WorldWideScience

Sample records for chromium alloys phase

  1. On the coexistence of the magnetic phases in chromium alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebech, Bente; Mikke, K.

    1969-01-01

    Detailed neutron diffraction investigations have been performed on Cr-Re alloys in order to explain the several observations in Cr alloys of the coexistence of a commensurable and an oscillatory magnetic phase. It is concluded that the individual magnetic phases probably occur in separate domains....

  2. Phase composition and properties of rapidly cooled aluminium-zirconium-chromium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolovskaya, E.M.; Badalova, L.M.; Podd''yakova, E.I.; Kazakova, E.F.; Loboda, T.P.; Gribanov, A.V.

    1989-01-01

    Using the methods of physicochemical analysis the interaction of aluminium with zirconium and chromium is studied. Polythermal cross sections between Al 3 -Zr-Al 7 Cr and radial polythermal cross section from aluminium-rich corner with the ratio of components Zr:Cr=5:7 by mass are constructed. The effect of zirconium and chromium content on electrochemical characteristics of aluminium-base rapidly quenching alloys in systems Al-Cr, Al-Zr, Al-Cr-Zr. An increase in chromium concentration in oversaturated solid solution of Al-Cr system expands considerably the range of passive state. When Al 7 Cr phase appears the range of passive stae vanishes

  3. Iron-nickel-chromium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karenko, M.K.

    1981-01-01

    A specification is given for iron-nickel-chromium age-hardenable alloys suitable for use in fast breeder reactor ducts and cladding, which utilize the gamma-double prime strengthening phase and are characterized in having a delta or eta phase distributed at or near grain boundaries. A range of compositions is given. (author)

  4. Protective claddings for high strength chromium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, J. F.

    1971-01-01

    The application of a Cr-Y-Hf-Th alloy as a protective cladding for a high strength chromium alloy was investigated for its effectiveness in inhibiting nitrogen embrittlement of a core alloy. Cladding was accomplished by a combination of hot gas pressure bonding and roll cladding techniques. Based on bend DBTT, the cladding alloy was effective in inhibiting nitrogen embrittlement of the chromium core alloy for up to 720 ks (200hours) in air at 1422 K (2100 F). A significant increase in the bend DBTT occurred with longer time exposures at 1422 K or short time exposures at 1589 K (2400 F).

  5. Effect of PFM Firing Cycles on the Mechanical Properties, Phase Composition, and Microstructure of Nickel-Chromium Alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Mohd; Tripathi, Arvind; Kar, Sushil Kumar; Sekhar, K Chandra

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the mechanical properties of beryllium-free nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) dental casting alloy before and after each porcelain firing cycle (once fired, twice fired, and thrice fired) and to relate these properties to the microstructural changes and changes in X-ray diffraction patterns of Ni-Cr alloy that occur after each porcelain firing cycle. Forty tensile bar specimens and 20 disc-shaped specimens of Ni-Cr alloy were prepared. These specimens were divided into four groups. The first group was not heat treated and tested in the as-cast condition, thus serving as control group. The second, third, and fourth groups were fired once, twice, and thrice, respectively. Tensile bar specimens were loaded to failure in tension using a universal testing machine. Values of ultimate tensile strength, 0.1% yield strength, and percentage elongations were determined. Microstructural study and hardness testing were done using an optical microscope and digital Vickers hardness tester, respectively, on disc-shaped specimens. Disc-shaped specimens were again used to obtain the X-ray diffraction patterns by using diffractometer Bruker D8 focus. Statistical comparisons of the mechanical properties and hardness of the alloy were made with ANOVA. Intergroup comparisons of the data in the as-cast and fired specimens were analyzed by applying Tukey's HSD multiple comparison tests. Before porcelain firing, the alloy exhibited higher ultimate tensile strength (548 MPa), 0.1% yield strength (327 MPa), hardness (192 HV), and lower elongation values (18%). After each firing cycle, there was a significant (p alloy. The microstructure of the control group specimen exhibited heterogeneous microstructure, and after each firing, microstructure of the alloy was gradually homogenized by formation of grain boundaries at the interdendritic interfaces. X-ray diffraction pattern shows that the alloy exhibited four strong diffraction peaks within the range of 2θ = 40

  6. Radiation stability of chromium low alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakin, V.P.; Kazakov, V.A.

    1990-01-01

    Radiation effect on the behaviour of mechanical properties and structure of chromium low alloys such as VKh-2K, KhP-3, VKhM in the wide range of temperatures and neutron fluences is studied. Radiation stability of the alloys is shown to be limited by low-temperature radiation embrittlement (LTRE), caused by radiation hardening as a result of formation of radiation-induced defects such as dislocation loops and vacancy voids in the structure. The methods for prevention LTRE of chromium alloys are suggested. 8 refs.; 8 figs

  7. The electrochemistry of chromium, chromium-boron and chromium-phosphorus alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffat, T.P.; Ruf, R.R.; Latanision, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    It is fairly well established that chromium-metalloid interactions represent the key to understanding the remarkable corrosion behavior of TM-Cr-M glasses; (Fe, Ni, Co,...)-Cr-(P, Si, C, S). The character and kinetics of passive film growth on the glasses are being studied ni order to assess the role of the film former, chromium, and the metalloids in the passivation process. A series of thin film microcrystalline chromium, Cr-B and Cr-P binary alloys have been fabricated by physical vapor deposition techniques. Vacuum melted conventionally processed chromium has also been studied. Examination of these materials in lM H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and lM HCl by voltammetry, potentiostatic and impedance techniques yields the following conclusion: 1. Pure chromium with a grain size varying from < 400 A to 0.5 mm exhibits no well defined differences in electrochemical behavior in lM H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. 2. The tremendous corrosion resistance of Cr-B alloys has been confirmed. 3. The beneficial effects observed for boron alloyed with chromium may be considered surprising in view of the neutral/negative influence of alloying boron with iron, i.e. Fe/sub 80/B/sub 20/. 4. The interaction of the electrochemistry of the metalloid constituent with that of the transition base element determines the corrosion behavior. 5. Preliminary work with Cr-P alloys indicates that certain compositions exhibit promising properties - certain films were found to be intact after two days of immersion in concentrated HCl. Further work is in progress

  8. Roentgenoelectronic investigation into oxidation of iron-chromium and iron-chromium-nickel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimov, A.G.; Rozenfel'd, I.L.; Kazanskij, L.P.; Machavariani, G.V.

    1978-01-01

    Kinetics of iron-chromium and iron-chromium-nickel alloy oxidation (of the Kh13 and Kh18N10T steels) in oxygen was investigated using X-ray electron spectroscopy. It was found that according to X-ray electron spectra chromium oxidation kinetics in the iron-chromium alloy differs significantly from oxidation kinetics of chromium pattern. Layer by layer X-ray electron analysis showed that chromium is subjected to a deeper oxidation as compared to iron, and accordingly, Cr 2 O 3 layer with pure iron impregnations is placed between the layer of mixed oxide (Fe 3 O 4 +Cr 2 O 3 ) and metal. A model of the iron-chromium alloy surface is suggested. The mixed oxide composition on the steel surface is presented as spinel Fesub(2+x)Crsub(1-x)Osub(y)

  9. Principles of alloy design in high nitrogen 12% chromium steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goecmen, A.; Ernst, P.; Holmes, P.

    1999-01-01

    12% chromium steels are hardened by a martensitic transformation and by precipitation reactions of the martensite during a subsequent tempering treatment. The original alloy design of these steels is based on the intensifying effect of C on the martensitic transformation hardening as well as on the effects of V and Mo on intensity and stability of carbide precipitation hardening reactions. Advanced alloy design of high carbon 12% chromium steels makes use of f.c.c.-MX type carbonitrides to improve grain refinement and tempering resistance, whereas alloying with about 0.05 wt.-% nitrogen already plays a decisive role. In this paper, new alloy design opportunities provided by high nitrogen are reviewed, which promise to achieve a best possible compromise between grain size limitation, particle hardening and particle stability of 12% chromium steels. The crucial effects of the solubility product of MX-type phases on grain coarsening resistance, precipitation hardening and particle stability are reviewed. The advantages of high nitrogen steels to improve these properties are rationalized to result from the lower solubility of nitrides compared with carbides. As an advantageous opportunity of the achievable higher grain coarsening resistance, the normalizing temperature in high nitrogen steels can be increased in order to increase the amount of the less soluble and thereby slow coarsening f.c.c.-nitrides. In addition, as a consequence of a higher normalizing temperature, the solubility gap of nitrides in the austenite is expanded, which in turn enables an effective precipitation hardening due to low soluble nitrides in the metastable austenite before the martensitic transformation

  10. Structure and growth of oxide on iron-chromium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, M.G.C.; McEnaney, B.; Scott, V.D.

    1974-01-01

    Several oxides form during the initial stages of oxidation of iron-chromium alloys at 400 to 600 0 C in CO 2 -1%CO gas. The nature of the oxidation product depends upon crystallographic orientation and composition of the substrate, and can be explained by considering the maximum solubility of chromium in different oxide phases together with interfacial and strain energy factors. Kinetics of oxidation together with micrographic observations indicate that, as oxidation proceeds spinel oxide M 3 O 4 nucleates at sites on the substrate surface associated with asperities. The spinel nuclei grow laterally and vertically until they coalesce and the scale subsequently thickens according to a parabolic rate law. The duplex structure of scales is interpreted in terms of an outward diffusion of cations together with simultaneous growth of an inner layer in the space created by this outward movement. Scale porosity provides a route for gas-phase transport of oxidant to support the growth of the inner layer. Regularly spaced lamellar voids which may form in the inner layer are believed to be associated with a cyclic vacancy condensation process. Enrichment of the inner layer in chromium is explained by analysis of the possible diffusion path networks in close-packed oxides. Some comments are made concerning possible practical applications of these data. (author)

  11. A review of chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klopp, W.D.

    1975-01-01

    The mechanical properties of chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten alloys are reviewed, with particular emphasis on high-temperature strength and low-temperature ductility. Precipitate strengthening is highly effective at 0.4-0.8 Tsub(m) in these metals, with HfC being most effective in tungsten and molybdenum, and Ta(B,C) most effective in chromium. Low-temperature ductility can be improved by alloying to promote rhenium ductilizing or solution softening. The low-temperature mechanical properties of these alloys appear related to electronic interactions rather than to the usual metallurgical considerations. (Auth.)

  12. Effect of carbon and silicon on nitrogen solubility in liquid chromium and iron-chromium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khyakkinen, V.I.; Bezobrazov, S.V.

    1986-01-01

    The study is aimed at specifying the role of carbon and silicon in high-chromium melts nitridation processes. It is shown that in high-chromium melts of the Cr-Fe-C system the nitrogen solubility is reduced with the growth of carbon content and in the chromium concentration range of 70-100% at 1873 K and P N 2 =0.1 MPa it is described by the lg[%N] Cr-Fe-C =lg[%N] cr-fe -0.098[%C] equation. While decreasing the temperature the nitrogen solubility in alloys is increased. Silicon essentially decreases the nitrogen solubility in liquid chromium. For the 0-10% silicon concentration range the relation between the equilibrium content of nitrogen and silicon at 1873 K and P N 2 =0.1 MPa is described by the straight line equation [%N] Cr-Si =6.1-0.338 [%Si

  13. Precipitation hardenable iron-nickel-chromium alloy having good swelling resistance and low neutron absorbence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenko, M.K.; Merrick, H.F.; Gibson, R.C.

    1982-01-01

    An iron-nickel-chromium age-hardenable alloy suitable for use in fast breeder reactor ducts and cladding utilizes the gamma-double prime strengthening phase and has a morphology of the gamma-double prime phase enveloping the gamma-prime phase and delta phase distributed at or near the grain boundaries. The alloy consists essentially of about 40-50 percent nickel, 7.5-14 percent chromium, 1.5-4 percent niobium, .25-.75 percent silicon, 1-3 percent titanium, .1-.5 percent aluminum, .02-1 percent carbon, .002-.015 percent boron, and the balance iron. Up to 2 percent manganese and up to .01 percent magnesium may be added to inhibit trace element effects; up to .1 percent zirconium may be added to increase radiation swelling resistance; and up to 3 percent molybdenum may be added to increase strength

  14. Method for electrodeposition of nickel--chromium alloys and coating of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stromatt, R.W.; Lundquist, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    High-quality electrodeposits of nickel-chromium binary alloys in which the percentage of chromium is controlled can be obtained by the addition of a complexing agent such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic disodium salt to the plating solution. The nickel-chromium alloys were found to provide an excellent hydrogen barrier for the protection of uranium fuel elements. (U.S.)

  15. Void swelling in fast reactor irradiated high purity binary iron-chromium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, E.A.; Stow, D.A.

    The void swelling characteristics of a series of high purity binary iron-chromium alloys containing 0 - 615 0 C. The void swelling behaviour can be qualitatively rationalized in terms of point defect trapping and precipitation processes involving chromium atoms

  16. On the rational alloying of structural chromium-nickel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astaf'ev, A.A.

    1982-01-01

    A study was made on the influence of chromium nickel, phosphorus on the critical brittleness temperature of Cr-Ni-Mo-V structural steels. It is shown that the critical brittleness temperature of these steels increases at chromium content more over than 2% and nickel content more than 2% in the result of carbide transformations during tempering. Increase of nickel content in Cr-Ni-Mo-V-steels strengthens the tendency to embrittlement during slow cooling, from tempering temperature owing to development of process of phosphorus grain-boundary segregation. Two mentioned mechanisms of embrittlement determine principles of rational steel alloying. The extreme dependence of the critical brittleness temperature on chromium and nickel content, which enables to choose the optimum composition of Cr-Ni-Mo-V-steels, was established

  17. Fractography of hydrogen-embrittled iron-chromium-nickel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Tensile specimens of iron-chromium-nickel base alloys were broken in either a hydrogen environment or in air following thermal charging with hydrogen. Fracture surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Fracture morphology of hydrogen-embrittled specimens was characterized by: changed dimple size, twin-boundary parting, transgranular cleavage, and intergranular separation. The nature and extent of the fracture mode changes induced by hydrogen varied systematically with alloy composition and test temperature. Initial microstructure developed during deformation processing and heat treating had a secondary influence on fracture mode

  18. Alkaline stress corrosion of iron-nickel-chromium austenitic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hocquellet, Dominique

    1984-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of the behaviour in stress corrosion of austenitic iron-nickel-chromium alloys by means of tensile tests at imposed strain rate, in a soda solution at 50 pc in water and 350 degrees C. The author shows that the mechanical-chemical model allows the experimental curves to be found again, provided the adjustment of characteristic parameters, on the one hand, of corrosion kinetics, and on the other hand, of deformation kinetics. A classification of the studied alloys is proposed [fr

  19. Chromium surface alloying of structural steels during laser treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurov, I.E.; Nagornykh, S.N.; Sivukhin, G.A.; Solenov, S.V.

    1987-01-01

    Results of matrix alloying from the surface layer and creation of considerably increased chromium concentration in the depth which permits to increase the efficiency of laser treatment of steels (12Kh18N10T and 38KhN3M) in the process of their further mechanical polishing, are presented. The treatment was realized by continuous CO 2 -laser at different power densities and scanning rates are presented. A model describing the creation of anomalous distributions of the alloying element in steels is plotted

  20. Antiferromagnetism in chromium alloy single crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum Møller, Hans; Trego, A.L.; Mackintosh, A.R.

    1965-01-01

    The antiferromagnetism of single crystals of dilute alloys of V, Mn and Re in Cr has been studied at 95°K and 300°K by neutron diffraction. The addition of V causes the diffraction peaks to decrease in intensity and move away from (100), while Mn and Re cause them to increase and approach (100) s...

  1. Study of phase transformations in Fe-Mn-Cr Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schule, W.; Panzarasa, A.; Lang, E.

    1988-01-01

    Nickel free alloys for fusion reactor applications are examined. Phase changes in fifteen, mainly austenitic iron-manganese-chromium-alloys of different compositions were investigated in the temperature range between -196 0 C and 1000 0 C after different thermo-mechanical treatments. A range of different physical measuring techniques was employed to investigate the structural changes occurring during heating and cooling and after cold-work: electrical resistivity techniques, differential thermal analysis, magnetic response, Vickers hardness and XRD measurement. The phase boundary between the α Fe-phase and the γ-phase of the iron manganese alloy is approximately maintained if chromium is added to the two component materials. Consequently all the alloy materials for contents of manganese smaller than about 30% Mn are not stable below 500 0 C. This concerns also the AMCR alloys. However the α Fe-phase is not formed during slow cooling from 1000 0 C to ambient temperature and is only obtained if nucleation sites are provided and after very long anneals. A cubic α Mn-type-phase is found for alloys with 18% Cr and 15% Mn, with 13% Cr and 25% Mn, with 10% Cr and 30% Mn, and with 10% Cr and 40% Mn. For these reasons the γ-phase field of the iron-chromium-manganese alloys is very small below 600 0 C and much narrower than reported in the literature. 95 figs. 22 refs

  2. Cast and hipped gamma titanium aluminum alloys modified by chromium, boron, and tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Shyhchin.

    1993-01-01

    A cast body is described of a chromium, boron, and tantalum modified titanium aluminum alloy, said alloy consisting essentially of titanium, aluminum, chromium, boron, and tantalum in the following approximate atomic ratio: Ti-Al 45-50 Cr 1-3 Ta 1-8 B 0.1-0.3 , and said alloy having been prepared by casting the alloy to form said cast body and by HIPping said body

  3. Segregation and precipitation in iron-chromium alloys during thermal ageing and irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senninger, O.

    2013-01-01

    Iron-Chromium alloys have a peculiar thermodynamic and diffusion behavior which is due to their magnetic properties. The alloy decomposition under thermal ageing has been studied in this thesis. An atomistic kinetic model has been performed in this aim in which we have modeled in details the chemical species thermodynamic and diffusion properties. In particular, the evolution of elements diffusion properties which the ferro-paramagnetic transition has been introduced in the model. Simulated decompositions have been compared with experiments for a large range of concentrations and temperatures. A good agreement between simulations and experiments was observed and these comparisons have highlighted the ferro to paramagnetic transition key role in the concentrated alloys kinetic decomposition. This study has also evidenced that the elements diffusion at phases interfaces is responsible for the alloy decomposition kinetic in long lasting.We have also started a study of the alloy radiation induced segregation. For that purpose, atomistic kinetic model has been performed modeling defects migration through a perfect planar sink. It have been shown, I agreement with former studies, that chromium tends to segregate in the vicinity of sinks at low temperatures and deplete at high temperature. (author) [fr

  4. Alloy formation during chromium electrodeposition at niobium cathode in molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, S.A.; Glagolevskaya, A.L.

    1993-01-01

    Alloy formation during electrodeposition of chromium at niobium cathode is studied in salt melts. It is shown that during chromium electrodeposition at niobium support intermetallic compound Cr 2 Nb is formed. Thermodynamic characteristics of Cr 0.66 Nb 0.33 alloy are determined. 10 refs., 1 fig

  5. High chromium nickel base alloys hot cracking susceptibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirand, G.; Primault, C.; Robin, V.

    2014-01-01

    High Chromium nickel based alloys (FM52) have a higher ductility dip cracking sensitivity. New filler material with higher niobium and molybdenum content are developed to decrease the hot crack formation. The behavior of these materials is studied by coupling microstructural analyses and hot cracking test, PVR test. The metallurgical analyses illustrate an Nb and Mo enrichment of the inter-dendritic spaces of the new materials. A niobium high content (FM52MSS) induces the formation of primary carbide at the end of solidification. The PVR test reveal a solidification crack sensitivity of the new materials, and a lowest ductility dip cracking sensitivity for the filler material 52MSS. (authors)

  6. Characteristics of oxidation of low-alloyed chromium in nitrogen tetroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamenev, A.Ya.; Goncharova, N.V.; Kopets, Z.V.; Tedushin, E.E.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of N 2 O 4 on corrosion properties of chromium-based alloys is studied. The method of structural materials analysis is described using as an example chromium-based alloys in the flow of chemically active N 2 O 4 at high temperatures. The method has been used to study corrosive behaviour of chromium at temperatures 923, 1073 and 1273 K. The time of exposure amounts up to 140 hours. The wave-like time dependence of mass velocity variation has been observed for all chromium samples under test. The time of the alloy exposure to N 2 O 4 medium and the nature of the alloying affect this dependence. The given metallograhic studies of chromium alloys show complex structure of the surface layer

  7. Iron -chromium alloys and free surfaces: from ab initio calculations to thermodynamic modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levesque, M.

    2010-11-01

    Ferritic steels possibly strengthened by oxide dispersion are candidates as structural materials for generation IV and fusion nuclear reactors. Their use is limited by incomplete knowledge of the iron-chromium phase diagram at low temperatures and of the phenomena inducing preferential segregation of one element at grain boundaries or at surfaces. In this context, this work contributes to the multi-scale study of the model iron-chromium alloy and their free surfaces by numerical simulations. This study begins with ab initio calculations of properties related to the mixture of atoms of iron and chromium. We highlight complex dependency of the magnetic moments of the chromium atoms on their local chemical environment. Surface properties are also proving sensitive to magnetism. This is the case of impurity segregation of chromium in iron and of their interactions near the surface. In a second step, we construct a simple energy model for high numerical efficiency. It is based on pair interactions on a rigid lattice to which are given local chemical environment and temperature dependencies. With this model, we reproduce the ab initio results at zero temperature and experimental results at high temperature. We also deduce the solubility limits at all intermediate temperatures with mean field approximations that we compare to Monte Carlo simulations. The last step of our work is to introduce free surfaces in our model. We then study the effect of ab initio calculated bulk and surface properties on surface segregation.Finally, we calculate segregation isotherms. We therefore propose an evolution model of surface composition of iron-chromium alloys as a function of bulk composition. which are given local chemical environment and temperature dependencies. With this model, we reproduce the ab initio results at zero temperature and experimental results at high temperature. We also deduce the solubility limits at all intermediate temperatures with mean field approximations that

  8. Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045, and N06696), Nikel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) seamless pipe and tube

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045, and N06696), Nikel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) seamless pipe and tube

  9. Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045 and N06696), Nickel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) plate, sheet and strip

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045 and N06696), Nickel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) plate, sheet and strip

  10. Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045, and N06696), Nickel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) rod, bar, and wire

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045, and N06696), Nickel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) rod, bar, and wire

  11. Use of thermogravimetry and thermodynamic calculations for specifying chromium diffusion occurring in alloys containing chromium carbides during high temperature oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthod, Patrice; Conrath, Elodie

    2015-01-01

    The chromium diffusion is of great importance for the high temperature oxidation behaviour of the chromium-rich carbides-strengthened superalloys. These ones contain high chromium quantities for allowing them well resisting hot corrosion by constituting and maintaining a continuous external scale of chromia. Knowing how chromium can diffuse in such alloys is thus very useful for predicting the sustainability of their chromia-forming behaviour. Since Cr diffusion occurs through the external part of the alloy already affected by the previous steps of oxidation (decarburized subsurface) it is more judicious to specify this diffusion during the oxidation process itself. This was successfully carried out in this work in the case of a model chromia-forming nickel-based alloy containing chromium carbides, Ni(bal.)–25Cr–0.5C (in wt.%). This was done by specifying, using real-time thermogravimetry, the mass gain kinetic due to oxidation, and by combining it with the post-mortem determination of the Cr concentration profiles in subsurface. The values of D Cr thus obtained for 1000, 1050 and 1100 °C in the alloy subsurface are consistent with the values obtained in earlier works for similar alloy's chemical compositions. - Highlights: • A Ni25Cr0.50C alloy was oxidized at high temperature in a thermo-balance. • The mass gain files were analysed to specify the Cr 2 O 3 volatilization constant K v . • Concentration profiles were acquired to specify the chromium gradient. • The diffusion coefficient of chromium through the subsurface was deduced. • The obtained diffusion coefficient is consistent with values previously obtained.

  12. Alloying effect of 3D transition elements on the ductility of chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Y.; Fukumori, J.; Morinaga, M.; Furui, M.; Nambu, T.; Sakaki, T.

    1996-01-01

    Chromium and its alloys have good corrosion resistance in corrosive environments and good oxidation resistance at high temperatures. In addition, they exhibit an excellent combination of low density and high creep strength. However, there is still a large barrier to the practical use because of their poor ductility at room temperature. According to recent investigations, an environmental effect was found on the ductility of high purity polycrystalline chromium. In this study, in order to find a way to improve the ductility of chromium at room temperature, the alloying effect on the ductility of chromium was investigated experimentally in several test environments

  13. Influence of Chromium and Molybdenum on the Corrosion of Nickel Based Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, J R; Gray, J; Szmodis, A W; Orme, C A

    2005-01-01

    The addition of chromium and molybdenum to nickel creates alloys with exceptional corrosion resistance in a diverse range of environments. This study examines the complementary roles of Cr and Mo in Ni alloy passivation. Four nickel alloys with varying amounts of chromium and molybdenum were studied in 1 molar salt solutions over a broad pH range. The passive corrosion and breakdown behavior of the alloys suggests that chromium is the primary element influencing general corrosion resistance. The breakdown potential was nearly independent of molybdenum content, while the repassivation potential is strongly dependant on the molybdenum content. This indicates that chromium plays a strong role in maintaining the passivity of the alloy, while molybdenum acts to stabilize the passive film after a localized breakdown event

  14. Chromium depletion on the surface of nickel based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dille, E.R.; McDonald, J.L.; Berry, P.

    1988-01-01

    Successful selection of corrosion resistant materials for flue gas desuflurization applications is tricky business at best. Most simulated, accelerated, concentrated corrosion tests try to rank materials to known corrosive condition. If you check the actual data, occasionally you find anomalies such as highly corrosion resistant materials performing below what was expected, while the rest of the group is performing normally. In the field the authors have observed similar results with few acceptable explanations. Recently the authors have found numerous cases of Ni/Cr/Mo alloys with a surface analysis below the ASTM specified range for the element chromium. These surface analysis have been done with a portable X-ray Fluorescent Instrument with the initial results confirmed by an independent laboratory

  15. Metallurgical characterization of new palladium-containing cobalt chromium and nickel chromium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Raghav

    Recently introduced to the market has been an entirely new subclass of casting alloy composition whereby palladium (˜25 wt%) is added to traditional base metal alloys such as CoCr and NiCr. Objectives. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microstructure and Vickers hardness of two new CoPdCr and one new NiPdCr alloy and compare them to traditional CoCr and NiCr alloys. Methods. The casting alloys investigated were: CoPdCr-A (Noble Crown NF, The Argen Corporation), CoPdCr-I (Callisto CP+, Ivoclar Vivadent), NiPdCr (Noble Crown, Argen), CoCr (Argeloy N.P. Special, Argen), and NiCr (Argeloy N.P. Star, Argen). As-cast cylindrical alloy specimens were mounted in epoxy resin and prepared with standard metallographic procedures, i.e. grinding with successive grades of SiC paper and polishing with alumina suspensions. The alloys were examined with an optical microscope, SEM/EPMA, and XRD to gain insight into their microstructure, composition, and crystal structure. Vickers hardness (VHN) was measured and statistically analyzed by one way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test (alpha=0.05). Results. Optical microscopy showed a dendritic microstructure for all alloys. The Pd-containing alloys appear to possess a more complex microstructure. SEM/EPMA showed Cr to be rather uniformly distributed in the matrix with palladium tending to be segregated apart from Mo and Ni or Co. Areas of different composition may explain the poor electrochemical results noted in previous studies. XRD suggested the main phase in the Ni-containing solutions was a face centered cubic Ni solid solution, whereas the CoCr exhibited a hexagonal crystal structure that was altered to face centered cubic when Pd was included in the composition. For Vickers hardness, the Co-containing alloys possessed a greater hardness than the Ni-containing alloys. However, the incorporation of Pd in CoCr and NiCr had only a slight effect on microhardness. Conclusion. Overall, the inclusion of palladium increases the

  16. Liquid phase surface nitriding of Ti-6Al-4V pre-placed with chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahedi Nemani, Alireza, E-mail: alireza_vahedi@ut.ac.ir; Sohi, M. Heydarzadeh; Amadeh, A.A.; Ghaffari, Mahya

    2016-08-01

    In this study, liquid phase surface nitriding of Ti-6Al-4V was carried out by pre-placing of chromium powder on the substrate and subsequent Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) surface melting. The effect of the application of low and high heat inputs on the microstructure, microhardness and wear resistance of the treated layers were studied. Surface alloying with chromium in a nitrogen containing atmosphere resulted in the formation of hard intermetallic compounds such as TiN, Cr{sub 2}N and TiCr{sub 2}. Moreover, the presence of beta stabilizer chromium together with the application of high heat input during surface treatment resulted in the presence of beta phase at room temperature. However, applying low heat input could not prevent transformation of beta to martensite. The hardness of the layers fabricated at high and low heat inputs were respectively 1050 and 1200 HV{sub 0.3} compared to average 280 HV{sub 0.3} for the as-received material. Liquid phase surface treatment of titanium at the aforementioned conditions improved the wear resistance. The lowest weight loss belonged to the specimen with the beta phase matrix. The formation of the fairly ductile bcc-β phase hindered crack nucleation during wear. The weight loss in this condition was 7 times lower than that of the base material. - Highlights: • Liquid phase surface nitriding of Ti-6Al-4V was carried out by TIG surface melting. • Cr powder was pre-placed on the surface as the beta stabilizer alloying element. • The treated layers were characterized by OM, SEM and X-ray diffraction pattern. • Hardness of the layers increased up to 3 times higher than that of the base alloy. • Liquid phase surface alloying improved the wear resistance.

  17. Studies on tempering at different temperatures of the beta phase retained by water quenching in uranium-chromium alloys containing from 0,37 to 4 atoms of chromium percent (1963); Etude du revenu a differentes temperatures de la phase beta retenue par trempe a l'eau dans les alliages uranium-chrome contenant de 0,37 a 4 atomes pour cent de chrome (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degois, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1962-07-15

    The author made a systematic study of the annealing of the beta phase retained by water-quenching in uranium-chromium alloys of concentrations between 0.37 and 4 of chromium percent. It is shown that alloys containing less than 1 atom per cent are transformed at temperatures between room temperature and 250 deg. C according to a bainitic process involving activation energies of the order of 14,500 cal/mole. Alloys containing more than 1 at. per cent are transformed at temperature between 400 and 650 deg. C by way of a germination and growth process involving an activation energy of the order of 33,000 cal/mole. The limit of solubility of chromium in beta uranium plays a fundamental part in the transformations of the alloys. The TTT curves of beta {yields} alpha transformation were drawn by the use of a thermo-dilatometer of very low inertia. The transformation law may be expressed 1 x = exp. (kt){sup n}; x represents the degree of progression of the transformation, k a coefficient dependent on the temperature, and n an exponent depending only on the composition of the alloy. A micrographic and crystallographic study confirmed the results found by dilatometry; in particular it was possible to measure the progression rates of the transformation. (author) [French] L'auteur a fait une etude systematique du revenu de la phase beta retenue par trempe a l'eau dans les alliages uranium-chrome de teneurs comprises entre 0,37 et 4 atomes pour cent de chrome. Il a montre que les alliages qui contiennent moins de 1 atome pour cent de chrome se transforment aux temperatures comprises entre la temperature ordinaire et 250 deg. C selon un processus bainitique mettant en jeu des energies d'activatlon de l'ordre de 14500 cal/mole. Les alliages qui renferment plus de 1 atome pour cent de chrome se transforment aux temperatures comprises entre 400 et 650 deg. C suivant un processus de germination et croissance mettant en jeu une energie d'activation de l'ordre de -33000 cal/mole. La

  18. The effect of copper, chromium, and zirconium on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, John A.; Shenoy, R. N.

    1991-01-01

    The present study evaluates the effect of the systematic variation of copper, chromium, and zirconium contents on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a 7000-type aluminum alloy. Fracture toughness and tensile properties are evaluated for each alloy in both the peak aging, T8, and the overaging, T73, conditions. Results show that dimpled rupture essentially characterize the fracture process in these alloys. In the T8 condition, a significant loss of toughness is observed for alloys containing 2.5 pct Cu due to the increase in the quantity of Al-Cu-Mg-rich S-phase particles. An examination of T8 alloys at constant Cu levels shows that Zr-bearing alloys exhibit higher strength and toughness than the Cr-bearing alloys. In the T73 condition, Cr-bearing alloys are inherently tougher than Zr-bearing alloys. A void nucleation and growth mechanism accounts for the loss of toughness in these alloys with increasing copper content.

  19. Assessment of corrosion resistance of cast cobalt- and nickel-chromium dental alloys in acidic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercieca, Sven; Caligari Conti, Malcolm; Buhagiar, Joseph; Camilleri, Josette

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the degradation resistance of nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) and cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloys used as a base material for partial dentures in contact with saliva. Wiron® 99 and Wironit Extra-Hard® were selected as representative casting alloys for Ni-Cr and Co-Cr alloys, respectively. The alloys were tested in contact with deionized water, artificial saliva and acidified artificial saliva. Material characterization was performed by X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and microhardness and nanohardness testing. The corrosion properties of the materials were then analyzed using open circuit potential analysis and potentiodynamic analysis. Alloy leaching in solution was assessed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry techniques. Co-Cr alloy was more stable than the Ni-Cr alloy in all solutions tested. Leaching of nickel and corrosion attack was higher in Ni-Cr alloy in artificial saliva compared with the acidified saliva. The corrosion resistance of the Co-Cr alloy was seen to be superior to that of the Ni-Cr alloy, with the former exhibiting a lower corrosion current in all test solutions. Microstructural topographical changes were observed for Ni-Cr alloy in contact with artificial saliva. The Ni-Cr alloy exhibited microstructural changes and lower corrosion resistance in artificial saliva. The acidic changes did not enhance the alloy degradation. Ni-Cr alloys are unstable in solution and leach nickel. Co-Cr alloys should be preferred for clinical use.

  20. Stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in primary water of PWR: study of chromium diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chetroiu, Bogdan-Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Alloy 600 (Ni-15%Cr-10%Fe) is known to be susceptible to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) in primary water of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). Recent studies have shown that chromium diffusion is a controlling rate step in the comprehension of SCC mechanism. In order to improve the understanding and the modelling of SCC of Alloy 600 in PWR primary medium the aim of this study was to collect data on kinetics diffusion of chromium. Volume and grain boundary diffusion of chromium in pure nickel and Alloy 600 (mono and poly-crystals) has been measured in the temperature range 678 K to 1060 K by using Secondary Ions Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) and Glow Discharge-Optical Spectrometry (GD-OES) techniques. A particular emphasis has been dedicated to the influence of plastic deformation on chromium diffusion in nickel single crystals (orientated <101>) for different metallurgical states. The experimental tests were carried out in order to compare the chromium diffusion coefficients in free lattice (not deformed), in pre-hardening specimens (4% and 20%) and in dynamic deformed tensile specimens at 773 K. It has been found that chromium diffusivity measured in dynamic plastic deformed creep specimens were six orders of magnitude greater than those obtained in not deformed or pre-hardening specimens. The enhancement of chromium diffusivity can be attributed to the presence of moving dislocations generated during plastic deformation. (author)

  1. Chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2 Whole wheat bread, 2 slices 2 Red wine, 5 ounces 1–13 Apple, unpeeled, 1 medium ... chromium or a placebo) might simply show the benefits of supplementation in a chromium-deficient population. Overall, ...

  2. Two phase titanium aluminide alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deevi, Seetharama C.; Liu, C. T.

    2001-01-01

    A two-phase titanic aluminide alloy having a lamellar microstructure with little intercolony structures. The alloy can include fine particles such as boride particles at colony boundaries and/or grain boundary equiaxed structures. The alloy can include alloying additions such as .ltoreq.10 at % W, Nb and/or Mo. The alloy can be free of Cr, V, Mn, Cu and/or Ni and can include, in atomic %, 45 to 55% Ti, 40 to 50% Al, 1 to 5% Nb, 0.3 to 2% W, up to 1% Mo and 0.1 to 0.3% B. In weight %, the alloy can include 57 to 60% Ti, 30 to 32% Al, 4 to 9% Nb, up to 2% Mo, 2 to 8% W and 0.02 to 0.08% B.

  3. Corrosion resistance of nickel alloys with chromium and silicon to the red fuming nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurvich, L.Ya.; Zhirnov, A.D.

    1994-01-01

    Corrosion and electrochemical behaviour of binary Ni-Cr, Ni-Si nickel and ternary Ni-Cr-Si alloys in the red fuming nitric acid (RFNA) (8-% of HNO 3 +20% of N 2 O 4 ) is studied. It is shown that nickel alloying with chromium improves its corrosion resistance to the red fuming nitric acid. Nickel alloying with silicon in quantities of up to 5 % reduces, and up to 10%-increases abruptly the corrosion resistance with subsequent decrease of the latter after the further increase of concentration. Ni-15% of Cr alloy alloying with silicon increases monotonously the corrosion resistance. 10 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Potentiometric determination of the tungsten content of tantalum-tungsten alloys with chromium II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavra, Z.; Ronen, S.; Levin, R.

    1977-05-01

    A method was developed for the potentiometric determination of the tungsten content of tantalum-tungsten alloys of different compositions. These were dissolved under conditions that enabled the tungsten content to be determined with chromium (II). Phosphoric acid was selected as a suitable complexing agent for the prevention of the precipitation of tungsten and tantalum compounds. The use of chromium (II) required an oxygen-tight system and therefore the work was carried out in suitable vessels for storage and tritation

  5. [Effect of fluoride concentration on the corrosion behavior of cobalt-chromium alloy fabricated by two different technology processes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiuxia, Yang; Ying, Yang; Han, Xu; Di, Wu; Ke, Guo

    2016-02-01

    This study aims to determine the effect of fluoride concentration on the corrosion behavior of cobalt-chromium alloy fabricated by two different technology processes in a simulated oral environment. A total of 15 specimens were employed with selective laser melting (SLM) and another 15 for traditional casting (Cast) in cobalt-chromium alloy powders and blocks with the same material composition. The corrosion behavior of the specimens was studied by potentiodynamic polarization test under different oral environments with varying solubilities of fluorine (0, 0.05%, and 0.20% for each) in acid artificial saliva (pH = 5.0). The specimens were soaked in fluorine for 24 h, and the surface microstructure was observed under a field emission scanning electron microscope after immersing the specimens in the test solution at constant temperature. The corrosion potential (Ecorr) value of the cobalt-chromium alloy cast decreased with increasing fluoride concentration in acidic artificial saliva. The Ecorr, Icorr, and Rp values of the cobalt-chromium alloy fabricated by two different technology processes changed significantly when the fluoride concentration was 0.20% (P technology processes exhibited a statistically significant difference. The Icorr value of the cobalt-chromium alloy cast was higher than that in the SLM group cobalt-chromium alloy when the fluoride concentration was 0.20% (P technology processes. The corrosion resistance of the cobalt-chromium alloy cast was worse than that of the SLM group cobalt-chromium alloy when the fluoride concentration was 0.20%.

  6. Study of effect of chromium on titanium dioxide phase transformation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Study of effect of chromium on titanium dioxide phase transformation by A Bellifa (pp 669–677). Figure S1. Structural ... 4 × 1⋅9486; 2 × 1⋅9799. Octahedral packing. 2 × 2 shared edges. 8 free edges. 3 shared edges. 4 corners. 5 free edges. 2 parallel shared edges. 2 corners. 10 free edges. O. O. Coordination scheme.

  7. Galvanic Interaction between Chalcopyrite and Pyrite with Low Alloy and High Carbon Chromium Steel Ball

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asghar Azizi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to investigate the galvanic interaction between pyrite and chalcopyrite with two types of grinding media (low alloy and high carbon chromium steel ball in grinding of a porphyry copper sulphide ore. Results indicated that injection of different gases into mill altered the oxidation-reduction environment during grinding. High carbon chromium steel ball under nitrogen gas has the lowest galvanic current, and low alloy steel ball under oxygen gas had the highest galvanic current. Also, results showed that the media is anodic relative to pyrite and chalcopyrite, and therefore pyrite or chalcopyrite with a higher rest potential acted as the cathode, whilst the grinding media with a lower rest potential acted as the anode, when they are electrochemically contacted. It was also found that low alloy steel under oxygen produced the highest amount of EDTA extractable iron in the slurry, whilst high carbon chromium steel under nitrogen atmosphere led to the lowest amount.

  8. Adhesive wear of iron chromium nickel silicon manganese molybdenum niobium alloys with duplex structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lugscheider, E.; Deppe, E.; Ambroziak, A.; Melzer, A.

    1991-01-01

    Iron nickel chromium manganese silicon and iron chromium nickel manganese silicon molybdenum niobium alloys have a so-called duplex structure in a wide concentration range. This causes an excellent resistance to wear superior in the case of adhesive stress with optimized concentrations of manganese, silicon, molybdenum and niobium. The materials can be used for welded armouring structures wherever cobalt and boron-containing alloy systems are not permissible, e.g. in nuclear science. Within the framework of pre-investigations for manufacturing of filling wire electrodes, cast test pieces were set up with duplex structure, and their wear behavior was examined. (orig.) [de

  9. Preparation of Copper and Chromium Alloyed Layers on Pure Titanium by Plasma Surface Alloying Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaojing; Li, Meng; Wang, Huizhen; Zhang, Xiangyu; Tang, Bin

    2015-05-01

    Cu-Cr alloyed layers with different Cu and Cr contents on pure titanium were obtained by means of plasma surface alloying technology. The microstructure, chemical composition and phase composition of Cu-Cr alloyed layers were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The experimental results demonstrate that the alloyed layers are bonded strongly to pure titanium substrate and consist of unbound Ti, CuTi, Cu3Ti, CuTi3 and Cr2Ti. The thickness of Cu5Cr5 and Cu7Cr3 alloyed layer are about 18 μm and 28 μm, respectively. The antibacterial properties against gram-negative Escherichia coli (E.coli, ATCC10536) and gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus, ATCC6538) of untreated pure titanium and Cu-Cr alloyed specimen were investigated by live/dead fluorescence staining method. The study shows that Cu-Cr alloyed layers exhibit excellent antibacterial activities against both E.coli and S.aureus within 24 h, which may be attributed to the formation of Cu-containing phases.

  10. Tensile strength of laser welded cobalt-chromium alloy with and without an argon atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartari, Anna; Clark, Robert K F; Juszczyk, Andrzej S; Radford, David R

    2010-06-01

    The tensile strength and depth of weld of two cobalt chromium alloys before and after laser welding with and without an argon gas atmosphere were investigated. Using two cobalt chromium alloys, rod shaped specimens (5 cm x 1.5 mm) were cast. Specimens were sand blasted, sectioned and welded with a pulsed Nd: YAG laser welding machine and tested in tension using an Instron universal testing machine. A statistically significant difference in tensile strength was observed between the two alloys. The tensile strength of specimens following laser welding was significantly less than the unwelded controls. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the micro-structure of the cast alloy was altered in the region of the weld. No statistically significant difference was found between specimens welded with or without an argon atmosphere.

  11. Modeling of chromium precipitation in Fe-Cr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallenius, J.; Olsson, P.; Lagerstedt, C.; Sandberg, N.; Chakarova, R.; Pontikis, V.

    2004-01-01

    We have implemented a set of Embedded Atom Method (EAM) potentials for simulation of Fe-Cr alloys. The functions for the pure elements were fitted to the respective elastic constants, vacancy formation energy, and thermal expansion coefficients. For Cr, properties of the paramagnetic state were applied, providing a positive Cauchy pressure and hence applicability of the EAM. By relaxing the requirement of reproducing the pressure-volume relation at short interaction distances, stability of the self-interstitial could be obtained. Our Fe-potential gives E lang110rang f -E lang111rang f =-0.23 eV. Mixed Fe-Cr pair potentials were fitted to the calculated mixing enthalpy of ferromagnetic Fe-Cr, which is negative for Cr concentrations below 6%. Simulation of thermal aging in Fe-Cr alloys using a potential fitted to the mixing enthalpy of Fe-20Cr exhibited pronounced Cr-precipitation for temperatures below 900 K, in agreement with the phase diagram. No such ordering was observed at any temperature using a potential fitted to the mixing enthalpy of Fe-5Cr. Applied to recoil cascade simulations the new potentials predict a smaller number of surviving defects than potentials found in the literature. We obtain a cascade efficiency of 0.135 NRT for damage energies in between 10 and 20 keV. An enhanced probability for Cr atoms to end up in defect structures is observed

  12. Effects of surface finishing conditions on the biocompatibility of a nickel-chromium dental casting alloy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGinley, Emma Louise

    2011-07-01

    To assess the effects of surface finishing condition (polished or alumina particle air abraded) on the biocompatibility of direct and indirect exposure to a nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) d.Sign®10 dental casting alloy on oral keratinocytes. Biocompatibility was performed by assessing cellular viability and morphology, metabolic activity, cellular toxicity and presence of inflammatory cytokine markers.

  13. Preparation, heat treatment, and mechanical properties of the uranium-5 weight percent chromium eutectic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, A.B.

    1980-10-01

    The eutectic alloy of uranium-5 wt % chromium (U-5Cr) was prepared from high-purity materials and cast into 1-in.-thick ingots. This material was given several simple heat treatments, the mechanical properties of these heat-treated samples were determined; and the microstructure was examined. Some data on the melting point and transformation temperatures were obtained

  14. Development of quantitative analysis for cadmium, lead and chromium in aluminum alloys by using x-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Satoshi; Kurusu, Kazuhiko; Kudou, Aiko

    2009-01-01

    A highly reliable quantitative analysis for cadmium, lead and chromium in aluminum alloys was developed. Standard samples were made by doping cadmium, lead and chromium into several aluminum alloys, and the composition of standard samples were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and gravimetric method. The calibration curves for these standard samples by using WD-XRF and ED-XRF exhibited linear correlation. Slope of calibration curves for Al-Cu alloy and Al-Zn-Mg alloy were smaller than other alloy's one, because of the effect by coexistent elements. Then, all calibration curves agreed with each other by performing correction with α-coefficient method. (author)

  15. Passivation and corrosion behaviours of cobalt and cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metikos-Hukovic, M.; Babic, R.

    2007-01-01

    Passivation and corrosion behaviour of the cobalt and cobalt-base alloy Co30Cr6Mo was studied in a simulated physiological solution containing chloride and bicarbonate ions and with pH of 6.8. The oxido-reduction processes included solid state transformations occurring at the cobalt/electrolyte interface are interpreted using theories of surface electrochemistry. The dissolution of cobalt is significantly suppressed by alloying it with chromium and molybdenum, since the alloy exhibited 'chromium like' passivity. The structural and protective properties of passive oxide films formed spontaneously at the open circuit potential or during the anodic polarization were studied using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in the wide frequency range

  16. Theory of alloy phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, R.E.; Ehrenreich, H.; Bennett, L.H.

    1977-01-01

    Various non-thermodynamic approaches to understanding and predicting phase diagrams are explored from the viewpoint of solid-state physics. The review is intended to indicate the scope of activity and some of the progress which has been made

  17. Application of the Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy for Chromium Effect Investigation in Binary Fe-Cr Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sojak, S.; Krsjak, V.; Slugen, V.; Stancek, S.; Petriska, M.; Vitazek, K.; Stacho, M.

    2008-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) is one of the non-destructive techniques applied with advantage for evaluation of the radiation treated materials microstructure. In this work, the PAS was used for study of different Fe-Cr alloys implanted by ions of helium. Investigation was focused on the chromium effect and the radiation defects resistance. In particular, the vacancy type defects (mono-vacancies, vacancy clusters) have been studied. The results show that the specific content of chromium has important influence on the size and distribution of induced defects. (authors)

  18. [The effect of hydrogen peroxide on the electrochemical corrosion properties and metal ions release of nickel-chromium dental alloys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jue; Qiao, Guang-yan

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the effect of hydrogen peroxide on the electrochemical corrosion and metal ions release of nickel-chromium dental alloys. The corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium dental alloys was compared by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization curve (PD) methods in artificial saliva after immersed in different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide for 112 h. The metal ions released from nickel-chromium dental alloys to the artificial saliva were detected after electrochemical measurements using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The data was statistically analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) using SPSS 13.0 software package. The electrochemical experiment showed that the sequence of polarization resistance in equivalent circuit (Rct), corrosion potential (Ecorr), pitting breakdown potential (Eb), and the difference between Ecorr and Eb representing the "pseudo-passivation" (δE) of nickel-chromium alloys in artificial saliva was 30% alloys to the artificial saliva, and the order of the concentrations of metal ions was 0% corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium dental alloys decrease after immersed in different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide for 112 h. Nickel-chromium dental alloys are more prone to corrosion in the artificial saliva with the concentration of hydrogen peroxide increased, and more metal ions are released in the artificial saliva.

  19. Chromium Extraction via Chemical Processing of Fe-Cr Alloys Fine Powder with High Carbon Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, D. M.; Navarro, R. C. S.; Souza, R. F. M.; Brocchi, E. A.

    2017-06-01

    Ferrous alloys are important raw materials for special steel production. In this context, alloys from the Fe-Cr system, with typical Cr weight fraction ranging from 0.45 to 0.95, are prominent, particularly for the stainless steel industry. During the process in which these alloys are obtained, there is considerable production of fine powder, which could be reused after suitable chemical treatment, for example, through coupling pyrometallurgical and hydrometallurgical processes. In the present study, the extraction of chromium from fine powder generated during the production of a Fe-Cr alloy with high C content was investigated. Roasting reactions were performed at 1073 K, 1173 K, and 1273 K (800 °C, 900 °C, and 1000 °C) with 300 pct (w/w) excess NaOH in an oxidizing atmosphere (air), followed by solubilization in deionized water, selective precipitation, and subsequent calcination at 1173 K (900 °C) in order to convert the obtained chromium hydroxide to Cr2O3. The maximum achieved Cr recovery was around 86 pct, suggesting that the proposed chemical route was satisfactory regarding the extraction of the chromium initially present. Moreover, after X-ray diffraction analysis, the final produced oxide has proven to be pure Cr2O3 with a mean crystallite size of 200 nm.

  20. Alloy phase stability and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stocks, G.M.; Pope, E.P.; Giamei, A.F.

    1991-01-01

    At the level of basic quantum theory the papers in this symposium reflect the great progress that has been made in understanding the physical properties of both ordered and disordered alloys based on Density Functional Theory (DFT). DFT provides a quantitative parameter-free (often referred to as first principles) theory of the ground state properties of these systems. This general approach has also been used in combination with classical elasticity and dislocation theory to provide the first quantitative understanding of some of the mechanical properties of intermetallic alloys. Recent advances have built on DFT theory to provide the first glimpses of a theory of the finite temperature phase stability of alloys. It is the strength of these first principles theories that the understanding of materials properties is in terms of the underlying electronic structure. At the level of atomistic simulation, based on semi-empirical potentials, again much progress has been made in understanding the properties of extended defects such as grain boundaries and dislocations. On the experimental front increasingly sophisticated tools are being brought to bear in order to understand both the underlying electronic structure and detailed atomic arrangements. This information, together with input from theory, is playing an increasing role in guiding alloy design efforts. At the more practical level a number of these sophisticated alloy design efforts have in recent years produced impressive results across a broad front. The properties of existing materials are continually being improved and new ones developed. Often this progress is based on a deeper understanding of the properties at the atomistic and electronic level. The design of new ordered intermetallic alloys that have reached or are reaching commercialization represents one of the major achievements of this investment of intellectual resources

  1. Study of the quenching and subsequent return to room temperature of uranium-chromium, uranium-iron, and uranium-molybdenum alloys containing only small amounts of the alloying element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaplace, J.

    1960-09-01

    By means of an apparatus which makes possible thermal pre-treatments in vacuo, quenching carried out in a high purity argon atmosphere, and simultaneous recording of time temperature cooling and thermal contraction curves, the author has examined the transformations which occur in uranium-chromium, uranium-iron and uranium-molybdenum alloys during their quenching and subsequent return to room temperature. For uranium-chromium and uranium-iron alloys, the temperature at which the γ → β transformation starts varies very little with the rate of cooling. For uranium-molybdenum alloys containing 2,8 atom per cent of Mo, this temperature is lowered by 120 deg. C for a cooling rate of 500 deg. C/mn. The temperature at which the β → α transformation starts is lowered by 170 deg. C for a cooling rate of 500 deg. C/mn in the case of uranium-chromium alloy containing 0,37 atom per cent of Cr. The temperature is little affected in the case of uranium-iron alloys. The addition of chromium or iron makes it possible to conserve the form β at ordinary temperatures after quenching from the β and γ regions. The β phase is particularly unstable and changes into needles of the α form even at room temperatures according to an autocatalytic transformation law similar to the austenitic-martensitic transformation law in the case of iron. The β phase obtained by quenching from the β phase region is more stable than that obtained by quenching from the γ region. Chromium is a more effective stabiliser of the β phase than is iron. Unfortunately it causes serious surface cracking. The β → α transformation in uranium-chromium alloys has been followed at room temperature by means of micro-cinematography. The author has not observed the direct γ → α transformation in uranium-molybdenum alloys containing 2,8 per cent of molybdenum even for cooling rates of up to 2000 deg. C/s. He has however observed the formation of several martensitic structures. (author) [fr

  2. Phase diagrams for surface alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Asbjørn; Ruban, Andrei; Stoltze, Per

    1997-01-01

    We discuss surface alloy phases and their stability based on surface phase diagrams constructed from the surface energy as a function of the surface composition. We show that in the simplest cases of pseudomorphic overlayers there are four generic classes of systems, characterized by the sign...... is based on density-functional calculations using the coherent-potential approximation and on effective-medium theory. We give self-consistent density-functional results for the segregation energy and surface mixing energy for all combinations of the transition and noble metals. Finally we discuss...

  3. Microstructure and phase stability of W-Cr alloy prepared by spark plasma sintering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vilémová, Monika; Illková, Ksenia; Lukáč, František; Matějíček, Jiří; Klečka, Jakub; Leitner, J.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 127, February (2018), s. 173-178 ISSN 0920-3796 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA17-23964S Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Tungsten-chromium alloy * Phase stability * Decomposition * Thermal conductivity * Self-passivating alloys * Spark plasma sintering Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials OBOR OECD: Materials engineering Impact factor: 1.319, year: 2016 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S092037961830005X

  4. Anodic solubility and electrochemical machining of hard alloys on the base of chromium and titanium carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davydov, A D; Klepikov, A N; Malofeeva, A N; Moroz, I I

    1985-01-01

    The regularities of anodic behaviour and electrochemical machining (ECM) of the samples of three materials with the following compositions: 25% of Cr/sub 3/C/sub 2/, 15% of Ni, 70% of TiC, 25% of Ni, 5% of Cr, 70% of TiC, 15% of Ni, 15% of Mo are investigated. It is shown that the electrochemical method is applicable to hard alloys machining on the base of chromium and titanium carbides, the machining of which mechanically meets serious difficulties. The alloys machining rate by a mobile cathode constitutes about 0.5 mm/min.

  5. The suppression of dissolution for alloy 690 in high temperature and high pressure water with chromium ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Toshio; Fujimoto, Shinji; Ohtani, Saburou; Watanabe, Masanori; Hirao, Kyozo; Okumoto, Masaru; Shibaike, Hiroyuki.

    1994-01-01

    As the material of heat exchanger tubes for PWRs, the nickel alloys such as alloy 690 and alloy 600 have been used, but 58 Ni and 60 Co contained as an impurity elute in primary cooling water, and are radioactivated, in this way, they become the cause of radiation exposure. By increasing chromium concentration, the corrosion resistance of nickel alloys is improved, and for modern heat exchangers, the alloy 690, of which the chromium content is increased up to 30%, has been adopted, and excellent results have been obtained. In this research, aiming at the further reduction of radiation exposure, by increasing the chromium concentration in surface layer using ion implantation technology, the change of the corrosion behavior of alloy 690 in high temperature, high pressure water was investigated. The chemical composition of the alloy 690 used, and the making of plate specimens are shown. The polarization behavior of alloy 690 in 0.1 mol/l sulfuric acid deaerated at normal temperature is reported, and the effect of suppressing dissolution was remarkable in the specimens with much implantation. The electrochemical behavior of alloy 690 in simulated cooling water was investigated. Immobile case has high chromium content and is thin. (K.I.)

  6. Crevice corrosion kinetics of nickel alloys bearing chromium and molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zadorozne, N.S.; Giordano, C.M.; Rodríguez, M.A.; Carranza, R.M.; Rebak, R.B.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The crevice corrosion resistance of the tested alloys increased with PREN, which is mainly affected by their Mo content. ► Crevice corrosion kinetics was controlled by ohmic drop only in the more dilute chloride solutions. ► Charge transfer control was observed in concentrated chloride solutions. ► A critical ohmic drop was not necessary for crevice corrosion to occur. ► Ohmic drop was a consequence of the crevice corrosion process in certain conditions. - Abstract: The crevice corrosion kinetics of alloys C-22, C-22HS and HYBRID-BC1 was studied in several chloride solutions at 90 °C. The crevice corrosion resistance of the alloys increased with PREN (Pitting Resistance Equivalent Number), which is mainly affected by the Mo content in the alloys. The crevice corrosion kinetics of the three alloys was analyzed at potentials slightly higher than the repassivation potential. Crevice propagation was controlled by ohmic drop in the more dilute chloride solutions, and by charge transfer in the more concentrated chloride solutions. Ohmic drop was not a necessary condition for crevice corrosion to occur.

  7. A determination, using solid zirconia electrolytes, of the activities of chromium oxide in ferrochromium alloys and slags at 1650 degrees Celsius

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wellbeloved, D.B.; Finn, C.W.P.

    1982-01-01

    This report describes the development of a method in which solid zirconia electrolytes are used in the determination of the activities of chromium and chromium oxide in ferrochromium alloys and slags at 1650 degrees Celsius. Problems related to the cracking of electrolytes as a result of thermal shock, the dissolution of electrolytes in slags, and electrical contacts are discussed. Results for the iron-chromium system at 1650 degrees Celsius are found to be in good agreement with published findings. A limited number of results are reported for slag, but these are inconclusive because there was contamination from container materials. A 'gas-phase' cell is described that overcomes most of the problems encountered

  8. First-principles studies of chromium line-ordered alloys in a molybdenum disulfide monolayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriambelaza, N. F.; Mapasha, R. E.; Chetty, N.

    2017-08-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed to study the thermodynamic stability, structural and electronic properties of various chromium (Cr) line-ordered alloy configurations in a molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) hexagonal monolayer for band gap engineering. Only the molybdenum (Mo) sites were substituted at each concentration in this study. For comparison purposes, different Cr line-ordered alloy and random alloy configurations were studied and the most thermodynamically stable ones at each concentration were identified. The configurations formed by the nearest neighbor pair of Cr atoms are energetically most favorable. The line-ordered alloys are constantly lower in formation energy than the random alloys at each concentration. An increase in Cr concentration reduces the lattice constant of the MoS2 system following the Vegard’s law. From density of states analysis, we found that the MoS2 band gap is tunable by both the Cr line-ordered alloys and random alloys with the same magnitudes. The reduction of the band gap is mainly due to the hybridization of the Cr 3d and Mo 4d orbitals at the vicinity of the band edges. The band gap engineering and magnitudes (1.65 eV to 0.86 eV) suggest that the Cr alloys in a MoS2 monolayer are good candidates for nanotechnology devices.

  9. Charge transfer in chromium-transition metal alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulakowski, K.; Maksymowicz, A.

    1984-07-01

    The average T-matrix approximation is applied for calculations of charge transfer of 3d-electrons in transition metal alloys. The role of concentration, long-range and short-range atomic order is investigated. The results are in reasonable agreement with experimental data. (author)

  10. Effect of chromium and phosphorus on the physical properties of iron and titanium-based amorphous metallic alloy films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distefano, S.; Rameshan, R.; Fitzgerald, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    Amorphous iron and titanium-based alloys containing various amounts of chromium, phosphorus, and boron exhibit high corrosion resistance. Some physical properties of Fe and Ti-based metallic alloy films deposited on a glass substrate by a dc-magnetron sputtering technique are reported. The films were characterized using differential scanning calorimetry, stress analysis, SEM, XRD, SIMS, electron microprobe, and potentiodynamic polarization techniques.

  11. [The effect of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) on the surface properties of nickel-chromium dental casting alloys after electrochemical corrosion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Guang-yan; Zhang, Li-xia; Wang, Jue; Shen, Qing-ping; Su, Jian-sheng

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the effect of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) on the surface properties of nickel-chromium dental alloys after electrochemical corrosion. The surface morphology and surface structure of nickel-chromium dental alloys were examined by stereomicroscope and scanning electron microscopy before and after electrochemical tests in 0 g/L and 1.0 g/L EGCG artificial saliva. The surface element component and chemical states of nickel-chromium dental alloys were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectrograph after electrochemical tests in 0 g/L and 1.0 g/L EGCG artificial saliva. More serious corrosion happened on the surface of nickel-chromium alloy in 1.0 g/L EGCG artificial saliva than in 0 g/L EGCG. The diameters of corrosion pits were smaller, and the dendrite structure of the alloy surface was not affected in 0 g/L EGCG. While the diameters of corrosion pits were larger, the dendritic interval of the alloy surface began to merge, and the dendrite structure was fuzzy in 1.0 g/L EGCG. In addition, the O, Ni, Cr, Be, C and Mo elements were detected on the surface of nickel-chromium alloys after sputtered for 120 s in 0 g/L EGCG and 1.0 g/L EGCG artificial saliva after electrochemical corrosion, and the surface oxides were mainly NiO and Cr(2)O(3). Compared with 0 g/L EGCG artificial saliva, the content of O, NiO and Cr(2)O(3) were lower in 1.0 g/L EGCG. The results of surface morphology and the corrosion products both show that the corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium alloys become worse and the oxide content of corrosion products on the surface reduce in 1.0 g/L EGCG artificial saliva.

  12. Bonding evolution with sintering temperature in low alloyed steels with chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuentes-Pacheco L.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, high performance PM steels for automotive applications follow a processing route that comprises die compaction of water-atomized powder, followed by sintering and secondary treatments, and finishing operations. This study examines Cr-alloyed sintered steels with two level of alloying. In chromium-alloyed steels, the surface oxide on the powder is of critical importance for developing the bonding between the particles during sintering. Reduction of this oxide depends mainly on three factors: temperature, dew point of the atmosphere, and carbothermic reduction provided by the added graphite. The transformation of the initial surface oxide evolves sequence as temperature increases during sintering, depending on the oxide composition. Carbothermic reduction is supposed to be the controlling mechanism, even when sintering in hydrogen-containing atmospheres. The effect of carbothermic reduction can be monitored by investigating the behavior of the specimens under tensile testing, and studying the resultant fracture surfaces.

  13. The potential for using high chromium ferritic alloys for hydroprocessing reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antalffy, Leslie P.; Chaku, Pran N.; Canonico, Domenic A.; Pfeifer, Jeff A.; Alcorn, Douglas G.

    2002-01-01

    This paper outlines the development of hydroprocessing reactors and the parallel development of applicable steels for their high temperature and high pressure process environments. Trends in the development of newer processes for severe hydroprocessing applications have been increasing in operating hydrogen partial pressures and operating temperatures that require the development of new alloys to meet these more severe process environments. The paper outlines the properties of conventional hydroprocessing reactor materials and discusses the advantages of the advanced high chromium ferritic steel alloy Grade 91 (9Cr-1Mo-V) for high temperature hydroprocessing applications. Additionally, the alloys permitted for ASME Section I and Section VIII Division I construction, Grade 92 (Code Case 2179), and what will probably be called Grade 122 (Code Case 2180) are briefly introduced as possible future choices for hydroprocessing reactor construction. These three alloys contain 9-12% Cr and have time independent allowable stress values above 566 deg. C. These high, time independent, strength values provide materials that will in some cases permit extending hydroprocessing temperature limits by 112 deg. C. The paper provides room temperature and elevated temperature mechanical and toughness properties for the low chrome and Grade 91 materials and discusses the effects of hydrogen attack, and hydrogen and isothermal embrittlement. Fabrication aspects, including forming and welding are addressed. The paper discusses the environmental resistance of these alloys and investigates the possibility of utilizing excess wall metal thickness in these materials in less severe applications in lieu of the deposition of a higher chromium alloy weld overlay to overcome the corrosive effects of the process environment

  14. [Comparison of the clinical effects of selective laser melting deposition basal crowns and cobalt chromium alloy base crowns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing-min; Wang, Wei-qian; Ma, Jing-yuan

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the clinical effects of selective laser melting (SLM) deposition basal crowns and cobalt chromium alloy casting base crowns. One hundred and sixty eight patients treated with either SLM deposition basal crowns (110 teeth) or cobalt chromium alloy casting basal crowns (110 teeth) were followed-up for 1 month, 6 months, 12 months and 24 months. The revised standard of American Public Health Association was used to evaluate the clinical effect of restoration, including the color of porcelain crowns, gingival inflammation, gingival margin discoloration, and crack or fracture. Data analysis was conducted with SPSS 20 software package for Student's t test and Chi-square test. Six cases were lost to follow-up. The patients who were treated with SLM deposition basal crowns (104 teeth) and cobalt chromium alloy casting base crowns (101 teeth) completed the study. Patients were more satisfied with SLM deposition cobalt chromium alloy porcelain crowns. There was 1 prosthesis with poor marginal fit after 24 months of restoration in SLM crowns. There were 6 prostheses with edge coloring and 8 with poor marginal fit in cobalt chromium alloy casting base crowns, which was significantly different between the 2 groups(P<0.05). The SLM deposition copings results in smaller edge coloring and better marginal fit than those of cobalt-chrome copings. Patients are pleased with short-term clinical results.

  15. In vitro and in vivo corrosion evaluation of nickel-chromium- and copper-aluminum-based alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benatti, O F; Miranda, W G; Muench, A

    2000-09-01

    The low resistance to corrosion is the major problem related to the use of copper-aluminum alloys. This in vitro and in vivo study evaluated the corrosion of 2 copper-aluminum alloys (Cu-Al and Cu-Al-Zn) compared with a nickel-chromium alloy. For the in vitro test, specimens were immersed in the following 3 corrosion solutions: artificial saliva, 0.9% sodium chloride, and 1.0% sodium sulfide. For the in vivo test, specimens were embedded in complete dentures, so that one surface was left exposed. The 3 testing sites were (1) close to the oral mucosa (partial self-cleaning site), (2) surface exposed to the oral cavity (self-cleaning site), and (3) specimen bottom surface exposed to the saliva by means of a tunnel-shaped perforation (non-self-cleaning site). Almost no corrosion occurred with the nickel-chromium alloy, for either the in vitro or in vivo test. On the other hand, the 2 copper-aluminum-based alloys exhibited high corrosion in the sulfide solution. These same alloys also underwent high corrosion in non-self-cleaning sites for the in vivo test, although minimal attack was observed in self-cleaning sites. The nickel-chromium alloy presented high resistance to corrosion. Both copper-aluminum alloys showed considerable corrosion in the sulfide solution and clinically in the non-self-cleaning site. However, in self-cleaning sites these 2 alloys did not show substantial corrosion.

  16. Relative effects of chromium and niobium on microstructure and mechanical properties as a function of oxygen content in TiAl alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamirand, M.; Bonnentien, J.-L.; Ferriere, G.; Guerin, S.; Chevalier, J.-P.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of 2 at.% chromium and niobium on microstructure and mechanical properties of Ti-48Al-x(Cr, Nb) have been investigated for alloys with different oxygen content, ranging from ultra-high purity to doped alloys. Chromium and niobium additions have significant effects for the high purity alloys, whereas for alloys containing oxygen, no significant modification is observed due to the strong stabilizing effect of oxygen on the lamellar microstructure

  17. Electrochemical and corrosion behavior of two chromium dental alloys in artificial bioenvironments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to compare the corrosion and tarnish behavior of NiCrMo and CoCrMo cast dental alloys in artificial bio environments. The cobalt chromium alloys are known and used in dentistry for many years, but its difficult machinability because of the strength and hardness, is an argument for scientists to study alternative materials with comparable biocompatibility. On the other hand, for dentistry devices beside corrosion behavior is important the aesthetic so, the used alloys have to preserve their shining and do not stain. The corrosion resistance has been evaluated using the Atomic mass spectroscopy method for ion release determination, the anodic polarization curves and the open circuit potential – time monitoring for corrosion behavior evaluation and optical microscopy for the structure analysis. The tarnish tendency of alloys was estimated using the method of cyclic immersion with frequency of 10 seconds for each minute during 72 hours in Na2S containing solution. The most important conclusion is that the alloys are comparable from corrosion and tarnish point of view, but we recommend to use the nickel base alloy only for orthodontic devices implanted for short periods of time, because of higher quantity of released ions.

  18. MD simulation of atomic displacement cascades near chromium-rich clusters in FeCr alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tikhonchev, M.; Svetukhin, V.; Gaganidze, E.

    2013-01-01

    The paper reports simulation of cascades in Fe–9 at.%Cr binary alloy containing chromium-rich clusters. The simulation is performed by the molecular dynamics method at the initial temperature of 300 K and primary knock-on atom energy of 15 and 20 keV. Spherical clusters containing 95 at.% of Cr with diameter of 1–5 nm have been considered. The properties of cascade evolution in the presence of chromium-rich cluster are studied. It is shown that these clusters tend to dissolve in collision cascades. However, clusters with diameter of ⩾3 nm exhibit only slight modifications and can be considered stable. Parameters of small (1–2 nm) clusters can change significantly and, in some cases, a 1 nm cluster can be totally dissolved

  19. MD simulation of atomic displacement cascades near chromium-rich clusters in FeCr alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tikhonchev, M., E-mail: tikhonchev@sv.ulsu.ru [Ulyanovsk State University, Research Institute of Technology, 42 Leo Tolstoy St., 432970 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Svetukhin, V. [Ulyanovsk State University, Research Institute of Technology, 42 Leo Tolstoy St., 432970 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Gaganidze, E. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2013-11-15

    The paper reports simulation of cascades in Fe–9 at.%Cr binary alloy containing chromium-rich clusters. The simulation is performed by the molecular dynamics method at the initial temperature of 300 K and primary knock-on atom energy of 15 and 20 keV. Spherical clusters containing 95 at.% of Cr with diameter of 1–5 nm have been considered. The properties of cascade evolution in the presence of chromium-rich cluster are studied. It is shown that these clusters tend to dissolve in collision cascades. However, clusters with diameter of ⩾3 nm exhibit only slight modifications and can be considered stable. Parameters of small (1–2 nm) clusters can change significantly and, in some cases, a 1 nm cluster can be totally dissolved.

  20. Phase formation in multicomponent monotectic aluminium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirkovic, Djordje; Groebner, Joachim; Schmid-Fetzer, Rainer [Institute of Metallurgy, Clausthal University of Technology (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Alloys with a miscibility gap in the liquid state are potential materials for advanced bearings in automotive and other applications. While binary alloys, such as Al-Pb or Al-Bi, are well known, the information available for ternary monotectic Al-alloys is scarce. However, the phase formation in multicomponent alloys is not only more challenging from a scientific aspect, it is also a prerequisite for a focused development of advanced alloys. This motivated our detailed study of monotectic Al-Bi-Cu-Sn alloys including both experimental and computational thermodynamic methods. Based on the initially established systematic classification of monotectic ternary Al-alloys, the first promising monotectic reaction was observed in the ternary Al-Bi-Zn system. Further ternary systems Al-Cu-Sn, Al-Bi-Sn, Al-Bi-Cu and Bi-Cu-Sn were investigated as basis for quaternary Al-Bi-Cu-Sn alloys. Experimental investigations of phase equilibria, enthalpies and solidification microstructures were combined with thermodynamic modeling. The results demonstrate that the developed precise thermodynamic description is vital to reveal the distinct multicomponent monotectic features of pertinent phase diagrams. The solidification paths of ternary monotectic alloy systems, Al-Bi-Zn, Al-Sn-Cu and Al-Bi-Cu, were also studied using thermodynamic calculations, revealing specific details of phase formation during solidification of selected alloys.

  1. Progress with alloy 33 (UNS R20033), a new corrosion resistant chromium-based austenitic material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, M.; Heubner, U.; Eichenhofer, K.W.; Renner, M.

    1996-01-01

    Alloy 33 (UNS R20033), a new chromium-based corrosion resistant austenitic material with nominally (wt. %) 33 Cr, 32 Fe, 31 Ni, 1.6 Mo, 0.6 Cu, 0.4 N has been introduced to the market in 1995. This paper provides new data on this alloy with respect to mechanical properties, formability, weldability, sensitization characteristics and corrosion behavior. Mechanical properties of weldments including ductility have been established, and match well with those of wrought plate material, without any degradation of ISO V-notch impact toughness in the heat affected zone. When aged up to 8 hours between 600 C and 1,000 C the alloy is not sensitized when tested in boiling azeotropic nitric acid (Huey test). Under field test conditions alloy 33 shows excellent resistance to corrosion in flowing 96--98.5% H 2 SO 4 at 135 C--140 C and flowing 99.1% H 2 SO 4 at 150 C. Alloy 33 has also been tested with some success in 96% H 2 SO 4 with nitrosyl additions at 240 C. In nitric acid alloy 33 is corrosion resistant up to 85% HNO 3 and 75 C or even more. Alloy 33 is also corrosion resistant in 1 mol. HCl at 40 C and in NaOH/NaOCl-solutions. In artificial seawater the pitting potential remains unchanged up to 75 C and is still well above the seawater's redox potential at 95 C. Alloy 33 can be easily manufactured into all product forms required. The new data provided support the multipurpose character of alloy 33 to cope successfully with many requirements of the Chemical Process Industry, the Oil and Gas Industry and the Refinery Industry

  2. TEM characterisation of stress corrosion cracks in nickel based alloys: effect of chromium content and chemistry of environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delabrouille, F.

    2004-11-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is a damaging mode of alloys used in pressurized water reactors, particularly of nickel based alloys constituting the vapour generator tubes. Cracks appear on both primary and secondary sides of the tubes, and more frequently in locations where the environment is not well defined. SCC sensitivity of nickel based alloys depends of their chromium content, which lead to the replacement of alloy 600 (15 % Cr) by alloy 690 (30 % Cr) but this phenomenon is not yet very well understood. The goal of this thesis is two fold: i) observe the effect of chromium content on corrosion and ii) characterize the effect of environment on the damaging process of GV tubes. For this purpose, one industrial tube and several synthetic alloys - with controlled chromium content - have been studied. Various characterisation techniques were used to study the corrosion products on the surface and within the SCC cracks: SIMS; TEM - FEG: thin foil preparation, HAADF, EELS, EDX. The effect of chromium content and surface preparation on the generalised corrosion was evidenced for synthetic alloys. Moreover, we observed the penetration of oxygen along triple junctions of grain boundaries few micrometers under the free surface. SCC tests show the positive effect of chromium for contents varying from 5 to 30 % wt. Plastic deformation induces a modification of the structure, and thus of the protective character, of the internal chromium rich oxide layer. SCC cracks which developed in different chemical environments were characterised by TEM. The oxides which are formed within the cracks are different from what is observed on the free surface, which reveals a modification of medium and electrochemical conditions in the crack. Finally we were able to evidence some structural characteristics of the corrosion products (in the cracks and on the surface) which turn to be a signature of the chemical environment. (author)

  3. Liquid Phase Sintering of Highly Alloyed Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Troels

    1996-01-01

    Liquid phase sintering of stainless steel is usually applied to improve corrosion resistance by obtaining a material without an open pore system. The dense structure normally also give a higher strength when compared to conventional sintered steel. Liquid phase sintrering based on addition...... of boride to AISI 316L type steels have previously been studied, but were found to be sensitive to intergranular corrosion due to formation of intermetallic phases rich in chromium and molybdenum. In order to improve this system further, new investigations have focused on the use of higher alloyed stainless...... steel as base material. The stainless base powders were added different amounts and types of boride and sintered in hydrogen at different temperatures and times in a laboratory furnace. During sintering the outlet gas was analyzed and subsequently related to the obtained microstructure. Thermodynamic...

  4. TEM investigations on the effect of chromium content and of stress relief treatment on precipitation in Alloy 82

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sennour, M.; Chaumun, E.; Crépin, J.; Duhamel, C.; Gaslain, F.; Guerre, C.; Curières, I. de

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Slight change of the Cr content does not affect the microstructure of the butt welds. •Stress relief thermal treatment leads to the intergranular precipitation of Cr 23 C 6 . •The Cr 23 C 6 carbides are supposed to improve the SCC resistance of the butt welds. -- Abstract: Nickel-base alloys are widely used in nuclear Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). Most of them have been found susceptible to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) in nominal PWR primary water. The time to initiation depends on the material and is longer for weld metals than for Alloy 600. This study will focus on Alloy 82, which is used in Dissimilar Metal Welds (DMWs). In service, DMWs are either in the as-welded state or have undergone a stress relief treatment. Previous SCC studies showed that the heat treatment reduces significantly the SCC susceptibility of the weld. In this context, this study focuses on the microstructure characterization of the weld in the as-welded state and in the heat-treated state. As chromium content is also a key factor for the SCC susceptibility, welds with low chromium content and medium chromium content were studied. The lower SCC susceptibility of the heat-treated welds was attributed to intergranular Cr 23 C 6 resulting from a combined effect of heat treatment and chromium and carbon contents. These intergranular carbides could explain the better behavior of Alloy 82, compared to other nickel-base alloys

  5. Trunnion Failure of the Recalled Low Friction Ion Treatment Cobalt Chromium Alloy Femoral Head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urish, Kenneth L; Hamlin, Brian R; Plakseychuk, Anton Y; Levison, Timothy J; Higgs, Genymphas B; Kurtz, Steven M; DiGioia, Anthony M

    2017-09-01

    Gross trunnion failure (GTF) is a rare complication in total hip arthroplasty (THA) reported across a range of manufacturers. Specific lots of the Stryker low friction ion treatment (LFIT) anatomic cobalt chromium alloy (CoCr) V40 femoral head were recalled in August 2016. In part, the recall was based out of concerns for disassociation of the femoral head from the stem and GTF. We report on 28 patients (30 implants) with either GTF (n = 18) or head-neck taper corrosion (n = 12) of the LFIT CoCr femoral head and the Accolade titanium-molybdenum-zirconium-iron alloy femoral stems. All these cases were associated with adverse local tissue reactions requiring revision of the THA. In our series, a conservative estimate of the incidence of failure was 4.7% (n = 636 total implanted) at 8.0 ± 1.4 years from the index procedure. Failures were associated with a high-offset 127° femoral stem neck angle and increased neck lengths; 43.3% (13 of 30) of the observed failures included implant sizes outside the voluntary recall (27.8% [5 of 18] of the GTF and 75.0% [8 of 12] of the taper corrosion cases). Serum cobalt and chromium levels were elevated (cobalt: 8.4 ± 7.0 μg/mL; chromium: 3.4 ± 3.3 μ/L; cobalt/chromium ratio: 3.7). The metal artifact reduction sequence magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated large cystic fluid collections typical with adverse local tissue reactions. During revision, a pseudotumor was observed in all cases. Pathology suggested a chronic inflammatory response. Impending GTF could be diagnosed based on aspiration of black synovial fluid and an oblique femoral head as compared with the neck taper on radiographs. In our series of the recalled LFIT CoCr femoral head, the risk of impending GTF or head-neck taper corrosion should be considered as a potential diagnosis in a painful LFIT femoral head and Accolade titanium-molybdenum-zirconium-iron alloy THA with unknown etiology. Almost half of the failures we observed included sizes outside of the

  6. Ostwald ripening of decomposed phases in Cu-Ni-Cr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Santiago, Felipe; Lopez-Hirata, Victor; Dorantes-Rosales, Hector J.; Saucedo-Munoz, Maribel L.; Gonzalez-Velazquez, Jorge L.; Paniagua-Mercado, Ana Ma.

    2008-01-01

    A study of the coarsening process of the decomposed phases was carried out in the Cu-34 wt.% Ni-4 wt.% Cr and Cu-45 wt.% Ni-10 wt.% Cr alloys using transmission electron microscopy. As aging progressed, the morphology of the coherent decomposed Ni-rich phase changed from cuboids to platelets aligned in the Cu-rich matrix directions. Prolonged aging caused the loss of coherency between the decomposed phases and the morphology of the Ni-rich phase changed to ellipsoidal. The variation of mean radius of the coherent decomposed phases with aging time followed the modified LSW theory for thermally activated growth in ternary alloy systems. The linear variation of the density number of precipitates and matrix supersaturation with aging time, also confirmed that the coarsening process followed the modified LSW theory in both alloys. The coarsening rate was faster in the symmetrical Cu-45 wt.% Ni-10 wt.% Cr alloy due to its higher volume fraction of precipitates. The activation energy for thermally activated growth was determined to be about 182 and 102 kJ mol -1 in the Cu-34 wt.% Ni-4 wt.% Cr and Cu-45 wt.% Ni-10 wt.% Cr alloys, respectively. The lower energy for the former alloy seems to be related to an increase in the atomic diffusion process as the chromium content increases. The size distributions of precipitates in the Cu-Ni-Cr alloys were broader and more symmetric than that predicted by the modified LSW theory for ternary alloys

  7. Influence of cobalt and chromium additions on the precipitation processes in a Cu-4Ti alloys; Influencia de la adicion de cobalto y cromo en el proceso de precipitacion en una aleacion de Cu-4Ti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donoso, E.

    2010-07-01

    The influence of 0.5% atomic cobalt and 1% atomic chromium additions on the precipitation hardening of Cu-4Ti alloy was studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and microhardness measurements. The analysis of the calorimetric curves, for binary alloy, shows the presence of two overlapping exothermic reactions (stages 1 and 2) attributed to the formation of Cu{sub 4}Ti and Cu{sub 3}Ti particles in the copper matrix, respectively. DSC curves for Cu-4Ti-0.5Co alloy shows three exothermic effects (overlapping stages 3 and 4 and stage 5) associated to the formation of phases Ti{sub 2}Co, TiCo and Cu{sub 4}Ti, respectively. DSC curves for Cu-4Ti1Cr alloy shows three exothermic reactions (stages 6, 7 and 9) and one endothermic peak (stage 8). The exothermic reactions correspond to the formation of phases Cr{sub 2}Ti, Cu{sub 4}Ti and Cu{sub 3}Ti, respectively, and the endothermic reactions are attributed to the Cr{sub 2}Ti dissolution. The activation energies calculated using the modified Kissinger method were lower than the ones corresponding to diffusion of cobalt, chromium, and titanium in copper. Kinetic parameters were obtained by a convolution method based on the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) formalism. Microhardness measurements confirmed the formation of the mentioned phases. Also, these measurements confirmed the effect of cobalt and chromium addition on the binary alloy hardness. (Author). 31 refs.

  8. The effect of σ-phase precipitation at 800°C on the corrosion resistance in sea-water of a high alloyed duplex stainless steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilms, M.E.; Gadgil, V.J.; Krougman, J.M.; Ijsseling, F.P.

    1994-01-01

    Super-duplex stainless steels are recently developed high alloyed stainless steels that combine good mechanical properties with excellent corrosion resistance. Because of a high content of chromium and molybdenum, these alloys are susceptible to σ-phase precipitation during short exposure to

  9. Phases in lanthanum-nickel-aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosley, W.C.

    1992-01-01

    Lanthanum-nickel-aluminum (LANA) alloys will be used to pump, store and separate hydrogen isotopes in the Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF). The aluminum content (y) of the primary LaNi 5 -phase is controlled to produce the desired pressure-temperature behavior for adsorption and desorption of hydrogen. However, secondary phases cause decreased capacity and some may cause undesirable retention of tritium. Twenty-three alloys purchased from Ergenics, Inc. for development of RTF processes have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and by electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) to determine the distributions and compositions of constituent phases. This memorandum reports the results of these characterization studies. Knowledge of the structural characteristics of these alloys is a useful first step in selecting materials for specific process development tests and in interpreting results of those tests. Once this information is coupled with data on hydrogen plateau pressures, retention and capacity, secondary phase limits for RTF alloys can be specified

  10. Shape Memory Alloy Adaptive Structures, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I effort will demonstrate and scale up an innovative manufacturing process that yields aerospace grade shape memory alloy (SMA) solids and periodic...

  11. Electronic structure theory of alloy phase stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turchi, P.E.A.; Sluiter, M.

    1992-01-01

    We present a brief overview of the advanced methodology which has been developed and applied to the study of phase stability properties in substitutional alloys. The approach is based on the real space version of the Generalized Perturbation Method within the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker multiple scattering formulation of the Coherent Potential Approximation. Temperature effects are taken into account with a generalized meanfield approach, namely the Cluster Variation Method, or with Monte-Carlo simulations. We show that this approach is well suited for studying ground state properties of substitutional alloys, for calculating energies of idealized interfaces and antiphase boundaries, and finally to compute alloy phase diagrams

  12. [Energy dispersive spectrum analysis of surface compositions of selective laser melting cobalt-chromium alloy fabricated by different processing parameters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Liang; Zeng, Li; Wei, Bin; Gong, Yao

    2015-06-01

    To fabricate selective laser melting cobalt-chromium alloy samples by different processing parameters, and to analyze the changes of energy dispersive spectrum(EDS) on their surface. Nine groups were set up by orthogonal experimental design according to different laser powers,scanning speeds and powder feeding rates(laser power:2500-3000 W, scanning speed: 5-15 mm/s, powder feeding rate: 3-6 r/min). Three cylinder specimens(10 mm in diameter and 3 mm in thickness) were fabricated in each group through Rofin DL 035Q laser cladding system using cobalt-chromium alloy powders which were developed independently by our group.Their surface compositions were then measured by EDS analysis. Results of EDS analysis of the 9 groups fabricated by different processing parameters(Co:62.98%-67.13%,Cr:25.56%-28.50%,Si:0.49%-1.23%) were obtained. They were similar to the compositions of cobalt-chromium alloy used in dental practice. According to EDS results, the surface compositions of the selective laser melting cobalt-chromium alloy samples are stable and controllable, which help us gain a preliminary sight into the range of SLM processing parameters. Supported by "973" Program (2012CB910401) and Research Fund of Science and Technology Committee of Shanghai Municipality (12441903001 and 13140902701).

  13. Plasma boriding of a cobalt–chromium alloy as an interlayer for nanostructured diamond growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, Jamin M.; Jubinsky, Matthew; Catledge, Shane A., E-mail: catledge@uab.edu

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Metal-boride layer creates a compatible surface for NSD deposition. • PECVD boriding on CoCrMo produces robust metal-boride layer. • Deposition temperature comparison shows 750 °C boriding masks surface cobalt. • EDS shows boron diffusion as well as deposition. • Nanoindentation hardness of CoCrMo substantially increases after boriding. - Abstract: Chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond coatings can potentially improve the wear resistance of cobalt–chromium medical implant surfaces, but the high cobalt content in these alloys acts as a catalyst to form graphitic carbon. Boriding by high temperature liquid baths and powder packing has been shown to improve CVD diamond compatibility with cobalt alloys. We use the microwave plasma-enhanced (PE) CVD process to deposit interlayers composed primarily of the borides of cobalt and chromium. The use of diborane (B{sub 2}H{sub 6}) in the plasma feedgas allows for the formation of a robust boride interlayer for suppressing graphitic carbon during subsequent CVD of nano-structured diamond (NSD). This metal–boride interlayer is shown to be an effective diffusion barrier against elemental cobalt for improving nucleation and adhesion of NSD coatings on a CoCrMo alloy. Migration of elemental cobalt to the surface of the interlayer is significantly reduced and undetectable on the surface of the subsequently-grown NSD coating. The effects of PECVD boriding are compared for a range of substrate temperatures and deposition times and are evaluated using glancing-angle X-ray diffraction (XRD), cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Boriding of CoCrMo results in adhered nanostructured diamond coatings with low surface roughness.

  14. Evaluation of effect of recasting of nickel-chromium alloy on its castability using different investment materials: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhinav Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Within the limitations of the study, it was concluded that there was no significant difference found in castability of different percentage combinations of new and once casted alloy using two investment materials. The addition of new alloy during recasting to maintain the castability of nickel-chromium alloy may therefore not be required.

  15. Preparation of Trivalent Chromium and Rare Earth Composite Conversion Coating on Aluminum Alloy Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jianzhen

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, the surface conversion film on 6063 aluminum alloy was prepared by chemical plating process with chromium sulfate, lanthanum sulfate and sodium phosphate as film forming agent. The corrosion resistance and surface morphology of the conversion film were analyzed by pitting corrosion test of copper sulfate and SEM. The results show that when Cr2(SO4)3 is 10 g/L, La2(SO4)3 is 2 g/L, Na3PO4 is 8 g/L, pH value is 3, temperature is 40 °C, reaction time is 10 min, the corrosion resistance of the surface conversion film is the best. The conversion coating is light green, composed of Cr, La, P, Al, O and other elements.

  16. Method of simultaneous continuous determination of transfer rates of iron and chromium into solution during Fe-Cr alloys dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirinov, T.I.; Florianovich, G.M.; Skuratnik, Ya.B.

    1978-01-01

    Radiometry method of simultaneous continuous registration of transfer rates of iron and chromium into solution from Fe-Cr alloys with various composition has been developed. Using gamma-spectrometer components of Fe-Cr alloys can be determined with high sensitivity in separate samples according to Fe 59 and Cr 51 radioactive labels, obtained by neutron activation. The above method is applied to estimate Fe and Cr transfer rates into H 2 SO 4 solution at the temperature of 50 deg from Fe - 28% Cr alloy during its active dissolution. It is established, that beginning with some seconds of alloy and solution contact, its components transfer into the solution in the same composition, as in the alloy. The method enables to determine Fe with the accuracy of up to 5% and Cr with that of up to 10%

  17. Phase distribution studies in metallic alloy SIMFUEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolay, S.; Basu, M.; Kaity, S.; Das, D.

    2014-01-01

    Utilization of U-Pu based alloy fuel in the three stage nuclear power generation program in India is one of the important mandate due to shorter doubling time for breeding of the fissile isotopes ( 239 Pu and 233 U) to be used in Th based driver fuel in the 3rd stage. Reported information shows successful performance of fuel with porous alloy matrix in achieving 10-15 atom % burn-up. The porosity and microstructure of this alloy are strongly dependent on the composition and phases of the fission products incorporated in the matrix. The porosity influences the extent of fuel swelling and fission gas release, which affects the performance and integrity of the fuel. This study addresses to these issues taking the base alloy U-10wt% Zr

  18. Optimizing Wear Resistance and Impact Toughness in High Chromium Iron Mo-Ni Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, K. K.; Verma, R. S.; Murty, G. M. D.

    2009-06-01

    An alloy with carbon and chromium in the range of 2.0 to 2.5% and 20 to 25%, respectively, with the addition of Mo and Ni in the range of 1.0 to 1.5% each when heat-treated at a quenching temperature of 1010 °C and tempering temperature of 550 °C produces a hardness in the range of 54 to 56 HRC and a microstructure that consists of discontinuous bands of high volume (35-40%) of wear resistant primary (eutectic) carbides in a tempered martensitic matrix with uniformly dispersed secondary precipitates. This alloy has been found to possess adequate impact toughness (5-6 J/cm2) with a wear resistance of the order of 3-4 times superior to Mn steel and 1.25 times superior to martensitic stainless steel with a reduction in cost-to-life ratio by a factor of 1.25 in both the cases.

  19. Effects of surface chromium depletion on localized corrosion of alloy 825 as a high-level nuclear waste container material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, D.S.; Sridhar, N.; Cragnolino, G.A.

    1995-01-01

    Effects of the chromium-depleted, mill-finished surface on the localized corrosion resistance of alloy 825 (UNS N08825) were investigated. Tests were conducted in solutions based on the ground water at Yucca mountain, Nevada, but with a higher concentration of chloride. Results indicated that breakdown (E p ) and repassivation (E rp ) potentials for mill-finished surfaces were more active than those for polished surfaces. Potentiodynamic polarization tests indicated pits could be initiated on the chromium-depleted surface at potentials of 220 mV SCE in a solution containing 1,000 ppm Cl - at 95 C. Potentiostatic tests identified a similar pit initiation potential for the mill-finished surface. However, under longterm potentiostatic tests, a higher potential of 300 mV SCE was needed to sustain stable pit growth beyond the chromium-depleted layer. An increase in surface roughness also was observed to decrease localized corrosion resistance of the material

  20. Vacuum-arc chromium coatings for Zr-1%Nb alloy protection against high-temperature oxidation in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuprin, A.S.; Belous, V.A.; Bryk, V.V.; Vasilenko, R.L.; Voevodin, V.N.; Ovcharenko, V.D.; Tolmacheva, G.N.; Kolodij, I.V.; Lunev, V.M.; Klimenko, I.O.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of vacuum-arc Cr coatings on the alloy E110 resistance to the oxidation in air at temperatures 1020 and 1100 deg C for 3600 s has been investigated. The methods of scanning electron microscope, X-ray analysis and nanoindentation were used to determine the thickness, phase, mechanical properties of coatings and oxide layers. The results show that the chromium coating can effectively protect fuel tubes against high-temperature oxidation in air for one hour. In the coating during oxidation at T = 1100 deg C a Cr 2 O 3 oxide layer of 5 μm thickness is formed preventing further oxygen penetration into the coating, and thus the tube shape is conserved. Under similar test conditions the oxidation of uncoated tubes with formation of a porous monocline oxide of ZrO 2 of a thickness more than ≥ 250 μm is observed, then the deformation and cracking of samples occur and the oxide layer breaks away

  1. Survey of degradation modes of four nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gdowski, G.E.

    1991-03-01

    This report examines the degradation modes of four Ni-Cr-Mo alloys under conditions relevant to the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). The materials considered are Alloys C-276, C-4, C-22, and 625 because they have desirable characteristics for the conceptual design (CD) of the high-level radioactive-waste containers presented in the YMP Site Characterization Plan (SCP). The types of degradation covered in this report are general corrosion; localized corrosion, including pitting and crevice corrosion; stress corrosion cracking in chloride environments; hydrogen embrittlement (HE); and undesirable phase transformations due to a lack of phase stability. Topics not specifically addressed are welding concerns and microbiological corrosion. The four Ni-Cr-Mo alloys have excellent corrosion resistance in chloride environments such as seawater as well as in more aggressive environments. They have significantly better corrosion resistance than the six materials considered for the CD waste container in the YMP SCP. (Those six materials are Types 304L and 3161L stainless steels, Alloy 825, unalloyed copper, Cu(70)-Ni(30), and 7% aluminum bronze.) In seawater, the Ni-Cr-Mo alloys have negligible general corrosion rates and show little evidence of localized corrosion. The four base materials of these alloys are expected to have nearly indistinguishable corrosion resistance in the YMP environments. The strength requirements of the SCP-CD waste container are met by these materials in the annealed condition; in this condition, they are highly resistant to HE. Historically, HE has been noted when these materials have been strengthened (cold-worked) and used in sour gas (H 2 S and CO 2 ) well service -- conditions that are not expected for the YMP. Metallurgical phase stability may be a concern under conditions favoring (1) the formation of intermetallics and carbides, and (2) microstructural ordering

  2. Changes in structure and phase composition of chromium diffusion layer on stainless steels after long annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knyazev, E.V.; Voshedchenko, B.M.; Voskresenskij, Yu.A.

    1985-01-01

    A study was made on the effect of elevated temperatures UU and long holdings at heat on structure, phase composition and properties of chromium diffusion layer on austenitic chromium-nickel stainless steels 10Kh18N10TVD, 10Kh15N30M4B, 10Kh11N23T3MR, 10Kh21N28V6M3. The following mechanism of processes taking place in diffusion chromium layer is presented. The steady drop of chromium concentrations is observed after diffusion saturation. Chromium redistribution related with system transformation to more equilibrium state and simultaneous decarburization of steel surfaces takes place in diffusion layers of 10Kh15N30M4B and 10Kh21N28V6M3 steels after annealing at different temperatures and holdings at heat. Decarburization of steel surface layers is practically excluded in diffusion layers of 10Kh18N10T-VD and 10Kh11N23T3MR steels. Diffusion chromium-saturated layer stays effective only on 10Kh18N10T-VD and 10Kh11N23T3MR steels on heating up to 1000 deq C with holding up to 250 h

  3. Effect of molybdenum and chromium additions on the mechanical properties of Fe3Al-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yangshan; Xue Feng; Mei Jianping; Yu Xingquan; Zhang Lining

    1995-01-01

    Iron aluminides based on Fe 3 Al offer excellent oxidation and sulfidation resistance, with lower material cost and density than stainless steels. However, their potential use as structural material has been hindered by limited ductility and a sharp drop in strength above 600 C. Recent development efforts have indicated that adequate engineering ductility of 10--20% and tensile yield strength of as high as 500 MPa can be achieved through control of composition and microstructure. These improved tensile properties make Fe 3 Al-based alloys more competitive against conventional austenic and ferritic steels. The improvement of high temperature mechanical properties has been achieved mainly by alloying processes. Molybdenum has been found to be one of the most important alloying elements for strengthening Fe 3 Al-based alloys at high temperatures. However, the RT(room temperature) ductility decreases with the increase of a molybdenum addition. On the other hand, a chromium addition to Fe 3 Al-based alloys is very efficient for improving RT ductility but not beneficial to yield strength at temperatures to 800 C. The purpose of the present paper is to report the effects of combined additions of molybdenum and chromium on mechanical properties at ambient temperature and high temperature of 600 C

  4. Phase equilibria analysis in chromium-nickel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurevich, Yu.G.; Frage, N.R.; Dudorova, T.A.

    1982-01-01

    Comparison of calculation results of nitrogen solubility in liquid multicomponent iron alloys containing essential concentrations of alloying transition metals is conducted. Nitrogen solubility has been calculated by the interaction parameters of the first order, by the interaction parameters of the first and second orders by the Schurmann-Kunze method; by the formula [% N]=[% N]sub(Fe)(Asub(Fe)/Asub(m)(1-1/6 μsub(j=3)sup(m)epsilonsub(N)sup(j)xsub(j))sup(6), where Asub(Fe) - mass of iron mol; Asub(m) - mass of alloy mol; xsub(j) - mol ratio of j-element; epsilonsub(N)sup(j) - Wagner parameter of interaction for nitrogen in iron base alloys. The calculation data have been compared with the experimental values of nitrogen solubility in iron alloys at 1600 deg C. Advantages of calculation by the formula in respect to other calculation methods of nitrogen solubility in iron base alloys are clarified. Approximately pointed out is the region of compositions for which accountancy of interaction parameters of the second and third orders is necessary

  5. Transpassive dissolution of alloy 625, chromium, nickel, and molybdenum in high-temperature solutions containing hydrochloric acid and oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kritzer, P.; Boukis, N.; Dinjus, E.

    2000-01-01

    Coupons of nickel, molybdenum, chromium, and the nickel-based Alloy 625 (UNS 06625) were corroded in strongly oxidizing hydrochloric acid (HCl) solutions at 350 C and a pressure (p) of 24 MPa, with reaction times between 0.75 h and 50 h. For Alloy 625, the effect of surface roughness also was investigated. Nickel and molybdenum showed strong material loss after only 5 h of reaction as a result of the instability of the solid oxides formed under experimental conditions. The attack on chromium started at the grain boundaries. At longer reaction times, thick, spalling oxide layers formed on the surface. The attack on Alloy 625 also started at the grain boundaries and at inclusions leading to the formation of small pits. On polished surfaces, the growth of these pits occurred faster than on nonpolished surfaces, but fewer pits grew. Corrosion products formed at the surface consisted of oxygen and chromium. On isolated spots, nickel- and chlorine-containing products also were found

  6. Method corroboration for the determination of high concentration of chromium in various alloys using atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalid, A.; Rahman, S.

    2009-01-01

    Atomic absorption spectrophotometric technique was employed to determine high concentration of chromium as usually found in alloys. Different instrumental parameters, such as wavelength, slit width, burner height and flow rate of fuel were optimized, for the minimum absorption signal with low background. The effect of cations (Al/sup +3/, Ca/sup +2/, Cd/sup +2/, Co/sup +2/, Cu/sup +2/, Fe/sup +2/, K/sup +/, Li/sup +/, Mg/sup +2/, Mn/sup +2/, Mo/sup +6/, Na/sup +/, Ni/sup +2/, Sr/sup +2/, V/sup +2/ and Zn/sup +2/) and acids (HCl, HNO/sup 3/, HClO/sub 4/ and H/sup 2/SO/sub 4/) on the determination of chromium under the optimized conditions was studied. The reliability of the procedure was cross-checked by analyzing the alloy samples with other analytical techniques such as spectrometry, ICP-ES and neutron activation analysis and comparing the results, which are in quite good agreement with each other. The developed procedure was successfully applied for the determination of chromium in various types of alloys. (author)

  7. Evaluation of the mechanical properties and porcelain bond strength of cobalt-chromium dental alloy fabricated by selective laser melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lin; Zhu, Haiting; Gai, Xiuying; Wang, Yanyan

    2014-01-01

    Limited information is available regarding the microstructure and mechanical properties of dental alloy fabricated by selective laser melting (SLM). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mechanical properties of a cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) dental alloy fabricated by SLM and to determine the correlation between its microstructure and mechanical properties and its porcelain bond strength. Five metal specimens and 10 metal ceramic specimens were fabricated to evaluate the mechanical properties of SLM Co-Cr dental alloy (SLM alloy) with a tensile test and its porcelain bond strength with a 3-point bending test. The relevant properties of the SLM alloy were compared with those of the currently used Co-Cr dental alloy fabricated with conventional cast technology (cast alloy). The Student t test was used to compare the results of the SLM alloy and the cast alloy (α=.05). The microstructure of the SLM alloy was analyzed with a metallographic microscope; the metal ceramic interface of the SLM porcelain bonded alloy was studied with scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and an electron probe microanalyzer. Both the mean (standard deviation) yield strength (884.37 ± 8.96 MPa) and tensile strength (1307.50 ±10.65 MPa) of the SLM alloy were notably higher than yield strength (568.10 ± 30.94 MPa) and tensile strength (758.73 ± 25.85 MPa) of the currently used cast alloy, and the differences were significant (P.05). Microstructure analysis suggested that the SLM alloy had a dense and obviously orientated microstructure, which led to excellent mechanical properties. Analysis from scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and the electron probe microanalyzer indicated that the SLM alloy had an intermediate layer with elemental interpenetration between the alloy and the porcelain, which resulted in an improved bonding interface. Compared with the currently used cast alloy, SLM alloy possessed improved mechanical

  8. Phase stability of transition metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hixson, R.S.; Schiferl, D.; Wills, J.M.; Hill, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project was focused on resolving unexplained differences in calculated and measured phase transition pressures in transition metals. Part of the approach was to do new, higher accuracy calculations of transmission pressures for group 4B and group 6B metals. Theory indicates that the transition pressures for these baseline metals should change if alloyed with a d-electron donor metal, and calculations done using the Local Density Approximation (LDA) and the Virtual Crystal Approximation (VCA) indicate that this is true. Alloy systems were calculated for Ti, Zr and Hf based alloys with various solute concentrations. The second part of the program was to do new Diamond Anvil Cell (DAC) measurements to experimentally verify calculational results. Alloys were prepared for these systems with grain size suitable for Diamond Anvil Cell experiments. Experiments were done on pure Ti as well as Ti-V and Ti-Ta alloys. Measuring unambiguous transition pressures for these systems proved difficult, but a new technique developed yielded good results

  9. Oxidation-induced phase transformations and lifetime limits of chromia-forming nickel-base alloy 625

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chyrkin, Anton

    2011-12-05

    For its high creep resistance the commercial nickel-base alloy 625 relies on solid solution strengthening in combination with precipitation hardening by formation of δ-Ni{sub 3}Nb and (Ni,Mo,Si){sub 6}C precipitates during high-temperature service. In oxidizing environments the alloy forms a slow growing, continuous chromia layer on the material surface which protects the alloy against rapid oxidation attack. The growth of the chromia base oxide scale results during exposure at 900-1000 C in oxidation-induced chromium depletion in the subsurface zone of the alloy. Microstructural analyses of the cross-sectioned specimens revealed that this process results in formation of a wide subsurface zone in which the mentioned strengthening phases are dissolved, in spite of the fact that both phases do not contain substantial amounts of the scale-forming element chromium. The cross-sectional analyses revealed that, in parallel to the formation of a precipitate depleted zone, a thin, continuous layer of niobium-rich intermetallic precipitates formed in the immediate vicinity of the scale/alloy interface. The Subsurface Phase Enrichment (abbreviated as SPE) was shown to be the result of an uphill-diffusion of niobium, i.e. the element stabilizing the strengthening precipitates δ-Ni{sub 3}Nb, in the chromium activity gradient and is thus a natural consequence of the oxidation-induced chromium depletion beneath the chromia scale. The thermodynamic calculations carried out using the Thermo-Calc/DICTRA software packages revealed that in alloy 625 the chemical activity of niobium decreases with decreasing chromium content. As chromium is being continuously removed from the alloy as the result of the chromia scale growth, the zone of lowest Nb-activity is formed in the location with the lowest chromium concentration, i.e. the scale/alloy interface. This creates a driving force for Nb to diffuse towards the scale/alloy interface against its own concentration gradient, which is known

  10. Radiation-enhanced diffusion in nickel-10.6% chromium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gieb, M.

    1995-01-01

    Results of investigations of the diffusion rate of nickel-10.6% chromium alloys after plastic deformation, after quenching from 700 C and from 1030 C, and during irradiation with 18 MeV protons and 1.85 MeV electrons are reported. The diffusion rate is measured by means of the electrical resistivity which increases with increasing degree of short range order. It was found that the characteristic temperature below which short range order develops is T t =550 C. Below about 400 C the atomic mobilities of the component atoms of the alloy are so small that no further increase in the degree of short range order is found in due laboratory times. The activation energy for self-diffusion was determined after quenching from 700 C to Q SD =2.88 eV. For the migration activation energy of vacancies a value of E M 1V =1.18 eV was obtained after quenching from 1030 C. For the migration activation energies of interstitials and vacancies values of E M 1I =1.04 eV and E M 1V =1.16 eV are derived from results of measurements of radiation enhanced diffusion, respectively. These values decrease with increasing high energy particle flux. The characteristic temperature for interstitial cluster formation is T t =300 C. Above this temperature radiation-induced interstitials and vacancies annihilate mainly by pair recombination. Below this temperature interstitials also annihilate at sinks which are formed during irradiation so that the concentration of vacancies increases with irradiation time. Their migration activation energy is approximately obtained in a straight-forward way from the experimental data. Above about 380 C the radiation enhanced diffusion rate is surprisingly much smaller than the thermal diffusion rate. The quasi-dynamic vacancy concentration built up during irradiation is much smaller than the thermal vacancy concentration. (orig.)

  11. Critical evaluation on structural stiffness of porous cellular structure of cobalt chromium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd Malek, N. M. S.; Mohamed, S. R.; Che Ghani, S. A.; Harun, W. S. Wan

    2015-12-01

    In order to improve the stiffness characteristics of orthopedic devices implants that mimic the mechanical behavior of bone need to be considered. With the capability of Additive layer manufacturing processes to produce orthopedic implants with tailored mechanical properties are needed. This paper discusses finite element (FE) analysis and mechanical characterization of porous medical grade cobalt chromium (CoCr) alloy in cubical structures with volume based porosity ranging between 60% to 80% produced using direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) process. ANSYS 14.0 FE modelling software was used to predict the effective elastic modulus of the samples and comparisons were made with the experimental data. The effective mechanical properties of porous samples that were determined by uniaxial compression testing show exponential decreasing trend with the increase in porosity. Finite element model shows good agreement with experimentally obtained stress-strain curve in the elastic regions. The models prove that numerical analysis of actual prosthesis implant can be computed particularly in load bearing condition

  12. 4-META opaque resin--a new resin strongly adhesive to nickel-chromium alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, T; Nagata, K; Takeyama, M; Atsuta, M; Nakabayashi, N; Masuhara, E

    1981-09-01

    1) A new adhesive opaque resin containing a reactive monomer, 4-methacryloxy-ethyl trimellitate anhydride (4-META), was prepared, and its application to thermosetting acrylic resin veneer crowns was studied. 2) The 4-META opaque resin was applied to a variety of nickel-chromium dental alloy specimens which had undergone different treatment, and endurance tests were conducted to evaluate the durability of adhesion. 3) Stable adhesion against water penetration was achieved with metal surfaces first etched with HCl and then oxidized with HNO3. A bond strength of 250 kg/cm2 was maintained even after immersion in water at 37 degrees C for 30 wk or at 80 degrees C for ten wk. Furthermore, this value did not decrease even after the specimens were subjected to 500 thermal cycles. 4) The 4-META opaque resin studied can eliminate the necessity for retention devices on metal castings. 5) The smooth 4-META opaque resin should have no adverse effects on gingivae.

  13. Critical evaluation on structural stiffness of porous cellular structure of cobalt chromium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Malek, N M S; Mohamed, S R; Che Ghani, S A; Wan Harun, W S

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve the stiffness characteristics of orthopedic devices implants that mimic the mechanical behavior of bone need to be considered. With the capability of Additive layer manufacturing processes to produce orthopedic implants with tailored mechanical properties are needed. This paper discusses finite element (FE) analysis and mechanical characterization of porous medical grade cobalt chromium (CoCr) alloy in cubical structures with volume based porosity ranging between 60% to 80% produced using direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) process. ANSYS 14.0 FE modelling software was used to predict the effective elastic modulus of the samples and comparisons were made with the experimental data. The effective mechanical properties of porous samples that were determined by uniaxial compression testing show exponential decreasing trend with the increase in porosity. Finite element model shows good agreement with experimentally obtained stress-strain curve in the elastic regions. The models prove that numerical analysis of actual prosthesis implant can be computed particularly in load bearing condition (paper)

  14. Standard Test Methods for Detecting Susceptibility to Intergranular Corrosion in Wrought, Nickel-Rich, Chromium-Bearing Alloys

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover two tests as follows: 1.1.1 Method A, Ferric Sulfate-Sulfuric Acid Test (Sections 3-10, inclusive)—This test method describes the procedure for conducting the boiling ferric sulfate—50 % sulfuric acid test which measures the susceptibility of certain nickel-rich, chromium-bearing alloys to intergranular corrosion (see Terminology G 15), which may be encountered in certain service environments. The uniform corrosion rate obtained by this test method, which is a function of minor variations in alloy composition, may easily mask the intergranular corrosion components of the overall corrosion rate on alloys N10276, N06022, N06059, and N06455. 1.1.2 Method B, Mixed Acid-Oxidizing Salt Test (Sections 11-18, inclusive)—This test method describes the procedure for conducting a boiling 23 % sulfuric + 1.2 % hydrochloric + 1 % ferric chloride + 1 % cupric chloride test which measures the susceptibility of certain nickel-rich, chromium-bearing alloys to display a step function increa...

  15. Dental implant suprastructures using cobalt-chromium alloy compared with gold alloy framework veneered with ceramic or acrylic resin: a retrospective cohort study up to 18 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teigen, Kyrre; Jokstad, Asbjørn

    2012-07-01

    An association between the long-term success and survival of implant-supported prostheses as a function of biomaterial combinations has not been established. The use of cast cobalt-chromium for the suprastructure framework may be an alternative to the conventional approach of using type 3 gold alloys. A retrospective chart audit of all patients who had received implant-supported fixed dental prostheses (FDP) before 1996 was identified in a private practice clinic. Data were recorded for FDPs made from four combinations of alloy frameworks and veneering material, i.e. type 3 gold and cobalt-chromium with ceramic or prefabricated acrylic teeth. The extracted data from the charts were subjected to explorative statistical tests including Kaplan-Meier survival analyses. Patients (n=198) with 270 short and extensive FDPs supported entirely by 1117 implants were identified. The average follow-up observation periods varied between 4 and 220 months, with an average of 120 months. The success and survival, as well as event rates and types of biological and technical complications, were similar for implant-supported FDPs using cobalt-chromium and type 3 gold alloy frameworks veneered with ceramics or prefabricated acrylic teeth. An influence of the suprastructure biomaterial combination on the clinical performance of the individual supporting implants could not be established. Implant-supported FDPs made from type 3 gold or cobalt-chromium frameworks and veneered with ceramic or prefabricated acrylic teeth demonstrate comparable clinical performance. The biomaterial combinations do not appear to influence the success or survival of the individual implants. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Solution-phase synthesis of chromium-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Kalinina, Irina V.

    2015-03-01

    The solution phase reactions of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with Cr(CO)6 and benzene-Cr(CO)3 can lead to the formation of small chromium clusters. The cluster size can be varied from less than 1 nm to about 4 nm by increasing the reaction time. TEM images suggest that the clusters are deposited predominantly on the exterior walls of the nanotubes. TGA analysis was used to obtain the Cr content and carbon to chromium ratio in the Cr-complexed SWNTs. It is suggested that the carbon nanotube benzenoid structure templates the condensation of chromium atoms and facilitates the loss of carbon monoxide leading to well defined metal clusters.

  17. Solution-phase synthesis of chromium-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Kalinina, Irina V.; Al-Hadeethi, Yas Fadel; Bekyarova, Elena; Zhao, Chao; Wang, Qingxiao; Zhang, Xixiang; Al-Zahrani, Ali; Al-Agel, Faisal Abdulaziz M; Al-Marzouki, Fahad M.; Haddon, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    The solution phase reactions of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with Cr(CO)6 and benzene-Cr(CO)3 can lead to the formation of small chromium clusters. The cluster size can be varied from less than 1 nm to about 4 nm by increasing the reaction time. TEM images suggest that the clusters are deposited predominantly on the exterior walls of the nanotubes. TGA analysis was used to obtain the Cr content and carbon to chromium ratio in the Cr-complexed SWNTs. It is suggested that the carbon nanotube benzenoid structure templates the condensation of chromium atoms and facilitates the loss of carbon monoxide leading to well defined metal clusters.

  18. Determination of the chromium concentration of phase decomposition products in an aged duplex stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwano, Hisashi; Imamasu, Hisanao

    2006-01-01

    A commercial duplex stainless steel has been aged at 673 K for up to 55,000 h. The aging results in the phase decomposition of the ferrite in duplex stainless steel. The end products of the phase decomposition are a Fe-rich and a Cr-rich phase. The chromium concentration of these phases is determined by measuring the hyperfine magnetic field and the isomer shift using Moessbauer effect. The experimental results are compared with a phase diagram calculated for Fe-Cr-Ni ternary system at 673 K.

  19. Theoretical study of the correlation between magnetism and the properties of defects in iron, chromium and their alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soulairol, R.

    2011-09-01

    This PhD thesis is devoted to the study of the correlation between the magnetism and the properties of defects in 3d metals, mainly iron- and chromium-based systems, which are used in many technological applications, such as the new-generation nuclear reactors. This work is based on two complementary approaches: the Density Functional Theory (DFT) and a Tight Binding model (TB). We begin this study by the properties of pure materials such as chromium and α-iron. For the first one, we observe that the presence of a spin density wave (SDW) induces an anisotropy in the formation of point defects as well as the migration of vacancies. For the second, the solution energy of various 3d impurities depends on two terms: a chemical contribution mainly linked to the difference between the number of d electrons of iron and solute, and a magnetic contribution that reveals to be predominant in Fe-Cr. In the following parts, we tackle the correlation between magnetism and extended defects. We show in particular that the existence of magnetic frustrations near Fe/Cr interfaces can lead to the creation of non collinear magnetic structures. It also influences the energetic stability of these interfaces. We have noticed, in agreement with experimental findings, the presence of SDW near Fe/Cr interfaces, which is able to decrease those magnetic frustrations at the interface. We have also studied the magnetic structure of iron or chromium clusters embedded in an Fe-Cr alloy. We have finally shown, in the last part of this work, how the TB approach was able to account for the energetic and magnetic properties of defects not only in pure iron or chromium, but also in Fe-Cr alloys. (author)

  20. Chromium speciation in environmental samples using a solid phase spectrophotometric method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Alaa S.; Kassem, Mohammed A.

    2012-10-01

    A solid phase extraction technique is proposed for preconcentration and speciation of chromium in natural waters using spectrophotometric analysis. The procedure is based on sorption of chromium(III) as 4-(2-benzothiazolylazo)2,2'-biphenyldiol complex on dextran-type anion-exchange gel (Sephadex DEAE A-25). After reduction of Cr(VI) by 0.5 ml of 96% concentrated H2SO4 and ethanol, the system was applied to the total chromium. The concentration of Cr(VI) was calculated as the difference between the total Cr and the Cr(III) content. The influences of some analytical parameters such as: pH of the aqueous solution, amounts of 4-(2-benzothiazolylazo)2,2'-biphenyldiol (BTABD), and sample volumes were investigated. The absorbance of the gel, at 628 and 750 nm, packed in a 1.0 mm cell, is measured directly. The molar absorptivities were found to be 2.11 × 107 and 3.90 × 107 L mol-1 cm-1 for 500 and 1000 ml, respectively. Calibration is linear over the range 0.05-1.45 μg L-1 with RSD of <1.85% (n = 8.0). Using 35 mg exchanger, the detection and quantification limits were 13 and 44 ng L-1 for 500 ml sample, whereas for 1000 ml sample were 8.0 and 27 ng L-1, respectively. Increasing the sample volume can enhance the sensitivity. No considerable interferences have been observed from other investigated anions and cations on the chromium speciation. The proposed method was applied to the speciation of chromium in natural waters and total chromium preconcentration in microwave digested tobacco, coffee, tea, and soil samples. The results were simultaneously compared with those obtained using an ET AAS method, whereby the validity of the method has been tested.

  1. Simulation studies of GST phase change alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyna, Glenn

    2008-03-01

    In order to help drive post-Moore's Law technology development, switching processes involving novel materials, in particular, GeSbTe (GST) alloys are being investigated for use in memory and eFuse applications. An anneal/quench thermal process crystallizes/amorphosizes a GST alloy which then has a low/high resistance and thereby forms a readable/writeable bit; for example, a ``one'' might be the low resistance, conducting crystalline state and a ``zero'' might be the high resistance, glassy state. There are many open questions about the precise nature of the structural transitions and the coupling to electronic structure changes. Computational and experimental studies of the effect of pressure on the GST materials were initiated in order to probe the physics behind the thermal switching process. A new pathway to reversible phase change involving pressure-induced structural metal insulator transitions was discovered. In a binary GS system, a room-temperature, direct, pressure-induced transformation from the high resistance amorphous phase to the low resistance crystalline phase was observed experimentally while the reverse process under tensile load was demonstrated via ab initio MD simulations performed on IBM's Blue Gene/L enabled by massively parallel software. Pressure induced transformations of the ternary material GST-225 (Ge2Sb2Te5) were, also, examined In the talk, the behavior of the two systems will be compared and insight into the nature of the phase change given.

  2. Effect of process parameters on surface oxides on chromium-alloyed steel powder during sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chasoglou, D.; Hryha, E.; Nyborg, L.

    2013-01-01

    The use of chromium in the PM steel industry today puts high demands on the choice and control of the atmosphere during the sintering process due to its high affinity to oxygen. Particular attention is required in order to control the surface chemistry of the powder which in turn is the key factor for the successful sintering and production of PM parts. Different atmosphere compositions, heating rates and green densities were employed while performing sintering trials on water atomized steel powder pre-alloyed with 3 wt.% Cr in order to evaluate the effect on surface chemical reactions. Fracture surfaces of sintered samples were examined using high resolution scanning electron microscopy combined with X-ray microanalysis. The investigation was complemented with thermogravimetric (TG) studies. Reaction products in particulate form containing strong-oxide forming elements such as Cr, Si and Mn were formed during sintering for all conditions. Processing in vacuum results in intensive inter-particle neck development during the heating stage and consequently in the excessive enclosure of surface oxide which is reflected in less good final mechanical properties. Enhanced oxide reduction was observed in samples processed in hydrogen-containing atmospheres independent of the actual content in the range of 3–10 vol.%. An optimum heating rate was required for balancing reduction/oxidation processes. A simple model for the enclosure and growth of oxide inclusions during the sinter-neck development is proposed. The obtained results show that significant reduction of the oxygen content can be achieved by adjusting the atmosphere purity/composition. - Highlights: ► A local atmosphere microclimate is very important for sintering of PM steels. ► High risk of surface oxide enclosure between 800 and 1000 °C. ► Coalescence and agglomeration of enclosed oxides take place during sintering. ► The effect of different process parameters on the oxide reduction is examined. ► A

  3. Effects of conventional welding and laser welding on the tensile strength, ultimate tensile strength and surface characteristics of two cobalt-chromium alloys: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhan Kumar, Seenivasan; Sethumadhava, Jayesh Raghavendra; Anand Kumar, Vaidyanathan; Manita, Grover

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of laser welding and conventional welding on the tensile strength and ultimate tensile strength of the cobalt-chromium alloy. Samples were prepared with two commercially available cobalt-chromium alloys (Wironium plus and Diadur alloy). The samples were sectioned and the broken fragments were joined using Conventional and Laser welding techniques. The welded joints were subjected to tensile and ultimate tensile strength testing; and scanning electron microscope to evaluate the surface characteristics at the welded site. Both on laser welding as well as on conventional welding technique, Diadur alloy samples showed lesser values when tested for tensile and ultimate tensile strength when compared to Wironium alloy samples. Under the scanning electron microscope, the laser welded joints show uniform welding and continuous molt pool all over the surface with less porosity than the conventionally welded joints. Laser welding is an advantageous method of connecting or repairing cast metal prosthetic frameworks.

  4. Study of effect of chromium on titanium dioxide phase transformation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    the other hand, the effect of solution pH in phase stability .... pore size of anatase phase decreases with increase of ... range of 0–200 °C, corresponding to desorption of water .... The correlation revealed a straight line with a slope equal to 1 for ...

  5. Segregation effects and phase developments during solidification of alloy 625

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højerslev, Christian; Tiedje, Niels Skat; Hald, John

    2006-01-01

    contained gamma-phase, Laves phase and, if carbon was dissolved in the liquid, niobium rich carbides formed. Molybdenum and niobium showed strong tendencies to segregate. Their segregation was balanced by inverse segregation of nickel and iron. The chromium concentration remained almost constant in gamma...

  6. Shape Memory Alloy-Based Periodic Cellular Structures, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I effort will develop and demonstrate an innovative shape memory alloy (SMA) periodic cellular structural technology. Periodic cellular structures...

  7. Effect of the pretreatment of silicone penetrant on the performance of the chromium-free chemfilm coated on AZ91D magnesium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Shiuan-Ho; Niu, Liyuan; Su, Yichang; Wang, Wenquan; Tong, Xian; Li, Guangyu

    2016-01-01

    This paper reported a new pretreatment of silicone penetrant for forming the chromium-free chemfilm (chemical conversion coating) on the surface of an AZ91D magnesium (Mg) alloy. Through applying micro current on the pretreatment solution, an uniform mask membrane was created on the surface of a Mg alloy. By using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) analyses, the chromium-free chemfilm on a Mg alloy was examined to analyze the performance during initial, middle, and final deposition periods. As a result, the pretreatment of silicone penetrant can effectively prevent the chemfilm from cracking, improve the anticorrosion ability and nucleation rate of the chromium-free chemfilm on a Mg alloy, and make the surface crystallization transform a long strip into short axis shape. - Highlights: • An AZ91D Mg alloy was pretreated by using silicone penetrant. • Surface crystallization of the chemfilm on a silicone-pretreated Mg alloy is smooth. • The pretreatment of silicone penetrant for a Mg alloy enhanced the anticorrosion ability.

  8. Effect of the pretreatment of silicone penetrant on the performance of the chromium-free chemfilm coated on AZ91D magnesium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Shiuan-Ho, E-mail: 1802186169@qq.com [College of Electronic Information and Mechatronic Engineering, Zhaoqing University, Zhaoqing Road, Duanzhou District, Zhaoqing, Guangdong, 526061 (China); Niu, Liyuan [Department of Material Engineer, Zhejiang Industry & Trade Vocational Colledge, WenZhou, 325000 (China); Su, Yichang [Department of Material Engineer, Zhejiang Industry & Trade Vocational Colledge, WenZhou, 325000 (China); College of Materials Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Nanling Campus, Changchun, 130025 (China); Wang, Wenquan [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Nanling Campus, Changchun, 130025 (China); Tong, Xian [Department of Material Engineer, Zhejiang Industry & Trade Vocational Colledge, WenZhou, 325000 (China); Li, Guangyu [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Nanling Campus, Changchun, 130025 (China)

    2016-03-01

    This paper reported a new pretreatment of silicone penetrant for forming the chromium-free chemfilm (chemical conversion coating) on the surface of an AZ91D magnesium (Mg) alloy. Through applying micro current on the pretreatment solution, an uniform mask membrane was created on the surface of a Mg alloy. By using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) analyses, the chromium-free chemfilm on a Mg alloy was examined to analyze the performance during initial, middle, and final deposition periods. As a result, the pretreatment of silicone penetrant can effectively prevent the chemfilm from cracking, improve the anticorrosion ability and nucleation rate of the chromium-free chemfilm on a Mg alloy, and make the surface crystallization transform a long strip into short axis shape. - Highlights: • An AZ91D Mg alloy was pretreated by using silicone penetrant. • Surface crystallization of the chemfilm on a silicone-pretreated Mg alloy is smooth. • The pretreatment of silicone penetrant for a Mg alloy enhanced the anticorrosion ability.

  9. Human biomonitoring of chromium and nickel from an experimental exposure to manual metal arc welding fumes of low and high alloyed steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Jens; Brand, Peter; Schettgen, Thomas; Lenz, Klaus; Purrio, Ellwyn; Reisgen, Uwe; Kraus, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    The uptake and elimination of metals from welding fumes is currently not fully understood. In the Aachen Workplace Simulation Laboratory (AWSL) it is possible to investigate the impact of welding fumes on human subjects under controlled exposure conditions. In this study, the uptake and elimination of chromium or chromium (VI) respectively as well as nickel was studied in subjects after exposure to the emissions of a manual metal arc welding process using low or high alloyed steel. In this present study 12 healthy male non-smokers, who never worked as welders before, were exposed for 6h to welding fumes of a manual metal arc welding process. In a three-fold crossover study design, subjects were exposed in randomized order to either clean air, emissions from welding low alloyed steel, and emissions from welding high alloyed steel. Particle mass concentration of the exposure aerosol was 2.5mg m(-3). The content of chromium and nickel in the air was determined by analysing air filter samples on a high emission scenario. Urine analysis for chromium and nickel was performed before and after exposure using methods of human biomonitoring. There were significantly elevated chromium levels after exposure to welding fumes from high alloyed steel compared to urinary chromium levels before exposure to high alloyed welding fumes, as well as compared to the other exposure scenarios. The mean values increased from 0.27 µg l(-1) to 18.62 µg l(-1). The results were in good agreement with already existing correlations between external and internal exposure (German exposure equivalent for carcinogenic working materials EKA). The variability of urinary chromium levels was high. For urinary nickel no significant changes could be detected at all. Six-hour exposure to 2.5mg m(-3) high alloyed manual metal arc welding fumes lead to elevated urinary chromium levels far higher (7.11-34.16 µg l(-1)) than the German biological exposure reference value (BAR) of 0.6 µg l(-1) directly after

  10. A study on Z-phase nucleation in martensitic chromium steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golpayegani, Ardeshir; Andren, Hans-Olof; Danielsen, Hilmar; Hald, John

    2008-01-01

    9-12% chromium martensitic steels are liable to the precipitation of Z-phase, Cr(V,Nb)N, after long time exposure at 550-650 deg. C. This complex nitride consumes vanadium nitrides and causes the creep strength of the material to fall drastically after several thousand hours of exposure. In this work, initial stages of precipitation of Z-phase have been studied and characterized using energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM). Vanadium nitrides were found to provide the most suitable nucleation site for Z-phase, since the misfit between the (0 0 1) planes of VN and Z-phase is very small. Furthermore, such a nucleation site would provide vanadium and nitrogen for the growth of Z-phase. The presence of niobium carbide has also been observed close to Z-phase nucleation sites, indicating niobium to be important for the nucleation and growth of Z-phase

  11. Phase transformations and resulting microstructures in Ti - 47 Al -2 Cr alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghasemi-Armaki, H.; Heshmati-Manesh, S.; Jafarian, H. R.; Nili-Ahmadabadi, M.

    2008-01-01

    During the last three decades, intermetallic alloys have focused attention because of their high strength to weight ratio and good creep resistance. Titanium aluminide alloys based on γ-Ti Al are potential candidates to replace Ni-based super alloys currently used in jet engine components at high temperatures because of their low density, high melting temperature, good elevated-temperature strength and modulus retention, high resistance to oxidation and hydrogen absorption, and excellent creep properties. One of the major concerns in these alloys is their poor ductility at room and intermediate temperatures which has been improved slightly by microstructure modifications through heat treatment. Thus, modification of microstructure during cooling and CCT diagram in these alloys is of vital importance. In this study, Ti - 47 Al - 2 Cr intermetallic alloy has been prepared by remelting 4 times with a vacuum arc remelting furnace. Homogenizing treatment was done at 1125 d eg C for 72 h in a sealed vacuum quartz tube. All heat treatments on the samples were carried out in a vacuum heat treatment furnace under a pressure of 10 -1 bar. The atmosphere inside the furnace was changed to that of high purity argon for each heat treatment as an added precaution against oxidation. In this paper, phase transformations in a γ-Ti Al based intermetallic alloy containing chromium were investigated. Heat treatments on samples of this alloy at temperatures above Tα and subsequent cooling with various cooling rates resulted in variety of microstructures. The schematic CCT diagram for this alloy was drawn from microstructural studies using microscopy routs and X-ray diffraction. Then, cyclic heat treatment with grain refining purpose was conducted on a sample of this alloy having massive gamma microstructure. During cyclic heat treatment, gradual dissociation of the gamma phase resulted in the formation of a Widmanstaetten type structure. Trend of microstructure evolution and

  12. An investigation of force components in orthogonal cutting of medical grade cobalt-chromium alloy (ASTM F1537).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Szymon; Ahearne, Eamonn

    2017-04-01

    An ageing population, increased physical activity and obesity are identified as lifestyle changes that are contributing to the ongoing growth in the use of in-vivo prosthetics for total hip and knee arthroplasty. Cobalt-chromium-molybdenum (Co-Cr-Mo) alloys, due to their mechanical properties and excellent biocompatibility, qualify as a class of materials that meet the stringent functional requirements of these devices. To cost effectively assure the required dimensional and geometric tolerances, manufacturers rely on high-precision machining. However, a comprehensive literature review has shown that there has been limited research into the fundamental mechanisms in mechanical cutting of these alloys. This article reports on the determination of the basic cutting-force coefficients in orthogonal cutting of medical grade Co-Cr-Mo alloy ASTM F1537 over an extended range of cutting speeds ([Formula: see text]) and levels of undeformed chip thickness ([Formula: see text]). A detailed characterisation of the segmented chip morphology over this range is also reported, allowing for an estimation of the shear plane angle and, overall, providing a basis for macro-mechanic modelling of more complex cutting processes. The results are compared with a baseline medical grade titanium alloy, Ti-6Al-4V ASTM F136, and it is shown that the tangential and thrust-force components generated were, respectively, ≈35% and ≈84% higher, depending primarily on undeformed chip thickness but with some influence of the cutting speed.

  13. A new 12% chromium steel strengthened by Z-phase precipitates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Fang; Rashidi, Masoud; Johansson, Lennart

    2016-01-01

    In order to increase the corrosion resistance and simultaneously maintain the creep resistance of 9-12% Cr steels at 650 degrees C, a new alloy design concept was proposed, using thermodynamically stable Z-phase (CrTaN) precipitates to strengthen the steel. A new trial Z-phase strengthened 12% Cr...

  14. The effect of remelting various combinations of new and used cobalt-chromium alloy on the mechanical properties and microstructure of the alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sharad; Mehta, Aruna S

    2012-01-01

    Remelting previously cast base metal alloy can adversely affect the mechanical properties of the alloy and necessitates addition of new alloy. To study the effect of remelting different combinations of new and used cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloy on its mechanical properties and microstructure. Using induction casting, 24 tensile test specimens were prepared for eight different combinations of new and used Co-Cr alloy. The test specimens were assessed for yield strength and percentage elongation. Microhardness was evaluated using Vickers's hardness tester. The tensile testing was carried out on a 50 kN servo-hydraulic universal testing machine. Microstructure analysis was done using an optical photomicroscope on the fractured samples after acid etching. The mean values (±standard deviation) and coefficient of variation were calculated. Student's 't' test was used for statistical analysis. Statistical significance was assumed at P=.05. The mean yield strength of eight different combination groups were as follows: group A: 849 MPa, group B ₁ : 834 MPa, group B ₂ : 915 MPa, group B ₃ : 897 MPa, group C ₁ : 874 MPa, group C ₂ : 859 MPa, group D ₁ : 845 MPa, and group D ₂ : 834 MPa. The mean percentage elongation for the different groups were as follows: group A: 7%, group B ₁ : 7%, group B ₂ : 8%, group B ₃ : 7%, group C ₁ : 8%, group C ₂ : 7%, group D ₁ : 7%, and group D 2 : 8%. The mean hardness values were as follows: group A: 373 VHN, group B ₁ : 373 VHN, group B ₂ : 346 VHN, group B ₃ : 346 VHN, group C ₁ : 364 VHN, group C ₂ : 343 VHN, group D ₁ : 376 VHN, and group D ₂ : 373 VHN. Repeated remelting of base metal alloy for dental casting without addition of new alloy can affect the mechanical properties of the alloy. Microstructure analysis shows deterioration upon remelting. However, the addition of 25% and 50% (by weight) of new alloy to the remelted alloy can bring about improvement both in mechanical properties and in

  15. Influence of the selected alloy additions on limiting the phase formation in Cu-Zn alloys

    OpenAIRE

    J. Kozana; St. Rzadkosz; M. Piękoś

    2010-01-01

    Influence of the selected alloy additions into copper and zinc alloys was investigated in order to find out the possibility of limiting the precipitation of unfavourable phase . The observation of microstructures and strength tests were performed. The results of metallographic and strength investigations indicate positive influence of small amounts of nickel, cobalt or tellurium. The precise determination of the influence of the selected alloy additions on limiting the gamma phase formation ...

  16. Influence of the selected alloy additions on limiting the phase formation in Cu-Zn alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kozana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Influence of the selected alloy additions into copper and zinc alloys was investigated in order to find out the possibility of limiting the precipitation of unfavourable phase . The observation of microstructures and strength tests were performed. The results of metallographic and strength investigations indicate positive influence of small amounts of nickel, cobalt or tellurium. The precise determination of the influence of the selected alloy additions on limiting the gamma phase formation will be the subject of further examinations.

  17. The influence of chromium on structure and mechanical properties of B2 nickel aluminide alloys. Ph.D. Thesis - Florida Univ., 1991 Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, James Dean

    1992-01-01

    Major obstacles to the use of NiAl-based alloys and composites are low ductility and toughness. These shortcomings result in part from a lack of sufficient slip systems to accommodate plastic deformation of polycrystalline material (von Mises Criterion). It has been reported that minor additions of chromium to polycrystalline NiAl cause the predominant slip system to shift from the usual. If true, then a major step toward increasing ductility in this compound may be realized. The purpose of the present study was to verify this phenomenon, characterize it with respect to chromium level and Ni to Al ratio, and correlate any change in slip system with microstructure and mechanical properties. Compression and tensile specimens were prepared from alloys containing 0 to 5 percent chromium and 45 to 55 percent aluminum. Following about one percent strain, transmission electron microscopy foils were produced and the slip systems determined using the g x b = 0 invisibility criterion. Contrary to previous results, chromium was found to have no effect on the preferred slip system of any of the alloys studied. Possible reasons for the inconsistency of the current results with previous work are considered. Composition-structure-property relationships are discerned for the alloys, and good correlation are demonstrated in terms of conventional strengthening models for metallic systems.

  18. Phases in U-Si alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domagala, R.F.

    1986-09-01

    The binary (two component) U-Si system contains a total of seven ''compounds.'' The most U-rich compounds are of interest to the RERTR community because they are now being employed as fuels in research and test reactors. The nomenclature used in describing these fuels and the metallurgical significance of the notations recorded may have different meanings to people from different technical backgrounds. This paper is a succinct exploration of the principles of phase equilibria and the realities of commerical fabrication as applied to U-Si alloys. It is an attempt to record in referenceable and retrievable form information of value to the continued development, application and understanding of silicide fuels

  19. Application of mechanical alloying to synthesis of intermetallic phases based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dymek, S.

    2001-01-01

    Mechanical alloying is the process of synthesis of powder materials during milling in high energetic mills, usually ball mills. The central event in mechanical alloying is the ball-powder-ball collision. Powder particles are trapped between the colliding balls during milling and undergo deformation and/or fracture. Fractured parts are cold welded. The continued fracture and cold welding results in a uniform size and chemical composition of powder particles. The main applications of mechanical alloying are: processing of ODS alloys, syntheses of intermetallic phases, synthesis of nonequilibrium structures (amorphous alloys, extended solid solutions, nanocrystalline, quasi crystals) and magnetic materials. The present paper deals with application of mechanical alloying to synthesis Ni A l base intermetallic phases as well as phases from the Nb-Al binary system. The alloy were processed from elemental powders. The course of milling was monitored by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. After milling, the collected powders were sieved by 45 μm grid and hot pressed (Nb alloys and NiAl) or hot extruded (NiAl). The resulting material was fully dense and exhibited fine grain (< 1 μm) and uniform distribution of oxide dispersoid. The consolidated material was compression and creep tested. The mechanical properties of mechanically alloys were superior to properties of their cast counterparts both in the room and elevated temperatures. Higher strength of mechanically alloyed materials results from their fine grains and from the presence of dispersoid. At elevated temperatures, the Nb-Al alloys have higher compression strength than NiAl-based alloys processed at the same conditions. The minimum creep rates of mechanically alloyed Nb alloys are an order of magnitude lower than analogously processed NiAl-base alloys. (author)

  20. Modelling and theories of alloy phase behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, R.E.; Davenport, J.W.; Weinert, M.; Bennett, L.H.

    1987-01-01

    Many trends in alloy phase formation are readily understood in terms of physically plausible atomic parameters. This has led to the introduction of structural maps where two (or more) such atomic parameters are employed as the coordinates and well-defined regions are observed to be associated with particular crystalline phases. These coordinates sometimes involve the difference in atomic parameters and sometimes involve an average. An alternative approach to the emphasis on atomic parameters has been the consideration of how atoms are packed in some crystal structure and how this controls what the constituent atoms may be. Recently this has led to the utilization of Wigner-Seitz (sometimes called Voronoi or Dirichlet) constructs of the atomic cells in a crystal structure and to the observation that sometimes two crystals which are nominally considered to have the same crystal structure according to normal crystallographic designation should be considered to be different. The Wigner-Seitz cell constructs have also offered a framework for understanding trends in the magnetic and chemical properties of particular phases as well as making coordination between crystalline and glassy structures. Neither of the above approaches provides numerical estimates of quantities of thermodynamic interest such as heats of formation. Such heats are being calculated. 42 refs., 15 figs

  1. New corrosion resistant alloys on the base of titanium and high-chromium steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomashov, N.D.; Chernova, G.P.

    1975-01-01

    It is shown that stability of titanium alloys, with α-structure (OT-4, AT3,AT6) and high-strength α+β or pure β-structure (BT-14; BT-15), in hydrochloric acid solutions may be significantly improved due to additional alloying by minor additions of Pd(0,2%) similar to pure titanium. Additions of 0,2% Pd also significantly improve acid resistance of alloys of the Fe-Cr system. The highest corrosion resistance has Fe,40%Cr,0,2%Pd alloy. This alloy is stable in 20-40%H 2 SO 4 and 1% HCl at 100 deg C

  2. Phase transformations in intermetallic phases in zirconium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filippov, V. P., E-mail: vpfilippov@mephi.ru [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation); Kirichenko, V. G. [Kharkiv National Karazin University (Ukraine); Salomasov, V. A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation); Khasanov, A. M. [University of North Carolina – Asheville, Chemistry Department (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Phase change was analyzed in intermetallic compounds of zirconium alloys (Zr – 1.03 at.% Fe; Zr – 0.51 at.% Fe; Zr – 0.51 at.% Fe – M(M = Nb, Sn). Mössbauer spectroscopy on {sup 57}Fe nuclei in backscattering geometry with the registration of the internal conversion electrons and XRD were used. Four types of iron bearing intermetallic compounds with Nb were detected. A relationship was found between the growth process of intermetallic inclusions and segregation of these phases. The growth kinetics of inclusions possibly is not controlled by bulk diffusion, and a lower value of the iron atom’s activation energy of migration can be attributed to the existence of enhanced diffusion paths and interface boundaries.

  3. Effective interactions approach to phase stability in alloys under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enrique, R.A.; Bellon, P.

    1999-01-01

    Phase stability in alloys under irradiation is studied considering effective thermodynamic potentials. A simple kinetic model of a binary alloy with phase separation is investigated. Time evolution in the alloy results from two competing dynamics: thermal diffusion, and irradiation induced ballistic exchanges The dynamical (steady state) phase diagram is evaluated exactly performing Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The solution is then compared to two theoretical frameworks: the effective quasi-interactions model as proposed by Vaks and Kamishenko, and the effective free energy model as proposed by Martin. New developments of these models are proposed to allow for quantitative comparisons. Both theoretical frameworks yield fairly good approximations to the dynamical phase diagram

  4. Effective interactions approach to phase stability in alloys under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enrique, R.A.; Bellon, P.

    1999-01-01

    Phase stability in alloys under irradiation is studied considering effective thermodynamic potentials. A simple kinetic model of a binary alloy with phase separation is investigated. Time evolution in the alloy results form two competing dynamics: thermal diffusion, and irradiation induced ballistic exchanges. The dynamical (steady state) phase diagram is evaluated exactly performing Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The solution is then compared to two theoretical frameworks: the effective quasi-interactions model as proposed by Vaks and Kamishenko, and the effective free energy model as proposed by Martin. New developments of these models are proposed to allow for quantitative comparisons. Both theoretical frameworks yield fairly good approximations to the dynamical phase diagram

  5. Effect of annealing procedure on the bonding of ceramic to cobalt-chromium alloys fabricated by rapid prototyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulga, Ayca

    2018-04-01

    An annealing procedure is a heat treatment process to improve the mechanical properties of cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloys. However, information is lacking about the effect of the annealing process on the bonding ability of ceramic to Co-Cr alloys fabricated by rapid prototyping. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of the fabrication techniques and the annealing procedure on the shear bond strength of ceramic to Co-Cr alloys fabricated by different techniques. Ninety-six cylindrical specimens (10-mm diameter, 10-mm height) made of Co-Cr alloy were prepared by casting (C), milling (M), direct process powder-bed (LaserCUSING) with and without annealing (CL+, CL), and direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) with annealing (EL+) and without annealing (EL). After the application of ceramic to the metal specimens, the metal-ceramic bond strength was assessed using a shear force test at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Shear bond strength values were statistically analyzed by 1-way ANOVA and Tukey multiple comparison tests (α=.05). Although statistically significant differences were found among the 3 groups (M, 29.87 ±2.06; EL, 38.92 ±2.04; and CL+, 40.93 ±2.21; P=.002), no significant differences were found among the others (P>.05). The debonding surfaces of all specimens exhibited mixed failure mode. These results showed that the direct process powder-bed method is promising in terms of metal-ceramic bonding ability. The manufacturing technique of Co-Cr alloys and the annealing process influence metal-ceramic bonding. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Phase coexistence and pinning of charge density waves by interfaces in chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, A.; Patel, S. K. K.; Uhlíř, V.; Kukreja, R.; Ulvestad, A.; Dufresne, E. M.; Sandy, A. R.; Fullerton, E. E.; Shpyrko, O. G.

    2016-11-01

    We study the temperature dependence of the charge density wave (CDW) in a chromium thin film using x-ray diffraction. We exploit the interference between the CDW satellite peaks and Laue oscillations to determine the amplitude, the phase, and the period of the CDW. We find discrete half-integer periods of CDW in the film and switching of the number of periods by one upon cooling/heating with a thermal hysteresis of 20 K. The transition between different CDW periods occurs over a temperature range of 30 K, slightly larger than the width of the thermal hysteresis. A comparison with simulations shows that the phase transition occurs as a variation of the volume fraction of two distinct phases with well-defined periodicities. The phase of the CDW is constant for all temperatures, and we attribute it to strong pinning of the CDW by the mismatch-induced strain at the film-substrate interface.

  7. A comparison of corrosion resistance of cobalt-chromium-molybdenum metal ceramic alloy fabricated with selective laser melting and traditional processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Li; Xiang, Nan; Wei, Bin

    2014-11-01

    A cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy fabricated by selective laser melting is a promising material; however, there are concerns about the change in its corrosion behavior. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes in corrosion behavior of a cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy fabricated by the selective laser melting technique before and after ceramic firing, with traditional processing of cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy serving as a control. Two groups of specimens were designated as group selective laser melting and group traditional. For each group, 20 specimens with a cylindrical shape were prepared and divided into 4 cells: selective laser melting as-cast, selective laser melting fired in pH 5.0 and 2.5, traditional as-cast, and traditional fired in pH 5.0 and 2.5. Specimens were prepared with a selective laser melting system for a selective laser melting alloy and the conventional lost wax technique for traditional cast alloy. After all specimen surfaces had been wet ground with silicon carbide paper (1200 grit), each group of 10 specimens was put through a series of ceramic firing cycles. Microstructure, Vickers microhardness, surface composition, oxide film thickness, and corrosion behavior were examined for specimens before and after ceramic firing. Three-way ANOVA was used to evaluate the effect of porcelain firing and pH values on the corrosion behavior of the 2 alloys (α=.05). Student t tests were used to compare the Vickers hardness. Although porcelain firing changed the microstructure, microhardness, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results, it showed no significant influence on the corrosion behavior of the selective laser melting alloy and traditional cast alloy (P>.05). No statistically significant influence was found on the corrosion behavior of the 2 alloys in different pH value solutions (P>.05). The porcelain firing process had no significant influence on the corrosion resistance results of the 2 alloys. Compared with traditional

  8. Thermodynamic and experimental study on phase stability in nanocrystalline alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Wenwu; Song Xiaoyan; Lu Nianduan; Huang Chuan

    2010-01-01

    Nanocrystalline alloys exhibit apparently different phase transformation characteristics in comparison to the conventional polycrystalline alloys. The special phase stability and phase transformation behavior, as well as the essential mechanisms of the nanocrystalline alloys, were described quantitatively in a nanothermodynamic point of view. By introducing the relationship between the excess volume at the grain boundary and the nanograin size, the Gibbs free energy was determined distinctly as a function of temperature and the nanograin size. Accordingly, the grain-size-dependence of the phase stability and phase transformation characteristics of the nanocrystalline alloy were calculated systematically, and the correlations between the phase constitution, the phase transformation temperature and the critical nanograin size were predicted. A series of experiments was performed to investigate the phase transformations at room temperature and high temperatures using the nanocrystalline Sm 2 Co 17 alloy as an example. The phase constitution and phase transformation sequence found in nanocrystalline Sm 2 Co 17 alloys with various grain-size levels agree well with the calculations by the nanothermodynamic model.

  9. Reaction kinetics of oxygen on single-phase alloys, oxidation of nickel and niobium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalauze, Rene

    1973-01-01

    This research thesis first addresses the reaction kinetics of oxygen on alloys. It presents some generalities on heterogeneous reactions (conventional theory, theory of jumps), discusses the core reaction (with the influence of pressure), discusses the influence of metal self-diffusion on metal oxidation kinetics (equilibrium conditions at the interface, hybrid diffusion regime), reports the application of the hybrid diffusion model to the study of selective oxidation of alloys (Wagner model, hybrid diffusion model) and the study of the oxidation kinetics of an alloy forming a solid solution of two oxides. The second part reports the investigation of the oxidation of single phase nickel and niobium alloys (phase α, β and γ)

  10. Studies on the process aspects related to chemical decontamination of chromium-containing alloys with redox processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, P.S.; Suresh, S.; Chandran, S.; Velmurugan, S.; Narasimhan, S.V.; Rajesh, P.

    2004-01-01

    Presence of chromium in the oxide layer makes oxidative pre-treatment with oxidizing agents such as potassium permanganate (KMnO 4 ) a must for the decontamination of stainless steels and other chromium containing alloys. The effectiveness of pre-treatment with oxidizing reagent varies with the conditions of treatment such as temperature, concentration and whether the medium is acidic or alkaline. A comparative study of the two acidic oxidizing agents, i.e., nitric acid-permanganate and permanganic acid was made. The dissolution behavior of copper and its oxide in permanganic acid was found to be comparable to that of chromium oxide. Citric acid and ascorbic acid were investigated as alternatives to oxalic acid for the reduction/decomposition of permanganate left over after the oxidizing pre-treatment step. It has been established that the reduction of chromate by citric acid is instantaneous only in presence of Mn 2+ ions. It has also been established that reduction of residual permanganate can be achieved with ascorbic acid and with minimum chemical requirement. The capabilities of nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)-ascorbic acid mixture for the dissolution of hematite have been explored. This study would help to choose the suitable oxidizing agent, the reducing agent used for decomposition of permanganate and to optimize the concentration of reducing formulation so that the process of decontamination is achieved with a minimum requirement of chemicals. The generation of radioactive ion exchange resin as waste is therefore held at a minimum. Ion exchange studies with metal ion complexes of relevance to decontamination were carried out with a view to choose a suitable type of ion exchanger. It has been established that treatment of the ion exchange resin with brine solution can solve the problem of leaching out of non-ionic organics from the resin. (orig.)

  11. Transmission electron microscope study of fusion-environment radiation damage in iron and iron-chromium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, L.L.S.

    1982-07-01

    A transmission electron microscopy study of radiation damage microstructures in iron and iron-chromium alloys has been performed. This study consisted of both qualitative and quantitative characterization of the dislocation and cavity microstructures, including determination of vacancy/interstitial character and Burgers vectors for dislocation loops and analysis of the cavity morphology. The effects of irradiation temperature, fluence, helium implantation, and chromium content were investigated. Neutron irradiation (iron specimens, 1 dpa, 455 to 1000 K) and triple-beam ion irradiation (Fe-10% Cr specimens, 10 dpa, 725 to 950 K; Fe-10% Cr specimens, 850 K, 0.3 to 100 dpa; and Fe, Fe-5% Cr, Fe-10% Cr specimens, 850 K, 10 dpa) were employed. In the triple-beam ion irradiation procedure, simultaneous bombardment with 4 MeV Fe/sup + +/ ions and energetic He/sup +/ and D/sub 2//sup +/ ions was used to simulate the fusion environment (10 at. ppM He/dpa and 41 at. ppM D/dpa). In addition, single-beam 4 MeV Fe/sup + +/ ion irradiations of Fe-10% Cr both with and without pre-injection of helium and deuterium were performed.

  12. Transmission electron microscope study of fusion-environment radiation damage in iron and iron-chromium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, L.L.S.

    1982-07-01

    A transmission electron microscopy study of radiation damage microstructures in iron and iron-chromium alloys has been performed. This study consisted of both qualitative and quantitative characterization of the dislocation and cavity microstructures, including determination of vacancy/interstitial character and Burgers vectors for dislocation loops and analysis of the cavity morphology. The effects of irradiation temperature, fluence, helium implantation, and chromium content were investigated. Neutron irradiation (iron specimens, 1 dpa, 455 to 1000 K) and triple-beam ion irradiation (Fe-10% Cr specimens, 10 dpa, 725 to 950 K; Fe-10% Cr specimens, 850 K, 0.3 to 100 dpa; and Fe, Fe-5% Cr, Fe-10% Cr specimens, 850 K, 10 dpa) were employed. In the triple-beam ion irradiation procedure, simultaneous bombardment with 4 MeV Fe ++ ions and energetic He + and D 2 + ions was used to simulate the fusion environment (10 at. ppM He/dpa and 41 at. ppM D/dpa). In addition, single-beam 4 MeV Fe ++ ion irradiations of Fe-10% Cr both with and without pre-injection of helium and deuterium were performed

  13. Phase transformations in the titanium-niobium binary alloy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffat, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    A fundamental study of the phase transformations in the Ti-Nb binary alloy system was completed. Eight alloys in the range 20 to 70 at% Nb were investigated using transmission electron microscopy, light metallography, and x-ray diffraction. Measurements of electric resistivity and Vicker's microhardness also were performed. Emphasis was placed on the minimization of interstitial contamination in all steps of alloy fabrication and specimen preparation. In order to eliminate the effects of prior cold working, the alloys studied were recrystallized at 1000 0 C. Phase transformations were studied in alloys quenched to room temperature after recrystallization and then isothermally aged, and in those isothermally aged without a prior room temperature quench. It was found that the microstructures of the quenched 20 and 25% Nb alloys were extremely sensitive to quench rate - with a fast quench producing martensite, a slow quench, the omega phase. Microstructures of the higher niobium content alloys were much less sensitive to quench rate. The microstructures of the isothermally aged 20 and 25% Nb alloys were found to be sensitive to prior thermal history. Alloys quenched to room temperature and then aged at 400 0 C contained large omega precipitates, while those aged without an intermediate room temperature quench contained alpha precipitates

  14. ANALYSIS OF KINETICS OF CAST IRON ALLOYING THROUGH SLAG PHASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Komarov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of cast iron alloying through slag phase due to use of nickel and copper oxides is considered and the analysis of kinetics regularity of alloying in case of absence of fuse in the form of milled cast-iron chips in slag and at their presence in it is carried out.

  15. Comparison and evaluation of marginal and internal gaps in cobalt-chromium alloy copings fabricated using subtractive and additive manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Yeon; Kim, Ji-Hwan; Kim, Hae-Young; Kim, Woong-Chul

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the marginal and internal gaps of cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloy copings fabricated using subtractive and additive manufacturing. A study model of an abutment tooth 46 was prepared by a 2-step silicone impression with dental stone. Fifteen stereolithography files for Co-Cr alloy copings were compiled using a model scanner and dental CAD software. Using the lost wax (LW), wax block (WB), soft metal block (SMB), microstereolithography (μ-SLA), and selected laser melting (SLM) techniques, 15 Co-Cr alloy copings were fabricated per group. The marginal and internal gaps of these Co-Cr alloy copings were measured using a digital microscope (160×), and the data obtained were analyzed using the non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis H-test and post-hoc Mann-Whitney U-test with Bonferroni correction. The mean values of the marginal, axial wall, and occlusal gaps were 91.8, 83.4, and 163μm in the LW group; 94.2, 77.5, and 122μm in the WB group; 60.0, 79.4, and 90.8μm in the SMB group; 154, 72.4, and 258μm in the μ-SLA group; and 239, 73.6, and 384μm in the SLM group, respectively. The differences in the marginal and occlusal gaps between the 5 groups were statistically significant (P<.05). The marginal gaps of the LW, WB, and SMB groups were within the clinically acceptable limit, but further improvements in the μ-SLA and SLM approaches may be required prior to clinical implementation. Copyright © 2017 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Specification for corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel covered welding electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    This specification prescribes requirements for covered corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel electrodes. These electrodes are normally used for shielded metal arc welding, and include those alloy steels designated as corrosion or heat-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steels, in which chromium exceeds 4.0% and nickel does not exceed 50.0%

  17. Specification for corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel covered welding electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    This specification prescribes requirements for covered corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel electrodes. These electrodes are normally used for shielded metal arc welding, and include those alloy steels designated as corrosion or heat-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steels, in which chromium exceeds 4.0 percent and nickel does not exceed 50.0 percent

  18. Method of processing titanium aluminium alloys modified by chromium and niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes the method of processing a TiAl base alloy to impart desirable strength and ductility properties which providing a melt of the TiAl base alloy having the formula Ti 51-42 Al 46-50 Cr 1-3 Nb 1-5

  19. The Kinetics of Phase Transformations During Tempering in Laser Melted High Chromium Cast Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M. Y.; Wang, Y.; Han, B.

    2012-06-01

    The precipitation of secondary carbides in the laser melted high chromium cast steels during tempering at 300-650 °C for 2 h in air furnace was characterized and the present phases was identified, by using transmission electron microscopy. Laser melted high chromium cast steel consists of austenitic dendrites and interdendritic M23C6 carbides. The austenite has such a strong tempering stability that it remains unchanged at temperature below 400 °C and the secondary hardening phenomenon starts from 450 °C to the maximum value of 672 HV at 560 °C. After tempering at 450 °C fine M23C6 carbides precipitate from the supersaturated austenite preferentially. In addition, the dislocation lines and slip bands still exist inside the austenite. While tempering at temperature below 560 °C, the secondary hardening simultaneously results from the martensite phase transformation and the precipitation of carbides as well as dislocation strengthening within a refined microstructure. Moreover, the formation of the ferrite matrix and large quality of coarse lamellar M3C carbides when the samples were tempered at 650 °C contributes to the decrease of hardness.

  20. Shape Memory Alloy-Based Periodic Cellular Structures, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase II effort will continue to develop and demonstrate an innovative shape memory alloy (SMA) periodic cellular structural technology. Periodic cellular...

  1. Phase transformations on Zr-Nb alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Sergio Norifumi

    1980-01-01

    This research intended the laboratory scale experimental development of Zr-Nb alloys with adequate characteristics for use as fuel element cladding or for the making of irradiation capsules. Zr-Nb alloys with different Nb contents were melted and the resulting material was characterised. The following metallurgical aspects were considered: preparation of Zr-Nb alloys with various Nb contents; heat and thermomechanical treatments; microstructural characterization; mechanical properties; oxidation properties. The influence of the heat treatment and thermomechanical treatment, on the out-of-pile mechanical and oxidation properties of the Zr-Nb alloys were studied. It was found that the alloy microhardness increases with the Nb content and/or with the thermomechanical treatment. Mechanical properties such as yield and ultimate tensile strength as well as elongation were determined by means of compression tests. The results showed that the alloy yield stress increases with the Nb content and with the thermomechanical treatment, while its elongation decreases. Thermogravimetric analysis determined the alloy oxidation kinetics, in the 400 - 800 deg C interval, at 1 atm. oxygen pressure. The results showed that the alloy oxidation rate increases with the temperature and Nb content. It was also observed that the oxidation rate increases considerably for temperatures higher than 600 deg C.(author)

  2. Report on the FY 1999 research survey on the development of high ductile chromium alloys; 1999 nendo koensei kuromu gokin no kaihatsu ni kansuru kenkyu chosa hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    The R and D of chromium alloys had been conducted till about the 1970s, which brought the unfavorable results. That's why chromium alloys are brittle at normal temperature and difficult in processing. However, the technology development in recent years review them. The development is earnestly desired also of the materials exceeding the Ni base super alloys which are heat resistant materials for power generation. Cr is rich as resource and light-weighted, and the oxidation film is stable and self-restorational at high temperature. The alloys are excellent in processability at normal temperature and excellent also in toughness. The nitrogen content is strongly concerned with brittleness and intergranular fracture at normal temperature. Therefore, Cr alloys were trially manufactured by the HIP sintering/hot forging method using electrolytic Cr powder with high-purity (99.99%) and low-nitrogen (10ppm) to study a possibility of improving brittleness at normal temperature, mechanical properties at high temperature, oxidation resistance, high-temperature corrosion resistance, etc. A variety of excellent characteristics of Cr alloys were made clear. However, also made clear were the problems: strength is low at normal temperature/high temperature; screw process is impossible because of high notch sensibility; those are not almighty high-temperature corrosion resistant materials. Further efforts should be exerted for the commercialization. (NEDO)

  3. Strength and fracture of two-phase alloys: a comparison of two alloy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurland, J.

    1978-01-01

    The functional roles of the hard and soft constituents in the deformation and fracture of two-phase alloys are discussed on the basis of two commercially important alloy systems, namely spheroidized carbon steels and cemented carbides, WC-Co. A modified rule of mixtures provides a structural approach to the yield and flow strength. Consideration of the fracture toughness is attempted by means of a phenomenological modelling of the fracture process on the microscale. While there are large differences in properties between the two alloys, the deformation and fracture processes show broad smilarities which are associated with the features of the interaction between constituents common to both alloys

  4. Real space multiple scattering description of alloy phase stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turchi, P.E.A.; Sluiter, M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of the advanced methodology which has been recently developed to study phase stability properties of substitutional alloys, including order-disorder phenomena and structural transformations. The approach is based on the real space version of the Generalized Perturbation Method first introduced by Ducastelle and Gautier, within the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker multiple scattering formulation of the Coherent Potential Approximation. Temperature effects are taken into account with a generalized meanfield approach, namely the Cluster Variation Method. The viability and the predictive power of such a scheme will be illustrated by a few examples, among them: the ground state properties of alloys, in particular the ordering tendencies for a series of equiatomic bcc-based alloys, the computation of alloy phase diagrams with the case of fcc and bcc-based Ni-Al alloys, the calculation of antiphase boundary energies and interfacial energies, and the stability of artificial ordered superlattices

  5. Dynamics of Shape Memory Alloy Systems, Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-22

    Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos in Systems with Discontinuous Support Using a Switch Model”, DINAME 2005 - XI International Conference on Dynamic Problems in...AFRL-AFOSR-CL-TR-2016-0003 Dynamics of Shape Memory Alloy Systems , Phase 2 Marcelo Savi FUNDACAO COORDENACAO DE PROJETOS PESQUISAS E EEUDOS TECNOL...release. 2 AFOSR FINAL REPORT Grant Title: Nonlinear Dynamics of Shape Memory Alloy Systems , Phase 2 Grant #: FA9550-11-1-0284 Reporting Period

  6. Prediction of Phase Separation of Immiscible Ga-Tl Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yunkyum; Kim, Han Gyeol; Kang, Youn-Bae; Kaptay, George; Lee, Joonho

    2017-06-01

    Phase separation temperature of Ga-Tl liquid alloys was investigated using the constrained drop method. With this method, density and surface tension were investigated together. Despite strong repulsive interactions, molar volume showed ideal mixing behavior, whereas surface tension of the alloy was close to that of pure Tl due to preferential adsorption of Tl. Phase separation temperatures and surface tension values obtained with this method were close to the theoretically calculated values using three different thermodynamic models.

  7. The effect of hot pressing time on the microstructure and properties of Laves phase NbCr{sub 2} alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, X. [College of Electromechanical Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautical and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanchang Institute of Aeronautical Technology, Nanchang 330063 (China); Lu, S.Q. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanchang Institute of Aeronautical Technology, Nanchang 330063 (China)], E-mail: niatlusq@126.com; Hu, P.; Huang, M.G.; Nie, X.W. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanchang Institute of Aeronautical Technology, Nanchang 330063 (China); Fu, M.W. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2008-06-25

    The microstructure and properties were investigated on the Laves phase NbCr{sub 2} alloys prepared through 20 h mechanical alloying of niobium and chromium powders and subsequent hot pressing at 1250 deg. C for different time. The results indicate that the Laves phase NbCr{sub 2} alloy with homogeneous microstructure and fine grains and high relative density is obtained. With the increase of hot pressing time, the density, grain size and Vickers hardness increase, the fracture toughness, however, decreases gradually. The alloy fabricated by hot pressing at 1250 deg. C for 30 min has the best overall properties. Its average grain size reaches about 248 nm, the relative density is 97.8% and the fracture toughness at room temperature is more than 4.7 MPa m{sup 1/2}. Compared with the Laves phase NbCr{sub 2} alloy prepared by arc-melting, which has the fracture toughness of 1.2 MPa m{sup 1/2}, the fracture toughness in this research is increased significantly.

  8. Surface Alloying of SUS 321 Chromium-Nickel Steel by an Electron-Plasma Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Yu. F.; Teresov, A. D.; Petrikova, E. A.; Krysina, O. V.; Ivanova, O. V.; Shugurov, V. V.; Moskvin, P. V.

    2017-07-01

    The mechanisms of forming nanostructured, nanophase layers are revealed and analyzed in austenitic steel subjected to surface alloying using an electron-plasma process. Nanostructured, nanophase layers up to 30 μm in thickness were formed by melting of the film/substrate system with an electron beam generated by a SOLO facility (Institute of High Current Electronics, SB RAS), Tomsk), which ensured crystallization and subsequent quenching at the cooling rates within the range 105-108 K/s. The surface was modified with structural stainless steel specimens (SUS 321 steel). The film/substrate system (film thickness 0.5 μm) was formed by a plasma-assisted vacuum-arc process by evaporating a cathode made from a sintered pseudoalloy of the following composition: Zr - 6 at.% Ti - 6 at.% Cu. The film deposition was performed in a QUINTA facility equipped with a PINK hot-cathode plasma source and DI-100 arc evaporators with accelerated cooling of the process cathode, which allowed reducing the size and fraction of the droplet phase in the deposited film. It is found that melting of the film/substrate system (Zr-Ti-Cu)/(SUS 321 steel) using a high-intensity pulsed electron beam followed by the high-rate crystallization is accompanied by the formation of α-iron cellular crystallization structure and precipitation of Cr2Zr, Cr3C2 and TiC particles on the cell boundaries, which as a whole allowed increasing microhardness by a factor of 1.3, Young's modulus - by a factor of 1.2, wear resistance - by a factor of 2.7, while achieving a three-fold reduction in the friction coefficient.

  9. Enhancement of the acute phase response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge in steers supplemented with chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The study examined the effect of chromium supplementation on the response of steers to an LPS challenge. Twenty steers received a premix that added 0 (control) or 0.2 mg/kg of chromium (KemTRACE®brandChromiumProprionate 0.04%, Kemin Industries) to the total diet on a dry matter basis for 55 d. Steer...

  10. Effect of cold working on the stress corrosion cracking resistance of nickel-chromium-iron alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, T.; Onimura, K.

    1987-01-01

    In order to grasp the stress corrosion cracking resistance of cold worked nickel base alloys in PWR primary water, the effect of cold working on the stress corrosion cracking resistance of alloys 600, X-750 and 690, in high temperature water, have been studied. Stress corrosion cracking tests were conducted at 360 0 C (633K) in a simulated PWR primary water for about 12,000 hours (43.2Ms). From the test results, it is concluded that the stress corrosion cracking resistance in the cold worked Alloy 600 at the same applied stress level increases with an increase in cold working ratio, and the cold worked alloys of thermally treated 690 and X-750 have excellent stress corrosion cracking resistance. (Author)

  11. Monte Carlo simulation of the surface magnetic phase transition in chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mata, G.J.; Valera, M.

    1995-03-01

    Antiferromagnetic chromium is known to have a surface magnetic phase transition at a temperature T s = 780K, which is well above its bulk Neel temperature, T N = 311K. Electronic structure calculations predict an enhancement of the magnetic moment at the surface, due to changes in the local electronic environment. In order to ascertain the role of such an enhancement in the surface magnetic transition, we have modelled the surface by means of a classical Heisenberg model in which: a) the magnitude of a given spin is equal to the value of the corresponding magnetic moment predicted by band structure calculations, b) the exchange interaction J between spins is the same throughout the system, and c) the exchange interaction is chosen so as to reproduce the bulk transition temperature. We find a ratio of surface to bulk transition temperature of T S /T N = 2.5, which is an excellent agreement with the experimental result. Our results suggest that the surface magnetic transition in chromium is driven by fluctuations in the orientation of the magnetic moments and that quantum fluctuations play a minor role. (author). 18 refs, 5 figs

  12. Quantitative analysis of chromium concentration in nickel based alloys by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy at atmospheric pressure using a nanosecond ultraviolet Nd:YAG laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, G.P.; Suri, B.M.; Verma, A.; Sundararaman, M.; Unnikrishnan, V.K.; Alti, K.; Kartha, V.B.; Santhosh, C.

    2010-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been well recognized as a simple, fast and direct analytical technique of elemental analysis of multi-element materials by a number of research groups all over the world. It is based on the focusing of a high-power pulsed laser beam with a power density > 100 MW/cm 2 onto a sample surface followed by optical emission spectroscopy of the plasma produced over the surface. In the present work, they have carried out the quantitative analysis of chromium in nickel-based-alloys using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in air at atmospheric pressure. In the present work the quantitative analysis of chromium in nickel-based-alloys using laser-induced break-down spectroscopy (LIBS) in air at atmospheric pressure has been carried out

  13. Discontinuous structural phase transition of liquid metal and alloys (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Li; Liu, Jiantong

    2004-01-01

    The diameter (d f ) of diffusion fluid cluster before and after phase transition has been calculated in terms of the paper ''Discontinuous structural phase transition of liquid metal and alloy (1)'' Physics Letters. A 326 (2004) 429-435, to verify quantitatively the discontinuity of structural phase transition; the phenomena of thermal contraction and thermal expansion during the phase transition, together with the evolution model of discontinuous structural phase transition are also discussed in this Letter to explore further the nature of structural transition; In addition, based on the viscosity experimental result mentioned in paper [Y. Waseda, The Structure of Non-Crystalline Materials--Liquids and Amorphous Solids, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1980], we present an approach to draw an embryo of the liquid-liquid (L-L) phase diagram for binary alloys above liquidus in the paper, expecting to guide metallurgy process so as to improve the properties of alloys. The idea that controls amorphous structure and its properties by means of the L-L phase diagram for alloys and by the rapid cooling technique to form the amorphous alloy has been brought forward in the end

  14. Microstructure and phase evolution in laser clad chromium carbide-NiCrMoNb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatesh, L.; Samajdar, I.; Tak, Manish; Doherty, Roger D.; Gundakaram, Ravi C.; Prasad, K. Satya; Joshi, S.V.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Microstructural development during laser cladding has been studied. • In this multi component system Cr 7 C 3 is found to be the stable carbide phase. • Phases were identified by EBSD since XRD results were not conclusive. • Increase in laser power and/or scanning speed reduced the carbide content. • Hardness seems to depend on phase content as well as microstructure. - Abstract: Microstructural development in laser clad layers of Chromium carbide (Cr x C y )-NiCrMoNb on SA 516 steel has been investigated. Although the starting powder contained both Cr 3 C 2 and Cr 7 C 3 , the clad layers showed only the presence of Cr 7 C 3 . Microtexture measurements by electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) revealed primary dendritic Cr 7 C 3 with Ni rich FCC metallic phase being present in the interdendritic spaces. Further annealing of the laser clad layers and furnace melting of the starting powder confirmed that Cr 7 C 3 is the primary as well as stable carbide phase in this multi component system. Increase in laser power and scanning speed progressively reduced carbide content in the laser clad layers. Increased scanning speed, which enhances the cooling rate, also led to reduction in the secondary arm spacing (λ 2 ) of the Cr 7 C 3 dendrites. The clad layer hardness increased with carbide content and with decreased dendrite arm spacing.

  15. Macro- and microdistributions in electrodeposition of chromium and its alloys from electrolytes based on chronic acid: microdistribution and microdissipation ability of the electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruglikov, S.S.; Kruglikova, E.S.

    1996-01-01

    The distribution of electrodeposited chromium and Cr-W, Cr-Mo, Cr-Ti, Cr-Zr alloys on a surface with a regular two-dimensional microprofile has been studied. The standard, self-regulating, supersulfate, tetrachromate and rough chrome-plating electrolytes, as well as electrolytes for Cr-Zr and Cr-Mo alloys production, feature practically uniform microdistribution. The conclusion is made that formation and effect of cathode film under stationary conditions of cathode process do not involve diffusion restrictions of cathode reaction rate, while the thickness of the cathode film is small as compared with the amplitude of the microprofiles studies. 6 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Single-phase high-entropy alloys. An overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozak, Roksolana; Steurer, Walter [ETH Zurich (Switzerland). Lab. of Crystallography; Sologubenko, Alla [ETH Zurich (Switzerland). Lab. of Nanotechnology

    2015-02-01

    The term 'high-entropy alloys (HEAs)' first appeared about 10 years ago defining alloys composed of n=5-13 principal elements with concentrations of approximately 100/n at.% each. Since then many equiatomic (or near equiatomic) single- and multi-phase multicomponent alloys were developed, which are reported for a combination of tunable properties: high hardness, strength and ductility, oxidation and wear resistance, magnetism, etc. In our paper, we focus on probably single-phase HEAs (solid solutions) out of all HEAs studied so far, discuss ways of their prediction, mechanical properties. In contrast to classical multielement/multiphase alloys, only single-phase multielement alloys (solid solutions) represent the basic concept underlying HEAs as mixing-entropy stabilized homogenous materials. The literature overview is complemented by own studies demonstrating that the alloys CrFeCoNi, CrFeCoNiAl{sub 0.3} and PdFeCoNi homogenized at 1300 and 1100 C, respectively, for 1 week are not single-phase HEAs, but a coherent mixture of two solid solutions.

  17. The quasicrystalline phase formation in Al-Cu-Cr alloys produced by mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sviridova, T.A.; Shevchukov, A.P.; Shelekhov, E.V. [National University of Science and Technology ' MISIS' , Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation); Diakonov, D.L. [Bardin Central Research Institute for the Iron and Steel Industry, Moscow 105005 (Russian Federation); Tcherdyntsev, V.V.; Kaloshkin, S.D. [National University of Science and Technology ' MISIS' , Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation)

    2011-06-15

    Research highlights: > Formation of decagonal quasicrystalline phase in Al-Cu-Cr alloys. > Obtained decagonal phase belongs to D{sub 3} family of decagonal quasicrystals. > Decagonal phase has 1.26 nm periodicity along 10-fold axis. > Alloys were produced by combination of mechanical alloying and subsequent annealing. > Phase composition of as-milled powders depending on annealing temperature. - Abstract: Almost single-phase decagonal quasicrystal with periodicity of 1.26 nm along 10-fold axis was produced in Al{sub 69}Cu{sub 21}Cr{sub 10} and Al{sub 72.5}Cu{sub 16.5}Cr{sub 11} alloys using combination of mechanical alloying (MA) and subsequent annealing. Phase transformations of as-milled powders depending on annealing temperature in the range of 200-800 deg. C are examined. Since the transformations can be explained based on kinetic and thermodynamic reasons it seems that applied technique (short preliminary MA followed by the annealing) permits to produce the equilibrium phases rather than metastable ones.

  18. Corrosion phase formation on container alloys in basalt repository environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, R.G.; Anantatmula, R.P.; Lutton, J.M.; Rivera, C.L.

    1986-01-01

    The Basalt Waste Isolation Project is evaluating the suitability of basalt in southeastern Washington State as a possible location for a nuclear waste repository. The performance of the waste package, which includes the waste form, container, and surrounding packing material, will be affected by the stability of container alloys in the repository environment. Primary corrosion phases and altered packing material containing metals leached from the container may also influence subsequent reactions between the waste form and repository environment. Copper- and iron-based alloys were tested at 50 0 to 300 0 C in an air/steam environment and in pressure vessels in ground-water-saturated basalt-bentonite packing material. Reaction phases formed on the alloys were identified and corrosion rates were measured. Changes in adhering packing material were also evaluated. The observed reactions and their possible effects on container alloy durability in the repository are discussed

  19. Lave phase precipitation in Nb- and Ti-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tewari, R.; Vishwanadh, B.; Dey, G.K.

    2010-01-01

    In multicomponent Nb-based alloys system, which are potential candidate materials for high temperature applications, the presence of Laves phase was noticed along with the silicides in equilibrium with the soft β-matrix. In Ti-Cr alloys, which show a tendency for inverse melting, the formation of the phase was noticed in the β matrix upon aging. The Laves phase being topologically closed pack structure appears to have strong tendency for the formation provided the criterion of atomic size factor is met

  20. Mechanisms of diffusional phase transformations in metals and alloys

    CERN Document Server

    Aaronson, Hubert I; Lee, Jong K

    2010-01-01

    Developed by the late metallurgy professor and master experimentalist Hubert I. Aaronson, this collection of lecture notes details the fundamental principles of phase transformations in metals and alloys upon which steel and other metals industries are based. Mechanisms of Diffusional Phase Transformations in Metals and Alloys is devoted to solid-solid phase transformations in which elementary atomic processes are diffusional jumps, and these processes occur in a series of so-called nucleation and growth through interface migration. Instead of relying strictly on a pedagogical approach, it doc

  1. Pressure vessel code construction capabilities for a nickel-chromium-tungsten-molybdenum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothman, M.F.

    1990-01-01

    HAYNES alloy 230 (UNS NO6230) has achieved wide usage in a variety of high-temperature aerospace, chemical process industry and industrial heating applications since its introduction in 1981. Combining high elevated temperature strength with excellent metallurgical stability, environment-resistance and relatively straight forward fabrication characteristics, this Ni-Cr-W-Mo alloy was an excellent candidate for ASME Pressure vessel Code applications. Coverage under case No. 2063 was granted in July, 1989, for both Section I and Section VIII Division 1 construction. In this paper, the metallurgy of 230 alloy will be described, and its design strength capabilities contrasted with those for more established code materials. Other important performance capabilities, such as long-term thermal stability, oxidation-resistance, fatigue-resistance, and resistance to other forms of environmental degradation will be discussed. It will be shown that the combined properties of 230 alloy offer some significant advantages over other materials for applications such as expansion bellows, heat-exchangers, valves and other components in the fossil energy, nuclear energy and chemical process industries, among others

  2. Influence of the addition of chromium in the microstructure and property of Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, C.A.; Coelho, R.E.; Lima, P.C. de; Carvalho, C.O. de; Conrado, L.C.

    2016-01-01

    The Copper based alloys with addition of a fourth element have been studied for 20 years. These alloys, depending on their composition present shape memory effect structure and now a day possess a diversity of applications. Considering the importance of these materials, it was developed in this research alloys of Cu-Al-Ni with addition of Cr in different percentages (0.2, 0.4, 0.7 and 2.26wt.%). A plasma furnace (Company-EDG, model-Discovery), with vacuum control and argon gas injection, was utilized. Posteriorly, the samples underwent heat treatment of solubilization. This treatment consisted in submitting all samples to a temperature of 900 deg C for 1 hour and followed by water solution (salt, water, ice and alcohol) quenching at a temperature of -10 deg C. The samples were polished and etched with Ferric Chloride. All samples were analyzed X-ray Fluorescence, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). XRD was carried out with a tension 30kV from 25 deg to 100 deg. It was possible to verify, through the obtained SEM images, that Cr has a fundamental role in the martensite structure evolution and with XRD analyses it was observed that with the increase of Cr, results in the formation of phases 18R and 2H with a decrease of phase γ2, the last one unwanted to this type of alloy. (author)

  3. Microstructures and phase transformations in interstitial alloys of tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahmen, U.

    1979-01-01

    The analysis of microstructures, phases, and possible ordering of interstitial solute atoms is fundamental to an understanding of the properties of metal-interstitial alloys in general. As evidenced by the controversies on phase transformations in the particular system tantalum--carbon, our understanding of this class of alloys is inferior to our knowledge of substitutional metal alloys. An experimental clarification of these controversies in tantalum was made. Using advanced techniques of electron microscopy and ultrahigh vacuum techology, an understanding of the microstructures and phase transformations in dilute interstitial tantalum--carbon alloys is developed. Through a number of control experiments, the role and sources of interstitial contamination in the alloy preparation (and under operating conditions) are revealed. It is demonstrated that all previously published work on the dilute interstitially ordered phase Ta 64 C can be explained consistently in terms of ordering of the interstitial contaminants oxygen and hydrogen, leading to the formation of the phases Ta 12 O and Ta 2 H

  4. Effect of manganese and chromium on microstructure and toughness of Fe-Cr-Mn alloys resulting from solid-solution treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okazaki, Yoshimitsu; Miyahara, Kazuya; Wade, Noboru; Hosoi, Yuzo

    1989-01-01

    This study is aimed at making clear the effect of Mn and Cr on the microstructure and toughness of an Fe-Cr-Mn alloy which is considered as one of the candidate alloys for reduced activation materials for the first wall application of the fusion reactor. The microstructures of Fe-12% Cr-(5∼30)% Mn(mass%) alloys after solution treatment at 1373 K for 3.6 ks are markedly varied with Mn contents; α'(martensite) + δ(ferrite) in 5% Mn alloy, α' + δ + ε(martensite) + γ(austenite) in the 10% Mn alloy, α' + ε + γ in 15% Mn alloy, ε + γ in the 20% Mn alloy, and ε + γ +δ in the 25% Mn alloy, and γ + δ in the 30% Mn alloy. It is to be noted that the δ phase increases with increasing Mn content when the Fe-12% Cr alloy contains more than 25% Mn, which suggests that Mn plays the role of a ferrite former. In Fe-15% Mn-Cr alloy, the δ phase is not observed in the range of Cr contents up to 12%, whereas it is markedly increased with the addition of 16% Cr. C, N and Ni are very helpful in forming the γ phase in these alloys as generally known in Fe-Cr-Ni alloys. The toughness evaluated by the Charpy impact test at 273 K and room temperature is very low in the 5% Mn alloy which consists of the α' and δ phases. It is, however, significantly improved by a small amount of the γ phase and increases with increase of γ phase stability. (author)

  5. Chromium-free conversion coatings based on inorganic salts (Zr/Ti/Mn/Mo) for aluminum alloys used in aircraft applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santa Coloma, P.; Izagirre, U.; Belaustegi, Y.; Jorcin, J.B.; Cano, F.J.; Lapeña, N.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Chromium-free conversion coatings for corrosion protection of aluminum alloys. • Salt spray and potentiodynamic sweep tests to study the corrosion behavior. • Local deposits on Cu-rich intermetallic particles enhanced corrosion resistance. • Surface characterization to relate bath's composition and corrosion resistance. • Best corrosion protection with conversion baths without titanium salts. - Abstract: Novel chromium-free conversion coatings based on Zr/Ti/Mn/Mo compounds were developed at a pilot scale to improve the corrosion resistance of the AA2024-T3 and AA7075-T6 aluminum alloys for aircraft applications. The influence of the presence of Zr and Ti in the Zr/Ti/Mn/Mo conversion bath's formulation on the corrosion resistance of the coated alloys was investigated. The corrosion resistance provided by the conversion coatings was evaluated by salt spray exposure and potentiodynamic sweeps. Optical and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) operating in the Kelvin Probe mode (SKPFM) were used to provide microstructural information of the coated samples that achieved the best results in the corrosion tests. The salt spray test evidenced the higher corrosion resistance of the coated samples compared to the bare surfaces for both alloys. The potentiodynamic tests showed that the corrosion current density decreased for coated AA7075-T6 and AA2024-T3 alloys, which indicated an obvious improvement of the corrosion resistance with all the processes for both alloys. Although the corrosion resistance of the coated samples appeared to be higher for the alloy AA7075-T6 than for the alloy AA2024-T3, both alloys achieved the best corrosion protection with the coatings deposited from conversion bath formulations containing no titanium salts. The microscopy analysis on the coated AA7075-T6 samples revealed that a local deposition of Zr compounds and, possibly, an

  6. Chromium-free conversion coatings based on inorganic salts (Zr/Ti/Mn/Mo) for aluminum alloys used in aircraft applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santa Coloma, P., E-mail: patricia.santacoloma@tecnalia.com [TECNALIA Research & Innovation, Parque Tecnológico de San Sebastián, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, E-20009 Donostia-San Sebastián, Gipuzkoa (Spain); Izagirre, U.; Belaustegi, Y.; Jorcin, J.B.; Cano, F.J. [TECNALIA Research & Innovation, Parque Tecnológico de San Sebastián, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, E-20009 Donostia-San Sebastián, Gipuzkoa (Spain); Lapeña, N. [Boeing Research & Technology Europe, S.L.U., Avenida Sur del Aeropuerto de Barajas 38, Building 4 – 3rd Floor, E-28042 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-08-01

    Highlights: • Chromium-free conversion coatings for corrosion protection of aluminum alloys. • Salt spray and potentiodynamic sweep tests to study the corrosion behavior. • Local deposits on Cu-rich intermetallic particles enhanced corrosion resistance. • Surface characterization to relate bath's composition and corrosion resistance. • Best corrosion protection with conversion baths without titanium salts. - Abstract: Novel chromium-free conversion coatings based on Zr/Ti/Mn/Mo compounds were developed at a pilot scale to improve the corrosion resistance of the AA2024-T3 and AA7075-T6 aluminum alloys for aircraft applications. The influence of the presence of Zr and Ti in the Zr/Ti/Mn/Mo conversion bath's formulation on the corrosion resistance of the coated alloys was investigated. The corrosion resistance provided by the conversion coatings was evaluated by salt spray exposure and potentiodynamic sweeps. Optical and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) operating in the Kelvin Probe mode (SKPFM) were used to provide microstructural information of the coated samples that achieved the best results in the corrosion tests. The salt spray test evidenced the higher corrosion resistance of the coated samples compared to the bare surfaces for both alloys. The potentiodynamic tests showed that the corrosion current density decreased for coated AA7075-T6 and AA2024-T3 alloys, which indicated an obvious improvement of the corrosion resistance with all the processes for both alloys. Although the corrosion resistance of the coated samples appeared to be higher for the alloy AA7075-T6 than for the alloy AA2024-T3, both alloys achieved the best corrosion protection with the coatings deposited from conversion bath formulations containing no titanium salts. The microscopy analysis on the coated AA7075-T6 samples revealed that a local deposition of Zr compounds and, possibly, an

  7. Formation of nano quasicrystalline and crystalline phases by mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamah, A.M.; Ibrahim, S. [Faculty of Petroleum and Mining Engineering, Suez Canal University, Suez (Egypt); Hanna, F.F., E-mail: fariedhanna@yahoo.com [Faculty of Petroleum and Mining Engineering, Suez Canal University, Suez (Egypt)

    2011-02-03

    Research highlights: > Mechanical alloying (MA) is an important method to investigate the formation of nano sized quasicrystalline phases in Al{sub 86}Cr{sub 14}, Al{sub 84}Fe{sub 16} and Al{sub 62.5}Cu{sub 25}Fe{sub 12.5} compounds. The second part of the present work is an attempt to examine the possibility of formation of the i-phase of the Al{sub 62.5}Cu{sub 25}Fe{sub 12.5}, which lies in the region of the perfect i-phase in the ternary phase diagram, by rapid solidification method. To perform the obtained quasi phase mechanical alloying and heat treatment at the rapid solidified sample were done. - Abstract: In the present work, the formation of nano quasicrystalline icosahedral phase in Al{sub 86}Cr{sub 14}, Al{sub 84}Fe{sub 16} and Al{sub 62.5}Cu{sub 25}Fe{sub 12.5} alloys has been investigated by mechanical alloying. Mixtures of quasicrystalline and related crystalline phases have been observed under various milling conditions. The X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis and electrical resistivity techniques have been used for characterization and physical property measurements. The particle size was calculated by X-ray profile using Williamson-Hall plot method and it was found to be 25-50 nm size.

  8. Formation of nano quasicrystalline and crystalline phases by mechanical alloying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamah, A.M.; Ibrahim, S.; Hanna, F.F.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Mechanical alloying (MA) is an important method to investigate the formation of nano sized quasicrystalline phases in Al 86 Cr 14 , Al 84 Fe 16 and Al 62.5 Cu 25 Fe 12.5 compounds. The second part of the present work is an attempt to examine the possibility of formation of the i-phase of the Al 62.5 Cu 25 Fe 12.5 , which lies in the region of the perfect i-phase in the ternary phase diagram, by rapid solidification method. To perform the obtained quasi phase mechanical alloying and heat treatment at the rapid solidified sample were done. - Abstract: In the present work, the formation of nano quasicrystalline icosahedral phase in Al 86 Cr 14 , Al 84 Fe 16 and Al 62.5 Cu 25 Fe 12.5 alloys has been investigated by mechanical alloying. Mixtures of quasicrystalline and related crystalline phases have been observed under various milling conditions. The X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis and electrical resistivity techniques have been used for characterization and physical property measurements. The particle size was calculated by X-ray profile using Williamson-Hall plot method and it was found to be 25-50 nm size.

  9. The properties and transport phenomena in oxide films on iron, nickel, chromium and their alloys in aqueous environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laitinen, T.; Bojinov, M.; Betova, I.; Maekelae, K.; Saario, T. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-01-01

    The construction materials used in coolant systems in nuclear power plants become covered with oxide films as a result of exposure to the aqueous environment. The susceptibility of the materials to different forms of corrosion, as well as the extent of the incorporation of radioactive species on the surfaces of the primary circuit, are greatly influenced by the physical and chemical properties of these oxide films. The composition and characteristics of the oxide films in turn depend on the applied water chemistry. This work was undertaken in order to collect and evaluate the present views on the structure and behaviour of oxide films formed on iron- and nickel-based materials in aqueous environments. This survey should serve to recognise the areas in which more understanding and research effort is needed. The review begins with a discussion on the bulk oxides of iron, nickel and chromium, as well as their mixed oxides. In addition to bulk oxides, the structure and properties of oxide films forming on pure iron, nickel and chromium and on iron- and nickel-based engineering alloys are considered. General approaches to model the structure and growth of oxide films on metals are discussed in detail. The specific features of the oxide structures, properties and growth at high temperatures are presented with special focus on the relevance of existing models. Finally, the role of oxide films in localised corrosion, oxide breakdown pitting. Stress corrosion cracking and related phenomena is considered. The films formed on the surfaces of iron- and nickel-based alloys in high-temperature aqueous environments generally comprise two layers, i.e. the so-called duplex structure. The inner part is normally enriched in chromium and has a more compact structure, while the outer part is enriched in iron and has a cracked or porous structure. The information collected clearly indicates the effect of the chemical environment on the properties of oxide films growing on metal surfaces

  10. The properties and transport phenomena in oxide films on iron, nickel, chromium and their alloys in aqueous environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laitinen, T.; Bojinov, M.; Betova, I.; Maekelae, K.; Saario, T.

    1999-01-01

    The construction materials used in coolant systems in nuclear power plants become covered with oxide films as a result of exposure to the aqueous environment. The susceptibility of the materials to different forms of corrosion, as well as the extent of the incorporation of radioactive species on the surfaces of the primary circuit, are greatly influenced by the physical and chemical properties of these oxide films. The composition and characteristics of the oxide films in turn depend on the applied water chemistry. This work was undertaken in order to collect and evaluate the present views on the structure and behaviour of oxide films formed on iron- and nickel-based materials in aqueous environments. This survey should serve to recognise the areas in which more understanding and research effort is needed. The review begins with a discussion on the bulk oxides of iron, nickel and chromium, as well as their mixed oxides. In addition to bulk oxides, the structure and properties of oxide films forming on pure iron, nickel and chromium and on iron- and nickel-based engineering alloys are considered. General approaches to model the structure and growth of oxide films on metals are discussed in detail. The specific features of the oxide structures, properties and growth at high temperatures are presented with special focus on the relevance of existing models. Finally, the role of oxide films in localised corrosion, oxide breakdown pitting. Stress corrosion cracking and related phenomena is considered. The films formed on the surfaces of iron- and nickel-based alloys in high-temperature aqueous environments generally comprise two layers, i.e. the so-called duplex structure. The inner part is normally enriched in chromium and has a more compact structure, while the outer part is enriched in iron and has a cracked or porous structure. The information collected clearly indicates the effect of the chemical environment on the properties of oxide films growing on metal surfaces

  11. The Properties Of And Transport Phenomena In Oxide Films On Iron, Nickel, Chromium And Their Alloys In Aqueous Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saario, T.; Laitinen, T.; Maekelae, K.; Bojinov, M.; Betova, I.

    1998-07-01

    The construction materials used in coolant systems in nuclear power plants become covered with oxide films as a result of exposure to the aqueous environment. The susceptibility of the materials to different forms of corrosion, as well as the extent of the incorporation of radioactive species on the surfaces of the primary circuit, are greatly influenced by the physical and chemical properties of these oxide films. The composition and characteristics of the oxide films in turn depend on the applied water chemistry. This work was undertaken in order to collect and evaluate the present views on the structure and behaviour of oxide films formed on iron- and nickel-based materials in aqueous environments. This survey should serve to recognise the areas in which more understanding and research effort is needed. The review begins with a discussion on the bulk oxides of iron, nickel and chromium, as well as their mixed oxides. In addition to bulk oxides, the structure and properties of oxide films forming on pure iron, nickel and chromium and on iron- and nickel-based engineering alloys are considered. General approaches to model the structure and growth of oxide films on metals are discussed in detail. The specific features of the oxide structures, properties and growth at high temperatures are presented with special focus on the relevance of existing models. Finally, the role of oxide films in localised corrosion, oxide breakdown, pitting, stress corrosion cracking and related phenomena is considered. The films formed on the surfaces of iron- and nickel-based alloys in high-temperature aqueous environments generally comprise two layers, i.e. the so-called duplex structure. The inner part is normally enriched in chromium and has a more dense structure, while the outer part is enriched in iron and has a cracked or porous structure. The information collected clearly indicates the effect of the chemical environment on the properties of oxide films growing on metal surfaces

  12. Effect of alloying elements on σ phase formation in Fe-Cr-Mn alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okazaki, Yoshimitsu; Miyahara, Kazuya; Hosoi, Yuzo; Tanino, Mitsuru; Komatsu, Hazime.

    1989-01-01

    Alloys of Fe-(8∼12%) Cr-(5∼30%) Mn were solution-treated at 1373 K for 3.6 ks, followed by cold-working of 50% reduction. Both solution-treated and 50% cold-worked materials were aged in the temperature range from 773 to 973 K for 3.6 x 10 3 ks. The identification of σ phase formation was made by using X-ray diffraction from the electrolytically extracted residues of the aged specimens. The region of σ phase formation determined by the present work is wider than that on the phase diagram already reported. It is to be noted that Mn promotes markedly the σ phase formation, and that three different types of σ phase formation are observed depending on Mn content: α→γ + α→γ + α + σ in 10% Mn, α→γ + σ in 15 to 20% Mn alloys, α→χ(Chi) →χ + σ + γ in 25 to 30% Mn alloys. An average electron concentration (e/a) in the σ phase was estimated by quantitative analysis of alloying elements using EPMA. The e/a value in the σ phase formed in Fe-(12∼16%) Cr-Mn alloys aged at 873 K for 3.6 x 10 3 ks is about 7.3, which is independent of Mn content. In order to prevent σ phase formation in Fe-12% Cr-15% Mn alloy, the value of Ni * eq of 11 (Ni * eq = Ni + 30(C) + 25(N)) is required. (author)

  13. Material composition and nuclear data libraries' influence on nickel-chromium alloys activation evaluation: a comparison with decay heat experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Cepraga, D G

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents the activation analyses on Inconel-600 nickel-chromium alloy. Three activation data libraries, namely the EAF-4.1, the EAF-97 and the FENDL/A-2, and the FENDL/D-2 decay data library, have been used to perform the calculation with the European activation code ANITA-4/M. The neutron flux distribution into the material samples was provided by JAERI as results of 3D Monte-Carlo MCNP transport code experiment simulation. A comparison with integral decay heat measurement performed at the Fusion Neutronics Source (FNS), JAERI, Tokai, Japan, is used to validate the computational approach. The calculation results are given and discussed. The impact of the material composition, including impurities, on the decay heat of samples irradiated in fusion-like neutron spectra is assessed and discussed. The discrepancies calculations-experiments are within the experimental errors, that is between 6% and 10%, except for the short cooling times (less than 40 min after the end of irradiation). To improve calcul...

  14. Effect of nano-oxide particle size on radiation resistance of iron–chromium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Weizong; Li, Lulu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Valdez, James A. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Saber, Mostafa [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Portland State University, Portland, OR 97201 (United States); Zhu, Yuntian, E-mail: ytzhu@ncsu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Koch, Carl C.; Scattergood, Ronald O. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Radiation resistance of Fe–14Cr alloys under 200 keV He irradiation at 500 °C was systematically investigated with varying sizes of nano oxide Zr, Hf and Cr particles. It is found that these nano oxide particles acted as effective sites for He bubble formation. By statistically analyzing 700–1500 He bubbles at the depth of about 150–700 nm from a series of HRTEM images for each sample, we established the variation of average He bubble size, He bubble density, and swelling percentage along the depth, and found them to be consistent with the He concentration profile calculated from the SIRM program. Oxide particles with sizes less than 3.5–4 nm are found most effective for enhancing radiation resistance in the studied alloy systems.

  15. Removal of chromium (VI) from water by micro-alloyed aluminium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper deals with Cr(VI) ion removal from water, by micro-alloyed aluminium composite (MAlC), under flow conditions. In a water environment the MAlC acts as a strong reducing agent. Dissolving it in water is accompanied by the generation of Al(III) ions and reduction of water to H2, with OH- ions. The final product is ...

  16. Decagonal quasicrystalline phase in as-cast and mechanically alloyed Al–Cu–Cr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shevchukov, A.P.; Sviridova, T.A.; Kaloshkin, S.D.; Tcherdyntsev, V.V.; Gorshenkov, M.V.; Churyukanova, M.N.; Zhang, D.; Li, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: ► Microstructure of as-cast Al–Cu–Cr alloys was investigated. ► Composition of decagonal quasicrystalline phase was determined. ► Single-phase decagonal quasicrystalline powder was obtained. ► Phase composition changes during heating were controlled using DSC and X-ray diffraction. -- Abstract: Microstructure and phase composition of three Al-rich as-cast alloys of Al–Cu–Cr system were investigated by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The decagonal quasicrystalline phase is contained in all alloys under study and has grains with faceted shape, its composition lies in the range of 71–73 at.% Al, 11–12 at.% Cu and 15–18 at.% Cr. The heating in calorimeter of the mechanically alloyed Al 73 Cu 11 Cr 16 powder up to 600 °C leads to the formation of the pure decagonal phase. Total thermal effect in the temperature range 250–600 °C corresponding to the quasicrystalline phase formation is about 15 kJ/mol

  17. Microstructure and phase evolution in laser clad chromium carbide-NiCrMoNb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkatesh, L., E-mail: venkatesh@arci.res.in [International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials (ARCI), Balapur, Hyderabad 500005 (India); Department of Metallurgical Engineering & Materials Science, IIT Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India); Samajdar, I. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering & Materials Science, IIT Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India); Tak, Manish [International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials (ARCI), Balapur, Hyderabad 500005 (India); Doherty, Roger D. [Department of Materials Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Gundakaram, Ravi C.; Prasad, K. Satya; Joshi, S.V. [International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials (ARCI), Balapur, Hyderabad 500005 (India)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • Microstructural development during laser cladding has been studied. • In this multi component system Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3} is found to be the stable carbide phase. • Phases were identified by EBSD since XRD results were not conclusive. • Increase in laser power and/or scanning speed reduced the carbide content. • Hardness seems to depend on phase content as well as microstructure. - Abstract: Microstructural development in laser clad layers of Chromium carbide (Cr{sub x}C{sub y})-NiCrMoNb on SA 516 steel has been investigated. Although the starting powder contained both Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} and Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3}, the clad layers showed only the presence of Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3}. Microtexture measurements by electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) revealed primary dendritic Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3} with Ni rich FCC metallic phase being present in the interdendritic spaces. Further annealing of the laser clad layers and furnace melting of the starting powder confirmed that Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3} is the primary as well as stable carbide phase in this multi component system. Increase in laser power and scanning speed progressively reduced carbide content in the laser clad layers. Increased scanning speed, which enhances the cooling rate, also led to reduction in the secondary arm spacing (λ{sub 2}) of the Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3} dendrites. The clad layer hardness increased with carbide content and with decreased dendrite arm spacing.

  18. Electronic structure and phase equilibria in ternary substitutional alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traiber, A.J.S.; Allen, S.M.; Waterstrat, R.M.

    1996-01-01

    A reliable, consistent scheme to study phase equilibria in ternary substitutional alloys based on the tight-binding approximation is presented. With electronic parameters from linear muffin-tin orbital calculations, the computed density of states and band structures compare well with those from more accurate abinitio calculations. Disordered alloys are studied within the tight-binding coherent-potential approximation extended to alloys; energetics of ordered systems are obtained through effective pair interactions computed with the general perturbation method; and partially ordered alloys are studied with a novel simplification of the molecular coherent-potential approximation combined with the general perturbation method. The formalism is applied to bcc-based Zr-Ru-Pd alloys which are promising candidates for medical implant devices. Using energetics obtained from the above scheme, we apply the cluster- variation method to study phase equilibria for particular pseudo- binary alloys and show that results are consistent with observed behavior of electronic specific heat coefficient with composition for Zr 0.5 (Ru, Pd) 0.5

  19. Chromium supplementation enhances the acute phase response of steers to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    The study examined the effect of chromium supplementation on the response of steers to an LPS challenge. Twenty crossbred steers (235±4 kg BW) received 0 ppb (Control; C) or 200 ppb chromium propionate (CHR) for 55 days. Steers were fitted with jugular catheters and rectal temperature (RT) recording...

  20. A novel solid phase extraction procedure on Amberlite XAD-1180 for speciation of Cr(III), Cr(VI) and total chromium in environmental and pharmaceutical samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narin, Ibrahim; Kars, Ayse; Soylak, Mustafa

    2008-01-01

    Due to the toxicity of chromium, species depend on their chemical properties and bioavailabilities, speciation of chromium is very important in environmental samples. A speciation procedure for chromium(III), chromium(VI) and total chromium in environmental samples is presented in this work, prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of chromium. The procedure is based on the adsorption of Cr(III)-diphenylcarbazone complex on Amberlite XAD-1180 resin. After oxidation of Cr(III), the developed solid phase extraction system was applied to determinate the total chromium. Cr(III) was calculated as the difference between the total Cr content and the Cr(VI) content. The analytical conditions for the quantitative recoveries of Cr(VI) on Amberlite XAD-1180 resin were investigated. The effects of some alkaline, earth alkaline, metal ions and also some anions were also examined. Preconcentration factor was found to be 75. The detection limits (LOD) based on three times sigma of the blank (N: 21) for Cr(VI) and total chromium were 7.7 and 8.6 μg/L, respectively. Satisfactory results for the analysis of total chromium in the stream sediment (GBW7310) certified reference material for the validation of the presented method was obtained. The procedure was applied to food, water and pharmaceutical samples successfully

  1. Improvement of hydrogen sorption properties of compounds based on Vanadium “bcc” alloys by mean of intergranular phase development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planté, D.; Raufast, C.; Miraglia, S.; Rango, P. de; Fruchart, D.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Decrease of “bcc” pseudo cell with the increase of amount of additive. •Additive phase improve activation kinetics. •Chromium in the “bcc” matrix decreases the lattice parameter and destabilizes hydride formation/dissociation. •Lower working temperatures could be obtain. -- Abstract: Body centered cubic structure (“bcc”) type alloys based on Vanadium [1] reveal promising characteristics for mobile applications. These disordered solid solutions have particular metal/hydride equilibrium and some regulation aspects have leaded us to pay special attention to this type of material [2]. Compounds based on Vanadium-rich solid solution have been elaborated in order to destabilize γ hydride phase (corresponding to the face centered cubic (“fcc”) structure of VH 2 ). Addition of Ni and Zr-rich Laves phase as a secondary phase results in the development of a particular microstructure composed of a principal “bcc” matrix rounded by intergranular activating phase. This results in a facilitated and faster activation of these compounds. The present study shows that some constituting species of the secondary phase have diffused in the main matrix and therefore have modified the thermodynamic of hydride. In fact, chromium diffusion into the “bcc” matrix destabilizes hydride. It is correlated to the lower stability of chromium hydride compared to Vanadium hydride. The enthalpic terms of each sample have been measured (assuming standard entropy of 130 J mol −1 K −1 ). The equilibrium metal/hydride can be easily switched in order to adapt it to a mobile hydride tank and obtain low working temperature in regard to the potential use

  2. Phase transformation of metastable cubic γ-phase in U-Mo alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, V.P.; Hegde, P.V.; Prasad, G.J.; Dey, G.K.; Kamath, H.S.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past decade considerable efforts have been put by many fuel designers to develop low enriched uranium (LEU 235 ) base U-Mo alloy as a potential fuel for core conversion of existing research and test reactors which are running on high enriched uranium (HEU > 85%U 235 ) fuel and also for the upcoming new reactors. U-Mo alloy with minimum 8 wt% molybdenum shows excellent metastability with cubic γ-phase in cast condition. However, it is important to characterize the decomposition behaviour of metastable cubic γ-uranium in its equilibrium products for in reactor fuel performance point of view. The present paper describes the phase transformation behaviour of cubic γ-uranium phase in U-Mo alloys with three different molybdenum compositions (i.e. 8 wt%, 9 wt% and 10 wt%). U-Mo alloys were prepared in an induction melting furnace and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) method for phase determination. Microstructures were developed for samples in as cast condition. The alloys were hot rolled in cubic γ-phase to break the cast structure and then they were aged at 500 o C for 68 h and 240 h, so that metastable cubic γ-uranium will undergo eutectoid decomposition to form equilibrium phases of orthorhombic α-uranium and body centered tetragonal U 2 Mo intermetallic compound. U-Mo alloy samples with different ageing history were then characterized by XRD for phase and development of microstructure.

  3. Specification for corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel covered welding electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    This specification prescribes requirements for covered corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel electrodes. These electrodes normally are used for shielded metal arc welding, and include those alloy steels designated as corrosion or heat-resisting chromium-nickel steels in which chromium exceeds 4.0 percent and nickel does not exceed 50.0 percent

  4. Phase-oriented surface segregation in an aluminium casting alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Chuong L.; Atanacio, Armand; Zhang, Wei; Prince, Kathryn E.; Hyland, Margaret M.; Metson, James B.

    2009-01-01

    There have been many reports of the surface segregation of minor elements, especially Mg, into surface layers and oxide films on the surface of Al alloys. LM6 casting alloy (Al-12%Si) represents a challenging system to examine such segregation as the alloy features a particularly inhomogeneous phase structure. The very low but mobile Mg content (approximately 0.001 wt.%), and the surface segregation of modifiers such as Na, mean the surface composition responds in a complex manner to thermal treatment conditions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been used to determine the distribution of these elements within the oxide film. Further investigation by dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry (DSIMS) confirmed a strong alignment of segregated Na and Mg into distinct phases of the structure.

  5. Surface coatings of mixed hard alloy powder metals sintered-on in vacuo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knotek, O.; Reimann, H.

    1980-01-01

    No technological difficulties are to be encountered in the processing of pseudo hard alloys in the form of powder compounds of conventional nickel base hard alloys with carbides. There is a great alloy influence on the resulting structures of the surface layers. Under some processing conditions the tungsten carbide is completely dissolved from molten matrix alloy. Hard phases on chromium carbide basis resulted upon cooling. Induced chromium carbide Cr 3 C 2 retains its structure while absorbing large amounts of iron into its grid. It can be concluded that not only alloying properties, but also eminently structural criterions are decisive for the stability of the applied supplementary hard phases. (orig.) [de

  6. Magnetic features of Fe-Cr-Co alloys with tailoring chromium content fabricated by spark plasma sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rastabi, Reza Amini; Ghasemi, Ali, E-mail: ali13912001@yahoo.com; Tavoosi, Majid; Ramazani, Mazaher

    2017-03-15

    Structural and magnetic characterization of Fe-Cr-Co alloys during milling, annealing and consolidation processes was the goal of this study. In this regards, different powder mixtures of Fe{sub 80−x}Cr{sub x}Co{sub 20} (15≤x≤35) were mechanically milled in a planetary ball mill and then were consolidated by spark plasma sintering (SPS). The produced samples were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). According to achieved results, the structure of as-milled samples in different compositions consists of single α phase solid solution with coercivity and saturation of magnetization in the range of 110–200 Oe and 150–220 emu/g, respectively. The magnetic properties of consolidated samples depend on the kinds of formed precipitates in microstructure and the maximum values of coercive force and saturation of magnetization obtained in Fe{sub 55}Cr{sub 25}Co{sub 20} magnetic (with single α phase) alloy were 107 Oe and Ms 172 emu/g, respectively. In fact, the formation of non-magnetic σ and γ phases has a destructive effect on magnetic properties of consolidated samples with higher Cr content. Since such magnet requires less cobalt, and contains similar magnetic feature with superior ductility compare to the AlNiCo 5, it could be considered as a promising candidate for employing instead of AlNiCo 5. - Highlights: • Milled samples consist of single phase α-solid solution. • Saturation of magnetization of Fe{sub 65}Cr{sub 15}Co{sub 20} reached to 172 emu/g. • Fe{sub 65}Cr{sub 15}Co{sub 20} alloy is the suitable composition fabricated by SPS.

  7. Magnetic features of Fe-Cr-Co alloys with tailoring chromium content fabricated by spark plasma sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rastabi, Reza Amini; Ghasemi, Ali; Tavoosi, Majid; Ramazani, Mazaher

    2017-01-01

    Structural and magnetic characterization of Fe-Cr-Co alloys during milling, annealing and consolidation processes was the goal of this study. In this regards, different powder mixtures of Fe 80−x Cr x Co 20 (15≤x≤35) were mechanically milled in a planetary ball mill and then were consolidated by spark plasma sintering (SPS). The produced samples were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). According to achieved results, the structure of as-milled samples in different compositions consists of single α phase solid solution with coercivity and saturation of magnetization in the range of 110–200 Oe and 150–220 emu/g, respectively. The magnetic properties of consolidated samples depend on the kinds of formed precipitates in microstructure and the maximum values of coercive force and saturation of magnetization obtained in Fe 55 Cr 25 Co 20 magnetic (with single α phase) alloy were 107 Oe and Ms 172 emu/g, respectively. In fact, the formation of non-magnetic σ and γ phases has a destructive effect on magnetic properties of consolidated samples with higher Cr content. Since such magnet requires less cobalt, and contains similar magnetic feature with superior ductility compare to the AlNiCo 5, it could be considered as a promising candidate for employing instead of AlNiCo 5. - Highlights: • Milled samples consist of single phase α-solid solution. • Saturation of magnetization of Fe 65 Cr 15 Co 20 reached to 172 emu/g. • Fe 65 Cr 15 Co 20 alloy is the suitable composition fabricated by SPS.

  8. Solid state welding processes for an oxide dispersion strengthened nickel-chromium-aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, T. J.

    1975-01-01

    Solid-state welding processes were evaluated for joining TD-NiCrAl (Ni-16Cr-4Al-2ThO2) alloy sheet. Both hot-press and resistance spot welding techniques were successfully applied in terms of achieving grain growth across the bond line. Less success was achieved with a resistance seam welding process. In stress-rupture shear and tensile shear tests of lap joints at 1100 C, most failures occurred in the parent material, which indicates that the weld quality was good and that the welds were not a plane of weakness. The overall weld quality was not as good as previously attained with TD-NiCr, probably because the presence of alumina at the faying surfaces and the developmental TD-NiCrAl sheet, which was not of the quality of the TD-NiCr sheet in terms of surface flatness and dimensional control.

  9. Phase transformations in the Cu.6 Pd.4 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imakuma, K.

    1977-01-01

    Order-disorder and structural transformations in the Cu-Pd 60-40% (Cu. 6 Pd. 4 ) alloy by means of a temperature and time dependent treatment are studied. The structural transformations by x-rays diffraction are also studied, where the bcc, fcc and tetragonal phases were observed. A qualitative analyze of the resistivity kinetics are made [pt

  10. Microstructure and tribologic behaviour of metastable austenitic FeMn alloys as a function of chromium content; Gefuegeausbildung und Triboverhalten metastabiler austenitischer FeMn-Legierungen in Abhaengigkeit vom Chromgehalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roethig, J. [Magdeburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Stroemungstechnik und Thermodynamik; Veit, P.; Strassburger, G.; Blaesing, J. [Magdeburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Experimentelle Physik; Heyse, H. [Magdeburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstofftechnik und Werkstoffpruefung

    1997-12-31

    In FeMn20Cr alloys with chromium contents of up to 20%, the solidification process is primarily an eutectic process. The {delta}-ferrite becomes increasingly instable below a temperature of 900 C and gradually disintegrates during slow cooling into austenite and a sigma phase. Tempering of these microstructures at T=450 C (6hours) leads to formation of {epsilon}-martensite in the austenite. Fast quenching starting above 900 C freezes the {delta}-ferrite, so that in the case of chromium contents between 13 and 18%, austenitic-hexagonal-ferritic microstructures form and above 18%, austenitic-ferritic microstructures. Tempering does not remove the {delta}-ferrite, but induces formation of {epsilon}-martensite in the austenite. Trobologic examinations with solutionized and water-quenched alloys showed, as compared to an FeMn20Cr18 alloy, for various types of wear, a very good tribologic performance (except for the alloy FeMn20Cr18 and cavitation). As to abrasion or hot wear, the formation of a sigma-phase or intercalation of metalloid hard phases should be considered. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] FeMn20Cr-Legierungen mit Chromgehalten bis zu 20% erstarren primaer ferritisch. Der {delta}-Ferrit ist unterhalb 900 C nicht mehr stabil und zerfaellt bei langsamer Abkuehlung in Austenit und Sigmaphase. Ein Anlassen dieser Gefuege T=450 C (6 Stunden) fuehrt zur {epsilon}-Martensitbildung im Austenit. Schnelles Abschrecken von oberhalb 900 C friert den {delta}-Ferrit ein, so dass bei Chromgehalten zwischen 13 und 18% austenitisch-hexagonal-ferritische und >18% austenitisch-ferritische Gefuege entstehen. Durch Anlassen kann der {delta}-Ferrit nicht beseitigt werden. Im Austenit kommt es aber zur {epsilon}-Martensitbildung. Tribologische Untersuchungen mit loesungsgegluehten und in Wasser abgeschreckten Legierungen zeigten im Vergleich zu einer FeCrNi-Legierung bei verschiedenen Verschleissarten (mit Ausnahme FeMn20Cr18 bei Kavitation) ein sehr gutes Triboverhalten. Gegenueber Abrasion

  11. Application of EIS to In Situ Characterization of Hydrothermal Sealing of Anodized Aluminum Alloys: Comparison between Hexavalent Chromium-Based Sealing, Hot Water Sealing and Cerium-Based Sealing

    OpenAIRE

    Carangelo, Anna; Curioni, Michele; Acquesta, Annalisa; Monetta, Tullio; Bellucci, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Chromic acid anodizing has been used for almost a century to enhance corrosion protection of aerospace alloys. For some applications,hydrothermal sealing in hexavalent chromium-containing solution is required to enhance further the corrosion resistance but, due toenvironmental concerns, the use of hexavalent chromium must be discontinued. Good progress has been made to replace chromatesduring anodizing but comparatively less effort has focused on the sealing process. In this work, for the fir...

  12. Phase constitution and corrosion resistance of Al–Co alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palcut, Marián, E-mail: marian.palcut@gmail.com; Priputen, Pavol; Šalgó, Kristián; Janovec, Jozef

    2015-09-15

    Al–24Co, Al–25Co, Al–26Co, Al–27Co and Al–28Co alloys (composition in atomic percent) were prepared by arc-melting in high purity argon. Each alloy was found to consist of several microstructure constituents. Precipitation sequences of different intermetallic compounds were described based on a previously published Al–Co phase diagram and non-equilibrium processes taking place during casting. Electrochemical corrosion was investigated by potentiodynamic polarization in aqueous NaCl solution at room temperature. A large amount of pitting is observed, with some of the phases being preferentially corroded. The nobility of Al–Co intermetallic compounds is discussed in terms of chemical composition and crystal structure. Conclusions towards the alloy stability are provided. - Highlights: • Al–24Co to Al–28Co alloys were prepared by arc-melting in high purity argon. • Precipitation sequences of different intermetallic compounds have been observed. • Anodic alloy dissolution takes place by galvanic mechanism. • Nobility of Al–Co intermetallic compounds increases with increasing Co concentration.

  13. Point Defects in Binary Laves-Phase Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liaw, P.K.; Liu, C.T.; Pike, L.M.; Zhu, J.H.

    1999-01-11

    Point defects in the binary C15 NbCrQ and NbCoz, and C 14 NbFe2 systems on both sides of stoichiometry were studied by both bulk density and X-ray Iattiee parameter measurements. It was found that the vacancy concentrations in these systems after quenching from 1000"C are essentially zero. The constitutional defects on both sides of stoichiometry for these systems were found to be of the anti-site type in comparison with the model predictions. Thermal vacancies exhibiting a maximum at the stoichiometric composition were obtained in NbCr2 Laves phase alloys after quenching from 1400"C. However, there are essentially no thermal vacancies in NbFe2 alloys after quenching from 1300oC. Anti-site hardening was found on both sides of stoichiometry for all the tie Laves phase systems studied, while the thermal vacancies in NbCr2 alloys quenched from 1400'C were found to soften the Laves phase. The anti-site hardening of the Laves phases is similar to that of the B2 compounds and the thermal vacancy softening is unique to the Laves phase. Neither the anti-site defects nor the thermal vacancies affect the fracture toughness of the Laves phases significantly.

  14. Phase transitions in alloys of the Ni-Mo system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ustinovshikov, Y.; Shabanova, I.

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The structure of Ni-20 at.% Mo and Ni-25 at.% Mo alloys was studied by methods of TEM and XPS. It is shown that at high temperatures the tendency toward phase separation takes place in the alloys and crystalline bcc Mo particles precipitate in the liquid solution. At 900 deg. C and below, the tendency toward ordering leads to the dissolution of Mo particles and precipitation of the particles of Ni 3 Mo, Ni 2 Mo or Ni 4 Mo chemical compounds. Highlights: → 'Chemical' phase transition 'ordering-phase separation' is first discovered in alloys of the Ni-Mo system. → It is first shown that the phase separation in the alloys studied begins at temperatures above the liquidus one. → The formation of Ni 3 Mo from A1 has gone through the intervening stage of the Ni 4 Mo and Ni 2 Mo coexistence. - Abstract: The structure of Ni-20 at.% Mo and Ni-25 at.% Mo alloys heat treated at different temperatures was studied by the method of transmission electron microscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to detect the sign of the chemical interaction between Ni and Mo atoms at different temperatures. It is shown that at high temperatures the tendency toward phase separation takes place. The system of additional reflections at positions {1 1/2 0} on the electron diffraction patterns testifies that the precipitation of crystalline bcc Mo particles begins in the liquid solution. At 900 deg. C and below, the tendency toward ordering leads to the precipitation of the particles of the chemical compounds. A body-centered tetragonal phase Ni 4 Mo (D1 a ) is formed in the Ni-20 at.% Mo alloy. In the Ni-25 at.% Mo alloy, the formation of the Ni 3 Mo (D0 22 ) chemical compound from the A1 solid solution has gone through the intervening stage of the Ni 4 Mo (D1 a ) and Ni 2 Mo (Pt 2 Mo) formation.

  15. The effect of remelting various combinations of new and used cobalt-chromium alloy on the mechanical properties and microstructure of the alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharad Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Repeated remelting of base metal alloy for dental casting without addition of new alloy can affect the mechanical properties of the alloy. Microstructure analysis shows deterioration upon remelting. However, the addition of 25% and 50% (by weight of new alloy to the remelted alloy can bring about improvement both in mechanical properties and in microstructure.

  16. Nanocrystalline Fe-Pt alloys. Phase transformations, structure and magnetism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyubina, J.V.

    2006-12-21

    This work has been devoted to the study of phase transformations involving chemical ordering and magnetic properties evolution in bulk Fe-Pt alloys composed of nanometersized grains. Nanocrystalline Fe{sub 100-x}Pt{sub x} (x=40-60) alloys have been prepared by mechanical ball milling of elemental Fe and Pt powders at liquid nitrogen temperature. The as-milled Fe-Pt alloys consist of {proportional_to} 100 {mu}m sized particles constituted by randomly oriented grains having an average size in the range of 10-40 nm. Depending on the milling time, three major microstructure types have been obtained: samples with a multilayer-type structure of Fe and Pt with a thickness of 20-300 nm and a very thin (several nanometers) A1 layer at their interfaces (2 h milled), an intermediate structure, consisting of finer lamellae of Fe and Pt (below approximately 100 nm) with the A1 layer thickness reaching several tens of nanometers (4 h milled) and alloys containing a homogeneous A1 phase (7 h milled). Subsequent heat treatment at elevated temperatures is required for the formation of the L1{sub 0} FePt phase. The ordering develops via so-called combined solid state reactions. It is accompanied by grain growth and thermally assisted removal of defects introduced by milling and proceeds rapidly at moderate temperatures by nucleation and growth of the ordered phases with a high degree of the long-range order. In a two-particle interaction model elaborated in the present work, the existence of hysteresis in recoil loops has been shown to arise from insufficient coupling between the low- and the high-anisotropy particles. The model reveals the main features of magnetisation reversal processes observed experimentally in exchange-coupled systems. Neutron diffraction has been used for the investigation of the magnetic structure of ordered and partially ordered nanocrystalline Fe-Pt alloys. (orig.)

  17. Effect of alloying elements on martensitic transformation in the binary NiAl(β) phase alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kainuma, R.; Ohtani, H.; Ishida, K.

    1996-01-01

    The characteristics of the B2(β) to L1 0 (β') martensitic transformation in NiAl base alloys containing a small amount of third elements have been investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It is found that in addition to the normal L1 0 (3R) martensite, the 7R martensite is also present in the ternary alloys containing Ti, Mo, Ag, Ta, or Zr. While the addition of third elements X (X: Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Zr, Nb, Mo, Ta, W, and Si) to the binary Ni 64 Al 36 alloy stabilizes the parent β phase, thereby lowering the M s temperature, addition of third elements such as Co, Cu, or Ag destabilizes the β phase, increasing the M s temperature. The occurrence of the 7R martensite structure is attributed to solid solution hardening arising from the difference in atomic size between Ni and Al and the third elements added. The variation in M s temperature with third element additions is primarily ascribed to the difference in lattice stabilities of the bcc and fcc phases of the alloying elements

  18. Influence of Chemical Composition on Rupture Properties at 1200 Degrees F. of Forged Chromium-Cobalt-Nickel-Iron Base Alloys in Solution-Treated and Aged Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, E E; Freeman, J W; White, A E

    1951-01-01

    The influence of systematic variations of chemical composition on rupture properties at 1200 degrees F. was determined for 62 modifications of a basic alloy containing 20 percent chromium, 20 percent nickel, 20 percent cobalt, 3 percent molybdenum, 2 percent tungsten, 1 percent columbium, 0.15 percent carbon, 1.7 percent manganese, 0.5 percent silicon, 0.12 percent nitrogen and the balance iron. These modifications included individual variations of each of 10 elements present and simultaneous variations of molybdenum, tungsten, and columbium. Laboratory induction furnace heats were hot-forged to round bar stock, solution-treated at 2200 degrees F., and aged at 1400 degrees F. The melting and fabrication conditions were carefully controlled in order to minimize all variable effects on properties except chemical composition. Information is presented which indicates that melting and hot-working conditions play an important role in high-temperature properties of alloys of the type investigated.

  19. Phase evolution and thermal stability of 2 Mg–Cu alloys processed by mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez, C., E-mail: carola.martinezu@usach.cl [Departamento de Ingeniería Metalúrgica, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Av. Lib. Bernardo O’Higgins 3363, Casilla de correo 10233, Santiago (Chile); Ordoñez, S., E-mail: stella.ordonez@usach.cl [Departamento de Ingeniería Metalúrgica, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Av. Lib. Bernardo O’Higgins 3363, Casilla de correo 10233, Santiago (Chile); Guzmán, D. [Departamento de Ingeniería en Metalurgia, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad de Atacama y CRIDESAT, Av. Copayapu 485, Casilla de Correo 240, Copiapó (Chile); Serafini, D. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Av. Lib. Bernardo O’Higgins 3363, Casilla de correo 307, Santiago (Chile); Iturriza, I. [CEIT, Manuel de Lardizábal 15, 20018 San Sebastián, España (Spain); Bustos, O. [Departamento de Ingeniería Metalúrgica, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Av. Lib. Bernardo O’Higgins 3363, Casilla de correo 10233, Santiago (Chile)

    2013-12-25

    Highlights: •Study of phase evolution of elemental powders Mg and Cu by mechanical alloying. •The presence of an amorphous precursor which crystallizes to Mg{sub 2}Cu can be observed. •Establishing the sequence of phase transformations leading to the formation of Mg{sub 2}Cu. •The feasibility to obtain Mg{sub 2}Cu by means two possible routes has been established. -- Abstract: Phase evolution during mechanical alloying (MA) of elemental Mg and Cu powders and their subsequent heat treatment is studied. Elemental Mg and Cu powders in a 2:1 atomic ratio were mechanically alloyed in a SPEX 8000D mill using a 10:1 ball-to-powder ratio. X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows that the formation of the intermetallic Mg{sub 2}Cu takes place between 3 and 4 h of milling, although traces of elemental Cu are still present after 10 h of milling. The thermal behavior of different powder mixtures was evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The combination of DSC, heat treatment and XRD has shown a sequence of phase transformations that results in the intermetallic Mg{sub 2}Cu from an amorphous precursor. This amorphous phase is converted into Mg{sub 2}Cu by heating at low temperature (407 K). Short MA times and the formation of the amorphous precursor, together with its subsequent transformation into Mg{sub 2}Cu at low temperatures; represent an advantageous alternative route for its preparation.

  20. Stochastic simulation of nucleation in binary alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    L’vov, P. E.; Svetukhin, V. V.

    2018-06-01

    In this study, we simulate nucleation in binary alloys with respect to thermal fluctuations of the alloy composition. The simulation is based on the Cahn–Hilliard–Cook equation. We have considered the influence of some fluctuation parameters (wave vector cutoff and noise amplitude) on the kinetics of nucleation and growth of minority phase precipitates. The obtained results are validated by the example of iron–chromium alloys.

  1. Recovery Of Chromium Metal (VI) Using Supported Liquid Membrane (SLM) Method, A study of Influence of NaCl and pH in Receiving Phase on Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholid Djunaidi, Muhammad; Lusiana, Retno A.; Rahayu, Maya D.

    2017-06-01

    Chromium metal(VI) is a valuable metal but in contrary has high toxicity, so the separation and recovery from waste are very important. One method that can be used for the separation and recovery of chromium (VI) is a Supported Liquid Membrane (SLM). SLM system contains of three main components: a supporting membrane, organic solvents and carrier compounds. The supported Membrane used in this research is Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), organic solvent is kerosene, and the carrier compound used is aliquat 336. The supported liquid membrane is placed between two phases, namely, feed phase as the source of analyte (Cr(VI)) and the receiving phase as the result of separation. Feed phase is the electroplating waste which contains of chromium metal with pH variation about 4, 6 and 9. Whereas the receiving phase are the solution of HCl, NaOH, HCl-NaCl and NaOH-NaCl with pH variation about 1, 3, 5 and 7. The efficiency separation is determined by measurement of chromium in the feed and the receiving phase using AAS (Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry). The experiment results show that transport of Chrom (VI) by Supported Liquid membrane (SLM) is influenced by pH solution in feed phase and receiving phase as well as NaCl in receiving phase. The highest chromium metal is transported from feed phase about 97,78%, whereas in receiving phase shows about 58,09%. The highest chromium metal transport happens on pH 6 in feed phase, pH 7 in receiving phase with the mixture of NaOH and NaCl using carrier compound aliquat 336.

  2. Full Electroresistance Modulation in a Mixed-Phase Metallic Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z. Q.; Li, L.; Gai, Z.; Clarkson, J. D.; Hsu, S. L.; Wong, A. T.; Fan, L. S.; Lin, M.-W.; Rouleau, C. M.; Ward, T. Z.; Lee, H. N.; Sefat, A. S.; Christen, H. M.; Ramesh, R.

    2016-03-01

    We report a giant, ˜22 %, electroresistance modulation for a metallic alloy above room temperature. It is achieved by a small electric field of 2 kV /cm via piezoelectric strain-mediated magnetoelectric coupling and the resulting magnetic phase transition in epitaxial FeRh /BaTiO3 heterostructures. This work presents detailed experimental evidence for an isothermal magnetic phase transition driven by tetragonality modulation in FeRh thin films, which is in contrast to the large volume expansion in the conventional temperature-driven magnetic phase transition in FeRh. Moreover, all the experimental results in this work illustrate FeRh as a mixed-phase model system well similar to phase-separated colossal magnetoresistance systems with phase instability therein.

  3. Corrosion resistance of sodium sulfate coated cobalt-chromium-aluminum alloys at 900 C, 1000 C, and 1100 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, G. J.

    1979-01-01

    The corrosion of sodium sulfate coated cobalt alloys was measured and the results compared to the cyclic oxidation of alloys with the same composition, and to the hot corrosion of compositionally equivalent nickel-base alloys. Cobalt alloys with sufficient aluminum content to form aluminum containing scales corrode less than their nickel-base counterparts. The cobalt alloys with lower aluminum levels form CoO scales and corrode more than their nickel-base counterparts which form NiO scales.

  4. Phase stability, mechanical properties, hardness, and possible reactive routing of chromium triboride from first-principle investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Ming-Min; Kuang, Xiao-Yu; Wang, Zhen-Hua; Shao, Peng; Ding, Li-Ping; Huang, Xiao-Fen

    2013-01-01

    The first-principles calculations are employed to provide a fundamental understanding of the structural features and relative stability, mechanical and electronic properties, and possible reactive route for chromium triboride. The predicted new phase of CrB 3 belongs to the rhombohedral phase with R-3m symmetry and it transforms into a hexagonal phase with P-6m2 symmetry at 64 GPa. The mechanical and thermodynamic stabilities of CrB 3 are verified by the calculated elastic constants and formation enthalpies. Also, the full phonon dispersion calculations confirm the dynamic stability of predicted CrB 3 . Considering the role of metallic contributions, the calculated hardness values from our semiempirical method for rhombohedral and hexagonal phases are 23.8 GPa and 22.1 GPa, respectively. In addition, the large shear moduli, Young's moduli, low Poisson's ratios, and small B/G ratios indicate that they are potential hard materials. Relative enthalpy calculations with respect to possible constituents are also investigated to assess the prospects for phase formation and an attempt at high-pressure synthesis is suggested to obtain chromium triboride

  5. Cermet anode compositions with high content alloy phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschman, Steven C.; Davis, Norman C.

    1989-01-01

    Cermet electrode compositions comprising NiO-NiFe.sub.2 O.sub.4 -Cu-Ni, and methods for making, are disclosed. Addition of nickel metal prior to formation and densification of a base mixture into the cermet allows for an increase in the total amount of copper and nickel that can be contained in the NiO-NiFe.sub.2 O.sub.4 oxide system. Nickel is present in a base mixture weight concentration of from 0.1% to 10%. Copper is present in the alloy phase in a weight concentration of from 10% to 30% of the densified composition. Such cermet electrodes can be formed to have electrical conductivities well in excess of 100 ohm.sup.-1 cm.sup.-1. Other alloy and oxide system cermets having high content metal phases are also expected to be manufacturable in accordance with the invention.

  6. Advanced STEM/EDX investigation on an oxide scale thermally grown on a high-chromium iron–nickel alloy under very low oxygen partial pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latu-Romain, L.; Madi, Y.; Mathieu, S.; Robaut, F.; Petit, J.-P.; Wouters, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A scale grown on a high-chromium iron–nickel alloy under low oxygen partial pressure was studied. • STEM-EDX maps at high resolution on a transversal thin lamella have been conducted. • The real complexity of the oxide layer has been highlighted. • These results explain the elevated number of semiconducting contributions. - Abstract: A thermal oxide scale has been grown on a high-chromium iron-nickel alloy under very low oxygen partial pressure (1050 °C, 10"−"1"0 Pa). In this paper, a special attention has been paid to morphological and chemical characterizations of the scale by scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis at high resolution on a cross-section thin lamella beforehand prepared by using a combined focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope instrument. The complexity of the oxide layer is highlighted, and the correlation between the present results and the ones of a photoelectrochemical study is discussed.

  7. The Study of Heat Treatment Effects on Chromium Carbide Precipitation of 35Cr-45Ni-Nb Alloy for Repairing Furnace Tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakarin Srisuwan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a specific kind of failure in ethylene pyrolysis furnace tubes. It considers the case in which the tubes made of 35Cr-45Ni-Nb high temperature alloy failed to carburization, causing creep damage. The investigation found that used tubes became difficult to weld repair due to internal carburized layers of the tube. The microstructure and geochemical component of crystallized carbide at grain boundary of tube specimens were characterized by X-ray diffractometer (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM with back-scattered electrons mode (BSE, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS. Micro-hardness tests was performed to determine the hardness of the matrix and the compounds of new and used tube material. The testing result indicated that used tubes exhibited a higher hardness and higher degree of carburization compared to those of new tubes. The microstructure of used tubes also revealed coarse chromium carbide precipitation and a continuous carbide lattice at austenite grain boundaries. However, thermal heat treatment applied for developing tube weld repair could result in dissolving or breaking up chromium carbide with a decrease in hardness value. This procedure is recommended to improve the weldability of the 35Cr-45Ni-Nb used tubes alloy.

  8. Essential Magnesium Alloys Binary Phase Diagrams and Their Thermochemical Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mezbahul-Islam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium-based alloys are becoming a major industrial material for structural applications because of their potential weight saving characteristics. All the commercial Mg alloys like AZ, AM, AE, EZ, ZK, and so forth series are multicomponent and hence it is important to understand the phase relations of the alloying elements with Mg. In this work, eleven essential Mg-based binary systems including Mg-Al/Zn/Mn/Ca/Sr/Y/Ni/Ce/Nd/Cu/Sn have been reviewed. Each of these systems has been discussed critically on the aspects of phase diagram and thermodynamic properties. All the available experimental data has been summarized and critically assessed to provide detailed understanding of the systems. The phase diagrams are calculated based on the most up-to-date optimized parameters. The thermodynamic model parameters for all the systems except Mg-Nd have been summarized in tables. The crystallographic information of the intermetallic compounds of different binary systems is provided. Also, the heat of formation of the intermetallic compounds obtained from experimental, first principle calculations and CALPHAD optimizations are provided. In addition, reoptimization of the Mg-Y system has been done in this work since new experimental data showed wider solubility of the intermetallic compounds.

  9. High-temperature superconducting phase in rare earth alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedyaev, A.V.; Molodykh, O.Eh.; Savchenko, M.A.; Stefanovich, A.V.

    1984-01-01

    A possibility of high-temperature superconducting phase existence in rare e arth alloys with aluminium: TbAl-NdAl is predicted. Such a phase is shown t o exist at t approximately 40 k, however its existence is possible only in a nar row temperature range and it might be metastable. A possibility of a supercondu cting phase occurrence in spin glass is studied. It is shown that the first kin d phase transition to superconducting state may first occur under definite condi tions in the system. But the phase in question will be a low-temperature one be cause of rather inefficient elctron-phonon interaction. Further temperature dec rease would lead to an appearance of magnetic order and to disappearance of the superconductivity

  10. Utilization of modified corn silk as a biosorbent for solid-phase extraction of Cr(III) and chromium speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hongmei; Pang, Jing; Wu, Mei; Wu, Qiaoli; Huo, Cuixiu

    2014-01-01

    The ues of corn silk modified with diluted nitric acid (HNO3-MCS) as a novel biosorbent has been established for solid-phase extraction of Cr(III) and chromium speciation in water samples. The functional groups of the HNO3-MCS surface are favorable for the adsorption of Cr(III). Effective extraction conditions were optimized in both batch and column methods. At pH 3.0 - 6.0, a discrimination of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) is achieved on the HNO3-MCS surface. Cr(III) ions are retained onto the HNO3-MCS surface, however, the adsorption of Cr(VI) is negligible under the same conditions. The adsorption isotherm of HNO3-MCS for Cr(III) has been demonstrated in accordance with a linear form of the Langmuir equation, and the maximum adsorption capacity is 35.21 mg g(-1). The well fitted linear regression of the pseudo-second order model showed the indication of a chemisorption mechanism for the entire concentration range. Thermodynamic studies have shown that the adsorption process is spontaneous and endothermic. The adsorbed Cr(III) was quantitatively eluted by a nitric acid solution with detection by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). With a sample volume of 30 mL, a detection limit (3σ) of 0.85 μg L(-1) and a precision of 2.0% RSD at the 40 μg L(-1) level were achieved. The concentration of Cr(III) could be accurately quantified within a linear range of 3 - 200 μg L(-1). After Cr(VI) has been reduced to Cr(III) with hydroxylamine hydrochloride, the total amount of chromium was obtained, and the content of Cr(VI) was given by subtraction. The procedure was validated by analyzing chromium in a certified reference material (GBW (E) 080039). It was also successfully applied for the speciation of chromium in wastewater samples.

  11. Evaluation and comparison of shear bond strength of porcelain to a beryllium-free alloy of nickel-chromium, nickel and beryllium free alloy of cobalt-chromium, and titanium: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananya Singh

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: It could be concluded that newer nickel and beryllium free Co-Cr alloys and titanium alloys with improved strength to weight ratio could prove to be good alternatives to the conventional nickel-based alloys when biocompatibility was a concern.

  12. New Fuel Alloys Seeking Optimal Solidus and Phase Behavior for High Burnup and TRU Burning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mariani, R.D.; Porter, D.L.; Kennedy, J.R.; Hayes, S.L.; Blackwood, V.S.; Jones, Z.S.; Olson, D.L.; Mishra, B.

    2015-01-01

    Recent modifications to fast reactor metallic fuels have been directed toward improving the melting and phase behaviors of the fuel alloy, for the purpose of ultra-high burnup and transuranic (TRU) burning. Improved melting temperatures increase the safety margin for uranium-based fast reactor fuel alloys, which is especially important for transuranic burning because the introduction of plutonium and neptunium acts to lower the alloy melting temperature. Improved phase behavior—single-phase, body-centered cubic—is desired because the phase is isotropic and the alloy properties are more predictable. An optimal alloy with both improvements was therefore sought through a comprehensive literature survey and theoretical analyses, and the creation and testing of some alloys selected by the analyses. Summarized here are those analyses, the impact of alloy modifications, and recent experimental results for selected pseudo-binary alloy systems that are hoped to accomplish the goals in a short timeframe. (author)

  13. Influence of mobile dislocations on phase separation in binary alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haataja, Mikko; Leonard, Francois

    2004-01-01

    We introduce a continuum model to describe the phase separation of a binary alloy in the presence of mobile dislocations. The kinetics of the local composition and dislocation density are coupled through their elastic fields. We show both analytically and numerically that mobile dislocations modify the standard spinodal decomposition process, and lead to several regimes of growth. Depending on the dislocation mobility and observation time, the phase separation may be accelerated, decelerated, or unaffected by mobile dislocations. For any finite dislocation mobility, we show that the domain growth rate asymptotically becomes independent of the dislocation mobility, and is faster than the dislocation-free growth rate

  14. Study of the quenching and subsequent return to room temperature of uranium-chromium, uranium-iron, and uranium-molybdenum alloys containing only small amounts of the alloying element; Etude de la trempe et du revenu a la temperature ordinaire d'alliages uranium-chrome, uranium-fer et uranium-molybdene, a faible teneur en element d'alliage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delaplace, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-09-15

    By means of an apparatus which makes possible thermal pre-treatments in vacuo, quenching carried out in a high purity argon atmosphere, and simultaneous recording of time temperature cooling and thermal contraction curves, the author has examined the transformations which occur in uranium-chromium, uranium-iron and uranium-molybdenum alloys during their quenching and subsequent return to room temperature. For uranium-chromium and uranium-iron alloys, the temperature at which the {gamma} {yields} {beta} transformation starts varies very little with the rate of cooling. For uranium-molybdenum alloys containing 2,8 atom per cent of Mo, this temperature is lowered by 120 deg. C for a cooling rate of 500 deg. C/mn. The temperature at which the {beta} {yields} {alpha} transformation starts is lowered by 170 deg. C for a cooling rate of 500 deg. C/mn in the case of uranium-chromium alloy containing 0,37 atom per cent of Cr. The temperature is little affected in the case of uranium-iron alloys. The addition of chromium or iron makes it possible to conserve the form {beta} at ordinary temperatures after quenching from the {beta} and {gamma} regions. The {beta} phase is particularly unstable and changes into needles of the {alpha} form even at room temperatures according to an autocatalytic transformation law similar to the austenitic-martensitic transformation law in the case of iron. The {beta} phase obtained by quenching from the {beta} phase region is more stable than that obtained by quenching from the {gamma} region. Chromium is a more effective stabiliser of the {beta} phase than is iron. Unfortunately it causes serious surface cracking. The {beta} {yields} {alpha} transformation in uranium-chromium alloys has been followed at room temperature by means of micro-cinematography. The author has not observed the direct {gamma} {yields} {alpha} transformation in uranium-molybdenum alloys containing 2,8 per cent of molybdenum even for cooling rates of up to 2000 deg. C

  15. Study of the quenching and subsequent return to room temperature of uranium-chromium, uranium-iron, and uranium-molybdenum alloys containing only small amounts of the alloying element; Etude de la trempe et du revenu a la temperature ordinaire d'alliages uranium-chrome, uranium-fer et uranium-molybdene, a faible teneur en element d'alliage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delaplace, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-09-15

    By means of an apparatus which makes possible thermal pre-treatments in vacuo, quenching carried out in a high purity argon atmosphere, and simultaneous recording of time temperature cooling and thermal contraction curves, the author has examined the transformations which occur in uranium-chromium, uranium-iron and uranium-molybdenum alloys during their quenching and subsequent return to room temperature. For uranium-chromium and uranium-iron alloys, the temperature at which the {gamma} {yields} {beta} transformation starts varies very little with the rate of cooling. For uranium-molybdenum alloys containing 2,8 atom per cent of Mo, this temperature is lowered by 120 deg. C for a cooling rate of 500 deg. C/mn. The temperature at which the {beta} {yields} {alpha} transformation starts is lowered by 170 deg. C for a cooling rate of 500 deg. C/mn in the case of uranium-chromium alloy containing 0,37 atom per cent of Cr. The temperature is little affected in the case of uranium-iron alloys. The addition of chromium or iron makes it possible to conserve the form {beta} at ordinary temperatures after quenching from the {beta} and {gamma} regions. The {beta} phase is particularly unstable and changes into needles of the {alpha} form even at room temperatures according to an autocatalytic transformation law similar to the austenitic-martensitic transformation law in the case of iron. The {beta} phase obtained by quenching from the {beta} phase region is more stable than that obtained by quenching from the {gamma} region. Chromium is a more effective stabiliser of the {beta} phase than is iron. Unfortunately it causes serious surface cracking. The {beta} {yields} {alpha} transformation in uranium-chromium alloys has been followed at room temperature by means of micro-cinematography. The author has not observed the direct {gamma} {yields} {alpha} transformation in uranium-molybdenum alloys containing 2,8 per cent of molybdenum even for cooling rates of up to 2000 deg. C

  16. Understanding Phase-Change Memory Alloys from a Chemical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolobov, A. V.; Fons, P.; Tominaga, J.

    2015-09-01

    Phase-change memories (PCM) are associated with reversible ultra-fast low-energy crystal-to-amorphous switching in GeTe-based alloys co-existing with the high stability of the two phases at ambient temperature, a unique property that has been recently explained by the high fragility of the glass-forming liquid phase, where the activation barrier for crystallisation drastically increases as the temperature decreases from the glass-transition to room temperature. At the same time the atomistic dynamics of the phase-change process and the associated changes in the nature of bonding have remained unknown. In this work we demonstrate that key to this behavior is the formation of transient three-center bonds in the excited state that is enabled due to the presence of lone-pair electrons. Our findings additionally reveal previously ignored fundamental similarities between the mechanisms of reversible photoinduced structural changes in chalcogenide glasses and phase-change alloys and offer new insights into the development of efficient PCM materials.

  17. Structural formation of aluminide phases on titanium alloy during annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamaeva, A.A.; Romankov, S.E.; Sagdoldina, Zh.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: The aluminum layer on the surface of titanium alloy has been formed by thermal deposition. The structural formation of aluminide phases on the surface has been studied. The sequence of structural transformations at the Ti/Al interface is limited by the reaction temperature and time. The sequence of aluminide phase formation is occurred in compliance with Ti-Al equilibrium phase diagram. At the initial stages at the Ti/Al interface the Al3Ti alloy starts forming as a result of interdiffusion, and gradually the whole aluminum films is spent on the formation of this layer. The Al3Ti layer decomposes with the increase of temperature (>600C). At 800C the two-phase (Ti3Al+TiAl) layer is formed on the titanium surface. The TiAl compound is unstable and later on with the increase of the exposure time at 800C gradually transforms into the Ti3Al. The chain of these successive transformations leads to the formation of the continuous homogeneous layer consisting of the Ti3Al compound on the surface. At temperatures exceeding the allotropic transformation temperature (>900C) the Ti3Al compound starts decomposing. All structural changes taking place at the Ti/Al interface are accompanied by considerable changes in micro hardness. The structure of initial substrate influences on kinetics of phase transformation and microstructure development. (author)

  18. Phases stability of shape memory alloys Cu based under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelaya, Maria Eugenia

    2006-01-01

    The effects of irradiation on the relative phase stability of phases related by a martensitic transformation in copper based shape memory alloys were studied in this work.Different kind of particles and energies were employed in the irradiation experiments.The first kind of irradiation was performed with 2,6 MeV electrons, the second one with 170 keV and 300 keV Cu ions and the third one with swift heavy ions (Kr, Xe, Au) with energies between 200 and 600 MeV.Stabilization of the 18 R martensite in Cu-Zn-Al-Ni induced by electron irradiation was studied.The results were compared to those of the stabilization induced by quenching and ageing in the same alloy, and the ones obtained by irradiation in 18 R-Cu-Zn-Al alloys.The effects of Cu irradiation over b phase were analyzed with several electron microscopy techniques including: scanning electron microscopy (S E M), high resolution electron microscopy (H R E M), micro diffraction and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (E D S). Structural changes in Cu-Zn-Al b phase into a closed packed structure were induced by Cu ion implantation.The closed packed structures depend on the irradiation fluence.Based on these results, the interface between these structures (closed packed and b) and the stability of disordered phases were analyzed. It was also compared the evolution of long range order in the Cu-Zn-Al and in the Cu-Zn-Al-Ni b phase as a function of fluence.The evolution of the g phase was also compared. Both results were discussed in terms of the mobility of irradiation induced point defects.Finally, the effects induced by swift heavy ions in b phase and 18 R martensite were studied. The results of the irradiation in b phase were qualitatively similar to those produced by irradiation with lower energies. On the contrary, nano metric defects were found in the irradiated 18 R martensite.These defects were characterized by H R E M.The characteristic contrast of the defects was associated to a local change in the

  19. Sputtering of two-phase AgxCuγ alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibic, N.; Milosavljevic, M.; Perusko, D.; Wilson, I.H.

    1992-01-01

    Elemental sputtering yields from two phase AgCu alloys were measured for 20, 40 and 50 at % Ag. Argon ion bombardment energies were in the range 35-55 keV and the ion dose was 1 x 10 19 ions cm -2 . The sputtering yield for silver was found to be considerably below what was expected by simple selective sputtering of a two component alloy. Analysis by electron probe X-ray microanalysis and scanning electron microscopy of the eroded surface indicated that surface diffusion of copper from copper rich grains and geometrical constraints in the dense cone forest on Cu/Ag eutectic regions combine to reduce the sputtering yield for silver. (author)

  20. Phase decomposition and morphology characteristic in thermal aging Fe–Cr alloys under applied strain: A phase-field simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yongsheng; Zhu Hao; Zhang Lei; Cheng Xiaoling

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Effects of variation mobility and applied strain on phase decomposition of Fe–Cr alloy were studied. ► Rate of phase decomposition rises as aging temperature and concentration increase. ► Phase transformation mechanism affects the volume fraction of equilibrium phase. ► Elongate morphology is intensified at higher aging temperature under applied strain. - Abstract: The phase decomposition and morphology evolution in thermal aging Fe–Cr alloys were investigated using the phase field method. In the simulation, the effects of atomic mobility, applied strain, alloy concentration and aging temperature were studied. The simulation results show that the rate of phase decomposition is influenced by the aging temperature and the alloy concentration, the equilibrium volume fractions (V f e ) of Cr-rich phase increases as aging temperature rises for the alloys of lower concentration, and the V f e decreases for the alloys with higher concentration. Under the applied strain, the orientation of Cr-rich phase is intensified as the aging temperature rises, and the stripe morphology is formed for the middle concentration alloys. The simulation results are helpful for understanding the phase decomposition in Fe–Cr alloys and the designing of duplex stainless steels working at high temperature.

  1. Establishment of Wear Resistant HVOF Coatings for 50CrMo4 Chromium Molybdenum Alloy Steel as an Alternative for Hard Chrome Plating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuppasamy, S.; Sivan, V.; Natarajan, S.; Kumaresh Babu, S. P.; Duraiselvam, M.; Dhanuskodi, R.

    2018-05-01

    High cost imported components of seamless steel tube manufacturing plants wear frequently and need replacement to ensure the quality of the product. Hard chrome plating, which is time consuming and hazardous, is conventionally used to restore the original dimension of the worn-out surface of the machine components. High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray coatings with NiCrBSi super alloy powder and Cr3C2 NiCr75/25 alloy powder applied on a 50CrMo4 (DIN-1.7228) chromium molybdenum alloy steel, the material of the wear prone machine component, were evaluated for use as an alternative for hard chrome plating in this present work. The coating characteristics are evaluated using abrasive wear test, sliding wear test and microscopic analysis, hardness test, etc. The study results revealed that the HVOF based NiCrBSi and Cr3C2NiCr75/25 coatings have hardness in the range of 800-900 HV0.3, sliding wear rate in the range of 50-60 µm and surface finish around 5 microns. Cr3C2 NiCr75/25 coating is observed to be a better option out of the two coatings evaluated for the selected application.

  2. Crystallization of amorphous phase in niobium alloys with oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dekanenko, V.M.; Samojlenko, Z.A.; Revyakin, A.V.

    1982-01-01

    Crystallization and subsequent phase transformations of amorphous phase during annealings in the system Nb-O are studied. It is shown that quenching from liquid state of niobium alloys with oxygen with a rate of 10 5 -10 6 K/s results in partial crystallization of the melt. Phase transition from amorphous to crystal state at 670 K in all probability takes place without the change of chemical composition. After crystallization the decomposition of oversaturated solid solution on the basis of NbO takes place with the separation of low- temperature modification, γ-Nb 2 O 5 . Niobium pentoxide of both modifications during prolong annealings at 770 K and short- time annealings higher 1070 K disappears completely [ru

  3. Magnetic phase diagram of HoxTm1-x alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarthour, R.S.; Cowley, R.A.; Ward, R.C.C.

    2000-01-01

    The magnetic phase diagram of the competing anisotropy system, Ho/Tm, has been determined by neutron-scattering techniques and the results compared with calculations based on a mean-field model. The crystal-field interactions in Ho favor alignment of the magnetic moments in the basal plane whereas......, with long-range order, were identified and the magnetic phase diagram, including a pentacritical point, determined. A mean-field model was used to explain the results and the results are in good agreement with the experimental results....... in Tm they favor alignment along the c axis. Single-crystal alloys were grown with molecular-beam epitaxy techniques in Oxford. The components of the magnetic moment alone the c direction and in the basal plane were determined from the neutron-scattering measurements. Five distinct magnetic phases...

  4. A Study of Phase Composition and Structure of Alloys of the Al - Mg - Si - Fe System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailybaeva, A. D.; Zolotorevskii, V. S.; Smagulov, D. U.; Islamkulov, K. M.

    2017-03-01

    The Thermo-Calc software is used to compute the phase transformations occurring during cooling of alloys. Polythermal and isothermal sections of the phase diagram of the Al - Mg - Si - Fe system are plotted. The phase composition and the structure of aluminum alloys in cast condition and after a heat treatment are studied experimentally.

  5. Phase characterisation in spark plasma sintered TiPt alloy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Chikosha, S

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info chikosha_2011.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 4354 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name chikosha_2011.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 PHASE CHARACTERISATION IN SPARK... to form “necks”  Radiant Joule heat and pressure drives “neck” growth and material transfer © CSIR 2006 www.csir.co.za Page 6 Objective  Produce TiPt alloy compacts by Spark plasma sintering (SPS) of equiatomic...

  6. Phase transformations during sintering of mechanically alloyed TiPt

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nxumalo, S

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Page 307 SMA alloys have been successfully used in several applications including medical, automotive and aerospace as stents, couplings and actuators. The most successful shape memory alloys currently are the NiTi alloys. These are however...

  7. Phase stability and elastic properties of Cr-V alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, M. C.; Suzuki, Y.; Schweiger, H.; Doǧan, Ö. N.; Hawk, J.; Widom, M.

    2013-02-01

    V is the only element in the periodic table that forms a complete solid solution with Cr and thus is particularly important in alloying strategy to ductilize Cr. This study combines first-principles density functional theory calculations and experiments to investigate the phase stability and elastic properties of Cr-V binary alloys. The cluster expansion study reveals the formation of various ordered compounds at low temperatures that were not previously known. These compounds become unstable due to the configurational entropy of bcc solid solution as the temperature is increased. The elastic constants of ordered and disordered compounds are calculated at both T = 0 K and finite temperatures. The overall trends in elastic properties are in agreement with measurements using the resonant ultrasound spectroscopy method. The calculations predict that addition of V to Cr decreases both the bulk modulus and the shear modulus, and enhances the Poisson’s ratio, in agreement with experiments. Decrease in the bulk modulus is correlated to decrease in the valence electron density and increase in the lattice constant. An enhanced Poisson’s ratio for bcc Cr-V alloys (compared to pure Cr) is associated with an increased density of states at the Fermi level. Furthermore, the difference charge density in the bonding region in the (110) slip plane is highest for pure Cr and decreases gradually as V is added. The present calculation also predicts a negative Cauchy pressure for pure Cr, and it becomes positive upon alloying with V. The intrinsic ductilizing effect from V may contribute, at least partially, to the experimentally observed ductilizing phenomenon in the literature.

  8. Phase stability and elastic properties of Cr-V alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, M C; Suzuki, Y; Schweiger, H; Doğan, Ö N; Hawk, J; Widom, M

    2013-01-23

    V is the only element in the periodic table that forms a complete solid solution with Cr and thus is particularly important in alloying strategy to ductilize Cr. This study combines first-principles density functional theory calculations and experiments to investigate the phase stability and elastic properties of Cr–V binary alloys. The cluster expansion study reveals the formation of various ordered compounds at low temperatures that were not previously known. These compounds become unstable due to the configurational entropy of bcc solid solution as the temperature is increased. The elastic constants of ordered and disordered compounds are calculated at both T = 0 K and finite temperatures. The overall trends in elastic properties are in agreement with measurements using the resonant ultrasound spectroscopy method. The calculations predict that addition of V to Cr decreases both the bulk modulus and the shear modulus, and enhances the Poisson’s ratio, in agreement with experiments. Decrease in the bulk modulus is correlated to decrease in the valence electron density and increase in the lattice constant. An enhanced Poisson’s ratio for bcc Cr–V alloys (compared to pure Cr) is associated with an increased density of states at the Fermi level. Furthermore, the difference charge density in the bonding region in the (110) slip plane is highest for pure Cr and decreases gradually as V is added. The present calculation also predicts a negative Cauchy pressure for pure Cr, and it becomes positive upon alloying with V. The intrinsic ductilizing effect from V may contribute, at least partially, to the experimentally observed ductilizing phenomenon in the literature.

  9. Effect of prior deformation on microstructural development and Laves phase precipitation in high-chromium stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Z-W; Chen, D; Kuo, J-C; Lin, D-Y

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated the influence of deformation on precipitation behaviour and microstructure change during annealing. Here, the prior deformation of high-chromium stainless steel was tensile deformation of 3%, 6% and 10%, and the specimens were then annealed at 700˚C for 10 h. The specimens were subsequently analyzed using backscattered electron image and electron backscattering diffraction measurements with SEM. Compared with the deformation microstructure, the grains revealed no preferred orientation. The precipitates of TiN and NbC were formed homogenously in the grain interior and at grain boundaries after annealing. Fine Laves phase precipitates were observed in grains and along subgrain boundaries as the deformation increased. Furthermore, the volume fraction of Laves phase increased, but the average particle diameter of precipitate was reduced as the deformation increased. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  10. Deformation and fracture behavior of titanium-aluminum-niobium-(chromium,molybdenum) alloys with a gamma+sigma microstructure at ambient temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesler, Michael Steiner

    Titanium aluminides are of interest as a candidate material for aerospace turbine applications due to their high strength to weight ratio. gamma-TiAl + alpha2-Ti3Al alloys have recently been incorporated in the low pressure turbine region but their loss of strength near 750C limits their high temperature use. Additions of Nb have been shown to have several beneficial effects in gamma+alpha2 alloys, including enhancements in strength and ductility of the gamma-phase, along with the stabilization of the cubic BCC beta-phase at forging temperatures allowing for thermomechanical processing. In the ternary Ti-Al-Nb system at high Nb-contents above approximately 10at%, there exists a two-phase gamma-TiAl + sigma-Nb2Al region at and above current service temperature for the target application. Limited research has been conducted on the mechanical properties of alloys with this microstructure, though they have demonstrated excellent high temperature strength, superior to that of gamma+alpha2 alloys. Because the sigma-phase does not deform at room temperature, high volume fractions of this phase result in poor toughness and no tensile elongation. Controlling the microstructural morphology by disconnecting the brittle matrix through heat treatments has improved the toughness at room temperature. In this study, attempts to further improve the mechanical properties of these alloys were undertaken by reducing the volume fraction of the sigma-phase and controlling the scale of the gamma+sigma microstructure through the aging of a meta-stable parent phase, the beta- phase, that was quenched-in to room temperature. Additions of beta-stabilizing elements, Cr and Mo, were needed in order to quench-in the beta-phase. The room temperature mechanical properties were evaluated by compression, Vickers' indentation and single edge notch bend tests at room temperature. The formation of the large gamma-laths at prior beta- phase grain boundaries was found to be detrimental to ductility due

  11. An XRD technique for quantitative phase analysis of Al-U-Zr alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, K.B.; Kulkarni, N.K.; Jain, G.C.

    2003-01-01

    In several nuclear research reactors all over the world, Al-U alloy is used as fuel. To stabilise less brittle phase UAl 3 in Al-U alloy, a small amount of Zr (1 to 3 wt% ) is added. A rapid, non destructive and simple x-ray diffraction technique has been developed for quantitative phase analysis Al-U-Zr alloy system containing UAl 4 , UAl 3 and Al. (author)

  12. Phase equilibria and thermodynamic properties of high-alloy tool steels : theoretical and experimental approach

    OpenAIRE

    Bratberg, Johan

    2005-01-01

    The recent development of tool steels and high-speed steels has led to a significant increase in alloy additions, such as Co, Cr, Mo, N, V, and W. Knowledge about the phase relations in these multicomponent alloys, that is, the relative stability between different carbides or the solubility of different elements in the carbides and in the matrix phase, is essential for understanding the behaviour of these alloys in heat treatments. This information is also the basis for improving the properti...

  13. The effect of zinc on the microstructure and phase transformations of casting Al-Cu alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manasijević Ivana I.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper is one of the main alloying elements for aluminum casting alloys. As an alloying element, copper significantly increases the tensile strength and toughness of alloys based on aluminum. The copper content in the industrial casting aluminum alloys ranges from 3,5 to 11 wt.%. However, despite the positive effect on the mechanical properties, copper has a negative influence on the corrosion resistance of aluminum and its alloys. In order to further improve the properties of Al-Cu alloys they are additional alloyed with elements such as zinc, magnesium and others. In this work experimental and analytical examination of the impact of zinc on the microstructure and phase transformations of Al-Cu alloys was carried out. In order to determine the effect of the addition of zinc to the structure and phase transformations of Al-Cu alloys two alloys of Al-Cu-Zn system with selected compositions were prepared and then examined using scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDX. The experimental results were compared with the results of thermodynamic calculations of phase equilibria.

  14. Electrically induced phase transition in GeSbTe alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruns, Gunnar; Schlockermann, Carl; Woda, Michael; Wuttig, Matthias [I. Physikalisches Institut Ia, RWTH Aachen, 52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    While phase change materials have already successfully been applied in rewriteable optical data storage, they are now also promising to form the basis for novel non-volatile electrical data storage devices. To understand the physical concepts of these so-called Phase Change Random Access Memory (PCRAM) it is mandatory to gain a deeper insight into the switching process between the highly resistive amorphous and the lowly resistive crystalline phase. The fast phase transitions between the amorphous and crystalline state of GeSbTe-based alloys has so far often been studied using pulsed laser irradiation. In this work an alternative approach is employed to investigate this transition. Electrical pulses are used to rapidly and reversibly switch between the two states. For these experiments a setup was built with a specially designed contacting circuit board to meet the requirements of electrical measurements on a nanosecond timescale. The influence of the pulse parameters on the change of device resistance was determined for different initial states. Furthermore the high time resolution of 0.4 ns allows investigation of transient electrical effects like the so-called threshold switching first described by Ovshinsky in the late 1960s.

  15. Electrically induced phase transition in GeSbTe alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruns, Gunnar; Schlockermann, Carl; Woda, Michael; Wuttig, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    While phase change materials have already successfully been applied in rewriteable optical data storage, they are now also promising to form the basis for novel non-volatile electrical data storage devices. To understand the physical concepts of these so-called Phase Change Random Access Memory (PCRAM) it is mandatory to gain a deeper insight into the switching process between the highly resistive amorphous and the lowly resistive crystalline phase. The fast phase transitions between the amorphous and crystalline state of GeSbTe-based alloys has so far often been studied using pulsed laser irradiation. In this work an alternative approach is employed to investigate this transition. Electrical pulses are used to rapidly and reversibly switch between the two states. For these experiments a setup was built with a specially designed contacting circuit board to meet the requirements of electrical measurements on a nanosecond timescale. The influence of the pulse parameters on the change of device resistance was determined for different initial states. Furthermore the high time resolution of 0.4 ns allows investigation of transient electrical effects like the so-called threshold switching first described by Ovshinsky in the late 1960s

  16. Investigations of binary and ternary phase change alloys for future memory applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rausch, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    The understanding of phase change materials is of great importance because it enables us to predict properties and tailor alloys which might be even better suitable to tackle challenges of future memory applications. Within this thesis two topics have been approached: on the one hand the understanding of the alloy In 3 Sb 1 Te 2 and on the other hand the so called resistivity drift of amorphous Ge-Sn-Te phase change materials. The main topic covers an in depth discussion of the ternary alloy In 3 Sb 1 Te 2 . At first glance, this alloy does not fit into the established concepts of phase alloys: e.g. the existence of resonant bonding in the crystalline phase is not obvious and the number of p-electrons is very low compared to other phase change alloys. Furthermore amorphous phase change alloys with high indium content are usually not discussed in literature, an exception being the recent work by Spreafico et al. on InGeTe 2 . For the first time a complete description of In 3 Sb 1 Te 2 alloy is given in this work for the crystalline phase, amorphous phase and crystallization process. In addition comparisons are drawn to typical phase change materials like Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 /GeTe or prototype systems like AgInTe 2 and InTe. The second topic of this thesis deals with the issue of resistivity drift, i.e. the increase of resistivity of amorphous phase change alloys with aging. This drift effect greatly hampers the introduction of multilevel phase change memory devices into the market. Recently a systematic decrease of drift coefficient with stoichiometry has been observed in our group going from GeTe over Ge 3 Sn 1 Te 4 to Ge 2 Sn 2 Te 4 . These alloys are investigated with respect to constraint theory.

  17. Specification for corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel welding rods and bare electrodes - approved 1969

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    This specification covers corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel welding rods for use with the atomic hydrogen and gas-tungsten-arc welding processes and bare electrodes for use with the submerged arc and gas metal-arc welding processes. These welding rods and electrodes include those alloy steels designated as corrosion- or heat-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steels, in which chromium exceeds 4% and nickel does not exceed 50%

  18. Morphology of intermetallic phases in Al-Si cast alloys and their fracture behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Hurtalová

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Applications of Al-Si cast alloys in recent years have increased especially in the automotive industry (dynamic exposed cast, en-gine parts, cylinder heads, pistons and so on. Controlling the microstructure of secondary aluminium cast alloys is very important, because these alloys contain more additional elements that form various intermetallic phases in the structure. Therefore, the contribution is dealing with the valuation type of intermetallic phases and their identification with using optical and scanning microscopy. Some of the intermetallic phases could be identified on the basis of morphology but some of them must be identified according EDX analysis. The properties of alu-minium alloy are affected by morphology of intermetallic phases and therefore it is necessary to study morphology and its fracture behav-iour. The present work shows morphology and typical fracture behaviour as the most common intermetallic phases forming in Al-Si alloys.

  19. Submicroscopic structure role in resistance of microplastic deformation of precipitation hardening nickel-chromium base alloys. 2. Softening stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gitgarts, M.I.; Kukareko, V.A.

    1985-01-01

    Reasons for decrease of elastic limit and hardness of KhN77TYuR, KhN56VMTYu and KhN67VMTYu alloys at early stages of ageing are analyzed. Alloy softening is shown to be conditioned by development of spatial ordering of γ'-particles by the matrix volume. It is concluded that regularity in particle disposition reduces resistance to microplastic shear to a greater extent than to macroplastic strains

  20. Standard specification for cobalt-chromium-nickel-molybdenum-tungsten alloy (UNS R31233) plate, sheet and strip. ASTM standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-09-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee B-2 on Nonferrous Metals and Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee B02.07 on Refined Nickel and Cobalt, and Alloys Containing Nickel or Cobalt or Both as Principal Constituents. Current edition approved Apr. 10, 1998 and published September 1998. Originally published as B 818-91. Last previous edition was B 818-93

  1. The Effect of Artificial Aging on The Bond Strength of Heat-activated Acrylic Resin to Surface-treated Nickel-chromium-beryllium Alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Jabbari, Youssef S; Zinelis, Spiros; Al Taweel, Sara M; Nagy, William W

    2016-01-01

    The debonding load of heat-activated polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) denture base resin material to a nickel-chromium-beryllium (Ni-Cr-Be) alloy conditioned by three different surface treatments and utilizing two different commercial bonding systems was investigated. Denture resin (Lucitone-199) was bonded to Ni-Cr-Be alloy specimens treated with Metal Primer II, the Rocatec system with opaquer and the Rocatec system without opaquer. Denture base resin specimens bonded to non-treated sandblasted Ni-Cr-Be alloy were used as controls. Twenty samples for each treatment condition (80 specimens) were tested. The 80 specimens were divided into two categories, thermocycled and non-thermocycled, containing four groups of ten specimens each. The non-thermocycled specimens were tested after 48 hours' storage in room temperature water. The thermocycled specimens were tested after 2,000 cycles in 4°C and 55°C water baths. The debonding load was calculated in Newtons (N), and collected data were subjected by non parametric test Kruskal-Wallis One Way Analysis of Variance on Ranks and Dunn's post hoc test at the α = 0.05. The Metal Primer II and Rocatec system without opaquer groups produced significantly higher bond strengths (119.9 and 67.6 N), respectively, than did the sandblasted and Rocatec system with opaquer groups, where the bond strengths were 2.6 N and 0 N, respectively. The Metal Primer II was significantly different from all other groups (P<0.05). The bond strengths of all groups were significantly decreased (P<0.05) after thermocycling. Although thermocycling had a detrimental effect on the debonding load of all surface treatments tested, the Metal Primer II system provided higher values among all bonding systems tested, before and after thermocycling.

  2. Microstructure and mechanical properties of Mg-Zn-Y alloy containing LPSO phase and I-phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhijian; Teng, Xinying; Lou, Gui; Zhou, Guorong; Leng, Jinfeng

    2017-08-01

    Microstructure and mechanical properties of Mg-Zn-Y alloy including LPSO phase and I-phase was investigated. Transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction analysis and differential scanning calorimeter analysis reveal that the LPSO (long period stacking ordered structure) phase and I-phase can co-exist within the α-Mg matrix. Wherein, the quasicrystal phases exist in the (I-phase  +  α-Mg) eutectic structures. In the Mg-Zn-Y alloy, it is also found that 14 H type LPSO phases consist of LPSO phase and I-phase. With the addition of quasicrystal master alloy content, the microstructures are refined, and the mechanical properties are enhanced.

  3. Unusual crystallization behavior in Ga-Sb phase change alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magali Putero

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Combined in situ X-ray scattering techniques using synchrotron radiation were applied to investigate the crystallization behavior of Sb-rich Ga-Sb alloys. Measurements of the sheet resistance during heating indicated a reduced crystallization temperature with increased Sb content, which was confirmed by in situ X-ray diffraction. The electrical contrast increased with increasing Sb content and the resistivities in both the amorphous and crystalline phases decreased. It was found that by tuning the composition between Ga:Sb = 9:91 (in at.% and Ga:Sb = 45:55, the change in mass density upon crystallization changes from an increase in mass density which is typical for most phase change materials to a decrease in mass density. At the composition of Ga:Sb = 30:70, no mass density change is observed which should be very beneficial for phase change random access memory (PCRAM applications where a change in mass density during cycling is assumed to cause void formation and PCRAM device failure.

  4. Laser surface treatment on a nickel based alloy in order to form chromium oxide to reduce cations release in primary circuit. Experimental and numerical study of laser mater interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouton, Lucille

    2015-01-01

    Alloy 690 (60%Ni, 30%Cr, 10%Fe) is mainly used in primary circuit pipes for nuclear power plants.The aim of this thesis is to form a Cr 2 O 3 layer, using laser surface melting, with the objective of creating a chromium-rich oxide layer. In order to optimize the treatment, it was first important to determine parameters influence on the layer oxide properties then, with the objective of a deeper understanding of mechanisms involved, to address thermo-physical phenomena occurring during and after the laser pulse striking the upper surface. A deep parametric study first enabled to find an optimized laser surface treatment which produces chromium enrichment of the upper surface and a dense and continuous oxide layer. This treatment has been applied on samples, set in a primary medium simulation loop. Experiments and calculations were carried out to provide understanding of surface chromium enrichment by laser process. The results were shown to explain chromium enrichment until melt pool solidification occurred on the upper surface, assumingly just before chromium oxide formation. This was also promoted by a high affinity with oxygen and a higher stability of Cr 2 O 3 oxide compared with other potential oxide formation. (author) [fr

  5. Characterization of TiN, TiC and Ti(C,N) in titanium-alloyed ferritic chromium steels focusing on the significance of different particle morphologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelic, S.K., E-mail: susanne.michelic@unileoben.ac.at [Chair of Ferrous Metallurgy, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Loder, D. [Chair of Ferrous Metallurgy, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Reip, T.; Ardehali Barani, A. [Outokumpu Nirosta GmbH, Essener Straße 244, 44793 Bochum (Germany); Bernhard, C. [Chair of Ferrous Metallurgy, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria)

    2015-02-15

    Titanium-alloyed ferritic chromium steels are a competitive option to classical austenitic stainless steels owing to their similar corrosion resistance. The addition of titanium significantly influences their final steel cleanliness. The present contribution focuses on the detailed metallographic characterization of titanium nitrides, titanium carbides and titanium carbonitrides with regard to their size, morphology and composition. The methods used are manual and automated Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy as well as optical microscopy. Additional thermodynamic calculations are performed to explain the precipitation procedure of the analyzed titanium nitrides. The analyses showed that homogeneous nucleation is decisive at an early process stage after the addition of titanium. Heterogeneous nucleation gets crucial with ongoing process time and essentially influences the final inclusion size of titanium nitrides. A detailed investigation of the nuclei for heterogeneous nucleation with automated Scanning Electron Microscopy proved to be difficult due to their small size. Manual Scanning Electron Microscopy and optical microscopy have to be applied. Furthermore, it was found that during solidification an additional layer around an existing titanium nitride can be formed which changes the final inclusion morphology significantly. These layers are also characterized in detail. Based on these different inclusion morphologies, in combination with thermodynamic results, tendencies regarding the formation and modification time of titanium containing inclusions in ferritic chromium steels are derived. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • The formation and modification of TiN in the steel 1.4520 was examined. • Heterogeneous nucleation essentially influences the final steel cleanliness. • In most cases heterogeneous nuclei in TiN inclusions are magnesium based. • Particle morphology provides important information

  6. Experimental patch testing with chromium-coated materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2017-01-01

    Chromium coatings on metal alloys can be decorative, and prevent corrosion and metal ion release. We recently showed that handling of a chromium-containing disc resulted in chromium deposition on the skin. To examine patch test reactivity to chromium-coated discs. We included 15 patients: 10...... chromium-allergic patients, and 5 patients without chromium allergy. All were patch tested with potassium dichromate, cobalt chloride, nickel sulfate, and nine different metallic discs. The chromium-allergic patients were also patch tested with serial dilutions of potassium dichromate. Positive...

  7. Hydrogen storage performance of Ti-V-based BCC phase alloys with various Fe content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, X.B.; Feng, S.L.; Wu, Z.; Xia, B.J.; Xu, N.X.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of Fe content on hydrogen storage characteristics of Ti-10Cr-18Mn-(32-x)V-xFe (x = 0, 2, 3, 4, 5) alloys has been investigated at 353 K. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the alloys present BCC and C14 two-phase structures for all of the Fe-containing alloys. With the increasing Fe content, the lattice parameters of the BCC phase decrease, which results in an increase of the hydrogen desorption plateau pressure of the alloys. Among the studied alloys, Ti-10Cr-18Mn-27V-5Fe alloy exhibits the smallest PCT plateau slope and a more suitable plateau pressure (0.1 MPa equ <1 MPa). The maximum and effective capacities of the alloy are 3.32 wt.% and 2.26 wt.%, respectively, which are higher than other reported Fe-containing BCC phase alloys. In addition, the V/Fe ratio in this alloy is close to that of (VFe) alloy, whose cost is much lower than that of pure V

  8. Phase transformation and microstructure evolution of the deformed Ti-30Zr-5Nb shape memory alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Wentao, E-mail: wtqu@xsyu.edu.cn [School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi' an Shiyou University, Xi' an 710065 (China); Sun, Xuguang; Yuan, Bifei [School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi' an Shiyou University, Xi' an 710065 (China); Xiong, Chengyang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Li, Yan, E-mail: liyan@buaa.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Nie, Yongsheng [Lanzhou Seemine SMA Co. Ltd., Lanzhou 730010 (China)

    2017-04-15

    The phase transformation and microstructures of the deformed Ti-30Zr-5Nb shape memory alloy were investigated. The X-ray diffraction measurements indicated that the Ti-30Zr-5Nb alloy was composed of a single orthorhombic α″-martensite phase. The alloy exhibited one yielding behavior in the tensile test, with a critical stress of ~ 600 MPa and a tensile strain of approximately 15%. A shape memory recovery accompanied by a permanent strain was exhibited in the deformed alloys when heated at 873 K. The permanent strain increased with increasing pre-strain. The microstructure evolution of the deformed alloy was investigated by transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that the martensite reorientation occurred and the dislocations were generated during deformation. The alloy displayed a reversible martensite transformation start temperature as high as 763 K. However, no strain-induced martensite stabilization was found in the deformed alloy with different pre-strain levels, potentially because the large chemical energy of the Ti-30Zr-5Nb alloy depressed the effects of the elastic energy and the dissipative energy. - Highlights: • Ti-30Zr-5Nb alloy is composed of single orthorhombic α″-martensite phase with M{sub s} of 721 K. • No martensite stabilization has been found in Ti-30Zr-5Nb alloy with different pre-strain. • Ti-30Zr-5Nb shows the maximum shape memory effect of 2.75% with a pre-strain of 8%.

  9. Effect of aluminium on formation of metastable phases in titanium-niobium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trenogina, T.L.; Derevyanko, V.N.; Vozilkin, V.A.

    2001-01-01

    Specific features of phase transformations in the alloy of Ti-20Nb-29Al (at.%) are investigated in comparison with those in the aluminium-free Ti-21Nb alloy. It is states that in the alloy Ti-20Nb-29Al on quenching the ordering of β-solid solution takes place with B2-structure formation. The B2-matrix experiences decomposition with the formation of ordered Ω 0 -phase which field ranges up to 700 deg C. The investigation results show that the sequence of phase formation in Ti-Nb-Al and aluminium-free alloys is much the same. The only difference between them is the formation of ordered phases in the alloy Ti-20Nb-29Al [ru

  10. Chromium related degradation of solid oxide fuel cells; Chrom-bezogene Degradation von Festoxid-Brennstoffzellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, Anita

    2011-05-04

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) offer a high potential for application as an auxiliary power unit (APU) for heavy goods vehicles as well as combined heat and power (CHP) systems. SOFCs are especially attractive due to their high efficiencies and the use of different fuel types. However, optimization in terms of long term stability and costs are still necessary. This work characterized the degradation of SOFCs with lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) cathodes under chromium influence. Galvanostatic cell tests were carried out at 800 C with operation times from 250 - 3000 h and variation of the chromium source and current density. The current densities of j = 0 (A)/(cm{sup 2}), j = 0,3 (A)/(cm{sup 2}) and j = 0,5 (A)/(cm{sup 2}) were applied. The high temperature ferritic alloy Crofer22APU was used as a chromium source. Variation of the chromium source was realized by coating the Crofer22APU insert with the chromium retention layer Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} and the cathode contact layer LCC10. Cell degradation was analyzed with regard to cell voltage, current density and area specific resistance (ASR). Microstructural alterations of the cathode as well as chromium content and distribution across the cell were investigated after completion of the cell tests. For cells with a chromium source present and operation with a nonzero current density, the course of cell degradation was divided into three phases: a run-in, weak linear degradation and strong linear degradation. A decrease of the chromium release rate by means of different coatings stretched the course of degradation along the timescale. Strong degradation, which is characterized by a significant increase in ASR as well as a decrease of current density at the operating point, was only observed when a chromium source in the setup was comb ined with operation of the cell with a non-zero current density. Operation of the cell with a chromium source but no current density caused a degradation of current density at the

  11. Oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloys. 14/20% chromium: effects of processing on deformation texture, recrystallization and tensile properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regle, H.

    1994-01-01

    The ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened alloys are promising candidates for high temperature application materials, in particular for long life core components of advanced nuclear reactors. The aim of this work is to control the microstructure, in order to optimise the mechanical properties. The two ferritic alloys examined here, MA956 and MA957, are obtained by Mechanical Alloying techniques. They are characterised by quite anisotropic microstructure and mechanical properties. We have investigated the influence of hot and cold working processes (hot extrusion, swaging and cold-drawing) and recrystallization heat treatments on deformation textures, microstructures and tensile properties. The aim was to control the size of the grains and their anisotropic shape, using recrystallization heat treatments. After consolidation and hot extrusion, as-received materials present a extremely fine microstructure with elongated grains and a very strong (110) deformation texture with single-crystal character. At that stage of processing, recrystallization temperature are very high (1450 degrees C for MA957 alloy and 1350 degrees C for MA956 alloy) and materials develop millimetric recrystallized grains. Additional hot extrusion induce a fibre texture. Cold-drawing maintains a fibre texture, but the intensity decreases with increasing cold-work level. For both materials, the decrease of texture intensities correspond to a decrease of the recrystallization temperatures (from 1350 degrees C for a low cold-work level to 750 degrees C for 60 % cold-deformation, case of MA956 alloy) and a refinement of the grain size (from a millimetric size to less than an hundred of micrometer). Swaging develop a cyclic component where the intensity increases with increasing deformation in this case, the recrystallization temperature remains always very high and the millimetric grain size is slightly modified, even though cold-work level increases. Technologically, cold-drawing is the only way

  12. Stress corrosion cracking of iron-nickel-chromium alloys in primary circuit environment of PWR-type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boursier, Jean-Marie

    1993-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 steam generator tubing is a great concern for pressurized water reactors. The mechanism that controls intergranular stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in primary water (lithiated-borated water) has yet to be clearly identified. A study of stress corrosion cracking behaviour, which can identify the main parameters that control the cracking phenomenon, was so necessary to understand the stress corrosion cracking process. Constant extension rate tests, and constant load tests have evidenced that Alloy 600 stress corrosion cracking involves firstly an initiation period, then a slow propagation stage with crack less than 50 to 80 micrometers, and finally a rapid propagation stage leading to failure. The influence of mechanical parameters have shown the next points: - superficial strain hardening and cold work have a strong effect of stress corrosion cracking resistance (decrease of initiation time and increase of crack growth rate), - strain rate was the most suitable parameter for describing the different stage of propagation. The creep behaviour of alloy 600 has shown an increase of creep rate in primary water compared to air, which implies a local interaction plasticity/corrosion. An assessment of the durations of the initiation and the propagation stages was attempted for the whole uniaxial tensile tests, using the macroscopic strain rate: - the initiation time is less than 100 hours and seems to be an electrochemical process, - the durations of the propagation stage are strongly dependent on the strain rate. The behaviour in high primary water temperature of Alloys 690 and 800, which replace Alloy 600, was studied to appraise their margin, and validate their choice. Then the last chapter has to objective to evaluate the crack tip strain rate, in order to better describe the evolution of the different stages of cracking. (author) [fr

  13. A study on Z-phase nucleation in martensitic chromium steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golpayegani, Ardeshir; Andrén, Hans-Olof; Danielsen, Hilmar Kjartansson

    2008-01-01

    , initial stages of precipitation of Z-phase have been studied and characterized using energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM). Vanadium nitrides were found to provide the most suitable nucleation site for Z-phase, since the misfit between the (0 0 1) planes of VN and Z-phase is very small....... Furthermore, such a nucleation site would provide vanadium and nitrogen for the growth of Z-phase. The presence of niobium carbide has also been observed close to Z-phase nucleation sites, indicating niobium to be important for the nucleation and growth of Z-phase....

  14. Formation of ω-phase in Zr-4 at.% Cr alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobromyslov, A.V.; Kazantseva, N.V.

    1996-01-01

    The ω-phase has been discovered in zirconium-base alloys with the transition metals of Period 4 of the Periodic Table only in Zr-V, Zr-Cr, and Zr-Cu alloys. The first mention about the ω-phase formation in Zr-Cr alloys was given for Zr-4.5 at.%. However, there were no experimental data that confirmed this fact. W.M. Rumball and F.G. Elder presented the X-ray results on the ω-phase formation in Zr-3.9 at.%Cr, but at the present time there are no electron microscope studies of the structure of the ω-phase in this system. Investigations of the features of the ω-phase formation, morphology of the ω-phase and the mechanism of its formation in the different zirconium-base alloys are necessary to establish the common features of the formation of structures with the metastable phases. The task of the present work is to study the conditions and features of the ω-phase formation in the Zr-Cr alloys and the effect of the eutectoid decomposition on the formation of ω-phase. This article is part of the detailed investigations of the feature and condition of the ω-phase formation in zirconium-base alloys with the transition metals of the groups I and V to VIII of the Periodic Table

  15. Electron concentration and phase stability in NbCr2-based Laves phase alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, J.H.; Liaw, P.K. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Liu, C.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

    1997-05-12

    Phase stability in NbCr{sub 2}-based transition-metal Laves phases was studied, based on the data reported for binary X-Cr, Nb-X, and ternary Nb-Cr-X phase diagrams. It was shown that when the atomic size ratios are kept identical, the average electron concentration factor, e/a, is the dominating factor in controlling the phase stability of NbCr{sub 2}-based transition-metal Laves phases. The e/a ratios for different Laves polytypes were determined as followed: with e/a < 5.76, the C15 structure is stabilized; at an e/a range of 5.88--7.53, the C14 structure is stabilized; with e/a > 7.65, the C15 structure is stabilized again. A further increase in the electron concentration factor (e/a > 8) leads to the disordering of the alloy. The electron concentration effect on the phase stability of Mg-based Laves phases and transition-metal A{sub 3}B intermetallic compounds is also reviewed and compared with the present observations in transition-metal Laves phases. In order to verify the e/a/phase stability relationship experimentally, additions of Cu (with e/a = 11) were selected to replace Cr in the NbCr{sub 2} Laves phase. Experimental results for the ternary Nb-Cr-Cu system are reported and discussed in terms of the correlation between the e/a ratio and phase stability in NbCr{sub 2}-based Laves phases. A new phase was found, which has an average composition of Nb-47Cr-3Cu. Within the solubility limit, the electron concentration and phase stability relationship is obeyed in the Nb-Cr-Cu system.

  16. Searching for Next Single-Phase High-Entropy Alloy Compositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E. Alman

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available There has been considerable technological interest in high-entropy alloys (HEAs since the initial publications on the topic appeared in 2004. However, only several of the alloys investigated are truly single-phase solid solution compositions. These include the FCC alloys CoCrFeNi and CoCrFeMnNi based on 3d transition metals elements and BCC alloys NbMoTaW, NbMoTaVW, and HfNbTaTiZr based on refractory metals. The search for new single-phase HEAs compositions has been hindered by a lack of an effective scientific strategy for alloy design. This report shows that the chemical interactions and atomic diffusivities predicted from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations which are closely related to primary crystallization during solidification can be used to assist in identifying single phase high-entropy solid solution compositions. Further, combining these simulations with phase diagram calculations via the CALPHAD method and inspection of existing phase diagrams is an effective strategy to accelerate the discovery of new single-phase HEAs. This methodology was used to predict new single-phase HEA compositions. These are FCC alloys comprised of CoFeMnNi, CuNiPdPt and CuNiPdPtRh, and HCP alloys of CoOsReRu.

  17. Design of high density gamma-phase uranium alloys for LEU dispersion fuel applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofman, Gerard L.; Meyer, Mitchell K.; Ray, Allison E.

    1998-01-01

    Uranium alloys are candidates for the fuel phase in aluminium matrix dispersion fuels requiring high uranium loading. Certain uranium alloys have been shown to have good irradiation performance at intermediate burnup. previous studies have shown that acceptable fission gas swelling behavior and fuel-aluminium interaction is possible only if the fuel alloy can be maintained in the high temperature body-centered-cubic γ-phase during fabrication and irradiation, at temperatures at which αU is the equilibrium phase. transition metals in Groups V through VIII are known to allow metastable retention of the gamma phase below the equilibrium isotherm. These metals have varying degrees of effectiveness in stabilizing the gamma phase. Certain alloys are metastable for very long times at the relatively low fuel temperatures seen in research operation. In this paper, the existing data on the gamma stability of binary and ternary uranium alloys is analysed. The mechanism and kinetics of decomposition of the gamma phase are assessed with the help of metal alloy theory. Alloys with the highest possible uranium content, good gamma-phase stability, and good neutronic performance are identified for further metallurgical studies and irradiation tests. Results from theory will be compared with experimentally generated data. (author)

  18. Novel phase diagram behavior and materials design in heterostructural semiconductor alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, Aaron M; Siol, Sebastian; Ndione, Paul F; Peng, Haowei; Deml, Ann M; Matthews, Bethany E; Schelhas, Laura T; Toney, Michael F; Gordon, Roy G; Tumas, William; Perkins, John D; Ginley, David S; Gorman, Brian P; Tate, Janet; Zakutayev, Andriy; Lany, Stephan

    2017-06-01

    Structure and composition control the behavior of materials. Isostructural alloying is historically an extremely successful approach for tuning materials properties, but it is often limited by binodal and spinodal decomposition, which correspond to the thermodynamic solubility limit and the stability against composition fluctuations, respectively. We show that heterostructural alloys can exhibit a markedly increased range of metastable alloy compositions between the binodal and spinodal lines, thereby opening up a vast phase space for novel homogeneous single-phase alloys. We distinguish two types of heterostructural alloys, that is, those between commensurate and incommensurate phases. Because of the structural transition around the critical composition, the properties change in a highly nonlinear or even discontinuous fashion, providing a mechanism for materials design that does not exist in conventional isostructural alloys. The novel phase diagram behavior follows from standard alloy models using mixing enthalpies from first-principles calculations. Thin-film deposition demonstrates the viability of the synthesis of these metastable single-phase domains and validates the computationally predicted phase separation mechanism above the upper temperature bound of the nonequilibrium single-phase region.

  19. Phase transformations in TiAl based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zghal, Slim; Thomas, Marc; Naka, Shigehisa; Finel, Alphonse; Couret, Alain

    2005-01-01

    Microstructural characteristics of a fully lamellar Ti 49 Al 47 Cr 2 Nb 2 alloy have been investigated in different annealed conditions by quantitative transmission electron microscopy. Statistical analyses have yielded clear information about the γ-γ interfaces, the respective orientation groups of the γ phase, and the distribution of orientational variants. From the results, three sequences of lamellar transformation have been identified with decreasing temperature: (1) a high-temperature heterogeneous transformation characterized by the nucleation of isolated primary γ lamellae mostly belonging to the same orientation group and having locally the same order; (2) a low-temperature homogeneous transformation in the ordered α 2 phase characterized by the formation of a fine lamellar structure with an even distribution of the orientation groups and a random ordering of γ lamellae; and (3) a coherent interfacial transformation at the α 2 /γ interfaces characterized by the nucleation of ultra-fine twin related lamellae. Finally, the driving forces for these various transformations as well as the nucleation mechanisms of γ lamellae involved in these transformations are discussed

  20. A phase-field and electron microscopy study of phase separation in Fe-Cr alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedstroem, Peter, E-mail: pheds@kth.se [Materials Science and Engineering, KTH (Royal Institute of Technology), SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Baghsheikhi, Saeed [Materials Science and Engineering, KTH (Royal Institute of Technology), SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Liu, Ping [Sandvik Materials Technology, R and D Centre, SE-81181 Sandviken (Sweden); Odqvist, Joakim [Materials Science and Engineering, KTH (Royal Institute of Technology), SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Sandvik Materials Technology, R and D Centre, SE-81181 Sandviken (Sweden)

    2012-02-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Experimental characterization and Phase-field modeling of phase separation in Fe-Cr. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transition from particle-like to spinodal-like structure observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural evolution generates increased hardness. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results in agreement with recent thermodynamic description. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantitative kinetic modeling must include thermal noise and improved kinetic data. - Abstract: Phase separation in the binary Fe-Cr system, the basis for the entire stainless steel family, is considered responsible for the low temperature embrittlement in ferritic, martensitic and duplex stainless steels. These steels are often used in load-bearing applications with considerable service time at elevated temperature. Thus, understanding the effect of microstructure on mechanical properties and predicting dynamics of phase separation are key issues. In the present work, experimental evaluation of structure and mechanical properties in binary Fe-Cr alloys as well as phase-field modeling, using a new thermodynamic description of Fe-Cr, is conducted. A significant hardening evolution with time is found for alloys aged between 400 and 550 Degree-Sign C, and it can be attributed to phase separation. The decomposed structure changed with increasing Cr content at 500 Degree-Sign C, with a more particle-like structure at 25 wt% Cr and a more spinodal-like structure at 30 wt% Cr. The observed transition of structure agrees with the thermodynamically predicted spinodal, although the transition is expected to be gradual. The phase-field simulations qualitatively agree with experiments. However, to enable accurate quantitative predictions, the diffusional mobilities must be evaluated further and thermal fluctuations as well as 3D diffusion fields must be properly accounted for.

  1. The microstructure and composition of equilibrium phases formed in hypoeutectic Te-In alloy during solidification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Baoguang [Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Hu, Jinwu [Center of Failure Analysis, Central Iron and Steel Research Institute, Beijing 100081 (China); Wang, Chongyun; Yang, Wenhui [Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Tian, Wenhuai, E-mail: wenhuaitian@ustb.edu.cn [Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2017-03-15

    As a key tellurium atoms evaporation source for ultraviolet detection photocathode, the hypoeutectic Te{sub 75}In{sub 25} alloy was prepared by employing a slow solidification speed of about 10{sup −2} K/s. The microstructure and chemical composition of the equilibrium phases formed in the as-prepared alloy were studied in this research work. The experimental results show that the as-prepared Te-In alloy was constituted by primary In{sub 2}Te{sub 5} phase and eutectic In{sub 2}Te{sub 5}/Te phases. The eutectic In{sub 2}Te{sub 5}/Te phases are distributed in the grain boundaries of primary In{sub 2}Te{sub 5} phase. With the slow solidification speed, a pure eutectic Te phase without any excessive indium solute was obtained, where Te content of eutectic Te phase is 100 mass%. Moreover, it can be considered that the stress between the In{sub 2}Te{sub 5} and Te phases plays an important role in reducing the tellurium vapor pressure in Te{sub 75}In{sub 25} alloy. - Highlights: • The microstructure of Te-In alloy as an evaporation source was analyzed. • A pure eutectic Te phase was obtained by using a slow solidification speed method. • The relation between vapor pressure and inner-stress in the alloy was discussed.

  2. Direct visualization of β phase causing intergranular forms of corrosion in Al–Mg alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Young-Ki, E-mail: deltag@naver.com; Allen, Todd

    2013-06-15

    For a more effective examination of microstructure in Al–Mg alloys, a new etching solution has been developed; dissolved ammonium persulfate in water. It is demonstrated how β phase (Al{sub 3}Mg{sub 2}) in Al–Mg alloys respond to this solution using samples of a binary Al–Mg alloy and a commercial 5083 aluminum alloy. Nanometer sized β phase is clearly visualized for the first time using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) instead of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It is anticipated that direct and unambiguous visualization of β phase will greatly augment intergranular corrosion research in 5xxx series aluminum alloys. - Highlights: • Nanometer sized β phase in Al-10% Mg is first clearly visualized with SEM. • Nanometer sized β phase in wrought alloy 5083 is first clearly visualized with SEM. • Grain boundary decorating β phase and isolated sponge-like β phase are shown. • This phase is confirmed to be β phase using composition analysis.

  3. On the corrosion behaviour of stainless steel, nickel-chromium and zirconium-alloys in pore water of Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heitz, E.; Graefen, H.

    1991-12-01

    On the basis of an extensive review of literature and available experience, an evaluation was made of the corrosion of a metallic matrix for radioactive nuclides embedded in porous, water containing Portland cement. As a metallic matrix, austenitic high-alloy steel, nickel-base alloys and zirconium alloys are discussed. Pore waters in Portland cement have low aggressivity. However, through contact with formation water, chloride and sulphate enrichment can occur. Although corrosion is principally possible on the basis of purely thermodynamic considerations, it can be assumed that local corrosion (pitting, stress corrosion cracking, intergranular corrosion) is highly improbable under the given boundary conditions. This is valid for all three groups of alloys and means that only low release rates of corrosion products are to be expected. As a result of the discussion on radiolysis-induced corrosion, additional corrosion activity can be excluded. Final conclusions concerning the stimulation of corrosion processes by microbial action cannot be drawn and, therefore, additional experiments are proposed. The release rates of radioactive products are controlled by a very low dissolution rate of the materials in the passive state. All three groups of alloys show this type of general dissolution. From a survey of literature data it can be concluded that release rates greater than 250 mg/m 2 per day are not exceeded. Since these data were mainly obtained by electrochemical methods, it is proposed that quantitative analytical investigations of the corrosion products in pore water be made. On the whole the release rates determined are far below corrosion rates which are generally technically relevant. (author) 13 figs., 9 tabs., 61 refs

  4. Salt fog corrosion behavior in a powder-processed icosahedral-phase-strengthened aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, T.J.; Gordillo, M.A.; Ernst, A.T.; Bedard, B.A.; Aindow, M.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Pitting corrosion resistance has been evaluated for an Al-Cr-Mn-Co-Zr alloy. • Pit densities and depths are far lower than for other high-strength Al alloys. • Corrosion proceeds by selective oxidation of the Al matrix around the other phases. - Abstract: The pitting corrosion resistance has been evaluated for a powder-processed Al-Cr-Mn-Co-Zr alloy which contains ≈35% by volume of an icosahedral quasi-crystalline phase and a little Al 9 Co 2 in an Al matrix. ASTM standard salt fog exposure tests show that the alloy exhibits far lower corrosion pit densities and depths than commercial high-strength aerospace Al alloys under the same conditions. Electron microscopy data show that the salt fog exposure leads to the selective oxidation of the face-centered cubic Al matrix around the other phases, and to the development of a porous outer oxide scale.

  5. Effect of different factors on phase transformations in Fe-Mn alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balychev, Yu.M.; Tkachenko, F.K.

    1983-01-01

    Phase transformations proceeding under Fe-Mn alloy heating are studied and the effect of previous working conditions, particularly, cooling rate on these transformations is investigated. Investigations have been conducted on pure Fe-Mn alloys with 2-15% Mn. Phase transformations are shown to proceed according to α → #betta# and epsilon → #betta# reaction in Fe-Mn alloys containing 2-15% Mn under heating. Cooling rate in the range of approximately 5-1000 deg/min in preliminary working essentially affects phase transformations under subsequent heating

  6. Effect of Iron Impurity on the Phase Composition, Structure and Properties of Magnesium Alloys Containing Manganese and Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkova, E. F.

    2017-07-01

    Results of a study of the interaction between iron impurity and manganese and aluminum alloying elements during formation of phase composition in alloys of the Mg - Mn, Mg - Al, Mg - Al - Mn, and Mg - Al - Zn - Mn systems are presented. It is proved that this interaction results in introduction of Fe into the intermetallic phase. The phase compositions of model magnesium alloys and commercial alloys MA2-1 and MA5 are studied. It is shown that both manganese and aluminum may bind the iron impurity into phases. Composite Fe-containing intermetallic phases of different compositions influence differently the corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys.

  7. Phase-field simulation of solidification in multicomponent alloys coupled with thermodynamic and diffusion mobility databases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ruijie; Jing Tao; Jie Wanqi; Liu Baicheng

    2006-01-01

    To simulate quantitatively the microstructural evolution in the solidification process of multicomponent alloys, we extend the phase-field model for binary alloys to multicomponent alloys with consideration of the solute interactions between different species. These interactions have a great influence not only on the phase equilibria but also on the solute diffusion behaviors. In the model, the interface region is assumed to be a mixture of solid and liquid with the same chemical potential, but with different compositions. The simulation presented is coupled with thermodynamic and diffusion mobility databases, which can accurately predict the phase equilibria and the solute diffusion transportation in the whole system. The phase equilibria in the interface and other thermodynamic quantities are obtained using Thermo-Calc through the TQ interface. As an example, two-dimensional computations for the dendritic growth in Al-Cu-Mg ternary alloy are performed. The quantitative solute distributions and diffusion matrix are obtained in both solid and liquid phases

  8. Strengthening behavior of beta phase in lamellar microstructure of TiAl alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hanliang; Seo, D. Y.; Maruyama, K.

    2010-01-01

    β phase can be introduced to TiAl alloys by the additions of β stabilizing elements such as Cr, Nb, W, and Mo. The β phase has a body-centered cubic lattice structure and is softer than the α2 and γ phases in TiAl alloys at elevated temperatures, and hence is thought to have a detrimental effect on creep strength. However, fine β precipitates can be formed at lamellar interfaces by proper heat treatment conditions and the β interfacial precipitate improves the creep resistance of fully lamellar TiAl alloys, since the phase interface of γ/β retards the motion of dislocations during creep. This paper reviews recent research on high-temperature strengthening behavior of the β phase in fully lamellar TiAl alloys.

  9. Phase transformations in the B2 phase of Co-rich Co-Al binary alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niitsu, K.; Omori, T.; Nagasako, M.; Oikawa, K.; Kainuma, R.; Ishida, K.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Bainitic transformation and a martensite-like structure from B2-CoAl were observed depending on quenching rate. → The phase separation into the metastable A2 + B2 structure was found in the as-quenched B2-CoAl. → The two-phase structure of A2 and B2 was found to show some coercive force after aging under a magnetic field. - Abstract: Phase transformations in the β (B2) phase of Co-21 and -23 at.% Al alloys were examined using transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. The microstructures obtained from as-quenched specimens were found to be strongly affected by the quenching condition. While relatively thick sheet-specimens with a lower quenching rate showed bainitic plate precipitates with a fcc structure, a martensite-like structure was observed by optical microscopy in relatively thin specimens with a higher quenching rate. Regardless of the quenching condition, a spinodal-like microstructure composed of A2 and B2 phases was also detected and the A2 phase changed to a metastable hcp phase during further aging.

  10. Phase-Field simulation of phase decomposition in Fe-Cr-Co alloy under an external magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Toshiyuki; Onodera, Hidehiro

    2004-07-01

    Phase decomposition during isothermal aging of a Fe-Cr-Co ternary alloy under an external magnetic field is simulated based on the phase-field method. In this simulation, since the Gibbs energy available from the thermodynamic CALPHAD database of the equilibrium phase diagram is employed as a chemical free energy, the present calculation provides the quantitative microstructure changes directly linked to the phase diagram. The simulated microstructure evolution demonstrates that the lamella like microstructure elongated along the external magnetic field is evolved with the progress of aging. The morphological and temporal developments of the simulated microstructures are in good agreement with experimental results that have been obtained for this alloy system.

  11. Study on the deterioration process of a chromium-free conversion coating on AZ91D magnesium alloy in NaCl solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Ming; Wu Shusen; An Ping; Luo Jirong

    2006-01-01

    The morphology of a chromium-free conversion coating for AZ91D magnesium alloy was observed with an Atomic Force Microscopy. The results showed the uniform conversion coating has a relatively smooth appearance with shallow valleys. The EDX results indicated that the compositions of the coating were mainly compounds of Mg, Al, Mn, P, Ca and O. The XRD result showed that the coating contained amorphous materials and a small quantity of crystalline compound. The pitting product of the coating in NaCl water solution mainly composed of Mg, Cl, Mn, P, Ca and O. The corrosion behavior of the samples in NaCl solution was also studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), which was characterized by one capacitive loop and one inductive loop. Based upon study on both a mathematical model for Faradic admittance of coating in NaCl solution and EIS, it could be considered that the inductive loop was caused by the adsorption of Cl anion and the appearance of pitting corrosion. A degradation mechanism of the coating in NaCl solution is set forth: dissolution velocity of the Cl - adsorption regions of the coating is higher than those non-adsorption regions, for Cl - anions are selective adsorption at some regions of coating surface. When the adsorption regions of coating layer are penetrated by dissolution, the pitting comes into being. The degradation mechanism of conversion coating and the mathematical model are consistent with the EIS results, polarization measurement results and coating's corrosion test results

  12. Microstructure of oxide dispersion strengthened Eurofer and iron-chromium alloys investigated by means of small-angle neutron scattering and transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heintze, C. [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Bergner, F., E-mail: f.bergner@fzd.de [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Ulbricht, A. [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Hernandez-Mayoral, M. [CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Keiderling, U. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Hahn-Meitner Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Lindau, R. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Weissgaerber, T. [Fraunhofer Institute IFAM-Dresden, Winterbergstr. 28, 01277 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-09-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthening of ferritic/martensitic chromium steels is a promising route for the extension of the range of operation temperatures for nuclear applications. The investigation of dedicated model alloys is an important means in order to separate individual effects contributing to the mechanical behaviour under irradiation and to improve mechanistic understanding. A powder metallurgy route based on spark plasma sintering was applied to fabricate oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe9Cr model materials. These materials along with Eurofer97 and ODS-Eurofer were investigated by means of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and TEM. For Fe9Cr-0.6 wt.%Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TEM results indicate a peak radius of the size distribution of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles of 4.2 nm with radii ranging up to 15 nm, and a volume fraction of 0.7%, whereas SANS indicates a peak radius of 3.8 nm and a volume fraction of 0.6%. It was found that the non-ODS Fe9Cr and Eurofer97 are suitable reference materials for ODS-Fe9Cr and ODS-Eurofer, respectively, and that the ODS-Fe9Cr variants are suitable model materials for the separated investigation of irradiation-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} particle interaction effects.

  13. Cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy causes metal accumulation and metallothionein up-regulation in rat liver and kidney

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Stig Storgaard; Danscher, Gorm; Stoltenberg, Meredin

    2007-01-01

    in liver and kidney. We found that metal ions are liberated from CoCrMo alloys and suggest that they are released by dissolucytosis, a process where macrophages causes the metallic surface to release metal ions. Animals with intramuscular implants accumulated metal in liver and kidney and metallohionein I....../II were elevated in liver tissue. The present data do not tell whether kidney and liver are the primary target organs or what possible toxicological effect the different metal ions might have, but they show that metal ions are liberated from CoCrMo alloys that are not subjected to mechanical wear...... and that they accumulate in liver and kidney tissue. That the liberated metal ions affect the tissues is supported by an up-regulation of the detoxifying/pacifying metalloprotein I/II in the liver. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Dec...

  14. Effect of Sn addition on phases stability and mechanical properties of aged Ti-10Mo Alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, F.F.; Lopes, E.S.N.; Cremasco, A.; Contieri, R.J.; Mello, M.G.; Caram, R.

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays there is considerable effort in order to develop new titanium alloys using non-toxic elements such as Mo and Sn. This work deals with the alloys Ti-Mo-Sn. The samples were melted, homogenized and hot swaged. Afterwards they were solubilized and water quenched. The alloys were also aged at several temperatures Characterization involved determination of Young's modulus, hardness, X-ray diffraction and optical microscopy. The X-ray diffraction indicated the presence of athermal and isothermal ω phase for Ti-10Mo alloy. One also evidenced that the Vickers hardness varies with the temperature and the time of aging heat treatment. (author)

  15. Precipitation of the sigma-phase in Mo-Re alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freze, N.I.; Levitskij, A.D.; Tyumentsev, A.N.; Korotaev, A.D.

    1975-01-01

    Disintegration processes in thin foils and replicas of alloys Mo+(52 - 56) wpc Re and Mo+(52 - 56)% Re+(0.05 - 0.10)% Fe wpc were studied by electronic microscopy. Alloying with iron was conducted to determine the effect of iron atom segregations at the grain boundaries on separation of the sigma-phase in these regions. Since the nature of disintegration in all alloys was identical, the experimental data were considered on the example of alloy Mo + 54 wpc Re. The laminated specimens of 1 - 2 mm in thickness subjected to cold rolling with subsequent tempering at T = 1100 deg C for 15 min were characterized by intensive disintegration. As a result finelydispersed laminated sigma-phase uniformly distributed throughout the entire volume of the material was formed. The non-deformed specimens did not show separation of the sigma-phase. As a result of separation of the finely-dispersed sigma-phase plasticity of the alloys was increased. So that a foil of Δh = 0.2 mm in thickness can be produced by cold rolling of the laminated specimens without intermediate annealing. By changing the initial state of the specimens and temperature of annealing dispersity and spatial distribution of the sigma-phase may be substantially modified. It provides for considerably increasing plasticity of the two-phase alloys. During separation of the sigma-phase hardness of the deformed specimens becomes greater. Therefore the low-temperature disintegration accompanied by separation of the sigma-phase may be employed for disperse strengthening of the Mo-Re alloys. The refractory properties of such alloye will not be high, since it is coagulated the finely-dispersed segregations of the sigma-phase even at T > 1100 deg C

  16. Effects of phase constitution of Zr-Nb alloys on their magnetic susceptibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Naoyuki; Tanaka, Yuko; Suyalatu; Kondo, Ryota; Doi, Hisashi; Tsutsumi, Yusuke; Hanawa, Takao

    2009-01-01

    The magnetic susceptibilities and microstructures of Zr-Nb binary alloys were investigated to develop a new metallic biomaterial with a low magnetic susceptibility for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The magnetic susceptibility was measured with a magnetic susceptibility balance, and the microstructure was evaluated with an X-ray diffractometer (XRD), an optical microscope (OM), and a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Zr-Nb alloys as-cast showed a minimum value of magnetic susceptibility between 3 and 9 mass% Nb, and the value abruptly increased up to 20 mass% Nb, followed by a gradual increase with the increase of the Nb content. XRD, OM, and TEM revealed that the minimum value of the susceptibility was closely related to the appearance of the athermal ω phase in the β phase. Since the magnetic susceptibility of Zr-3Nb alloy consisting of an α' phase was as low as that of Zr-9Nb alloy consisting of the β and ω phases, that of the ω phase was lower than that of the α' and β phases. When Zr-16Nb alloy was heat-treated, the isothermal ω phase appeared, and, simultaneously, the magnetic susceptibility decreased. Therefore, the ω phase contributes to the decrease of the magnetic susceptibility, independently of the formation process of the ω phase. The magnetic susceptibility of the Zr-3Nb alloy as-cast was almost one-third that of Ti-6Al-4V alloy, which is commonly used for medical implant devices. Zr-Nb alloys are useful for medical devices used under MRI. (author)

  17. Formation of soft magnetic high entropy amorphous alloys composites containing in situ solid solution phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ran; Sun, Huan; Chen, Chen; Tao, Juan; Li, Fushan

    2018-03-01

    Fe-Co-Ni-Si-B high entropy amorphous alloys composites (HEAACs), which containing high entropy solid solution phase in amorphous matrix, show good soft magnetic properties and bending ductility even in optimal annealed state, were successfully developed by melt spinning method. The crystallization phase of the HEAACs is solid solution phase with body centered cubic (BCC) structure instead of brittle intermetallic phase. In addition, the BCC phase can transformed into face centered cubic (FCC) phase with temperature rise. Accordingly, Fe-Co-Ni-Si-B high entropy alloys (HEAs) with FCC structure and a small amount of BCC phase was prepared by copper mold casting method. The HEAs exhibit high yield strength (about 1200 MPa) and good plastic strain (about 18%). Meanwhile, soft magnetic characteristics of the HEAs are largely reserved from HEAACs. This work provides a new strategy to overcome the annealing induced brittleness of amorphous alloys and design new advanced materials with excellent comprehensive properties.

  18. Martensitic phase transformation in shape-memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golestaneh, A.A.

    1979-01-01

    Isothermal studies are described of the shape-recovery phenomenon, stress-strain behavior, electrical resistivity and thermo-electric power associated with the martensite-parent phase reaction in the Ni-Ti shape-memory alloys. The energy-balance equation that links the reaction kinetics with the strain energy change during the cooling-deforming and heating cycle is analyzed. The strain range in which the Clausius-Clapeyron equation satisfactorily describes this reaction is determined. A large change in the Young's modulus of the specimen is found to be associated with the M → P reaction. A hysteresis loop in the resistivity-temperature plot is found and related to the anomaly in the athermal resistivity changes during cyclic M → P → M transformation. An explanation for the resistivity anomaly is offered. The M structure is found to be electrically negative relative to the P structure. A thermal emf of greater than or equal to 0.12 mV is found at the M-P interface

  19. Phase transformations at continuous cooling in VT6ch and VT23 alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyasotskaya, V.S.; Lyasotskij, I.V.; Meshcheryakov, V.N.; Ravdonikas, N.Yu.; Nadtochij, S.I.; Faustov, N.N.

    1986-01-01

    Phase transformations at continuous cooling at β-region temperatures in VT6ch and VT23 alloys are studied. Nonequilibrium phases: α', α'', (ω), βsub(e), αsub(e), are shown to be formed in these alloys depending on cooling composition and rate. It is established that at cooling at temperatures below Ar 3 in alloys studied high-temperature α-phase is formed, and at temperatures below 650 deg C - more dispersed low-temperature α-phase precipitating from β-solution volumes mostly enriched by alloying elements according to the intermediate mechanism. Diagrams of anisothermal β-phase decomposition for VT6ch and VT23 alloys are plotted in coincidence with the results of thermal, thermodifferential, metallographic and X-ray diffraction analyses; lines of martensite transformation, lines of high- and low-temperature α-phase formation are pointed on the diagrams. Besides, for VT23 alloy a line for (ω)-phase formation is pointed

  20. Phase transformation and precipitation in aged Ti-Ni-Hf high-temperature shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, X.L.; Cai, W.; Zheng, Y.F.; Zhao, L.C.

    2006-01-01

    More attention has been paid to ternary Ti-Ni-Hf high-temperature shape memory alloys (SMAs) due to their high phase transformation temperatures, good thermal stability and low cost. However, the Ti-Ni-Hf alloys have been found to have low ductility and only about 3% shape memory effect and these have hampered their applications. It is well known that there are three methods to improve the shape memory properties of high-temperature SMAs: (a) cold rolling + annealing; (b) adding another element to the alloy; (c) aging. These methods are not suitable to improve the properties of Ti-Ni-Hf alloys. In this paper, a method of conditioning Ni-rich Ti-Ni-Hf alloys as high-temperature SMAs by aging is presented. For Ni-rich Ti 80-x Ni x Hf 20 alloys (numbers indicate at.%) the phase transformation temperatures are on average increased by more than 100 K by aging at 823 K for 2 h. Especially for those alloys with Ni contents less than 50.6 at.%, the martensitic transformation start temperatures (M s ) are higher than 473 K after aging. Transmission electron microscopy shows the presence of (Ti + Hf) 3 Ni 4 precipitates after aging. Compared with the precipitation of Ti 3 Ni 4 particles in Ni-rich Ti-Ni alloys, the precipitation of (Ti + Hf) 3 Ni 4 particles in Ni-rich Ti-Ni-Hf alloys needs higher temperatures and longer times

  1. Microtwin formation in the α phase of duplex titanium alloys affected by strain rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Yi-Hsiang; Wu, Shu-Ming; Kao, Fang-Hsin; Wang, Shing-Hoa; Yang, Jer-Ren; Yang, Chia-Chih; Chiou, Chuan-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The long and dense twins in α phase of SP700 alloy occurring at lower strain rates promote a good ductility. → The deformation in SP700 alloy changed to micro twins-controlled mechanism in α as the strain rate decreases. → The material has time to redistribute the deformed strain between α and β as the strain rate decreases. - Abstract: The effect of tensile strain rate on deformation microstructure was investigated in Ti-6-4 (Ti-6Al-4V) and SP700 (Ti-4.5Al-3V-2Mo-2Fe) of the duplex titanium alloys. Below a strain rate of 10 -2 s -1 , Ti-6-4 alloy had a higher ultimate tensile strength than SP700 alloy. However, the yield strength of SP700 was consistently greater than Ti-6-4 at different strain rates. The ductility of SP700 alloy associated with twin formation (especially at the slow strain rate of 10 -4 s -1 ), always exceeded that of Ti-6-4 alloy at different strain rates. It is caused by a large quantity of deformation twins took place in the α phase of SP700 due to the lower stacking fault energy by the β stabilizer of molybdenum alloying. In addition, the local deformation more was imposed on the α grains from the surrounding β-rich grains by redistributing strain as the strain rate decreased in SP700 duplex alloy.

  2. Investigations on the binary systems of boron with chromium, columbium, nickel, and thorium, including a discussion of the Phase TiB in the titanium-boron system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, L H; Kiessling, R

    1950-01-01

    Investigations on the binary systems chromium-, columbium-, nickel-, and thorium-boron are reported. The titanium-boron system is discussed, and it is shown that the phase TiB, previously assumed to have zincblende structure, probably has a face-centered titanium lattice with boron in the octahedral interstices. In the chromium-boron system, the structure of the eta phase has been determined. It has the composition Cr/sub 3/B/sub 4/ and is isomorphous with Ta/sub 3/B/sub 4/ and Mn/sub 3/B/sub 4/. Some data for the delta phase are also given. For the columbium-boron system, a phase analysis has been carried out. The structures of three of the intermediary phases, CbB, Cb/sub 3/B/sub 2/, and CbB/sub 2/ (with extended homogeneity range), have been determined. They are isomorphous with corresponding phases of the tantalum-boron system. A brief phase analysis of the nickel-boron system showed the existence of a phase with lower boron content than Ni/sub 2/B, which has not been previously reported. In the thorium-boron system a new phase, probably with a complicated structure, was found with a boron content of about 50 at. %.

  3. Near Net Shape Fabrication Technology for Shape Memory Alloy Components, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This STTR Phase I effort proposes to develop an innovative, affordable processing route for larger-sized shape memory alloy (SMA) components. Despite significant...

  4. Influence of pressure on the solid state phase transformation of Cu–Al–Bi alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Li; Jian-Hua, Liu; Wen-Kui, Wang; Ri-Ping, Liu

    2010-01-01

    The solid state phase transformation of Cu-Al-Bi alloy under high pressure was investigated by x-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Experimental results show that the initial crystalline phase in the Cu-Al-Bi alloy annealed at 750 °C under the pressures in the range of 0–6 GPa is α-Cu solid solution (named as α-Cu phase below), and high pressure has a great influence on the crystallisation process of the Cu-Al-Bi alloy. The grain size of the α-Cu phase decreases with increasing pressure as the pressure is below about 3 GPa, and then increases (P > 3 GPa). The mechanism for the effects of high pressure on the crystallisation process of the alloy has been discussed. (condensed matter: structure, thermal and mechanical properties)

  5. Oxidation kinetics of a Pb-64 at.% In single-phase alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, M.X.; Chang, Y.A.; Marcotte, V.C.

    1991-01-01

    The solid-state oxidation kinetics of a Pb-64 at.% IN(50 wt.%) single-phase alloy were studied from room temperature to 150C using AES (Auger Electron Spectroscopy) depth profiling technique. The general oxidation behavior of this alloy is different from that of a Pb-3 at.% In alloy but similar to that of a Pb-30 at.% In alloy. The oxide formed on this alloy is almost pure In oxide (In 2 O 3 ) with the possible existence of some In suboxide near the oxide/alloy interface. At room temperature, oxidation of the alloy follows a direct logarithmic law, and the results can be described by the model proposed previously by Zhang, Chang, and Marcotte. At temperatures higher than 75C, rapid oxidation occurred initially followed by a slower parabolic oxidation at longer time. These data were described quantitatively by the model which assumes the existence of short-circuit diffusion in addition to lattice diffusion in the oxide as proposed by Smeltzer, Haering, and Kirkaldy. The effects of alloy composition in the oxidation kinetics of (pb, In) alloy are also examined by comparing the data for Pb-3, 30, and 64 at.% In alloys

  6. The study on binary Mg-Co hydrogen storage alloys with BCC phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yao; Tsushio, Yoshinori; Enoki, Hirotoshi; Akiba, Etsuo

    2005-01-01

    Novel Mg-Co binary alloys were successfully synthesized by mechanical alloying. These alloys were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron micrograph (TEM), pressure-composition-isotherms measurements (P-C-T) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Both XRD Rietveld analysis and TEM observation confirmed that these binary alloys contain BCC phase and that the BCC phase existed in the range from 37 to 80 at.% Co. The lattice parameter of the BCC phase increased with the increase of the Co content from 37 to 50 at.%. When the Co content reached 50 at.%, the lattice parameter reached a maximum value, and then turned to decrease gradually with further increase of the Co content. Most of Mg-Co BCC alloys absorbed hydrogen at 373 K under 6 MPa of hydrogen pressure. The Mg 60 Co 40 alloy showed the highest hydrogen absorption capacity, about 2.7 mass% hydrogen. However, all the Mg-Co alloys studied did not desorb hydrogen at 373 K. By means of DSC measurements and in situ XRD analysis, it was found that under 4 MPa hydrogen atmosphere, Mg 50 Co 50 alloy transformed from BCC solid solution to Mg 2 CoH 5 tetragonal hydride at 413 K

  7. Interrelation of material microstructure, ultrasonic factors, and fracture toughness of two phase titanium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vary, A.; Hull, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    The pivotal role of an alpha-beta phase microstructure in governing fracture toughness in a titanium alloy, Ti-662, is demonstrated. The interrelation of microstructure and fracture toughness is demonstrated using ultrasonic measurement techniques originally developed for nondestructive evaluation and material property characterization. It is shown that the findings determined from ultrasonic measurements agree with conclusions based on metallurgical, metallographic, and fractographic observations concerning the importance of alpha-beta morphology in controlling fracture toughness in two phase titanium alloys.

  8. Scanning Precession Electron Diffraction Study of 2xxx Series Aluminium Alloys Exhibiting Several Coexisting Strengthening Phases

    OpenAIRE

    Sunde, Jonas Kristoffer

    2016-01-01

    Throughout this thesis, scanning precession electron diffraction is applied to heat-treated Al-Cu-Li and Al-Mg-Cu-Ag alloys, shedding light on the distribution of phases present and the complex interplay between these microstructural features. The employed technique yielded high quality data sets, which through subsequent data processing enabled a detailed phase mapping of these multi-component Al alloys. Among the main results presented, are virtual dark field images highlighting all separat...

  9. Formation of the minor phase shell on the surface of hypermonotectic alloy powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, J.Z.

    2006-01-01

    The microstructure evolution in an atomized hypermonotectic alloy drop is calculated. The results indicate that the formation of the minor phase shell on the surface of the powder is due to the heterogeneous nucleation of the minor phase droplets on the atomized drop surface and the resultant diffusional transfer of solute during the liquid-liquid phase transformation

  10. Interstitial-phase precipitation in iron-base alloys: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelton, A.R.

    1982-06-01

    Recent developments have elucidated the atomistic mechanisms of precipitation of interstitial elements in simple alloy systems. However, in the more technologically important iron base alloys, interstitial phase precipitation is generally not well understood. The present experimental study was therefore designed to test the applicability of these concepts to more complex ferrous alloys. Hence, a comparative study was made of interstitial phase precipitation in ferritic Fe-Si-C and in austenitic phosphorus-containing Fe-Cr-Ni steels. These systems were subjected to a variety of quench-age thermal treatments, and the microstructural development was subsequently characterized by transmission electron microscopy

  11. The effect warming time of mechanical properties and structural phase aluminum alloy nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husna Al Hasa, M.; Anwar Muchsin

    2011-01-01

    Ferrous aluminum alloys as fuel cladding will experience the process of heat treatment above the recrystallization temperature. Temperature and time of heat treatment will affect the nature of the metal. Heating time allows will affect change in mechanical properties, thermal and structure of the metal phase. This study aims to determine the effect of time of heat treatment on mechanical properties and phase metal alloys. Testing the mechanical properties of materials, especially violence done by the method of Vickers. Observation of microstructural changes made by metallographic-optical and phase structure were analyzed Based on the x-ray diffraction patterns Elemental analysis phase alloy compounds made by EDS-SEM. Test results show the nature of violence AlFeNiMg alloy by heating at 500°C with a warm-up time 1 hour, 2 hours and 3 hours respectively decreased range 94.4 HV, 87.6 HV and 85.1 HV. The nature of violence AlFeNi alloy showed a decrease in line with the longer heating time. Metallographic-optical observations show the microstructural changes with increasing heating time. Microstructure shows the longer the heating time trend equi axial shaped grain structure of growing and the results showed a trend analyst diffraction pattern formation and phase θ α phase (FeAl3) in the alloy. (author)

  12. Synthesis Of NiCrAlC alloys by mechanical alloying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, A.K.; Pereira, J.I.; Vurobi Junior, S.; Cintho, O.M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is the synthesis of nickel alloys (NiCrAlC), which has been proposed like a economic alternative to the Stellite family Co alloys using mechanical alloying, followed by sintering heat treatment of milled material. The NiCrAlC alloys consist of a chromium carbides dispersion in a Ni 3 Al intermetallic matrix, that is easily synthesized by mechanical alloying. The use of mechanical alloying enables higher carbides sizes and distribution control in the matrix during sintering. We are also investigated the compaction of the processed materials by compressibility curves. The milling products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, and the end product was featured by conventional metallography and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), that enabled the identification of desired phases, beyond microhardness test, which has been shown comparable to alloys manufactured by fusion after heat treating. (author)

  13. Influence of Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum Alloy (ASTM F75) on Bone Ingrowth in an Experimental Animal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuchuat, Jésica; Berli, Marcelo; Maldonado, Ysaí; Decco, Oscar

    2017-12-26

    Cr-Co-Mo (ASTM F75) alloy has been used in the medical environment, but its use as a rigid barrier membrane for supporting bone augmentation therapies has not been extensively investigated. In the present study, Cr-Co-Mo membranes of different heights were placed in New Zealand white, male rabbit tibiae to assess the quality and volume of new bone formation, without the use of additional factors. Animals were euthanized at 20, 30, 40, and 60 days. Bone formation was observed in all of the cases, although the tibiae implanted with the standard membranes reached an augmentation of bone volume that agreed with the density values over the timecourse. In all cases, plasmatic exudate was found under the membrane and in contact with the new bone. Histological analysis indicated the presence of a large number of chondroblasts adjacent to the inner membrane surface in the first stages, and osteoblasts and osteocytes were observed under them. The bone formation was appositional. The Cr-Co-Mo alloy provides a scaffold with an adequate microenvironment for vertical bone volume augmentation, and the physical dimensions and disposition of the membrane itself influence the new bone formation.

  14. Influence of Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum Alloy (ASTM F75 on Bone Ingrowth in an Experimental Animal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jésica Zuchuat

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cr-Co-Mo (ASTM F75 alloy has been used in the medical environment, but its use as a rigid barrier membrane for supporting bone augmentation therapies has not been extensively investigated. In the present study, Cr-Co-Mo membranes of different heights were placed in New Zealand white, male rabbit tibiae to assess the quality and volume of new bone formation, without the use of additional factors. Animals were euthanized at 20, 30, 40, and 60 days. Bone formation was observed in all of the cases, although the tibiae implanted with the standard membranes reached an augmentation of bone volume that agreed with the density values over the timecourse. In all cases, plasmatic exudate was found under the membrane and in contact with the new bone. Histological analysis indicated the presence of a large number of chondroblasts adjacent to the inner membrane surface in the first stages, and osteoblasts and osteocytes were observed under them. The bone formation was appositional. The Cr-Co-Mo alloy provides a scaffold with an adequate microenvironment for vertical bone volume augmentation, and the physical dimensions and disposition of the membrane itself influence the new bone formation.

  15. Microstructures and Surface Stabilities of {Ni-0.4C-6Ta- xCr, 0 ≤ x ≤ 50 Wt Pct} Cast Alloys at High Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthod, Patrice

    2018-06-01

    Nickel-based cast alloys rich in chromium and reinforced by TaC carbides are potentially very interesting alloys for applications at elevated temperatures. Unfortunately, unlike cobalt-chromium and iron-chromium alloys, it is difficult to obtain exclusively TaC as primary carbides in Ni-Cr alloys. In alloys containing 30 wt pct Cr tantalum, carbides coexist with chromium carbides. The latter tend to weaken the alloy at elevated temperatures because they become rapidly spherical and then quickly lose their reinforcing effect. In this work, we attempted to stabilize TaC as a single carbide phase by testing different chromium contents in the [0, 50 wt pct] range. Six alloys containing 0.4C and 6Ta, weight contents corresponding to equivalent molar contents, were elaborated by foundry, and their as-cast microstructures were characterized. Samples of all alloys were exposed to 1127 °C and 1237 °C for 24 hours to characterize their stabilized microstructures. The surface fractions of chromium carbides and tantalum carbides were measured by image analysis, and their evolutions vs the chromium content were studied. For the chosen C and Ta contents, it appears that obtaining TaC only is possible by decreasing the chromium content to 10 wt pct. At the same time, TaC fractions are unfortunately too low because a large portion of tantalum integrates into the solid solution in the matrix. A second consequence is a critical decrease in oxidation resistance. Other possible methods to stabilize TaC as a single carbide are evocated, such as the simultaneous increase in Ta and decrease in chromium from 30 wt pct Cr.

  16. Structure and phase stability of a Pu-0.32 wt% Ga alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, D.W., E-mail: David.Wheeler@awe.co.uk; Ennaceur, S.M.; Matthews, M.B.; Roussel, P.; Bayer, P.D.

    2016-08-01

    In plutonium-gallium (Pu-Ga) alloys that have a Ga content of 0.3–0.4 wt%, their readiness to transform to α′ renders them of particular interest in efforts to understand the tenuous nature of δ phase stability. The present study is a comprehensive examination of the structure and phase stability of a cast Pu-0.32 wt% Ga alloy, the Ga content being close to the minimum amount needed to retain the δ phase to ambient temperature. The alloy was characterised in both the as-cast condition as well as following a homogenising heat treatment. The 250-h heat treatment at 450 °C was shown to achieve an apparently stable δ-Pu phase. However, the stability of the δ-Pu phase was shown to be marginal: partial transformation to α′-Pu was observed when the alloy was subjected to hydrostatic compression. Similar transformation was also apparent during metallographic preparation as well as during hardness indentation. The results provide new understanding of the nature of δ phase stability. - Highlights: • New insights into the delta phase stability of a Pu-0.32 wt% Ga alloy. • Density and DSC of as-cast alloy both show α-Pu contents of approximately 30%. • The heat-treated alloy has a largely δ-Pu structure at ambient temperature. • Heat-treated alloy susceptible to δ → α transformation during hardness indentation.

  17. Formation of metastable phases and nanocomposite structures in rapidly solidified Al-Fe alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayak, S.S.; Chang, H.J.; Kim, D.H.; Pabi, S.K.; Murty, B.S.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Structures of nanocomposites in rapidly solidified Al-Fe alloys were investigated. → Nanoquasicrystalline, amorphous and intermetallics phases coexist with α-Al. → Nanoquasicrystalline phase was observed for the first time in the dilute Al alloys. → Thermodynamic driving force plays dominant role in precipitation of Fe-rich phases. → High hardness (3.57 GPa) was observed for nanocomposite of Al-10Fe alloy. - Abstract: In the present work the structure and morphology of the phases of nanocomposites formed in rapidly solidified Al-Fe alloys were investigated in details using analytical transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Nanoquasicrystalline phases, amorphous phase and intermetallics like Al 5 Fe 2 , Al 13 F 4 coexisted with α-Al in nanocomposites of the melt spun alloys. It was seen that the Fe supersaturation in α-Al diminished with the increase in Fe content and wheel speed indicating the dominant role of the thermodynamic driving force in the precipitation of Fe-rich phases. Nanoquasicrystalline phases were observed for the first time in the dilute Al alloys like Al-2.5Fe and Al-5Fe as confirmed by high resolution TEM. High hardness (3.57 GPa) was measured in nanocomposite of Al-10Fe alloy, which was attributed to synergistic effect of solid solution strengthening due to high solute content (9.17 at.% Fe), dispersion strengthening by high volume fraction of nanoquasicrystalline phase; and Hall-Petch strengthening from finer cell size (20-30 nm) of α-Al matrix.

  18. Mechanical behaviour of δ-phase Pu-Ga alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaschner, G.C.; Stout, M.G.; Hecker, S.S.

    2007-01-01

    Paper describes a model to ensure prediction of the mechanical behaviour of gallium stabilized plutonium FCC-alloys representing the mechanical threshold strength (MSS) constitutive model based on the effect of temperature, of strain rate, of grain size and of alloy composition. One performed the comparative analysis of the design data derived by means of the elaborated mathematical techniques and of the published results of the mechanical tests of Pu-Ga system various alloys. The model is shown to be adequate to predict the tensile strength and the yield strength values [ru

  19. Investigations of binary and ternary phase change alloys for future memory applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rausch, Pascal

    2012-09-13

    The understanding of phase change materials is of great importance because it enables us to predict properties and tailor alloys which might be even better suitable to tackle challenges of future memory applications. Within this thesis two topics have been approached: on the one hand the understanding of the alloy In{sub 3}Sb{sub 1}Te{sub 2} and on the other hand the so called resistivity drift of amorphous Ge-Sn-Te phase change materials. The main topic covers an in depth discussion of the ternary alloy In{sub 3}Sb{sub 1}Te{sub 2}. At first glance, this alloy does not fit into the established concepts of phase alloys: e.g. the existence of resonant bonding in the crystalline phase is not obvious and the number of p-electrons is very low compared to other phase change alloys. Furthermore amorphous phase change alloys with high indium content are usually not discussed in literature, an exception being the recent work by Spreafico et al. on InGeTe{sub 2}. For the first time a complete description of In{sub 3}Sb{sub 1}Te{sub 2} alloy is given in this work for the crystalline phase, amorphous phase and crystallization process. In addition comparisons are drawn to typical phase change materials like Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5}/GeTe or prototype systems like AgInTe{sub 2} and InTe. The second topic of this thesis deals with the issue of resistivity drift, i.e. the increase of resistivity of amorphous phase change alloys with aging. This drift effect greatly hampers the introduction of multilevel phase change memory devices into the market. Recently a systematic decrease of drift coefficient with stoichiometry has been observed in our group going from GeTe over Ge{sub 3}Sn{sub 1}Te{sub 4} to Ge{sub 2}Sn{sub 2}Te{sub 4}. These alloys are investigated with respect to constraint theory.

  20. Stress-induced phase transformation and room temperature aging in Ti-Nb-Fe alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, S.; Schaffer, J.E. [Fort Wayne Metals Research Products Corp, 9609 Ardmore Ave., Fort Wayne, IN 46809 (United States); Ren, Y. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2017-01-05

    Room temperature deformation behavior of Ti-17Nb-1Fe and Ti-17Nb-2Fe alloys was studied by synchrotron X-ray diffraction and tensile testing. It was found that, after proper heat treatment, both alloys were able to recover a deformation strain of above 3.5% due to the Stress-induced Martensite (SIM) phase transformation. Higher Fe content increased the beta phase stability and onset stress for SIM transformation. A strong {110}{sub β} texture was produced in Ti-17Nb-2Fe compared to the {210}{sub β} texture that was observed in Ti-17Nb-1Fe. Room temperature aging was observed in both alloys, where the formation of the omega phase increased the yield strength (also SIM onset stress), and decreased the ductility and strain recovery. Other metastable beta Ti alloys may show a similar aging response and this should draw the attention of materials design engineers.

  1. Phase composition and microhardness of rapidly quenched Al-Fe alloys after high pressure torsion deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tcherdyntsev, V.V.; Kaloshkin, S.D.; Gunderov, D.V.; Afonina, E.A.; Brodova, I.G.; Stolyarov, V.V.; Baldokhin, Yu.V.; Shelekhov, E.V.; Tomilin, I.A

    2004-07-15

    Aluminium-based Al-Fe alloys with Fe content of 2, 8, and 10 wt.% were prepared by rapid quenching (RQ) from the melt at a rate of 10{sup 6} K/s. Structure of the alloys was examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Moessbauer spectroscopy. Phase transformations of RQ alloys by high pressure torsion (HPT) were studied. Dependences of phase composition on the intensity of HPT were investigated. Microhardness measurements of HPT alloys show a considerable structural heterogeneity of specimens, the dependence of microhardness on the radius of the pills was found out. Phase composition and microhardness during the heating were investigated. At the initial step of heating (120-150 deg. C), an increase in microhardness was observed, whereas further heating leads to a decrease in the microhardness.

  2. Atomic bonding of precipitate and phase transformation of Al-Cu-Mg alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yingjun; Hou Xianhua; Mo Qifeng; Wei Chengyang; Qin Xiaobing

    2007-01-01

    Atomic bonding of the GPB zone and S'' phase of Al-Cu-Mg alloys in early aging stage are calculated using the empirical electron theory (EET) in solid. The results show that not only the covalence bond-network is very strong in GPB zone, but the whole covalence bond energy of S'' phase is also very large, and all the primary bond-net framework of these precipitates can consolidate the matrix of alloy. Phase transformation from GPB zone to S'' phase is explained reasonably based on atomic bonding and total binding capacity of Al and Cu atoms in these precipitates

  3. Ultra-precision machining induced phase decomposition at surface of Zn-Al based alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To, S.; Zhu, Y.H.; Lee, W.B.

    2006-01-01

    The microstructural changes and phase transformation of an ultra-precision machined Zn-Al based alloy were examined using X-ray diffraction and back-scattered electron microscopy techniques. Decomposition of the Zn-rich η phase and the related changes in crystal orientation was detected at the surface of the ultra-precision machined alloy specimen. The effects of the machining parameters, such as cutting speed and depth of cut, on the phase decomposition were discussed in comparison with the tensile and rolling induced microstrucutural changes and phase decomposition

  4. TEM characterisation of stress corrosion cracks in nickel based alloys: effect of chromium content and chemistry of environment; Caracterisation par MET de fissures de corrosion sous contrainte d'alliages a base de nickel: influence de la teneur en chrome et de la chimie du milieu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delabrouille, F

    2004-11-15

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is a damaging mode of alloys used in pressurized water reactors, particularly of nickel based alloys constituting the vapour generator tubes. Cracks appear on both primary and secondary sides of the tubes, and more frequently in locations where the environment is not well defined. SCC sensitivity of nickel based alloys depends of their chromium content, which lead to the replacement of alloy 600 (15 % Cr) by alloy 690 (30 % Cr) but this phenomenon is not yet very well understood. The goal of this thesis is two fold: i) observe the effect of chromium content on corrosion and ii) characterize the effect of environment on the damaging process of GV tubes. For this purpose, one industrial tube and several synthetic alloys - with controlled chromium content - have been studied. Various characterisation techniques were used to study the corrosion products on the surface and within the SCC cracks: SIMS; TEM - FEG: thin foil preparation, HAADF, EELS, EDX. The effect of chromium content and surface preparation on the generalised corrosion was evidenced for synthetic alloys. Moreover, we observed the penetration of oxygen along triple junctions of grain boundaries few micrometers under the free surface. SCC tests show the positive effect of chromium for contents varying from 5 to 30 % wt. Plastic deformation induces a modification of the structure, and thus of the protective character, of the internal chromium rich oxide layer. SCC cracks which developed in different chemical environments were characterised by TEM. The oxides which are formed within the cracks are different from what is observed on the free surface, which reveals a modification of medium and electrochemical conditions in the crack. Finally we were able to evidence some structural characteristics of the corrosion products (in the cracks and on the surface) which turn to be a signature of the chemical environment. (author)

  5. TEM characterisation of stress corrosion cracks in nickel based alloys: effect of chromium content and chemistry of environment; Caracterisation par MET de fissures de corrosion sous contrainte d'alliages a base de nickel: influence de la teneur en chrome et de la chimie du milieu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delabrouille, F

    2004-11-15

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is a damaging mode of alloys used in pressurized water reactors, particularly of nickel based alloys constituting the vapour generator tubes. Cracks appear on both primary and secondary sides of the tubes, and more frequently in locations where the environment is not well defined. SCC sensitivity of nickel based alloys depends of their chromium content, which lead to the replacement of alloy 600 (15 % Cr) by alloy 690 (30 % Cr) but this phenomenon is not yet very well understood. The goal of this thesis is two fold: i) observe the effect of chromium content on corrosion and ii) characterize the effect of environment on the damaging process of GV tubes. For this purpose, one industrial tube and several synthetic alloys - with controlled chromium content - have been studied. Various characterisation techniques were used to study the corrosion products on the surface and within the SCC cracks: SIMS; TEM - FEG: thin foil preparation, HAADF, EELS, EDX. The effect of chromium content and surface preparation on the generalised corrosion was evidenced for synthetic alloys. Moreover, we observed the penetration of oxygen along triple junctions of grain boundaries few micrometers under the free surface. SCC tests show the positive effect of chromium for contents varying from 5 to 30 % wt. Plastic deformation induces a modification of the structure, and thus of the protective character, of the internal chromium rich oxide layer. SCC cracks which developed in different chemical environments were characterised by TEM. The oxides which are formed within the cracks are different from what is observed on the free surface, which reveals a modification of medium and electrochemical conditions in the crack. Finally we were able to evidence some structural characteristics of the corrosion products (in the cracks and on the surface) which turn to be a signature of the chemical environment. (author)

  6. Phase formation and crystallization behavior of melt spun Sm-Fe-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shield, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    The phase formation and microstructures of Sm-Fe alloys have been investigated at Sm levels of 11 and 17 atomic percent and with alloying additions of Ti and C. At lower Sm content, virtually phase pure SmFe 7 formed, while higher Sm content resulted in the formation of SmFe 7 , SmFe 2 and amorphous phases. The addition of Ti and C resulted in greater stability and a larger volume fraction of the amorphous phase. The binary Sm-Fe alloys at both Sm levels had tremendously variable microstructures, with large discrepancies in grain size and phase distribution from region to region. The addition of Ti and C tended to result in a more homogeneous microstructure, as well as a refinement in the microstructural scale. (orig.)

  7. Corrosion of low alloy steel containing 0.5% chromium in supercritical CO2-saturated brine and water-saturated supercritical CO2 environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Liang; Gao, Kewei; Li, Qian

    2018-05-01

    The corrosion behavior of P110 low-Cr alloy steel in supercritical CO2-saturated brine (aqueous phase) and water-saturated supercritical CO2 (SC CO2 phase) was investigated. The results show that P110 steel primarily suffered general corrosion in the aqueous phase, while severe localized corrosion occurred in the SC CO2 phase. The formation of corrosion product scale on P110 steel in the aqueous phase divided into three stages: formation of the initial corrosion layer containing amorphous Cr(OH)3, FeCO3 and a small amount of Fe3C; transformation of initial corrosion layer to mixed layer, which consisted of FeCO3 and a small amount of Cr(OH)3 and Fe3C; growth and dissolution of the mixed layer. Finally, only a single mixed layer covered on the steel in the aqueous phase. However, the scale formed in SC CO2 phase consisted of two layers: the inner mixed layer and the dense outer FeCO3 crystalline layer.

  8. Decomposition of the γ phase in as-cast and quenched U–Zr alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irukuvarghula, S., E-mail: sandeep.irukuvarghula@manchester.ac.uk [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station (United States); School of Materials, University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Ahn, Sangjoon [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station (United States); Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, UNIST (Korea, Republic of); McDeavitt, S.M. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station (United States)

    2016-05-15

    An investigation of the decomposition of the high temperature γ phase in as-cast and quenched U–Zr alloys was conducted. Differential scanning calorimetry data clearly showed δ⇌γ transformations in alloys with <10 wt% Zr while XRD data did not contain any peaks which uniquely identify it's presence. Since δ phase forms via ω transformation, a comparison of the theoretical diffraction patterns for ω and δ revealed that the intensities of the peaks which uniquely identify the existence of δ when α-U is present, were either very weak, or were zero in ω, suggesting that the ambiguity can be explained if the phase present in these alloys is ω as opposed to δ. Our data are consistent with the presence of δ and ω in as-cast and quenched U–50Zr alloy, respectively, and (α + ω) in rest of the as-cast and quenched alloys. Based on the experimental data, the transformation sequence from γ phase in U–Zr alloys is proposed.

  9. Phase formation in Mg-Sn-Si and Mg-Sn-Si-Ca alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlov, A.; Groebner, J. [Institute of Metallurgy, Clausthal University of Technology, Robert-Koch-Str. 42, D-38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Schmid-Fetzer, R., E-mail: schmid-fetzer@tu-clausthal.de [Institute of Metallurgy, Clausthal University of Technology, Robert-Koch-Str. 42, D-38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)

    2011-02-17

    Research highlights: > The solidification paths of ternary and quaternary alloys are analyzed in detail, using the tool of thermodynamic calculations. > The precipitation sequence of phases and their amounts compare well with the microstructure of alloys. > The most efficient comparison to the experimental thermal analysis data is done by calculation of the enthalpy variation with temperature. > The viability of a procedure for the selection of multicomponent key samples is demonstrated for the development of the Mg-Ca-Si-Sn phase diagram. - Abstract: Experimental work is done and combined with the Calphad method to generate a consistent thermodynamic description of the Mg-Ca-Si-Sn quaternary system, validated for Mg-rich alloys. The viability of a procedure for the selection of multicomponent key samples is demonstrated for this multicomponent system. Dedicated thermal analysis with DTA/DSC on sealed samples is performed and the microstructure of slowly solidified alloys is analyzed using SEM/EDX. The thermodynamic description and phase diagram of the ternary Mg-Si-Sn system, developed in detail also in this work, deviates significantly from a previous literature proposal. The phase formation in ternary and quaternary alloys is analyzed using the tool of thermodynamic equilibrium and Scheil calculations for the solidification paths and compared with present experimental data. The significant ternary/quaternary solid solubilities of pertinent intermetallic phases are quantitatively introduced in the quaternary Mg-Ca-Si-Sn phase diagram and validated by experimental data.

  10. Specification for corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel bare and composite metal cored and stranded arc welding electrodes and welding rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    This specification prescribes requirements for corrosion or heat resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel electrodes and welding rods. These electrodes and welding rods are normally used for arc welding and include those alloy steels designated as corrosion or heat-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steels, in which chromium exceeds 4.0 percent and nickel does not exceed 50.0 percent

  11. Interaction of tantalum, chromium, and phosphorus at 1070 K: Phase diagram and structural chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomnytska, Ya. [Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, Kyryla and Mefodiya Street 6, UA-79005 Lviv (Ukraine); Babizhetskyy, V., E-mail: v.babizhetskyy@googlemail.com [Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, Kyryla and Mefodiya Street 6, UA-79005 Lviv (Ukraine); Oliynyk, A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2G2 (Canada); Toma, O. [Laboratory MOLTECH – Anjou, UMR-CNRS 6200, University of Angers, 49045 Angers (France); Dzevenko, M. [Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, Kyryla and Mefodiya Street 6, UA-79005 Lviv (Ukraine); Mar, A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2G2 (Canada)

    2016-03-15

    Solid-state phase equilibria have been established in the Ta–Cr–P system in the region of 0–67 at% P at 1070 K through powder X-ray diffraction analysis. Mutual substitution of Ta and Cr in binary phosphides gives rise to significant homogeneity ranges in Ta{sub 1.00–0.66}Cr{sub 0–0.34}P (NbAs-type; a=3.332(3)–3.1366(3) Å, c=11.386(4)–11.364(2) Å), Ta{sub 3.0–2.1}Cr{sub 0–0.9}P (Ti{sub 3}P-type, a=10.156(2)–9.9992(2) Å, c=5.015(1)–4.956(2) Å), and Cr{sub 3.0–2.4}Ta{sub 0–0.6}P (Ni{sub 3}P-type, a=9.186(5)–9.217(4) Å, c=4.557(3)–4.5911(3) Å). A limited homogeneity range is found in the ternary phase Ta{sub 1.0–0.8}Cr{sub 1.0–1.2}P (TiNiSi-type, a=6.2344(5)–6.141(2) Å, b=3.5034(3)–3.3769(6) Å, c=7.3769(6)–7.357(2) Å). The OsGe{sub 2}-type structures (space group C2/m) of a new P-rich compound, Ta{sub 0.92(2)}Cr{sub 0.08(2)}P{sub 2} (a=8.8586(3) Å, b=3.2670(2) Å, c=7.4871(2) Å, β=119.315(2)°) as well as of the Ti-containing analogue Ta{sub 0.93(3)}Ti{sub 0.07(3)}P{sub 2} (a=8.8592(5) Å, b=3.2663(3) Å, c=7.4870(5) Å, β=119.309(2)°) were refined from powder X-ray diffraction data. - Graphical abstract: Solid-state phase equilibria have been established in the Ta–Cr–P system in the region of 0–67 at% P at 1070 K through powder X-ray diffraction analysis. Mutual substitution of Ta and Cr in binary phosphides gives rise to significant homogeneity ranges in Ta{sub 1.00–0.66}Cr{sub 0–0.34}P, Ta{sub 3.0–2.1}Cr{sub 0–0.9}P, and Cr{sub 3.0–2.4}Ta{sub 0–0.6}P. A limited homogeneity range is found in the ternary phase Ta{sub 1.0–0.8}Cr{sub 1.0–1.2}P. The OsGe{sub 2}-type structures of a new P-rich compound, Ta{sub 0.92(2)}Cr{sub 0.08(2)}P{sub 2} as well as of the Ti-containing analogue Ta{sub 0.93(3)}Ti{sub 0.07(3)}P{sub 2} were establish from powder X-ray diffraction data. No homogeneity ranges for binary compounds Cr{sub 12}P{sub 7}, Cr{sub 2}P, Ta{sub 5}P{sub 3} were detected. - Highlights:

  12. Chromium allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M B; Johansen, J D; Menné, Torkil

    2003-01-01

    Most studies investigating chromium allergy have been performed with Cr(VI). However, real exposure to chromium from leather products includes both Cr(III) and Cr(VI). We have determined and compared the minimum elicitation threshold (MET) concentration for Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in Cr(VI)-sensitive ......Most studies investigating chromium allergy have been performed with Cr(VI). However, real exposure to chromium from leather products includes both Cr(III) and Cr(VI). We have determined and compared the minimum elicitation threshold (MET) concentration for Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in Cr......(III) was concluded to play an important role in chromium allergy, because Cr(III) and Cr(VI) were both capable of eliciting eczema at low concentrations. Rather than regarding chromium dermatitis as a result of Cr(VI) allergy alone, it may be more correct to consider it as a result of a combined Cr(III) and Cr......(VI) allergy....

  13. Phase characterisation and mechanical behaviour of Fe–B modified Cu–Zn–Al shape memory alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Kanayo Alaneme

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The microstructures, phase characteristics and mechanical behaviour of Cu–Zn–Al alloys modified with Fe, B, and Fe–B mixed micro-alloying additions has been investigated. Cu–Zn–Al alloys were produced by casting with and without the addition of the microelements (Fe, B and Fe–B. The alloys were subjected to a homogenisation – cold rolling – annealing treatment schedule, before the alloys were machined to specifications for tensile test, fracture toughness, and hardness measurement. Optical, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis were utilised for microstructural and phase characterisation of the alloys. A distinct difference in grain morphology was observed in the alloys produced – the unmodified alloy had predominantly needle-like lath martensite structure with sharp grain edges while significantly larger transverse grain size and curve edged/near elliptical grain shape was observed for the modified Cu–Zn–Al alloys. Cu–Zn with fcc structure was the predominant phase identified in the alloys while Cu–Al with bcc structure was the secondary phase observed. The hardness of the unmodified Cu–Zn–Al alloy was higher than that of the modified alloys with reductions in hardness ranging between 32.4 and 51.5%. However, the tensile strength was significantly lower than that of the modified alloy grades (28.37–52.74% increase in tensile strength was achieved with the addition of micro-alloying elements. Similarly, the percent elongation and fracture toughness (10–23% increase of the modified alloy was higher than that of the unmodified alloy grade. The modified alloy compositions mostly exhibited fracture features indicative of a fibrous micro-mechanism to crack initiation and propagation, characterised by the prevalence of dimpled rupture.

  14. Experimental patch testing with chromium-coated materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P; Jellesen, Morten S; Zachariae, Claus; Johansen, Jeanne D

    2017-06-01

    Chromium coatings on metal alloys can be decorative, and prevent corrosion and metal ion release. We recently showed that handling of a chromium-containing disc resulted in chromium deposition on the skin. To examine patch test reactivity to chromium-coated discs. We included 15 patients: 10 chromium-allergic patients, and 5 patients without chromium allergy. All were patch tested with potassium dichromate, cobalt chloride, nickel sulfate, and nine different metallic discs. The chromium-allergic patients were also patch tested with serial dilutions of potassium dichromate. Positive/weaker reactions were observed to disc B (1 of 10), disc C (1 of 10), and disc D, disc E, and disc I (4 of 10 each). As no controls reacted to any of the discs, the weak reactions indicate allergic reactions. Positive patch test reactions to 1770 ppm chromium(VI) in the serial dilutions of potassium dichromate were observed in 7 of 10 patients. When the case group was narrowed down to include only the patients with a current positive patch test reaction to potassium dichromate, elicitation of dermatitis by both chromium(III) and chromium(VI) discs was observed in 4 of 7 of patients. Many of the patients reacted to both chromium(III) and chromium(VI) surfaces. Our results indicate that both chromium(VI) and chromium(III) pose a risk to chromium-allergic patients. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Biodegradability engineering of biodegradable Mg alloys: Tailoring the electrochemical properties and microstructure of constituent phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Pil-Ryung; Han, Hyung-Seop; Yang, Gui-Fu; Kim, Yu-Chan; Hong, Ki-Ha; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Jung, Jae-Young; Ahn, Jae-Pyeong; Kim, Young-Yul; Cho, Sung-Youn; Byun, Ji Young; Lee, Kang-Sik; Yang, Seok-Jo; Seok, Hyun-Kwang

    2013-01-01

    Crystalline Mg-based alloys with a distinct reduction in hydrogen evolution were prepared through both electrochemical and microstructural engineering of the constituent phases. The addition of Zn to Mg-Ca alloy modified the corrosion potentials of two constituent phases (Mg + Mg2Ca), which prevented the formation of a galvanic circuit and achieved a comparable corrosion rate to high purity Mg. Furthermore, effective grain refinement induced by the extrusion allowed the achievement of much lower corrosion rate than high purity Mg. Animal studies confirmed the large reduction in hydrogen evolution and revealed good tissue compatibility with increased bone deposition around the newly developed Mg alloy implants. Thus, high strength Mg-Ca-Zn alloys with medically acceptable corrosion rate were developed and showed great potential for use in a new generation of biodegradable implants. PMID:23917705

  16. Sulfide phase in the Fe-Ti-S and Fe-C-Ti-S alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinochka, Ya.N.; Balakina, N.A.; Shmelev, Yu.S.

    1976-01-01

    The nature of the sulfide phases in Fe-Ti-S and Fe-C-Ti-S alloys was studied. The carbide and the sulfide phase were identified the aid of X-ray spectral microanalysis. It was established that for a small content of titanium and sulfur in ternary Fe-Ti-S alloys the solidification of the γ-solution on the boundaries of dendritic branches is accompanied, along with the precipitation of a sulfide rich in iron of the (Fe, Ti) S type where a small quantity of titanium is dissolved, by the formation of a titanium-bearing sulfide eutectic γ + TiS. The amount of the sulfide eutectic increases with the contents of titanium and sulfur until a purely eutectic alloy is formed. Both carbides and sulfides may be formed in the solidification of quaternary alloys Fe-C-Ti-S

  17. Phase diagram of nanoscale alloy particles used for vapor-liquid-solid growth of semiconductor nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Eli; Sutter, Peter

    2008-02-01

    We use transmission electron microscopy observations to establish the parts of the phase diagram of nanometer sized Au-Ge alloy drops at the tips of Ge nanowires (NWs) that determine their temperature-dependent equilibrium composition and, hence, their exchange of semiconductor material with the NWs. We find that the phase diagram of the nanoscale drop deviates significantly from that of the bulk alloy, which explains discrepancies between actual growth results and predictions on the basis of the bulk-phase equilibria. Our findings provide the basis for tailoring vapor-liquid-solid growth to achieve complex one-dimensional materials geometries.

  18. Formation of AlFeSi phase in AlSi12 alloy with Ce addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kores

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The influence of cerium addition on the solidification sequence and microstructure constituents of the Al-Si alloys with 12,6 mass % Si was examined. The solidification was analyzed by a simple thermal analysis. The microstructures were examined with conventional light and scanning electron microscopy. Ternary AlSiCe phase was formed in the Al-Si alloys with added cerium during the solidification process. AlSiCe and β-AlFeSi phases solidified together in the region that solidified the last. Cerium addition influenced on the morphology of the α-AlFeSi phase solidification.

  19. Microstructural aspects of fatigue failure of two-phase titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filip, R.; Sieniawski, J.

    1995-01-01

    Investigations conducted in this work were aimed at obtaining information on the influence of the microstructure of the two-phase titanium alloys on fatigue strength. A course of fatigue failure depends on both dispersion and a number of secondary α-phase particles. The lamellar structure is formed during controlled cooling from the temperature range of β-phase stability. The cooling rate influences the geometrical parameters of the microstructure and finally the fatigue strength of the alloy. (author). 20 refs, 12 figs, 2 tabs

  20. Density functional simulations of Sb-rich GeSbTe phase change alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Gabardi, S; Caravati, S; Bernasconi, M; Parrinello, M

    2012-01-01

    We generated models of the amorphous phase of Sb rich GeSbTe phase change alloys by quenching from the melt within density functional molecular dynamics. We considered the two compositions Ge 1Sb 1Te 1 and Ge 2Sb 4Te 5. Comparison with previous results on the most studied Ge 2Sb 2Te 5 allowed us to draw some conclusions on the dependence of the structural properties of the amorphous phase on the alloy composition. Vibrational and electronic properties were also scrutinized. Phonons at high fr...

  1. Microstructures and mechanical properties of two-phase alloys based on NbCr{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, K.C.; Kotula, P.G.; Cady, C.M.; Mauro, M.E.; Thoma, D.J.

    1999-07-01

    A two-phase, NbCrTi alloy (bcc + C15 Laves phase) has been developed using several alloy design methodologies. In efforts to understand processing-microstructure-property relationships, different processing routes were employed. The resulting microstructures and mechanical properties are discussed and compared. Plasma arc melted (PAM) samples served to establish baseline, as-cast properties. In addition, a novel processing technique, involving decomposition of a supersaturated and metastable precursor phase during hot isostatic pressing (HIP), was used to produce a refined, equilibrium two-phase microstructure. Quasi-static compression tests as a function of temperature were performed on both alloy types. Different deformation mechanisms were encountered based upon temperature and microstructure.

  2. Observation of polyamorphism in the phase change alloy Ge1Sb2Te4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, B.; Sen, S.; Cho, J.-Y.; Joo, Y.-C.; Clark, S. M.

    2012-10-01

    A high-pressure synchrotron x-ray diffraction study of the phase change alloy Ge1Sb2Te4 demonstrates the existence of a polyamorphic phase transition between the "as deposited" low density amorphous (LDA) phase and a high density amorphous (HDA) phase at ˜10 GPa. The entropy of the HDA phase is expected to be higher than that of the LDA phase resulting in a negative Clapeyron slope for this transition. These phase relations may enable the polyamorphic transition to play a role in the memory and data storage applications.

  3. Phase analysis and magnetocaloric properties of Zr substituted Gd-Si-Ge alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabahar, K.; Raj Kumar, D.M.; Manivel Raja, M.; Chandrasekaran, V.

    2011-01-01

    The structure, microstructure, magneto-structural transition and magnetocaloric effect have been investigated in series of (Gd 5-x Zr x )Si 2 Ge 2 alloys with 0≤x≥0.20. X-ray powder diffraction analysis revealed the presence of orthorhombic structure for Zr containing alloys at room temperature in contrast to the monoclinic structure observed in the parent Gd 5 Si 2 Ge 2 alloy. The microstructural studies reveal that, low Zr addition (x≤0.1) resulted in low volume fraction of detrimental Gd 5 Si 3 -type secondary phase compared to that present in the parent alloy. All the Zr containing alloys have shown the presence of only second order magnetic transition unlike the parent alloy showing both first order structural and second order magnetic transition. A moderate (ΔS) M value of -5.5 J/kg K was obtained for the x=0.05 alloy at an enhanced operating temperature of 292 K compared to -7.8 J/kg K at 274 K of the parent alloy for an applied field of 2 T. The interesting feature of Zr (x=0.05) containing alloy is the wide operating temperature range of ∼25 K than that of ∼10-12 K for the parent, which resulted in enhanced net refrigerant capacity of 103 J/kg compared to that of 53 J/kg for the parent alloy. - Research highlights: → Zr addition in Gd 5 Si 2 Ge 2 alloy has been investigated for the first time to reduce the 5:3-type (Gd 5 Si 3 ) secondary phase formed when using commercial grade elements in Gd 5 Si 2 Ge 2 alloy. → It is interesting to observe that Zr addition decrease the volume fraction 5:3. → The refrigerator capacity and transition temperature of Zr added alloy is greater than the pure Gd 5 Si 2 Ge 2 which makes this alloy promising for room temperature application.

  4. Cube-phase in excess Hg-type Al-Mg-Si alloy studied by EFTEM

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matsuda, K.; Ishida, Y.; Müllerová, Ilona; Frank, Luděk; Ikeno, S.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 9 (2006), s. 2605-2610 ISSN 0022-2461 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : Al-Mg-Si alloy * beta-phase * cube-phase * EFTEM * EDS Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 0.999, year: 2006

  5. Microstructural characterization and phase transformation of ternary alloys near at Al3Ti compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angeles Ch, C.

    1999-01-01

    This research work is related with the structural characteristic and compositional values of the crystalline phases, which are found in ternary alloys of Ti-Al-Fe and TI-Al-Cu. These types of alloys were obtained using a rapid solidification technique (10 3 -10 4 K/s) and pure elements such as Al, Ti, Fe and Cu (99.99%). These cooling velocities allow the formation of stable phases and small grain sizes (approximately in range of a few micras). The obtained results indicate the presence of Al 3 Ti and others phases of L1 2 type. These phases are commonly found in a matrix rich in A1. The microalloyed elements (Cu and Fe) substitute the aluminum in both kinds of phases. Alloys with low content of Cu show transition states from the tetragonal structure DO 22 to the cubic phases L1 2 . The structural characteristics of the alloys are related with some microhardness measurement. The results show that the presence of the L1 2 phase tends to increase to hardness depending of the content of this phase

  6. Effects in Mg-Zn-based alloys strengthened by quasicrystalline phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlček, M; Čížek, J; Lukáč, F; Melikhova, O; Hruška, P; Procházka, I; Vlach, M; Stulíková, I; Smola, B; Jäger, A

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium Mg-based alloys are promising lightweight structural materials for automotive, aerospace and biomedical applications. Recently Mg-Zn-Y system attracted a great attention due to a stable icosahedral phase (I-phase) with quasicrystalline structure which is formed in these alloys. Positron lifetime spectroscopy and in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction were used to study thermal stability of I-phase and precipitation effects in Mg-Zn-Y and Mg- Zn-Al alloys. All alloys containing quasicrystalline I-phase exhibit misfit defects characterized by positron lifetime of ∼ 300 ps. These defects are associated with the interfaces between I- phase particles and Mg matrix. The quasicrystalline I-phase particles were found to be stable up to temperatures as high as ∼ 370°C. The W-phase is more stable and melts at ∼ 420°C. Concentration of defects associated with I-phase decreases after annealing at temperatures above ∼ 300°C. (paper)

  7. Unirradiated characteristics of U-Si alloys as dispersed-phase fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domagala, R.F.; Wiencek, T.C.

    1987-06-01

    To satisfy the power demands of many research reactors, a new LEU fuel with a high density and U content was needed. Any fuel must be compatible with Al and its alloys so that it may be fabricable as a dispersed-phase in Al alloy and Al matrix plate-type elements following, as nearly as possible, established commercial manufacturing techniques. U-Si and U-Si-Al alloys at or near the composition of U 3 Si were immediately attractive because of work documented by the Canadians. 8 refs., 2 figs

  8. Phase and microstructural characterization of Mo–Si–B multiphase intermetallic alloys produced by pressureless sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taleghani, P.R.; Bakhshi, S.R.; Borhani, G.H.; Erfanmanesh, M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Active and ultra-fine Mo–Si–B powders were produced by mechanical alloying. • The phases of MoSi 2 and MoB were obtained by sintering Mo–57Si–10B at 1400 °C for 2 h. • Composite based on MoB/MoSi 2 was obtained by sintering Mo–47Si–23B at 1300 °C for 3 h. • High content of MoB in the composite based on MoB/MoSi 2 increased density. • High hardness of the composite based on MoB/MoSi 2 is related to MoB matrix. -- Abstract: In this study Mo–47Si–23B and Mo–57Si–10B powders (at.%) was milled for 20 h in attritor ball mill with a rotational speed of 365 rpm and the ball/powder mass ratio 20/1. After degassing of As-mechanically alloyed powders at 450 °C, the powders were pressed into cylindrical samples with 25 mm diameter under 600 MPa pressure. The samples were sintered by using of a tube resistance furnace under Ar atmosphere. Phase and microstructure characteristic of mechanically alloyed powders and sintered samples, were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Also hardness test was performed. Homogeneous distribution of active and ultra-fine powders were obtained after milling for 20 h. Mo–57Si–10B alloy with MoB and MoSi 2 dominant phases was produced by sintering at 1400 °C for 2 h. Dominant phases similar to Mo–57Si–10B alloy sintered at 1400 °C for 2 h could be synthesized in Mo–47Si–23B alloy after sintering at 1300 °C for 3 h, but volume fraction of MoB phase was different. The Mo–47Si–23B alloy contained a higher phase fraction of MoB compound as compared to Mo–57Si–10B alloy. Very high density in Mo–47Si–23B alloys was obtained, due to the presence of high volume fraction of MoB phase. Formation heat of MoB acted as a positive potential to increase driving force of sintering and consequently bulk density. Finally, a uniform and fine distribution of MoSi 2 particles in MoB continuous matrix in the microstructure of Mo-47Si

  9. Growth of second phase particles in a copper--beryllium alloy. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunch, R.; Wells, R.; Mukherjee, A.K.

    1977-01-01

    Growth of second phase particles from a solid solution of copper-beryllium was studied to determine this alloy's suitability for acoustic emission testing. Optical and Scanning Electron microscopes were used to study the microstructure. Micro and macro hardness tests were also performed. A hardness curve for aging at 550 0 F was determined. Microscopic examination revealed the presence of large inclusions which make this alloy unsuitable for the acoustic tests envisioned

  10. Simple material physics experiment for studying phase diagrams and solid state transformations in alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, S; Kamal, R [Punjabi Univ., Patiala (India). Dept. of Physics

    1977-09-01

    Study of phase diagram and accompanying solid state transformations is essential to determine the best possible composition, manufacturing techniques and physical properties of an alloy. A simple technique having wide applications in metallurgical industry is to study the temperature--time curve of the alloy undergoing cooling with an uniform rate. An experiment which uses this technique is described. It is widely applicable in the fields of materials science, applied solid state physics, physical metallurgy and physical chemistry.

  11. Phase decomposition in a mechanically alloyed Cu-44.5 at%Ni-22.5 at%Fe alloy during isothermal aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Hirata, Victor M.; Saucedo-Munoz, Maribel L.; Diaz-Barriga-Arceo, Lucia G.

    2006-01-01

    A supersaturated solid solution of Cu-44.5 at%Ni-22.5 at%Fe alloy was produced by ball milling of a pure chemical elemental mixture for 1080 ks. An fcc supersaturated solid solution with a grain size of about 20 nm was obtained after milling. This alloy was subsequently aged at 803, 898 and 1003 K for different times. The growth kinetics of the modulation wavelength was determined from the X-ray diffraction results and followed the Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner theory for a diffusion-controlled coarsening in the MA alloy after aging. The growth kinetics of composition modulation wavelength for the MA alloy was faster at 803 and 898 K than that for the same alloy composition obtained by a conventional processing and then aged at the same temperatures. The activation energy for the decomposed phase coarsening process in the MA alloy was lower than that corresponding to the conventionally-processed alloy. (author)

  12. Influence of atomic ordering on sigma phase precipitation of the Fe{sub 50}Cr{sub 50} alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vélez, G.Y., E-mail: g.y.velezcastillo@gmail.com [Universidad del Valle, Departamento de Física, A.A. 25360 Cali (Colombia); Instituto de Física, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, avenida Manuel Nava 6, zona universitaria, 78290 San Luis Potosí, SLP México (Mexico); Pérez Alcázar, G.A. [Universidad del Valle, Departamento de Física, A.A. 25360 Cali (Colombia)

    2015-09-25

    Highlights: • σ-FeCr phase can be delayed when α-FeCr phase is ordered. • The formation of σ phase is favored by concentration gradients of α phase. • We determine the iron occupation number of the five sites of σ-Fe{sub 50}Cr{sub 50}. - Abstract: In this work we report a study of the kinetic of the formation of the σ-Fe{sub 50}Cr{sub 50} alloy which is obtained by heat treatment of α-FeCr samples with different atomic ordering. Two α-FeCr alloys were obtained, one by mechanical alloying and the other by arc-melting. Both alloys were heated at 925 K for 170 h and then quenched into ice water. Before heat treatment both alloys exhibit α-FeCr disordered structure with greater ferromagnetic behavior in the alloy obtained by mechanical alloying due to its higher atomic disorder. The sigma phase precipitation is influenced by the atomic ordering of the bcc samples: in the alloy obtained by mechanical alloying, the bcc phase is completely transformed into the σ phase; in the alloy obtained by melted the α–σ transformation is partial.

  13. Stability study of the γ phase in U-Nb-Zr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arico, S.F; Hermida, J.D; Gribaudo, L.M

    2006-01-01

    The development of new low enrichment nuclear fuels for research and radioisotope production reactors imposes the knowledge of properties and behaviors about a series of alloys which the reducing of U 235 (fissionable) concentration is compensated with a greater density of this element inside the fuel. One of these series is composed by U alloys with different contents of alloying, that allow to retain the body centered cubic structure solid solution recognized as phase α in metastable condition at low temperatures. For the present work 10 U based alloys were manufactured with different concentrations containing up to 43,7 % zirconium weight and up to 7,3 % niobium weight. An arch oven was utilized with argon atmosphere. The identification of the present phases in massive samples from the melting was carried out through X-rays diffraction analysis. The results obtained in this work are compared with others results published since the year 1957. In the samples melted the intermetallic UZr 2 diminishes in quantity with the reduction of the composition of Zr in the alloys. In all of them were identified, besides, Zr 6 Fe 3 O, ZrO 0,35 , α and U 3 O 8 present in quantities reduced. The quantity of the two last phases diminishes at the same time with the content in Zr. The parameter of network of the cubic phase γU in these alloys can be represented for the equation: α=(3,5796 -0,1616.x Nb +0,1155.x Zr )/(1.0306+0,003.x Nb -0,0068.x Zr . The parameter of network of the γ phase was measured. Comparing it measured with the value calculated, for eight alloys, the proposed equation showed a very good adjustment (HC)

  14. Formation and Disruption of W-Phase in High-Entropy Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sephira Riva

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available High-entropy alloys (HEAs are single-phase systems prepared from equimolar or near-equimolar concentrations of at least five principal elements. The combination of high mixing entropy, severe lattice distortion, sluggish diffusion and cocktail effect favours the formation of simple phases—usually a bcc or fcc matrix with minor inclusions of ordered binary intermetallics. HEAs have been proposed for applications in which high temperature stability (including mechanical and chemical stability under high temperature and high mechanical impact is required. On the other hand, the major challenge to overcome for HEAs to become commercially attractive is the achievement of lightweight alloys of extreme hardness and low brittleness. The multicomponent AlCrCuScTi alloy was prepared and characterized using powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD, scanning-electron microscope (SEM and atomic-force microscope equipped with scanning Kelvin probe (AFM/SKP techniques. Results show that the formation of complex multicomponent ternary intermetallic compounds upon heating plays a key role in phase evolution. The formation and degradation of W-phase, Al2Cu3Sc, in the AlCrCuScTi alloy plays a crucial role in its properties and stability. Analysis of as-melted and annealed alloy suggests that the W-phase is favoured kinetically, but thermodynamically unstable. The disruption of the W-phase in the alloy matrix has a positive effect on hardness (890 HV, density (4.83 g·cm−3 and crack propagation. The hardness/density ratio obtained for this alloy shows a record value in comparison with ordinary heavy refractory HEAs.

  15. Phase stability of CuAlMn shape memory alloys

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zárubová, Niva; Novák, Václav

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 378, - (2004), s. 216-221 ISSN 0921-5093 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : CuAlMn * shape memory alloys * martensitic transformation * - stress -strain tests * tension-compression cycling * history dependent phenomena Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.445, year: 2004

  16. Peculiarities of phase transformation in Ni3Fe powder alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuzhdin, A.A.

    1990-01-01

    Ordering process in sintered powder alloy Ni 3 Fe by normal and high temperatures was studied. Thermal stresses connected with porosity level of material effect on transformation peculiarities. The changes of electric conductivity, thermal expansion coefficient, bulk modulus during transformation were studied. The analysis of this changes was made

  17. Predictive calculation of phase formation in Al-rich Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-Sc-Zr alloys using a thermodynamic Mg-alloy database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groebner, J.; Rokhlin, L.L.; Dobatkina, T.V.; Schmid-Fetzer, R.

    2007-01-01

    Three series of Al-rich alloys in the system Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-Sc-Zr and the subsystems Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-Sc and Al-Zn-Mg-Sc were studied by thermodynamic calculations. Phase formation was compared with experimental data obtained by DTA and microstructural analysis. Calculated phase diagrams, phase amount charts and enthalpy charts together with non-equilibrium calculations under Scheil conditions reveal significant details of the complex phase formation. This enables consistent and correct interpretation of thermal analysis data. Especially the interpretation of liquidus temperature and primary phase is prone to be wrong without using this tool of computational thermodynamics. All data are predictions from a thermodynamic database developed for Mg-alloys and not a specialized Al-alloy database. That provides support for a reasonable application of this database for advanced Mg-alloys beyond the conventional composition ranges

  18. Predictive calculation of phase formation in Al-rich Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-Sc-Zr alloys using a thermodynamic Mg-alloy database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groebner, J. [Institute of Metallurgy, Clausthal University of Technology, Robert-Koch Strasse 42, D-38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Rokhlin, L.L. [Baikov Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Leninsky prosp. 49, 119991 GSP-1, Moscow (Russian Federation); Dobatkina, T.V. [Baikov Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Leninsky prosp. 49, 119991 GSP-1, Moscow (Russian Federation); Schmid-Fetzer, R. [Institute of Metallurgy, Clausthal University of Technology, Robert-Koch Strasse 42, D-38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)]. E-mail: schmid-fetzer@tu-clausthal.de

    2007-05-16

    Three series of Al-rich alloys in the system Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-Sc-Zr and the subsystems Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-Sc and Al-Zn-Mg-Sc were studied by thermodynamic calculations. Phase formation was compared with experimental data obtained by DTA and microstructural analysis. Calculated phase diagrams, phase amount charts and enthalpy charts together with non-equilibrium calculations under Scheil conditions reveal significant details of the complex phase formation. This enables consistent and correct interpretation of thermal analysis data. Especially the interpretation of liquidus temperature and primary phase is prone to be wrong without using this tool of computational thermodynamics. All data are predictions from a thermodynamic database developed for Mg-alloys and not a specialized Al-alloy database. That provides support for a reasonable application of this database for advanced Mg-alloys beyond the conventional composition ranges.

  19. Experimental, computational and theoretical studies of δ′ phase coarsening in Al–Li alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pletcher, B.A.; Wang, K.G.; Glicksman, M.E.

    2012-01-01

    Experimental characterization of microstructure evolution in three binary Al–Li alloys provides critical tests of both diffusion screening theory and multiparticle diffusion simulations, which predict late-stage phase-coarsening kinetics. Particle size distributions, growth kinetics and maximum particle sizes obtained using quantitative, centered dark-field transmission electron microscopy are compared quantitatively with theoretical and computational predictions. We also demonstrate the dependence on δ′ precipitate volume fraction of the rate constant for coarsening and the microstructure’s maximum particle size, both of which remained undetermined for this alloy system for nearly a half century. Our experiments show quantitatively that the diffusion-screening theoretical description of phase coarsening yields reasonable kinetic predictions, and that useful simulations of microstructure evolution are obtained via multiparticle diffusion. The tested theory and simulation method will provide useful tools for future design of two-phase alloys for elevated temperature applications.

  20. Vanadium Influence on Iron Based Intermetallic Phases in AlSi6Cu4 Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolibruchová D.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Negative effect of iron in Al-Si alloys mostly refers with iron based intermetallic phases, especially Al5FeSi phases. These phases are present in platelet-like forms, which sharp edges are considered as main cracks initiators and also as contributors of porosity formation. In recent times, addition of some elements, for example Mn, Co, Cr, Ni, V, is used to reduce influence of iron. Influence of vanadium in aluminium AlSi6Cu4 alloy with intentionally increased iron content is presented in this article. Vanadium amount has been graduated and chemical composition of alloy has been analysed by spectral analysis. Vanadium influence on microstructural changes was evaluated by microstructural analysis and some of intermetallic particles were reviewed by EDX analysis.

  1. Computation material science of structural-phase transformation in casting aluminium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golod, V. M.; Dobosh, L. Yu

    2017-04-01

    Successive stages of computer simulation the formation of the casting microstructure under non-equilibrium conditions of crystallization of multicomponent aluminum alloys are presented. On the basis of computer thermodynamics and heat transfer during solidification of macroscale shaped castings are specified the boundary conditions of local heat exchange at mesoscale modeling of non-equilibrium formation the solid phase and of the component redistribution between phases during coalescence of secondary dendrite branches. Computer analysis of structural - phase transitions based on the principle of additive physico-chemical effect of the alloy components in the process of diffusional - capillary morphological evolution of the dendrite structure and the o of local dendrite heterogeneity which stochastic nature and extent are revealed under metallographic study and modeling by the Monte Carlo method. The integrated computational materials science tools at researches of alloys are focused and implemented on analysis the multiple-factor system of casting processes and prediction of casting microstructure.

  2. Iron Intermetallic Phases in the Alloy Based on Al-Si-Mg by Applying Manganese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Podprocká R.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Manganese is an effective element used for the modification of needle intermetallic phases in Al-Si alloy. These particles seriously degrade mechanical characteristics of the alloy and promote the formation of porosity. By adding manganese the particles are being excluded in more compact shape of “Chinese script” or skeletal form, which are less initiative to cracks as Al5FeSi phase. In the present article, AlSi7Mg0.3 aluminium foundry alloy with several manganese content were studied. The alloy was controlled pollution for achieve higher iron content (about 0.7 wt. % Fe. The manganese were added in amount of 0.2 wt. %, 0.6 wt. %, 1.0 wt. % and 1.4 wt. %. The influence of the alloying element on the process of crystallization of intermetallic phases were compared to microstructural observations. The results indicate that increasing manganese content (> 0.2 wt. % Mn lead to increase the temperature of solidification iron rich phase (TAl5FeSi and reduction this particles. The temperature of nucleation Al-Si eutectic increase with higher manganese content also. At adding 1.4 wt. % Mn grain refinement and skeleton particles were observed.

  3. On the quantitative X-ray phase analysis of R-Co alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyubushkin, V.A.; Lyubushkina, L.M.; Vetoshkin, I.D.

    1982-01-01

    Using the method of quantitative X-ray phase analysis two-phase (RCo 5 -R 2 Co 17 ) alloys Sm-Co and Pr-Co have been studied. The investigations are made using the DRON-2.0 dif,ractometer in filtrated FeKα-radiation. Calibration diagrams for model binary mixtures are built, their use is recommended for express-evaluation of the amount of the phase determined. Test of the technique suggested is carried out

  4. THE ATM-SMC1 PATHWAY IS ESSENTIAL FOR ACTIVATION OF THE CHROMIUM[VI]-INDUCED S-PHASE CHECKPOINT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr[VI] is a common industrial waste product, an environmental pollutant, and a recognized human carcinogen. Following cellular uptake, Cr[VI] can cause DNA damage, however, the mechanisims by which mammalian cells respond to Cr-induced DNA damage remain to b...

  5. Influence of W-phase on mechanical properties and damping capacity of Mg–Zn–Y–Nd–Zr alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Hao, E-mail: haofeng804@gmail.com [College of Science, Hebei North University, Zhangjiakou 075000, Hebei (China); Yang, Yang [College of Science, Hebei North University, Zhangjiakou 075000, Hebei (China); Chang, Haixia [College of Law and Politics, Hebei North University, Zhangjiakou 075000 (China)

    2014-07-15

    This work mainly investigated the influence of W-phase on the mechanical properties and damping capacities of as-cast Mg–Zn–Y–Nd–Zr alloys with Zn/RE (rare element) ratio about 1.0. Obtained results indicate that the alloys with Zn and RE addition are composed of α-Mg matrix and W-phase. With the contents of Zn and RE increasing, the diffraction peaks of W-phase are gradually intensified and the morphology of W-phase transforms from fine-network microstructure to coarse-network microstructure. The tensile strength and fracture mechanism are strongly dependent on the quality of W-phase and the alloy with W-phase content of 8.0% has the highest strength as a result of strong atomic bonding between the W-phase and the Mg matrix. The damping capacities of Mg–Zn–Y–Nd–Zr alloys decrease gradually with the increasing amount of W-phase and then maintain at high level at high strain amplitude. The decline of damping capacity can be explained by the forming of W-phase, which makes more phases and interfaces form in the alloys. And the mobile dislocation densities in the alloys increase as residual stress at the interface of W-phase/Mg matrix and long dislocations generate in the α-Mg matrix. Therefore, the damping of alloy with high W-phase content improves accordingly with the increasing amount of moving dislocations.

  6. Formation, stability and crystal structure of the {sigma} phase in Mo-Re-Si alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bei, H., E-mail: beih@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Yang, Y., E-mail: ying.yang@computherm.com [CompuTherm LLC, Madison, WI 53719 (United States); Viswanathan, G.B. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433 (United States); Rawn, C.J.; George, E.P. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)] [University of Tennessee, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Tiley, J. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433 (United States); Chang, Y.A. [CompuTherm LLC, Madison, WI 53719 (United States)] [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53705 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    The formation, stability and crystal structure of the {sigma} phase in Mo-Re-Si alloys were investigated. Guided by thermodynamic calculations, six critically selected alloys were arc melted and annealed at 1600 deg. C for 150 h. Their as-cast and annealed microstructures, including phase fractions and distributions, the compositions of the constituent phases and the crystal structure of the {sigma} phase were analyzed by thermodynamic modeling coupled with experimental characterization by scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Two key findings resulted from this work. One is the large homogeneity range of the {sigma} phase region, extending from binary Mo-Re to ternary Mo-Re-Si. The other is the formation of a {sigma} phase in Mo-rich alloys either through the peritectic reaction of liquid + Mo{sub ss} {yields} {sigma} or primary solidification. These findings are important in understanding the effects of Re on the microstructure and providing guidance on the design of Mo-Re-Si alloys.

  7. Influence of the alloying elements vanadium, chromium and carbon on the electrochemical behavior of uranium in media with a pH 13 or a pH acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pommier, Gerard; Jouve, Gerard; Lacombe, Paul.

    1976-06-01

    The electrochemical properties of uranium alloys with low vanadium and chromium contents were studied in aqueous medium for different pH values of the solution (pH between 0 and 5 in H 2 SO 4 medium and pH=13 in NaOH medium). In acid medium, the study of the behavior of the two types of alloys carried out by the potentiokinetic method is described. The specific role of chromium concerning the anodic process is demonstrated and the influence of vanadium in specimens of same nominal vanadium contents but different carbon contents is revealed by the modification of the reduction overvoltage of water. In basic medium, the electrochemical study was supported by an optical method of determining the relative growth kinetics of the films in situ and continuously. At lower values of potential, the growth of an oxide film of UO 2 with linear growth kinetics is demonstrated; at higher values of potential a system of two layers is observed and its evolution is followed kinematically. The film initially formed is constituted of an oxide UO 3 2H 2 O, and its growth is linear, then a film of UO 2 develops underneath. A structural evolution of the superficial film is then observed, an evolution which leads to its cracking after breakdown. These phenomena were followed by electron microscopy using a technic of two stage replicas [fr

  8. Characterization of phase changes during fabrication of copper alloys, crystalline and non-crystalline, prepared by mechanical alloying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Rojas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The manufacture of alloys in solid state has many differences with the conventional melting (casting process. In the case of high energy milling or mechanical alloying, phase transformations of the raw materials are promoted by a large amount of energy that is introduced by impact with the grinding medium; there is no melting, but the microstructural changes go from microstructural refinement to amorphization in solid state. This work studies the behavior of pure metals (Cu and Ni, and different binary alloys (Cu-Ni and Cu-Zr, under the same milling/mechanical alloying conditions. After high-energy milling, X ray diffraction (XRD patterns were analyzed to determine changes in the lattice parameter and find both microstrain and crystallite sizes, which were first calculated using the Williamson-Hall (W-H method and then compared with the transmission electron microscope (TEM images. Calculations showed a relatively appropriate approach to observations with TEM; however, in general, TEM observations detect heterogeneities, which are not considered for the W-H method. As for results, in the set of pure metals, we show that pure nickel undergoes more microstrain deformations, and is more abrasive than copper (and copper alloys. In binary systems, there was a complete solid solution in the Cu-Ni system and a glass-forming ability for the Cu-Zr, as a function of the Zr content. Mathematical methods cannot be applied when the systems have amorphization because there are no equations representing this process during milling. A general conclusion suggests that, under the same milling conditions, results are very different due to the significant impact of the composition: nickel easily forms a solid solution, while with a higher zirconium content there is a higher degree of glassforming ability.

  9. Mechanical properties of molybdenum alloyed liquid phase-sintered tungsten-based composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemp, P.B.; German, R.M.

    1995-01-01

    Tungsten-based composites are fabricated from mixed elemental powders using liquid phase sintering, usually with a nickel-iron matrix. During sintering, the tungsten undergoes grain growth, leading to microstructure coarsening that lowers strength but increases ductility. Often the desire is to increase strength at the sacrifice of ductility, and historically, this has been performed by postsintering deformation. There has been considerable research on alloying to adjust the as-sintered mechanical properties to match those of swaged alloys. Prior reports cover many additions, seemingly including much of the periodic table. Unfortunately, many of the modified alloys proved disappointing, largely due to degraded strength at the tungsten-matrix interface. Of these modified alloys, the molybdenum-containing systems exhibit a promising combination of properties, cost, and processing ease. For example, the 82W-8Mo-7Ni-3Fe alloy gives a yield strength that is 34% higher than the equivalent 90W-7Ni-3Fe alloy (from 535 to 715 MPa) but with a 33% decrease in fracture elongation (from 30 to 20% elongation). This article reports on experiments geared to promoting improved properties in the W-Mo-Ni-Fe alloys. However, unlike the prior research which maintained a constant Ni + Fe content and varied the W:Mo ratio, this study considers the Mo:(Ni + Fe) ratio effect for 82, 90, and 93 wt pct W

  10. Microstructures of tribologically modified surface layers in two-phase alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueroa, C G; Ortega, I; Jacobo, V H; Ortiz, A; Bravo, A E; Schouwenaars, R

    2014-01-01

    When ductile alloys are subject to sliding wear, small increments of plastic strain accumulate into severe plastic deformation and mechanical alloying of the surface layer. The authors constructed a simple coaxial tribometer, which was used to study this phenomenon in wrought Al-Sn and cast Cu-Mg-Sn alloys. The first class of materials is ductile and consists of two immiscible phases. Tribological modification is observed in the form of a transition zone from virgin material to severely deformed grains. At the surface, mechanical mixing of both phases competes with diffusional unmixing. Vortex flow patterns are typically observed. The experimental Cu-Mg-Sn alloys are ductile for Mg-contents up to 2 wt% and consist of a- dendrites with a eutectic consisting of a brittle Cu 2 Mg-matrix with α-particles. In these, the observations are similar to the Al-Sn Alloys. Alloys with 5 wt% Mg are brittle due to the contiguity of the eutectic compound. Nonetheless, under sliding contact, this compound behaves in a ductile manner, showing mechanical mixing of a and Cu 2 Mg in the top layers and a remarkable transition from a eutectic to cellular microstructure just below, due to severe shear deformation. AFM-observations allow identifying the mechanically homogenized surface layers as a nanocrystalline material with a cell structure associated to the sliding direction

  11. Modeling of Eutectic Formation in Al-Si Alloy Using A Phase-Field Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahimi Z.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We have utilized a phase-field model to investigate the evolution of eutectic silicon in Al-Si alloy. The interfacial fluctuations are included into a phase-field model of two-phase solidification, as stochastic noise terms and their dominant role in eutectic silicon formation is discussed. We have observed that silicon spherical particles nucleate on the foundation of primary aluminum phase and their nucleation continues on concentric rings, through the Al matrix. The nucleation of silicon particles is attributed to the inclusion of fluctuations into the phase-field equations. The simulation results have shown needle-like, fish-bone like and flakes of silicon phase by adjusting the noise coefficients to larger values. Moreover, the role of primary Al phase on nucleation of silicon particles in Al-Si alloy is elaborated. We have found that the addition of fluctuations plays the role of modifiers in our simulations and is essential for phase-field modeling of eutectic growth in Al-Si system. The simulated finger-like Al phases and spherical Si particles are very similar to those of experimental eutectic growth in modified Al-Si alloy.

  12. Chemical and phase composition of powders obtained by electroerosion dispersion from alloys WC-Co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putintseva, M.N.

    2004-01-01

    A consideration is given to the dependence of chemical and phase compositions of dispersed powders on the conditions, the medium of electroerosion dispersing and the content of cobalt in an initial alloy. It is shown that dissociation of carbon from tungsten carbide proceeds even on dispersing in liquid hydrocarbon-containing media (kerosene and machine oil). The phase composition is determined to a large extent by a medium of dispersing and a cobalt content in the initial alloy. In all powders complex tungsten-cobalt carbides and even Co 7 W 6 intermetallic compounds are found [ru

  13. Chemical and Phase Composition of Powders Obtained by Electroerosion Dispersion from WC - Co Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putintseva, M. N.

    2004-03-01

    The dependence of the chemical and phase composition of dispersed powders on the mode and medium of electroerosion dispersion and the content of cobalt in the initial alloy is considered. It is shown that the dissociation of carbon from tungsten carbide occurs even in dispersion in liquid hydrocarbon-bearing media (kerosene and industrial oils). The phase composition is primarily determined by the dispersion medium and the content of cobalt in the initial alloy. Compound tungsten-cobalt carbides and even a Co7W6 intermetallic are determined in all the powders.

  14. Thermodynamic analysis of 6xxx series Al alloys: Phase fraction diagrams

    OpenAIRE

    Cui S.; Mishra R.; Jung I.-H.

    2018-01-01

    Microstructural evolution of 6xxx Al alloys during various metallurgical processes was analyzed using accurate thermodynamic database. Phase fractions of all the possible precipitate phases which can form in the as-cast and equilibrium states of the Al-Mg-Si-Cu-Fe-Mn-Cr alloys were calculated over the technically useful composition range. The influence of minor elements such as Cu, Fe, Mn, and Cr on the amount of each type of precipitate in the as-cast and equilibrium conditions were analyzed...

  15. Phase transition temperature in the Zr-rich corner of Zr-Nb-Sn-Fe alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canay, M.; Danón, C. A.; Arias, D.

    2000-08-01

    The influence of small composition changes on the phase transformation temperature of Zr-1Nb-1Sn-0.2(0.7)Fe alloys was studied in the present work, by electrical resistivity measurements and metallographic techniques. For the alloy with 0.2 at.% Fe we have determined Tα↔α+β=741°C and Tα+β↔β=973°C, and for the 0.7 at.% Fe the transformation temperatures were T α↔α+β=712°C and T α+β↔β=961°C. We have verified that the addition of Sn stabilized the β phase.

  16. Amorphous phase formation in intermetallic Mg2Ni alloy synthesized by ethanol wet milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.-W.; Chyou, S.-D.; Wang, S.-H.; Yang, M.-W.; Hsu, C.-Y.; Tien, H.-C.; Huang, N.-N.

    2009-01-01

    The hydriding/dehydriding properties of an intermetallic Mg 2 Ni alloy synthesized by wet ball milling in ethanol have been investigated. The appearance of the particle surface after different milling methods is one obvious difference. The alloyed powders prepared by either dry milling or wet milling under ethanol were characterized for phase content by X-ray diffractometer (XRD). The results show that two broad diffuse peaks, which are an ionic-organic-Mg amorphous material, appear in addition to the nickel element peaks. This unexpected amorphous phase has the special hydrogen absorbing/desorbing features.

  17. Optimization of phase analysis of refractory alloys in the gas-ion-reaction chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumenkamp, H.J.; Hoven, H.; Koizlik, K.; Nickel, H.

    1980-04-01

    Reactor components outside the core which are under high thermal and mechanical stresses are made from refractory alloys. For basic research and for quality control, these materials are investigated by metallography, which is an independent group of characterization procedures as well as basis for many other methods. An important way of increasing the information about a material yielded by metallography is the expansions of phase contrast, in particular the phase contrasting in the gas-ion-reaction chamber. In this paper, the experimental procedure is described and the process of optimizing the procedure with respect to the Ni- and Fe-based refractory alloys examined in the IRW is discussed. (orig.) [de

  18. Phase transitions and thermal expansion in Ni51- x Mn36 + x Sn13 alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaletina, Yu. V.; Gerasimov, E. G.; Kazantsev, V. A.; Kaletin, A. Yu.

    2017-10-01

    Thermal expansion and structural and magnetic phase transitions in alloys of the Ni-Mn-Sn system have been investigated. The spontaneous martensitic transformation in Ni51-xMn36 + xSn13 (0 ≤ x ≤ 3) alloys is found to be accompanied by high jumps in the temperature dependences of the linear thermal expansion. The relative change in the linear sizes of these alloys at the martensitic transformation is 1.5 × 10-3. There are no anomalies in the magnetic-ordering temperature range in the temperature dependences of the coefficient of linear thermal expansion. The differences in the behavior of linear thermal expansion at the martensitic transformation in Ni51-xMn36 + xSn13 (0 ≤ x ≤ 3) and Ni47Mn40Sn13( x = 4) alloys have been established.

  19. Heterogeneous catalysis in liquid-phase oxidation of olefin--2. Dependence of the structure of vanadium-chromium binary oxide catalyst for oxidation of cyclohexene on the method of preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takehira, K; Hayakawa, T; Ishikawa, T

    1978-01-01

    Dependence of the structure of vanadium-chromium binary oxide catalyst for oxidation of cyclohexene on the method of preparation was studied in an extension of previous work by using three series of binary oxide catalysts, D, E, and F, which were prepared by coprecipitation from acidic, neutral, and alkaline media, respectively. The specific activity at 60/sup 0/C, 1 atm oxygen, and benzene solvent decreased in the order D > E > F, but all three series showed maximum activity at 90% chromium. The selectivity for epoxide also followed the order D > E > F, but the maximum selectivity occurred at 50% chromium for D, 75% for E, and 90% for F. Comparison of these results with X-ray diffraction and ESR spectral structural analysis of the various chromium(III) vanadate phases supported the previously proposed mechanism, with cyclohexene autoxidation initiated by free radical decomposition of cyclohexene hydroperoxide occurring on a different type of active site.

  20. Microstructural study on gamma phase stability in U-9 wt% Mo alloy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saify, M.T.; Jha, S.K.; Hussain, M.M.; Singh, R.P.; Neogy, S.; Srivastava, D.; Dey, G.K.

    2009-01-01

    Uranium exists in three polymorphic forms viz., orthorhombic α phase - stable up to 667 deg C, tetragonal β phase - stable between 667 deg C and 771 deg C and bcc γ phase - stable above 771 deg C. When alloying of uranium is done, the alloying additions alter the temperature ranges over which the α, β and γ phases are stable. In addition, they frequently retard the rates at which phase transformations occur. As a result, a number of metastable phases can be obtained in uranium alloys. It has been well known among reactor designers that a pure uranium metal is not suitable for power reactor fuel mainly because of (i) phase changes occurring at lower temperatures and (ii) poor irradiation behavior of α phase. γ phase uranium alloys containing small amount of another metal to stabilize the γ-U solid solution provides good prospects in this respect. U-Mo alloy is one of the prospective materials for low enrichment uranium fuel with high U loading because a solid solution of Mo in the γ-U phase possesses acceptable irradiation and mechanical properties and is formed over a wide range of Mo concentration. In the present work vacuum induction melted and cast U-9 wt% Mo alloy was subjected to different thermo mechanical processing to investigate the stability of the γ phase. The as cast alloy was rolled at 550 deg C and then homogenized at 1000 deg C in the γ phase field for 24 hours followed by (i) water quenching and (ii) furnace cooling to generate two different starting conditions. Two of the water-quenched samples were aged at 500 deg C for 5 days and 14 days and one as-rolled sample was aged at 500 deg C for 5 days. The as-cast, as-rolled, homogenized and aged samples were subjected to optical microscopy and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) investigations. All the samples were also subjected to microhardness measurements. The as cast sample contained predominantly the gamma phase along with inclusions. After homogenizing the alloy at 1000 deg C and quenching in

  1. Preparation, microstructure and thermal properties of Mg−Bi alloys as phase change materials for thermal energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Dong; Sun, Zheng; Li, Yuanyuan; Cheng, Xiaomin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The microstructure and thermal properties of Mg−Bi alloys are determined. • The relationship between melting enthalpies and phase composition are studied. • The activation energy of Mg−54%Bi alloy is calculated by multiple DSC technology. • Mg−54%Bi alloy is proposed as a phase change material at high (>420 °C) temperature. - Abstract: Comparing with Al-based phase change material, Mg-based phase change material is getting more and more attention due to its high corrosion resistance with encapsulation materials based on iron. This study focuses on the characterization of Mg−36%Bi, Mg−54%Bi and Mg−60%Bi (wt. %) alloys as phase change materials for thermal energy storage at high temperature. The phase compositions, microstructure and phase change temperatures were investigated by X-ray diffusion (XRD), electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA) and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) analysis, respectively. The results indicates that the microstructure of Mg−36%Bi and Mg−54%Bi alloys are mainly composed of α-Mg matrix and α-Mg + Mg_3Bi_2 eutectic phases, Mg−60%Bi alloy are mainly composed of the Mg_3Bi_2 phase and α-MgMg_3Bi_2 eutectic phases. The melting enthalpies of Mg−36%Bi, Mg−54%Bi and Mg−60%Bi alloys are 138.2, 180.5 and 48.7 J/g, with the phase change temperatures of 547.6, 546.3 and 548.1 °C, respectively. The Mg−54%Bi alloy has the highest melting enthalpy in three alloys. The main reason may be that it has more proportion of α-Mg + Mg_3Bi_2 eutectic phases. The thermal expansion of three alloys increases with increasing temperature. The values of the thermal conductivity decrease with increasing Bi content. Besides, the activation energy of Mg−54%Bi was calculated by multiple DSC technology.

  2. Laser-induced microstructural development and phase evolution in magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan, Y.C.; Zhou, W.; Li, Z.L.; Zheng, H.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Secondary phase evolution caused by laser processing was firstly reported. • Microstructure development was controlled by heat flow thermodynamics and kinetics. • Solid-state transformation resulted in submicron and nano-scale precipitates. • Cluster-shaped particles in overlapped region were due to precipitation coarsening. • Properties of materials can be tailored selectively by laser processing. -- Abstract: Secondary phase plays an important role in determining microstructures and properties of magnesium alloys. This paper focuses on laser-induced microstructure development and secondary phase evolution in AZ91D Mg alloy studied by SEM, TEM and EDS analyses. Compared to bulk shape and lamellar structure of the secondary phase in as-received cast material, rapid-solidified microstructures with various morphologies including nano-precipitates were observed in laser melt zone. Formation mechanisms of microstructural evolution and effect of phase development on surface properties were further discussed

  3. Phase stability and microstructures of high entropy alloys ion irradiated to high doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Songqin [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China); Gao, Michael C. [National Energy Technology Laboratory, 1450 Queen Ave SW, Albany, OR, 97321 (United States); AECOM, P.O. Box 1959, Albany, OR, 97321 (United States); Yang, Tengfei [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing, 100871 (China); Liaw, Peter K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, 37996 (United States); Zhang, Yong, E-mail: drzhangy@ustb.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China)

    2016-11-15

    The microstructures of Al{sub x}CoCrFeNi (x = 0.1, 0.75 and 1.5 in molar ratio) high entropy alloys (HEAs) irradiated at room temperature with 3 MeV Au ions at the highest fluence of 105, 91, and 81 displacement per atom, respectively, were studied. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution TEM (HRTEM) analyses show that the initial microstructures and phase composition of all three alloys are retained after ion irradiation and no phase decomposition is observed. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the disordered face-centered cubic (FCC) and disordered body-centered cubic (BCC) phases show much less defect cluster formation and structural damage than the NiAl-type ordered B2 phase. This effect is explained by higher entropy of mixing, higher defect formation/migration energies, substantially lower thermal conductivity, and higher atomic level stress in the disordered phases.

  4. Microstructure and heat resistance of Mg-Al-Zn alloys containing metastable phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jeong-Min; Park, Bong-Koo; Jun, Joong-Hwan; Shin, Keesam; Kim, Ki-Tae; Jung, Woon-Jae

    2007-01-01

    In this research microstructural studies have been made on cast specimens of AZ91 base alloys containing various amounts of Zn. As the amount of Zn addition increased up to 2%, any new Zn-containing phase did not appear while the Zn content in Mg 17 Al 12 phase continuously increased. A quasi-crystalline phase started to form at Mg 17 Al 12 phase when the added Zn content was about 3 wt.%. The tensile strength and elongation of the alloys at 175 deg. C were observed to increase significantly with increasing Zn content. The quasi-crystalline phase was found to be stable up to 300 deg. C, based on scanning electron microscopy examinations of the specimens heated at different temperatures for 24 h

  5. L-J phase in a Cu2.2Mn0.8Al alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, S. C.; Liu, T. F.

    1995-06-01

    A new type of precipitate (designated L-J phase) with two variants was observed within the (DO3 + L21) matrix in a Cu2.2Mn0.8Al alloy. Transmission electron microscopy examinations indicated that the L-J phase has an orthorhombic structure with lattice parameters a = 0.413 nm, b = 0.254 nm and c = 0.728 nm. The orientation relationship between the L-J phase and the matrix is (100)L-J//(011) m , (010)L-J//(111) m and (001)L-J//(211) m . The rotation axis and rotation angle between two variants of the L-J phase are [021] and 90 deg. The L-J phase has never been observed in various Cu-Al, Cu-Mn, and Cu-Al-Mn alloy systems before.

  6. Peculiarities of α- and ω-phase precipitations in cold-deformed Ti-Nb alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadykova, G.N.

    1978-01-01

    The peculiar features of the depositions of ω and α-phases have been examined, the depositions being evolved under the following conditions: holding in vacuum of 10 -5 mm Hg at the temperature of about 250 to 450 deg C, of an alloy containing 30% Ti, 35% Nb, and 7.5% Zr, which was previously subjected to quenching and cold deformation up to the thickness of about 0.1 mm. The structure of the alloys was examined by resorting to the X-ray, metallographic, and electron-microscopic analysis methods. The microhardness was measured. It is the cold deformation that promotes intensely the formation of α-phase in the ageing of Ti-Nb alloys. In this case, the formation of ω-phase is suppressed. At the initial stages of decomposition, the equiaxial particles of α phase are formed in titanium alloys containing about 30 to 35% Nb and up to 7.5% Zr: then the acicular α particles are formed in less distorted areas of β-matrix. A variation in their dimensions depending on the treatment conditions is shown. An increase in hardness of the examined cold-strained alloys in ageing, within the temperature range of up to about 350 deg C, is attributed to the formation of α+β structure. On cold straining and ageing, it proves to be possible to create β+ω+α structure in Ti-Nb alloys. For this purpose, before starting the cold straining, it will be necessary to obtain the structure containing a considerable proportion of ω-phase

  7. Enhanced Densification of PM Steels by Liquid Phase Sintering with Boron-Containing Master Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vattur Sundaram, Maheswaran; Surreddi, Kumar Babu; Hryha, Eduard; Veiga, Angela; Berg, Sigurd; Castro, Fransisco; Nyborg, Lars

    2018-01-01

    Reaching high density in PM steels is important for high-performance applications. In this study, liquid phase sintering of PM steels by adding gas-atomized Ni-Mn-B master alloy was investigated for enhancing the density levels of Fe- and Mo- prealloyed steel powder compacts. The results indicated that liquid formation occurs in two stages, beginning with the master alloy melting (LP-1) below and eutectic phase formation (LP-2) above 1373 K (1100 °C). Mo and C addition revealed a significant influence on the LP-2 temperatures and hence on the final densification behavior and mechanical properties. Microstructural embrittlement occurs with the formation of continuous boride networks along the grain boundaries, and its severity increases with carbon addition, especially for 2.5 wt pct of master alloy content. Sintering behavior, along with liquid generation, microstructural characteristics, and mechanical testing revealed that the reduced master alloy content from 2.5 to 1.5 wt pct (reaching overall boron content from 0.2 to 0.12 wt pct) was necessary for obtaining good ductility with better mechanical properties. Sintering with Ni-Mn-B master alloy enables the sintering activation by liquid phase formation in two stages to attain high density in PM steels suitable for high-performance applications.

  8. Phase separation in equiatomic AlCoCrFeNi high-entropy alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzoni, A., E-mail: anna.manzoni@helmholtz-berlin.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Institute of Applied Materials, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Daoud, H.; Völkl, R.; Glatzel, U. [Metals and Alloys, University Bayreuth, Ludwig-Thoma-Strasse 36b, D-95447 Bayreuth (Germany); Wanderka, N. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Institute of Applied Materials, D-14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-09-15

    The microstructure of the as-cast AlCoCrFeNi high entropy alloy has been investigated by transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. The alloy shows a very pronounced microstructure with clearly distinguishable dendrites and interdendrites. In both regions a separation into an Al–Ni rich matrix and Cr–Fe-rich precipitates can be observed. Moreover, fluctuations of single elements within the Cr–Fe rich phase have been singled out by three dimensional atom probe measurements. The results of investigations are discussed in terms of spinodal decomposition of the alloying elements inside the Cr–Fe-rich precipitates. - Highlights: ► The Alloy separates into an Al–Ni rich matrix and Cr–Fe-rich precipitates. ► Concentration depth profiles in the Cr–Fe rich regions show opposite fluctuations. ► They have been attributed to the spinodal decomposition of Fe- and Cr-rich phases. ► The Al–Ni rich region corresponds well to the Al–Ni rich phases observed in the 6 component AlCoCrCuFeNi alloy.

  9. Effects of deep cryogenic treatment on the solid-state phase transformation of Cu-Al alloy in cooling process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuhui; Liao, Bo; Liu, Jianhua; Chen, Shuqing; Feng, Yu; Zhang, Yanyan; Zhang, Ruijun

    2012-07-01

    The solid-state phase transformation temperature and duration of deep cryogenic treated and untreated Cu-Al alloys in cooling process were measured by differential scanning calorimetry measurement. The solid-state phase transformation activation energy and Avrami exponent were calculated according to these measurements. The effects of deep cryogenic treatment on the solid-state phase transformation were investigated based on the measurement and calculation as well as the observation of alloy's microstructure. The results show that deep cryogenic treatment can increase the solid-phase transformation activation energy and shorten the phase transformation duration, which is helpful to the formation of fine grains in Cu-Al alloy.

  10. The structural phases and vibrational properties of Mo1-xWxTe2 alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Sean M.; Beams, Ryan; Krylyuk, Sergiy; Kalish, Irina; Singh, Arunima K.; Bruma, Alina; Tavazza, Francesca; Joshi, Jaydeep; Stone, Iris R.; Stranick, Stephan J.; Davydov, Albert V.; Vora, Patrick M.

    2017-12-01

    The structural polymorphism in transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) provides exciting opportunities for developing advanced electronics. For example, MoTe2 crystallizes in the 2H semiconducting phase at ambient temperature and pressure, but transitions into the 1T‧ semimetallic phase at high temperatures. Alloying MoTe2 with WTe2 reduces the energy barrier between these two phases, while also allowing access to the T d Weyl semimetal phase. The \\text{M}{{\\text{o}}1-\\text{x}} WxTe2 alloy system is therefore promising for developing phase change memory technology. However, achieving this goal necessitates a detailed understanding of the phase composition in the MoTe2-WTe2 system. We combine polarization-resolved Raman spectroscopy with x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) to study bulk \\text{M}{{\\text{o}}1-\\text{x}} WxTe2 alloys over the full compositional range x from 0 to 1. We identify Raman and XRD signatures characteristic of the 2H, 1T‧, and T d structural phases that agree with density-functional theory (DFT) calculations, and use them to identify phase fields in the MoTe2-WTe2 system, including single-phase 2H, 1T‧, and T d regions, as well as a two-phase 1T‧  +  T d region. Disorder arising from compositional fluctuations in \\text{M}{{\\text{o}}1-\\text{x}} WxTe2 alloys breaks inversion and translational symmetry, leading to the activation of an infrared 1T‧-MoTe2 mode and the enhancement of a double-resonance Raman process in \\text{2H-M}{{\\text{o}}1-\\text{x}} WxTe2 alloys. Compositional fluctuations limit the phonon correlation length, which we estimate by fitting the observed asymmetric Raman lineshapes with a phonon confinement model. These observations reveal the important role of disorder in \\text{M}{{\\text{o}}1-\\text{x}} WxTe2 alloys, clarify the structural phase boundaries, and provide a foundation for future explorations of phase transitions and electronic phenomena in this

  11. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterization of the ω phase in water quenched Ti-5553 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Dongyang; Lu, Yafeng; Zhang, Kong; Liu, Qian; Zhou, Lian

    2012-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to investigate the ω phase in water quenched Ti-5553 alloy with a nominal composition of Ti–5Al–5V–5Mo–3Cr (wt.%), and the ω and the β phase were distinguished by deconvoluting the XPS spectra of Al2p, V2p and Cr2p core level regions. In addition, it is found that the binding energy of core level electron of alloying elements shifts comparing with that of pure metals, and the fact was interpreted by charge redistribution model. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy technique could be used to characterize the nano-scale ω phase in β alloys. - Highlights: ► We characterize the ω phase in Ti-5553 alloy by XPS. ► Binding energy of Al2p, V2p and Cr2p electron are different in the ω and β phase. ► Structural difference leads to the binding energy gap.

  12. Phase transformation in rapidly quenched Fe-Cr-Co-Mo-Ti-Si-B alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukov, D. G.; Shubakov, V. S.; Zhukova, E. Kh; Gorshenkov, M. V.

    2018-03-01

    The research results of phase transformations in Fe-24Cr-16Co-3Mo-0.2Ti-1Si-B alloys (with a boron content of 1 to 3% by mass) obtained by rapid quenching are presented. The structure formation regularities during the melt spinning and during the subsequent crystallization annealing in rapidly quenched bands of the Fe-Cr-Co-Mo-Ti-Si-B system alloys were studied. The changes in the phase composition of the rapidly quenched Fe-Cr-Co-Mo-Ti- Si-B system alloys after quenching at various quench rates and at different boron concentrations in the alloys are studied. It is shown that during crystallization from an amorphous state, at temperatures above 570 °C, in addition to the α-phase, the σ-phase appears first, followed by the γ-phase. Heat treatment of rapidly quenched bands to high-coercive state was carried out. A qualitative assessment of magnetic properties in a high-coercivity state was carried out. An evaluation of the level of magnetic properties in a high-coercivity state allows us to conclude that the application of a magnetic field during crystallization from an amorphous state leads to anisotropy of the magnetic properties, that is, an anisotropic effect of thermo-magnetic treatment is detected.

  13. Effect of phase transformations on laser forming of Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Y.; Cheng, P.; Yao, Y.L.; Yang, Z.; Egland, K.

    2005-01-01

    In laser forming, phase transformations in the heat-affected zone take place under steep thermal cycles, and have a significant effect on the flow behavior of Ti-6Al-4V alloy and the laser-forming process. The flow-stress data of a material are generally provided as only dependent on strain, strain rate, and temperature, while phase transformations are determined by both temperature and temperature history. Therefore, effect of phase transformations on the flow behavior of materials in thermomechanical processing is not given necessary considerations. In the present work, both the α→β transformation during heating and the decomposition of β phase, producing martensite α ' or lamellae α dependent on cooling rate, are numerically investigated. The spatial distribution of volume fractions of phases is obtained by coupling thermal and phase transformation kinetic modeling. Consequently, the flow stress of Ti-6Al-4V alloy is calculated by the rule of mixtures based on the phase ratio and the flow stress of each single phase, which is also a function of temperature, strain, and strain rate. According to the obtained flow-stress data, the laser-forming process of Ti-6Al-4V alloy is modeled by finite element method, and the deformation is predicted. A series of carefully controlled experiments are conducted to validate the theoretically predicted results

  14. Microstructural study and numerical simulation of phase decomposition of heat treated Co–Cu alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Mebed

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of heat treatment on the phase decomposition and the grain size of Co–10 at% Cu alloy were studied. Few samples were aged in a furnace for either 3 or 5 h and then quenched in iced water. The materials and phase compositions were investigated using energy dispersive spectrometry and X-ray diffraction techniques. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the samples contained Co, Cu, CuO, CoCu2O3, CoCuO2 phases in different proportions depending on the heat treatment regimes. The formation of dendrite Co phase rendered the spinodal decomposition while the oxidations prevent the initiation of the spinodal decomposition even for a deep long aging inside the miscibility gap. Since the Bragg reflections from different phases of Co–Cu alloy significantly overlap, the crystal structural parameters were refined with FULLPROF program. The shifts in the refined lattice constants (a, b and c, the space group and the grain size were found to be phase- and heat treatment-dependant. Two-dimensional computer simulations were conducted to study the phase decomposition of Co–Cu binary alloy systems. The excess free energy as well as the strain energy, without a priori knowledge of the shape or the position of the new phase, was precisely evaluated. The results indicate that the morphology and the shape of the microstructure agree with SEM observation.

  15. Nondestructive detection of an undesirable metallic phase, T.sub.1, during processing of aluminum-lithium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Otto; Bracci, David J.; Jiles, David C.; Brasche, Lisa J. H.; Shield, Jeffrey E.; Chumbley, Leonard S.

    1990-08-07

    A method is disclosed for detecting the T.sub.1 phase in aluminum-lithium alloys through simultaneous measurement of conductivity and hardness. In employing eddy current to measure conductivity, when the eddy current decreases with aging of the alloy, while the hardness of the material continues to increase, the presence of the T.sub.1 phase may be detected.

  16. Phase separation and antisite defects in the thermoelectric TiNiSn half-Heusler alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirievsky, K.; Gelbstein, Y.; Fuks, D.

    2013-01-01

    The half-Heusler TiNiSn alloys have recently gained an attention as promising candidates for thermoelectric applications. Improvement of these alloys for such applications can be obtained by both electronic and compositional optimizations. The latter can result in a miscibility gap, allowing a phase separation in the nano-scale and consequently a thermal conductivity reduction. Combination of ab initio calculations and statistical thermodynamics was applied for studying the relative stability of a number of superstructures in TiNiSn based alloys. The quasi-binary phase diagram beyond T=0 K for TiNiSn–TiNi 2 Sn solid solutions was calculated using energy parameters extracted from the total energy calculations for ordered structures in the Ni sublattice. We demonstrated that a decomposition of the off-stoichiometric Ni-rich half-Heusler alloy into the stoichiometric TiNiSn phase and into Ni deficient Heusler TiNi 2 Sn phase occurs at elevated temperatures—an effect which recently had been observed experimentally. Furthermore, favorable energetic conditions for antisite defects formation were deduced, based on calculations of the energy of formation, an effect which was explained as a cooperative process of partial disordering on the Ni sublattice. The influence of these two effects on improvement of the thermoelectric performance of TiNiSn based half Heusler compounds is discussed. - Graphical abstract: Phase separation and antisite defects in the thermoelectric TiNiSn alloy, are covered as methods for nanostructuring and thereby enhancement of the thermoelectric potential. - Highlights: • Ab initio calculations/statistical thermodynamics was applied for studying the TiNiSn system. • The phase diagram for TiNiSn–TiNi 2 Sn solid solutions was calculated. • Decomposition of the Ni-rich HH into TiNiSn and Ni deficient TiNi 2 Sn phases was observed. • Favorable energetic conditions for antisite defects formation were deduced

  17. Unusual morphology of the omega phase in a Zr-1.75 At. pct Ni alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, D.; Mukhopadhyay, P.; Ramadasan, E.; Banerjee, S.

    1993-01-01

    The observations reported in the present communication were made in the course of a microstructural investigation on dilute Zr-Ni alloys. The alloys were prepared from nuclear-grade sponge zirconium and high-purity nickel by nonconsumable arc melting. Repeated melting was carried out to enhance homogeneity. A master alloy was used in the preparation of very dilute alloys. The observations reported here clearly indicate that the formation of the ω phase on β quenching, can occur in the binary Zr-Ni system at very low solute concentrations, suggesting that nickel is a strong ω stabilizer. Such a situation is known to obtain in the binary Zr-Mo system also. However, the unusual ω morphology observed in the present work has not been reported in the context of dilute Zr-Mo alloys. The appearance of sharp ω reflections and the absence of streaking and diffuse distributions in the selected area electron diffraction (SAD) patterns suggest that the Zr-1.75 at. pct Ni composition lies toward the solute lean end of the composition range associated with the formation of the athermal ω phase in the binary Zr-Ni system. In a more dilute Zr-Ni alloy (Zr-1.30 at. pct Ni), no athermal ω could be observed in β quenched specimens. The absence of streaking is also consistent with the fact that the ω phase in the β quenched Zr-1.75 at. pct Ni alloy did not occur in the form of very fine precipitates. The unusual ω morphology encountered in this work merits further investigation

  18. Nickel-based gadolinium alloy for neutron adsorption application in ram packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robino, C.; McConnell, P.; Mizia, R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper will outline the results of a metallurgical development program that is investigating the alloying of gadolinium into a nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy matrix. Gadolinium has been chosen as the neutron absorption alloying element due to its high thermal neutron absorption cross section and low solubility in the expected U.S. repository environment. The nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy family was chosen for its known corrosion performance, mechanical properties, and weldability. The workflow of this program includes chemical composition definition, primary and secondary melting studies, ingot conversion processes, properties testing, and national consensus codes and standards work. The microstructural investigation of these alloys shows that the gadolinium addition is not soluble in the primary austenite metallurgical phase and is present in the alloy as gadolinium-rich second phase. This is similar to what is observed in a stainless steel alloyed with boron. The mechanical strength values are similar to those expected for commercial Ni-Cr-Mo alloys. The alloys have been corrosion tested in simulated Yucca Mountain aqueous chemistries with acceptable results. The initial results of weldability tests have also been acceptable. Neutronic testing in a moderated critical array has generated favorable results. An American Society for Testing and Materials material specification has been issued for the alloy and a Code Case has been submitted to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers for code qualification. The ultimate goal is acceptance of the alloy for use at the Yucca Mountain repository

  19. Some new characteristics of the strengthening phase in β-phase magnesium-lithium alloys containing aluminum and beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Guangsheng; Staiger, Mark; Kral, Milo

    2004-01-01

    Hardness, optical-microscopy and X-ray diffraction studies on the strengthening phase in β-phase magnesium-lithium alloys containing different content of aluminum were carried out to give some new characteristics of the strengthening phase affecting lattice distortion and α-Mg precipitation in the β-matrix. In the presence of the strengthening-phase precipitates, the matrix lattice undergoes substantial strain characterized by peak broadening. The peak width in the β-matrix phase pattern can provide an indication of lattice strain caused by the strengthening-phase precipitates. The origin of α-Mg precipitation resulting from the decomposition of the strengthening phase into stable AlLi compound is also explained in the present work

  20. Microstructure and phase evolution during the dealloying of bi-phase Al–Ag alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, T.T.; Gao, Y.L.; Zhang, Z.H.; Zhai, Q.J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Selective leaching of α-Al(Ag) and Ag 2 Al occurs simultaneously during dealloying. ► Diffusion of Al and vacancy controlled mechanism dominate the etching of Ag 2 Al. ► The coarsening of ligaments in NPS follows a time dependence of d ∝t 2/5 . - Abstract: The chemical dealloying of bi-phase Al-35Ag alloy has been investigated within the parting limit. The dealloying of α-Al(Ag) and Ag 2 Al commenced simultaneously, and all α-Al(Ag) and part of Ag 2 Al were dealloyed, leaving residual Ag 2 Al to be dealloyed afterwards. The dealloying of the residual Ag 2 Al is associated with vacancy controlled mechanism and diffusion of Al atoms. It is revealed that the diffusions of the Al and Ag atoms during dealloying are significant. The Ag skeletons formed at the initial stage, and became coarsened gradually with a time dependence of d ∝t 2/5 , illustrating the vital role of diffusion of Ag atoms.

  1. A new method to determinate phase transformation in shape memory alloys: infrared thermography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bubulinca, C.; Balandraud, X.; Grediac, M.; Plaiasu, G. A.; Abrudeanu, M.; Stanciu, S.

    2013-01-01

    In this article it is presented a shape memory alloy case, based on copper, namely Cu-Zn-Al, which is subjected to periodic mechanical traction. Traction is performed in conditions of normal temperature and pressure. The purpose of this article it is to study stress induced phase transformation. All tests are performed in same conditions. Transformation on which is based this effect occurs in two ways: by applying a stress or temperature variation. In this article it is studied stress induced phase transformation. The method to analyze the microstructure of an shape memory alloy (SMA) is relatively new and it is based on tracking the evolution of temperature. After thermal analysis we can decide in which state is one alloy without any other supplier measures (differential scanning calorimetric or electrical resistivity). If our specimen will producing thermal energy when specimen is tensile he is austenitic. If absorbing heat during the first deformation is in martensitic state. (authors)

  2. Effect of alloying element partitioning on ferrite hardening in a low alloy ferrite-martensite dual phase steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebrahimian, A., E-mail: ebrahimiana@yahoo.com; Ghasemi Banadkouki, S.S.

    2016-11-20

    In this paper, the effect of carbon and other alloying elements partitioning on ferrite hardening behavior were studied in details using a low alloy AISI4340 ferrite-martensite dual phase (DP) steel. To do so, various re-austenitised samples at 860 °C for 60 min were isothermally heated at 650 °C from 3 to 60 min and then water–quenched to obtain the final ferrite-martensite DP microstructures containing different ferrite and martensite volume fractions. Light and electron microscopic observations were supplemented with electron dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and nanoindentation tests to explore the localized compositional and hardening variations within ferrite grains in DP samples. The experimental results showed that the ferrite hardness was varied with progress of austenite to ferrite phase transformation in DP samples. In the case of a particular ferrite grain in a particular DP sample, despite a homogeneous distribution of carbon concentration, the ferrite hardness was significantly increased by increasing distance from the central location toward the interfacial α/γ areas. Beside a considerable influence of martensitic phase transformation on adjacent ferrite hardness, these results were rationalized in part to the significant level of Cr and Mo pile-up at α/γ interfaces leading to higher solid solution hardening effect of these regions. The reduction of potential energy developed by attractive interaction between C-Cr and C-Mo couples toward the carbon enriched prior austenite areas were the dominating driving force for pile-up segregation.

  3. The role of intermetallic phases in the corrosion of magnesium-rare earth alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva Campos, Maria del Rosario

    2016-07-25

    A new concept to develop a RE based Mg alloy with improved corrosion resistance was followed in the current work. Based on subsequent characterisation steps to eliminate less suitable RE elements the best microstructure for improved corrosion resistance was identified. At first, the corrosion properties of selected RE elements were determined. Based on these results RE elements that have a potential to enhance the corrosion resistance of Mg-RE alloys were selected. Two aspects of RE elements were important for the selection: the electrochemical properties and the solid solubility in Mg. If the solubility limit of RE elements in the Mg matrix is exceeded, they form intermetallic phases with Mg. By performing galvanic coupling measurements the compatibility between Mg matrix and intermetallic phases were estimated. At that point three binary Mg-RE alloys systems remained (Mg-Ce, Mg-La, and Mg-Gd). To evaluate the influence of composition (amount of intermetallic phases) on the corrosion behaviour, four concentrations were cast with 1, 5, 10 and 15 wt. % of RE. Ce and La have a lower solid solubility in Mg matrix generating higher volume fraction of the secondary phases, thus higher dissolution rates in the binary Mg-RE alloys. While Gd with higher solid solubility shows a different behaviour. Additions of up to 10 wt. % Gd resulted in similar behaviour compared to 1 wt. % Gd addition. The most promising results were obtained for the Mg-Gd system with 10 wt. % Gd. Thus, the microstructure of this alloy was further modified by heat treatments to understand the influence of microstructural changes on corrosion behaviour. A ternary element was used to attempt further optimisation of the corrosion performance. Additions of Al, Zn, Ga and Y did not show any improvement in the corrosion resistance of Mg10Gd. This is due to increasing volume fractions of critical more noble phases and the microstructure dominated by eutectic phase formation. Thus galvanic effects became much

  4. The role of intermetallic phases in the corrosion of magnesium-rare earth alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Campos, Maria del Rosario

    2016-01-01

    A new concept to develop a RE based Mg alloy with improved corrosion resistance was followed in the current work. Based on subsequent characterisation steps to eliminate less suitable RE elements the best microstructure for improved corrosion resistance was identified. At first, the corrosion properties of selected RE elements were determined. Based on these results RE elements that have a potential to enhance the corrosion resistance of Mg-RE alloys were selected. Two aspects of RE elements were important for the selection: the electrochemical properties and the solid solubility in Mg. If the solubility limit of RE elements in the Mg matrix is exceeded, they form intermetallic phases with Mg. By performing galvanic coupling measurements the compatibility between Mg matrix and intermetallic phases were estimated. At that point three binary Mg-RE alloys systems remained (Mg-Ce, Mg-La, and Mg-Gd). To evaluate the influence of composition (amount of intermetallic phases) on the corrosion behaviour, four concentrations were cast with 1, 5, 10 and 15 wt. % of RE. Ce and La have a lower solid solubility in Mg matrix generating higher volume fraction of the secondary phases, thus higher dissolution rates in the binary Mg-RE alloys. While Gd with higher solid solubility shows a different behaviour. Additions of up to 10 wt. % Gd resulted in similar behaviour compared to 1 wt. % Gd addition. The most promising results were obtained for the Mg-Gd system with 10 wt. % Gd. Thus, the microstructure of this alloy was further modified by heat treatments to understand the influence of microstructural changes on corrosion behaviour. A ternary element was used to attempt further optimisation of the corrosion performance. Additions of Al, Zn, Ga and Y did not show any improvement in the corrosion resistance of Mg10Gd. This is due to increasing volume fractions of critical more noble phases and the microstructure dominated by eutectic phase formation. Thus galvanic effects became much

  5. Phase evolution and its effects on the magnetic performance of nanocrystalline SmCo7 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhexu; Song Xiaoyan; Xu Wenwu

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of the phase constitution and the microstructure, as well as their effects on magnetic performance, were investigated systematically using a prepared nanocrystalline single-phase SmCo 7 alloy as the starting material for a series of annealing processes. The SmCo 7 (1:7 H) phase was discovered to have a good single-phase stability from room temperature up to 600 deg. C. The destabilization of the SmCo 7 phase results in the formation of the Sm 2 Co 17 (2:17 R) and SmCo 5 (1:5 H) phases, which exist as phase-transformation twins and particulate precipitates, respectively, with a completely coherent relationship with the 1:7 H parent phase. For the first time the formation mechanism of the 2:17 R phase-transformation twins has been proposed, in which the ordered substitution of 1/3 of the Sm atoms by Co-Co dumbbell pairs along two particular crystal directions was demonstrated. The characteristic width values of the 2:17 R phase-transformation twins, as deduced from this model of the mechanism, were unambiguously verified by the experimental results. Among the SmCo 7 alloys with various phase constitutions and microstructures, the best magnetic properties were obtained in the nanocrystalline 1:7 H single-phase alloys. The present work may promote a new understanding of nanoscale-stabilized single-phase SmCo 7 and its potential applications as unique high-temperature permanent magnets.

  6. Toughened cyanate ester alloys via reaction-induced phase separation; Hanno yuhatsugataso bunkai ni yoru taishogekisei cyanate ester alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirohata, T.; Kuroda, M.; Nishimura, A. [Sumitomo Electric Industries, Ltd., Osaka (Japan); Inoue, T. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-03-15

    For the purpose of toughening the matrices of fiber-reinforced plastics (FRPs), the effect of thermosetting/thermoplastic polymer alloys based on cyanate ester alloys is investigated. In the experiment, materials are heated and then allowed to set, which are mixtures of 87.0-43.5wt% of cyanate ester resin, 0-43.5wt% of epoxy resin, and 13.0wt% of soluble polyimide. FRP properties are examined by measuring the after-shock compressive strength, flexural elasticity and flaxural strength, and by performing morphology observation. It is then found that a cyanate ester/soluble polyimide system forms a polymer alloy with phase separation, that its glass transition temperature does not drop, and that the rupture strength is increased approximately twice. A carbon fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) incorporating this system is twice higher in after-shock compression strength than a CFRP incorporating a cyanate ester. The system withstands high temperatures, retaining at 200degC approximately 90% of the elastic modulus it exhibits at room temperature. 15 refs., 16 figs.

  7. Identification of phases in zinc alloy powders using electron backscatter diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, Martin G. [Graduate Center for Materials Research, University of Missouri-Rolla, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Kenik, Edward A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 100 Bethel Valley Rd., Bldg. 4515, MS-6064, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); O' Keefe, Matthew J. [Graduate Center for Materials Research, University of Missouri-Rolla, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States)]. E-mail: mjokeefe@umr.edu; Miller, F. Scott [Graduate Center for Materials Research, University of Missouri-Rolla, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Johnson, Benedict [Graduate Center for Materials Research, University of Missouri-Rolla, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States)

    2006-05-25

    Scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) were used for the structural characterization of phases in Zn alloy powders. Commercial Zn alloy powders contained additions of <1000 ppm of Bi, In, Al or Mg. Bismuth and In have extremely low solubility in Zn and form intermetallic Bi-In compounds which segregate to the Zn grain boundaries. The Bi-In phases were <0.3 {mu}m in size, had low melting points, and were not abundant enough for EBSD analysis. Increasing the alloying additions 20-40-fold resulted in Bi-In phases >1 {mu}m that could be used for EBSD analysis for phase characterization. Deformation-free microstructures were obtained by mechanical polishing and ion milling. The Zn matrix was characterized as Zn via EBSD. A BiIn{sub 2} phase was identified in the powder microstructures via EBSD. An In phase with 8-9 wt.% Bi was identified using low voltage energy dispersive spectroscopy and closely matched the composition predicted by the Bi-In phase diagram.

  8. Preferential site occupancy of alloying elements in TiAl-based phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holec, David, E-mail: david.holec@unileoben.ac.at; Reddy, Rajeev K.; Klein, Thomas; Clemens, Helmut [Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversität Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria)

    2016-05-28

    First principles calculations are used to study the preferential occupation of ternary alloying additions into the binary Ti-Al phases, namely, γ-TiAl, α{sub 2}-Ti{sub 3}Al, β{sub o}-TiAl, and B19-TiAl. While the early transition metals (TMs, group IVB, VB, and VIB elements) prefer to substitute for Ti atoms in the γ-, α{sub 2}-, and B19-phases, they preferentially occupy Al sites in the β{sub o}-TiAl. Si is, in this context, an anomaly, as it prefers to sit on the Al sublattice for all four phases. B and C are shown to prefer octahedral Ti-rich interstitial positions instead of substitutional incorporation. The site preference energy is linked with the alloying-induced changes of energy of formation, hence alloying-related (de)stabilisation of the phases. We further show that the phase-stabilisation effect of early TMs on β{sub o}-phase has a different origin depending on their valency. Finally, an extensive comparison of our predictions with available theoretical and experimental data (which is, however, limited mostly to the γ-phase) shows a consistent picture.

  9. Determination of the single-phase constitutive relations of α/β dual phase TC6 titanium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Ran; Li, Guoju [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Materials Under Shock and Impact, Beijing 100081 (China); Nie, Zhihua [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Fan, Qunbo, E-mail: fanqunbo@bit.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Materials Under Shock and Impact, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2016-10-15

    The constitutive relations of α and β phases in a TC6 titanium alloy were determined by implementing a two-phase elastic-plastic self-consistent (EPSC) framework combined with the evolution of lattice strains; these strains were obtained via in-situ tensile loading synchrotron-based x-ray diffraction experiments. It was found that the {200}{sub β} reflection has the lowest stiffness and load partitions prior to the α phase during the elastic loading stage in this alloy. The simulated parameters including the diffraction elastic constant and initial yield stress of lattice reflections exhibited satisfactory correspondence with the experimental results. Further analysis of the characteristics of the Schmid Factor (SF) distributions of the main slip systems revealed that the elastic-plastic transition process in the α phase occurs over a prolonged period. In contrast, the β phase undergoes a transient process owing to its relatively more concentrated SF frequency distributions, than those of the α phase. In addition, the fitted stress-strain curve of each phase was compared with the measured macro stress-strain curve obtained from the in-situ experiment. It revealed Young's moduli of 110.3 GPa and 104.5 GPa, and yield stresses of 877.8 MPa and 969 MPa, for the α and β phases, respectively.

  10. Effect of applied strain on phase separation of Fe-28 at.% Cr alloy: 3D phase-field simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lihui; Li, Yongsheng; Liu, Chengwei; Chen, Shi; Shi, Shujing; Jin, Shengshun

    2018-04-01

    A quantitative simulation of the separation of the α‧ phase in Fe-28 at.% Cr alloy under the effects of applied strain is performed by utilizing a three-dimensional phase-field model. The elongation of the Cr-enriched α‧ phase becomes obvious with the influence of applied uniaxial strain for the phase separation transforms from spinodal decomposition of 700 K to nucleation and growth of 773 K. The applied strain shows a significant influence on the early stage phase separation, and the influence is enlarged with the elevated temperature. The steady-state coarsening with the mechanism of spinodal decomposition is substantially affected by the applied strain for low-temperature aging, while the influence is reduced as the temperature increases and as the phase separation mechanism changes to nucleation and growth. The peak value of particle size distribution decreases, and the PSD for 773 K becomes more widely influenced by the applied strain. The simulation results of separation of the Cr-enriched α‧ phase with the applied strain provide a further understanding of the strain effect on the phase separation of Fe-Cr alloys from the metastable region to spinodal regions.

  11. Al-Cu-Li and Al-Mg-Li alloys: Phase composition, texture, and anisotropy of mechanical properties (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betsofen, S. Ya.; Antipov, V. V.; Knyazev, M. I.

    2016-04-01

    The results of studying the phase transformations, the texture formation, and the anisotropy of the mechanical properties in Al-Cu-Li and Al-Mg-Li alloys are generalized. A technique and equations are developed to calculate the amounts of the S1 (Al2MgLi), T1 (Al2CuLi), and δ' (Al3Li) phases. The fraction of the δ' phase in Al-Cu-Li alloys is shown to be significantly higher than in Al-Mg-Li alloys. Therefore, the role of the T1 phase in the hardening of Al-Cu-Li alloys is thought to be overestimated, especially in alloys with more than 1.5% Li. A new model is proposed to describe the hardening of Al-Cu-Li alloys upon aging, and the results obtained with this model agree well with the experimental data. A texture, which is analogous to that in aluminum alloys, is shown to form in sheets semiproducts made of Al-Cu-Li and Al-Mg-Li alloys. The more pronounced anisotropy of the properties of lithium-containing aluminum alloys is caused by a significant fraction of the ordered coherent δ' phase, the deformation mechanism in which differs radically from that in the solid solution.

  12. Permeation of chromium salts through human skin in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Fullerton, A; Avnstorp, C

    1992-01-01

    Chromium permeation studies were performed on full thickness human skin in diffusion cells. All samples were analysed for the total chromium content by graphite furnace Zeeman-corrected atomic absorption spectrometry. Some samples were analysed by an ion chromatographic method permitting...... the simultaneous determination of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) as well. The amounts of chromium found in all skin layers were significantly higher when potassium dichromate was applied to the skin compared with chromium chloride or chromium nitrate. Chromium could only be detected in the recipient phase after application...... of the dichromate solution. Chromium skin levels increased with increasing concentrations of applied chromium salts up to 0.034 M Cr. The amount of chromium in recipient phase and skin layers increased with increasing pH when the applied solution contained potassium dichromate. This was ascribed to a decreased skin...

  13. Effect of Second Phase Particles on the Tensile Instability of a Nanostructured Al-1%Si Alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Tian Lin; Wu, Gui Lin; Liu, Qing

    2014-01-01

    A nanostructured Al-1%Si alloy containing dispersed Si particles was produced by heavily cold-rolling to study the effect of second phase particles on the tensile instability of nanostructured metals. Tensile tests were conducted on the as-deformed sample and the samples after recovery annealing ...

  14. Volta potential of second phase particles in extruded AZ80 magnesium alloy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andreatta, F.; Apachitei, I.; Kodentsov, A.; Dzwonczyk, J.; Duszcyk, J.

    2006-01-01

    Magnesium alloys show strong susceptibility to localized corrosion when immersed in aggressive solutions (e.g. chlorides). The existence of second phase particles in the microstructure might represent initiation sites for localized corrosion. This is due to the formation of galvanic couples between

  15. Thermodynamic analysis of 6xxx series Al alloys: Phase fraction diagrams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui S.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Microstructural evolution of 6xxx Al alloys during various metallurgical processes was analyzed using accurate thermodynamic database. Phase fractions of all the possible precipitate phases which can form in the as-cast and equilibrium states of the Al-Mg-Si-Cu-Fe-Mn-Cr alloys were calculated over the technically useful composition range. The influence of minor elements such as Cu, Fe, Mn, and Cr on the amount of each type of precipitate in the as-cast and equilibrium conditions were analyzed. Phase fraction diagrams at 500 °C were mapped in the composition range of 0-1.1 wt.% Mg and 0-0.7 wt.% Si to investigate the as-homogenized microstructure. In addition, phase fraction diagram of Mg2Si at 177 °C was mapped to understand the microstructure after final annealing of 6xxx Al alloy. Based on the calculated diagrams, the design strategy of 6xxx Al alloy to produce highest strength due to Mg2Si is discussed.

  16. The Effect of Grain Size on Mechanical Instability in Single-Phase Li-Alloy Anodes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wolfenstine, Jeff

    2000-01-01

    .... The results of this study suggest that decreasing the particle and/or grain size is not a practical approach to solving the mechanical instability problem of single phase Li alloys that are intended to be used as anodes in Li-ion batteries.

  17. Evaluation of microstructure and phase relations in a powder processed Ti-44Al-12Nb alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, S.G.; Reddy, R.G.; Wu, J.; Holthus, J.

    1995-01-01

    Titanium aluminides based on the ordered face-centered tetragonal γTiAl phase possess attractive properties, such as low density, high melting point, good elevated temperature strength, modulus retention, and oxidation resistance, making these alloys potential high-temperature structural materials. These alloys can be processed by both ingot metallurgy and powder metallurgy routes. In the present study, three variations of the powder metallurgy route were studied to process a Ti-44Al-12Nb (at.%) alloy: (a) cold pressing followed by reaction sintering (CP process); (b) cold pressing, vacuum hot pressing, and then sintering (HP process); and (c) arc melting, hydride-dehydride process to make the alloy powder, cold isostatic pressing, and then sintering (AM process). Microstructural and phase relations were studied by x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with an energy-dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The phases identified were Ti 3 Al and TiAl; an additional Nb 2 Al phase was observed in the HP sample. The microstructures of CP and HP processed samples are porous and chemically inhomogeneous whereas the AM processed sample revealed fine equiaxed microstructure. This refinement of the microstructure is attributed to the fine, homogeneous powder produced by the hydride-dehydride process and the high compaction pressures

  18. Phase composition of rapidly solidified Ag-Sn-Cu dental alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecong Dzuong; Do Minh Nghiep; Nguyen van Dzan; Cao the Ha

    1996-01-01

    The phase composition of some rapidly solidified Ag-Sn-Cu dental alloys with different copper contents (6.22 wtpct) has been studied by XRD, EMPA and optical microscopy. The samples were prepared from melt-spun ribbons. The microstructure of the as-quenched ribbons was microcrystalline and consisted of the Ag sub 3 Sn, Ag sub 4 Sn, Cu sub 3 Sn and Cu sub 3 Sn sub 8 phases. Mixing with mercury (amalgamation) led to formation of the Ag sub 2 Hg sub 3, Sn sub 7 Hg and Cu sub 6 Sn sub 5 phases. The amount of copper atoms in the alloys played an important role in phase formation in the amalgams

  19. Density functional simulations of Sb-rich GeSbTe phase change alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabardi, S; Bernasconi, M; Caravati, S; Parrinello, M

    2012-01-01

    We generated models of the amorphous phase of Sb-rich GeSbTe phase change alloys by quenching from the melt within density functional molecular dynamics. We considered the two compositions Ge 1 Sb 1 Te 1 and Ge 2 Sb 4 Te 5 . Comparison with previous results on the most studied Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 allowed us to draw some conclusions on the dependence of the structural properties of the amorphous phase on the alloy composition. Vibrational and electronic properties were also scrutinized. Phonons at high frequencies above 200 cm -1 are localized in tetrahedra around Ge atoms in Sb-rich compounds as well as in Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 . All compounds are semiconducting in the amorphous phase, with a band gap in the range 0.7-1.0 eV.

  20. Density functional simulations of Sb-rich GeSbTe phase change alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabardi, S.; Caravati, S.; Bernasconi, M.; Parrinello, M.

    2012-09-01

    We generated models of the amorphous phase of Sb-rich GeSbTe phase change alloys by quenching from the melt within density functional molecular dynamics. We considered the two compositions Ge1Sb1Te1 and Ge2Sb4Te5. Comparison with previous results on the most studied Ge2Sb2Te5 allowed us to draw some conclusions on the dependence of the structural properties of the amorphous phase on the alloy composition. Vibrational and electronic properties were also scrutinized. Phonons at high frequencies above 200 cm-1 are localized in tetrahedra around Ge atoms in Sb-rich compounds as well as in Ge2Sb2Te5. All compounds are semiconducting in the amorphous phase, with a band gap in the range 0.7-1.0 eV.

  1. Study the microstructure of three and four component phases in Al-Ni-Fe-La alloys

    KAUST Repository

    Kolobylina, Natalia

    2016-12-21

    Aluminium alloys play a key role in modern engineering since they are the most used non-ferrous material. They have been widely used in automotive, aerospace, and construction engineering due to their good corrosion resistance, superior mechanical properties along with good machinability, weldability, and relatively low cost. The progress in practical application has been determined by intensive research and development works on the Al alloys. A new class of Al–REM–TM aluminum alloys (REM indicates rare earth metal and TM is transition metal) was revealed in the end of the last century. These alloys differ from conventional ones by their extraordinary ability to form metal glasses and nanoscale composites in a wide range of compositions. Having low density, these alloys possess unique mechanical characteristics and corrosion resistance. Two as received alloys, namely Al85Ni9Fe2La4 and Al85Ni7Fe4La4 were obtained in the form of ingots from melts of corresponding compositions upon cooling in air were studied by scanning/transmission electron microscopy (STEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) microanalysis and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The microstructural analyses were performed in a aberration corrected TITAN 80-300 TEM/STEM (FEI, USA) attached with EDX spectrometer with ultrathin window (EDAX, USA). The specimens for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were prepared by an electrochemical or ion etching. It was found that the received alloys exhibits along with fcc Al and Al4La (Al11La3) particles, these alloys contain a ternary phase Al3Ni1 Fe isostructural to the Al3Ni phase and a quaternary phase Al8Fe2 NiLa isostructural to the Al8Fe2Eu phase and monoclinic phase Al9(Fe,Ni)2 isostructural to the Al9Co2. The study by HRSTEM together with a new atomic resolution energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis method demonstrated that Fe and Ni atoms substituted one another in the Al8Fe2–NiLa quaternary compound. Besides, several types of defects were determined: first

  2. Thermal stability and phase transformations of martensitic Ti–Nb alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Bönisch, Mariana Calin, Thomas Waitz, Ajit Panigrahi, Michael Zehetbauer, Annett Gebert, Werner Skrotzki and Jürgen Eckert

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at understanding the governing microstructural phenomena during heat treatments of Ni-free Ti-based shape memory materials for biomedical applications, a series of Ti–Nb alloys with Nb concentrations up to 29 wt% was produced by cold-crucible casting, followed by homogenization treatment and water quenching. Despite the large amount of literature available concerning the thermal stability and ageing behavior of Ti–Nb alloys, only few studies were performed dealing with the isochronal transformation behavior of initially martensitic Ti–Nb alloys. In this work, the formation of martensites (α' and α'' and their stability under different thermal processing conditions were investigated by a combination of x-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, dilatometry and electron microscopy. The effect of Nb additions on the structural competition in correlation with stable and metastable phase diagrams was also studied. Alloys with 24 wt% Nb or less undergo a transformation sequence on heating from room temperature to 1155 K. In alloys containing >24 wt% Nb α'' martensitically reverts back to β0, which is highly unstable against chemical demixing by formation of isothermal ωiso. During slow cooling from the single phase β domain α precipitates and only very limited amounts of α'' martensite form.

  3. The influence of surface microchemistry in protective film formation on multi-phase magnesium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray-Munro, J.E.; Luan, B.; Huntington, L.

    2008-01-01

    The high strength:weight ratio of magnesium alloys makes them an ideal metal for automotive and aerospace applications where weight reduction is of significant concern. Unfortunately, magnesium alloys are highly susceptible to corrosion particularly in salt-spray conditions. This has limited their use in the automotive and aerospace industries, where exposure to harsh service conditions is unavoidable. The simplest way to avoid corrosion is to coat the magnesium-based substrate by a process such as electroless plating, which is a low-cost, non line of sight process. Magnesium is classified as a difficult to plate metal due to its high reactivity. This means that in the presence of air magnesium very quickly forms a passive oxide layer that must be removed prior to plating. Furthermore, high aluminium content alloys are especially difficult to plate due to the formation of intermetallic species at the grain boundaries, resulting in a non-uniform surface potential across the substrate and thereby further complicating the plating process. The objective of this study is to understand how the magnesium alloy microstructure influences the surface chemistry of the alloy during both pretreatment and immersion copper coating of the substrate. A combination of scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and scanning Auger microscopy has been used to study the surface chemistry at the various stages of the coating process. Our results indicate that the surface chemistry of the alloy is different on the aluminum rich β phase of the material compared to the magnesium matrix which leads to preferential deposition of the metal on the aluminum rich phase of the alloy

  4. Engineered Alloy Structures by Friction Stir Reaction Processing, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I effort examines the feasibility of an innovative surface modification technology incorporating friction stir reaction processing for producing...

  5. Microstructural anomalies in a W-Ni alloy liquid phase sintered under microgravity conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.; Iacocca, R.G.; Johnson, J.L.; German, R.M.; Kohara, Shiro

    1995-01-01

    The gravitational role in liquid phase sintering (LPS) is a problem of great interest in both materials science and engineering practice. Gravity-induced microstructural gradients in grain size, grain shape, and solid volume fraction have been well documented in liquid phase sintered tungsten heavy alloys and have been analyzed by a number of theoretical models. However, gravity may have many unknown effects on LPS, which can only be revealed by experiments conducted under microgravity conditions

  6. Martensitic phase transformations in Ni–Ti-based shape memory alloys: The Landau theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shchyglo, Oleg; Salman, Umut; Finel, Alphonse

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple Landau free energy functional for cubic-to-orthorhombic and cubic-to-monoclinic martensitic phase transformations. The functional is derived following group–subgroup relations between different martensitic phases – tetragonal, trigonal, orthorhombic and monoclinic – in order to fully capture the symmetry properties of the free energy of the austenite and martensite phases. The derived free energy functional is fitted to the elastic and thermodynamic properties of NiTi and NiTiCu shape memory alloys which exhibit cubic-to-monoclinic and cubic-to-orthorhombic martensitic phase transformations, respectively.

  7. The effect of molybdenum content with changes in phase and heat capacity of UMo alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslina Br Ginting; Supardjo; Agoeng Kadarjono; Dian Anggraini

    2011-01-01

    Has done the analysis of phase and heat capacity change of the UMo alloy by variation of 7% Mo, 8% and 9% Mo. Analysis performed using phase change Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA) at a temperature between 30°C until 1400°C with heating rate 10°C/minute and heat capacity analysis carried out using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) at a temperature between 30°C to 450°C with heating rate 5°C/minute. The purpose of this study was to determine the character of the UMo alloy include phase change and heat capacity variation with Mo content due to higher content of Mo is expected to change both the character U-7% Mo alloy, U-8% Mo and U-9% Mo. The analysis showed that of 7% Mo, 8% Mo and 9% Mo the combination experiencing α+ δ a phase change becomes α + β phase at temperatures of 578.63°C to 580.16°C. At the temperature 606.50°C to 627.58°C having a phase change of α+ β to β + γ be followed by the endothermic reaction in the content of 9% Mo with the enthalpy ΔH = 6.5989 J / g. At temperatures 1075.45°C up to 1160.51°C phase change β + γ into γ phase. The increase in Mo content to heating at a temperature 1100°C not cause a significant phase change. At temperatures above 1177.21°C, the increase in Mo content leads to changes in the γ phase of forming L + γ phase which followed the reaction of uranium with Mo to form γ phase - solid solution. The higher content of Mo, the reaction heat is needed and released the greater. The results of the analysis of the heat capacity is obtained that the increase in Mo content in the U-7% Mo, U-8% Mo, and U-9% Mo alloy does not give a significant difference in heat capacity. This is attested by doing different test (F test) at 95% degree of confidence. This data is expected to be as a first step to study the manufacture of UMo alloy as a fuel of high uranium density for research reactor. (author)

  8. Deformation characteristics of {delta} phase in the delta-processed Inconel 718 alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, H.Y., E-mail: haiyanzhang@imr.ac.cn [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Zhang, S.H., E-mail: shzhang@imr.ac.cn [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Cheng, M. [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Li, Z.X. [Beijing Institute of Aeronautica1 Materials, Beijing 100095 (China)

    2010-01-15

    The hot working characteristics of {delta} phase in the delta-processed Inconel 718 alloy during isothermal compression deformation at temperature of 950 deg. C and strain rate of 0.005 s{sup -1}, were studied by using optical microscope, scanning electron microscope and quantitative X-ray diffraction technique. The results showed that the dissolution of plate-like {delta} phase and the precipitation of spherical {delta} phase particles coexisted during the deformation, and the content of {delta} phase decreased from 7.05 wt.% to 5.14 wt.%. As a result of deformation breakage and dissolution breakage, the plate-like {delta} phase was spheroidized and transferred to spherical {delta} phase particles. In the center with largest strain, the plate-like {delta} phase disappeared and spherical {delta} phase appeared in the interior of grains and grain boundaries.

  9. Phase change memory based on SnSe{sub 4} alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karanja, J.M.; Karimi, P.M.; Njoroge, W.K. [Physics Department, Kenyatta University, P.O. Box 43844, Nairobi (Kenya); Wamwangi, D.M., E-mail: Daniel.Wamwangi@wits.ac.za [School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, 2050 (South Africa)

    2013-01-01

    A phase change alloy has been synthesized and characterized. The reversible phase transitions between amorphous and crystalline states of SnSe{sub 4} films have been studied using variable electrical pulses and X-ray diffraction. Temperature dependent sheet resistance measurements have shown two distinct resistivity states of more than two orders of magnitude. This high electrical contrast makes the alloy suitable for nonvolatile phase change memory applications. X-ray diffraction has attributed the large electrical contrast to an amorphous–crystalline phase transition. The nonvolatile memory cells have been fabricated using a simple sandwich structure (metal/chalcogenide thin film/metal). A threshold voltage of 3.71 V has been determined for this phase change random access memory cell. Memory switching was initiated using the voltage pulses of 3.71 V, 90 ns, 1.3 V and 26 μs, for the crystallization and amorphization process, respectively. - Highlights: ► Phase transition of SnSe{sub 4} alloys with high set resistivity of 1.43 Ωm ► High transition temperatures of 174 °C ► Transition due to amorphous–crystalline changes ► Threshold switching at a high threshold voltage of 3.71 V.

  10. Dynamic Recrystallization Behavior and Corrosion Resistance of a Dual-Phase Mg-Li Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Liu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The hot deformation and dynamic recrystallization behavior of the dual-phase Mg-9Li-3Al-2Sr-2Y alloy had been investigated using a compression test. The typical dual-phase structure was observed, and average of grain size of as-homogenized alloy is about 110 µm. It mainly contains β-Li, α-Mg, Al4Sr and Al2Y phases. The dynamic recrystallization (DRX kinetic was established based on an Avrami type equation. The onset of the DRX process occurred before the peak of the stress–strain flow curves. It shows that the DRX volume fraction increases with increasing deformation temperature or decreasing strain rate. The microstructure evolution during the hot compression at various temperatures and strain rates had been investigated. The DRX grain size became larger with the increasing testing temperature or decreasing strain rate because the higher temperature or lower strain rate can improve the migration of DRX grain boundaries. The fully recrystallized microstructure can be achieved in a small strain due to the dispersed island-shape α-Mg phases, continuous the Al4Sr phases and spheroidal Al2Y particles, which can accelerate the nucleation. The continuous Al4Sr phases along the grain boundaries are very helpful for enhancing the corrosion resistance of the duplex structured Mg-Li alloy, which can prevent the pitting corrosion and filiform corrosion.

  11. Dynamic Recrystallization Behavior and Corrosion Resistance of a Dual-Phase Mg-Li Alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Xie, Wen; Wei, Guobing; Yang, Yan; Liu, Junwei; Xu, Tiancai; Xie, Weidong; Peng, Xiaodong

    2018-03-09

    The hot deformation and dynamic recrystallization behavior of the dual-phase Mg-9Li-3Al-2Sr-2Y alloy had been investigated using a compression test. The typical dual-phase structure was observed, and average of grain size of as-homogenized alloy is about 110 µm. It mainly contains β-Li, α-Mg, Al₄Sr and Al₂Y phases. The dynamic recrystallization (DRX) kinetic was established based on an Avrami type equation. The onset of the DRX process occurred before the peak of the stress-strain flow curves. It shows that the DRX volume fraction increases with increasing deformation temperature or decreasing strain rate. The microstructure evolution during the hot compression at various temperatures and strain rates had been investigated. The DRX grain size became larger with the increasing testing temperature or decreasing strain rate because the higher temperature or lower strain rate can improve the migration of DRX grain boundaries. The fully recrystallized microstructure can be achieved in a small strain due to the dispersed island-shape α-Mg phases, continuous the Al₄Sr phases and spheroidal Al₂Y particles, which can accelerate the nucleation. The continuous Al₄Sr phases along the grain boundaries are very helpful for enhancing the corrosion resistance of the duplex structured Mg-Li alloy, which can prevent the pitting corrosion and filiform corrosion.

  12. Structure-phase transformations in 36NXTYu highly deformed alloy during aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plotnikov, S.V.; Radashin, M.V.; Alontseva, D.L.

    2001-01-01

    The 36NXTYu alloy - containing 35.39% Ni, 12.43% Cr, 3.08% Ti, 1.22% Al, 0.93% Mn, 0.36% Si, 0.09% Cu , 0.03% C, 0.12% P, 0.09% S and the rest iron - has been examined. Under aging beginning in the alloy the Ni 3 (Al,Yi) type metastable γ'-phase release of with L12 structure is taking place, and then the stable η-phase (Ni 3 Ti, DO 24 ) is occurring. The thin foils structure and micro-diffraction analysis were observed with help of the electron microscope. Fractography has been watched on the scanning electron microscope. For study both phase content and samples texture the DRON-3 diffractometer was applied. The mechanical testing include one-axis static expansion with measurement of a strength limit, conventional fluidity limit, relational extension up to sample breakage. It is shown, that rolling deep levels in the 36NXTYu alloy, in the common case, do not change the structure-phase transformation morphology, but instead of γ'-phase the η-phase is discretely releasing

  13. Phase transition and hydrogen storage properties of Mg–Ga alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Daifeng; Ouyang, Liuzhang; Wu, Cong; Wang, Hui; Liu, Jiangwen; Sun, Lixian; Zhu, Min

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A fully reversible transformation in Mg–Ga–H system with reduced dehydrogenation enthalpy is realized. • The mechanism of phase transformation in the de/hydrogenation of Mg–Ga alloy is revealed. • The de/hydrogenation process of Mg 5 Ga 2 compound is expressed as: Mg 5 Ga 2 + H 2 ↔ 2Mg 2 Ga + MgH 2 . - Abstract: Mg-based alloys are viewed as one of the most promising candidates for hydrogen storage; however, high desorption temperature and the sluggish kinetics of MgH 2 hinder their practical application. Alloying and changing the reaction pathway are effective methods to solve these issues. As the solid solubility of Ga in Mg is 5 wt% at 573 K, the preparation of a Mg(Ga) solid solution at relatively high temperatures was designed in this paper. The phase transition and hydrogen storage properties of the MgH 2 and Mg 5 Ga 2 composite (hereafter referred to as Mg–Ga alloy) were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), pressure–composition-isotherm (PCI) measurements, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The reversible hydrogen storage capacity of Mg–Ga alloy is 5.7 wt% H 2 . During the dehydrogenation process of Mg–Ga alloy, Mg 2 Ga reacts with MgH 2 , initially releasing H 2 and forming Mg 5 Ga 2 ; subsequently, MgH 2 decomposes into Mg with further release of H 2 . The phase transition mechanism of the Mg 5 Ga 2 compound during the dehydrogenation process was also investigated by using in situ XRD analysis. In addition, the dehydrogenation enthalpy and entropy changes, and the apparent activation energy were also calculated

  14. Changes in phase composition and stress state of surface layers of VK20 hard alloy after ion bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platonov, G.L.; Leonov, E.Yu.; Anikin, V.N.; Anikeev, A.I.

    1988-01-01

    Titanium ion bombardment of the surface of the hard VK20 alloy is studied for its effect on variations in the phase and chemical composition of its surface layers. It is stated that ion treatment results in the appearance of the η-phase of Co 6 W 6 C composition in the surface layer of the VK20 alloy, in the increase of distortions and decrease of coherent scattering blocks of the hard alloy carbide phase. Such a bombardment is found to provoke a transition of the plane-stressed state of the hard alloy surface into the volume-stressed state. It is established that ion treatment does not cause an allotropic transition of the cobalt phase α-modification, formed during grinding of the hard alloy, into the β-modification

  15. Modeling creep deformation of a two-phase TiAI/Ti3Al alloy with a lamellar microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomeusz, Michael F.; Wert, John A.

    1994-10-01

    A two-phase TiAl/Ti3Al alloy with a lamellar microstructure has been previously shown to exhibit a lower minimum creep rate than the minimum creep rates of the constituent TiAl and Ti3Al single-phase alloys. Fiducial-line experiments described in the present article demonstrate that the creep rates of the constituent phases within the two-phase TiAl/Ti3Al lamellar alloy tested in compression are more than an order of magnitude lower than the creep rates of single-phase TiAl and Ti3Al alloys tested in compression at the same stress and temperature. Additionally, the fiducial-line experiments show that no interfacial sliding of the phases in the TiAl/Ti3Al lamellar alloy occurs during creep. The lower creep rate of the lamellar alloy is attributed to enhanced hardening of the constituent phases within the lamellar microstructure. A composite-strength model has been formulated to predict the creep rate of the lamellar alloy, taking into account the lower creep rates of the constituent phases within the lamellar micro-structure. Application of the model yields a very good correlation between predicted and experimentally observed minimum creep rates over moderate stress and temperature ranges.

  16. Ion-Molecule Reaction of Gas-Phase Chromium Oxyanions: CrxOyHz- + H2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gianotto, Anita Kay; Hodges, Brittany DM; Benson, Michael Timothy; Harrington, Peter Boves; Appelhans, Anthony David; Olson, John Eric; Groenewold, Gary Steven

    2003-01-01

    Chromium oxyanions having the general formula CrxOyHz- play a key role in many industrial, environmental, and analytical processes, which motivated investigations of their intrinsic reactivity. Reactions with water are perhaps the most significant, and were studied by generating CrxOyHz- in the gas phase using a quadrupole ion trap secondary ion mass spectrometer. Of the ions in the Cr1OyHz envelope (y = 2, 3, 4; z = 0, 1), only CrO2- was observed to react with H2O, producing the hydrated CrO3H2- at a slow rate (∼0.07% of the ion-molecule collision constant at 310 K). CrO3-, CrO4-, and CrO4H- were unreactive. In contrast, Cr2O4-, Cr2O5-, and Cr2O5H2- displayed a considerable tendency to react with H2O. Cr2O4- underwent sequential reactions with H2O, initially producing Cr2O5H2- at a rate that was ∼7% efficient. Cr2O5H2- then reacted with a second H2O by addition to form Cr2O6H4- (1.8% efficient) and by OH abstraction to form Cr2O6H3- (0.6% efficient). The reactions of Cr2O5- were similar to those of Cr2O5H2-: Cr2O5- underwent addition to form Cr2O6H2- (3% efficient) and OH abstraction to form Cr2O6H- (<1% efficient). By comparison, Cr2O6- was unreactive with H2O, and in fact, no further H2O addition could be observed for any of the Cr2O6Hz- anions. Hartree-Fock ab initio calculations showed that reactive CrxOyHz- species underwent nucleophilic attack by the incoming H2O molecules, which produced an initially formed adduct in which the water O was bound to a Cr center. The experimental and computational studies suggested that Cr2OyHz- species that have bi- or tricoordinated Cr centers are susceptible to attack by H2O; however, when the metal becomes tetracoordinate, reactivity stops. For the Cr2OyHz- anions the lowest energy structures all contained rhombic Cr2O2 rings with pendant O atoms and/or OH groups. The initially formed [Cr2Oy- + H2O] adducts underwent H rearrangement to a gem O atom to produce stable dihydroxy structures. The calculations indicated that

  17. On the phase evolution of AlCoCrCuFeMnSix high entropy alloys prepared by mechanical alloying and arc melting route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anil; Chopkar, Manoj

    2018-05-01

    Effect of Si addition on phase formation of AlCoCrCuFeMnSix (x=0, 0.3, 0.6 and 0.9) high entropy alloy have been investigated in this work. The alloys are prepared by mechanical alloying and vacuum arc melting technique. The X-ray diffraction results reveals the formation of mixture of face centered and body centered cubic solid solution phases in milled powders. The addition of Si favours body centered cubic structure formation during milling process. Whereas, after melting the milled powders, body centered phases formed during milling is partial transformed into sigma phases. XRD results were also correlated with the SEM elemental mapping of as casted samples. Addition of Si favours σ phase formation in the as cast samples.

  18. Solid-liquid phase equilibria of Fe-Cr-Al alloys and spinels

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurray, J. W.; Hu, R.; Ushakov, S. V.; Shin, D.; Pint, B. A.; Terrani, K. A.; Navrotsky, A.

    2017-08-01

    Ferritic FeCrAl alloys are candidate accident tolerant cladding materials. There is a paucity of data concerning the melting behavior for FeCrAl and its oxides. Analysis tools have therefore had to utilize assumptions for simulations using FeCrAl cladding. The focus of this study is to examine in some detail the solid-liquid phase equilibria of FeCrAl alloys and spinels with the aim of improving the accuracy of severe accident scenario computational studies.

  19. Phase-field model and its numerical solution for coring and microstructure evolution studies in alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchi, Patrice E. A.; Fattebert, Jean-Luc; Dorr, Milo R.; Wickett, Michael E.; Belak, James F.

    2011-03-01

    We describe an algorithm for the numerical solution of a phase-field model (PFM) of microstructure evolution in alloys using physical parameters from thermodynamic (CALPHAD) and kinetic databases. The coupled system of PFM equations includes a local order parameter, a quaternion representation of local crystal orientation and a species composition parameter. Time evolution of microstructures and alloy composition is obtained using an implicit time integration of the system. Physical parameters in databases can be obtained either through experiment or first-principles calculations. Application to coring studies and microstructure evolution of Au-Ni will be presented. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344

  20. Evidence of new high-pressure magnetic phases in Fe-Pt Invar alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, M.; Endo, S.; Miura, K.; Ono, F.

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the magnetic properties of disordered Fe 70 Pt 30 Invar alloy under high pressure, measurements of the real part of the AC susceptibility (χ) were made under pressure up to 7.5 GPa in the temperature range 4.2-385 K using a cubic anvil high-pressure apparatus. The Curie temperature (T C ) decreased with increasing pressure, and then, two new high-pressure magnetic phases appeared. These results show that the ferromagnetism of Fe-Pt Invar alloy becomes weaker, and the antiferromagnetic interaction becomes dominant with increasing pressure

  1. Effect of hard second-phase particles on the erosion resistance of model alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosel, T.H.; Aptekar, S.S.

    1986-01-01

    The dependence of erosion rate on second phase volume fraction (SPVF) has been studied for Cu/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and Cu/WC(W/sub 2/C) model alloys produced by pressing and sintering. The intention was to investigate the reasons for the poor contribution to erosion resistance made by large hard second phase particles (SPP) in other studies. The results show that for Cu/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ alloys, the erosion rate generally increased with SPVF, demonstrating a negative contribution to erosion resistance. This occurred despite the fact that the measured erosion rate of monolithic Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ was lower by one to two orders of magnitude than that of the pure matrix. Changing from severe erosion with large erodent particles at high velocity to mild conditions with small erodent at low velocity caused a change from depression of the SPPs to protrusion from the surface, with some improvement of the relative erosion resistance compared to the pure matrix. For Cu/WC(W/sub 2/C) alloys, changing from severe to mild erosion conditions caused a change from an increase of erosion with SPVF to a decrease. The results are discussed in terms of the increased microfracture of the unsupported edges of the second phase particles compared to a flat single-phase surface. This edge is consistent with the results, and explains observations not predicted by existing theories for erosion of single-phase materials. A model is introduced which predicts a new averaging law for the erosion rate of a two-phase alloy in terms of erosion rates of its constituent phases

  2. Solid - solid and solid - liquid phase transitions of iron and iron alloys under laser shock compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmand, M.; Krygier, A.; Appel, K.; Galtier, E.; Hartley, N.; Konopkova, Z.; Lee, H. J.; McBride, E. E.; Miyanishi, K.; Nagler, B.; Nemausat, R.; Vinci, T.; Zhu, D.; Ozaki, N.; Fiquet, G.

    2017-12-01

    An accurate knowledge of the properties of iron and iron alloys at high pressures and temperatures is crucial for understanding and modelling planetary interiors. While Earth-size and Super-Earth Exoplanets are being discovered in increasingly large numbers, access to detailed information on liquid properties, melting curves and even solid phases of iron and iron at the pressures and temperatures of their interiors is still strongly limited. In this context, XFEL sources coupled with high-energy lasers afford unique opportunities to measure microscopic structural properties at far extreme conditions. Also the achievable time resolution allows the shock history and phase transition mechanisms to be followed during laser compression, improving our understanding of the high pressure and high strain experiments. Here we present recent studies devoted to investigate the solid-solid and solid-liquid transition in laser-shocked iron and iron alloys (Fe-Si, Fe-C and Fe-O alloys) using X-ray diffraction and X-ray diffuse scattering. Experiment were performed at the MEC end-station of the LCLS facility at SLAC (USA). Detection of the diffuse scattering allowed the identification of the first liquid peak position along the Hugoniot, up to 4 Mbar. The time resolution shows ultrafast (between several tens and several hundreds of picoseconds) solid-solid and solid-liquid phase transitions. Future developments at XFEL facilities will enable detailed studies of the solid and liquid structures of iron and iron alloys as well as out-of-Hugoniot studies.

  3. Structural conditions of achieving maximum ductility of two-phase Ni-NiO alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabin, V.V.; Dabizha, E.V.; Movchan, B.A.

    1984-01-01

    A study was made on possibility of increasing ductility of two-phase Ni-NiO alloys, proJuced by traditional technology: ingot smelting, rolling and corresponding annealing for production of grain with certain size. The correlation of mechanical properties of Ni-NiO alloys and pure nickel shows that completion of the structural conJition D--lambda (where D - the average grain diameter, lambda - the value of free path between particles) in two-phase alloys enables: to increase the ultimate strength 1.5 times and preserve the basic level of pure nickel plasticity - at 20 deg C; to increase plasticity 1.4-1.5 times with preserved basic level of pure nickel plasticity - at 800 deg C. The conclusions testify to possibility of controlling mechanical properties of two-phase alloys using structural D and lambda parameters It is proposed that creation of structures with more unifor m particle distribution with respect to sizes will the accompanied by further increase of plasticity under D=lambda condition

  4. Numerical simulation of solute trapping phenomena using phase-field solidification model for dilute binary alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Silva Furtado

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulation of solute trapping during solidification, using two phase-field model for dilute binary alloys developed by Kim et al. [Phys. Rev. E, 60, 7186 (1999] and Ramirez et al. [Phys. Rev. E, 69, 05167 (2004] is presented here. The simulations on dilute Cu-Ni alloy are in good agreement with one dimensional analytic solution of sharp interface model. Simulation conducted under small solidification velocity using solid-liquid interface thickness (2λ of 8 nanometers reproduced the solute (Cu equilibrium partition coefficient. The spurious numerical solute trapping in solid phase, due to the interface thickness was negligible. A parameter used in analytical solute trapping model was determined by isothermal phase-field simulation of Ni-Cu alloy. Its application to Si-As and Si-Bi alloys reproduced results that agree reasonably well with experimental data. A comparison between the three models of solute trapping (Aziz, Sobolev and Galenko [Phys. Rev. E, 76, 031606 (2007] was performed. It resulted in large differences in predicting the solidification velocity for partition-less solidification, indicating the necessity for new and more acute experimental data.

  5. Phase separation and structure formation in gadolinium based liquid and glassy metallic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Junhee

    2014-01-01

    In this PhD research the liquid-liquid phase separation phenomena in Gd-based alloys was investigated in terms of phase equilibria, microstructure formation upon quenching the melt and corresponding magnetic properties of phase-separated metallic glasses. The phase diagrams of the binary subsystems Gd-Zr and Gd-Ti were experimentally reassessed. Especially the phase equilibria with the liquid phase could be determined directly by combining in situ high energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction with electrostatic levitation of the melt. The Gd-Zr system is of eutectic type with a metastable miscibility gap. The eutectic composition at 18 ± 2 at.% Zr, the liquidus line and the coexistence of bcc-Zr and bcc-Gd at elevated temperature could be determined. The Gd-Ti system is a monotectic system. The experimental observations in this work led to improved new Gd-Zr and Gd-Ti phase diagrams. The phase equilibria of the ternary Gd-Ti-Co system were analyzed for two alloy compositions. The XRD patterns for molten Gd 35 Ti 35 Co 30 gave direct evidence for the coexistence of two liquid phases formed by liquid-liquid phase separation. The first experimental and thermodynamic assessment of the ternary Gd-Ti-Co system revealed that the stable miscibility gap of binary Gd-Ti extends into the ternary Gd-Ti-Co system (up to about 30 at.% Co). New phase-separated metallic glasses were synthesized in Gd-TM-Co-Al (TM = Hf, Ti or Zr) alloys. The microstructure was characterized in terms of composition and cooling rate dependence of phase separation. Due to large positive enthalpy of mixing between Gd on the one side and Hf, Ti or Zr on the other side, the alloys undergo liquid-liquid phase separation during rapid quenching the melt. The parameters determining the microstructure development during phase separation are the thermodynamic properties of the liquid phase, kinetic parameters and quenching conditions. By controlling these parameters and conditions the microstructure can be

  6. Phase transformation in a Ni-Mo-Cr alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dymek, S.; Wrobel, M.; Blicharski, M.; Dollar, M.

    2001-01-01

    The paper gives a characteristic of a nickel-based superalloy containing 25 wt.% Mo and 8 wt.% Cr with particular attention to the influence of a thermochemical and heat treatment on phase transformations. The applied heat treatments are comprised of soaking temperature 1100 o C followed by aging at 650 o C at three conditions: conventional aging for 72 hours, prolonged aging for 4000 hours and prolonged aging for 4000 hours followed by cold working and subsequent aging for 1000 hours. The conventional aging led to the formation of lenticular precipitates of the dispersed metastable Ni 2 (Mo,Cr) phase. The aging for 4000 hours brought about coarsening of the ordered domains without changing their crystallographic and ordering characteristics. The plastic deformation preceded the further aging for 1000 hours accelerated the decomposition of the Ni 2 (Mo,Cr) phase on the mixture of the Ni 3 Mo and Ni 4 Mo-based phases. (author)

  7. Characterization and Computational Modeling of Minor Phases in Alloy LSHR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jou, Herng-Jeng; Olson, Gregory; Gabb, Timothy; Garg, Anita; Miller, Derek

    2012-01-01

    The minor phases of powder metallurgy disk superalloy LSHR were studied. Samples were consistently heat treated at three different temperatures for long times to approach equilibrium. Additional heat treatments were also performed for shorter times, to assess minor phase kinetics in non-equilibrium conditions. Minor phases including MC carbides, M23C6 carbides, M3B2 borides, and sigma were identified. Their average sizes and total area fractions were determined. CALPHAD thermodynamics databases and PrecipiCalc(TradeMark), a computational precipitation modeling tool, were employed with Ni-base thermodynamics and diffusion databases to model and simulate the phase microstructural evolution observed in the experiments with an objective to identify the model limitations and the directions of model enhancement.

  8. Manufacturing For Design of Titanium Alloys, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I program proposes to exploit the tremendous benefits that could be offered by the development of a microstructural refinement and control technology...

  9. Average Structure Evolution of δ-phase Pu-Ga Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Alice Iulia [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Page, Katharine L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Spallation Neutron Source (SNS); Gourdon, Olivier [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Siewenie, Joan E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Spallation Neutron Source (SNS); Richmond, Scott [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Saleh, Tarik A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ramos, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Schwartz, Daniel S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-30

    [Full Text] Plutonium metal is a highly unusual element, exhibiting six allotropes at ambient pressure, from room temperature to its melting point. Many phases of plutonium metal are unstable with temperature, pressure, chemical additions, and time. This strongly affects structure and properties, and becomes of high importance, particularly when considering effects on structural integrity over long time periods. The fcc δ-phase deserves additional attention, not only in the context of understanding the electronic structure of Pu, but also as one of the few high-symmetry actinide phases that can be stabilized down to ambient pressure and room temperature by alloying it with trivalent elements. We will present results on recent work on aging of Pu-2at.%Ga and Pu-7at.%Ga alloys

  10. Variations of Microsegregation and Second Phase Fraction of Binary Mg-Al Alloys with Solidification Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliwal, Manas; Kang, Dae Hoon; Essadiqi, Elhachmi; Jung, In-Ho

    2014-07-01

    A systematic experimental investigation on microsegregation and second phase fraction of Mg-Al binary alloys (3, 6, and 9 wt pct Al) has been carried out over a wide range of cooling rates (0.05 to 700 K/s) by employing various casting techniques. In order to explain the experimental results, a solidification model that takes into account dendrite tip undercooling, eutectic undercooling, solute back diffusion, and secondary dendrite arm coarsening was also developed in dynamic linkage with an accurate thermodynamic database. From the experimental data and solidification model, it was found that the second phase fraction in the solidified microstructure is not determined only by cooling rate but varied independently with thermal gradient and solidification velocity. Lastly, the second phase fraction maps for Mg-Al alloys were calculated from the solidification model.

  11. Metastable Phase Separation and Concomitant Solute Redistribution of Liquid Fe-Cu-Sn Ternary Alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao-Mei, Zhang; Wei-Li, Wang; Ying, Ruan; Bing-Bo, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Liquid Fe-Cu-Sn ternary alloys with lower Sn contents are usually assumed to display a peritectic-type solidification process under equilibrium condition. Here we show that liquid Fe 47.5 Cu 47.5 Sn 5 ternary alloy exhibits a metastable immiscibility gap in the undercooling range of 51–329 K (0.19T L ). Macroscopic phase separation occurs once undercooling exceeds 196 K and causes the formation of a floating Fe-rich zone and a descending Cu-rich zone. Solute redistribution induces the depletion of Sn concentration in the Fe-rich zone and its enrichment in the Cu-rich zone. The primary Fe phase grows dendritically and its growth velocity increases with undercooling until the appearance of notable macrosegregation, but will decrease if undercooling further increases beyond 236 K. The microsegregation degrees of both solutes in Fe and Cu phases vary only slightly with undercooling. (condensed matter: structure, mechanical and thermal properties)

  12. Formation and transformation of binary intermetallic phases in high purity Al-Fe alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griger, A.; Stefaniay, V.; Kovacs-Csetenyi, E.; Turmezey, T.

    1990-01-01

    The solid solubility of iron in aluminium is very low (<0.04%), (all compositions are given in w%) therefore most of the iron content appears as intermetallic phases in combination with aluminium and other elements. The amount of iron does not exceed the level of the eutectic concentration in the commercial aluminium alloys, however the non-desired effect of these primary phases of large size must be taken into consideration. In the case of rapid solidification (RS) the eutectic point shifts to higher values of iron content. The eutectic has a very fine structure and the primary phases formed at high cooling rates have also very low particle size. Because of it, for the sake of improvement of the thermo-mechanical properties of the RS aluminium alloys the quantity of iron can be increased up to 8-10%. Above this concentration the favourable properties do not develop while the elongation decreases

  13. Precipitation kinetics of the phase. gamma. ' in Fe-Ni-Cr alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavassoli, A.A.; Pozarnik, F.

    1984-04-01

    The authors investigated the precipitation and coalescence kinetics of the ..gamma..'phase in alloy 800, an austenitic steel with 33% Ni, 20% Cr and small amounts of Ti and Al. The results led to a law concerning the variation with temperature, ageing, and chemical composition of the particle size in the ..gamma..'phase. This law was used to calculate the variation of the elasticity limit of the alloy due to the formation of the ..gamma..'phase. The calculations were based on the theories of interaction of (weakly and strongly coupled) dislocation pairs with coherent particles ordered without constraint; the anisotropy of tension along the dislocation line was taken into account as well as the influence of the deformation induced by the misfit. A comparison with experimental results shows that averaging does not occur until 2x10/sup 5/ h at operating temperatures below 800 K.

  14. Monotectic four-phase reaction in Al-Bi-Zn alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groebner, J. [Clausthal University of Technology, Institute of Metallurgy, Robert-Koch-Str. 42, D-38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Mirkovic, D. [Clausthal University of Technology, Institute of Metallurgy, Robert-Koch-Str. 42, D-38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Schmid-Fetzer, R. [Clausthal University of Technology, Institute of Metallurgy, Robert-Koch-Str. 42, D-38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)]. E-mail: schmid-fetzer@tu-clausthal.de

    2005-06-15

    Thermodynamic phase diagram calculations were used for the systematic search for a monotectic four-phase reaction in ternary Al-alloys. Systems with intermetallic phases and also the elements Cd and Hg were excluded in the present search. The ternary Al-Bi-Zn is a rare occasion where such a reaction, L' = L' + (Al)' + (Zn), actually occurs. Experimental work could be focused on key samples in that system and involved DSC for thermal analysis and calorimetry, and also metallographic analysis using SEM/EDX. Experimental results verify the existence of the monotectic reaction and were also used for a quantitative thermodynamic modeling of Al-Bi-Zn. Solidification paths and microstructures of Al-Bi-Zn alloys are shown to be rather complex. Using thermodynamic calculations, these rich details involving up to three invariant reactions and unexpected monovariant reaction types can be clearly revealed and understood.

  15. Thermal stability and primary phase of Al-Ni(Cu)-La amorphous alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Zhenghua; Li Jinfu; Rao Qunli; Zhou Youhe

    2008-01-01

    Thermal stability and primary phase of Al 85+x Ni 9-x La 6 (x = 0-6) and Al 85 Ni 9-x Cu x La 6 (x = 0-9) amorphous alloys were investigated by X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimeter. It is revealed that replacing Ni in the Al 85 Ni 9 La 6 alloy by Cu decreases the thermal stability and makes the primary phase change from intermetallic compounds to single fcc-Al as the Cu content reaches and exceeds 4 at.%. When the Ni and La contents are fixed, replacing Al by Cu increases the thermal stability but also promotes the precipitation of single fcc-Al as the primary phase

  16. Short range order and phase separation in Ti-rich Ti-Al alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liew, H.J.

    1999-01-01

    Many metals and alloys are used in service under conditions in which they are metastable or unstable with respect to phase separation or transformation. Analytical and numerical models exist for relatively simple decomposition processes, such as nucleation and growth mechanisms and spinodal decomposition. In reality, however, more complex phase transformations may occur which are less well understood. For example, reactions involving coupled ordering and phase separation, such as the 'conditional spinodal mechanism', have been predicted. A 'conditional spinodal' is defined as a reaction in which compositional phase separation is thermodynamically possible only after a prior process, such as ordering at the parent composition. There is some debate regarding which real alloy systems exhibit such complex behaviour. Previous atom probe field ion microscopy work on titanium-rich titanium-aluminium based alloys has led to the suggestion that formation of the α 2 phase in this system may occur by a complex phase separation process. As well as being of interest from the point of view of fundamental materials science, this has potential engineering significance as the Ti-Al system forms the basis of the current generation of high-temperature Ti-based alloys for compressor applications in jet engines. This thesis describes an investigation into the phase decomposition process taking place in a titanium-rich Ti-Al alloy lying in the two-phase α+α 2 region. Experimentally, a binary alloy containing 15at% aluminium was heat-treated and examined using electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, atom probe field ion microscopy and mechanical testing methods. Neutron diffraction experiments were also completed on this system for the first time. In addition, fully three-dimensional atomistic simulations were conducted using a Monte Carlo computer model based on first principles thermodynamic stability calculations of the Ti-Al system. The results provide an insight into many aspects

  17. Phase Evolution and Mechanical Properties of AlCoCrFeNiSi x High-Entropy Alloys Synthesized by Mechanical Alloying and Spark Plasma Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anil; Swarnakar, Akhilesh Kumar; Chopkar, Manoj

    2018-05-01

    In the current investigation, AlCoCrFeNiSi x (x = 0, 0.3, 0.6 and 0.9 in atomic ratio) high-entropy alloy systems are prepared by mechanical alloying and subsequently consolidated by spark plasma sintering. The microstructural and mechanical properties were analyzed to understand the effect of Si addition in AlCoCrFeNi alloy. The x-ray diffraction analysis reveals the supersaturated solid solution of the body-centered cubic structure after 20 h of ball milling. However, the consolidation promotes the transformation of body-centered phases partially into the face-centered cubic structure and sigma phases. A recently proposed geometric model based on the atomic stress theory has been extended for the first time to classify single phase and multi-phases on the high-entropy alloys prepared by mechanical alloying and spark plasma sintering process. Improved microhardness and better wear resistance were achieved as the Si content increased from 0 to 0.9 in the present high-entropy alloy.

  18. Dual-scale phase-field simulation of Mg-Al alloy solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monas, A; Shchyglo, O; Tegeler, M; Steinbach, I; Höche, D

    2015-01-01

    Phase-field simulations of the nucleation and growth of primary α-Mg phase as well as secondary, β-phase of a Mg-Al alloy are presented. The nucleation model for α- and β-Mg phases is based on the “free growth model” by Greer et al.. After the α-Mg phase solidification we study a divorced eutectic growth of α- and β-Mg phases in a zoomed in melt channel between α-phase dendrites. The simulated cooling curves and final microstructures of α-grains are compared with experiments. In order to further enhance the resolution of the interdendritic region a high-performance computing approach has been used allowing significant simulation speed gain when using supercomputing facilities. (paper)

  19. Non-isothermal kinetic analysis on the phase transformations of Fe–Co–V alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasani, S.; Shamanian, M.; Shafyei, A.; Behjati, P.; Szpunar, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We investigated, occurrence of different phase transformations in a FeCo- 7.15%wt V alloy upon heating to 1200 °C. • We investigated, the determination of the activation energy for these phase transformations by using five isoconversional methods. • We investigated, the calculation of the empirical kinetic triplets by using the invariant kinetic parameters method and fitting model. - Abstract: In this study, occurrence of different phase transformations was investigated in a FeCo-7 wt% V alloy upon heating to 1200 °C by the dilatometry method at different heating rates (5, 10, and 15 °C min −1 ). It was found that four phase transformations (including B2-type atomic ordering in α phase, first stage of polymorphic transformation (α → α r + γ), ordering to disordering, and second stage of polymorphic transformation (α r → γ) occur in this alloy up to 1200 °C. Two isoconversional methods, as Starink and Friedman, were used to determine variation of the activation energy with temperature, E(T). Moreover, the empirical kinetic triplets (E, A, and g(α)) were calculated by the invariant kinetic parameters (IKP) method and fitting model

  20. The speed of growth of the gamma phase comes prime in nickel based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peretti, M.M; Ges, A.M; Versaci, R.A

    2004-01-01

    Nickel-based alloys have a high fraction in volume of precipitate phase. This precipitate phase provides the characteristics of high mechanical resistance to high temperatures and, therefore, a study of the growth of this phase can predict the behavior of the components in service. This work studies the speed of growth in the alloy INCONEL 713C at temperatures of 800 o C, 875 o C and 950 o C with different treatment times. The present phase in this alloy is Ni3(AlTi), with a very high fraction in volume. The follow-up on the growth of the phase was carried out using scanning and transmission electron microscopy techniques. The speed of growth presents modifications that increase and decrease as a function of time. These variations in speed are attributed to modifications in the size and morphology of the precipitate particles. The changes in size and morphology directly influence the interfacial energy that produces the change in the speed of growth (CW)

  1. Application of feal intermetallic phase matrix based alloys in the turbine components of a turbocharger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Cebulski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a possible application of the state-of-the-art alloys based on the FeAl intermetallic phases as materials for the manufacture of heat-proof turbine components in an automobile turbocharger. The research was aimed at determining the resistance to corrosion of Fe40Al5CrTiB alloy in a gaseous environment containing 9 % O2 + 0,2 % HCl + 0,08 % SO2 + N2. First the kinetics of corrosion processes for the considered alloy were determined at the temperatures of 900 °C, 1 000 °C and 1 100 °C, which was followed by validation under operating conditions. To do so, the tests were carried out over a distance of 20 000 km. The last stage involved examination of the surfaces after the test drive. The obtained results are the basis for further research in this field.

  2. Lithium salts as leachable corrosion inhibitors and potential replacement for hexavalent chromium in organic coatings for the protection of aluminum alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, P; Liu, Y; Terryn, H.A.; Mol, J.M.C.

    2016-01-01

    Lithium salts are being investigated as leachable corrosion inhibitor and potential replacement for hexavalent chromium in organic coatings. Model coatings loaded with lithium carbonate or lithium oxalate demonstrated active corrosion inhibition and the formation of a protective layer in a

  3. Phase transformations behavior in a Cu-8.0Ni-1.8Si alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, Q. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China); Li, Z., E-mail: lizhou6931@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China) and Key Laboratory of Nonferrous Metal Materials Science and Engineering, Ministry of Education, Changsha, 410083 (China); Wang, M.P. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China); Key Laboratory of Nonferrous Metal Materials Science and Engineering, Ministry of Education, Changsha, 410083 (China); Zhang, L.; Gong, S. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China); Xiao, Z. [Department of Engineering, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, L693 GH (United Kingdom); Pan, Z.Y. [Hunan Nonferrous Metals Holding Group Co., Ltd., Changsha, 410015 (China)

    2011-02-24

    Research highlights: > High solute concentrations Cu-Ni-Si alloy with super high strength and high conductivity has a good prospect for replacing Cu-Be alloys. At least four different kinds of precipitation products (DO{sub 22} ordered structure, {beta}-Ni{sub 3}Si precipitate, {delta}-Ni{sub 2}Si precipitate and {gamma}-Ni{sub 5}Si{sub 2} precipitate) have been observed in previous investigation. Therefore, the overall phase transformation behavior of Cu-Ni-Si alloy appears to be very complex. And most previous studies on the phase transformation usually investigated the precipitation process at only one temperature or at most a few temperatures, which is far away to establish a time-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagram for Cu-Ni-Si alloy. > The phase transformation behavior of Cu-8.0Ni-1.8Si alloy has been studied systematically at wide temperature range in this paper. The results we have gained are that: after solution treatment, followed by different conditions of isothermal treatment, DO{sub 22} ordering, discontinuous precipitation and continuous precipitation were observed in the alloy; discontinuous precipitates of {beta}-Ni{sub 3}Si phase appeared when the alloy isothermal treated at 550 deg. C for short time, which had not been reported by the previous Cu-Ni-Si system alloy's researchers in their papers; two kinds of precipitates of {beta}-Ni{sub 3}Si and {delta}-Ni{sub 2}Si were determined by the TEM characterization; the orientation relationship between the two kinds of precipitates and Cu-matrix is that: (1 1 0){sub Cu}//(1 1 0){sub {beta}}//(211-bar){sub {delta}}, [112-bar]{sub Cu}//[11-bar 2]{sub {beta}}//[3 2 4]{sub {delta}}; during overaging treatment, Cu-matrix, {beta}-Ni{sub 3}Si, {delta}-Ni{sub 2}Si and {delta}'-Ni{sub 2}Si were distinguished in the samples and the orientation relationship between the precipitates and Cu-matrix can be expressed as that: (0 2 2){sub Cu}//(0 2 2){sub {beta}}//(1 0 0){sub {delta}}, (02-bar 2){sub Cu

  4. Phase selection during pulsed laser annealing of Fe-V alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perepezko, J.H.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Peercy, P.S.

    1987-01-01

    Pulsed laser melting of the low-temperature σ (tetragonal, D8/sub b/) phase has been used to generate a liquid undercooled with respect to the melting point of the higher-temperature, equilibrium α (bcc) solid solution in equiatomic Fe-V alloys. From calculations based on reported thermodynamic data and equilibrium transformation temperatures, the metastable melting point of the σ phase is about 1720 K for an Fe-50 at.% V alloy, which is 54 K below the melting temperature of the α phase. During rapid heating of well-annealed σ-phase material with a 30 ns laser pulse to above melt threshold, the σ → α reaction is suppressed, so that the melt zone is undercooled by -- 54 K with respect to the equilibrium α phase. The α phase nucleates from the undercooled molten surface layer and is retained during the subsequent rapid cooling (-- 10/sup 10/ K/s) because of the relatively sluggish α → σ transformation. X-ray diffraction (Read camera) and TEM identified the σ phase in the near-surface after melting σ with incident laser energies (1.0-1.41 J/cm/sup 2/) which are well above the melt threshold as determined by changes in reflectivity (-- 0.7 J/cm/sup 2/). The α phase nucleated from the undercooled liquid within -- 20 ns

  5. Precipitation behaviors of cubic and tetragonal Zr–rich phase in Al–(Si–)Zr alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Tong [Australian Centre for Microscopy & Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Key Laboratory of Liquid–Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Ceguerra, Anna; Breen, Andrew [Australian Centre for Microscopy & Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Liu, Xiangfa; Wu, Yuying [Key Laboratory of Liquid–Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Ringer, Simon, E-mail: simon.ringer@sydney.edu.au [Australian Centre for Microscopy & Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2016-07-25

    The precipitation behaviors of Zr–rich phase in binary Al–0.5Zr and ternary Al–3Si–0.5Zr alloys were investigated by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and atom probe. After the alloys were aged at 525 °C for 24 h, the precipitates in Al–0.5Zr alloy are identified as L1{sub 2}–ZrAl{sub 3}, performing a coherent relationship with the Al matrix. While in Al–3Si–0.5Zr alloy, the precipitates are Si–containing D0{sub 23}–Zr(Al,Si){sub 3}, which has an approximate 90° reversed cube–on–cube orientation relationship with Al. It is regarded that Si accelerates the precipitation of D0{sub 23}–Zr(Al,Si){sub 3}. - Highlights: • L1{sub 2}–ZrAl{sub 3} and D0{sub 23}–Zr(Al, Si){sub 3} particles precipitate in Al–Zr and Al–Si–Zr alloys. • D0{sub 23}–Zr(Al, Si){sub 3} performs an approximate 90° reversed cube–on–cube orientation relationship with Al. • Si accelerates the precipitation process of D0{sub 23}–Zr(Al,Si){sub 3}.

  6. Electroplating on titanium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    Activation process forms adherent electrodeposits of copper, nickel, and chromium on titanium alloy. Good adhesion of electroplated deposits is obtained by using acetic-hydrofluoric acid anodic activation process.

  7. Theory of phase transformation and reorientation in single crystalline shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, J J; Liang, N G; Cai, M; Liew, K M; Huang, W M

    2008-01-01

    A constitutive model, based on an (n+1)-phase mixture of the Mori–Tanaka average theory, has been developed for stress-induced martensitic transformation and reorientation in single crystalline shape memory alloys. Volume fractions of different martensite lattice correspondence variants are chosen as internal variables to describe microstructural evolution. Macroscopic Gibbs free energy for the phase transformation is derived with thermodynamics principles and the ensemble average method of micro-mechanics. The critical condition and the evolution equation are proposed for both the phase transition and reorientation. This model can also simulate interior hysteresis loops during loading/unloading by switching the critical driving forces when an opposite transition takes place

  8. Phase composition of Al-Ti-Nb-Mo γ alloys in the heat-treatment temperature range: Calculation and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, N. A.; Dashkevich, N. I.; Bel'tyukova, S. O.

    2015-07-01

    The phase composition of TNM-type Al-Ti-Nb-Mo γ alloys at heat-treatment temperatures is quantitatively studied using the Thermo-Calc program package and experimental methods. Isothermal cross sections are calculated and the joint influence of two alloying elements on the phase composition of the alloy is determined at the mean concentration of a third component. Based on the calculations of vertical cross sections, the boundaries of the four-phase eutectoid reaction α → α2 + β + γ are found. The temperature is shown to significantly influence the phase compositions of the γ alloys, among them the mass fractions of various phases (α, β, γ,α2) and the element concentration in them.

  9. Effects of Ni and Mo on the microstructure and some other properties of Co-Cr dental alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matkovic, Tanja; Matkovic, Prosper; Malina, Jadranka

    2004-01-01

    Influences of adding Ni and Mo on the microstructure and properties of as-cast Co-Cr base alloys have been investigated in order to determine the region of their optimal characteristics for biomedical application. The alloys were produced by arc-melting technique under argon atmosphere. Using optical metallography and scanning electron micro analyser it has been established that among 10 samples of Co-Cr-Ni alloys only samples 5 and 9 with the composition Co 55 Cr 40 Ni 5 and Co 60 Cr 30 Ni 10 have appropriate dendritic solidification microstructure. This microstructure, typical for commercial dental alloys, appears and beside greater number of as-cast Co-Cr-Mo alloys. The results of hardness and corrosion resistance measurements revealed the strong influence of different alloy chemistry and of as-cast microstructure. Hardness of alloys decreases with nickel content, but increases with chromium content. Therefore all Co-Cr-Ni alloys have significantly lower hardness than Co-Cr-Mo alloys. Corrosion resistance of alloys in artificial saliva was evaluated on the base of pitting potential. Superior corrosion characteristics have the samples with typical dendritic microstructure and higher chromium content, until nickel content have not significant effect. According to this, in ternary Co-Cr-Ni phase diagram was located the small concentration region (about samples 5 and 9) in them alloy properties can satisfied the high requirements for biomedical applications. This region is considerably larger in Co-Cr-Mo phase diagram

  10. Age-hardening and related phase transformation in an experimental Ag-Cu-Pd-Au alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seol, Hyo-Joung; Lee, Doung-Hun; Lee, Hee-Kyung; Takada, Yukyo; Okuno, Osamu; Kwon, Yong Hoon; Kim, Hyung-Il

    2006-01-01

    The age-hardening behaviour, phase transformation and related microstructural changes of an experimental Ag-Cu-Pd-Au alloy were examined by means of hardness test, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observations and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The specimen alloy showed apparent age-hardenability at the aging temperatures of 350 deg. C and 400 deg. C. By aging the solution-treated specimen at 400 deg. C, two phases of the Ag-rich α 1 phase and the Pd-containing Cu-rich α 2 phase were transformed into four phases of the Ag-rich α 1 ' phase, the Cu-rich α 2 ' phase, the CsCl-type CuPd phase and the AuCu(I) ordered phase. Microstructure of the solution-treated specimen consisted of the Ag-rich α 1 matrix, Cu-rich α 2 particle-like structures of various sizes and the lamellar structure of the α 1 and α 2 phases. When the peak hardness was obtained, the very fine lamellar structure consisting of the Ag-rich α 1 ' and Cu-rich α 2 ' phases was newly formed in the matrix. By further aging, the very fine lamellar structure grew and coarsened apparently, and the matrix was covered with the coarsened lamellar structure. The hardness increase was considered to be caused mainly by the diffusion and precipitation of Cu from the Ag-rich α 1 matrix, and the hardness decrease in the latter stage of age-hardening process was caused by the coarsening of the very fine lamellar structure. The CsCl-type CuPd phase and the AuCu(I) ordered phase did not contribute to the hardness increase

  11. Age-hardening and related phase transformation in an experimental Ag-Cu-Pd-Au alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seol, Hyo-Joung [Department of Dental Materials, College of Dentistry, Pusan National University, 1-10 Ami-dong, Seo-gu, Pusan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Doung-Hun [Department of Dental Materials, College of Dentistry, Pusan National University, 1-10 Ami-dong, Seo-gu, Pusan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hee-Kyung [Department of Dental Technology, Daegu Health College, San 7 Taejeon-dong, Buk-gu, Daegu 702-722 (Korea, Republic of); Takada, Yukyo [Division of Dental Biomaterials, Graduate School of Dentistry, Tohoku University, 4-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Okuno, Osamu [Division of Dental Biomaterials, Graduate School of Dentistry, Tohoku University, 4-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Kwon, Yong Hoon [Department of Dental Materials, College of Dentistry, Pusan National University, 1-10 Ami-dong, Seo-gu, Pusan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung-Il [Department of Dental Materials, College of Dentistry, Pusan National University, 1-10 Ami-dong, Seo-gu, Pusan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: hilkim@pusan.ac.kr

    2006-01-05

    The age-hardening behaviour, phase transformation and related microstructural changes of an experimental Ag-Cu-Pd-Au alloy were examined by means of hardness test, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observations and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The specimen alloy showed apparent age-hardenability at the aging temperatures of 350 deg. C and 400 deg. C. By aging the solution-treated specimen at 400 deg. C, two phases of the Ag-rich {alpha}{sub 1} phase and the Pd-containing Cu-rich {alpha}{sub 2} phase were transformed into four phases of the Ag-rich {alpha}{sub 1}{sup '} phase, the Cu-rich {alpha}{sub 2}{sup '} phase, the CsCl-type CuPd phase and the AuCu(I) ordered phase. Microstructure of the solution-treated specimen consisted of the Ag-rich {alpha}{sub 1} matrix, Cu-rich {alpha}{sub 2} particle-like structures of various sizes and the lamellar structure of the {alpha}{sub 1} and {alpha}{sub 2} phases. When the peak hardness was obtained, the very fine lamellar structure consisting of the Ag-rich {alpha}{sub 1}{sup '} and Cu-rich {alpha}{sub 2}{sup '} phases was newly formed in the matrix. By further aging, the very fine lamellar structure grew and coarsened apparently, and the matrix was covered with the coarsened lamellar structure. The hardness increase was considered to be caused mainly by the diffusion and precipitation of Cu from the Ag-rich {alpha}{sub 1} matrix, and the hardness decrease in the latter stage of age-hardening process was caused by the coarsening of the very fine lamellar structure. The CsCl-type CuPd phase and the AuCu(I) ordered phase did not contribute to the hardness increase.

  12. A phase field model for segregation and precipitation induced by irradiation in alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badillo, A.; Bellon, P.; Averback, R. S.

    2015-04-01

    A phase field model is introduced to model the evolution of multicomponent alloys under irradiation, including radiation-induced segregation and precipitation. The thermodynamic and kinetic components of this model are derived using a mean-field model. The mobility coefficient and the contribution of chemical heterogeneity to free energy are rescaled by the cell size used in the phase field model, yielding microstructural evolutions that are independent of the cell size. A new treatment is proposed for point defect clusters, using a mixed discrete-continuous approach to capture the stochastic character of defect cluster production in displacement cascades, while retaining the efficient modeling of the fate of these clusters using diffusion equations. The model is tested on unary and binary alloy systems using two-dimensional simulations. In a unary system, the evolution of point defects under irradiation is studied in the presence of defect clusters, either pre-existing ones or those created by irradiation, and compared with rate theory calculations. Binary alloys with zero and positive heats of mixing are then studied to investigate the effect of point defect clustering on radiation-induced segregation and precipitation in undersaturated solid solutions. Lastly, irradiation conditions and alloy parameters leading to irradiation-induced homogeneous precipitation are investigated. The results are discussed in the context of experimental results reported for Ni-Si and Al-Zn undersaturated solid solutions subjected to irradiation.

  13. A phase field model for segregation and precipitation induced by irradiation in alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badillo, A; Bellon, P; Averback, R S

    2015-01-01

    A phase field model is introduced to model the evolution of multicomponent alloys under irradiation, including radiation-induced segregation and precipitation. The thermodynamic and kinetic components of this model are derived using a mean-field model. The mobility coefficient and the contribution of chemical heterogeneity to free energy are rescaled by the cell size used in the phase field model, yielding microstructural evolutions that are independent of the cell size. A new treatment is proposed for point defect clusters, using a mixed discrete-continuous approach to capture the stochastic character of defect cluster production in displacement cascades, while retaining the efficient modeling of the fate of these clusters using diffusion equations. The model is tested on unary and binary alloy systems using two-dimensional simulations. In a unary system, the evolution of point defects under irradiation is studied in the presence of defect clusters, either pre-existing ones or those created by irradiation, and compared with rate theory calculations. Binary alloys with zero and positive heats of mixing are then studied to investigate the effect of point defect clustering on radiation-induced segregation and precipitation in undersaturated solid solutions. Lastly, irradiation conditions and alloy parameters leading to irradiation-induced homogeneous precipitation are investigated. The results are discussed in the context of experimental results reported for Ni–Si and Al–Zn undersaturated solid solutions subjected to irradiation. (paper)

  14. New Wang-Landau approach to obtain phase diagrams for multicomponent alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Kazuhito; Tanaka, Ryohei; Yuge, Koretaka

    2017-10-01

    We develop an approach to apply the Wang-Landau algorithm to multicomponent alloys in a semi-grand-canonical ensemble. Although the Wang-Landau algorithm has great advantages over conventional sampling methods, there are few applications to alloys. This is because calculating compositions in a semi-grand-canonical ensemble via the Wang-Landau algorithm requires a multidimensional density of states in terms of total energy and compositions, and constructing it is difficult from the viewpoints of both implementation and computational cost. In this study, we develop a simple approach to calculate the alloy phase diagram based on the Wang-Landau algorithm, and show that a number of one-dimensional densities of states could lead to compositions in a semi-grand-canonical ensemble as a multidimensional density of states could. Finally, we apply the present method to Cu-Au and Pd-Rh alloys and confirm that the present method successfully describes the phase diagram with high efficiency, validity, and accuracy.

  15. High-temperature phase transformation in Cr added TiAl base alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, E.; Niinobe, K.; Nobuki, M.; Nakamura, M.; Tsujimoto, T.

    1999-07-01

    The authors have investigated a microstructure evolution of a Ti-48Al-3.5Cr (in at.%) alloy at high-temperatures ({gt} 1,473K). In the alloy annealed at 1673K for 1.8ks, followed by air-cooling, a characteristic microstructure with a feathery fashion was uniformly formed. From a cooling-rate-controlling study, it was found that formation of the feathery structure is accomplished during continuous cooling from 1673K to 1573K, within the {alpha} + {gamma} two-phase region. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the feathery structure is composed of lamellar colonies (5--10{micro}m) which are crystallographically tilted slightly (a few degree) with their neighbors. A surprising fact is that lamellae in each colony are mostly the {gamma} phase with few {alpha}{sub 2} phase less than 5% in volume. This suggests that the feathery structure is a metastable product and has not resulted from the {alpha} {r{underscore}arrow} {alpha} + {gamma} transformation above 1,573 K. Instead, the feathery structure formation should be attributed to the non-equilibrium {alpha} {r{underscore}arrow} {gamma} transformation which occurs at high-temperatures with a small degree of supercooling. The authors discuss this interesting phase transformation in terms of the {alpha} {r{underscore}arrow} {gamma} massive transformation, based on the continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagram constructed for the present alloy.

  16. Effect of phase composition on the corrosion properties of alloys of the magnesium-yttrium system in neutral solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnoyarskii, V.V.; Petrova, L.M.; Dobatkina, T.V.; Korol'kova, I.G.

    1992-01-01

    A study is made of the effect of phase composition on the corrosive dissolution of binary alloys of the system magnesium-8.2% yttrium. It is shown that the appearance of the intermetallide Mg 24 Y 5 - being the effective cathode - intensifies self-dissolution of the alloy under conditions of anodic galvanostatic polarization

  17. Obtention of uranium-molybdenum alloy ingots microstructure and phase characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedrosa, Tercio A.; Braga, Daniel M.; Paula, Joao Bosco de; Brina, Jose Giovanni M.; Ferraz, Wilmar B., E-mail: tap@cdtn.b, E-mail: bragadm@cdtn.b, E-mail: jbp@cdtn.b, E-mail: jgmb@cdtn.b, E-mail: ferrazw@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The replacement of high enriched uranium (U-{sup 235} > 85 wt%) by low enriched uranium (U-{sup 235} < 20 wt%) nuclear fuels in research and test reactors is being implemented as an initiative of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program, conceived in the USA since mid-70s, in order to avoid nuclear weapons proliferation. Such replacement implies in the use of compounds or alloys with higher uranium densities. Several uranium alloys that fill this requirement has been investigated since then. Among these alloys, U-Mo presents great application potential due to its physical properties and good behavior during irradiation, which makes it an important option as a nuclear fuel material for the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor - RMB. The development of the plate-type nuclear fuel based on U-Mo alloys is being performed at the Nuclear Technology Development Centre (CDTN) and also at the Institute of Energetic and Nuclear Research - IPEN. U-{sup 10}Mo ingots were melted in an induction furnace with protective argon atmosphere. The microstructure of the ingots were characterized through optical and scanning electronic microscopy in the as cast and heat treated conditions. Energy Dispersive Spectrometry and X-Ray Diffraction were used as characterization techniques for elemental analysis and phases determination. It was confirmed the presence of metastable gamma-phase in the as cast condition, surrounded by hypereutectoid alpha-phase (uranium-rich phase), as well as a pearlite-like constituent, composed by alternated lamellas of U{sub 2}Mo compound and alpha-phase, in the heat treated condition. (author)

  18. CHARACTERIZATION OF PHASES IN SECONDARY AlZn10Si8Mg CAST ALLOY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Tillová

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Using recycled aluminium cast alloys is profitable in many aspects. Requiring only 5 % of the energy to produce secondary metal as compared to primary metal and generates only 5 % of the green house gas emissions, the recycling of aluminium is therefore beneficial of both environmental and economical point of view. Secondary AlZn10Si8Mg (UNIFONT® - 90 cast alloy are used for engine and vehicle constructions, hydraulic unit and mouldmaking without heat treatment. Properties include good castability, very good mechanical strength and elongation, light weight, good wear resistance, low thermal expansion and very good machining. Improved mechanical properties are strongly dependent upon the morphologies, type and distribution of the secondary phases, which are in turn a function of alloy composition and cooling rate. The presence of additional elements as Mg, Mn, Fe, or Cu allows many complex intermetallic phases to form, which make characterisation non-trivial. These include, for example, Mg2Si, Al2CuMg and AlFeMn phases, all of which may have some solubility for additional elements. Phase’s identification in aluminium alloys is often non-trivial due to the fact that some of the phases have either similar crystal structures or only subtle changes in their chemistries. A combination different analytical techniques (light microscopy upon black-white and colour etching, scanning electron microscopy (SEM upon deep etching, energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX and HV 0.01 microhardness measurement were therefore been used for the identification of the various phase.

  19. Characterisation of phases in nanostructured, multilayered titanium alloys by analytical and high-resolution electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyrska-Filemonowicz, A; Buffat, P A

    2009-01-01

    Surface processing of a Ti-6Al-4V alloy led to a complex multilayered microstructure containing several phases of the Ni-Ti-P-Al-O system, which improves the mechanical and tribological surface properties. The microstructure, chemical and phase compositions of the hard layer formed on the surface were investigated by LM, XRD, SEM as well as analytical/high-resolution TEM, STEM, EDS, electron diffraction and FIB. Phase identification based on electron diffraction, HRTEM and EDS microanalysis revealed the presence of several binary and ternary phases in the system Ti-Ni-P, sometimes with partial substitution of Ti by Al. However some phases, mainly nanoparticles, still remain not identified satisfactorily. Electron microscopy techniques used for identification of phases present in surface multilayers and some practical limits to their routine application are reminded here.

  20. Synthesis Of NiCrAlC alloys by mechanical alloying; Sintese de ligas NiCrAlC por moagem de alta energia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, A.K.; Pereira, J.I.; Vurobi Junior, S.; Cintho, O.M., E-mail: alissonkws@gmail.co [Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa (UEPG), PR (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of the present paper is the synthesis of nickel alloys (NiCrAlC), which has been proposed like a economic alternative to the Stellite family Co alloys using mechanical alloying, followed by sintering heat treatment of milled material. The NiCrAlC alloys consist of a chromium carbides dispersion in a Ni{sub 3}Al intermetallic matrix, that is easily synthesized by mechanical alloying. The use of mechanical alloying enables higher carbides sizes and distribution control in the matrix during sintering. We are also investigated the compaction of the processed materials by compressibility curves. The milling products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, and the end product was featured by conventional metallography and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), that enabled the identification of desired phases, beyond microhardness test, which has been shown comparable to alloys manufactured by fusion after heat treating. (author)

  1. Non-destructive identification of unknown minor phases in polycrystalline bulk alloys using three-dimensional X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yiming, E-mail: yangyiming1988@outlook.com [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xu, Liang [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wang, Yudan; Du, Guohao [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Yang, Sam [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Melbourne, VIC 3168 (Australia); Xiao, Tiqiao, E-mail: tqxiao@sinap.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2017-02-15

    Minor phases make considerable contributions to the mechanical and physical properties of metals and alloys. Unfortunately, it is difficult to identify unknown minor phases in a bulk polycrystalline material using conventional metallographic methods. Here, a non-destructive method based on three-dimensional X-ray diffraction (3DXRD) is developed to solve this problem. Simulation results demonstrate that this method is simultaneously able to identify minor phase grains and reveal their positions, orientations and sizes within bulk alloys. According to systematic simulations, the 3DXRD method is practicable for an extensive sample set, including polycrystalline alloys with hexagonal, orthorhombic and cubic minor phases. Experiments were also conducted to confirm the simulation results. The results for a bulk sample of aluminum alloy AA6061 show that the crystal grains of an unexpected γ-Fe (austenite) phase can be identified, three-dimensionally and nondestructively. Therefore, we conclude that the 3DXRD method is a powerful tool for the identification of unknown minor phases in bulk alloys belonging to a variety of crystal systems. This method also has the potential to be used for in situ observations of the effects of minor phases on the crystallographic behaviors of alloys. - Highlights: •A method based on 3DXRD is developed for identification of unknown minor phase. •Grain position, orientation and size, is simultaneously acquired. •A systematic simulation demonstrated the applicability of the proposed method. •Experimental results on a AA6061 sample confirmed the practicability of the method.

  2. Investigation of phase stability of novel equiatomic FeCoNiCuZn based-high entropy alloy prepared by mechanical alloying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Vinay Kumar; Sanyal, S.; Sinha, S. K.

    2018-05-01

    The present work reports the structural and phase stability analysis of equiatomic FeCoNiCuZn High entropy alloy (HEA) systems prepared by mechanical alloying (MA) method. In this research effort some 1287 alloy combinations were extensively studied to arrive at most favourable combination. FeCoNiCuZn based alloy system was selected on the basis of physiochemical parameters such as enthalpy of mixing (ΔHmix), entropy of mixing (ΔSmix), atomic size difference (ΔX) and valence electron concentration (VEC) such that it fulfils the formation criteria of stable multi component high entropy alloy system. In this context, we have investigated the effect of novel alloying addition in view of microstructure and phase formation aspect. XRD plots of the MA samples shows the formation of stable solid solution with FCC (Face Cantered Cubic) after 20 hr of milling time and no indication of any amorphous or intermetallic phase formation. Our results are in good agreement with calculation and analysis done on the basis of physiochemical parameters during selection of constituent elements of HEA.

  3. High resolution orientation mapping of secondary phases in ATI 718Plus® alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krakow Robert

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The polycrystalline superalloy ATI 718Plus ® (hereafter 718Plus has been developed to replace the established alloy Inconel 718 by offering higher temperature capability for applications in gas turbines. The alloy exhibits two secondary phases in the austenitic matrix; it is strengthened by the γ′-phase with η-phase discontinuously precipitated at the grain boundaries. It can be utilized to control grain growth during forging. Generally, hexagonal η phase has been reported to possess a defined crystallographic orientation with the matrix. However, the material studied here exhibits blocky η-phase that has been precipitated and grown during thermo-mechanical processing. Therefore a measurable change in orientation relationship is expected. The standard technique for orientation mapping is electron back-scattered diffraction with spatial resolution of 100 nm. That is insufficient for studying η-phase in 718Plus. By applying high resolution orientation mapping in the transmission electron microscope (Philips CM 300 FEGTEM equipped with a Nanomegas ASTARTM system a resolution of 3 nm was achieved. The indexed diffraction data was analysed using the Matlab Toolbox Mtex. The analysis included grain reconstruction and exclusion of low confidence measurements. The data set allows generating phase boundary maps indicating interfaces characteristics. Quantitative assessment shows that only 19% of the γ-η-interfaces fulfil the orientation relationship.

  4. Phase instability of alloys caused by transmutation effects during neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platov, Yu.M.; Pletnev, M.N.

    1994-01-01

    A theory of the phase changes in a two-phase binary A-B alloy in the coarsening condition caused by burnout of solute B due to nuclear reactions is presented. It is shown that this burnout process introduces diffusion redistribution of solute between second phase precipitates and solid solution. The burnout induced solute flux away from second phase precipitates to solid solution maintaining the concentration of element B in the vicinity to its solubility limit and stimulates, thus, the second phase particle dissolution. This occurs in addition to a process decreasing their sizes as a result of direct burnout of atoms B in the precipitates. In the framework of the theory developed here, analytical expressions describing time evolution of the precipitate size distributions, changes of mean radius and number density of the precipitates, and second phase dissolution times are obtained. On the basis of these results and numerical calculations for aluminium-scandium alloy, it is shown that the burnout processes can induce essential phase changes, and thus cause significant changes of the properties of irradiated materials at high neutron fluences. ((orig.))

  5. Thermodynamic Properties of Chromium Adsorption by Sediments ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MBI

    2013-06-19

    Jun 19, 2013 ... The adsorption of Chromium from aqueous solution using river Watari sediment as an adsorbent was modeled. The influence of initial ... number of metals, including chromium, copper, nickel and zinc. The ion ... through filter paper to determine the concentration ... liquid and solid phases were separated by.

  6. Anti corrosion layer for stainless steel in molten carbonate fuel cell - comprises phase vapour deposition of titanium nitride, aluminium nitride or chromium nitride layer then oxidising layer in molten carbonate electrolyte

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Forming an anticorrosion protective layer on a stainless steel surface used in a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) - comprises the phase vapour deposition (PVD) of a layer comprising at least one of titanium nitride, aluminium nitride or chromium nitride and then forming a protective layer in situ...

  7. Fireside corrosion testing of candidate superheater tube alloys, coatings, and claddings -- Phase 2 field testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blough, J.L. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States)

    1996-08-01

    In Phase 1 of this project, a variety of developmental and commercial tubing alloys and claddings was exposed to laboratory fireside corrosion testing simulating a superheater or reheater in a coal-fired boiler. Phase 2 (in situ testing) has exposed samples of 347, RA85H, HR3C, 253MA, Fe{sub 3}Al + 5Cr, 310 modified, NF 709, 690 clad, and 671 clad for over 10,000 hours to the actual operating conditions of a 250-MW coal-fired boiler. The samples were installed on air-cooled, retractable corrosion probes, installed in the reheater cavity, controlled to the operating metal temperatures of an existing and advanced-cycle, coal-fired boiler. Samples of each alloy are being exposed for 4,000, 12,000, and 16,000 hours of operation. The present results are for the metallurgical examination of the corrosion probe samples after approximately 4,400 hours of exposure.

  8. Transmission electron microscopy investigation of interfaces in a two-phase TiAl alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahon, G. J.; Howe, J. M.

    1990-06-01

    The atomic structures of the γ/α2 and γ/γT interfaces in a TiAl alloy were investigated using conventional and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in order to understand the growth mechanisms and deformation behavior of the two-phase alloy. The results show that the α2 plates grow from the γ phase by the migration of a/6 partial dislocation ledges across the faces and that the γ/α2 interface usually contains closely spaced arrays of interfacial dislocations. Deformation twins cut through both γ twin boundaries and α2 plates during deformation, although slip of twinning c slocations through α2 appears to be a difficult process. Both the γ/α2 and γ/γT interfaces can be imaged and modeled at the atomic level, although slight crystal and/or beam tilt can complicate image interpretation.

  9. The relative stability of dislocations embedded in the β phase matrix and in martensite phases in copper based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovey, Francisco; Hazarabedian, Alfredo; Garces, Jorge

    1988-01-01

    Dislocations are formed during martensitic transformations in shape memory alloys. The number of dislocations (with Burgers vector →b β = a o and line direction in the β phase) increases when the material is subjected to thermoelastic or pseudoelastic cycles. The dislocations are accumulated in the sample and are incorporated in the corresponding growing phase. The relative energy of the dislocations when embedded in the parent phase (with respect to b) one or another variant of martensite is evaluated in this work. The crystallographic changes of the dislocations provide a primary selection rule for those martensite variants in which the dislocations have the lowest energy. In order to proceed more quantitatively a full calculation of the dislocation energies has to be performed using the anisotropic theory. In this work these calculations have been made on the basis of measured elastic constants of the β and 2H phases of a Cu-Al-Ni alloy. It is concluded that those martensite variants are favored energetically whose basal plane contains the Burgers vector and line direction of the dislocations (Splitting into Shockley partials is suggested to occur). The importance of this result for the two-way shape memory (TWSM) effect is discussed and a mechanism is proposed which can account for the multiplication of dislocations during the transformation. (Author)

  10. Quasicrystalline and crystalline phases in Al65Cu20(Fe, Cr)15 alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, W.; Koester, U.; Mueller, F.; Rosenberg, M.

    1992-01-01

    Two types of icosahedral quasicrystals are observed in Al 65 Cu 20 Fe 15-x Cr x (0 ≤ x ≤ 15) alloys, the face-centred AlCuFe-type icosahedral phase with dissoluted Cr and the primitive AlCuCr-type icosahedral phase with dissoluted Fe. In the vicinity of Al 65 Cu 20 Fe 8 Cr 7 a stable decagonal phase (a=0.45 nm and c=1.23 nm) forms competitively with the icosahedral quasicrystals. All these three quasicrystalline phases can be regarded as Hume-Rothery phases stabilized by the energy band factor. The density is measured to be 4.57, 4.44, and 4.11 g/cm 3 for the icosahedral Al 65 Cu 20 Fe 15 , the decagonal Al 65 Cu 20 Fe 8 Cr 7 , and the icosahedral Al 65 Cu 20 Cr 15 alloys, respectively. Depending on the composition in the range between Al 65 Cu 20 Fe 8 Cr 7 and Al 65 Cu 20 Cr 15 , several crystalline phases are observed during the transormation of the AlCuCr-type icosahedral phase: the 1/1-3/2-type orthorhombic (o) and the 1/0-3/2-type tetragonal (t) approximants of the decagonal phase, a hexagonal (h) phase, as well as a long-range vacancy ordered τ 3 -phase derived from a CsCl-type structure with a=0.2923 nm. The structures of all the crystalline phases are closely related to those of the icosahedral (i) and decagonal (d) quasicrystals, which leads to a definite orientation relationship as follows: i5 parallel d10 parallel o[100] parallel t[100] parallel h[001] parallel τ 3 [110]. (orig.)

  11. Aging and Phase Stability Studies of Alloy 22 FY08 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, S G

    2008-04-03

    This report is a compilation of work done over the past ten years in support of phase stability studies of Alloy 22 for the Yucca Mountain Project and contains information previously published, reported, and referenced. Most sections are paraphrased here for the convenience of readers. Evaluation of the fabrication processes involved in the manufacture of waste containers is important as these processes can have an effect on the metallurgical structure of an alloy. Because material properties such as strength, toughness, aging kinetics and corrosion resistance are all dependent on the microstructure, it is important that prototypes be built and evaluated for processing effects on the performance of the material. Of particular importance are welds, which have an as-cast microstructure with chemical segregation and precipitation of complex phases resulting from the welding process. The work summarized in this report contains information on the effects of fabrication processes such as solution annealing, stress mitigation, heat-to-heat variability, and welding on the kinetics of precipitation, mechanical, and corrosion properties. For a waste package lifetime of thousands of years, it is impossible to test directly in the laboratory the behavior of Alloy 22 under expected repository conditions. The changes that may occur in these materials must be accelerated. For phase stability studies, this is achieved by accelerating the phase transformations by increasing test temperatures above those anticipated in the proposed repository. For these reasons, Alloy 22 characterization specimens were aged at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Aging Facilities for times from 1 hour up to 8 years at temperatures ranging from 200-750 C. These data as well as the data from specimens aged at 260 C, 343 C, and 427 C for 100,028 hours at Haynes International will be used for performance confirmation and model validation.

  12. Geometric relationships for homogenization in single-phase binary alloy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnam, J.; Tenney, D. R.; Stein, B. A.

    1978-01-01

    A semiempirical relationship is presented which describes the extent of interaction between constituents in single-phase binary alloy systems having planar, cylindrical, or spherical interfaces. This relationship makes possible a quick estimate of the extent of interaction without lengthy numerical calculations. It includes two parameters which are functions of mean concentration and interface geometry. Experimental data for the copper-nickel system are included to demonstrate the usefulness of this relationship.

  13. Clean Grain Boundary Found in C14/Body-Center-Cubic Multi-Phase Metal Hydride Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao-Ting Shen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The grain boundaries of three Laves phase-related body-center-cubic (bcc solid-solution, metal hydride (MH alloys with different phase abundances were closely examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and more importantly, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD techniques. By using EBSD, we were able to identify the alignment of the crystallographic orientations of the three major phases in the alloys (C14, bcc, and B2 structures. This finding confirms the presence of crystallographically sharp interfaces between neighboring phases, which is a basic assumption for synergetic effects in a multi-phase MH system.

  14. Phase transformations in interstitial Fe-N alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liapina, T.

    2005-04-15

    Nitriding is a prominent thermochemical heat-treatment procedure leading to various types of surface property improvements of the treated iron and steel. Many questions regarding even very basic properties of these compound layers and the relevant nitride phases are still open. Some of these open questions related with the behaviour of iron nitrides and, in particular, of iron nitride compound layers occurring below the usual process temperatures are addressed to in this thesis, as relevant e.g. for the cooling procedure after nitriding. The most important iron nitrides occurring in iron-nitride compound layers are the {gamma}'- and {epsilon}-phases in the Fe-N system. It is shown that for relatively low nitrogen contents of epsilon-iron nitrides (around Fe{sub 3}N) the cooling rate upon going down from an elevated annealing temperature to room temperature has a significant effect on the lattice parameters. X-ray and neutron diffraction analysis revealed that the lattice parameter values observed after fast cooling are affected by the higher degree of nitrogen disorder at elevated temperature, thus changing the c/a ratio. New relations between the lattice parameters of {epsilon}-iron nitrides and the nitrogen content are suggested for different types of cooling. The investigation by TEM of the decomposition upon annealing (633 K, 673 K) of initially homogeneous {epsilon}-Fe{sub 3}N powders revealed that the {gamma}'-formation occurs in only a few powder particles in a grain-like form. Moreover, diffraction line-profile analysis revealed N transport occurring from particle to particle, leading to inhomogeneities of N content in the epsilon-phase. It was shown that {gamma}'-iron nitride formation can occur by backwards growth of the existing {gamma}'-sublayer at the cost of the {epsilon}-sublayer increasing N concentration in the {epsilon}-layer. Another process, which may additionally occur in the compound layer upon annealing, is diffusion of N

  15. Chemical Frustration. A Design Principle for the Discovery of New Complex Alloy and Intermetallic Phases, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredrickson, Daniel C [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-06-23

    Final technical report for "Chemical Frustration: A Design Principle for the Discovery of New Complex Alloy and Intermetallic Phases" funded by the Office of Science through the Materials Chemistry Program of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  16. Application of the ultrasonic phased array technique to alloy 182 weld inspection in PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsiao, Chu Chung; Shie, Namg Chian; Chu, Shyr Liang; Lee, Sou See; Toung, Jean Chung; Su, Liang Chun; Yang, Hai Ming

    2006-01-01

    Cracks were found in nickel-based welds frequently in some nuclear power plants. The development of inspection technique capability of finding these cracks is thus in great demand. The difficulties of inspection and evaluation for nickel-based welds include ultrasonic reflection of interface of dissimilar materials, ultrasonic distortion of anisotropic microstructure, and signal-to-noise ratio reduction of coarse grain. In this study, an Alloy 182 mock-up with the same size and material properties as in the field is designed and fabricated. The Alloy 182 mock-up specimen contains various cracks and notches for calibration. Phased array UT and other ultrasonic inspection techniques are used in this study. Based on the experiment results, the phased array probe with 2D dual crystals and low frequency (1.5MHz) longitudinal wave is found to perform well. Finally, phased array ultrasonic testing technique has been approved to be an effectively nondestructive test method for DMW with real size testing block involved. Typically, phased array probe can generate sharp tip diffraction signal and thus reliable and accurate result can be obtained for sizing the defect. Furthermore, phased array probe can also generate various angles and focal lengths and thus combinatorial effect can be achieved for several traditional probes. With a full understanding of the beam behavior and an optimized delay laws, the phased away ultrasonic technique integrated with an automatic scanner will achieve not only to save scanning time but also to reduce the amount of radiation exposure on field inspection.

  17. Sn-Sb-Se based binary and ternary alloys for phase change memory applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Kyung-Min

    2008-10-28

    In this work, the effect of replacing Ge by Sn and Te by Se was studied for a systematic understanding and prediction of new potential candidates for phase change random access memories applications. The temperature dependence of the electrical/structural properties and crystallization kinetics of the Sn-Se based binary and Sn-Sb-Se based ternary alloys were determined and compared with those of the GeTe and Ge-Sb-Te system. The temperature dependence of electrical and structural properties were investigated by van der Pauw measurements, X-ray diffraction, X-ray reflectometry. By varying the heating rate, the Kissinger analysis has been used to determine the combined activation barrier for crystallization. To screen the kinetics of crystallization, a static laser tester was employed. In case of binary alloys of the type Sn{sub x}Se{sub 1-x}, the most interesting candidate is SnSe{sub 2} since it crystallizes into a single crystalline phase and has high electrical contrast and reasonably high activation energy for crystallization. In addition, the SnSe{sub 2}-Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} pseudobinary alloy system also might be sufficient for data retention due to their higher transition temperature and activation energy for crystallization in comparison to GeTe-Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} system. Furthermore, SnSe{sub 2}-Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} pseudobinary alloys have a higher crystalline resistivity. The desired rapid crystallization speed can be obtained for Sn{sub 1}Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 5} and Sn{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 7} alloys. (orig.)

  18. Kinetics of first order phase transformation in metals and alloys. Isothermal evolution in martensite transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Ohshima, Ken-ichi

    2011-01-01

    The 11th lecture about microstructures and fluctuation in solids reports on the martensitic phase transformation of alkali metals and alloys. The martensitic transformation is a diffusionless first order phase transformation. Martensitic transformations are classified into two with respect to kinetics, one is isothermal transformation and the other is athermal transformation. The former transformation depends upon both temperature and time, but the latter solely depends on temperature. The former does not have a definite transformation start temperature but occurs after some finite incubation time during isothermal holding. The isothermal martensitic transformation is changed to the athermal one under high magnetic field, and also the reverse transformation occurs under the application of hydrostatic pressure. The former phenomena were observed in Fe-Ni-Mn alloys, Fe-Ni-Cr alloys and also the reverse transformation in Fe-3.1at%Ni-0.5at%Mn alloys. The athermal transformation was observed in Li and Na metals at 73 and 36 K, respectively. A neutron diffraction study has been performed on single crystals of metallic Na. On cooling the virgin sample, the incubation time to transform from the bcc structure to the low-temperature structure (9R structure) is formed to be more than 2h at 38 K, 2 K higher than the transformation temperature of 36 K. The full width of half maximum of the Bragg reflection suddenly increased, due to some deformation introduced by the nucleation of the low-temperature structure. In relation to the deformation, strong extra-diffuse scattering (Huang sca