WorldWideScience

Sample records for chromium alloys

  1. Galvanic cells including cobalt-chromium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjerdet, N R

    1980-01-01

    Galvanic cells may be created when dentures made of cobalt-chromium alloys are placed on teeth with metallic restorations. The power of such cells was evaluated in an in vitro galvanic using amalgams, gold alloy, and nickel-chromium alloys. The amalgams and one of the nickel-chromium alloys revealed high corrosion currents when placed in contact with cobalt-chromium alloy, the conventional amalgam showing the highest values. The gold alloy and another nickel-chromium alloy exhibited low corrosion currents and they were noble with respect to cobalt-chromium.

  2. Standard Specification for Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Columbium Alloy (UNS N06625), Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Silicon Alloy (UNS N06219), and Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten Alloy (UNS N06650) Rod and Bar

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2014-01-01

    Standard Specification for Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Columbium Alloy (UNS N06625), Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Silicon Alloy (UNS N06219), and Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten Alloy (UNS N06650) Rod and Bar

  3. Mechanical properties of metal-ceramic systems from nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirković Nemanja

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Metal-ceramic bond strength and alloys' elastic modulus clearly determine the potential of alloy application, because the ceramic integrity during mastication depends on these two characteristics. The aim of this study was to evaluate metal-ceramic bond strength and elastic modulus of cobalt-chromium alloys in making porcelainfused- to-metal restorations, regarding the application of the most frequent nickel-chromium alloy. Methods. The research was performed as an experimental study. Six metalceramic samples were made from nickel-chromium alloy (Wiron 99 and cobalt-chromium alloy (Wirobond C, according to the manufactures manuals and instructions from ISO 9693: 1996. Three-point bending test was performed up to the ceramic fracture. The fracture load was measured on an universal testing machine (Zwick, type 1464, with cross-head speed of 0,05mm/min. Results. The results of this study confirmed the significant differences between the metal-ceramic bond strength (p < 0.01 and elastic modulus (p < 0.001 of nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys, where cobalt-chromium alloys showed higher values for both tested parameters. Conclusion. Cobalt-chromium metal-ceramic alloys can successfully replace nickel-chromium alloys, especially for fabrication of long-span metal-ceramic bridges due to the great flexural strength.

  4. REINFORCEMENT OF NICKEL CHROMIUM ALLOYS WITH SAPPHIRE WHISKERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SAPPHIRE, COMPOSITE MATERIALS, CERAMIC FIBERS , CERAMIC FIBERS , TITANIUM COMPOUNDS, ZIRCONIUM COMPOUNDS, HYDRIDES, ADDITIVES, CHROMIUM ALLOYS, FIBER METALLURGY, IRON COMPOUNDS, ENCAPSULATION, DENSITY, SURFACE TENSION.

  5. Oxidation resistant, thoria-dispersed nickel-chromium-aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranow, S.; Klingler, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Modified thoria-dispersed nickel-chromium alloy has been developed that exhibits greatly improved resistance to high-temperature oxidation. Additions of aluminum have been made to change nature of protective oxide scale entirely and to essentially inhibit oxidation at temperatures up to 1260 C.

  6. High temperature oxidation of iron-chromium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikkelsen, Lars

    2003-06-15

    The high temperature oxidation of the ferritic alloy Fe78Cr22 has been investigated in the present work. The effect of small alloying additions of cerium and/or silicon was also investigated. The alloys were oxidized at 973, 1173 and 1373 K in either air or a hydrogen/argon mixture. The various reaction atmospheres contained between 0.02 and 50% water vapour. The oxide scales formed on the various alloys at 973 K consisted of thin chromia layers. The oxide scales grown on the alloys at 1173 K also consisted of a chromia layer. The microstructure of the chromia scales was found to depend on the reaction atmosphere. The chromia scales grown in hydrogen/argon atmospheres formed oxide whiskers and oxide ridges at the surface of the scales, while the chromia scales grown in air formed larger oxide grains near the surface. This difference in oxide microstructure was due to the vaporization of chromium species from the chromia scales grown in air. Two different growth mechanisms are proposed for the growth of oxide whiskers. The growth rate of the chromia scales was independent of the oxygen activity. This is explained by a growth mechanism of the chromia scales, where the growth is governed by the diffusion of interstitial chromium. The addition of silicon to the iron-chromium alloy resulted in the formation of silica particles beneath the chromia scale. The presence of silicon in the alloy was found to decrease the growth rate of the chromia scale. This is explained by a blocking mechanism, where the silica particles beneath the chromia scale partly block the outwards diffusion of chromium from the alloy to the chromia scale. The addition of cerium to the iron-chromium alloy improved the adhesion of the chromia scale to the alloy and decreased the growth rate of chromia. It was observed that the minimum concentration of cerium in the alloy should be 0.3 at.% in order to observe an effect of the cerium addition. The effect of cerium is explained by the &apos

  7. Effects of irradiation on chromium's behavior in ferritic/martensitic FeCr alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinfu HE; Wen YANG; Zhehao QU; Sheng FAN

    2009-01-01

    The effects of irradiation on chromium performance under different temperatures in Fe-20at%Cr were modeled by modified Marlowe code. Chromium precipitation was observed in FeCr alloy after irradiation; interstitial Chromium atoms are the preferred formation of mixed FeCr dumbbells in the direction ofand; interstitial chromium atoms congregated on {111} and {110} plane. The results are compared with experiment observations and are useful to understanding the irradiation performances of FeCr alloy.

  8. New alloys to conserve critical elements. [replacing chromium in steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Previous studies and surveys on availability of domestic reserves have shown that chromium is a most critical element within the U.S. metal industry. More precisely, the bulk of chromium is consumed in the production of stainless steels, specifically Type 304 stainless steel (304SS) which contains 18% Cr. The present paper deals with means of reducing chromium in commercial stainless steels by substituting more abundant or less expensive elements with the intent of maintaining the properties of 304SS. The discussion focuses on some of the oxidation and corrosion properties of new substitute stainless steels with only 12% Cr, which represents a potential saving of 33% of the chromium consumed in the production of 304SS. The alloying elements substituted for Cr in 304SS are selected according to their potential for protective oxide formation during high-temperature oxidation; these are Al, Si, Ti, Y, and misch metal which is 99.7% rare-earth metals containing 50 to 55% cerium. Other alloying elements to impart corrosion resistance are Mn, Mo, and V.

  9. Standard Specification for Pressure Consolidated Powder Metallurgy Iron-Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum (UNS N08367), Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Columbium (Nb) (UNS N06625), Nickel-Chromium-Iron Alloys (UNS N06600 and N06690), and Nickel-Chromium-Iron-Columbium-Molybdenum (UNS N07718) Alloy Pipe Flanges, Fittings, Valves, and Parts

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2015-01-01

    Standard Specification for Pressure Consolidated Powder Metallurgy Iron-Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum (UNS N08367), Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Columbium (Nb) (UNS N06625), Nickel-Chromium-Iron Alloys (UNS N06600 and N06690), and Nickel-Chromium-Iron-Columbium-Molybdenum (UNS N07718) Alloy Pipe Flanges, Fittings, Valves, and Parts

  10. Antiferromagnetism in chromium alloy single crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum Møller, Hans; Trego, A.L.; Mackintosh, A.R.

    1965-01-01

    The antiferromagnetism of single crystals of dilute alloys of V, Mn and Re in Cr has been studied at 95°K and 300°K by neutron diffraction. The addition of V causes the diffraction peaks to decrease in intensity and move away from (100), while Mn and Re cause them to increase and approach (100) so...

  11. Urinary levels of nickel and chromium associated with dental restoration by nickel-chromium based alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo; Xia, Gang; Cao, Xin-Ming; Wang, Jue; Xu, Bi-Yao; Huang, Pu; Chen, Yue; Jiang, Qing-Wu

    2013-03-01

    This paper aims to investigate if the dental restoration of nickel-chromium based alloy (Ni-Cr) leads to the enhanced excretions of Ni and Cr in urine. Seven hundred and ninety-five patients in a dental hospital had single or multiple Ni-Cr alloy restoration recently and 198 controls were recruited to collect information on dental restoration by questionnaire and clinical examination. Urinary concentrations of Ni and Cr from each subject were measure by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Compared to the control group, the urinary level of Ni was significantly higher in the patient group of dental restoration. Potential short- and long-term effects of Ni-Cr alloy restoration need to be investigated.

  12. Standard Specification for Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Copper, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tantalum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten, and Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium Alloy Plate, Sheet, and Strip

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2015-01-01

    Standard Specification for Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Copper, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tantalum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten, and Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium Alloy Plate, Sheet, and Strip

  13. Standard Specification for Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium, Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium-Tantalum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Copper, and Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten Alloy Rod

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2015-01-01

    Standard Specification for Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium, Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium-Tantalum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Copper, and Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten Alloy Rod

  14. Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045 and N06696), Nickel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) plate, sheet and strip

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045 and N06696), Nickel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) plate, sheet and strip

  15. Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045, and N06696), Nikel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) seamless pipe and tube

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045, and N06696), Nikel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) seamless pipe and tube

  16. Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045, and N06696), Nickel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) rod, bar, and wire

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045, and N06696), Nickel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) rod, bar, and wire

  17. Urinary levels of nickel and chromium associated with dental restoration by nickel-chromium based alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Chen; Gang Xia; Xin-Ming Cao; Jue Wang; Bi-Yao Xu; Pu Huang; Yue Chen; Qing-Wu Jiang

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate if the dental restoration of nickel-chromium based alloy (Ni-Cr) leads to the enhanced excretions of Ni and Cr in urine. Seven hundred and ninety-five patients in a dental hospital had single or multiple Ni-Cr alloy restoration recently and 198 controls were recruited to collect information on dental restoration by questionnaire and clinical examination. Urinary concentrations of Ni and Cr from each subject were measure by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Compared to the control group, the urinary level of Ni was significantly higher in the patient group of 〈 1 month of the restoration duration, among which higher Ni excretions were found in those with either a higher number of teeth replaced by dental alloys or a higher index of metal crown not covered with the porcelain. Urinary levels of Cr were significantly higher in the three patient groups of 〈1, 1 to 〈3 and 3 to 〈6 months, especially in those with a higher metal crown exposure index. Linear curve estimations showed better relationships between urinary Ni and Cr in patients within 6-month groups. Our data suggested significant increased excretions of urinary Ni and Cr after dental restoration. Potential short- and long-term effects of Ni-Cr alloy restoration need to be investigated.

  18. Chromium accumulation, microorganism population and enzyme activities in soils around chromium-containing slag heap of steel alloy factory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Shun-hong; PENG Bing; YANG Zhi-hui; CHAI Li-yuan; ZHOU Li-cheng

    2009-01-01

    The environmental risk of chromium pollution is pronounced in soils adjacent to chromate industry. It is important to investigate the functioning of soil microorganisms in ecosystems exposed to long-term contamination by chromium. 45 soil samples obtained from different places of the slag heap in a steel alloy factory were analyzed for chromium contamination level and its effect on soil microorganisms and enzyme activities. The results show that the average concentrations of total Cr in the soil under the slag heap, adjacent to the slag heap and outside the factory exceed the threshold of Secondary Environmental Quality Standard for Soil in China by 354%, 540% and 184%, respectively, and are 15, 21 and 9 times higher than the local background value, respectively. Elevated chromium loadings result in changes in the activity of the soil microbe, as indicated by the negative correlations between soil microbial population and chromium contents. Dehydrogenase activity is greatly depressed by chromium in the soil. The results imply that dehydrogenase activity can be used as an indicator for the chromium pollution level in the area of the steel alloy factory.

  19. STUDY ON MORPHOLOGY OF CHROMIUM IN CHILLED Cu-0.14%-2.0%Cr ALLOYS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.W.Yang; Z.K.Fan

    2004-01-01

    The morphology of chromium in chilled Cu-Cr alloys with 0.14%-2.0% Cr has been studied. The results showed that eutectic Cr phase takes a fibrous shape, and pre-eutectic Cr is dendritic in the studied chilled Cu-Cr alloy. During solute treatment of the eutectic and super-eutectic Cu-Cr alloys, only part of chromium particles dissolved in copper phase,some fiber and dendritic chromium still remained. Forging before solute treatment can reduce the size of primary Cr particles, which benefits the aging structure.

  20. Sodium corrosion behavior of austenitic alloys and selective dissolution of chromium and nickel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, T.; Mutoh, I.; Yagi, T.; Ikenaga, Y.

    1986-06-01

    The corrosion behavior of six austenitic alloys and reference Type 316 stainless steel (SS) has been examined in a flowing sodium environment at 700°C for up to about 4000 h. The alloys with a range of nickel content between ~ 15 and 43 wt% were designed and manufactured with an expectation of improved swelling resistance during fast neutron irradiation, compared to reference Type 316 SS. The corrosion loss of the alloys at zero downstream position and the concentrations of chromium, nickel and iron in the surface region were determined as a function of corrosion time. The selective dissolution of nickel and chromium played an important role in sodium corrosion of the alloys. During the initial period, accelerated corrosion took place and selective dissolution of chromium and nickel proceeded at a rapid rate. During the subsequent period, the overall corrosion rate and depletion of chromium and nickel decreased with increasing time until the corrosion rate and the surface concentrations of chromium, nickel and iron, which depended on composition of the alloys, reached the steady-state after about 2000 h. Also, the corrosion rate increased with increasing original nickel content of the alloys. Microstructural examination revealed surface attack of the alloys with higher nickel contents, in particular for the two precipitation strengthened Fe-Ni alloys. The alloys showed a trend of increasing carbon and nitrogen contents.

  1. Investigations on the fracture toughness of austempered ductile iron alloyed with chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, P. Prasad; Putatunda, Susil K

    2003-04-15

    An investigation was carried out to examine the influence of chromium content on the plane strain fracture toughness of austempered ductile iron (ADI). ADIs containing 0, 0.3 and 0.5 wt.% chromium were austempered over a range of temperatures to produce different microstructures. The microstructures were characterized by optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Plane strain fracture toughness of all these materials was determined and correlated with microstructure and chromium content. The chromium content was found to influence the fracture toughness through its influence on the processing window. Since the chromium addition shifts the processing window to shorter durations, the higher chromium alloys at higher austempering temperatures tend to fall outside of the processing window, resulting in less than optimum microstructure and inferior fracture toughness. A small chromium addition of 0.3 wt.% was found to be beneficial for the fracture toughness of ADI.

  2. Effects of extrusion on chromium precipitation in Cu-Cr alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范志康; 杨红旺; 梁淑华; 肖鹏

    2003-01-01

    Cu-Cr alloys containing Cr from 0.14% to 2.0% in mass were prepared as foils for TEM observation before and after being extruded. The results show that before extrusion, the spheroid or short bar chromium disperse in copper matrix of the Cu-Cr alloy, and the relationship between Cu and Cr follows the Nishiyama-Wasserman (NW) relationship, I.e. [110]Cu∥[001]Cr. After the Cu-Cr alloy was extruded at 860℃, dark field image along (224)Cu clearly shows that there are precipitated chromium particles in copper matrix. However, the SADP comprises only (112)Cu zone.

  3. Selective Ablation of thin Nickel-chromium-alloy Films Using Ultrashort Pulsed Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabst, Linda; Ebert, Robby; Exner, Horst

    The selective ablation of 100nm thin Nickel-Chromium-alloy films on glass substrate was investigated using femtosecond laser pulses (λ=1030nm, τp=170 fs, Ep,max=7μJ). The influence of the processing parameters such as fluence, pulse number and pulse repetition rate on the ablation process was examined. Single and multiple pulses ablation thresholds of the Nickel-Chromium-alloy film were determined and the incubation coefficient calculated. Optical and electron microscopy were employed to characterize the patterned area. As a result, different irradiation morphologies were observed, dependent from the processing parameters. A processing window for film side ablation of the Nickel-Chromium-alloy film without damaging the underlying glass substrate was found, however, the edge of the ablation craters were covered with laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS).

  4. Galvanic Interaction between Chalcopyrite and Pyrite with Low Alloy and High Carbon Chromium Steel Ball

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asghar Azizi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to investigate the galvanic interaction between pyrite and chalcopyrite with two types of grinding media (low alloy and high carbon chromium steel ball in grinding of a porphyry copper sulphide ore. Results indicated that injection of different gases into mill altered the oxidation-reduction environment during grinding. High carbon chromium steel ball under nitrogen gas has the lowest galvanic current, and low alloy steel ball under oxygen gas had the highest galvanic current. Also, results showed that the media is anodic relative to pyrite and chalcopyrite, and therefore pyrite or chalcopyrite with a higher rest potential acted as the cathode, whilst the grinding media with a lower rest potential acted as the anode, when they are electrochemically contacted. It was also found that low alloy steel under oxygen produced the highest amount of EDTA extractable iron in the slurry, whilst high carbon chromium steel under nitrogen atmosphere led to the lowest amount.

  5. Synthesis of chromium and ferrochromium alloy in molten salts by the electro-reduction method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge X.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we successfully applied the Fray-Farthing-Chen Cambridge electro-reduction process on the preparation of chromium from chromium oxide, and for the first time, the synthesis of ferrochromium alloy from chromium oxide and iron oxide mixture and the chromite ore in molten calcium chloride. The present work systematically investigated the influences of sintered temperature of the solid precursor, electrochemical potential, electrolysis temperature and time on the products by using a set of advanced characterization techniques, including XRD and SEM/EDS analyses. In particular, our results show that this process is energy-friendly and technically-feasible for the direct extraction of ferrochromium alloy from chromite ore. Our findings thus provide useful insights for designing a novel green process to produce ferrochromium alloy from low-grade chromite ore or stainless steel slag.

  6. Effect of recasting on the elastic modulus of metal-ceramic systems from nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirković Nemanja

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Elastic modulus of metal-ceramic systems determines their flexural strength and prevents damages on ceramics during mastication. Recycling of basic alloys is often a clinical practice, despite the possible effects on the quality of the future metal-ceramic dentures. This research was done to establish recasting effects of nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys on the elastic modulus of metalceramic systems in making fixed partial dentures. Methods. The research was performed as an experimental study. Six metal-ceramic samples of nickel-chromium alloy (Wiron 99 and cobalt-chromium alloy (Wirobond C were made. Alloy residues were recycled through twelve casting generations with the addition of 50% of new alloy on the occasion of every recasting. Three- point bending test was used to determine elastic modulus, recommended by the standard ISO 9693:1999. Fracture load for damaging ceramic layer was recorded on the universal testing machine (Zwick, type 1464, with the speed of 0,05 mm/min. Results. The results of this research revealed significant differences between elasticity modules of metal-ceramic samples in every examined recycle generation. Recasting had negative effect on the elastic modulus of the examined alloys. This research showed the slight linear reduction of elastic modulus up to the 6th generation of recycling. After the 6th recycling there was a sudden fall of elastic modulus. Conclusion. Recasting of nickelchromium and cobalt-chromium alloys is not recommended because of the reduced elastic modulus of these alloys. Instead of reusing previously recasted alloys, the alloy residues should be returned to the manufacturer. .

  7. Effects of surface finishing conditions on the biocompatibility of a nickel-chromium dental casting alloy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGinley, Emma Louise

    2011-07-01

    To assess the effects of surface finishing condition (polished or alumina particle air abraded) on the biocompatibility of direct and indirect exposure to a nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) d.Sign®10 dental casting alloy on oral keratinocytes. Biocompatibility was performed by assessing cellular viability and morphology, metabolic activity, cellular toxicity and presence of inflammatory cytokine markers.

  8. Hot hardness of nickel-rich nickel-chromium-aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, S. R.

    1976-01-01

    Rockwell A hardness of cast nickel-chromium-aluminum (NiCrAl) alloys was examined from ambient to 1150 K and compared to cast NiAl and IN-100. Alloy constitution was either gamma, gamma prime + gamma or gamma + beta + alpha + gamma prime. Below 1000 K beta containing NiCrAl alloys have hardnesses comparable to IN-100; above 1000 K they soften faster than IN-100. At 1150 K the hardness of beta-containing NiCrAl alloys decreases with increasing beta-content. The beta-containing NiCrAl alloys were harder than beta-NiAl. The ultimate tensile strengths of the NiCrAl alloys were estimated. The effects of NiCrAl coatings on strength and fatigue life of cooled turbine components were deduced.

  9. The effect of selective oxidation of chromium on the creep strength of alloy 617

    OpenAIRE

    Ennis, P.; Quadakkers, W.; H. Schuster

    1993-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect on creep strength of the selective oxidation of chromium which causes the formation of a carbide-fi-ee subsurface zone, specimens of Ni22Cr12Co9Mo1Al (Alloy 617) were subjected to heat treatments to simulate a long-term service exposure of a thin-walled heat exchanger tube operating at high temperatures. In creep tests carried out at 900°C, specimens with extensive chromium-depleted and carbide-free subsurface zones exhibited higher creep strength than speci...

  10. On the coexistence of the magnetic phases in chromium alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebech, Bente; Mikke, K.

    1969-01-01

    Detailed neutron diffraction investigations have been performed on Cr-Re alloys in order to explain the several observations in Cr alloys of the coexistence of a commensurable and an oscillatory magnetic phase. It is concluded that the individual magnetic phases probably occur in separate domains....

  11. Chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intern Med 1991;115:917-24. Abraham AS, Brooks BA, Eylath U. The effects of chromium supplementation on serum glucose and lipids in patients with and without non-insulin-dependent diabetes. Metabolism 1992;41:768-71. Hermann J, Arquitt A. ...

  12. Characterization of Two ODS Alloys: Chromium-18 ODS and Chromium-9 ODS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, Julianne

    ODS alloys, or oxide dispersion strengthened alloys, are made from elemental or pre-alloyed metal powders mechanically alloyed with oxide powders in a high-energy attributor mill, and then consolidated by either hot isostatic pressing or hot extrusion causing the production of nanometer scale oxide and carbide particles within the alloy matrix; crystalline properties such as creep strength, ductility, corrosion resistance, tensile strength, swelling resistance, and resistance to embrittlement are all observed to be improved by the presence of nanoparticles in the matrix. The presented research uses various methods to observe and characterize the microstructural and microchemical properties of two experimental ODS alloys, 18Cr ODS and 9Cr ODS. The results found aid in assessing the influence of chemical and structural variations on the effectiveness of the alloy, and further aid in the optimization of these advanced alloys for future use in nuclear cladding and structural applications in Generation IV nuclear reactors. Characterization of these alloys has been conducted in order to identify the second-phase small precipitates through FESEM, TEM, EDS, Synchrotron X-ray diffraction analysis, and CuKalpha XRD analysis of bulk samples and of nanoparticles after extraction from the alloy matrix. Comparison of results from these methods allows further substantiation of the accuracy of observed nanoparticle composition and identification. Also, TEM samples of the two alloys have been irradiated in-situ with 1 MeV Kr and 300 keV Fe ions to various doses and temperatures at the IVEM-Tandem TEM at Argonne National Laboratory and post-irradiated characterization has been conducted and compared to the pre-irradiated characterization results in order to observe the microstructural and microchemical evolution of nanoparticles under irradiation. Overall in the as-received state, the initial Y2O3 is not found anymore and in addition to oxide particles the alloys contain carbides

  13. Compliance of a cobalt chromium coronary stent alloy – the COVIS trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwinger Robert HG

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cobalt chromium coronary stents are increasingly being used in percutaneous coronary interventions. There are, however, no reliable data about the characteristics of unfolding and visibility of this stent alloy in vivo. The aim of this study is to compare cobalt chromium coronary stents with conventional stainless steel stents using intracoronary ultrasound. Methods Twenty de novo native coronary stenoses ≤ 20 mm in length (target vessel reference diameter ≥ 2.5 and ≤ 4.0 mm received under sequential intracoronary ultrasound either a cobalt chromium stent (Multi-Link Vision®; n = 10 or a stainless steel stent (Multi-Link Zeta®; n = 10. Results For optimal unfolding, the cobalt chromium stent requires a higher balloon deployment pressure (13.90 ± 2.03 atm than the stainless steel stent (11.50 ± 2.12 atm. Furthermore, the achieved target vessel diameter of the cobalt chromium stent (Visibility-Index QCA/IVUS Multi-Link Vision®1.13 / Multi-Link Zeta® 1.04 is more easily overrated by Quantitative Coronary Analysis. Conclusion These data indicate that stent material-specific recommendations for optimal implantation pressure and different stent material with an equal design should both be considered in interpreting QCA-analysis.

  14. PRODUCTION, STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF CHROMIUM BRONZE ALLOYED MECHANICALLY WITH THE MELTING OF NANOCRYSTALLINE MODIFYING LIGATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. G. Lovshenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The reactive mechanical alloying is an effective technology for production of nanocrystalline modifying modifiers and ligatures. During smelting chromium bronzes use of mechanically alloyed modifying ligatures allow to exclude from the technology the environmentally hazardous high-temperature process of production of cast ligatures and to reduces reduce the optimum temperature of the melt alloying process copper at 50–100 °C by reducing its duration 2, 5–3,5 times This excluded process requires expensive furnace equipment. Mechanically alloyed modifying ligatures allow the formation of dispersion-strengthened heat-resistant materials with sub -,/ microcrystalline structure type bases, which are strength, hardness, conductivity and temperature of the onset of recrystallization about 15–20% superior to the base, which increases the resistance of the welding electrodes by 1.8–2.2 times. 

  15. Surface modification of cobalt-chromium-tungsten-nickel alloy using octadecyltrichlorosilanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mani, Gopinath [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, San Antonio, TX 78249 (United States); Feldman, Marc D. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, San Antonio, TX 78249 (United States); Division of Cardiology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); The Department of Veteran Affairs South Texas Health Care System, 7400 Merton Minter Blvd., San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Oh, Sunho [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, San Antonio, TX 78249 (United States); Agrawal, C. Mauli [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, San Antonio, TX 78249 (United States)], E-mail: Mauli.Agrawal@utsa.edu

    2009-03-15

    Cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloys have been extensively used for medical implants because of their excellent mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility. This first time study reports the formation and stability of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on a Co-Cr-W-Ni alloy. SAMs of octadecyltrichlorosilanes (OTS) were coated on sputtered Co-Cr-W-Ni alloy thin film and bulk Co-Cr-W-Ni alloy. OTS SAM coated alloy specimens were characterized using contact angle goniometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Contact angle analysis and FTIR suggested that ordered monolayers were coated on both sputtered and bulk alloy. XPS suggested the selective dissolution of cobalt from the alloy during the formation of OTS SAM. The bonding between the alloy and the OTS SAM was mainly attributed to Si-O-Cr and Si-O-W covalent bonds and a smaller contribution from Si-O-Co bonds. AFM images showed the distribution of islands of monolayers coated on the alloy. The height of monolayers in majority of the islands was closer to the theoretical length of fully extended OTS molecules oriented perpendicular to the surface. The stability of OTS SAM was investigated in tris-buffered saline at 37 {sup o}C for up to 7 days. Contact angle, FTIR, and XPS collectively confirmed that the monolayers remain ordered and bound to the alloy surface under this condition. This study shows that Co-Cr alloys can be surface modified using SAMs for potential biomedical applications.

  16. Electrodeposition of Tantalum and Tantalum-Chromium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-01

    authors wish to acknowledge Mrs. Theresa Brassard and Mr. Joe Barranco for preparing micrographs of the specimens and microhardness measure- ments, and...Ahmad, P. Greco, G. D’Andrea, J. Barranco , "Potential Erosion Resistant Refractory Metal (And/Or) Alloy Coatings for Gun Tubes," Proceedings 1978...U.S. Patent 344058 (1969), Canadian Patent 688546 (1963). 17 REFERENCES 1. I. Ahmad, P. Greco, G. D’Andrea, and J. Barranco , "Potential Erosion

  17. a Structural Investigation of the Passive Film on Iron and Iron/chromium Alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkar, Moussa

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. The Electrochemical Polarisation, Photocurrent Spectroscopy and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) techniques have been used to study the passive film on pure iron and iron alloy samples containing up to 25% chromium. The material used in this work was prepared both as bulk and thin films. The bulk samples were passivated electrochemically at various anodic potentials whereas the film ones were either fully converted into passive films by simple immersion in various solutions for one week or electrochemically at various anodic potentials. The Fe and Fe/Cr film samples used in the electrochemical passivation were deposited onto gold substrate and those passivated by immersion were deposited directly onto mylar. Polarisation curves for both the bulk and film materials were recorded. They suggest that the electrochemical behaviour of the two materials is similar. The wavelength and potential dependence of the photocurrent spectra were also recorded for the bulk and film samples of Fe and Fe/Cr alloys. The data were analysed to obtain the effective optical band gaps and flat band potentials of the passive films respectively. These results also show that the two materials are similar. Furthermore, the photocurrent data suggest that the passive film on Fe/Cr alloys consists of Fe(III) and Cr(III) phases. The fluorescence EXAFS above the Fe and Cr K-absorption edges of the passive film on Fe and Fe/Cr alloy films has been recorded both in-situ and ex-situ. The spectra obtained in these studies were analysed to obtain average Fe-O and Fe-Fe separations as well as Cr-O and Cr-Cr ones. These results together with a detailed examination of the XANES suggest that the passive film on iron in the absence of chromium is best described as a disordered gamma -FeOOH-like structure and that on Fe/Cr alloys as well as on pure Fe passivated in chromate solution contains two simultaneous

  18. Bonding evolution with sintering temperature in low alloyed steels with chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuentes-Pacheco L.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, high performance PM steels for automotive applications follow a processing route that comprises die compaction of water-atomized powder, followed by sintering and secondary treatments, and finishing operations. This study examines Cr-alloyed sintered steels with two level of alloying. In chromium-alloyed steels, the surface oxide on the powder is of critical importance for developing the bonding between the particles during sintering. Reduction of this oxide depends mainly on three factors: temperature, dew point of the atmosphere, and carbothermic reduction provided by the added graphite. The transformation of the initial surface oxide evolves sequence as temperature increases during sintering, depending on the oxide composition. Carbothermic reduction is supposed to be the controlling mechanism, even when sintering in hydrogen-containing atmospheres. The effect of carbothermic reduction can be monitored by investigating the behavior of the specimens under tensile testing, and studying the resultant fracture surfaces.

  19. Microstructure and properties of Ti–Nb–V–Mo-alloyed high chromium cast iron

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Youping Ma; Xiulan Li; Yugao Liu; Shuyi Zhou; Xiaoming Dang

    2013-10-01

    The correlations of microstructure, hardness and fracture toughness of high chromium cast iron with the addition of alloys (titanium, vanadium, niobium and molybdenum) were investigated. The results indicated that the as-cast microstructure changed from hypereutectic, eutectic to hypoeutectic with the increase of alloy contents. Mo dissolved in austenite and increased the hardness by solid solution strengthening. TiC and NbC mainly existed in austenite and impeded the austenite dendrite development. V existed in multicomponent systems in forms of V alloy compounds (VCrFe8 and VCr2C2).With the increase of alloy additions, carbides size changed gradually from refinement to coarseness, hardness and impact toughness were increased and then decreased. Compared with the fracture toughness (6 J/cm2) and hardness (50.8HRC) without any alloy addition, the toughness and hardness at 0.60 V–0.60Ti–0.60Nb–0.35Mo (wt%) additions were improved and achieved to 11 J/cm2 and 58.9HRC, respectively. The synergistic roles of Ti, Nb, V and Mo influenced the solidification behaviour of alloy. The refinement of microstructure and improvement of carbides morphologies, size and distribution improved the impact toughness.

  20. MD simulation of atomic displacement cascades near chromium-rich clusters in FeCr alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tikhonchev, M., E-mail: tikhonchev@sv.ulsu.ru [Ulyanovsk State University, Research Institute of Technology, 42 Leo Tolstoy St., 432970 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Svetukhin, V. [Ulyanovsk State University, Research Institute of Technology, 42 Leo Tolstoy St., 432970 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Gaganidze, E. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2013-11-15

    The paper reports simulation of cascades in Fe–9 at.%Cr binary alloy containing chromium-rich clusters. The simulation is performed by the molecular dynamics method at the initial temperature of 300 K and primary knock-on atom energy of 15 and 20 keV. Spherical clusters containing 95 at.% of Cr with diameter of 1–5 nm have been considered. The properties of cascade evolution in the presence of chromium-rich cluster are studied. It is shown that these clusters tend to dissolve in collision cascades. However, clusters with diameter of ⩾3 nm exhibit only slight modifications and can be considered stable. Parameters of small (1–2 nm) clusters can change significantly and, in some cases, a 1 nm cluster can be totally dissolved.

  1. Study of a New Chromium-Free Conversion Coating Formed on ZnAl Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG Jin-ming; GUO Zhong-cheng; HAN Xia-yun; YANG Ning

    2004-01-01

    A new chromium-free conversion film was obtained on surface of a ZnAl alloy by chemical conversion process.Influence of the additives in treating solution containing cerium salt on the corrosion protection of the conversion film formed on zinc alloy was investigated. Corrosion tests and electrochemical measurements in sodium chloride solution were performed. The microstructure and composition of the coatings were examined by means of SEM, EDS and XRD. It was found that the corrosion protection capabilities of the conversion film are markedly increased with the cerium nitride plus additives (hydrogen fluoride acid and an organic inhibitor) treating process. The modified conversion film is an organic/inorganic composite coating and is much more corrosion resistant than the conventional chromate conversion coating and the single cerium conversion coating.

  2. Study of a New Chromium-Free Conversion Coating Formed on ZnAl Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONGJin-ming; GUOZhong-cheng; HANXia-yun; YANGNing

    2004-01-01

    A new chromium-free conversion film was obtained on surface of a ZnA1 alloy by chemical conversion process. Influence of the additives in treating solution containing cerium salt on the corrosion protection of the conversion film formed on zinc alloy was investigated. Corrosion tests and electrochemical measurements in sodium chloride solution were performed. The microstructure and composition of the coatings were examined by means of SEM, EDS and XRD. It was found that the corrosion protection capabilities of the conversion film are markedly increased with the cerium nitride plus additives (hydrogen fluoride acid and an organic inhibitor) treating process. The modified conversion film is an organic/inorganic composite coating and is much more corrosion resistant than the conventional chromate conversion coating and the single cerium conversion coating.

  3. Evaluation of effect of recasting of nickel-chromium alloy on its castability using different investment materials: An in vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Abhinav Sharma; Shobha J Rodrigues; Thilak B Shetty; Vidya K Shenoy; Mahesh Mundathaje; Sharon Saldanha

    2016-01-01

    Context: Castability has been found to be affected by many aspects of the entire casting system. Very few references in dental literature are available regarding recasting of the base metal alloys. Aims: To evaluate and compare the castability of fresh and reused nickel-chromium alloy and to evaluate the effect of two brands of investment materials on castability of nickel-chromium alloy. Subjects and Methods: For the experimental purpose of evaluation of the effect of recasting of nick...

  4. Computer Simulation and Experimental Validation on the Oxidation and Sulfate Corrosion Resistance of Novel Chromium Based High Temperature Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shizhong

    2013-02-28

    This report summarizes our recent works of ab initio molecular dynamics inter-atomic potentials development on dilute rare earth element yttrium (Y) etc. doped chromium (Cr) alloy systems, its applications in oxidation and corrosion resistance simulation, and experiment validation on the candidate systems. The simulation methods, experimental validation techniques, achievements already reached, students training, and future improvement are briefly introduced.

  5. Wear behaviour of cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloys used in metal-on-metal hip implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varano, Rocco

    The influence of carbon (C) content, microstructure, crystallography and mechanical properties on the wear behaviour of metal-on-metal (MM) hip implants made from commercially available cobalt-chromium-molybdenum (CoCrMo) alloys designated as American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) grade F1537, F75 and as-cast were studied in this work. The as-received bars of wrought CoCrMo alloys (ASTM F1537 of either about 0.05% or 0.26% C) were each subjected to various heat treatments to develop different microstructures. Pin and plate specimens were fabricated from each bar and were tested against each other using a linear reciprocating pin-on-plate apparatus in 25% by volume bovine serum solution. The applied normal load was 9.81 N and the reciprocating plate had a sinusoidal velocity with an average speed of 26 mm/s. The wear was measured gravimetrically and it was found to be most strongly affected by alloy C content, irrespective of grain size or carbide morphology. More precisely, the wear behaviour was directly correlated to the dissolved C content of the alloys. Increased C in solid-solution coincided with lower volumetric wear since C helps to stabilize the face-centred cubic (FCC) crystal structure thus limiting the amount of strain induced transformation (SIT) to the hexagonal close-packed crystal structure (HCP). Based on the observed surface twinning in and around the contact zone and the potentially detrimental effect of the HCP phase, it was postulated that the MM wear behaviour of CoCrMo alloys in the present study was controlled by a deformation mechanism, rather than corrosion or tribochemical reactions.

  6. Evaluation of effect of recasting of nickel-chromium alloy on its castability using different investment materials: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhinav Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Within the limitations of the study, it was concluded that there was no significant difference found in castability of different percentage combinations of new and once casted alloy using two investment materials. The addition of new alloy during recasting to maintain the castability of nickel-chromium alloy may therefore not be required.

  7. Chromium and iron contained half-Heusler MnNiGe-based alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budzynski, M. [UMCS, Institute of Physics, 1 sq.M.Curie-Skłodowska, 20-031 Lublin (Poland); Valkov, V.I.; Golovchan, A.V.; Kamenev, V.I. [Donetsk Institute for Physics and Engineering, 72, R.Luxemburg str., 83114 Donetsk (Ukraine); Mitsiuk, V.I., E-mail: vmitsiuk@gmail.com [Scientific-Practical Materials Research Center of National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, 19 P.Brovky Str., 220072 Minsk (Belarus); Sivachenko, A.P. [Donetsk Institute for Physics and Engineering, 72, R.Luxemburg str., 83114 Donetsk (Ukraine); Surowiec, Z. [UMCS, Institute of Physics, 1 sq.M.Curie-Skłodowska, 20-031 Lublin (Poland); Tkachenka, T.M. [Scientific-Practical Materials Research Center of National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, 19 P.Brovky Str., 220072 Minsk (Belarus)

    2015-12-15

    The magnetic characteristics of chromium and iron containing MnNiGe-based alloys with several types of quenching and annealing were investigated. It was found that the quenched Mn{sub 0.89}Cr{sub 0.11}NiGe has a spontaneous and magnetic field induced magnetostructural first-order transitions at room temperature. These transitions might be accompanied by a large magnetocaloric effect. In general, Mn{sub 0.89}Cr{sub 0.11}NiGe can be classified as promising material for use in the magnetocaloric application at room temperatures. The first order magnetostructural phase transition from the ferromagnetic to paramagnetic state is not realized in MnNi0.90Fe0.10Ge. In contrast to Mn{sub 0.89}Cr{sub 0.11}NiGe, however, the FM state in quenched-on-wheel MnNi0.90Fe0.10Ge is preserved to the lowest temperatures. Based on the set of the magnetic properties, it has been concluded that the iron containing MnNiGe-based alloys are less promising for practical use.

  8. Macrophage responses to 316L stainless steel and cobalt chromium alloys with different surface topographies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jordan A; Lamichhane, Sujan; Mani, Gopinath

    2016-11-01

    The surface topography of a biomaterial plays a vital role in determining macrophage interactions and influencing immune response. In this study, we investigated the effect of smooth and microrough topographies of commonly used metallic biomaterials such as 316 L stainless steel (SS) and cobalt-chromium (CoCr) alloys on macrophage interactions. The macrophage adhesion was greater on CoCr compared to SS, irrespective of their topographies. The macrophage activation and the secretion of most pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, and IP-10) were greater on microrough surfaces than on smooth surfaces by day-1. However, by day-2, the macrophage activation on smooth surfaces was also significantly increased up to the same level as observed on the microrough surfaces, with more amount of cytokines secreted. The secretion of anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10) was significantly increased from day-1 to day-2 on all the alloy surfaces with the effect most prominently observed on microrough surfaces. The production of nitric oxide by the macrophages did not show any major substrate-dependent effect. The foreign body giant cells formed by macrophages were least observed on the microrough surfaces of CoCr. Thus, this study demonstrated that the nature of material (SS or CoCr) and their surface topographies (smooth or microrough) strongly influence the macrophage responses. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2658-2672, 2016.

  9. Adherence of Candida albicans in cobalto- chromium and titanium alloys, with different sandpapering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidnei MARCACCI

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The capacity of Candida albicans adherence is one ofits main factors of virulence. Surfaces of different materials canpropitiate conditions for higher or lower adherence and greater virulence of the microorganisms. Objective: Evaluate the adherence of Candida albicans in cobalto-chromium and titanium alloys, with different sandpapering. Material and methods: Twenty-four cylindrical samples have been constructed, 12 of titanium and 12 of cobalt-chromium, divided in 4 groups of six. All have been polished in the habitual form by the same technician. Samples have been sandpapered at about high rotation for 15 seconds each sandpaper, on all its surface. A group of each metal was sandpapered only with sandpaper for metal number 80. The two other groups have been sandpapered in agreement with the sequence (decreasing granulation: 80, 150 and 220. Samples have been sterilized and located in plates of cells culture. In each well of the plate was added standardized amount of Sabouraud broth and suspension containing 106 cells per milliliter of C. albicans (ATCC 18804. After incubation, the number of adhered cells per mm2 was obtained by the method of sowing in plate of Petri. The obtained values have been tabulated and submitted to the tests of ANOVA and Tukey,with level of significance of 5%. Results: There was statistical difference for the granulation of sandpapers, what not occurred when considering metals.Conclusion: The bigger the final granulation of sandpaper, the greater the adherence and the type of metal did not influence in the result.

  10. Effects of TIG Surface Melting and Chromium Surface Alloying on Microstructure,Hardness and Wear Resistance of ADI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A Amirsadeghi; M Heydarzadeh Sohi; S F Kashani Bozorg

    2008-01-01

    Microhardness and wear resistance of different mierostruetures formed by TIG (tungsten inert gas) surface melting and chromium surface alloying (using ferrochromium) of ADI (austempered ductile iron) were studied.Surface melting resulted in the formation of a ledeburitic structure in the melted zone,and this structure has a hardness up to 896 HV as compared to 360 HV in that of ADI.Moreover,chromium surface alloying resulted in the formation of different structures including:(1) a hypereuteetic structure consisting of primary (Fe,Cr)7C3 carbides and a eutectie matrix of transformed austenite (into martensite and retained austenite),as also (Fe,Cr)7C3 carbides,with a hardness of 1 078 HV;(2) a hypoeutectic structure consisting of the same eutectic along with transformed primary austenite,with a hardness of 755 HV;and (3) a ledeburitic structure with an acieular morphology and a hardness of 896 HV.The results also indicated that surface melting reduced the wear rate of the ADI by approximately 37%.Also,chromium surface alloying yielded a superior wear behavior and reduced the wear rate of the treated specimens by about 38% and 70%,depending on the structures formed.

  11. Growth and structural determination of He bubbles in iron/chromium alloys using molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhishek, A.; Warrier, M.; Ganesh, R.; Caro, A.

    2016-04-01

    Helium(He) produced by transmutation process inside structural material due to neutron irradiation plays a vital role in the degradation of material properties. We have carried out Molecular dynamics(MD) simulations to study the growth of He bubble in Iron-Chromium alloy. Simulations are carried out at two different temperatures, viz. 0.1 K and 800 K, upto He bubble radius of 2.5 nm. An equation for variation of volume of He bubbles with the number of He atoms is obtained at both the temperatures. Bubble pressure and potential energy variation is obtained with increasing bubble radius. Dislocations are also found to be emitted after the bubble reaches a critical radius of 0.39 nm at 800 K. Separate MD simulations of He with pre-created voids are also carried out to study the binding energies of He and Vacancy (V) to Hem-Vn cluster. Binding energies are found to be in the range of 1-5.5 eV.

  12. Cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy causes metal accumulation and metallothionein up-regulation in rat liver and kidney

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Stig Storgaard; Danscher, Gorm; Stoltenberg, Meredin;

    2007-01-01

    Cobalt-chromium-molybdenum (CoCrMo) metal-on-metal hip prosthesis has had a revival due to their excellent wear properties. However, particulate wear debris and metal ions liberated from the CoCrMo alloys might cause carcinogenicity, hypersensitivity, local and general tissue toxicity, genotoxicity...... and inflammation-generating qualities. Nine months after implanting small pieces of CoCrMo alloy intramuscularly and intraperitoneally in rats, we analysed the accumulation of metals with a multi-element analysis, and the levels of metallothionein I/II with real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction...... in liver and kidney. We found that metal ions are liberated from CoCrMo alloys and suggest that they are released by dissolucytosis, a process where macrophages causes the metallic surface to release metal ions. Animals with intramuscular implants accumulated metal in liver and kidney and metallohionein I...

  13. Effect of chromium on the corrosion behaviour of powder-processed Fe–0·45 wt% P alloys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yashwant Mehta; Shefali Trivedi; K Chandra; P S Mishra

    2010-08-01

    The corrosion behaviour of Fe–0·45P with/without addition of chromium, prepared by powder forging route was studied in different environments. The corrosion studies in acidic (0·25 M H2SO4 solution of pH 0·6) and neutral/marine (3·5% NaCl solution of pH 6·8) solutions were conducted using Tafel Extrapolation method. The rate of corrosion in alkaline medium (0·5 M Na2CO3 + 1·0 M NaHCO3 solution of pH 9·4) was measured using linear polarization technique. The studies compare electrolytic Armco iron with Fe–P alloys. It was observed that, chromium improved the resistance to corrosion in acidic and marine environments. The corrosion rates were minimal in alkaline medium and low in neutral solution.

  14. Electrochemical investigation of chromium oxide-coated Ti-6Al-4V and Co-Cr-Mo alloy substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Viswanathan; Zeng, Haitong; Lawrynowicz, Daniel; Zhang, Zongtao; Gilbert, Jeremy L

    2011-08-01

    Hard coatings for articulating surfaces of total joint replacements may improve the overall wear resistance. However, any coating approach must take account of changes in corrosion behavior. This preliminary assessment analyzes the corrosion kinetics, impedance and mechanical-electrochemical stability of 100 μm thick plasma sprayed chromium oxide (Cr₂O₃) coatings on bearing surfaces in comparison to the native alloy oxide films on Co-Cr-Mo and Ti-6Al-6V. Cyclic potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and mechanical abrasion under potentiostatic conditions were performed on coated and substrate surfaces in physiological saline. SEM analysis characterized the coating morphology. The results showed that the corrosion current density values of chromium oxide coatings (0.4-1.2 μA/cm²) were of the same order of magnitude as Ti-6Al-4V alloy. Mechanical abrasion did not increase corrosion rates of chromium oxide coatings but did for uncoated Co-Cr-Mo and Ti-6Al-4V. The impedance response of chromium oxide coatings was very different than Co-Cr-Mo and Ti-6Al-4V native oxides characterized by a defected coating model. More of a frequency-independent purely resistive response was seen in mid-frequency range for the coatings (CPE(coat) : 40-280 nF/cm² (rad/s)(1-α) , α: 0.67-0.83) whereas a more capacitive character is seen for Co-Cr-Mo and Ti-6Al-4V (CPE(ox) around 20 μF/cm² (rad/s)(1-α) , α around 0.9). Pores, interparticle gaps and incomplete fusion typical for thermal spray coatings were present in these oxides which could have influenced corrosion resistance. The coating microstructure could have allowed some fluid penetration. Overall, these coatings appear to have suitable corrosion properties for wear surfaces.

  15. Development, processing and fabrication of a nickel based nickel-chromium-iron alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinlade, Dotun Adebayo

    An optimal powder metallurgy (P/M) approach to produce a nickel base Superalloy similar in composition to INCONEL(TM) 600 was carried out utilising a simple uniaxial pressing process. The efficiencies of a lubricant addition, binder, sintering times and temperatures were measured in terms of green and sintered densities as well as microstructural changes that occurred during processing. It was observed that with increasing % polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), an overall decrease in density of compact was obtained and that using 0.75wt % of lubricant (microwax) green densities in excess of 70% can be obtained. The samples were subsequently sintered in air at 1270°C for times ranging from 0.5h to 5h and also in vacuum (6 millitorr) with temperatures ranging from 1260 through to 1400°C. The air sintering was carried out to optimize sintering time, whereas the vacuum sintering was employed to optimize sintering temperature. On sintering for 5h in air, chromium enrichment occurred at the grain boundaries with subsequent depletion of nickel and iron; this was not noted for 2h sintering or for sintering under vacuum. The optimum sintering conditions were determined to be at 1300°C sintering for 2h in vacuum. The samples processed under the optimum conditions were successfully cold rolled to 40% of the original thickness without cracking. An investigation was also undertaken to determine the effect of Al concentration (1-12w/o) on the microstructure of the powder metallurgically (P/M) processed Ni-Cr-Fe ternary alloy, with a view to determine the concentration of aluminium that would yield a homogenously distributed and optimum volume fraction of the intermetallic-gamma'(Ni3Al) phase without the formation of topologically closed packed phases in the ternary alloy. The phases that were likely to form with the variation in concentration of Al were first simulated by JMatPro(TM) thermodynamic software package, and then Ni-Cr-Fe alloys with varying concentration of aluminum were

  16. The clinical effects of artificial teeth in nickel-chromium alloy containing titanium, cobalt chromium alloy, high-gold alloy porcelain%含钛镍铬合金、钴铬合金、高金合金烤瓷牙的临床应用比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李鸿飞

    2011-01-01

    Objective To compare clinical effects of the artificial teeth in nickel-chromium alloy containing titanium, cobalt chromium alloy, high-gold alloy-porcelain restorations. Methods The patients treated with nickel-chromium alloy containing titanium (n = 189, 233units) , cobalt chromium alloy (n = 206,251 units) and porcelain high-gold alloy (n =97, 118units) were observed in 3 months, 1 year, 3 years, including the color of porcelain crowns, gingival inflammation, gingival margin discoloration, and the crack or fracture or collapse of porcelain situation. Results There was no significant difference( P > 0.05 ) in color, gingival margin inflammation (3 months) , the crack or fracture or collapse of porcelain between artificial teeth in nickel-chromium alloy containing titanium andte cobalt chromium alloy-porcelain crown; the rate of gingival margin color (1 year and 3 years) of nickel-chromium alloy containing titanium group was higher than that of cobalt-chromium alloy group, and it was significantly higher than that of the high-gold alloy porcelain group ( P 0.05) . Conclusions The technic of high-gold alloy porcelain teeth has obvious advantages in chemical stability, biocompatibility and color; the artificial teeth in nickel chrome grill porcelain has been gradually replaced by the teeth made of cobalt-chromium alloy in recent years; the long term effects of Ni-Cr alloy-porcelain crown needs further research.%目的 比较含钛镍铬合金、钴铬合金、高金合金烤瓷修复体的临床应用效果.方法 选择含钛镍铬合金、钴铬合金和高金合金烤瓷修复患者分别为189例(233单位冠)、206例(251单位冠)和97例(118单位冠)修复完成后分别于3个月、1年、3年复查,检查烤瓷冠的色泽、牙龈炎症、龈缘变色以及裂纹或折裂或崩瓷情况.结果 含钛镍铬合金、钴铬合金烤瓷冠在色泽、龈缘炎症(3个月时)、裂纹或折裂或崩瓷方面无显著性差异(P>0.05);龈缘变色(1年及3

  17. Comparative study between laser sintering and casting for retention of resin composite veneers to cobalt-chromium alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratomi, Ryuta; Kamada, Kohji; Taira, Yohsuke; Higuchi, Shizuo; Watanabe, Ikuya; Sawase, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the bond strengths between resin composite veneer and laser-sintered cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloy with and without retention devices (Laser-R and Laser-N respectively). Cast Co-Cr alloy with and without retention devices (Cast-R and Cast-N respectively) were also prepared for fabrication technique comparison. Disk-shaped Co-Cr alloy specimens were air-abraded with alumina and veneered with a veneering system, Estenia C&B (ES) or Ceramage (CE). After 20,000 thermocycles, tensile testing was performed. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and multiple comparison test. When no retention devices were present, no significant differences were observed between Laser-N/ES and Cast-N/ES, or between Laser- N/CE and Cast-N/CE, but ES exhibited significantly higher bond strength than CE. With retention devices, Laser-R/ES, Cast- R/ES and Laser-R/CE showed no significant differences, and their retention strengths were significantly higher than that of Cast- R/CE. Compared to cast Co-Cr alloy, laser-sintered Co-Cr alloy with retention devices provided better retention durability for resin composite-veneered prostheses.

  18. 齿科用镍铬合金材料的生物安全性能%Biological security of nickel-chromium alloys in the dentistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝钢

    2013-01-01

      背景:镍铬烤瓷合金在口腔修复中的应用广泛,合金中离子的释放对人体可能存在毒副作用或不良生物学反应。目的:从齿科用镍铬合金材料中镍金属的细胞毒性、合金中镍离子析出量、临床安全性等方面做一阐述。方法:检索2004至2009年 PubMed 数据库(http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/PubMed)及万方数据库(http://www.wanfangdata.com.cn)有关齿科用镍铬合金材料生物安全性能的文献。英文检索词为“Ni-Cr al oy,cytotoxicity,prosthodontics,security”,中文检索词为“镍铬合金,细胞毒性,口腔修复,安全性”。保留14篇文章归纳总结。结果与结论:镍铬合金临床应用时间长,由于其价格低廉,与金瓷结合效果较好,制作工艺相对容易,故在口腔修复中应用广泛。近年来镍铬合金的不良作用普遍受到关注,但尚无证据证明镍铬烤瓷有毒性离子释放析出于口腔唾液环境中,可能对口腔接触细胞及全身产生毒性反应;目前已知检测手段证明其在临床应用的许可范围内。在烤瓷全冠制作时应选用含铬质量系数高的镍铬合金。%BACKGROUND: Nickel-chromium alloys have been widely applied in the oral restoration. Ions released from the alloy, however, exert a side effect or result in adverse biological reactions. OBJECTIVE: To review the cytotoxicity of nickel metal used in nickel-chromium alloy, the amount of precipitation of nickel ions from the alloy, and clinical safety of nickel-chromium alloy materials. METHODS: A computer-based search of PubMed and Wanfang databases was performed for articles related to biological security of nickel-chromium alloys in the oral restoration published between 2004 and 2009. The key words were Ni-Cr alloy, cytotoxicity, prosthodontics, security in English and Chinese, respectively. Final y, 14 articles were included in result analysis. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Nickel-chromium alloy

  19. Effect of cleanser solutions on the color of acrylic resins associated with titanium and nickel-chromium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena de Freitas Oliveira Paranhos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effect of cleanser solutions on the color of heat-polymerized acrylic resin (HPAR and on the brightness of dental alloys with 180 immersion trials. Disk-shaped specimens were made with I commercially pure titanium, II nickel-chromium-molybdenum-titanium, III nickel-chromium molybdenum, and IV nickel-chromium-molybdenum beryllium. Each cast disk was invested in the flasks, incorporating the metal disk into the HPAR. The specimens (n = 5 were then immersed in solutions containing: 0.05% sodium hypochlorite, 0.12% chlorhexidine digluconate, 0.500 mg cetylpyridinium chloride, a citric acid tablet, one of two different sodium perborate/enzyme tablets, and water. The color measurements (∆E of the HPAR were determined by a colorimeter in accordance with the National Bureau of Standards. The surface brightness of the metal was visually examined for the presence of tarnish. The results (ANOVA; Tukey test-α = 0.05 show that there was a significant difference between the groups (p < 0.001 but not among the solutions (p = 0.273. The highest mean was obtained for group III (5.06, followed by group II (2.14. The lowest averages were obtained for groups I (1.33 and IV (1.35. The color changes in groups I, II and IV were slight but noticeable, and the color change was considerable for group III. The visual analysis showed that 0.05% sodium hypochlorite caused metallic brightness changes in groups II and IV. It can be concluded that the agents had the same effect on the color of the resin and that the metallic alloys are not resistant to the action of 0.05% sodium hypochlorite.

  20. Effect of cleanser solutions on the color of acrylic resins associated with titanium and nickel-chromium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas Oliveira Paranhos, Helena de; Bezzon, Osvaldo Luiz; Davi, Letícia Resende; Felipucci, Daniela Nair Borges; Silva, Cláudia Helena Lovato da; Pagnano, Valéria Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of cleanser solutions on the color of heat-polymerized acrylic resin (HPAR) and on the brightness of dental alloys with 180 immersion trials. Disk-shaped specimens were made with I) commercially pure titanium, II) nickel-chromium-molybdenum-titanium, III) nickel-chromium molybdenum, and IV) nickel-chromium-molybdenum beryllium. Each cast disk was invested in the flasks, incorporating the metal disk into the HPAR. The specimens (n=5) were then immersed in solutions containing: 0.05% sodium hypochlorite, 0.12% chlorhexidine digluconate, 0.500 mg cetylpyridinium chloride, a citric acid tablet, one of two different sodium perborate/enzyme tablets, and water. The color measurements (∆E) of the HPAR were determined by a colorimeter in accordance with the National Bureau of Standards. The surface brightness of the metal was visually examined for the presence of tarnish. The results (ANOVA; Tukey test-α=0.05) show that there was a significant difference between the groups (p<0.001) but not among the solutions (p=0.273). The highest mean was obtained for group III (5.06), followed by group II (2.14). The lowest averages were obtained for groups I (1.33) and IV (1.35). The color changes in groups I, II and IV were slight but noticeable, and the color change was considerable for group III. The visual analysis showed that 0.05% sodium hypochlorite caused metallic brightness changes in groups II and IV. It can be concluded that the agents had the same effect on the color of the resin and that the metallic alloys are not resistant to the action of 0.05% sodium hypochlorite.

  1. THE INVESTIGATION ON PLASMA ARC TREATMENT OF CHROMIUM PLATED ALLOY STRUCTURE STEEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X.M. Fan; J.W. Huang; K.H. Wang; Q. Liu

    2005-01-01

    The technology of plasma arc was used to modify the interface adhesion between chromium coating and steel substrate. The interface microstructure was studied as a function of plasma arc processing parameters. Microstructure analysis was performed by optical microscopy,scanning electron microscopy and electron probe. The microhardness distribution along the depth of a cross-section of the chromium coating and the substrate was measured. The results show the energy density of transferred plasma arc is obviously higher than plasma non-transferred arc. The molten interface was obtained by plasma transferred arc. Interfaces between chromium coating and steel substrate can be divided by plasma non-transferred arc into three classes: non-molten, a little molten and molten. Good interface bonding was obtained by proper process parameters. The microhardness of chromium coating decreases with increasing energy density of plasma arc.

  2. An investigation of force components in orthogonal cutting of medical grade cobalt-chromium alloy (ASTM F1537).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Szymon; Ahearne, Eamonn

    2017-02-01

    An ageing population, increased physical activity and obesity are identified as lifestyle changes that are contributing to the ongoing growth in the use of in-vivo prosthetics for total hip and knee arthroplasty. Cobalt-chromium-molybdenum (Co-Cr-Mo) alloys, due to their mechanical properties and excellent biocompatibility, qualify as a class of materials that meet the stringent functional requirements of these devices. To cost effectively assure the required dimensional and geometric tolerances, manufacturers rely on high-precision machining. However, a comprehensive literature review has shown that there has been limited research into the fundamental mechanisms in mechanical cutting of these alloys. This article reports on the determination of the basic cutting-force coefficients in orthogonal cutting of medical grade Co-Cr-Mo alloy ASTM F1537 over an extended range of cutting speeds ([Formula: see text]) and levels of undeformed chip thickness ([Formula: see text]). A detailed characterisation of the segmented chip morphology over this range is also reported, allowing for an estimation of the shear plane angle and, overall, providing a basis for macro-mechanic modelling of more complex cutting processes. The results are compared with a baseline medical grade titanium alloy, Ti-6Al-4V ASTM F136, and it is shown that the tangential and thrust-force components generated were, respectively, ≈35% and ≈84% higher, depending primarily on undeformed chip thickness but with some influence of the cutting speed.

  3. Studies on the process aspects related to chemical decontamination of chromium-containing alloys with redox processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, P.S.; Suresh, S.; Chandran, S.; Velmurugan, S.; Narasimhan, S.V. [Water and Steam Chemistry Lab. of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (India); Rajesh, P. [Applied Chemistry Div. of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (India)

    2004-08-01

    Presence of chromium in the oxide layer makes oxidative pre-treatment with oxidizing agents such as potassium permanganate (KMnO{sub 4}) a must for the decontamination of stainless steels and other chromium containing alloys. The effectiveness of pre-treatment with oxidizing reagent varies with the conditions of treatment such as temperature, concentration and whether the medium is acidic or alkaline. A comparative study of the two acidic oxidizing agents, i.e., nitric acid-permanganate and permanganic acid was made. The dissolution behavior of copper and its oxide in permanganic acid was found to be comparable to that of chromium oxide. Citric acid and ascorbic acid were investigated as alternatives to oxalic acid for the reduction/decomposition of permanganate left over after the oxidizing pre-treatment step. It has been established that the reduction of chromate by citric acid is instantaneous only in presence of Mn{sup 2+} ions. It has also been established that reduction of residual permanganate can be achieved with ascorbic acid and with minimum chemical requirement. The capabilities of nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)-ascorbic acid mixture for the dissolution of hematite have been explored. This study would help to choose the suitable oxidizing agent, the reducing agent used for decomposition of permanganate and to optimize the concentration of reducing formulation so that the process of decontamination is achieved with a minimum requirement of chemicals. The generation of radioactive ion exchange resin as waste is therefore held at a minimum. Ion exchange studies with metal ion complexes of relevance to decontamination were carried out with a view to choose a suitable type of ion exchanger. It has been established that treatment of the ion exchange resin with brine solution can solve the problem of leaching out of non-ionic organics from the resin. (orig.)

  4. Health implication among occupational exposed workers in a chromium alloy factory,Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. Muttamara; Shing Tet Leong

    2004-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess the occupational exposure and its health impact on the chromium alloyworkers. Environmental and biological monitoring, noise and audiometry measurements were done to evaluate theexposure levels in the factory. A total of 112 non-smoking workers were monitored from July 2001 to August 2002.The results showed that most of the chromium and lead exposures in the factory were below the ACGIH-TWA of 50μg/m3 for chromium( Ⅵ ) and OSHA-PEL of 50 μg/m3 for lead. The highest chromium(7.25 ± 0. 16 μg/m3 ) and lead(14.50 ± 0.29 μg/m3) concentrations were measured in the vibro room. The results indicated that elevatedconcentrations of chromium and lead were found in both blood and urine samples especially in those areas whichwere characterized by poor ventilation. The metal contents in blood and urine samples were significantly correlatedwith airborne metal concentrations in the factory. The result demonstrated that blood and urinary levels amongworkers were associated with increasing age and duration of exposure.The background noise level of the factory ranged from 67.6 to 89.2 dBA and was frequently higher than thethreshold limit value for noise(90 dBA). According to the audiometric test, the exposed workers showed signs ofnoise-induced hearing loss. Noise at work continued to be an important factor to hearing loss among exposedworkers. In our statistical analysis, a significant hearing loss was established on age effect and year of exposureamong the workforce.

  5. Effect of selective laser melting deposition cobalt chromium alloy porcelain crown restoration on related molecule contents in serum and gingival crevicular fluid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Hua Wei; Lei Yang

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To study the effect of selective laser melting deposition cobalt chromium alloy porcelain crown restoration on contents of inflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules in serum and gingival tissue.Methods:80 cases of patients who received cobalt chromium alloy porcelain crown restoration in our hospital from May 2013 to August 2014 were enrolled and randomly divided into two groups. Observation group received selective laser melting deposition cobalt chromium alloy porcelain crown restoration and control group received casting cobalt chromium metal porcelain crown restoration. Then contents of inflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules in serum and gingival crevicular fluid of both groups were detected.Results: (1) Inflammatory cytokines: compared with serum inflammatory cytokine contents of control group, serum NF-κB, IL-6, IL-8, IL-1β, TNF-α and NO contents of observation group trended to decrease; (2) Adhesion molecules in gingival crevicular fluid: compared with adhesion molecule contents in gingival crevicular fluid of control group, mRNA contents of CD11a, CD18, LFA-1, E-selectin and P-selectin in gingival crevicular fluid of observation group trended to decrease; (3) Adhesion molecules in serum: compared with adhesion molecule contents in serum of control group, sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 contents in serum of observation group were lower.Conclusion: Selective laser melting deposition cobalt chromium alloy porcelain crown restoration is helpful to relieve inflammatory response of gingival tissue, with expression of decreased generation of inflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules; it’s an ideal material for crown restoration.

  6. The three dimensional distribution of chromium and nickel alloy welding fumes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeoka,Kiyoshi

    1991-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the fumes generated from manual metal arc (MMA and submerged metal arc (SMA welding of low temperature service steel, and the chromium and nickel percentages in these fumes, were measured at various horizontal distances and vertical heights from the arc in order to obtain a three dimensional distribution. The MMA welding fume concentrations were significantly higher than the SMA welding fume concentrations. The highest fume concentration on the horizontal was shown in the fumes collected directly above the arc. The fume concentration vertically was highest at 50 cm height and reduced by half at 150 cm height. The fume concentration at 250 cm height was scarcely different from that at 150 cm height. The distribution of the chromium concentration vertically was analogous to the fume concentration, and a statistically significant difference in the chromium percentages was not found at the different heights. The nickel concentrations were not statistically significant within the welding processes, but the nickel percentages in the SMA welding fumes were statistically higher than in the MMA welding fumes. The highest nickel concentration on the horizontal was found in the fumes collected directly above the arc. The highest nickel concentration vertically showed in the fume samples collected at 50 cm height, but the greater the height the larger the nickel percentage in the fumes.

  7. Evaluation of roughness and micromorphology of epoxy paint on cobalt-chromium alloy before and after thermal cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Alessandra Cardoso da Silva; Muzilli, Carlos Alberto; Miranda, Milton Edson; Flório, Flávia Martão; Basting, Roberta Tarkany

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that the epoxy paint used to coat metal substrates in industrial electrostatic painting applications could also be used to mask metal clasps in removable dental prostheses (RDP). The purpose of this study was to evaluate both the influence of thermal cycling and the in vitro roughness of a surface after application of epoxy paint, as well as to assess the micromorphology of a cobalt-chromium (CoCr) based metal structure. Sixty test specimens were fabricated from a CoCr alloy. The specimens were separated into three groups (n = 20) according to surface treatment: Group 1 (Pol) - polished with abrasive stone and rubbers; Group 2 (Pol+Epo) - polished and coated with epoxy paint; Group 3 (Epo) - air-abraded with aluminum oxide particles and coated with epoxy paint. The surface roughness was evaluated before and after 1000 thermal cycles (5°C and 50°C). The surface micromorphology was verified by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The two-way repeated measures ANOVA showed significant differences among surface treatments (p < 0.0001), but no difference was found before and after thermal cycling (p = 0.6638). The CoCr-based metal alloy surfaces treated with epoxy paint (Groups 2 and 3) were rougher than the surfaces that were only polished (Group 1). Thermal cycling did not influence surface roughness, or lead to chipping or detachment of the epoxy paint.

  8. Several braze filler metals for joining an oxide-dispersion-strengthened nickel-chromium-aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyorgak, C. A.

    1975-01-01

    An evaluation was made of five braze filler metals for joining an aluminum-containing oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloy, TD-NiCrAl. All five braze filler metals evaluated are considered suitable for joining TD-NiCrAl in terms of wettability and flow. Also, the braze alloys appear to be tolerant of slight variations in brazing procedures since joints prepared by three sources using three of the braze filler metals exhibited similar brazing characteristics and essentially equivalent 1100 C stress-rupture properties in a brazed butt-joint configuration. Recommendations are provided for brazing the aluminum-containing ODS alloys.

  9. SECM Study of Effect of Chromium Content on the Localized Corrosion Behavior of Low-Alloy Steels in Chloride Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indira, K.; Nishimura, T.

    2016-10-01

    This paper investigates the effect of chromium (Cr) content (0, 1, 3 and 5% Cr) in epoxy-coated alloy steel against corrosion using in situ electrochemical techniques such as EIS and SECM in a 3% NaCl solution. The EIS results revealed that the epoxy-coated Cr steel exhibited higher impedance values than carbon steel, which is attributed to the greater resistance of Cr steel toward corrosion. Based on the cyclic voltammogram results, the tip potentials were set at -0.7, 0.04 and 0.60 V for determining the concentration of dissolved oxygen at cathodic region, and oxidation of Cr2+ and Fe2+ at anodic region, respectively. The SECM measurements showed that, the tip current in the anodic region has decreased with increase in Cr content of the sample, which indicates that the oxidation of Fe2+ and Cr2+ decreases (corrosion is reduced) with the increase in Cr content of the steel. Besides, 5% Cr steel can maintain the highest corrosion resistance, and 1 and 3% Cr steels have higher corrosion resistance than the 0% Cr steel. This higher corrosion resistance of Cr steel samples could be due to the formation of Cr-rich hydro-oxide layers [Cr(OH)3 as a corrosion product] on the surface of the samples. Thus, the epoxy-coated Cr alloy steel has greater corrosion resistance in a chloride-containing environment than the carbon steel. Hence, epoxy-coated Cr alloy steel can be successfully used as a construction material in structures.

  10. An in vitro Comparative Evaluation of Micro Tensile Bond Strength of Two metal bonding Resin Cements bonded to Cobalt Chromium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musani, Smita; Musani, Iqbal; Dugal, Ramandeep; Habbu, Nitin; Madanshetty, Pallavi; Virani, Danish

    2013-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the micro tensile bond strength of two metal bonding resin cements to sandblasted cobalt chromium alloy. Materials & Methods: Eight, Cobalt chromium alloy blocks of dimensions 10x5x5 mm were cast, finished and polished. One of the faces of each alloy block measuring 5x5mm was sandblasted with 50 μm grit alumina particles. The alloy blocks were then cleaned in an ultrasonic cleaner for 1 min and then air dried with an air stream. The Sandblasted surfaces of the two alloy blocks were bonded together with 2 different metal bonding resin systems (Panavia F Kuraray and DTK Kleber – Bredent). The samples were divided into 2 groups (n=4). Group 1- Two Co-Cr blocks were luted with Panavia cement. Group 2- Two Co-Cr blocks were luted with DTK Kleber-Bredent cement. The bonded samples were cut with a diamond saw to prepare Microtensile bars of approximately 1mm x 1mm x 6mm. Thirty bars from each group were randomly separated into 2 subgroups (n=15) and left for 3hrs (baseline) as per manufacturer's instructions while the other group was aged for 24hrs in 370C water, prior to loading to failure under tension at a cross head speed of 1mm/min. Failure modes were determined by means of stereomicroscopy (sm). Statistical analysis was performed through one way – ANOVA. Results: Significant variation in micro-tensile bond strength was observed between the two metal bonding resin systems. Conclusion: DTK showed higher mean bond strength values than Panavia F cement both at baseline and after aging. How to cite this article: Musani S, Musani I, Dugal R, Habbu N, Madanshetty P, Virani D. An in vitro Comparative Evaluation of Micro Tensile Bond Strength of Two metal bonding Resin Cements bonded to Cobalt Chromium alloy. J Int Oral Health 2013;5(5):73-8. PMID:24324308

  11. OPTIMIZATION OF TECHNOLOGY PERTAINING TO PROCESSING OF MECHANICALLY ALLOYED AND DISPERSIVELY HARDENED NICKEL-CHROMIUM COMPOSITIONS IN SEMI-FINISHED PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. G. Lovshenko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates an influence of main technological factors pertaining to processing operations (annealing and hot-tempered  compaction of nano-structural mechanically alloyed granulated nickel-chromium compositions on the properties of highly strong compact semi-products with inter-metallide and oxide hardening. Optimization of the process, phase composition and structure of semi-products have been executed and investigated in the paper.

  12. Casting accuracy of a nickel and beryllium-free cobalt-chromium alloy for crown and bridge prostheses and resin-bonded bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, O

    1985-01-01

    In the 1970's economic factors dictated the development of alternatives to gold alloys in dentistry in the USA and in Europe. A similar development has not occurred in Sweden because of different laws. Alloys that contain nickel and beryllium present a health hazard and are therefore of little interest to the Swedish market. A review of the literature shows that castings of base-metal alloys are less accurate than castings of conventional gold alloys and of low gold alloys. However, in long-span-bridges and in thin resin-bonded cast restorations, their physical and mechanical properties are superior to those of the gold alloys. In this study the casting accuracy of a nickel- and beryllium-free cobalt-chromium alloy, Neobond II Special, is investigated. Neobond II Special was found to be less accurate than Sjödings C-guld. The marginal discrepancies of the castings were small, however, when the castings were oversized. It also proved to be technique sensitive to conventional dental laboratory procedures. Thus, it seems difficult to get castings with an acceptable retention as well as small marginal discrepancies when using the base-metal alloy.

  13. Survey of degradation modes of four nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gdowski, G.E. [KMI Energy Services, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1991-03-01

    This report examines the degradation modes of four Ni-Cr-Mo alloys under conditions relevant to the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). The materials considered are Alloys C-276, C-4, C-22, and 625 because they have desirable characteristics for the conceptual design (CD) of the high-level radioactive-waste containers presented in the YMP Site Characterization Plan (SCP). The types of degradation covered in this report are general corrosion; localized corrosion, including pitting and crevice corrosion; stress corrosion cracking in chloride environments; hydrogen embrittlement (HE); and undesirable phase transformations due to a lack of phase stability. Topics not specifically addressed are welding concerns and microbiological corrosion. The four Ni-Cr-Mo alloys have excellent corrosion resistance in chloride environments such as seawater as well as in more aggressive environments. They have significantly better corrosion resistance than the six materials considered for the CD waste container in the YMP SCP. (Those six materials are Types 304L and 3161L stainless steels, Alloy 825, unalloyed copper, Cu(70)-Ni(30), and 7% aluminum bronze.) In seawater, the Ni-Cr-Mo alloys have negligible general corrosion rates and show little evidence of localized corrosion. The four base materials of these alloys are expected to have nearly indistinguishable corrosion resistance in the YMP environments. The strength requirements of the SCP-CD waste container are met by these materials in the annealed condition; in this condition, they are highly resistant to HE. Historically, HE has been noted when these materials have been strengthened (cold-worked) and used in sour gas (H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2}) well service -- conditions that are not expected for the YMP. Metallurgical phase stability may be a concern under conditions favoring (1) the formation of intermetallics and carbides, and (2) microstructural ordering.

  14. Electronic structure of liquid iron alloys with manganese, chromium, and vanadium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtseva, E. D.; Singer, V. V.; Radovskii, I. Z.; Dovgopol, S. P.; Vorontsov, B. S.; Gel'D, P. V.

    1983-01-01

    Electrical resistivity of liquid FeCr, FeV, and FeMn alloys has been measured in the concentration range between 0 and 70% (by weight) of the dopping element, and over the temperature interval from tmelting to 1750°C. Using the Faber-Ziman-Evans method, concentration dependences of the electrical resistivity of liquid FeCr, FeV, and FeMn alloys have been calculated. Concentration dependences of the number of electrons per atom have been estimated.

  15. XPS and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy studies on effects of the porcelain firing process on surface and corrosion properties of two nickel-chromium dental alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jing; Tang, Chun-bo; Zhu, Zhi-jun; Zhou, Guo-xing; Wang, Jie; Yang, Yi; Wang, Guo-ping

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a simulated porcelain firing process on the surface, corrosion behavior and cell culture response of two nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) dental alloys. A Be-free alloy and a Be-containing alloy were tested. Before porcelain firing, as-cast specimens were examined for surface composition using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and metallurgical phases using X-ray diffraction. Corrosion behaviors were evaluated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. 3T3 fibroblasts were cultured and exposed indirectly to specimens. MTT assays were counted after 3 and 6 days. The cell culture mediums exposed to specimens were analyzed for metal ion release. After porcelain firing, similar specimens were examined for the same properties. In both as-cast and fired conditions, the Be-free Ni-Cr alloy showed significantly more resistance to corrosion than the Be-containing Ni-Cr alloy, which exhibited BeNi phase. After porcelain firing, the corrosion resistance of the Be-free Ni-Cr alloy decreased statistically, corresponding with evident decreases of Cr and Ni oxides on the alloy surface. Also, the alloy's MTT assay decreased significantly corresponding with an obvious increase of Ni-ion release after the firing. For the Be-containing Ni-Cr alloy, the firing process led to increases of surface oxides and metallic Be, while its corrosion resistance and cell culture response were not significantly changed after porcelain firing. The results suggested that the corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of the Be-free Ni-Cr alloy decreased after porcelain firing, whereas the firing process had little effect on the same properties of the Be-containing Ni-Cr alloy.

  16. Bioaccessibility studies of ferro-chromium alloy particles for a simulated inhalation scenario: a comparative study with the pure metals and stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midander, Klara; de Frutos, Alfredo; Hedberg, Yolanda; Darrie, Grant; Wallinder, Inger Odnevall

    2010-07-01

    research effort was therefore conducted to generate quantitative bioaccessibility data for particles of ferro-chromium alloys compared with particles of the pure metals and stainless steel exposed at in vitro conditions in synthetic biological media of relevance for particle inhalation and ingestion. All results are presented combining bioaccessibility data with aspects of particle characteristics, surface composition, and barrier properties of surface oxides. Iron and chromium were the main elements released from ferro-chromium alloys upon exposure in synthetic biological media. Both elements revealed time-dependent release processes. One week exposures resulted in very small released particle fractions being less than 0.3% of the particle mass at acidic conditions and less than 0.001% in near pH-neutral media. The extent of Fe released from ferro-chromium alloy particles was significantly lower compared with particles of pure Fe, whereas Cr was released to a very low and similar extent as from particles of pure Cr and stainless steel. Low release rates are a result of a surface oxide with passive properties predominantly composed of chromium(III)-rich oxides and silica and, to a lesser extent, of iron(II,III)oxides. Neither the relative bulk alloy composition nor the surface composition can be used to predict or assess the extent of metals released in different synthetic biological media. Ferro-chromium alloys cannot be assessed from the behavior of their pure metal constituents.

  17. Chromium-free conversion coatings based on inorganic salts (Zr/Ti/Mn/Mo) for aluminum alloys used in aircraft applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santa Coloma, P., E-mail: patricia.santacoloma@tecnalia.com [TECNALIA Research & Innovation, Parque Tecnológico de San Sebastián, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, E-20009 Donostia-San Sebastián, Gipuzkoa (Spain); Izagirre, U.; Belaustegi, Y.; Jorcin, J.B.; Cano, F.J. [TECNALIA Research & Innovation, Parque Tecnológico de San Sebastián, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, E-20009 Donostia-San Sebastián, Gipuzkoa (Spain); Lapeña, N. [Boeing Research & Technology Europe, S.L.U., Avenida Sur del Aeropuerto de Barajas 38, Building 4 – 3rd Floor, E-28042 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-08-01

    Highlights: • Chromium-free conversion coatings for corrosion protection of aluminum alloys. • Salt spray and potentiodynamic sweep tests to study the corrosion behavior. • Local deposits on Cu-rich intermetallic particles enhanced corrosion resistance. • Surface characterization to relate bath's composition and corrosion resistance. • Best corrosion protection with conversion baths without titanium salts. - Abstract: Novel chromium-free conversion coatings based on Zr/Ti/Mn/Mo compounds were developed at a pilot scale to improve the corrosion resistance of the AA2024-T3 and AA7075-T6 aluminum alloys for aircraft applications. The influence of the presence of Zr and Ti in the Zr/Ti/Mn/Mo conversion bath's formulation on the corrosion resistance of the coated alloys was investigated. The corrosion resistance provided by the conversion coatings was evaluated by salt spray exposure and potentiodynamic sweeps. Optical and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) operating in the Kelvin Probe mode (SKPFM) were used to provide microstructural information of the coated samples that achieved the best results in the corrosion tests. The salt spray test evidenced the higher corrosion resistance of the coated samples compared to the bare surfaces for both alloys. The potentiodynamic tests showed that the corrosion current density decreased for coated AA7075-T6 and AA2024-T3 alloys, which indicated an obvious improvement of the corrosion resistance with all the processes for both alloys. Although the corrosion resistance of the coated samples appeared to be higher for the alloy AA7075-T6 than for the alloy AA2024-T3, both alloys achieved the best corrosion protection with the coatings deposited from conversion bath formulations containing no titanium salts. The microscopy analysis on the coated AA7075-T6 samples revealed that a local deposition of Zr compounds and, possibly, an

  18. The properties and transport phenomena in oxide films on iron, nickel, chromium and their alloys in aqueous environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laitinen, T.; Bojinov, M.; Betova, I.; Maekelae, K.; Saario, T. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-01-01

    The construction materials used in coolant systems in nuclear power plants become covered with oxide films as a result of exposure to the aqueous environment. The susceptibility of the materials to different forms of corrosion, as well as the extent of the incorporation of radioactive species on the surfaces of the primary circuit, are greatly influenced by the physical and chemical properties of these oxide films. The composition and characteristics of the oxide films in turn depend on the applied water chemistry. This work was undertaken in order to collect and evaluate the present views on the structure and behaviour of oxide films formed on iron- and nickel-based materials in aqueous environments. This survey should serve to recognise the areas in which more understanding and research effort is needed. The review begins with a discussion on the bulk oxides of iron, nickel and chromium, as well as their mixed oxides. In addition to bulk oxides, the structure and properties of oxide films forming on pure iron, nickel and chromium and on iron- and nickel-based engineering alloys are considered. General approaches to model the structure and growth of oxide films on metals are discussed in detail. The specific features of the oxide structures, properties and growth at high temperatures are presented with special focus on the relevance of existing models. Finally, the role of oxide films in localised corrosion, oxide breakdown pitting. Stress corrosion cracking and related phenomena is considered. The films formed on the surfaces of iron- and nickel-based alloys in high-temperature aqueous environments generally comprise two layers, i.e. the so-called duplex structure. The inner part is normally enriched in chromium and has a more compact structure, while the outer part is enriched in iron and has a cracked or porous structure. The information collected clearly indicates the effect of the chemical environment on the properties of oxide films growing on metal surfaces

  19. Rapid Prototyping for In Vitro Knee Rig Investigations of Prosthetized Knee Biomechanics: Comparison with Cobalt-Chromium Alloy Implant Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Schröder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Retropatellar complications after total knee arthroplasty (TKA such as anterior knee pain and subluxations might be related to altered patellofemoral biomechanics, in particular to trochlear design and femorotibial joint positioning. A method was developed to test femorotibial and patellofemoral joint modifications separately with 3D-rapid prototyped components for in vitro tests, but material differences may further influence results. This pilot study aims at validating the use of prostheses made of photopolymerized rapid prototype material (RPM by measuring the sliding friction with a ring-on-disc setup as well as knee kinematics and retropatellar pressure on a knee rig. Cobalt-chromium alloy (standard prosthesis material, SPM prostheses served as validation standard. Friction coefficients between these materials and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE were additionally tested as this latter material is commonly used to protect pressure sensors in experiments. No statistical differences were found between friction coefficients of both materials to PTFE. UHMWPE shows higher friction coefficient at low axial loads for RPM, a difference that disappears at higher load. No measurable statistical differences were found in knee kinematics and retropatellar pressure distribution. This suggests that using polymer prototypes may be a valid alternative to original components for in vitro TKA studies and future investigations on knee biomechanics.

  20. Material composition and nuclear data libraries' influence on nickel-chromium alloys activation evaluation: a comparison with decay heat experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Cepraga, D G

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents the activation analyses on Inconel-600 nickel-chromium alloy. Three activation data libraries, namely the EAF-4.1, the EAF-97 and the FENDL/A-2, and the FENDL/D-2 decay data library, have been used to perform the calculation with the European activation code ANITA-4/M. The neutron flux distribution into the material samples was provided by JAERI as results of 3D Monte-Carlo MCNP transport code experiment simulation. A comparison with integral decay heat measurement performed at the Fusion Neutronics Source (FNS), JAERI, Tokai, Japan, is used to validate the computational approach. The calculation results are given and discussed. The impact of the material composition, including impurities, on the decay heat of samples irradiated in fusion-like neutron spectra is assessed and discussed. The discrepancies calculations-experiments are within the experimental errors, that is between 6% and 10%, except for the short cooling times (less than 40 min after the end of irradiation). To improve calcul...

  1. Electrical conductivity and phase diagram of binary alloys. 21: The system palladium-chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grube, G.; Knabe, R.

    1985-01-01

    Pd-Cr alloys were investigated by thermal analysis, hardness measurements, X-ray analysis, microscopic examination of etched pieces, and temperature-resistance curves of the solid alloys. Only one compound, Pd2Cr3, m, 1389 deg, is formed. It possesses a cubic face centered lattice and forms with excess Pd a series of solid solutions with a minimum m.p. at 45 atoms% Pd. Hardness maximum appears at the Pd2Cr3 point. Pd2Cr3 forms no solid solutions with Cr but eutectic point appears at 25 atoms% Pd, m. 1320 deg. The sp. resistance of pure Cr in an atom of H, indicates no allotropic forms. Cr2O3 is solid in molten Cr. Pure Cr melts at 1890 plus or minus 10 deg but Cr contg. Cr2O3 starts to melt at 1770 to 1790 deg.

  2. Gallium suboxide vapor attack on chromium, cobalt, molybdenum, tungsten and their alloys at 1200 [degrees] C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolman, D. G. (David G.); Taylor, T. N. (Thomas N.); Park, Y. (Youngsoo); Stan, M. (Marius); Butt, D. P. (Darryl P.); Maggiore, C. J. (Carl J.); Tesmer, Joseph R.; Havrilla, G. J. (George J.)

    2004-01-01

    Our prior work elucidated the failure mechanism of furnace materi als (304 SS, 316 SS, and Hastelloy C-276) exposed to gallium suboxide (Ga{sub 2}O) and/or gallium oxide (Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}) during plutonium - gallium compound processing. Failure was hypothesized to result from concurrent alloy oxidation/Ga compound reduction followed by Ga uptake. The aim of the current work is to screen candidate replacement materials. Alloys Haynes 25 (49 Co - 20 Cr - 15 W - 10 Ni - 3 Fe - 2 Mn - 0.4 Si, wt%), 52 Mo - 48 Re (wt%), 62 W - 38 Cu (wt%), and commercially pure Cr, Co, Mo, W, and alumina were examined. Preliminary assessments of commercially pure W and Mo - Re suggest that these materials may be suitable for furnace construction. Thermodynamics calculations indicating that materials containing Al, Cr, Mn, Si, and V would be susceptible to oxidation in the presence of Ga{sub 2}O were validated by experimental results. In contrast to that reported previously, an alternate reaction mechanism for Ga uptake, which does not require concurrent alloy oxidation, controls Ga uptake for certain materials. A correlation between Ga solubility and uptake was noted.

  3. The chromium doping of Ni{sub 3}Fe alloy and restructuring of grain boundary ensemble at the phase transition A1→L1{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perevalova, Olga [Institute of Strength Physics and Material Science, Siberian Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Akademicheskii Av., 2/4, Tomsk, 634021 (Russian Federation); Konovalova, Elena, E-mail: knv123@yandex.ru [Surgut State University, Lenina Av., 1, Surgut, 628400 (Russian Federation); Koneva, Nina; Kozlov, Eduard [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, Solyanaya Sq., 2, Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The grain boundary structure of the Ni{sub 3}(Fe,Cr) alloy is studied in states with a short and long-range order formed at the phase transition A1→L1{sub 2}. It is found that the new boundaries of general and special types are formed during an ordering annealing, wherein the special boundaries share increases. The spectrum of special boundaries is changed due to decreasing of ∑3 boundary share. It leads to weakening of the texture in the alloy with atomic long-range order. The features of change of the special boundaries spectrum at the phase transition A1→L1{sub 2} in the Ni{sub 3}(Fe,Cr) alloy are determined by decreasing of the stacking fault energy and the atomic mean square displacement at the chromium doping.

  4. Influence of alloying on phase precipitation of high chromium cast iron%合金化对高铬铸铁相析出的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李秀兰; 周新军; 谢文玲; 马幼平

    2015-01-01

    The chromium alloy was prepared from 2.8wt%carbon and 31.0wt%chromium by the additions of trace multi-alloying elements ( Ti, Nb, V, Mo) .The existence forms of Ti , Nb, V in multicomponent system were studied by calculation from the alloy thermodynamic consideration .The effect of additions of alloy elements on carbides precipitation behavior of high chromium cast iron was investigated .The results show that Ti and Nb exist in the multi-alloying system in forms of TiC and NbC during solidification .V element exists mainly in alloy compounds ( VCr2 C2 ,VCrFe8 ) .The first precipitated high melted point particles ( TiC, NbC) during cooling can act as the heterogeneous nuclei of M7C3 carbides, As a result, the increase of nucleation rate results in refined M 7C3 carbides morphology.However,the addition of excess alloy elements weakens the roles of M 7 C3 carbides refinement .%添加多元微量合金元素V、Ti、Nb和Mo到2.8C-31Cr合金中制备多元铬系合金,从合金热力学析出角度,通过计算分析Ti、V、Nb在多元体系中的存在方式,探讨添加的合金元素对高铬铸铁凝固组织中碳化物析出的影响。结果表明,Ti和Nb在高铬铸铁凝固过程中主要形成TiC和NbC,V主要存在于合金化合物VCr2 C2和VCrFe8中。先析出的TiC和NbC能充当碳化物异质形核基底,增加形核率使组织细化。但添加过量的合金元素却削弱了对碳化物的细化作用。

  5. Solid state welding processes for an oxide dispersion strengthened nickel-chromium-aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, T. J.

    1975-01-01

    Solid-state welding processes were evaluated for joining TD-NiCrAl (Ni-16Cr-4Al-2ThO2) alloy sheet. Both hot-press and resistance spot welding techniques were successfully applied in terms of achieving grain growth across the bond line. Less success was achieved with a resistance seam welding process. In stress-rupture shear and tensile shear tests of lap joints at 1100 C, most failures occurred in the parent material, which indicates that the weld quality was good and that the welds were not a plane of weakness. The overall weld quality was not as good as previously attained with TD-NiCr, probably because the presence of alumina at the faying surfaces and the developmental TD-NiCrAl sheet, which was not of the quality of the TD-NiCr sheet in terms of surface flatness and dimensional control.

  6. The Mechanical properties and microstructural relationships in iron--manganese--chromium alloys. [14 to 20% Mn, 13 to 18% Cr, Al and Ti additions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, L.D.

    1977-01-01

    The relationships between microstructure and mechanical properties were studied for a series of Fe--Mn--Cr alloys. A combination of optical and scanning electron microscopy, EDAX analysis, and x-ray diffractometry was used to characterize the microstructures. Tensile testing and Charpy V-notch impact testing were utilized to study the mechanical properties. Triplex structures of gamma (fcc), alpha (bcc), and epsilon (hcp) were obtained in air-cool and quench-and-refrigeration heat treatments. Increasing volume fractions of metastable austenite and epsilon-martensite phases, which transform during testing, were found to have beneficial effects on the toughness and ductility properties, without significant losses in strength properties. A chromium concentration of 13 percent led to a better combination of strength and ductility than a concentration of 18 percent. The mechanical properties and preliminary corrosion results for the air-cooled 18Mn--13Cr and 16Mn--13Cr alloys are comparable to those of AISI 300 series austenitic stainless steels. These alloys show promise, therefore, as base systems for replacement austenitic stainless alloys. In addition, the 18Mn--13Cr air-cooled alloy exhibits excellent cryogenic properties, i.e., a yield strength of 360 MPa (53 ksi), an ultimate strength of 1110 MPa (161 ksi) an elongation of 60 percent, and a reduction in area of 17 percent at -196/sup 0/C. 62 figures, 9 tables.

  7. Feasibility study of tungsten as a diffusion barrier between nickel-chromium-aluminum and Gamma/Gamma prime - Delta eutectic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, S. G.; Zellars, G. R.

    1978-01-01

    Coating systems proposed for potential use on eutectic alloy components in high-temperature gas turbine engines were studied with emphasis on deterioration of such systems by diffusion. A 1-mil thick W sheet was placed between eutectic alloys and a NiCrAl layer. Layered test specimens were aged at 1100 C for as long as long as 500 hours. Without the W barrier, the delta phase of the eutectic deteriorated by diffusion of Nb into the NiCrAl. Insertion of the W barrier stopped the diffusion of Nb from delta. Chromium diffusion from the NiCrAl into the gamma/gamma prime phase of the eutectic was greatly reduced by the barrier. However, the barrier thickness decreased with time; and W diffused into both the NiCrAl and the eutectic. When the delta platelets were alined parallel to the NiCrAl layer, rather than perpendicular, diffusion into the eutectic was reduced.

  8. Influence of Chemical Composition on Rupture Properties at 1200 Degrees F. of Forged Chromium-Cobalt-Nickel-Iron Base Alloys in Solution-Treated and Aged Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, E E; Freeman, J W; White, A E

    1951-01-01

    The influence of systematic variations of chemical composition on rupture properties at 1200 degrees F. was determined for 62 modifications of a basic alloy containing 20 percent chromium, 20 percent nickel, 20 percent cobalt, 3 percent molybdenum, 2 percent tungsten, 1 percent columbium, 0.15 percent carbon, 1.7 percent manganese, 0.5 percent silicon, 0.12 percent nitrogen and the balance iron. These modifications included individual variations of each of 10 elements present and simultaneous variations of molybdenum, tungsten, and columbium. Laboratory induction furnace heats were hot-forged to round bar stock, solution-treated at 2200 degrees F., and aged at 1400 degrees F. The melting and fabrication conditions were carefully controlled in order to minimize all variable effects on properties except chemical composition. Information is presented which indicates that melting and hot-working conditions play an important role in high-temperature properties of alloys of the type investigated.

  9. The Study of Heat Treatment Effects on Chromium Carbide Precipitation of 35Cr-45Ni-Nb Alloy for Repairing Furnace Tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakarin Srisuwan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a specific kind of failure in ethylene pyrolysis furnace tubes. It considers the case in which the tubes made of 35Cr-45Ni-Nb high temperature alloy failed to carburization, causing creep damage. The investigation found that used tubes became difficult to weld repair due to internal carburized layers of the tube. The microstructure and geochemical component of crystallized carbide at grain boundary of tube specimens were characterized by X-ray diffractometer (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM with back-scattered electrons mode (BSE, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS. Micro-hardness tests was performed to determine the hardness of the matrix and the compounds of new and used tube material. The testing result indicated that used tubes exhibited a higher hardness and higher degree of carburization compared to those of new tubes. The microstructure of used tubes also revealed coarse chromium carbide precipitation and a continuous carbide lattice at austenite grain boundaries. However, thermal heat treatment applied for developing tube weld repair could result in dissolving or breaking up chromium carbide with a decrease in hardness value. This procedure is recommended to improve the weldability of the 35Cr-45Ni-Nb used tubes alloy.

  10. Comparison of Repairing Effect Between Cobalt Chromium Alloy Porcelain Teeth and Zirconium Dioxide Porcelain Teeth%钴铬合金烤瓷牙和二氧化锆烤瓷牙修复效果对比

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖银蓉

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare repairing effect of cobalt chromium alloy porcelain teeth and zirconium dioxide porcelain teeth. Methods To retrospective analyze 96 cases (172 tooth)clinical data of porcelain teeth prosthesis in our department from January 2010 to December 2013, the patients of zirconium dioxide porcelain teeth were 38 cases (70 tooth),which was zirconium dioxide porcelain teeth group,the patients of cobalt chromium alloy porcelain teeth were 58 cases(102 tooth), which was cobalt chromium alloy porcelain teeth group,the clinical result of two groups were compared. Results The effective rate 34 cases (94.73%)of zirco-nium dioxide porcelain teeth and effective rate 53 cases (91.37%)of cobalt chromium alloy porcelain teeth were compared, which was no difference (χ2=0.87,P>0.05). But after treatment of two groups,incidence of complications of cobalt chromium alloy porce-lain teeth group were higher than those of zirconium dioxide porcelain teeth group(χ2=3.95,P0.05)。但是两组患者治疗后,钴铬合金组并发症发生率高于二氧化锆组,差异有统计学意义(χ2=3.95,P<0.05)。结论二氧化锆烤瓷牙的疗效优于钴铬合金烤瓷牙,若患者经济条件允许,应该优先考虑二氧化锆烤瓷牙。

  11. Investigation of the fatigue and short-term mechanical properties of 13% chromium steel and titanium alloys after welding or treatment with high-frequency currents as applied to steam-turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonserovskii, F. G.; Nikitin, V. I.; Silevich, V. M.; Simin, O. N.

    2008-02-01

    We present the results of a study on comparing the structural strength of rotor blades made of stainless 13% chromium steels for their design versions in which wear-resistant straps made of cast VZK stellite are soldered or welded on the blade inlet edges. It is shown that treatment of VT6 alloy with high-frequency currents increases the endurance limit of the zone subjected to strengthening and makes the alloy more resistant to erosion. The worn blades of a 48-T4 titanium alloy repaired with the use of welding technologies have operational characteristics at least as good as those of newly manufactured ones.

  12. Influence of cobalt and chromium additions on the precipitation processes in a Cu-4Ti alloys; Influencia de la adicion de cobalto y cromo en el proceso de precipitacion en una aleacion de Cu-4Ti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donoso, E.

    2010-07-01

    The influence of 0.5% atomic cobalt and 1% atomic chromium additions on the precipitation hardening of Cu-4Ti alloy was studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and microhardness measurements. The analysis of the calorimetric curves, for binary alloy, shows the presence of two overlapping exothermic reactions (stages 1 and 2) attributed to the formation of Cu{sub 4}Ti and Cu{sub 3}Ti particles in the copper matrix, respectively. DSC curves for Cu-4Ti-0.5Co alloy shows three exothermic effects (overlapping stages 3 and 4 and stage 5) associated to the formation of phases Ti{sub 2}Co, TiCo and Cu{sub 4}Ti, respectively. DSC curves for Cu-4Ti1Cr alloy shows three exothermic reactions (stages 6, 7 and 9) and one endothermic peak (stage 8). The exothermic reactions correspond to the formation of phases Cr{sub 2}Ti, Cu{sub 4}Ti and Cu{sub 3}Ti, respectively, and the endothermic reactions are attributed to the Cr{sub 2}Ti dissolution. The activation energies calculated using the modified Kissinger method were lower than the ones corresponding to diffusion of cobalt, chromium, and titanium in copper. Kinetic parameters were obtained by a convolution method based on the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) formalism. Microhardness measurements confirmed the formation of the mentioned phases. Also, these measurements confirmed the effect of cobalt and chromium addition on the binary alloy hardness. (Author). 31 refs.

  13. Effect of alloying elements on the composition of carbide phases and mechanical properties of the matrix of high-carbon chromium-vanadium steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, V. I.; Tarasenko, L. V.; Utkina, A. N.

    2017-01-01

    Based on the results of phase physicochemical analysis of high-carbon chromium-vanadium steel, the predominant type of carbide that provides high wear resistance has been established, and its amount and amount of carbon in martensite have been determined. Data on the composition and the amount of carbide phase and on the chemical composition of the martensite of high-carbon steel have been obtained, which allows determination of the alloying-element concentration limits. The mechanical testing of heats of a chosen chemical composition has been carried out after quenching and low-temperature tempering. The tests have demonstrated benefits of new steel in wear resistance and bending strength with the fatigue strength being retained, compared to steels subjected to cementation. The mechanism of secondary strengthening of the steel upon high-temperature tempering has been revealed. High-temperature tempering can be applied to articles that are required to possess both high wear resistance and heat resistance.

  14. The Effect of Artificial Aging on The Bond Strength of Heat-activated Acrylic Resin to Surface-treated Nickel-chromium-beryllium Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Jabbari, Youssef S.; Zinelis, Spiros; Al Taweel, Sara M.; Nagy, William W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The debonding load of heat-activated polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) denture base resin material to a nickel-chromium-beryllium (Ni-Cr-Be) alloy conditioned by three different surface treatments and utilizing two different commercial bonding systems was investigated. Materials and Methods Denture resin (Lucitone-199) was bonded to Ni-Cr-Be alloy specimens treated with Metal Primer II, the Rocatec system with opaquer and the Rocatec system without opaquer. Denture base resin specimens bonded to non-treated sandblasted Ni-Cr-Be alloy were used as controls. Twenty samples for each treatment condition (80 specimens) were tested. The 80 specimens were divided into two categories, thermocycled and non-thermocycled, containing four groups of ten specimens each. The non-thermocycled specimens were tested after 48 hours’ storage in room temperature water. The thermocycled specimens were tested after 2,000 cycles in 4°C and 55°C water baths. The debonding load was calculated in Newtons (N), and collected data were subjected by non parametric test Kruskal-Wallis One Way Analysis of Variance on Ranks and Dunn’s post hoc test at the α = 0.05. Results The Metal Primer II and Rocatec system without opaquer groups produced significantly higher bond strengths (119.9 and 67.6 N), respectively, than did the sandblasted and Rocatec system with opaquer groups, where the bond strengths were 2.6 N and 0 N, respectively. The Metal Primer II was significantly different from all other groups (P<0.05). The bond strengths of all groups were significantly decreased (P<0.05) after thermocycling. Conclusions Although thermocycling had a detrimental effect on the debonding load of all surface treatments tested, the Metal Primer II system provided higher values among all bonding systems tested, before and after thermocycling. PMID:27335613

  15. Characterization of TiN, TiC and Ti(C,N) in titanium-alloyed ferritic chromium steels focusing on the significance of different particle morphologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelic, S.K., E-mail: susanne.michelic@unileoben.ac.at [Chair of Ferrous Metallurgy, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Loder, D. [Chair of Ferrous Metallurgy, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Reip, T.; Ardehali Barani, A. [Outokumpu Nirosta GmbH, Essener Straße 244, 44793 Bochum (Germany); Bernhard, C. [Chair of Ferrous Metallurgy, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria)

    2015-02-15

    Titanium-alloyed ferritic chromium steels are a competitive option to classical austenitic stainless steels owing to their similar corrosion resistance. The addition of titanium significantly influences their final steel cleanliness. The present contribution focuses on the detailed metallographic characterization of titanium nitrides, titanium carbides and titanium carbonitrides with regard to their size, morphology and composition. The methods used are manual and automated Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy as well as optical microscopy. Additional thermodynamic calculations are performed to explain the precipitation procedure of the analyzed titanium nitrides. The analyses showed that homogeneous nucleation is decisive at an early process stage after the addition of titanium. Heterogeneous nucleation gets crucial with ongoing process time and essentially influences the final inclusion size of titanium nitrides. A detailed investigation of the nuclei for heterogeneous nucleation with automated Scanning Electron Microscopy proved to be difficult due to their small size. Manual Scanning Electron Microscopy and optical microscopy have to be applied. Furthermore, it was found that during solidification an additional layer around an existing titanium nitride can be formed which changes the final inclusion morphology significantly. These layers are also characterized in detail. Based on these different inclusion morphologies, in combination with thermodynamic results, tendencies regarding the formation and modification time of titanium containing inclusions in ferritic chromium steels are derived. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • The formation and modification of TiN in the steel 1.4520 was examined. • Heterogeneous nucleation essentially influences the final steel cleanliness. • In most cases heterogeneous nuclei in TiN inclusions are magnesium based. • Particle morphology provides important information

  16. COMPARISON OF BOND STRENGTH OF COMMERCIALLY PURE TITANIUM AND NICKEL CHROMIUM ALLOY WITH THREE DIFFERENT LUTING CEMENTS: AN IN-VITRO STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Metal ceramic fixed dental prosthesis remains widely used for oral rehabilitation. The type of alloy used to fabricate the metal substructure of the crown also affects its retention. The aim of this study is to compare the bond strength of commercially pure titanium and nickel chromium plates cemented with three different cements and to comparatively evaluate the bond strength of each luting cement. METHODS Specimens of each metal were divided into three groups, which received one of the following luting techniques: Group 1 (CPTi and Group 2 (NiCr with resin cement; Group 3 (CPTi and Group 4 (NiCr with Glass Ionomer Cement; Group 5 (CPTi and Group 6 (NiCr with Zinc phosphate cement. The bonded specimens were submitted for the bond strength tests conducted with a Universal Testing Machine with a shear mode under a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Debonded specimens were examined under electron microscope. RESULT The results indicate that Group 1 and 2 have significantly higher values than Group 3, 4, 5 and 6. Also, Group 3 and 4 have significantly higher values when compared to Group 5 and 6. Whereas, there was no significant difference between Group 1 and 2, Group 3 and 4 as well as Group 5 and 6. The scanning electron microscope illustrated the different modes of fracture that occurred at the metal cement interface. Resin cement showed predominantly cohesive failure. Glass ionomer cement showed a mixed mode of both cohesive and adhesive fracture and Zinc phosphate cement also showed mixed mode of fracture with predominantly adhesive failure. CONCLUSIONS Resin cements showed the most superior bond with both commercially pure titanium and nickel chromium metal. Zinc phosphate cement showed the lowest bond strength with both the metals. There was no significant difference observed between the cement bond with different metals.

  17. The Effect of Slag on the Effectiveness of Phosphorus Removal from Ferrous Alloys Containing Carbon, Chromium and Nickel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawecka-Cebula E.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the impact of slag composition on phosphorus removal from ferrous solutions containing carbon, chromium and nickel. Additions of cryolite, Na3AlF6, were applied for better fluxing and higher phosphate capacity of the slag. An X-ray analysis of final slags formed during dephosphorization of ferrous solutions containing chromium and nickel with CaO-CaF2 or CaO-CaF2-Na3AlF6 mixtures of different chemical compositions was carried out. The equilibrium composition of the liquid and the solid phase while cooling the slags from 1673K to 298K was computed using FactSage 6.2 software. The performed equilibrium computations indicated that the slags were not entirely liquid at those temperatures. The addition of cryolite causes a substantial increase of the liquid phase of the slag. It also has a favourable effect on the dephosphorization grade of hot metal. The obtained results were statistically processed and presented in the form of regression equations.

  18. Study on electrodeposition of copper-chromium alloy%铜-铬合金电沉积的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    滕莹雪; 郭菁

    2013-01-01

    Cu-Cr alloy was prepared by electrodeposition respectively from 4 kinds of electrolytes containing different complexing agents i.e. glycine, ascorbic acid, thiourea, and trisodium citrate. The electrochemical behaviors of different electrolytes were studied by cyclic voltammetry and linear scanning voltammetry. The electrolyte with glycine as complexing agent is most suitable for electrodeposition of Cu-Cr alloy. The Cu-Cr alloy coating obtained therefrom at 10 A/dm2 for 10 min features Cr content up to 18.63%, thickness 25μm, smooth and bright golden yellow surface, strong adhesion, and relative conductivity 68.2%. The conductivity of the Cu-Cr alloy coating basically meets the demand of contact materials.%采用氨基乙酸、抗坏血酸、硫脲和柠檬酸三钠4种配位体系镀液电沉积制备Cu-Cr合金。通过测定循环伏安曲线和线性扫描伏安曲线,研究了不同镀液的电化学行为。氨基乙酸体系镀液最适用于制备Cu-Cr合金,采用该配方制得的Cu-Cr合金中Cr含量高达18.63%,10 A/dm2下电镀10 min所得镀层厚度为25μm,表面平整,呈光亮的金黄色,结合力好,相对导电率达68.2%,导电性基本满足触头材料要求。

  19. Hydrogen absorption behavior of multicomponent zirconium based AB{sub 2} alloys with different chromium-vanadium ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peretti, H.A.; Visintin, A.; Mogni, L.V.; Corso, H.L.; Andrade Gamboa, J.; Serafini, D.; Triaca, W.E

    2003-05-12

    Recent developments on new electrode materials for nickel-metal hydride batteries include Laves phases based on ZrCr{sub 2} with multiple substitutions to improve the electrode performance. In this work, results on the hydrogen absorption behavior of the Zr{sub 0.9}Ti{sub 0.1}NiMn{sub 0.5}Cr{sub x}V{sub 0.5-x} alloy (with 0{<=}x{<=}0.5) obtained by volumetric and electrochemical techniques are presented. The structural and morphological characterization of the alloy is also studied by X-ray powder diffractometry (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS). The (PCT) curves show a high hydrogen storage capacity expressed as hydrogen atoms per formula unit (H/F.U.{approx}3.6), and a steep slope rather than a horizontal plateau corresponding to the two-phase equilibrium. Electrode activation was achieved by voltammetric cycling between preset potentials in alkaline solution. Discharge capacities of about 340 mAh/g are found for high Cr/V content ratios, whereas the high-rate dischargeability significantly decreases on increasing the Cr content in the alloy.

  20. TEM characterisation of stress corrosion cracks in nickel based alloys: effect of chromium content and chemistry of environment; Caracterisation par MET de fissures de corrosion sous contrainte d'alliages a base de nickel: influence de la teneur en chrome et de la chimie du milieu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delabrouille, F

    2004-11-15

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is a damaging mode of alloys used in pressurized water reactors, particularly of nickel based alloys constituting the vapour generator tubes. Cracks appear on both primary and secondary sides of the tubes, and more frequently in locations where the environment is not well defined. SCC sensitivity of nickel based alloys depends of their chromium content, which lead to the replacement of alloy 600 (15 % Cr) by alloy 690 (30 % Cr) but this phenomenon is not yet very well understood. The goal of this thesis is two fold: i) observe the effect of chromium content on corrosion and ii) characterize the effect of environment on the damaging process of GV tubes. For this purpose, one industrial tube and several synthetic alloys - with controlled chromium content - have been studied. Various characterisation techniques were used to study the corrosion products on the surface and within the SCC cracks: SIMS; TEM - FEG: thin foil preparation, HAADF, EELS, EDX. The effect of chromium content and surface preparation on the generalised corrosion was evidenced for synthetic alloys. Moreover, we observed the penetration of oxygen along triple junctions of grain boundaries few micrometers under the free surface. SCC tests show the positive effect of chromium for contents varying from 5 to 30 % wt. Plastic deformation induces a modification of the structure, and thus of the protective character, of the internal chromium rich oxide layer. SCC cracks which developed in different chemical environments were characterised by TEM. The oxides which are formed within the cracks are different from what is observed on the free surface, which reveals a modification of medium and electrochemical conditions in the crack. Finally we were able to evidence some structural characteristics of the corrosion products (in the cracks and on the surface) which turn to be a signature of the chemical environment. (author)

  1. Magnetic features of Fe-Cr-Co alloys with tailoring chromium content fabricated by spark plasma sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastabi, Reza Amini; Ghasemi, Ali; Tavoosi, Majid; Ramazani, Mazaher

    2017-03-01

    Structural and magnetic characterization of Fe-Cr-Co alloys during milling, annealing and consolidation processes was the goal of this study. In this regards, different powder mixtures of Fe80-xCrxCo20 (15≤x≤35) were mechanically milled in a planetary ball mill and then were consolidated by spark plasma sintering (SPS). The produced samples were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). According to achieved results, the structure of as-milled samples in different compositions consists of single α phase solid solution with coercivity and saturation of magnetization in the range of 110-200 Oe and 150-220 emu/g, respectively. The magnetic properties of consolidated samples depend on the kinds of formed precipitates in microstructure and the maximum values of coercive force and saturation of magnetization obtained in Fe55Cr25Co20 magnetic (with single α phase) alloy were 107 Oe and Ms 172 emu/g, respectively. In fact, the formation of non-magnetic σ and γ phases has a destructive effect on magnetic properties of consolidated samples with higher Cr content. Since such magnet requires less cobalt, and contains similar magnetic feature with superior ductility compare to the AlNiCo 5, it could be considered as a promising candidate for employing instead of AlNiCo 5.

  2. Theoretical study of the correlation between magnetism and the properties of defects in iron, chromium and their alloys; Etude theorique de la correlation entre le magnetisme et les proprietes des defauts dans le fer, le chrome et leurs alliages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soulairol, R.

    2011-09-15

    This PhD thesis is devoted to the study of the correlation between the magnetism and the properties of defects in 3d metals, mainly iron- and chromium-based systems, which are used in many technological applications, such as the new-generation nuclear reactors. This work is based on two complementary approaches: the Density Functional Theory (DFT) and a Tight Binding model (TB). We begin this study by the properties of pure materials such as chromium and {alpha}-iron. For the first one, we observe that the presence of a spin density wave (SDW) induces an anisotropy in the formation of point defects as well as the migration of vacancies. For the second, the solution energy of various 3d impurities depends on two terms: a chemical contribution mainly linked to the difference between the number of d electrons of iron and solute, and a magnetic contribution that reveals to be predominant in Fe-Cr. In the following parts, we tackle the correlation between magnetism and extended defects. We show in particular that the existence of magnetic frustrations near Fe/Cr interfaces can lead to the creation of non collinear magnetic structures. It also influences the energetic stability of these interfaces. We have noticed, in agreement with experimental findings, the presence of SDW near Fe/Cr interfaces, which is able to decrease those magnetic frustrations at the interface. We have also studied the magnetic structure of iron or chromium clusters embedded in an Fe-Cr alloy. We have finally shown, in the last part of this work, how the TB approach was able to account for the energetic and magnetic properties of defects not only in pure iron or chromium, but also in Fe-Cr alloys. (author)

  3. The impact on renal function by dental restoration of nickel-chromium alloys%佩戴镍铬烤瓷冠对肾功能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王珏; 曹新明; 夏刚; 黄埔; 李国强; 陈霜; 姜庆五; 陈波

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨镍铬合金烤瓷冠的佩戴是否会造成机体肾功能的损伤.方法 对33例镍铬合金烤瓷冠佩戴者进行佩戴前和佩戴2月后的肾功能重复测量,并采用配对t捡验和重复测量数据线性回归分析探讨肾功能的变化与镍铬合金冠佩戴的关系.结果 配对t检验未观察到镍铬合金烤瓷冠的佩戴对各血尿肾功能生化指标(血:总蛋白、白蛋白、血肌酐、血尿素氮、血尿酸、肾小球滤过率的估计值;尿:白蛋白、N-乙酰-β-D-氨基葡糖苷酶、视黄醇结合蛋白、β2-微球蛋白)实测值和异常率的明显改变.重复测量数据的广义线性模型仅发现年龄和肾功能的异常有关,但与镍铬合金烤瓷冠的佩戴时间、数量和金属裸露水平无关.结论 镍铬合金烤瓷冠的佩戴与机体的肾功能损伤无明确相关性.%Objective To explore whether the dental restoration of nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) will lead to renal dysfunction. Methods A prospective follow-up study was conducted in 33 patients undergoing dental restoration of Ni-Cr alloy, and the associations of alloy restoration with biological parameters of renal function were analyzed by paired t test and general linear model of repeated measures. Results Paired t test did not show any significant change in both of the measurement values and the prevalence of abnormal serum or urine parameters of renal function (Serum: total protein, albumin, urea nitrogen, urea acid and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR); urine: albumin, N -acetyl-β-D - glucosaminidase, retinol-binding protein and β2- microglobulin) (P>0.05). General linear models of repeated measures of renal dysfunction only showed a positive association with age, but with the time and number of alloy restoration, and the level of metal basis uncovered with porcelain. Conclusion Dental restoration of Ni-Cr alloy might not lead to the renal dysfunction in this prospective follow-up study.

  4. New alloys to conserve critical elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Based on availability of domestic reserves, chromium is one of the most critical elements within the U.S. metal industry. New alloys having reduced chromium contents which offer potential as substitutes for higher chromium containing alloys currently in use are being investigated. This paper focuses primarily on modified Type 304 stainless steels having one-third less chromium, but maintaining comparable oxidation and corrosion properties to that of type 304 stainless steel, the largest single use of chromium. Substitutes for chromium in these modified Type 304 stainless steel alloys include silicon and aluminum plus molybdenum.

  5. Avaliação da fundibilidade de uma liga de cobalto-cromo Castability evaluation of a cobalt-chromium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana da Fonte Porto CARREIRO

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho propusemo-nos a avaliar a fundibilidade de uma liga de cobalto-cromo (VERA-PDI em função da utilização de três revestimentos: Knebel (aglutinado por sílica, Termocast e Wirovest (aglutinados por fosfato e duas temperaturas de aquecimento para o molde (900°C e 950°C. Para a execução do teste foi utilizado o método descrito por HINMAN et al.9 (1985. O método de fundição foi o de cera perdida sob chama de gás-oxigênio. Os dados obtidos foram submetidos a análise estatística e demonstraram não haver diferença estatisticamente significante para os revestimentos Knebel e Wirovest, e diferença estatisticamente significante ao nível de 0,1% para o revestimento Termocast quando da variação da temperatura de aquecimento do molde. Quando analisamos os revestimentos sob temperatura do molde de 900°C verificamos diferença estatisticamente significante entre Knebel e Termocast e Knebel e Wirovest ao nível de 0,1%, e diferença entre Termocast e Wirovest ao nível de 5%. Para a temperatura de 950°C houve diferença estatisticamente significante ao nível de 0,1% entre todos os revestimentos. Dentro dos parâmetros utilizados neste estudo pudemos concluir que, para a liga VERA-PDI, a utilização do revestimento Knebel e temperatura de aquecimento do molde de 950°C proporcionaram melhores resultados quanto à fundibilidade.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the castability of a cobalt-chromium alloy (Vera-PDI using three investments: Knebel (agglutinated by silica, Termocast and Wirovest (both agglutinated by phosphate at two molding temperatures (900°C and 950°C; using HINMAN et al.9 (1985; methodology. The casting method of using a wax and gas-oxygen flame was used. There was no significant statistical difference between the Knebel and Wirovest investments; however, there was a statistically significant difference for Termocast investment (P < 0.1 at the different temperatures. When analyzing the

  6. Relación entre factores micro- estructurales e impacto repetido en aleaciones de alto cromo para bolas de molino. // Relationship among factors micro - structural and impact repeated in alloys of high chromium for mill balls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Albertin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Las aleaciones de alto cromo son empleadas para la fabricación de bolas de molino en industrias de procesamiento deminerales. Los usuarios y fabricantes requieren lograr mejores resultados técnicos-económicos en sus aplicaciones, por loque necesitan aumentar los conocimientos relacionados con los aspectos estructurales de estos materiales. En este trabajo serealiza una investigación con vistas a establecer relaciones entre la estructura de las aleaciones y su comportamiento ante elimpacto repetido que es un fenómeno característico en estos procesos.Se funden bolas con varias aleaciones hipo eutécticas, eutécticas, e hipereutécticas; se prueban en un equipo que simula elimpacto repetido. Los resultados permiten comprobar los buenos resultados de aleaciones hipo eutécticas con relaciones deCr/C altas y a su vez altos contenidos de Cr y de aleaciones eutécticas para menores relaciones de Cr/C y menorescontenidos de Cr, en ambos casos los carburos eutécticos son de forma simétrica, regulares y no forman redes continuas decarburos asimétricos bordeando los granos, que presentan peores comportamiento en el impacto repetido y que son el casode las hipoeutécticas con bajas relaciones Cr/C y las hipereutécticas donde aparecen también grandes carburos primariosPalabras claves: Alto-cromo, bolas de molino, impacto repetido, desgaste.____________________________________________________________________________Abstract.High Chromium alloys are used to manufacture grinding balls for the Industry of Construction Materials. Customers andusers need to improve their knowledge about the relationships between microstructure and the parts damage in these alloysto obtain better technical-economics results. In this paper the results of a research to obtain different microstructures ofeutectics, hipoeutectics and hipereutectics alloys are presented, searching for the lesser damage in these alloys. These alloysare tested in a repeated impact testing

  7. 高铬铸铁及低合金钢与高锰钢的磨损试验对比研究%Comparing Investigation on Abrasive Wear of High Chromium Cast Iron, Low Alloy Steel and High Manganese Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张鲲鹏; 陈培友; 唐建新

    2013-01-01

    在模拟实际破碎机工况条件下,对高铬铸铁、低合金钢与高锰钢进行磨料磨损性能试验与对比,以得到在试验对应的实际工作条件下性能较优的抗磨材料.试验结果表明,在低应力冲击载荷条件下,高铬铸铁的抗磨性能最好,低合金钢次之,高锰钢最差;在低冲击载荷条件下高锰钢的性能潜力不能得到充分发挥,而高铬铸铁更适用于低冲击载荷条件下的抗磨件.%Under the condition of simulating actual working of broken machine,the impact abrasive wear resistances of high-Cr cast iron,low alloy steel and high-Mn steel were studied,and the better material in wear-resistant performance was obtained under the test conditions of corresponding actual operating conditions.The results show that the anti-wear properties of high chromium cast iron is best in low-stress impact load conditions,followed by low-alloy steel,highmanganese steel is worst; the potential of high manganese steel in performance can not be given full in low-impact load conditions,high chromium cast iron is more suitable.

  8. Influence of nickel-chromium alloy and gold-platinum alloy PFM on canine gingival tissues%镍铬合金与金铂合金烤瓷熔附金属全冠对犬牙龈组织的形态学影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李新; 巴彩凤; 周蕊; 王稚英

    2009-01-01

    目的:比较镍铬合金和金铂合金2 种烤瓷熔附金属全冠(porcelain fused to metal,PFM)对犬牙龈组织结构的影响,观察PFM修复术的生物学效果,为临床上选择烤瓷熔附金属材料提供参考.方法:将3 只健康犬以镍铬合金和金铂合金2 种PFM修复犬牙,通过光镜和透射电镜观察犬牙龈组织的结构,用TUNEL方法检测细胞凋亡,并进行统计学分析.结果:镍铬合金PFM修复犬的牙龈组织,光镜下可见大量的炎性细胞浸润,局部血管出血;电镜下有大量细胞凋亡,凋亡指数为58.63%±11.12%,有细胞核固缩等反应.金铂合金PFM修复犬的牙龈组织光镜下未见大量的炎性细胞浸润及局部血管出血;电镜下少有细胞凋亡;凋亡指数为(26.90±17.35)%.统计分析显示镍铬合金PFM组和金铂合金PFM组的凋亡数与对照组都具有统计学意义,镍铬合金PFM组和金铂合金PFM组细胞凋亡数量有明显差异(P<0.05),镍铬合金组凋亡指数高.结论:镍铬合金PFM对犬牙龈组织结构的影响大,而金铂合金PFM对犬牙龈组织结构的影响小.临床PFM修复时,尽可能选择金铂合金制作PFM基底冠.%Objective: To compare the influence of nickel-chromium alloy and gold-platinum alloy porcelain-fused-to-metal ( PFM ) on ultramicrostructure of canine gingival tissues, to survey the biological effects after PFM full crown restoration, and to provide data for selection of PFM materials. Methods; The nickel-chromium alloy and gold-platinum alloy PFM full crowns were used to repair canines in 3 healthy dogs. The microstructure of canine gingival tissue was observed through light microscope and transmission electron microscope. Apoptosis of canine gingival cells was detected by TUNEL method. Results; Under light microscope, inflammatory cell infiltration and partial bleeding were seen in the nickel-chromium alloy PFM full crown repaired canine gingival tissues. Under transmission electron microscope, large amount of

  9. Effects of chromium and nitrogen content on the microstructures and mechanical properties of as-cast Co-Cr-Mo alloys for dental applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoda, Keita; Suyalatu; Takaichi, Atsushi; Nomura, Naoyuki; Tsutsumi, Yusuke; Doi, Hisashi; Kurosu, Shingo; Chiba, Akihiko; Igarashi, Yoshimasa; Hanawa, Takao

    2012-07-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of as-cast Co-(20-33)Cr-5Mo-N alloys were investigated to develop ductile Co-Cr-Mo alloys without Ni addition for dental applications that satisfy the requirements of the type 5 criteria in ISO 22674. The effects of the Cr and N contents on the microstructure and mechanical properties are discussed. The microstructures were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), and electron back-scattered diffraction pattern analysis. The mechanical properties were evaluated using tensile testing. The proof strength and elongation of N-containing 33Cr satisfied the type 5 criteria in ISO 22674. ε-phase with striations was formed in the N-free (20-29)Cr alloys, while there was slight formation of ε-phase in the N-containing (20-29)Cr alloys, which disappeared in N-containing 33Cr. The lattice parameter of the γ-phase increased with increasing Cr content (i.e. N content) in the N-containing alloys, although the lattice parameter remained almost the same in the N-free alloys because of the small atomic radius difference between Co and Cr. Compositional analyses by EDS and XRD revealed that in the N-containing alloys Cr and Mo were concentrated in the cell boundary, which became enriched in N, stabilizing the γ-phase. The mechanical properties of the N-free alloys were independent of the Cr content and showed low strength and limited elongation. Strain-induced martensite was formed in all the N-free alloys after tensile testing. On the other hand, the proof strength, ultimate tensile strength, and elongation of the N-containing alloys increased with increasing Cr content (i.e. N content). Since formation of ε-phase after tensile testing was confirmed in the N-containing alloys the deformation mechanism may change from strain-induced martensite transformation to another form, such as twinning or dislocation slip, as the N content increases. Thus the N

  10. Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabeza, Sandra; Garcés, Gerardo; Pérez, Pablo; Adeva, Paloma

    2014-07-01

    The Mg98.5Gd1Zn0.5 alloy produced by a powder metallurgy route was studied and compared with the same alloy produced by extrusion of ingots. Atomized powders were cold compacted and extruded at 623 K and 673 K (350 °C and 400 °C). The microstructure of extruded materials was characterized by α-Mg grains, and Mg3Gd and 14H-LPSO particles located at grain boundaries. Grain size decreased from 6.8 μm in the extruded ingot, down to 1.6 μm for powders extruded at 623 K (350 °C). Grain refinement resulted in an increase in mechanical properties at room and high temperatures. Moreover, at high temperatures the PM alloy showed superplasticity at high strain rates, with elongations to failure up to 700 pct.

  11. Comparative evaluation of effect of metal primer and sandblasting on the shear bond strength between heat cured acrylic denture base resin and cobalt-chromium alloy: An in vitrostudy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kalra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of metal primers and sandblasting on the shear bond strength (SBS of heat cured acrylic denture base resin to cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr alloy. Materials and Methods: A total number of 40 disk shaped wax patterns (10 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness were cast in Co-Cr alloy. Samples were divided into 4 groups depending on the surface treatment received. Group 1: No surface treatment was done and acts as control group. Group 2: Only sandblasting was done. Group 3: Only metal primer was applied. Group 4: Both metal primer and sandblasting were done. After surface treatment samples had been tested in Universal Testing Machine at crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min in shear mode and scanning, electron microscope evaluation was done to observe the mode of failure. Statistical Analysis: All the observations obtained were analyzed statistically using software SPSS version 17; one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey test were applied. Results: The one-way ANOVA indicated that SBS values varied according to type of surface treatment done. The SBS was highest (18.70 ± 1.2 MPa when both sandblasting and metal primer was done when compared with no surface treatment (2.59 ± 0.32 MPa. Conclusions: It could be concluded that the use of metal primers along with sandblasting significantly improves the bonding of heat cured acrylic denture base resin with the Co-Cr alloy.

  12. Oxidation and surface segregation of chromium in Fe–Cr alloys studied by Mössbauer and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idczak, R., E-mail: ridczak@ifd.uni.wroc.pl; Idczak, K.; Konieczny, R.

    2014-09-15

    The room temperature {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer and XPS spectra were measured for polycrystalline iron-based Fe–Cr alloys. The spectra were collected using three techniques: the transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy (TMS), the conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) and the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The combination of these experimental techniques allows to determine changes in Cr concentration and the presence of oxygen in bulk, in the 300 nm pre-surface layer and on the surface of the studied alloys.

  13. 氟离子对两种不同工艺制作的钴铬合金耐腐蚀性能的影响%Effect of fluoride concentration on the corrosion behavior of cobalt-chromium alloy fabricated by two different technology processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨秋霞; 杨瑛; 徐晗; 吴迪; 郭恪

    2016-01-01

    目的:   在模拟口腔环境下研究氟离子对采用选择性激光熔覆(SLM)技术和传统铸造技术两种工艺制作的钴铬合金耐腐蚀性的影响。方法   选择具有相同材料成分的钴铬合金金属粉末和金属块,分别采用SLM(SLM组)和铸造技术(Cast组)各制作15个试件,置于含不同氟离子质量分数(0、0.05%、0.20%)的酸性人工唾液(pH值为5.0)中浸泡24 h进行电化学试验,采用动电位极化曲线法测试合金的自腐蚀电位Ecor、自腐蚀电流密度Icor和极化电阻Rp,同时结合扫描电子显微镜(SEM)观察,分析两组试件的耐腐蚀性能。结果   铸造工艺制作的钴铬合金在酸性人工唾液中的Ecor随着氟离子质量分数的升高而减小。当氟离子质量分数为0.20%时,两种工艺制作的钴铬合金的Ecor、Icor、Rp均有明显改变(P<0.05),SEM结果也显示合金表面均出现腐蚀现象。当氟离子质量分数为0.20%时,Cast组钴铬合金的Icor高于SLM组,而Ecor和Rp低于SLM组(P<0.05)。结论   氟离子可降低两种工艺制作的钴铬合金的耐腐蚀性,在氟离子质量分数较高(0.20%)时,SLM技术制作的钴铬合金的耐腐蚀性优于铸造工艺制作的钴铬合金。%Objective This study aims to determine the effect of fluoride concentration on the corrosion behavior of cobaltchromium alloy fabricated by two different technology processes in a simulated oral environment. Methods A total of 15 specimens were employed with selective laser melting (SLM) and another 15 for traditional casting (Cast) in cobalt-chromium alloy powders and blocks with the same material composition. The corrosion behavior of the specimens was studied by potentiodynamic polarization test under different oral environments with varying solubilities of fluorine (0, 0.05%, and 0.20% for each) in acid artificial saliva (pH=5.0). The specimens were soaked in

  14. Chromium in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    The best source of chromium is brewer's yeast. However, many people do not use brewer's yeast because it causes bloating ( abdominal distention ) and nausea . Other good sources of chromium include ...

  15. Distribution of soluble and precipitated iron and chromium products generated by anodic dissolution of 316L stainless steel and alloy C-22: final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estill, J; Farmer, J; Gordon, S; King, K; Logotetta, L; Silberman, D

    1999-08-11

    At near neutral pH and at applied potentials above the threshold potential for localized breakdown of the passive film, virtually all of the dissolved chromium appeared to be in the hexavalent oxidation state (Cr(VI)). In acidic environments, such as crevice solutions formed during the crevice corrosion of 316L and C-22 samples in 4 M NaCl, virtually all of the dissolved chromium appeared to be in the trivalent oxidation state (Cr(III)). These general observations appear to be consistent with the Pourbaix diagram for chromium (Pourbaix 1974), pp. 307-321. At high pH and high anodic polarization (pH {approximately} 8 and 800 mV vs. SHE), the predominate species is believed to be the soluble chromate anion (CrO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}). At the same pH, but lower polarization (pH {approximately} 8 and 0 mV vs. SHE), the predominate species are believed to be precipitates such as trivalent Cr(OH){sub 3} {center_dot} n(H{sub 2}O) and hexavalent Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. In acidified environments such as those found in crevices (pH < 3), soluble Cr{sup 3+} is expected to form over a wide range of potential extending from 400 mV vs. SHE to approximately 1200 mV vs. SHE. Again, this is consistent with the observations from the creviced samples. In earlier studies by the principal investigator, it has been found that low-level chromium contamination in ground water is usually in the hexavalent oxidation state (Farmer et al. 1996). In general, dissolved iron measured during the crevice experiments appears to be Fe(II) in acidic media and Fe(III) in near-neutral and alkaline solutions (table 3). In the case of cyclic polarization measurements, the dissolved iron measured at the end of some cyclic polarization measurements with C-22 appeared to be in the Fe(III) state. This is probably due to the high electrochemical potential at which these species were generated during the potential scan. Note that the reversal potential was approximately 1200 mV vs. Ag/AgCl during these scans. These

  16. Heterogeneous chromium catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a heterogeneous chromium catalyst system for the polymerisation of ethylene and/or alpha olefins prepared by the steps of: (a) providing a silica-containing support, (b) treating the silica-containing support with a chromium compound to form a chromium-based silica-c

  17. Metal-on-metal bearings in total hip arthroplasties : Influence of cobalt chromium ions on bacterial growth and biofilm formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosman, Anton H.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Bulstra, Sjoerd K.; Busscher, Henk J.; Neut, Danielle

    2009-01-01

    Metal-on-metal (MOM) bearings involving cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloys in total hip arthroplasties are becoming more and more popular due to their low wear. Consequences of corrosion products of Co-Cr alloys are for the most part unclear, and the influence of cobalt and chromium ions on biofilm form

  18. Chromium(VI) release from leather and metals can be detected with a diphenylcarbazide spot test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Johansen, Jeanne D.; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2015-01-01

    Along with chromium, nickel and cobalt are the clinically most important metal allergens. However, unlike for nickel and cobalt, there is no validated colorimetric spot test that detects chromium. Such a test could help both clinicians and their patients with chromium dermatitis to identify culprit...... at 0.5 ppm without interference from other pure metals, alloys, or leather. A market survey using the test showed no chromium(VI) release from work tools (0/100). However, chromium(VI) release from metal screws (7/60), one earring (1/50), leather shoes (4/100) and leather gloves (6/11) was observed. We...

  19. The Production of Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum Alloy with Open Pore Structure as an Implant and the Investigation of Its Biocompatibility In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Er

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A dental crown material, Nickel-Chrome-Molybdenum alloy, is manufactured using precision casting method from a polyurethane foam model in a regular and open-pore form, as a hard tissue implant for orthopedic applications. The samples produced have 10, 20, and 30 (±3 pores per inch of pore densities and 0.0008, 0.0017, and 0.0027 g/mm3 densities, respectively. Samples were implanted in six dogs and observed for a period of two, four, and six months for the histopathological examinations. The dogs were examined radiologically in 15-day intervals and clinically in certain intervals. The implants were taken out with surrounding tissue at the end of these periods. Implants and surrounding tissues were examined histopathologically in terms of biocompatibility. As a result, it is seen that new bone tissue was formed, in pores of the porous implant at the head of the tibia in dogs implanted. Any pathology, inflammation, and reaction in old and new tissues were not observed. It was concluded that a dental alloy (Ni-Cr-Mo alloy could also be used as a biocompatible hard tissue implant material for orthopedics.

  20. High strength alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maziasz, Phillip James [Oak Ridge, TN; Shingledecker, John Paul [Knoxville, TN; Santella, Michael Leonard [Knoxville, TN; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; John, Randy Carl [Houston, TX; Kim, Dong Sub [Sugar Land, TX

    2010-08-31

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tubular that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  1. High strength alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maziasz, Phillip James; Shingledecker, John Paul; Santella, Michael Leonard; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo; Sikka, Vinod Kumar; Vinegar, Harold J.; John, Randy Carl; Kim, Dong Sub

    2012-06-05

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tublar that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  2. Nobilium 钴铬钼合金铸造卡环固位力的研究%Retention force of casting clasps for Nobilium 2000 cobalt-chromium-mo-lybdenum alloy removable partial dentures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐婉容; 李丽华; 米方林; 吴艳; 刘英

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To compare the trend of the retention change during the circulation of the clasp dislodging and inserting between Cobalt-Chromium-Molybdenum alloy and pure titanium casting clasps,it can provide theoretical reference for the design of clasps in Nobilium casting framework dentures.Methods:Fabricating standard metal abutment of the second mandibular premolar,and then 36 RPT clasps was cast from Cobalt-Chromium-Molybdenum alloy (n =18)and pure titanium(n =18)with lost-wax casting craft. Each group was subdivided in three parts,corresponding to 0.25 mm,0.50 mm and 0.75 mm undercuts,respectively,and every part contains 6 clasps.The specimens were subjected to an insertion /removal circulation test.The chatillon force measuring instrument was used to record the retention force at different circulation times(0,1 200,2 400,3 600,4 800,6 000,7 000 times).Results:(1 )Under the 0.50 mm undercut,the retention force of Nobilium Co-Cr-Mo alloy T clasps is better than the pure titanium clasps,the difference has statistical significance (P =0.017 5).In the other conditions,although Co-Cr-Mo consistently showed greater rentention compared to pure titanium,no significant differences were observed (P >0.05 ).(2)Comparing retention force for the three undercuts between the pure titanium and Co-Cr-Mo,no statistically significant differences(P >0.05).(3)Analyzing the Co-Cr-Mo alloy during the test,it had a slight increase in retention force from the beginning to the end of the simulation test.Conclusion:Nobilium Cobalt-Chromium-Mo-lybdenum alloy casting T clasps have good retention force and greater ability to resist permanent deformation,and can keep effective re-tention force during the circulation of the clasp dislodging and inserting.The best undercut depth is 0.5 mm.%目的:比较钴铬钼合金和纯钛铸造卡环在反复脱位循环过程中固位力的变化趋势,为 Nobilium 整铸支架义齿的卡环设计提供理论参考。方法:制作下颌第二前

  3. Performance of iron-chromium-aluminum alloy surface coatings on Zircaloy 2 under high-temperature steam and normal BWR operating conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Weicheng; Mouche, Peter A.; Han, Xiaochun; Heuser, Brent J.; Mandapaka, Kiran K.; Was, Gary S.

    2016-03-01

    Iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) coatings deposited on Zircaloy 2 (Zy2) and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) by magnetron sputtering have been tested with respect to oxidation weight gain in high-temperature steam. In addition, autoclave testing of FeCrAl-coated Zy2 coupons under pressure-temperature-dissolved oxygen coolant conditions representative of a boiling water reactor (BWR) environment has been performed. Four different FeCrAl compositions have been tested in 700 °C steam; compositions that promote alumina formation inhibited oxidation of the underlying Zy2. Parabolic growth kinetics of alumina on FeCrAl-coated Zy2 is quantified via elemental depth profiling. Autoclave testing under normal BWR operating conditions (288 °C, 9.5 MPa with normal water chemistry) up to 20 days demonstrates observable weight gain over uncoated Zy2 simultaneously exposed to the same environment. However, no FeCrAl film degradation was observed. The 900 °C eutectic in binary Fe-Zr is addressed with the FeCrAl-YSZ system.

  4. Environmental impact and site-specific human health risks of chromium in the vicinity of a ferro-alloy manufactory, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen-xing; Chen, Jian-qun; Chai, Li-yuan; Yang, Zhi-hui; Huang, Shun-hong; Zheng, Yu

    2011-06-15

    Previous studies often neglected the direct exposure to soil heavy metals in human health risk assessment. The purpose of this study was to assess the environmental impact and site-specific health risks of chromium (Cr) by both direct and indirect exposure assessment method. Results suggested that total Cr was shown a substantial buildup with a significant increase in the industrial and cultivated soils (averaged 1910 and 986 mg kg(-1), respectively). The Cr contents of vegetables exceeded the maximum permissible concentration by more than four times in every case. Human exposure to Cr was mainly due to dietary food intake in farming locations and due to soil ingestion in both industrial and residential sites. Soil ingestion was the main contributor pathway for direct exposure, followed by inhalation, and then dermal contact. The highest risks of vegetable ingestion were associated with consumption of Chinese cabbage. The results also indicated that plant tissues are able to convert the potentially toxic Cr (VI) species into the non-toxic Cr (III) species. The analyses of human health risks indicated that an important portion of the population is at risk, especially in the industrial site.

  5. The effect of environment on the creep deformation of ultra-high purity nickel-chromium-iron alloys at 360 degrees Celcius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraventi, Denise Jean

    2000-10-01

    Steam generators in pressurized water nuclear power plants have experienced significant problems with intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) on the inner diameter of steam generator tubing for over 25 years. In the course of research to understand IGSCC, it has been shown that creep deformation may play a significant role in the cracking of commercial Alloy 600 (Ni-16Cr-9Fe-0.03C). The primary water environment can cause decreases in creep resistance (i.e., faster creep rates, shorter time to failure, and higher creep strains). During corrosion under the conditions of interest, both hydrogen reduction and metal dissolution occur. One or both may contribute to the enhancement of creep. The purpose of this work was to isolate the mechanism by which the water environment causes the creep deformation to increase. Activation area and activation enthalpy for glide were measured in argon and primary water on high purity Ni-16Cr-9Fe alloys. The results indicated that the activation area was reduced by primary water, consistent with a hydrogen enhanced plasticity mechanism for enhanced creep. The stress dependence of creep was also examined in argon and primary water. The results indicated that the internal stress of the alloy is reduced by the primary water environment. Lower internal stress is consistent with both a hydrogen model as well as a vacancy-aided climb model for enhanced creep. To isolate the effect of hydrogen on the creep of the alloy, experiments were conducted in a dissociated hydrogen environment. The results indicated that hydrogen would only increase the steady state creep rate if present before loading of the samples. However, if the sample was already in steady state creep and hydrogen introduced, a transient in the creep strain was observed. The creep rate returned to the original steady state rate in a short time. The results indicate that while hydrogen does affect the steady state creep to an extent, hydrogen cannot completely account for

  6. 铸造钴铬合金含银抗菌涂层表面性能及体外细胞毒性研究%Study of Ag-containing on casting cobalt chromium alloy on the surface structure and the cell toxicity in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵敏; 梁锐英; 孟贺; 徐艳丽; 李敬东; 吴文慧

    2012-01-01

    目的 检测钴铬合金含银抗菌涂层的表面性能及细胞毒性,为其临床应用提供依据.方法 于钴铬合金表面应用等离子喷涂技术制备含银抗菌涂层(涂层组),通过扫描电镜、能谱分析及X射线衍射分析表面性能.以常规铸造的钴铬合金试件为合金对照组,利用甲基噻唑基四唑法测试涂层组合金浸提液(分为25%、50%、75%和100%亚组)和合金对照组浸提液以及阴性对照组(新鲜培养液)对小鼠成纤维细胞L929增殖的影响(培养1、2、3d);用流式细胞术测试阴性对照组、涂层组和合金对照组培养48 h后L929细胞周期的差异.结果 涂层表面均匀致密,与基底材料未见明显间隙,表层主要物相为Ag、Cr和少量的Ag2O、Cr2O3.细胞培养1、2、3d后,阴性对照组、各涂层亚组和合金对照组A值差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);阴性对照组各时间点毒性评级均为0级,各涂层亚组和合金对照组各时间点毒性评级均为1级.涂层组G2期细胞周期比例为(8.23±0.39)%,合金对照组G2期细胞周期比例为(8.70±0.46)%,两组间差异无统计学意义(P>0.05),显著低于阴性对照组[(24.15±0.71)%].结论 钴铬合金含银涂层结构稳定,与临床常用钴铬合金相比,对L929细胞的增殖及细胞周期影响无明显差异,细胞相容性良好.%Objective To detect cobalt chromium alloy antimicrobial coating silver of the surface structure and the cell toxicity in order to provide a theoretical basis for clinical application.Methods Plasma spraying technique was adopted to prepare cobalt chromium alloy antimicrobial coating silver. Scanning electron microscopy,energy dispersive analysis and X-ray diffraction analysis were used to evaluate the surface properties.The methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium and flow cytometry method was adopted to test the L929 cell proliferation and the influence of the cell cycle. Results The surface of the coating was uniform and compact

  7. Effects of Multi-Alloying on Carbide of Eutectic High Chromium Cast Iron Containing 31%Cr%多元合金化对共晶31Cr高铬铸铁碳化物的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马幼平; 宋绍峰; 李秀兰; 党晓明

    2011-01-01

    The eutectic high chromium cast iron containing 31%Cr was deal with multi-alloying,the microstructure,composition,carbide size and morphology were investigated through metallurgical microscope,scanning electron microscope(SEM),AXIOS(PW4400) X fluorescence and Leica image analyzer.The results show that,the size is refined and the morphology was improved of carbide through multi-alloying,the morphology factor K of carbide increases and then decreases,while the grain factor D of carbide is contrary to the morphology factor K.The optimum composition is selected,which the morphology factor K is 0.83 and the grain factor D is 0.66 micron of the carbide.Recombination action between nucleation and growth mechanisms of eutectic composition phase improves the size of carbide.The reasons of carbide morphology evolved are the interaction among which the activity of carbon atoms and the interfacial tension of carbide are changed,and produce divorced eutectic.%采用多元合金化处理共晶31Cr高铬铸铁,借助金相显微镜、扫描电镜、AXIOS(PW4400)型X荧光及Leica图像分析仪对金相组织、成分、碳化物尺寸及形貌进行分析。结果表明,经多元合金化后,碳化物尺寸细化、形貌改善,碳化物形状因子K先增大后减小,粒度因子D先减小后增大;确定了最佳成分,其碳化物的形状因子K=0.83,粒度因子D=0.66μm;共晶组成相形核及长大机制转变的复合作用改善了碳化物尺寸;溶液中碳原子活度、碳化物界面张力的改变和产生离异共晶的共同作用导致了碳化物形貌的演变。

  8. 佩戴镍铬合金烤瓷冠对肾功能影响的横断面研究%A cross-sectional study of impact of dental restoration of nickel-chromium alloy on renal function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王珏; 曹新明; 夏刚; 徐碧瑶; 邓汉龙; 王德芳; 姜庆五; 陈波

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore whether the dental restoration of nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) will lead to the renal dysfunction. Methods Seven hundred and ninety-five (795) Ni-Cr alloy consumers and 85 controls were investigated by the questionnaire and the biological examination of renal function. Independent t test, one-way ANOVA, linear regression models and logistic regression models were used to analyze the impact of alloy restoration (time, number and metal exposure level) on renal function parameters. Results There was no significant change between Ni-Cr alloy consumers and the controls regarding to both of the measurement values and the abnormality of the biological indexes from either serum examination [total protein, albumin, urea nitrogen, urea acid and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR)] and urine examination (albumin, Nacetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase, retinol-binding protein and β2- microglobulin) (P>0. 05). Logistic analyses of both estimated eGFR and urinary indexes of renal dysfunction showed that the independent factors of renal dysfunction were age and body mass index, but not the parameters of dental restoration including wearing time, number and the level of metal basis uncovered with porcelain (P>0. 05). Conclusions Dental restoration of Ni-Cr alloy is not associated with renal dysfunction in human in this cross-sectional study.%目的 探讨镍铬合金烤瓷冠的佩戴是否会造成机体的肾功能损伤.方法 对795例镍铬合金烤瓷冠佩戴者(接触组)和85例口腔门诊非镍铬合金修复者(对照组)进行烤瓷冠修复的问卷调查和血尿肾功能生化指标的测定,采用两独立样本t检验,单因素方差分析,线性回归模型和logistic回归模型分析佩戴时间、数量和金属裸露水平对肾功能生化指标的影响,P<0.05为差异有统计学意义.结果 各血生化指标(血清总蛋白、白蛋白、血肌酐、血尿素氮、血尿酸和肾小球滤过率的估计值)和尿生化指标(尿白

  9. Effect of processing parameters on hardness of selective laser melting cobalt-chromium alloy%加工参数设置对选择性激光熔积钴铬合金硬度的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张碧楚; 曾丽; 忻贤贞; 魏斌

    2015-01-01

    目的:观测几种加工参数设置对选择性激光熔积(SLM)钴铬合金的表面形貌和表面维氏硬度的影响。方法使用正交实验设计9组不同的加工参数,即激光功率为2500W、2750W、3000W,扫描速度为5mm/s、10mm/s、15mm/s,送粉速率为3r/min、4.5r/min、6r/min,制备9组选择性激光熔积钴铬合金试件,每组5个(直径10mm,厚度3mm),经抛光处理后分别进行扫描电镜观察和表面维氏硬度测试,采用SPSS16.0软件包进行数据处理。结果9组不同加工参数制备下SLM钴铬合金试件的扫描电镜图像均呈现均匀而规则的细胞样结构;其平均表面维氏硬度均在345HV以上。结论当加工参数设置在激光功率2500~3000W,扫描速度5~15mm/s,送粉速率3~6r/min范围内时,SLM钴铬合金具有较为理想的表面形貌和表面硬度,能适合临床应用需求。%Objective To investigate the effects of several processing parameters on surface morphol-ogy and surface hardness of cobalt-chromium(Co-Cr) alloy fabricated by selective laser melting (SLM). Methods Nine groups of selective laser melting Co-Cr alloy were fabricated by different processing parameters (laser power:2500W, 2750W, 3000W;scanning speed:5mm/s, 10mm/s, 15mm/s;power feeding rate:3r/min, 4.5r/min, 6r/min) by orthogonal experiment design, each group has five specimens (10mm diameter and 3mm thickness). The speci-mens’ surface morphology was observed by a scanning electron microscope and their Vickers hardness was mea-sured by micro-hardness tester. The data was analyzed with SPSS16.0 software package. Results The SEM im-ages showed all selective laser melting Co-Cr alloy had a homogeneous and regular cellular structure and the mean surface Vickers hardness were all above 345HV. Conclusion When laser power is set at 2500-3000W, scanning speed is set by 5-15mm/s and power feeding rate is set by 3-6r/min, SLM Co-Cr alloy has both ideal surface prop-erty and surface

  10. Effect of Artificial Saliva and Intraoral Fluoride on the Fatigue Strength and Roughness Values of Chromium- cobalt Alloy Clasp.%人工唾液和氟化物对钴铬合金卡环疲劳强度及粗糙度影响的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘杰; 赵笺龄; 商维荣

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨人工唾液和氟化物对钴铬合金卡环疲劳强度及粗糙度的影响.方法:用成品卡环蜡型制作钴铬合金卡环60个,分为6组,分别在空气中、人工唾液和氟化物中进行测试,初始载荷强度和疲劳失效前的载荷循环次数被自动记录;疲劳裂纹和表面形貌进行扫描电镜分析.用精密粗糙度测量仪检测各组表面粗糙度.结果:钴铬合金卡环在不同测试条件下的疲劳强度及粗糙度有差异.统计分析表明,pH5.6NaF处理组与对照组的循环载荷次数有显著性差异(P<0.01).pH5.6NaF处理组在处理前后的粗糙度有显著性差异(P<0.01).结论:人工唾液和氟化物会使钴铬合金卡环的疲劳强度下降,而表面粗糙度升高.%Objective: To study the effect of artificial saliva and intraoral fluoride on the fatigue strength and roughness values of cobalt-chromium alloy clasp. Methods: Sixty casting clasp specimens of cobalt-chromium alloys made from prefabricated wax were divided into 6 groups. Specimens were tested in air, artificial saliva and intraoral fluoride. Initial loading force and loading cycle before fracture were registered automatically. The fatigue corrosion cracks and surface corrosion situation were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Surface roughness values in different groups were measured by precision topographer. Results.. The fatigue strength and roughness values of chromium-cobalt alloy were not different among six test conditions. StatistiCal analysis showed that there was significant difference between pH5.6NaF group and control group in loading cycle(P<0.01) pH5,6 NaF group had significant difference before and after processing the surface roughness (P<0. 01) Conclusion: Both artificial saliva and intraoral fluoride reduced the fatigue strength of chromium-cobalt alloy, whereas, improved the roughness values.

  11. 反复熔铸影响新旧钴铬烤瓷合金的机械性能%Mechanical properties of cobalt-chromium alloys containing different proportion of once-used alloys after recasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖月; 任丹丹; 王丹

    2013-01-01

    背景:目前关于反复铸造后钴铬烤瓷合金机械性能改变的研究已有较多研究报道,而对于将回收旧料再利用于新料中后再铸造钴铬烤瓷合金机械性能的研究则少有报道。  目的:研究反复熔铸对不同比例新旧钴铬烤瓷合金拉伸强度、屈服强度、延伸率及显微硬度等机械性能的影响。  方法:由新钴铬烤瓷合金熔铸成Ⅰ代铸件,40%Ⅰ代废旧料添加60%新钴铬烤瓷合金熔铸成Ⅱ代铸件,40%Ⅱ代废旧料添加60%新钴铬烤瓷合金熔铸成Ⅲ代铸件,40%Ⅲ代废旧料添加60%新钴铬烤瓷合金熔铸成第Ⅳ代铸件。采用拉伸实验测试各代试件的拉伸强度、0.2%屈服强度、延伸率;采用弯曲实验测试各代试件的弯曲强度;采用硬度实验测试各代试件的维氏硬度值;并进行显微金相观察。  结果与结论:Ⅱ,Ⅲ,Ⅳ代铸件拉伸强度、0.2%屈服强度、延伸率、弯曲强度及维氏硬度值与Ⅰ代铸件比较,差异均无显著性意义。Ⅰ代试样晶粒的大小均匀一致,直径较小,沿晶界分布的碳化物大小也较均匀细小,主要呈球形和不规则的蠕虫状两种形态;Ⅱ代和Ⅲ代试样组织形态尚均匀,只是晶粒有些粗化;Ⅳ代试样显微组织中的碳化物开始粗化,不规则蠕虫状的碳化物含量增多,可发现晶粒内存在少量非金属夹杂物。表明新旧比例为3∶2的钴铬烤瓷合金至少可以反复熔铸3次而不引起机械性能下降。%BACKGROUND:There are numerous studies about mechanical changes of recast cobalt-chromium ceramic al oys. However, little is reported on the mechanical properties of cobalt-chromium ceramic al oys containing once-used al oys after recasts. OBJECTIVE:To study the effects of different proportion of once-used al oys to recasting cobalt-chromium al oys on their mechanical properties, including tensile strength, yield strength, elongation and

  12. Low-chromium reduced-activation chromium-tungsten steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Maziasz, P.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Bainitic microstructures formed during continuous cooling can differ from classical upper and lower bainite formed during isothermal transformation. Two types of non-classical bainite were observed depending on the cooling rate: carbide-free acicular bainite at rapid cooling rates and granular bainite at slower cooling rates. The Charpy impact toughness of the acicular ferrite was found to be considerably better than for the granular bainite. It was postulated that alloying to improve the hardenability of the steel would promote the formation of acicular bainite, just as increasing the cooling rate does. To test this, chromium and tungsten were added to the 2 1/4Cr-2W and 2 1/4Cr-2WV steel compositions to increase their hardenability, and the microstructures and mechanical properties were examined.

  13. Standard practice for determining the susceptibility of stainless steels and related Nickel-Chromium-Iron Alloys to stress-corrosion cracking in polythionic acids

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for preparing and conducting the polythionic acid test at room temperature, 22 to 25°C (72 to 77°F), to determine the relative susceptibility of stainless steels or other related materials (nickel-chromiumiron alloys) to intergranular stress corrosion cracking. 1.2 This practice can be used to evaluate stainless steels or other materials in the “as received” condition or after being subjected to high-temperature service, 482 to 815°C (900 to 1500°F), for prolonged periods of time. 1.3 This practice can be applied to wrought products, castings, and weld metal of stainless steels or other related materials to be used in environments containing sulfur or sulfides. Other materials capable of being sensitized can also be tested in accordance with this test. 1.4 This practice may be used with a variety of stress corrosion test specimens, surface finishes, and methods of applying stress. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, ...

  14. NICKEL-BASE ALLOY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inouye, H.; Manly, W.D.; Roche, T.K.

    1960-01-19

    A nickel-base alloy was developed which is particularly useful for the containment of molten fluoride salts in reactors. The alloy is resistant to both salt corrosion and oxidation and may be used at temperatures as high as 1800 deg F. Basically, the alloy consists of 15 to 22 wt.% molybdenum, a small amount of carbon, and 6 to 8 wt.% chromium, the balance being nickel. Up to 4 wt.% of tungsten, tantalum, vanadium, or niobium may be added to strengthen the alloy.

  15. Determination of the Silicon, Vanadium, Iron, Aluminum, Nickel, Molybdenum and Chromium in Titanium Alloy by ICP-AES%ICP-AES测定钛合金中硅钒铁铝镍钼铬

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    成勇

    2012-01-01

    This paper has built an analysis method of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) for direct and simultaneous determination of alloying elements or trace impurities of silicon, vanadium, iron, aluminum, nickel, molybdenum and chromium in the titanium alloy. The titanium alloy samples were digested completely by hydrofluoric acid and nitric acid mixed reagents and the heating conditions of the digestion reaction were controlled at room temperature or 70 ℃ water bath to avoid the volatilization loss of the element and ensure that the hydrolysis reaction of high-concentration titanium in the low acidity medium did not occur. The effect of titanium matrix and coexisting elements on the determination of the spectral interference was tested. The internal standard correction method using the yttrium as internal standard element was employed, and elemental analysis of spectral lines, internal calibration spectrum, the synchronous background correction positions and ICP spectrometer working conditions were selected preferably to effectively eliminate the physical interference resulting from titanium substrate and improve the detection precision and detection limit level. The test results of the practical application show that the detection limit is 10~27 μg/L, the background equivalent density is 5~38 μg/L, the correlation coefficient r≥0.9992, the recovery rate is 95.0%~105.0% and the RSD≤2.27%.%建立了电感耦合等离子体原子发射光谱法(ICP-AES)直接同时测定钛合金中合金元素或微量杂质硅钒铁铝镍钼铬的分析方法.采用氢氟酸和硝酸混合试剂并且在室温或70℃水浴控制加热条件下消解样品,从而避免了待测元素的挥发损失以及确保了高浓度钛基体在低酸度介质中也不会发生水解反应.试验了钛基体和共存元素对测定的光谱干扰影响,采取以钇作为内标元素的内标校正法,并且优选了待测元素分析谱线、内标校正谱

  16. A prospective follow-up study on the impact of urinary excretions of nickel and chromium after dental restoration by nickel-chromium based alloys%佩戴镍铬合金烤瓷冠对尿镍铬水平影响的前瞻性随访研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹新明; 王珏; 夏刚; 徐碧瑶; 沈庆平; 钟群; 姜庆五; 陈波

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore whether the dental restoration of nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) based alloys will lead to extra excretions of urinary Ni and Cr. Methods Urinary Ni and Cr were repeatedly measured in 33 patients before and 2 months after the dental restoration of Ni-Cr alloys. The associations between alloy restoration and urinary Ni or Cr were analyzed by paired t test and general linear model of repeated measures. Results A slightly higher urinary Ni was found in patients after 2 month of the alloy restoration, but the difference was not statistically significant (before: 46.4 ug·mol-1 crea; after: 67.6 ug·mol-1 crea; P=0.063). This difference was only in female subjects (before: 44.8 ug·mol-1 crea; after: 73.7 ug·mol-1 crea; P=0.068). A significant higher urinary Cr was found in patients after 2 month of the alloy restoration (before: 57.0 ug·mor-1 crea; after: 99.4 ug·mol-1 crea; P=0.024). This significant difference was only in female subjects (before: 59.8 ug·mol-1 crea; after: 124.4 ug·mol-1 crea; P=0.023). General linear models of repeated measurements showed that urinary excretions of Ni and Cr were associated with the number of restoration and the area of metal basis uncovered with porcelain. Conclusion Dental restoration of Ni-Cr alloy might lead to the enhanced excretions of urinary Ni and Cr.%目的 探讨镍铬合金烤瓷冠的佩戴是否会导致机体尿镍铬水平升高.方法 对33例镍铬合金烤瓷冠佩戴者进行佩戴前和佩戴2月后的尿镍和尿铬重复测量,并采用配对t检验和重复测量数据线性回归分析探讨尿镍铬水平的变化与镍铬合金烤瓷冠佩戴的关系.结果 镍铬合金烤瓷冠佩戴2月后,机体尿镍水平(67.6 μg·mol-1肌酐)略高于佩戴前(46.4 μg·mol-1肌酐),但差异无统计学意义(P=0.063);女性患者佩戴前为44.8 μg·mol-1肌酐,佩戴后为73.7μg·mol-1肌酐(P=0.068).佩戴2月后,机体尿铬水平(99.4 μg·Tol-1肌酐)明显高于佩戴前(57.0

  17. Cobalt chromium stents versus stainless steel stents in diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Ahmed Tantawy

    2014-03-01

    Conclusions: We concluded that no significant statistical difference was found between the two stents (cobalt-chromium alloy bare metal stent versus conventional bare metal stainless steel stent in diabetic patients regarding (initial procedural success, in-hospital complications, the incidence of ISR at follow up, event-free survival at follow up.

  18. Spin-wave and critical neutron scattering from chromium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage; Axe, J.D.; Shirane, G.

    1971-01-01

    Chromium and its dilute alloys are unique examples of magnetism caused by itinerant electrons. The magnetic excitations have been studied by inelastic neutron scattering using a high-resolution triple-axis spectrometer. Spin-wave peaks in q scans at constant energy transfer ℏω could, in general, ...

  19. Corrosion Resistance of Fe-Ni-Cr Alloy Coating Electroplated with Trivalent Chromium Sulphate Salt Containing Electrolyte%三价铬硫酸盐体系电镀Fe-Ni-Cr合金镀层的耐蚀性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史艳华; 陈吉

    2011-01-01

    The Fe-Ni-Cr alloy coating on carbon steel was electrodeposited on mild steel No.20 with trivalent chromium sulfate salt containing electrolyte, and the corrosion resistance in 3.5% NaCl solution of coatings deposited with different processes was investigated by means of potentiodynamical polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. The experimental results showed that the optimal deposition parameters were as following: FeSO4·7H2O 15 g/L, NiSO4·6H2O 8 g/L, Cr2(SO4)3·6H2O 200g/L, C6H8O·7H2O 70g/L, current density 4 A/dm2, temperature 55 ℃. The corrosion rate of the coating in 3.5% NaCl solution was 73.2 mg·m-2·h-1, which was 23.3% lower than that of base material.%采用三价铬硫酸盐体系在普通碳素钢基体上电镀Fe-Ni-Cr合金镀层,通过浸泡失重法研究不同工艺条件下制备的镀层在3.5% NaCl溶液中的耐蚀性能,并用电化学分析方法研究了镀层试样的耐蚀机理.结果表明,最佳电镀Fe-Ni-Cr合金工艺为:主盐浓度FeS04·7H2O 15 g/L、NiSO4·6H2O 8 g/L、Cr(SO4)3.6H2O 200g/L;络合剂柠檬酸浓度70 g/L;电流密度为4 A/dm2,电镀温度为55℃.该工艺制备的Fe-Ni-Cr 合金镀层在3.5% NaCl溶液中的腐蚀速率为73.2 mg-m-2·h-1,耐蚀性比基体提高23.3%.

  20. AZ91 D镁合金Mo-Mn无铬转化膜的制备与耐蚀性%Preparation and Corrosion Resistance of Mo-Mn Chromium-free Conversion Coating Formed on AZ91 D Magnesium Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱青; 朱明; 余勇; 张路路

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT:Objective To improve the surface corrosion resistance of AZ91D magnesium alloy by Mo-Mn chromium-free conver-sion coating. Methods Effects of different concentrations of NaMoO4 and KMnO4 and temperature on the transformed sample film were studied by orthogonal experimental method. After optimizing experiment parameters, the effects of the time on the conversion film was also studied. The morphology and component of conversion coatings were researched by SEM and EDS. Moreover, the po-larization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of conversion coating were tested in 3. 5%NaCl aqueous solution. Results The results showed that when the condition was 10 g/L NaMoO4 , 6 g/L KMnO4 at 50 ℃ and pH 5 for 40 min, where the morphology of the sample was relatively even and the amount of cracks was relatively low. Compared to the corrosion resistance of magnesium substrate, the corrosion potential of conversion film was increased by about 0. 075 V ,and the corrosion current density decreased by nearly 1 order of magnitude. When the condition was 20 g/L NaMoO4 , 8 g/L KMnO4 at 50 ℃ and pH 5 for 40 min, the morphology of the sample was the most even and the amount of cracks was the least. Compared to the corrosion resistance of magnesium substrate, the corrosion potential of conversion film was increased by about 0. 047 V ,and the corrosion current density decreased by nearly 2 orders of magnitude. EIS showed that the polarization resistance of the latter conversion film sample was 1450. 2 Ω, while the polarization resistance of magnesium matrix was 806. 4 Ω. Conclusion Mo-Mn chromium-free conversion coating could obviously improve the surface corrosion resistance of AZ91D magnesium alloy.%目的:通过Mo-Mn无铬转化膜提高AZ91 D镁合金的表面耐蚀性。方法采用正交实验法,研究不同浓度的NaMoO4和KMnO4以及温度对转化膜的影响。优选实验参数后,考察时间对转化膜的影响。利用SEM及EDS研究转化膜

  1. A cross-sectional survey on immunological function after dental restoration of nickel-chromium alloy%戴用镍铬合金烤瓷冠对免疫功能影响的横断面研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏刚; 陈波; 徐碧瑶; 曹新明; 王珏; 姜庆五

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨口内戴用镍铬合金烤瓷冠是否导致机体免疫功能学指标改变.方法 对镍铬合金烤瓷冠戴用者795例和对照组198人进行问卷调查、测定尿镍铬和血免疫功能指标,并分析镍铬烤瓷冠戴用时间、尿镍铬与免疫功能指标间的关系.结果 将镍铬合金烤瓷冠戴用者和对照组的所有样本合并,根据尿镍和尿铬水平分为尿镍低水平组(< 37.28 μg/mol肌酐)、中水平组(37.28~ 115.73 μg/mol肌酐)和高水平组(>115.73 μg/mol肌酐);尿铬低水平组(<34.72 μg/mol肌酐)、中水平组(34.72 ~79.81 μg/mol肌酐)和高水平组(>79.81 μg/mol肌酐).结果 仅发现尿镍高水平组的血清白细胞介素( interleukin,IL)1β水平[(1.50±0.84) μg/L]显著低于尿镍低水平组[(1.63±0.82)μg/L](P<0.05),未发现尿镍中水平组与低水平组间、尿铬各水平组间在血清肿瘤坏死因子α(tumor necrosis factor-alpha,TNF-α)、IL-1β和IL-6间的差异有统计学意义.单因素方差分析和各影响因素的线性回归分析仅发现年龄与TNF-α的升高有关,未发现戴用时间、数量和金属裸露水平,以及尿镍和尿铬对TNF-α、IL-1β和IL-6等免疫学指标的显著影响.结论 本研究未观察 到戴用镍铬合金烤瓷冠与机体免疫功能指标TNF-α、IL-1β和IL-6的升高具有相关关系.%Objective To investigate the immunological function parameters in patients undergoing dental restoration of nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr).Methods Seven hundred and ninety-five Ni-Cr alloy consumers as exposure group,together with 198 controls,were surveyed by the questionnaire and the biological examination of immunological function.Results After splitting all subjects into three groups of equal sample size by urinary Ni or urinary Cr,serum interleukin-1 beta( IL-1 β) was found to be significantly higher in the group of urinary Ni > 115.73 μg/mol creatinine comparing to the group of urinary Ni < 37.28

  2. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1998-03-10

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and cast in copper chill molds. 3 figs.

  3. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santella, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding east nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and east in copper chill molds.

  4. RESEARCH AND APPLICATION OF AS-CAST WEAR RESISTANCE HIGH CHROMIUM CAST IRON

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    The influence of alloy elements, such as boron and silicon, on the microstructure and properties of as-cast high chromium cast iron is studied. The results show that boron and silicon have a great effect on the mechanical properties and the wear resistance. Through proper addition of boron and silicon, the properties of as-cast high chromium cast iron can be improved effectively. Through analyzing the distribution of elements by scanning electron microscope, it has been shown that the addition of boron and silicon lowers the mass fraction of chromium saturated in as-cast austenite, and makes it unstable and liable to be transformed into martensite. The as-cast high chromium cast iron with proper content of boron and silicon is suitable for the manufacture of lining for asphalt concrete mixer and its wear resistance is 14 times that of lining made of low alloy white cast iron.

  5. 21 CFR 872.3710 - Base metal alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Base metal alloy. 872.3710 Section 872.3710 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3710 Base metal alloy. (a) Identification. A base metal alloy is a device composed primarily of base metals, such as nickel, chromium, or cobalt, that...

  6. 贵金属、镍铬合金烤瓷修复体与中国人牙周组织健康关系的系统评价%Effect of gold alloy restorations and nickel-chromium restorations to the periodontal tissue of the Chinese: A systematic review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李菁文; 李春洁; 吕俊; 刘雯雯; 梁星

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chinese researchers have done many corresponding clinical trials and mostly agree that, compared with nickel-chromium restorations, gold alloy restorations are better to the Chinese periodontal tissue in the long term. However, there is still no relevant systematic review analyzing and evaluating those results in a more rigorous and convincing way.OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of nickel-chromium restorations and gold alloy restorations to the periodontal tissue of the Chinese.METHODS: Electronic searches were conducted in China Biology Medicine disc (CBMdisc, 1978-01/2011-03) and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI, 1979-01/2011-03). Hand-searching covered 10 Chinese dental journals. Randomized controlled trials satisfying the eligible criteria were selected and the risks of bias were assessed. With the data extracted by two well-trained investigators independently, Meta-analysis was processed by Revman 5.0.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Six studies with moderate risk of bias were included. The results indicated gold alloy restorations could reduce 79% of the risk of post -restorative gingivitis in nickel-chromium restorations (P < 0.05), and gold alloy restorations could also reduce the risk of gingival coloration by 94% of nickel-chromium restorations (P < 0.05). The results on the restoration fitness with four studies pooled indicated better restoration fitness in gold alloy restorations than nickel-chromium restorations (P < 0.05). Present evidences indicated that gold alloy rest orations have lower risk in inducing gingivitis and gingival coloration compared to nickel-chromium. But more high quality studies are still needed to confirm the conclusion.%背景:国内许多学者认为贵金属烤瓷修复体较镍铬合金更有利于保持牙周组织的长期健康,但国内外尚无相关的系统评价.目的:评价贵金属与镍铬合金烤瓷修复体对中国人牙周组织健康的影响.方法:计算机检索中

  7. Growth of magnetic cobalt/chromium nano-arrays by atom-optical lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atoneche, F; Malik, D; Kirilyuk, A; Toonen, A J; Etteger, A F van; Rasing, Th, E-mail: f.atoneche@science.ru.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen, Institute for Molecules and Materials, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2011-07-06

    Arrays of magnetic cobalt/chromium (Co-Cr) nanolines are grown by depositing an atomic beam of Co-Cr alloy through a laser standing wave (SW) at {lambda}/2 = 212.8 nm onto a substrate. During deposition, only the chromium atoms are resonantly affected by the optical potential created by the SW, causing a periodic modulation of the chromium concentration and consequently of the magnetic properties. Magnetic force microscopy and magneto-optical Kerr effect studies reveal a patterned magnetic structure on the substrate surface.

  8. Growth of magnetic cobalt/chromium nano-arrays by atom-optical lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atoneche, F.; Malik, D.; Kirilyuk, A.; Toonen, A. J.; van Etteger, A. F.; Rasing, Th

    2011-07-01

    Arrays of magnetic cobalt/chromium (Co-Cr) nanolines are grown by depositing an atomic beam of Co-Cr alloy through a laser standing wave (SW) at λ/2 = 212.8 nm onto a substrate. During deposition, only the chromium atoms are resonantly affected by the optical potential created by the SW, causing a periodic modulation of the chromium concentration and consequently of the magnetic properties. Magnetic force microscopy and magneto-optical Kerr effect studies reveal a patterned magnetic structure on the substrate surface.

  9. THE WEAR RESISTANCE INCREASE OF CHROMIUM CAST IRON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Ilyushenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the tests on the wear resistance of chromium cast irons of different compositions obtained in sand forms. It has been shown that increase of the wear resistance and mechanical properties of the cast iron is possible to obtain using the casting in metal molds. A further increase in wear resistance of parts produced in metal molds is possible by changing the technological parameters of casting and alloying by titanium.

  10. Duct and cladding alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenko, Michael K.

    1983-01-01

    An austenitic alloy having good thermal stability and resistance to sodium corrosion at 700.degree. C. consists essentially of 35-45% nickel 7.5-14% chromium 0.8-3.2% molybdenum 0.3-1.0% silicon 0.2-1.0% manganese 0-0.1% zirconium 2.0-3.5% titanium 1.0-2.0% aluminum 0.02-0.1% carbon 0-0.01% boron and the balance iron.

  11. Influence of tungsten and titanium on the structure of chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kopyciński

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the as-cast state structure of chromium cast iron designed for operation under harsh impact-abrasive conditions. In the process of chromium iron castings manufacture, very strong influence on the structure of this material have the parameters of the technological process. Among others, adding to the Fe-Cr-C alloy the alloying elements like tungsten and titanium leads to the formation of additional carbides in the structure of this cast iron, which may favourably affect the casting properties, including the resistance to abrasive wear.

  12. Cr5系堆焊合金碳、铬过渡形式对高温磨损性能影响的研究%Research on Influence of Transition Way of Carbon and Chromium of Cr5 Series Hardfacing Alloy on High-temperature Wear Property

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王清宝; 史耀武; 栗卓新; 王立志; 李侠; 肖静

    2012-01-01

    In the roll welding composite manufacture, in order to save precious carbon, improve cost-effective of hardfacing material, the submerged arc welding of flux-cored wires is used while the deposited metal remained unchanged in order to research the influence of different carbon, chromium adding ways to deposited metal microstructure and properties. Through the abrasion hardness, high tensile, high room temperature toughness and quantifying the amount of wear of the sample before and after, the relationship between microstructure, adding ways and wear resistance is analyzed combining the microstructure before and after wear, scanning electron microscopy and other aids. When Cr5 series hardfacing alloys are used, on the basis of keeping the compositions of hardfacing deposited metal unchanged basically, it is researched about the influence of different addition ways of carbon and chromium on microstructure and properties of hardfacing alloy. The results show that the high-temperature wear resistance of hardfacing metal is proportional to the high-temperature strength and hardness of the alloy at the temperature of 600 °C, and improved along with the increase of alloy toughness; for the flux-cored wire with direct addition of graphite and chromium powder, the wear resistance of hardfacing deposited metal is much better than that with direct addition of chromium carbide. High-temperature wear results from multiple factors including alloy oxidation, cutting, fatigue cracking and stripping, etc. Ideal high-temperature wear-resistant hardfacing material depends on not only the alloying system adopted by hardfacing metal, but also other factors such as microstructure, anti-oxidation property, high-temperature strength and toughness. Therefore, changing the addition way of alloys may strengthen deposited metal without need of modifying agents and external field excitation.%在轧辊堆焊复合制造中,为节约贵重碳化物及提高堆焊材料的性价比,在堆焊熔

  13. Microbial Diversity of Chromium-Contaminated Soils and Characterization of Six Chromium-Removing Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhiguo; Hu, Yuting; Yin, Zhen; Hu, Yuehua; Zhong, Hui

    2016-06-01

    Three soil samples obtained from different sites adjacent to a chromium slag heap in a steel alloy factory were taken to examine the effect of chromium contamination on soil bacterial diversity as determined by construction of 16S rDNA clone libraries and sequencing of selected clones based on restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Results revealed that Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Alphaproteobacteria occurred in all three soil samples, although the three samples differed in their total diversity. Sample 1 had the highest microbial diversity covering 12 different classes, while Sample 3 had the lowest microbial diversity. Strains of six different species were successfully isolated, one of which was identified as Zobellella denitrificans. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a strain belonging to the genus Zobellella able to resist and reduce chromium. Among all isolates studied, Bacillus odysseyi YH2 exhibited the highest Cr(VI)-reducing capability, with a total removal of 23.5 % of an initial Cr(VI) concentration of 350 mg L-1.

  14. Oxidation of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690: Experimentally Accelerated Study in Hydrogenated Supercritical Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Tyler; Cao, Guoping; Was, Gary S.

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study is to determine whether the oxidation of Alloys 600 and 690 in supercritical water occurs by the same mechanism in subcritical water. Coupons of Alloys 690 and 600 were exposed to hydrogenated subcritical and supercritical water from 633 K to 673 K (360 °C to 400 °C) and the oxidation behavior was observed. By all measures of oxide character and behavior, the oxidation process is the same above and below the supercritical line. Similar oxide morphologies, structures, and chemistries were observed for each alloy across the critical point, indicating that the oxidation mechanism is the same in both subcritical and supercritical water. Oxidation results in a multi-layer oxide structure composed of particles of NiO and NiFe2O4 formed by precipitation on the outer surface and a chromium-rich inner oxide layer formed by diffusion of oxygen to the metal-oxide interface. The inner oxide on Alloy 600 is less chromium rich than that observed on Alloy 690 and is accompanied by preferential oxidation of grain boundaries. The inner oxide on Alloy 690 initially forms by internal oxidation before a protective layer of chromium-rich MO is formed with Cr2O3 at the metal-oxide interface. Grain boundaries in Alloy 690 act as fast diffusion paths for chromium that forms a protective Cr2O3 layer at the surface, preventing grain boundary oxidation from occurring.

  15. Oxidation of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690: Experimentally Accelerated Study in Hydrogenated Supercritical Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Tyler; Cao, Guoping; Was, Gary S.

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study is to determine whether the oxidation of Alloys 600 and 690 in supercritical water occurs by the same mechanism in subcritical water. Coupons of Alloys 690 and 600 were exposed to hydrogenated subcritical and supercritical water from 633 K to 673 K (360 °C to 400 °C) and the oxidation behavior was observed. By all measures of oxide character and behavior, the oxidation process is the same above and below the supercritical line. Similar oxide morphologies, structures, and chemistries were observed for each alloy across the critical point, indicating that the oxidation mechanism is the same in both subcritical and supercritical water. Oxidation results in a multi-layer oxide structure composed of particles of NiO and NiFe2O4 formed by precipitation on the outer surface and a chromium-rich inner oxide layer formed by diffusion of oxygen to the metal-oxide interface. The inner oxide on Alloy 600 is less chromium rich than that observed on Alloy 690 and is accompanied by preferential oxidation of grain boundaries. The inner oxide on Alloy 690 initially forms by internal oxidation before a protective layer of chromium-rich MO is formed with Cr2O3 at the metal-oxide interface. Grain boundaries in Alloy 690 act as fast diffusion paths for chromium that forms a protective Cr2O3 layer at the surface, preventing grain boundary oxidation from occurring.

  16. Bacterial adhesion of zirconia ceramics versus nickel chromium alloy as oral materials%氧化锆陶瓷与镍铬合金口腔材料的细菌黏附性对比

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩月红; 成之远; 王明德

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Experimental and clinical experiences show that the surface roughness of dental restoration materials directly affects bacterial adhesion; in addition, the material composition and physicochemical properties are also important influencing factors. OBJECTIVE: To compare the bacterial adhesion of zirconia ceramics and nickel chromium al oy as oral materials. METHODS: Zirconia ceramics and nickel chromium al oy were respectively cut into 10 pieces of 3. 0 cm ×3.0 cm×0. 2 cm plate specimens. For each material, five pieces were subjected to surface polishing treatment, and the other five pieces were glazed. Surface roughness value of specimens was detected. Experimental strains of Streptococcus mutans was cultured on the specimen surface at 37 ℃ for 48 hours, and the amount of bacteria adhering to the specimen surface was detected. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Surface roughness of four groups of specimens showed no difference. The amount of bacteria that adhered to the polishing specimens of zirconia ceramics was significantly lower than that of nickel chromium al oy (P < 0.05), but no difference was found in the amount of bacteria adhering to the glazing specimens of nickel-chromium al oy and zirconia ceramics. These findings indicate that zirconia ceramics has better ability to inhibit bacterial adhesion than nickel-chromium al oy, especial y after glazing.%背景:实验及临床经验表明,修复材料表面的粗糙度直接影响细菌的黏附性,除此之外,材料组成及本身理化性质也是重要影响因素。目的:对比氧化锆陶瓷与镍铬合金口腔材料的细菌黏附性。方法:将氧化锆陶瓷、镍铬合金分别制成3.0 cm ×3.0 cm ×0.2 cm 的板片,每种材料各10片。两种材料各选取其中5片进行抛光处理,另5片进行上釉处理,检测4组试件的粗糙度。将变形链球菌浮液滴加于4组材料表面,37℃厌氧培养48 h,检测各组细菌黏附数量。结果与结论:4

  17. Chromium related degradation of solid oxide fuel cells; Chrom-bezogene Degradation von Festoxid-Brennstoffzellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, Anita

    2011-05-04

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) offer a high potential for application as an auxiliary power unit (APU) for heavy goods vehicles as well as combined heat and power (CHP) systems. SOFCs are especially attractive due to their high efficiencies and the use of different fuel types. However, optimization in terms of long term stability and costs are still necessary. This work characterized the degradation of SOFCs with lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) cathodes under chromium influence. Galvanostatic cell tests were carried out at 800 C with operation times from 250 - 3000 h and variation of the chromium source and current density. The current densities of j = 0 (A)/(cm{sup 2}), j = 0,3 (A)/(cm{sup 2}) and j = 0,5 (A)/(cm{sup 2}) were applied. The high temperature ferritic alloy Crofer22APU was used as a chromium source. Variation of the chromium source was realized by coating the Crofer22APU insert with the chromium retention layer Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} and the cathode contact layer LCC10. Cell degradation was analyzed with regard to cell voltage, current density and area specific resistance (ASR). Microstructural alterations of the cathode as well as chromium content and distribution across the cell were investigated after completion of the cell tests. For cells with a chromium source present and operation with a nonzero current density, the course of cell degradation was divided into three phases: a run-in, weak linear degradation and strong linear degradation. A decrease of the chromium release rate by means of different coatings stretched the course of degradation along the timescale. Strong degradation, which is characterized by a significant increase in ASR as well as a decrease of current density at the operating point, was only observed when a chromium source in the setup was comb ined with operation of the cell with a non-zero current density. Operation of the cell with a chromium source but no current density caused a degradation of current density at the

  18. Groundwater contaminant by hexavalent chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, C. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Oxidation of trivalent chromium to hexavalent chromium has been investigated as a function of total manganese in soils as well as various incubation conditions. Chromium and manganese contents were analyzed by atomic absorption (graphite furnace and flame emission respectively) following acid digestion. Total hexavalent chromium generation capacity was determined by addition of 0.001 M CrCL3, incubation, and analysis by s-diphenyl carbazide. Samples were then leached with CaSO{sub 4} and MgSO{sub 4} and incubated in various environments (oven, freeze-drier, field moist, ultrafreeze) to test for geogenic generation of Cr(IV). The degree of geogenic generation of hexavalent chromium was compared with total Mn and Cr content as well as hexavalent generational capacity.

  19. Properties of CuCr contact materials with low chromium content and fine particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹辉; 王亚平; 郑志; 冼爱平

    2003-01-01

    The voltage withstanding capability and electric conductivity of CuCr contact materials with low chromium content and fine Cr particles were studied. The results show that the withstanding voltage has little relation with the Cr content for the melted-casting CuCr alloy within 15%-29% Cr content, and that the electric conductivity of the alloy increases with the decreasing of Cr content.

  20. [Research Progress in Genotoxic Effects of Degradation Products, Cobalt, Chromium Ions and Nanoparticles from Metal-on-metal Prostheses on Cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hao; Han, Qinglin; Liu, Fan

    2015-04-01

    Cobalt or chromium alloys are the most common clinical materials of prosthesis and there have been some investigators at home and abroad have done related researches about the genotoxic effects of cobalt and chromium ions and nanoparticles. People have certain understanding about the mechanism of production of ions as well as their influence on cells. However, chromium or cobalt nanoparticles genotoxicity related research is still in its preliminary stage. In each stage, the mechanisms, from creating of the particles, through entering cells, until finally causing genotoxic, are still contained many problems to be solved. This article reviews the research progress in mechanisms of production and genotoxic effects of cobalt, chromium ions and nanoparticles.

  1. On texture formation of chromium electrodeposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian Bergenstof; Leisner, Peter; Horsewell, Andy

    1998-01-01

    The microstructure, texture and hardness of electrodeposited hard, direct current (DC) chromium and pulsed reversed chromium has been investigated. These investigations suggest that the growth and texture of hard chromium is controlled by inhibition processes and reactions. Further, it has been...... established that codeposition of Cr2O3 nanoparticles is a general feature of DC chromium electrodeposition....

  2. Corrosion of high temperature alloys in solar salt at 400, 500, and 680ÀC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Gill, David Dennis; LaFord, Marianne Elizabeth

    2013-09-01

    Corrosion tests at 400, 500, and 680ÀC were performed using four high temperature alloys; 347SS, 321SS In625, and HA230. Molten salt chemistry was monitored over time through analysis of nitrite, carbonate, and dissolved metals. Metallography was performed on alloys at 500 and 680ÀC, due to the relatively thin oxide scale observed at 400ÀC. At 500ÀC, corrosion of iron based alloys took the form of chromium depletion and iron oxides, while nickel based alloys also had chromium depletion and formation of NiO. Chromium was detected in relatively low concentrations at this temperature. At 680ÀC, significant surface corrosion occurred with metal losses greater than 450microns/year after 1025hours of exposure. Iron based alloys formed complex iron, sodium, and chromium oxides. Some data suggests grain boundary chromium depletion of 321SS. Nickel alloys formed NiO and metallic nickel corrosion morphologies, with HA230 displaying significant internal oxidation in the form of chromia. Nickel alloys both exhibited worse corrosion than iron based alloys likely due to preferential dissolution of chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten.

  3. Preparation and corrosion resistance studies of nanometric sol-gel-based CeO{sub 2} film with a chromium-free pretreatment on AZ91D magnesium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Shiyan [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Li Qing, E-mail: liqingswu@yeah.ne [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Chen Bo [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Yang Xiaokui [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China)

    2010-01-01

    Magnesium alloy, although valuable, is reactive and requires protection before it can be applied in many fields. In this study, a novel protective environmental-friendly gradient coating was performed on AZ91D magnesium alloy by non-chromate surface treatments, which consisted of phytic acid chemical conversion coating and the sol-gel-based CeO{sub 2} thin film. The surface morphologies, microstructure and composition of the coatings were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy disperse spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The corrosion resistance of the coatings was evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The effects of the concentration, layers, temperature of heat treatment of CeO{sub 2} sol on the anti-corrosion properties of the gradient coating for magnesium were also investigated. The results showed that the gradient coating was mainly composed of crystalline CeO{sub 2}. According to the results of electrochemical tests, the corrosion resistance of AZ91D magnesium alloy was found to be greatly improved by means of this new environmental-friendly surface treatment.

  4. Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Nickel Alloys - A Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebak, R

    2004-07-12

    Nickel can dissolve a large amount of alloying elements while still maintaining its austenitic structure. That is, nickel based alloys can be tailored for specific applications. The family of nickel alloys is large, from high temperature alloys (HTA) to corrosion resistant alloys (CRA). In general, CRA are less susceptible to environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) than stainless steels. The environments where nickel alloys suffer EAC are limited and generally avoidable by design. These environments include wet hydrofluoric acid and hot concentrated alkalis. Not all nickel alloys are equally susceptible to cracking in these environments. For example, commercially pure nickel is less susceptible to EAC in hot concentrated alkalis than nickel alloyed with chromium (Cr) and molybdenum (Mo). The susceptibility of nickel alloys to EAC is discussed by family of alloys.

  5. CHROMIUM STATUS IN DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshavarz

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available Fasting serum chromium, total cholesterol HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, triacytglycerot and blood sugar were determined in fifty two diabetic patients with no other organic diseases anil compared with those obtained from a control group including fourty two healthy volunteers matched for age, sex ami body mass irutex (BMI. Fasting serum chromium and HDL-cholesterol were significantly lower in patients than in controls (p<0.0001 and p<0.001 respectively, but the mean triacytglycerot concentration was significantly higher in patients than in controls (p<002. Mean total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol values were not significantly different in the two groups. Mean intake of energy, proteins, fats and chromium, estimated by the 24 hr dietary recall method were not significantly different in the two groups. We demonstrated that despite an adequate intake of chromium, the fasting serum chromium was lower in diabetic patients than in control subjects. Chromium deficiency in diabetic patients may act as a contributing factor in aggravating the disease's complications.

  6. In Vitro Analyses of the Toxicity, Immunological, and Gene Expression Effects of Cobalt-Chromium Alloy Wear Debris and Co Ions Derived from Metal-on-Metal Hip Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga M. Posada

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Joint replacement has proven to be an extremely successful and cost-effective means of relieving arthritic pain and improving quality of life for recipients. Wear debris-induced osteolysis is, however, a major limitation and causes orthopaedic implant aseptic loosening, and various cell types including macrophages, monocytes, osteoblasts, and osteoclasts, are involved. During the last few years, there has been increasing concern about metal-on-metal (MoM hip replacements regarding adverse reactions to metal debris associated with the MoM articulation. Even though MoM-bearing technology was initially aimed to extend the durability of hip replacements and to reduce the requirement for revision, they have been reported to release at least three times more cobalt and chromium ions than metal-on-polyethylene (MoP hip replacements. As a result, the toxicity of metal particles and ions produced by bearing surfaces, both locally in the periprosthetic space and systemically, became a concern. Several investigations have been carried out to understand the mechanisms responsible for the adverse response to metal wear debris. This   review aims at summarising in vitro analyses of the toxicity, immunological, and gene expression effects of cobalt ions and wear debris derived from MoM hip implants.

  7. 镍铬铍合金烤瓷冠修复中铍离子对口腔常见细菌及牙周组织的影响%Inhibitory Effect of Beryllium Ions on Oral Subgingival Bacterias under Nickel-Chromium-Beryllium Alloy Porcelain Crown Repair and the Effect on Periodontal Tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺会平; 杨甜甜; 刘欣

    2016-01-01

    Objective] To investigate the inhibitory effect of beryllium ions on the growth of two oral subgingival bacterias under nickel‐chromium‐beryllium alloy porcelain crown repair and the post‐repair effect on periodontal tissues .[Methods] This study was divided into two parts :(1) The in vitro trials were divided into three groups ,the experimental group (containing beryllium ion in artificial saliva 0 .5ml + oral Streptococcus suspension liquid / Porphyromonasgingivalis suspension liquid 0 .5mL) ,the positive group (artificial saliva 0 .5mL + oral streptococci suspension liquid / Porphy‐romonasgingivalis suspension liquid 0 .5mL) and the negative group (artificial saliva 0 .5mL + BHI medium 0 .5 mL) ,and oral streptococci experimentally cultured for 24h ,Porphyromonasgingivalis cultured for 48h .(2) 20 cases of patients un‐dergoing nickel chromium alloy porcelain crowns were selected and measured before restoration ,the levels of gingival sul‐cus fluid (GCF) ,aspartate aminotransferase (GCF‐AST) and alkaline phosphatase (GCF‐ALP) activity were measured respectively 3 months before and after the repair .[Results] In the experimental group ,six beryllium ion concentrations (1 .25 ,2 .5 ,5 ,10 ,20 ,40 ppm) of oral streptococci suspension ,Porphyromonasgingivalis bacteria colony counts were significantly lower than positive group ( P 0 .05) .[Conclusion] In the nickel chromium beryllium alloy ,be‐ryllium ion has a certain inhibitory effect on the growth of Streptococcus mutans suspension and Porphyromonas gingival‐is .Nickel chromium beryllium alloy porcelain crown has little effect on the periodontal tissue .%【目的】探讨镍铬铍合金烤瓷冠修复中铍离子对口腔两种龈下细菌生长的影响及修复后对患者牙周组织的影响。【方法】本研究分为两个部分:①体外实验分为三组,实验组(含有铍离子的人工唾液0.5 mL +口腔链球菌悬液/牙龈卟啉单胞菌悬液0.5 m

  8. Effects of Cerium on Alloy Elements Distribution in Ferrous Matrix Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘英才; 刘俊友; 尹衍生; 刘国权

    2001-01-01

    The effect of the addition of rare earths in Fe-based high chromium alloy powders on elements distribution in matrix materials and mechanical properties were studied. The results show that the addition of cerium can increase the chromium amount in carbonides and increase the micro-hardness after carbonization and the wear-resistant property of materials.

  9. Chromium related degradation of solid oxide fuel cells; Chrom-bezogene Degradation von Festoxid-Brennstoffzellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, Anita

    2011-05-04

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) offer a high potential for application as an auxiliary power unit (APU) for heavy goods vehicles as well as combined heat and power (CHP) systems. SOFCs are especially attractive due to their high efficiencies and the use of different fuel types. However, optimization in terms of long term stability and costs are still necessary. This work characterized the degradation of SOFCs with lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) cathodes under chromium influence. Galvanostatic cell tests were carried out at 800 C with operation times from 250 - 3000 h and variation of the chromium source and current density. The current densities of j = 0 (A)/(cm{sup 2}), j = 0,3 (A)/(cm{sup 2}) and j = 0,5 (A)/(cm{sup 2}) were applied. The high temperature ferritic alloy Crofer22APU was used as a chromium source. Variation of the chromium source was realized by coating the Crofer22APU insert with the chromium retention layer Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} and the cathode contact layer LCC10. Cell degradation was analyzed with regard to cell voltage, current density and area specific resistance (ASR). Microstructural alterations of the cathode as well as chromium content and distribution across the cell were investigated after completion of the cell tests. For cells with a chromium source present and operation with a nonzero current density, the course of cell degradation was divided into three phases: a run-in, weak linear degradation and strong linear degradation. A decrease of the chromium release rate by means of different coatings stretched the course of degradation along the timescale. Strong degradation, which is characterized by a significant increase in ASR as well as a decrease of current density at the operating point, was only observed when a chromium source in the setup was comb ined with operation of the cell with a non-zero current density. Operation of the cell with a chromium source but no current density caused a degradation of current density at the

  10. Comparison of Metal Dusting Behavior of Several Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Guang-wei; DENG Bo; FENG Di

    2004-01-01

    Metal dusting behaviors of several alloys with different chromium contents and other elements were investigated in a given gaseous environment. The samples of the alloys were exposed at 650 ℃ for 650 h, and were periodically removed to examine coke protrusions and pits formed on the sample surfaces by SEM and determine metal wastage. The results were interpreted in terms of the compositional variations of the employed alloys.

  11. Abrasive Wear Behavior of High Chromium Cast Iron and Hadfield Steel-- A Comparison

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mehdi Mazar Atabaki; Sajjad Jafari; Hassan Abdollah-pour

    2012-01-01

    Wear properties of two different crushers used for grinding raw materials of cement industry are compared using pin-on-disk wear test.The wear test was carried out with different loads on a pin.Abrasive wear behavior of two alloys was evaluated by comparing mass loss,wear resistance,microhardness and friction coefficient.The microstructure of the specimens was detected using optical microscope.The results showed that abrasive wear of high chromium cast iron is lower than that of Hadfield steel.Due to the presence of M7C3 carbides on the high chromium cast iron matrix,impact crushers exhibited higher friction coefficient

  12. High strength, tough alloy steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gareth; Rao, Bangaru V. N.

    1979-01-01

    A high strength, tough alloy steel is formed by heating the steel to a temperature in the austenite range (1000.degree.-1100.degree. C.) to form a homogeneous austenite phase and then cooling the steel to form a microstructure of uniformly dispersed dislocated martensite separated by continuous thin boundary films of stabilized retained austenite. The steel includes 0.2-0.35 weight % carbon, at least 1% and preferably 3-4.5% chromium, and at least one other substitutional alloying element, preferably manganese or nickel. The austenite film is stable to subsequent heat treatment as by tempering (below 300.degree. C.) and reforms to a stable film after austenite grain refinement.

  13. Influence of chromium on the initial corrosion behavior of low alloy steels in the CO2-O2-H2S-SO2 wet-dry corrosion environment of cargo oil tankers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-he Zhao; Wei Liu; Jie Zhao; Dong Zhang; Peng-cheng Liu; Min-xu Lu

    2015-01-01

    The influence of Cr on the initial corrosion behavior of low-alloy steels exposed to a CO2–O2–H2S–SO2wet–dry corrosion envi-ronment was investigated using weight-loss measurements, scanning electron microscopy, N2 adsorption tests, X-ray diffraction analysis, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results show that the corrosion rate increases with increasing Cr content in samples subjected to corrosion for 21 d. However, the rust grain size decreases, its specific surface area increases, and it becomes more compact and denser with increasing Cr content, which indicates the enhanced protectivity of the rust. The results of charge transfer resistance (Rct) calculations indicate that higher Cr contents can accelerate the corrosion during the first 7 d and promote the formation of the enhanced protective inner rust after 14 d; the formed protective inner rust is responsible for the greater corrosion resistance during long-term exposure.

  14. Chromium at High Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Rafael

    2012-02-01

    Chromium has long served as the archetype of spin density wave magnetism. Recently, Jaramillo and collaborators have shown that Cr also serves as an archetype of magnetic quantum criticality. Using a combination of x-ray diffraction and electrical transport measurements at high pressures and cryogenic temperatures in a diamond anvil cell, they have demonstrated that the N'eel transition (TN) can be continuously suppressed to zero, with no sign of a concurrent structural transition. The order parameter undergoes a broad regime of exponential suppression, consistent with the weak coupling paradigm, before deviating from a BCS-like ground state within a narrow but accessible quantum critical regime. The quantum criticality is characterized by mean field scaling of TN and non mean field scaling of the transport coefficients, which points to a fluctuation-induced reconstruction of the critical Fermi surface. A comparison between pressure and chemical doping as means to suppress TN sheds light on different routes to the quantum critical point and the relevance of Fermi surface nesting and disorder at this quantum phase transition. The work by Jaramillo et al. is broadly relevant to the study of magnetic quantum criticality in a physically pure and theoretically tractable system that balances elements of weak and strong coupling. [4pt] [1] R. Jaramillo, Y. Feng, J. Wang & T. F. Rosenbaum. Signatures of quantum criticality in pure Cr at high pressure. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 107, 13631 (2010). [0pt] [2] R. Jaramillo, Y. Feng, J. C. Lang, Z. Islam, G. Srajer, P. B. Littlewood, D. B. McWhan & T. F. Rosenbaum. Breakdown of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer ground state at a quantum phase transition. Nature 459, 405 (2009).

  15. Resistência de união entre cimentos e liga de níquel-cromo, em função da ciclagem térmica e variações no procedimento de união Tensile bond strength between cements and nickel-chromium alloy related to thermocycling and adhesive variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Ruiz MARTUCI

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available A investigação teve a finalidade de avaliar a resistência de união de uma liga de níquel-cromo com diversos agentes cimentantes frente à imersão, sem ou com termociclagem e idade. A liga usada foi a Litecast B. Os sistemas adesivos usados foram Ketac-Cem, Vitremer, Enforce com Flúor em três variações: a com primer apenas (Enforce P; b com primer e adesivo (Enforce P + A; c apenas adesivo (Enforce A. Discos metálicos, obtidos por fundição, foram cimentados entre si, constituindo os corpos de prova, que foram imersos em água destilada e submetidos ou não à ciclagem térmica. Os testes foram feitos 1 e 90 dias após a cimentação. As conclusões foram: o Ketac-Cem apresentou baixa resistência adesiva, sendo superado pelo Vitremer; o Enforce P, embora aumentasse a resistência ao longo do tempo, fez com que ela permanecesse baixa; o Enforce P + A apresentou alta resistência em um dia, que diminuiu ao longo do tempo; o Enforce A apresentou superioridade adesiva, que se manteve ao longo do tempo com ciclagem térmica; a influência da ciclagem térmica foi dependente do sistema adesivo.We evaluated tensile bond strengths between a nickel-chromium alloy and cements at different times (one and 90 days using or not thermocycling. Alloy used was Litecast B, and luting cements were Ketac-Cem, Vitremer, and Fluoride Enforce with three variations: a only primer; b with primer and bond; c only with bond. Metallic discs with 6 mm diameter were cemented together and immersed in distilled water. Half specimens were thermocycled and half one not. Conclusions were: Ketac-Cem presented low bonding strength, being that of Vitremer very higher; the material Enforce when used only with primer increased adhesion with time but yet remained relatively low after 90 days; Enforce used with bond only achieved superior adhesion, still present specially with termocycling after 90 days; influence of thermocycling depends on adhesive system.

  16. Influence of finishing on the electrochemical properties of dental alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, T; Hattori, M; Hasegawa, K; Yoshinari, M; Kawada, E; Oda, Y

    2000-05-01

    Dental alloy surface finishing procedures of may influence their electrochemical behavior, which is used to evaluate their corrosion resistance. We examined the polarization resistance and potentiodynamic polarization profile of the precious-metal alloys, Type 4 gold alloy and silver-palladium alloy, and the base-metal alloys, nickel-chromium alloy, cobalt-chromium alloy, and CP-titanium. Three types of finishing procedure were examined: mirror-finishing using 0.05 micron alumina particles, polishing using #600 abrasive paper and sandblasting. Dissolution of the alloy elements in 0.9% NaCl solution was also measured and compared with the electrochemical evaluation. The corrosion resistance of the dental alloys was found to relate to finishing as follows: The polarization resistance and potentiodynamic polarization behavior revealed that the corrosion resistance improved in the order of sandblasting, #600-abrasive-paper polishing, and mirror-finishing. While the corrosion potential, critical current density and passive current density varied depending on the type of finishing, the transpassive potential remained unchanged. The influence of finishing on the corrosion resistance of precious-metal alloys was less significant than on that of base-metal alloys. A mirror-finishing specimen was recommended for use in evaluation of the corrosion resistance of various dental alloys.

  17. Iron-based amorphous alloys and methods of synthesizing iron-based amorphous alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Cheng Kiong; Bauer, William A.; Choi, Jor-Shan; Day, Dan; Farmer, Joseph C.

    2016-05-03

    A method according to one embodiment includes combining an amorphous iron-based alloy and at least one metal selected from a group consisting of molybdenum, chromium, tungsten, boron, gadolinium, nickel phosphorous, yttrium, and alloys thereof to form a mixture, wherein the at least one metal is present in the mixture from about 5 atomic percent (at %) to about 55 at %; and ball milling the mixture at least until an amorphous alloy of the iron-based alloy and the at least one metal is formed. Several amorphous iron-based metal alloys are also presented, including corrosion-resistant amorphous iron-based metal alloys and radiation-shielding amorphous iron-based metal alloys.

  18. Chromium Salen Mediated Alkene Epoxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kaare Brandt; Norrby, Per-Ola; Daly, Adrian M.;

    2002-01-01

    The mechanism of alkene epoxidation by chromium(v) oxo salen complexes has been studied by DFT and experimental methods. The reaction is compared to the closely related Mn-catalyzed process in an attempt to understand the dramatic difference in selectivity between the two systems. Overall......, the studies show that the reactions have many similarities, but also a few critical differences. In agreement with experiment, the chromium system requires a change from low- to high-spin in the catalytic cycle, whereas the manganese system can proceed either with spin inversion or entirely on the high......-spin surface. The low-spin addition of metal oxo species to an alkene leads to an intermediate which forms epoxide either with a barrier on the low-spin surface or without a barrier after spin inversion. Supporting evidence for this intermediate was obtained by using vinylcyclopropane traps. The chromium...

  19. 选择性激光熔化技术制作牙科钴铬合金的电化学腐蚀性能研究%Electrochemical-corrosion behavior of dental cobalt-chromium alloy fabricated by selective laser melting technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    忻贤贞; 项楠; 陈洁; 徐丹; 魏斌

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the electrochemical-corrosion behavior of a dental cobalt-chromium ( Co-Cr) alloy fabricated by selective laser melting (SLM) under conditions simulating the oral environment. Methods Co-Cr alloy specimens for dental use (cylinder, 10 mm in diameter and 3 mm in thickness) were obtained by fabrication with the same Co-Cr alloy using SLM technique ( SLM group, n = 5) or traditional ca3t technique ( control group, n = 5). The electrochemical-corrosion behavior of the specimens were analysed with the parameter of polarization resistance ( Rp), which was examined with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests in an artificial saliva solution with two different pHs ( before diet, 5.0; after diet, 2.5). Results At pH of 5.0, Rp values of SLM group and control group were 4.25 ± 1. 11 and 3. 82 ± 1. 40 respectively, and there was no significant difference between two groups (P > 0.05). AtpHof2.5, R values of SLM group and control group were 5.83 ±0. 88 and 3.49 ±0.83 respectively, and there were significant differences between two groups (P <0. 05). Conclusion Compared with traditional cast technique, dental Co-Cr alloy fabricated by SLM has better anti-corrosion behavior in acid oral environment after diet.%目的 采用针对区域选择性激光熔化(SLM)技术制作钴铬合金口腔修复材料,考量其在特殊口腔环境中的电化学腐蚀性能.方法 选取具有相同成分的钴铬(Co-Cr)合金金属粉末和金属块,分别运用SLM技术(SLM组,n=5)和传统的铸造工艺(对照组,n=5)制作适用于口腔修复的Co-Cr合金试件(圆柱形,直径10 mm,厚度3 mm).模拟特殊口腔环境(未进食pH值为5.0,进食后pH值为2.5),采用电化学交流阻抗谱的方法获取相关拟合数据,根据极化电阻值Rp分析两组试件的耐腐蚀性能.结果当模拟口腔环境中pH值为5.0时,SLM组和对照组的Rp值分别为4.25±1.11和3.82±1.40,组间比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);当模

  20. 新型钴铬合金可降解涂层西罗莫司洗脱支架在猪冠状动脉过度扩张模型中对新生内膜的影响%A novel biodegradable polymer-coated cobalt-chromium alloy sirolimus-eluting stent:evaluation in a porcine model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张斌; 陈明; 郑博; 王新刚; 范媛媛; 霍勇

    2014-01-01

    目的:评价L-605钴铬合金支架平台、聚丙交酯-乙交酯(PLGA)共聚物载体西罗莫司药物洗脱支架在小型猪冠状动脉过度扩张模型中的安全性和有效性。方法裸金属支架(BMS,15枚)、已上市可降解涂层西罗莫司药物洗脱支架(EXCEL,21枚)和钴铬合金PLGA共聚物载体西罗莫司药物洗脱支架(Co-P-SES,21枚)分组随机置入30头小型猪的前降支(LAD)28枚,回旋支(LCX)13枚,右冠状动脉(RCA)16枚。术后28 d、91 d及182 d复查冠状动脉造影,评价管腔丢失(LL)等指标后处死动物,进行组织形态学及组织病理学分析。结果术后28 d及91 d,各实验组的管腔丢失、新生内膜面积、炎症积分及内皮化积分差异均无统计学意义,但术后28 d Co-P-SES组在扫描电镜下观察内皮化程度优于EXCEL组;术后182 d,Co-P-SES组与EXCEL组在管腔丢失、炎症积分及内皮化积分中差异均无统计学意义,但在内弹力板环绕面积相似的情况下, Co-P-SES组的管腔面积大于EXCEL组[(4.31±0.94)mm2比(2.62±1.17)mm2,P=0.020)],新生内膜面积小于EXCEL组[(1.87±0.53)mm2比(0.84±0.41)mm2,P=0.004)],差异均有统计学意义。结论在小型猪冠状动脉过度扩张模型中,Co-P-SES的安全性与EXCEL类似,在内皮化及减少新生内膜形成方面可能存在一定优势,有必要进一步临床研究以更好地评价其安全性及有效性。%Objective To assess the safety and efifcacy of a novel biodegradable polymer-coated Cobalt-Chromium alloy sirolimus-eluting stent in a porcine model. Methods Bare metal stents (BMS) (n=15), commercial available EXcellstents (n=21), and Cobalt-Chromium alloy PLAG-coated sirolimus-eluting stents (Co-P-SES) (n=21) were implanted in left anterior descending coronary (LAD, n=28)and left circumflex coronary (LCX, n=13), and right coronary artery (RCA, n=16) of 30 mini-pigs randomly

  1. Biocompatibility of Fe-Cr-Mo soft magnetic alloy with chromium plating%铁铬钼软磁合金表面镀铬后的生物相容性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏银花; 聂二民; 姜瑞; 张春元; 曾尽娣; 谈济洲

    2015-01-01

    背景:研究表明,铁铬钼系列软磁合金具有理想的磁性能和机械加工性能,表面镀 Cr6+处理可明显增强其在口腔环境中的耐腐蚀性,但其表面镀铬后的生物安全性仍需进一步检验。目的:评价铁铬钼软磁合金表面镀铬后的生物相容性。方法:取对数生长期L-929细胞悬液,以6×107 L-1的细胞浓度接种于96孔板中,分别加入纯钛浸提液、铁铬钼软磁合金原样浸提液、铁铬钼电镀Cr6+软磁合金浸提液与聚氯乙烯浸提液培养。培养5 d后,观察细胞形态和贴壁情况,采用CCK-8法检测细胞A值,并计算各组细胞相对增殖率,评价材料细胞毒性分级。结果与结论:纯钛浸提液组细胞形态正常,贴壁生长良好,表现为无细胞毒性;铁铬钼软磁合金原样浸提液组细胞形态和生长状态均良好,偶见个别细胞溶解,培养液内出现散在红褐色颗粒,表现为无或极轻微的细胞毒性;铁铬钼镀 Cr6+软磁合金浸提液组细胞生长状态良好,表现为无或极轻微的细胞毒性;聚氯乙烯浸提液组超过70%细胞固缩或溶解呈空泡状,大量细胞碎片,超过50%细胞生长抑制,表现中度以上的细胞毒性。铁铬钼电镀Cr6+软磁合金浸提液的细胞毒性为0至1级。表明镀铬的铁铬钼软磁合金具有良好的生物相容性。%BACKGROUND:Studies have demonstrated that Fe-Cr-Mo soft magnetic aloy has desired magnetic properties and machining properties. Surface Cr6+ plating treatment can significantly enhance the corrosion resistance in oral environment, but its biosecurity needs further testing. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the biocompatibility of Fe-Cr-Mo soft magnetic aloy with chromium plating. METHODS:Logarithmic growth phase L929 cel suspension was obtained and seeded in 96-wel plates at a cel concentration of 6×107/L. Pure titanium extract, Fe-Cr-Mo soft magnetic aloy original extract, Cr6+-plated Fe-Cr-Mo soft

  2. 6061铝合金无铬磷酸盐稀土转化膜的腐蚀性研究%Study on the Corrosion Resistance of Chromium -Free Phosphate Rare Earth Conversion Coating on 6061 Aluminum Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李红玲; 孟志芬; 韩延安; 娄淑芳; 李杰; 李文静

    2012-01-01

    测试了磷酸盐转化膜和稀土促进的转化膜在不同pH溶液中的极化曲线、时间-电位曲线和电化学阻抗谱(EIS),对磷酸盐转化膜的耐蚀性能进行了研究.电化学测试表明:稀土磷酸盐处理后的铝合金试样的阳极极化电流下降;交流阻抗测试结果显示:由稀土促进生成的磷酸盐化学转化膜具有较大的极化电阻,二者都说明经稀土促进的转化膜的耐腐蚀性能得到了加强.%The corrosion resistance of phosphate conversion coating was studied by the polarization curves, time - potential curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of phosphate conversion coating in solutions with different pH values. Electrochemical tests showed that anodic polarization current of alumi num alloy treated by rare earth phosphate declined and AC impedance test results indicated that phosphate conversion coating activated by rare earth gave a large polarization resistance. Both indicated that the corro sion resistance of phosphate conversion coating activated by rare earth were enhanced.

  3. Environmental biochemistry of chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losi, M E; Amrhein, C; Frankenberger, W T

    1994-01-01

    Chromium is a d-block transitional element with many industrial uses. It occurs naturally in various crustal materials and is discharged to the environment as industrial waste. Although it can occur in a number of oxidation states, only 3+ and 6+ are found in environmental systems. The environmental behavior of Cr is largely a function of its oxidation state. Hexavalent Cr compounds (mainly chromates and dichromates) are considered toxic to a variety of terrestrial and aquatic organisms and are mobile in soil/water systems, much more so than trivalent Cr compounds. This is largely because of differing chemical properties: Hexavalent Cr compounds are strong oxidizers and highly soluble, while trivalent Cr compounds tend to form relatively inert precipitates at near-neutral pH. The trivalent state is generally considered to be the stable form in equilibrium with most soil/water systems. A diagram of the Cr cycle in soils and water is given in Fig. 6 (Bartlett 1991). This illustration provides a summary of environmentally relevant reactions. Beginning with hexavalent Cr that is released into the environment as industrial waste, there are a number of possible fates, including pollution of soil and surface water and leaching into groundwater, where it may remain stable and, in turn, can be taken up by plants or animals, and adsorption/precipitation, involving soil colloids and/or organic matter. Herein lies much of the environmental concern associated with the hexavalent form. A portion of the Cr(VI) will be reduced to the trivalent form by inorganic electron donors, such as Fe2+ and S2-, or by bioprocesses involving organic matter. Following this conversion, Cr3+ can be expected to precipitate as oxides and hydroxides or to form complexes with numerous ligands. This fraction includes a vast majority of global Cr reserves. Soluble Cr3+ complexes, such as those formed with citrate, can undergo oxidation when they come in contact with manganese dioxide, thus reforming

  4. Corrosion behavior of tantalum-coated cobalt-chromium modular necks compared to titanium modular necks in a simulator test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Ulrich; Neumann, Daniel; Frank, Mario

    2014-04-01

    This study compared the corrosion behavior of tantalum-coated cobalt-chromium modular necks with that of titanium alloy modular necks at their junction to titanium-alloy femoral stem. Tests were performed in a dry assembly and two wet assemblies, one contaminated with calf serum and the other contaminated with calf serum and bone particles. Whereas the titanium modular neck tested in the dry assembly showed no signs of corrosion, the titanium modular necks tested in both wet assemblies showed marked depositions and corrosive attacks. By contrast, the tantalum-coated cobalt-chromium modular necks showed no traces of corrosion or chemical attack in any of the three assemblies. This study confirms the protective effect of tantalum coating the taper region of cobalt-chromium modular neck components, suggesting that the use of tantalum may reduce the risk of implant failure due to corrosion.

  5. Properties of electrodeposited amorphous Fe-Ni-W alloy deposits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Feng-jiao; WANG Miao; LU Xin

    2006-01-01

    A new technique of electroplating amorphous Fe-Ni-W alloy deposits was proposed. The structure and morphology of Fe-Ni-W alloy deposit were detected by XRD and SEM. The friction and wear behavior of Fe-Ni-W alloy deposit were studied and compared with that of chromium deposit. The corrosion properties against 5% sodium chloride, 5% sulfuric acid and 5% sodium hydroxide were also discussed. The experimental results indicate that Fe-Ni-W alloy deposits have superior properties against wear than hard chromium deposits under dry sliding condition. Under oil sliding condition, except their better wear resistance, the deposits can protect their counterparts against wear. The deposits plated on brass and AISI 1045 steel show good behavior against corrosion of 5% sodium chloride, 5% sulfuric acid and 5% sodium hydroxide. The bath of electroplating amorphous Fe-Ni-W alloy deposits is environmentally friendly and would find widely use in industry.

  6. The use of trivalent chromium bath to obtain a solar selective black chromium coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Survilienė, S.; Češūnienė, A.; Juškėnas, R.; Selskienė, A.; Bučinskienė, D.; Kalinauskas, P.; Juškevičius, K.; Jurevičiūtė, I.

    2014-06-01

    Black chromium coatings were electrodeposited from a trivalent chromium bath using a ZnO additive as a second main component. Black chromium was electrodeposited on steel and copper plates and substrates plated with bright nickel prior to black chromium electrodeposition. The black chromium coatings were characterized by XRD and SEM. The XRD data suggest that the phase structure of black chromium may be defined as a zinc solid solution in chromium or a chromium solid solution in zinc depending on the chromium/zinc ratio in the deposit. The role of substrate finish was evaluated through the corrosion resistance and reflectance of black chromium. According to corrosion tests the samples plated with bright nickel prior to black chromium deposition have shown the highest corrosion resistance. The electrodeposited black chromium possesses good optical properties for the absorption of solar energy. The absorption coefficient of black chromium was found to be over 0.99 for the samples obtained without the Ni undercoat and below 0.99 for those obtained with the use of Ni undercoat. However, the use of nickel undercoat before black chromium plating is recommended because it remarkably improves the corrosion resistance of samples.

  7. AZ31变形镁合金化学镀前无铬酸洗工艺研究%An Investigation of Chromium-Free Pickling Process for Electroless Nickel Plating on AZ 31 Wrought Magnesium Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦铁男; 马立群; 贺忠臣; 姚妍; 丁毅

    2011-01-01

    主要研究了AZ 31变形镁合金化学镀前的磷酸-硝酸-氢氟酸混合酸洗工艺及各组分对镁合金基体的腐蚀失重表面形貌、镀层与基体的截面形貌和结合力的影响.结果表明:氢氟酸的加入可以有效降低酸洗反应速率并防止新鲜的镁合金基体表面的再次氧化;硝酸的体积分数对镁合金表面形貌的改变有较大影响;当磷酸-硝酸-氢氟酸的体积分数分别为300 mL/L,60 mL/L和100 mL/L时,镀层与基体的结合力最好.%A phosphoric acid-nitric acid-hydrofuoric acid mixed acid pickling process was studied for electroless nickel plating on AZ 31 wrought magnesium alloy sheet. The effects of pickle components on corrosion weight loss, surface morphology, cross section morphology and adhesion strength between the substrate and coating were investigated. The results show that addition of hydrofluoric acid can effectively reduce the rate of pickling reaction and protect the fresh substrate from being Oxidized again. The volume fraction of nitric acid has a great impact on changes of the surface morphology of magnesium substrate. The best adhesion strength between the substrate and the coating is achieved when the pickle solution contains 300 mL/L phosphoric acid, 60 mL/L nitric acid and 100 mL/L hydrofluoric acid.

  8. Density of liquid NiCoAlCr quarternary alloys measured by modified sessile drop method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Liang; ZHANG Shu-fang; XIAO Feng; YANG Ling-chuan; DONG Jian-xin; CAO Chun-lan; TAO Zai-nan; K. MUKAI

    2006-01-01

    The densities of liquid NiCoAlCr quaternary alloys with a fixed molar ratio of Ni to Co to Al (x(Ni)-x(Co)-x(Al)≈73-12-15) which is close to the average value of the commercial Ni-based superalloys TMS75, INCO713, CM247LC and CMSX-4, and the mass fraction of chromium changes from 0 to 9% were measured by a modified sessile drop method. It is found that with increasing temperature and chromium concentration in the alloys, the densities of the liquid NiCoAlCr quaternary alloys decrease, whereas the molar volume of the liquid NiCoAlCr quaternary alloys increases. And the liquid densities of NiCoAlCr quaternary alloys calculated from the partial molar volumes of nickel, cobalt, aluminum and chromium in the corresponding Ni-bases binary alloys are in good agreement with the experimental ones, i.e. within the error tolerance range the densities of the liquid Ni-based multi-component alloys can be predicted from the partial volumes of elements in Ni-based binary alloys in liquid state. The molar volume of liquid NiCoAlCr binary alloy shows a negative deviation from the ideal linear mixing and the deviation changes small with the increase of chromium concentration at the same temperature.

  9. Materials corrosion of high temperature alloys immersed in 600C binary nitrate salt.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Gill, David Dennis; LaFord, Marianne Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    Thirteen high temperature alloys were immersion tested in a 60/40 binary nitrate salt. Samples were interval tested up to 3000 hours at 600ÀC with air as the ullage gas. Chemical analysis of the molten salt indicated lower nitrite concentrations present in the salt, as predicted by the equilibrium equation. Corrosion rates were generally low for all alloys. Corrosion products were identified using x-ray diffraction and electron microprobe analysis. Fe-Cr based alloys tended to form mixtures of sodium and iron oxides, while Fe-Ni/Cr alloys had similar corrosion products plus oxides of nickel and chromium. Nickel based alloys primarily formed NiO, with chromium oxides near the oxide/base alloy interface. In625 exhibited similar corrosion performance in relation to previous tests, lending confidence in comparisons between past and present experiments. HA230 exhibited internal oxidation that consisted of a nickel/chromium oxide. Alloys with significant aluminum alloying tended to exhibit superior performance, due formation of a thin alumina layer. Soluble corrosion products of chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten were also formed and are thought to be a significant factor in alloy performance.

  10. Wear resistant steels and casting alloys containing niobium carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theisen, W.; Siebert, S.; Huth, S. [Lehrstuhl Werkstofftechnik, Ruhr-Univ. Bochum (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    Niobium, like titanium and vanadium, forms superhard MC carbides that remain relatively pure in technical alloys on account of their low solubility for other metallic alloying elements. However, because they have a greater hardness than the precipitated chromium carbides commonly used in wear-resistant alloys, they are suitable as alternative hard phases. This contribution deals with new wear-resistant steels and casting alloys containing niobium carbide. These include a secondary hardening hardfacing alloy, a composite casting alloy for wear applications at elevated temperatures, a white cast iron as well as two variants of a corrosion-resistant cold-work tool steel produced by melt metallurgy and by powder metallurgy. A heat-resistant casting alloy is also discussed. Based on equilibrium calculations the microstructures developing during production of the alloys are analysed, and the results are discussed with respect to important properties such as abrasive wear and corrosion resistance. (orig.)

  11. Kinetics of chromium evaporation from heat-resisting steel under reduced pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Kolmasiak

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a kinetic analysis of the process of chromium evaporation from ferrous alloys smelted under reduced pressure. The study discussed comprised determination of the liquid phase mass transfer coefficient as well as the value of the constant evaporation rate. By applying these values as well as the values of the overall mass transfer coefficient estimated based on the relevant experimental data, the fractions of resistance of the individual process stages were established.

  12. Simultaneous determination of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) in aqueous solutions by ion chromatography and chemiluminescence detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Jøns, O; Nielsen, B

    1992-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of chromium(iii) and chromium(vi) in a flow system based on chemiluminescence was developed. A Dionex cation-exchange guard column was used to separate chromium(iii) from chromium(vi), and chromium(vi) was reduced by potassium sulfite, whereupon both...

  13. Concepts in surface alloying of metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh S. Hosmani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Surface alloying is widely used method in industries to improve the surface properties of metals/alloys. Significance of the various surface engineering techniques to improve the properties of engineering components in various applications, for example, automobile industries, has grown substantially over the many years. The current paper is focused on the fundamental scientific aspects of the surface alloying of metals. Widely used surface alloying elements involved are interstitial elements such as nitrogen, carbon, and substitutional element, chromium. This topic is interdisciplinary in nature and various science and engineering streams can work together for the further development in this topic. This paper has attempted to cover the essential concepts of surface alloying along with some of the interesting results in this research area.

  14. Clinical utility of platinum chromium bare-metal stents in coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge C

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Claudia Jorge,1 Christophe Dubois1,2 1Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, University Hospitals Leuven, 2Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven, Belgium Abstract: Coronary stents represent a key development for the treatment of obstructive coronary artery disease since the introduction of percutaneous coronary intervention. While drug-eluting stents gained wide acceptance in contemporary percutaneous coronary intervention practice, further developments in bare-metal stents remain crucial for patients who are not candidates for drug-eluting stents, or to improve metallic platforms for drug elution. Initially, stent platforms used biologically inert stainless steel, restricting stent performance due to limitations in flexibility and strut thickness. Later, cobalt chromium stent alloys outperformed steel as the material of choice for stents, allowing latest generation stents to be designed with significantly thinner struts, while maintaining corrosion resistance and radial strength. Most recently, the introduction of the platinum chromium alloy refined stent architecture with thin struts, high radial strength, conformability, and improved radiopacity. This review will provide an overview of the novel platinum chromium bare-metal stent platforms available for coronary intervention. Mechanical properties, clinical utility, and device limitations will be summarized and put into perspective. Keywords: bare metal stent, coronary stent alloys, coronary artery disease

  15. 铝合金表面无铬磷酸盐稀土转化膜的成膜机理及耐蚀性研究%Study on the Film Forming Mechanism and Corrosion Resistance of Non-chromium Phosphate Rare Earth Conversion Coating on Al Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李红玲; 付小宁

    2011-01-01

    从磷化成膜过程的电化学行为和稀土对磷化膜生长过程的影响两方面,对6061铝合金表面一种不合铬的复合磷酸盐膜的成膜机理进行了研究,并利用极化曲线对其耐蚀性进行了初步探究.结果表明:磷化成膜过程主要分为4个阶段,即基体侵蚀期、晶体初步形成期、基体再溶解和晶体形成期、基体溶解和晶体生长达到平衡期;稀土化合物的引入,提高了磷化膜的耐蚀性,缩短了磷化时间,同时也促进了反应离子在金属表面的吸附,形成多个活性点,有利于新的结晶均匀增长,极大改善了磷化膜的表面质量.%The electrochemical behavior of film process and the effect of rare earth on a phosphating film's growth process were studied. The phosphating film was formed on 6061 aluminium alloy surface, it was non-chromium phosphate rare earth conv ersion coating. At the same time it's corrosion resistance was explored preliminarily by making use of the polarization curve. The results show that this bonderizing process has mainly four stages: this bonderizing process has mainly the basement corroding scheduled time, crystal first formation scheduled time, basement dissolve again and crystal formation scheduled time, basement dissolve and crystal growth equilibration scheduled time. With the help of rare earth, the corrosion-resistance of the bonderizing film is raised, and phosphating time is shortened, at the same time the reaction ion being in metal outside adsorption is boosted and many active point was formed. This is beneficial to the new crystal's incresament homogeneously. Therefore the bonderizing film surface mass is improved greatly.

  16. Sonoassisted microbial reduction of chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathiravan, Mathur Nadarajan; Karthick, Ramalingam; Muthu, Naggapan; Muthukumar, Karuppan; Velan, Manickam

    2010-04-01

    This study presents sonoassisted microbial reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) using Bacillus sp. isolated from tannery effluent contaminated site. The experiments were carried out with free cells in the presence and absence of ultrasound. The optimum pH and temperature for the reduction of Cr(VI) by Bacillus sp. were found to be 7.0 and 37 degrees C, respectively. The Cr(VI) reduction was significantly influenced by the electron donors and among the various electron donors studied, glucose offered maximum reduction. The ultrasound-irradiated reduction of Cr(VI) with Bacillus sp. showed efficient Cr(VI) reduction. The percent reduction was found to increase with an increase in biomass concentration and decrease with an increase in initial concentration. The changes in the functional groups of Bacillus sp., before and after chromium reduction were observed with FTIR spectra. Microbial growth was described with Monod and Andrews model and best fit was observed with Andrews model.

  17. Inoculation of chromium white cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kopyciński

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been proved that an addition of boron carbide introduced as an inoculant to the chromium white cast iron changes the structureof castings. Castings after inoculation revealed a different structure with numerous grains. Primary precipitates of chromium carbide also appeared, reducing the mechanical properties of as-cast parts. Properly established heat treatment regime makes chromium iron castings regain their, originally high, mechanical properties.

  18. Crystallization of Low-alloyed Construction Cast Steel Modified with V and Ti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Studnicki

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper crystallization studies of low-alloyed construction cast steel were presented for different additions of chromium, nickel and molybdenum modified with vanadium and titanium. Studies were conducted using developed TDA stand, which additionally enabled evaluation of cooling rate influence on crystallization process of investigated alloys.

  19. 选择性激光熔化钴铬合金基底冠与铸造钴铬合金基底冠边缘适合性比较%Evaluation of marginal fit in vitro between selective laser melting deposition basal crowns and cobalt chromium alloy base crowns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李靖敏; 王维倩; 马婧媛

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the marginal fit in vitro between selective laser melting deposition basal crowns and cobalt chromi-um alloy casting base crowns.Methods Twenty working dies were created from a single master die and were used to fabricate twenty copings in each as the following groups:A(selective laser melting deposition basal crowns,n=1 0),B(cobalt-chrome alloy basal crown, n=1 0).All the metal copings were fabricated according to manufacturers.The restorations were seated on the master die,and high-reso-lution digital photographs were taken of the marginal area on all four sides.The vertical marginal gap was then measured using a calibra-ted digital software program.Analysis of Variance was used to determine the differences using SPSS 20.0 software package.Results The mean marginal gaps were:group A:(48.20 ±4.61 )μm;group B:(77.90 ±6.26)μm .There was significant difference between two groups.Conclusions The marginal gaps of two different metal copings are clinically acceptable.The selective laser melting deposi-tion copings resulted in smaller marginal gaps than cobalt-chrome copings,which shows that the marginal fit of elective laser melting deposition copings is better than cobalt-chrome copings.%目的:评价选择性激光熔化钴铬合金烤瓷冠和传统铸造钴铬合金烤瓷冠的边缘适合性。方法制作下颌第一磨牙全冠牙体制备标准金属代型1个,复制并灌注石膏模型后,制作选择性激光熔化钴铬合金基底冠和铸造钴铬合金基底冠各10个,依次将其就位于金属标准代型上。在体式显微镜下,对基底冠边缘与金属代型肩台之间的适合度进行观察,用 CCD 数字图像捕捉系统进行成像,并用专业测量软件测量边缘缝隙宽度。最后计算各组10个样本的平均值,采用 SPSS 20.0软件包对数据进行统计学处理。结果选择性激光熔化钴铬合金基底冠和传统铸造钴铬合金基底冠平均

  20. Iron-based alloy and nitridation treatment for PEM fuel cell bipolar plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Yang, Bing [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-11-09

    A corrosion resistant electrically conductive component that can be used as a bipolar plate in a PEM fuel cell application is composed of an alloy substrate which has 10-30 wt. % Cr, 0.5 to 7 wt. % V, and base metal being Fe, and a continuous surface layer of chromium nitride and vanadium nitride essentially free of base metal. A oxide layer of chromium vanadium oxide can be disposed between the alloy substrate and the continuous surface nitride layer. A method to prepare the corrosion resistant electrically conductive component involves a two-step nitridization sequence by exposing the alloy to a oxygen containing gas at an elevated temperature, and subsequently exposing the alloy to an oxygen free nitrogen containing gas at an elevated temperature to yield a component where a continuous chromium nitride layer free of iron has formed at the surface.

  1. Reduction of chromium oxide from slags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutiérrez-Paredes, J.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Experimental and theoretical work were performed to estimate the effect of slag basicity and amount of reducing agents on the reduction of chromium oxide from the slag which interacted with molten steel at 1,600 °C. The slag system contained CaO, MgO, SiO2, CaF2 and Cr2O3 together with Fe-alloys (Fe-Si and Fe-Si-Mg. The CaF2 and MgO contents in the slags were 10 mass % each; Cr2O3 was 25%. The amount of the ferroalloys ranged from 12.5 to 50 g per 100 g of slag. The (CaO+MgO/SiO2 ratio was held at 1 and 2. The Cr yield was determined using both Fe-alloys as reducing agents. Some estimations were made to determine the theoretical effect of temperature, slag basicity, (CaO+MgO/SiO2, and amount of reducing agents in the slag on the chromium recovery. The FACT (Facility for the Analysis of Chemical Thermodynamics computational package is used to determine the equilibrium between the slag and molten steel.

    En el presente trabajo se realiza un estudio teórico y experimental para determinar el efecto de la basicidad de la escoria y la cantidad de agentes reductores sobre la reducción de óxidos de cromo contenidos en la escoria, la cual está en contacto con acero líquido a 1.600 °C. La escoria se prepara con los reactivos CaO, MgO, SiO2, CaF2 y ferroaleaciones (Fe-Si y Fe-Si-Mg. Los contenidos de CaF2 y MgO en la escoria son de 10 %, cada uno, y el de Cr2O3 es 25 %. La cantidad de la ferroaleación varía de 12,5 a 50 g por cada 100 g de escoria. La relación (CaO+MgO/SiO2 tiene los valores de 1 y 2. Se determina la eficiencia de recuperación de cromo empleando los dos tipos de ferroaleaciones. Se realizaron cálculos para determinar el efecto teórico de la temperatura, la basicidad de la escoria, (CaO+MgO/SiO2, y la cantidad de agentes reductores sobre la reducci

  2. Effects of yttrium, aluminum and chromium concentrations in bond coatings on the performance of zirconia-yttria thermal barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecura, S.

    1980-01-01

    A cyclic furnace study was conducted on thermal barrier systems to evaluate the effects of yttrium, chromium and aluminum in nickel-base alloy bond coatings and the effect of bond coating thickness on yttria-stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coating life. Without yttrium in the bond coatings, the zirconia coatings failed very rapidly. Increasing chromium and aluminum in the Ni-Cr-Al-Y bond coatings increased total coating life. This effect was not as great as that due to yttrium. Increased bond coat thickness was also found to increase life.

  3. Corrosion behavior of nickel-containing alloys in artificial sweat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randin, J P

    1988-07-01

    The corrosion resistance of various nickel-containing alloys was measured in artificial sweat (perspiration) using the Tafel extrapolation method. It was found that Ni, CuNi 25 (coin alloy), NiAl (colored intermetallic compounds), WC + Ni (hard metal), white gold (jewelry alloy), FN42 and Nilo Alby K (controlled expansion alloys), and NiP (electroless nickel coating) are in an active state and dissolve readily in oxygenated artificial sweat. By contrast, austenitic stainless steels, TiC + Mo2C + Ni (hard metal), NiTi (shape-memory alloy), Hastelloy X (superalloy), Phydur (precipitation hardening alloy), PdNi and SnNi (nickel-containing coatings) are in a passive state but may pit under certain conditions. Cobalt, Cr, Ti, and some of their alloys were also investigated for the purpose of comparison. Cobalt and its alloys have poor corrosion resistance except for Stellite 20. Chromium and high-chromium ferritic stainless steels have a high pitting potential but the latter are susceptible to crevice corrosion. Ti has a pitting potential greater than 3 V. Comparison between the in vitro measurements of the corrosion rate of nickel-based alloys and the clinical observation of the occurrence of contact dermatitis is discussed.

  4. Electrodeposition of chromium from trivalent chromium urea bath containing sulfate and chloride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The reduction of Cr( Ⅲ) to Cr( Ⅱ ) on copper electrode in trivalent chromium urea bath containing chromium sulfate and chromium chloride as chromium source has been investigated by potentiodynamic sweep. The transfer coefficient α for reduction of Cr( Ⅲ ) to Cr( Ⅱ ) on copper electrode was calculated as 0.46. The reduction is a quasi-reversible process. J-t responses at different potential steps showed that the generation and adsorption characteristics of carboxylate bridged oligomer are relevant to cathode potential. The interface behavior between electrode and solution for Cr( Ⅲ ) complex is a critical factor influencing sustained electrode position of chromium. The hypotheses of the electro-inducing polymerization of Cr( Ⅲ ) was proposed. The potential scope in which sustained chromium deposits can be prepared is from- 1.3 V to- 1.7 V (vs SCE) in the urea bath. Bright chromium deposits with thickness of 30 μm can be prepared in the bath.

  5. 29 CFR 1915.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... system dysfunction; any history of asthma, dermatitis, skin ulceration, or nasal septum perforation; and... is present or is likely to be present from skin or eye contact with chromium (VI), the employer shall... cleaned in a manner that minimizes skin or eye contact with chromium (VI) and effectively prevents...

  6. 29 CFR 1926.1126 - Chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... system dysfunction; any history of asthma, dermatitis, skin ulceration, or nasal septum perforation; and... is present or is likely to be present from skin or eye contact with chromium (VI), the employer shall... cleaned in a manner that minimizes skin or eye contact with chromium (VI) and effectively prevents...

  7. 29 CFR 1910.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... activity involving chromium cannot release dusts, fumes, or mists of chromium (VI) in concentrations at or... currents that prevent the LEVs from performing efficiently. The use of fans has a similar effect. Industry... and positioning of cross drafts, fans, doors, windows, partitions and process equipment that...

  8. Bioaccessibility, bioavailability and toxicity of commercially relevant iron- and chromium-based particles: in vitro studies with an inhalation perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedberg Yolanda

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Production of ferrochromium alloys (FeCr, master alloys for stainless steel manufacture, involves casting and crushing processes where particles inevitably become airborne and potentially inhaled. The aim of this study was to assess potential health hazards induced by inhalation of different well-characterized iron- and chromium-based particles, i.e. ferrochromium (FeCr, ferrosiliconchromium (FeSiCr, stainless steel (316L, iron (Fe, chromium (Cr, and chromium(IIIoxide (Cr2O3, in different size fractions using in vitro methods. This was done by assessing the extent and speciation of released metals in synthetic biological medium and by analyzing particle reactivity and toxicity towards cultured human lung cells (A549. Results The amount of released metals normalized to the particle surface area increased with decreasing particle size for all alloy particles, whereas the opposite situation was valid for particles of the pure metals. These effects were evident in artificial lysosomal fluid (ALF of pH 4.5 containing complexing agents, but not in neutral or weakly alkaline biological media. Chromium, iron and nickel were released to very low extent from all alloy particles, and from particles of Cr due to the presence of a Cr(III-rich protective surface oxide. Released elements were neither proportional to the bulk nor to the surface composition after the investigated 168 hours of exposure. Due to a surface oxide with less protective properties, significantly more iron was released from pure iron particles compared with the alloys. Cr was predominantly released as Cr(III from all particles investigated and was strongly complexed by organic species of ALF. Cr2O3 particles showed hemolytic activity, but none of the alloy particles did. Fine-sized particles of stainless steel caused however DNA damage, measured with the comet assay after 4 h exposure. None of the particles revealed any significant cytotoxicity in terms of cell death

  9. The Effect of Silicon and Aluminum Additions on the Oxidation Resistance of Lean Chromium Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunning, J.S.; Alman, D.E.; Rawers, J.C.

    2001-09-01

    The effect of Si and Al additions on the oxidation of lean chromium austenitic stainless steels has been studied. A baseline composition of Fe-16Cr-16Ni-2Mn-1Mo was selected to allow combined Si and Al additions of up to 5 wt. pct. in a fully austenitic alloy. The baseline composition was selected using a net Cr equivalent equation to predict the onset of G-ferrite formation in austenite. Cyclic oxidation tests in air for 1000 hours were carried out on alloys with Si only or combined Si and Al additions in the temperature range 700 C to 800 C. Oxidation resistance of alloys with Si only additions were outstanding, particularly at 800 C. It was evident that different rate controlling mechanisms for oxidation were operative at 700 C and 800 C in the Si alloys. In addition, Si alloys pre-oxidized at 800 C, showed a zero weight gain in subsequent testing for 1000 hours at 700 C. The rate controlling mechanism in alloys with combined Si and Al addition for oxidation at 800 C was also different than alloys with Si only. SEM and ESCA analysis of the oxide films and base material at the oxide/base metal interface were conducted to study potential rate controlling mechanisms.

  10. [Bioremediation of chromium (VI) contaminated site by reduction and microbial stabilization of chromium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jia-Chuan; Zhang, Jian-Rong; Liu, Xi-Wen; Xu, Qian; Shi, Wei-Lin

    2014-10-01

    Chromium (VI) contaminated soil samples were collected from a chemical plant in Suzhou. Firstly, the reduced soil was prepared by adding reagent (Stone-sulfure reagent) into polluted soil to transfer most chromium (VI) into chromium (III), then a nutrient solution was introduced into the reduced soil, and the stabilized soil was obtained after 60 days culturing. The chromium (VI) content of the three kinds of soil was analyzed. The results showed that the chromium (VI) content in toxicity characteristic leaching liquid (TCLL) dropped by 96. 8% (from 8.26 mg · L(-1) to 0.26 mg · L(-1)), and the total chromium content dropped by 95.7% (from 14.66 mg · L(-1) to 0.63 mg · L(-1)) after bioremediation in 5% nutrient solution. Additionally, the durability of chromium stabilization was tested by potassium permanganate oxidation and sterilization of microbe-treated soil. After oxidation, the chromium (VI) content in TCLL of the reduced soil was increased from 8.26 mg · L(-1) to 14.68 mg · L(-1). However, the content after bioremediation was decreased to 2.68 mg · L(-1). The results of sterilization demonstrated that the death of microbe had no significant effect on the stabilization of chromium. Consequently, the research in this paper demonstrated the feasibility of bioremediation of chromium (VI) polluted soil through reduction followed by stabilization/soilidification, and provided a technique with low cost but high efficiency.

  11. Heat-Resistance of the Powder Cobalt Alloys Reinforced by Niobium or Titanium Carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherepova, T.S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of heat-resistance of powder cobalt alloys at 1100 °C were investigated. These alloys were developed for the protection of workers banding shelves GTE blades from wear. The alloys were prepared by hot pressing powders of cobalt, chromium, aluminum, iron and niobium or titanium carbides. The values of heat resistance alloys containing carbides between 30 and 70% (vol. depend on the type made of carbide alloys: alloys with titanium carbide superior in heat-resistant alloy of niobium carbide. The most significant factor affecting on the heat-resistant alloys, is porosity: with its increase the parameters decline regardless of the type and content of carbide. The optimum composition of powder heat resisting alloys of titanium carbide with a melting point above 1300 °C were determined for use in the aircraft engine.

  12. The open-circuit ennoblement of alloy C-22 and other Ni-Cr-Mo alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloydis, A. C.; Noël, J. J.; Shoesmith, D. W.; McIntyre, N. S.

    2005-01-01

    The open-circuit corrosion and anodic oxidation behavior of the C-series of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys (C-4, C-276, C-2000, and C-22) and alloy 625 have been studied at 25°C and 75°C in 1.0 mol·L-1 NaCl+1.0 mol·L-1 H2SO4. A combination of open-circuit potential, potentiostatic polarization, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were employed in the study. The composition of the films formed was determined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. Passive oxide film resistances increase and defect oxide film concentrations decrease as films thicken and chromium and molybdenum segregate to the alloy/oxide and oxide/solution interfaces, respectively. The high-chromium alloys exhibit higher film resistances and lower film defect concentrations consistent with the more positive potentials observed on these alloys. The results show that the observed ennoblement in corrosion potentials with time is coupled to the Cr/Mo segregation process and the suppression of defect injection at the alloy/oxide interface. By all measures, C-22 exhibited the best passive properties.

  13. Microstructure and wear resistance of high chromium cast iron containing niobium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Zhiguo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, the effect of niobium addition on the microstructure, mechanical properties and wear resistance of high chromium cast iron has been studied. The results show that the microstructure of the heat-treated alloys is composed of M7C3 and M23C6 types primary carbide, eutectic carbide, secondary carbide and a matrix of martensite and retained austenite. NbC particles appear both inside and on the edge of the primary carbides. The hardness of the studied alloys maintains around 66 HRC, not significantly affected by the Nb content within the selected range of 0.48%-0.74%. The impact toughness of the alloys increases with increasing niobium content. The wear resistance of the specimens presents little variation in spite of the increase of Nb content under a light load of 40 N. However, when heavier loads of 70 and 100 N are applied, the wear resistance increases with increasing Nb content.

  14. Influences of copper on solidification structure and hardening behavior of high chromium cast irons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jun; XIONG Ji; FAN Hong-yuan; SHEN Bao-luo; GAO Sheng-ji

    2008-01-01

    The influences of copper on microstructure and the hardening behavior of high chromium cast irons subjected to sub-critical treatment were investigated.The results show that the mierostructure of the as-cast high chromium cast irons consists of retained austenite,martensite and M7 C3 type eutectic carbide.When copper is added into high chromium cast irons,austenite and carbide contents are increased.The increased addition of copper content from 0%to 1.84%leads to the increase of austenite and carbide from 15.9%and 20.0% to 61.0%and 35.5%,respectively.In the process of sub-critical treatment,the retained austenite in the matrix can be precipitated into secondary carbides and then transforms into martensite in cooling process,which causes the secondary hardening of the alloy under sub-critical treatment.High chromium cast irons containing copper in sub-critical treatment appear the second hardening curve peak due to the precipitation of copper from supersaturated matrix.

  15. TREATMENT OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM IN CHROMITE ORE PROCESSING SOLID WASTE USING A MIXED REDUCTANT SOLUTION OF FERROUS SULFATE AND SODIUM DITHIONITE

    Science.gov (United States)

    We developed a method for disseminating ferrous iron in the subsurface to enhance chemical reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in a chromite ore processing solid waste derived from the production of ferrochrome alloy. The method utilizes ferrous sulfate (FeSO4) in combinati...

  16. Synthesis of Chromium (Ⅲ) 5-aminosalicylate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wei; HAO Er-jun; JIANG Yu-qin

    2004-01-01

    As we all known that diabetes is a chronic disease with major health consequences.Research has revealed that the occurrence of diabetes have great thing to do with the chromium deficient. Almost 40 years after the first report of glucose tolerance factor(GTF) [1], no conclusive evidence for an isolable ,biologically active form of chromium exited. Three materials have been proposed to be the biologically active form of chromium: "glucose tolerance factor", chromium Picolinate and low-molecular-weight chromium-binding substance (LWMCr) [2] . So there is potential for the design of new chromium drugs .5-Aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) is identified as an active component in the therapy of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis . The therapeutic action of 5-ASA is believed to be coupled to its ability to act as a free radical scavenger [3-4],acting locally on the inflamed colonic mucosa [5-7]. However, the clinical use of 5-ASA is limited, since orally administered 5-ASA is rapidly and completely absorbed from the upper gastrointestinal tract and therefore the local therapeutic effects of 5-ASA in the colon is hardly expected.In this paper, we report the synthesis of chromium(Ⅲ)5-aminosalicylate from 5-ASA and CrCl3. 6H2O.The synthesis route is as follow:The complex has been characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectra, X-ray powder diffractionand TG-DTA . They indicate that the structure is tris(5-ASA) Chromium . Experiments show that thecomplex has a good activity for supplement tiny dietary chromium, lowering blood glucose levels,lowering serum lipid levels and in creasing lean body mass .

  17. Characteristics of chromium-allergic dermatitis patients prior to regulatory intervention for chromium in leather

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P; Zachariae, Claus;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chromium-tanned leather articles currently constitute the most important cause of contact allergy to chromium in Denmark. A regulation on the content of hexavalent chromium in leather was adopted in November 2013 by the EU member states. OBJECTIVES: To characterize patients...... with chromium allergy and their disease, to serve as a baseline for future studies on the potential effect of the new regulation on chromium in leather. METHODS: A questionnaire case-control study was performed on 155 dermatitis patients with positive patch test reactions to potassium dichromate and a matched...... control group of 621 dermatitis patients. Comparisons were made by use of a χ(2) -test and the Mann-Whitney U-test. Logistic regression analyses were used to test for associations. RESULTS: Sixty-six per cent of chromium-allergic patients had a positive history of contact dermatitis caused by leather...

  18. Chromium in leather footwear-risk assessment of chromium allergy and dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Strandesen, Maria; Poulsen, Pia B;

    2012-01-01

    Background. Chromium-tanned leather footwear, which releases >3 ppm hexavalent Cr(VI), may pose a risk of sensitizing and eliciting allergic dermatitis. Objectives. To determine the content and potential release of chromium in leather footwear and to discuss the prevention of chromium contact...... allergy and dermatitis. Methods. Sixty pairs of leather shoes, sandals and boots (20 children's, 20 men's, and 20 women's) were purchased in Copenhagen and examined with X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. Chromium was extracted according to the International Standard, ISO 17075. The detection level for Cr......(VI) was 3 ppm. Results. Chromium was identified in 95% of leather footwear products, the median content being 1.7% (range 0-3.3%). No association with store category or footwear category was found. A tendency for there to be a higher chromium content in footwear with high prices was shown (p(trend) = 0...

  19. Leaching of chromium from chromium contaminated soil: Speciation study and geochemical modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anđelković Darko H.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Distribution of chromium between soil and leachate was monitored. A natural process of percolating rainwater through the soil was simulated in the laboratory conditions and studied with column leaching extraction. Migration of chromium in the soil is conditioned by the level of chromium soil contamination, the soil organic matter content, and rainwater acidity. Chromium (III and chromium(VI were determined by spectrophotometric method with diphenilcarbazide in acidic media. Comparing the results of chromium speciation in leachate obtained by experimental model systems and geochemical modelling calculations using Visual MINTEQ model, a correlation was observed regarding the influence of the tested parameters. Leachate solutions showed that the concentration of Cr depended on the organic matter content. The influence of pH and soil organic matter content is in compliance after its definition through experimental and theoretical way. The computer model - Stockholm Humic Model used to evaluate the leaching results corresponded rather well with the measured values.

  20. Chromium isotope uptake in carbonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodler, Alexandra

    composition of contemporaneous seawater. Marine carbonates are ubiquitous throughout Earth’s rock record rendering them a particularly interesting archive for constraining past changes in ocean chemistry. This thesis includes an investigation of the fractionation behavior of Cr isotopesduring coprecipitation......Chromium (Cr) is a redox sensitive element potentially capable of tracing fine-scale fluctuations of the oxygenation of Earth’s early surface environments and seawater. The Cr isotope composition of carbonates could perhaps be used as paleo-redox proxy to elucidate changes in the geological past...... related to the rise of oxygen and the evolution of the biosphere. However, before the Cr isotopesystem can be applied to faithfully delineate paleo-environmental changes, careful assessment of the signal robustness and a thorough understanding of the Cr cycle in Earth system processes is necessary...

  1. Chromium (VI) adsorption on boehmite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granados-Correa, F. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apartado Postal 18-1027 Col., Escandon, Delegacion Miguel Hidalgo, C.P. 11801 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: fgc@nuclear.inin.mx; Jimenez-Becerril, J. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apartado Postal 18-1027 Col., Escandon, Delegacion Miguel Hidalgo, C.P. 11801 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2009-03-15

    Boehmite was synthesized and characterized in order to study the adsorption behavior and the removal of Cr(VI) ions from aqueous solutions as a function of contact time, initial pH solution, amount of adsorbent and initial metal ion concentration, using batch technique. Adsorption data of Cr(VI) on the boehmite were analyzed according to Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) adsorption models. Thermodynamic parameters for the adsorption system were determinated at 293, 303, 313 and 323 K temperatures. The kinetic values and thermodynamic parameters from the adsorption process show that the Cr(VI) ions adsorption on boehmite is an endothermic and spontaneous process. These results show that the boehmite could be considered as a potential adsorbent for chromium ions in aqueous solutions.

  2. Nickel aluminide alloy for high temperature structural use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chain T.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    1991-01-01

    The specification discloses nickel aluminide alloys including nickel, aluminum, chromium, zirconium and boron wherein the concentration of zirconium is maintained in the range of from about 0.05 to about 0.35 atomic percent to improve the ductility, strength and fabricability of the alloys at 1200.degree. C. Titanium may be added in an amount equal to about 0.2 to about 0.5 atomic percent to improve the mechanical properties of the alloys and the addition of a small amount of carbon further improves hot fabricability.

  3. Activities of chromium in molten copper at dilute concentrations by solid-state electrochemical cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inouye, T. K.; Fujiwara, H.; Iwase, M.

    1991-08-01

    In order to obtain the activities of chromium in molten copper at dilute concentrations (copper was brought to equilibrium with molten CaCl2 + Cr2O3 slag saturated with Cr2O3 (s), at temperatures between 1423 and 1573 K, and the equilibrium oxygen partial pressures were measured by means of solid-oxide galvanic cells of the type Mo/Mo + MoO2/ZrO2(MgO)/(Cu + Cr))alloy + Cr2O3 + (CaCl2 + Cr2O3)slag/Mo. The free energy changes for the dissolution of solid chromium in molten copper at infinite dilution referred to 1 wt pct were determined as Cr (s) = Cr(1 wt pct, in Cu) and Δ G° = + 97,000 + 73.3 (T/K) ± 2,000 J mol-1.

  4. EFFECT OF Cr AND Al CONTENT ON THE STACKING FAULT ENERGY IN γ-Fe-Mn ALLOYS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X.Tian; Y.S.Zhang

    2003-01-01

    The effects of Cr and Al content were investigated on the stacking fault energy in austenitic Fe-31Mn-(0-7.26)Cr-0.96C and Fe-31Mn-(0-8.68)Al-0.85C alloys by the thermodynamic analysis. The results show that the additions of chromium or aluminum increase the non-magnetic component of the stacking fault energy in the γ-FeMn alloys, and the effect of aluminum is larger than that of chromium. The change in the magnetic entropy caused in the antiferromagnetic transition increases the free energy difference between the γ and ε phases in the γ-Fe-Mn alloys. The effects of chromium and aluminum on the magnetic component were discussed on the basis of the influence of both upon the antiferromagnetic transition in the γ-Fe-Mn alloys.

  5. Laser Alloyed Coatings of TiB2/Graphite on 9Cr18 Stainless Steel Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YING Li-xia; WANG Li-qin; JIA Xiao-mei; GU Le

    2007-01-01

    Modified coatings including carbide of iron, nickel, chromium, silicon, and titanium are obtained on 9Cr18 stainless steel surface by laser alloying. The processing method, the microstructure, the interface, the tribological properties, and the forming mechanisms of the coatings are analyzed. The results show that the microstructure of the alloyed coatings is mainly irregular FeC crystals. Carbides of chromium and iron are around the FeC crystals. Small granular TiC disperses in the alloyed coatings. The microhardness of the alloyed coatings is greatly improved because of the occurrence of carbide with high hardness. At the same time, the wear resistance of the alloyed coatings are higher than that of 9Cr18 stainless steel.

  6. AEROSOL BEHAVIOR IN CHROMIUM WASTE INCINERATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suyuan Yu

    2003-01-01

    Cr2O3 is considered as the dominant incineration product during the combustion disposal of chromium waste. A hydrogen/air diffusion flame was employed to simulate the industrial process of incineration. Cr2O3 aerosols were generated inside the flame by the gas phase reaction of chromium and oxygen. Chromium came from the rapid decomposition of chromium hexacarbonyl (Cr(CO)6) at room temperature and was carried into the combustion chamber by hydrogen. Aerosol and clusters can then be easily formed in the flame by nucleation and coagulation. A two dimensional Discrete-Sectional Model (DSM) was adopted to calculate the Cr2O3 aerosol behavior. The experimental measurement method was Dynamic Light Scattering. The numerically predicted results agreed well with those of the experimental measurement. Both results show that the Cr2O3 aerosol size reached about 70 nanometers at the flame top.

  7. Localized Corrosion of Chromium Coated Steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, X.; Beentjes, P.; Mol, A.; Terryn, H.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the studies of the local corrosion behaviour of chromium-coated ultra low carbon steel in NaCl solution using polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and SVET.

  8. CHROMIUM CONCENTRATION IN TEHRAN ELECTROPLATING PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghiasseddin

    1988-12-01

    Full Text Available Hazards of soluable hexa and trivalent chromium have been documented by many investigators. But there was no information regarding safety of about 5000 workers at exposure risk to chromium in 600 primitive electroplating work shops of Tehran. During this study more than 70% of work shops were inactive due to some of their own problems. Out of active plants those that were relatively more cooperative 43 manual and 3 semi automatic were investigated for chromium concentration both by personal and environmental Sampling. The Samples were analyzed by AAS and cholormetry. In 30% of personal and 40% of environmental samples both total and Cr+6 were higher than ACGIH’S TLV. In one of semiautomatic plant Cr=6 was as high as 0.71 mg/m.3.Regarding injuries, following observations were made: Nasal wound 85%, skin irritation 73% , Dermatitis 35% and some other chromium related injuries including 2 cases of Septum perforations.

  9. Potentiometry: A Chromium (III) -- EDTA Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, J. I.; Howell, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an experiment that involves the preparation of a chromium (III)-EDTA compound, a study of its infrared spectrum, and the potentiometric determination of two successive acid dissociation constants. (Author/GS)

  10. Susceptibility of two types of low-alloy hull steels to pit initiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianmin Wang; Xuequn Chen; Guomin Li

    2004-01-01

    Four low-alloy hull steels with different alloy elements were selected. Their susceptibility to pitting corrosion was compared by means of electrochemical polarization test. The inclusions in the steels and their pitting corrosion characteristics were studied by an electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA). The results indicate that some inclusions are the main sources of pitting corrosion.The susceptibility of nickel-chromium steel to pit initiation is less than that of manganese steel. Under the same conditions, nickelchromium steel is easier to passivate than manganese steel, and the passive films on nickel-chromium steel surface are more stable than that on manganese steel. In low-alloy steels, the higher the contents of nickel and chromium, the lower the critical passive pH value. In the same kind of steel, multi-phase inclusions containing sulfide are easier to initiate pitting corrosion than other inclusions.

  11. Effects of Si on the Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of High-Chromium Cast Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, J. P.; Pan, Q. L.; Peng, H. J.; Cui, H. R.; Xiao, C. A.

    2016-11-01

    Effect of Si on the microstructures and mechanical properties of high-chromium cast iron was investigated. The eutectic carbides are refined greatly and a transformation of matrix from austenitic matrix to pearlite is observed with increase in Si content from 0.5 to 1.5 wt.%. The refinement of eutectic microstructure is attributed to the decrease in the eutectic temperature, while the transformation from austenite matrix to pearlite is associated with the increase in solubility of carbon in the matrix. In the pearlite matrix, two types of pearlite are observed: one with lamellar pearlite, distributing at the periphery, and the second one with granular pearlite at the center. The density of secondary carbides precipitated from the matrix increases greatly with addition of Si from 0.5 to 1.5 wt.%, which is associated with more carbon and chromium elements confined in the matrix in the alloy containing 1.5 wt.%. More rod-like particles are observed in the alloy containing 0.5 wt.% Si, while the morphology of secondary carbides of alloy containing 1.5 wt.% is granular. The mechanical properties are improved with a 7% increase in tensile strength from 586 to 626 MPa and impact toughness from 5.8 to 7.3 J cm-2.

  12. Permeation of chromium salts through human skin in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Fullerton, A; Avnstorp, C

    1992-01-01

    Chromium permeation studies were performed on full thickness human skin in diffusion cells. All samples were analysed for the total chromium content by graphite furnace Zeeman-corrected atomic absorption spectrometry. Some samples were analysed by an ion chromatographic method permitting...... the simultaneous determination of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) as well. The amounts of chromium found in all skin layers were significantly higher when potassium dichromate was applied to the skin compared with chromium chloride or chromium nitrate. Chromium could only be detected in the recipient phase after application...... of the dichromate solution. Chromium skin levels increased with increasing concentrations of applied chromium salts up to 0.034 M Cr. The amount of chromium in recipient phase and skin layers increased with increasing pH when the applied solution contained potassium dichromate. This was ascribed to a decreased skin...

  13. Skin deposition of nickel, cobalt, and chromium in production of gas turbines and space propulsion components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julander, Anneli; Skare, Lizbet; Mulder, Marie; Grandér, Margaretha; Vahter, Marie; Lidén, Carola

    2010-04-01

    Skin exposure to nickel, cobalt, and chromium may cause sensitization and allergic contact dermatitis and it is known that many alloys and platings may release significant amounts of the metals upon contact with skin. Occupational exposure to these sensitizing metals has been studied in different settings with regards to airborne dust and different biological end points, but little is known about deposition on skin from airborne dust and direct contact with materials containing the metals. In this study, skin deposition was studied in 24 workers in an industry for development and manufacturing of gas turbines and space propulsion components. The workers were employed in three departments, representing different exposure scenarios: tools sharpening of hard metal items, production of space propulsion structures, and thermal application of different metal-containing powders. A novel acid wipe sampling technique was used to sample metals from specific skin surfaces on the hands and the forehead of the workers. Total amounts of nickel, cobalt, and chromium were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The result showed that nickel, cobalt, and chromium could be detected on all skin surfaces sampled. The highest level of nickel was 15 microg cm(-2) h(-1), the highest for cobalt was 4.5 microg cm(-2) h(-1), and for chromium 0.6 microg cm(-2) h(-1). The three departments had different exposures regarding the metals. The highest levels of nickel on the skin of the workers were found in the thermal applications department, cobalt in the tools sharpening department, and chromium in the space propulsion components department. In conclusion, the workers' exposure to the metals was more likely to come from direct skin contact with items, rather than from airborne dust, based on the fact that the levels of metals were much higher on the fingers than on the back side of the hands and the forehead. The skin exposure levels of nickel and cobalt detected are judged

  14. Adsorption and protein-induced metal release from chromium metal and stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, M; Hedberg, Y; Jiang, T; Herting, G; Wang, X; Thormann, E; Blomberg, E; Wallinder, I Odnevall

    2012-01-15

    A research effort is undertaken to understand the mechanism of metal release from, e.g., inhaled metal particles or metal implants in the presence of proteins. The effect of protein adsorption on the metal release process from oxidized chromium metal surfaces and stainless steel surfaces was therefore examined by quartz crystal microbalance with energy dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (GFAAS). Differently charged and sized proteins, relevant for the inhalation and dermal exposure route were chosen including human and bovine serum albumin (HSA, BSA), mucin (BSM), and lysozyme (LYS). The results show that all proteins have high affinities for chromium and stainless steel (AISI 316) when deposited from solutions at pH 4 and at pH 7.4 where the protein adsorbed amount was very similar. Adsorption of albumin and mucin was substantially higher at pH 4 compared to pH 7.4 with approximately monolayer coverage at pH 7.4, whereas lysozyme adsorbed in multilayers at both investigated pH. The protein-surface interaction was strong since proteins were irreversibly adsorbed with respect to rinsing. Due to the passive nature of chromium and stainless steel (AISI 316) surfaces, very low metal release concentrations from the QCM metal surfaces in the presence of proteins were obtained on the time scale of the adsorption experiment. Therefore, metal release studies from massive metal sheets in contact with protein solutions were carried out in parallel. The presence of proteins increased the extent of metals released for chromium metal and stainless steel grades of different microstructure and alloy content, all with passive chromium(III)-rich surface oxides, such as QCM (AISI 316), ferritic (AISI 430), austentic (AISI 304, 316L), and duplex (LDX 2205).

  15. Galvanic corrosion behavior of titanium implants coupled to dental alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortada, M; Giner, L; Costa, S; Gil, F J; Rodríguez, D; Planell, J A

    2000-05-01

    The corrosion of five materials for implant suprastructures (cast-titanium, machined-titanium, gold alloy, silver-palladium alloy and chromium-nickel alloy), was investigated in vitro, the materials being galvanically coupled to a titanium implant. Various electrochemical parameters E(CORR), i(CORR) Evans diagrams, polarization resistance and Tafel slopes) were analyzed. The microstructure of the different dental materials was observed before and after corrosion processes by optical and electron microscopy. Besides, the metallic ions released in the saliva environment were quantified during the corrosion process by means of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry technique (ICP-MS). The cast and machined titanium had the most passive current density at a given potential and chromium-nickel alloy had the most active critical current density values. The high gold content alloys have excellent resistance corrosion, although this decreases when the gold content is lower in the alloy. The palladium alloy had a low critical current density due to the presence of gallium in this composition but a selective dissolution of copper-rich phases was observed through energy dispersive X-ray analysis.

  16. Analysis of thermoelectric properties of high-temperature complex alloys of nickel-base, iron-base and cobalt-base groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holanda, R.

    1984-01-01

    The thermoelectric properties alloys of the nickel-base, iron-base, and cobalt-base groups containing from 1% to 25% 106 chromium were compared and correlated with the following material characteristics: atomic percent of the principle alloy constituent; ratio of concentration of two constituents; alloy physical property (electrical resistivity); alloy phase structure (percent precipitate or percent hardener content); alloy electronic structure (electron concentration). For solid-solution-type alloys the most consistent correlation was obtained with electron concentration, for precipitation-hardenable alloys of the nickel-base superalloy group, the thermoelectric potential correlated with hardener content in the alloy structure. For solid-solution-type alloys, no problems were found with thermoelectric stability to 1000; for precipitation-hardenable alloys, thermoelectric stability was dependent on phase stability. The effects of the compositional range of alloy constituents on temperature measurement uncertainty are discussed.

  17. Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Composite Resin Bonded to Alloy Treated With Sandblasting and Electrolytic Etching

    OpenAIRE

    Goswami, M. M.; Gupta, S.H.; Sandhu, H. S.

    2013-01-01

    Conservation of natural tooth structure precipitated the emergence of resin-retained fixed partial dentures. The weakest link in this modality is the bond between resin cement and alloy of the retainer. Various alloy surface treatment have been recommended to improve alloy–resin bond. This in vitro study was carried out to observe changes in the Nickel–Chromium alloy (Wiron 99, Bego) surface following sandblasting or electrolytic etching treatment by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and to ...

  18. Direct access to macroporous chromium nitride and chromium titanium nitride with inverse opal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weitian; DiSalvo, Francis J

    2015-03-21

    We report a facile synthesis of single-phase, nanocrystalline macroporous chromium nitride and chromium titanium nitride with an inverse opal morphology. The material is characterized using XRD, SEM, HR-TEM/STEM, TGA and XPS. Interconversion of macroporous CrN to Cr2O3 and back to CrN while retaining the inverse opal morphology is also demonstrated.

  19. Hemocompatibility Improvement of Chromium-Bearing Bare-Metal Stent Platform After Magnetoelectropolishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokicki, Ryszard; Haider, Waseem; Maffi, Shivani Kaushal

    2015-01-01

    Research was undertaken to determine the influence of the increased content of chromium in the outermost passive layer of magneto-electrochemically refined Co-Cr alloy L-605 surface on its hemocompatibility. The chemistry, roughness, surface energy, and wettability of conventionally electropolished (EP) and magnetoelectropolished (MEP) samples were studied with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), open circuit potential, atomic force microscopy, and contact angle meter. In vitro hemocompatibility of tested material surfaces was assessed using two important indicators of vascular responses to biomaterial, namely endothelialization and platelets adhesion. The endothelialization was assessed by seeding and incubating samples with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) for 3 days before counting and observing them under a fluorescent microscope. The platelet (rich plasma blood) adhesion and activation test on EP and MEP L-605 alloy surfaces was assessed using a laser scanning confocal microscope. The XPS analysis of MEP samples showed significant enrichment of the passive layer with Cr and O when compared with the EP one. The amount of other elements in the passive layer did not show a significant difference between EP and MEP treatments. The adhesion of HUVEC cells shows remarkable affinity to surfaces enriched in Cr (MEP) with almost 100% confluency. In addition, the number of platelets that adhered to standard EP surfaces was higher compared to the MEP surface. The present study shows that the chromium-enriched surface of cobalt-chromium alloy L-605 by the magnetoelectropolishing process tremendously improves surface hemocompatibility with regard to stent functionality by enhanced endothelialization and lower platelet adhesion and should be taken under consideration as an alternative surface of biodegradable polymer drug-eluting stents, polymer-free drug-eluting stents as well as bare-metal stents.

  20. The Key Technique of Manufacture of Dense Chromium Sesquioxide Refractories

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIMaoqiang; ZHANGShuying; 等

    1998-01-01

    Dense chromium sesquioxide refractories have widely been used in the kilns for making alkai-free and anti-alkali glass fibers due to their excellent re-sistance to molten glasses.Densifications of chromium sesquioxide during sintering can be blocked by evaporation of chromium trioxide derived from oxidation at high temperature,In this paper the mech-anism of sintering chromium oxide and the process-ing technique for making dense chromium sesquiox-ide refractories are discussed .A process in laboratory scale for making dense chromium sesquioxide bricks is demonstrated.

  1. Synthesis Of NiCrAlC alloys by mechanical alloying; Sintese de ligas NiCrAlC por moagem de alta energia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, A.K.; Pereira, J.I.; Vurobi Junior, S.; Cintho, O.M., E-mail: alissonkws@gmail.co [Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa (UEPG), PR (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of the present paper is the synthesis of nickel alloys (NiCrAlC), which has been proposed like a economic alternative to the Stellite family Co alloys using mechanical alloying, followed by sintering heat treatment of milled material. The NiCrAlC alloys consist of a chromium carbides dispersion in a Ni{sub 3}Al intermetallic matrix, that is easily synthesized by mechanical alloying. The use of mechanical alloying enables higher carbides sizes and distribution control in the matrix during sintering. We are also investigated the compaction of the processed materials by compressibility curves. The milling products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, and the end product was featured by conventional metallography and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), that enabled the identification of desired phases, beyond microhardness test, which has been shown comparable to alloys manufactured by fusion after heat treating. (author)

  2. Abrasion Resistance of as-Cast High-Chromium Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pokusová Marcela

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available High chromium cast irons are widely used as abrasion resistant materials. Their properties and wear resistance depend on carbides and on the nature of the matrix supporting these carbides. The paper presents test results of irons which contain (in wt.% 18-22 Cr and 2-5 C, and is alloyed by 1.7 Mo + 5 Ni + 2 Mn to improve the toughness. Tests showed as-cast irons with mostly austenitic matrix achieved hardness 36-53 HRC but their relative abrasion-resistance was higher than the tool steel STN 19436 heat treated on hardness 60 HRC.

  3. Synthesis of a new complex Chromium (Ⅲ) 2-mercaptonicotinate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wei; HAO Er-jun; JIANG Yu-qin

    2004-01-01

    Chromium is an essential trace element for mammals[1-3].Diabetes is a chronic disease with major health consequence. Studies show that the occurrence of diabetes have great thing to do with the chromium deficient. Almost 40 years after the first report of glucose tolerance factor(GTF)[4]no conclusive evidence for an isolable ,biologically active form of chromium exited. Three materials have been proposed to be the biologically active form of chromium: "glucose tolerance factor", chromium Picolinate and low-molecular-weight chromium-binding substance (LWMCr)[5]So there is potential for the design of new chromium drugs[6].Chromium compounds have been used in medicine for centuries and there is potential for the design of new chromium drugs.2-Mercaptonicotinic acid(MN) displays the interesting biological activity. Chromium( Ⅲ )2-mercaptonicotinate is a common and effective biologically active form of Chromium. The test of biological activity indicated that may be useful in treating of diabetes. In this paper, we reported the The synthesis route is as follow:The structure of the complex has been characterized by IR, elemental analysis, MS,atomic absorption spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction and TG-DTA analysis.They indicate that the structure of Chromium 2-mercaptonicotinate.HPLC is used for determination of the purity. Studies show that the complex has a good biological activity for supplement tiny dietary chromium,lowering blood glucose levels, lowering serum lipid levels and increasing lean body mass.

  4. The effect of sprue design and alloy type on the fit of three-unit metal/ceramic bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A

    1995-12-01

    This study was designed to compare the effect of three sprue designs and three types of metal alloy/ceramic on the accuracy of fit of three unit bridges. A sprue design which has straight sprues attached directly to the pattern but does not have a button of excess metal connecting the sprues together after casting, produced the best marginal accuracy, irrespective of the alloy type used. Of the three alloys used (gold, palladium and nickel/chromium based alloys) the gold alloy produced better fitting bridges with each sprue design used.

  5. The metallurgy of high temperature alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tien, J. K.; Purushothaman, S.

    1976-01-01

    Nickel-base, cobalt-base, and high nickel and chromium iron-base alloys are dissected, and their microstructural and chemical components are assessed with respect to the various functions expected of high temperature structural materials. These functions include the maintenance of mechanical integrity over the strain-rate spectrum from creep resistance through fatigue crack growth resistance, and such alloy stability expectations as microstructural coarsening resistance, phase instability resistance and oxidation and corrosion resistance. Special attention will be given to the perennial conflict and trade-off between strength, ductility and corrosion and oxidation resistance. The newest developments in the constitution of high temperature alloys will also be discussed, including aspects relating to materials conservation.

  6. A Novel Surface Treatment for Titanium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowther, S. E.; Park, C.; SaintClair, T. L.

    2004-01-01

    High-speed commercial aircraft require a surface treatment for titanium (Ti) alloy that is both environmentally safe and durable under the conditions of supersonic flight. A number of pretreatment procedures for Ti alloy requiring multi-stages have been developed to produce a stable surface. Among the stages are, degreasing, mechanical abrasion, chemical etching, and electrochemical anodizing. These treatments exhibit significant variations in their long-term stability, and the benefits of each step in these processes still remain unclear. In addition, chromium compounds are often used in many chemical treatments and these materials are detrimental to the environment. Recently, a chromium-free surface treatment for Ti alloy has been reported, though not designed for high temperature applications. In the present study, a simple surface treatment process developed at NASA/LaRC is reported, offering a high performance surface for a variety of applications. This novel surface treatment for Ti alloy is conventionally achieved by forming oxides on the surface with a two-step chemical process without mechanical abrasion. This acid-followed-by-base treatment was designed to be cost effective and relatively safe to use in a commercial application. In addition, it is chromium-free, and has been successfully used with a sol-gel coating to afford a strong adhesive bond after exposure to hot-wet environments. Phenylethynyl containing adhesives were used to evaluate this surface treatment with sol-gel solutions made of novel imide silanes developed at NASA/LaRC. Oxide layers developed by this process were controlled by immersion time and temperature and solution concentration. The morphology and chemical composition of the oxide layers were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Bond strengths made with this new treatment were evaluated using single lap shear tests.

  7. Hexavalent chromium recovery by liquid–liquid extraction with 2-octylaminopyridine from acidic chloride media and its sequential separation from other heavy toxic metal ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.P. Mane

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A systematic study of extraction of chromium(VI with 2-octylaminopyridine (2-OAP in xylene at room temperature has been conducted. Quantitative extraction of chromium(VI was observed in the 0.4–0.8 M concentration range of hydrochloric acid. From the extracted complex species in the organic phase, chromium(VI was back extracted with 7 N ammonia (3 × 10 mL, and was determined by spectrophotometric method. Various parameters such as 2-OAP concentration, equilibrium period, effect of various diluents, aqueous: organic volume ratio, acidity and diverse ions were studied. The extraction reaction proceeds with ion-pair formation and the stoichiometry of extracted species was found to be [(2OAPH+ CrO3Cl−](org. The separation and determination of chromium(VI from associated and toxic metals in binary, ternary and multicomponent mixture were carried out. The method permits the sequential separation of chromium(VI from other toxic metals and has been used to separate and determine chromium(VI from alloys, and effluent water samples from tannery industries.

  8. In vitro corrosion behaviour and metallic ion release of different prosthodontic alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, F J; Sánchez, L A; Espías, A; Planell, J A

    1999-12-01

    The corrosion resistance for six metallic alloys often used in clinical dentistry, was evaluated by measuring their polarisation resistance in an artificial saliva environment. The critical current density (icr), the passive current density (ip), the corrosion potential (Ecorr) and the critical pitting potential (Ecp), were studied. Metallic ion release from the different alloys was analysed in a saliva environment at 37 degrees C. The nickel-chromium alloy exhibited important corrosion and a high quantity of ions was released. The titanium presented a low value of ion release and a good corrosion resistance due to the passive film on the metal surface. The high gold content alloy provided the best corrosion resistance.

  9. Durability and degradation of HT9 based alloy waste forms with variable Ni and Cr content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-12-31

    Short-term electrochemical and long-term hybrid electrochemical corrosion tests were performed on alloy waste forms in reference aqueous solutions that bound postulated repository conditions. The alloy waste forms investigated represent candidate formulations that can be produced with advanced electrochemical treatment of used nuclear fuel. The studies helped to better understand the alloy waste form durability with differing concentrations of nickel and chromium, species that can be added to alloy waste forms to potentially increase their durability and decrease radionuclide release into the environment.

  10. Serum chromium levels in gestational diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P G Sundararaman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To measure serum chromium level in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM from Chennai, South India. Materials and Methods: Thirty women with gestational diabetes, 60 age matched controls. Inclusion criteria: Gestational age 22-28 weeks, age group 20-35 years. Exclusion Criteria: Gestational age beyond 28 weeks, malnutrition or presence of infection. Serum chromium was measured using inductive couple plasma emission spectrometer. Results: Serum chromium levels of women with GDM, 1.59+/-0.02 ng/ml (range: 0.16-4.0 ng/ml were lower than in controls (4.58+/-0.62 ng/ml; range 0.82-5.33 ng/ml (P < 0.001. However, there were no significant differences among cases and controls when subdivided by parity. Conclusions: Women with GDM from a South Indian city had lower levels of serum chromium compared to pregnant women without GDM. Studies may be done whether chromium supplementation is useful in this group of women.

  11. Surface Chemistry and Spectroscopy of Chromium in Inorganic Oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Wachs, I.E.; Schoonheydt, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on the surface chemistry and spectroscopy of chromium in inorganic oxides. Characterization of the molecular structures of chromium; Mechanics of hydrogenation-dehydrogenation reactions; Mobility and reactivity on oxidic surfaces.

  12. Residual Chromium in Leather by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    S. Okoh; I. O. Okunade; D. J. Adeyemo; Ahmed, Y A; A. A. Audu; E. Amali

    2012-01-01

    Problem statement: Most tanning processes employ the use of chromium sulphate. For chromium tanned leather, finished products may contain high amount of residual chromium. This may pose some health hazards, since chromium is known to be toxic at elevated concentration. This justifies the need for the study. Approach: Various samples of leather were collected from a tannery, a leather crafts market, a leather dump site and from local tanners all in Kano, Nigeria in 2009. The samples were irrad...

  13. Corrosion of High Chromium Ferritic/Martensitic Steels in High Temperature Water. a Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, P.; Lapena, J.; Blazquez, F. [Ciemat, Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    Available literature concerning corrosion of high-chromium ferritic/martensitic steels in high temperature water has been reviewed. The subjects considered are general corrosion, effect of irradiation on corrosion, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). In addition some investigations about radiation induced segregation (RIS) are shown in order to know the compositional changes at grain boundaries of these alloys and their influence on corrosion properties. The data on general corrosion indicate moderate corrosion rates in high temperature water up to 350 degree centigree. Considerably larger corrosion rates were observed under neutron irradiation. The works concerning to the behaviour of these alloys to stress corrosion cracking seem to conclude that in these materials is necessary to optimize the temper temperature and to carry out the post-weld heat treatments properly in order to avoid stress corrosion cracking. (Author) 40 refs.

  14. Preparation of Chromium Oxide Coatings on Aluminum Borate Whiskers by a Hydrothermal Deposition Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Aluminum borate whiskers (9Al2O32B2O3) can be used to reinforce aluminum alloys to produce light and strong composites. However, the adverse interfacial reactions between the whiskers and the aluminum alloys inhibit their practical uses; therefore, a protective coating is needed on whiskers. In this work, aluminum borate whiskers were coated with chromium-coating deposits in a hydrothermal solution containing CrCl3, Na2C4H4O6, NaPH2O2, and H3BO3. The presence of the impurity P in the hydrothermal deposits can be avoided by reducing the amount of NaPH2O2 in the coating solution. Thermodynamic analysis was used to discuss the behavior of ions in the coating process. The subsequent heating of the hydrothermal products in air at 800 ℃ yielded smooth Cr2O3 films with a thickness of 0.060.07 μm.

  15. Hexavalent and trivalent chromium in leather: What should be done?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretto, Angelo

    2015-11-01

    Trivalent chromium compounds are used for leather tanning, and chromium may be released during use of leather goods. In certain instances, small amounts of hexavalent chromium can be formed and released. Both trivalent and hexavalent chromium can elicit allergic skin reaction in chromium sensitised subjects, the latter being significantly more potent. Induction of sensitisation only occurs after exposure to hexavalent chromium. A minority of subjects are sensitised to chromium, and in a fraction of these subjects allergic skin reaction have been described after wearing leather shoes or, less frequently, other leather goods. The evidence that in all these cases the reaction is related to hexavalent chromium is not always strong. The content of hexavalent chromium in leather is regulated in European Union, but rate of release rather than content is relevant for allergic skin reaction. The role of trivalent chromium appear much less relevant if at all. Modern tanning procedure do not pose significant risk due to either hexavalent or trivalent chromium. Dismissing bad quality and worn-off leather goods is relevant in reducing or eliminating the skin reaction. It should also be pointed out that shoe components or substances other than chromium in leather may cause allergic/irritative skin reactions.

  16. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining...

  17. Problems of phase identification in high-nitrogen chromium-manganese cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Pirowski

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available An atzcrnpt has been madc to offcr an intcrprctation of ihc rnicrostructurc of chromium-mangancx cast stccl aftcr adding to 1his stccla targc amount of nitrogcn as an alloying clcrncnr. Nitropcn was addcd 10 rhc cast stccl by two mcthods: rhc first mcthod consistcrl inadding a nitridcd fcrrornangancsc, the second method in rcmclting thc nitrogen-rscc alloy undcr rhc atrnosphcrc of nitrogen maintaininghigh N1 prcssurc abovc the mctal meSt (33 MPa.Somc imponant diffcrcnces in the microstructurc of rhc cxamincd cast sleet havc bccn observed. dcpcnding on how the nitrogcn wasintroduced to Ihc alloy. Whcn melting was carried out undcr thc armosphcric prcssurc adding thc nitridcd fcrroaIloys. the matrix was composedof nitridcd nustcnitc, and numerous nitrides (carboni~rides wcrc forming a wcll-dcvclopcd ncrwork along tbc grain boundaries.Mcl t ing of alloy iindcr thc high prcsairc or nirrogcn enabPcs oblaining much highcr concentrarion of this clclncnt in lncral. Thc network ofprccipilarcs along lhc grain houndwics is obscrvcd to cxist no longcr. and thc Pamellar stmcturc occupics now practically ihc cnrirc mctalvolumc. Whcn :illoys arc mcltctt in rhc air, only small fragments oh the lamellar structurc, forming thc. so ca!lcd. "Chincse script" and localclusters arc! prcscnt.At this stagc of thc rcscarch. an artcmpa has bcen mad& to identify thc phascs in chromium-~nnngn~icsc cnst stccl u s i n ~a transmissionclectron rnicroscopc. Thc conducrcd slzldics pnnly confirrncd rhc conclusions resulting from ~ h ccx nminntions cnrricd out prcvioi~slyu ndcrthc optical rnicroscopc. So far. howcvcr, no consistcna answer has bccn found to thc qucstion of what typc arc Z ~ pCrc cipi~alcsp rcscnt inthe structurc of thc cxamincrh alloy.Attcmpts at furthcr intcrprcintion of thc obtained tcsults will hc taken at the next stage of thc work with n~tcntionfo ci~sscdo n thc prccipitatcsformed during rhc proccss of wlidilicat ion of thc cxnmincd chromium-manganese cast

  18. Study on comprehensive properties of duplex austenitic surfacing alloys for impacting abrasion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, comprehensive property crack resistance, work hardening and abrasion resistance of a series of double-phases austenitic alloys(FAW) has been studied by means of SEM, TEM and type MD-10 impacting wear test machine. FAW alloys are of middle chromium and low manganese, including Fe-Cr-Mo-C alloy,Fe-Cr-Mn-C alloy and Fe-Cr-Mn-Ni-C alloy, that are designed for working in condition of impacting abrasion resistance hardfacing.Study results show that the work hardening mechanism of FAW alloys are mainly deformation high dislocation density and dynamic carbide aging, the form of wearing is plastic chisel cutting. Adjusting the amount of carbon, nickel, manganese and other elements in austenitic phase area, the FAW alloy could fit different engineering conditions of high impacting, high temperature and so on.

  19. Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22 in Chloride Solutions Containing Organic Acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carranza, R M; Giordano, C M; Rodr?guez, M A; Rebak, R B

    2005-11-04

    Alloy 22 (N06022) is a nickel based alloy containing alloying elements such as chromium, molybdenum and tungsten. It is highly corrosion resistant both under reducing and under oxidizing conditions. Electrochemical studies such as electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were performed to determine the corrosion behavior of Alloy 22 in 1M NaCl solutions at various pH values from acidic to neutral at 90 C. Tests were also carried out in NaCl solutions containing oxalic acid or acetic acid. It is shown that the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 was higher in a solution containing oxalic acid than in a solution of the same pH acidified with HCl. Acetic acid was not corrosive to Alloy 22. The corrosivity of oxalic acid was attributed to its capacity to form stable complex species with metallic cations from Alloy 22.

  20. Abrasive Performance of Chromium Carbide Reinforced Ni3Al Matrix Composite Cladding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shang-ping; LUO He-li; FENG Di; CAO Xu; ZHANG Xi-e

    2009-01-01

    The Microstructure and room temperature abrasive wear resistance of chromium carbide reinforced NiM3Al matrix composite cladding at different depth on nickel base alloy were investigated. The results showed that there is a great difference in microstructure and wear resistance of the Ni3 Al matrix composite at different depth. Three kinds of tests, designed for different load and abrasive size, were used to understand the wear behaviour of this material. Under all three wear conditions, the abrasion resistance of the composite cladding at the depth of 6 mm, namely NC-M2, was much higher than that of the composite cladding at the depth of 2 mm, namely NC-M1. In addition, the wear-resistant advantage of NC-M2 was more obvious when the size of the abrasive was small. The relative wear resistance of NC-M2 increased from 1.63 times to 2.05 times when the size of the abrasive decreased from 180 μm to 50μm. The mierostructure of the composite cladding showed that the size of chromium carbide particles, which was mainly influenced by cooling rate of melting pool, was a function of distance from the interface between the coating and substrate varied gradually. The chromium carbide particles near the interface were finer than that far from inter-face, which was the main reason for the different wear resistance of the composite cladding at different depth.

  1. Effects of ultraviolet irradiation on bonding strength between Co-Cr alloy and citric acid-crosslinked gelatin matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Motoki; Sasaki, Makoto; Katada, Yasuyuki; Taguchi, Tetsushi

    2014-02-01

    Novel techniques for creating a strong bond between polymeric matrices and biometals are required. We immobilized polymeric matrices on the surface of biometal for drug-eluting stents through covalent bond. We performed to improve the bonding strength between a cobalt-chromium alloy and a citric acid-crosslinked gelatin matrix by ultraviolet irradiation on the surface of cobalt-chromium alloy. The ultraviolet irradiation effectively generated hydroxyl groups on the surface of the alloy. The bonding strength between the gelatin matrix and the alloy before ultraviolet irradiation was 0.38 ± 0.02 MPa, whereas it increased to 0.48 ± 0.02 MPa after ultraviolet irradiation. Surface analysis showed that the citric acid derivatives occurred on the surface of the cobalt-chromium alloy through ester bond. Therefore, ester bond formation between the citric acid derivatives active esters and the hydroxyl groups on the cobalt-chromium alloy contributed to the enhanced bonding strength. Ultraviolet irradiation and subsequent immobilization of a gelatin matrix using citric acid derivatives is thus an effective way to functionalize biometal surfaces.

  2. Studying chromium biosorption using arabica coffee leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Carlos Florez García

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This work was aimed at providing an alternative for removing heavy metals such as chromium from waste water (effluent from the leather industry and galvanoplasty (coating with a thin layer of metal by electrochemical means, using coffee leaves as bio- mass. Using arabica coffee (Castle variety leaves led to 82% chromium removal efficiency for 1,000 mg/L synthetic dissolutions in 4 pH dissolution operating conditions, 0 rpm agitation, 0.149 mm diameter biomass particle size and 0.85 g/ml biomass / dissolution volume ratio.

  3. New mixed aluminium–chromium diarsenate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Alem Bouhassine

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Potassium chromium aluminium diarsenate, KCr1/4Al3/4As2O7, was prepared by solid-state reaction. The structure consists of (Cr1/4/Al3/4O6 octahedra and As2O7 diarsenate groups sharing corners to build up a three-dimensional anionic framework. The potassium cations are located in wide channels running along the c-axis direction. The crystal structure is isostructural with the triclinic AIMIIIX2O7 (AI = alkali metal; MIII = Al, Cr, Fe; X = As, P compounds. However, the MIII octahedrally coordinated site is 25% partially occupied by chromium and 75% by aluminium.

  4. Strategies for chromium bioremediation of tannery effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Satyendra Kumar; Tripathi, Manikant; Srinath, Thiruneelakantan

    2012-01-01

    Bioremediation offers the possibility of using living organisms (bacteria, fungi, algae,or plants), but primarily microorganisms, to degrade or remove environmental contaminants, and transform them into nontoxic or less-toxic forms. The major advantages of bioremediation over conventional physicochemical and biological treatment methods include low cost, good efficiency, minimization of chemicals, reduced quantity of secondary sludge, regeneration of cell biomass, and the possibility of recover-ing pollutant metals. Leather industries, which extensively employ chromium compounds in the tanning process, discharge spent-chromium-laden effluent into nearby water bodies. Worldwide, chromium is known to be one of the most common inorganic contaminants of groundwater at pollutant hazardous sites. Hexavalent chromium poses a health risk to all forms of life. Bioremediation of chromium extant in tannery waste involves different strategies that include biosorption, bioaccumulation,bioreduction, and immobilization of biomaterial(s). Biosorption is a nondirected physiochemical interaction that occurs between metal species and the cellular components of biological species. It is metabolism-dependent when living biomass is employed, and metabolism-independent in dead cell biomass. Dead cell biomass is much more effective than living cell biomass at biosorping heavy metals, including chromium. Bioaccumulation is a metabolically active process in living organisms that works through adsorption, intracellular accumulation, and bioprecipitation mechanisms. In bioreduction processes, microorganisms alter the oxidation/reduction state of toxic metals through direct or indirect biological and chemical process(es).Bioreduction of Cr6+ to Cr3+ not only decreases the chromium toxicity to living organisms, but also helps precipitate chromium at a neutral pH for further physical removal,thus offering promise as a bioremediation strategy. However, biosorption, bioaccumulation, and

  5. Chromium allergy and dermatitis: prevalence and main findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Johansen, Jeanne D.; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl;

    2015-01-01

    The history of chromium as an allergen goes back more than a century, and includesan interventional success with national legislation that led to significant changes inthe epidemiology of chromium allergy in construction workers. The 2015 EU Leather Regulation once again put a focus on chromium...... allergy, emphasizing that the investigation of chromium allergy is still far from complete. Our review article on chromium focuses on the allergen’s chemical properties, its potential exposure sources, and the allergen’s interaction with the skin, and also provides an overview of the regulations...

  6. The influence of chromium on mechanical properties of austempered ductile cast iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartosiewicz, L.; Singh, I.; Alberts, F. A.; Krause, A. R.; Putatunda, S. K.

    1995-02-01

    An investigation was carried out to examine the influence of microstructure and chromium on the tensile properties and plane strain fracture toughness of austempered ductile cast iron (ADI). The investigation also examined the growth kinetics of ferrite in these alloys. Compact tension and round cylindrical tensile specimens were prepared from ductile cast iron with Cr as well as without Cr. These specimens were then given four different heat treatments to produce four different microstructures. Tensile tests and fracture toughness tests were carried out as per ASTM standards E-8 and E-399. The crack growth mechanism during fracture toughness tests was also determined. The test results indicate that yield strength, tensile strength, and fracture toughness of ADI increases with an increase in the volume fractions of ferrite, and the fracture toughness reaches a peak when the volume fractions of the ferrite are approximately 60% in these alloys. The Cr addition was found to reduce the fracture toughness of ADI at lower hardness levels (<40 HRC); at higher hardness levels (≥40 HRC), the effect of chromium on the fracture toughness was negligible. The crack growth mechanism was found to be a combination of quasi-cleavage and microvoid coalescences, and the crack trajectories connect the graphite nodules along the way.

  7. Pack cementation coatings for alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yi-Rong; Zheng, Minhui; Rapp, R.A. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The halide-activated pack cementation process was modified to produce a Ge-doped silicide diffusion coating on a Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb alloy in a single processing step. The morphology and composition of the coating depended both on the composition of the pack and on the composition and microstructure of the substrate. Higher Ge content in the pack suppressed the formation of CrSi{sub 2} and reduced the growth kinetics of the coating. Ge was not homogeneously distributed in the coatings. In cyclic and isothermal oxidation in air at 700 and 1050{degrees}C, the Ge-doped silicide coating protected the Cr-Nb alloys from significant oxidation by the formation of a Ge-doped silica film. The codeposition and diffusion of aluminum and chromium into low alloy steel have been achieved using elemental Al and Cr powders and a two-step pack cementation process. Sequential process treatments at 925{degrees}C and 1150{degrees}C yield dense and uniform ferrite coatings, whose compositions are close to either Fe{sub 3}Al or else FeAl plus a lower Cr content, when processed under different conditions. The higher content of Al in the coatings was predicted by thermodynamic calculations of equilibrium in the gas phase. The effect of the particle size of the metal powders on the surface composition of the coating has been studied for various combinations of Al and Cr powders.

  8. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Trivalent and Hexavalent Chromium Based on Ingestion and Inhalation of Soluble Chromium Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    be largely Cr(III) although some Cr(VI) exposure probably also occurs. Stainless-steel welders are exposed to nickel as well as to chromium compounds...welders are equivocal with respect to involvement of chromium, particularly since nickel in some chemical forms is an established lung carcinogen (Stern...microglobulin (Lindberg and Vesterberg, 1983), retinol-binding protein (Franchini and Mutti , 1988), B-glucuronidase ( Mutti et al., 1979), and kidney brush border

  9. Remanent life assessment of creep resistant modified 12% chromium steels: microstructural analysis and microstructural development models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundin, L.; Andren, H.O. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Physics; Norell, M.; Nyborg, L. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Engineering Metals

    1996-09-01

    In this report, an overview of the current status of the development work, physical metallurgy and creep properties of 9-12% chromium steels is given. These steels find their application mainly in the power generating industry, at high temperatures. In Sweden, a co-operation between research groups specialized at microanalysis and modelling of 9-12% chromium steels has been initiated. This co-operation is outlined in this report, as well as the most important results achieved so far. The microstructure of four different alloys have been studied in detail with different analytical methods including atom-probe field-ion microscopy, electron microscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy. The role of different elements on precipitation processes and the composition of all relevant phases have been studied. Furthermore, segregation of impurity elements to creep cavities and creep fracture surfaces have been studied for two of the alloys. Models for the microstructural development of 9-12% chromium steels during heat treatment and creep testing are currently being produced. The work has been focused on modelling the nucleation and growth of MN and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitates during tempering, and the first results from these studies are currently being compared to microscopy observation. In addition, equilibrium phase calculations have been made and been found to predict existing phases to a high degree. A complete description of the creep properties of these steels must also include a model of the relationship between microstructure and creep behaviour. However, the microstructural development models will form an important basis for complete models of this kind. 57 refs

  10. Biological groundwater treatment for chromium removal at low hexavalent chromium concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamais, Daniel; Noutsopoulos, Constantinos; Kavallari, Ioanna; Nyktari, Eleni; Kaldis, Apostolos; Panousi, Eleni; Nikitopoulos, George; Antoniou, Kornilia; Nasioka, Maria

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this work is to develop and evaluate biological groundwater treatment systems that will achieve hexavalent chromium reduction and total chromium removal from groundwater at hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) groundwater concentrations in the 0-200 μg/L range. Three lab-scale units operated, as sequencing batch reactors (SBR) under aerobic, anaerobic and anaerobic-aerobic conditions. All systems received groundwater with a Cr(VI) content of 200 μg/L. In order to support biological growth, groundwater was supplemented with milk, liquid cheese whey or a mixture of sugar and milk to achieve a COD concentration of 200 mg/L. The results demonstrate that a fully anaerobic system or an anaerobic-aerobic system dosed with simple or complex external organic carbon sources can lead to practically complete Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(III). The temperature dependency of maximum Cr(VI) removal rates can be described by the Arrhenius relationship. Total chromium removal in the biological treatment systems was not complete because a significant portion of Cr(III) remained in solution. An integrated system comprising of an anaerobic SBR followed by a sand filter achieved more than 95% total chromium removal thus resulting in average effluent total and dissolved chromium concentrations of 7 μg/L and 3 μg/L, respectively.

  11. The electronic structure of antiferromagnetic chromium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1981-01-01

    The author has used the local spin density formalism to perform self-consistent calculations of the electronic structure of chromium in the non-magnetic and commensurate antiferromagnetic phases, as a function of the lattice parameter. A change of a few per cent in the atomic radius brings...

  12. Description Of Alloy Layer Formation On A Cast Steel Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szajnar J.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A description of alloy layer formation on a steel substrate is presented. Two types of formation are considered: diffusion of carbon and chromium into the solid from the pad in the direction of the cast steel within the FeCrC (grains and diffusion in a layer of liquid chromium cast iron formed in a preceding step. The influence of silicon in the pad on the pad’s transformation into the liquid is also examined. Solidus and liquidus temperatures of high carbon ferrochromium are determined. The larger the content of Si is used in the experiment, the lower the solidus temperature of the FeCrC alloy is observed. This results from the higher intensity of the elements’ diffusion and faster formation of the liquid.

  13. A Kinetic Model of Chromium in a Flame

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Chromium has been identified as a carcinogenic metal.Incineration is the useful method for disposal of toxic chromium hazard waste and a chromium kinetic model in a flame is very important to study chromium oxidation.Chromium chemical kinetics over a range of temperatures of a hydrogen/air flame is proposed.Nine chromium compounds and fifty-eight reversible chemical reactions were considered The forward reaction rates are calculated based on the molecular collision approach for unknown ones and Arrhenius's Law for known ones.The backward reaction rates were calculated according to forward reaction rates, the equilibrium constants and chemical thermodynamics.It is verified by several equilibrium cases and is tested by a hydrogen/air diffusion flame.The results show that the kinetic model could be used in cases in which the chromium kinetics play an important role in a flame

  14. Oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloys. 14/20% chromium: effects of processing on deformation texture, recrystallization and tensile properties; Alliages ferritiques 14/20% de chrome renforces par dispersion d`oxydes. Effets des procedes de mise en forme sur les textures de deformation, la recristallisation et les proprietes de traction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regle, H.

    1994-12-31

    The ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened alloys are promising candidates for high temperature application materials, in particular for long life core components of advanced nuclear reactors. The aim of this work is to control the microstructure, in order to optimise the mechanical properties. The two ferritic alloys examined here, MA956 and MA957, are obtained by Mechanical Alloying techniques. They are characterised by quite anisotropic microstructure and mechanical properties. We have investigated the influence of hot and cold working processes (hot extrusion, swaging and cold-drawing) and recrystallization heat treatments on deformation textures, microstructures and tensile properties. The aim was to control the size of the grains and their anisotropic shape, using recrystallization heat treatments. After consolidation and hot extrusion, as-received materials present a extremely fine microstructure with elongated grains and a very strong (110) deformation texture with single-crystal character. At that stage of processing, recrystallization temperature are very high (1450 degrees C for MA957 alloy and 1350 degrees C for MA956 alloy) and materials develop millimetric recrystallized grains. Additional hot extrusion induce a fibre texture. Cold-drawing maintains a fibre texture, but the intensity decreases with increasing cold-work level. For both materials, the decrease of texture intensities correspond to a decrease of the recrystallization temperatures (from 1350 degrees C for a low cold-work level to 750 degrees C for 60 % cold-deformation, case of MA956 alloy) and a refinement of the grain size (from a millimetric size to less than an hundred of micrometer). Swaging develop a cyclic component where the intensity increases with increasing deformation in this case, the recrystallization temperature remains always very high and the millimetric grain size is slightly modified, even though cold-work level increases. (Abstract Truncated)

  15. Corrosion resistance and electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation testing of some iron-base hardfacing alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cockeram, B.V.

    1999-11-01

    Hardfacing alloys are weld deposited on a base material to provide a wear resistant surface. Commercially available iron-base hardfacing alloys are being evaluated for replacement of cobalt-base alloys to reduce nuclear plant activation levels. Corrosion testing was used to evaluate the corrosion resistance of several iron-base hardfacing alloys in highly oxygenated environments. The corrosion test results indicate that iron-base hardfacing alloys in the as-deposited condition have acceptable corrosion resistance when the chromium to carbon ratio is greater than 4. Tristelle 5183, with a high niobium (stabilizer) content, did not follow this trend due to precipitation of niobium-rich carbides instead of chromium-rich carbides. This result indicates that iron-base hardfacing alloys containing high stabilizer contents may possess good corrosion resistance with Cr:C < 4. NOREM 02, NOREM 01, and NoCo-M2 hardfacing alloys had acceptable corrosion resistance in the as-deposited and 885 C/4 hour heat treated condition, but rusting from sensitization was observed in the 621 C/6 hour heat treated condition. The feasibility of using an Electrochemical Potentiokinetic Reactivation (EPR) test method, such as used for stainless steel, to detect sensitization in iron-base hardfacing alloys was evaluated. A single loop-EPR method was found to provide a more consistent measurement of sensitization than a double loop-EPR method. The high carbon content that is needed for a wear resistant hardfacing alloy produces a high volume fraction of chromium-rich carbides that are attacked during EPR testing. This results in inherently lower sensitivity for detection of a sensitized iron-base hardfacing alloy than stainless steel using conventional EPR test methods.

  16. Effect of Ti-V-Nb-Mo addition on microstructure of high chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Youping

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The effects of trace additions of multi-alloying elements (Ti, Nb, V, Mo on carbides precipitation and as-cast microstructure of eutectic high chromium cast iron containing 2.85wt.%C and 31.0wt.%Cr were investigated from thermodynamic and kinetic considerations. The thermodynamic calculations show that Ti and Nb exist in the multi-alloying system in the forms of TiC and NbC. The formation of VC during the solidification is not feasible from the thermodynamic consideration. XRD analysis shows that the V exists in alloy compounds (VCr2C2, VCrFe8. The first precipitated high melting point particles (TiC, NbC can act as the heterogeneous substrate of M7C3 carbides, which results in significant refinement of the M7C3 carbides. After the addition of alloying elements, C atom diffusion is hindered due to the strong affinities of the strong carbide forming elements for carbon, which decreases the growth rate of carbides. The combined roles of the increase of nucleation rate and the decrease of carbides growth rate lead to the finer microstructure.

  17. Strength and plasticity of Fe-Cr alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skripnyak, V. A.; Emelyanova, E. S.; Sergeev, M. V.; Skripnyak, N. V.; Zinovieva, O. S.

    2016-11-01

    High-chromium steels are attractive as promising structural materials for applications in nuclear facilities. Using the multilevel modeling, yield stress values of precipitation-hardened Fe-Cr steels are predicted in the temperature range up to 1115 K and pressures up to 10 GPa. The adiabatic curve obtained demonstrates a good correlation with the experimental data for a Fe-Cr-Ni alloy in the pressure range up to 10 GPa.

  18. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys via rapid solidification technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, R.

    1984-01-01

    Aluminum alloys containing 10 to 11.5 wt. pct. of iron and 1.5 to 3 wt. pct. of chromium using the technique of rapid solidification powder metallurgy were studied. Alloys were prepared as thin ribbons (.002 inch thick) rapidly solidified at uniform rate of 10(6) C/second by the melt spinning process. The melt spun ribbons were pulverized into powders (-60 to 400 mesh) by a rotating hammer mill. The powders were consolidated by hot extrusion at a high reduction ratio of 50:1. The powder extrusion temperature was varied to determine the range of desirable processing conditions necessary to yield useful properties. Powders and consolidated alloys were characterized by SEM and optical metallography. The consolidated alloys were evaluated for (1) thermal stability, (2) tensile properties in the range, room temperature to 450 F, and (3) notch toughness in the range, room temperature to 450 F.

  19. The structure of rapidly solidified Al- Fe- Cr alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yearim, R.; Shechtman, D.

    1982-11-01

    Four aluminum alloys, designed for use at elevated temperatures, were studied. The alloys were supersaturated with iron and chromium, and one of them contained small amounts of Ti, V, and Zr. The starting materials were alloy powders made by the RSR (Rapid Solidification Rate) centrifugal atomization process. Extrusion bars were made from the four powders. The as-extruded microstructure and the microstructure of the alloys after annealing at 482 °C were investigated by optical and transmission electron microscopy and by X-ray diffraction. The microstructure consists of equiaxed grains of aluminum matrix and two types of precipitates, namely, Al3(Fe ,Cr) and a metastable phase, Al6(Fe,Cr). The precipitates were different in their shape, size, distribution, and location within the grains.

  20. MODULATED STRUCTURES AND ORDERING STRUCTURES IN ALLOYING AUSTENITIC MANGANESE STEEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L. He; Z.H. Jin; J.D. Lu

    2001-01-01

    The microstructure of Fe-10Mn-2Cr-1.5C alloy has been investigated with transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometer. The superlattice diffraction spots and satellite reflection pattrens have been observed in the present alloy, which means the appearence of the ordering structure and modulated structure in the alloy. It is also proved by X-ray diffraction analysis that the austenite in the alloy is more stable than that in traditional austenitic manganese steel. On the basis of this investigation,it is suggested that the C-Mn ordering clusters exist in austenitic manganese steel and the chromium can strengthen this effect by linking the weaker C-Mn couples together,which may play an important role in work hardening of austenitic manganese steel.

  1. Aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Linda B. (Inventor); Starke, Edgar A., Jr. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    This invention relates to aluminum alloys, particularly to aluminum-copper-lithium alloys containing at least about 0.1 percent by weight of indium as an essential component, which are suitable for applications in aircraft and aerospace vehicles. At least about 0.1 percent by weight of indium is added as an essential component to an alloy which precipitates a T1 phase (Al2CuLi). This addition enhances the nucleation of the precipitate T1 phase, producing a microstructure which provides excellent strength as indicated by Rockwell hardness values and confirmed by standard tensile tests.

  2. Effect the addition of 10% (volume fraction) chromium on the mechanical properties of NiAlCr processed by powder metallurgy; Efecto de la adicion de un 10% en volumen de cromo en el comportamiento a traccion de aleaciones pulvimetalurgicas NiAlCr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Barriocanal, J.; Garces, G.; Perez, P.; Adeva, P.

    2005-07-01

    The mechanical properties of Ni{sub 3}Al-Cr reinforced with 10% in volume fraction of chromium particles produced by powder metallurgy have been studied. For this purpose, milled powders with composition of Ni-20.9Al-8Cr-0.49B (% st.) with and without the addition of 10% in volume fraction of chromium particles have been produced. Both alloys were consolidated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). After HIP, heat treatment was applied to homogenize the microstructure. The chromium reinforcement has an important effect in the yield strength and ultimate strength increase. The reinforced alloy presents a yield strength of 1300 MPa at room temperature with respect to 800 MPa for the un-reinforced material. After heat treatment, the yield strength of both alloys does not change significantly. However, a decrease in ductility and ultimate tensile strength have been observed. (Author) 4 refs.

  3. Effect of chromium on the corrosion resistance of aluminide coatings on nickel and nickel-based substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godlewski, K.; Godlewska, E.

    1987-04-01

    The aluminide and Cr-Al diffusion coatings on nickel and the nickel-based alloy EI 867 obtained by a two-step pack cementation technique were subjected to various corrosion tests consisting of oxidation under thermal cycling conditions as well as isothermal oxidation in the presence of fused Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. The presence of chromium in the surface layer of aluminide coatings had a beneficial effect on their resistance to oxidation in that the oxide layer formed was less prone to spallation. This type of coating microstructure also appeared to be advantageous with respect to hot corrosion since pitting, which is typical of the degradation of aluminide coatings, was not observed. It is postulated that the chromium-enriched zone acts as a barrier to the oxidation of refractory metals (molybdenum, tungsten and vanadium) present in somewhat deeper coating layers in the form of carbide or intermetallic phases, thus preventing the onset of catastrophic corrosion.

  4. 77 FR 6627 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Hard and Decorative Chromium...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-08

    ... aluminum to provide resistance to corrosion. The chromium anodizing process is used to coat aircraft parts... Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Hard and Decorative Chromium Electroplating and Chromium Anodizing Tanks... Pollutant Emissions: Hard and Decorative Chromium Electroplating and Chromium Anodizing Tanks; and...

  5. CHROMIUM INDUCED CYTOTOXICITY IN BLACKGRAM (VIGNA MUNGO L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chidambaram ، P. Sundaramoorthy ، A. Murugan ، K. Sankar Ganesh ، L. Baskaran

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromium is known to be highly toxic to biological systems. This study was designed to determine the mutagenic effects of different concentrations (0, 10, 25, 50, 100 and 200 mg/L of hexavalent chromium on root tip cells of blackgram (Vigna mungo L. Hepper. The blackgram seeds were equi-spacially arranged in sterilized petriplates lined with filter paper and they were treated with different concentrations of chromium solution. In germination studies, the morphological growth parameters such as germination percentage, root length, shoot length fresh weight and dry weight of blackgram seedlings were decreased with increasing dose of chromium concentrations. No germination of blackgram seeds was recorded at 300mg/l chromium concentration. Chromosome aberration assay was used to determine the mitotic indices and rate of chromosome aberration in blackgram root tip cells due to chromium treatment. The results showed that the mitotic indices were complicated due to different concentrations of chromium. However, the increase in chromium concentration has led to a gradual increase in the percentage of chromosomal aberration and mitotic index. The chromosome length, absolute chromosome length and average chromosome lengths were gradually found to decrease. There was no considerable change in 2n number of chromosome with the increase in chromium concentrations. It is concluded that the hexavalent chromium has significant mutagenic effect on the root tip cells of blackgram.

  6. Long-Term Cyclic Oxidation Behavior of Wrought Commercial Alloys at High Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingtao Li

    2003-08-05

    The oxidation resistance of a high-temperature alloy is dependent upon sustaining the formation of a protective scale, which is strongly related to the alloying composition and the oxidation condition. The protective oxide scale only provides a finite period of oxidation resistance owing to its eventual breakdown, which is especially accelerated under thermal cycling conditions. This current study focuses on the long-term cyclic oxidation behavior of a number of commercial wrought alloys. The alloys studied were Fe- and Ni-based, containing different levels of minor elements, such as Si, Al, Mn, and Ti. Oxidation testing was conducted at 1000 and 1100 C in still air under both isothermal and thermal cycling conditions (1-day and 7-days). The specific aspects studied were the oxidation behavior of chromia-forming alloys that are used extensively in industry. The current study analyzed the effects of alloying elements, especially the effect of minor element Si, on cyclic oxidation resistance. The behavior of oxide scale growth, scale spallation, subsurface changes, and chromium interdiffusion in the alloy were analyzed in detail. A novel model was developed in the current study to predict the life-time during cyclic oxidation by simulating oxidation kinetics and chromium interdiffusion in the subsurface of chromia-forming alloys.

  7. Development of new metallic alloys for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niinomi, Mitsuo; Nakai, Masaaki; Hieda, Junko

    2012-11-01

    New low modulus β-type titanium alloys for biomedical applications are still currently being developed. Strong and enduring β-type titanium alloy with a low Young's modulus are being investigated. A low modulus has been proved to be effective in inhibiting bone atrophy, leading to good bone remodeling in a bone fracture model in the rabbit tibia. Very recently β-type titanium alloys with a self-tunable modulus have been proposed for the construction of removable implants. Nickel-free low modulus β-type titanium alloys showing shape memory and super elastic behavior are also currently being developed. Nickel-free stainless steel and cobalt-chromium alloys for biomedical applications are receiving attention as well. Newly developed zirconium-based alloys for biomedical applications are proving very interesting. Magnesium-based or iron-based biodegradable biomaterials are under development. Further, tantalum, and niobium and its alloys are being investigated for biomedical applications. The development of new metallic alloys for biomedical applications is described in this paper.

  8. Low-aluminum content iron-aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikka, V.K.; Goodwin, G.M.; Alexander, D.J. [and others

    1995-06-01

    The low-aluminum-content iron-aluminum program deals with the development of a Fe-Al alloy with aluminum content such as a produce the minimum environmental effect at room temperature. The FAPY is an Fe-16 at. % Al-based alloy developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as the highest aluminum-containing alloy with essentially no environmental effect. The chemical composition for FAPY in weight percent is: aluminum = 8.46, chromium = 5.50, zirconium = 0.20, carbon = 0.03, molybdenum = 2.00, yttrium = 0.10 and iron = 83.71. The ignots of the alloy can be hot worked by extrusion, forging, and rolling processes. The hot-worked cast structure can be cold worked with intermediate anneals at 800{degrees}C. Typical room-temperature ductility of the fine-grained wrought structure is 20 to 25% for this alloy. In contrast to the wrought structure, the cast ductility at room temperature is approximately 1% with a transition temperature of approximately 100 to 150{degrees}C, above which ductility values exceed 20%. The alloy has been melted and processed into bar, sheet, and foil. The alloy has also been cast into slabs, step-blocks of varying thicknesses, and shapes. The purpose of this section is to describe the welding response of cast slabs of three different thicknesses of FAPY alloy. Tensile, creep, and Charpy-impact data of the welded plates are also presented.

  9. Iron-aluminum alloys having high room-temperature and method for making same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikka, V.K.; McKamey, C.G.

    1993-08-24

    A wrought and annealed iron-aluminum alloy is described consisting essentially of 8 to 9.5% aluminum, an effective amount of chromium sufficient to promote resistance to aqueous corrosion of the alloy, and an alloying constituent selected from the group of elements consisting of an effective amount of molybdenum sufficient to promote solution hardening of the alloy and resistance of the alloy to pitting when exposed to solutions containing chloride, up to about 0.05% carbon with up to about 0.5% of a carbide former which combines with the carbon to form carbides for controlling grain growth at elevated temperatures, and mixtures thereof, and the balance iron, wherein said alloy has a single disordered [alpha] phase crystal structure, is substantially non-susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement, and has a room-temperature ductility of greater than 20%.

  10. Void and precipitate structure in ion- and electron-irradiated ferritic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnuki, Soumei; Takahashi, Heishichiro; Takeyama, Taro

    1984-05-01

    Void formation and precipitation were investigated in Fe10Cr and Fe13Cr base alloys by 200 keV C + ion and 1 MeV electron irradiation. The ferritic alloys exhibited significant resistance to void swelling. In FeCr and FeCr-Si alloys, ion-irradiation produced the precipitates of M 23C 6 type. In the FeCrTi alloy, Ti-rich precipitates were formed with high number density on {100} plane. During electron-irradiation Fe-10Cr alloy, complex dislocation loops were produced with high number density, of which Burgers vector was mostly . EDX analysis showed slightly enrichment of chromium on dislocation loops. These results suggested that the stability of type dislocation structure at high dose is an important factor on good swelling resistance in the ferritic alloys, moreover, titanium addition will intensify the stability of the doslocations through the fine precipitation on dislocations.

  11. High temperature oxidation behavior of ODS iron-base alloys for nuclear energy application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, M.; Zhou, Z.; Liao, L.; Chen, W.; Ge, C. [Univ. of Science and Technology Beijing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing (China)

    2010-07-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) iron based alloys are considered as promising high temperature structural material for advanced nuclear energy systems due to its higher creep strength and radiation damage resistance than conventional commercial steels. In this study, the oxidation behavior of ODS iron based alloys with different Cr content (12-18%) was investigated by exposing samples at high temperature of 700℃ and 1000℃ in atmosphere environment, the exposure time is up to 500 h. Results showed that 14Cr and 18Cr ODS alloys exhibited better oxidation resistance than 12Cr ODS alloys. For the same chromium content, the oxidation resistance of ODS alloys are better than that of non-ODS alloys. (author)

  12. Femtosecond laser surface structuring and oxidation of chromium thin coatings: Black chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotsedi, L., E-mail: Kotsedi@tlabs.ac.za [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Nuru, Z.Y. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Mthunzi, P. [National Laser Centre, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, 0001 Pretoria (South Africa); Muller, T.F.G. [University of the Western Cape, Physics Department, Bellville, 7535 Cape Town (South Africa); Eaton, S.M. [Physics Department, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Julies, B. [University of the Western Cape, Physics Department, Bellville, 7535 Cape Town (South Africa); Manikandan, E. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Ramponi, R. [Physics Department, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Maaza, M. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa)

    2014-12-01

    Highlights: • Oxidation of the chromium thin film to chromium oxide by femtosecond laser with a fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm. • Solar absorber from chromium oxide that low percentage reflectance. • Femtosecond laser oxidation, with a de-focused laser. • Chromium oxide formation by femtosecond laser in normal ambient. - Abstract: In view of their potential applications as selective solar absorbers, chromium coatings on float glass substrates were nano/micro structured by femtosecond laser in air. Raman and X-rays diffraction investigations confirmed the formation of an ultra-porous α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer at the surface; higher is the input laser power, enhanced is the crystallinity of the α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer. The α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer with the Cr underneath it in addition to the photo-induced porosity acted as a classical ceramic–metal nano-composite making the reflectance to decrease significantly within the spectral range of 190–1100 nm. The average reflectance decreased from 70 to 2%.

  13. Production of basic chromium sulfate by using recovered chromium from ashes of thermally treated leather.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmer, Aline; Nunes, Keila Guerra Pacheco; Gutterres, Mariliz; Marcílio, Nilson Romeu

    2010-04-15

    Leather wastes tanned with chromium are generated during the production process of leather, hence the wastes from hand crafted goods and footwear industries are a serious environmental problem. The thermal treatment of leather wastes can be one of the treatment options because the wastes are rich in chromium and can be used as a raw material for sodium chromate production and further to obtain several chromium compounds. The objective of this study was to utilize the chromium from leather wastes via basic chromium sulfate production to be subsequently applied in a hide tanning. The obtained results have shown that this is the first successful attempt to achieve desired base properties of the product. The result was achieved when the following conditions were applied: a molar ratio between sodium sulfite and sodium dichromate equal to 6; reaction time equal to 5 min before addition of sulfuric acid; pH of sodium dichromate solution equal to 2. Summarizing, there is an opportunity to utilize the dangerous wastes and reused them in the production scheme by minimizing or annulling the environmental impact and to attend a sustainable process development concept.

  14. Interactions of chromium with microorganisms and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, C; Campos-García, J; Devars, S; Gutiérrez-Corona, F; Loza-Tavera, H; Torres-Guzmán, J C; Moreno-Sánchez, R

    2001-05-01

    Chromium is a highly toxic non-essential metal for microorganisms and plants. Due to its widespread industrial use, chromium (Cr) has become a serious pollutant in diverse environmental settings. The hexavalent form of the metal, Cr(VI), is considered a more toxic species than the relatively innocuous and less mobile Cr(III) form. The presence of Cr in the environment has selected microbial and plant variants able to tolerate high levels of Cr compounds. The diverse Cr-resistance mechanisms displayed by microorganisms, and probably by plants, include biosorption, diminished accumulation, precipitation, reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III), and chromate efflux. Some of these systems have been proposed as potential biotechnological tools for the bioremediation of Cr pollution. In this review we summarize the interactions of bacteria, algae, fungi and plants with Cr and its compounds.

  15. Effect of polyethylene glycol on electrochemically deposited trivalent chromium layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joo-Yul LEE; Man KIM; Sik-Chol KWON

    2009-01-01

    The structural characteristics of the trivalent chromium deposits and their interfacial behavior in the plating solution with and without polyethylene glycol molecules were observed by using various electrochemical methods such as cyclic voltammetry, open circuit potential transition, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectrometry. It is shown that the polyethylene glycol molecules make the reductive current density lower in the trivalent chromium plating system and promote a hydrogen evolution reaction through their adsorption on the electrode surface. And the trivalent chromium layer formed from the polyethylene glycol-containing solution has somewhat higher density of cracks on its surface and results in a lower film resistance, lower polarization resistance, and higher capacitance in a corrosive atmosphere. It is also revealed that the formation of chromium carbide layer is facilitated in the presence of polyethylene glycol, which means easier electrochemical codeposition of chromium and carbon, not single chromium deposition.

  16. Speciation and recovery of chromium from chromite ore processing residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreeram, K J; Ramasami, T

    2001-10-01

    The processing of chromite ore is associated with the generation of large quantities of solid wastes containing chromium, which have been disposed of as landfill for many years. The mobilization and operational speciation of chromium contained in soils contaminated with metal salts are important in terms of the environment. Several methods have been employed for the extraction and recovery of solid wastes. Chromium contained in contaminated soils and solid wastes can be categorized as exchangeable, oxidizable, carbonate-bound, reducible and residual. The results from this study indicate a need for efficient leaching methodologies in chromite ore processing plants to decrease the non-detrital fractions of chromium in the residue. Aggressive methodologies are required to recover chromium from the detrital fractions. The potential benefits of employing sodium peroxide for the complete recovery of chromium from chromite residue have been demonstrated, and the need to ensure the safety of the process has been emphasized.

  17. From nanotechnology to nanogenotoxicology: genotoxic effect of cobalt-chromium nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zülal Atlı Şekeroğlu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology is a multi-disciplinary technology that processes the materials that can be measured with nanometer-level and combines many research field or discipline. Nanomaterials (NMs are widely used in the fields of science, technology, communication, electronics, industry, pharmacy, medicine, environment, consumer products and military. Until recently little has been known about whether or not nanomaterials have the toxic or hazardous effects on human health and the environment. However, several studies have indicated that exposure to some nanomaterials, e.g. nanoparticles, can cause some adverse effects in humans and animals. Over the last years the number of publications focusing on nanotoxicology has gained momentum, but, there is still a gap about the genotoxicity of nanomaterials.Metal nanoparticles and their alloys with excellent mechanical properties are the materials which can be easily adapted to the mechanical conditions of the musculoskeletal system. Cobalt-chromium alloys are widely used in orthopedic applications as joint prosthesis and bone regeneration material, fillings and dental implants in jaw surgery, and in cardiovascular surgery, especially stent applications. Studies about cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of metal nanoparticles on human indicate that some metal nanoparticles have cytotoxic and genotoxic effects and they may be hazardous for humans. However, a few studies have been reported concerning the genotoxic effects of cobalt-chromium nanoparticles. The data from these studies indicate that cobalt-chromium nanoparticles have cytotoxic and genotoxic effects. It has been stated that the wear debris from implants cause DNA and chromosome damage in patients with cobalt-chromium replacements. It was also found that the risk of urinary cancers such as bladder, ureter, kidney and prostate in patients after hip replacement than among the wider population.Because there are very little biocompatibility and toxicity tests on

  18. Chromium Toxicity: Reductive Enzymes in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    internal organs (e.g. lungs, liver, kidneys) [24,27,64], pulmonary fibrosis and chronic bronchitis [2], skin ulcers and allergic dermatitis [2], and...cross the skin [2] and are readily transported across cell membranes [18] via an anion carrier [6]. Cr compounds are also mutagenic [67], and the bulk of...reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase- dependent chromium(VI) reduction. Analyst 120:935-938. 42. Miura, A

  19. Dimensionally Controlled Lithiation of Chromium Oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fister, Tim T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hu, Xianyi [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Esbenshade, Jennifer [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Chen, Xiao [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Wu, Jinsong [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Dravid, Vinayak [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Bedzyk, Michael [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Long, Brandon [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gewirth, Andrew A. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Shi, Bing [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Schlepütz, Christian M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Fenter, Paul [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-01-12

    Oxide conversion reactions are an alternative approach for high capacity lithium ion batteries but are known to suffer from structural irreversibility associated with the phase separation and reconstitution of reduced metal species and Li2O. In particular, the morphology of the reduced metal species is thought to play a critical role in the electrochemical properties of a conversion material. Here we use a model electrode with alternating layers of chromium and chromium oxide to better understand and control these phase changes in real-time and at molecular length scales. Despite lacking crystallinity at the atomic scale, this superstructure is observed (with X-ray reflectivity, XR) to lithiate and delithiate in a purely one-dimensional manner, preserving the layered structure. The XR data show that the metal layers act as nucleation sites for the reduction of chromium in the conversion reaction. Irreversibility during delithiation is due to the formation of a ternary phase, LiCrO2, which can be further delithiated at higher potentials. The results reveal that the combination of confining lithiation to nanoscale sheets of Li2O and the availability of reaction sites in the metal layers in the layered structure is a strategy for improving the reversibility and mass transport properties that can be used in a wide range of conversion materials.

  20. Thermotransport of hydrogen and deuterium in vanadium, niobium and tantalum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.F.

    1981-10-01

    Heats of transport have been determined for thermotransport of hydrogen and deuterium in pure vanadium, niobium and tantalum; in vanadium alloyed with either niobium, titanium or chromium; and in niobium-tantalum alloys. In all cases, thermotransport was toward colder regions and was significantly greater for deuterium than for hydrogen. A mass spectrometric technique was used to simultaneously measure heats of transport for hydrogen and deuterium in a single specimen containing both isotopes. This technique greatly increased the precision with which isotope effects in the heat of transport could be measured. The predominant effect of alloying was to dramatically increase thermotransport; however, thermotransport decreased as niobium was added to tantalum.

  1. Sulphidation behaviour of. beta. -NiAl-. cap alpha. -Cr pseudobinary alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godlewska, E.; Godlewski, K.; Mrowec, S.

    1987-03-01

    The sulphidation behaviour of alloys belonging to the ..beta..-NiAl-..cap alpha..-Cr pseudobinary system was studied at S/sub 2/ pressures P/sub S2/ of 5-2 x 10/sup 3/ Pa and temperatures of 1173 and 1273 K. The alloys contained 0, 4, 10 and 20 at.% Cr and the atomic ratio of nickel to aluminium was always 1 to 1. Kinetic measurements were carried out in a thermogravimetric set-up. The sulphidation rate increased with temperature, S/sub 2/ pressure and chromium concentration in the alloy. The scale morphology and composition for each alloy studied were influenced by the sulphidation parameters. The scales were usually of a multiphase and multilayer nature with varying proportions of Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/, Ni/sub 3/S/sub 2/ and Cr/sub x/S. The innermost part of the scale was always rich in aluminium or aluminium and chromium, the amount of nickel being the highest on the surface. At 1273 K and P/sub S2/ = 5 Pa the scales on chromium-rich alloys consisted of Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/ and Cr/sub x/S only.

  2. Processes affecting the remediation of chromium-contaminated sites.

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, C.D.; Wittbrodt, P R

    1991-01-01

    The remediation of chromium-contaminated sites requires knowledge of the processes that control the migration and transformation of chromium. Advection, dispersion, and diffusion are physical processes affecting the rate at which contaminants can migrate in the subsurface. Heterogeneity is an important factor that affects the contribution of each of these mechanisms to the migration of chromium-laden waters. Redox reactions, chemical speciation, adsorption/desorption phenomena, and precipitat...

  3. Electrical Resistance Alloys and Low-Expansion Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjer, Torben

    1996-01-01

    The article gives an overview of electrical resistance alloys and alloys with low thermal expansion. The electrical resistance alloys comprise resistance alloys, heating alloys and thermostat alloys. The low expansion alloys comprise alloys with very low expansion coefficients, alloys with very low...

  4. New technology for comprehensive utilization of aluminum-chromium residue from chromium salts production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-bin; QI Tian-gui; JIANG Xin-min; ZHOU Qiu-sheng; LIU Gui-hua; PENG Zhi-hong; HAN Deng-lun; ZHANG Zhong-yuan; YANG Kun-shan

    2008-01-01

    Colloidal aluminum-chromium residue(ACR) was mass-produced in chromate production process, and the large energy consumption and high recovery cost existed in traditional methods of utilizing such ACR. To overcome those problems, a new comprehensive method was proposed to deal with the ACR, and was proven valid in industry. In the new process, the chromate was separated firstly from the colloidal ACR by ripening and washing with additives, by which more than 95% hexavalent chromium was recovered. The chromium-free aluminum residue(CFAR), after properly dispersed, was digested at 120-130 ℃ and more than 90% alumina can be recovered. And then the pregnant aluminate solution obtained from digestion was seeded to precipitate aluminum hydroxide. This new method can successfully recover both alumina and sodium chromate, and thus realize the comprehensive utilization of ACR from chromate industry.

  5. Stabilization and solidification of chromium-contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherne, C.A.; Thomson, B.M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Civil Engineering Dept.; Conway, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-11-01

    Chromium-contaminated soil is a common environmental problem in the United States as a result of numerous industrial processes involving chromium. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is the species of most concern because of its toxicity and mobility in groundwater. One method of diminishing the environmental impact of chromium is to reduce it to a trivalent oxidation state [Cr(III)], in which it is relatively insoluble and nontoxic. This study investigated a stabilization and solidification process to minimize the chromium concentration in the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) extract and to produce a solidified waste form with a compressive strength in the range of 150 to 300 pounds per square inch (psi). To minimize the chromium in the TCLP extract, the chromium had to be reduced to the trivalent oxidation state. The average used in this study was an alluvium contaminated with chromic and sulfuric acid solutions. The chromium concentration in the in the in situ soil was 1212 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) total chromium and 275 mg/kg Cr(VI). The effectiveness of iron, ferrous sulfate to reduce Cr(VI) was tested in batch experiments.

  6. Tribological Characteristics of Chromium-active Carbon Electroplated Composite Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUKa-fi; HUAMeng; Yi-min

    2004-01-01

    A process of chromium electroplating using a standard bath with additives and active carbon particles was reported, and the tribological behaviors of the composite coatings using the pin-on-disk tester and the table wear tester were i nvestig(aed. Experimental results indicate that the electroplated chromium-active carbon composite coatings exhibited the low friction coefficient anti excellent anti-wear properties whets coffered with the normal chromium electroplated ones. The formation of active carbon particles within the chromium matrices can be explained by SEM analysis and the mechanis of wear resistance of the composite coatings were studied.

  7. Chromium recycling of tannery waste through microbial fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsifas, E A; Giannoutsou, E; Lambraki, M; Barla, M; Karagouni, A D

    2004-02-01

    An Aspergillus carbonarius isolate, selected from an established microbial culture collection, was used to study the biodegradation of chromium shavings in solid-state fermentation experiments. Approximately 97% liquefaction of the tannery waste was achieved and the liquid obtained from long-term experiments was used to recover chromium. The resulting alkaline chromium sulfate solution was useful in tanning procedures. A proteinaceous liquid was also obtained which has potential applications as a fertilizer or animal feed additive and has several other industrial uses. The A. carbonarius strain proved to be a very useful tool in tannery waste-treatment processes and chromium recovery in the tanning industries.

  8. Influence of Chelating Agents on Chromium Fate in Sediment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGXIAOCHANG; SUNJINHE; 等

    1996-01-01

    A laboratory investigation on reaction between chelating agents and chromium was conducted to evaluate the effect of chelating agents on the adsorption and desorption of chromium in sediment.The amount of adsorbed chromium(VI) in sediment decreased slightly by 5%-10% because of addition of chelating agents.Chelating agents inhibited the removal of Cr(Ⅲ)by sediment from solutions and the inhibiting effect was in the order:citric acid>tartaric acid>EDTA,Salicylic acid.No effect of chelating agents on desorption of chromium in sediment was observed.

  9. Fretting corrosion behaviour of ball-and-socket joint on dental implants with different prosthodontic alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, F J; Canedo, R; Padrós, A; Bañeres, M V; Arano, J M

    2003-01-01

    The fretting corrosion of five materials for implant suprastructures (cast-titanium, machined-titanium, gold alloy, silver-palladium alloy and chromium-nickel alloy), was investigated in vitro, the materials being galvanically coupled to a titanium ball-and-socket-joint with tetrafluoroethylene under mechanical load. Various electrochemical parameters (E(corr), i(corr), Evans diagrams, polarization resistance and Tafel slopes) were analyzed. The microstructure of the different dental materials was observed before and after corrosion processes by optical and electron microscopy. It can be observed that the mechanical load produces an important decrease of the corrosion resistance. The cast and machined titanium had the most passive current density at a given potential and chromium-nickel alloy had the most active critical current density values. The high gold content alloys have excellent resistance corrosion, although this decreases when the gold content is lower in the alloy. The palladium alloy had a low critical current density due to the presence of gallium in this composition but a selective dissolution of copper-rich phases was observed through energy dispersive X-ray analysis.

  10. Segregation phenomena at growing alumina/alloy interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Peggy Y.

    2005-03-30

    The chemistry and structure at the scale/alloy interface are important factors governing scale adhesion. The chemical changes can occur from segregation of impurities in the alloy, such as sulphur and carbon, or alloying elements such as chromium, aluminium and reactive elements. This paper reviews studies of the changes of interfacial composition with oxidation time for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} formed on several model alumina-forming alloys, and tries to relate that to the interfacial strength. Results show that sulphur segregation to oxide/metal interfaces can indeed occur, but the type and amount of segregants at the interface depend on the alloy composition and the interface structure. Co-segregation of impurities with alloying elements can also occur, resulting in multi-layer segregants at the interface. Sulphur-containing interfaces are indeed weaker, but the major role of sulphur is to enhance interfacial void formation. Reactive elements in the alloy not only gather sulfur but also exert an additional positive effect on scale adhesion.

  11. Impact toughness of high strength low alloy TMT reinforcement ribbed bar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bimal Kumar Panigrahi; Surendra Kumar Jain

    2002-08-01

    Charpy V-notch impact toughness of 600 MPa yield stress TMT rebars alloyed with copper, phosphorus, chromium and molybdenum has been evaluated. Subsize Charpy specimens were machined from the rebar keeping the tempered martensite rim intact. The copper–phosphorus rebar showed toughness of 35 J at room temperature. The toughness of copper–molybdenum and copper–chromium rebars was 52 J. The lower toughness of phosphorus steel is attributed to solid solution strengthening and segregation of phosphorus to grain boundaries. Due to superior corrosion resistance, copper–phosphorus TMT rebar is a candidate material in the construction sector.

  12. Transmutation-induced embrittlement of V-Ti-Ni and V-Ni alloys in HFIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnuki, S.; Takahashi, H. [Hokkaido Univ., Sapparo (Japan); Garner, F.A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Pawel, J.E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    Vanadium, V-1Ni, V-10Ti and V-10Ti-1Ni (at %) were irradiated in HFIR to doses ranging from 18 to 30 dpa and temperatures between 300 and 600C. Since the irradiation was conducted in a highly thermalized neutron spectrum without shielding against thermal neutrons, significant levels of chromium (15-22%) were formed by transmutation. The addition of such large chromium levels strongly elevated the ductile to brittle transition temperature. At higher irradiation temperatures radiation-induced segregation of transmutant Cr and solute Ti at specimen surfaces leads to strong increases in the density of the alloy.

  13. Diffusion of hexavalent chromium in chromium-containing slag as affected by microbial detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunyan; Yang, Zhihui; Chai, Liyuan; Zhao, Kun

    2009-09-30

    An electrochemical method was used to determine the diffusion coefficient of chromium(VI) in chromium-containing slag. A slag plate was prepared from the original slag or the detoxified slag by Achromobacter sp. CH-1. The results revealed that the apparent diffusion coefficient of Cr(VI) was 4.4 x 10(-9)m(2)s(-1) in original slag and 2.62 x 10(-8)m(2)s(-1) in detoxified slag. The results implied that detoxification of chromium-containing slag by Achromobacter sp. CH-1 could enhance Cr(VI) release. Meanwhile, the results of laboratory experiment showed that the residual total Cr(VI) in slag decreased from an initial value of 6.8 mg g(-1) to 0.338 mg g(-1) at the end of the detoxification process. The Cr(VI) released from slag was also reduced by Achromobacter sp. CH-1 strain since water soluble Cr(VI) in the leachate was not detected after 4 days. Therefore, Achromobacter sp. CH-1 has potential application for the bio-detoxification of chromium-containing slag.

  14. Radiometric and spectrophotometric studies of the behavior of chromium(VI) oxide in concentrated perchloric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pezzin, S.H.; Collins, C.H.; Collins, K.E. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Archundia, C. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico). Inst. de Ciencias Nucleares

    1997-11-01

    A study of the behavior of {sup 51}CrO{sub 3} in 70% HClO{sub 4} over the temperature range from 20 to 194 C by means of Cr-51 labelling, UV-VIS spectrophotometry and ion exchange chromatography, shows that the solubility of {sup 51}CrO{sub 3} depends on a competition between the dissolution process and the acid reduction of solution phase Cr(VI). These processes occur simultaneously and are dependent on both the temperature and the concentration of Cr(VI), as shown by comparison between radiometric measurements (where total chromium can be accurately determined) and spectrophotometric measurements (where only the Cr(VI) is detectable at the wavelengths studied). These conclusions are confirmed by PbCrO{sub 4} precipitation of {sup 51}Cr(VI), where at 194 C, 97% of the total chromium appears as Pb{sup 51}CrO{sub 4} while at 86 C only 5% does. Cation exchange chromatography of the solution after brief contact of {sup 51}CrO{sub 3} with concentrated HClO{sub 4} at 20 C shows only traces of {sup 51}Cr(VI), most of the radioactivity eluting as {sup 51}Cr(H{sub 2}O){sup 3+}{sub 6}, with smaller amounts of species with +2 and +1 charges. These results imply serious limitations to the spectrophotometric determination of low concentrations of total chromium in alloys or in biological material which use dissolution in 70% HClO{sub 4} as a primary analytical step. (orig.)

  15. ALUMINUM AND CHROMIUM LEACHING WORKSHOP WHITEPAPER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCabe, D; Jeff Pike, J; Bill Wilmarth, B

    2007-04-25

    A workshop was held on January 23-24, 2007 to discuss the status of processes to leach constituents from High Level Waste (HLW) sludges at the Hanford and Savannah River Sites. The objective of the workshop was to examine the needs and requirements for the HLW flowsheet for each site, discuss the status of knowledge of the leaching processes, communicate the research plans, and identify opportunities for synergy to address knowledge gaps. The purpose of leaching of non-radioactive constituents from the sludge waste is to reduce the burden of material that must be vitrified in the HLW melter systems, resulting in reduced HLW glass waste volume, reduced disposal costs, shorter process schedules, and higher facility throughput rates. The leaching process is estimated to reduce the operating life cycle of SRS by seven years and decrease the number of HLW canisters to be disposed in the Repository by 1000 [Gillam et al., 2006]. Comparably at Hanford, the aluminum and chromium leaching processes are estimated to reduce the operating life cycle of the Waste Treatment Plant by 20 years and decrease the number of canisters to the Repository by 15,000-30,000 [Gilbert, 2007]. These leaching processes will save the Department of Energy (DOE) billions of dollars in clean up and disposal costs. The primary constituents targeted for removal by leaching are aluminum and chromium. It is desirable to have some aluminum in glass to improve its durability; however, too much aluminum can increase the sludge viscosity, glass viscosity, and reduce overall process throughput. Chromium leaching is necessary to prevent formation of crystalline compounds in the glass, but is only needed at Hanford because of differences in the sludge waste chemistry at the two sites. Improving glass formulations to increase tolerance of aluminum and chromium is another approach to decrease HLW glass volume. It is likely that an optimum condition can be found by both performing leaching and improving

  16. Safety, absorption, and antioxidant effects of chromium histidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supplemental chromium has been shown to be involved in the alleviation of the metabolic syndrome, glucose intolerance, polycystic ovary syndrome, depression, excess body fat, and gestational, steroid-induced, and type 2 diabetes. Chromium amino acid complexes that contained histidine displayed cons...

  17. Mechanisms of bacterial resistance to chromium compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Díaz, Martha I; Díaz-Pérez, César; Vargas, Eréndira; Riveros-Rosas, Héctor; Campos-García, Jesús; Cervantes, Carlos

    2008-06-01

    Chromium is a non-essential and well-known toxic metal for microorganisms and plants. The widespread industrial use of this heavy metal has caused it to be considered as a serious environmental pollutant. Chromium exists in nature as two main species, the trivalent form, Cr(III), which is relatively innocuous, and the hexavalent form, Cr(VI), considered a more toxic species. At the intracellular level, however, Cr(III) seems to be responsible for most toxic effects of chromium. Cr(VI) is usually present as the oxyanion chromate. Inhibition of sulfate membrane transport and oxidative damage to biomolecules are associated with the toxic effects of chromate in bacteria. Several bacterial mechanisms of resistance to chromate have been reported. The best characterized mechanisms comprise efflux of chromate ions from the cell cytoplasm and reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). Chromate efflux by the ChrA transporter has been established in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Cupriavidus metallidurans (formerly Alcaligenes eutrophus) and consists of an energy-dependent process driven by the membrane potential. The CHR protein family, which includes putative ChrA orthologs, currently contains about 135 sequences from all three domains of life. Chromate reduction is carried out by chromate reductases from diverse bacterial species generating Cr(III) that may be detoxified by other mechanisms. Most characterized enzymes belong to the widespread NAD(P)H-dependent flavoprotein family of reductases. Several examples of bacterial systems protecting from the oxidative stress caused by chromate have been described. Other mechanisms of bacterial resistance to chromate involve the expression of components of the machinery for repair of DNA damage, and systems related to the homeostasis of iron and sulfur.

  18. Enhancement of surface properties of SAE 1020 by chromium plasma immersion recoil implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, M.; Mello, C. B.; Beloto, A. F.; Rossi, J. O.; Reuther, H.

    2007-04-01

    SAE 1020 steel is commonly used as concrete reinforcement and small machine parts, but despite its good mechanical properties, as ductility, hardness and wear resistance, it is susceptible to severe corrosion. It is well known that chromium content above 12% in Fe alloys increases their corrosion resistance. In order to obtain this improvement, we studied the introduction of chromium atoms into the matrix of SAE 1020 steel by recoil implantation process using a plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) system. Potentiodynamic scans showed that the presence of Cr film leads to a gain in the corrosion potential, from -650 mV to -400 mV. After PIII treatment, the corrosion potential increased further to -340 mV, but the corrosion current density presented no significant change. Vickers microhardness tests showed surface hardness increase of up to about 27% for the treated samples. Auger electron spectroscopy showed that, for a 30 nm film, Cr was introduced for about 20 nm into the steel matrix. Tribology tests, of pin-on-disk type, showed that friction coefficient of treated samples was reduced by about 50% and a change in wear mechanism, from adhesive to abrasive mode, occurred.

  19. The relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties of ferritic chromium steel weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayr, Peter; Cerjak, Horst [Graz Univ. of Technology (Austria); Toda, Yoshiaki; Hara, Toru; Abe, Fujio [National Institute for Materials Science (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    Welding as the major joining and repair technology for steels in thermal power plants has a significant influence on the steels microstructure and, therefore, on its properties. Heat-resistant martensitic 9-12% chromium steels show an affinity to the retention of delta ferrite in the heat-affected zone of their weldments. This is related to their high level of ferrite stabilizing alloying elements such as Cr, W or Mo. Retained delta ferrite in martensitic steel grades has a significant negative influence on creep strength, fatigue strength, toughness and oxidation resistance. In the long-term range of creep exposure, many weldments of martensitic heatresistant steels fail by Type IV cracking in the fine-grained region of the heat-affected zone. In this work, the formation of the heat-affected zone microstructures in martensitic chromium steels is studied by in-situ X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation, optical microscopy as well as most advanced electron microscopical methods. The observed microstructure is directly linked to the mechanical properties, i.e. ductility, toughness and creep strength. Characteristic failure modes are discussed in detail. (orig.)

  20. Corrosion resistance enhancement of SAE 1020 steel after Chromium implantation by nitrogen ion recoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Francisco Gomes

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available SAE 1020 construction steel is widely used as mortar reinforcement and small machine parts, but aside good surface properties as high ductility, hardness and wear resistance, its surface is prone to severe corrosion. As it is known, Chromium in amount over 12%-13% in the Fe alloys renders them resistance to several corrosive attacks. SAE 1020 samples were recovered with Chromium film and then bombarded either by nitrogen Ion Beam (IB or Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII to recoil implant Cr atoms in the Fe matrix. Samples treated by 100 keV N+ IB showed irregular, thin Cr profile, remaining a part of the film on the surface, to about 10 nm. Samples treated by 40 kV N PIII presented Cr layer of about 18% at., ranging to around 90 nm. Cr of the film was implanted in the Fe matrix in an almost flat profile. Results of corrosion test showed good performance of the PIII treated sample. The IB treated sample showed some enhancement over the non-treated reference and the only Cr film deposited sample showed no modification on the corrosion behavior as compared to the non-treated reference sample.

  1. Observational Approach to Chromium Site Remediation - 13266

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Myers, R. [Washington Closure Hanford, 2620 Fermi, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Production reactors at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, required massive quantities of water for reactor cooling and material processing. To reduce corrosion and the build-up of scale in pipelines and cooling systems, sodium dichromate was added to the water feedstock. Spills and other releases at the makeup facilities, as well as leaks from miles of pipelines, have led to numerous areas with chromium-contaminated soil and groundwater, threatening fish populations in the nearby Columbia River. Pump-and-treat systems have been installed to remove chromium from the groundwater, but significant contamination remain in the soil column and poses a continuing threat to groundwater and the Columbia River. Washington Closure Hanford, DOE, and regulators are working on a team approach that implements the observational approach, a strategy for effectively dealing with the uncertainties inherent in subsurface conditions. Remediation of large, complex waste sites at a federal facility is a daunting effort. It is particularly difficult to perform the work in an environment of rapid response to changing field and contamination conditions. The observational approach, developed by geotechnical engineers to accommodate the inherent uncertainties in subsurface conditions, is a powerful and appropriate method for site remediation. It offers a structured means of quickly moving into full remediation and responding to the variations and changing conditions inherent in waste site cleanups. A number of significant factors, however, complicate the application of the observational approach for chromium site remediation. Conceptual models of contamination and site conditions are difficult to establish and get consensus on. Mid-stream revisions to the design of large excavations are time-consuming and costly. And regulatory constraints and contract performance incentives can be impediments to the flexible responses required under the

  2. Atom Lithography with a Chromium Atomic Beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wen-Tao; LI Tong-Bao

    2006-01-01

    @@ Direct write atom lithography is a new technique in which resonant light is used to pattern an atomic beam and the nanostructures are formed when the atoms deposit on the substrate. We design an experiment setup to fabricate chromium nanolines by depositing an atomic beam of 52 Cr through an off-resonant laser standing wave with the wavelength of 425.55 nm onto a silicon substrate. The resulting nanolines exhibit a period of 215 ± 3 nm with height of 1 nm.

  3. The fate of chromium during tropical weathering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berger, Alfons; Frei, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We performed a mineral, geochemical and Cr–Sr–Pb isotope study on a laterite profile developed on ca. 540 Ma old tonalitic bedrock in Madagascar with special emphasis on the behavior of chromium during tropical weathering. The observed strong depletions of Ca, Si, and P, and enrichment of Fe and Al......, in the soil, relative to bedrock and underlying saprolite, are the characteristic features pertinent to laterites. The enrichment of Fe in topsoil horizon can be correlated with enrichment of P, and the redox sensitive elements Mn and Cr, and indicates redistribution of these elements related to oxidation...

  4. Bioleaching of chromium from tannery sludge by indigenous Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan-Shan; Pan, Zhi-Yan; Lang, Jian-Min; Xu, Jian-Miao; Zheng, Yu-Guo

    2007-08-17

    Chromium in tannery sludge will cause serious environmental problems and is toxic to organisms. The acidophilic sulfur-oxidizing Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans can leach heavy metals form urban and industrial wastes. This study examined the ability of an indigenous sulfur-oxidizing A. thiooxidans to leach chromium from tannery sludge. The results showed that the pH of sludge mixture inoculated with the indigenous A. thiooxidans decreased to around 2.0 after 4 days. After 6 days incubation in shaking flasks at 30 degrees C and 160 rpm, up to 99% of chromium was solubilized from tannery sludge. When treated in a 2-l bubble column bioreactor for 5 days at 30 degrees C and aeration of 0.5 vvm, 99.7% of chromium was leached from tannery sludge. The results demonstrated that chromium in tannery sludge can be efficiently leached by the indigenous A. thiooxidans.

  5. Abrasive wear property of laser melting/deposited Ti2Ni/TiNi intermetallic alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A wear resistant intermetallic alloy consisting of TiNi primary dendrites and Ti2Ni matrix was fabricated by the laser melting deposition manufacturing process. Wear resistance of Ti2Ni/TiNi alloy was evaluated on an abrasive wear tester at room temperature under the different loads. The results show that the intermetallic alloy suffers more abrasive wear attack under low wear test load of 7, 13 and 25 N than high-chromium cast-iron. However, the intermetallic alloy exhibits better wear resistance under wear test load of 49 N. Abrasive wear of the laser melting deposition Ti2Ni/TiNi alloy is governed by micro-cutting and plowing.Pseudoelasticity of TiNi plays an active role in contributing to abrasive wear resistance.

  6. Perfect cubic texture, structure, and mechanical properties of nonmagnetic copper-based alloy ribbon substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlebnikova, Yu. V.; Rodionov, D. P.; Gervas'eva, I. V.; Egorova, L. Yu.; Suaridze, T. R.

    2015-03-01

    A sharp cubic texture is formed in a number of copper alloys subjected to cold deformation by rolling by 98.6-99% followed by recrystallization annealing, which opens up fresh opportunities for long thin ribbons made of these alloys to be used as substrates in the production of second-generation high- T c superconductor (2G HTSC) cables. The possibility of creating ternary alloys based on a binary Cu-30 at % Ni alloy with additional elements that harden its fcc matrix (iron, chromium) is shown. The measurements of the mechanical properties of textured ribbons made of these alloys demonstrate that their yield strength is higher than that of a textured ribbon made of pure copper by a factor of 2.5-4.5.

  7. Fracture toughness of copper-base alloys for ITER applications: A preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, D.J.; Zinkle, S.J.; Rowcliffe, A.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Oxide-dispersion strengthened copper alloys and a precipitation-hardened copper-nickel-beryllium alloy showed a significant reduction in toughness at elevated temperature (250{degrees}C). This decrease in toughness was much larger than would be expected from the relatively modest changes in the tensile properties over the same temperature range. However, a copper-chromium-zirconium alloy strengthened by precipitation showed only a small decrease in toughness at the higher temperatures. The embrittled alloys showed a transition in fracture mode, from transgranular microvoid coalescence at room temperature to intergranular with localized ductility at high temperatures. The Cu-Cr-Zr alloy maintained the ductile microvoid coalescence failure mode at all test temperatures.

  8. Oxidation of two-phase Cu-Cr alloys with different microstructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The oxidation of PM Cu-50Cr, MA Cu-40Cr and MS Cu-40Cr alloys at 800  ℃ in 0.1  MPa O2 was studied. The most important difference of their oxidation behaviors is the formation of an exclusive chromia scale on the surface of the MS Cu-40Cr alloy and a continuous chromia layer beneath an outer CuO layer corresponding MA Cu-40Cr alloy, while a complex scale composing of CuO, Cu2O, Cu2Cr2O4 and Cr2O3 formed on the PM Cu-50Cr alloy. This result implies that alloy microstructure affects their oxidation behaviors largely. Microcrystalline structure provides numerous diffusion paths for reactive component chromium, shorter diffusion distance and rapid dissolution of Cr-riched second phase. All these favor the exclusive formation of the most stable oxide.

  9. Industrial Experience on the Caustic Cracking of Stainless Steels and Nickel Alloys - A Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebak, R B

    2005-10-09

    Caustic environments are present in several industries, from nuclear power generation to the fabrication of alkalis and alumina. The most common material of construction is carbon steel but its application is limited to a maximum temperature of approximately 80 C. The use of Nickel (Ni) alloys is recommended at higher temperatures. Commercially pure Ni is the most resistant material for caustic applications both from the general corrosion and the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) perspectives. Nickel rich alloys also offer a good performance. The most important alloying elements are Ni and chromium (Cr). Molybdenum (Mo) is not a beneficial alloying element and it dissolves preferentially from the alloy in presence of caustic environments. Austenitic stainless steels such as type 304 and 316 seem less resistant to caustic conditions than even plain carbon steel. Experimental evidence shows that the most likely mechanism for SCC is anodic dissolution.

  10. Laser cladding of Ni-based alloy on stainless steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Chun-fang; TIAN Xin-li; TAN Yong-sheng; WU Zhi-yuan

    2004-01-01

    The coatings on a stainless steel substrate were conducted by laser cladding of Ni-based alloy, using a 5 kW continuous wave CO2 flow transverse laser. SEM, EDX and X-ray diffraction were used to analyze the microstructure and constituent phases of the obtained coatings by laser cladding with direct injection of the powder into the melt pool. Solidification planar, cellular and dendrite structures were observed in Ni-based alloy coating. There exists an optimum metallurgical bond between Ni-based laser cladding layer and the base material. The high hardness of the Ni-based alloy coating is attributed to the presence of M7C3-type carbides (essentially chromium-riched carbide) dispersed in the γ(Ni,Fe) phase matrix.

  11. Criticality of iron and its principal alloying elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuss, Philip; Harper, E M; Nassar, N T; Reck, Barbara K; Graedel, T E

    2014-04-01

    Because modern technology depends on reliable supplies of a wide variety of materials and because of increasing concern about those supplies, a comprehensive methodology was created to quantify the degree of criticality of the metals of the periodic table. In this paper, we apply this methodology to iron and several of its main alloying elements (i.e., vanadium, chromium, manganese, and niobium). These elements represent the basic metals of any industrial society and are vital for national security and economic well-being. Assessments relating to the dimensions of criticality - supply risk, vulnerability to supply restriction, and environmental implications - for 2008 are made on the global level and for the United States. Evaluations of each of the multiple indicators are presented, with aggregate results plotted in "criticality space", together with Monte Carlo simulation-derived "uncertainty cloud" estimates. Iron has the lowest supply risk, primarily because of its widespread geological occurrence. Vanadium displays the highest cradle-to-gate environmental implications, followed by niobium, chromium, manganese, and iron. Chromium and manganese, both essential in steel making, display the highest vulnerability to supply restriction, largely because substitution or substitution at equal performance is not possible for all end-uses. From a comprehensive perspective, we regard the overall criticality as low for iron and modest for the alloying elements we evaluated.

  12. The Theory for the Mechanism of Chromium Plating: The Theory for the Physical Characteristics of Chromium Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    1947-01-01

    deposits arc pro- duced as the coll potential is successively raised. The sulfato ion "hus has an extremely important effect in the chromium plating...and sulfato iDU in the bath wore then used in an attempt to obtain more satisfactory hexagonal chromium deposits. The data obtained are summarUod

  13. Reciprocal interaction between dental alloy biocorrosion and Streptococcus mutans virulent gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Songmei; Qiu, Jing; Ren, Yanfang; Yu, Weiqiang; Zhang, Fuqiang; Liu, Xiuxin

    2016-04-01

    Corrosion of dental alloys is a major concern in dental restorations. Streptococcus mutans reduces the pH in oral cavity and induces demineralization of the enamel as well as corrosion of restorative dental materials. The rough surfaces of dental alloys induced by corrosion enhance the subsequent accumulation of plaque. In this study, the corrosion process of nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) and cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloys in a nutrient-rich medium containing S. mutans was studied using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electrochemical corrosion test. Our results showed that the release of Ni and Co ions increased, particularly after incubation for 3 days. The electrochemical corrosion results showed a significant decrease in the corrosion resistance (Rp) value after the alloys were immersed in the media containing S. mutans for 3 days. Correspondingly, XPS revealed a reduction in the relative dominance of Ni, Co, and Cr in the surface oxides after the alloys were immersed in the S. mutans culture. After removal of the biofilm, the pre-corroded alloys were re-incubated in S. mutans medium, and the expressions of genes associated with the adhesion and acidogenesis of S. mutans, including gtfBCD, gbpB, fif and ldh, were evaluated by detecting the mRNA levels using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We found that the gtfBCD, gbpB, ftf and Idh expression of S. mutans were noticeably increased after incubation with pre-corroded alloys for 24 h. This study demonstrated that S. mutans enhanced the corrosion behavior of the dental alloys, on the other hand, the presence of corroded alloy surfaces up-regulated the virulent gene expression in S. mutans. Compared with smooth surfaces, the rough corroded surfaces of dental alloys accelerated the bacteria-adhesion and corrosion process by changing the virulence gene expression of S. mutans.

  14. Dissolution of chromium in sulfuric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. POPIC

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available By combining electrochemical corrosion rate measurements and spectrophotometric analysis of the electrolyte it was shown that at room temperature chromium dissolves in deaerated 0.1 M Na2SO4 + H2SO4 (pH 1 solution as Cr(II and Cr(III ions in he ratio Cr(II : Cr(III @ 7 : 1. This process was stable over 4 h without any detectable change. The total corrosion rate of chromium calculated from the analytical data is about 12 times higher, than that determined electrochemically by cathodic Tafel line extrapolation to the corrosion potential. This finding was confirmed by applying the weight-loss method for the determination of the corrosion rate. This enormous difference between these experimentally determined corrosion rates can be explained by the rather fast, “anomalous” dissolution process proposed by Kolotyrkin and coworkers (chemical reaction of Cr with H2O molecules occurring simultaneously with the electrochemical corrosion process.

  15. Electrochemical modification of chromium surfaces using 4-nitro- and4-fluorobenzenediazonium salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinge, Mogens; Cecatto, Marcel; Kingshott, Peter;

    2009-01-01

    Chromium surfaces can be electrografted with organic surface films using 4-nitro- or 4-fluorobenzenediazonium salts, despite the fact that the surfaces are covered with a protective chromium oxide layer......Chromium surfaces can be electrografted with organic surface films using 4-nitro- or 4-fluorobenzenediazonium salts, despite the fact that the surfaces are covered with a protective chromium oxide layer...

  16. Workshop on effects of chromium coating on Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductor strand: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-12

    This report discusses the following topics: Chromium coating on superconductor strand -- an overview; technology of chromium plating; comparison of wires plated by different platers; search for chromium in copper; strand manufactures` presentations; chromium plating at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; a first look at a chromium plating process development project tailored for T.P.X. and I.T.E.R. strand; and influence of chromium diffusion and related phenomena on the reference ratios of bare and chromium plated Nb{sub 3}Sn strand.

  17. Bioavailability of a potato chromium complex to the laboratory rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, H.K.

    1985-01-01

    Research objectives were to study the effect of food source, preparation method and chemical form on bioavailability of chromium. Chromium concentration in potatoes was determined and tubers labeled either intrinsically or extrinsically with radioactive chromate. A labeled chromium complexes was isolated from preparations of raw, baked or fried potatoes and chromatographed on gel permeation media. Availability of the potato chromium complex to the rat was examined in three feeding studies. Animals were dosed with radioactive extrinsically or intrinsically labeled potato extract or with chromate. A labeled chromium complex was isolated from gastrointestinal contents of rats and chromatographed. Potato pulp and peel contained 1.63 and 2.70 ..mu..g Cr/g tissue respectively. True and apparent absorption from extrinsically labeled feedings were 33.4 +/- 4.7 and 29.8 +/- 11.2% respectively, and no differences existed between absorption from raw and cooked potatoes. Absorption from the extrinsic labeled potatoes differed significantly from absorption of inorganic chromatium. Apparent absorption of raw (11.1 +/- 7.9%) and cooked (-0.7 +/- 2.8%) intrinsically labeled feedings differed significantly. Absorption of inorganic chromium was 17.8% (true) and 11.5% (apparent). Examination of the chromium complex isolated from gastrointestinal tract contents showed enlargement of the complex in the stomach after consumption.

  18. Chromium Content in the Human Hip Joint Tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Barbara Brodziak-Dopiera; Jerzy Kwapuliski; Krzysztof Sobczyk; Danuta Wiechua

    2015-01-01

    Objective Chromium has many important functions in the human body. For the osseous tissue, its role has not been clearly defined. This study was aimed at determining chromium content in hip joint tissues. Methods A total of 91 hip joint samples were taken in this study, including 66 from females and 25 from males. The sample tissues were separated according to their anatomical parts. The chromium content was determined by the AAS method. The statistical analysis was performed with U Mann-Whitney's non-parametric test, P≤0.05. Results The overall chromium content in tissues of the hip joint in the study subjects was as follows:5.73 µg/g in the articular cartilage, 5.33 µg/g in the cortical bone, 17.86 µg/g in the cancellous bone, 5.95 µg/g in the fragment of the cancellous bone from the intertrochanteric region, and 1.28 µg/g in the joint capsule. The chromium contents were observed in 2 group patients, it was 7.04 µg/g in people with osteoarthritis and 12.59 µg/g in people with fractures. Conclusion The observed chromium content was highest in the cancellous bone and the lowest in the joint capsule. Chromium content was significantly different between the people with hip joint osteoarthritis and the people with femoral neck fractures.

  19. Mode of occurrence of chromium in four US coals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Frank E.; Shah, N.; Huffman, G.P.; Kolker, A.; Crowley, S.; Palmer, C.A.; Finkelman, R.B.

    2000-01-01

    The mode of occurrence of chromium in three US bituminous coals and one US subbituminous has been examined using both X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy and a selective leaching protocol supplemented by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron microprobe measurements. A synthesis of results from both methods indicates that chromium occurs principally in two forms in the bituminous coals: the major occurrence of chromium is associated with the macerals and is not readily leached by any reagent, whereas a second, lesser occurrence, which is leachable in hydrofluoric acid (HF), is associated with the clay mineral, illite. The former occurrence is believed to be a small particle oxyhydroxide phase (CrO(OH)). One coal also contained a small fraction (<5%) of the chromium in the form of a chromian magnetite, and the leaching protocol indicated the possibility of a similar small fraction of chromium in sulfide form in all three coals. There was little agreement between the two techniques on the mode of occurrence of chromium in the subbituminous coal; however, only a limited number of subbituminous coals have been analyzed by either technique. The chromium in all four coals was trivalent as no evidence was found for the Cr6+ oxidation state in any coal.

  20. Removal of chromium from tannery effluents by adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadali, O A; Magdy, Y H; Daifullah, A A M; Ebrahiem, E E; Nassar, M M

    2004-01-01

    Tannery effluent is characterized not only by heavy loads but also with toxic heavy metals especially chromium ions. Chromium is considered an important source of contamination due to large volume of exhaust liquid discharged and solid sludge produced. Details on adsorption studies were carried out using synthetic chromium salts (chromium chloride) as adsorbate, and cement kiln dust (a waste from white cement industry) as adsorbent. Equilibrium isotherms have been determined for the adsorption of chromium ions on cement kiln dust. Kinetic study provided that the adsorption process is diffusion controlled. The experimental results have been fitted using Freundlich, Langmuir, and Redlich Peterson isotherms. The maximum adsorption capacity of cement kiln dust was found to be 33 mg/g. Industrial tannery effluent (22-mg/L chromium and COD 952 mg/L) was also treated by cement dust. The treated effluent (using 20 g cement dust per 1 L) contains only 0.6 mg/L chromium and COD 200 mg/L.

  1. Chromium-induced membrane damage: protective role of ascorbic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Importance of chromium as environmental toxicant is largely due to impact on the body to produce cellular toxicity. The impact of chromium and their supplementation with ascorbic acid was studied on plasma membrane of liver and kidney in male Wistar rats (80 - 100gbody weight). It has been observed that the intoxication with chromium ( i. p. ) at the dose of 0.8 mg/100g body weight per day for a period of 28 days causes significant increase in the level of cholesterol and decrease in the level of phospbolipid of both liver and kidney. The alkaline pbosphatase, total ATPase and Na + -K + -ATPase activities were significantly decreased in both liver and kidney after chromium treatment,except total ATPase activity of kidney. It is suggested that chromium exposure at the present dose and duration induce for the alterations of structure and function of both liver and kidney plasma membrane. Ascorbic acid ( i.p. at the dose of 0.5 mg,/100g body weight per day for period of 28 days) supplementation can reduce these structural changes in the plasma membrane of liver and kidney. But the functional changes can not be completely replenished by the ascorbic acid supplementation in response to chromium exposure. So it is also suggested that ascorbic acid (nutritional antioxidant) is useful free radical scavenger to restrain the chromium-induced membrane damage.

  2. Stabilization of chromium salt in ordinary portland cement

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Damir Barbir; Pero Dabić; Petar Krolo

    2012-12-01

    Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) samples containing the chromium salt have been investigated using differential microcalorimetry, conductometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis. The effect of chromium on OPC hydration was evaluated by continuous observing of early hydration. The microcalorimetrical results show that with increasing the share of chromium salt, heat maximums assume lower values and the occurrence of the maximum registered in the earlier hydration times. Conductometrical measurements show that with increasing addition of chromium salt, curve did not show any specific shape, immediate drop in specific conductivity is noticed and the maximum is reached earlier. This coincides with microcalorimetrical results. It can be concluded that the addition of chromium does not affect the mechanism of the hydration process, but it does affect the kinetic parameters and dynamics of the cement hydration process. It was found that chromium salt addition to the cement–water system is acceptable up to 2 wt.%. According to standard EN 196-3 for OPC, the beginning of binding time should occur after 60 minutes. Increased amount of chromium over 2 wt.% significantly accelerate the beginning of binding time and for the system it is not acceptable.

  3. Identification of a cast iron alloy containing nonstrategic elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, C. V.; Anton, D. L.; Lemkey, F. D.; Nowotny, H.; Bailey, R. S.; Favrow, L. H.; Smeggil, J. G.; Snow, D. B.

    1989-01-01

    A program was performed to address the mechanical and environmental needs of Stirling engine heater head and regenerator housing components, while reducing the dependence on strategic materials. An alloy was developed which contained no strategic elemental additions per se. The base is iron with additions of manganese, molybdenum, carbon, silicon, niobium, and ferro-chromium. Such an alloy should be producible on a large scale at very low cost. The resulting alloy, designated as NASAUT 4G-Al, contained 15 Mn, 15 Cr, 2 Mo, 1.5 C, 1.0 Si, 1.0 Nb (in weight percent) with a balance of Fe. This alloy was optimized for chemistry, based upon tensile strength, creep-rupture strength, fracture behavior, and fatigue resistance up to 800 C. Alloys were also tested for environmental compatibility. The microstructure and mechanic properties (including hardness) were assessed in the as-cast condition and following several heat treatments, including one designed to simulate a required braze cycle. The alloy was fabricated and characterized in the form of both equiaxed and columnar-grained castings. The columnar grains were produced by directional solidification, and the properties were characterized in both the longitudinal and transverse orientations. The NASAUT 4G-Al alloy was found to be good in cyclic-oxidation resistance and excellent in both hydrogen and hot-corrosion resistance, especially in comparison to the baseline XF-818 alloy. The mechanical properties of yield strength, stress-rupture life, high-cycle-fatigue resistance, and low-cycle-fatigue resistance were good to excellent in comparison to the current alloy for this application, HS-31 (X-40), with precise results depending in a complex manner on grain orientation and temperature. If required, the ductility could be improved by lowering the carbon content.

  4. Spectroscopic analysis of chromium bioremediation products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadharajan, C.; Nico, P. S.; Yang, L.; Marcus, M. A.; Steefel, C.; Larsen, J. T.; Beller, H. R.; Brodie, E. L.

    2010-12-01

    Remediation of chromium contamination frequently involves reducing the toxic and soluble hexavalent form, Cr(VI), to the relatively harmless and mostly immobile trivalent state, Cr(III). The objective of this study is to identify the biogeochemical reactions that control in situ chromium reduction in the presence of different dominant electron acceptors, i.e., NO3-, Fe(III), and SO42-. It was hypothesized that indirect, abiotic reduction of Cr(VI) by reduced metabolic products [Fe(II) and sulfides] would dominate over direct enzymatic reduction by denitrifying, iron-reducing, or sulfate-reducing bacteria. It is further hypothesized that the enzymatic reduction of Cr(VI) would produce relatively pure chromium hydroxide precipitates, whereas indirect reduction would result in mixed Cr-Fe hydroxide solid phases. Flow-through columns containing homogenized sediments from the 100H site at Hanford, WA were subjected to nitrate-, sulfate- or iron-reducing conditions in the presence of 5 µM Cr(VI) and 5 mM lactate. Cr(VI) was depleted in the effluent solutions from the nitrate- and sulfate-reducing columns; however only a small amount of Cr(VI) was removed under iron-reducing conditions. Preliminary analysis of micro X-ray absorption spectra indicate that the untreated and iron-reducing column sediments contained pre-existing Cr in the form of primary minerals, e.g. chromite and/or Cr-bearing micas. However, there was an increase in the relative abundance of mixed-phase Cr-Fe hydroxides, i.e., Cr1-xFex(OH)3 in the nitrate- and sulfate-treated columns. A possible explanation for the observations is that the production of Fe(II) was enhanced under the nitrate- and sulfate- reducing conditions, and was most likely sulfide-driven in the latter case. The Fe(II) was subsequently available for reduction of Cr(VI) resulting in the mixed-phase precipitates. The results from the spectroscopic analysis support the hypothesis that Fe(II)-mediated Cr reduction prevails over direct

  5. Mutagenic and carcinogenic actions of chromium and its compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamyrbaev, Arstan Abdramanovich; Dzharkenov, Timur Agataevich; Imangazina, Zina Amangalievna; Satybaldieva, Umit Abulkhairovna

    2015-05-01

    Numerous experimental observations have been made on microorganisms and culture of the cells of mammals as well as the accounting of the chromosomal aberrations in the bone marrow cells of the mammals and of human cells displayed that the chromium and its compounds possess a pronounced mutagenic effect. Translocation test, induction record of DNA damage and repair systems in the mammalian and human cells with greater precision proves the presence of the mutagenic effect of the chromium and its compounds, which in turn is dependent on dose and time of this metal intoxication. Chromium and its compounds have pronounced mutagenic effect, on increased admission to organism of mammals and protozoa.

  6. Microbial biotechnology for remediation of aquatic habitats polluted with chromium

    OpenAIRE

    Viorica Coşier; I. Valentin Petrescu-Mag

    2008-01-01

    Chromium may occur in nine different forms of oxidation ranging from ?II to +VI, with forms II, III and VI as the most commonly encountered. In Cluj county, chromium pollution dates well back in time and has caused important dysfunction to the mechanical-biological wastewater purification station of the city of Cluj (Coşier & Diţă 1996). The purpose of this study was to develop one microbial method able to reduce hexavalent chromium (mobile, permeable to cell membrane, carcinogenic and mutage...

  7. [Blood and urine chromium: compared values between chromium exposed workers and common people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenzani, A; Verso, M G; Picciotto, D

    2008-01-01

    Aim of present study is the valutation and quantification of chromium in blood and urine. We compared 3 groups of persons formed by building workers, in particular masons, because cement contains potassium chromate that is dangerous for health, and by common people: urban population and outside the town population. In fact, exposure to CrVI risk is high for people who live near chromate industries. We maked a medical examination, blood and instrumental tests, chromium measuring in blood (recent exposure indicator) and urine (recent and previous indicator). Then we used statistical methods to estimate obtained values of blood and urine chromium among professional exposed people and common people. At the end we think that preventive measures in working environment reduced exposure to CrVI but environmental exposure (for example road dust from catalytic converter erosion, from brake lining erosion, cement dust and tobacco smoke), in the last years, has increased. So there are no difference between urban population and outside the town population and there are also no difference with professional exposed people for work prevention according to law in force, that let down professional risk using safe limits.

  8. Possible adverse effect of chromium in occupational exposure of tannery workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornhauser, Carlos; Wróbel, Katarzyna; Wróbel, Kazimierz; Malacara, Juan Manuel; Nava, Laura Eugenia; Gómez, Leobardo; González, Rita

    2002-04-01

    Our aim was to investigate the adverse effects of occupational exposure to trivalent chromium. We measured chromium and iron levels in serum and urine and hemoglobin levels in tannery workers and unexposed persons. We studied three groups of subjects. Group 1 included 15 non-smoking male tannery workers highly exposed to chromium from tanning and retanning departments. Group 2 included 14 non-smoking male tannery workers with moderate chromium exposure from dying, drying and finishing departments. Group 3 included 11 healthy, non-smoking male subjects without direct chromium exposure. Higher serum chromium levels were observed in groups 1 and 2 with respect to group 3 (mean values respectively: 0.43; 0.25 and 0.13 microg x l(-1)). Urine chromium levels in group 1 were higher than those in controls (mean values: 1.78 and 1.35 microg x l(-1)). In group 1 an inverse association was found between serum chromium and urine iron (-0.524), urine chromium and hemoglobin (-0.594) and between the urine chromium to iron ratio and hemoglobin (-0.693, p<0.05). The results suggest a chromium adverse effect on iron metabolism, possibly associated with excessive body chromium accumulation. In conclusion, chromium urine test could be recommended for diagnosis of chromium adverse effect on iron metabolism. Further studies are needed to quantify the relationship between urine chromium and hemoglobin metabolism.

  9. Scientific Opinion on ChromoPrecise® cellular bound chromium yeast added for nutritional purposes as a source of chromium in food supplements and the bioavailability of chromium from this source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food (ANS

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food (ANS provides a scientific opinion re-evaluating the safety of ChromoPrecise® cellular bound chromium yeast added for nutritional purposes as a source of chromium in food supplements and the bioavailability of chromium from this source. ChromoPrecise® is a yeast preparation with an enriched trivalent chromium content, obtained by culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the presence of chromium chloride. A daily intake of 100 µg chromium(III. There are limited data on the nature and identity of the organic chromium(III compounds contained in chromium-enriched yeast and on their toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic behaviour in the body. Overall, the Panel concluded that the bioavailability in man of chromium from chromium-enriched yeast is potentially up to approximately ten times higher than that of chromium from chromium chloride. A NOAEL of 2500 mg/kg bw/day ChromoPrecise® was identified in a 90-day feeding study in rats; no evidence of adverse effects of chromium yeasts were reported in other animal studies investigating the effects of dietary supplementation with chromium yeast. ChromoPrecise® chromium yeast was non-genotoxic in a range of in vitro genotoxicity studies. Although no information was available on the chronic toxicity, carcinogenicity or reproductive toxicity of ChromoPrecise® chromium yeast, the ANS Panel has previously concluded that trivalent chromium is not carcinogenic, and limited data on other chromium yeasts provide no evidence of an effect on reproductive endpoints. No adverse effects have been reported in clinical efficacy trials with chromium yeasts. The Panel concluded that the use of ChromoPrecise® chromium yeast in food supplements is not of concern, despite the lack of data on the nature and identity of the organic chromium(III compounds contained in the product, provided that the intake does not exceed 250 μg/day, as recommended by the WHO.

  10. Effect of pre-oxidation on high temperature sulfidation behavior of FeCr and FeCrAl alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pillis Marina Fuser

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available High temperature corrosion of structural alloys in sulfur bearing environments is many orders of magnitude higher than in oxidizing environments. Efforts to increase sulfidation resistance of these alloys include addition of alloying elements. Aluminum additions to iron-chromium alloys bring about increase in sulfidation resistance. This paper reports the effect of pre-oxidation on the sulfidation behavior of Fe-20Cr and Fe-20Cr-5Al alloys in H2-2% H2S environment at 800 °C. The surfaces of sulfidized specimens were also examined. Pre-oxidation of the two alloys results in an incubation period during subsequent sulfidation. After this incubation period, the Fe-20Cr alloy showed sulfidation behavior similar to that when the alloy was not pre-oxidized. The incubation period during sulfidation of the Fe-20Cr-5Al alloy was significantly longer, over 45 h, compared to 2 h for the Al free alloy. Based on the microscopic and gravimetric data a mechanism for sulfidation of these alloys with pre-oxidation has been proposed.

  11. Influence of S. mutans on base-metal dental casting alloy toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinley, E L; Dowling, A H; Moran, G P; Fleming, G J P

    2013-01-01

    We have highlighted that exposure of base-metal dental casting alloys to the acidogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans significantly increases cellular toxicity following exposure to immortalized human TR146 oral keratinocytes. With Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), S. mutans-treated nickel-based (Ni-based) and cobalt-chromium-based (Co-Cr-based) dental casting alloys were shown to leach elevated levels of metal ions compared with untreated dental casting alloys. We targeted several biological parameters: cell morphology, viable cell counts, cell metabolic activity, cell toxicity, and inflammatory cytokine expression. S. mutans-treated dental casting alloys disrupted cell morphology, elicited significantly decreased viable cell counts (p S. mutans-treated Ni-based dental casting alloys induced elevated levels of cellular toxicity compared with S. mutans-treated Co-Cr-based dental casting alloys. While our findings indicated that the exacerbated release of metal ions from S. mutans-treated base-metal dental casting alloys was the likely result of the pH reduction during S. mutans growth, the exact nature of mechanisms leading to accelerated dissolution of alloy-discs is not yet fully understood. Given the predominance of S. mutans oral carriage and the exacerbated cytotoxicity observed in TR146 cells following exposure to S. mutans-treated base-metal dental casting alloys, the implications for the long-term stability of base-metal dental restorations in the oral cavity are a cause for concern.

  12. Oxidation-induced phase transformations and lifetime limits of chromia-forming nickel-base alloy 625

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chyrkin, Anton

    2011-12-05

    For its high creep resistance the commercial nickel-base alloy 625 relies on solid solution strengthening in combination with precipitation hardening by formation of δ-Ni{sub 3}Nb and (Ni,Mo,Si){sub 6}C precipitates during high-temperature service. In oxidizing environments the alloy forms a slow growing, continuous chromia layer on the material surface which protects the alloy against rapid oxidation attack. The growth of the chromia base oxide scale results during exposure at 900-1000 C in oxidation-induced chromium depletion in the subsurface zone of the alloy. Microstructural analyses of the cross-sectioned specimens revealed that this process results in formation of a wide subsurface zone in which the mentioned strengthening phases are dissolved, in spite of the fact that both phases do not contain substantial amounts of the scale-forming element chromium. The cross-sectional analyses revealed that, in parallel to the formation of a precipitate depleted zone, a thin, continuous layer of niobium-rich intermetallic precipitates formed in the immediate vicinity of the scale/alloy interface. The Subsurface Phase Enrichment (abbreviated as SPE) was shown to be the result of an uphill-diffusion of niobium, i.e. the element stabilizing the strengthening precipitates δ-Ni{sub 3}Nb, in the chromium activity gradient and is thus a natural consequence of the oxidation-induced chromium depletion beneath the chromia scale. The thermodynamic calculations carried out using the Thermo-Calc/DICTRA software packages revealed that in alloy 625 the chemical activity of niobium decreases with decreasing chromium content. As chromium is being continuously removed from the alloy as the result of the chromia scale growth, the zone of lowest Nb-activity is formed in the location with the lowest chromium concentration, i.e. the scale/alloy interface. This creates a driving force for Nb to diffuse towards the scale/alloy interface against its own concentration gradient, which is known

  13. 镍铬-镍硅热电偶老化失效机理初探%Primary study of nickel chromium-nickel silicon thermocouple aging failure mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谌立新; 郭卫芳; 陈东

    2011-01-01

    In this paper,the oxidation of nickel chromium-nickel silicon thermocouple after 605h aging failure test in the atmosphere in 1200℃ was carried out and the oxidation process was analysed,and that the priority oxidation of the Si and Ni in the nickel-silicon alloy is main cause of the tolerance of nickel chromium-nickel silicon thermocouple thermo-electromotive force.%就镍铬-镍硅热电偶在大气中1200℃、605h老化失效试验后的氧化情况进行了分析,对氧化过程进行了探讨,结果表明镍硅合金中的硅和镍的优先氧化是引起镍铬-镍硅热电偶热电动势超差的主要原因。

  14. Base-metal dental casting alloy biocompatibility assessment using a human-derived three-dimensional oral mucosal model.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGinley, E L

    2012-01-01

    Nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) alloys used in fixed prosthodontics have been associated with type IV Ni-induced hypersensitivity. We hypothesised that the full-thickness human-derived oral mucosa model employed for biocompatibility testing of base-metal dental alloys would provide insights into the mechanisms of Ni-induced toxicity. Primary oral keratinocytes and gingival fibroblasts were seeded onto Alloderm™ and maintained until full thickness was achieved prior to Ni-Cr and cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloy disc exposure (2-72 h). Biocompatibility assessment involved histological analyses with cell viability measurements, oxidative stress responses, inflammatory cytokine expression and cellular toxicity analyses. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis determined elemental ion release levels. We detected adverse morphology with significant reductions in cell viability, significant increases in oxidative stress, inflammatory cytokine expression and cellular toxicity for the Ni-Cr alloy-treated oral mucosal models compared with untreated oral mucosal models, and adverse effects were increased for the Ni-Cr alloy that leached the most Ni. Co-Cr demonstrated significantly enhanced biocompatibility compared with Ni-Cr alloy-treated oral mucosal models. The human-derived full-thickness oral mucosal model discriminated between dental alloys and provided insights into the mechanisms of Ni-induced toxicity, highlighting potential clinical relevance.

  15. Processing and Composition Effects on the Fracture Behavior of Spray-Formed 7XXX Series Al Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, M. M.; Ziemian, C. W.; Eden, T. J.

    2010-12-01

    The fracture properties of high-strength spray-formed Al alloys were investigated, with consideration of the effects of elemental additions such as zinc, manganese, and chromium and the influence of the addition of SiC particulate. Fracture resistance values between 13.6 and 25.6 MPa (m)1/2 were obtained for the monolithic alloys in the T6 and T7 conditions, respectively. The alloys with SiC particulate compared well and achieved fracture resistance values between 18.7 and 25.6 MPa (m)1/2. The spray-formed materials exhibited a loss in fracture resistance ( K I) compared to ingot metallurgy 7075 alloys but had an improved performance compared to high-solute powder metallurgy alloys of similar composition. Characterization of the fracture surfaces indicated a predominantly intergranular decohesion, possibly facilitated by the presence of incoherent particles at the grain boundary regions and by the large strength differential between the matrix and precipitate zone. It is believed that at the slip band-grain boundary intersection, particularly in the presence of large dispersoids and/or inclusions, microvoid nucleation would be significantly enhanced. Differences in fracture surfaces between the alloys in the T6 and T7 condition were observed and are attributed to inhomogeneous slip distribution, which results in strain localization at grain boundaries. The best overall combination of fracture resistance properties were obtained for alloys with minimum amounts of chromium and manganese additions.

  16. Corrosion Behavior of Alloys in Molten Fluoride Salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Guiqiu

    The molten fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature nuclear reactor (FHR) has been proposed as a candidate Generation IV nuclear reactor. This reactor combines the latest nuclear technology with the use of molten fluoride salt as coolant to significantly enhance safety and efficiency. However, an important challenge in FHR development is the corrosion of structural materials in high-temperature molten fluoride salt. The structural alloys' degradation, particularly in terms of chromium depletion, and the molten salt chemistry are key factors that impact the lifetime of nuclear reactors and the development of future FHR designs. In support of materials development for the FHR, the nickel base alloy of Hastelloy N and iron-chromium base alloy 316 stainless steel are being actively considered as critical structural alloys. Enriched 27LiF-BeF2 (named as FLiBe) is a promising coolant for the FHR because of its neutronic properties and heat transfer characteristics while operating at atmospheric pressure. In this study, the corrosion behavior of Ni-5Cr and Ni-20Cr binary model alloys, and Hastelloy N and 316 stainless steel in molten FLiBe with and without graphite were investigated through various microstructural analyses. Based on the understanding of the corrosion behavior and data of above four alloys in molten FLiBe, a long-term corrosion prediction model has been developed that is applicable specifically for these four materials in FLiBe at 700ºC. The model uses Cr concentration profile C(x, t) as a function of corrosion distance in the materials and duration fundamentally derived from the Fick's diffusion laws. This model was validated with reasonable accuracy for the four alloys by fitting the calculated profiles with experimental data and can be applied to evaluate corrosion attack depth over the long-term. The critical constant of the overall diffusion coefficient (Deff) in this model can be quickly calculated from the experimental measurement of alloys' weight

  17. Study of corrosion erosion behaviour of stainless alloys in industrial phosphoric acid medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenbour, Abdellah; Hajji, Mohamed-Adil; Jallouli, El Miloudi; Bachir, Ali Ben

    2006-12-01

    The corrosion and corrosion-abrasion resistance of some stainless steels in industrial phosphoric acid 30% P 2O 5 has been studied using electrochemical techniques. The corrosion rate of materials increases with the increase of temperature. Alloys which contain chromium, molybdenum and nitrogen in sufficient quantities present the best behaviour. In the abrasion-corrosion conditions, the experimental device set up allowed to follow continually samples electrochemical behaviour. Under dynamic conditions and without solid particles, the increase of acid projection speed has no effect on the alloys corrosion behaviour. The adding of abrasive leads to a general increase of corrosion rate and to a decrease of material resistance. Under these conditions, materials attack is controlled by synergistic effect between the abrasion and the impurities. The cast 30% Cr shows good resistance according to his high chromium content.

  18. Effects of Ni and Mo on the microstructure and some other properties of Co-Cr dental alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matkovic, Tanja; Matkovic, Prosper; Malina, Jadranka

    2004-03-10

    Influences of adding Ni and Mo on the microstructure and properties of as-cast Co-Cr base alloys have been investigated in order to determine the region of their optimal characteristics for biomedical application. The alloys were produced by arc-melting technique under argon atmosphere. Using optical metallography and scanning electron micro analyser it has been established that among 10 samples of Co-Cr-Ni alloys only samples 5 and 9 with the composition Co{sub 55}Cr{sub 40}Ni{sub 5} and Co{sub 60}Cr{sub 30}Ni{sub 10} have appropriate dendritic solidification microstructure. This microstructure, typical for commercial dental alloys, appears and beside greater number of as-cast Co-Cr-Mo alloys. The results of hardness and corrosion resistance measurements revealed the strong influence of different alloy chemistry and of as-cast microstructure. Hardness of alloys decreases with nickel content, but increases with chromium content. Therefore all Co-Cr-Ni alloys have significantly lower hardness than Co-Cr-Mo alloys. Corrosion resistance of alloys in artificial saliva was evaluated on the base of pitting potential. Superior corrosion characteristics have the samples with typical dendritic microstructure and higher chromium content, until nickel content have not significant effect. According to this, in ternary Co-Cr-Ni phase diagram was located the small concentration region (about samples 5 and 9) in them alloy properties can satisfied the high requirements for biomedical applications. This region is considerably larger in Co-Cr-Mo phase diagram.

  19. Thermodynamic Equilibrium Diagrams of Sulphur-Chromium System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The chemical and electrochemical equilibria in the presence of gaseous phase were investigated. Many substances, which consisted of sulphur and chromium, were considered. Various thermodynamic equilibria were calculated in different pressures. Calculation results were shown as log p―1/T and E―T diagrams. These diagrams may be used to study the corrosion of chromium in sulphur-containing circumstances. The diagrams are also used to thermodynami-cally determine the existence area of various substances and so on.

  20. Stereology of carbide phase in modified hypereutectic chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Suchoń

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In paper are presented results of studies of carbide phase stereology modified hypereutectic wear resistance chromium cast iron which contains carbon about 3,5% and chromium about 25%. Three substances were applied to the modification: boron carbide (B4C, ferroniobium (FeNb and mixture of ferroniobium and rare-earth (RE. The measurements of geometrical features of carbides were conducted on microsection taken from castings wich were cooled with various velocities.

  1. SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ACTIVITIES FOR CHROMIUM IN THE 100 AREAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PETERSEN SW

    2009-07-02

    {sm_bullet} Primary Objective: Protect the Columbia River - Focus is control and treatment of contamination at or near the shoreline, which is influenced by bank storage {sm_bullet} Secondary Objective: Reduce hexavalent chromium to <48 parts per billion (ppb) in aquifer (drinking water standard) - Large plumes with isolated areas of high chromium concentrations (> 40,000 ppb), - Unknown source location(s); probably originating in reactor operation areas

  2. Chromium Ions Improve Moisure Resistance of Epoxy Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Clair, A. K.; St. Clair, T. L.; Stoakley, D. M.; Singh, J. J.; Sprinkle, D. R.

    1986-01-01

    Broad spectrum of thermosetting epoxy resins used on commercial and military aircraft, primarily as composite matrices and adhesives. In new technique, chromium-ion containing epoxy with improved resistance to moisture produced where chromium ions believed to prevent absorption of water molecules by coordinating themselves to hydroxyl groups on epoxy chain. Anticipated that improved epoxy formulation useful as composite matrix resin, adhesive, or casting resin for applications on commercial and advanced aircraft. Improvement made without sacrifice in mechanical properties of polymer.

  3. Performance of chromium nitride based coatings under plastic processing conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Cunha, l.; Andritschky, M.; Pischow, K.; Wang, Z.(Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing, China); Zarychta, A.; Miranda, A. S.; A.M. Cunha

    2000-01-01

    Chromium nitride based coatings were produced in the form of monolithic and multilayer coatings, by DC and RF reactive magnetron sputtering. These coatings were deposited onto stainless steel and tool steel substrates. Chromium nitride coatings have;proved to be wear and corrosion resistant. The combination of these characteristics was necessary to protect surfaces during plastic processing. In order to select the best coatings, some mechanical and tribological tests were performed. Har...

  4. 40 CFR Appendix Xii to Part 266 - Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery Furnaces XII Appendix XII to Part 266... FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. XII Appendix XII to Part 266—Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may...

  5. Oxidation-induced phase transformations and lifetime limits of chromia-forming nickel-base alloy 625

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chyrkin, Anton

    2011-12-05

    For its high creep resistance the commercial nickel-base alloy 625 relies on solid solution strengthening in combination with precipitation hardening by formation of δ-Ni{sub 3}Nb and (Ni,Mo,Si){sub 6}C precipitates during high-temperature service. In oxidizing environments the alloy forms a slow growing, continuous chromia layer on the material surface which protects the alloy against rapid oxidation attack. The growth of the chromia base oxide scale results during exposure at 900-1000 C in oxidation-induced chromium depletion in the subsurface zone of the alloy. Microstructural analyses of the cross-sectioned specimens revealed that this process results in formation of a wide subsurface zone in which the mentioned strengthening phases are dissolved, in spite of the fact that both phases do not contain substantial amounts of the scale-forming element chromium. The cross-sectional analyses revealed that, in parallel to the formation of a precipitate depleted zone, a thin, continuous layer of niobium-rich intermetallic precipitates formed in the immediate vicinity of the scale/alloy interface. The Subsurface Phase Enrichment (abbreviated as SPE) was shown to be the result of an uphill-diffusion of niobium, i.e. the element stabilizing the strengthening precipitates δ-Ni{sub 3}Nb, in the chromium activity gradient and is thus a natural consequence of the oxidation-induced chromium depletion beneath the chromia scale. The thermodynamic calculations carried out using the Thermo-Calc/DICTRA software packages revealed that in alloy 625 the chemical activity of niobium decreases with decreasing chromium content. As chromium is being continuously removed from the alloy as the result of the chromia scale growth, the zone of lowest Nb-activity is formed in the location with the lowest chromium concentration, i.e. the scale/alloy interface. This creates a driving force for Nb to diffuse towards the scale/alloy interface against its own concentration gradient, which is known

  6. Lime enhanced chromium removal in advanced integrated wastewater pond system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadesse, I; Isoaho, S A; Green, F B; Puhakka, J A

    2006-03-01

    The removal of trivalent chromium from a combined tannery effluent in horizontal settling tanks and subsequent Advanced Integrated Wastewater Pond System (AIWPS) reactors was investigated. The raw combined effluent from Modjo tannery had pH in the range of 11.2-12. At this pH, a trivalent chromium removal of 46-72% was obtained in the horizontal settling tanks after a one-day detention time. Trivalent chromium precipitated as chromium hydroxide, Cr(OH)3. 58-95% Cr(III) was removed in the advanced facultative pond (AFP) where the water column pH of 7.2-8.4 was close to pH 8, which is the optimum precipitation pH for trivalent chromium. Chromium removals in the secondary facultative pond (SFP) and maturation pond (MP) were 30-50% and 6-16%, respectively. With Cr(III) concentration of 0.2-0.8 mg/l in the final treated effluent, the AIWPS preceded by horizontal settling tanks produced effluent that could easily meet most of the current Cr(III) discharge limits to receive water bodies.

  7. Magnetic behaviour of Co-Cr alloys above the critical concentration for ferromagnetism

    OpenAIRE

    Gavoille, G.; Durupt, S.; Hubsch, J.

    1982-01-01

    We have investigated Co-Cr alloys with chromium concentrations slightly larger than the critical concentration for long range magnetic order (25 %). Our results suggest a strong inhomogeneous magnetic state consisting of clusters with a large distribution of formation températures. At low temperatures one observes a superparamagnetic to ferromagnetic transition followed by a ferromagnetic to spin glass transition at lower temperature in the range of concentration 25 % to 29 %.

  8. Two-Phase (TiAl+TiCrAl) Coating Alloys for Titanium Aluminides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael P. (Inventor); Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Brindley, William J. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A coating for protecting titanium aluminide alloys, including the TiAl gamma + Ti3Al (alpha(sub 2)) class, from oxidative attack and interstitial embrittlement at temperatures up to at least 1000 C. is disclosed. This protective coating consists essentially of titanium, aluminum. and chromium in the following approximate atomic ratio: Ti(41.5-34.5)Al(49-53)Cr(9.5-12.5)

  9. Experimental skin deposition of chromium on the hands following handling of samples of leather and metal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P.; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl;

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chromium is an important skin sensitizer. Exposure to it has been regulated in cement, and recently in leather. Studies on the deposition of chromium ions on the skin as a result of handling different chromium-containing materials are sparse, but could improve the risk assessment...... of contact sensitization and allergic contact dermatitis caused by chromium. Objectives: To determine whether the handling of chromium-containing samples of leather and metal results in the deposition of chromium onto the skin. Methods: Five healthy volunteers participated. For 30 min, they handled samples...... of leather and metal known to contain and release chromium. Skin deposition of chromium was assessed with the acid wipe sampling technique. Results: Acid wipe sampling of the participants' fingers showed chromium deposition on the skin in all participants who had been exposed to leather (range 0.01–0.20 µg...

  10. Phase Diagram Modelling: Nickel - Aluminum - Chromium System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-04-01

    conducted by Kaufman and co-workers and their lattice stabilities have formed the basis of phase diagram calculations to the present day.1 In...mol ( 0.74827 Ni + 0.73305E-01 Cr + 0.83609E-02 Al ( 1200.00 C, 1.0000 <—s -.Molten alloy <—s <—s) atm, L- NiCrAl , a=0.82994 ) 0.00000

  11. [Chromium content in foods and dietary intake estimation in the Northwest of Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grijalva Haro, M I; Ballesteros Vázquez, M N; Cabrera Pacheco, R M

    2001-03-01

    Chromium is an indispensable nutrient for the carbohydrates and lipids metabolism. In this study the chromium content in the twenty main foods of the diet from Northwestern Mexico was determined, as well as the daily mean intake which was estimated based on the food intake basket of this region. Chromium content was analyzed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry using the graphite furnace technique and previous digestion of foods in microwave oven. The chromium mean intake was estimated considering the chromium daily mean intake for person per day and the chromium content of the foods analyzed in this study. The range chromium content in the foods analyzed was between 0.0004 and 0.1641 microgram/g dry weight. White cheese showed the highest chromium content followed by pasta soup, wheat tortilla, bread and meat. The main foods chromium contributors in the diet were: wheat tortilla (20%), white cheese (11%), corn tortilla (11%), pasta soup (10%), milk (10%), meat (9%) and white bread (8%). The daily chromium intake was 30.43 +/- 1.6 micrograms/d. Chromium values obtained in the food analyzed are considered low. Moreover, chromium intake obtained from the diet is not enough to meet the safety and adequate daily chromium intake. Therefore, the population from the Northwestern Mexico has a suboptimal dietary chromium intake.

  12. TEM study of mechanically alloyed ODS steel powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Jan, E-mail: j.hoffmann@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials (IAM-AWP), Karlsruhe (Germany); Klimenkov, Michael; Lindau, Rainer; Rieth, Michael [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials (IAM-AWP), Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    Compared to present reactors, modern nuclear power plant concepts are based on materials which can be operated at higher temperatures and up to higher neutron doses. Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels - produced by mechanical alloying - with chromium contents of 9 and 14 wt.% (or even more) are typical candidate materials. As the preparation of TEM samples from milled powders is usually very difficult, a new approach has been successfully adopted coming from the TEM sample preparation of biological tissues. Here, the alloyed powder is first embedded and then cut into thin films of 60-90 nm thickness using a microtom. The focal point is to gain a better knowledge of the solution mechanism of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the steel powder during mechanical alloying. Investigations on mechanically alloyed powders containing 13% Cr and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} were made using a Tecnai Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope (STEM) with EDX detector. Detailed elemental mappings of the powder particles show the presence of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles after different milling times. The non-dissolved Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase was detected on the surface of the mechanically alloyed powder particles in the specimen alloyed at times down to 24 h. After mechanically alloying of 80 h, no Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase has been detected. Inside the mechanically alloyed powder, no particles were detected. All further results of the elemental mappings after different milling times are analyzed, compared, and discussed in this paper.

  13. Thermodynamic Modeling as a Strategy for Casting High Alloy Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peri Reddy V; S Raman Sankaranarayanan

    2009-01-01

    Strategies based on thermodynamic calculations can be used to overcome the problems associated with oxides encountered in steel plant operations, which can lead to certain difficulties in the process such as clogging of submerged entry nozzle during continuous casting. Approaches to producing high alloy steels by continuous casting have been taken. One of the strategies to avoid the oxidation of chromium is to add a small amount of other elements (subject to other constraints), which do not cause subsequent problems. The problem has been studied using the Thermo-CalcR software, with related databases; and the results obtained for different process conditions or generic com-positions have been presented.

  14. Corrosion of boiler tube alloys in refuse firing: Shredded vs bulk refuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, H.H. (Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)); Daniel, P.L.; Blue, J.D. (Babcock Wilcox, Barberton, OH (United States))

    1994-08-01

    Results of corrosion probe exposures at two mass burning incinerators were compared with those conducted in a unit burning refuse-derived fuel. Tests were conducted with carbon steel, low-alloy steels, stainless steels, and high nickel-chromium alloys. Corrosion rates at similar metal and gas temperatures were essentially the same for both types of fuel. Boiler tube performance in the waterwalls of other incinerators confirmed these results. Boiler design and operating conditions appear to be more important factors in tube wastage than the extent of refuse processing.

  15. Nanostructured Cu-Cr alloy with high strength and electrical conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islamgaliev, R. K., E-mail: saturn@mail.rb.ru; Nesterov, K. M. [Institute of Physics of Advanced Materials, Ufa State Aviation Technical University, Ufa 450000 (Russian Federation); Bourgon, J.; Champion, Y. [ICMPE-CNRS, Université Paris 12, 6-8 rue Henri Dunant, 94320 Thiais, cedex (France); Valiev, R. Z. [Institute of Physics of Advanced Materials, Ufa State Aviation Technical University, Ufa 450000 (Russian Federation); Laboratory for Mechanics of Bulk Nanostructured Materials, Saint Petersburg State University, 198504 Peterhof, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-05-21

    The influence of nanostructuring by high pressure torsion (HPT) on strength and electrical conductivity in the Cu-Cr alloy has been investigated. Microstructure of HPT samples was studied by transmission electron microscopy with special attention on precipitation of small chromium particles after various treatments. Effect of dynamic precipitation leading to enhancement of strength and electrical conductivity was observed. It is shown that nanostructuring leads to combination of high ultimate tensile strength of 790–840 MPa, enhanced electrical conductivity of 81%–85% IACS and thermal stability up to 500 °C. The contributions of grain refinement and precipitation to enhanced properties of nanostructured alloy are discussed.

  16. 镍铬合金烤瓷修复体拆除前后患牙龈下菌群的变化%Variation in subgingival flora of abutments before and after removal of nickel-chromium alloy porcelain-fused-to-metal restoration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭大伟; 宋玲; 张春艳; 曹阳; 李菁文; 梁星

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Currently, there are few reports on the effect of nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) al oy porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) restoration on subgingival flora of abutment. OBJECTIVE:To investigate the effect of the Ni-Cr al oy PFM restoration on subgingival flora ratio of abutment. METHODS:Nine patients (12 teeth) who suspected that Ni-Cr al oy PFM could affect their health and therefore came to hospital to ask for removal of the prosthesis were selected in this study. Their subgingival plaques of abutment were obtained before and 1 month, 3 months after the Ni-Cr al oy PFM restorations were removed, respectively, and the changes of subgingival flora were observed and analyzed by the method of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:The images of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis in subgingival bacteria of experimental group had significant changes at 1 and 3 months after Ni-Cr al oy PFM restorations removed, furthermore, there were significant differences in the images of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis at 1 and 3 months. In addition, the specific bands were selected from denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis image that appeared before Ni-Cr al oy PFM restorations removed and weakened or disappeared after the removal of restorations, then 16S rDNA sequence in the specific bands were analyzed. The results showed that the gene sequences of these bands were closest related to Eikenel a corrodens, Campylobacter rectus and Eubacterium saphenu. These findings indicated that the Ni-Cr al oy PFM restorations would result in the changes of the proportion of subgingival microflora and increases in the detection rates of some periodontal pathogens.%背景:目前有关镍铬合金烤瓷修复体对龈下菌群影响的研究还较少。  目的:探讨镍铬合金烤瓷修复体对龈下菌群构成比的影响。  方法:选择因怀疑镍铬合金烤瓷修复体影响健康而要求拆除原修复体的烤瓷牙患者9

  17. Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Commercial Ni-Cr-Mo Alloys - A Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebak, R B

    2004-11-09

    Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum alloys (Ni-Cr-Mo) are highly resistant to general corrosion, localized corrosion and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC). Cr acts as a beneficial element under oxidizing acidic conditions and Mo under reducing conditions. All three elements (Ni, Cr and Mo) act synergistically to provide resistance to EAC in environments such as hot concentrated chloride solutions. Ni-Cr-Mo alloys may suffer EAC in environments such as hot caustic solutions, hot wet hydrofluoric acid (HF) solutions and in super critical water oxidation (SCWO) applications. Not all the Ni-Cr-Mo alloys have the same susceptibility to cracking in the mentioned environments. Most of the available data regarding EAC is for the oldest Ni-Cr-Mo alloys such as N10276 and N06625.

  18. Blanch Resistant and Thermal Barrier NiAl Coating Systems for Advanced Copper Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Sai V. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A method of forming an environmental resistant thermal barrier coating on a copper alloy is disclosed. The steps include cleansing a surface of a copper alloy, depositing a bond coat on the cleansed surface of the copper alloy, depositing a NiAl top coat on the bond coat and consolidating the bond coat and the NiAl top coat to form the thermal barrier coating. The bond coat may be a nickel layer or a layer composed of at least one of copper and chromium-copper alloy and either the bond coat or the NiAl top coat or both may be deposited using a low pressure or vacuum plasma spray.

  19. KCl-induced high temperature corrosion of selected commercial alloys. Part II: alumina and silica-formers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiamehr, Saeed; Dahl, Kristian Vinter; Montgomery, Melanie;

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory testing on selected alumina and silica-forming alloys was performed to evaluate their performance against high temperature corrosion induced by potassium chloride (KCl). The alloys studied were FeCrAlY, Kanthal APM, Nimonic 80A, 214, 153MA and HR160. Exposure was conducted at 600 °C......). It was observed that alloying with aluminum did not lead to the formation of protective alumina for the studied alloys. The silicon containing stainless steel 153MA showed an analogous performance to low silicon austenitic stainless steels of similar chromium and nickel contents. For alloy HR160, a potassium...... in static laboratory air for the same duration and temperature with either KCl or K2CO3 deposits. Comparison of results obtained with these experiments showed that both potassium and chlorine can play a role in material degradation by KCl....

  20. U.S. Contribution 1994 Summary Report Task T12: Compatibility and irradiation testing of vanadium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.L. [comp.

    1995-03-01

    Vanadium alloys exhibit important advantages as a candidate structural material for fusion first wall/blanket applications. These advantages include fabricability, favorable safety and environmental features, high temperature and high wall load capability, and long lifetime under irradiation. Vanadium alloys with (3-5)% chromium and (3-5)% titanium appear to offer the best combination of properties for first wall/blanket applications. A V-4Cr-4Ti alloy is recommended as the reference composition for the ITER application. This report provides a summary of the R&D conducted during 1994 in support of the ITER Engineering Design Activity. Progress is reported for Vanadium Alloy Production, Welding, Physical Properties, Baseline Mechanical Properties, Corrosion/Compatibility, Neutron Irradiation Effects, Helium Transmutation Effects on Irradiated Alloys, and the Status of Irradiation Experiments. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual reports from this publication.

  1. High temperature oxidation of slurry coated interconnect alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Åsa Helen

    2012-01-01

    and resistance in this oxide scale. Slurry coated ferritic alloy samples were oxidized long term in air containing 1% water at 900˚C to measure the oxidation rate of the coated samples. The ferritic alloys included in the study were Crofer 22APU and Sandvik 1C44Mo20. Some complementary experiments were also.......85Sr0.15)CoO3 + 10% Co3O4, LSC, coatings were found to be relatively successful in decreasing the oxidation rate, the chromium content in the outermost part of ii the dense scale, and the electrical resistance in the growing oxide scales when applied onto Crofer 22APU. But, the positive effects...... on Crofer 22APU alloy samples and their failure on Sandvik 1C44Mo20 samples are believed to depend on the manganese access in the coating/alloy system. It appeared that a certain amount of manganese was acquired to stabilize the oxide growth on the alloy samples coated with cobalt rich coatings...

  2. Chromium-chromium interaction in a binuclear mixed-valent Cr(I)-Cr(II) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzamly, Ahmed; Gorelsky, Serge I; Gambarotta, Sandro; Korobkov, Ilia; Le Roy, Jennifer; Murugesu, Muralee

    2014-11-03

    A mixed-valent Cr(I)-Cr(II) binuclear complex, {κ(1),κ(2),κ(3)-N,P,P-cyclo[(Ph)PCH2N(CH2Ph)CH2]}2(CrCl2)[Cr(μ-Cl)(AlClMe2)]·4toluene (1), of a P2N2 cyclic ligand was obtained upon treatment of the chromium precursor with alkylaluminum. Complex 1 was accessible from either its trivalent or divalent precursors, and density functional theory calculations revealed the presence of only σ- and π-orbital interactions in the Cr-Cr bond.

  3. Experimental Investigation and Analytical Modeling of Solid-Particle Erosion Behavior of Stellite Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsoesie, Sydney

    Stellite alloys are a range of cobalt-chromium alloys, also containing tungsten or molybdenum and a small amount (corrosion, wear and erosion environments. In this research a group of Stellite alloys that are commonly employed or potentially materials for erosion resistance application are studied under solid-particle erosion test. Two particle impact velocities (84 m/s and 98 m/s) and two impingement angles (30 degree and 90 degree) are used in the test. It is demonstrated that Stellite alloys are more resistant to erosion at 90 degree impingement angle than at 30 degree impingement angle and the erosion damage of Stellite alloys increases with the particle impact velocity. The erosion resistance of Stellite alloys is controlled mainly by their carbon content, but the tungsten and molybdenum contents also play an important role, because these elements determine the volume fractions of carbides and intermetallics in Stellite alloys. The eroded surfaces are analyzed using SEM to further understand the erosion test results. An erosion model, originally developed by Sheldon and Kanhere (1972), known as S-K model, has been modified for use on Stellite alloys, with the support of experimental data. The significant contribution of this modification is that the effect of particle impingement angle has been included. With this modified S-K model, for a Stellite alloy that has a similar chemical composition to one of the alloys studied in this research, the erosion rate for a set particle impact, velocity at an impingement angle between 30 degree and 90 degree can, be estimated. This modified S-K model can be used for erosion characterization of existing Stellite alloys and in the designing of new Stellite alloys for erosion resistance application.

  4. Welding and mechanical properties of cast FAPY (Fe-16 at. % Al-based) alloy slabs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikka, V.K.; Goodwin, G.M.; Alexander, D.J.; Howell, C.R.

    1995-08-01

    The low-aluminum-content iron-aluminum program deals with the development of a Fe-Al alloy with aluminum content such as a produce the minimum environmental effect at room temperature. The FAPY is an Fe-16 at. % Al-based alloy developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as the highest aluminum-containing alloy with essentially no environmental effect. The chemical composition for FAPY in weight percent is: aluminum = 8.46, chromium = 5.50, zirconium = 0.20, carbon = 0.03, molybdenum = 2.00, yttrium = 0.10, and iron = 83.71. The cast ingots of the alloy can be hot worked by extrusion, forging, and rolling processes. The hot- worked cast structure can be cold worked with intermediate anneals at 800{degrees}C. Typical room-temperature ductility of the fine-grained wrought structure is 20 to 25% for this alloy. In contrast to the wrought structure, the cast ductility at room temperature is approximately 1% with a transition temperature of approximately 100 to 150{degrees}C, above which ductility values exceed 20%. The alloy has been melted and processed into bar, sheet, and foil. The alloy has also been cast into slabs, step-blocks of varying thicknesses, and shapes. The purpose of this section is to describe the welding response of cast slabs of three different thicknesses of FAPY alloy. Tensile, creep, and Charpy-impact data of the welded plates are also presented.

  5. Evaluation of mechanical properties in stainless alloy ferritic with 5 % molybdenum; Avaliacao das propriedades mecanicas em ligas inoxidaveis ferriticas com 5% de molibdenio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima Filho, V.X.; Gomes, F.H.F.; Guimaraes, R.F.; Saboia, F.H.C.; Abreu, H.F.G. de [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia do Ceara (IFCE). Campus Maracanau, CE (Brazil)], e-mail: venceslau@ifce.edu.br

    2010-07-01

    The deterioration of equipment in the oil industry is caused by high aggressiveness in processing the same. One solution to this problem would increase the content of molybdenum (Mo) alloys, since this improves the corrosion resistance. As the increase of Mo content causes changes in mechanical properties, we sought to evaluate the mechanical properties of alloys with 5% Mo and different levels of chromium (Cr). Were performed metallography and hardness measurement of the alloys in the annealed condition. Subsequent tests were performed tensile and Charpy-V, both at room temperature. The results showed that 2% difference in the content of Cr did not significantly alter the mechanical properties of alloys. The alloys studied had higher values in measured properties when compared to commercial ferritic alloys with similar percentages of Cr. The high content of Mo resulted in a brittle at room temperature but ductile at temperatures above 70 degree C. (author)

  6. CALVES GROWTH INFANT OF BREED NELLORE SUPPLEMENTED WITH CHROMIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. C. Lima

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated the growth of nursling Nelore calves supplemented with chromium during creep feeding. The study was conducted using 131 Nelore calves with an average age of 60 days and average adjusted initial weight of 75 kg; considering that all calves were accompanied by their mothers. Therefore, the experimental groups were defined as T1: 35 males supplemented with chromium; T2: 34 males without chromium, T3: 30 females supplemented with chromium and T4: 32 females supplemented without chromium. The experimental period lasted from 60 days of age to 210 days (weaning, the animals were kept in two pickets of Panicum maximum cv. Mombasa provided with troughs for the creep feeding system, which permitted calves exclusive access to the concentrate formula based on 75% of TDN and 20% of crude protein, with 35% of soybean meal, 63% of corn and 2% of mineral nucleus containing 10 mg of chromium chelate for each kg of the product. The data were subjected to the analysis of variance, using the software R (R Development Core Team, 2013. In the evaluation of the live weight at 150 days of age, no significant difference was found in the use of chromium in males and females (regardless of sex. However, in the analysis between sexes, females’ live weights were lower than males’ live weight (p = 0.04, being 131.1 kg and 138.1 kg respectively. In the evaluation of live weight at 210 days there was no significant difference between males and females (p = 0.07, but there was a difference (p = 0.03 in the use of chrome in the evaluated treatments. So, it could be concluded that the creep feeding system with chrome chelate supplementation promoted an improvement in male and females calves’ growth for average daily weight gain and weaning weight, with a positive influence on the weight of cows.

  7. Influence of laser alloying with boron and niobium on microstructure and properties of Nimonic 80A-alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makuch, N.; Piasecki, A.; Dziarski, P.; Kulka, M.

    2015-12-01

    Ni-base superalloys were widely used in aeronautics, chemical and petrochemical industries due to their high corrosion resistance, high creep and rupture strength at high temperature. However, these alloys were not considered for applications in which conditions of appreciable mechanical wear were predominant. The diffusion boriding provided suitable protection against wear. Unfortunately, this process required long duration and high temperature. In this study, instead of the diffusion process, the laser alloying with boron and niobium was used in order to produce the hard and wear resistant layer on Nimonic 80A-alloy. The laser-alloying was carried out as a two-step process. First, the external cylindrical surface of specimens was pre-placed with a paste containing boron and niobium. Then, the pre-placed coating and the thin surface layer of the substrate were re-melted by a laser beam. The high laser beam power (P=1.56 kW) and high averaging irradiance (E=49.66 kW/cm2) provided the thick laser re-melted zone. The laser-borided layers were significantly thicker (470 μm) in comparison with the layers obtained as a consequence of the diffusion boriding. Simultaneously, the high overlapping of multiple laser tracks (86%) caused that the laser-alloyed layer was uniform in respect of the thickness. The produced layer consisted of nickel borides (Ni3B, Ni2B, Ni4B3, NiB), chromium borides (CrB, Cr2B), niobium borides (NbB2, NbB) and Ni-phase. The presence of hard borides caused the increase in microhardness up to 1000 HV in the re-melted zone. However, the measured values were lower than those-characteristic of niobium borides, chromium borides and nickel borides. The presence of the soft Ni-phase in re-melted zone was the reason for such a situation. After laser alloying, the significant increase in abrasive wear resistance was also observed. The mass wear intensity factor, as well as the relative mass loss of the laser-alloyed specimens, was over 10 times smaller in

  8. Nitridation of chromium powder in ammonia atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Li; Qiang Zhen; Rong Li

    2015-01-01

    CrN powder was synthesized by nitriding Cr metal in ammonia gas flow, and its chemical reaction mechanism and nitridation process were studied. Through thermodynamic calculations, the Cr−N−O predominance diagrams were constructed for different tempera-tures. Chromium nitride formed at 700−1200°C under relatively higher nitrogen and lower oxygen partial pressures. Phases in the products were then investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), and the Cr2N content varied with reaction temperature and holding time. The results indicate that the Cr metal powder nitridation process can be explained by a diffusion model. Further, Cr2N formed as an intermediate product because of an incomplete reaction, which was observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). After nitriding at 1000°C for 20 h, CrN powder with an average grain size of 63 nm was obtained, and the obtained sample was analyzed by using a scanning electron microscope (SEM).

  9. Chromium increases pancreatic metallothionein in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis-Heredia, M J; Quintanilla-Vega, B; Sierra-Santoyo, A; Hernández, J M; Brambila, E; Cebrián, M E; Albores, A

    2000-01-03

    The ability of chromium (Cr) salts to increase metallothionein (MT) levels in rat liver, kidney and pancreas, and its relationship with the presence of toxic effects are reported here. Rats were injected subcutaneously with 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, or 50 mg K2Cr2O7/kg and sacrificed 24 h later. Total Cr accumulation followed a dose-dependent pattern, levels in kidney being higher than those in liver or pancreas, suggesting different tissue bioavailabilities and accumulation patterns. Cr(IV) administration resulted in a tissue-specific MT induction: pancreas and liver showed five- and 3.5-fold MT increases, respectively; no increase was observed in the kidney. A positive correlation was observed between zinc and MT concentrations in liver, and between total Cr and MT concentrations in pancreas. Serum alpha-amylase activity showed a dose-dependent increase starting from 20 mg/kg, whereas serum glucose levels increased at doses higher than 30 mg/kg. Serum aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase activities were increased in a dose-dependent manner, from 20 and 30 mg/kg, respectively. Our results showed that treatment with Cr(VI) can induce MT synthesis in pancreas and suggests a subsequent binding of Cr to MT. Also, pancreas is a target organ for Cr toxicity, and the usefulness of alpha-amylase activity as a sensitive biomarker of Cr toxicity in human exposed populations merits further study.

  10. Can elevated chromium induce somatopsychic responses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovrincevic, I; Leung, F Y; Alfieri, M A; Grace, D M

    1996-01-01

    The possible somatopsychological effects of chromium (Cr) was investigated in a population of patients, from a surgical ward of our hospital, who required total parenteral nutrition (TPN) solutions, and who became exposed to various amounts of this metal from this treatment. The study involved a questionnaire as well as biochemical tests which included serum Cr and other selected trace metals. The renal status for all eligible patients was within normal parameters. The patient population varied in age, pathology, surgical treatment, and duration on TPN. The results showed that every patient who received TPN had an increased serum Cr level; some increases were up to 50-fold above the normal reference level for serum Cr. Although statistical analysis failed to show any significant statistical relationship between an increased serum Cr and the investigated somatopsychological disturbances, this effect cannot be ruled out since one case did show all the dream disturbances. Considering these cases, the action of sedative medications that may suppress the effects of Cr, cannot be ruled out. As Cr(III) may be potentially genotoxic at high concentrations, infusion of this metal over long time periods should be avoided. Supplementation of Cr in TPN solutions appears to be unnecessary for short-term TPN because this metal is a known contaminant of these solutions. Efforts are required to find TPN nutrients with low or no Cr contamination.

  11. Welding Metallurgy of Alloy HR-160

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DuPont, J.N.; Michael, J.R.; Newbury, B.D.

    1999-05-28

    The solidification behavior and resultant solidification cracking susceptibility of autogenous gas tungsten arc fusion welds in alloy HR-160 was investigated by Varestraint testing, differential thermal analysis, and various microstructural characterization techniques. The alloy exhibited a liquidus temperature of 1387 {deg}C and initiated solidification by a primary L - {gamma} reaction in which Ni, Si, and Ti segregated to the interdendritic liquid and Co segregated to the {gamma} dendrite cores. Chromium exhibited no preference for segregation to the solid or liquid phase during solidification. Solidification terminated at {approx} 1162 {deg}C by a eutectic-type L - [{gamma}+ (Ni,Co){sub 16}(Ti,Cr){sub 6}Si{sub 7}] reaction. The (Ni,Co){sub 16}(Ti,Cr){sub 6}Si{sub 7} phase is found to be analogous to the G phase which forms in the Ni-Ti-Si and Co-Ti-Si ternary systems, and similarities are found to exist between the solidification behavior of this commercial multicomponent alloy and the simple Ni-Si and Ni-Ti binary systems. Reasonable agreement is obtained between the calculated and measured volume percent of the [{gamma} +(Ni,Co){sub l6}(Ti,Cr){sub 6}Si{sub 7}] eutectic-typr constituent with the Scheil equation using experimentally determined k values for Si and Ti from electron microprobe data. The alloy exhibited a very high susceptibility to solidification cracking in the Varestraint test. This is attributed to a large solidification temperature range of 225 {deg}C and the presence of 2 to 5 vol% solute rich interdendritic liquid which preferentially wets the grain boundaries and interdendritic regions.

  12. Translating VDM to Alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lausdahl, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    . Traditionally, theorem provers are used to prove that specifications are correct but this process is highly dependent on expert users. Alternatively, model finding has proved to be useful for validation of specifications. The Alloy Analyzer is an automated model finder for checking and visualising Alloy...... specifications. However, to take advantage of the automated analysis of Alloy, the model-oriented VDM specifications must be translated into a constraint-based Alloy specifications. We describe how a sub- set of VDM can be translated into Alloy and how assertions can be expressed in VDM and checked by the Alloy...

  13. Hexavalent Chromium Reduction and Its Distribution in the Cell and Medium by Chromium Resistant Fusarium solani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousumi Sen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, batch biosorption of Cr(VI was studied using the fungal strain isolated from soil. The fungal strain was characterized as Fusarium solani. The total Cr distribution in the biomass (fungus and in the media obtained from the experiment conducted at 500 mg l -1 initial Cr(VI concentration and pH 5.0. The results indicated both intracellular and extracellular accumulation and enzymatic reduction of Cr(VI and this was supported by the Transmission Electron Microscopic (TEM observation at the same Cr(VI concentration and pH value. Chromium elution from Fusarium solani containing Cr was then tried out using a number of chromium eluting reagents and a maximum Cr could be eluted using 0.5N sodium hydroxide solution without destructing the biomass structure. The total Cr was recovered by pH adjustment from both biomass and media was found to be 44% of the initial Cr(VI concentration (500 mg l-1.

  14. One-step pickling-activation before magnesium alloy plating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xin-juan; YU Gang; OUYANG Yue-jun; HE Xiao-mei; ZHANG Jun; YE Li-yuan

    2009-01-01

    A one-step pickling-activation process was proposed as an environmental friendly pretreatment method in phosphate-permanganate solution before electroplating on magnesium alloys. The effects of pickling-activation on qualities of coating were assessed by adhesion and porosity testing of copper plating. The interfacial reactions between specimen and solution were analyzed with SEM, EDX and XRD. The results show that the developed process of pickling-activation can equalize the potentials on substrate surface. The compacted zinc film can be obtained by zinc immersion after treating magnesium alloy in the pH 4-6 phosphate-permanganate solution for 3-5 min. The adhesion and corrosion resistance of copper plating are enhanced. The one-step pickling-activation can replace the existing two-step process of acid pickling and activation which contains a great deal of chromium and fluorine. The procedure of surface pretreatment is simplified and the production environment is improved.

  15. Method of making high strength, tough alloy steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gareth; Rao, Bangaru V. N.

    1979-01-01

    A high strength, tough alloy steel, particularly suitable for the mining industry, is formed by heating the steel to a temperature in the austenite range (1000.degree.-1100.degree. C.) to form a homogeneous austenite phase and then cooling the steel to form a microstructure of uniformly dispersed dislocated martensite separated by continuous thin boundary films of stabilized retained austenite. The steel includes 0.2-0.35 weight % carbon, at least 1% and preferably 3-4.5% chromium, and at least one other subsitutional alloying element, preferably manganese or nickel. The austenite film is stable to subsequent heat treatment as by tempering (below 300.degree. C.) and reforms to a stable film after austenite grain refinement.

  16. Corrosion-resistant nickel-base alloys for gas turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, J.W.; Hulsizer, W.R.

    1976-08-01

    Laboratory corrosion screening procedures used during the past ten years in developing nickel-base superalloys for gas turbine applications are described. Hot salt corrosion tests have included crucible and salt shower exposures. Reproducible techniques were established and alloy composition effects defined, leading to development of M313, IN-587, a IN-792. Correlations have been made with corrosion results in burner rigs, and engine experience confirming anticipated behavior is now becoming available. During this work a number of limitations of these accelerated laboratory tests were uncovered; these are discussed. Finally, brief descriptions of the states of development of alloy MA 755E (an oxide dispersion-strengthened superalloy) and IN-939 (a cast 23 percent chromium superalloy) are outlined as examples of advanced corrosion resistant, high strength materials of the future.

  17. Effect of B and Cr on elastic strength and crystal structure of Ni{sub 3}Al alloys under high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raju, S.V., E-mail: sraju@fiu.edu [CeSMEC, Dept. of Mechanical Engr., Florida International University, Miami, FL 33172 (United States); Oni, A.A. [Department of Materials Science and Engr., North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Godwal, B.K. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Yan, J. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94730 (United States); Earth and Planetary Sciences Department, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Drozd, V. [CeSMEC, Dept. of Mechanical Engr., Florida International University, Miami, FL 33172 (United States); Srinivasan, S. [Department of Materials Science and Engg., Iowa State University, Iowa, IA (United States); LeBeau, J.M. [Department of Materials Science and Engr., North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Rajan, K. [Department of Materials Science and Engg., Iowa State University, Iowa, IA (United States); Saxena, S.K. [CeSMEC, Dept. of Mechanical Engr., Florida International University, Miami, FL 33172 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Ni{sub 3}Al, Ni{sub 3}Al:B and Ni-Al-Cr alloys were prepared by Bridgman-Stockburger technique. • Crystal structures confirmed by XRD and Electron microscopy studies. • Bulk modulus from XRD studies under pressure and Young’s modulus from nano-indentation were determined. • Combining the above results enabled shear modulus and Poisson’s ratio. • K/G ratio suggests that Ni{sub 3}Al doped with B (500 ppm) has the highest hardness with ductility. - Abstract: Samples of Ni{sub 3}Al, Ni{sub 3}Al:B and Ni–Al–Cr super alloys were prepared by directional solidification method and their effect of alloying with ternary elements on the mechanical properties was investigated. In-situ X-ray diffraction studies were carried out on undoped Ni{sub 3}Al, Ni{sub 3}Al:B with boron 500 ppm and Ni–Al–Cr with 7.5 at.% of chromium super alloys at high pressure using diamond anvil cell. The results indicate that micro-alloying with B forms γ′-phase (L1{sub 2} structure), similar to the pure Ni {sub 3}Al, while Ni–Al–Cr alloy consists of γ′ precipitates in a matrix of γ-phase (Ni-FCC structure). The crystal structure of all three alloys was stable up to 20 GPa. Micro alloying with boron increases bulk modulus of Ni{sub 3}Al by 8% whereas alloying with chromium has the opposite effect decreasing the modulus by 11% when compared to undoped alloy. Further, the elastic modulus and hardness of Ni{sub 3}Al, Ni{sub 3}Al:B and Ni–Al–Cr alloys were determined using the nano-indentation technique, in combination with compressibility data which enabled the estimation of shear modulus and Poisson’s ratio of these alloys.

  18. Spectroscopic study for a chromium-adsorbed montmorillonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurtay, Maidina ·; Tuersun, Maierdan ·; Cai, Yuanfeng; Açıkgöz, Muhammed; Wang, Hongtao; Pan, Yuguan; Zhang, Xiaoke; Ma, Xiaomei

    2017-02-01

    Samples of purified montmorillonite with trace amounts of quartz were subjected to different concentrations of chromium sulphate solutions for one week to allow cation exchange. The chromium-bearing montmorillonites were verified and tested using powder X-ray diffractometry (XRD), X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometry and Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to explore the occupation sites of the chromium. The ESR spectra recorded before and after the chromium exchange show clear differences: a strong and broad resonance with two shoulders at the lower magnetic field side was present to start, and its intensity as well as that of the ferric iron resonance, increased with the concentration of added chromium. The signals introduced by the chromium, for example at g = 1.975 and 2.510 etc., suggested that the chromium had several occupational sites. The ESR peak with g = 2.510 in the second derivative spectrum suggested that Cr3+ was weakly bounded to TOT with the form of [Cr(H2O)3]3+ in hexagonal cavities. This was verified by comparing the FTIR spectra of the pure and modified montmorillonite. The main resonance centred at g = 1.975 indicated that the majority of Cr3+ occupied the interlayer region as [Cr(H2O)6]3+. The substitution of Ca2 + by Cr3+ also greatly affected the vibration of the hydrogens associate to water, ranged from 3500 to 2600 cm-1 in FTIR. Furthermore, the presence of two diffraction lines in the XRD results (specifically those with d-values of 1.5171 and 1.2673 nm) and the calculations of the size of the interlayer space suggested the presence of two types of montmorillonite with different hydration cations in the sample exposed to 0.2 M chromium sulphate. The two diffraction lines were assigned to [Cr(H2O)6]3+ and [Cr(H2O)3O3]3+, respectively. This also suggested that the species of hydration cation was constrained by the concentration of the chromium solution.

  19. Reactive Boride Brazing on Low-Alloy Automotive Grade Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanisamy, B.; Upadhyaya, A.

    2011-11-01

    Brazing is a widely used process to improve the performance of steels used in automotive applications. The substrate material is often exposed to harsh conditions in these applications and may affect the service life of the component. Reactive boride brazing aims to improve the mechanical properties of the substrate material by forming a ceramic-metal composite coating in a single-step process in situ. In this study, sintered Ancor 4300 low-alloy steel is used as the substrate with chromium-rich braze and chromium-lean braze materials. The mechanical properties of the brazed samples were studied in detail using microindentation hardness measurements and the transverse rupture test. The results indicate that the brazed superlayer has a 10 times higher hardness. There was a significant improvement in the transverse rupture strength of the steel brazed with the chromium-rich boride as compared to the pure substrate material. In an effort to reduce processing time, green compacts of the substrate were also directly brazed and yielded favorable results.

  20. A possible role for chromium(III) in genotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snow, E.T. (New York Univ. Medical Center, Tuxedo (United States))

    1991-05-01

    Chromium is found in the environment in two major forms: reduced Cr{sup III} and Cr{sup VI}, or chromate. Chromate, the most biologically active species, is readily taken up by living cells and reduced intracellularly, via reactive intermediates, to stable Cr{sup III} species. Cr{sup III}, the most abundant form of chromium in the environment, does not readily cross cell membranes and is relatively inactive in vivo. However, intracellular Cr{sup III} can react slowly with both nucleic acids and proteins and can be genotoxic. The authors have investigated the genotoxicity of Cr{sup III} in vitro using a DNA replication assay and in vivo by CaCl{sub 2}-mediated transfection of chromium-treated DNA into Escherichia coli. These results suggest that Cr{sup III} alters the interaction between the DNA template and the polymerase such that the binding strength of the DNA polymerase is increased and the fidelity of DNA replication is decreased. These interactions may contribute to the mutagenicity of chromium ions in vivo and suggest that Cr{sup III} can contribute to chromium-mediated carcinogenesis.

  1. Low-chromium reduced-activation ferritic steels for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Kenik, E.A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Development of reduced-activation ferritic steels has concentrated on high-chromium (8-10 wt% Cr) steels. However, there are advantages for a low-chromium steel, and initial ORNL studies on reduced-activation steels were on compositions with 2.25 to 12% Cr. Those studies showed an Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.25V-0.1C (2 1/4Cr-2WV) steel to have the highest strenglth of the steels studied. Although this steel had the best strength, Charpy impact properties were inferior to those of an Fe-9Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C (9Cr-2WVTa) and an Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.1C (2 1/4Cr-2W) steel. Therefore, further development of the low-chromium Cr-W steels was required. These results indicate that it is possible to develop low-chromium reduced-activation ferritic steels that have tensile and impact properties as good or better than those of high-chromium (7-9% Cr) steels. Further improvement of properties should be possible by optimizing the composition.

  2. Enhancement of chromium uptake in tanning using oxazolidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundarapandiyan, S; Brutto, Patrick E; Siddhartha, G; Ramesh, R; Ramanaiah, B; Saravanan, P; Mandal, A B

    2011-06-15

    Monocyclic and bicyclic oxazolidines were offered at three different junctures of chrome tanning process viz. prior to BCS offer, along with BCS and after basification. It was found that oxazolidine when offered after basification brought about better chromium uptake and reduction of chromium load in the wastewater. Offer of oxazolidine was also varied. Increase in offer of oxazolidine from 0.25% to 1% was found to enhance the chromium uptake and decrease the chromium load in wastewater. But the increase in uptake was not proportionate to the increase in oxazolidine offer more than 0.75%. Offer of 1% Zoldine ZA 78 (monocyclic oxazolidine) and Zoldine ZE (bicyclic oxazolidine) after basification brought about 63.4% and 73.1% enhancement in chrome content in leather compared to control where oxazolidine was not offered. The tone of the wetblue was found to be altered moderately. However this did not call for any process adjustments in wet-finishing. The oxazolidine treated leathers were found to be immensely fuller and tighter. It was found experimentally that offer of 1% of oxazolidine facilitated reduction in the offer of syntans administered for filling and grain tightening by around 46%. Oxazolidine could bring about significant reduction in cost of chemicals apart from resulting environmental benefits due to enhancement of chromium uptake during tanning.

  3. Bioaccumulation and biosorption of chromium by Aspergillus niger MTCC 2594.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandana Mala, John Geraldine; Unni Nair, Balachandran; Puvanakrishnan, Rengarajulu

    2006-06-01

    Chromium toxicity is of prime concern due to chrome tanning processes in the leather sector. Chrome tanning results in the discharge of toxic levels of chromium causing pollution hazards. Chromium levels of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) were high above permissible limits in chrome samples after chrome tanning. The potential of Aspergillus niger MTCC 2594 to accumulate chromium as well as its biosorption capacity is investigated in this study. Bioaccumulation of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in the spent chrome liquor has resulted in a 75-78% reduction of the initial Cr content in 24-36 h. A. niger biomass is found to be very effective in the biosorption of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in spent chrome liquor. Maximum adsorption of 83% for biosorption of Cr(III) at 48 h and 79% of Cr(VI) at 36 h in spent chrome liquor is observed. The biosorption characteristics fit well with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms and the adsorption parameters are evaluated. The biosorption of Cr also follows Lagergren kinetics. A. niger biomass is effectively used for the biosorption of chromium with 79-83% Cr removal in 36-48 h.

  4. Microbial exudate promoted dissolution and transformation of chromium containing minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, E. M.; Sun, J.; Tang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Because of its utility in many industrial processes, chromium has become the second most common metal contaminant in the United States. The two most common oxidation states of chromium in nature are Cr(III), which is highly immobile, and Cr(VI), which is highly mobile and toxic. In both natural and engineered environments, the most common remediation of Cr(VI) is through reduction, which results in chromium sequestration in the low solubility mixed Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxide phases. Consequently, the stability of these minerals must be examined to assess the fate of chromium in the subsurface. We examined the dissolution of mixed Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides in the presence of common microbial exudates, including the siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB; a common organic ligand secreted by most microbes with high affinity for ferric iron and other trivalent metal ions) and oxalate (a common organic acid produced by microbes). The solids exhibited incongruent dissolution with preferential leaching of Fe from the solid phase. Over time, this leads to a more Cr rich mineral, which is known to be more soluble than the corresponding mixed mineral phase. We are currently investigating the structure of the reacted mineral phases and soluble Cr(III) species, as well as the potential oxidation and remobilization of the soluble Cr species. Results from this study will provide insights regarding the long term transport and fate of chromium in the natural environment in the presence of microbial activities.

  5. Effective bioleaching of chromium in tannery sludge with an enriched sulfur-oxidizing bacterial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jing; Gou, Min; Tang, Yue-Qin; Li, Guo-Ying; Sun, Zhao-Yong; Kida, Kenji

    2016-10-01

    In this study, a sulfur-oxidizing community was enriched from activated sludge generated in tannery wastewater treatment plants. Bioleaching of tannery sludge containing 0.9-1.2% chromium was investigated to evaluate the effectiveness of the enriched community, the effect of chromium binding forms on bioleaching efficiency, and the dominant microbes contributing to chromium bioleaching. Sludge samples inoculated with the enriched community presented 79.9-96.8% of chromium leaching efficiencies, much higher than those without the enriched community. High bioleaching efficiencies of over 95% were achieved for chromium in reducible fraction, while 60.9-97.9% were observed for chromium in oxidizable and residual fractions. Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, the predominant bacteria in the enriched community, played an important role in bioleaching, whereas some indigenous heterotrophic species in sludge might have had a supporting role. The results indicated that A. thiooxidans-dominant enriched microbial community had high chromium bioleaching efficiency, and chromium binding forms affected the bioleaching performance.

  6. Development of a coprecipitation system for the speciation/preconcentration of chromium in tap waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karatepe, Aslihan, E-mail: karatepea@gmail.com [Nevsehir University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Department of Chemistry, 50000 Nevsehir (Turkey); Korkmaz, Esra [Bozok University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Department of Chemistry, Yozgat (Turkey); Soylak, Mustafa [Erciyes University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Chemistry Department, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Elci, Latif [Pamukkale University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Department of Chemistry, 20020 Denizli (Turkey)

    2010-01-15

    A method for the speciation of chromium(III), chromium(VI) and determination of total chromium based on coprecipitation of chromium(III) with dysprosium hydroxide has been investigated and applied to tap water samples. Chromium(III) was quantitatively recovered by the presented method, while the recovery values for chromium(VI) was below 10%. The influences of analytical parameters including amount of dysprosium(III), pH, centrifugation speed and sample volume for the quantitative precipitation were examined. No interferic effects were observed from alkali, earth alkali and some transition metals for the analyte ions. The detection limits (k = 3, N = 15) were 0.65 {mu}g/L for chromium(III) and 0.78 {mu}g/L for chromium(VI). The validation of the presented method was checked by the analysis of certified reference materials.

  7. Process for improving moisture resistance of epoxy resins by addition of chromium ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    St.clair, A. K.; Stoakley, D. M.; St.clair, T. L.; Singh, J. J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A process for improving the moisture resistance properties of epoxidized TGMDA and DGEBA resin system by chemically incorporating chromium ions is described. The addition of chromium ions is believed to prevent the absorption of water molecules.

  8. CHROMIUM ELECTROANALYSIS AT SCREEN PRINTED ELECTRODE MODIFIED BY THIN FILMS OF NICKEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    A rapid and potentially cost-effective electrochemical method is reported for analysis of chromium (VI) and Chromium(III) using a nickel modified screen printed carbon ink electrode. Electrochemical characteristics of nickel modified electrode as well voltammetric behavior f...

  9. Alloy Fabrication Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At NETL’s Alloy Fabrication Facility in Albany, OR, researchers conduct DOE research projects to produce new alloys suited to a variety of applications, from gas...

  10. Oxidation Behavior of Binary Niobium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Charles A.; Corey, James L.

    1960-01-01

    This investigation concludes a study to determine the effects of up to 25 atomic percent of 55 alloying additions on the oxidation characteristics of niobium. The alloys were evaluated by oxidizing in an air atmosphere for 4 hours at 1000 C and 2 hours at 1200 C. Titanium and chromium improved oxidation resistance at both evaluation conditions. Vanadium and aluminum improved oxidation resistance at 1000 C, even though the V scale tended to liquefy and the Al specimens became brittle and the scale powdery. Copper, cobalt, iron, and iridium improved oxidation resistance at 1200 C. Other investigations report tungsten and molybdenum are protective up to about 1000 C, and tantalum at 1100 C. The most important factor influencing the rate of oxidation was the ion size of the alloy additions. Ions slightly smaller than the Nb(5+) ion are soluble in the oxide lattice and tend to lower the compressive stresses in the bulk scale that lead to cracking. The solubility of the alloying addition also depends on the valence to some extent. All of the elements mentioned that improve the oxidation resistance of Nb fit this size criterion with the possible exception of Al, whose extremely small size in large concentrations would probably lead to the formation of a powdery scale. Maintenance of a crack-free bulk scale for as long as possible may contribute to the formation of a dark subscale that ultimately is rate- controlling in the oxidation process. The platinum-group metals, especially Ir, appear to protect by entrapment of the finely dispersed alloying element by the incoming Nb2O5 metal-oxide interface. This inert metallic Ir when alloyed in a sufficient amount with Yb appears to give a ductile phase dispersed in the brittle oxide. This scale would then flow more easily to relieve the large compressive stresses to delay cracking. Complex oxide formation (which both Ti and Zr tend to initiate) and valence effects, which probably change the vacancy concentration in the scale

  11. A study of the process of desorption of hexavalent chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.B. Amorim

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work the process of desorption of hexavalent chromium, a toxic metal ion, from the marine algae Sargassum sp, following biosorption experiments 2³ factorial design was studied. A technique was applied to three eluents: HCl, H2SO4 and EDTA. Three factors of importance were evaluated: concentration of eluent, the ratio between mass of biosorbent and volume of eluent (S/L and process time. A statistical analysis of the experimental results showed that the three variables evaluated are significant for all three eluents. The models for chromium desorption were validated, as the results agreed well with the observed values. Through use of the response surface methodology, a factorial design based optimization technique; it was possible to identify the most suitable eluent and the interval of values for the process variables that resulted in the most significant desorption of chromium, which is relevant information for work aiming at process optimization.

  12. Bioabsorption of chromium from retan chrome liquor by cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandi, M; Shashirekha, V; Swamy, Mahadeswara

    2009-01-01

    The bioaccumulation of chromium from retan chrome liquor by Spirulina fusiformis was investigated under laboratory as well as field conditions. At the optimal conditions, metal ion uptake increased with initial metal ion concentration up to 300mg/l. The effect on various physico-chemical parameters like total solids (TS), total dissolved solids (TDS), total suspended solids (TSS), chlorides, sulphates, phenols, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biochemical studies related to biomass, chlorophyll-a and protein were also carried out. The present study indicates that S. fusiformis is very effective in removal of chromium (93-99%) besides removing other toxicants from retan chrome liquor. The sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and FTIR studies indicate the interaction/complexation between Cr and alga. The mechanism involved in bioaccumulation of chromium is also discussed. The process when upgraded can be applied for detoxification of tannery effluents.

  13. Extraction of Chromium from Carbon Ferrochromium Residual Wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarevskiy, P. P.; Gizatulin, R. A.; Romanenko, Yu E.; Valuev, D. V.; Valueva, A. V.; Serikbol, A.

    2015-09-01

    This work reports the problem of processing residual wastes after producing carbon ferrochrome by recycling dust using a hydrometallurgical method with the purpose of extracting the basic component - chromium, The X-ray diffraction analysis results, chemical and granulometric compositions of dust from the carbon ferrochrome production are given, The method for the production of chemical-enrichment concentrate (CEC) by processing ferrous dust is described, with obtaining a middling product - sodium mono-chromate with its further reduction to chromium hydroxide, followed by autoclave leaching, and resulting in the production of chemically enriched chrome concentrate, The plant used for autoclave leaching and filtering is schematically depicted, The smelting process of metallic chromium using the ladle aluminothermic method is described,

  14. Studies of removal of chromium by model constructed wetland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mant

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Chromium is a pollutant present in tannery wastewater, its removal is necessary for protection of the environment. Penisetum purpureum, Brancharia decumbens and Phragmites australis were grown hydroponically in experimental gravel beds to determine their potential for the phytoremediation of solutions containing 10 and 20 mg Cr dm-3. These concentrations, similar to tannery wastewater after initial physico-chemical treatment were used with the aim of developing an economic secondary treatment to protect the environment. All the systems achieved removal efficiencies of 97 - 99.6% within 24 hours. P. purpureum and B. decumbens removed 78.1% and 68.5% respectively within the first hour. Both P. purpureum and B. decumbens were tolerant of the concentrations of chromium applied, but P. purpureum showed the greatest potential because its faster growth and larger biomass achieved a much greater chromium removal over the whole length of time of the experiment.

  15. Electron magnetic resonance investigation of chromium diffusion in yttria powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biasi, R.S. de, E-mail: rsbiasi@ime.eb.b [Secao de Engenharia Mecanica e de Materiais, Instituto Militar de Engenharia, Pr. General Tiburcio, 80, 22290-270 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Grillo, M.L.N., E-mail: mluciag@uerj.b [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, 20550-013 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2010-03-01

    The electron magnetic resonance (EMR) technique was used to investigate the diffusion of chromium in yttria (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) powders. The EMR absorption intensity was measured for several annealing times and three different temperatures of isothermal annealing: 1273, 1323 and 1373 K. The activation temperature for diffusion, calculated from the experimental data using a theoretical model based on the Fick equation, was found to be E{sub A}=342+-5 kJ mol{sup -1}. This value is larger than the activation energy for the diffusion of chromium in rutile (TiO{sub 2}), periclase (MgO) and cobalt monoxide (CoO) and smaller than the activation energy for the diffusion of chromium in chrysoberyl (BeAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}).

  16. Chromium Resistant Bacteria: Impact on Plant Growth in Soil Microcosm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayel Hanane

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Three chromium resistant bacterial strains, Pseudomonas fluorescens PF28, Enterobacter amnigenus EA31 and Enterococcus gallinarum S34 isolated from tannery waste contaminated soil were used in this study. All strains could resist a high concentration of K2Cr2O7 that is up to 300 mg/L. The effect of these strains on clover plants (Trifolium campestre in the presence of two chromium salts CrCl3 and K2Cr2O7 was studied in soil microcosm. Application of chromium salts adversely affected seed germination, root and shoot length. Bacterial inoculation improved the growth parameters under chromate stress when compared with non inoculated respective controls. There was observed more than 50% reduction of Cr(VI in inoculated soil microcosms, as compared to the uninoculated soil under the same conditions. The results obtained in this study are significant for the bioremediation of chromate pollution.

  17. Improvement on simultaneous determination of chromium species in aqueous solution by ion chromatography and chemiluminescence detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Liao, Y.P.; Jons, O.

    1997-01-01

    A sensitive method for the simultaneous determination of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) was chromatography and chemiluminescence detection. Two Dionex ion-exchange guard columns in series, CG5 and AG7, were used to separate chromium(III) from chromium(VI). Chromium(VI) was reduced by potassium......, the stabilities of reductant and luminol solutions were studied. The linear range of the calibration curve for chromium(III) and chromium(VI) was 1-400 mu g l(-1). The detection limit was 0.12 mu g l(-1) for chromium(III) and 0.09 mu g l(-1) for chromium(VI), respectively. The precision at the 20 mu g l(-1) level...... was 1.4% for chromium(III) and 2.5% for chromium(VI), respectively. The accuracy of the chromium(III) determination was determined by analysis of the NIST standard reference material 1643c, Trace elements in water with the result 19.1 +/- 1.0 mu g Cr(III) l(-1) (certified value 19.0 +/- 0.6 mu g Cr...

  18. 21 CFR 73.3110a - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.3110a Section... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3110a Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide (Pigment Blue 36) (CAS Reg....

  19. Effect of vibration frequency on microstructure and performance of high chromium cast iron prepared by lost foam casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-qi Zou

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present research, high chromium cast irons (HCCIs were prepared using the lost foam casting (LFC process. To improve the wear resistance of the high chromium cast irons (HCCIs, mechanical vibration was employed during the solidification of the HCCIs. The effects of vibration frequency on the microstructure and performance of the HCCIs under as-cast, as-quenched and as-tempered conditions were investigated. The results indicated that the microstructures of the LFC-produced HCCIs were refined due to the introduction of mechanical vibration, and the hardness was improved compared to that of the alloy without vibration. However, only a slight improvement in hardness was found in spite of the increase of vibration frequency. In contrast, the impact toughness of the as-tempered HCCIs increased with an increase in the vibration frequency. In addition, the wear resistance of the HCCIs was improved as a result of the introduction of vibration and increased with an increase in the vibration frequency.

  20. F-Alloy: An Alloy Based Model Transformation Language

    OpenAIRE

    Gammaitoni, Loïc; Kelsen, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Model transformations are one of the core artifacts of a model-driven engineering approach. The relational logic language Alloy has been used in the past to verify properties of model transformations. In this paper we introduce the concept of functional Alloy modules. In essence a functional Alloy module can be viewed as an Alloy module representing a model transformation. We describe a sublanguage of Alloy called F-Alloy that allows the specification of functional Alloy modules. Module...

  1. PLUTONIUM-THORIUM ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonfeld, F.W.

    1959-09-15

    New plutonium-base binary alloys useful as liquid reactor fuel are described. The alloys consist of 50 to 98 at.% thorium with the remainder plutonium. The stated advantages of these alloys over unalloyed plutonium for reactor fuel use are easy fabrication, phase stability, and the accompanying advantuge of providing a means for converting Th/sup 232/ into U/sup 233/.

  2. Wear resistance of a pressable low-fusing ceramic opposed by dental alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Adriana Cláudia Lapria; de Oliveira, André Almeida; Alves Gomes, Erica; Silveira Rodrigues, Renata Cristina; Faria Ribeiro, Ricardo

    2014-04-01

    Dental alloys have increasingly replaced by dental ceramics in dentistry because of aesthetics. As both dental alloys and ceramics can be present in the oral cavity, the evaluation of the wear resistance of ceramics opposed by dental alloys is important. The aim of the present study was to evaluate wear resistance of a pressable low-fusing ceramic opposed by dental alloys as well as the microhardness of the alloys and the possible correlation of wear and antagonist microhardness. Fifteen stylus tips samples of pressable low-fusing ceramic were obtained, polished and glazed. Samples were divided into three groups according to the disk of alloy/metal to be used as antagonist: Nickel-Chromium (Ni-Cr), Cobalt-Chromium (Co-Cr) and commercially pure titanium (cp Ti). Vickers microhardness of antagonist disks was evaluated before wear tests. Then, antagonist disks were sandblasted until surface roughness was adjusted to 0.75μm. Wear tests were performed at a speed of 60 cycles/min and distance of 10mm, in a total of 300,000 cycles. Before and after wear tests, samples were weighted and had their profile designed in an optical comparator to evaluate weight and height loss, respectively. Ni-Cr and cp Ti caused greater wear than Co-Cr, presenting greater weight (p=.009) and height (p=.002) loss. Cp Ti microhardness was lower than Ni-Cr and Co-Cr (p<.05). There is a positive correlation between weight and height loss (p<.05), but weight (p=.204) and height (p=.05) loss are not correlated to microhardness. The results suggest that pressable low-fusing ceramic presents different wear according to the dental alloy used as antagonist and the wear is not affected by antagonist microhardness.

  3. Experimental study on 830 MPa grade pipeline steel containing chromium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Ren; Shuai Zhang; Shuang Wang; Wen-yue Liu

    2009-01-01

    The diversity of microstructure and properties of 830 Mpa grade pipeline steel containing chromium was investigated by optical microscope and transmission electron microscopy. The main microstructures were multiple configurations, containing lath bainite and granule bainite. Mechanical properties test results showed that the yield strength and tensile strength improved with in-creasing chromium content. The toughness and elongation decreased at the same time, so temper process was introduced. Appling proper temper parameters, the values of toughness and elongation were improved dramatically, and the strength decreased slightly.

  4. Fractionation behavior of chromium isotopes during coprecipitation with calcium carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodler, Alexandra; Sánchez-Pastor, Nuria; Fernández-Díaz, Lurdes;

    2015-01-01

    Interest in chromium (Cr) isotope incorporation into carbonates arises from the observation that Cr isotopic composition of carbonates could be used as a paleoclimate proxy to elucidate past fluctuations of oxygen contents in atmosphere and hydrosphere. The use of Cr isotopes to track paleoenviro......Interest in chromium (Cr) isotope incorporation into carbonates arises from the observation that Cr isotopic composition of carbonates could be used as a paleoclimate proxy to elucidate past fluctuations of oxygen contents in atmosphere and hydrosphere. The use of Cr isotopes to track...

  5. Use of chitosan for chromium removal from exhausted tanning baths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaro, Raffaele; Fabbricino, Massimiliano; Lanzetta, Rosa; Mancino, Anna; Naviglio, Biagio; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Sartorio, Roberto; Tomaselli, Michele; Tortora, Gelsomina

    2008-01-01

    A novel approach, based on chitosan heavy-metal sequestrating ability, is proposed for chromium(III) removal from spent tanning liquor. Experimental results, obtained at lab-scale using real wastewater, are presented and discussed. Resulting efficiencies are extremely high, and strongly dependent on chitosan dose and pH value. Comparative analyses with other polysaccharides is also carried out showing that amine groups are more efficient than carboxyl and sulphate ones. Chromium recovery from sorption complexes and chitosan regeneration is finally proposed to optimize the whole process.

  6. Primary and secondary crystallization of modified hypoeutectic chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Studnicki

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents investigations of crystallization of modified hypoeutectic wear resistant chromium cast iron which contains carbon about 2% and chromium on three levels (12%, 18% and 25%. Three substances were applied to the modification ( boron carbide (B4C, ferroniobium (FeNb and mixture of ferroniobium and mischmetal (RE. The investigations of crystallization were conducted the DTA method in DTA-C and DTA-Is testers. The influence on the course of the process of primary and secondary crystallization was observed.

  7. Fertilizers and Mixed Crop Cultivation of Chromium Tolerant and Sensitive Plants under Chromium Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Dheeba

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Zea mays (maize and Vigna radiata (green gram are found to be the chromium (Cr tolerant and sensitive plants, respectively. In the present paper, we investigate the reduction of the toxicity of Cr in the sensitive plants by the mixed crop cultivation in the field using various amendments. Further, the potassium dichromate was used as the source of hexavalent Cr. The results indicated that Cr adversely affects both the growth and yield of plants. The soil properties vary with Cr and different fertilizer amendments and the yield of both plants were affected by Cr. We conclude that metal accumulation of seeds of green gram was higher than corn and the application of single fertilizer either farm yard manure (FYM or nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium (NPK enhances the growth and yield of both the tolerant and sensitive plants in the mixed crop cultivations.

  8. Spatial distribution of chromium in soils contaminated by chromium-containing slag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Shun-hong; PENG Bing; YANG Zhi-hui; CHAI Li-yuan; XU You-ze; SU Chang-qing

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the metal chromium (Cr) contamination of soil at a chromium-containing slag site by ferrochromium production, the contaminated sites, under slag heap, in the vicinity of slag heap and arable soils near the outlet of sewer channel, and unpolluted site 5 km away from one ferroalloy plant in Hunan Province, China, were selected. The concentrations of total Cr and water soluble Cr in bulk soil samples and profile depth samples were determined. The results show that the soils in the vicinity of slag heap have the highest total Cr content followed by the soils under the slag heap and near the outlet of sewer channel of the factory. The mean concentrations of total Cr in the top soils at above three contaminated locations exceed the critical level of Secondary Environmental Quality Standard for Soil in China by 3.5, 5.4 and 1.8 times. In most Cr polluted soils, total Cr has a relative accumulation in soil depth of 40-60 cm, but this trend is not found in unpolluted soils. The average concentrations of water soluble Cr (Ⅵ) in top soils under slag heap and in the vicinity of slag heap are 176.9 times and 52.7 times higher than that in the uncontaminated soils, respectively. However, water soluble Cr (Ⅵ) contents in soils near sewer channel are all low and the values are close to that in the uncontaminated soils. Although water soluble Cr (Ⅵ) content in soil profiles decreases with soil depths, it in soils under slag heap maintains a high level even at a depth of 100-150 cm. The results imply that the transportation of Cr (Ⅵ) can result in a potential risk of groundwater system in this area.

  9. Evolution of Globular Microstructure and Rheological Properties of Stellite™ 21 Alloy after Heating to Semisolid State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sołek, Krzysztof Piotr; Rogal, Łukasz; Kapranos, Platon

    2016-11-01

    Metal alloys can be successfully thixoformed in the partially liquid state if they display non-dendritic near-globular microstructures. The article presents the development of feedstock with such non-dendritic microstructure produced through the solid-state route of strain-induced melt-activated (SIMA) method, for a Stellite™ 21 alloy. Stellite™ alloys are a range of cobalt-chromium alloys designed for wear and corrosion resistance, currently shaped by casting, powder metallurgy or forging processes, but semisolid-state processing offers the possibility of a near-net-shaping method for these alloys. In this work, sprayformed followed by extrusion samples were heated to the temperature range at which the liquid and solid phases coexist in the material and spheroidal shape solid particles in a liquid matrix were obtained as required for semisolid processing. Microstructural investigations were carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in combination with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), with a further objective of analyzing the rheological properties of Stellite™ 21 alloy in the semisolid state, providing results to be used for identification of a processing window of temperature and viscosity ranges for thixoforming this alloy.

  10. Accelerated Stress Corrosion Crack Initiation of Alloys 600 and 690 in Hydrogenated Supercritical Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Tyler; Was, Gary S.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine whether stress corrosion crack initiation of Alloys 600 and 690 occurs by the same mechanism in subcritical and supercritical water. Tensile bars of Alloys 690 and 600 were strained in constant extension rate tensile experiments in hydrogenated subcritical and supercritical water from 593 K to 723 K (320 °C to 450 °C), and the crack initiation behavior was characterized by high-resolution electron microscopy. Intergranular cracking was observed across the entire temperature range, and the morphology, structure, composition, and temperature dependence of initiated cracks in Alloy 690 were consistent between hydrogenated subcritical and supercritical water. Crack initiation of Alloy 600 followed an Arrhenius relationship and did not exhibit a discontinuity or change in slope after crossing the critical temperature. The measured activation energy was 121 ± 13 kJ/mol. Stress corrosion crack initiation in Alloy 690 was fit with a single activation energy of 92 ± 12 kJ/mol across the entire temperature range. Cracks were observed to propagate along grain boundaries adjacent to chromium-depleted metal, with Cr2O3 observed ahead of crack tips. All measures of the SCC behavior indicate that the mechanism for stress corrosion crack initiation of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 is consistent between hydrogenated subcritical and supercritical water.

  11. Accelerated Stress Corrosion Crack Initiation of Alloys 600 and 690 in Hydrogenated Supercritical Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Tyler; Was, Gary S.

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study is to determine whether stress corrosion crack initiation of Alloys 600 and 690 occurs by the same mechanism in subcritical and supercritical water. Tensile bars of Alloys 690 and 600 were strained in constant extension rate tensile experiments in hydrogenated subcritical and supercritical water from 593 K to 723 K (320 °C to 450 °C), and the crack initiation behavior was characterized by high-resolution electron microscopy. Intergranular cracking was observed across the entire temperature range, and the morphology, structure, composition, and temperature dependence of initiated cracks in Alloy 690 were consistent between hydrogenated subcritical and supercritical water. Crack initiation of Alloy 600 followed an Arrhenius relationship and did not exhibit a discontinuity or change in slope after crossing the critical temperature. The measured activation energy was 121 ± 13 kJ/mol. Stress corrosion crack initiation in Alloy 690 was fit with a single activation energy of 92 ± 12 kJ/mol across the entire temperature range. Cracks were observed to propagate along grain boundaries adjacent to chromium-depleted metal, with Cr2O3 observed ahead of crack tips. All measures of the SCC behavior indicate that the mechanism for stress corrosion crack initiation of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 is consistent between hydrogenated subcritical and supercritical water.

  12. FORMATION OF CHROMATE CONVERSION COATINGS ON ALUMINUM AND ITS ALLOYS: AN IN SITU XANES STUDY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SASAKI,K.; ISAACS,H.S.; JAFFCOATE,C.S.; BUCHHAIT,R.; LEGAT,V.; LEE,H.; SRINIVASAMURTHI,V.

    2001-09-02

    We used in situ X-ray adsorption near-edge structure (XANES) to investigate the formation of chromate conversion coatings on pure Al, commercial Al alloys (AA 1100, AA2024, and AA7075), and a series of binary Al-Cu alloys. The method employed a new electrochemical cell that can determine the ratio of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) to total chromium (Cr(total)) speciation in conversion coatings as a function of exposure time to a chromate solution. The spectra showed that the initial Cr(VI)/Cr(total) ratios are greater than later ones for pure Al and AA1100, but not for AA2024 and AA7075. Measurements with Al-Cu alloys demonstrated that the difference observed in AA2024 and AA7075 may not be due to Cu alloying. The proportion of Cr(VI) in the coatings becomes approximately constant after 180 s of exposure for all the specimens examined even though the coatings continue to grow.

  13. Physiological, biochemical and histometric responses of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus L.) by dietary organic chromium (chromium picolinate) supplementation

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Chromium has been recognized as a new and important micro-nutrient, essential for both human and animal nutrition. This study was conducted to evaluate the appropriateness and/or the use of safety level of dietary chromium picolinate (Cr-Pic), and its effects on the physiological responses, the histometric characteristics, and the chemical analysis of dorsal muscles of mono-sex Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus. A total of 420 fingerlings (28.00 ± 0.96 g) were randomly distributed into 21 f...

  14. Corrosion of ferritic-martensitic steels and nickel-based alloys in supercritical water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiaowei

    The corrosion behavior of ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels and Ni-based alloys in supercritical water (SCW) has been studied due to their potential applications in future nuclear reactor systems, fossil fuel power plants and waste treatment processes. 9˜12% chromium ferritic/martensitic steels exhibit good radiation resistance and stress corrosion cracking resistance. Ni-based alloys with an austenitic face-centered cubic (FCC) structure are designed to retain good mechanical strength and corrosion/oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures. Corrosion tests were carried out at three temperatures, 360°C, 500°C and 600°C, with two dissolved oxygen contents, 25 ppb and 2 ppm for up to 3000 hours. Alloys modified by grain refinement and reactive element addition were also investigated to determine their ability to improve the corrosion resistance in SCW. A duplex oxide structure was observed in the F/M steels after exposure to 25 ppb oxygen SCW, including an outer oxide layer with columnar magnetite grains and an inner oxide layer constituted of a mixture of spinel and ferrite phases in an equiaxed grain structure. An additional outermost hematite layer formed in the SCW-exposed samples when the oxygen content was increased to 2 ppm. Weight gain in the F/M steels increased with exposure temperatures and times, and followed parabolic growth kinetics in most of the samples. In Ni-based alloys after exposure to SCW, general corrosion and pitting corrosion were observed, and intergranular corrosion was found when exposed at 600°C due to formation of a local healing layer. The general oxide structure on the Ni-based alloys was characterized as NiO/Spinel/(CrxFe 1-x)2O3/(Fe,Ni). No change in oxidation mechanism was observed in crossing the critical point despite the large change in water properties. Corrosion resistance of the F/M steels was significantly improved by plasma-based yttrium surface treatment because of restrained outward diffusion of iron by the

  15. Creep Resistant Zinc Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank E. Goodwin

    2002-12-31

    This report covers the development of Hot Chamber Die Castable Zinc Alloys with High Creep Strengths. This project commenced in 2000, with the primary objective of developing a hot chamber zinc die-casting alloy, capable of satisfactory service at 140 C. The core objectives of the development program were to: (1) fill in missing alloy data areas and develop a more complete empirical model of the influence of alloy composition on creep strength and other selected properties, and (2) based on the results from this model, examine promising alloy composition areas, for further development and for meeting the property combination targets, with the view to designing an optimized alloy composition. The target properties identified by ILZRO for an improved creep resistant zinc die-casting alloy were identified as follows: (1) temperature capability of 1470 C; (2) creep stress of 31 MPa (4500 psi); (3) exposure time of 1000 hours; and (4) maximum creep elongation under these conditions of 1%. The project was broadly divided into three tasks: (1) Task 1--General and Modeling, covering Experimental design of a first batch of alloys, alloy preparation and characterization. (2) Task 2--Refinement and Optimization, covering Experimental design of a second batch of alloys. (3) Task 3--Creep Testing and Technology transfer, covering the finalization of testing and the transfer of technology to the Zinc industry should have at least one improved alloy result from this work.

  16. Biocompatibility of dental alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braemer, W. [Heraeus Kulzer GmbH and Co. KG, Hanau (Germany)

    2001-10-01

    Modern dental alloys have been used for 50 years to produce prosthetic dental restorations. Generally, the crowns and frames of a prosthesis are prepared in dental alloys, and then veneered by feldspar ceramics or composites. In use, the alloys are exposed to the corrosive influence of saliva and bacteria. Metallic dental materials can be classified as precious and non-precious alloys. Precious alloys consist of gold, platinum, and small amounts of non-precious components such as copper, tin, or zinc. The non-precious alloys are based on either nickel or cobalt, alloyed with chrome, molybdenum, manganese, etc. Titanium is used as Grade 2 quality for dental purposes. As well as the dental casting alloys, high purity electroplated gold (99.8 wt.-%) is used in dental technology. This review discusses the corrosion behavior of metallic dental materials with saliva in ''in vitro'' tests and the influence of alloy components on bacteria (Lactobacillus casei and Streptococcus mutans). The test results show that alloys with high gold content, cobalt-based alloys, titanium, and electroplated gold are suitable for use as dental materials. (orig.)

  17. Characterization of air-formed surface oxide film on a Co-Ni-Cr-Mo alloy (MP35N) and its change in Hanks' solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagai, Akiko, E-mail: nag-bcr@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Inorganic Materials, Institute of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 2-3-10 Kanda-surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0062 (Japan); Tsutsumi, Yusuke [Department of Metals, Institute of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 2-3-10 Kanda-surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0062 (Japan); Suzuki, Yuta [Department of Inorganic Materials, Institute of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 2-3-10 Kanda-surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0062 (Japan); Faculty of Engineering, Tokai University, 4-1-1 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); Katayama, Keiichi [Faculty of Engineering, Tokai University, 4-1-1 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); Hanawa, Takao [Department of Metals, Institute of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 2-3-10 Kanda-surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0062 (Japan); Yamashita, Kimihiro [Department of Inorganic Materials, Institute of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 2-3-10 Kanda-surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0062 (Japan)

    2012-05-01

    The air-formed surface oxide films used for stents were characterized to determine their composition and chemical state on a Co-Ni-Cr-Mo alloy. The change of the films in Hanks' solution was used to estimate the reconstruction of the film in the human body. Angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterize the composition of the film and substrate, as well as the film's thickness. The surface oxide film on the Co-Ni-Cr-Mo alloy (when mechanically polished) consists of oxide species of cobalt, nickel, chromium, and molybdenum, contains a large amount of OH{sup -}, and has a thickness of approximately 2.5 nm. Cations exist in the oxide as Co{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Cr{sup 3+}, Mo{sup 4+}, Mo{sup 5+}, and Mo{sup 6+}. Chromium is enriched and cobalt and nickel are depleted in the oxide; however, nickel is enriched and cobalt is depleted in the substrate alloy just under the surface oxide film. Concentration of chromium was low and that of nickel was high at small take-off angles. This indicates that distribution of chromium is greater in the inner layer, but nickel is distributed more in the outer layer of the surface oxide film. During immersion in Hanks' solution, cobalt and nickel dissolved, and the film composition changed to mostly chromium oxide (Cr{sup 3+}), along with small amounts of cobalt, nickel, and molybdenum oxides, and calcium phosphate containing magnesium, potassium, and carbonate. After immersion in Hanks' solution, the thickness of the surface layer containing calcium phosphate increased to more than 4 nm, while the amount of OH{sup -} increased. The amount of cobalt and nickel in the surface oxide film and in the substrate alloy just below the oxide decreased during immersion.

  18. Reactor target from metal chromium for "pure" high-intensive artificial neutrino source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrin, V. N.; Kozlova, Yu. P.; Veretenkin, E. P.; Logachev, A. V.; Logacheva, A. I.; Lednev, I. S.; Okunkova, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents the first results of development of manufacturing technology of metallic chromium targets from highly enriched isotope 50Cr for irradiation in a high flux nuclear reactor to obtain a compact high intensity neutrino source with low content of radionuclide impurities and minimum losses of enriched isotope. The main technological stages are the hydrolysis of chromyl fluoride, the electrochemical reduction of metallic chromium, the hot isostatic pressing of chromium powder and the electrical discharge machining of chromium bars. The technological stages of hot isostatic pressing of chromium powder and of electrical discharge machining of Cr rods have been tested.

  19. The oxidation and reduction of chromium of stainless steels in an eletric arc furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Arh

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The oxidation of chromium during the elaboration of stainless steels occurs with oxygen in solution blown inthe melt and with oxides in the slag. A higher content of silicon in the furnace charge decreases the extent of oxidation of chromium, however, the efficient reduction of chromium from the slag is of essential importance for a minimal loss of chromium. In this survey, the theory of the oxidation of chromium, its reduction from the slag and the conditions for the formation of foaming slag are discussed.

  20. STRUCTURE FORMATION OF ALLOYS ON IRON BASIS AFTER LASER ALLOYING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. V. Diachenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to investigations on influence of laser treatment regimes of gas-thermal and adhesive coatings from self-fluxing powders on iron basis and after melting with modifying plaster on their roughness and phase composition. One of mathematical planning methods that is a complete factor experiment method has been used for investigation of parameters’ influence on micro-geometry of coatings. The executed investigations have made it possible to observe a general regularity which does not depend on a type of alloying plaster: while increasing speed of laser beam relatively to treated part, beam diameter value of Ra parameter is becoming less. Decrease in height of surface irregularities in case of increasing laser beam speed is related with intensification of evaporation processes. An increase in beam diameter diminishes Ra parameter of the surface. This is due to the fact that decrease in power density occurs at high rate of beam defocusing. Overlapping coefficient does not exert a pronounced effect on Ra parameter of fused coatings. While increasing the speed of laser beam relatively to the part structure is transferred from dendrite into supersaturated one with carbide and boride precipitations. It has been established that technological parameters of laser treatment and particularly speed of laser beam influence on coating composition. While increasing the speed up to v5 = 5 × 10–3 m/s amount of chromium has become larger by 1.5-fold that resulted in increase of micro-hardness of the coating from 9.5–10.1 GPa up to 11.04–15.50 GPa.

  1. Passivation and corrosion of the high performance materials alloy 33, alloy 31 and nickel in LiBr solution at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igual Munoz, A.; Garcia Anton, J.; Guinon, J.L.; Perez Herranz, V. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear. E.T.S. Industriales, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, P.O. Box 22012, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    Aqueous solutions containing high concentrations of Lithium Bromide are employed as absorbent solutions for almost all types of heating and refrigerating absorption systems that use natural gas or steam as energy sources. LiBr solutions can cause serious corrosion problems in common metallic components. The objective of the present work was to study the corrosion resistance of new high alloyed materials in commercial LiBr heavy brine solution (which contains chromate as inhibitor), at different temperatures (25, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 and 80 deg. C). The materials tested were stainless steels Alloy 33 (UNS R20033), a new corrosion resistant austenitic material alloyed with nominally (wt%) 33 Cr, 32 Fe, 31 Ni; Nicrofer 3127 hMo-alloy 31 (UNS N08031), an iron-nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy with nitrogen; and pure Nickel. Corrosion resistance was estimated from the cyclic potentiodynamic polarization curves, comparing OCP values, calculating corrosion potentials and current rates from Tafel analysis; in order to characterize the passivating behaviour of the alloys the study was completed with the analysis of the pitting potentials, passivating current and re-passivating properties at the temperatures under study. Passivating properties are well observed in all the samples in commercial LiBr solution at all temperatures. In these cases, passivation properties decrease with temperature. (authors)

  2. Role of alloying elements and carbides in the chlorine-induced corrosion of steels and alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Jürgen Grabke

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The high temperature corrosion of steels and Ni-base alloys in oxidizing and chloridizing environments is of practical interest in relation to problems in waste incineration plants and power plants using Cl containing fuels. The behaviour of the most important alloying elements Fe, Cr, Ni, Mo, Mn, Si, Al upon corrosion in an oxidizing and chloridizing atmosphere was elucidated: the reactions and kinetics can be largely understood on the base of thermodynamic data, i.e. free energy of chloride formation, vapor pressure of the chlorides and oxygen pressure pO2 needed for the conversion chlorides -> oxides. The mechanism is described by 'active oxidation', comprising inward penetration of chlorine into the scale, formation of chlorides at the oxide/metal interface, evaporation of the chlorides and conversion of the evaporating chlorides into oxides, which occurs in more or less distance from the surface (depending on pO2. This process leads to loose, fragile, multilayered oxides which are unprotective (therefore: active oxidation. Fe and Cr are rapidly transferred into such scale, Ni and Mo are relatively resistant. In many cases, the grain boundaries of the materials are strongly attacked, this is due to a susceptibility of chromium carbides to chloridation. In contrast the carbides Mo2C, TiC and NbC are less attacked than the matrix. Alloys on the basis Fe-Cr-Si proved to be rather resistant, and the alloying elements Ni and Mo clearly retard the attack in an oxidizing and chloridizing environment.

  3. Effect of Chromium on Corrosion Behavior of P110 Steels in CO2-H2S Environment with High Pressure and High Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianbo Sun

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The novel Cr-containing low alloy steels have exhibited good corrosion resistance in CO2 environment, mainly owing to the formation of Cr-enriched corrosion film. In order to evaluate whether it is applicable to the CO2 and H2S coexistence conditions, the corrosion behavior of low-chromium steels in CO2-H2S environment with high pressure and high temperature was investigated using weight loss measurement and surface characterization. The results showed that P110 steel suffered localized corrosion and both 3Cr-P110 and 5Cr-P110 steels exhibited general corrosion. However, the corrosion rate of 5Cr-P110 was the highest among them. The corrosion process of the steels was simultaneously governed by CO2 and H2S. The outer scales on the three steels mainly consisted of FeS1−x crystals, whereas the inner scales on Cr-containing steels comprised of amorphous FeS1−x, Cr(OH3 and FeCO3, in contrast with the amorphous FeS1−x and FeCO3 mixture film of P110 steel. The more chromium the steel contains, the more chromium compounds the corrosion products contain. The addition of chromium in steels increases the uniformity of the Cr-enriched corrosion scales, eliminates the localized corrosion, but cannot decrease the general corrosion rates. The formation of FeS1−x may interfere with Cr-enriched corrosion scales and lowering the corrosion performance of 3Cr-P110 and 5Cr-P110 steels.

  4. Chromium(VI) transport and fate in unsaturated zone and aquifer: 3D Sandbox results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xingmin; Sobecky, Patricia A; Zhao, Lanpo; Crawford, Patrice; Li, Mingtang

    2016-04-01

    The simulation of Cr(VI) behavior in an unsaturated zone and aquifer, using a 3D experimental set-up were performed to illustrate the distribution, transport and transformation of Cr(VI), and further to reveal the potential harm of Cr(VI) after entering the groundwater. The result indicated that chromium(VI) was transported in the vertical direction, meanwhile, was transported in the horizontal direction under the influence of groundwater flow. The direction and distance away from the pollution source zone had great effect on the chromium(VI) concentration. At the sampling sites near the pollution source zone, there was a sudden increase of chromium(VI) concentration. The concentration of chromium(III) concentration in some random effluent samples was not detected. Chromium had not only transported but also had fraction and specie transformation in the unsaturated zone and aquifer. The relative concentration of residue fraction chromium was decreased with time. The content of Fe-Mn oxide fraction chromium was increased with time. The relative content of exchangeable and carbonate-bound fraction chromium was lower and the content variations were not obvious. Chromium(VI) (91-98%) was first reduced to chromium(III) rapidly. The oxidation reaction occurred later and the relative content of chromium(VI) was increased again. The presence of manganese oxides under favorable soil conditions can promote the reoxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI).

  5. Investigation of the weldability of iron-aluminum-chromium overlay coatings for corrosion protection in oxidizing/sulfidizing environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regina, Jonathan R.

    The current study investigated the effect of chromium additions on the hydrogen cracking susceptibility of Fe-Al weld overlay claddings containing chromium additions. It was found that the weldability of FeAlCr claddings was a function of both the aluminum and chromium concentrations of the weld coatings. Weld overlay compositions that were not susceptible to hydrogen cracking were identified and the underlying mechanism behind the hydrogen cracking phenomenon was investigated further. It was concluded that the cracking behavior of the FeAlCr welds depended strongly on the microstructure of the weld fusion zone. Although it was found that the cracking susceptibility was influenced by the presence of Fe-Al intermetallic phases (namely Fe3 Al and FeAl), the cracking behavior of FeAlCr weld overlay claddings also depended on the size and distribution of carbide and oxide particles present within the weld structure. These particles acted as hydrogen trapping sites, which are areas where free hydrogen segregates and can no longer contribute to the hydrogen embrittlement of the metal. It was determined that in practical applications of these FeAlCr weld overlay coatings, carbon should be present within these welds to reduce the amount of hydrogen available for hydrogen cracking. Based on the weldability results of the FeAlCr weld claddings, coating compositions that were able to be deposited crack-free were used for long-term corrosion testing in a simulated low NOx environment. These alloys were compared to a Ni-based superalloy (622), which is commonly utilized as boiler tube coatings in power plant furnaces for corrosion protection. It was found that the FeAlCr alloys demonstrated superior corrosion resistance when compared to the Ni-based superalloy. Due to the excellent long-term corrosion behavior of FeAlCr weld overlays that were immune to hydrogen cracking, it was concluded that select FeAlCr weld overlay compositions would make excellent corrosion resistant

  6. 75 FR 67100 - Superalloy Degassed Chromium From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    ... superalloy degassed chromium from Japan (70 FR 76030). The Commission is conducting a review to determine..., subparts A, D, E, and F (19 CFR part 207), as most recently amended at 74 FR 2847 (January 16, 2009). \\1... rule 201.15(b)(19 CFR 201.15(b)), 73 FR 24609 (May 5, 2008). This advice was developed in...

  7. 76 FR 8773 - Superalloy Degassed Chromium From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ... applicable deadline.'' (75 FR 80457). Accordingly, pursuant to section 751(c) of the Tariff Act of 1930 (19 U... COMMISSION Superalloy Degassed Chromium From Japan AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission... Japan would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material injury. On December 22,...

  8. Effects of chromium picolinate supplementation in type 2 diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niladê Rosinski Rocha

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The effects of chromium picolinate in Type 2 diabetic patients are investigated.  Seventeen Type 2 diabetic patients were randomly divided into two groups. The experimental group received fiber-rich hypocaloric diet and chromium picolinate whereas the control group received fiber-rich hypocaloric diet and placebo. The chromium picolinate was offered twice a day at the dose of 100 μg. Anthropometric data such as blood pressure, fasting glycemia and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c were measured and these parameters were evaluated again after 90 days. No difference was reported in rates of body weight, waist, hip, body mass index, blood pressure and fasting glycemia (Control vs. Experimental groups after treatment. However, a decrease (p = 0.0405 of HbA1c occurred in the experimental group when the pre- and post-treatment rates were compared. HbA1c data showed that chromium picolinate improved the glycemic control in Type 2 diabetes.

  9. Intestinal absorption of chromium as affected by wheat bran

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keim, K.S.; Holloway, C.L.; Hegsted, M.

    1986-03-01

    This study was designed to investigate the influence of dietary fiber, as found in wheat bran, on the absorption of chromium. Twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups of 10. The control was fed a semi-purified diet containing casein, methionine, cornstarch, sucrose, corn oil, mineral and vitamin mix, and choline bitartrate. The experimental group was fed the same diet but with soft red winter wheat bran added to a level of 35% of the diet at the expense of sucrose. To determine chromium absorption and uptake by selected tissues, rats were fasted for 24 hr, fed 5 g of the respective diet, 2 hr later intubated with 100..mu..Ci of Cr-51of sacrificed 24 hr later. The rats wee housed in metabolic cages after the Cr-51 intubation. The addition of wheat brand to the diet did not significantly affect chromium absorption as measured by percent dose of Cr-51 in the 24 hr urine. The percent dose in the control group was 0.68 +/- 0.20% (mean +/- SEM) and in the experimental group 0.63 +/- 0.24% (mean +/-SEM) (N.S.). The cr-51 uptake of liver, spleen, jejunum, and blood was not statistically different between groups. These results indicate that dietary fiber as found in wheat bran does not impair intestinal absorption of chromium.

  10. Domestic Production Issues in Chromium and Platinum-Group Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    Protection Agency. OPA 87-005. Washington: Government Printing Office, May 1987. 16. Foley, Jeffrey Y. and James C. Barker . Chromite Deposits Along...Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers, 1976. 52. Stowe, Clive W. Evolution of Chromium Ore Fields. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold Company

  11. Microbial biotechnology for remediation of aquatic habitats polluted with chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viorica Coşier

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Chromium may occur in nine different forms of oxidation ranging from ?II to +VI, with forms II, III and VI as the most commonly encountered. In Cluj county, chromium pollution dates well back in time and has caused important dysfunction to the mechanical-biological wastewater purification station of the city of Cluj (Coşier & Diţă 1996. The purpose of this study was to develop one microbial method able to reduce hexavalent chromium (mobile, permeable to cell membrane, carcinogenic and mutagenic (Ishikawa et al 1994 to the trivalent form (insoluble and an essential element for humans (Song et al 2006. Different sources of chromium-reducing bacteria and many sources of carbon and energy added to the Kvasnikov mineral basal medium (Komori et al 1990 with increasing amount of chromate (200- 1000 mg/l were tested. Two bacterial strains, able to reduce even 1000 mg chromate/l, were isolated in pure culture. For one of these bacterial strains, we determined the optimum conditions for the reduction of Cr (VI.

  12. DANGER OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM AND STRATEGY FOR THE REMEDITATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniruddha Roy

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Some metals as micronutrients have a major role in the life and growth process of plants and animals. However, certain forms of some metals may also act as toxic material even in relatively small quantities. Chromium is such a metal, whose concentration above a certain limit may cause a serious problem to the health of living organisms. Chromium (Cr may occur in several chemical forms in organic and inorganic systems. In biological systems only Cr (III and Cr (VI are significant. Among these two states, trivalent chromium (Cr-III is considered as an essential component, while hexavalent Chromium (Cr-VI in biological system has been detected as responsible for so many diseases, even some specific forms of cancer. This paper intends to present the adverse effect of Cr(VI on environment as well as on human beings and also try to find a way out to dissolve the problem by a newly developed efficient and cost effective technique.

  13. FEATURES OF CHROMIUM DOPING OF WEAR-RESISTANT CAST IRON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Netrebko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work analysis of the influence of chromium on the process of carbide formation, changes in chemical composition of the metal substrate in the areas adjacent to the carbides and at the hardness of iron while economy nickel and manganesealloying.

  14. Structure and morphology studies of chromium film at elevated temperature in hypersonic environment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G M Hegde; V Kulkarni; M Nagaboopathy; K P J Reddy

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents the after shock heated structural and morphological studies of chromium film coated on hypersonic test model as a passive drag reduction element. The structural changes and the composition of phases of chromium due to shock heating (2850 K) are characterized using X-ray diffraction studies. Surface morphology changes of chromium coating have been studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) before and after shock heating. Significant amount of chromium ablation and sublimation from the model surface is noticed from SEM micrographs. Traces of randomly oriented chromium oxides formed along the coated surface confirm surface reaction of chromium with oxygen present behind the shock. Large traces of amorphous chromium oxide phases are also observed.

  15. Preparation and Characterization of Plasma-Sprayed Ultrafine Chromium Oxide Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Feng; JIANG Xianliang; YU Yueguang; ZENG Keli; REN Xianjing; LI Zhenduo

    2007-01-01

    Ultrafine chromium oxide coatings were prepared by plasma spraying with ultrafine feedstock. Processing parameters of plasma spraying were optimized. Optical microscope (OM) was used to observe the microstructure of the ultrafine chromium oxide coatings. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the morphology and particle size of ultrafine powder feedstock as well as to examine the microstructure of the chromium oxide coating. In addition, hardness and bonding strength of the ultrafine chromium oxide coatings were measured.The results showed that the optimized plasma spraying parameters were suitable for ultrafine chromium oxide coating and the properties and microstructure of the optimized ultrafine chromium oxide coating were superior compared to conventional chromium oxide wear resistant coatings.

  16. Ailanthus Altissima and Phragmites Australis for chromium removal from a contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, Ezio; Fratino, Umberto; Petrella, Andrea; Torretta, Vincenzo; Rada, Elena Cristina

    2016-08-01

    The comparative effectiveness for hexavalent chromium removal from irrigation water, using two selected plant species (Phragmites australis and Ailanthus altissima) planted in soil contaminated with hexavalent chromium, has been studied in the present work. Total chromium removal from water was ranging from 55 % (Phragmites) to 61 % (Ailanthus). After 360 days, the contaminated soil dropped from 70 (initial) to 36 and 41 mg Cr/kg (dry soil), for Phragmites and Ailanthus, respectively. Phragmites accumulated the highest amount of chromium in the roots (1910 mg Cr/kg(dry tissue)), compared with 358 mg Cr/kg(dry tissue) for Ailanthus roots. Most of chromium was found in trivalent form in all plant tissues. Ailanthus had the lowest affinity for Cr(VI) reduction in the root tissues. Phragmites indicated the highest chromium translocation potential, from roots to stems. Both plant species showed good potentialities to be used in phytoremediation installations for chromium removal.

  17. Filter effectiveness in the manufacture of high-chromium steel castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Garbiak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of studies on the application of ceramic filters in the manufacture of cast hearth plates at the WestPomeranian University of Technology in Szczecin. Castings were poured from the heat-resistant G-X40CrNiSi27-4 cast steel in greensand moulds. The development of casting manufacturing technology included the following studies: analysis of the causes of nonmetallicinclusions in high-chromium alloys, computer simulation of mould filling with liquid metal using standard gating systems without filters and new systems with the built-in filter, making pilot castings, quantitative determination of the content of non-metallicinclusions, determination of the oxygen and nitrogen content, and evaluation of the extent of occurrence of the raw casting s urfacedefects. As a result of the conducted studies and analyses, the quality of produced castings was improved, mainly through the reducedcontent of non-metallic inclusions and better raw casting surface quality.

  18. Evaluation of anti-corrosive lubricating behavior of dicationic ionic liquid coatings for biomedical alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Danyal Alam

    Since their inception, orthopedic implants composed of biomedical alloys have been plagued with failures associated with corrosion and wear processes. Despite current surface treatments and techniques being employed to mitigate corrosion and wear, these failure mechanisms continue to occur as prevalent failure modes. Recently, a novel class of compounds known as ionic liquids has been proposed as a multi-functional coating to protect the surfaces of commercially pure titanium surfaces comprising dental implants. In this study, the goal was to evaluate select formulations of these ionic liquids to serve as anti-corrosive lubricants for titanium and cobalt chromium molybdenum alloys widely used in orthopedic implants. Electrochemical and tribological testing of dicationic imidazolium-based ionic liquids revealed these compounds to be superior candidates as corrosion inhibitors and lubricants of biomedical alloy surfaces.

  19. Effect of Alloying Elements on Thermal Wear of Cast Hot-Forging Die Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shu-qi; CHEN Kang-min; CUI Xiang-hong; JIANG Qi-chuan; HONG Bian

    2006-01-01

    The effect of main alloying elements on thermal wear of cast hot-forging die steels was studied. The wear mechanism was discussed. The results show that alloying elements have significant influences on the thermal wear of cast hot-forging die steels. The wear rates decrease with an increase in chromium content from 3% to 4% and molybdenum content from 2% to 3%, respectively. With further increase of chromium and molybdenum contents, chromium slightly reduces the wear resistance and molybdenum severely deteriorates the wear resistance with high wear rate. Lower vanadium/carbon ratio (1.5-2.5) leads to a lower wear resistance with higher wear rate. With an increase in vanadium/carbon ratio, the wear resistance of the cast steel substantially increases. When vanadium/carbon ratio is 3, the wear rate reaches the lowest value. The predominant mechanism of thermal wear of cast hot-forging die steels are oxidation wear and fatigue delamination. The Fe2O3 and Fe3O4 or lumps of brittle wear debris are formed on the wear surface.

  20. Laboratory scale studies on removal of chromium from industrial wastes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Chromium being one of the major toxic pollutants is discharged from electroplating and chrome tanning processes and is also found in the effluents of dyes, paint pigments, manufacturing units etc. Chromium exists in aqueous systems in both trivalent (Cr 3+) and hexavalent (Cr 6+) forms. The hexavalent form is carcinogenic and toxic to aquatic life, whereas Cr3+ is however comparatively less toxic. This study was undertaken to investigate the total chromium removal from industrial effluents by chemical means in order to achieve the Pakistan NEQS level of 1 mg/L by the methods of reduction and precipitation. The study was conducted in four phases.In phase I, the optimum pH and cost effective reducing agent among the four popular commercial chemicals was selected. As a result, pH of 2 was found to be most suitable and sodium meta bisulfate was found to be the most cost effective reducing agent respectively. Phase II showed that lower dose of sodium meta bisulfate was sufficient to obtain 100 % efficiency in reducing Cr6+ to Cr3+, and it was noted that reaction time had no significance in the whole process. A design curve for reduction process was established which can act as a tool for treatment of industrial effluents.Phase III studies indicated the best pH was 8.5 for precipitation of Cr 3+ to chromium hydroxide by using lime. An efficiency of 100 % was achievable and a settling time of 30 minutes produced clear effluent. Finally in Phase IV actual waste samples from chrome tanning and electroplating industries, when precipitated at pH of 12 gave 100 % efficiency at a settling time of 30 minutes and confirmed that chemical means of reduction and precipitation is a feasible and viable solution for treating chromium wastes from industries.

  1. Arsenic and chromium topsoil levels and cancer mortality in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Olivier; Fernández-Navarro, Pablo; Martín-Méndez, Iván; Bel-Lan, Alejandro; Locutura, Juan F; López-Abente, Gonzalo

    2016-09-01

    Spatio-temporal cancer mortality studies in Spain have revealed patterns for some tumours which display a distribution that is similar across the sexes and persists over time. Such characteristics would be common to tumours that shared risk factors, including the chemical soil composition. The objective of the present study is to assess the association between levels of chromium and arsenic in soil and the cancer mortality. This is an ecological cancer mortality study at municipal level, covering 861,440 cancer deaths in 7917 Spanish mainland towns from 1999 to 2008. Chromium and arsenic topsoil levels (partial extraction) were determined by ICP-MS at 13,317 sampling points. To estimate the effect of these concentrations on mortality, we fitted Besag, York and Mollié models, which included, as explanatory variables, each town's chromium and arsenic soil levels, estimated by kriging. In addition, we also fitted geostatistical-spatial models including sample locations and town centroids (non-aligned data), using the integrated nested Laplace approximation (INLA) and stochastic partial differential equations (SPDE). All results were adjusted for socio-demographic variables and proximity to industrial emissions. The results showed a statistical association in men and women alike, between arsenic soil levels and mortality due to cancers of the stomach, pancreas, lung and brain and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL). Among men, an association was observed with cancers of the prostate, buccal cavity and pharynx, oesophagus, colorectal and kidney. Chromium topsoil levels were associated with mortality among women alone, in cancers of the upper gastrointestinal tract, breast and NHL. Our results suggest that chronic exposure arising from low levels of arsenic and chromium in topsoil could be a potential risk factor for developing cancer.

  2. Activated carbon adsorption for chromium treatment and recovery; Adsorbimento di cromo su carboni attivi a scopo di recupero e decontaminazione

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baroncelli, F.; Castelli, S.; De Francesco, M. [ENEA, Casaccia (Italy). Area Energia e Innovazione

    1994-05-01

    The capability of actived carbon systems to adsorb chromium from wastewater of galvanic industry is valued. Batch tests and column tests are carried out with good results. An activated carbon with acidic surface oxides can adsorb both chromate and chromium (III); chromate is reduced in situ and then adsorbed as chromium (III). Chromium can be desorbed from carbon by an acid or basic treatment obtaining respectively chromium (III) or chromate solutions. Carbon can be regenerated many times without evident signs of deterioration.

  3. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by ferrous iron: A process of chromium isotope fractionation and its relevance to natural environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing, Lasse Nørbye; Dideriksen, Knud; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane;

    2011-01-01

    Stable chromium (Cr) isotopes can be used as a tracer for changing redox conditions in modern marine systems and in the geological record. We have investigated isotope fractionation during reduction of Cr(VI)aq by Fe(II)aq. Reduction of Cr(VI)aq by Fe(II)aq in batch experiments leads to significant...

  4. Raman spectroscopy of supported chromium oxide catalysts : determination of chromium-oxygen bond distances and bond orders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Wachs, I.E.

    1996-01-01

    An empirical correlation is described for relating Raman stretching frequencies of chromium—oxygen (Cr—O) bonds to their bond lengths in chromium oxide reference compounds. An exponential fit of crystallographically determined Cr—O bond lengths to Cr—O Raman symmetric stretching frequencies (800–130

  5. EFFECT OF CHEMISTRY VARIATIONS IN PLATE AND WELD FILLER METAL ON THE CORROSION PERFORMANCE OF NI-CR-MO ALLOYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.V. Fix

    2006-02-07

    The ASTM standard B 575 provides the requirements for the chemical composition of Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum (Ni-Cr-Mo) alloys such as Alloy 22 (N06022) and Alloy 686 (N06686). The compositions of each element are given in a range. For example, the content of Mo is specified from 12.5 to 14.5 weight percent for Alloy 22 and from 15.0 to 17.0 weight percent for Alloy 686. It was important to determine how the corrosion rate of welded plates of Alloy 22 using Alloy 686 weld filler metal would change if heats of these alloys were prepared using several variations in the composition of the elements even though still in the range specified in B 575. All the material used in this report were especially prepared at Allegheny Ludlum Co. Seven heats of plate were welded with seven heats of wire. Immersion corrosion tests were conducted in a boiling solution of sulfuric acid plus ferric sulfate (ASTM G 28 A) using both as-welded (ASW) coupons and solution heat-treated (SHT) coupons. Results show that the corrosion rate was not affected by the chemistry of the materials in the range of the standards.

  6. Effect of Chemistry Variations in Plate and Weld Filler Metal on the Corrosion Performance of Ni-Cr-Mo Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fix, D V; Rebak, R B

    2006-02-05

    The ASTM standard B 575 provides the requirements for the chemical composition of Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum (Ni-Cr-Mo) alloys such as Alloy 22 (N06022) and Alloy 686 (N06686). The compositions of each element are given in a range. For example, the content of Mo is specified from 12.5 to 14.5 weight percent for Alloy 22 and from 15.0 to 17.0 weight percent for Alloy 686. It was important to determine how the corrosion rate of welded plates of Alloy 22 using Alloy 686 weld filler metal would change if heats of these alloys were prepared using several variations in the composition of the elements even though still in the range specified in B 575. All the material used in this report were especially prepared at Allegheny Ludlum Co. Seven heats of plate were welded with seven heats of wire. Immersion corrosion tests were conducted in a boiling solution of sulfuric acid plus ferric sulfate (ASTM G 28 A) using both as-welded (ASW) coupons and solution heat-treated (SHT) coupons. Results show that the corrosion rate was not affected by the chemistry of the materials in the range of the standards.

  7. Chromium, chromium isotopes and selected trace elements, western Mojave Desert, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izbicki, John A. [U.S. Geological Survey, 4165 Spruance Road, Suite O, San Diego, CA 92123 (United States)], E-mail: jaizbick@usgs.gov; Ball, James W. [U.S. Geological Survey, 3215 Marine Street, Boulder, Colorado, CO 80303 (United States); Bullen, Thomas D. [U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road, Building 15, McKelvey Building, MS-420, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Sutley, Stephen J. [Denver Federal Center, P.O. Box 25046, MS-964, Denver, CO 80225-0046 (United States)

    2008-05-15

    Chromium(VI) concentrations in excess of the California Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of 50 {mu}g/L occur naturally in alkaline, oxic ground-water in alluvial aquifers in the western Mojave Desert, southern California. The highest concentrations were measured in aquifers eroded from mafic rock, but Cr(VI) as high as 27 {mu}g/L was measured in aquifers eroded from granitic rock. Chromium(VI) concentrations did not exceed 5 {mu}g/L at pH < 7.5 regardless of geology. {delta}{sup 53}Cr values in native ground-water ranged from 0.7 to 5.1 per mille and values were fractionated relative to the average {delta}{sup 53}Cr composition of 0 per mille in the earth's crust. Positive {delta}{sup 53}Cr values of 1.2 and 2.3 per mille were measured in ground-water recharge areas having low Cr concentrations, consistent with the addition of Cr(VI) that was fractionated on mineral surfaces prior to entering solution. {delta}{sup 53}Cr values, although variable, did not consistently increase or decrease with increasing Cr concentrations as ground-water flowed down gradient through more oxic portions of the aquifer. However, increasing {delta}{sup 53}Cr values were observed as dissolved O{sub 2} concentrations decreased, and Cr(VI) was reduced to Cr(III), and subsequently removed from solution. As a result, the highest {delta}{sup 53}Cr values were measured in water from deep wells, and wells in discharge areas near dry lakes at the downgradient end of long flow paths through alluvial aquifers. {delta}{sup 53}Cr values at an industrial site overlying mafic alluvium having high natural background Cr(VI) concentrations ranged from -0.1 to 3.2 per mille . Near zero {delta}{sup 53}Cr values at the site were the result of anthropogenic Cr. However, mixing with native ground-water and fractionation of Cr within the plume increased {delta}{sup 53}Cr values at the site. Although {delta}{sup 53}Cr was not necessarily diagnostic of anthropogenic Cr, it was possible to identify the extent

  8. Investigation of performance degradation of SOFC using chromium-containing alloy interconnects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beeaff, D.R.; Dinesen, A.; Hendriksen, Peter Vang

    2007-01-01

    The long-term aging of a stack element (fuel cell, current collectors, and interconnect materials) was studied. A pair of tests were made in which one sample contained an interconnect, a high-temperature stainless steel (Crofer 22 APU), treated with an LSMC coating applied to the cathode-side int...

  9. Fibroblastic activities post implantation of cobalt chromium alloy and pure germanium in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, J M; Natiella, J R; Baier, R E; Natiella, R R

    1984-02-01

    Different preimplantation surface finishes were applied to surgical vitallium discs and germanium prisms implanted for 20 days within the back muscles of adult rabbits. Histopathologic analysis of the numbers of nuclei of active fibroblasts immediately adjacent to the implants was carried out. The mean apparent volume fractions (MAVF) for the subdermal implant sites were found to depend on the surface cleanliness of the implant, the cleanest or highest-surface-energy surfaces giving the highest MAVF values for active fibroblasts.

  10. Catalyst Alloys Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xincai

    2014-10-01

    Catalysts are one of the key materials used for diamond formation at high pressures. Several such catalyst products have been developed and applied in China and around the world. The catalyst alloy most widely used in China is Ni70Mn25Co5 developed at Changsha Research Institute of Mining and Metallurgy. In this article, detailed techniques for manufacturing such a typical catalyst alloy will be reviewed. The characteristics of the alloy will be described. Detailed processing of the alloy will be presented, including remelting and casting, hot rolling, annealing, surface treatment, cold rolling, blanking, finishing, packaging, and waste treatment. An example use of the catalyst alloy will also be given. Industrial experience shows that for the catalyst alloy products, a vacuum induction remelt furnace can be used for remelting, a metal mold can be used for casting, hot and cold rolling can be used for forming, and acid pickling can be used for metal surface cleaning.

  11. PLUTONIUM-ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonfeld, F.W.; Waber, J.T.

    1960-08-30

    A series of nuclear reactor fuel alloys consisting of from about 5 to about 50 at.% zirconium (or higher zirconium alloys such as Zircaloy), balance plutonium, and having the structural composition of a plutonium are described. Zirconium is a satisfactory diluent because it alloys readily with plutonium and has desirable nuclear properties. Additional advantages are corrosion resistance, excellent fabrication propenties, an isotropie structure, and initial softness.

  12. Effect of Heat Treatment on the Abrasive Wear Behavior of High Chromium Iron under Dry Sliding Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Ayeni

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of heat treatment on the abrasive wear behavior of high chromium cast iron (NF253AHT under dry sliding condition has been investigated. Rectangular cross sectioned samples of the alloy were produced by sand casting. After casting, the samples were machined to equal dimensions of 50 mm x 15 mm x 10 mm and heat treated by annealing, hardening and tempering. Abrasive wear tests were carried out on the samples using the pin-on-disc wear test. The tests were carried out under restricted values of speed, load and time. Within this limit, the hardened sample displayed a superior wear resistance, while the annealed sample displayed the weakest wear resistance. A graphical model (wear map displaying all the wear regimes of the alloy, which may serve as a wear predictive tool was subsequently developed from the results of the wear tests. With the exception of the as-cast and annealed specimen, all other specimens (hardened and tempered have functioned adequately in wear prone environment, but with different degree of effectiveness. Hence, the hardened and tempered samples can be used in shot blast equipments and in the grinding of minerals.

  13. Mechanical properties and the structure of chromium-zirconium bronze after dynamic channel-angular pressing and subsequent aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zel'dovich, V. I.; Dobatkin, S. V.; Frolova, N. Yu.; Khomskaya, I. V.; Kheifets, A. E.; Shorokhov, E. V.; Nasonov, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the structure and mechanical properties of the low-alloy chromium-zirconium bronze Cu-0.14% Cr-0.04% Zr have been investigated after a high-strain-rate (104-105 s-1) deformation by the method of dynamic channel-angular pressing (DCAP) and following annealings at 300-700°C. A significant increase in the mechanical properties of the investigated bronze after DCAP and after DCAP and subsequent aging at temperatures of 400-450°C has been established. Thus, compared to the initial quenched state the ultimate tensile strength increases by a factor of 2.6 and 2.8 and the yield stress, by a factor of 3.3 and 5.1, respectively, with the retention of satisfactory plasticity. It has been shown that, upon DCAP and subsequent annealings, in the low-alloyed bronze under investigation there occurs a decomposition of the α solid solution with the precipitation of nanosized particles. This leads to a significant strengthening of the bronze and to an increase in its thermal stability compared with the pure copper subjected to DCAP.

  14. A computational investigation of boron-doped chromium and chromium clusters by density functional theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The geometries,stabilities and electronic properties of Crn and CrnB(n=2-9) clusters have been systematically investigated by density functional theory.The results suggest that the lowest energy structures for CrnB clusters can be obtained by substituting one Cr atom in Crn+1 clusters with B atom.The geometries of CrnB clusters are similar to that of Crn+1 clusters except for local structural distortion.The second-order difference and fragmentation energy show Cr4,Cr6,Cr8,Cr3B,Cr5B and Cr8B cluster are the most stable among these studied clusters.The impurity B increases the stabilities of chromium cluster.When B is doped on the Crn clusters,cluster geometry does dominate positive role in enhancing their stability.The doped B atom does not change the coupling way of the Cr site in Crn clusters,but breaks the symmetry and the Cr atoms are no longer equivalent.The doped B atom increases the total magnetic moments of Crn in most cases.

  15. A metastable chromium carbide powder obtained by carburization of a metastable chromium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loubiere, S. [Univ. Paul-Sabatier, Toulouse (France). Lab. de Chimie des Materiaux Inorganique; Laurent, C. [Univ. Paul-Sabatier, Toulouse (France). Lab. de Chimie des Materiaux Inorganique; Bonino, J.P. [Univ. Paul-Sabatier, Toulouse (France). Lab. de Chimie des Materiaux Inorganique; Rousset, A. [Univ. Paul-Sabatier, Toulouse (France). Lab. de Chimie des Materiaux Inorganique

    1996-10-15

    A metastable Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2-x} carbide powder is prepared by carburization of a metastable chromium oxide in H{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} atmosphere under the appropriate conditions (temperature, dwell time and CH{sub 4} content). A very high specific surface area (greater than 210 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}) of the starting oxide is necessary to avoid the formation of the sole stable Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} phase. The transformation from the stable Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} to the metastable Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2-x} is observed for the first time. The driving force could be an epitaxial effect between Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2-x} and the surrounding graphite layer. This is consistent with the observation that the formation of graphite layers by CH{sub 4} cracking is easier in the Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2-x}-containing powders. (orig.)

  16. Chromium(VI) but not chromium(III) species decrease mitoxantrone affinity to DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicka, Anna M; Stojek, Zbigniew; Hepel, Maria

    2013-01-31

    Binding of mitoxantrone (MXT) to double-stranded DNA has been investigated as a model drug-DNA binding system to evaluate the effects of various forms of chromium on the binding properties. We have found that Cr(III), which binds strongly to DNA, does not affect the MXT affinity to DNA. In contrast, Cr(VI), in the form of chromate ions CrO(4)(2-), decreases the MXT affinity to DNA despite electrostatic repulsions with phosphate-deoxyribose chains of DNA. The MXT-DNA binding constant was found to decrease from (1.96 ± 0.005) × 10(5) to (0.77 ± 0.018) × 10(5) M(-1) for Cr(VI) concentration changing from 0 to 30 μM. The influence of Cr(VI) on MXT-DNA binding has been attributed to the oxidation of guanine residue, thus interrupting the intercalation of MXT into the DNA double helix at the preferential CpG intercalation site. This supposition is corroborated by the observed increase in the MXT binding site size from 2 bp (base pairs) to 4-6 bp in the presence of Cr(VI). The measurements of the MXT-DNA binding constant and the MXT binding site size on a DNA molecule have been carried out using spectroscopic, voltammetric, and nanogravimetric techniques, providing useful information on the mechanism of the interactions.

  17. Maximum availability and mineralogical control of chromium released from AOD slag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junguo; Liu, Bao; Zeng, Yanan; Wang, Ziming; Gao, Zhiyuan

    2017-03-01

    AOD (argon oxygen decarburization) slag is the by-product in the stainless steel refining process. Chromium existing in AOD slag can leach out and probably poses a serious threat to the environment. To assess the leaching toxicity of chromium released from AOD slag, the temperature-dependent maximum availability leaching test was performed. To determine the controlling mineralogical phases of chromium released from AOD slag, a Visual MINTEQ simulation was established based on Vminteq30 and the FactSage 7.0 database. The leaching tests indicated that the leaching availability of chromium was slight and mainly consisted of trivalent chromium. Aging of AOD slag under the atmosphere can oxidize trivalent chromium to hexavalent chromium, which could be leached out by rainwater. According to the simulation, the chromium concentration in leachates was controlled by the freely soluble pseudo-binary phases in the pH = 7.0 leaching process and controlled by the Cr2O3 phase in the pH = 4.0 leaching process. Chromium concentrations were underestimated when the controlling phases were determined to be FeCr2O4 and MgCr2O4. Facilitating the generation of the insoluble spinel-like phases during the cooling and disposal process of the molten slag could be an effective approach to decreasing the leaching concentration of chromium and its environmental risk.

  18. Finished leather waste chromium acid extraction and anaerobic biodegradation of the products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Maria J; Almeida, Manuel F; Pinho, Sílvia C; Santos, Isabel C

    2010-06-01

    Due to the amounts of chromium in the leachate resulting from leather leaching tests, chromium sulfate tanned leather wastes are very often considered hazardous wastes. To overcome this problem, one option could be recovering the chromium and, consequently, lowering its content in the leather scrap. With this objective, chromium leather scrap was leached with sulfuric acid solutions at low temperature also aiming at maximizing chromium removal with minimum attack of the leather matrix. The effects of leather scrap dimension, sulfuric acid and sodium sulfate concentration in the solutions, as well as extraction time and temperature on chromium recovery were studied, and, additionally, organic matrix degradation was evaluated. The best conditions found for chromium recovery were leather scrap conditioning using 25mL of concentrated H(2)SO(4)/L solution at 293 or 313K during 3 or 6days. Under such conditions, 30-60+/-5% of chromium was recovered and as low as 3-6+/-1% of the leather total organic carbon (TOC) was dissolved. Using such treatment, the leather scrap area and volume are reduced and the residue is a more brittle material showing enhanced anaerobic biodegradability. Although good recovery results were achieved, due to the fact that the amount of chromium in eluate exceeded the threshold value this waste was still hazardous. Thus, it needs to be methodically washed in order to remove all the chromium de-linked from collagen.

  19. Black and green pigments based on chromium-cobalt spinels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliziario, Sayonara A., E-mail: sayonaraea@iq.unesp.br [Departamento de Fisico-Quimica, Instituto de Quimica, UNESP - Univ Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Quimica, CCEN, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Campus I, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Andrade, Jeferson M. de [Departamento de Quimica, CCEN, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Campus I, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Lima, Severino J.G. [Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, CT, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Campus I, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Paskocimas, Carlos A. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, CT, Natal, RN (Brazil); Soledade, Luiz E.B. [Departamento de Quimica, CCEN, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Campus I, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Hammer, P.; Longo, E. [Departamento de Fisico-Quimica, Instituto de Quimica, UNESP - Univ Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Souza, Antonio G.; Santos, Ieda M.G. [Departamento de Quimica, CCEN, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Campus I, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {yields} Co(Co{sub 2-x}Cr{sub x})O{sub 4} powders with different chromium concentrations (x = 0, 0.25 and 1) were prepared by the polymeric precursor method. {yields} Co(CoCr)O{sub 4} and Co(Co{sub 1.75}Cr{sub 0.25})O{sub 4} displayed a dark color and CoCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} was green. {yields} The colors were related to the different oxidation states of Cr and Co. {yields} Cobalt enrichment result in an increasing presence of Co(III) and a decrease amount of Cr(VI). - Abstract: Chromium and cobalt oxides are widely used in the manufacture of industrial pigments. In this work, the Co(Co{sub 2-x}Cr{sub x})O{sub 4} powders with different chromium concentrations (x = 0, 0.25 and 1) were synthesized by the polymeric precursor method, heat treatment between 600 and 1000 deg. C. These powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, colorimetry, UV-vis absorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. Even with the addition of chromium, the XRD patterns revealed that all powders crystallize in a single spinel cubic structure. The spinels with higher cobalt amount, Co(CoCr)O{sub 4} and Co(Co{sub 1.75}Cr{sub 0.25})O{sub 4}, displayed a dark color, without the Co{sup 3+} reduction observed in Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} between 900 and 950 deg. C. The spinel with higher chromium amount, CoCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}, was green. The colors were directly related to the occupation of tetrahedral and octahedral sites by the chromophores, as well as to the different oxidation states of chromium and cobalt. The different optical band gap values estimated from UV-vis spectra suggested the existence of intermediary energy levels within the band gap. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed an increasing presence of Co(III) and a decreasing amount of Cr(VI) with cobalt enrichment.

  20. Production and fabrication of vanadium alloys for the radiative divertor program of DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, W.R.; Smith, J.P.; Stambaugh, R.D.

    1996-04-01

    V-4Cr-4-Ti alloy has been recently selected for use in the manufacture of a portion of the DIII-D Radiative Divertor modification, as part of an overall DIII-D vanadium alloy deployment effort developed by General Atomics (GA) in conjunction with the Argonne and Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ANL or ORNL). The goal of this work is to produce a production-scale heat of the alloy and fabricate it into product forms for the manufacture of a portion of the Radiative Divertor (RD) for the DIII-D tokamak, to develop the fabrications technology for manufacture of the vanadium alloy radiative Divertor components, and to determine the effects of typical tokamak environments in the behavior of the vanadium alloy. The production of a {approx}1300-kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy is currently in progress at Teledyne Wah Chang of Albany, oregon (TWCA) to provide sufficient material for applicable product forms. Two unalloyed vanadium ingots for the alloy have already been produced by electron beam melting of raw processes vanadium. Chemical compositions of one ingot and a portion of the second were acceptable, and Charpy V-Notch (CVN) impact test performed on processed ingot samples indicated ductile behavior. Material from these ingots are currently being blended with chromium and titanium additions, and will be vacuum-arc remelted into a V-4Cr-4Ti alloy ingot and converted into product forms suitable for components of the DIII-D RD structure. Several joining methods selected for specific applications in fabrication of the RD components are being investigated, and preliminary trials have been successful in the joining of V-alloy to itself by both resistance and inertial welding processes and to Inconel 625 by inertial welding.

  1. Characterization of Ni–Cr alloys using different casting techniques and molds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Wen-Cheng, E-mail: wencchen@fcu.edu.tw [Advanced Medical Devices and Composites Laboratory, Department of Fiber and Composite Materials, College of Engineering, Feng Chia University, Taichung 40724, Taiwan (China); Teng, Fu-Yuan [Department of Dentistry, Kaohsiung Armed Forces General Hospital, Kaohsiung 802, Taiwan (China); School of Dentistry, College of Dental Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Hung, Chun-Cheng [School of Dentistry, College of Dental Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China)

    2014-02-01

    This study differentiated the mechanical properties of nickel–chromium (Ni–Cr) alloys under various casting techniques (different casting molds and casting atmospheres). These techniques were sampled by a sand mold using a centrifugal machine in ambient air (group I) and electromagnetic induction in an automatic argon castimatic casting machine (group II). The specimen casting used a graphite mold by a castimatic casting machine (group III). The characteristics of the Ni–Cr alloys, yield and ultimate tensile strength, bending modulus, microhardness, diffraction phase, grindability, ability to spring back, as well as ground microstructure and pattern under different casting conditions were evaluated. The group III specimens exhibited the highest values in terms of strength, modulus, hardness, and grindability at a grind rate of 500 rpm. Moreover, group III alloys exhibited smaller grain sizes, higher ability to spring back, and greater ductility than those casted by sand investment (groups I and II). The main factor, “casting mold,” significantly influenced all mechanical properties. The graphite mold casting of the Ni–Cr dental alloys in a controlled atmosphere argon casting system provided an excellent combination of high mechanical properties and good ability to spring back, and preserved the ductile properties for application in Ni–Cr porcelain-fused system. The results can offer recommendations to assist a prosthetic technician in selecting the appropriate casting techniques to obtain the desired alloy properties. - Highlights: • Properties of Ni–Cr alloys using various casting techniques are characterized. • Alloys cast by graphite mold exhibited higher recovery angle and more ductility. • Alloys cast by graphite mold exhibited higher strength and grinding rate. • Alloys in this study increase operative room to adjust the precision for prosthesis.

  2. Removal of Chromium with The Complexing Agents from Industrial Effluents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Prameena Sheeja

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Human activities and consequent developments have brought about the spectre of an overwhelming degradation of all facets of the natural environment-physical, chemical, biological and social. Environmental pollution, especially by chemicals, is one of the most significant factors in the degradation of the biosphere components. Among all chemical contaminants, heavy metals are believed to be of special ecological, biological and health significance. Unlike organic pollutants, the majority of which are susceptible to biological degradation, metal ions do not degrade into harmless end products. Chemical precipitation is a simple and economical method, and hence, has been widely used. The reduction of chromium (VI to chromium (III can be done with the help of ferrous sulphate. The precipitation was carried out in the presence and absence of complexing agents such as ammonium chloride, tartrate and citrate.

  3. Internal Friction In The PFN Ceramics With Chromium Dopand

    OpenAIRE

    Zachariasz R.; Bochenek D.; Bruś B.

    2015-01-01

    An aim of this work was to determine an influence of an admixture, the chromium (for x from 0.01 to 0.06), on the mechanical properties of the PFN ceramics. The ceramics with chemical composition Pb(Fe0.5−xCrxNb0.5)O3 was synthesized in two steps from simple oxides PbO, Fe2O3, Nb2O5, Cr2O3. The first stage was based on obtaining the FeNbO4 from the Fe2O3 and Nb2O5 simple oxides. At this stage an admixture in a form the Cr2O3 chromium oxide was added to the solution. In the second stage the Pb...

  4. Properties of thermally stable PM Al-Cr based alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vojtech, D. [Department of Metals and Corrosion Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague, Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)], E-mail: Dalibor.Vojtech@vscht.cz; Verner, J. [Department of Metals and Corrosion Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague, Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Serak, J. [Department of Metals and Corrosion Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague, Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Simancik, F. [Institute of Materials and Machine Mechanics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Racianska 75, 831 02 Bratislava 3 (Slovakia); Balog, M. [Institute of Materials and Machine Mechanics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Racianska 75, 831 02 Bratislava 3 (Slovakia); Nagy, J. [Institute of Materials and Machine Mechanics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Racianska 75, 831 02 Bratislava 3 (Slovakia)

    2007-06-15

    The presented paper describes properties of Al-6.0 wt.%Cr-2.3 wt.%Fe-0.4 wt.%Ti-0.7 wt.%Si alloy produced by powder metallurgy (PM). The powder alloy was prepared by the pressure nitrogen melt atomization. The granulometric powder fraction of less than 45 {mu}m was then hot-extruded at 450 deg. C to produce a rod of 6 mm in diameter. Microstructure of the as-extruded material was composed of recrystallized {alpha}(Al) grains (the average grain size of 640 nm) and Al{sub 13}Cr{sub 2} spheroids (the average particle diameter of 130 nm and interparticle spacing of 290 nm). Metastable phases were not observed due to their decomposition on the hot extrusion. Hardness of the as-extruded material was 108 HV1, ultimate tensile strength, 327 MPa, yield strength, 258 MPa and elongation, 14%. Mechanical properties resulted mainly from Hall-Petch strengthening. The room-temperature mechanical properties were also measured after a long-term annealing at 400 deg. C. The investigated PM material was compared with the commercial Al-11.8 wt.%Si-0.9 wt.%Ni-1.2 wt.%Cu-1.2 wt.%Mg casting alloy generally applied at elevated temperatures. The PM alloy showed much higher thermal stability, since its room temperature hardness and tensile properties did not degradate significantly even after annealing at 400 deg. C/200 h. In contrast, the hardness and strength of the casting alloy reduced rapidly already after a 30 min annealing. The excellent thermal stability of the investigated PM material was a consequence of very slow diffusivities and low equilibrium solubilities of chromium and iron in solid aluminium.

  5. Microstructure and properties of laser-borided Inconel 600-alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulka, M., E-mail: michal.kulka@put.poznan.pl; Dziarski, P.; Makuch, N.; Piasecki, A.; Miklaszewski, A.

    2013-11-01

    Nickel-based superalloys are used extensively for a variety of industrial applications involving high temperatures and aggressive environments. However, under conditions of appreciable mechanical wear (adhesive or abrasive), these materials have to be distinguished by suitable wear protection. The diffusion boronizing is the thermo-chemical treatment, which improves the tribological properties of nickel and its alloys. Nevertheless, the long duration of this process is necessary in order to obtain the layers of the thickness up to about 100 μm. Instead of the diffusion process, in this study the laser boriding is used for producing boride layer on Inconel 600-alloy. During the laser alloying, the external cylindrical surface of base material is coated by paste, including amorphous boron. Then the surface is re-melted by a laser beam. The high overlapping of multiple laser tracks (86%) causes the formation of uniform laser-alloyed layer in respect of the thickness. Laser re-melted zone, heat-affected zone and the substrate characterize the microstructure. In the re-melted zone, the three areas are observed: compact borides zone consisting of nickel, chromium and iron borides (close to the surface), zone of increased percentage of Ni–Cr–Fe-matrix (appearing in the greater distance from the surface) and zone of dominant Ni–Cr–Fe-matrix percentage (at the end of the layer). The hardness obtained is comparable to that-obtained in case of diffusion boriding. Simultaneously, the laser-borided layers are significantly thicker (about 346 or 467 μm depending on the laser power used). The significant increase in their abrasive wear resistance is observed. The wear intensity factors, as well as the relative mass loss of the laser-borided samples, are ten times smaller in comparison with untreated Inconel 600-alloy.

  6. Microstructure and properties of laser-borided Inconel 600-alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulka, M.; Dziarski, P.; Makuch, N.; Piasecki, A.; Miklaszewski, A.

    2013-11-01

    Nickel-based superalloys are used extensively for a variety of industrial applications involving high temperatures and aggressive environments. However, under conditions of appreciable mechanical wear (adhesive or abrasive), these materials have to be distinguished by suitable wear protection. The diffusion boronizing is the thermo-chemical treatment, which improves the tribological properties of nickel and its alloys. Nevertheless, the long duration of this process is necessary in order to obtain the layers of the thickness up to about 100 μm. Instead of the diffusion process, in this study the laser boriding is used for producing boride layer on Inconel 600-alloy. During the laser alloying, the external cylindrical surface of base material is coated by paste, including amorphous boron. Then the surface is re-melted by a laser beam. The high overlapping of multiple laser tracks (86%) causes the formation of uniform laser-alloyed layer in respect of the thickness. Laser re-melted zone, heat-affected zone and the substrate characterize the microstructure. In the re-melted zone, the three areas are observed: compact borides zone consisting of nickel, chromium and iron borides (close to the surface), zone of increased percentage of Ni-Cr-Fe-matrix (appearing in the greater distance from the surface) and zone of dominant Ni-Cr-Fe-matrix percentage (at the end of the layer). The hardness obtained is comparable to that-obtained in case of diffusion boriding. Simultaneously, the laser-borided layers are significantly thicker (about 346 or 467 μm depending on the laser power used). The significant increase in their abrasive wear resistance is observed. The wear intensity factors, as well as the relative mass loss of the laser-borided samples, are ten times smaller in comparison with untreated Inconel 600-alloy.

  7. Microstructure and mechanical property change of dissimilar metal welds Alloy 600 - Alloy 182 - A508 Gr. 3 according to thermal aging effect at 400 .deg. C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, Jun Hyuk; Choi, Kyoung Joon; Kim, Ji Hyun [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To prevent such critical matters above mentioned, investigation about degradation mechanism of materials by thermal aging should be conducted. However, there are no sufficient studies on this field. Therefore, the final goal of this study is to investigate microstructure along the DMW undergone thermal aging process. Firstly, in order to get a reference data for further comparison analysis which is expected to show degradation mechanism of the weld joint, un-heated weld joint was investigated with several instruments, Vickers hardness tester, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and an energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS). Detail instrumental analysis in Alloy 600 - Alloy 182 - A508 Gr. 3 DMW joint were performed in order to investigate microstructure and mechanical properties of material. Following conclusions can be drawn from this study. Alloy 182 has austenitic dendrite structure which is formed by heat flow during welding process. Type-II boundaries were observed at the interface between Alloy 182 and A508 Gr. 3. Chemical composition shows rapid transition at the interface which makes 3000 µm of chromium dilution zone. Microstructure of A508 Gr. 3 was investigated from the interface between Alloy 182 to base metal.

  8. Preparation of Silica Modified with 2-Mercaptoimidazole and its SorptionProperties of Chromium(III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Budiman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Modified silica gel was prepared to remove the heavy metal of chromium(III from water sample. Silica gel was used as supporting material and the 2-mercaptoimidazole was immobilized onto surface silica so that the silica would have selective properties to adsorb the heavy metal chromium(III through the formation of coordination compound between the 2-mercaptoimidazole and chromium(III. The characterization of modified silica gel was carried out by analyzing the Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrum of this material in order to ensure the immobilization of 2-mercaptoimidazole onto the surface. The effect of pH solution, initial concentration of chromium(III, and interaction time were investigated in batch mode to find the adsorption properties of chromium(III onto modified silica. The condition optimum of these parameters was applied to determine the removal percentage of chromium(III in water sample using the modified silica gel

  9. Determination of Chromium(III) Picolinate Using High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Ultraviolet Spectrophotometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Il; Woo, Dong Jin; Kang, Dae Kyung [EASY BIO System, Inc, Chonan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Myung Hee [Pollin, Inc, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Gun Jo [Korea Food and Drug Administration, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Ki Won [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-10-15

    Cr-(pic){sub 3} has been widely used as food additives, drugs, and feed additives. Accordingly, its determination method should be established. In the present paper, we have studied the determination method of chromium(III) picolinate accurately using ESI-MS on-lined with HPLC. Chromium(III) picolinate in feed products was determined successfully. Chromium(III) is very well known as an essential mineral. It is suggested as a cofactor in the maintenance of both normal lipid and carbohydrate metabolism by assisting the action of insulin on a cell membrane. According to the National Research Council, the daily recommended intake of chromium(III) is 50-200 μg. Several organic chromium(III) complexes have been reported to have significantly higher absorption and tissue incorporation activity than inorganic salts such as chromium(III) chloride.

  10. Biological monitoring of occupational exposure to different chromium compounds at various valency states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutti, A.; Pedroni, C.; Arfini, G.; Franchini, I.; Minoia, C.; Micoli, G.; Baldi, C.

    1984-01-01

    Chromium concentrations in the air were measured in seven different workroom environments, where exposure to water soluble hexavalent or trivalent compounds was expected. Urinary excretion of chromium was measured before and after the same arbitrarily chosen working day. End-of-shift urinary chromium and its increase above pre-exposure levels were closely related to the concentration of water soluble chromium (VI) in the air. The values corresponding to 50 micrograms m-3 in the air, which is the current threshold limit value in most countries, were 29.8 and 12.2 micrograms g-1 of creatinine, respectively. Urinary chromium in workers exposed to water insoluble chromates or to water soluble chromic (III) sulphate was definitely higher than that observed in subjects not occupationally exposed to chromium compounds, but it cannot be recommended as short-term exposure test for evaluation of the job-related hazard.

  11. Bioconcentration of chromium in edible mushrooms: influence of environmental and genetic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, M A; Alonso, J; Melgar, M J

    2013-08-01

    Chromium concentrations were determined in 167 samples of wild edible mushrooms, collected from three different sites (urban, traffic and pastureland areas) in Lugo (NW Spain). The hymenophore (H) and the rest of the fruiting body (RFB) were analysed separately. The analyses were performed using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The highest mean chromium levels (mg/kg dry weight) of 3.5 and 8.0, 4.5 and 6.2, and 6.2 and 4.3 were found in Lycoperdon utriforme, Coprinus comatus and Agaricus campestris in H and RFB, respectively. The highest concentrations of chromium were observed in terrestrial saprophytic species in relation to mycorrhizal species. With respect to the underlying substrates, chromium concentration was lowest in the pastureland area (24.6 mg/kg dw). All mushroom species were bioexclusors of chromium (BCFmushrooms harvested from the areas investigated poses no toxicological risk to human health due to chromium.

  12. Innovative soil treatment process design for removal of trivalent chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stallings, J.H. [Air Force, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH (United States). Aeronautical Systems Center; Durkin, M.E. [Hughes Missile Systems Co., Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A soil treatment process has been developed as part of a US Air Force environmental compliance project at Air Force Plant 44, Tucson, AZ for treating soil contaminated with heavy metals including trivalent chromium, cadmium, copper, and nickel. The process was designed to treat a total of 133,000 tons of soil in a 400 ton per day facility. Features of the soil treatment process include physical treatment and separation, and a chemical treatment process of the remaining fines using a hypochlorite leach allowing chromium to be solubilized at a high pH. After treating, fines are washed in three stage countercurrent thickeners and chromium hydroxide cake is recovered as a final produce from the leach solution. Treatability studies were conducted, laboratory and a pilot plant was built. Process design criteria and flow sheet, material balances, as well as preliminary equipment selection and sizing for the facility have been completed. Facility was designed for the removal of Cr at a concentration of an average of 1230 mg/kg from the soil and meeting a risk based clean-closure limit of 400 mg/kg of Cr. Capital costs for the 400 tpd plant were estimated at 9.6 million with an operating and maintenance cost of $54 per ton As process is most economic for large quantities of soil with relatively low concentrations of contaminants, it was not used in final closure when the estimated volume of contaminated soil removed dropped to 65,000 tons and concentration of chromium increased up to 4000 mg/kg. However, the process could have application in situations where economics and location warrant.

  13. Chromium speciation in solid matrices and regulation: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unceta, N. [University of the Basque Country, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Vitoria-Gasteiz (Spain); Seby, F. [Ultra Traces Analyses Aquitaine (UT2A), Helioparc Pau-Pyrenees, Pau (France); Malherbe, J.; Donard, O.F.X. [Universite de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour, Helioparc Pau-Pyrenees, Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique Bio-Inorganique et Environnement, IPREM, UMR CNRS 5254, Pau (France)

    2010-06-15

    In recent years, the extensive use of chromium in industrial processes has led to the promotion of several directives and recommendations by the European Union, that try to limit and regulate the presence of Cr(VI) in the environment and to protect industrial workers using chromium and end-users of manufactured products. As a consequence, new standard methods and analytical procedures have been published at the EU level for Cr(VI) determination in soil, sludge, sediment, and similar waste materials, workplace atmospheres, cement, packaging materials, industrially produced samples, and corrosion-protection layers on some components of vehicles and electrical and electronic equipment. The objective of this article is to summarize the different directives and recommendations and to critically review the currently existing standard methods and the methods published in the literature for chromium speciation in the above mentioned solid matrices, putting the emphasis on the different extraction procedures which have been developed for each matrix. Particular attention has been paid to Cr(III) and Cr(VI) inter-conversions that can occur during extraction and efforts to minimize these unwanted reactions. Although the use of NaOH-Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solutions with hot plate extraction seems to be the more widespread procedure, species transformation can still occur and several studies suggest that speciated isotope-dilution mass spectrometry (SIDMS) could be a suitable tool for correction of these interconversions. Besides, recent studies have proved the role of Cr(III) in chromium toxicology. As a consequence, the authors suggest an update of standard methods in the near future. (orig.)

  14. Technology Demonstration of the Zero Emissions Chromium Electroplating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    blanket technology for electroplating tanks. When no liquid blanket is used, evaporation of water, especially during warm weather conditions, requires...0.007 0.004 0.002 Tank 12A had noticeable blobs floating on the surface and also at the interfacial layer of PRD fluid and the chromium acid solution...Tank 12B did not have any such blobs . All the parts removed after plating looked fairly good. There were no visible streaks, water breaks, etc. The

  15. Recovery of Chromium from Waste Taning Liquors by Magnesium Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood M. Barbooti

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This is a case study of AL-Za’afaraniya tanning factory, 15 km to the south of Baghdad, to spot light on simple chemical treatment of the discharged water to solve the environmental problems associated with its chromium content management. The treatment was extended to the recovery and reuse of chromium. Chromium was precipitated by the addition of magnesium oxide which also aid as a neutralizer for the acidic effluent. The laboratory treatment was carried out to find the optimum conditions. The wastewater samples were taken from the outline area of the tannery. Box-Wilson method was adopted to find useful relationships between the operating variables (temperature, mixing period and magnesium oxide dose and the pH and chromium content of effluent. The experimental data were successfully fitted to second order polynomial mathematical models for the treatment. The most favorable operating conditions for the treatment were: temperature, 30 ºC; mixing period, 50 min and magnesium oxide concentration, 3000 mg/L. On using the optimum conditions a mathematical model simulating the operation for the treatment was obtained as follows:Cr = 6.0848 – 0.001839 X11 – 0.105334 X12 – 0.041038 X13pH = 10.29086 – 0.001223 X11 – 0.140043 X12 – 0.00953 X13Experimentally Cr concentration was decreased to about (0.5 mg/L in wastewater after raising the pH value to (7.35 by adding magnesium oxide.

  16. Evidence of weak ferromagnetism in chromium(III) oxide particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez-Vazquez, Carlos E-mail: qfmatcvv@usc.es; Banobre-Lopez, Manuel; Lopez-Quintela, M.A.; Hueso, L.E.; Rivas, J

    2004-05-01

    The low temperature (4chromium(III) oxide particles have been studied. A clear evidence of the presence of weak ferromagnetism is observed below 250 K. The magnetisation curves as a function of the applied field show coercive fields due to the canted antiferromagnetism of the particles. Around 55 K a maximum is observed in the zero-field-cooled curves; this maximum can be assumed as a blocking temperature, similarly to ultrafine ferromagnetic particles.

  17. Ductile transplutonium metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, William V.

    1983-01-01

    Alloys of Ce with transplutonium metals such as Am, Cm, Bk and Cf have properties making them highly suitable as sources of the transplutonium element, e.g., for use in radiation detector technology or as radiation sources. The alloys are ductile, homogeneous, easy to prepare and have a fairly high density.

  18. Study on anaerobic treatment of wastewater containing hexavalent chromium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yan-bin; XIAO Hua-hua; SUN Shui-yu

    2005-01-01

    A self-made anaerobic bio-filter bed which was inoculated with special sludge showed high efficiency in removing hexavalent chromium. When pump flow was 47 ml/min and CODCr ofwastewater was about 140 mg/L, it took 4 h to decrease the Cr6+ concentrations from about 60 mg/L to under 0.5 mg/L, compared with 14 h without carbon source addition. Cr6+ concentrations ranged from 64.66 mg/L to 75.53 mg/L, the system efficiency was excellent. When Cr6+ concentration reached 95.47 mg/L,the treatment time was prolonged to 7.5 h. Compared with the contrast system, the system with trace metals showed clear superiority in that the Cr6+ removal rate increased by 21.26%. Some analyses also showed that hexavalent chromium could probably be bio-reduced to trivalent chromium, and that as a result, the chrome hydroxide sediment was formed on the surface of microorganisms.

  19. Adsorptive stripping voltammetric determination of chromium in gallium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palrecha, M M; Mathur, P K

    1997-12-19

    The electroanalytical chemistry of trace metals has progressed strongly with the development of cathodic stripping voltammetry (CSV) preceded by adsorption collection of organic metal complexes. A sensitive method for the determination of trace amount of chromium in gallium is described. Gallium is dissolved in sodium hydroxide containing hydrogen peroxide. The method is based on the catalytic activity of nitrate ions on the reduction of Cr(III)TTHA (triethylene tetramine-N,N,N',N'',N''',N'''-hexaacetic acid) complex. The sensitivity of this method is further improved by adsorption preconcentration of Cr(III)TTHA complex at a hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE). The Cr(III) formed at the electrode surface by the reduction of Cr(VI), which is present in the bulk solution, is immediately complexed by TTHA. The adsorbed complex is then reduced at a peak potential of - 1.26 V, and the peak height of Cr(III) reduction is measured. The determination limit was restricted by the amount of chromium present in the reagent blank solution. The method is suitable for the determination of chromium at level as low as 0.2 mug g(-1) (with about 50 mg of sample) and a relative standard deviation of 15%.

  20. The chromium site in doped glassy lithium tetraborate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, T.D. [Department of Engineering Physics, Air Force Institute of Technology, 2950 Hobson Way, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433 (United States); Echeverria, E.; Beniwal, Sumit [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 855 North 16th Street, Theodore Jorgensen Hall, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588-0299 (United States); Adamiv, V.T.; Burak, Ya. V.; Enders, Axel [Institute of Physical Optics, 23 Dragomanov Street, Lviv 79005 (Ukraine); Petrosky, J.C.; McClory, J.W. [Department of Engineering Physics, Air Force Institute of Technology, 2950 Hobson Way, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433 (United States); Dowben, P.A., E-mail: pdowben1@unl.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 855 North 16th Street, Theodore Jorgensen Hall, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588-0299 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, we find that Cr substitutes primarily in the Li{sup +} site as a dopant in lithium tetraborate Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} glasses, in this case 98.4Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}–1.6Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} or nominally Li{sub 1.98}Cr{sub 0.025}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}. This strong preference for a single site is nonetheless accompanied by site distortions and some site disorder, helping explain the optical properties of chromium doped Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} glasses. The resulting O coordination shell has a contraction of the Cr–O bond lengths as compared to the Li–O bond lengths. There is also an increase in the O coordination number. - Graphical abstract: Lithium tetraborate: labeled are the B1 and B2 sites, where the latter correspond to BO{sub 3} and BO{sub 4} structures respectively. - Highlights: • Adoption of the Li + site for chromium dopants in lithium tetraborate identified. • Increased oxygen coordination for glass over the crystalline lithium tetraborate. • Distortions about the doping chromium characterized. • Local bond order is preserved in spite of the glassy nature.