spectra of (nat)B(x)C make it evident that boron isotopes are not randomly distributed in the structure. However, doping with 2% silicon brings about a random distribution. PMID:22945740

  14. Silicon carbide as platform for energy applications

    OpenAIRE

    Syväjärvi, Mikael; Jokubavicius, Valdas; Sun, Jianwu; Liu, Xinyu; Løvvik, Ole Martin; Ou, Haiyan; Wellmann, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Silicon carbide is emerging as a novel material for a range of energy and environmental technologies. Previously, silicon carbide was considered as a material mainly for transistor applications. We have initiated the use of silicon carbide material towards optoelectronics in general lighting and solar cells, and further pursue concepts in materials for thermoelectrics, biofuel cells and supercapacitor research proposals. In fact, there are a number of energy applications which can be based on...

  15. Crystallization of nodular cast iron with carbides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a crystallization process of nodular cast iron with carbides having a different chemical composition have been presented. It have been found, that an increase of molybdenum above 0,30% causes the ledeburutic carbides crystallization after (γ+ graphite eutectic phase crystallization. When Mo content is lower, these carbides crystallize as a pre-eutectic phase. In this article causes of this effect have been given.

  16. Boron carbide nanolumps on carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, J. Y.; Li, W. Z.; Wen, J. G.; Ren, Z. F.

    2002-01-01

    Boron carbide nanolumps are formed on the surface of multiwall carbon nanotubes by a solid-state reaction between boron and carbon nanotubes. The reaction is localized so that the integrity of the structure of carbon nanotubes is maintained. Inner layers of multiwall carbon nanotubes are also bonded to boron carbide nanolumps. These multiwall carbon nanotubes with boron carbide nanolumps are expected to be the ideal reinforcing fillers for high-performance composites because of the favorable morphology.

  17. Food Chromium Contents, Chromium Dietary Intakes And Related Biological Variables In French Free-Living Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromium (Cr III), an essential trace element, functions in potentiating insulin sensitivity, regulating glucose homeostasis, improving lipid profile, and maintaining lean body mass. Glucose intolerance and chromium deficiency increase with age, and could be aggravating factors of the metabolic synd...

  18. Shock-wave strength properties of boron carbide and silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-resolved velocity interferometry measurements have been made on boron carbide and silicon carbide ceramics to assess dynamic equation-of-state and strength properties of these materials. Hugoniot precursor characteristics, and post-yield shock and release wave properties, indicated markedly different dynamic strength and flow behavior for the two carbides. (orig.)

  19. Soils contaminated with hexavalent chromium

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca, Bruna Catarina da Silva

    2011-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento em Engenharia Química e Biológica The interest in environmental soil science has been growing in the last years due to the continuous degradation of this major natural resource. With this in mind, and because chromium and lead are two of the most toxic heavy metals frequently detected as soil contaminants in the Portuguese territory, the study and development of few remediation techniques and the indissociable description of the sorption and migration of...

  20. Methods for producing silicon carbide fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnier, John E.; Griffith, George W.

    2016-03-01

    Methods of producing silicon carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a silicon-containing gas in a reaction chamber at a temperature ranging from approximately 1500.degree. C. to approximately 2000.degree. C. A partial pressure of oxygen in the reaction chamber is maintained at less than approximately 1.01.times.10.sup.2 Pascal to produce continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers. Continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers and articles formed from the continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers are also disclosed.

  1. Polytype distribution in circumstellar silicon carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daulton, T L; Bernatowicz, T J; Lewis, R S; Messenger, S; Stadermann, F J; Amari, S

    2002-06-01

    The inferred crystallographic class of circumstellar silicon carbide based on astronomical infrared spectra is controversial. We have directly determined the polytype distribution of circumstellar SiC from transmission electron microscopy of presolar silicon carbide from the Murchison carbonaceous meteorite. Only two polytypes (of a possible several hundred) were observed: cubic 3C and hexagonal 2H silicon carbide and their intergrowths. We conclude that this structural simplicity is a direct consequence of the low pressures in circumstellar outflows and the corresponding low silicon carbide condensation temperatures. PMID:12052956

  2. Preparation and Characterization of Nanocrystalline Hard Chromium Coatings Using Eco-Friendly Trivalent Chromium Bath

    OpenAIRE

    V. S. Protsenko; V. O Gordiienko; Danilov, F. I.; Kwon, S.C.

    2011-01-01

    A new aqueous sulfate trivalent chromium bath is described. The chromium bath contains formic acid and carbamide as complexing agents. Chromium was deposited at a temperature of 30÷40 oC and a cathode current density of 10÷25 A dm-2. The bath allows obtaining thick (up to several hundred micrometers) hard chromium coatings with nanocrystalline structure. The electrodeposition rate reaches 0.8÷0.9 µm min-1.

  3. Effects of carbon content and microstructure on corrosion rate of 13% chromium steel in wet CO2 environments; Shitsujun CO2 kankyochu deno 13%Cr ko no fushoku ni oyobosu C ryo to kinzoku soshiki no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara, T.; Asahi, H. [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-11-15

    Thirteen percent chromium steel is excellent in corrosion resistance of CO2. A large quantity of 13% chromium steel is used in oil and gas fields where CO2 is produced. Usually, AISI 420 13% chromium steel to which C was added 0.2% is used for an oil field tube. Since AISI 420 steel is tempered, chromium carbide is formed and the effective chromium amount in a parent phase is decreased to deteriorate the corrosion resistance of CO2. Therefore, it is desired to decrease the carbon content as far as possible for improvement of corrosion resistance of CO2. AISI 410 13% chromium steel with a carbon content of 0.1% is difficult to form {delta}-ferrite. It has a problem in manufacturing because the hot working performance is low. In this report, on the basis of AISI 420 13% chromium steel, the effects of composition on CO2 corrosion were investigated using the steel whose carbon content was changed. Ferrite, martensite, and tempered martensite differ in a corrosion rate. The corrosion rate increases in the order of martensite, ferrite, and tempered martensite. The corrosion rate of 13% chromium steel is represented by the product of the corrosion rate of each microstructure and the fraction of it. 11 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. REMOVAL OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM FROM DRINKING WATER

    OpenAIRE

    A. R. Asgari ، F. Vaezi ، S. Nasseri ، O. Dördelmann ، A. H. Mahvi ، E. Dehghani Fard

    2008-01-01

    Removal of chromium can be accomplished by various methods but none of them is cost-effective in meeting drinking water standards. For this study, granular ferric hydroxide was used as adsorbent for removal of hexavalent chromium. Besides, the effects of changing contact time, pH and concentrations of competitive anions were determined for different amounts of granular ferric hydroxide. It was found that granular ferric hydroxide has a high capacity for adsorption of hexavalent chromium from ...

  5. Organic matter formed from hydrolysis of metal carbides of the iron peak of cosmic elemental abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, Franco

    2003-01-01

    This work is a modern revisitation of an old idea of great chemists of the past such as Berthelot, Mendeleev, Cloez and Moissan: the formation of organic matter under pre-biotic conditions starting from the hydrolysis of metal carbides. This idea was originally proposed for the formation of petroleum in the Earth and was extended to other bodies of the solar system by Sokolov at the end of the 19th century. The reason for this revisitation lies in the fact that complex organic matter resembling a petroleum fraction may exist in certain protoplanetary nebulae. The present work starts with a survey of the theory of the inorganic origin of petroleum and reports on current evidence for its derivation from residues of formerly living matter, but also considers theories that admit both a biogenic and an abiogenic origin for petroleum. By considering the cosmic abundance of elements and the evidence concerning the presence of carbides in meteorites, we discuss the formation, structure and hydrolysis products derived from the metal carbides of the iron peak of cosmic elemental abundance. Chromium carbide (Cr3C2) has then been used as a model compound for all the key carbides of the iron peak of the cosmic abundance (Cr, Fe, Ni, V, Mn, Co) and it has been hydrolysed under different conditions and the hydrocarbons formed have been analysed using electronic spectroscopy, high-performance liquid chromatography with a diode-array detector (HPLC-DAD) and by Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Methane, a series of about 20 different alkenes with single and conjugated double bonds have been detected. Paraffins are formed simultaneously with the alkene series but no acetylenic hydrocarbons have been detected. This study confirms early works considering the easy hydrolysis of the carbides of Cr, Fe, Ni, Mn and Co with the formation of H2, a series of alkanes including methane and a series of alkenes including ethylene. The peculiar behaviour of copper carbide (copper is

  6. Dispersion of boron carbide in a tungsten carbide/cobalt matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Particles of boron carbide (105-125 microns) were coated with a layer (10-12 microns) of titanium carbide in a fluidized bed. These coated particles have been successfully incorporated in a tungsten carbide--cobalt matrix by hot pressing at 1 tonf/in2, (15.44 MN/m2) at 13500C. Attempts to produce a similar material by a cold pressing and sintering technique were unsuccessful because of penetration of the titanium carbide layer by liquid cobalt. Hot-pressed material containing boron carbide had a static strength in bend of approximately 175,000 lbf/in2, (1206MN/m2) which compares favorably with the strength of conventionally produced tungsten carbide/cobalt. The impact strength of the material containing boron carbide was however considerably lower than tungsten carbide/cobalt. In rock drilling tests on Darley Dale sandstone at low speeds and low loads, the material containing boron carbide drilled almost ten times as far without seizure as tungsten carbide/cobalt. In higher speed and higher load rotary drilling tests conducted by the National Coal Board, the material containing boron carbide chipped badly compared with normal NCB hardgrade material

  7. Permeation of chromium salts through human skin in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Fullerton, A; Avnstorp, C;

    1992-01-01

    of the dichromate solution. Chromium skin levels increased with increasing concentrations of applied chromium salts up to 0.034 M Cr. The amount of chromium in recipient phase and skin layers increased with increasing pH when the applied solution contained potassium dichromate. This was ascribed to a decreased skin...... barrier function of the skin. The amount of chromium found in all skin layers after application of chromium chloride decreased with increasing pH due to lower solubility of the salt. The % of chromium found in the recipient phase as chromium(VI) increased with increasing total chromium concentration...... indicating a limited reduction ability of the skin in vitro....

  8. Boron carbide whiskers produced by vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Boron carbide whiskers have an excellent combination of properties for use as a reinforcement material. They are produced by vaporizing boron carbide powder and condensing the vapors on a substrate. Certain catalysts promote the growth rate and size of the whiskers.

  9. Ligand sphere conversions in terminal carbide complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsing, Thorbjørn Juul; Reinholdt, Anders; Sauer, Stephan P. A.; Bendix, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    Metathesis is introduced as a preparative route to terminal carbide complexes. The chloride ligands of the terminal carbide complex [RuC(Cl)2(PCy3)2] (RuC) can be exchanged, paving the way for a systematic variation of the ligand sphere. A series of substituted complexes, including the first exam...

  10. Carbide evolution in temper embrittled NiCrMoV bainitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittig, J.E. [Vanderbilt Univ., Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Nashville, TN (United States); Sinclair, R. [Stanford Univ., Dept. of Materials Science, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Phosphorus segregation to prior austenite grain boundaries in low alloy steel from exposure to temperatures of 300 to 600 C results in a susceptibility for intergranular fracture referred to as ''temper embrittlement''. It has been observed that alloying steel with Mo greatly reduces the phosphorus segregation kinetics. Therefore changes in the ferrite matrix composition from carbide precipitation and evolution involving Mo can influence the segregation phenomenon and fracture properties. This study uses analytical electron microscopy of extraction replicas to characterize the changes in carbide chemistry of a NiCrMoV bainitic steel with 0.25 wt% C that accompany the phosphorus segregation during aging at 480 C for up to 3400 hr. The steel was doped with 0.02 wt% P and tempered at 650 C to two different hardness levels, i.e., two different initial carbide distributions. The amount of grain boundary phosphorus segregation produced by aging at 480 C correlates with the level of molybdenum that remains in solution in the ferritic matrix whereas changes in vanadium and chromium appear to have less influence on the temper embrittlement. (orig.)

  11. Composite carbide powders and HVOF sprayed coatings with a plastic matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Formanek

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The paper presents the characterization of powders containing hard phases of chromium and titaniumcarbides in a plastic matrix, intended for thermal spraying of coatings. The synthesized powder compositescontaining chromium carbides, produced in high-temperature activated syntheses has been presented.Design/methodology/approach: Commercial materials, such as NiCr- CrxCy, are fabricated by means oftechnologies applied in powder metallurgy. The influence has been determined of the chemical compositionand size analysis of original blends and synthesis processes on the products obtained. The powders NiCr-Cr3C2–TiC and FeCr- Cr3C2-TiC are manufactured by self-activated high temperature synthesis. The synthesizedpowders were thermally sprayed by supersonic method in HVOF - Jet Kote II system. The structure and phasecomposition of the powders and coatings were determined by: scanning microscopy, X-ray phase analysis,energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX and X-ray diffraction analysis.Findings: The structure and application of HVOF sprayed coatings containing chromium and titanium carbideshas been presented.Practical implications: The HVOF thermally sprayed coatings are characterized high erosion- corrosionresistance of wear at elevated temperature.Originality/value: The paper presents the characterization of new type of NiCr-Cr3C2 –TiC and FeCr- Cr3C2-TiC powders.

  12. Chromium in aqueous nitrate plutonium process streams: Corrosion of 316 stainless steel and chromium speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was undertaken to determine if chromium(+6) could exist in plutonium process solutions under normal operating conditions. Four individual reactions were studied: the rate of dissolution of stainless steel, which is the principal source of chromium in process solutions; the rate of oxidation of chromium(+3) to chromium(+6) by nitric acid; and the reduction of chromium(+6) back to chromium(+3) by reaction with stainless steel and with oxalic acid. The stainless steel corrosion rate was found to increase with increasing nitric acid concentration, increasing hydrofluoric acid concentration, and increasing temperature. Oxidation of chromium(+3) to chromium(+6) was negligible at room temperature and only became significant in hot concentrated nitric acid. The rate of reduction of chromium(+6) back to chromium(+3) by reaction with stainless steel or oxalic acid was found to be much greater than the rate of the reverse oxidation reaction. Based on these findings and taking into account normal operating conditions, it was determined that although there would be considerable chromium in plutonium process streams it would rarely be found in the (+6) oxidation state and would not exist in the (+6) state in the final process waste solutions

  13. Alkane dehydrogenation over supported chromium oxide catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Schoonheydt, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The dehydrogenation of alkanes over supported chromium oxide catalysts in the absence of oxygen is of high interest for the industrial production of propene and isobutene. In this review, a critical overview is given of the current knowledge nowadays available about chromium-based dehydrogenation ca

  14. An investigation on gamma attenuation behaviour of titanium diboride reinforced boron carbide-silicon carbide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyuk, Bulent; Beril Tugrul, A.

    2014-04-01

    In this study, titanium diboride (TiB2) reinforced boron carbide-silicon carbide composites were investigated against Cs-137 and Co-60 gamma radioisotope sources. The composite materials include 70% boron carbide (B4C) and 30% silicon carbide (SiC) by volume. Titanium diboride was reinforced to boron carbide-silicon carbide composites as additive 2% and 4% by volume. Average particle sizes were 3.851 µm and 170 nm for titanium diboride which were reinforced to the boron carbide silicon carbide composites. In the experiments the gamma transmission technique was used to investigate the gamma attenuation properties of the composite materials. Linear and mass attenuation coefficients of the samples were determined. Theoretical mass attenuation coefficients were calculated from XCOM computer code. The experimental results and theoretical results were compared and evaluated with each other. It could be said that increasing the titanium diboride ratio causes higher linear attenuation values against Cs-137 and Co-60 gamma radioisotope sources. In addition decreasing the titanium diboride particle size also increases the linear and mass attenuation properties of the titanium diboride reinforced boron carbide-silicon carbide composites.

  15. MICROSTRUCTURE AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF ULTRAFINE WC/Co CEMENTED CARBIDES WITH CUBIC BORON NITRIDE AND Cr₃C₂ ADDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genrong Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the microstructure and mechanical properties of ultrafine tungsten carbide and cobalt (WC/Co cemented carbides with cubic boron nitride (CBN and chromium carbide (Cr₃C₂ fabricated by a hot pressing sintering process. This study uses samples with 8 wt% Co content and 7.5 vol% CBN content, and with different Cr₃C₂ content ranging from 0 to 0.30 wt%. Based on the experimental results, Cr₃C₂ content has a significant influence on inhibiting abnormal grain growth and decreasing grain size in cemented carbides. Near-full densification is possible when CBN-WC/Co with 0.25 wt% Cr₃C₂ is sintered at 1350°C and 20 MPa; the resulting material possesses optimal mechanical properties and density, with an acceptable Vickers hardness of 19.20 GPa, fracture toughness of 8.47 MPa.m1/2 and flexural strength of 564 MPa.u̇ Å k⃗

  16. Effect of Rare Earth Element on Formation and Propagation of Thermal Fatigue Crack in Low-Chromium Semi-Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Tao; LI Feng; CHEN Hua; YU Cui-yan

    2005-01-01

    The formation and growth of thermal fatigue crack in low-chromium semi-steel were investigated by means of optical microscope and scanning electron microscope, and the function of RE in low-chromium semi-steel was analyzed. The results show that the thermal fatigue cracks are mainly generated at eutectic carbides, and the cracks not only grow and spread but also join each other. RE can improve the eutectic carbide′s morphology, inhibit the generation and propagation of thermal fatigue cracks, and therefore promote the activation energy for the crack′s propagation, which is especially more noticeable in case of the RE modification in combination with heat treatment. The mathematical model of the crack propagation is put forward.

  17. Neutron scattering and models: Chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Differential neutron elastic-scattering cross sections of elemental chromium are measured from 4.5 ∼ 10 MeV in steps of ∼ 0.5 MeV and at ≥ 40 scattering angles distributed between ∼ 17 degree--160 degree. Concurrently differential cross sections for the inelastic neutron excitation of the yrast 2+ (1.434 MeV) level in d52Cr are determined. In addition, broad inelastically-scattered neutron groups are observed corresponding to composite excitation of levels up to ∼ 5.5 MeV in the various chromium isotopes. These experimental results are combined with low-energy values previously reported from this laboratory, with recent ∼ 8 → 15 MeV data measured at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt and with a 21.6 MeV result from the literature to form an extensive neutron-scattering data base which is interpreted in the context of spherical-optical and coupled-channels (rotational and vibrational) models. These models reasonably describe the observables but indicate rather large energy-dependent parameter trends at low energies similar to those previously reported near the peak of the So strength function in studies at this laboratory. The physical implications of the measurements and models are discussed including deformation, coupling, dispersive and asymmetry effects

  18. Factors affecting the performances of sprayed chromium carbide coatings for gas-cooled reactor heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper discusses some important factors to be considered for using sprayed coatings in gas-cooled reactor heat exchangers. These factors include (a) high-temperature gaseous corresion, (b) thermal stability of coatings, (c) metallurgical compatibility between the coating and substrate, and (d) effects of the coating on the mechanical properties of the substrate alloy. The coatings evaluated were Cr3C2--NiCr and Cr23C6--NiCr applied by either plasma-arc or detonation-gun process

  19. Reproductive toxicological aspects of chromium in males

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To expand our present understanding of the effects of chromium on male fertility a number of studies were designed to achieve this through the use of chromium intoxicated experimental animals and through investigation of sexual hormones and sperm quality in welders. Also in view of the lack of an experimental model for effects of noxious substance on the epididymal spermatozoa the main objectives of the series of studies reviewed here were: A. To establish a model for evaluation of epididymal sperm count and motility in the rat. B. To investigate and compare the effects of tri- and hexavalent chromium on epididymal spermatozoa. Further to describe the effects of low-dose long-time exposure of rats to the most toxicological interesting chromium oxidative state - hexavalent chromium. C. By the use of autoradiography and γ-countinuing to expand the present knowledge on the distribution of chromium in the body with special reference to the male reproductive organs. D. To describe the effects of exposure to hexavalent chromium in welding fume on levels of sexual hormones and semen parameters in welders. (EG)

  20. Effects of carbon and molybdenum on the microstructures of high chromium white cast irons; Efeito do carbono e do molibdenio na microestrutura dos ferros fundidos brancos de alto cromo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinatora, Amilton; Ambrosio Filho, Francisco; Goldenstein, Helio; Fuoco, Ricardo; Albertin, Eduardo; Mei, Paulo Roberto

    1992-12-31

    The effects of 3 levels of carbon and 1.5% Mo addition on the solidification structures of a 15% chromium white cast iron were studied. The volume fraction of primary austenite and of eutectic carbides, as well as the number of carbide particles per unit length and the mean secondary dendrite arm spacing were measured. By means of thermal analysis, thermal arrest corresponding to the formation of the primary austenite and of the eutectic were determined. The increase in the carbon content and the addition of Mo led to lowering of the thermal arrests and to coarsening of the particles. (author) 15 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Thermal Expansion of Hafnium Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisaffe, Salvatore J.

    1960-01-01

    Since hafnium carbide (HfC) has a melting point of 7029 deg. F, it may have many high-temperature applications. A literature search uncovered very little information about the properties of HfC, and so a program was initiated at the Lewis Research Center to determine some of the physical properties of this material. This note presents the results of the thermal expansion investigation. The thermal-expansion measurements were made with a Gaertner dilatation interferometer calibrated to an accuracy of +/- 1 deg. F. This device indicates expansion by the movement of fringes produced by the cancellation and reinforcement of fixed wave-length light rays which are reflected from the surfaces of two parallel quartz glass disks. The test specimens which separate these disks are three small cones, each approximately 0.20 in. high.

  2. Synthesis of Chromium (Ⅲ) 5-aminosalicylate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wei; HAO Er-jun; JIANG Yu-qin

    2004-01-01

    As we all known that diabetes is a chronic disease with major health consequences.Research has revealed that the occurrence of diabetes have great thing to do with the chromium deficient. Almost 40 years after the first report of glucose tolerance factor(GTF) [1], no conclusive evidence for an isolable ,biologically active form of chromium exited. Three materials have been proposed to be the biologically active form of chromium: "glucose tolerance factor", chromium Picolinate and low-molecular-weight chromium-binding substance (LWMCr) [2] . So there is potential for the design of new chromium drugs .5-Aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) is identified as an active component in the therapy of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis . The therapeutic action of 5-ASA is believed to be coupled to its ability to act as a free radical scavenger [3-4],acting locally on the inflamed colonic mucosa [5-7]. However, the clinical use of 5-ASA is limited, since orally administered 5-ASA is rapidly and completely absorbed from the upper gastrointestinal tract and therefore the local therapeutic effects of 5-ASA in the colon is hardly expected.In this paper, we report the synthesis of chromium(Ⅲ)5-aminosalicylate from 5-ASA and CrCl3. 6H2O.The synthesis route is as follow:The complex has been characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectra, X-ray powder diffractionand TG-DTA . They indicate that the structure is tris(5-ASA) Chromium . Experiments show that thecomplex has a good activity for supplement tiny dietary chromium, lowering blood glucose levels,lowering serum lipid levels and in creasing lean body mass .

  3. Liquid Phase Sintering of Boron-Containing Powder Metallurgy Steel with Chromium and Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ming-Wei; Fan, Yu-Chi; Huang, Her-Yueh; Cai, Wen-Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Liquid phase sintering is an effective method to improve the densification of powder metallurgy materials. Boron is an excellent alloying element for liquid phase sintering of Fe-based materials. However, the roles of chromium and carbon, and particularly that of the former, on liquid phase sintering are still undetermined. This study demonstrated the effects of chromium and carbon on the microstructure, elemental distribution, boride structure, liquid formation, and densification of Fe-B-Cr and Fe-B-Cr-C steels during liquid phase sintering. The results showed that steels with 0.5 wt pct C densify faster than those without 0.5 wt pct C. Moreover, although only one liquid phase forms in Fe-B-Cr steel, adding 0.5 wt pct C reduces the formation temperature of the liquid phase by about 50 K (°C) and facilitates the formation of an additional liquid, resulting in better densification at 1473 K (1200 °C). In both Fe-B-Cr and Fe-B-Cr-C steels, increasing the chromium content from 1.5 to 3 wt pct raises the temperature of liquid formation by about 10 K (°C). Thermodynamic simulations and experimental results demonstrated that carbon atoms dissolved in austenite facilitate the eutectic reaction and reduce the formation temperature of the liquid phase. In contrast, both chromium and molybdenum atoms dissolved in austenite delay the eutectic reaction. Furthermore, the 3Cr-0.5Mo additive in the Fe-0.4B steel does not change the typical boride structure of M2B. With the addition of 0.5 wt pct C, the crystal structure is completely transformed from M2B boride to M3(B,C) boro-carbide.

  4. Chromium in leather footwear-risk assessment of chromium allergy and dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Strandesen, Maria; Poulsen, Pia B;

    2012-01-01

    Background. Chromium-tanned leather footwear, which releases >3 ppm hexavalent Cr(VI), may pose a risk of sensitizing and eliciting allergic dermatitis. Objectives. To determine the content and potential release of chromium in leather footwear and to discuss the prevention of chromium contact...... allergy and dermatitis. Methods. Sixty pairs of leather shoes, sandals and boots (20 children's, 20 men's, and 20 women's) were purchased in Copenhagen and examined with X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. Chromium was extracted according to the International Standard, ISO 17075. The detection level for Cr......(VI) was 3 ppm. Results. Chromium was identified in 95% of leather footwear products, the median content being 1.7% (range 0-3.3%). No association with store category or footwear category was found. A tendency for there to be a higher chromium content in footwear with high prices was shown (p(trend) = 0...

  5. Characteristics of chromium-allergic dermatitis patients prior to regulatory intervention for chromium in leather

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P; Zachariae, Claus;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chromium-tanned leather articles currently constitute the most important cause of contact allergy to chromium in Denmark. A regulation on the content of hexavalent chromium in leather was adopted in November 2013 by the EU member states. OBJECTIVES: To characterize patients with...... chromium allergy and their disease, to serve as a baseline for future studies on the potential effect of the new regulation on chromium in leather. METHODS: A questionnaire case-control study was performed on 155 dermatitis patients with positive patch test reactions to potassium dichromate and a matched...... control group of 621 dermatitis patients. Comparisons were made by use of a χ(2) -test and the Mann-Whitney U-test. Logistic regression analyses were used to test for associations. RESULTS: Sixty-six per cent of chromium-allergic patients had a positive history of contact dermatitis caused by leather...

  6. Chromium intensification of a processed dental radiograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was undertaken to determine (1) the usefulness of chromium intensifier to improve the diagnostic quality of light radiograph; (2) the effect of chromium intensifier on density contrast; and (3) the effect of various chemical concentrations on density. The following results obtained: 1. CHROMIUM INTENSIFIER is useful for intensifying and improving the diagnostic quality of a light dental radiograph. 2. The degree of intensification can be controlled by varying bleaching time, repeating the processing, varying the proportions of the potassium bicarbonate and hydrochloric acid solutions. 3. The image produced is black and permanent. 4. The intensifier increases density and contrast

  7. Chromium (VI) adsorption on boehmite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granados-Correa, F. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apartado Postal 18-1027 Col., Escandon, Delegacion Miguel Hidalgo, C.P. 11801 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: fgc@nuclear.inin.mx; Jimenez-Becerril, J. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apartado Postal 18-1027 Col., Escandon, Delegacion Miguel Hidalgo, C.P. 11801 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2009-03-15

    Boehmite was synthesized and characterized in order to study the adsorption behavior and the removal of Cr(VI) ions from aqueous solutions as a function of contact time, initial pH solution, amount of adsorbent and initial metal ion concentration, using batch technique. Adsorption data of Cr(VI) on the boehmite were analyzed according to Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) adsorption models. Thermodynamic parameters for the adsorption system were determinated at 293, 303, 313 and 323 K temperatures. The kinetic values and thermodynamic parameters from the adsorption process show that the Cr(VI) ions adsorption on boehmite is an endothermic and spontaneous process. These results show that the boehmite could be considered as a potential adsorbent for chromium ions in aqueous solutions.

  8. Chromium – An essential mineral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merlin D Lindemann

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The status of chromium (Cr is not a new question. Cr is clearly an essential nutrient; this is a position that has been held for over three decades by individual scientists, groups of scientists, and governmental committees. The most uniform response across species with regard to Cr deficiency symptoms that are responsive to Cr supplementation are alterations in glucose metabolism with special reference to peripheral tissue sensitivity to insulin. Because the body’s ability to control blood glucose is critical to many life functions, and loss of ability to adequately control blood glucose can lead to many health debilitations, a consequence of Cr supplementation can be improved health and reproductive outcomes as well as improved survival rate or life span.

  9. Occupational asthma due to chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroyer, C; Dewitte, J D; Bassanets, A; Boutoux, M; Daniel, C; Clavier, J

    1998-01-01

    We describe a 28-year-old subject employed as a roofer in a construction company since the age of 19, who developed work-related symptoms of a cough, shortness of breath, wheezing, rhinitis and headaches. A description of a usual day at work suggested that the symptoms worsened while he was sawing corrugated fiber cement. Baseline spirometry was normal, and there was a mild bronchial hyperresponsiveness to carbachol. A skin patch test to chromium was negative. A specific inhalation challenge showed a boderline fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) after exposure to fiber cement dust. Exposure to nebulization of potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7), at 0.1 mg.ml-1 for 30 min, was followed by an immediate fall by 20% FEV1. Simultaneously, a significant increase in bronchial hyperresponsiveness was demonstrated. PMID:9782225

  10. Chromium isotope uptake in carbonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodler, Alexandra

    Chromium (Cr) is a redox sensitive element potentially capable of tracing fine-scale fluctuations of the oxygenation of Earth’s early surface environments and seawater. The Cr isotope composition of carbonates could perhaps be used as paleo-redox proxy to elucidate changes in the geological past....... Processes that potentially fractionate Cr isotopes, perhaps during deposition, burial and alteration need to be constrained.Previous studies have shown that Cr isotopes are fractionated during oxidative weathering on land, where heavy Cr isotopes are preferentially removed with Cr(VI) while residual soils...... retain an isotopically light Cr signature. Cr(VI) enriched in heavy Cr isotopes is then transported via river waters to the oceans and sequestered into marine sediments. Marine chemical sediments such asbanded iron formations and modern marine carbonates have proven useful in recording the Cr isotope...

  11. Electroextraction of boron from boron carbide scrap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Ashish [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam – 603102 (India); Anthonysamy, S., E-mail: sas@igcar.gov.in [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam – 603102 (India); Ghosh, C. [Physical Metallurgy Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam – 603102 (India); Ravindran, T.R. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam – 603102 (India); Divakar, R.; Mohandas, E. [Physical Metallurgy Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam – 603102 (India)

    2013-10-15

    Studies were carried out to extract elemental boron from boron carbide scrap. The physicochemical nature of boron obtained through this process was examined by characterizing its chemical purity, specific surface area, size distribution of particles and X-ray crystallite size. The microstructural characteristics of the extracted boron powder were analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopic examination of boron powder was also carried out to determine its crystalline form. Oxygen and carbon were found to be the major impurities in boron. Boron powder of purity ∼ 92 wt. % could be produced by the electroextraction process developed in this study. Optimized method could be used for the recovery of enriched boron ({sup 10}B > 20 at. %) from boron carbide scrap generated during the production of boron carbide. - Highlights: • Recovery of {sup 10}B from nuclear grade boron carbide scrap • Development of process flow sheet • Physicochemical characterization of electroextracted boron • Microscopic examination of electroextracted boron.

  12. Vanadium carbide coatings: deposition process and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanadium carbide coatings on carbon and alloyed steels were produced by the method of diffusion saturation from the borax melt. Thickness of the vanadium carbide layer was 5-15 μm, depending upon the steel grade and diffusion saturation parameters. Microhardness was 20000-28000 MPa and wear resistance of the coatings under conditions of end face friction without lubrication against a mating body of WC-2Co was 15-20 times as high as that of boride coatings. Vanadium carbide coatings can operate in air at a temperature of up to 400 oC. They improve fatigue strength of carbon steels and decrease the rate of corrosion in sea and fresh water and in acid solutions. The use of vanadium carbide coatings for hardening of various types of tools, including cutting tools, allows their service life to be extended by a factor of 3 to 30. (author)

  13. Stabilization of boron carbide via silicon doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, J E; Bhakhri, V; Hao, R; Prior, T J; Scheler, T; Gregoryanz, E; Chhowalla, M; Giulani, F

    2015-01-14

    Boron carbide is one of the lightest and hardest ceramics, but its applications are limited by its poor stability against a partial phase separation into separate boron and carbon. Phase separation is observed under high non-hydrostatic stress (both static and dynamic), resulting in amorphization. The phase separation is thought to occur in just one of the many naturally occurring polytypes in the material, and this raises the possibility of doping the boron carbide to eliminate this polytype. In this work, we have synthesized boron carbide doped with silicon. We have conducted a series of characterizations (transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction) on pure and silicon-doped boron carbide following static compression to 50 GPa non-hydrostatic pressure. We find that the level of amorphization under static non-hydrostatic pressure is drastically reduced by the silicon doping. PMID:25427850

  14. Electroextraction of boron from boron carbide scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies were carried out to extract elemental boron from boron carbide scrap. The physicochemical nature of boron obtained through this process was examined by characterizing its chemical purity, specific surface area, size distribution of particles and X-ray crystallite size. The microstructural characteristics of the extracted boron powder were analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopic examination of boron powder was also carried out to determine its crystalline form. Oxygen and carbon were found to be the major impurities in boron. Boron powder of purity ∼ 92 wt. % could be produced by the electroextraction process developed in this study. Optimized method could be used for the recovery of enriched boron (10B > 20 at. %) from boron carbide scrap generated during the production of boron carbide. - Highlights: • Recovery of 10B from nuclear grade boron carbide scrap • Development of process flow sheet • Physicochemical characterization of electroextracted boron • Microscopic examination of electroextracted boron

  15. Ni doping of semiconducting boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wide band gap, temperature stability, high resistivity, and robustness of semiconducting boron carbide make it an attractive material for device applications. Undoped boron carbide is p type; Ni acts as a n-type dopant. Here we present the results of controlled doping of boron carbide with Ni on thin film samples grown using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The change in the dopant concentration within the thin film as a function of the dopant flow rate in the precursor gas mixture was confirmed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements; with increasing dopant concentration, current-voltage (I-V) curves clearly establish the trend from p-type to n-type boron carbide.

  16. High temperature thermoelectric properties of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbides are refractory solids with potential for application as very high temperature p-type thermoelectrics in power conversion applications. The thermoelectric properties of boron carbides are unconventional. In particular, the electrical conductivity is consistent with the thermally activated hopping of a high density (∼1021/cm3) of bipolarons; the Seebeck coefficient is anomalously large and increases with increasing temperature; and the thermal conductivity is surprisingly low. In this paper, these unusual properties and their relationship to the unusual structure and bonding present in boron carbides are reviewed. Finally, the potential for utilization of boron carbides at very high temperatures (up to 2200 degrees C) and for preparing n-type materials is discussed

  17. Stabilization of boron carbide via silicon doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, J. E.; Bhakhri, V.; Hao, R.; Prior, T. J.; Scheler, T.; Gregoryanz, E.; Chhowalla, M.; Giulani, F.

    2015-01-01

    Boron carbide is one of the lightest and hardest ceramics, but its applications are limited by its poor stability against a partial phase separation into separate boron and carbon. Phase separation is observed under high non-hydrostatic stress (both static and dynamic), resulting in amorphization. The phase separation is thought to occur in just one of the many naturally occurring polytypes in the material, and this raises the possibility of doping the boron carbide to eliminate this polytype. In this work, we have synthesized boron carbide doped with silicon. We have conducted a series of characterizations (transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction) on pure and silicon-doped boron carbide following static compression to 50 GPa non-hydrostatic pressure. We find that the level of amorphization under static non-hydrostatic pressure is drastically reduced by the silicon doping.

  18. Modelling Precipitation of Carbides in Martensitic Steels

    OpenAIRE

    Yamasaki, Shingo

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to model carbide precipitation in steels of a quaternary system which includes two substitutional elements. The work focuses on secondary hardening steels which are used for high-strength components, where hydrogen embrittlement is one of the major factors responsible for failure. It is believed that carbide particles can act as hydrogen trapping sites, thus reducing the risk of embrittlement. The thesis begins with a review of the physical metallurgy of secondary...

  19. Ultrarapid microwave synthesis of superconducting refractory carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nb1-xTaxC Carbides can be synthesized by high power MW methods in less than 30 s. In situ and ex situ techniques probing changes in temperature and dielectric properties with time demonstrate that the reactions self-terminate as the loss tangent of the materials decreases. The resulting carbides are carbon deficient and superconducting; Tc correlates linearly to unit cell volume, reaching a maximum at NbC. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  20. Simultaneous determination of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) in aqueous solutions by ion chromatography and chemiluminescence detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Jøns, O; Nielsen, B

    1992-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of chromium(iii) and chromium(vi) in a flow system based on chemiluminescence was developed. A Dionex cation-exchange guard column was used to separate chromium(iii) from chromium(vi), and chromium(vi) was reduced by potassium sulfite, whereupon both sp....... The detection limit was 0.5 micrograms l-1 for both species. Data were in agreement with Zeeman-effect background corrected atomic absorption spectrometry measurements....

  1. AEROSOL BEHAVIOR IN CHROMIUM WASTE INCINERATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suyuan Yu

    2003-01-01

    Cr2O3 is considered as the dominant incineration product during the combustion disposal of chromium waste. A hydrogen/air diffusion flame was employed to simulate the industrial process of incineration. Cr2O3 aerosols were generated inside the flame by the gas phase reaction of chromium and oxygen. Chromium came from the rapid decomposition of chromium hexacarbonyl (Cr(CO)6) at room temperature and was carried into the combustion chamber by hydrogen. Aerosol and clusters can then be easily formed in the flame by nucleation and coagulation. A two dimensional Discrete-Sectional Model (DSM) was adopted to calculate the Cr2O3 aerosol behavior. The experimental measurement method was Dynamic Light Scattering. The numerically predicted results agreed well with those of the experimental measurement. Both results show that the Cr2O3 aerosol size reached about 70 nanometers at the flame top.

  2. Potentiometry: A Chromium (III) -- EDTA Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, J. I.; Howell, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an experiment that involves the preparation of a chromium (III)-EDTA compound, a study of its infrared spectrum, and the potentiometric determination of two successive acid dissociation constants. (Author/GS)

  3. Optimized chemical composition, working and heat treatment condition for resistance to irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking of cold worked 316 and high-chromium austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have reported that the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in baffle former bolts made of austenitic stainless steels for PWR after long-term operation is caused by irradiation-induced grain boundary segregation. The resistance to PWSCC of simulated austenitic stainless steels whose chemical compositions are simulated to the grain boundary chemical composition of 316 stainless steel after irradiation increased with decrease of the silicon content, increases of the chromium content, and precipitation of M23C6 carbides at the grain boundaries. In order to develop resistance to irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking in austenitic stainless steels, optimized chemical compositions and heat treatment conditions for 316CW and high-chromium austenitic stainless steels for PWR baffle former bolts were investigated. For 316CW stainless steel, ultra-low-impurities and high-chromium content are beneficial. About 20% cold working before aging and after solution treatment has also been recommended to recover sensitization and make M23C6 carbides coherent with the matrix at the grain boundaries. Heating at 700 to 725degC for 20 to 50 h was selected as a suitable aging procedure. Cold working of 5 to 10% after aging produced the required mechanical properties. The optimized composition of the high-chromium austenitic stainless steel contents 30% chromium, 30% nickel, and ultra-low impurity levels. This composition also reduces the difference between its thermal expansion coefficient and that of 304 stainless steel for baffle plates. Aging at 700 to 725degC for longer than 40 h and cold working of 10 to 15% after aging were selected to meet mechanical property specifications. (author)

  4. Plasma spraying of zirconium carbide – hafnium carbide – tungsten cermets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brožek, Vlastimil; Ctibor, Pavel; Cheong, D.-I.; Yang, S.-H.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 1 (2009), s. 49-64. ISSN 1335-8987 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Plasma spraying * cermet coatings * microhardness * zirconium carbide * hafnium carbide * tungsten * water stabilized plasma Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  5. Plasma Spraying of Zirconium Carbide – Hafnium Carbide – Tungsten Cermets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brožek, Vlastimil; Ctibor, Pavel; Cheong, D.-I.; Yang, S.-H.

    Vol. 3. Reutte: PlanseeGroup, 2009, s. 1-3. (GT49). ISBN N. [Plansee Seminar on High Performance PM Materials /17th./. Reutte (AT), 25.05.2009-29.05.2009] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Hafnium carbide * zirconium carbide * tungsten cermets * plasma spraying * water stabilized plasma Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  6. Bioremediation of chromium solutions and chromium containing wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaviya, Piyush; Singh, Asha

    2016-08-01

    Cr(VI) represents a serious threat to human health, living resources and ecological system as it is persistent, carcinogenic and toxic, whereas, Cr(III), another stable oxidation state of Cr, is less toxic and can be readily precipitated out of solution. The conventional methods of Cr(VI) removal from wastewaters comprise of chemical reduction followed by chemical precipitation. However, these methods utilize large amounts of chemicals and generate toxic sludge. This necessitates the need for devising an eco-technological strategy that would use the untapped potential of the biological world for remediation of Cr(VI) containing wastewaters. Among several viable approaches, biotransformation of Cr(VI) to relatively non-toxic Cr(III) by chromium resistant bacteria offers an economical- and environment-friendly option for its detoxification. Various studies on use of Cr(VI) tolerant viable bacterial isolates for treatment of Cr(VI) containing solutions and wastewater have been reported. Therefore, a detailed account of mechanisms and processes involved in bioreduction of Cr(VI) from solutions and wastewaters by bacterial isolates are the focus of this review article in addition to a discussion on toxicity of Cr(VI) on bacterial strains and various factors affecting Cr(VI) bioreduction. PMID:25358056

  7. Influence of Rare Earth on Carbide in Weld Metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yuan-Bin; REN Deng-Yi

    2003-01-01

    The influence of rare earths (RE) on carbides in high carbon steel weld metal was studied by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX). It is found that rare earth markedly affects the quantity, morphology and distribution of carbides. The precipitating mechanism of carbides was proposed in which rare earth compounds with high surface energy serve as the nucleation sites for carbides in superheated liquid metal and the induced carbides are precipitated extensively and distributed evenly. The preferential precipitation of carbides decreases the carbon content in matrix, which is transformed into low carbon lath martensite after welds are chilled to room temperature.

  8. Formation of Interfacial Carbide Layers in Multilayer Ti/DLC Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaramazza, Jasen; Buck, Zachary; Donato, Tyler; Curran, Brittany; Lunk, C. A.; Lofland, S. E.; Hettinger, J. D.

    2012-02-01

    Titanium (Ti)/Diamond-like-carbon (DLC) and Chromium (Cr)/Carbon (C) multilayer films were prepared on c-axis oriented single crystal sapphire (Al2O3) substrates using magnetron sputtering. Interfacial properties of the films were analyzed using x-ray reflectivity and scanning electron microscopy. When DLC is sputtered on a layer of Ti, an interfacial layer of titanium carbide (TiC) forms which is reported for the first time. Energy provided by the substrate bias necessary to facilitate DLC sp3 bond formation is suspected of allowing TiC to synthesize in a thin layer before DLC forms. It was also found that DLC has difficulty forming on Cr. These results are relevant to biomedical applications where DLC is applied as a low friction/wear film that can be formed on the surface of implants composed mainly of titanium. Further investigation into the medical and tribological effects of TiC interfacial layers is suggested.

  9. Diminishing Chromium Use on Combined Chromium-Gambier Tanning Process Upon the Characteristics of Tanned Leather

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kasim

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The research was aimed to investigate the influence of minimizing chromium use on combined chromium-gambier process upon the characteristics of tanned leather. At the first stage of tanning process, chromium was used and in the second stage it was replaced by gambier. The raw material used was dried saline-preserved goat skin. The treatments applied on the tanning process were the different concentrations of chromium ranging from the highest level of 6% to the lowest level of 1% which was then re-tanned by using 8% concentration of gambier. The examination parameters included chemical and physical properties as well as visual investigation on the tanned leather in accordance with SNI-06-0463-1989-A. The result showed that the tanning process by using 2% chromium in the first step and 8% gambier in the second step was a treatment combination producing tanned leather that met the standard. The examination on tanned leather resulted from such treatment showed 56.33% rawhide, 17.45% of bound tannin, 31.22% of tanning level, tensile strength 386.30 kg/cm2, flexibility 31.91%, leather width 1.3 mm, density 0.75 g/cm3, the leather was quite elastic with light brownish color. In conclusion, minimizing the use of chromium in the combined tanning process of chromium and gambier can be implemented to the lowest of 2% chromium concentration and 8% gambier in the first and second step, respectively.

  10. Lateral stress evolution in chromium sulfide cermets with varying excess chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petel, O. E.; Appleby-Thomas, G. J.; Wood, D. C.; Capozzi, A.; Nabavi, A.; Goroshin, S.; Frost, D. L.; Hazell, P. J.

    2016-04-01

    The shock response of chromium sulfide-chromium, a cermet of potential interest as a matrix material for ballistic applications, has been investigated at two molar ratios. Using a combustion synthesis technique allowed for control of the molar ratio of the material, which was investigated under near-stoichiometric (cermet) and excess chromium (interpenetrating composite) conditions, representing chromium:sulfur molar ratios of 1.15:1 and 4:1, respectively. The compacts were investigated via the plate-impact technique, which allowed the material to be loaded under a one-dimensional state of strain. Embedded manganin stress gauges were employed to monitor the temporal evolution of longitudinal and lateral components of stress in both materials. Comparison of these two components has allowed assessment of the variation of material shear strength both with impact pressure/strain-rate and time for the two molar ratio conditions. The two materials exhibited identical material strength despite variations in their excess chromium contents.

  11. Joining of boron carbide using nickel interlayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbide ceramics such as boron carbide due to their unique properties such as low density, high refractoriness, and high strength to weight ratio have many applications in different industries. This study focuses on direct bonding of boron carbide for high temperature applications using nickel interlayer. The process variables such as bonding time, temperature, and pressure have been investigated. The microstructure of the joint area was studied using electron scanning microscope technique. At all the bonding temperatures ranging from 1150 to 1300degC a reaction layer formed across the ceramic/metal interface. The thickness of the reaction layer increased by increasing temperature. The strength of the bonded samples was measured using shear testing method. The highest strength value obtained was about 100 MPa and belonged to the samples bonded at 1250 for 75 min bonding time. The strength of the joints decreased by increasing the bonding temperature above 1250degC. The results of this study showed that direct bonding technique along with nickel interlayer can be successfully utilized for bonding boron carbide ceramic to itself. This method may be used for bonding boron carbide to metals as well.

  12. Wear and wear transition in silicon carbide ceramics during sliding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wear and wear transition in silicon carbide ceramics during sliding have been investigated. Three different microstructures, i.e., solid-state-sintered silicon carbide, liquid-phase-sintered silicon carbide, and a liquid-phase-sintered SiC-TiB2 composite, were produced by hot pressing. Wear data and examinations of worn surfaces showed that the wear behavior of these silicon carbide ceramics was significantly different. In the solid-state-sintered silicon carbide, the wear occurred by a grooving process. In the liquid-phase-sintered silicon carbide and composite, on the other hand, an abrupt transition in the wear mechanism from an initial grooving process to a grain pullout process occurred during the test. The transition occurred significantly earlier in the composite than in the carbide. The different wear behavior in these silicon carbide ceramics is discussed in relation to the grain or interphase boundary strength

  13. Method of fabricating porous silicon carbide (SiC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, Joseph S. (Inventor); Kurtz, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Porous silicon carbide is fabricated according to techniques which result in a significant portion of nanocrystallites within the material in a sub 10 nanometer regime. There is described techniques for passivating porous silicon carbide which result in the fabrication of optoelectronic devices which exhibit brighter blue luminescence and exhibit improved qualities. Based on certain of the techniques described porous silicon carbide is used as a sacrificial layer for the patterning of silicon carbide. Porous silicon carbide is then removed from the bulk substrate by oxidation and other methods. The techniques described employ a two-step process which is used to pattern bulk silicon carbide where selected areas of the wafer are then made porous and then the porous layer is subsequently removed. The process to form porous silicon carbide exhibits dopant selectivity and a two-step etching procedure is implemented for silicon carbide multilayers.

  14. Boron carbide whisker and platelet reinforced ceramic matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide whisker and platelet-reinforced alumina and boron-carbide-whisker-reinforced silicon carbide composites were prepared by hot-pressing. The mechanical properties of hot-pressed boron carbide platelet and whisker-reinforced composites are better than the inherent ceramic matrix. A maximum fracture toughness, K(lc), of 9.5 MPa sq rt m is achieved for alumina/boron carbide whisker composites, 8.6 MPa sq rt m is achieved for alumina/boron carbide platelet composites, and 3.8 MPa sq rt m is achieved for silicon carbide/boron carbide whisker composites. The fracture toughness is dependent on the volume fraction of the platelets and whiskers. 12 refs

  15. Silicon Carbide Solar Cells Investigated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.

    2001-01-01

    The semiconductor silicon carbide (SiC) has long been known for its outstanding resistance to harsh environments (e.g., thermal stability, radiation resistance, and dielectric strength). However, the ability to produce device-quality material is severely limited by the inherent crystalline defects associated with this material and their associated electronic effects. Much progress has been made recently in the understanding and control of these defects and in the improved processing of this material. Because of this work, it may be possible to produce SiC-based solar cells for environments with high temperatures, light intensities, and radiation, such as those experienced by solar probes. Electronics and sensors based on SiC can operate in hostile environments where conventional silicon-based electronics (limited to 350 C) cannot function. Development of this material will enable large performance enhancements and size reductions for a wide variety of systems--such as high-frequency devices, high-power devices, microwave switching devices, and high-temperature electronics. These applications would supply more energy-efficient public electric power distribution and electric vehicles, more powerful microwave electronics for radar and communications, and better sensors and controls for cleaner-burning, more fuel-efficient jet aircraft and automobile engines. The 6H-SiC polytype is a promising wide-bandgap (Eg = 3.0 eV) semiconductor for photovoltaic applications in harsh solar environments that involve high-temperature and high-radiation conditions. The advantages of this material for this application lie in its extremely large breakdown field strength, high thermal conductivity, good electron saturation drift velocity, and stable electrical performance at temperatures as high as 600 C. This behavior makes it an attractive photovoltaic solar cell material for devices that can operate within three solar radii of the Sun.

  16. The diffusion bonding of silicon carbide and boron carbide using refractory metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joining is an enabling technology for the application of structural ceramics at high temperatures. Metal foil diffusion bonding is a simple process for joining silicon carbide or boron carbide by solid-state, diffusive conversion of the metal foil into carbide and silicide compounds that produce bonding. Metal diffusion bonding trials were performed using thin foils (5 microm to 100 microm) of refractory metals (niobium, titanium, tungsten, and molybdenum) with plates of silicon carbide (both α-SiC and β-SiC) or boron carbide that were lapped flat prior to bonding. The influence of bonding temperature, bonding pressure, and foil thickness on bond quality was determined from metallographic inspection of the bonds. The microstructure and phases in the joint region of the diffusion bonds were evaluated using SEM, microprobe, and AES analysis. The use of molybdenum foil appeared to result in the highest quality bond of the metal foils evaluated for the diffusion bonding of silicon carbide and boron carbide. Bonding pressure appeared to have little influence on bond quality. The use of a thinner metal foil improved the bond quality. The microstructure of the bond region produced with either the α-SiC and β-SiC polytypes were similar

  17. CALPHAD study of cubic carbide systems with Cr

    OpenAIRE

    He, Zhangting

    2015-01-01

    Cubic carbides (titanium, tantalum, niobium, and zirconium carbides) can constitute a significant proportion of so-called cubic and cermet grades, where it is added to substitute a portion of tungsten carbide. It is thus critical to understand and be able to thermodynamically model the cubic carbide systems. In order to do this, the thermodynamic descriptions of lower order systems, such as the Ti-Cr-C system, need to be well studied. To approach this goal, an extensive literature survey of t...

  18. The enriched chromium neutrino source for GALLEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preparation and study of an intense source of neutrinos in the form of neutron irradiated materials which are enriched in Cr-50 for use in the GALLEX solar neutrino experiment are discussed. Chromyl fluoride gas is enriched in the Cr-50 isotope by gas centrifugation and subsequently converted to a very stable form of chromium oxide. The results of neutron activation analyses of such chromium samples indicate low levels of any long-lived activities, but show that short-lived activities, in particular Na-24, may be of concern. These results show that irradiating chromium oxide enriched in Cr-50 is preferable to irradiating either natural chromium or argon gas as a means of producing a neutrino source to calibrate the GALLEX detector. These results of the impurity level analysis of the enriched chromyl fluoride gas and its conversion to the oxide are also of interest to work in progress by other members of the Collaboration investigating an alternative conversion of the enriched gas to chromium metal. 35 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs

  19. Serum chromium levels in gestational diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P G Sundararaman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To measure serum chromium level in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM from Chennai, South India. Materials and Methods: Thirty women with gestational diabetes, 60 age matched controls. Inclusion criteria: Gestational age 22-28 weeks, age group 20-35 years. Exclusion Criteria: Gestational age beyond 28 weeks, malnutrition or presence of infection. Serum chromium was measured using inductive couple plasma emission spectrometer. Results: Serum chromium levels of women with GDM, 1.59+/-0.02 ng/ml (range: 0.16-4.0 ng/ml were lower than in controls (4.58+/-0.62 ng/ml; range 0.82-5.33 ng/ml (P < 0.001. However, there were no significant differences among cases and controls when subdivided by parity. Conclusions: Women with GDM from a South Indian city had lower levels of serum chromium compared to pregnant women without GDM. Studies may be done whether chromium supplementation is useful in this group of women.

  20. Occupational exposure to chromium(VI compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Skowroń

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the effect of chromium(VI (Cr(VI on human health under conditions of acute and chronic exposure in the workplace. Chromium(VI compounds as carcinogens and/or mutagens pose a direct danger to people exposed to them. If carcinogens cannot be eliminated from the work and living environments, their exposure should be reduced to a minimum. In the European Union the proposed binding occupational exposure limit value (BOELV for chromium(VI of 0.025 mg/m³ is still associated with high cancer risk. Based on the Scientific Commitee of Occupational Exposure Limits (SCOEL document chromium(VI concentrations at 0.025 mg/m³ increases the risk of lung cancer in 2–14 cases per 1000 exposed workers. Exposure to chromium(VI compounds expressed in Cr(VI of 0.01 mg Cr(VI/m3 is responsible for the increased number of lung cancer cases in 1–6 per 1000 people employed in this condition for the whole period of professional activity. Med Pr 2015;66(3:407–427

  1. [Occupational exposure to chromium(VI) compounds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowroń, Jolanta; Konieczko, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the effect of chromium(VI) (Cr(VI)) on human health under conditions of acute and chronic exposure in the workplace. Chromium(VI) compounds as carcinogens and/or mutagens pose a direct danger to people exposed to them. If carcinogens cannot be eliminated from the work and living environments, their exposure should be reduced to a minimum. In the European Union the proposed binding occupational exposure limit value (BOELV) for chromium(VI) of 0.025 mg/m³ is still associated with high cancer risk. Based on the Scientific Commitee of Occupational Exposure Limits (SCOEL) document chromium(VI) concentrations at 0.025 mg/m³ increases the risk of lung cancer in 2-14 cases per 1000 exposed workers. Exposure to chromium(VI) compounds expressed in Cr(VI) of 0.01 mg Cr(VI)/m3; is responsible for the increased number of lung cancer cases in 1-6 per 1000 people employed in this condition for the whole period of professional activity. PMID:26325053

  2. Silicon carbide, an emerging high temperature semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matus, Lawrence G.; Powell, J. Anthony

    In recent years, the aerospace propulsion and space power communities have expressed a growing need for electronic devices that are capable of sustained high temperature operation. Applications for high temperature electronic devices include development instrumentation within engines, engine control, and condition monitoring systems, and power conditioning and control systems for space platforms and satellites. Other earth-based applications include deep-well drilling instrumentation, nuclear reactor instrumentation and control, and automotive sensors. To meet the needs of these applications, the High Temperature Electronics Program at the Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as a high temperature semiconductor material. Research is focussed on developing the crystal growth, characterization, and device fabrication technologies necessary to produce a family of silicon carbide electronic devices and integrated sensors. The progress made in developing silicon carbide is presented, and the challenges that lie ahead are discussed.

  3. Anomalous electronic transport in boron carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emin, D.; Samara, G. A.; Wood, C.

    The boron carbides are composed of icosahedral units, B12 and B11C1, linked together by strong intericosahedral bonds. With such distributions of icosahedral and intericosahedral compositions, boron carbides, B/sub 1-x/C/sub x/, are single phase over 0.1 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 0.2. The electronic transport properties of the boron carbides were examined within this single-phase region. Results are inconsistent with conventional analyses of both itinerant and hopping transport. Most striking are Seebeck coefficients which are both large and rapidly increasing functions of temperature despite thermally activated dc conductivities. These results manifest the hopping of small bipolaronic holes between carbon-containing icosahedral that are inequivalent in energy and electron-lattice coupling strength. Under hydrostatic pressures up to approx. 25 kbar, the dc conductivities increase with pressure. This anomalous behavior for hopping conduction reflects the distinctive structure and bonding of these materials.

  4. Carbides composite surface layers produced by (PTA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajoure, Meloud, E-mail: Tajoore2000@yahoo.com [MechanicalEng.,HIHM,Gharian (Libya); Tajouri, Ali, E-mail: Tajouri-am@yahoo.com, E-mail: dr.mokhtarphd@yahoo.com; Abuzriba, Mokhtar, E-mail: Tajouri-am@yahoo.com, E-mail: dr.mokhtarphd@yahoo.com [Materials and Metallurgical Eng., UOT, Tripoli (Libya); Akreem, Mosbah, E-mail: makreem@yahoo.com [Industrial Research Centre,Tripoli (Libya)

    2013-12-16

    The plasma transferred arc technique was applied to deposit a composite layer of nickel base with tungsten carbide in powder form on to surface of low alloy steel 18G2A type according to polish standard. Results showed that, plasma transferred arc hard facing process was successfully conducted by using Deloro alloy 22 plus tungsten carbide powders. Maximum hardness of 1489 HV and minimum dilution of 8.4 % were achieved by using an arc current of 60 A. However, when the current was further increased to 120 A and the dilution increases with current increase while the hardness decreases. Microstructure of the nickel base deposit with tungsten carbide features uniform distribution of reinforcement particles with regular grain shape half - dissolved in the matrix.

  5. Flashlamp-pumped lasing of chromium-doped GSG garnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The implications for the practical use of chromium:GSGG in lamp-pumped tunable lasers are discussed in this paper. The authors report here some major improvements in the performance of the flashlamp-pumped chromium:GSGG laser

  6. Surface Chemistry and Spectroscopy of Chromium in Inorganic Oxides

    OpenAIRE

    Weckhuysen, B. M.; Wachs, I.E.; Schoonheydt, R. A.

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on the surface chemistry and spectroscopy of chromium in inorganic oxides. Characterization of the molecular structures of chromium; Mechanics of hydrogenation-dehydrogenation reactions; Mobility and reactivity on oxidic surfaces.

  7. Microstructure and properties of Ti–Nb–V–Mo-alloyed high chromium cast iron

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Youping Ma; Xiulan Li; Yugao Liu; Shuyi Zhou; Xiaoming Dang

    2013-10-01

    The correlations of microstructure, hardness and fracture toughness of high chromium cast iron with the addition of alloys (titanium, vanadium, niobium and molybdenum) were investigated. The results indicated that the as-cast microstructure changed from hypereutectic, eutectic to hypoeutectic with the increase of alloy contents. Mo dissolved in austenite and increased the hardness by solid solution strengthening. TiC and NbC mainly existed in austenite and impeded the austenite dendrite development. V existed in multicomponent systems in forms of V alloy compounds (VCrFe8 and VCr2C2).With the increase of alloy additions, carbides size changed gradually from refinement to coarseness, hardness and impact toughness were increased and then decreased. Compared with the fracture toughness (6 J/cm2) and hardness (50.8HRC) without any alloy addition, the toughness and hardness at 0.60 V–0.60Ti–0.60Nb–0.35Mo (wt%) additions were improved and achieved to 11 J/cm2 and 58.9HRC, respectively. The synergistic roles of Ti, Nb, V and Mo influenced the solidification behaviour of alloy. The refinement of microstructure and improvement of carbides morphologies, size and distribution improved the impact toughness.

  8. Tool steel for cold worck niobium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tool steel was designed so as to have a microstructure with the matrix similar a cold work tool steel of D series, containing a dispersion of Niobium carbides, with no intention of putting Niobium in solution on the matrix. The alloy was cast, forged and heat treated. The alloy was easily forged; the primary carbide morfology, after forging, was faceted, tending to equiaxed. The hardness obtained was equivalent to the maximum hardness of a D-3 sttel when quenched from any temperature between 9500C, and 12000, showing a very small sensitivy to the quenching temperature. (Author)

  9. Silicon carbide microsystems for harsh environments

    CERN Document Server

    Wijesundara, Muthu B J

    2011-01-01

    Silicon Carbide Microsystems for Harsh Environments reviews state-of-the-art Silicon Carbide (SiC) technologies that, when combined, create microsystems capable of surviving in harsh environments, technological readiness of the system components, key issues when integrating these components into systems, and other hurdles in harsh environment operation. The authors use the SiC technology platform suite the model platform for developing harsh environment microsystems and then detail the current status of the specific individual technologies (electronics, MEMS, packaging). Additionally, methods

  10. Sintering of boron carbide (B4C)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide (B4C) is used as a control element in different types of reactors due to the high fast and thermal neutron absorption cross-section of B-10. Requirements of the Advanced Reactor Division of the Bariloche Atomic Center triggered the study of the possibilities of fabricating B4C pellets by cold-pressing and sintering. The results of essays of sinterability of two different commercial boron carbide powders, sintered at temperatures between 1200 and 2200 deg C, are given. Characterizations of the samples were made to determine the evolution of density, porosity, microstructure and boron content as a function of sintering temperature. (Author)

  11. Thermal conductivity behavior of boron carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, C.; Zoltan, A.; Emin, D.; Gray, P. E.

    1983-01-01

    Knowledge of the thermal conductivity of boron carbides is necessary to evaluate its potential for high temperature thermoelectric energy conversion applications. The thermal diffusivity of hot pressed boron carbide B/sub 1-x/C/sub x/ samples as a function of composition, temperature and temperature cycling was measured. These data in concert with density and specific heat data yield the thermal conductivities of these materials. The results in terms of a structural model to explain the electrical transport data and novel mechanisms for thermal conduction are discussed.

  12. Ultrarapid microwave synthesis of superconducting refractory carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallance, Simon R. [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Nottingham (United Kingdom); School of Chemistry, University Nottingham (United Kingdom); Round, David M. [School of Chemistry, University Nottingham (United Kingdom); Ritter, Clemens [Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France); Cussen, Edmund J. [WestCHEM, Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Kingman, Sam [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Nottingham (United Kingdom); Gregory, Duncan H. [WestCHEM, Department of Chemistry, University of Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-26

    Nb{sub 1-x}Ta{sub x}C Carbides can be synthesized by high power MW methods in less than 30 s. In situ and ex situ techniques probing changes in temperature and dielectric properties with time demonstrate that the reactions self-terminate as the loss tangent of the materials decreases. The resulting carbides are carbon deficient and superconducting; T{sub c} correlates linearly to unit cell volume, reaching a maximum at NbC. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  13. Studies of Some Novel Chromium Pyridine Dicarboxylate Complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Chauhan Jayprakash S; Patel Rameshchandra P; Pandya Ajit V

    2014-01-01

    Chromium pyridine di-carboxylate complexes are synthesized from Chromium (III) with pyridine 2, 6- dicarboxylic acid, pyridine 2, 3 and 2, 5- dicarboxylic acids. Chromium forms colored complexes. Chromium (III) forms a violate complex with pyridine 2, 6- dicarboxylic acid and purple violate complex with pyridine 2, 3 and 2, 5- dicarboxylic acids. The job’s method indicates metal ligand ratio to be 1:2. The interpretation of UV-VIS spectra indicates octahedral geometry and IR spectra give clue...

  14. Determination of chromium combined with DNA, RNA and proteins in chromium-rich brewer's yeast by NAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The content of chromium in the DNA, RNA and protein fractions separated from chromium-rich and normal brewer's yeast was determined by neutron activation analysis (NAA). Our results show that the extracted relative amounts and concentrations of DNA, RNA and proteins have no significant difference for two types of yeast, but the chromium content in DNA, RNA and proteins fractions extracted from the chromium-rich yeast are substantially higher than those from the normal. In addition, the concentration of chromium in DNA is much higher than that in RNA and proteins. It is evident that the inorganic chromium compounds can enter the yeast cell during the yeast cultivation in the chromium-containing culture medium and are converted into organic chromium species, which are combined with DNA, RNA and proteins. (author)

  15. Chromium allergy and dermatitis: prevalence and main findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Johansen, Jeanne D.; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl;

    2015-01-01

    The history of chromium as an allergen goes back more than a century, and includesan interventional success with national legislation that led to significant changes inthe epidemiology of chromium allergy in construction workers. The 2015 EU Leather Regulation once again put a focus on chromium...

  16. 21 CFR 73.1326 - Chromium hydroxide green.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium hydroxide green. 73.1326 Section 73.1326... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1326 Chromium hydroxide green. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive chromium hydroxide green is principally hydrated chromic sesquioxide...

  17. 21 CFR 73.2326 - Chromium hydroxide green.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium hydroxide green. 73.2326 Section 73.2326... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2326 Chromium hydroxide green. (a) Identity and specifications.The color additive chromium hydroxide green shall conform in identity and specifications to...

  18. Thermodynamic properties of chromium bearing slags and minerals. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao Yanping; Holappa, L.

    1996-12-31

    In this report, the thermodynamic properties of chromium bearing slags and minerals were reviewed based on the available information in the literature. It includes the analysing methods for oxidation state of chromium in slags, oxidation state of chromium and activities of chromium oxides in slags and minerals. The phase diagrams of chromium oxide systems and chromium distributions between slag and metal phases are also covered ill this review. Concerning the analysing methods, it was found that most of the available approaches are limited to iron free slag systems and the sample preparation is very sensitive to the analysing results. In silicate slags under reducing atmosphere, divalent and trivalent chromium co-exist in the slags. It is agreed that the fraction of divalent chromium to total chromium increases with higher temperature, lower slag basicity and oxygen potential. For the slags under oxidising atmosphere, trivalent, pentavalent and hexavalent states were reported to be stable. The activities of CrO and CrO{sub 1.5} were concluded to have positive deviation from ideal solution. Slag basicity has a positive effect and temperature has a negative effect on the activities of chromium oxides. The phase diagrams of the Cr-O, binary, and ternary chromium containing oxide systems have been examined systematically. The analysis shows that the data on the quaternary and quinary systems are insufficient, and require further investigation. The most important features of the chromium containing silicate slags are the large miscibility gaps and the stability of the chromite spinel. (orig.) (76 refs.)

  19. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining...

  20. Hexavalent and trivalent chromium in leather: What should be done?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretto, Angelo

    2015-11-01

    Trivalent chromium compounds are used for leather tanning, and chromium may be released during use of leather goods. In certain instances, small amounts of hexavalent chromium can be formed and released. Both trivalent and hexavalent chromium can elicit allergic skin reaction in chromium sensitised subjects, the latter being significantly more potent. Induction of sensitisation only occurs after exposure to hexavalent chromium. A minority of subjects are sensitised to chromium, and in a fraction of these subjects allergic skin reaction have been described after wearing leather shoes or, less frequently, other leather goods. The evidence that in all these cases the reaction is related to hexavalent chromium is not always strong. The content of hexavalent chromium in leather is regulated in European Union, but rate of release rather than content is relevant for allergic skin reaction. The role of trivalent chromium appear much less relevant if at all. Modern tanning procedure do not pose significant risk due to either hexavalent or trivalent chromium. Dismissing bad quality and worn-off leather goods is relevant in reducing or eliminating the skin reaction. It should also be pointed out that shoe components or substances other than chromium in leather may cause allergic/irritative skin reactions. PMID:26361854

  1. SAFETY OF TRIVALENT CHROMIUM COMPLEXES USED IN NUTRIENT SUPPLEMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toxicity studies regarding trivalent chromium have often been completed under conditions that are not designed to reflect conditions that would be encountered under normal physiological conditions. We have shown that the incorporation of chromium into tissues of rats from chromium chloride and chro...

  2. Strategies for chromium bioremediation of tannery effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Satyendra Kumar; Tripathi, Manikant; Srinath, Thiruneelakantan

    2012-01-01

    Bioremediation offers the possibility of using living organisms (bacteria, fungi, algae,or plants), but primarily microorganisms, to degrade or remove environmental contaminants, and transform them into nontoxic or less-toxic forms. The major advantages of bioremediation over conventional physicochemical and biological treatment methods include low cost, good efficiency, minimization of chemicals, reduced quantity of secondary sludge, regeneration of cell biomass, and the possibility of recover-ing pollutant metals. Leather industries, which extensively employ chromium compounds in the tanning process, discharge spent-chromium-laden effluent into nearby water bodies. Worldwide, chromium is known to be one of the most common inorganic contaminants of groundwater at pollutant hazardous sites. Hexavalent chromium poses a health risk to all forms of life. Bioremediation of chromium extant in tannery waste involves different strategies that include biosorption, bioaccumulation,bioreduction, and immobilization of biomaterial(s). Biosorption is a nondirected physiochemical interaction that occurs between metal species and the cellular components of biological species. It is metabolism-dependent when living biomass is employed, and metabolism-independent in dead cell biomass. Dead cell biomass is much more effective than living cell biomass at biosorping heavy metals, including chromium. Bioaccumulation is a metabolically active process in living organisms that works through adsorption, intracellular accumulation, and bioprecipitation mechanisms. In bioreduction processes, microorganisms alter the oxidation/reduction state of toxic metals through direct or indirect biological and chemical process(es).Bioreduction of Cr6+ to Cr3+ not only decreases the chromium toxicity to living organisms, but also helps precipitate chromium at a neutral pH for further physical removal,thus offering promise as a bioremediation strategy. However, biosorption, bioaccumulation, and

  3. Collisional properties of trapped cold chromium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Pavlovich, Z; Côté, R; Sadeghpour, H R; Pavlovic, Zoran; Roos, Bjoern O.; Côté, Robin

    2004-01-01

    We report on calculations of the elastic cross section and thermalization rate for collision between two maximally spin-polarized chromium atoms in the cold and ultracold regimes, relevant to buffer-gas and magneto-optical cooling of chromium atoms. We calculate ab initio potential energy curves for Cr2 and the van der Waals coefficient C6, and construct interaction potentials between two colliding Cr atoms. We explore the effect of shape resonances on elastic cross section, and find that they dramatically affect the thermalization rate. Our calculated value for the s-wave scattering length is compared in magnitude with a recent measurement at ultracold temperatures.

  4. Synthesis and properties of low-carbon boron carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the production of boron carbides of low carbon content (3 and CCl4 at 1273-1673 K in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that phase separation had occurred, and tetragonal boron carbide was formed along with β-boron or α-boron carbide under carbon-depleted gas-phase conditions. At temperatures greater than 1390 degrees C, graphite substrates served as a carbon source, affecting the phases present. A microstructure typical of CVD-produced α-boron carbide was observed. Plan view TEM of tetragonal boron carbide revealed a blocklike structure

  5. Boron carbide-based ceramics via polymer route synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide is a ceramic material with excellent high temperature physical properties. As compared to conventional techniques, the preparation of boron carbide from polymeric precursors is attractive as this technique offers a number of unique advantages. In this paper, the screening of polymeric precursors to boron carbide will be discussed. Two promising boron carbide, carborane containing polymeric precursors have resulted in 60-70 wt.% ceramic yields. The chemistry of polymer synthesis and the transformations from the polymer to amorphous and crystalline boron carbide were investigated with infrared spectroscopy, NMR spectroscopy, thermal analysis, and x-ray diffraction

  6. Determination of carbon and sulphur in boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide is used in control rods of nuclear power reactors. The chemical specification for carbon in boron carbide ranges between 15 - 24 wt.% depending upon the grade of boron carbide. Hence carbon in boron carbide is to be determined accurately to find out the stoichiometry. Sulphur, which is present in trace quantities, is also to be determined to find out the purity of boron carbide. Carbon is determined by combustion followed by (i) thermal conductivity detection and (ii) infrared detection. Sulphur is determined by (i) combustion followed by infrared detection and (ii) vacuum combustion extraction - quadrupole mass spectrometry. The results are compared. (author)

  7. Influence of rare earth nanoparticles and inoculants on performance and microstructure of high chromium cast iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Yuncheng; WANG You; PAN Zhaoyi; YU Lili

    2012-01-01

    The high chromium cast irons (HCCIs) with rare earth (RE) nanoparticles or inoculants were fabricated in the casting process.The phase compositions and microstructure were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and optical microscopy (OM),respectively.The hardness and impact toughness were tested by Rockwel-hardmeter and impacting test enginery.And then,the morphology of fracture was researched by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).The results demonstrated that the phase compositions of HCCIs with addition of RE nanoparticles or inoculants which were M7C3 carbides + α -Fe did not change obviously.However,the prime M7C3 carbides morphology had great changes with the increase of RE nanoparticles,which changed from long lath to granular or island shape.When the content of RE nanoparticles was 0.4 wt.%,the microstructure of high chromium cast iron was refined greatly.The microstructure of carbides was coarser when the addition of RE nanoparticles was higher than 0.4 wt.%.The hardness and impact toughness of HCCIs were improved by addition of RE nanoparticles or inoculants.The impact toughness of HCCIs was increased 36.4% with RE nanoparticles of 0.4 wt.%,but the hardness changed slightly.In addition,the adding of RE nanoparticles or inoculants could reduce the degree of the brittle fracture.Fracture never seemed regular,instead,containing lots of laminates and dimples with the increase of the RE nanoparticles.The results also indicated that the optimal addition amonnt of the RE nanoparticles was 0.4%,under this composition,the microstructure and mechanical property achieved the best cooperation.In addition,through the study of erosion wear rate,when adding 0.4% RE nanoparticles into the HCCIs,the erosion wear rate got the minimum 0.32×10-3 g/mm2,which could increase 51.5% compared with that without any RE nanoparticles.

  8. Influence of nitrogen on the structure and properties of chromium, chromium-molybdenum and chromium-manganese steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phase transformations, precipitation processes and properties of the chromium, chromium-molybdenum and chromium-manganese steels with a high content of nitrogen as the dependence on thermal treatment were investigated. In case of Fe-0.08C-18Cr-18Mn-N and Fe-0.08C-18Cr-18Mn-2Mo-N steels the samples in the state after solution at temperature 1050oC and 1150oC and 1250oC and after subsequent annealing in 600oC and 800oC were investigated. heat treatment of the Fe-0.5C-10Cr-N and Fe-0.5C-10Cr-1Mo-N steels included austenitizment from 1000oC with air cooling and hardening from 1000oC with oil cooling and tempering in 650oC and 750oC in two hours with cooling in the air. These investigations show that the influence of nitrogen as an alloy element on the phase transformations, precipitation processes, mechanical and corrosion properties is connected with the presence of molybdenum and chromium in the steel. Nitrogen with these elements creates complex ions with the coordinate number 6. This statement is formed on the base of both calculations and investigation results. (author)

  9. Casimir forces from conductive silicon carbide surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedighi Ghozotkhar, Mehdi; Svetovoy, V. B.; Broer, W. H.; Palasantzas, G.

    2014-01-01

    Samples of conductive silicon carbide (SiC), which is a promising material due to its excellent properties for devices operating in severe environments, were characterized with the atomic force microscope for roughness, and the optical properties were measured with ellipsometry in a wide range of fr

  10. Composites of titanium carbide with scandium matrix

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brožek, Vlastimil; Pala, Zdeněk; Vilémová, Monika; Kubatík, Tomáš František; Mušálek, Radek; Nevrlá, Barbara; Mastný, L.

    Ostrava: Tanger Ltd, 2014, s. 1181-1186. ISBN 978-80-87294-54-3. [METAL 2014,International Conference on Metallurgy and Materials/23./. Brno (CZ), 21.05.2014-23.05.2014] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : hard compounds * titanium carbide * scandium oxycarbide * spark plasma sintering Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry www.metal.2014.com

  11. Evidence of hydrogen embrittlement of tungsten carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, G C

    1978-02-01

    Tungsten carbide vessels containing materials at high temperature and high pressure are used in many laboratories. We note that any oils at medium to high temperature which can break down and liberate hydrogen cause rapid failure of the pressure vessel, whereas perfluorated kerosenes used as lubricants inside a pressure vessel give sharply increased life of the vessel. PMID:18699072

  12. High-temperature carbidization of carboniferous rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldin, B. A.; Grass, V. E.; Nadutkin, A. V.; Nazarova, L. Yu.

    2009-08-01

    Processes of thermal metamorphism of carboniferous rocks have been studied experimentally. The conditions of high-temperature interaction of shungite carbon with components of the contained rocks, leading to formation of carbide compounds, have been determined. The results of this investigation contribute to the works on searching for new raw material for prospective material production.

  13. Direct plasmadynamic synthesis of ultradisperse silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivkov, A. A.; Nikitin, D. S.; Pak, A. Ya.; Rakhmatullin, I. A.

    2013-01-01

    Ultradisperse cubic silicon carbide (β-SiC) has been obtained by direct plasmadynamic synthesis in pulsed supersonic carbon-silicon plasma jet incident on a copper obstacle in argon atmosphere. The powdered product has a high content of β-SiC in the form of single crystals with average size of about 100 nm and nearly perfect crystallographic habit.

  14. Boron carbide morphology changing under purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmatullin, I. A.; Sivkov, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Boron carbide synthesized by using coaxial magnetoplasma accelerator with graphite electrodes was purified by two different ways. XRD-investigations showed content changing and respectively powder purification. Moreover TEM-investigations demonstrated morphology changing of product under purification that was discussed in the work.

  15. Boron carbide synthesis at plasma spray process

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ctibor, Pavel; Brožek, Vlastimil; Hofman, R.

    Bari : Department of Chemistry, University of Bari, 2003 - (d'Agostino, R.; Favia, P.; Fracassi, F.; Palumbo, F.). s. 631 [International Symposium on Plasma Chemistry/16th./. 22.06.2003-27.06.2003, Taormina] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : boron carbide , plasma spray process Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  16. Boron Carbides As Thermo-electric Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Charles

    1988-01-01

    Report reviews recent theoretical and experimental research on thermoelectric materials. Recent work with narrow-band semiconductors demonstrated possibility of relatively high thermoelectric energy-conversion efficiencies in materials withstanding high temperatures needed to attain such efficiencies. Among promising semiconductors are boron-rich borides, especially boron carbides.

  17. Low temperature CVD deposition of silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coating of graphite on silicon carbide from the gaseous phase in a hot-well, open flow reactor at 1150degC is described. This study constitutes the first part of an investigation of the process for the coating of nuclear fuel by chemical vapor deposition (CVD)

  18. The manufacturing method of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new method for manufacturing of boron carbide as powder with controlled purity and surface development has been described. The suspension of boric acid aqueous solution and carbon black in alcohol has been homogenized mechanically. Water and alcohol are then evaporated during mixing. After drying homogenous mixture is heated in temperature range of 1270-1870 C during one hour

  19. Growth and structure of carbide nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent research on the growth and structure of carbide nanorods is reviewed. Carbide nanorods have been prepared by reacting carbon nanotubes with volatile transition metal and main group oxides and halides. Using this approach it has been possible to obtain solid carbide nanorods of TiC, SiC, NbC, Fe3C, and BCx having diameters between 2 and 30 nm and lengths up to 20 microm. Structural studies of single crystal TiC nanorods obtained through reactions of TiO with carbon nanotubes show that the nanorods grow along both [110] and [111] directions, and that the rods can exhibit either smooth or saw-tooth morphologies. Crystalline SiC nanorods have been produced from reactions of carbon nanotubes with SiO and Si-iodine reactants. The preferred growth direction of these nanorods is [111], although at low reaction temperatures rods with [100] growth axes are also observed. The growth mechanisms leading to these novel nanomaterials have also been addressed. Temperature dependent growth studies of TiC nanorods produced using a Ti-iodine reactant have provided definitive proof for a template or topotactic growth mechanism, and furthermore, have yielded new TiC nanotube materials. Investigations of the growth of SiC nanorods show that in some cases a catalytic mechanism may also be operable. Future research directions and applications of these new carbide nanorod materials are discussed

  20. Micromachining of Silicon Carbide using femtosecond lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farsari, M [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology - Hellas, PO Box 1527, 71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Filippidis, G [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology - Hellas, PO Box 1527, 71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Zoppel, S [Vienna University of Technology, Photonics Institute, Gusshausstr. 27-29/387, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Reider, G A [Vienna University of Technology, Photonics Institute, Gusshausstr. 27-29/387, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Fotakis, C [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology - Hellas, PO Box 1527, 71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2007-04-15

    We have demonstrated micromachining of bulk 3C silicon carbide (3C- SiC) wafers by employing 1028nm wavelength femtosecond laser pulses of energy less than 10 nJ directly from a femtosecond laser oscillator, thus eliminating the need for an amplified system and increasing the micromachining speed by more than four orders of magnitude.

  1. Micromachining of Silicon Carbide using femtosecond lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have demonstrated micromachining of bulk 3C silicon carbide (3C- SiC) wafers by employing 1028nm wavelength femtosecond laser pulses of energy less than 10 nJ directly from a femtosecond laser oscillator, thus eliminating the need for an amplified system and increasing the micromachining speed by more than four orders of magnitude

  2. Boron carbide nanowires: Synthesis and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zhe

    Bulk boron carbide has been widely used in ballistic armored vest and the property characterization has been heavily focused on mechanical properties. Even though boron carbides have also been projected as a promising class of high temperature thermoelectric materials for energy harvesting, the research has been limited in this field. Since the thermal conductivity of bulk boron carbide is still relatively high, there is a great opportunity to take advantage of the nano effect to further reduce it for better thermoelectric performance. This dissertation work aims to explore whether improved thermoelectric performance can be found in boron carbide nanowires compared with their bulk counterparts. This dissertation work consists of four main parts. (1) Synthesis of boron carbide nanowires. Boron carbide nanowires were synthesized by co-pyrolysis of diborane and methane at low temperatures (with 879 °C as the lowest) in a home-built low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) system. The CVD-based method is energy efficient and cost effective. The as-synthesized nanowires were characterized by electron microscopy extensively. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results show the nanowires are single crystalline with planar defects. Depending on the geometrical relationship between the preferred growth direction of the nanowire and the orientation of the defects, the as-synthesized nanowires could be further divided into two categories: transverse fault (TF) nanowires grow normal to the defect plane, while axial fault (AF) ones grow within the defect plane. (2) Understanding the growth mechanism of as-synthesized boron carbide nanowires. The growth mechanism can be generally considered as the famous vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. TF and AF nanowires were found to be guided by Ni-B catalysts of two phases. A TF nanowire is lead by a hexagonal phase catalyst, which was proved to be in a liquid state during reaction. While an AF nanowires is catalyzed by a

  3. Chromium activity measurements in nickel based alloys for very high temperature reactors: Inconel 617, haynes 230 and model alloys - HTR2008-58147

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alloys Haynes 230 and Inconel 617 are potential candidates for the intermediate heat exchangers (IHX) of (V)-HTR reactors. The behaviour under corrosion of these alloys by the (V)-HTR coolant (impure helium) is an important selection criterion because it defines the service life of these components. At high temperature, the Haynes 230 is likely to develop a chromium oxide on the surface. This layer protects from the exchanges with the surrounding medium and thus confers certain passivity on metal. At very high temperature, the initial microstructure made up of austenitic grains and coarse intra and intergranular M6C carbide grains rich in W will evolve. The M6C carbides remain and some M23C6 richer in Cr appear. Then, carbon can reduce the protective oxide layer Then, the alloy loses its protective coating and can corrode quickly. Experimental investigations were performed on these nickel based alloys under an impure helium flow [1]. To predict the surface reactivity of chromium under impure helium, it is necessary to determine its chemical activity in a temperature range close to the operating conditions of the heat exchangers (T∼1273 K). For that, high temperature mass spectrometry measurements coupled to multiple effusion Knudsen cells are carried out on several samples: Haynes 230, Inconel 617 and model alloys 1178, 1181, 1201. This coupling makes it possible thermodynamic equilibrium to be obtained between the vapour phase and the condensed phase of the sample. The measurement of the chromium ionic intensity (/) of the molecular beam resulting from a cell containing an alloy provides the values of partial pressure according to the temperature. This value is compared to that of the pure substance (Cr) at the same temperature. These calculations provide thermodynamic data characteristic of the chromium behaviour in these alloys. These activity results call into question those previously measured by Hilpert [2], largely used in the literature. (authors)

  4. Electrodeposition of black chromium thin films from trivalent chromium-ionic liquid solution

    OpenAIRE

    Eugénio, S.; Vilar, Rui; C. M. Rangel; Baskaran, I.

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, black chromium thin films were electrodeposited from a solution of 1-butyl-3- methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIm][BF4] ionic liquid containing trivalent chromium (Cr(III)). Homogeneous and well adherent coatings have been obtained on nickel, copper and stainless steel substrates. The nucleation and growth of the films were investigated by cyclic voltammetry and current-density/time transient techniques. SEM/EDS, XPS and XRD were used to study the morphology, chem...

  5. Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium by Viable Cells of Chromium Resistant Bacteria Isolated from Chromite Mining Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Satarupa Dey; Baishali Pandit; A. K. Paul

    2014-01-01

    Environmental contamination of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is of serious concern for its toxicity as well as mutagenic and carcinogenic effects. Bacterial chromate reduction is a cost-effective technology for detoxification as well as removal of Cr(VI) from polluted environment. Chromium resistant and reducing bacteria, belonging to Arthrobacter, Pseudomonas, and Corynebacterium isolated from chromite mine overburden and seepage samples of Orissa, India, were found to tolerate 12–18 mM Cr(VI...

  6. Reduction of Chromium-VI by Chromium Resistant Lactobacilli: A Prospective Bacterium for Bioremediation

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Ritesh; Sinha, Vartika; Kannan, Ambrose; Upreti, Raj K.

    2012-01-01

    Chromium is a toxic heavy metal, which primarily exists in two inorganic forms, Cr (VI) and Cr (III). Highly soluble hexavalent chromium is carcinogenic due to its oxidizing nature. It is well established that the intestinal bacteria including Lactobacilli have regulatory effect on intestinal homeostasis and a breakdown in the relationship between intestinal cells and bacteria results in the manifestation of gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. In this study Cr (VI) resistance was developed in La...

  7. Mechanical properties of metal-ceramic systems from nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Mirković Nemanja

    2007-01-01

    Background/Aim. Metal-ceramic bond strength and alloys' elastic modulus clearly determine the potential of alloy application, because the ceramic integrity during mastication depends on these two characteristics. The aim of this study was to evaluate metal-ceramic bond strength and elastic modulus of cobalt-chromium alloys in making porcelainfused- to-metal restorations, regarding the application of the most frequent nickel-chromium alloy. Methods. The research was performed as an experimenta...

  8. Chromium-manganese steels of transition class

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Possibilities of nickel replacing by manganese and preparing the same level of mechanical properties as in chromium-nickel steels due to γ-α transformations taking place during property tests, are studied. Chromium-manganese steels with the composition of 0.05-0.1%C, 13-14%Cr, 5.0-6.5%Mn, 0.2-0.5%Si, 0.03-0.13%N, 0.05-0.01%Al and additionally alloyed 0.3-2.0%Cu, 0.05-0.6%V, 0.3-1.0%Mo, 0.02-0.05%Ca in various combinations have been melted. It is shown, that using alloying and heat treatment one can control the phase composition, austenite resistance to martensite transformation during loading and mechanical properties of chromium-manganese steels of the transition class. The use of the phase transformation in the process of testing determines the level of mechanical properties. The optimum development of the transformation accompanied by a sufficient development of processes of hardening and microstresses relaxation permits to obtain a high level of mechanical properties: σsub(B)=1500 MPa, σsub(0.2)-1130MPa, delta=15%, psi=37%, asub(H)=1000 kJ/msup(2) which exceeds the level for chromium-nickel steels. Steels have a lower cost and do not require any complecated heat treatment regime

  9. Defect structure of electrodeposited chromium layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy was applied to study the effects of pre-treatment and composition of substrates on the quality and defect structure of electrodeposited thick chromium coatings. The results show that both parameters are important, and a scenario is proposed why the mechanically polished substrate gives more defective film than the electro polished one.

  10. Defect structure of electrodeposited chromium layers

    CERN Document Server

    Marek, T; Vertes, A; El-Sharif, M; McDougall, J; Chisolm, C U

    2000-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy was applied to study the effects of pre-treatment and composition of substrates on the quality and defect structure of electrodeposited thick chromium coatings. The results show that both parameters are important, and a scenario is proposed why the mechanically polished substrate gives more defective film than the electro polished one.

  11. Flashlamp-pumped lasing of chromium: GSGG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasing action in chromium-doped gadolinium scandium gallium garnet (Cr:GSGG) is well established for both CW/sup (1)/ and flashlamp/sup (2)/ pumping. This paper describes an investigation of flashlamp-pumped Cr:GSGG lasers and indicates some of the factors which limit performance

  12. Trace Elements Excluding Iron - Chromium and Zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    The percentage of middle-aged US adults who are participating in leisure-time physical activities is growing. These adults also seek credible information about specific supplements that the public press routinely describes as necessary to enable increases in physical performance. Chromium and zinc a...

  13. HEALTH ASSESSMENT DOCUMENT FOR CHROMIUM. FINAL REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The full document represents a comprehensive data base that considers all sources of chromium in the environment, the likelihood for its exposure to humans, and the possible consequences to man and lower organisms from its absorption. This information is integrated into a format ...

  14. 29 CFR 1926.1126 - Chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR 1926.51 Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide washing facilities in conformance with 29 CFR 1926.51. Eating and drinking areas provided by the employer shall also... requirements of the Hazard Communication Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1200. (3) Cleaning and replacement. (i)...

  15. 29 CFR 1910.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR 1910.141. Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide washing facilities in conformance with 29 CFR 1910.141. Eating and drinking areas provided by the employer shall also... requirements of the Hazard Communication Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1200. (3) Cleaning and replacement. (i)...

  16. 29 CFR 1915.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR 1910.141. Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide washing facilities in conformance with 29 CFR 1915.97. Eating and drinking areas provided by the employer shall also... requirements of the Hazard Communication Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1200. (3) Cleaning and replacement. (i)...

  17. Chromium(III) and chromium(VI) surface treated galvanized steel for outdoor constructions: environmental aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, David; Hedberg, Yolanda; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger

    2010-06-01

    The long-term degradation of chromium(III) (Zn-Cr(III)) and chromium(VI)-based (Zn-Cr(VI)) surface treatments on galvanized steel and their capacities to hinder the release of zinc induced by atmospheric corrosion at nonsheltered urban and marine exposure conditions for 2 years are investigated. Compared to bare zinc sheet, both surface treatments revealed high corrosion protection abilities and capacities to hinder the release of zinc, still evident after 2 years of exposure. The zinc barrier properties of the thinner Zn-Cr(VI) (10 nm) treatment were during the first 100 days of urban exposure slightly improved compared with Zn-Cr(III) (35 nm). However, their long-term protection capacities were inverse. Released concentrations of total chromium correspond to annual release rates less than 0.000032 (Zn-Cr(III)) and 0.00014 g Cr m(-2) yr(-1) (Zn-Cr(VI)) after 1 year of urban exposure. Aging by indoor storage of the surface treatments prior to outdoor exposure reduced the released Cr concentrations from the surface treatments. No Cr(VI) was released from the aged surfaces but from the freshly exposed Zn-Cr(VI). Marine exposure conditions resulted in a faster reduction of chromate to chromium(III)oxide compared with urban conditions, and a significantly lower amount of both chromium(III) and chromium(VI) released from Zn-Cr(VI) at the marine site compared with the urban site. PMID:20462267

  18. Biological groundwater treatment for chromium removal at low hexavalent chromium concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamais, Daniel; Noutsopoulos, Constantinos; Kavallari, Ioanna; Nyktari, Eleni; Kaldis, Apostolos; Panousi, Eleni; Nikitopoulos, George; Antoniou, Kornilia; Nasioka, Maria

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this work is to develop and evaluate biological groundwater treatment systems that will achieve hexavalent chromium reduction and total chromium removal from groundwater at hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) groundwater concentrations in the 0-200 μg/L range. Three lab-scale units operated, as sequencing batch reactors (SBR) under aerobic, anaerobic and anaerobic-aerobic conditions. All systems received groundwater with a Cr(VI) content of 200 μg/L. In order to support biological growth, groundwater was supplemented with milk, liquid cheese whey or a mixture of sugar and milk to achieve a COD concentration of 200 mg/L. The results demonstrate that a fully anaerobic system or an anaerobic-aerobic system dosed with simple or complex external organic carbon sources can lead to practically complete Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(III). The temperature dependency of maximum Cr(VI) removal rates can be described by the Arrhenius relationship. Total chromium removal in the biological treatment systems was not complete because a significant portion of Cr(III) remained in solution. An integrated system comprising of an anaerobic SBR followed by a sand filter achieved more than 95% total chromium removal thus resulting in average effluent total and dissolved chromium concentrations of 7 μg/L and 3 μg/L, respectively. PMID:26971177

  19. Nephrotoxic and hepatotoxic effects of chromium compounds in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laborda, R.; Diaz-Mayans, J.; Nunez, A.

    1986-03-01

    The nephrotoxic, hepatotoxic and cardiotoxic actions of hexavalent chromium compounds, as well as their effects on lung, blood and circulation may contribute to the fatal outcome of chromium intoxication. Although trivalent chromium have been regarded as relatively biologically inert, there are a few salts of chromium III that have been found to be carcinogenic when inhaled, ingested or brought in contact with the tissues. Sensitive persons and industry workers have been subjects of dermatitis, respiratory tract injuries and digestive ulcers due to chromium compounds. In this work, the authors have studied the effect of trivalent and hexavalent chromium compounds on rats measuring the transaminases (GOT and GPT), urea and creatinine levels in serum of chromium poisoned animals at different times.

  20. A Kinetic Model of Chromium in a Flame

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Chromium has been identified as a carcinogenic metal.Incineration is the useful method for disposal of toxic chromium hazard waste and a chromium kinetic model in a flame is very important to study chromium oxidation.Chromium chemical kinetics over a range of temperatures of a hydrogen/air flame is proposed.Nine chromium compounds and fifty-eight reversible chemical reactions were considered The forward reaction rates are calculated based on the molecular collision approach for unknown ones and Arrhenius's Law for known ones.The backward reaction rates were calculated according to forward reaction rates, the equilibrium constants and chemical thermodynamics.It is verified by several equilibrium cases and is tested by a hydrogen/air diffusion flame.The results show that the kinetic model could be used in cases in which the chromium kinetics play an important role in a flame

  1. The Chromium is an essential element in the human

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chromium is an essential element for human and animals, because it a preponderant function in the insulin metabolism as a glucose tolerance factor (GTF). The deficiency of chromium engenders a deterioration in the glucose metabolism due to bad efficiency of insulin. Because the importance of this element an exhaustive reference review was made and this presents some studies realized in laboratory animals and in human beings where it is prove with resuits the effect of chromium over the improvement of patients with non-insulin dependant diabetes. Three substances are presented as chromium active biological forms: a material rich in chromium known as glucose tolerance factor, chromium picolinate and a substance of low molecular weight LMWCr in its forms of apo and holo that contains chromium and it links the insulin receptor and improves its activity. Also this paper presents information about the condition of diabetes in Costa Rica. (Author)

  2. Carbide precipitation, grain boundary segregation, and temper embrittlement in NiCrMoV rotor steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, N.; Briant, C. L.; Hall, E. L.

    1985-05-01

    This paper presents a study of carbide precipitation, grain boundary segregation, and temper embrittlement in NiCrMoV rotor steels. One of the steels was high purity, one was doped with phosphorus, one was doped with tin, and one was commercial purity. In addition, two NiCrV steels, one high purity and one doped with phosphorus, were examined. Carbide precipitation was studied with analytical electron microscopy. It was found that after one hour of tempering at 600 ‡C only M3C carbides were precipitated in the NiCrMoV steels. These were very rich in iron. As the tempering time increased, the chromium content of the M3C carbides increased significantly, but their size did not change. Chromium rich M7C3 precipitates began to form after 20 hours of tempering, and after 50 hours of tempering Mo-rich M2C carbides were precipitated. Also, after 100 hours of tempering, the matrix formed bands rich in M3C or M7C3 and M2C particles. Tempering occurred more rapidly in the NiCrV steels. Grain boundary segregation was studied with Auger electron spectroscopy. It was found that the amount of phosphorus and tin segregation that occurred during a step-cooling heat treatment after tempering was less if a short time tempering treatment had been used. It will be proposed that this result occurs because the low temperature tempering treatments leave more carbon in the matrix. Carbon then compctes with phosphorus and tin for sites at grain boundaries. This compctition appears to affect phosphorus segregation more than tin segregation. In addition to these two impurity elements, molybdenum and nickel segregated during low temperature aging. The presence of molybdenum in the steel did not appear to affect phosphorus segregation. Finally, it will be shown that all of the steels that contain phosphorus and/or tin exhibit some degree of temper embrittlement when they are aged at 520 ‡C or are given a step-cooling heat treatment. Of the NiCrMoV steels, the phosphorus-doped steel showed

  3. Reaction of chromium(VI) with glutathione or with hydrogen peroxide: identification of reactive intermediates and their role in chromium(VI)-induced DNA damage.

    OpenAIRE

    Aiyar, J; Berkovits, H J; Floyd, R A; Wetterhahn, K E

    1991-01-01

    The types of reactive intermediates generated upon reduction of chromium(VI) by glutathione or hydrogen peroxide and the resulting DNA damage have been determined. In vitro, reaction of chromium(VI) with glutathione led to formation of two chromium(V) complexes and the glutathione thiyl radical. When chromium(VI) was reacted with DNA in the presence of glutathione, chromium-DNA adducts were obtained, with no DNA strand breakage. The level of chromium-DNA adduct formation correlated with chrom...

  4. Design and performance of chromium mist generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirgar Aram

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromium mist generator is an essential tool for conducting researches and making science-based recommendations to evaluate air pollution and its control systems. The purpose of this research was to design and construct a homogenous chromium mist generator and the study of some effective factors including sampling height and distances between samplers in side-by-side sampling on chromium mist sampling method. A mist generator was constructed, using a chromium electroplating bath in pilot scale. Concentration of CrO3 and sulfuric acid in plating solution was 125 g L-1 and 1.25 g L-1, respectively. In order to create permanent air sampling locations, a Plexiglas cylindrical chamber (75 cm height, 55 cm i.d was installed the bath overhead. Sixty holes were produced on the chamber in 3 rows (each 20. The distance between rows and holes was 15 and 7.5 cm, respectively. Homogeneity and effective factors were studied via side-by-side air sampling method. So, 48 clusters of samples were collected on polyvinyl chloride (PVC filters housed in sampling cassettes. Cassettes were located in 35, 50, and 65 cm above the solution surface with less than 7.5 and/or 7.5-15 cm distance between heads. All samples were analyzed according to the NIOSH method 7600. According to the ANOVA test, no significant differences were observed between different sampling locations in side-by-side sampling (P=0.82 and between sampling heights and different samplers distances (P=0.86 and 0.86, respectively. However, there were notable differences between means of coefficient of variations (CV in various heights and distances. It is concluded that the most chromium mist homogeneity could be obtained at height 50 cm from the bath solution surface and samplers distance of < 7.5 cm.

  5. Processing development of 4 tantalum carbide-hafnium carbide and related carbides and borides for extreme environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaballa, Osama Gaballa Bahig

    Carbides, nitrides, and borides ceramics are of interest for many applications because of their high melting temperatures and good mechanical properties. Wear-resistant coatings are among the most important applications for these materials. Materials with high wear resistance and high melting temperatures have the potential to produce coatings that resist degradation when subjected to high temperatures and high contact stresses. Among the carbides, Al4SiC4 is a low density (3.03 g/cm3), high melting temperature (>2000°C) compound, characterized by superior oxidation resistance, and high compressive strength. These desirable properties motivated this investigation to (1) obtain high-density Al4SiC4 at lower sintering temperatures by hot pressing, and (2) to enhance its mechanical properties by adding WC and TiC to the Al4SiC4. Also among the carbides, tantalum carbide and hafnium carbide have outstanding hardness; high melting points (3880°C and 3890°C respectively); good resistance to chemical attack, thermal shock, and oxidation; and excellent electronic conductivity. Tantalum hafnium carbide (Ta4HfC 5) is a 4-to-1 ratio of TaC to HfC with an extremely high melting point of 4215 K (3942°C), which is the highest melting point of all currently known compounds. Due to the properties of these carbides, they are considered candidates for extremely high-temperature applications such as rocket nozzles and scramjet components, where the operating temperatures can exceed 3000°C. Sintering bulk components comprised of these carbides is difficult, since sintering typically occurs above 50% of the melting point. Thus, Ta4 HfC5 is difficult to sinter in conventional furnaces or hot presses; furnaces designed for very high temperatures are expensive to purchase and operate. Our research attempted to sinter Ta4HfC5 in a hot press at relatively low temperature by reducing powder particle size and optimizing the powder-handling atmosphere, milling conditions, sintering

  6. Chromium supplementation improved post-stroke brain infarction and hyperglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Ying; Mao, Frank Chiahung; Liu, Chia-Hsin; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Lai, Nai-Wei; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2016-04-01

    Hyperglycemia is common after acute stroke and is associated with a worse outcome of stroke. Thus, a better understanding of stress hyperglycemia is helpful to the prevention and therapeutic treatment of stroke. Chromium is an essential nutrient required for optimal insulin activity and normal carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Beyond its nutritional effects, dietary supplement of chromium causes beneficial outcomes against several diseases, in particular diabetes-associated complications. In this study, we investigated whether post-stroke hyperglycemia involved chromium dynamic mobilization in a rat model of permanent focal cerebral ischemia and whether dietary supplement of chromium improved post-stroke injury and alterations. Stroke rats developed brain infarction, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance. Post-stroke hyperglycemia was accompanied by elevated secretion of counter-regulatory hormones including glucagon, corticosterone, and norepinephrine, decreased insulin signaling in skeletal muscles, and increased hepatic gluconeogenesis. Correlation studies revealed that counter-regulatory hormone secretion showed a positive correlation with chromium loss and blood glucose increased together with chromium loss. Daily chromium supplementation increased tissue chromium levels, attenuated brain infarction, improved hyperglycemia, and decreased plasma levels of glucagon and corticosterone in stroke rats. Our findings suggest that stroke rats show disturbance of tissue chromium homeostasis with a net loss through urinary excretion and chromium mobilization and loss might be an alternative mechanism responsible for post-stroke hyperglycemia. PMID:26477944

  7. Chromium Activity Measurements in Nickel Based Alloys for Very High Temperature Reactors: Inconel 617, Haynes 230, and Model Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alloys Haynes 230 and Inconel 617 are potential candidates for the intermediate heat exchangers (IHXs) of (very) high temperature reactors ((V)-HTRs). The behavior under corrosion of these alloys by the (V)-HTR coolant (impure helium) is an important selection criterion because it defines the service life of these components. At high temperature, the Haynes 230 is likely to develop a chromium oxide on the surface. This layer protects from the exchanges with the surrounding medium and thus confers certain passivity on metal. At very high temperature, the initial microstructure made up of austenitic grains and coarse intra- and intergranular M6C carbide grains rich in W will evolve. The M6C carbides remain and some M23C6 richer in Cr appear. Then, carbon can reduce the protective oxide layer. The alloy loses its protective coating and can corrode quickly. Experimental investigations were performed on these nickel based alloys under an impure helium flow (Rouillard, F., 2007, 'Mecanismes de formation et de destruction de la couche d'oxyde sur un alliage chrominoformeur en milieu HTR, Ph.D. thesis, Ecole des Mines de Saint-Etienne, France). To predict the surface reactivity of chromium under impure helium, it is necessary to determine its chemical activity in a temperature range close to the operating conditions of the heat exchangers (T approximate to 1273 K). For that, high temperature mass spectrometry measurements coupled to multiple effusion Knudsen cells are carried out on several samples: Haynes 230, Inconel 617, and model alloys 1178, 1181, and 1201. This coupling makes it possible for the thermodynamic equilibrium to be obtained between the vapor phase and the condensed phase of the sample. The measurement of the chromium ionic intensity (I) of the molecular beam resulting from a cell containing an alloy provides the values of partial pressure according to the temperature. This value is compared with that of the pure substance (Cr) at the same temperature

  8. HCl removal using cycled carbide slag from calcium looping cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Cycled carbide slag from calcium looping cycles is used to remove HCl. • The optimum temperature for HCl removal of cycled carbide slag is 700 °C. • The presence of CO2 restrains HCl removal of cycled carbide slag. • CO2 capture conditions have important effects on HCl removal of cycled carbide slag. • HCl removal capacity of carbide slag drops with cycle number rising from 1 to 50. - Abstract: The carbide slag is an industrial waste from chlor-alkali plants, which can be used to capture CO2 in the calcium looping cycles, i.e. carbonation/calcination cycles. In this work, the cycled carbide slag from the calcium looping cycles for CO2 capture was proposed to remove HCl in the flue gas from the biomass-fired and RDFs-fired boilers. The effects of chlorination temperature, HCl concentration, particle size, presence of CO2, presence of O2, cycle number and CO2 capture conditions in calcium looping cycles on the HCl removal behavior of the carbide slag experienced carbonation/calcination cycles were investigated in a triple fixed-bed reactor. The chlorination product of the cycled carbide slag from the calcium looping after absorbing HCl is not CaCl2 but CaClOH. The optimum temperature for HCl removal of the cycled carbide slag from the carbonation/calcination cycles is 700 °C. The chlorination conversion of the cycled carbide slag increases with increasing the HCl concentration. The cycled carbide slag with larger particle size exhibits a lower chlorination conversion. The presence of CO2 decreases the chlorination conversions of the cycled carbide slag and the presence of O2 has a trifling impact. The chlorination conversion of the carbide slag experienced 1 carbonation/calcination cycle is higher than that of the uncycled calcined sorbent. As the number of carbonation/calcination cycles increases from 1 to 50, the chlorination conversion of carbide slag drops gradually. The high calcination temperature and high CO2 concentration in the

  9. Sliding wear behavior of carbide coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wear rates of sliding surfaces under starved lubrication conditions are frequently controlled by the onset of scuffing or adhesive transfer resulting in scratching or galling damage mechanisms. Thermally sprayed coatings containing a high volume fraction of hard phases, such as carbides, generally exhibit good abrasion resistance. However, during sliding contact with ferrous materials, the onset of adhesive transfer can occur at relatively low combinations of temperature, sliding speed and contact pressure. Improvements may be obtained when appropriate additions of solid lubricating phases are distributed within the coating. These additions are usually accompanied by an increase in the coating porosity which may itself alter the sliding wear behavior by modifying the distribution of lubricating oil. This paper describes an investigation of the influence of coating porosity on the sliding wear behavior of two conventional carbide coatings

  10. An improved method of preparing silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of preparing silicon carbide is described which comprises forming a desired shape from a polysilane of the average formula:[(CH3)2Si][CH3Si]. The polysilane contains from 0 to 60 mole percent (CH3)2Si units and from 40 to 100 mole percent CH3Si units. The remaining bonds on the silicon are attached to another silicon atom or to a halogen atom in such manner that the average ratio of halogen to silicon in the polysilane is from 0.3:1 to 1:1. The polysilane has a melt viscosity at 1500C of from 0.005 to 500 Pa.s and an intrinsic viscosity in toluene of from 0.0001 to 0.1. The shaped polysilane is heated in an inert atmosphere or in a vacuum to an elevated temperature until the polysilane is converted to silicon carbide. (author)

  11. Hadfield steels with Nb and Ti carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hadfield Steels and the mechanisms responsible for its high strain hardening rate were reviewed. Addition of carbide forming alloying elements to the base compostion was discussed, using the matrix sttel concept. Three experimental crusher jaws were cast, with Nb and Nb + Ti added to the usual Hadfiedl compostion, with enough excess carbon to allow the formation of MC carbides. Samples for metallographic analysis were prepared from both as cast and worn out castings. The carbic morphology was described. Partition of alloying elements was qualitatively studied, using Energy Dispersive Espectroscopy in SEM. The structure of the deformed layer near the worn surface was studied by optical metalography and microhardness measurements. The results showed that fatigue cracking is one of the wear mechanisms is operation in association with the ciclic work hardening of the surface of worn crusher jaws. (Author)

  12. Sputtering behavior of boron and boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sputtering yields of boron were measured with D+ and B+ ions for normal and oblique angles of incidence. Self-sputtering data of boron carbide were simulated in the experiment by using Ne+ ions. The energies of the impinging ions were between 20 eV and 10 keV. The measured data are compared with computer simulated values calculated with the TRIMSP program. The boron data for normal ion impact are higher than the calculated values, whereas those for oblique ion incidence are smaller than the calculation predicts. This discrepancy is explained by the surface roughness and supported by SEM micrographs. The comparison of the boron carbide data with TRIMSP calculations shows much better agreement than the boron data. In this case the target surface was much smoother. (orig.)

  13. Reliable Breakdown Obtained in Silicon Carbide Rectifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neudeck, Philip G.

    1997-01-01

    The High Temperature Integrated Electronics and Sensor (HTIES) Program at the NASA Lewis Research Center is currently developing silicon carbide (SiC) for use in harsh conditions where silicon, the semiconductor used in nearly all of today's electronics, cannot function. Silicon carbide's demonstrated ability to function under extreme high-temperature, high-power, and/or high-radiation conditions will enable significant improvements to a far-ranging variety of applications and systems. These range from improved high-voltage switching for energy savings in public electric power distribution and electric vehicles, to more powerful microwave electronics for radar and cellular communications, to sensor and controls for cleaner-burning, more fuel-efficient jet aircraft and automobile engines.

  14. Behavior of Disordered Boron Carbide under Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanchini, Giovanni; McCauley, James W.; Chhowalla, Manish

    2006-07-01

    Gibbs free-energy calculations based on density functional theory have been used to determine the possible source of failure of boron carbide just above the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL). A range of B4C polytypes is found to be stable at room pressure. The energetic barrier for shock amorphization of boron carbide is by far the lowest for the B12(CCC) polytype, requiring only 6GPa≈P(HEL) for collapse under hydrostatic conditions. The results clearly demonstrate that the collapse of the B12(CCC) phase leads to segregation of B12 and amorphous carbon in the form of 2 3 nm bands along the (113) lattice direction, in excellent agreement with recent transmission electron microscopy results.

  15. Free electron laser annealing of silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied the application of FEL for the semiconductor processing on the practical device fabrication. FEL annealing at a variety of wavelengths (10.0-13.0 μm) have been performed under room temperature for amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC) and Nitrogen implanted cubic silicon carbide (3C-SiC) films. Infrared absorption spectroscopy indicated that the annealing at 12.6 μm, corresponding to the absorption peak of Si-C stretch mode, was effective for recrystallization. On the other hand, Hall effect measurements showed the increase of carrier density for N-implanted 3C-SiC films at around 10.4 μm, whereas the absorption was weak at this wavelength. The present results demonstrated that the direct excitation of the lattice vibration with FEL can induce the reconstruction of disordered atoms and activating dopants even at room temperature. (author)

  16. Hydrolysis of hafnium nitrides and carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrolysis of Hafnium Nitrides and Carbides. The hydrolytic behavior of Hafnium mononitride and monocarbide has been studied and compared with that of Titanium and Zirconium nitrides and carbides. In the case of hydrolysis of HfN the gaseous products were H2, N2 and a small amount of NO, and the liquid product was NH3, as in the case of TiN and ZrN. In isothermal hydrolysis the principal product was NH3 at temperatures lower than 8000C, which was replaced by N2 at temperatures higher than 9000C. In this respect HfN was similar to ZrN, but not to TiN which produced mainly N2 even by hydrolysis at 8000C. The products of hydrolysis of HfC were found to be CO, CO2, H2 and a small amount of CH4 also as in the case of TiC and ZrC. In the isothermal hydrolysis of HfC it was observed that a large amount of H2 evolved at the early stage of the hydrolysis while CO2 continued to evolve with some amount of H2 even after the ceasing of CO evolution. From analysis of the hydrolytic behavior the solid residue after the hydrolysis of HfC was considered to contain some waxes (Csub(n)Hsub(m)). It was suggested that the carbide of the element of smaller atomic number (Ti) would tend to form oxygen compounds (CO, CO2) while the carbide of the element of larger atomic number (Zr, Hf) hydrogen compounds(Csub(n)Hsub(m)), since ThC and UC formed only hydrocarbons and H2 by hydrolysis. This suggestion was also valid to nitride. (auth.)

  17. Interaction of energetic tritium with silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to investigate the physical and chemical interactions of energetic hydrogen isotope species with silicon carbide, recoil tritium from the 3He(n,p)T reaction has been allowed to react with K-T silicon carbide and silicon carbide powder. The results show that if the silicon carbide has been degassed and annealed at 14000C prior to tritium bombardment, a considerable fraction of the tritium (ca. 40%) is released as HTO from the SiC upon heating to 13500C under vacuum conditions. Most of the remaining tritium is retained in SiC, e.g., the retention of the tritium in the K-T SiC was found to be 62 and 22% upon heating to 600 and 13500C, respectively. This is in direct contrast to graphite samples in which the tritium is not released to any significant extent even when heated to 13500C. Samples which were exposed to H2O and H2 prior to tritium bombardment were heated to 6000C after the irradiation. The results obtained indicate that a total of 38.7 and 2.49% of the tritium is released in the form of HT and CH3T in the case of H2 or H2O exposure, respectively. Treatment of degassed samples after tritium bombardment with H2O and H2 at temperatures up to 10000C leads to the release of up to 44.9% of the tritium as HT and CH3T. 42 references, 2 figures, 2 tables

  18. Boron carbide synthesis by plasma spray process

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ctibor, Pavel; Brožek, Vlastimil; Hofman, R.

    Bari : Department of Chemistry, University of Bari, 2003 - (d'Agostino, R.; Favia, P.; Fracassi, F.; Palumbo, F.), s. - [International Symposium on Plasma Chemistry/16th./. Taormina (IT), 22.06.2003-27.06.2003] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/01/0149 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : boron carbide , plasma spray, synthesis Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  19. Plasma Spray Deposition of Boron Carbide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brožek, Vlastimil; Hofman, R.; Ctibor, Pavel; Hrabovský, Milan

    Praha : MAXDORF, s.r.o., 2002 - (Nitsch, K.; Rodová, M.). s. 11-12 [Development of Materials Science in Research and Education.. 10.09.2002-12.09.2002, Ostravice] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/01/0149; GA ČR GA202/01/1563 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : plasma spray, boron carbide Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  20. Electron-Spin Resonance in Boron Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Charles; Venturini, Eugene L.; Azevedo, Larry J.; Emin, David

    1987-01-01

    Samples exhibit Curie-law behavior in temperature range of 2 to 100 K. Technical paper presents studies of electron-spin resonance of samples of hot pressed B9 C, B15 C2, B13 C2, and B4 C. Boron carbide ceramics are refractory solids with high melting temperatures, low thermal conductives, and extreme hardnesses. They show promise as semiconductors at high temperatures and have unusually large figures of merit for use in thermoelectric generators.

  1. Magnetism of hydrogen-irradiated silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spin-polarized density functional theory is used to study two-hydrogen defect complexes in silicon carbide. We find that the magnetism depends on the distances of the two hydrogen atoms. Magnetism appears when the two hydrogen defects are distant from each other, and magnetism cancels out if they are close to each other. The critical distance between the two hydrogen defects is determined.

  2. Compressive creep of hot pressed silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon carbide has a good match of chemical, mechanical and thermal properties and therefore is considered an excellent structural ceramic for high temperature applications. The aim of the present work is compressive creep evaluation of liquid phase sintered silicon carbide with aluminum and rare earth oxide as sintering aids. Rare earth oxides are possible additives considering their highly refractory remnant grain-boundary phase and lower synthesis costs compared to high purity rare earth. Samples were prepared with silicon carbide powder (90 wt%) and aluminum oxide (5 wt%) plus rare earth oxide (5 wt%) additions. Powders were mixed, milled and hot pressed at 1800 deg. C in argon atmosphere. Compressive creep tests were carried out under stress from 150 to 300 MPa and temperatures from 1300 to 1400 deg. C. At lower creep test temperatures, the obtained stress exponent values were correlated to mechanisms based on diffusion. At intermediate temperatures, grain-boundary sliding becomes operative, accommodated by diffusion. At higher temperatures cavities are discernible. Oxidation reactions and ionic diffusion result on surface oxidized layer, grain-boundary amorphous and intergranular crystalline Al6Si2O13, δ-Y2Si2O7 and YAG phases. In this case cavitation and amorphous phases redistribution enhance grain-boundary sliding, not accommodated by diffusion. Coalescence occurs at triple point and multigrain-junctions, with subsequent strain rate acceleration and cavitational creep.

  3. Doping of silicon carbide by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It appeared that in some fields, as the hostile environments (high temperature or irradiation), the silicon compounds showed limitations resulting from the electrical and mechanical properties. Doping of 4H and 6H silicon carbide by ion implantation is studied from a physicochemical and electrical point of view. It is necessary to obtain n-type and p-type material to realize high power and/or high frequency devices, such as MESFETs and Schottky diodes. First, physical and electrical properties of silicon carbide are presented and the interest of developing a process technology on this material is emphasised. Then, physical characteristics of ion implantation and particularly classical dopant implantation, such as nitrogen, for n-type doping, and aluminium and boron, for p-type doping are described. Results with these dopants are presented and analysed. Optimal conditions are extracted from these experiences so as to obtain a good crystal quality and a surface state allowing device fabrication. Electrical conduction is then described in the 4H and 6H-SiC polytypes. Freezing of free carriers and scattering processes are described. Electrical measurements are carried out using Hall effect on Van der Panw test patterns, and 4 point probe method are used to draw the type of the material, free carrier concentrations, resistivity and mobility of the implanted doped layers. These results are commented and compared to the theoretical analysis. The influence of the technological process on electrical conduction is studied in view of fabricating implanted silicon carbide devices. (author)

  4. Nuclear fuel management and boron carbide coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years one way of introducing burnable absorber is to coat the fuel pellets by a thin layer of burnable absorber so called integral fuel burnable absorber (IFBA). In this method the fuel is coated with boron nitride or boron carbide. Boron has low absorption cross-section and when it exists on the surface of the fuel, it interacts with thermalized neutron. B4C is a boron compound, which can be used for coating the nuclear fuel. It has high thermal stability and withstands high pressure and temperatures. High technology product of boron carbide has different ratio of B: C. But in nuclear reactor when boron carbide is used, it must be rich with boron. In this research chemical vapor decomposition (CVD) has been using boron trichloride and carbon tetra chloride for reactant materials. The experiments were carried out at high temperatures (1050 degree Celsius, 1225 degree Celsius and 1325 degree Celsius). The coated samples were analyzed using X-Ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and will be presented in this paper. It was seen that decreasing the reaction temperature caused an increase on the quality and thickness of the coating

  5. Femtosecond laser surface structuring and oxidation of chromium thin coatings: Black chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotsedi, L., E-mail: Kotsedi@tlabs.ac.za [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Nuru, Z.Y. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Mthunzi, P. [National Laser Centre, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, 0001 Pretoria (South Africa); Muller, T.F.G. [University of the Western Cape, Physics Department, Bellville, 7535 Cape Town (South Africa); Eaton, S.M. [Physics Department, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Julies, B. [University of the Western Cape, Physics Department, Bellville, 7535 Cape Town (South Africa); Manikandan, E. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Ramponi, R. [Physics Department, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Maaza, M. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa)

    2014-12-01

    Highlights: • Oxidation of the chromium thin film to chromium oxide by femtosecond laser with a fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm. • Solar absorber from chromium oxide that low percentage reflectance. • Femtosecond laser oxidation, with a de-focused laser. • Chromium oxide formation by femtosecond laser in normal ambient. - Abstract: In view of their potential applications as selective solar absorbers, chromium coatings on float glass substrates were nano/micro structured by femtosecond laser in air. Raman and X-rays diffraction investigations confirmed the formation of an ultra-porous α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer at the surface; higher is the input laser power, enhanced is the crystallinity of the α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer. The α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer with the Cr underneath it in addition to the photo-induced porosity acted as a classical ceramic–metal nano-composite making the reflectance to decrease significantly within the spectral range of 190–1100 nm. The average reflectance decreased from 70 to 2%.

  6. Femtosecond laser surface structuring and oxidation of chromium thin coatings: Black chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Oxidation of the chromium thin film to chromium oxide by femtosecond laser with a fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm. • Solar absorber from chromium oxide that low percentage reflectance. • Femtosecond laser oxidation, with a de-focused laser. • Chromium oxide formation by femtosecond laser in normal ambient. - Abstract: In view of their potential applications as selective solar absorbers, chromium coatings on float glass substrates were nano/micro structured by femtosecond laser in air. Raman and X-rays diffraction investigations confirmed the formation of an ultra-porous α-Cr2O3 layer at the surface; higher is the input laser power, enhanced is the crystallinity of the α-Cr2O3 layer. The α-Cr2O3 layer with the Cr underneath it in addition to the photo-induced porosity acted as a classical ceramic–metal nano-composite making the reflectance to decrease significantly within the spectral range of 190–1100 nm. The average reflectance decreased from 70 to 2%

  7. Production of basic chromium sulfate by using recovered chromium from ashes of thermally treated leather.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmer, Aline; Nunes, Keila Guerra Pacheco; Gutterres, Mariliz; Marcílio, Nilson Romeu

    2010-04-15

    Leather wastes tanned with chromium are generated during the production process of leather, hence the wastes from hand crafted goods and footwear industries are a serious environmental problem. The thermal treatment of leather wastes can be one of the treatment options because the wastes are rich in chromium and can be used as a raw material for sodium chromate production and further to obtain several chromium compounds. The objective of this study was to utilize the chromium from leather wastes via basic chromium sulfate production to be subsequently applied in a hide tanning. The obtained results have shown that this is the first successful attempt to achieve desired base properties of the product. The result was achieved when the following conditions were applied: a molar ratio between sodium sulfite and sodium dichromate equal to 6; reaction time equal to 5 min before addition of sulfuric acid; pH of sodium dichromate solution equal to 2. Summarizing, there is an opportunity to utilize the dangerous wastes and reused them in the production scheme by minimizing or annulling the environmental impact and to attend a sustainable process development concept. PMID:20031309

  8. Silicon carbide sintered body manufactured from silicon carbide powder containing boron, silicon and carbonaceous additive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hidehiko

    1987-01-01

    A silicon carbide powder of a 5-micron grain size is mixed with 0.15 to 0.60 wt% mixture of a boron compound, i.e., boric acid, boron carbide (B4C), silicon boride (SiB4 or SiB6), aluminum boride, etc., and an aluminum compound, i.e., aluminum, aluminum oxide, aluminum hydroxide, aluminum carbide, etc., or aluminum boride (AlB2) alone, in such a proportion that the boron/aluminum atomic ratio in the sintered body becomes 0.05 to 0.25 wt% and 0.05 to 0.40 wt%, respectively, together with a carbonaceous additive to supply enough carbon to convert oxygen accompanying raw materials and additives into carbon monoxide.

  9. Tungsten carbide platelet-containing cemented carbide with yttrium containing dispersed phase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li; CHEN Shu; WANG Yuan-jie; YU Xian-wang; XIONG Xiang-jun

    2008-01-01

    A fine and platelet tungsten carbide patterned structure with fine yttrium containing dispersed phase was observed in liquid phase sintered WC-20%Co-1%Y2O3 cemented carbide with ultrafine tungsten carbide and nano yttrium oxide as starting materials. By comparing the microstructures of the alloy prepared by hot-press at the temperature below the eutectic melting temperature and by conventional liquid phase sintering, it is shown that hexagonal and truncated trigonal plate-like WC grains are formed through the mechanism of dissolution-precipitation (recrystallization) at the stage of liquid phase sintering. Yttrium in the addition form of oxide exhibits good ability in inhibiting the discontinuous or inhomogeneous WC grain growth in the alloy at the stage of solid phase sintering.

  10. Sintering of nano crystalline silicon carbide by doping with boron carbide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M S Datta; A K Bandyopadhyay; B Chaudhuri

    2002-06-01

    Sinterable nano silicon carbide powders of mean particle size (37 nm) were prepared by attrition milling and chemical processing of an acheson type alpha silicon carbide having mean particle size of 0.39 m (390 nm). Pressureless sintering of these powders was achieved by addition of boron carbide of 0.5 wt% together with carbon of 1 wt% at 2050°C at vacuum (3 mbar) for 15 min. Nearly 99% sintered density was obtained. The mechanism of sintering was studied by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. This study shows that the mechanism is a solid-state sintering process. Polytype transformation from 6H to 4H was observed.

  11. Silicon carbide for chemical application prepared by SPS method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brožek, Vlastimil; Kubatík, Tomáš František; Vilémová, Monika; Mušálek, Radek; Mastný, L.

    Prague: Czech Society of Industrial Chemistry, 2014 - (Kalenda, P.; Lubojacký, J.), s. 129-134 ISBN 978-80-86238-64-7. [Mezinárodní chemicko-technologická konference/2./. Mikulov (CZ), 07.04.2014-09.04.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36566G Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : silicon carbide * spark plasma sintering * silicon carbide corrosion * impurities in silicon carbide Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy www.icct.cz

  12. Characterization of boron carbide with an electron microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteudi, G.; Ruste, J.

    1983-01-01

    Within the framework of a study of heterogeneous materials (Matteudi et al., 1971: Matteudi and Verchery, 1972) thin deposits of boron carbide were characterized. Experiments using an electronic probe microanalyzer to analyze solid boron carbide or boron carbide in the form of thick deposits are described. Quantitative results on boron and carbon are very close to those obtained when applying the Monte Carlo-type correction calculations.

  13. Microstructural and Mechanical characterization of WC-Co cemented carbides

    OpenAIRE

    Zakia, Rizki

    2013-01-01

    WC-Co cemented carbides are ceramic-metal composite materials made of carbides embedded in a metal phase that acts as a binder. They exhibit an exceptional combination of strength, toughness and wear resistance as a result of the extremely different properties of their two constitutive phases. Consequently, cemented carbides have been positioned as suitable options when selecting materials for tribomechanical applications, and their implementation continues to gain a place in t...

  14. Inelastic Scattering of Neutrons in Chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phonon spectrum of chromium has been studied by neutron inelastic scattering. The dispersion curves are very similar, in form to those of tungsten and molybdenum, indicating similar interionic force constants. The neutron groups broaden but do not shift appreciably when the temperature is raised. No effect has been observed which can be attributed to the interaction between the phonons and the crystal magnetization in the antiferromagnetic phase. (author)

  15. Observational Approach to Chromium Site Remediation - 13266

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Production reactors at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, required massive quantities of water for reactor cooling and material processing. To reduce corrosion and the build-up of scale in pipelines and cooling systems, sodium dichromate was added to the water feedstock. Spills and other releases at the makeup facilities, as well as leaks from miles of pipelines, have led to numerous areas with chromium-contaminated soil and groundwater, threatening fish populations in the nearby Columbia River. Pump-and-treat systems have been installed to remove chromium from the groundwater, but significant contamination remain in the soil column and poses a continuing threat to groundwater and the Columbia River. Washington Closure Hanford, DOE, and regulators are working on a team approach that implements the observational approach, a strategy for effectively dealing with the uncertainties inherent in subsurface conditions. Remediation of large, complex waste sites at a federal facility is a daunting effort. It is particularly difficult to perform the work in an environment of rapid response to changing field and contamination conditions. The observational approach, developed by geotechnical engineers to accommodate the inherent uncertainties in subsurface conditions, is a powerful and appropriate method for site remediation. It offers a structured means of quickly moving into full remediation and responding to the variations and changing conditions inherent in waste site cleanups. A number of significant factors, however, complicate the application of the observational approach for chromium site remediation. Conceptual models of contamination and site conditions are difficult to establish and get consensus on. Mid-stream revisions to the design of large excavations are time-consuming and costly. And regulatory constraints and contract performance incentives can be impediments to the flexible responses required under the observational

  16. Stainless chromium-nickel steels. Chapter I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical composition is tabulated of 90 chromium-nickel stainless steels and alloys given in volume %. The values are also given of the corrosion resistance of the steels and alloys. The tables show data on the surface condition or the methods of material working, types and chemical composition of the medium where corrosion resistance tests were carried out, temperature, pressure, time of tests, corrosion rates, corrosion types, and literature references. A total of 35 references is given. (J.B.)

  17. Loading chromium atoms in a magnetic guide

    OpenAIRE

    Greiner, A; Sebastian, J.; Rehme, P.; Aghajani-Talesh, A.; Griesmaier, A.; Pfau, T.

    2007-01-01

    We have realized a magnetic guide for ultracold chromium atoms by continuously loading atoms directly from a Zeeman slower into a horizontal guide. We observe an atomic flux of $2 \\cdot 10^7$ atoms/s and are able to control the mean velocity of the guided atoms between 0 m/s and 3 m/s. We present our experimental results on loading and controlling the mean velocity of the guided atoms and discuss the experimental techniques that are used.

  18. X-616 Chromium Sludge Lagoons pictorial overview, Piketon, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant uses large quantities of water for process cooling. The X-616 Liquid Effluent Control Facility was placed in operation in December 1976 to treat recirculation cooling water blowdown from the process cooling system. A chromium-based corrosion inhibitor was used in the cooling water system. A chromium sludge was produced in a clarifier to control chromium levels in the water. Chromium sludge produced by this process was stored in two surface impoundments called the X-616 Chromium Sludge Lagoons. The sludge was toxic due to its chromium concentration and therefore required treatment. The sludge was treated, turning it into a sanitary waste, and buried in an Ohio EPA approved landfill. The plant's process cooling water system has changed to a more environmentally acceptable phosphate-based inhibitor. Closure activities at X-616 began in August 1990, with all construction activities completed in June 1991, at a total cost of $8.0 million

  19. Silicon Carbide Corrugated Mirrors for Space Telescopes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Trex Enterprises Corporation (Trex) proposes technology development to manufacture monolithic, lightweight silicon carbide corrugated mirrors (SCCM) suitable for...

  20. Transformations of Carbides During Tempering of D3 Tool Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nykiel, Tadeusz; Hryniewicz, Tadeusz

    2014-06-01

    The studies were performed on D3 tool steel hardened after austenitizing at 1050 °C during 30 min and tempering at 200-700 °C. Based on the diffraction studies performed from the extraction replicas, using electron microscopy, it was found that after 120-min tempering in the consecutive temperatures, the following types of carbides occur: Apart from higher mentioned carbides, there are also big primary carbides and fine secondary M7C3 carbides occurring, which did not dissolve during austenitizing.

  1. Carbides in Nodular Cast Iron with Cr and Mo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In these paper results of elements microsegregation in carbidic nodular cast iron have been presented. A cooling rate in the centre of the cross-section and on the surface of casting and change of moulding sand temperature during casting crystallization and its self-cooling have been investigated. TDA curves have been registered. The linear distribution of elements concentration in an eutectic grain, primary and secondary carbides have been made. It was found, that there are two kinds of carbides: Cr and Mo enriched. A probable composition of primary and secondary carbides have been presented.

  2. Thermodynamic and kinetic study of uranium carbide pyrophoricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research thesis concerns the development of nuclear reactors of fourth generation, and more particularly the use of carbide fuels instead of oxide fuels. An experimental part allows the investigation of mechanisms resulting in the pyrophoric reaction of a powder of uranium carbide, and addresses the determination of kinetic parameters intrinsic to the oxidation of powdered uranium carbide. Experimental results are then used to develop models of oxidation of powders of carbide uranium which are applied to a simplified mono-dispersed powder, and then introduced in a computation code. Simulation results are compared with experimental results

  3. Chromium oxidation state mapping in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, R.; Fayard, B.; Salomé, M.; Devès, G.; Susini, J.

    2003-03-01

    The widespread use of chromium in industrial applications such as chemical production of pigments, refractory brick production, tanning, metallurgy, electroplating, and combustion of fuels has lead to human occupational exposure and to its increased introduction into the environment. Hexavalent chromium compounds are established carcinogens but their mechanism of cell transformation is not known. Up to now, no microanalytical technique was sensitive enough to allow the observation of chromium distribution, and oxidation state identification, within isolated cells at carcinogenic concentrations. In this experiment, we used successfully the ID-21 X-ray microscope to map Cr(VI) and total Cr distributions in cells exposed in vitro to soluble, and insoluble, Cr(VI) compounds. Exposure to soluble compounds, weak carcinogens, resulted in a homogeneous intracellular distribution of Cr, confirming by in situ measurement that Cr is present in the cell nucleus. Cr(VI) was never detected in cells which suggests a mechanism of rapid intracellular reducticn. On the other hand, exposure to insoluble compounds, strong carcinogens, also resulted in a homogeneous distribution of reduced forms of Cr in cells, and their nucleus. However, in this case, Cr(VI)-rich structures were observed into the cells suggesting that carcinogenicity is enhanced when oxidation reactions due to Cr(VI) chronic exposure are associated to Cr-DNA alterations.

  4. Dimensionally Controlled Lithiation of Chromium Oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fister, Tim T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hu, Xianyi [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Esbenshade, Jennifer [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Chen, Xiao [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Wu, Jinsong [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Dravid, Vinayak [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Bedzyk, Michael [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Long, Brandon [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gewirth, Andrew A. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Shi, Bing [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Schlepütz, Christian M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Fenter, Paul [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-01-12

    Oxide conversion reactions are an alternative approach for high capacity lithium ion batteries but are known to suffer from structural irreversibility associated with the phase separation and reconstitution of reduced metal species and Li2O. In particular, the morphology of the reduced metal species is thought to play a critical role in the electrochemical properties of a conversion material. Here we use a model electrode with alternating layers of chromium and chromium oxide to better understand and control these phase changes in real-time and at molecular length scales. Despite lacking crystallinity at the atomic scale, this superstructure is observed (with X-ray reflectivity, XR) to lithiate and delithiate in a purely one-dimensional manner, preserving the layered structure. The XR data show that the metal layers act as nucleation sites for the reduction of chromium in the conversion reaction. Irreversibility during delithiation is due to the formation of a ternary phase, LiCrO2, which can be further delithiated at higher potentials. The results reveal that the combination of confining lithiation to nanoscale sheets of Li2O and the availability of reaction sites in the metal layers in the layered structure is a strategy for improving the reversibility and mass transport properties that can be used in a wide range of conversion materials.

  5. Chromium--a material for fusion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to their low neutron-induced radioactivity chromium based materials are considered to be candidates for structure materials in fusion technology. In this paper investigations are presented of unirradiated chromium with a purity of 99.96% (DUCROPUR) and a dispersion strengthened chromium alloy Cr5Fe1Y2O3 (DUCROLLOY). Both materials have been produced in a powder metallurgical route. Mechanical tests of smooth and pre-cracked specimens have been performed in a wide temperature range. Below 280 deg. C the fracture toughness values of DUCROPUR are very low (1/2), above the transition temperature they exceed 500 MPa m1/2. Large plastic deformations have been observed. DUCROLLOY does not indicate such a significant increase of fracture toughness in the tested temperature range. But above 400 deg. C large plastic deformations can be obtained in bending samples, too. The fatigue crack propagation behaviour of DUCROPUR at 300 deg. C is similar to that of a ductile metal

  6. Characterization of silicon-silicon carbide ceramic derived from carbon-carbon silicon carbide composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Vijay K. [Indian Institute of Technology, Varanasi (India). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Krenkel, Walter [Univ. of Bayreuth (Germany). Dept. of Ceramic Materials Engineering

    2013-04-15

    The main objective of the present work is to process porous silicon - silicon carbide (Si - SiC) ceramic by the oxidation of carboncarbon silicon carbide (C/C - SiC) composites. Phase studies are performed on the oxidized porous composite to examine the changes due to the high temperature oxidation. Further, various characterization techniques are performed on Si- SiC ceramics in order to study the material's microstructure. The effects of various parameters such as fiber alignment (twill weave and short/chopped fiber) and phenolic resin type (resol and novolak) are characterized.

  7. Effect of welding thermal cycle on the structure and properties of new effective alloying chromium-manganese-nickel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure and properties of efficiently alloyed chromium-manganese-nickel steels of three experimental meltings with variable content of manganese - 2% (meltings 1 and 2) and 10% (melting 3). Steel of melting 3 was additionally alloyed with molybdenum and vanadium, and that of melting 2 - with nitrogen. The effect of different cooling rates (5, 25, 100 deg C) corresponding to electroslag, automatic flux-shielded and manual arc weldings on the structure and properties of HAZ metal of the experimental melting steels. It is shown that to decrease grain growth and intensive carbide formation, when developing technology of the steel welding attempts should be made to decrease the duration of HAZ metal maintaining at high temperature and to increase cooling rate

  8. Effect of Hot Deformation on Formation and Growth of Thermal Fatigue Crack in Chromium Wear Resistant Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Li-min; LIU Jian-hua

    2006-01-01

    The formation and growth of thermal fatigue crack in chromium wear resistant cast iron was investigated, and the effect of hot deformation on the crack was analyzed by means of optical microscope and scanning electron microscope and high frequency induction thermal fatigue tester. The results show that eutectic carbide is the main location and passage for initiation and extension of thermal fatigue cracks, hot deformation can improve the eutectic carbide′s morphology and distribution, inhibit the generation and propagation of thermal fatigue cracks. In the experiment, the propagation rate of thermal fatigue crack reduces with the quantity of hot deformation increasing, which was analyzed in the point view of the activation energy of crack propagation.

  9. Effect of Manganese on As-Cast Microstructure and Hardening Behavior of High Chromium White Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Zhi-ping; SHEN Bao-luo; WANG Jun; LIU Hao-huai; LUO Cheng

    2005-01-01

    The effect of manganese on the as-cast structure and hardening behavior of high chromium white cast iron subjected to sub-critical treatment was studied. The results indicate that the fraction of retained austenite and the manganese distribution in as-cast alloys are controlled by manganese content. The manganese distribution in as-cast alloys is not homogeneous. The manganese content in carbide is higher than that in matrix. Whether the secondary hardening occurs or not and the peak hardness of secondary hardening is controlled by manganese content in retained austenite in as-cast structure. Higher manganese content can cause more retained austenite. The secondary hardening occurs in sub-critical treating process if the fraction of retained austenite is high.

  10. A REVIEW OF BIOSORPTION OF CHROMIUM IONS BY MICROORGANISMS

    OpenAIRE

    Inga Zinicovscaia

    2012-01-01

    Due to its widespread industrial use, chromium has become a serious pollutant in diverse environmental settings. The main source of chromium pollution including the Republic o Moldova is industry. It is a great need to develop new eco-friendly methods of chromium removal. Biosorption of heavy metals is a most promising technology involved in the removal of toxic metals from industrial waste streams and natural waters. This article is an extended abstract of a communication presented at the...

  11. CHROMIUM INDUCED CYTOTOXICITY IN BLACKGRAM (VIGNA MUNGO L.)

    OpenAIRE

    A. Chidambaram ، P. Sundaramoorthy ، A. Murugan ، K. Sankar Ganesh ، L. Baskaran

    2009-01-01

    Chromium is known to be highly toxic to biological systems. This study was designed to determine the mutagenic effects of different concentrations (0, 10, 25, 50, 100 and 200 mg/L) of hexavalent chromium on root tip cells of blackgram (Vigna mungo L. Hepper). The blackgram seeds were equi-spacially arranged in sterilized petriplates lined with filter paper and they were treated with different concentrations of chromium solution. In germination studies, the morphological growth parameters such...

  12. Processes affecting the remediation of chromium-contaminated sites.

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, C.D.; Wittbrodt, P R

    1991-01-01

    The remediation of chromium-contaminated sites requires knowledge of the processes that control the migration and transformation of chromium. Advection, dispersion, and diffusion are physical processes affecting the rate at which contaminants can migrate in the subsurface. Heterogeneity is an important factor that affects the contribution of each of these mechanisms to the migration of chromium-laden waters. Redox reactions, chemical speciation, adsorption/desorption phenomena, and precipitat...

  13. Analysis of molybdenum, chromium, vanadium and iron by polarographic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of direct current Tast polarograph, differential pulse polarography and phase-selective alternative current Tast polarography to the problem of determining molybdenum, chromium, vanadium and iron in various supporting electrolytes is reported. The effect of the supporting electrolyte on the wave/peak potential and sensitivity of the metal ion have been examined. The polarographic methods were applied for simultaneous determination of chromium (3)/chromium (6), vanadium (4), vanadium (5) and iron (2)/iron (3) in different supporting electrolytes

  14. Production of a chromium Bose-Einstein condensate

    OpenAIRE

    Griesmaier, Axel; Stuhler, Jürgen; Pfau, Tilman

    2005-01-01

    The recent achievement of Bose-Einstein condensation of chromium atoms [1] has opened longed-for experimental access to a degenerate quantum gas with long-range and anisotropic interaction. Due to the large magnetic moment of chromium atoms of 6 {$\\mu$}B, in contrast to other Bose- Einstein condensates (BECs), magnetic dipole-dipole interaction plays an important role in a chromium BEC. Many new physical properties of degenerate gases arising from these magnetic forces have been predicted in ...

  15. Removal of chromium(VI) from saline wastewaters by

    OpenAIRE

    AKSU, Zümriye

    2002-01-01

    Some industrial wastewaters contain higher quantities of salts besides chromium(VI) ions so the effect of these salts on the biosorption of chromium(VI) should be investigated. The biosorption of chromium (VI) from saline solutions on two strains of living Dunaliella algae were tested under laboratory conditions as a function of pH, initial metal ion and salt (NaCl) concentrations in a batch system. The biosorption capacity of both Dunaliella strains strongly de...

  16. Increase of chromium utilization in stainless steel melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The processes of deoxidizing when melting stainless 18-10 steels in electric are furnaces by the method of remelting with wastes are investigated. The dependences of amount of reduced chromium on silicon consumption are made more precise. It is shown that it is useful to apply aluminium for deoxidation of acid high-chromium slags. Based on the data on pilot melts the extent to which aluminium can be used as a reducing agent for chromium is estimated. 3 refs., 2 figs

  17. Scientific Opinion on ChromoPrecise® cellular bound chromium yeast added for nutritional purposes as a source of chromium in food supplements and the bioavailability of chromium from this source

    OpenAIRE

    EFSA Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food (ANS)

    2012-01-01

    The Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food (ANS) provides a scientific opinion re-evaluating the safety of ChromoPrecise® cellular bound chromium yeast added for nutritional purposes as a source of chromium in food supplements and the bioavailability of chromium from this source. ChromoPrecise® is a yeast preparation with an enriched trivalent chromium content, obtained by culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the presence of chromium chloride. A daily intake of 100 µg ch...

  18. Chromium depletion from stainless steels during vacuum annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behaviour of chromium during selective evaporation by high temperature vacuum annealing has been investigated by means of energy dispersive X-ray analysis and by neutron activation analysis. It was established that the rate of chromium loss from austenitic stainless steels 316 and 321 is controlled by chromium inter-diffusion rather than tracer diffusion in the alloy. Two important parameters in selective removal of chromium from alloy steels are the variation in the chromium surface concentration with time and the depletion profile in the alloy. The present work gives support for the model in which loss of chromium is dependent on its diffusivity in the alloy and on an interface transfer coefficient. The results showed that the surface concentration of chromium decreased with increasing vacuum annealing time. The chromium depletion profile in the metal was in accord with the previous derived model, apart from an anomalous near surface region. Here the higher resolution of a neutron activation technique indicated a region within approximately 2 microns of the surface where the chromium concentration decreased more steeply than expected. (author)

  19. Stabilization and solidification of chromium-contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherne, C.A.; Thomson, B.M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Civil Engineering Dept.; Conway, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-11-01

    Chromium-contaminated soil is a common environmental problem in the United States as a result of numerous industrial processes involving chromium. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is the species of most concern because of its toxicity and mobility in groundwater. One method of diminishing the environmental impact of chromium is to reduce it to a trivalent oxidation state [Cr(III)], in which it is relatively insoluble and nontoxic. This study investigated a stabilization and solidification process to minimize the chromium concentration in the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) extract and to produce a solidified waste form with a compressive strength in the range of 150 to 300 pounds per square inch (psi). To minimize the chromium in the TCLP extract, the chromium had to be reduced to the trivalent oxidation state. The average used in this study was an alluvium contaminated with chromic and sulfuric acid solutions. The chromium concentration in the in the in situ soil was 1212 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) total chromium and 275 mg/kg Cr(VI). The effectiveness of iron, ferrous sulfate to reduce Cr(VI) was tested in batch experiments.

  20. Method of trivalent chromium concentration determination by atomic spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reheulishvili, Aleksandre N.; Tsibakhashvili, Neli Ya.

    2006-12-12

    A method is disclosed for determining the concentration of trivalent chromium Cr(III) in a sample. The addition of perchloric acid has been found to increase the atomic chromium spectrometric signal due to Cr(III), while leaving the signal due to hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) unchanged. This enables determination of the Cr(III) concentration without pre-concentration or pre-separation from chromium of other valences. The Cr(III) concentration may be measured using atomic absorption spectrometry, atomic emission spectrometry or atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

  1. Tribological Characteristics of Chromium-active Carbon Electroplated Composite Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUKa-fi; HUAMeng; Yi-min

    2004-01-01

    A process of chromium electroplating using a standard bath with additives and active carbon particles was reported, and the tribological behaviors of the composite coatings using the pin-on-disk tester and the table wear tester were i nvestig(aed. Experimental results indicate that the electroplated chromium-active carbon composite coatings exhibited the low friction coefficient anti excellent anti-wear properties whets coffered with the normal chromium electroplated ones. The formation of active carbon particles within the chromium matrices can be explained by SEM analysis and the mechanis of wear resistance of the composite coatings were studied.

  2. Defect transformation in GSGG crystals during chromium ion activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absorption and induced absorption spectra, dose dependence of induced absorption, thermoluminescence of GSGG crystals, nominally pure and activated with chromium and neodymium ions in different concentrations, are investigated. It is shown that it is chromium ion presence in large concentration that decreases the induced coloration in GSGG crystals after γ-irradiation at 300 K. Optimum concentration of chromium ions for the minimum of induced coloration are found. The mechanism of decrease of induced coloration consisting in Fermi level displacement by chromium ion activation is established. Defect concentration and localization and recombination possibilities of electrons and holes in GSGG crystals are estimated by computer simulation

  3. Oral bioavailability of chromium from a specific site.

    OpenAIRE

    Witmer, C M; Harris, R.; Shupack, S I

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of soil from a specific site in New Jersey indicated a low level of sodium and chromium present as a calcium compound. Chromium was then administered orally to young, mature male rats at a level of 240 micrograms/kg for 14 days as chromium-contaminated soil, as CaCrO4, and as an equimolar mixture of the soil and calcium salts for 14 days. The rats were sacrificed 24 hr after the last dosing, and tissues were taken immediately for chromium analysis. Blood, muscle, and liver contained ...

  4. MICRO-SEGREGATION OF CHROMIUM IN Fe-Cr ALLOY

    OpenAIRE

    Igata, N.; Sato, S; ANDO, T.; H. Doi; Nishikawa, O.; Shibata, M.

    1984-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to clarify the behavior of chromium atoms in iron-5at.% chromium alloy. When the specimens were quenched after soultion annealing at 1150°C for 1hr, FIM image was only a bright area, but when they were tempered from 450°C to 650°C, both bright areas and dark areas were observed in the FIM image. In these quenched specimens there was microsegregation of chromium atoms : In bright areas the chromium concentration was lower, and in dark areas it was higher ...

  5. Influence of Chelating Agents on Chromium Fate in Sediment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGXIAOCHANG; SUNJINHE; 等

    1996-01-01

    A laboratory investigation on reaction between chelating agents and chromium was conducted to evaluate the effect of chelating agents on the adsorption and desorption of chromium in sediment.The amount of adsorbed chromium(VI) in sediment decreased slightly by 5%-10% because of addition of chelating agents.Chelating agents inhibited the removal of Cr(Ⅲ)by sediment from solutions and the inhibiting effect was in the order:citric acid>tartaric acid>EDTA,Salicylic acid.No effect of chelating agents on desorption of chromium in sediment was observed.

  6. Analysing the chromium-chromium multiple bond using multiconfigurational quantum chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Brynda, Marcin; Gagliardi, Laura; Roos, Björn O.

    2009-01-01

    This Letter discusses the nature of the chemical bond between two chromium atoms in different di-chromium complexes with the metal atoms in different oxidation states. Starting with the Cr diatom, with its formally sextuple bond and oxidation number zero, we proceed to analyse the bonding in some Cr(I)–Cr(I) XCrCrX complexes with X varying from F, to Phenyl, and Aryl. The bond distance in these complexes varies over a large range: 1.65–1.83 Å and we suggest explanations for these variations. ...

  7. The effect of chromium picolinate on serum cholesterol and apolipoprotein fractions in human subjects.

    OpenAIRE

    Press, R. I.; Geller, J.; Evans, G. W.

    1990-01-01

    Chromium has been implicated as a cofactor in the maintenance of normal lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. A deficiency of chromium results from diets low in biologically available chromium. Picolinic acid, a metabolite of tryptophan, forms stable complexes with transitional metal ions, which results in an improved bioavailability of the metal ion chromium. To determine whether or not chromium picolinate is effective in humans, 28 volunteer subjects were given either chromium tripicolinate (3...

  8. Preparation and electrocatalytic activity of tungsten carbide and titania nanocomposite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: The electrocatalytic activity of tungsten carbide and titania nanocomposite is related to the structure, crystal phase and chemical components of the nanocomposite, and is also affected by the property of electrolyte. A synergistic effect exists between tungsten carbide and titania of the composite. Highlights: → Electrocatalytic activity of tungsten carbide and titania nanocomposite with core-shell structure. → Activity is related to the structure, crystal phase and chemical component of the nanocomposite. → The property of electrolyte affects the electrocatalytic activity. → A synergistic effect exists between tungsten carbide and titania of the composite. -- Abstract: Tungsten carbide and titania nanocomposite was prepared by combining a reduced-carbonized approach with a mechanochemical approach. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope under scanning mode and X-ray energy dispersion spectrum. The results show that the crystal phases of the samples are composed of anatase, rutile, nonstoichiometry titanium oxide, monotungsten carbide, bitungsten carbide and nonstoichiometry tungsten carbide, and they can be controlled by adjusting the parameters of the reduced-carbonized approach; tungsten carbide particles decorate on the surface of titania support, the diameter of tungsten carbide particle is smaller than 20 nm and that of titania is around 100 nm; the chemical components of the samples are Ti, O, W and C. The electrocatalytic activity of the samples was measured by a cyclic voltammetry with three electrodes. The results indicate that the electrocatalytic activities of the samples are related to their crystal phases and the property of electrolyte in aqueous solution. A synergistic effect between titania and tungsten carbide is reported for the first time.

  9. The Effect of Chromium Added into Basal Diet on Serum Total Protein, Urea, Triglyceride, Cholesterol and Serum and Tissue Chromium, Zinc, Copper Levels in Rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    *, Kâzim ŞAHİN; *, Talat GÜLER; +, N. ŞAHİN; *, O. N. ERTAS; +, N. ERKAL

    1999-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of supplemantal dietary chromium on serum total protein, urea, triglycerides, cholesterol, and serum and tissue chromium, zinc, and copper contents of pregnant rabbits, their offspring and their young rabbits. Treatment groups consisted of chromium level as follows: Control Group no supplementation chromium into basal diet, Treatment I (200 ppb Group) contained 200 ppb of supplemental chromium into basal diet, and Treatment II (400 ppb Group...

  10. Precipitation of carbides in Cr – Mo – V cast steel after service and regenerative heat treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Golański

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of research on precipitation processes in chromium – molybdenum – vanadium cast steel. Theexamined material was the following cast steel grade: L21HMF and G17CrMoV5 – 10 (L17HMF after long-term operation at elevatedtemperatures and after regenerative heat treatment. Identification of precipitates was performed by means of the transmission electronmicroscope using carbon extraction replicas and thin foils. On the basis of identifications it has been proved that in the structure ofinvestigated cast steel grades, degraded by long-term operation, there are a few sorts of carbides with diverse stability, such as: M3C; M2C, M23C6, MC, M7C3. Moreover, the occurrence of compound complexes of precipitates – the so called “H-carbides” – has been revealed. Heat treatment of the examined cast steels contributed to changes in morphology and precipitation type. Whilst in the bainitic structure, obtained through heat treatment, only the occurrence of carbide types, such as: M3C; M23C6 and MC has been noticed.

  11. Critically coupled surface phonon-polariton excitation in silicon carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuner, Burton; Korobkin, Dmitriy; Fietz, Chris; Carole, Davy; Ferro, Gabriel; Shvets, Gennady

    2009-09-01

    We observe critical coupling to surface phonon-polaritons in silicon carbide by attenuated total reflection of mid-IR radiation. Reflectance measurements demonstrate critical coupling by a double scan of wavelength and incidence angle. Critical coupling occurs when prism coupling loss is equal to losses in silicon carbide and the substrate, resulting in maximal electric field enhancement. PMID:19724526

  12. Brazed boron-silicon carbide/aluminum structural panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, W. E., Jr.; Bales, T. T.; Brooks, T. G.; Lawson, A. G.; Mitchell, P. D.; Royster, D. M.; Wiant, R.

    1978-01-01

    Fluxless brazing process minimizes degradation of mechanical properties composite material of silicon carbide coated boron fibers in an aluminum matrix. Process is being used to fabricate full-scale Boron-Silicon Carbide/Aluminum-Titanium honeycomb core panels for flight testing and ground testing.

  13. Mass spectrometric determination of boron isotope in boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron isotopes in boron carbide are measured by thermionic ionization mass spectrometry with no prior chemical separation. Boron is converted to sodium borate by fusion of the boron carbide with sodium hydroxide (or sodium carbonate) directly on the rhenium filament. The boron isotopic ratios are measured by using the Na2BO2+ ion

  14. Combustion synthesis of boron carbide - a spectroscopic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron Carbide is one of the hardest materials known, ranking third behind diamond and cubic boron nitride. It is the hardest material produced in tonnage quantities. Boron carbide (BxCx) enriched in the 10B isotope is used as a control rod material in the nuclear industry due to its high neutron absorption cross section and other favorable physico-chemical properties. Conventional methods of preparation of boron carbide are energy intensive processes accompanied by huge loss of boron. Attempts were made at IGCAR Kalpakkam to develop energy efficient and cost effective methods to prepare boron carbide. Nuclear applications of boron carbide include shielding, control rod and shut down pellets. Within control rods, boron carbide is often powdered, to increase its surface area. The products of the gel combustion and microwave synthesis experiments were characterized for phase purity by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The carbide formation was ascertained using finger-print spectroscopy of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR). Samples of pyrolized/microwave heated powder were characterized for surface morphology using electron microscope (SEM). The present work shows the recent advances in understanding of structural and chemical variation in boron carbide and their influence on morphology, optical and vibrational property result discussed in details. (author)

  15. Determination of boron and silicon in boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sodium carbonate fusion technique for the dissolution of boron carbide followed by the determination of boron by alkalimetric titration and silicon impurity by spectrophotometry is described. The elemental boron content in the commercially available boron carbide ranged from 77.2 to 77.60 % and the silicon in the range 1170 to 2500 ppm. (author)

  16. Preliminary fabrication studies of alternative LMFBR carbide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary fabrication studies were made of various compositions of thorium-uranium carbide and thorium-plutonium carbide fuel pellets that were prepared using the carbothermic reduction process. Temperatures of 1750 and 20000C were used during the reduction cycle. Sintering temperatures of 1800 and 20000C were used to prepare fuel pellets of low (87%) and high (> 94%) theoretical densities

  17. Properties of titanium carbide and vanadium carbide mixtures as first wall coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikama, T.; Sakai, Y.; Fukutomi, M.; Okada, M.

    1985-08-01

    Mixtures of titanium carbide(TiC) and vanadium carbide(VC) were deposited onto molybdenum at 870 K by a planar magnetron sputtering method. Molybdenum coated with the mixtures of (Ti 1-xV x) 0.6C 0.4(0 ≲ x $ˇ0.7) was tensile-deformed to rupture at a strain rate of 7×10 -4 s -1 at 300 K. During the deformation of the molybdenum substrate, crack formation and exfoliation of the deposited film of the mixture were monitored by acoustic emission (AE) and by optical observation. The mixtures of titanium carbide and vanadium carbide have larger fracture strengths than their parent carbides. Mixtures in the composition range, (Ti 0.6V 0.4) 0.6C 0.4-(Ti 0.5V 0.5) 0.6C 0.4 had the largest fracture strengths. The larger fracture strength of the film of the mixture decreased the resistance of the film to exfoliation. However, film in the composition ranges. (Ti 0.95V 0.05) 0.6C 0.4-(Ti 0.8V 0.2) 0.6C 0.4 and (Ti 0.4V 0.6) 0.6C 0.4-(Ti 0.3V 0.7) 0.6C 0.4 showed good resistance against exfoliation. The detection of AE from the deposits suggested that these films might have the ability to deform plastically to a small extent.

  18. Mechanical properties of Silicon Carbide Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhateeb, Abdullah; Zhang, Daqing; McIlroy, David; Aston, David Eric

    2004-05-01

    Silicon carbide nanowires could be potentially useful for high strength materials which lead to the interest in understanding their mechanical properties. In this report we use the digital pulse force microscopy to analyze the mechanical properties of SiC nanowires .Stiffness and adhesion images of SiC nanowires on silicon grating were obtained and calibrated force-distance curves were plotted along the wire which spans on a 1.5 micron trench. Moreover, spring constant and Young's modules have been calculated from the linear part of the force-distance curves.

  19. Mechanical characteristics of microwave sintered silicon carbide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Mandal; A Seal; S K Dalui; A K Dey; S Ghatak; A K Mukhopadhyay

    2001-04-01

    The present work deals with the sintering of SiC with a low melting additive by microwave technique. The mechanical characteristics of the products were compared with that of conventionally sintered products. The failure stress of the microwave sintered products, in biaxial flexure, was superior to that of the products made by conventional sintering route in ambient condition. In firing of products by conventionally sintered process, SiC grain gets oxidized producing SiO2 (∼ 32 wt%) and deteriorates the quality of the product substantially. Partially sintered silicon carbide by such a method is a useful material for a varieties of applications ranging from kiln furniture to membrane material.

  20. An improved method for preparing silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A desired shape is formed from a polysilane and the shape is heated in an inert atmosphere or under vacuum to 1150 to 16000C until the polysilane is converted to silicon carbide. The polysilane contains from 0 to 60 mole percent of (CH3)2Si units and from 40 to 100 mole percent of CH3Si units. The remaining bonds on silicon are attached to another silicon atom or to a chlorine or bromine atom, such that the polysilane contains from 10 to 43 weight percent of hydrolyzable chlorine or from 21 to 63 weight percent of hydrolyzable bromine. (author)

  1. Deep reactive ion etching of silicon carbide

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, S.; Rajanna, K.; Abe, T.(High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 305-0801, Tsukuba, Japan); Esashi, M

    2001-01-01

    In this article, we describe more than 100-\\mu m-deep reactive ion etching (RIE) of silicon carbide (SiC) in oxygen-added sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) plasma. We used a homemade magnetically enhanced, inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etcher (ME-ICP-RIE) and electroplated nickel masks. First, 5 h etching experiments using etching gases with 0%, 5%, 10% and 20% oxygen were performed by supplying rf power of 150 and 130 W to an ICP antenna and a sample stage, respectively. They demonstrated ...

  2. Nitride and carbide preforms for infiltration process

    OpenAIRE

    A. Twardowska; Nowak, R; P. Kurtyka; B. Smuk; M. Podsiadło; L. Jaworska; N. Sobczak

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Infiltration of molten metals into porous ceramic preforms is the only technique suitable for the fabrication of high volume fraction of ceramic materials in MMCs. The most popular material for porous preforms is Al2O3 because of its low cost. Infiltration process generates thermal stresses in the Al2O3 preforms. The thermal shock resistance of Al2O3 is lower than for Si3N4 or Al2O3/TiC+TiN materials. The aim of this study is to obtain the nitride and carbide base preforms material f...

  3. Structural relaxation of amorphous silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have examined amorphous structures of silicon carbide (SiC) using both transmission electron microscopy and a molecular-dynamics approach. Radial distribution functions revealed that amorphous SiC contains not only heteronuclear (Si-C) bonds but also homonuclear (Si-Si and C-C) bonds. The ratio of heteronuclear to homonuclear bonds was found to change upon annealing, suggesting that structural relaxation of the amorphous SiC occurred. Good agreement was obtained between the simulated and experimentally measured radial distribution functions

  4. Structural relaxation of amorphous silicon carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimaru, Manabu; Bae, In-Tae; Hirotsu, Yoshihiko; Matsumura, Syo; Sickafus, Kurt E

    2002-07-29

    We have examined amorphous structures of silicon carbide (SiC) using both transmission electron microscopy and a molecular-dynamics approach. Radial distribution functions revealed that amorphous SiC contains not only heteronuclear (Si-C) bonds but also homonuclear (Si-Si and C-C) bonds. The ratio of heteronuclear to homonuclear bonds was found to change upon annealing, suggesting that structural relaxation of the amorphous SiC occurred. Good agreement was obtained between the simulated and experimentally measured radial distribution functions. PMID:12144449

  5. STABILITY AND ABSORPTION OF CHROMIUM AND ABSORPTION OF CHROMIUM HISTIDINE BY HUMANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increased intake of chromium has been shown to lead to improvements in glucose, insulin, lipids, and related variables in studies involving humans, experimental and farm animals. However, the results are often variable depending not only upon the selection of subjects, but also dietary conditions a...

  6. Metallurgical investigation of the base material and weldments of the 9% chromium X 10 CrMoVNb 9 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the as-supplied condition, the steel X 10CrMoVNb 91 exhibits martensitic microstructure containing chromium carbide particles (M23C6) on the martensite lath boundaries and fine precipitates of coherent and non-coherent Nb-V carbonitrides of the type MX in the grain interior. If the material is subjected to creep testing the precipitation of Laves phase and additional precipitation of M23 C6 and MX takes place in the microstructure and overaging of coherent MX takes place in the microstructure and overaging of coherent MX phase begins. Recovery and recrystallization processes occur more quickly. The creep-rupture behaviour of the material can be assumed to be predominantly governed by the MX precipitate, while the concentrations of vanadium, niobium, carbon and nitrogen in the precipitate play a major role on the effectiveness of the precipitate. In weldments, the creep damage initiates, as a rule, at the edge of the HAZ adjacent to the unaffected base material. The short-time heating of these zones to tempertures just above Ac1 temperature results in the formation of austenite with very low carbon content, because the carbides hardly go into solution at this temperature. During cooling this austenite transforms to martensite, which is very soft. Moreover, this martensite recrystallizes almost completely when conventionally tempered at about 750deg C. (orig./MM)

  7. Analysis of tungsten carbides by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinson, K; Knott, A C; Belcher, C B

    Five sample presentation techniques were examined for the X-ray fluorescence spectrometric analysis of tungsten carbide alloys in powder and cemented forms. Powder samples may be oxidized by air at 600 degrees before fusion (I), or preferably by lithium nitrate during fusion (II); the fusion is effected with lithium-lanthanum tetraborate followed by briquetting with graphite. Powder samples may also be blended with wax and briquetted (III). Cemented carbides are surface-prepared with silicon carbide before analysis (V). Briquettes prepared by blending carbide powder, lithium-lanthanum tetraborate and graphite (IV), give poor reproducibility, however, owing to micro-absorption effects the technique is not recommended. The determination of eight common elements in tungsten carbide is discussed and the relative standard deviations are 0.002-0.004 for major and 0.008-0.01 for minor elements. PMID:18961988

  8. Synthesis and photoluminescence property of boron carbide nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large scale, high density boron carbide nanowires have been synthesized by using an improved carbothermal reduction method with B/B2O3/C powder precursors under an argon flow at 1100°C. The boron carbide nanowires are 5–10 μm in length and 80–100 nm in diameter. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) characterizations show that the boron carbide nanowire has a B4C rhombohedral structure with good crystallization. The Raman spectrum of the as-grown boron carbide nanowires is consistent with that of a B4C structure consisting of B11C icosahedra and C-B-C chains. The room temperature photoluminescence spectrum of the boron carbide nanowires exhibits a visible range of emission centred at 638 nm. (condensed matter: structure, thermal and mechanical properties)

  9. Supported molybdenum carbide for higher alcohol synthesis from syngas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Qiongxiao; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Chiarello, Gian Luca;

    2013-01-01

    carbide, while the selectivity to methanol follows the opposite trend. The effect of Mo2C loading on the alcohol selectivity at a fixed K/Mo molar ratio of 0.14 could be related to the amount of K2CO3 actually on the active Mo2C phase and the size, structure and composition of the supported carbide......Molybdenum carbide supported on active carbon, carbon nanotubes, and titanium dioxide, and promoted by K2CO3, has been prepared and tested for methanol and higher alcohol synthesis from syngas. At optimal conditions, the activity and selectivity to alcohols (methanol and higher alcohols) over...... supported molybdenum carbide are significantly higher compared to the bulk carbide. The CO conversion reaches a maximum, when about 20wt% Mo2C is loaded on active carbon. The selectivity to higher alcohols increases with increasing Mo2C loading on active carbon and reaches a maximum over bulk molybdenum...

  10. Chromium and Polyphenols From Cinnamon Improve Insulin Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naturally occurring compounds that have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity include chromium and polyphenols found in cinnamon. These compounds also have similar effects on insulin signaling and glucose control. The signs of chromium deficiency are similar to those for the metabolic syndrome ...

  11. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium (2010 External Review Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [UPDATE] New Schedule for IRIS Hexavalent Chromium Assessment In Feb 2012, EPA developed a new schedule for completing the IRIS hexavalent chromium assessment. Based on the recommendations of the external peer review panel, which met in May 2011 to review the dra...

  12. Composition and structure of plasma sprayed chromium steel powders

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schneeweiss, O.; Voleník, Karel; Kolman, Blahoslav Jan

    Praha, 2005, s. 105-111. ISBN 1899072 18 7. [EURO Powder Metallurgy Congress & Exhibition. Prague (CZ), 02.10.2005-05.10.2005] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : chromium steel * plasma spraying * chromium depletion * Mössbauer spectroscopy Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  13. Safety, absorption, and antioxidant effects of chromium histidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supplemental chromium has been shown to be involved in the alleviation of the metabolic syndrome, glucose intolerance, polycystic ovary syndrome, depression, excess body fat, and gestational, steroid-induced, and type 2 diabetes. Chromium amino acid complexes that contained histidine displayed cons...

  14. Toxicity and adaptation of Dictyosphaerium chlorelloides to extreme chromium contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Fortún, Sebastián; López-Rodas, Victoria; Navarro, Macarena; Marvá, Fernando; D'ors, Ana; Rouco, Mónica; Haigh-Florez, David; Costas, Eduardo

    2009-09-01

    Metals are often spilled by industries into inland water environments, with adverse consequences. Numerous papers have reported that heavy metals produce massive destruction of algae. Nevertheless, algal populations seem to become tolerant when they have had previous exposures to heavy metals. Because the mechanisms allowing heavy metal tolerance of algae are not yet known, the present study analyzed the effect of hexavalent chromium on growth and photosynthetic performance of Dictyosphaerium chlorelloides, stressing on the adaptation mechanisms to chromium contamination. Growth and photosynthetic performance of algal cells were inhibited by Cr(VI) at 10 mg/L, and the 72-h median inhibition concentration was established as 1.64 and 1.54 mg/L, respectively. However, after further incubation for a three month period in an environment with 25 mg/L of chromium, some rare, chromium-resistant cells occasionally were found. A Luria-Delbrück fluctuation analysis was performed to distinguish between resistant algae arising from rare, spontaneous mutations and resistant algae arising from physiological adaptation and other adaptive mechanisms. Resistant cells arose only by spontaneous mutations before the addition of chromium, with a rate of 1.77 x 10(-6) mutants per cell division. From a practical point of view, the use of both chromium-sensitive and chromium-resistant genotypes could make possible a specific algal biosensor for chromium. PMID:19323601

  15. Residual Chromium in Leather by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Okoh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Most tanning processes employ the use of chromium sulphate. For chromium tanned leather, finished products may contain high amount of residual chromium. This may pose some health hazards, since chromium is known to be toxic at elevated concentration. This justifies the need for the study. Approach: Various samples of leather were collected from a tannery, a leather crafts market, a leather dump site and from local tanners all in Kano, Nigeria in 2009. The samples were irradiated for 6 h in the inner site of the Nigerian Research Reactor (NIRR-1 at a flux of 5×1011 ncm-2 sec-1. Results: After evaluating the spectrum, the mean results for chromium in the samples were determined as 2.33±0.3, 2.23±0.3 and 2.93±0.4% for samples from the tannery, leather crafts market and leather dump sites respectively. Chromium concentration in samples collected from local tanners who use tannins from Acacia nilotica as tanning agent was below the detection limit of Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA technique used in the study. Conclusion: Although, the concentrations of chromium in the analysed samples were not much higher than what were obtained in literature, they may be enough to sensitize the population that is allergic to chromium.

  16. AMORPHOUS ALLOY SURFACE COATINGS FOR HARD CHROMIUM REPLACEMENT - PHASE I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hard chromium coatings (0.25 to10 mil thick) are used extensively for imparting wear and erosion resistance to components in both industrial and military applications. The most common means of depositing hard chromium has been through the use of chromic acid baths containing ...

  17. Electrocatalysis using transition metal carbide and oxide nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regmi, Yagya N.

    Carbides are one of the several families of transition metal compounds that are considered economic alternatives to catalysts based on noble metals and their compounds. Phase pure transition metal carbides of group 4-6 metals, in the first three periods, were synthesized using a common eutectic salt flux synthesis method, and their electrocatalytic activities compared under uniform electrochemical conditions. Mo2C showed highest hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activities among the nine metal carbides investigated, but all other metal carbides also showed substantial activities. All the metal carbides showed remarkable enhancement in catalytic activities as supports, when compared to traditional graphitic carbon as platinum support. Mo2C, the most active transition metal carbide electrocatalyst, was prepared using four different synthesis routes, and the synthesis route dependent activities compared. Bifunctional Mo 2C that is HER as well as oxygen evolution reaction (OER) active, was achieved when the carbide was templated on a multiwalled carbon nanotube using carbothermic reduction method. Bimetallic carbides of Fe, Co, and Ni with Mo or W were prepared using a common carbothermic reduction method. Two different stoichiometries of bimetallic carbides were obtained for each system within a 60 °C temperature window. While the bimetallic carbides showed relatively lower electrocatalytic activities towards HER and ORR in comparison to Mo2C and WC, they revealed remarkably higher OER activities than IrO2 and RuO2, the state-of-the-art OER catalysts. Bimetallic oxides of Fe, Co, and Ni with Mo and W were also prepared using a hydrothermal synthesis method and they also revealed OER activities that are much higher than RuO2 and IrO2. Additionally, the OER activities were dependent on the degree and nature of hydration in the bimetallic oxide crystal lattice, with the completely hydrated, as synthesized, cobalt molybdate and nickel

  18. ADVANCES IN HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM REMOVAL AT HANFORD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NESHEM DO; RIDDELLE J

    2012-01-30

    At the Hanford Site, chromium was used as a corrosion inhibitor in the reactor cooling water and was introduced into the groundwater as a result of planned and unplanned discharges from reactors during plutonium production since 1944. Beginning in 1995, groundwater treatment methods were evaluated leading to the use of pump and treat facilities with ion exchange using Dowex 21 K, a regenerable strong base anion exchange resin. This required regeneration of the resin, which is currently performed offsite. Resin was installed in a 4 vessel train, with resin removal required from the lead vessel approximately once a month. In 2007, there were 8 trains (32 vessels) in operation. In 2008, DOE recognized that regulatory agreements would require significant expansion in the groundwater chromium treatment capacity. Previous experience from one of the DOE project managers led to identification of a possible alternative resin, and the contractor was requested to evaluate alternative resins for both cost and programmatic risk reductions. Testing was performed onsite in 2009 and 2010, using a variety of potential resins in two separate facilities with groundwater from specific remediation sites to demonstrate resin performance in the specific groundwater chemistry at each site. The testing demonstrated that a weak base anion single-use resin, ResinTech SIR-700, was effective at removing chromium, had a significantly higher capacity, could be disposed of efficiently on site, and would eliminate the complexities and programmatic risks from sampling, packaging, transportation and return of resin for regeneration. This resin was installed in Hanford's newest groundwater treatment facility, called 100-DX, which began operations in November, 2010, and used in a sister facility, 100-HX, which started up in September of 2011. This increased chromium treatment capacity to 25 trains (100 vessels). The resin is also being tested in existing facilities that utilize Dowex 21 K for

  19. Chromium-Makes stainless steel stainless

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropschot, S.J.; Doebrich, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Chromium, a steely-gray, lustrous, hard metal that takes a high polish and has a high melting point, is a silvery white, hard, and bright metal plating on steel and other material. Commonly known as chrome, it is one of the most important and indispensable industrial metals because of its hardness and resistance to corrosion. But it is used for more than the production of stainless steel and nonferrous alloys; it is also used to create pigments and chemicals used to process leather.

  20. The electronic structure of antiferromagnetic chromium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1981-01-01

    The author has used the local spin density formalism to perform self-consistent calculations of the electronic structure of chromium in the non-magnetic and commensurate antiferromagnetic phases, as a function of the lattice parameter. A change of a few per cent in the atomic radius brings...... the calculated ground state properties into agreement with experiment. The magnetisation is studied as function of volume in several models, and it is shown that a Stoner picture provides an extremely accurate description of the full calculation provided the sp-d hybridisation is taken into account. It is found...

  1. Effects of UV light and chromium ions on wood flavonoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The individual and simultaneous effect of UV light and chromium ions was investigated by spectrophotometric methods on inert surfaces impregnated with quercetin or robinetin. The UV-VIS spectra of the silica gel plates impregnated with these flavonoids were modified characteristically after irradiating ultraviolet light. Even a half an hour of irradiation has caused irreversible changes in the molecule structure. A certain chemical - presumably complexation - was concluded from the change of spectral bands assigned to flavonoids when impregnated with chromic ions. Hexavalent chromium caused more complex changes in the absorption spectra. The differences in the spectra could indicate either the oxidation and decomposition of flavonoids, or some kind of coordination process and the reduction of hexavalent chromium. The simultaneous application of UV light and chromium ions caused more pronounced effects. The complexation process between chromium(III) and flavonoid was completed

  2. CHROMIUM BIOACCUMULATION FROM COMPOSTS AND VERMICOMPOSTS BASED ON TANNERY SLUDGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof GONDEK

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Storage of waste substances is not indifferent to ecological equilibrium in the environment therefore should not be the ultimate way to limit waste arduousness. Therefore, the conducted investigations aimed to determine the effect of tannery composts and vermicomposts loaded with chromium on this element bioaccumulation in earthworm bodies and biomass of selected plants. Chromium in composts and vermicomposts based on tannery sludges occurred in small quantities and easily soluble compounds. Chromium concentrations in redworm biomass points to this metal accumulation in Eisenia fetida body tissues. This element content in redworm biomass was signifi cantly positively correlated with its content in composts. Chromium content in plants was diversifi ed and on treatments was generally smaller than on mineral treatment or farmyard manure. Chromium absorbed by plants was stored mainly in the root systems, and over the norm content of this element found in vermicomposts did not cause its excessive accumulation in plant biomass.

  3. Biosorption potency of Aspergillus niger for removal of chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Shaili; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2006-09-01

    Aspergillus niger isolated from soil and effluent of leather tanning mills had higher activity to remove chromium. The potency of Aspergillus niger was evaluated in shake flask culture by absorption of chromium at pH 6 and temperature 30 degrees C. The results of the study indicated removal of more than 75% chromium by Aspergillus niger determined by diphenylcarbazide colorimetric assay and atomic absorption spectrophotometry after 7 days. Study of microbial Cr(VI) reduction and identification of reduction intermediates has been hindered by the lack of analytical techniques that can identify the oxidation state with subcellular spatial resolution. Therefore, removal of chromium was further substantiated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), which indicated an accumulation of chromium in the fungal mycelium. PMID:16874547

  4. Specific features of the electrocrystallization of chromium together with molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made on molybdenum effect on surface structure and some physicomechanical properties of electrolytic chromium during Cr-Mo electrodeposition from CrO3 solutions with additions of SO42- and SiFe62- anions. Cr-Mo deposition was conducted at 55 deg C and 0.5 A/cm2 current density which corresponds to conditions of hard chromizing. It is shown that the change hardness, hydridation and internal stresses of chromium coatings during their alloying with molybdenum is conditioned by structure change. Mo introduction into chromium is not manifested clearly in these characteristics. The change of chromium structure during deposition with molybdenum is probably related both with change of anion relation in cathode film (decrease of catalytic anion content in it) and peculiarities of chromium electrocrystallization. This requires special study with application of methods for investigation into fine and surface structure

  5. Silicon Carbide: The Problem with Laboratory Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speck, A. K.; Hofmeister, A. M.; Barlow, M. J.

    2000-03-01

    The interpretation of astronomical observations of infrared (IR) silicon carbide (SiC) features in the spectra of carbon stars have revealed discrepancies between the work of astronomers and that of meteoriticists. The silicon carbide observed around carbon stars has been attributed to one type of SiC (α) while meteoritic samples believed to have formed around such stars are of another type of SiC (β). The key to solving this problem has been to understand the sources of laboratory data used by astronomers in order to interpret the IR spectra. Through comparison of thin film IR absorption spectra and spectra taken using finely ground samples dispersed in potassium bromide (KBr) pellets we show that the previously invoked ``KBr matrix-correction'' is unnecessary for powder dispersions obtained from very fine grain sizes of SiC. Comparison of our data and previous measurements show that dust around carbon stars is β-SiC, consistent with laboratory studies of presolar grains in meteorites. The implications of these findings affect twenty years of work. The IR spectroscopic laboratory data used by astronomers to identify dust species in space must be carefully scrutinized to ensure that the KBr correction is not responsible for further misattributions of minerals in astronomical dust features.

  6. Ultrasmall Carbide Nanospheres - Formation and Electronic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinke, Petra; Monazami, Ehsan; McClimon, John

    2015-03-01

    Metallic nanoparticles are highly coveted but are subject to rapid Ostwald ripening even at moderate temperatures limiting study of their properties. Ultrasmall transition metal carbide ``nanospheres'' are synthesized by a solid-state reaction between fullerene as carbon scaffold, and a W surface. This produces nanospheres with a narrow size distribution below 2.5 nm diameter. The nanosphere shape is defined by the scaffold and densely packed arrays can be achieved. The metal-fullerene reaction is temperature driven and progresses through an intermediate semiconducting phase until the fully metallic nanospheres are created at about 350 C. The reaction sequence is observed with STM, and STS maps yield the local density of states. The reaction presumably progresses by stepwise introduction of W-atoms in the carbon scaffold. The results of high resolution STM/STS in combination with DFT calculations are used to unravel the reaction mechanism. We will discuss the transfer of this specific reaction mechanism to other transition metal carbides. The nanospheres are an excellent testbed for the physics and chemistry of highly curved surfaces.

  7. Electronic properties of disordered silicon carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The disorder effects on the electronic properties of silicon carbide were studied at the atomic or micro-structural scale. We have investigated a great variety of materials: silicon carbide fibers, carbonated amorphous silicon films, single crystals and amorphous or crystalline SiC powders. The DC and AC conductivity measurements on the SiC fibers point out the major role of their micro-structure at the nanometric scale, which leads to large dielectric constants. Hopping of polaronic carriers is the dominant conduction mechanism. An electrons spin resonance study of all the materials was performed: sp2 hybridized carbon is always present, in diluted form in the amorphous systems or as free carbon in the crystalline one. Some irradiation defects of SiC were identified: silicon or carbon vacancy and carbon complexes with sp2 hybridization. Such a carbon is responsible of the low paramagnetic stability of the silicon dangling bonds. It is believed to induce the polaronic behavior of the localized carriers. (Author). refs., figs., tabs

  8. ELECTROCHEMICAL MACHINING OF CARBIDES AND BORIDES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dissaux, Bernard Antoine; Muller, Rolf H.; Tobias, Charles W.

    1978-07-01

    The use of high rate anodic dissolution (electrochemical machining) for shaping titanium carbide, zirconium carbide, titanium boride and zirconium boride has been investigated in 2N potassium nitrate and 3N sodium chloride under current densities ranging from 20 to 120 A/cm{sup 2} (corresponding to cutting rates of 0.3 to 1.8 mm/min). The dissolution stoichiometry for all these materials is independent of the current density in the range 20 to 120 A/cm{sup 2}. Both titanium and zirconium appear to dissolve in the +4 state, boron in the +3 state and the weight loss measurements indicate that carbon is oxidized to CO and CO{sub 2}. The current voltage curves permit to establish that, over the entire current density and flow range investigated, dissolution occurs in the transpassive state. The surface roughness obtained on TiC and ZrC is within 3-5 {micro}m and is independent of current density, applied voltage or flow rate.

  9. High temperature intermetallic binders for HVOF carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas turbines technology has a long history of employing the desirable high temperature physical attributes of ceramic-metallic (cermet) materials. The most commonly used coatings incorporate combinations of WC-Co and Cr3C2-NiCr, which have also been successfully utilized in other non-turbine coating applications. Increased turbine operating temperatures and other high temperature service conditions have made apparent the attractive notion of increasing the temperature capability and corrosion resistance of these coatings. In this study the intermetallic binder NiAl has been used to replace the cobalt and NiCr constituents of conventional WC and Cr3C2 cermet powders. The composite carbide thermal spray powders were fabricated for use in the HVOF coating process. The structure of HVOF deposited NiAl-carbide coatings are compared directly to the more familiar WC-Co and Cr3C2-NiCr coatings using X-ray diffraction, back-scattered electron imaging (BEI) and electron dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Hardness variations with temperature are reported and compared between the NiAl and Co/NiCr binders

  10. Pressureless sintering of beta silicon carbide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study reports the pressureless sintering of cubic phase silicon carbide nanoparticles (β-SiC). Green blended compounds made of SiC nano-sized powder, a fugitive binder and a sintering agent (boron carbide, B4C), have been prepared. The binder is removed at low temperature (e.g. 800 degrees C) and the pressureless sintering studied between 1900 and 2100 degrees C. The nearly theoretical density (98% relative density) was obtained after 30 min at 2100 degrees C. The structural and microstructural evolutions during the heat treatment were characterised. The high temperatures needed for the sintering result in the β-SiC to α-SiC transformation which is revealed by the change of the composite microstructure. From 1900 degrees C, dense samples are composed of β-SiC grains surrounding α-SiC platelets in a well-defined orientation. TEM investigations and calculation of the activation energy of the sintering provided insight to the densification mechanism. (authors)

  11. Dynamic compaction of tungsten carbide powder.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gluth, Jeffrey Weston; Hall, Clint Allen; Vogler, Tracy John; Grady, Dennis Edward

    2005-04-01

    The shock compaction behavior of a tungsten carbide powder was investigated using a new experimental design for gas-gun experiments. This design allows the Hugoniot properties to be measured with reasonably good accuracy despite the inherent difficulties involved with distended powders. The experiments also provide the first reshock state for the compacted powder. Experiments were conducted at impact velocities of 245, 500, and 711 m/s. A steady shock wave was observed for some of the sample thicknesses, but the remainder were attenuated due to release from the back of the impactor or the edge of the sample. The shock velocity for the powder was found to be quite low, and the propagating shock waves were seen to be very dispersive. The Hugoniot density for the 711 m/s experiment was close to ambient crystal density for tungsten carbide, indicating nearly complete compaction. When compared with quasi-static compaction results for the same material, the dynamic compaction data is seen to be significantly stiffer for the regime over which they overlap. Based on these initial results, recommendations are made for improving the experimental technique and for future work to improve our understanding of powder compaction.

  12. Dominant factors in carbide fuel swelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Identification of the dominant factors involved in carbide fuel fission gas swelling and release behaviour has been attempted by comparison between experimental data and the results predicted by means of a physical model. The model assumes that fission gas release occurs entirely through gas atom migration in the matrix solid and that fission gas bubbles, intra and intergranular, grow as the net result of gas atom precipitation into the bubbles and gas atom re-solution from the bubbles. Further, it is assumed that local gas atom redistribution process in the immediate neighbourhood of a bubble is so rapid that the bubble size always corresponds to the equilibrium size that maintains exact balance between the rate of resolution and that of precipitation. Computation runs performed with the model using carefully chosen combination of physical parameters have successfully reproduced the spread of experimental gas release and swelling data. Comparisons between the predicted results and the experimental data readily identify the grain size, and not the temperature, as the dominant factor affecting fission gas behaviour. The effect of other fuel design parameters such as fission rate density, hydrostatic pressure, etc. is generally shown to be minor. Further study, however, indicates that the external fuel dimensional changes resulting from fuel cracking very often overshadow that from fission gas swelling alone. It is concluded that efforts to control carbide fuel swelling should be directed towards the control of fuel microstructure rather than the control of fuel porosity as has been generally practiced so far. (author)

  13. Sol–gel processing of carbidic glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L M Manocha; E Yasuda; Y Tanabe; S Manocha; D Vashistha

    2000-02-01

    Carbon incorporation into the silicate network results in the formation of rigid carbidic glasses with improved physical, mechanical and thermal properties. This generated great interest in the development of these heteroatom structured materials through different processing routes. In the present studies, sol–gel processing has been used to prepare silicon based glasses, especially oxycarbides through organic–inorganic hybrid gels by hydrolysis–condensation reactions in silicon alkoxides, 1,4-butanediol and furfuryl alcohol with an aim to introduce Si–C linkages in the precursors at sol level. The incorporation of these linkages has been studied using IR and NMR spectroscopy. These bonds, so introduced, are maintained throughout the processing, especially during pyrolysis to high temperatures. In FFA–TEOS system, copolymerization with optimized mol ratio of the two results in resinous mass. This precursor on pyrolysis to 1000°C results in Si–O–C type amorphous solid black mass. XRD studies on the materials heated to 1400°C exhibit presence of crystalline Si–C and cristobalites in amorphous Si–O–C mass. In organic–inorganic gel system, the pyrolysed mass exhibits phase stability up to much higher temperatures. The carbidic materials so produced have been found to exhibit good resistance against oxidation at 1000°C.

  14. Radiation Damage Effects in Uranium Carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with the results of research into the irradiation behaviour of cast uranium carbide following that reported in another paper by Childs et al. The main conclusions are as follows: 1. The saturation resistivity and lattice parameter increases for hypostoichiometric specimens irradiated at 80oC vary systematically with the excess concentration of uranium present in solution in the UC phase. 2. The temperature coefficient of resistivity (measured over the range 77 - 293oK), unlike the resistivity itself, is not significantly affected by irradiation. 3. A small resistivity annealing stage, additional to those at 150 and 510oC, occurs between 1000 and 1200oC. The annealing-out of the lattice parameter change also occurs in two main stages at 150 and 510oC (5-h anneals). A careful survey of the range 400 - 800oC has failed to reveal the stage postulated by other workers to occur at about 710oC. The significance of the results in determining the defect structure of irradiated uranium carbide is discussed. (author)

  15. Production process for boron carbide coated carbon material and boron carbide coated carbon material obtained by the production process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A boron carbide coated carbon material is used for a plasma facing material of a thermonuclear reactor. The surface of a carbon material is chemically reacted with boron oxide to convert it into boron carbide. Then, it is subjected to heat treatment at a temperature of not lower than 1600degC in highly evacuated or inactive atmosphere to attain a boron carbide coated carbon material. The carbon material used is an artificial graphite or a carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite material. In the heat treatment, when the atmosphere is in vacuum, it is highly evacuated to less than 10Pa. Alternatively, in a case of inactive atmosphere, argon or helium gas each having oxygen and nitrogen content of not more than 20ppm is used. With such procedures, there can be obtained a boron carbide-coated carbon material with low content of oxygen and nitrogen impurities contained in the boron carbide coating membrane thereby hardly releasing gases. (I.N.)

  16. Selenium protection from cadmium and chromium poisoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of selenium with cadmium and chromium was studied in 168 chicken-broilers (DWCxWR) divided into four equal groups. Eight-week old control animals received an intravenous dose of /sup 115m/Cd Chloride 370 KBq/Kg (Group I), or 51Cr Chloride 370 KBq/Kg (Group II). The kinetics of these isotopes were studied by scintillation spectrometry (NaI/TI) carried out for whole blood, plasma, plasma proteins, urine, feces and homogenates of all organs at various time intervals. Animals in Groups III and IV received eight subcutaneous doses of sodium selenate (5ug) at 8-week intervals prior to /sup 115m/Cd or 51Cr. The kinetics of these elements were studied as in the previous two groups. It was found that selenium affected those kinetics in two ways: (a) by increasing the excretion of Cd by 11 +/- 3% (P < 0.001) and that of Cr by 7 +/- 1% (P < 0.001); and (b) by favoring redistribution of those elements, with significant (P < 0.001) reductions in liver, endocrine glands and kidney and increases (P < 0.01) in bone. The study suggests that selenium protects the animals' vital organs from environmental pollutants, such as cadmium and chromium

  17. The hydrogen anode in chromium electrowinning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of a hydrogen anode for electrowinning of chromium from an ammonium chromium sulfate electrolyte (chrome alum process) was investigated in a laboratory-scale cell equipped with a diaphragm. The composition of the solution and the temperature followed industrial practice. Current density, pH, and anolyte flow rate through the diaphragm were varied and optimized for the cell. For a cathodic current density of 915 A/m2 at 50oC, the optimum initial pH was 2.37. The hydrogen anode was made of a platinized Toray carbon paper (0.35 mg Pt per cm2) supplied by E-TEK. The hydrogen pressure was maintained at 2 cm H20 above ambient atmosphere. The potential of the hydrogen anode was about 1 V lower than that of a Pb-Ag anode (1%Ag) in a similar cell. As expected, no Cr+6 was generated in the anolyte. The cathodic current efficiency was slightly lower with the hydrogen anode than with the Pb-Ag anode. (author)

  18. Biliary excretion of chromium in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relative amount of chromium excreted in rat bile after injection of Cr-III is much less than after injection of Cr-VI, about 0.1% and from 6-8% during 5 hours respectively, for corresponding dose levels. The liver to bile ratio was 50-100 for Cr-III injection for Cr-VI the ratio was 2-3. With doses up to 18 μmol Cr/kg, only Cr-III was found in bile even after injection of CR-VI.Glutathione depletion of the liver with cyclohexene oxide decreased chromium excretion in bile. Such treatment also decresed the reduction of Cr-VI to Cr-III in the liver cell as only Cr-VI was found in bile. A different distribution of Cr-III in the liver dependent on whether derived from Cr-VI or taken up by the liver as such must be assumed. Taking into account the usual low penetration of biological membranes by Cr-III, a possible active transport mechanism or a specific diffusable Cr-III compound must be postulated. (author)

  19. Preparation and Fatigue Properties of Functionally Graded Cemented Carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cemented carbides with a functionally graded structure have significantly improved mechanical properties and lifetimes in cutting, drilling and molding. In this work, WC-6 wt.% Co cemented carbides with three-layer graded structure (surface layer rich in WC, mid layer rich in Co and the inner part of the average composition) were prepared by carburizing pre-sintered η-phase-containing cemented carbides. The three-point bending fatigue tests based on the total-life approach were conducted on both WC-6wt%Co functionally graded cemented carbides (FGCC) and conventional WC-6wt%Co cemented carbides. The functionally graded cemented carbide shows a slightly higher fatigue limit (∼100 MPa) than the conventional ones under the present testing conditions. However, the fatigue crack nucleation behavior of FGCC is different from that of the conventional ones. The crack nucleates preferentially along the Co-gradient and perpendicular to the tension surface in FGCC, while parallel to the tension surface in conventional cemented carbides

  20. Effect of strong carbide forming elements in hardfacing weld metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuanbin Zhang; Dengyi Ren

    2004-01-01

    To achieve high carbon hard-facing weld metals with both high hardness and crack resistance, strong carbide forming elements Ti, Nb and V were alloyed into the weld metals, and their effect on the formation of carbides and the matrix microstructure were studied. Electron Probe Microanalysis (EPMA), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy(EDS) and Transmission Electron Microscopy(TEM) were adopted to investigate the microstructure, then thermodynamics of the formation of carbides was calculated and their effect on the matrix was further discussed. It is revealed that Nb, Ti and V influence strongly the distribution and existing state of carbon, inducing precipitation of carbides accompanying with the depletion of carbon in matrix. But when only V are alloyed as carbide forming element, the carbides are scarce and distributed along grain boundaries, and the hard-facing alloy is too hard, while the using of only Nb or Ti could not reinforce the weld metals effectively. The hard-facing alloy reinforced with Nb, V and Ti can form dispersive fine carbides and low carbon martensite matrix.

  1. Uranium-plutonium carbide as an LMFBR advanced fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium-plutonium carbide offers an improved fuel system for advanced breeder reactors. The high thermal conductivity and density of carbide fuels permit superior breeding performance and high specific power operation. These advantages combine to increase plutonium production, reduce fuel cycle and power costs, and lower plant capital costs. The carbide advantages are obtained at conservative fuel sytem design and operating conditions. Carbide fabrication technology has been demonstrated by the production of quality-assured fuel elements for irradiation testing. The carbide irradiation test program has demonstrated that high burnup can be achieved with several designs and that the consequences of postulated off-normal operating events are benign. Design bases to support helium- and sodium-bonded carbide fuel pin test irradiations in the Fast Flux Test Facility have been developed in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II and the Transient Reactor irradiation experiments. Important issues regarding safety, reprocessing, and commercial-scale fabrication remain to be addressed in the continuing development of carbide fuels. Fiscal and historical circumstances have combined to preclude this development. This report reviews these circumstances and the state of the technology in general and advances a rationale for why development should be continued

  2. Boron carbide/carbon composite material and production process therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The boron carbide/carbon composite material of the present invention comprises from 15 to 40% by volume of graphite and the balance of two kinds of powdery boron carbides X and Y having different average grain sizes. The average grain size of the powdery boron carbide X is less than 1/2 of the average grain size of the boron carbide Y, and the composite material comprises more than 10% by volume of the powdery boron carbide X and more than 30% by volume of the powdery boron carbide Y. They are press-molded under heating at a temperature range of 480 to 600degC, followed by sintering. A binder pitch of less evaporation ingredient melting upon heating is used as a binder. Since the pitch of satisfactory melting property is used, there is no worry that binding property lacks to reduce the lowering of the strength even if a great amount of powdery boron carbide is added. Further, since a carbonization yield is improved due to less evaporation content, density and strength of the composite material can be increased. (T.M.)

  3. Computational Studies of Physical Properties of Boron Carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lizhi Ouyang

    2011-09-30

    The overall goal is to provide valuable insight in to the mechanisms and processes that could lead to better engineering the widely used boron carbide which could play an important role in current plight towards greener energy. Carbon distribution in boron carbide, which has been difficult to retrieve from experimental methods, is critical to our understanding of its structure-properties relation. For modeling disorders in boron carbide, we implemented a first principles method based on supercell approach within our G(P,T) package. The supercell approach was applied to boron carbide to determine its carbon distribution. Our results reveal that carbon prefers to occupy the end sites of the 3-atom chain in boron carbide and further carbon atoms will distribute mainly on the equatorial sites with a small percentage on the 3-atom chains and the apex sites. Supercell approach was also applied to study mechanical properties of boron carbide under uniaxial load. We found that uniaxial load can lead to amorphization. Other physical properties of boron carbide were calculated using the G(P,T) package.

  4. The atomic configuration of graphene/vanadium carbide interfaces in vanadium carbide-encapsulating carbon nanocapsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazaki, Gaku; Matsuura, Daisuke; Kizuka, Tokushi

    2014-03-01

    Carbon nanocapsules (CNCs) encapsulating vanadium carbide (VC) nanocrystals with a NaCI structure were synthesized by a gas-evaporation method using arc-discharge heating. The CNCs were observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The VC nanocrystals within the nanospaces of CNCs were truncated by low-index facets and were coated with several graphene layers, forming graphene/VC interfaces. The atomic configuration and interlayer spacings at the interfaces were found. PMID:24745251

  5. Exposure to Fibres, Crystalline Silica, Silicon Carbide and Sulphur Dioxide in the Norwegian Silicon Carbide Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Føreland, S.; Bye, E; Bakke, B.; Eduard, W

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess personal exposure to fibres, crystalline silica, silicon carbide (SiC) and sulphur dioxide in the Norwegian SiC industry. Methods: Approximately 720 fibre samples, 720 respirable dust samples and 1400 total dust samples were collected from randomly chosen workers from the furnace, processing and maintenance departments in all three Norwegian SiC plants. The respirable dust samples were analysed for quartz, cristobalite and non-fibrous SiC conten...

  6. Strength degradation of cemented carbides due to thermal shock

    OpenAIRE

    Tarragó Cifre, Jose María; Dorvlo, Selassie; Al-Dawery, Ihsan; Llanes Pitarch, Luis Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Despite the recognition of thermal shock and thermal fatigue as common failure modes in cemented carbide applications, the information on the influence of the microstructure on the resistance of hardmetals to abrupt temperature changes is rather scarce. In this paper, the strength behaviour of cemented carbides after severe thermal shock damage is investigated. In doing so, cemented carbides were subjected to thermal shock at two temperature ranges (¿T of 400ºC and 550ºC) and their retained s...

  7. Separation of Nuclear Fuel Surrogates from Silicon Carbide Inert Matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this project has been to identify a process for separating transuranic species from silicon carbide (SiC). Silicon carbide has become one of the prime candidates for the matrix in inert matrix fuels, (IMF) being designed to reduce plutonium inventories and the long half-lives actinides through transmutation since complete reaction is not practical it become necessary to separate the non-transmuted materials from the silicon carbide matrix for ultimate reprocessing. This work reports a method for that required process

  8. Material properties of silicon and silicon carbide foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoby, Marc T.; Goodman, William A.

    2005-08-01

    Silicon and silicon carbide foams provide the lightweighting element for Schafer Corporation's silicon and silicon carbide lightweight mirror systems (SLMSTM and SiC-SLMSTM). SLMSTM and SiC-SLMSTM provide the enabling technology for manufacturing lightweight, athermal optical sub-assemblies and instruments. Silicon and silicon carbide foam samples were manufactured and tested under a Schafer-funded Internal Research and Development program in various configurations to obtain mechanical and thermal property data. The results of the mechanical tests that are reported in this paper include Young's modulus, compression strength, tensile strength, Poisson's ratio and vibrational damping. The results of the thermal tests include thermal conductivity and coefficient of thermal expansion.

  9. Hugoniot equation of state and dynamic strength of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide ceramics have been particularly problematic in attempts to develop adequate constitutive model descriptions for purposes of analysis of dynamic response in the shock and impact environment. Dynamic strength properties of boron carbide ceramic differ uniquely from comparable ceramics. Furthermore, boron carbide is suspected, but not definitely shown, to undergoing polymorphic phase transformation under shock compression. In the present paper, shock-wave compression measurements conducted over the past 40 years are assessed for the purpose of achieving improved understanding of the dynamic equation of state and strength of boron carbide. In particular, attention is focused on the often ignored Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Hugoniot measurements performed on porous sintered boron carbide ceramic. The LANL data are shown to exhibit two compression anomalies on the shock Hugoniot within the range of 20–60 GPa that may relate to crystallographic structure transitions. More recent molecular dynamics simulations on the compressibility of the boron carbide crystal lattice reveal compression transitions that bear similarities to the LANL Hugoniot results. The same Hugoniot data are complemented with dynamic isentropic compression data for boron carbide extracted from Hugoniot measurements on boron carbide and copper granular mixtures. Other Hugoniot measurements, however, performed on near-full-density boron carbide ceramic differ markedly from the LANL Hugoniot data. These later data exhibit markedly less compressibility and tend not to show comparable anomalies in compressibility. Alternative Hugoniot anomalies, however, are exhibited by the near-full-density data. Experimental uncertainty, Hugoniot strength, and phase transformation physics are all possible explanations for the observed discrepancies. It is reasoned that experimental uncertainty and Hugoniot strength are not likely explanations for the observed differences. The notable

  10. Hugoniot equation of state and dynamic strength of boron carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grady, Dennis E. [Applied Research Associates, Southwest Division, 4300 San Mateo Blvd NE, A-220, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87110-129 (United States)

    2015-04-28

    Boron carbide ceramics have been particularly problematic in attempts to develop adequate constitutive model descriptions for purposes of analysis of dynamic response in the shock and impact environment. Dynamic strength properties of boron carbide ceramic differ uniquely from comparable ceramics. Furthermore, boron carbide is suspected, but not definitely shown, to undergoing polymorphic phase transformation under shock compression. In the present paper, shock-wave compression measurements conducted over the past 40 years are assessed for the purpose of achieving improved understanding of the dynamic equation of state and strength of boron carbide. In particular, attention is focused on the often ignored Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Hugoniot measurements performed on porous sintered boron carbide ceramic. The LANL data are shown to exhibit two compression anomalies on the shock Hugoniot within the range of 20–60 GPa that may relate to crystallographic structure transitions. More recent molecular dynamics simulations on the compressibility of the boron carbide crystal lattice reveal compression transitions that bear similarities to the LANL Hugoniot results. The same Hugoniot data are complemented with dynamic isentropic compression data for boron carbide extracted from Hugoniot measurements on boron carbide and copper granular mixtures. Other Hugoniot measurements, however, performed on near-full-density boron carbide ceramic differ markedly from the LANL Hugoniot data. These later data exhibit markedly less compressibility and tend not to show comparable anomalies in compressibility. Alternative Hugoniot anomalies, however, are exhibited by the near-full-density data. Experimental uncertainty, Hugoniot strength, and phase transformation physics are all possible explanations for the observed discrepancies. It is reasoned that experimental uncertainty and Hugoniot strength are not likely explanations for the observed differences. The notable

  11. Silver diffusion through silicon carbide in microencapsulated nuclear fuels TRISO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The silver diffusion through silicon carbide is a challenge that has persisted in the development of microencapsulated fuels TRISO (Tri structural Isotropic) for more than four decades. The silver is known as a strong emitter of gamma radiation, for what is able to diffuse through the ceramic coatings of pyrolytic coal and silicon carbide and to be deposited in the heat exchangers. In this work we carry out a recount about the art state in the topic of the diffusion of Ag through silicon carbide in microencapsulated fuels and we propose the role that the complexities in the grain limit can have this problem. (Author)

  12. Workshop on effects of chromium coating on Nb3Sn superconductor strand: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the following topics: Chromium coating on superconductor strand -- an overview; technology of chromium plating; comparison of wires plated by different platers; search for chromium in copper; strand manufactures' presentations; chromium plating at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; a first look at a chromium plating process development project tailored for T.P.X. and I.T.E.R. strand; and influence of chromium diffusion and related phenomena on the reference ratios of bare and chromium plated Nb3Sn strand

  13. Stabilization of chromium salt in ordinary portland cement

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Damir Barbir; Pero Dabić; Petar Krolo

    2012-12-01

    Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) samples containing the chromium salt have been investigated using differential microcalorimetry, conductometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis. The effect of chromium on OPC hydration was evaluated by continuous observing of early hydration. The microcalorimetrical results show that with increasing the share of chromium salt, heat maximums assume lower values and the occurrence of the maximum registered in the earlier hydration times. Conductometrical measurements show that with increasing addition of chromium salt, curve did not show any specific shape, immediate drop in specific conductivity is noticed and the maximum is reached earlier. This coincides with microcalorimetrical results. It can be concluded that the addition of chromium does not affect the mechanism of the hydration process, but it does affect the kinetic parameters and dynamics of the cement hydration process. It was found that chromium salt addition to the cement–water system is acceptable up to 2 wt.%. According to standard EN 196-3 for OPC, the beginning of binding time should occur after 60 minutes. Increased amount of chromium over 2 wt.% significantly accelerate the beginning of binding time and for the system it is not acceptable.

  14. Chromium speciation in rainwater: temporal variability and atmospheric deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieber, R.J.; Willey, J.D.; Zvalaren, S.D. [University of North Carolina at Wilmington, Wilmington, NC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2002-12-15

    Chromium is released into the atmosphere by a variety of anthropogenic activities which include steel manufacturing, leather tanning, wood presentation and fossil fuel combustion. The concentrations of the various chromium species were determined in 89 rainwater samples collected in Wilmington, NC from October 1, 1999 to December 31, 2001. Volume weighted annual average concentrations of Cr{sub total}, particulate Cr, Cr(III)(aq), and Cr(VI)(aq) were 4.6, 2.2, 0.8 and 1.2 nM, respectively. There was distinct seasonal and diurnal variability in the concentrations of the various chromium species. Chromium emissions to the global atmosphere by both natural and anthropogenic sources are estimated to be 2.2 x 10{sup 9} mol/yr. Using rainwater concentration data along with other published rainwater Cr concentrations and an estimate for total global annual rain, the total global flux of chromium removed from the atmosphere via wet deposition is 2.1 x 10{sup 9} mol/yr. This represents complete removal of Cr and indicates that essentially all chromium released into the global atmosphere is removed via rain. About half this chromium is dissolved with roughly equal concentrations of toxic Cr(VI) and relatively harmless Cr(III) species. 48 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Bioavailability of a potato chromium complex to the laboratory rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research objectives were to study the effect of food source, preparation method and chemical form on bioavailability of chromium. Chromium concentration in potatoes was determined and tubers labeled either intrinsically or extrinsically with radioactive chromate. A labeled chromium complexes was isolated from preparations of raw, baked or fried potatoes and chromatographed on gel permeation media. Availability of the potato chromium complex to the rat was examined in three feeding studies. Animals were dosed with radioactive extrinsically or intrinsically labeled potato extract or with chromate. A labeled chromium complex was isolated from gastrointestinal contents of rats and chromatographed. Potato pulp and peel contained 1.63 and 2.70 μg Cr/g tissue respectively. True and apparent absorption from extrinsically labeled feedings were 33.4 +/- 4.7 and 29.8 +/- 11.2% respectively, and no differences existed between absorption from raw and cooked potatoes. Absorption from the extrinsic labeled potatoes differed significantly from absorption of inorganic chromatium. Apparent absorption of raw (11.1 +/- 7.9%) and cooked (-0.7 +/- 2.8%) intrinsically labeled feedings differed significantly. Absorption of inorganic chromium was 17.8% (true) and 11.5% (apparent). Examination of the chromium complex isolated from gastrointestinal tract contents showed enlargement of the complex in the stomach after consumption

  16. Chromium-induced membrane damage: protective role of ascorbic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Importance of chromium as environmental toxicant is largely due to impact on the body to produce cellular toxicity. The impact of chromium and their supplementation with ascorbic acid was studied on plasma membrane of liver and kidney in male Wistar rats (80 - 100gbody weight). It has been observed that the intoxication with chromium ( i. p. ) at the dose of 0.8 mg/100g body weight per day for a period of 28 days causes significant increase in the level of cholesterol and decrease in the level of phospbolipid of both liver and kidney. The alkaline pbosphatase, total ATPase and Na + -K + -ATPase activities were significantly decreased in both liver and kidney after chromium treatment,except total ATPase activity of kidney. It is suggested that chromium exposure at the present dose and duration induce for the alterations of structure and function of both liver and kidney plasma membrane. Ascorbic acid ( i.p. at the dose of 0.5 mg,/100g body weight per day for period of 28 days) supplementation can reduce these structural changes in the plasma membrane of liver and kidney. But the functional changes can not be completely replenished by the ascorbic acid supplementation in response to chromium exposure. So it is also suggested that ascorbic acid (nutritional antioxidant) is useful free radical scavenger to restrain the chromium-induced membrane damage.

  17. Neutron irradiation induced amorphization of silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, L.L.; Hay, J.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-09-01

    This paper provides the first known observation of silicon carbide fully amorphized under neutron irradiation. Both high purity single crystal hcp and high purity, highly faulted (cubic) chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were irradiated at approximately 60 C to a total fast neutron fluence of 2.6 {times} 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2}. Amorphization was seen in both materials, as evidenced by TEM, electron diffraction, and x-ray diffraction techniques. Physical properties for the amorphized single crystal material are reported including large changes in density ({minus}10.8%), elastic modulus as measured using a nanoindentation technique ({minus}45%), hardness as measured by nanoindentation ({minus}45%), and standard Vickers hardness ({minus}24%). Similar property changes are observed for the critical temperature for amorphization at this neutron dose and flux, above which amorphization is not possible, is estimated to be greater than 130 C.

  18. Radiation damage of transition metal carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, G.

    1991-01-01

    In this grant period we have investigated electrical properties of transition metal carbides and radiation-induced defects produced by low-temperature electron irradiation in them. Special attention has been given to the composition VC[sub 0.88] in which the vacancies on the carbon sublattice of this fcc crystal order to produce a V[sub 8]C[sub 7] superlattice. The existence of this superlattice structure was found to make the crystal somewhat resistant to radiation damage at low doses and/or at ambient temperature. At larger doses significant changes in the resistivity are produced. Annealing effects were observed which we believe to be connected with the reconstitution of the superlattice structure.

  19. Neutron irradiation induced amorphization of silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides the first known observation of silicon carbide fully amorphized under neutron irradiation. Both high purity single crystal hcp and high purity, highly faulted (cubic) chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were irradiated at approximately 60 C to a total fast neutron fluence of 2.6 x 1025 n/m2. Amorphization was seen in both materials, as evidenced by TEM, electron diffraction, and x-ray diffraction techniques. Physical properties for the amorphized single crystal material are reported including large changes in density (-10.8%), elastic modulus as measured using a nanoindentation technique (-45%), hardness as measured by nanoindentation (-45%), and standard Vickers hardness (-24%). Similar property changes are observed for the critical temperature for amorphization at this neutron dose and flux, above which amorphization is not possible, is estimated to be greater than 130 C

  20. Understanding the sintering of cemented carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solidification structures of the Co--W--C system are discussed; the work was undertaken to clarify cooling reactions in cobalt-bonded tungsten carbide alloys. Alloys were prepared by induction melting Co, C, W, and WC in an alumina crucible and cooling at the rate of 100 C per minute. Liquidus surfaces for the primary precipitation of (Co,W)6C, fcc-Co, and the mu phase, Co7W6, were established. The phase diagram presented shows the basal projection of the liquidus surface in the Co-rich part of the Co--W--C system. The diagram indicates three tested alloys, five eutectics, and five peritectic reactions. The solidification of the alloys is discussed. 5 figures

  1. Nanoporous Silicon Carbide for Nanoelectromechanical Systems Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, T.; Khan, F.; Adesida, I.; Bohn, P.; Rittenhouse, T.; Lienhard, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    A major goal of this project is to produce porous silicon carbide (PSiC) via an electroless process for eventual utilization in nanoscale sensing platforms. Results in the literature have shown a variety of porous morphologies in SiC produced in anodic cells. Therefore, predictability and reproducibility of porous structures are initial concerns. This work has concentrated on producing morphologies of known porosity, with particular attention paid toward producing the extremely high surface areas required for a porous flow sensor. We have conducted a parametric study of electroless etching conditions and characteristics of the resulting physical nanostructure and also investigated the relationship between morphology and materials properties. Further, we have investigated bulk etching of SiC using both photo-electrochemical etching and inductively-coupled-plasma reactive ion etching techniques.

  2. Gas emission from ultradispersed carbide powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of gas emission from the ultra-dispersed carbides (B4C, SiC, TiC) powders formed by pulsed plasma synthesis technology (condensator discharge) in the environment of corresponding chlorides and methan with the additions of H2 and Ar was investigated. The emitted gases consisted of CH4, H2O, Co(N2), CO2. Calculated heats of gas emission processes (less than 200 kJ/mol) for different components show their adsorption nature up to 700 deg C. The emission of components having mass numbers 28 and 44 raises at higher temperatures that can be considered as a consequence of high temperature reactions between oxygen and carbon containing phases in synthesized powders

  3. Microwave hybrid synthesis of silicon carbide nanopowders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanosized silicon carbide powders were synthesised from a mixture of silica gel and carbon through both the conventional and microwave heating methods. Reaction kinetics of SiC formation were found to exhibit notable differences for the samples heated in microwave field and furnace. In the conventional method SiC nanopowders can be synthesised after 105 min heating at 1500 deg. C in a coke-bed using an electrical tube furnace. Electron microscopy studies of these powders showed the existence of equiaxed SiC nanopowders with an average particle size of 8.2 nm. In the microwave heating process, SiC powders formed after 60 min; the powder consisted of a mixture of SiC nanopowders (with two average particle sizes of 13.6 and 58.2 nm) and particles in the shape of long strands (with an average diameter of 330 nm)

  4. Mechanic-chemistry of tungsten carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the current work results on tungsten carbide nanocrystalline structure generation study under high-energy deformation and W-C with Ni mechanical alloying are presented. Mechanical alloying of W and C was worked out in planetary ball mill with water cooling in argon environment. X-ray diffraction examination of these samples were carried out in diffractometer DRON-3.0 with application of CoKα- and CuKα- radiations. With help of X-ray phase analysis in the examined time range of mechanical activation (1-10 min) of powder mixtures with content (W-C)-70 mass. % Ni the WC phase does not found. The observed broadening of W reflexes on diffract-grams in the course of activation time is explaining by reagents' grain size decrease, micro-tensions accumulation under deformations, concentration heterogeneousness generation

  5. Preparation of Silicon Carbide with High Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In order to prepare silicon carbide with high properties, three kinds of SiC powders A, B, and C with different composition and two kinds of additives, which were Y2O3-Al2O3 system and Y2O3-La2O3 system, were used in this experiment. The properties of hot-pressed SiC ceramics were measured. With the same additives, different SiC powder resulted in different properties. On the other hand, with the same SiC powder, increasing the amount of the additive Y2O3-Al2O3 improved properties of SiC ceramics at room temperature, and increasing the amount of the additive Y2O3-La2O3 improved property SiC ceramics at elevated temperature. In addition, the microstructure of SiC ceramics was studied by scanning electron microscopy.

  6. Chemical Mechanical Polishing of Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J. Anthony; Pirouz

    1999-01-01

    The High Temperature Integrated Electronics and Sensors (HTIES) team at the NASA Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as an enabling electronic technology for many aerospace applications. The Lewis team is focusing on the chemical vapor deposition of the thin, single-crystal SiC films from which devices are fabricated. These films, which are deposited (i.e., epitaxially "grown") on commercial wafers, must consist of a single crystal with very few structural defects so that the derived devices perform satisfactorily and reliably. Working in collaboration (NASA grant) with Professor Pirouz of Case Western Reserve University, we developed a chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) technique for removing the subsurface polishing damage prior to epitaxial growth of the single-crystal SiC films.

  7. Production of titanium carbide from ilmenite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutham Niyomwas

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The production of titanium carbide (TiC powders from ilmenite ore (FeTiO3 powder by means of carbothermal reduction synthesis coupled with hydrochloric acid (HCl leaching process was investigated. A mixture of FeTiO3 and carbon powders was reacted at 1500oC for 1 hr under flowing argon gas. Subsequently, synthesized product of Fe-TiC powders were leached by 10% HCl solutions for 24 hrs to get final product of TiC powders. The powders were characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy. The product particles were agglomerated in the stage after the leaching process, and the size of this agglomerate was 12.8 μm with a crystallite size of 28.8 nm..

  8. Carboloy grade 370 (sintered cemented carbide)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carboloy Grade 370 containing 72.0 WC, 8.0 TiC, 11.5 TaC, 8.5 Co is a tough, wear-resistant grade of cemented carbide for heavy duty roughing cuts of steels, ferrous castings, stainless steels, and some high-temperature alloys. It successfully withstands those high temperatures encountered in heavy duty machining. It is used as the as-sintered condition, without further heat treatment. It cannot be machined, but can be ground to final size by use of SiC and diamonds as abrasives. Carbology 370 is rarely applied where corrosive environments exist. Safety note is given to ensure protection for personnel and equipment from flying fragments and sharp edges when working with these materials, and an adequate ventilation in grinding operation to avoid pulmonary problems. Microstructure and hardness vs. temperature curves for Carboloy 370 are presented and its physical and mechanical properties are tabulated

  9. Tunable plasticity in amorphous silicon carbide films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Yusuke; Kim, Namjun; King, Sean W; Bielefeld, Jeff; Stebbins, Jonathan F; Dauskardt, Reinhold H

    2013-08-28

    Plasticity plays a crucial role in the mechanical behavior of engineering materials. For instance, energy dissipation during plastic deformation is vital to the sufficient fracture resistance of engineering materials. Thus, the lack of plasticity in brittle hybrid organic-inorganic glasses (hybrid glasses) often results in a low fracture resistance and has been a significant challenge for their integration and applications. Here, we demonstrate that hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide films, a class of hybrid glasses, can exhibit a plasticity that is even tunable by controlling their molecular structure and thereby leads to an increased and adjustable fracture resistance in the films. We decouple the plasticity contribution from the fracture resistance of the films by estimating the "work-of-fracture" using a mean-field approach, which provides some insight into a potential connection between the onset of plasticity in the films and the well-known rigidity percolation threshold. PMID:23876200

  10. Thermal Conductivity of Uranium Nitride and Carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Szpunar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the electronic thermal conductivity of alternative fuels like uranium nitride and uranium carbide. We evaluate the electronic contribution to the thermal conductivity, by combining first-principles quantum-mechanical calculations with semiclassical correlations. The electronic structure of UN and UC was calculated using Quantum Espresso code. The spin polarized calculations were performed for a ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic ordering of magnetic moments on uranium lattice and magnetic moment in UC was lower than in UN due to stronger hybridization between 2p electrons of carbon and 5f electrons of uranium. The nonmagnetic electronic structure calculations were used as an input to BolzTrap code that was used to evaluate the electronic thermal conductivity. It is predicted that the thermal conductivity should increase with the temperature increase, but to get a quantitative agreement with the experiment at higher temperatures the interaction of electrons with phonons (and electron-electron scattering needs to be included.

  11. Thermal Oxidation of Silicon Carbide Substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiufang Chen; Li'na Ning; Yingmin Wang; Juan Li; Xiangang Xu; Xiaobo Hu; Minhua Jiang

    2009-01-01

    Thermal oxidation was used to remove the subsurface damage of silicon carbide (SiC) surfaces. The anisotrow of oxidation and the composition of oxide layers on Si and C faces were analyzed. Regular pits were observed on the surface after the removal of the oxide layers, which were detrimental to the growth of high quality epitaxial layers. The thickness and composition of the oxide layers were characterized by Rutherford backscat-tering spectrometry (RBS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. Epitaxial growth was performed in a metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) system. The substrate surface morphol-ogy after removing the oxide layer and gallium nitride (GaN) epilayer surface were observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results showed that the GaN epilayer grown on the oxidized substrates was superior to that on the unoxidized substrates.

  12. Fertilizers and Mixed Crop Cultivation of Chromium Tolerant and Sensitive Plants under Chromium Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    B. Dheeba; Sampathkumar, P; Kannan, K.

    2015-01-01

    Zea mays (maize) and Vigna radiata (green gram) are found to be the chromium (Cr) tolerant and sensitive plants, respectively. In the present paper, we investigate the reduction of the toxicity of Cr in the sensitive plants by the mixed crop cultivation in the field using various amendments. Further, the potassium dichromate was used as the source of hexavalent Cr. The results indicated that Cr adversely affects both the growth and yield of plants. The soil properties vary with Cr and differe...

  13. Helium behaviour in implanted boron carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motte Vianney

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available When boron carbide is used as a neutron absorber in nuclear power plants, large quantities of helium are produced. To simulate the gas behaviour, helium implantations were carried out in boron carbide. The samples were then annealed up to 1500 °C in order to observe the influence of temperature and duration of annealing. The determination of the helium diffusion coefficient was carried out using the 3He(d,p4He nuclear reaction (NRA method. From the evolution of the width of implanted 3He helium profiles (fluence 1 × 1015/cm2, 3 MeV corresponding to a maximum helium concentration of about 1020/cm3 as a function of annealing temperatures, an Arrhenius diagram was plotted and an apparent diffusion coefficient was deduced (Ea = 0.52 ± 0.11 eV/atom. The dynamic of helium clusters was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM of samples implanted with 1.5 × 1016/cm2, 2.8 to 3 MeV 4He ions, leading to an implanted slab about 1 μm wide with a maximum helium concentration of about 1021/cm3. After annealing at 900 °C and 1100 °C, small (5–20 nm flat oriented bubbles appeared in the grain, then at the grain boundaries. At 1500 °C, due to long-range diffusion, intra-granular bubbles were no longer observed; helium segregates at the grain boundaries, either as bubbles or inducing grain boundaries opening.

  14. Microbial Diversity of Chromium-Contaminated Soils and Characterization of Six Chromium-Removing Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhiguo; Hu, Yuting; Yin, Zhen; Hu, Yuehua; Zhong, Hui

    2016-06-01

    Three soil samples obtained from different sites adjacent to a chromium slag heap in a steel alloy factory were taken to examine the effect of chromium contamination on soil bacterial diversity as determined by construction of 16S rDNA clone libraries and sequencing of selected clones based on restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Results revealed that Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Alphaproteobacteria occurred in all three soil samples, although the three samples differed in their total diversity. Sample 1 had the highest microbial diversity covering 12 different classes, while Sample 3 had the lowest microbial diversity. Strains of six different species were successfully isolated, one of which was identified as Zobellella denitrificans. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a strain belonging to the genus Zobellella able to resist and reduce chromium. Among all isolates studied, Bacillus odysseyi YH2 exhibited the highest Cr(VI)-reducing capability, with a total removal of 23.5 % of an initial Cr(VI) concentration of 350 mg L-1.

  15. Chromium removal from tannery wastewater by using of flying ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple and economic method to chromium removal from tannery wastewater by means of flying ash is presented. The chromium removal operation is a discontinuous process that involve the mass of flying ash, time of contact and temperature or ph as variables, their which are optimized through Box-Wilson type experimental design. The results were successful: From an initial fluid whit chromium concentration of 1850m ppm, final concentrations of 0.008 ppm and 0.5 ppm of Cr+3 and Cr+6 respectively were achieved. These post-treatment concentrations are into the approved range definite by Government's Laws to this waste type

  16. A REVIEW OF BIOSORPTION OF CHROMIUM IONS BY MICROORGANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Zinicovscaia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to its widespread industrial use, chromium has become a serious pollutant in diverse environmental settings. The main source of chromium pollution including the Republic o Moldova is industry. It is a great need to develop new eco-friendly methods of chromium removal. Biosorption of heavy metals is a most promising technology involved in the removal of toxic metals from industrial waste streams and natural waters. This article is an extended abstract of a communication presented at the Conference Ecological Chemistry 2012

  17. Thermal incorporation behavior during the reduction and stabilization of chromium wastes

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Jun; 楊駿

    2015-01-01

    The possibility of employing periclase to stabilize chromium in chromium wastes into spinel-based ceramics through thermal method was investigated by heating mixture of simulated chromium waste and magnesium oxide. Different types of magnesium oxide precursors were introduced to incorporate chromium oxide into magnesiochromite (MgCr2O4) ranging from 550 ºC to 1350 ºC. Magnesium oxide precursors of both types can effectively incorporate chromium oxide but via different mechanisms. Three main f...

  18. Effects of Supplemental Dietary Chromium on Yield and Nutrient Digestibility of Laying Hens Under Low Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    ŞAHİN, Kazım; ERTAŞ, O. Nihat; GÜLER, Talat; ÇİFTÇİ, Mehmet

    2001-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of chromium picolinate (CrPi) added into diet containing 710.3 ppb chromium on yield and nutrient digestibility of laying hens at low temperature. Forty-six-week-old laying hens were randomly assigned to four groups of 30 hens per group. Treatment groups were fed different supplemental dietary chromium levels. Thus, hens were fed diets with no supplemental chromium (Control Group), 100 ppb of supplemental chromium (100 Group), 200 ppb of s...

  19. Evaluation of the comprehensiveness and reliability of the chromium composition of foods in the literature ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Thor, Mayly Y.; Harnack, Lisa; King, Denise; Jasthi, Bhaskarani; Pettit, Janet

    2011-01-01

    In the early 1960s, trivalent chromium Cr3+ became recognized as an essential trace element due to its potential metabolic and cardiovascular benefits. No comprehensive chromium database currently exists; thus a thorough review of the literature was conducted to examine the availability and reliability of chromium data for foods. A number of key issues were identified that challenge the feasibility of adding chromium to a food and nutrient database. Foremost, dietary chromium data reported in...

  20. Chromium(III) complexation to natural organic matter : Mechanisms and modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Gustafsson, Jon Petter; Persson, I.; Oromieh, A. G.; Van Schaik, J. W. J.; Sjöstedt, Carin; Kleja, D. B.

    2014-01-01

    Chromium is a common soil contaminant, and it often exists as chromium(III). However, limited information exists on the coordination chemistry and stability of chromium(III) complexes with natural organic matter (NOM). Here, the complexation of chromium(III) to mor layer material and to Suwannee River Fulvic Acid (SRFA) was investigated using EXAFS spectroscopy and batch experiments. The EXAFS results showed a predominance of monomeric chromium(III)-NOM complexes at low pH (<5), in which o...

  1. Abatement of Chromium Emissions from Steelmaking Slags - Cr Stabilization by Phase Separation

    OpenAIRE

    Albertsson, Galina

    2013-01-01

    Chromium is an important alloying element in stainless steel but also environmentally harmful element. A number of mineralogical phases present in the slag matrix can contain chromium and lead to chromium leaching. Chromium in slag if not stabilized, could oxidize to the cancerogenic hexavalent state, and leach out if exposed to acidic and oxygen rich environment. Other environmental concerns are slag dusting and chromium escape to the atmosphere. Despite the fact that there is a certain risk...

  2. The oxidation and reduction of chromium of stainless steels in an eletric arc furnace

    OpenAIRE

    Arh, B.; F. Tehovnik

    2011-01-01

    The oxidation of chromium during the elaboration of stainless steels occurs with oxygen in solution blown inthe melt and with oxides in the slag. A higher content of silicon in the furnace charge decreases the extent of oxidation of chromium, however, the efficient reduction of chromium from the slag is of essential importance for a minimal loss of chromium. In this survey, the theory of the oxidation of chromium, its reduction from the slag and the conditions for the formation of foaming sla...

  3. Chromium accumulation, microorganism population and enzyme activities in soils around chromium-containing slag heap of steel alloy factory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Shun-hong; PENG Bing; YANG Zhi-hui; CHAI Li-yuan; ZHOU Li-cheng

    2009-01-01

    The environmental risk of chromium pollution is pronounced in soils adjacent to chromate industry. It is important to investigate the functioning of soil microorganisms in ecosystems exposed to long-term contamination by chromium. 45 soil samples obtained from different places of the slag heap in a steel alloy factory were analyzed for chromium contamination level and its effect on soil microorganisms and enzyme activities. The results show that the average concentrations of total Cr in the soil under the slag heap, adjacent to the slag heap and outside the factory exceed the threshold of Secondary Environmental Quality Standard for Soil in China by 354%, 540% and 184%, respectively, and are 15, 21 and 9 times higher than the local background value, respectively. Elevated chromium loadings result in changes in the activity of the soil microbe, as indicated by the negative correlations between soil microbial population and chromium contents. Dehydrogenase activity is greatly depressed by chromium in the soil. The results imply that dehydrogenase activity can be used as an indicator for the chromium pollution level in the area of the steel alloy factory.

  4. Evaluation of chromium in red blood cells as an indicator of exposure to hexavalent chromium: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devoy, Jérôme; Géhin, Antoine; Müller, Samuel; Melczer, Mathieu; Remy, Aurélie; Antoine, Guillaume; Sponne, Isabelle

    2016-07-25

    Chromium(VI) compounds are classified as carcinogenic to humans. Whereas chromium measurements in urine and whole blood (i.e., including plasma) are indicative of recent exposure, chromium in red blood cells (RBC) is attributable specifically to Cr(VI) exposure. Before recommending Cr in RBC as a biological indicator of Cr(VI) exposure, in-vitro studies must be undertaken to assess its reliability. The present study examines the relationship between the chromium added to a blood sample and that subsequently found in the RBC. After incubation of total blood with chromium, RBC were isolated, counted and their viability assessed. Direct analysis of chromium in RBC was conducted using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. Hexavalent, but not trivalent Cr, was seen to accumulate in the RBC and we found a strong correlation between the Cr(VI) concentration added to a blood sample and the amount of Cr in RBC. This relationship appears to be independent of the chemical properties of the human blood samples (e.g., different blood donors or different reducing capacities). Even though in-vivo studies are still needed to integrate our understanding of Cr(VI) toxicokinetics, our findings reinforce the idea that a single determination of the chromium concentration in RBC would enable biomonitoring of critical cases of Cr(VI) exposure. PMID:27178267

  5. The fate of chromium during tropical weathering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berger, Alfons; Frei, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We performed a mineral, geochemical and Cr–Sr–Pb isotope study on a laterite profile developed on ca. 540 Ma old tonalitic bedrock in Madagascar with special emphasis on the behavior of chromium during tropical weathering. The observed strong depletions of Ca, Si, and P, and enrichment of Fe and Al...... weathering profile. The negatively fractionated δ53Cr values measured in the weathering profile relative to the unaltered tonalitic bedrock characterized by a high temperature magmatic inventory Cr isotope signature are consistent with loss of a positively fractionated Cr(VI) pool formed during weathering...... highly oxidative conditions, which in well drained sulfide-bearing parent bedrocks potentially lead to both, acid dissolution of sulfide-hosted Cr and redox-promoted mobilization of Cr(VI) from silicates during later stages of weathering under basic pH conditions....

  6. Neutron capture by the chromium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capture cross sections of the chromium isotopes have been measured at neutron energies up to 350 keV using the capture cross section facility at the 40 m station of the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator. Parameters have been derived for 180 resonances. A moderate correlation [rho(gamma-n-0,gamma-gamma) approximately 0.45] is observed between reduced neutron widths and radiative widths for s-wave resonances. Calculations of valence widths show that valence capture can only account for the correlated component of the observed radiative widths. An additional mechanism such as a 2p-1h doorway state must therefore be occurring to explain the uncorrelated component. (author)

  7. Properties of cemented carbides alloyed by metal melt treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents the results of investigations into the influence of alloying elements introduced by metal melt treatment (MMT-process) on properties of WC-Co and WC-Ni cemented carbides. Transition metals of the IV - VIll groups (Ti, Zr, Ta, Cr, Re, Ni) and silicon were used as alloying elements. It is shown that the MMT-process allows cemented carbides to be produced whose physico-mechanical properties (bending strength, fracture toughness, total deformation, total work of deformation and fatigue fracture toughness) are superior to those of cemented carbides produced following a traditional powder metallurgy (PM) process. The main mechanism and peculiarities of the influence of alloying elements added by the MMT-process on properties of cemented carbides have been first established. The effect of alloying elements on structure and substructure of phases has been analyzed. (author)

  8. On the singularity of high temperature carbidization of niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of specific behavior of niobium carbidization process at high temperature non-isothermal conditions depending of heating rates of samples are presented. Experiments were carried out by High Speed Scanning Electrothermography method in a wide temperature range (1000-2300 oC) using gaseous methane as a source of carbon. It was established that at heating rates of samples more than 10,000 oC/s and T ≥ 2200 oC sharp increase of carbidization rate occurs which were registered by three independent methods: by weight gain, carbide layers growth and heat release rate. Based on SEM examinations of reacted samples the abnormal dependence of carbidization rate vs. heating rate was caused by the formation of non-equilibrium liquid phase at temperatures noticeably lower than the melting point of the lowest eutectic in Nb-C system.

  9. Novel Manufacturing Process for Unique Mixed Carbide Refractory Composites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This STTR Phase I project will establish the feasibility of an innovative manufacturing process to fabricate a range of unique hafnium/silicon based carbide...

  10. Microwave synthesis of phase-pure, fine silicon carbide powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fine, monophasic silicon carbide powder has been synthesized by direct solid-state reaction of its constituents namely silicon and carbon in a 2.45 GHz microwave field. Optimum parameters for the silicon carbide phase formation have been determined by varying reaction time and reaction temperature. The powders have been characterized for their particle size, surface area, phase composition (X-ray diffraction) and morphology (scanning electron microscope). Formation of phase-pure silicon carbide can be achieved at 1300 deg. C in less than 5 min of microwave exposure, resulting in sub-micron-sized particles. The free energy values for Si + C → SiC reaction were calculated for different temperatures and by comparing them with the experimental results, it was determined that phase-pure silicon carbide can be achieved at around 1135 deg. C

  11. On surface Raman scattering and luminescence radiation in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werheit, H; Filipov, V; Schwarz, U; Armbrüster, M; Leithe-Jasper, A; Tanaka, T; Shalamberidze, S O

    2010-02-01

    The discrepancy between Raman spectra of boron carbide obtained by Fourier transform Raman and conventional Raman spectrometry is systematically investigated. While at photon energies below the exciton energy (1.560 eV), Raman scattering of bulk phonons of boron carbide occurs, photon energies exceeding the fundamental absorption edge (2.09 eV) evoke additional patterns, which may essentially be attributed to luminescence or to the excitation of Raman-active processes in the surface region. The reason for this is the very high fundamental absorption in boron carbide inducing a very small penetration depth of the exciting laser radiation. Raman excitations essentially restricted to the boron carbide surface region yield spectra which considerably differ from bulk phonon ones, thus indicating structural modifications. PMID:21386312

  12. Radial furnace shows promise for growing straight boron carbide whiskers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feingold, E.

    1967-01-01

    Radial furnace, with a long graphite vaporization tube, maintains a uniform thermal gradient, favoring the growth of straight boron carbide whiskers. This concept seems to offer potential for both the quality and yield of whiskers.

  13. Analytical chemistry methods for boron carbide absorber material. [Standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DELVIN WL

    1977-07-01

    This standard provides analytical chemistry methods for the analysis of boron carbide powder and pellets for the following: total C and B, B isotopic composition, soluble C and B, fluoride, chloride, metallic impurities, gas content, water, nitrogen, and oxygen. (DLC)

  14. Chemical vapour deposition: Transition metal carbides go 2D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogotsi, Yury

    2015-11-01

    The unique properties of 2D materials, such as graphene or transition metal dichalcogenides, have been attracting much attention in the past decade. Now, metallically conductive and even superconducting transition metal carbides are entering the game.

  15. Synthesis of high quality superfine structural powders of silicium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have synthesized and studied the experimental samples of silicium carbide, which were produced of mechanically activized elemental fine-disperse silicium and pyrolitical soot according to the technology developed by the authors. We have shown that, as a result of synthesis, it is possible to produce the powder of silicium carbide (α- and β-phases) with high purity, nanodimensional fractional composition, and silicium dioxide content not more then 1- 2 mass %

  16. Bainite obtaining in cast iron with carbides castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In these paper the possibility of upper and lower bainite obtaining in cast iron with carbides castings are presented. Conditions, when in cast iron with carbides castings during continuous free air cooling austenite transformation to upper bainite or its mixture with lower bainte proceeds, have been given. A mechanism of this transformation has been given, Si, Ni, Mn and Mo distribution in the eutectic cell has been tested and hardness of tested castings has been determined.

  17. Impact of pressure on Sintering of Cemented Carbides

    OpenAIRE

    Owais, Tariq Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    In this Master Thesis work, the effect of pressure on sintering of cemented carbides is investigated. Special focus hasbeen given to the residual porosity after sintering. It is well known that sintering shrinkage depends on binder phasecontent, grain size, temperature and pressure. Thus 4 different cemented carbides grades were selected. The gradeswere pressed into standard products and TRS (Tensile Rupture Strength) rods with two different shrinkage factors.These were then sintered at diffe...

  18. Stability of MC Carbide Particles Size in Creep Resisting Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vodopivec, F.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical analysis of the dependence microstructure creep rate. Discussion on the effects of carbide particles size and their distribution on the base of accelerated creep tests on a steel X20CrMoV121 tempered at 800 °C. Analysis of the stability of carbide particles size in terms of free energy of formation of the compound. Explanation of the different effect of VC and NbC particles on accelerated creep rate.

  19. ADHERENCE AND PROPERTIES OF SILICON CARBIDE BASED FILMS ON STEEL

    OpenAIRE

    Lelogeais, M.; Ducarroir, M.; Berjoan, R.

    1991-01-01

    Coatings of silicon carbide with various compositions have been obtained in a r.f plasma assisted process using tetramethylsilane and argon as input gases. Some properties against mechanical applications of such deposits on steel have been investigated. Residual stresses and hardness are reported and discussed in relation with plasma parameters and deposit composition. By scratch testing, it was shown that the silicon carbide films on steel denote a good adherence when compared with previous ...

  20. Synthesis of carbides of metals by electrodischarge method

    OpenAIRE

    Tsolin, Pavlo L.; Terekhov, Anatolii Yu.; Kuskova, Nataliia I.

    2014-01-01

    Initiation by electric discharge of plasma-chemical reaction which is accompanied by the erosion of electrodes material and by synthesis corresponding carbides is discussed. The object of the research is to establish possibility of synthesis of metal carbides during electrodischarge treatment of hydrocarbon liquid. Electrical discharge in the liquid hydrocarbons is studied experimentally using various materials of electrodes (titanium, aluminum, copper, niobium) as a method of synthesis of me...

  1. Structure and single-phase regime of boron carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emin, David

    1988-09-01

    The boron carbides are composed of twelve-atom icosahedral clusters which are linked by direct covalent bonds and through three-atom intericosahedral chains. The boron carbides are known to exist as a single phase with carbon concentrations from about 8 to about 20 at. %. This range of carbon concentrations is made possible by the substitution of boron and carbon atoms for one another within both the icosahedra and intericosahedral chains. The most widely accepted structural model for B4C (the boron carbide with nominally 20% carbon) has B11C icosahedra with C-B-C intericosahedral chains. Here, the free energy of the boron carbides is studied as a function of carbon concentration by considering the effects of replacing carbon atoms within B4C with boron atoms. It is concluded that entropic and energetic considerations both favor the replacement of carbon atoms with boron atoms within the intericosahedral chains, C-B-C-->C-B-B. Once the carbon concentration is so low that the vast majority of the chains are C-B-B chains, near B13C2, subsequent substitutions of carbon atoms with boron atoms occur within the icosahedra, B11C-->B12. Maxima of the free energy occur at the most ordered compositions: B4C,B13C2,B14C. This structural model, determined by studying the free energy, agrees with that previously suggested by analysis of electronic and thermal transport data. These considerations also provide an explanation for the wide single-phase regime found for boron carbides. The significant entropies associated with compositional disorder within the boron carbides, the high temperatures at which boron carbides are formed (>2000 K), and the relatively modest energies associated with replacing carbon atoms with boron atoms enable the material's entropy to be usually important in determining its composition. As a result, boron carbides are able to exist in a wide range of compositions.

  2. Rapid Wolff–Kishner reductions in a silicon carbide microreactor

    OpenAIRE

    Newman, Stephen G.; Gu, Lei; Lesniak, Christoph; Victor, Georg; Meschke, Frank; Abahmane, Lahbib; Jensen, Klavs F.

    2013-01-01

    Wolff–Kishner reductions are performed in a novel silicon carbide microreactor. Greatly reduced reaction times and safer operation are achieved, giving high yields without requiring a large excess of hydrazine. The corrosion resistance of silicon carbide avoids the problematic reactor compatibility issues that arise when Wolff–Kishner reductions are done in glass or stainless steel reactors. With only nitrogen gas and water as by-products, this opens the possibility of performing selective, l...

  3. High-Q silicon carbide photonic-crystal cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan Y.; Lu, Xiyuan; Lin, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate one-dimensional photonic-crystal nanobeam cavities in amorphous silicon carbide. The fundamental mode exhibits intrinsic optical quality factor as high as 7.69 × 104 with mode volume ˜ 0.60 ( λ / n ) 3 at wavelength 1.5 μm. A corresponding Purcell factor value of ˜104 is the highest reported to date in silicon carbide optical cavities. The device exhibits great potential for integrated nonlinear photonics and cavity nano-optomechanics.

  4. Synthesis and Characterization of Amorphous Carbide-based Thin Films

    OpenAIRE

    Folkenant, Matilda

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, research on synthesis, structure and characterization of amorphous carbide-based thin films is presented. Crystalline and nanocomposite carbide films can exhibit properties such as high electrical conductivity, high hardness and low friction and wear. These properties are in many cases structure-related, and thus, within this thesis a special focus is put on how the amorphous structure influences the material properties. Thin films within the Zr-Si-C and Cr-C-based systems hav...

  5. Design, Fabrication and Performance of Boron-Carbide Control Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A control blade design, incorporating boron-carbide (B4C) in stainless-steel tubes, was introduced into service in boiling water reactors in April 1961. Since that time this blade has become the standard reference control element in General Electric boiling-water reactors, replacing the 2% boron-stainless-steel blades previously used. The blades consist of a sheathed, cruciform array of small vertical stainless-steel tubes filled with compácted boron-carbide powder. The boron-carbide powder is confined longitudinally into several independent compartments by swaging over ball bearings located inside the tubes. The development and use of boron-carbide control rods is discussed in five phases: 1. Summary of experience with boron-steel blades and reasons for transition to boron-carbide control; 2. Design of the boron-carbide blade, beginning with developmental experiments, including early measurements performed in the AEC ''Control Rod Material and Development Program'' at the Vallecitos Atomic Laboratory, through a description of the final control blade configuration; 3. Fabrication of the blades and quality control procedures; 4. Results of confirmatory pre-operational mechanical and reactivity testing; and 5. Post-operational experience with the blades, including information on the results of mechanical inspection and reactivity testing after two years of reactor service. (author)

  6. Highly thermal conductive carbon fiber/boron carbide composite material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a composite member for use in walls of a thermonuclear reactor, if carbon fibers and boron carbide are mixed, since they are brought into contact with each other directly, boron is reacted with the carbon fibers to form boron carbide to lower thermal conductivity of the carbon fibers. Then, in the present invention, graphite or amorphous carbon is filled between the carbon fibers to provide a fiber bundle of not less than 500 carbon fibers. Further, the surface of the fiber bundle is coated with graphite or amorphous carbon to suppress diffusion or solid solubilization of boron to carbon fibers or reaction of them. Then, lowering of thermal conductivity of the carbon fibers is prevented, as well as the mixing amount of the carbon fiber bundles with boron carbide, a sintering temperature and orientation of carbon fiber bundles are optimized to provide a highly thermal conductive carbon fiber/boron carbide composite material. In addition, carbide or boride type short fibers, spherical graphite, and amorphous carbon are mixed in the boron carbide to prevent development of cracks. Diffusion or solid solubilization of boron to carbon fibers is reduced or reaction of them if the carbon fibers are bundled. (N.H.)

  7. Conductivities and Seebeck coefficients of boron carbides: Softening bipolaron hopping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aselage, T. L.; Emin, D.; McCready, S. S.

    2001-08-01

    The electrical conductivities and Seebeck coefficients of boron carbides B12+xC3-x with 0.06function of the composition x. This strong sensitivity to composition indicates that percolation effects, arising from boron carbides having carbon atoms in inequivalent locations, influence the conductivity at low temperature. With x holes per unit cell, boron carbides have very large Seebeck coefficients that depend only weakly on x. The magnitudes and temperature dependences of the Seebeck coefficients are consistent with large contributions from carrier-induced softening of local vibrations. Softening effects can be exceptionally large when singlet bipolarons are stabilized among degenerate electronic energy levels by their softening of symmetry-breaking vibrations: ``softening bipolarons.'' The boron carbide transport properties are generally consistent with those expected of softening bipolarons. Finally, two high-temperature effects are observed in the boron carbide conductivities. The conductivities of samples having high carrier densities, x~1, are suppressed above 700 K. This suppression can arise when the rapid hopping of nearby carriers disrupts the energy coincidence required for a carrier's hop. At even higher temperatures, a sharp increase in the boron carbide conductivities (σ~T4) suggests a radiation-induced excitation of mobile charge carriers.

  8. Superplastic behavior and cavitation for WC-Co cemented carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosokawa, H.; Shimojima, K. [Inst. for Structural and Engineering Materials, National Inst. of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) (Japan); Kawakami, M.; Terada, O. [Fuji Die Co. Ltd., Hadano, Kanagawa (Japan); Sano, S. [Fuji Die Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Mabuchi, M. [Dept. of Energy Science and Technology, Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    Superplastic behavior and cavitation were investigated for WC-15 mass% Co cemented carbides with the WC grain sizes of 0.7 {mu}m (A) and 5.2 {mu}m (B), WC-10 mass% Co cemented carbide with the WC grain size of 1.5 {mu}m (C) and WC-5 mass% Co cemented carbides with the WC grain sizes of 0.5 {mu}m (D) and 2.5 {mu}m (E) by tensile tests at 1473 K. WC contiguity were 0.51, 0.31, 0.27, 0.56 and 0.49, respectively. The large elongations about 200% were obtained for the B and the C having smaller values of WC contiguity compared to the other cemented carbides. The values of cavity volume fraction for them were less for the other cemented carbides, furthermore, cavities formed at WC/WC interfaces. Therefore, it is noted that the distribution of the Co phase is important for superplasticity of the cemented carbides. (orig.)

  9. Chromium and Polyphenols from Cinnamon and Insulin Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Factors that improve insulin sensitivity usually lead to improvements in risk factors associated with the metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. Naturally occurring bioactive compounds that have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity include chromium and polyphenols found in ...

  10. Contingency plans for chromium utilization. Publication NMAB-335

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States depends entirely on foreign sources for the critical material, chromium, making it very vulnerable to supply disruptions. This vulnerability results because chromium is essential for the fabrication of corrosion-resisting steels and high-temperature, oxidation-resisting alloys in applications that are vital to the nation's technological well-being; because no substitutes are known for these materials in those applications; and because the known, substantial deposits of chromite ore are only in a few geographical locations that could become inaccessible to the United States as a result of political actions. The effectiveness of programs such as stockpiling, conservation, and research and development for substitutes to reduce the impact of disruption of imports of chromite and ferrochromium are discussed. Alternatives for decreasing chromium consumption also are identified for chromium-containing materials in the areas of design, processing, and substitution

  11. Synthesis and characterization of novel chromium pillared clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New chromium pillared clays of basal spacing 2.45 nm were synthesized and characterized. The chromium oligomers used for intercalation were prepared by quick addition of base and acid to Cr(III) monomeric solutions followed by reflux. The synthesized clays exhibit increased BET surface area and higher micropore volume compared to clays with lower galleries, pillared either by smaller Cr(III) oligomers or by Cr(III) monomers. Important parameters affecting the d001 basal spacing were studied, e.g. the pH of the pillaring solution, the intercalation time, the chromium concentration and the counter-anion present in the chromium solutions. Scanning electron micrographs were acquired to demonstrate changes of the clay texture before and after pillaring. The thermal behavior of the synthesized clays was also examined

  12. Adsorption Properties of Chromium (VI by Chitosan Coated Montmorillonite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahe Fan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of chromium (VI by Chitosan Coated Montmorillonite (CCM from aqueous solution was studied. To evaluate the adsorption capacity, the effects of pH, initial concentration and temperature on the adsorption were investigated. The isothermal data was applied to Langmuir linear and the Freundlich linear isotherm equation and the thermodynamic parameters (ΔH, ΔG, ΔS were calculated according to the values of binding Langmuir constant, KL. Results indicated that the adsorption between CCM and chromium (VI was significantly physical, the negative ΔH constant at lower temperature confirmed that the more chromium (VI was adsorbed by chitosan coated montmorillonite at lower temperature. The kinetics of the sorption process of chromium (VI on chitosan coated montmorillonite were investigated using the pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order kinetics, results showed that the pseudo-second order equation model provided the best correlation with the experimental results.

  13. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium (Peer Review Plan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is conducting a peer review of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of hexavalent chromium that will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database.

  14. Fabrication of high rate chromium getter sources for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design and fabrication techniques are described for the manufacture of large-capacity chromium getter sources, analogous to the commercially available titanium getter source known as Ti-Ball, manufactured by Varian Associates

  15. Detecting Grain-Boundary Chromium Depletion in Inconel 600

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airey, G. P.; Vaia, A. R.; Pessall, N.; Aspden, R. G.

    1981-11-01

    Techniques to evaluate grain-boundary chromium depletion in Inconel Alloy 600 were investigated. Procedures studied were a modified Huey test, reactivation polarization, magnetic permeability measurements, and eddy current measurements. Results from these tests were correlated with susceptibility to stress-assisted intergranular cracking in polythionic acid. Thermally treated Inconel Alloy 600 steam generator tubing was the principal source of material evaluated, but experimental heats of Ni-Cr-Fe alloys with 8-18 wt.% Cr were prepared to determine the critical chromium level below which stress-assisted intergranular cracking occurs; this critical chromium content was found to be between 9.8 and 11.7 wt.%. All four techniques were considered suitable to evaluate grain-boundary chromium depletion; the modified Huey test and reactivation polarization technique showed a greater sensitivity than the magnetic permeability and eddy current measurements.

  16. The diffusion of chromium in a duplex alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffusion of chromium in a duplex stainless steel containing approximately 8% ferrite has been investigated in the temperature range 600 to 10000C using the standard serial sectioning technique. The resulting concentration profiles exhibited up to four distinct regions. The two main regions are attributed to volume diffusion in the austenite and ferrite phases, the other zones being due to short circuiting paths. Volume diffusion in the austenite phase is in good agreement with chromium diffusion in Type 316 steel. The chromium diffusion coefficient in the ferrite phase of approximate composition 25 wt % Cr, 5 wt % Ni is given by: Dsub(α) = (6.0(+11,-3)) x 10-6 exp - ((212+-5)/RT) m2s-1 the activation energy being expressed in kJ.mol-1. Little evidence was found for enhanced chromium diffusion along austenite/ferrite interface boundaries. (author)

  17. Chromium plating pollution source reduction by plasma source ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is growing concern over the environmental toxicity and workers' health issues due to the chemical baths and rinse water used in the hard chromium plating process. In this regard the significant hardening response of chromium to nitrogen ion implantation can be environmentally beneficial from the standpoint of decreasing the thickness and the frequency of application of chromium plating. In this paper the results of a study of nitrogen ion implantation of chrome plated test flats using the non-line-of-sight Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII) process, are discussed. Surface characterization was performed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), and Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA). The surface properties were evaluated using a microhardness tester, a pin-on-disk wear tester, and a corrosion measurement system. Industrial field testing of nitrogen PSII treated chromium plated parts showed an improvement by a factor of two compared to the unimplanted case

  18. New Chromium Carbonyl Catalysts for [6+2] Cycloaddition Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Kundig, Ernst Peter; Robvieux, Fabrice; Kondratenko, Mikhail

    2002-01-01

    The complexes, (benzene)chromiumdicarbonyl(methyl acrylate) and chromiumdicarbonylbis(cyclohexadiene), are precursors for the highly coordinatively unsaturated chromium dicarbonyl fragment 3, a catalyst for the cycloaddition of activated olefins to cycloheptatriene.

  19. Development and Evaluation of Mixed Uranium-Refractory Carbide/Refractory Carbide Cer-Cer Fuels Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this proposal a new carbide-based fuel is introduced with outstanding potential to eliminate the loss of uranium, minimizes the loss of uranium, and retains...

  20. Biosorption of Chromium (VI) from Aqueous Solutions onto Fungal Biomass

    OpenAIRE

    Ismael Acosta R.; Xöchitl Rodríguez; Conrado Gutiérrez; Ma. de Guadalupe Moctezuma

    2004-01-01

    The biosorption of chromium (VI) on eighteen different natural biosorbents: Natural sediment, chitosan, chitin, Aspergillus flavus I-V, Aspergillus fumigatus I-ll, Helmintosporium sp, Cladosporium sp, Mucor rouxii mutant, M. rouxii IM-80, Mucor sp-I and 2, Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans was studied in this work. It was found that the biomass of C. neoformans, natural sediment, Helmintosporium sp and chitosan was more efficient to remove chromium (VI) (determined spectrophotometr...