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Sample records for chromium 64

  1. Chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intern Med 1991;115:917-24. Abraham AS, Brooks BA, Eylath U. The effects of chromium supplementation on serum glucose and lipids in patients with and without non-insulin-dependent diabetes. Metabolism 1992;41:768-71. Hermann J, Arquitt A. ...

  2. Chromium in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    The best source of chromium is brewer's yeast. However, many people do not use brewer's yeast because it causes bloating ( abdominal distention ) and nausea . Other good sources of chromium include ...

  3. Heterogeneous chromium catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a heterogeneous chromium catalyst system for the polymerisation of ethylene and/or alpha olefins prepared by the steps of: (a) providing a silica-containing support, (b) treating the silica-containing support with a chromium compound to form a chromium-based silica-c

  4. Chromium Toxicity: Reductive Enzymes in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    internal organs (e.g. lungs, liver, kidneys) [24,27,64], pulmonary fibrosis and chronic bronchitis [2], skin ulcers and allergic dermatitis [2], and...cross the skin [2] and are readily transported across cell membranes [18] via an anion carrier [6]. Cr compounds are also mutagenic [67], and the bulk of...reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase- dependent chromium(VI) reduction. Analyst 120:935-938. 42. Miura, A

  5. Optimizing IA-64 performance

    CERN Document Server

    Jarp, S

    2001-01-01

    Examines key features of the Itanium processor architecture and microarchitecture. The Itanium, originally known as the IA-64, is a 64-bit processor designed by Hewlett-Packard and Intel. In addition to the obvious performance gains that 64-bit addressing brings, the Itanium also supports performance-enhancing techniques such as predication, speculation, rotating registers, a wide parallel execution core, high clock speed, fast bus architecture, multiple execution units, and the like. Moreover, the Itanium is designed from the ground up around parallelism and uses a new kind of instruction set based on the Explicit Parallel Instruction Computing (EPIC) specification, which allows the processing of Windows-based and UNIX- based applications, among other features. Operating-system support for the IA-64 has been announced for 64-bit Windows, HP-UX, varieties of Linux, and AIX 51. The author shows how to achieve optimal code generation by a compiler or generate optimized sequences ofIA-64 assembly code to ensure ...

  6. Groundwater contaminant by hexavalent chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, C. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Oxidation of trivalent chromium to hexavalent chromium has been investigated as a function of total manganese in soils as well as various incubation conditions. Chromium and manganese contents were analyzed by atomic absorption (graphite furnace and flame emission respectively) following acid digestion. Total hexavalent chromium generation capacity was determined by addition of 0.001 M CrCL3, incubation, and analysis by s-diphenyl carbazide. Samples were then leached with CaSO{sub 4} and MgSO{sub 4} and incubated in various environments (oven, freeze-drier, field moist, ultrafreeze) to test for geogenic generation of Cr(IV). The degree of geogenic generation of hexavalent chromium was compared with total Mn and Cr content as well as hexavalent generational capacity.

  7. On texture formation of chromium electrodeposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian Bergenstof; Leisner, Peter; Horsewell, Andy

    1998-01-01

    The microstructure, texture and hardness of electrodeposited hard, direct current (DC) chromium and pulsed reversed chromium has been investigated. These investigations suggest that the growth and texture of hard chromium is controlled by inhibition processes and reactions. Further, it has been...... established that codeposition of Cr2O3 nanoparticles is a general feature of DC chromium electrodeposition....

  8. CHROMIUM STATUS IN DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshavarz

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available Fasting serum chromium, total cholesterol HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, triacytglycerot and blood sugar were determined in fifty two diabetic patients with no other organic diseases anil compared with those obtained from a control group including fourty two healthy volunteers matched for age, sex ami body mass irutex (BMI. Fasting serum chromium and HDL-cholesterol were significantly lower in patients than in controls (p<0.0001 and p<0.001 respectively, but the mean triacytglycerot concentration was significantly higher in patients than in controls (p<002. Mean total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol values were not significantly different in the two groups. Mean intake of energy, proteins, fats and chromium, estimated by the 24 hr dietary recall method were not significantly different in the two groups. We demonstrated that despite an adequate intake of chromium, the fasting serum chromium was lower in diabetic patients than in control subjects. Chromium deficiency in diabetic patients may act as a contributing factor in aggravating the disease's complications.

  9. Galvanic cells including cobalt-chromium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjerdet, N R

    1980-01-01

    Galvanic cells may be created when dentures made of cobalt-chromium alloys are placed on teeth with metallic restorations. The power of such cells was evaluated in an in vitro galvanic using amalgams, gold alloy, and nickel-chromium alloys. The amalgams and one of the nickel-chromium alloys revealed high corrosion currents when placed in contact with cobalt-chromium alloy, the conventional amalgam showing the highest values. The gold alloy and another nickel-chromium alloy exhibited low corrosion currents and they were noble with respect to cobalt-chromium.

  10. Chromium at High Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Rafael

    2012-02-01

    Chromium has long served as the archetype of spin density wave magnetism. Recently, Jaramillo and collaborators have shown that Cr also serves as an archetype of magnetic quantum criticality. Using a combination of x-ray diffraction and electrical transport measurements at high pressures and cryogenic temperatures in a diamond anvil cell, they have demonstrated that the N'eel transition (TN) can be continuously suppressed to zero, with no sign of a concurrent structural transition. The order parameter undergoes a broad regime of exponential suppression, consistent with the weak coupling paradigm, before deviating from a BCS-like ground state within a narrow but accessible quantum critical regime. The quantum criticality is characterized by mean field scaling of TN and non mean field scaling of the transport coefficients, which points to a fluctuation-induced reconstruction of the critical Fermi surface. A comparison between pressure and chemical doping as means to suppress TN sheds light on different routes to the quantum critical point and the relevance of Fermi surface nesting and disorder at this quantum phase transition. The work by Jaramillo et al. is broadly relevant to the study of magnetic quantum criticality in a physically pure and theoretically tractable system that balances elements of weak and strong coupling. [4pt] [1] R. Jaramillo, Y. Feng, J. Wang & T. F. Rosenbaum. Signatures of quantum criticality in pure Cr at high pressure. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 107, 13631 (2010). [0pt] [2] R. Jaramillo, Y. Feng, J. C. Lang, Z. Islam, G. Srajer, P. B. Littlewood, D. B. McWhan & T. F. Rosenbaum. Breakdown of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer ground state at a quantum phase transition. Nature 459, 405 (2009).

  11. Chromium Salen Mediated Alkene Epoxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kaare Brandt; Norrby, Per-Ola; Daly, Adrian M.;

    2002-01-01

    The mechanism of alkene epoxidation by chromium(v) oxo salen complexes has been studied by DFT and experimental methods. The reaction is compared to the closely related Mn-catalyzed process in an attempt to understand the dramatic difference in selectivity between the two systems. Overall......, the studies show that the reactions have many similarities, but also a few critical differences. In agreement with experiment, the chromium system requires a change from low- to high-spin in the catalytic cycle, whereas the manganese system can proceed either with spin inversion or entirely on the high......-spin surface. The low-spin addition of metal oxo species to an alkene leads to an intermediate which forms epoxide either with a barrier on the low-spin surface or without a barrier after spin inversion. Supporting evidence for this intermediate was obtained by using vinylcyclopropane traps. The chromium...

  12. Environmental biochemistry of chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losi, M E; Amrhein, C; Frankenberger, W T

    1994-01-01

    Chromium is a d-block transitional element with many industrial uses. It occurs naturally in various crustal materials and is discharged to the environment as industrial waste. Although it can occur in a number of oxidation states, only 3+ and 6+ are found in environmental systems. The environmental behavior of Cr is largely a function of its oxidation state. Hexavalent Cr compounds (mainly chromates and dichromates) are considered toxic to a variety of terrestrial and aquatic organisms and are mobile in soil/water systems, much more so than trivalent Cr compounds. This is largely because of differing chemical properties: Hexavalent Cr compounds are strong oxidizers and highly soluble, while trivalent Cr compounds tend to form relatively inert precipitates at near-neutral pH. The trivalent state is generally considered to be the stable form in equilibrium with most soil/water systems. A diagram of the Cr cycle in soils and water is given in Fig. 6 (Bartlett 1991). This illustration provides a summary of environmentally relevant reactions. Beginning with hexavalent Cr that is released into the environment as industrial waste, there are a number of possible fates, including pollution of soil and surface water and leaching into groundwater, where it may remain stable and, in turn, can be taken up by plants or animals, and adsorption/precipitation, involving soil colloids and/or organic matter. Herein lies much of the environmental concern associated with the hexavalent form. A portion of the Cr(VI) will be reduced to the trivalent form by inorganic electron donors, such as Fe2+ and S2-, or by bioprocesses involving organic matter. Following this conversion, Cr3+ can be expected to precipitate as oxides and hydroxides or to form complexes with numerous ligands. This fraction includes a vast majority of global Cr reserves. Soluble Cr3+ complexes, such as those formed with citrate, can undergo oxidation when they come in contact with manganese dioxide, thus reforming

  13. Study on anaerobic treatment of wastewater containing hexavalent chromium*

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Yan-Bin; Xiao, Hua-hua; Sun, Shui-yu

    2005-01-01

    A self-made anaerobic bio-filter bed which was inoculated with special sludge showed high efficiency in removing hexavalent chromium. When pump flow was 47 ml/min and CODCr of wastewater was about 140 mg/L, it took 4 h to decrease the Cr6+ concentrations from about 60 mg/L to under 0.5 mg/L, compared with 14 h without carbon source addition. Cr6+ concentrations ranged from 64.66 mg/L to 75.53 mg/L, the system efficiency was excellent. When Cr6+ concentration reached 95.47 mg/L, the treatment ...

  14. Health screening - women - ages 40 to 64

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health maintenance visit - women - ages 40 to 64; Physical exam - women - ages 40 to 64; Yearly exam - ... 64; Checkup - women - ages 40 to 64; Women's health - ages 40 to 64; Preventive care - women - ages ...

  15. Health screening - men - ages 40 to 64

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health maintenance visit - men - ages 40 to 64; Physical exam - men - ages 40 to 64; Yearly exam - ... 64; Checkup - men - ages 40 to 64; Men's health - ages 40 to 64; Preventive care - men - ages ...

  16. The use of trivalent chromium bath to obtain a solar selective black chromium coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Survilienė, S.; Češūnienė, A.; Juškėnas, R.; Selskienė, A.; Bučinskienė, D.; Kalinauskas, P.; Juškevičius, K.; Jurevičiūtė, I.

    2014-06-01

    Black chromium coatings were electrodeposited from a trivalent chromium bath using a ZnO additive as a second main component. Black chromium was electrodeposited on steel and copper plates and substrates plated with bright nickel prior to black chromium electrodeposition. The black chromium coatings were characterized by XRD and SEM. The XRD data suggest that the phase structure of black chromium may be defined as a zinc solid solution in chromium or a chromium solid solution in zinc depending on the chromium/zinc ratio in the deposit. The role of substrate finish was evaluated through the corrosion resistance and reflectance of black chromium. According to corrosion tests the samples plated with bright nickel prior to black chromium deposition have shown the highest corrosion resistance. The electrodeposited black chromium possesses good optical properties for the absorption of solar energy. The absorption coefficient of black chromium was found to be over 0.99 for the samples obtained without the Ni undercoat and below 0.99 for those obtained with the use of Ni undercoat. However, the use of nickel undercoat before black chromium plating is recommended because it remarkably improves the corrosion resistance of samples.

  17. Study on anaerobic treatment of wastewater containing hexavalent chromium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yan-bin; XIAO Hua-hua; SUN Shui-yu

    2005-01-01

    A self-made anaerobic bio-filter bed which was inoculated with special sludge showed high efficiency in removing hexavalent chromium. When pump flow was 47 ml/min and CODCr ofwastewater was about 140 mg/L, it took 4 h to decrease the Cr6+ concentrations from about 60 mg/L to under 0.5 mg/L, compared with 14 h without carbon source addition. Cr6+ concentrations ranged from 64.66 mg/L to 75.53 mg/L, the system efficiency was excellent. When Cr6+ concentration reached 95.47 mg/L,the treatment time was prolonged to 7.5 h. Compared with the contrast system, the system with trace metals showed clear superiority in that the Cr6+ removal rate increased by 21.26%. Some analyses also showed that hexavalent chromium could probably be bio-reduced to trivalent chromium, and that as a result, the chrome hydroxide sediment was formed on the surface of microorganisms.

  18. Study on anaerobic treatment of wastewater containing hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan-bin; Xiao, Hua-hua; Sun, Shui-yu

    2005-06-01

    A self-made anaerobic bio-filter bed which was inoculated with special sludge showed high efficiency in removing hexavalent chromium. When pump flow was 47 ml/min and COD(Cr) of wastewater was about 140 mg/L, it took 4 h to decrease the Cr6+ concentrations from about 60 mg/L to under 0.5 mg/L, compared with 14 h without carbon source addition. Cr6+ concentrations ranged from 64.66 mg/L to 75.53 mg/L, the system efficiency was excellent. When Cr6+ concentration reached 95.47 mg/L, the treatment time was prolonged to 7.5 h. Compared with the contrast system, the system with trace metals showed clear superiority in that the Cr6+ removal rate increased by 21.26%. Some analyses also showed that hexavalent chromium could probably be bio-reduced to trivalent chromium, and that as a result, the chrome hydroxide sediment was formed on the surface of microorganisms.

  19. Study on anaerobic treatment of wastewater containing hexavalent chromium*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan-bin; Xiao, Hua-hua; Sun, Shui-yu

    2005-01-01

    A self-made anaerobic bio-filter bed which was inoculated with special sludge showed high efficiency in removing hexavalent chromium. When pump flow was 47 ml/min and CODCr of wastewater was about 140 mg/L, it took 4 h to decrease the Cr6+ concentrations from about 60 mg/L to under 0.5 mg/L, compared with 14 h without carbon source addition. Cr6+ concentrations ranged from 64.66 mg/L to 75.53 mg/L, the system efficiency was excellent. When Cr6+ concentration reached 95.47 mg/L, the treatment time was prolonged to 7.5 h. Compared with the contrast system, the system with trace metals showed clear superiority in that the Cr6+ removal rate increased by 21.26%. Some analyses also showed that hexavalent chromium could probably be bio-reduced to trivalent chromium, and that as a result, the chrome hydroxide sediment was formed on the surface of microorganisms. PMID:15909347

  20. Simultaneous determination of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) in aqueous solutions by ion chromatography and chemiluminescence detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Jøns, O; Nielsen, B

    1992-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of chromium(iii) and chromium(vi) in a flow system based on chemiluminescence was developed. A Dionex cation-exchange guard column was used to separate chromium(iii) from chromium(vi), and chromium(vi) was reduced by potassium sulfite, whereupon both...

  1. Sonoassisted microbial reduction of chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathiravan, Mathur Nadarajan; Karthick, Ramalingam; Muthu, Naggapan; Muthukumar, Karuppan; Velan, Manickam

    2010-04-01

    This study presents sonoassisted microbial reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) using Bacillus sp. isolated from tannery effluent contaminated site. The experiments were carried out with free cells in the presence and absence of ultrasound. The optimum pH and temperature for the reduction of Cr(VI) by Bacillus sp. were found to be 7.0 and 37 degrees C, respectively. The Cr(VI) reduction was significantly influenced by the electron donors and among the various electron donors studied, glucose offered maximum reduction. The ultrasound-irradiated reduction of Cr(VI) with Bacillus sp. showed efficient Cr(VI) reduction. The percent reduction was found to increase with an increase in biomass concentration and decrease with an increase in initial concentration. The changes in the functional groups of Bacillus sp., before and after chromium reduction were observed with FTIR spectra. Microbial growth was described with Monod and Andrews model and best fit was observed with Andrews model.

  2. Practical Evaluation of Stateful NAT64/DNS64 Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SKOBERNE, N.

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available It is often suggested that the approach to IPv6 transition is dual-stack deployment; however, it is not feasible in certain environments. As Network Address Translation -- Protocol Translation (NAT-PT has been deprecated, stateful NAT64 and DNS64 RFCs have been published, supporting only IPv6-to-IPv4 translation scenario. Now the question of usability in the real world arises. In this paper, we systematically test a number of widely used application-layer network protocols to find out how well they traverse Ecdysis, the first open source stateful NAT64 and DNS64 implementation. We practically evaluated 18 popular protocols, among them HTTP, RDP, MSNP, and IMAP, and discuss the shortcomings of such translations that might not be apparent at first sight.

  3. Inoculation of chromium white cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kopyciński

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been proved that an addition of boron carbide introduced as an inoculant to the chromium white cast iron changes the structureof castings. Castings after inoculation revealed a different structure with numerous grains. Primary precipitates of chromium carbide also appeared, reducing the mechanical properties of as-cast parts. Properly established heat treatment regime makes chromium iron castings regain their, originally high, mechanical properties.

  4. REMOVAL OF CHROMIUM FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTION USING LOCALLY AVAILABLE INEXPENSIVE TARO AND WATER HYACINTH AS BIOSORBENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahjalal Khandaker

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation, locally available and inexpensive Taro and Water Hyacinth were used as biosorbents to remove chromium from synthetic wastewater. The removal of this metal ion from water in the batch and column method have been studied and discussed. Adsorption kinetics and equilibrium isotherm studies were also carried out. The material exhibits good adsorption capacity and the data follow both Freundlich and Langmuir models. Scanning Electronic Microscopic image was also used to understand the surface characteristics of biosorbent before and after biosorption studies. Effects of various factors such as pH, adsorbent dose, adsorbate initial concentration, particle size etc. were analyzed. The initial concentrations of chromium were considered 5-30mgL-1 in batch method and only 4mgL-1 in column method. The maximum chromium adsorbed was 1.64 mgg-1 and 4.44 mgg-1 in Batch method and 1.15 mgg-1 and 0.75 mgg-1 in Column method. Batch and Column desorption and regeneration studies were conducted. Column desorption studies indicated that both of these biosorbents could be reused for removing heavy metals. Results of the laboratory experiments show that the performance of Taro and Water Hyacinth prove that they can effectively be used as low cost biosorbents for the removal of chromium from wastewater.KEYWORDS:   adsorption; chromium removal; Taro; water hyacinth; batch method; column studies

  5. Electrodeposition of chromium from trivalent chromium urea bath containing sulfate and chloride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The reduction of Cr( Ⅲ) to Cr( Ⅱ ) on copper electrode in trivalent chromium urea bath containing chromium sulfate and chromium chloride as chromium source has been investigated by potentiodynamic sweep. The transfer coefficient α for reduction of Cr( Ⅲ ) to Cr( Ⅱ ) on copper electrode was calculated as 0.46. The reduction is a quasi-reversible process. J-t responses at different potential steps showed that the generation and adsorption characteristics of carboxylate bridged oligomer are relevant to cathode potential. The interface behavior between electrode and solution for Cr( Ⅲ ) complex is a critical factor influencing sustained electrode position of chromium. The hypotheses of the electro-inducing polymerization of Cr( Ⅲ ) was proposed. The potential scope in which sustained chromium deposits can be prepared is from- 1.3 V to- 1.7 V (vs SCE) in the urea bath. Bright chromium deposits with thickness of 30 μm can be prepared in the bath.

  6. 29 CFR 1915.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... system dysfunction; any history of asthma, dermatitis, skin ulceration, or nasal septum perforation; and... is present or is likely to be present from skin or eye contact with chromium (VI), the employer shall... cleaned in a manner that minimizes skin or eye contact with chromium (VI) and effectively prevents...

  7. 29 CFR 1926.1126 - Chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... system dysfunction; any history of asthma, dermatitis, skin ulceration, or nasal septum perforation; and... is present or is likely to be present from skin or eye contact with chromium (VI), the employer shall... cleaned in a manner that minimizes skin or eye contact with chromium (VI) and effectively prevents...

  8. 29 CFR 1910.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... activity involving chromium cannot release dusts, fumes, or mists of chromium (VI) in concentrations at or... currents that prevent the LEVs from performing efficiently. The use of fans has a similar effect. Industry... and positioning of cross drafts, fans, doors, windows, partitions and process equipment that...

  9. Quantification of total and hexavalent chromium in lager beers: variability between styles and estimation of daily intake of chromium from beer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Elsa; Soares, M Elisa; Kozior, Marta; Krejpcio, Zbigniew; Ferreira, Isabel M P L V O; Bastos, M Lourdes

    2014-09-17

    A survey of the presence of total and hexavalent chromium in lager beers was conducted to understand the variability between different styles of lager beer packaged in glass or cans and to estimate daily intake of total Cr and hexavalent chromium from beer. Graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy using validated methodologies was applied. Selective extraction of hexavalent chromium was performed using a Chromabond NH2/500 mg column and elution with nitric acid. The detection limits were 0.26 and 0.68 μg L(-1) for total Cr and Cr(VI), respectively. The mean content of total Cr ranged between 1.13 μg L(-1) in canned pale lager and 4.32 μg L(-1) in low-alcohol beers, whereas the mean content of Cr(VI) was beer, beer consumption can contribute approximately 2.28-8.64 and 1.6-6.17% of the recommended daily intake of chromium for women and men, respectively.

  10. [Bioremediation of chromium (VI) contaminated site by reduction and microbial stabilization of chromium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jia-Chuan; Zhang, Jian-Rong; Liu, Xi-Wen; Xu, Qian; Shi, Wei-Lin

    2014-10-01

    Chromium (VI) contaminated soil samples were collected from a chemical plant in Suzhou. Firstly, the reduced soil was prepared by adding reagent (Stone-sulfure reagent) into polluted soil to transfer most chromium (VI) into chromium (III), then a nutrient solution was introduced into the reduced soil, and the stabilized soil was obtained after 60 days culturing. The chromium (VI) content of the three kinds of soil was analyzed. The results showed that the chromium (VI) content in toxicity characteristic leaching liquid (TCLL) dropped by 96. 8% (from 8.26 mg · L(-1) to 0.26 mg · L(-1)), and the total chromium content dropped by 95.7% (from 14.66 mg · L(-1) to 0.63 mg · L(-1)) after bioremediation in 5% nutrient solution. Additionally, the durability of chromium stabilization was tested by potassium permanganate oxidation and sterilization of microbe-treated soil. After oxidation, the chromium (VI) content in TCLL of the reduced soil was increased from 8.26 mg · L(-1) to 14.68 mg · L(-1). However, the content after bioremediation was decreased to 2.68 mg · L(-1). The results of sterilization demonstrated that the death of microbe had no significant effect on the stabilization of chromium. Consequently, the research in this paper demonstrated the feasibility of bioremediation of chromium (VI) polluted soil through reduction followed by stabilization/soilidification, and provided a technique with low cost but high efficiency.

  11. Ready a Commodore 64 retrospective

    CERN Document Server

    Dillon, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    How did the Commodore 64 conquer the hearts of millions and become a platform people still actively develop for even today? What made it so special? This book will appeal to both those who like tinkering with old technology as a hobby and nostalgic readers who simply want to enjoy a trip down memory lane. It discusses in a concise but rigorous format the different areas of home gaming and personal computing where the C64 managed to innovate and push forward existing boundaries. Starting from Jack Tramiel's vision of designing computers "for the masses, not the classes," the book introduces the 6510, VIC-II and SID chips that made the C64 unique. It briefly discusses its Basic programming language and then proceeds to illustrate not only many of the games that are still so fondly remembered but also the first generation of game engines that made game development more approachable − among other topics that are often neglected but are necessary to provide a comprehensive overview of how far reaching the C64 in...

  12. Low-chromium reduced-activation chromium-tungsten steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Maziasz, P.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Bainitic microstructures formed during continuous cooling can differ from classical upper and lower bainite formed during isothermal transformation. Two types of non-classical bainite were observed depending on the cooling rate: carbide-free acicular bainite at rapid cooling rates and granular bainite at slower cooling rates. The Charpy impact toughness of the acicular ferrite was found to be considerably better than for the granular bainite. It was postulated that alloying to improve the hardenability of the steel would promote the formation of acicular bainite, just as increasing the cooling rate does. To test this, chromium and tungsten were added to the 2 1/4Cr-2W and 2 1/4Cr-2WV steel compositions to increase their hardenability, and the microstructures and mechanical properties were examined.

  13. Synthesis of Chromium (Ⅲ) 5-aminosalicylate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wei; HAO Er-jun; JIANG Yu-qin

    2004-01-01

    As we all known that diabetes is a chronic disease with major health consequences.Research has revealed that the occurrence of diabetes have great thing to do with the chromium deficient. Almost 40 years after the first report of glucose tolerance factor(GTF) [1], no conclusive evidence for an isolable ,biologically active form of chromium exited. Three materials have been proposed to be the biologically active form of chromium: "glucose tolerance factor", chromium Picolinate and low-molecular-weight chromium-binding substance (LWMCr) [2] . So there is potential for the design of new chromium drugs .5-Aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) is identified as an active component in the therapy of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis . The therapeutic action of 5-ASA is believed to be coupled to its ability to act as a free radical scavenger [3-4],acting locally on the inflamed colonic mucosa [5-7]. However, the clinical use of 5-ASA is limited, since orally administered 5-ASA is rapidly and completely absorbed from the upper gastrointestinal tract and therefore the local therapeutic effects of 5-ASA in the colon is hardly expected.In this paper, we report the synthesis of chromium(Ⅲ)5-aminosalicylate from 5-ASA and CrCl3. 6H2O.The synthesis route is as follow:The complex has been characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectra, X-ray powder diffractionand TG-DTA . They indicate that the structure is tris(5-ASA) Chromium . Experiments show that thecomplex has a good activity for supplement tiny dietary chromium, lowering blood glucose levels,lowering serum lipid levels and in creasing lean body mass .

  14. AH-64E Apache Remanufacture (AH-64E Remanufacture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    strike, armed reconnaissance, Manned-Unmanned Teaming, security and vertical maneuver missions across the full spectrum of warfare from Stability and...Jan 2008 LUT Nov 2009 Nov 2009 May 2010 Nov 2009 Milestone C Jul 2010 Jul 2010 Jan 2011 Sep 2010 IOT &E Mar 2012 Mar 2012 Sep 2012 Mar 2012 FRP Jul...Acronyms and Abbreviations IOT &E - Initial Operational Test and Evaluation LUT - Limited User Test AH-64E Remanufacture December 2015 SAR March 21, 2016

  15. Characteristics of chromium-allergic dermatitis patients prior to regulatory intervention for chromium in leather

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P; Zachariae, Claus;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chromium-tanned leather articles currently constitute the most important cause of contact allergy to chromium in Denmark. A regulation on the content of hexavalent chromium in leather was adopted in November 2013 by the EU member states. OBJECTIVES: To characterize patients...... with chromium allergy and their disease, to serve as a baseline for future studies on the potential effect of the new regulation on chromium in leather. METHODS: A questionnaire case-control study was performed on 155 dermatitis patients with positive patch test reactions to potassium dichromate and a matched...... control group of 621 dermatitis patients. Comparisons were made by use of a χ(2) -test and the Mann-Whitney U-test. Logistic regression analyses were used to test for associations. RESULTS: Sixty-six per cent of chromium-allergic patients had a positive history of contact dermatitis caused by leather...

  16. Chromium in leather footwear-risk assessment of chromium allergy and dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Strandesen, Maria; Poulsen, Pia B;

    2012-01-01

    Background. Chromium-tanned leather footwear, which releases >3 ppm hexavalent Cr(VI), may pose a risk of sensitizing and eliciting allergic dermatitis. Objectives. To determine the content and potential release of chromium in leather footwear and to discuss the prevention of chromium contact...... allergy and dermatitis. Methods. Sixty pairs of leather shoes, sandals and boots (20 children's, 20 men's, and 20 women's) were purchased in Copenhagen and examined with X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. Chromium was extracted according to the International Standard, ISO 17075. The detection level for Cr......(VI) was 3 ppm. Results. Chromium was identified in 95% of leather footwear products, the median content being 1.7% (range 0-3.3%). No association with store category or footwear category was found. A tendency for there to be a higher chromium content in footwear with high prices was shown (p(trend) = 0...

  17. Leaching of chromium from chromium contaminated soil: Speciation study and geochemical modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anđelković Darko H.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Distribution of chromium between soil and leachate was monitored. A natural process of percolating rainwater through the soil was simulated in the laboratory conditions and studied with column leaching extraction. Migration of chromium in the soil is conditioned by the level of chromium soil contamination, the soil organic matter content, and rainwater acidity. Chromium (III and chromium(VI were determined by spectrophotometric method with diphenilcarbazide in acidic media. Comparing the results of chromium speciation in leachate obtained by experimental model systems and geochemical modelling calculations using Visual MINTEQ model, a correlation was observed regarding the influence of the tested parameters. Leachate solutions showed that the concentration of Cr depended on the organic matter content. The influence of pH and soil organic matter content is in compliance after its definition through experimental and theoretical way. The computer model - Stockholm Humic Model used to evaluate the leaching results corresponded rather well with the measured values.

  18. Chromium isotope uptake in carbonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodler, Alexandra

    composition of contemporaneous seawater. Marine carbonates are ubiquitous throughout Earth’s rock record rendering them a particularly interesting archive for constraining past changes in ocean chemistry. This thesis includes an investigation of the fractionation behavior of Cr isotopesduring coprecipitation......Chromium (Cr) is a redox sensitive element potentially capable of tracing fine-scale fluctuations of the oxygenation of Earth’s early surface environments and seawater. The Cr isotope composition of carbonates could perhaps be used as paleo-redox proxy to elucidate changes in the geological past...... related to the rise of oxygen and the evolution of the biosphere. However, before the Cr isotopesystem can be applied to faithfully delineate paleo-environmental changes, careful assessment of the signal robustness and a thorough understanding of the Cr cycle in Earth system processes is necessary...

  19. Chromium (VI) adsorption on boehmite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granados-Correa, F. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apartado Postal 18-1027 Col., Escandon, Delegacion Miguel Hidalgo, C.P. 11801 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: fgc@nuclear.inin.mx; Jimenez-Becerril, J. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apartado Postal 18-1027 Col., Escandon, Delegacion Miguel Hidalgo, C.P. 11801 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2009-03-15

    Boehmite was synthesized and characterized in order to study the adsorption behavior and the removal of Cr(VI) ions from aqueous solutions as a function of contact time, initial pH solution, amount of adsorbent and initial metal ion concentration, using batch technique. Adsorption data of Cr(VI) on the boehmite were analyzed according to Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) adsorption models. Thermodynamic parameters for the adsorption system were determinated at 293, 303, 313 and 323 K temperatures. The kinetic values and thermodynamic parameters from the adsorption process show that the Cr(VI) ions adsorption on boehmite is an endothermic and spontaneous process. These results show that the boehmite could be considered as a potential adsorbent for chromium ions in aqueous solutions.

  20. Mechanical properties of metal-ceramic systems from nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirković Nemanja

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Metal-ceramic bond strength and alloys' elastic modulus clearly determine the potential of alloy application, because the ceramic integrity during mastication depends on these two characteristics. The aim of this study was to evaluate metal-ceramic bond strength and elastic modulus of cobalt-chromium alloys in making porcelainfused- to-metal restorations, regarding the application of the most frequent nickel-chromium alloy. Methods. The research was performed as an experimental study. Six metalceramic samples were made from nickel-chromium alloy (Wiron 99 and cobalt-chromium alloy (Wirobond C, according to the manufactures manuals and instructions from ISO 9693: 1996. Three-point bending test was performed up to the ceramic fracture. The fracture load was measured on an universal testing machine (Zwick, type 1464, with cross-head speed of 0,05mm/min. Results. The results of this study confirmed the significant differences between the metal-ceramic bond strength (p < 0.01 and elastic modulus (p < 0.001 of nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys, where cobalt-chromium alloys showed higher values for both tested parameters. Conclusion. Cobalt-chromium metal-ceramic alloys can successfully replace nickel-chromium alloys, especially for fabrication of long-span metal-ceramic bridges due to the great flexural strength.

  1. AEROSOL BEHAVIOR IN CHROMIUM WASTE INCINERATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suyuan Yu

    2003-01-01

    Cr2O3 is considered as the dominant incineration product during the combustion disposal of chromium waste. A hydrogen/air diffusion flame was employed to simulate the industrial process of incineration. Cr2O3 aerosols were generated inside the flame by the gas phase reaction of chromium and oxygen. Chromium came from the rapid decomposition of chromium hexacarbonyl (Cr(CO)6) at room temperature and was carried into the combustion chamber by hydrogen. Aerosol and clusters can then be easily formed in the flame by nucleation and coagulation. A two dimensional Discrete-Sectional Model (DSM) was adopted to calculate the Cr2O3 aerosol behavior. The experimental measurement method was Dynamic Light Scattering. The numerically predicted results agreed well with those of the experimental measurement. Both results show that the Cr2O3 aerosol size reached about 70 nanometers at the flame top.

  2. Localized Corrosion of Chromium Coated Steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, X.; Beentjes, P.; Mol, A.; Terryn, H.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the studies of the local corrosion behaviour of chromium-coated ultra low carbon steel in NaCl solution using polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and SVET.

  3. CHROMIUM CONCENTRATION IN TEHRAN ELECTROPLATING PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghiasseddin

    1988-12-01

    Full Text Available Hazards of soluable hexa and trivalent chromium have been documented by many investigators. But there was no information regarding safety of about 5000 workers at exposure risk to chromium in 600 primitive electroplating work shops of Tehran. During this study more than 70% of work shops were inactive due to some of their own problems. Out of active plants those that were relatively more cooperative 43 manual and 3 semi automatic were investigated for chromium concentration both by personal and environmental Sampling. The Samples were analyzed by AAS and cholormetry. In 30% of personal and 40% of environmental samples both total and Cr+6 were higher than ACGIH’S TLV. In one of semiautomatic plant Cr=6 was as high as 0.71 mg/m.3.Regarding injuries, following observations were made: Nasal wound 85%, skin irritation 73% , Dermatitis 35% and some other chromium related injuries including 2 cases of Septum perforations.

  4. Potentiometry: A Chromium (III) -- EDTA Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, J. I.; Howell, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an experiment that involves the preparation of a chromium (III)-EDTA compound, a study of its infrared spectrum, and the potentiometric determination of two successive acid dissociation constants. (Author/GS)

  5. Standard Specification for Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Copper, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tantalum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten, and Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium Alloy Plate, Sheet, and Strip

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2015-01-01

    Standard Specification for Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Copper, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tantalum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten, and Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium Alloy Plate, Sheet, and Strip

  6. Standard Specification for Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium, Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium-Tantalum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Copper, and Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten Alloy Rod

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2015-01-01

    Standard Specification for Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium, Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium-Tantalum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Copper, and Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten Alloy Rod

  7. Permeation of chromium salts through human skin in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Fullerton, A; Avnstorp, C

    1992-01-01

    Chromium permeation studies were performed on full thickness human skin in diffusion cells. All samples were analysed for the total chromium content by graphite furnace Zeeman-corrected atomic absorption spectrometry. Some samples were analysed by an ion chromatographic method permitting...... the simultaneous determination of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) as well. The amounts of chromium found in all skin layers were significantly higher when potassium dichromate was applied to the skin compared with chromium chloride or chromium nitrate. Chromium could only be detected in the recipient phase after application...... of the dichromate solution. Chromium skin levels increased with increasing concentrations of applied chromium salts up to 0.034 M Cr. The amount of chromium in recipient phase and skin layers increased with increasing pH when the applied solution contained potassium dichromate. This was ascribed to a decreased skin...

  8. Direct access to macroporous chromium nitride and chromium titanium nitride with inverse opal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weitian; DiSalvo, Francis J

    2015-03-21

    We report a facile synthesis of single-phase, nanocrystalline macroporous chromium nitride and chromium titanium nitride with an inverse opal morphology. The material is characterized using XRD, SEM, HR-TEM/STEM, TGA and XPS. Interconversion of macroporous CrN to Cr2O3 and back to CrN while retaining the inverse opal morphology is also demonstrated.

  9. The Key Technique of Manufacture of Dense Chromium Sesquioxide Refractories

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIMaoqiang; ZHANGShuying; 等

    1998-01-01

    Dense chromium sesquioxide refractories have widely been used in the kilns for making alkai-free and anti-alkali glass fibers due to their excellent re-sistance to molten glasses.Densifications of chromium sesquioxide during sintering can be blocked by evaporation of chromium trioxide derived from oxidation at high temperature,In this paper the mech-anism of sintering chromium oxide and the process-ing technique for making dense chromium sesquiox-ide refractories are discussed .A process in laboratory scale for making dense chromium sesquioxide bricks is demonstrated.

  10. Inverse Association of Plasma Chromium Levels with Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes: A Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sijing Chen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Chromium has long been known as an enhancer of insulin action. However, the role of chromium in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM in humans remains controversial. The current study aimed to examine the associations of plasma chromium levels with T2DM and pre-diabetes mellitus (pre-DM. We conducted a case-control study involving 1471 patients with newly diagnosed T2DM, 682 individuals with newly diagnosed pre-DM, and 2290 individuals with normal glucose tolerance in a Chinese population from 2009 to 2014. Plasma chromium was measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Plasma chromium levels were lower in the T2DM and pre-DM groups than in the control group (median: 3.68 μg/L, 3.61 μg/L, 3.97 μg/L, respectively, p < 0.001. After adjustment for potential confounding factors, the odds ratios (95% confidence interval for T2DM across increasing quartiles of plasma chromium levels were 1 (referent, 0.67 (0.55–0.83, 0.64 (0.51–0.79, and 0.58 (0.46–0.73, respectively (p for trend <0.001. The corresponding odds ratios (95% confidence interval for pre-DM were 1 (referent, 0.70 (0.54–0.91, 0.67 (0.52–0.88, and 0.58 (0.43–0.78, respectively (p for trend < 0.001. Our results indicated that plasma chromium concentrations were inversely associated with T2DM and pre-DM in Chinese adults.

  11. Inverse Association of Plasma Chromium Levels with Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes: A Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sijing; Jin, Xiaoling; Shan, Zhilei; Li, Shuzhen; Yin, Jiawei; Sun, Taoping; Luo, Cheng; Yang, Wei; Yao, Ping; Yu, Kaifeng; Zhang, Yan; Cheng, Qian; Cheng, Jinquan; Bao, Wei; Liu, Liegang

    2017-01-01

    Chromium has long been known as an enhancer of insulin action. However, the role of chromium in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in humans remains controversial. The current study aimed to examine the associations of plasma chromium levels with T2DM and pre-diabetes mellitus (pre-DM). We conducted a case-control study involving 1471 patients with newly diagnosed T2DM, 682 individuals with newly diagnosed pre-DM, and 2290 individuals with normal glucose tolerance in a Chinese population from 2009 to 2014. Plasma chromium was measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Plasma chromium levels were lower in the T2DM and pre-DM groups than in the control group (median: 3.68 μg/L, 3.61 μg/L, 3.97 μg/L, respectively, p < 0.001). After adjustment for potential confounding factors, the odds ratios (95% confidence interval) for T2DM across increasing quartiles of plasma chromium levels were 1 (referent), 0.67 (0.55–0.83), 0.64 (0.51–0.79), and 0.58 (0.46–0.73), respectively (p for trend <0.001). The corresponding odds ratios (95% confidence interval) for pre-DM were 1 (referent), 0.70 (0.54–0.91), 0.67 (0.52–0.88), and 0.58 (0.43–0.78), respectively (p for trend < 0.001). Our results indicated that plasma chromium concentrations were inversely associated with T2DM and pre-DM in Chinese adults. PMID:28304331

  12. Synthesis of a new complex Chromium (Ⅲ) 2-mercaptonicotinate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wei; HAO Er-jun; JIANG Yu-qin

    2004-01-01

    Chromium is an essential trace element for mammals[1-3].Diabetes is a chronic disease with major health consequence. Studies show that the occurrence of diabetes have great thing to do with the chromium deficient. Almost 40 years after the first report of glucose tolerance factor(GTF)[4]no conclusive evidence for an isolable ,biologically active form of chromium exited. Three materials have been proposed to be the biologically active form of chromium: "glucose tolerance factor", chromium Picolinate and low-molecular-weight chromium-binding substance (LWMCr)[5]So there is potential for the design of new chromium drugs[6].Chromium compounds have been used in medicine for centuries and there is potential for the design of new chromium drugs.2-Mercaptonicotinic acid(MN) displays the interesting biological activity. Chromium( Ⅲ )2-mercaptonicotinate is a common and effective biologically active form of Chromium. The test of biological activity indicated that may be useful in treating of diabetes. In this paper, we reported the The synthesis route is as follow:The structure of the complex has been characterized by IR, elemental analysis, MS,atomic absorption spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction and TG-DTA analysis.They indicate that the structure of Chromium 2-mercaptonicotinate.HPLC is used for determination of the purity. Studies show that the complex has a good biological activity for supplement tiny dietary chromium,lowering blood glucose levels, lowering serum lipid levels and increasing lean body mass.

  13. 当我64

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘伟民

    2007-01-01

    <正>四十年前,Paul McCartney写了《When I’m Sixty- Four》,唱出耳顺之年的情操——"如果你不嫌弃.我还会留在你身边……不过.这是很多年以后的事。"制作新大碟《Memory Almost Full》时.他正好64岁……原来.时间的确过得很快。时间飞逝、记忆将满。他其实一直都在挣扎.究竟哪一个人、哪一件事.可以移至资源回收筒而不会后悔?

  14. Serum chromium levels in gestational diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P G Sundararaman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To measure serum chromium level in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM from Chennai, South India. Materials and Methods: Thirty women with gestational diabetes, 60 age matched controls. Inclusion criteria: Gestational age 22-28 weeks, age group 20-35 years. Exclusion Criteria: Gestational age beyond 28 weeks, malnutrition or presence of infection. Serum chromium was measured using inductive couple plasma emission spectrometer. Results: Serum chromium levels of women with GDM, 1.59+/-0.02 ng/ml (range: 0.16-4.0 ng/ml were lower than in controls (4.58+/-0.62 ng/ml; range 0.82-5.33 ng/ml (P < 0.001. However, there were no significant differences among cases and controls when subdivided by parity. Conclusions: Women with GDM from a South Indian city had lower levels of serum chromium compared to pregnant women without GDM. Studies may be done whether chromium supplementation is useful in this group of women.

  15. Surface Chemistry and Spectroscopy of Chromium in Inorganic Oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Wachs, I.E.; Schoonheydt, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on the surface chemistry and spectroscopy of chromium in inorganic oxides. Characterization of the molecular structures of chromium; Mechanics of hydrogenation-dehydrogenation reactions; Mobility and reactivity on oxidic surfaces.

  16. Residual Chromium in Leather by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    S. Okoh; I. O. Okunade; D. J. Adeyemo; Ahmed, Y A; A. A. Audu; E. Amali

    2012-01-01

    Problem statement: Most tanning processes employ the use of chromium sulphate. For chromium tanned leather, finished products may contain high amount of residual chromium. This may pose some health hazards, since chromium is known to be toxic at elevated concentration. This justifies the need for the study. Approach: Various samples of leather were collected from a tannery, a leather crafts market, a leather dump site and from local tanners all in Kano, Nigeria in 2009. The samples were irrad...

  17. Evaluation of Excitation Function for 64Zn

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>Present work concerns the evaluated neutron induced excitation function data for 64Zn, and mainly on (n, γ) reaction channel. The related experimental data were collected, analyzed and corrected for 64Zn

  18. Hexavalent and trivalent chromium in leather: What should be done?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretto, Angelo

    2015-11-01

    Trivalent chromium compounds are used for leather tanning, and chromium may be released during use of leather goods. In certain instances, small amounts of hexavalent chromium can be formed and released. Both trivalent and hexavalent chromium can elicit allergic skin reaction in chromium sensitised subjects, the latter being significantly more potent. Induction of sensitisation only occurs after exposure to hexavalent chromium. A minority of subjects are sensitised to chromium, and in a fraction of these subjects allergic skin reaction have been described after wearing leather shoes or, less frequently, other leather goods. The evidence that in all these cases the reaction is related to hexavalent chromium is not always strong. The content of hexavalent chromium in leather is regulated in European Union, but rate of release rather than content is relevant for allergic skin reaction. The role of trivalent chromium appear much less relevant if at all. Modern tanning procedure do not pose significant risk due to either hexavalent or trivalent chromium. Dismissing bad quality and worn-off leather goods is relevant in reducing or eliminating the skin reaction. It should also be pointed out that shoe components or substances other than chromium in leather may cause allergic/irritative skin reactions.

  19. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining...

  20. Standard Specification for Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Columbium Alloy (UNS N06625), Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Silicon Alloy (UNS N06219), and Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten Alloy (UNS N06650) Rod and Bar

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2014-01-01

    Standard Specification for Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Columbium Alloy (UNS N06625), Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Silicon Alloy (UNS N06219), and Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten Alloy (UNS N06650) Rod and Bar

  1. 12 CFR 4.64 - Promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Promotion. 4.64 Section 4.64 Banks and Banking...; Contracting for Goods and Services § 4.64 Promotion. (a) Scope. The OCC, under the direction of the Deputy Comptroller for Resource Management, engages in promotion and outreach activities designed to identify...

  2. 47 CFR 64.1401 - Expanded interconnection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Expanded interconnection. 64.1401 Section 64...) MISCELLANEOUS RULES RELATING TO COMMON CARRIERS Expanded Interconnection § 64.1401 Expanded interconnection. (a... 69, subpart G of this chapter, shall offer expanded interconnection for interstate special...

  3. 14 CFR 29.64 - Climb: General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Climb: General. 29.64 Section 29.64 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Performance § 29.64 Climb: General. Compliance with...

  4. 19 CFR 122.64 - Other aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Other aircraft. 122.64 Section 122.64 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Clearance of Aircraft and Permission To Depart § 122.64 Other aircraft. Clearance or permission to depart shall be...

  5. 33 CFR 401.64 - Calling in.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Calling in. 401.64 Section 401.64... SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Radio Communications § 401.64 Calling in. (a) Every vessel, intending to transit or in transit, shall report on the assigned frequency to the designated Seaway...

  6. 22 CFR 40.64 - Stowaways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stowaways. 40.64 Section 40.64 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE VISAS REGULATIONS PERTAINING TO BOTH NONIMMIGRANTS AND IMMIGRANTS UNDER THE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Illegal Entrants and Immigration Violators § 40.64 Stowaways....

  7. 27 CFR 6.4 - Jurisdictional limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Jurisdictional limits. 6.4 Section 6.4 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS âTIED-HOUSEâ Scope of Regulations § 6.4 Jurisdictional limits. (a) General....

  8. 46 CFR 64.67 - Shutoff valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Shutoff valve. 64.67 Section 64.67 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.67 Shutoff valve. A shutoff...

  9. 22 CFR 64.2 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definitions. 64.2 Section 64.2 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PUBLIC DIPLOMACY AND EXCHANGES PARTICIPATION BY FEDERAL EMPLOYEES IN CULTURAL EXCHANGE PROGRAMS OF FOREIGN COUNTRIES § 64.2 Definitions. For the purpose of this part: (a)...

  10. 46 CFR 64.97 - Cargo hose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo hose. 64.97 Section 64.97 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Cargo Handling System § 64.97 Cargo hose. Each hose assembly, consisting of couplings and a...

  11. 28 CFR 540.64 - Press pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Press pools. 540.64 Section 540.64... PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Contact With News Media § 540.64 Press pools. (a) The Warden may establish a press pool whenever he or she determines that the frequency of requests for interviews and...

  12. 46 CFR 64.95 - Piping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Piping. 64.95 Section 64.95 Shipping COAST GUARD... SYSTEMS Cargo Handling System § 64.95 Piping. (a) Piping, valves, flanges, and fittings used in the... the piping system must comply with § 56.60-25(c) of this chapter....

  13. 46 CFR 64.45 - Securing devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Securing devices. 64.45 Section 64.45 Shipping COAST... HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.45 Securing devices. An MPT or its framework must have sufficient number of positive action securing devices, including hooks, lugs, or padeyes, to attach the...

  14. 16 CFR 1.64 - Condemnation proceedings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Condemnation proceedings. 1.64 Section 1.64 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE GENERAL PROCEDURES Injunctive and Condemnation Proceedings § 1.64 Condemnation proceedings. In those cases...

  15. Studying chromium biosorption using arabica coffee leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Carlos Florez García

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This work was aimed at providing an alternative for removing heavy metals such as chromium from waste water (effluent from the leather industry and galvanoplasty (coating with a thin layer of metal by electrochemical means, using coffee leaves as bio- mass. Using arabica coffee (Castle variety leaves led to 82% chromium removal efficiency for 1,000 mg/L synthetic dissolutions in 4 pH dissolution operating conditions, 0 rpm agitation, 0.149 mm diameter biomass particle size and 0.85 g/ml biomass / dissolution volume ratio.

  16. New mixed aluminium–chromium diarsenate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Alem Bouhassine

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Potassium chromium aluminium diarsenate, KCr1/4Al3/4As2O7, was prepared by solid-state reaction. The structure consists of (Cr1/4/Al3/4O6 octahedra and As2O7 diarsenate groups sharing corners to build up a three-dimensional anionic framework. The potassium cations are located in wide channels running along the c-axis direction. The crystal structure is isostructural with the triclinic AIMIIIX2O7 (AI = alkali metal; MIII = Al, Cr, Fe; X = As, P compounds. However, the MIII octahedrally coordinated site is 25% partially occupied by chromium and 75% by aluminium.

  17. Strategies for chromium bioremediation of tannery effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Satyendra Kumar; Tripathi, Manikant; Srinath, Thiruneelakantan

    2012-01-01

    Bioremediation offers the possibility of using living organisms (bacteria, fungi, algae,or plants), but primarily microorganisms, to degrade or remove environmental contaminants, and transform them into nontoxic or less-toxic forms. The major advantages of bioremediation over conventional physicochemical and biological treatment methods include low cost, good efficiency, minimization of chemicals, reduced quantity of secondary sludge, regeneration of cell biomass, and the possibility of recover-ing pollutant metals. Leather industries, which extensively employ chromium compounds in the tanning process, discharge spent-chromium-laden effluent into nearby water bodies. Worldwide, chromium is known to be one of the most common inorganic contaminants of groundwater at pollutant hazardous sites. Hexavalent chromium poses a health risk to all forms of life. Bioremediation of chromium extant in tannery waste involves different strategies that include biosorption, bioaccumulation,bioreduction, and immobilization of biomaterial(s). Biosorption is a nondirected physiochemical interaction that occurs between metal species and the cellular components of biological species. It is metabolism-dependent when living biomass is employed, and metabolism-independent in dead cell biomass. Dead cell biomass is much more effective than living cell biomass at biosorping heavy metals, including chromium. Bioaccumulation is a metabolically active process in living organisms that works through adsorption, intracellular accumulation, and bioprecipitation mechanisms. In bioreduction processes, microorganisms alter the oxidation/reduction state of toxic metals through direct or indirect biological and chemical process(es).Bioreduction of Cr6+ to Cr3+ not only decreases the chromium toxicity to living organisms, but also helps precipitate chromium at a neutral pH for further physical removal,thus offering promise as a bioremediation strategy. However, biosorption, bioaccumulation, and

  18. Chromium allergy and dermatitis: prevalence and main findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Johansen, Jeanne D.; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl;

    2015-01-01

    The history of chromium as an allergen goes back more than a century, and includesan interventional success with national legislation that led to significant changes inthe epidemiology of chromium allergy in construction workers. The 2015 EU Leather Regulation once again put a focus on chromium...... allergy, emphasizing that the investigation of chromium allergy is still far from complete. Our review article on chromium focuses on the allergen’s chemical properties, its potential exposure sources, and the allergen’s interaction with the skin, and also provides an overview of the regulations...

  19. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Trivalent and Hexavalent Chromium Based on Ingestion and Inhalation of Soluble Chromium Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    be largely Cr(III) although some Cr(VI) exposure probably also occurs. Stainless-steel welders are exposed to nickel as well as to chromium compounds...welders are equivocal with respect to involvement of chromium, particularly since nickel in some chemical forms is an established lung carcinogen (Stern...microglobulin (Lindberg and Vesterberg, 1983), retinol-binding protein (Franchini and Mutti , 1988), B-glucuronidase ( Mutti et al., 1979), and kidney brush border

  20. Biological groundwater treatment for chromium removal at low hexavalent chromium concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamais, Daniel; Noutsopoulos, Constantinos; Kavallari, Ioanna; Nyktari, Eleni; Kaldis, Apostolos; Panousi, Eleni; Nikitopoulos, George; Antoniou, Kornilia; Nasioka, Maria

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this work is to develop and evaluate biological groundwater treatment systems that will achieve hexavalent chromium reduction and total chromium removal from groundwater at hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) groundwater concentrations in the 0-200 μg/L range. Three lab-scale units operated, as sequencing batch reactors (SBR) under aerobic, anaerobic and anaerobic-aerobic conditions. All systems received groundwater with a Cr(VI) content of 200 μg/L. In order to support biological growth, groundwater was supplemented with milk, liquid cheese whey or a mixture of sugar and milk to achieve a COD concentration of 200 mg/L. The results demonstrate that a fully anaerobic system or an anaerobic-aerobic system dosed with simple or complex external organic carbon sources can lead to practically complete Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(III). The temperature dependency of maximum Cr(VI) removal rates can be described by the Arrhenius relationship. Total chromium removal in the biological treatment systems was not complete because a significant portion of Cr(III) remained in solution. An integrated system comprising of an anaerobic SBR followed by a sand filter achieved more than 95% total chromium removal thus resulting in average effluent total and dissolved chromium concentrations of 7 μg/L and 3 μg/L, respectively.

  1. The electronic structure of antiferromagnetic chromium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1981-01-01

    The author has used the local spin density formalism to perform self-consistent calculations of the electronic structure of chromium in the non-magnetic and commensurate antiferromagnetic phases, as a function of the lattice parameter. A change of a few per cent in the atomic radius brings...

  2. A Kinetic Model of Chromium in a Flame

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Chromium has been identified as a carcinogenic metal.Incineration is the useful method for disposal of toxic chromium hazard waste and a chromium kinetic model in a flame is very important to study chromium oxidation.Chromium chemical kinetics over a range of temperatures of a hydrogen/air flame is proposed.Nine chromium compounds and fifty-eight reversible chemical reactions were considered The forward reaction rates are calculated based on the molecular collision approach for unknown ones and Arrhenius's Law for known ones.The backward reaction rates were calculated according to forward reaction rates, the equilibrium constants and chemical thermodynamics.It is verified by several equilibrium cases and is tested by a hydrogen/air diffusion flame.The results show that the kinetic model could be used in cases in which the chromium kinetics play an important role in a flame

  3. [Experimental study on chromium in gannan navel orange by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuan; Liu, Mu-Hua; Yao, Ming-Yin; Peng, Qiu-Mei; Chen, Tian-Bing; Zhang, Xu; Lin, Yong-Zeng

    2012-09-01

    It is a relatively new task to apply the laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to fruit samples. To apply LIBS technique in the field related to analysis of trace heavy metal element in fruits samples, we have done primary experiments using Gannan navel orange samples. The authors put the samples into different concentration gradient K2Cr2O7 solution and left it for 30 hours, and then we did the LIBS experiment, discriminated characteristic spectra of chromium element and recorded the peak intensity information. Weighing three grams of sample and determined chromium concentration in the samples by atomic absorption spectrophotometer using wet digestion. The calibration curve of the line intensities versus the concentrations of the Cr element was acquired by the Origin software. The authors found that the linear correlation coefficient is 0. 981 66. The calibration curve can be used for the quantitative analysis of chromium element with an unknown concentration in Gannan navel orange. The LIBS detection limit of Cr in the solution was 11.64 mg x g(-1) from the measured calibration curve. Experiment results showed that LIBS technique is a valid means for measuring and quantitatively analyzing the content of heavy metal elements in fruit samples.

  4. 77 FR 6627 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Hard and Decorative Chromium...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-08

    ... aluminum to provide resistance to corrosion. The chromium anodizing process is used to coat aircraft parts... Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Hard and Decorative Chromium Electroplating and Chromium Anodizing Tanks... Pollutant Emissions: Hard and Decorative Chromium Electroplating and Chromium Anodizing Tanks; and...

  5. CHROMIUM INDUCED CYTOTOXICITY IN BLACKGRAM (VIGNA MUNGO L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chidambaram ، P. Sundaramoorthy ، A. Murugan ، K. Sankar Ganesh ، L. Baskaran

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromium is known to be highly toxic to biological systems. This study was designed to determine the mutagenic effects of different concentrations (0, 10, 25, 50, 100 and 200 mg/L of hexavalent chromium on root tip cells of blackgram (Vigna mungo L. Hepper. The blackgram seeds were equi-spacially arranged in sterilized petriplates lined with filter paper and they were treated with different concentrations of chromium solution. In germination studies, the morphological growth parameters such as germination percentage, root length, shoot length fresh weight and dry weight of blackgram seedlings were decreased with increasing dose of chromium concentrations. No germination of blackgram seeds was recorded at 300mg/l chromium concentration. Chromosome aberration assay was used to determine the mitotic indices and rate of chromosome aberration in blackgram root tip cells due to chromium treatment. The results showed that the mitotic indices were complicated due to different concentrations of chromium. However, the increase in chromium concentration has led to a gradual increase in the percentage of chromosomal aberration and mitotic index. The chromosome length, absolute chromosome length and average chromosome lengths were gradually found to decrease. There was no considerable change in 2n number of chromosome with the increase in chromium concentrations. It is concluded that the hexavalent chromium has significant mutagenic effect on the root tip cells of blackgram.

  6. Femtosecond laser surface structuring and oxidation of chromium thin coatings: Black chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotsedi, L., E-mail: Kotsedi@tlabs.ac.za [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Nuru, Z.Y. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Mthunzi, P. [National Laser Centre, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, 0001 Pretoria (South Africa); Muller, T.F.G. [University of the Western Cape, Physics Department, Bellville, 7535 Cape Town (South Africa); Eaton, S.M. [Physics Department, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Julies, B. [University of the Western Cape, Physics Department, Bellville, 7535 Cape Town (South Africa); Manikandan, E. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Ramponi, R. [Physics Department, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Maaza, M. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa)

    2014-12-01

    Highlights: • Oxidation of the chromium thin film to chromium oxide by femtosecond laser with a fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm. • Solar absorber from chromium oxide that low percentage reflectance. • Femtosecond laser oxidation, with a de-focused laser. • Chromium oxide formation by femtosecond laser in normal ambient. - Abstract: In view of their potential applications as selective solar absorbers, chromium coatings on float glass substrates were nano/micro structured by femtosecond laser in air. Raman and X-rays diffraction investigations confirmed the formation of an ultra-porous α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer at the surface; higher is the input laser power, enhanced is the crystallinity of the α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer. The α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer with the Cr underneath it in addition to the photo-induced porosity acted as a classical ceramic–metal nano-composite making the reflectance to decrease significantly within the spectral range of 190–1100 nm. The average reflectance decreased from 70 to 2%.

  7. Production of basic chromium sulfate by using recovered chromium from ashes of thermally treated leather.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmer, Aline; Nunes, Keila Guerra Pacheco; Gutterres, Mariliz; Marcílio, Nilson Romeu

    2010-04-15

    Leather wastes tanned with chromium are generated during the production process of leather, hence the wastes from hand crafted goods and footwear industries are a serious environmental problem. The thermal treatment of leather wastes can be one of the treatment options because the wastes are rich in chromium and can be used as a raw material for sodium chromate production and further to obtain several chromium compounds. The objective of this study was to utilize the chromium from leather wastes via basic chromium sulfate production to be subsequently applied in a hide tanning. The obtained results have shown that this is the first successful attempt to achieve desired base properties of the product. The result was achieved when the following conditions were applied: a molar ratio between sodium sulfite and sodium dichromate equal to 6; reaction time equal to 5 min before addition of sulfuric acid; pH of sodium dichromate solution equal to 2. Summarizing, there is an opportunity to utilize the dangerous wastes and reused them in the production scheme by minimizing or annulling the environmental impact and to attend a sustainable process development concept.

  8. 7 CFR 922.64 - Termination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Termination. 922.64 Section 922.64 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... 31 of the then current fiscal period. (d) The provisions of this part shall, in any event,...

  9. 17 CFR 200.64 - Judicial review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Judicial review. 200.64... AND ETHICS; AND INFORMATION AND REQUESTS Canons of Ethics § 200.64 Judicial review. The Congress has provided for review by the courts of the decisions and orders by this Commission. Members should...

  10. 47 CFR 101.64 - Service areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service areas. 101.64 Section 101.64... Service areas. Service areas for 38.6-40.0 GHz service are Economic Areas (EAs) as defined below. EAs are.... Additionally, there are four EA-like areas: Guam and Northern Mariana Islands; Puerto Rico and the U.S....

  11. 27 CFR 4.64 - Prohibited practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prohibited practices. 4.64 Section 4.64 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... practices. (a) Restrictions. The advertisement of wine shall not contain: (1) Any statement that is false...

  12. 24 CFR 6.4 - Discrimination prohibited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Discrimination prohibited. 6.4... COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT ACT OF 1974 General Provisions § 6.4 Discrimination prohibited. (a) Section 109... benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity funded in whole or in...

  13. 40 CFR 428.64 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 428.64 Section 428.64 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Medium-Sized General Molded, Extruded, and Fabricated Rubber Plants...

  14. 36 CFR 64.11 - Project performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Project performance. 64.11 Section 64.11 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GRANTS... Project performance. The State or local applicant shall be responsible for insuring the project is...

  15. Interactions of chromium with microorganisms and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, C; Campos-García, J; Devars, S; Gutiérrez-Corona, F; Loza-Tavera, H; Torres-Guzmán, J C; Moreno-Sánchez, R

    2001-05-01

    Chromium is a highly toxic non-essential metal for microorganisms and plants. Due to its widespread industrial use, chromium (Cr) has become a serious pollutant in diverse environmental settings. The hexavalent form of the metal, Cr(VI), is considered a more toxic species than the relatively innocuous and less mobile Cr(III) form. The presence of Cr in the environment has selected microbial and plant variants able to tolerate high levels of Cr compounds. The diverse Cr-resistance mechanisms displayed by microorganisms, and probably by plants, include biosorption, diminished accumulation, precipitation, reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III), and chromate efflux. Some of these systems have been proposed as potential biotechnological tools for the bioremediation of Cr pollution. In this review we summarize the interactions of bacteria, algae, fungi and plants with Cr and its compounds.

  16. 64DAPSK-OFDM与64QAM-OFDM系统性能比较%Performance Comparison between 64DAPSK-OFDM and 64QAM-OFDM Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦雅娟; 刘元安

    2004-01-01

    针对OFDM 系统中的MQAM和MDAPSK两种子载波高阶调制技术,介绍了64QAM和64DAPSK信号的比特软输出解调方法,比较了64DAPSK-OFDM和64QAM-OFDM系统的误码性能.仿真结果表明,在频率选择性和时间选择性衰落信道下,若信道相邻子载波或相邻OFDM符号的相关性能得到保证,采用64DAPSK调制可以用较少的信噪比损失换取OFDM系统复杂度的大大降低.

  17. Effect of polyethylene glycol on electrochemically deposited trivalent chromium layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joo-Yul LEE; Man KIM; Sik-Chol KWON

    2009-01-01

    The structural characteristics of the trivalent chromium deposits and their interfacial behavior in the plating solution with and without polyethylene glycol molecules were observed by using various electrochemical methods such as cyclic voltammetry, open circuit potential transition, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectrometry. It is shown that the polyethylene glycol molecules make the reductive current density lower in the trivalent chromium plating system and promote a hydrogen evolution reaction through their adsorption on the electrode surface. And the trivalent chromium layer formed from the polyethylene glycol-containing solution has somewhat higher density of cracks on its surface and results in a lower film resistance, lower polarization resistance, and higher capacitance in a corrosive atmosphere. It is also revealed that the formation of chromium carbide layer is facilitated in the presence of polyethylene glycol, which means easier electrochemical codeposition of chromium and carbon, not single chromium deposition.

  18. Speciation and recovery of chromium from chromite ore processing residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreeram, K J; Ramasami, T

    2001-10-01

    The processing of chromite ore is associated with the generation of large quantities of solid wastes containing chromium, which have been disposed of as landfill for many years. The mobilization and operational speciation of chromium contained in soils contaminated with metal salts are important in terms of the environment. Several methods have been employed for the extraction and recovery of solid wastes. Chromium contained in contaminated soils and solid wastes can be categorized as exchangeable, oxidizable, carbonate-bound, reducible and residual. The results from this study indicate a need for efficient leaching methodologies in chromite ore processing plants to decrease the non-detrital fractions of chromium in the residue. Aggressive methodologies are required to recover chromium from the detrital fractions. The potential benefits of employing sodium peroxide for the complete recovery of chromium from chromite residue have been demonstrated, and the need to ensure the safety of the process has been emphasized.

  19. Dimensionally Controlled Lithiation of Chromium Oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fister, Tim T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hu, Xianyi [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Esbenshade, Jennifer [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Chen, Xiao [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Wu, Jinsong [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Dravid, Vinayak [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Bedzyk, Michael [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Long, Brandon [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gewirth, Andrew A. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Shi, Bing [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Schlepütz, Christian M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Fenter, Paul [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-01-12

    Oxide conversion reactions are an alternative approach for high capacity lithium ion batteries but are known to suffer from structural irreversibility associated with the phase separation and reconstitution of reduced metal species and Li2O. In particular, the morphology of the reduced metal species is thought to play a critical role in the electrochemical properties of a conversion material. Here we use a model electrode with alternating layers of chromium and chromium oxide to better understand and control these phase changes in real-time and at molecular length scales. Despite lacking crystallinity at the atomic scale, this superstructure is observed (with X-ray reflectivity, XR) to lithiate and delithiate in a purely one-dimensional manner, preserving the layered structure. The XR data show that the metal layers act as nucleation sites for the reduction of chromium in the conversion reaction. Irreversibility during delithiation is due to the formation of a ternary phase, LiCrO2, which can be further delithiated at higher potentials. The results reveal that the combination of confining lithiation to nanoscale sheets of Li2O and the availability of reaction sites in the metal layers in the layered structure is a strategy for improving the reversibility and mass transport properties that can be used in a wide range of conversion materials.

  20. Processes affecting the remediation of chromium-contaminated sites.

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, C.D.; Wittbrodt, P R

    1991-01-01

    The remediation of chromium-contaminated sites requires knowledge of the processes that control the migration and transformation of chromium. Advection, dispersion, and diffusion are physical processes affecting the rate at which contaminants can migrate in the subsurface. Heterogeneity is an important factor that affects the contribution of each of these mechanisms to the migration of chromium-laden waters. Redox reactions, chemical speciation, adsorption/desorption phenomena, and precipitat...

  1. New technology for comprehensive utilization of aluminum-chromium residue from chromium salts production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-bin; QI Tian-gui; JIANG Xin-min; ZHOU Qiu-sheng; LIU Gui-hua; PENG Zhi-hong; HAN Deng-lun; ZHANG Zhong-yuan; YANG Kun-shan

    2008-01-01

    Colloidal aluminum-chromium residue(ACR) was mass-produced in chromate production process, and the large energy consumption and high recovery cost existed in traditional methods of utilizing such ACR. To overcome those problems, a new comprehensive method was proposed to deal with the ACR, and was proven valid in industry. In the new process, the chromate was separated firstly from the colloidal ACR by ripening and washing with additives, by which more than 95% hexavalent chromium was recovered. The chromium-free aluminum residue(CFAR), after properly dispersed, was digested at 120-130 ℃ and more than 90% alumina can be recovered. And then the pregnant aluminate solution obtained from digestion was seeded to precipitate aluminum hydroxide. This new method can successfully recover both alumina and sodium chromate, and thus realize the comprehensive utilization of ACR from chromate industry.

  2. A Low Noise 64x64 Germanium Array for Far IR Astronomy Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to investigate the feasibility of developing a 64x64 far infrared germanium focal-plane array with the following key design features: 1- Four...

  3. A Low Noise 64x64 Germanium Array for Far IR Astronomy Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develope a 64x64 far infrared germanium focal-plane array with the following key design features: 1- Four top-illuminated, 32x32 germanium sub-arrays...

  4. Stabilization and solidification of chromium-contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherne, C.A.; Thomson, B.M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Civil Engineering Dept.; Conway, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-11-01

    Chromium-contaminated soil is a common environmental problem in the United States as a result of numerous industrial processes involving chromium. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is the species of most concern because of its toxicity and mobility in groundwater. One method of diminishing the environmental impact of chromium is to reduce it to a trivalent oxidation state [Cr(III)], in which it is relatively insoluble and nontoxic. This study investigated a stabilization and solidification process to minimize the chromium concentration in the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) extract and to produce a solidified waste form with a compressive strength in the range of 150 to 300 pounds per square inch (psi). To minimize the chromium in the TCLP extract, the chromium had to be reduced to the trivalent oxidation state. The average used in this study was an alluvium contaminated with chromic and sulfuric acid solutions. The chromium concentration in the in the in situ soil was 1212 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) total chromium and 275 mg/kg Cr(VI). The effectiveness of iron, ferrous sulfate to reduce Cr(VI) was tested in batch experiments.

  5. Tribological Characteristics of Chromium-active Carbon Electroplated Composite Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUKa-fi; HUAMeng; Yi-min

    2004-01-01

    A process of chromium electroplating using a standard bath with additives and active carbon particles was reported, and the tribological behaviors of the composite coatings using the pin-on-disk tester and the table wear tester were i nvestig(aed. Experimental results indicate that the electroplated chromium-active carbon composite coatings exhibited the low friction coefficient anti excellent anti-wear properties whets coffered with the normal chromium electroplated ones. The formation of active carbon particles within the chromium matrices can be explained by SEM analysis and the mechanis of wear resistance of the composite coatings were studied.

  6. REINFORCEMENT OF NICKEL CHROMIUM ALLOYS WITH SAPPHIRE WHISKERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SAPPHIRE, COMPOSITE MATERIALS, CERAMIC FIBERS , CERAMIC FIBERS , TITANIUM COMPOUNDS, ZIRCONIUM COMPOUNDS, HYDRIDES, ADDITIVES, CHROMIUM ALLOYS, FIBER METALLURGY, IRON COMPOUNDS, ENCAPSULATION, DENSITY, SURFACE TENSION.

  7. Chromium recycling of tannery waste through microbial fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsifas, E A; Giannoutsou, E; Lambraki, M; Barla, M; Karagouni, A D

    2004-02-01

    An Aspergillus carbonarius isolate, selected from an established microbial culture collection, was used to study the biodegradation of chromium shavings in solid-state fermentation experiments. Approximately 97% liquefaction of the tannery waste was achieved and the liquid obtained from long-term experiments was used to recover chromium. The resulting alkaline chromium sulfate solution was useful in tanning procedures. A proteinaceous liquid was also obtained which has potential applications as a fertilizer or animal feed additive and has several other industrial uses. The A. carbonarius strain proved to be a very useful tool in tannery waste-treatment processes and chromium recovery in the tanning industries.

  8. Influence of Chelating Agents on Chromium Fate in Sediment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGXIAOCHANG; SUNJINHE; 等

    1996-01-01

    A laboratory investigation on reaction between chelating agents and chromium was conducted to evaluate the effect of chelating agents on the adsorption and desorption of chromium in sediment.The amount of adsorbed chromium(VI) in sediment decreased slightly by 5%-10% because of addition of chelating agents.Chelating agents inhibited the removal of Cr(Ⅲ)by sediment from solutions and the inhibiting effect was in the order:citric acid>tartaric acid>EDTA,Salicylic acid.No effect of chelating agents on desorption of chromium in sediment was observed.

  9. CD64-directed immunotoxin inhibits arthritis in a novel CD64 transgenic rat model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vuuren, AJ; van Roon, JAG; Walraven, [No Value; Stuij, [No Value; Harmsen, MC; McLaughlin, PMJ; de Winkel, JGJV; Thepen, T

    2006-01-01

    Macrophages are known to play a key role during inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Inflammatory macrophages have increased expression of CD64, the high-affinity receptor for IgG. Targeting this receptor through a CD64-directed immunotoxin, composed of an Ab against CD64 and Ricin A, results

  10. Diffusion of hexavalent chromium in chromium-containing slag as affected by microbial detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunyan; Yang, Zhihui; Chai, Liyuan; Zhao, Kun

    2009-09-30

    An electrochemical method was used to determine the diffusion coefficient of chromium(VI) in chromium-containing slag. A slag plate was prepared from the original slag or the detoxified slag by Achromobacter sp. CH-1. The results revealed that the apparent diffusion coefficient of Cr(VI) was 4.4 x 10(-9)m(2)s(-1) in original slag and 2.62 x 10(-8)m(2)s(-1) in detoxified slag. The results implied that detoxification of chromium-containing slag by Achromobacter sp. CH-1 could enhance Cr(VI) release. Meanwhile, the results of laboratory experiment showed that the residual total Cr(VI) in slag decreased from an initial value of 6.8 mg g(-1) to 0.338 mg g(-1) at the end of the detoxification process. The Cr(VI) released from slag was also reduced by Achromobacter sp. CH-1 strain since water soluble Cr(VI) in the leachate was not detected after 4 days. Therefore, Achromobacter sp. CH-1 has potential application for the bio-detoxification of chromium-containing slag.

  11. ALUMINUM AND CHROMIUM LEACHING WORKSHOP WHITEPAPER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCabe, D; Jeff Pike, J; Bill Wilmarth, B

    2007-04-25

    A workshop was held on January 23-24, 2007 to discuss the status of processes to leach constituents from High Level Waste (HLW) sludges at the Hanford and Savannah River Sites. The objective of the workshop was to examine the needs and requirements for the HLW flowsheet for each site, discuss the status of knowledge of the leaching processes, communicate the research plans, and identify opportunities for synergy to address knowledge gaps. The purpose of leaching of non-radioactive constituents from the sludge waste is to reduce the burden of material that must be vitrified in the HLW melter systems, resulting in reduced HLW glass waste volume, reduced disposal costs, shorter process schedules, and higher facility throughput rates. The leaching process is estimated to reduce the operating life cycle of SRS by seven years and decrease the number of HLW canisters to be disposed in the Repository by 1000 [Gillam et al., 2006]. Comparably at Hanford, the aluminum and chromium leaching processes are estimated to reduce the operating life cycle of the Waste Treatment Plant by 20 years and decrease the number of canisters to the Repository by 15,000-30,000 [Gilbert, 2007]. These leaching processes will save the Department of Energy (DOE) billions of dollars in clean up and disposal costs. The primary constituents targeted for removal by leaching are aluminum and chromium. It is desirable to have some aluminum in glass to improve its durability; however, too much aluminum can increase the sludge viscosity, glass viscosity, and reduce overall process throughput. Chromium leaching is necessary to prevent formation of crystalline compounds in the glass, but is only needed at Hanford because of differences in the sludge waste chemistry at the two sites. Improving glass formulations to increase tolerance of aluminum and chromium is another approach to decrease HLW glass volume. It is likely that an optimum condition can be found by both performing leaching and improving

  12. Safety, absorption, and antioxidant effects of chromium histidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supplemental chromium has been shown to be involved in the alleviation of the metabolic syndrome, glucose intolerance, polycystic ovary syndrome, depression, excess body fat, and gestational, steroid-induced, and type 2 diabetes. Chromium amino acid complexes that contained histidine displayed cons...

  13. Mechanisms of bacterial resistance to chromium compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Díaz, Martha I; Díaz-Pérez, César; Vargas, Eréndira; Riveros-Rosas, Héctor; Campos-García, Jesús; Cervantes, Carlos

    2008-06-01

    Chromium is a non-essential and well-known toxic metal for microorganisms and plants. The widespread industrial use of this heavy metal has caused it to be considered as a serious environmental pollutant. Chromium exists in nature as two main species, the trivalent form, Cr(III), which is relatively innocuous, and the hexavalent form, Cr(VI), considered a more toxic species. At the intracellular level, however, Cr(III) seems to be responsible for most toxic effects of chromium. Cr(VI) is usually present as the oxyanion chromate. Inhibition of sulfate membrane transport and oxidative damage to biomolecules are associated with the toxic effects of chromate in bacteria. Several bacterial mechanisms of resistance to chromate have been reported. The best characterized mechanisms comprise efflux of chromate ions from the cell cytoplasm and reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). Chromate efflux by the ChrA transporter has been established in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Cupriavidus metallidurans (formerly Alcaligenes eutrophus) and consists of an energy-dependent process driven by the membrane potential. The CHR protein family, which includes putative ChrA orthologs, currently contains about 135 sequences from all three domains of life. Chromate reduction is carried out by chromate reductases from diverse bacterial species generating Cr(III) that may be detoxified by other mechanisms. Most characterized enzymes belong to the widespread NAD(P)H-dependent flavoprotein family of reductases. Several examples of bacterial systems protecting from the oxidative stress caused by chromate have been described. Other mechanisms of bacterial resistance to chromate involve the expression of components of the machinery for repair of DNA damage, and systems related to the homeostasis of iron and sulfur.

  14. Observational Approach to Chromium Site Remediation - 13266

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Myers, R. [Washington Closure Hanford, 2620 Fermi, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Production reactors at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, required massive quantities of water for reactor cooling and material processing. To reduce corrosion and the build-up of scale in pipelines and cooling systems, sodium dichromate was added to the water feedstock. Spills and other releases at the makeup facilities, as well as leaks from miles of pipelines, have led to numerous areas with chromium-contaminated soil and groundwater, threatening fish populations in the nearby Columbia River. Pump-and-treat systems have been installed to remove chromium from the groundwater, but significant contamination remain in the soil column and poses a continuing threat to groundwater and the Columbia River. Washington Closure Hanford, DOE, and regulators are working on a team approach that implements the observational approach, a strategy for effectively dealing with the uncertainties inherent in subsurface conditions. Remediation of large, complex waste sites at a federal facility is a daunting effort. It is particularly difficult to perform the work in an environment of rapid response to changing field and contamination conditions. The observational approach, developed by geotechnical engineers to accommodate the inherent uncertainties in subsurface conditions, is a powerful and appropriate method for site remediation. It offers a structured means of quickly moving into full remediation and responding to the variations and changing conditions inherent in waste site cleanups. A number of significant factors, however, complicate the application of the observational approach for chromium site remediation. Conceptual models of contamination and site conditions are difficult to establish and get consensus on. Mid-stream revisions to the design of large excavations are time-consuming and costly. And regulatory constraints and contract performance incentives can be impediments to the flexible responses required under the

  15. Atom Lithography with a Chromium Atomic Beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wen-Tao; LI Tong-Bao

    2006-01-01

    @@ Direct write atom lithography is a new technique in which resonant light is used to pattern an atomic beam and the nanostructures are formed when the atoms deposit on the substrate. We design an experiment setup to fabricate chromium nanolines by depositing an atomic beam of 52 Cr through an off-resonant laser standing wave with the wavelength of 425.55 nm onto a silicon substrate. The resulting nanolines exhibit a period of 215 ± 3 nm with height of 1 nm.

  16. The fate of chromium during tropical weathering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berger, Alfons; Frei, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We performed a mineral, geochemical and Cr–Sr–Pb isotope study on a laterite profile developed on ca. 540 Ma old tonalitic bedrock in Madagascar with special emphasis on the behavior of chromium during tropical weathering. The observed strong depletions of Ca, Si, and P, and enrichment of Fe and Al......, in the soil, relative to bedrock and underlying saprolite, are the characteristic features pertinent to laterites. The enrichment of Fe in topsoil horizon can be correlated with enrichment of P, and the redox sensitive elements Mn and Cr, and indicates redistribution of these elements related to oxidation...

  17. Bioleaching of chromium from tannery sludge by indigenous Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan-Shan; Pan, Zhi-Yan; Lang, Jian-Min; Xu, Jian-Miao; Zheng, Yu-Guo

    2007-08-17

    Chromium in tannery sludge will cause serious environmental problems and is toxic to organisms. The acidophilic sulfur-oxidizing Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans can leach heavy metals form urban and industrial wastes. This study examined the ability of an indigenous sulfur-oxidizing A. thiooxidans to leach chromium from tannery sludge. The results showed that the pH of sludge mixture inoculated with the indigenous A. thiooxidans decreased to around 2.0 after 4 days. After 6 days incubation in shaking flasks at 30 degrees C and 160 rpm, up to 99% of chromium was solubilized from tannery sludge. When treated in a 2-l bubble column bioreactor for 5 days at 30 degrees C and aeration of 0.5 vvm, 99.7% of chromium was leached from tannery sludge. The results demonstrated that chromium in tannery sludge can be efficiently leached by the indigenous A. thiooxidans.

  18. The Theory for the Mechanism of Chromium Plating: The Theory for the Physical Characteristics of Chromium Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    1947-01-01

    deposits arc pro- duced as the coll potential is successively raised. The sulfato ion "hus has an extremely important effect in the chromium plating...and sulfato iDU in the bath wore then used in an attempt to obtain more satisfactory hexagonal chromium deposits. The data obtained are summarUod

  19. Dissolution of chromium in sulfuric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. POPIC

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available By combining electrochemical corrosion rate measurements and spectrophotometric analysis of the electrolyte it was shown that at room temperature chromium dissolves in deaerated 0.1 M Na2SO4 + H2SO4 (pH 1 solution as Cr(II and Cr(III ions in he ratio Cr(II : Cr(III @ 7 : 1. This process was stable over 4 h without any detectable change. The total corrosion rate of chromium calculated from the analytical data is about 12 times higher, than that determined electrochemically by cathodic Tafel line extrapolation to the corrosion potential. This finding was confirmed by applying the weight-loss method for the determination of the corrosion rate. This enormous difference between these experimentally determined corrosion rates can be explained by the rather fast, “anomalous” dissolution process proposed by Kolotyrkin and coworkers (chemical reaction of Cr with H2O molecules occurring simultaneously with the electrochemical corrosion process.

  20. Electrochemical modification of chromium surfaces using 4-nitro- and4-fluorobenzenediazonium salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinge, Mogens; Cecatto, Marcel; Kingshott, Peter;

    2009-01-01

    Chromium surfaces can be electrografted with organic surface films using 4-nitro- or 4-fluorobenzenediazonium salts, despite the fact that the surfaces are covered with a protective chromium oxide layer......Chromium surfaces can be electrografted with organic surface films using 4-nitro- or 4-fluorobenzenediazonium salts, despite the fact that the surfaces are covered with a protective chromium oxide layer...

  1. Standard Specification for Pressure Consolidated Powder Metallurgy Iron-Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum (UNS N08367), Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Columbium (Nb) (UNS N06625), Nickel-Chromium-Iron Alloys (UNS N06600 and N06690), and Nickel-Chromium-Iron-Columbium-Molybdenum (UNS N07718) Alloy Pipe Flanges, Fittings, Valves, and Parts

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2015-01-01

    Standard Specification for Pressure Consolidated Powder Metallurgy Iron-Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum (UNS N08367), Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Columbium (Nb) (UNS N06625), Nickel-Chromium-Iron Alloys (UNS N06600 and N06690), and Nickel-Chromium-Iron-Columbium-Molybdenum (UNS N07718) Alloy Pipe Flanges, Fittings, Valves, and Parts

  2. Workshop on effects of chromium coating on Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductor strand: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-12

    This report discusses the following topics: Chromium coating on superconductor strand -- an overview; technology of chromium plating; comparison of wires plated by different platers; search for chromium in copper; strand manufactures` presentations; chromium plating at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; a first look at a chromium plating process development project tailored for T.P.X. and I.T.E.R. strand; and influence of chromium diffusion and related phenomena on the reference ratios of bare and chromium plated Nb{sub 3}Sn strand.

  3. Bioavailability of a potato chromium complex to the laboratory rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, H.K.

    1985-01-01

    Research objectives were to study the effect of food source, preparation method and chemical form on bioavailability of chromium. Chromium concentration in potatoes was determined and tubers labeled either intrinsically or extrinsically with radioactive chromate. A labeled chromium complexes was isolated from preparations of raw, baked or fried potatoes and chromatographed on gel permeation media. Availability of the potato chromium complex to the rat was examined in three feeding studies. Animals were dosed with radioactive extrinsically or intrinsically labeled potato extract or with chromate. A labeled chromium complex was isolated from gastrointestinal contents of rats and chromatographed. Potato pulp and peel contained 1.63 and 2.70 ..mu..g Cr/g tissue respectively. True and apparent absorption from extrinsically labeled feedings were 33.4 +/- 4.7 and 29.8 +/- 11.2% respectively, and no differences existed between absorption from raw and cooked potatoes. Absorption from the extrinsic labeled potatoes differed significantly from absorption of inorganic chromatium. Apparent absorption of raw (11.1 +/- 7.9%) and cooked (-0.7 +/- 2.8%) intrinsically labeled feedings differed significantly. Absorption of inorganic chromium was 17.8% (true) and 11.5% (apparent). Examination of the chromium complex isolated from gastrointestinal tract contents showed enlargement of the complex in the stomach after consumption.

  4. Chromium Content in the Human Hip Joint Tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Barbara Brodziak-Dopiera; Jerzy Kwapuliski; Krzysztof Sobczyk; Danuta Wiechua

    2015-01-01

    Objective Chromium has many important functions in the human body. For the osseous tissue, its role has not been clearly defined. This study was aimed at determining chromium content in hip joint tissues. Methods A total of 91 hip joint samples were taken in this study, including 66 from females and 25 from males. The sample tissues were separated according to their anatomical parts. The chromium content was determined by the AAS method. The statistical analysis was performed with U Mann-Whitney's non-parametric test, P≤0.05. Results The overall chromium content in tissues of the hip joint in the study subjects was as follows:5.73 µg/g in the articular cartilage, 5.33 µg/g in the cortical bone, 17.86 µg/g in the cancellous bone, 5.95 µg/g in the fragment of the cancellous bone from the intertrochanteric region, and 1.28 µg/g in the joint capsule. The chromium contents were observed in 2 group patients, it was 7.04 µg/g in people with osteoarthritis and 12.59 µg/g in people with fractures. Conclusion The observed chromium content was highest in the cancellous bone and the lowest in the joint capsule. Chromium content was significantly different between the people with hip joint osteoarthritis and the people with femoral neck fractures.

  5. Mode of occurrence of chromium in four US coals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Frank E.; Shah, N.; Huffman, G.P.; Kolker, A.; Crowley, S.; Palmer, C.A.; Finkelman, R.B.

    2000-01-01

    The mode of occurrence of chromium in three US bituminous coals and one US subbituminous has been examined using both X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy and a selective leaching protocol supplemented by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron microprobe measurements. A synthesis of results from both methods indicates that chromium occurs principally in two forms in the bituminous coals: the major occurrence of chromium is associated with the macerals and is not readily leached by any reagent, whereas a second, lesser occurrence, which is leachable in hydrofluoric acid (HF), is associated with the clay mineral, illite. The former occurrence is believed to be a small particle oxyhydroxide phase (CrO(OH)). One coal also contained a small fraction (<5%) of the chromium in the form of a chromian magnetite, and the leaching protocol indicated the possibility of a similar small fraction of chromium in sulfide form in all three coals. There was little agreement between the two techniques on the mode of occurrence of chromium in the subbituminous coal; however, only a limited number of subbituminous coals have been analyzed by either technique. The chromium in all four coals was trivalent as no evidence was found for the Cr6+ oxidation state in any coal.

  6. Removal of chromium from tannery effluents by adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadali, O A; Magdy, Y H; Daifullah, A A M; Ebrahiem, E E; Nassar, M M

    2004-01-01

    Tannery effluent is characterized not only by heavy loads but also with toxic heavy metals especially chromium ions. Chromium is considered an important source of contamination due to large volume of exhaust liquid discharged and solid sludge produced. Details on adsorption studies were carried out using synthetic chromium salts (chromium chloride) as adsorbate, and cement kiln dust (a waste from white cement industry) as adsorbent. Equilibrium isotherms have been determined for the adsorption of chromium ions on cement kiln dust. Kinetic study provided that the adsorption process is diffusion controlled. The experimental results have been fitted using Freundlich, Langmuir, and Redlich Peterson isotherms. The maximum adsorption capacity of cement kiln dust was found to be 33 mg/g. Industrial tannery effluent (22-mg/L chromium and COD 952 mg/L) was also treated by cement dust. The treated effluent (using 20 g cement dust per 1 L) contains only 0.6 mg/L chromium and COD 200 mg/L.

  7. Chromium-induced membrane damage: protective role of ascorbic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Importance of chromium as environmental toxicant is largely due to impact on the body to produce cellular toxicity. The impact of chromium and their supplementation with ascorbic acid was studied on plasma membrane of liver and kidney in male Wistar rats (80 - 100gbody weight). It has been observed that the intoxication with chromium ( i. p. ) at the dose of 0.8 mg/100g body weight per day for a period of 28 days causes significant increase in the level of cholesterol and decrease in the level of phospbolipid of both liver and kidney. The alkaline pbosphatase, total ATPase and Na + -K + -ATPase activities were significantly decreased in both liver and kidney after chromium treatment,except total ATPase activity of kidney. It is suggested that chromium exposure at the present dose and duration induce for the alterations of structure and function of both liver and kidney plasma membrane. Ascorbic acid ( i.p. at the dose of 0.5 mg,/100g body weight per day for period of 28 days) supplementation can reduce these structural changes in the plasma membrane of liver and kidney. But the functional changes can not be completely replenished by the ascorbic acid supplementation in response to chromium exposure. So it is also suggested that ascorbic acid (nutritional antioxidant) is useful free radical scavenger to restrain the chromium-induced membrane damage.

  8. Stabilization of chromium salt in ordinary portland cement

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Damir Barbir; Pero Dabić; Petar Krolo

    2012-12-01

    Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) samples containing the chromium salt have been investigated using differential microcalorimetry, conductometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis. The effect of chromium on OPC hydration was evaluated by continuous observing of early hydration. The microcalorimetrical results show that with increasing the share of chromium salt, heat maximums assume lower values and the occurrence of the maximum registered in the earlier hydration times. Conductometrical measurements show that with increasing addition of chromium salt, curve did not show any specific shape, immediate drop in specific conductivity is noticed and the maximum is reached earlier. This coincides with microcalorimetrical results. It can be concluded that the addition of chromium does not affect the mechanism of the hydration process, but it does affect the kinetic parameters and dynamics of the cement hydration process. It was found that chromium salt addition to the cement–water system is acceptable up to 2 wt.%. According to standard EN 196-3 for OPC, the beginning of binding time should occur after 60 minutes. Increased amount of chromium over 2 wt.% significantly accelerate the beginning of binding time and for the system it is not acceptable.

  9. 32 CFR 64.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN MANAGEMENT AND MOBILIZATION OF REGULAR AND RESERVE RETIRED MILITARY MEMBERS § 64.1 Purpose. This part implements 10 U.S.C. 688... of retired Regular and Reserve military personnel preparing for their use during a mobilization....

  10. 32 CFR 64.5 - Responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN MANAGEMENT AND MOBILIZATION OF REGULAR AND RESERVE RETIRED MILITARY MEMBERS § 64.5 Responsibilities. (a) The Assistant Secretary of Defense for Reserve Affairs and the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense...

  11. 32 CFR 64.4 - Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN MANAGEMENT AND MOBILIZATION OF REGULAR AND RESERVE RETIRED MILITARY MEMBERS § 64.4 Policy. (a) It is DoD policy that military... national security needs. (c) The military retirees ordered to active duty may be used according to...

  12. 42 CFR 64a.103 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... on the first day of the clinical traineeship. Mental Health Systems Act means the Mental Health... OBLIGATED SERVICE FOR MENTAL HEALTH TRAINEESHIPS § 64a.103 Definitions. As used in this part: Act means the... grant authorized by section 303 of the Act. Community Mental Health Centers Act means the...

  13. 32 CFR 64.3 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN MANAGEMENT AND MOBILIZATION OF REGULAR AND RESERVE RETIRED MILITARY MEMBERS § 64.3 Definitions. (a) Key employee. Any Reservist or any military retiree (Regular or Reserve) identified by his or her employer, private or...

  14. 36 CFR 64.6 - Application procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...). (2) A map showing the location of the property to be acquired and/or developed and its relation to... how the project embodies the selection criteria outlined in § 64.8. (4) Indicate any known problems... application will include copies of State, county, or city maps showing the geographic location of the...

  15. Removal of copper, nickel and chromium mixtures from metal plating wastewater by adsorption with modified carbon foam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Gu; Lee, Soonjae; Park, Jeong-Ann; Park, Chanhyuk; Lee, Sang Jeong; Kim, Song-Bae; An, Byungryul; Yun, Seong-Taek; Lee, Sang-Hyup; Choi, Jae-Woo

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the characterizations and adsorption efficiencies for chromium, copper and nickel were evaluated using manufacture-grade Fe2O3-carbon foam. SEM, XRD, XRF and BET analyses were performed to determine the characteristics of the material. Various pore sizes (12-420 μm) and iron contents (3.62%) were found on the surface of the Fe2O3-carbon foam. Fe2O3-carbon foam was found to have excellent adsorption efficiency compared to carbon foam for mixed solutions of cationic and anionic heavy metals. The adsorption capacities for chromium, copper and nickel were 6.7, 3.8 and 6.4 mg/g, respectively, which were obtained using a dual exponential adsorption model. In experiments with varying dosages of the Fe2O3 powder, no notable differences were observed in the removal efficiency. In a fixed-bed column test, Fe2O3-carbon foam achieved adsorption capacities for chromium, copper and nickel of 33.0, 12.0 and 9.5 mg/g, respectively, after 104 h. Based on these results, Fe2O3-carbon foam was observed to be a promising material for treatment of plating wastewater.

  16. In vitro development of resistance to arsenite and chromium-VI in Lactobacilli strains as perspective attenuation of gastrointestinal disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upreti, Raj K; Sinha, Vartika; Mishra, Ritesh; Kannan, Ambrose

    2011-05-01

    Inadvertent intake of inorganic arsenic and chromium through drinking water and food causing their toxic insults is a major health problem. Intestinal bacteria including Lactobacilli play important regulatory roles on intestinal homeostasis, and their loss is known to cause gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. Probiotic Lactobacilli resistance to arsenite and chromium-VI could be an importantfactorfor the perspective attenuation of Gl-disorders caused by these toxic metals/metalloid. In the present study resistance of arsenite (up to 32 ppm), Cr-VI (up to 64 ppm), and arsenite plus Cr-VI (32 ppm each) were developed under in vitro condition following chronological chronic exposures in Lactobacilli strains. Comparative study of biochemical parameters such as membrane transport enzymes and structural constituents; dehydrogenase and esterase activity tests, which are respective indicators for respiratory and energy producing processes, and the general heterotrophic activity of cells, of resistant strains showed similarities with their respective normal parent strains. The resistant strains were also found to be sensitive to antibiotics. Findings indicate that these resistant probiotic Lactobacilli would be useful in the prophylactic interventions of arsenic and chromium GI-toxicity.

  17. Spectroscopic analysis of chromium bioremediation products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadharajan, C.; Nico, P. S.; Yang, L.; Marcus, M. A.; Steefel, C.; Larsen, J. T.; Beller, H. R.; Brodie, E. L.

    2010-12-01

    Remediation of chromium contamination frequently involves reducing the toxic and soluble hexavalent form, Cr(VI), to the relatively harmless and mostly immobile trivalent state, Cr(III). The objective of this study is to identify the biogeochemical reactions that control in situ chromium reduction in the presence of different dominant electron acceptors, i.e., NO3-, Fe(III), and SO42-. It was hypothesized that indirect, abiotic reduction of Cr(VI) by reduced metabolic products [Fe(II) and sulfides] would dominate over direct enzymatic reduction by denitrifying, iron-reducing, or sulfate-reducing bacteria. It is further hypothesized that the enzymatic reduction of Cr(VI) would produce relatively pure chromium hydroxide precipitates, whereas indirect reduction would result in mixed Cr-Fe hydroxide solid phases. Flow-through columns containing homogenized sediments from the 100H site at Hanford, WA were subjected to nitrate-, sulfate- or iron-reducing conditions in the presence of 5 µM Cr(VI) and 5 mM lactate. Cr(VI) was depleted in the effluent solutions from the nitrate- and sulfate-reducing columns; however only a small amount of Cr(VI) was removed under iron-reducing conditions. Preliminary analysis of micro X-ray absorption spectra indicate that the untreated and iron-reducing column sediments contained pre-existing Cr in the form of primary minerals, e.g. chromite and/or Cr-bearing micas. However, there was an increase in the relative abundance of mixed-phase Cr-Fe hydroxides, i.e., Cr1-xFex(OH)3 in the nitrate- and sulfate-treated columns. A possible explanation for the observations is that the production of Fe(II) was enhanced under the nitrate- and sulfate- reducing conditions, and was most likely sulfide-driven in the latter case. The Fe(II) was subsequently available for reduction of Cr(VI) resulting in the mixed-phase precipitates. The results from the spectroscopic analysis support the hypothesis that Fe(II)-mediated Cr reduction prevails over direct

  18. Mutagenic and carcinogenic actions of chromium and its compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamyrbaev, Arstan Abdramanovich; Dzharkenov, Timur Agataevich; Imangazina, Zina Amangalievna; Satybaldieva, Umit Abulkhairovna

    2015-05-01

    Numerous experimental observations have been made on microorganisms and culture of the cells of mammals as well as the accounting of the chromosomal aberrations in the bone marrow cells of the mammals and of human cells displayed that the chromium and its compounds possess a pronounced mutagenic effect. Translocation test, induction record of DNA damage and repair systems in the mammalian and human cells with greater precision proves the presence of the mutagenic effect of the chromium and its compounds, which in turn is dependent on dose and time of this metal intoxication. Chromium and its compounds have pronounced mutagenic effect, on increased admission to organism of mammals and protozoa.

  19. Microbial biotechnology for remediation of aquatic habitats polluted with chromium

    OpenAIRE

    Viorica Coşier; I. Valentin Petrescu-Mag

    2008-01-01

    Chromium may occur in nine different forms of oxidation ranging from ?II to +VI, with forms II, III and VI as the most commonly encountered. In Cluj county, chromium pollution dates well back in time and has caused important dysfunction to the mechanical-biological wastewater purification station of the city of Cluj (Coşier & Diţă 1996). The purpose of this study was to develop one microbial method able to reduce hexavalent chromium (mobile, permeable to cell membrane, carcinogenic and mutage...

  20. Microbial Diversity of Chromium-Contaminated Soils and Characterization of Six Chromium-Removing Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhiguo; Hu, Yuting; Yin, Zhen; Hu, Yuehua; Zhong, Hui

    2016-06-01

    Three soil samples obtained from different sites adjacent to a chromium slag heap in a steel alloy factory were taken to examine the effect of chromium contamination on soil bacterial diversity as determined by construction of 16S rDNA clone libraries and sequencing of selected clones based on restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Results revealed that Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Alphaproteobacteria occurred in all three soil samples, although the three samples differed in their total diversity. Sample 1 had the highest microbial diversity covering 12 different classes, while Sample 3 had the lowest microbial diversity. Strains of six different species were successfully isolated, one of which was identified as Zobellella denitrificans. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a strain belonging to the genus Zobellella able to resist and reduce chromium. Among all isolates studied, Bacillus odysseyi YH2 exhibited the highest Cr(VI)-reducing capability, with a total removal of 23.5 % of an initial Cr(VI) concentration of 350 mg L-1.

  1. [Blood and urine chromium: compared values between chromium exposed workers and common people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenzani, A; Verso, M G; Picciotto, D

    2008-01-01

    Aim of present study is the valutation and quantification of chromium in blood and urine. We compared 3 groups of persons formed by building workers, in particular masons, because cement contains potassium chromate that is dangerous for health, and by common people: urban population and outside the town population. In fact, exposure to CrVI risk is high for people who live near chromate industries. We maked a medical examination, blood and instrumental tests, chromium measuring in blood (recent exposure indicator) and urine (recent and previous indicator). Then we used statistical methods to estimate obtained values of blood and urine chromium among professional exposed people and common people. At the end we think that preventive measures in working environment reduced exposure to CrVI but environmental exposure (for example road dust from catalytic converter erosion, from brake lining erosion, cement dust and tobacco smoke), in the last years, has increased. So there are no difference between urban population and outside the town population and there are also no difference with professional exposed people for work prevention according to law in force, that let down professional risk using safe limits.

  2. Chromium accumulation, microorganism population and enzyme activities in soils around chromium-containing slag heap of steel alloy factory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Shun-hong; PENG Bing; YANG Zhi-hui; CHAI Li-yuan; ZHOU Li-cheng

    2009-01-01

    The environmental risk of chromium pollution is pronounced in soils adjacent to chromate industry. It is important to investigate the functioning of soil microorganisms in ecosystems exposed to long-term contamination by chromium. 45 soil samples obtained from different places of the slag heap in a steel alloy factory were analyzed for chromium contamination level and its effect on soil microorganisms and enzyme activities. The results show that the average concentrations of total Cr in the soil under the slag heap, adjacent to the slag heap and outside the factory exceed the threshold of Secondary Environmental Quality Standard for Soil in China by 354%, 540% and 184%, respectively, and are 15, 21 and 9 times higher than the local background value, respectively. Elevated chromium loadings result in changes in the activity of the soil microbe, as indicated by the negative correlations between soil microbial population and chromium contents. Dehydrogenase activity is greatly depressed by chromium in the soil. The results imply that dehydrogenase activity can be used as an indicator for the chromium pollution level in the area of the steel alloy factory.

  3. Possible adverse effect of chromium in occupational exposure of tannery workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornhauser, Carlos; Wróbel, Katarzyna; Wróbel, Kazimierz; Malacara, Juan Manuel; Nava, Laura Eugenia; Gómez, Leobardo; González, Rita

    2002-04-01

    Our aim was to investigate the adverse effects of occupational exposure to trivalent chromium. We measured chromium and iron levels in serum and urine and hemoglobin levels in tannery workers and unexposed persons. We studied three groups of subjects. Group 1 included 15 non-smoking male tannery workers highly exposed to chromium from tanning and retanning departments. Group 2 included 14 non-smoking male tannery workers with moderate chromium exposure from dying, drying and finishing departments. Group 3 included 11 healthy, non-smoking male subjects without direct chromium exposure. Higher serum chromium levels were observed in groups 1 and 2 with respect to group 3 (mean values respectively: 0.43; 0.25 and 0.13 microg x l(-1)). Urine chromium levels in group 1 were higher than those in controls (mean values: 1.78 and 1.35 microg x l(-1)). In group 1 an inverse association was found between serum chromium and urine iron (-0.524), urine chromium and hemoglobin (-0.594) and between the urine chromium to iron ratio and hemoglobin (-0.693, p<0.05). The results suggest a chromium adverse effect on iron metabolism, possibly associated with excessive body chromium accumulation. In conclusion, chromium urine test could be recommended for diagnosis of chromium adverse effect on iron metabolism. Further studies are needed to quantify the relationship between urine chromium and hemoglobin metabolism.

  4. Scientific Opinion on ChromoPrecise® cellular bound chromium yeast added for nutritional purposes as a source of chromium in food supplements and the bioavailability of chromium from this source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food (ANS

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food (ANS provides a scientific opinion re-evaluating the safety of ChromoPrecise® cellular bound chromium yeast added for nutritional purposes as a source of chromium in food supplements and the bioavailability of chromium from this source. ChromoPrecise® is a yeast preparation with an enriched trivalent chromium content, obtained by culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the presence of chromium chloride. A daily intake of 100 µg chromium(III. There are limited data on the nature and identity of the organic chromium(III compounds contained in chromium-enriched yeast and on their toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic behaviour in the body. Overall, the Panel concluded that the bioavailability in man of chromium from chromium-enriched yeast is potentially up to approximately ten times higher than that of chromium from chromium chloride. A NOAEL of 2500 mg/kg bw/day ChromoPrecise® was identified in a 90-day feeding study in rats; no evidence of adverse effects of chromium yeasts were reported in other animal studies investigating the effects of dietary supplementation with chromium yeast. ChromoPrecise® chromium yeast was non-genotoxic in a range of in vitro genotoxicity studies. Although no information was available on the chronic toxicity, carcinogenicity or reproductive toxicity of ChromoPrecise® chromium yeast, the ANS Panel has previously concluded that trivalent chromium is not carcinogenic, and limited data on other chromium yeasts provide no evidence of an effect on reproductive endpoints. No adverse effects have been reported in clinical efficacy trials with chromium yeasts. The Panel concluded that the use of ChromoPrecise® chromium yeast in food supplements is not of concern, despite the lack of data on the nature and identity of the organic chromium(III compounds contained in the product, provided that the intake does not exceed 250 μg/day, as recommended by the WHO.

  5. Influence of chromium supplementation on energy metabolism in horses used in policing activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A Fonseca

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The influence of chromium supplementation on some blood variables in 11 adult stallions used for policing activities was evaluated. Each animal was treated with 11mg of chromium/400kg body weight, orally, for a period of 30 days. On days 0 (before and 30 (after the animals were evaluated and blood samples were obtained before and after exercise. Plasma glucose and lactate and serum cortisol and insulin were analyzed in each of these moments. On day 0, plasma glucose concentrations were 68.4±5.6mg/dL and 78.7±6.5mg/dL; plasma lactate concentrations were 6.2±0.6mg/dL and 13.1±7.6mg/dL; serum cortisol values were 48.5±7.9ng/mL and 42.6±19.7ng/mL; and serum insulin values were 3.0±6.4µUI/mL and 1.9±1.7µUI/mL, respectively, before and after exercise. On day 30, plasma glucose concentrations were 73.3±5.7mg/dL and 78.4±6.7mg/dL; plasma lactate concentrations were 7.3±0.9mg/dL and 7.6±1.2mg/dL; serum cortisol values were 62.9±21.8ng/mL and 40.3±17.0ng/mL; and serum insulin values were 1.4±1.3µUI/mL and 1.7±1.4µUI/mL, respectively, before and after exercise. As an effect of the exercise, a decrease was shown in the concentration of serum insulin and an increase in plasma lactate and glucose. Chromium supplementation resulted in a reduction of lactate values after physical activity, possibly indicating that chromium contributed to a better utilization of plasma glucose and to a better adaptation of animals to physical activity.

  6. ATLAS software stack on ARM64

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Joshua Wyatt; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on the port of the ATLAS software stack onto new prototype ARM64 servers. This included building the “external” packages that the ATLAS software relies on. Patches were needed to introduce this new architecture into the build as well as patches that correct for platform specific code that caused failures on non-x86 architectures. These patches were applied such that porting to further platforms will need no or only very little adjustments. A few additional modifications were needed to account for the different operating system, Ubuntu instead of Scientific Linux 6 / CentOS7. Selected results from the validation of the physics outputs on these ARM 64-bit servers will be shown. CPU, memory and IO intensive benchmarks using ATLAS specific environment and infrastructure have been performed, with a particular emphasis on the performance vs. energy consumption.

  7. STS-64 SAFER Assembly development team members

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system, to be tested on the STS-64 flight, is surrounded by the team members who have spent a number of recent man hours in preparation for the system's first test-flight. In front are (left to right) Russell L. Flack and Bob Lowe. In the back row are (left to right) Jack D. Humphreys, Chuck Deason, Bill Wood and James Brown.

  8. ATLAS software stack on ARM64

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Joshua Wyatt; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment explores new hardware and software platforms that, in the future, may be more suited to its data intensive workloads. One such alternative hardware platform is the ARM architecture, which is designed to be extremely power efficient and is found in most smartphones and tablets. CERN openlab recently installed a small cluster of ARM 64-bit evaluation prototype servers. Each server is based on a single-socket ARM 64-bit system on a chip, with 32 Cortex-A57 cores. In total, each server has 128 GB RAM connected with four fast memory channels. This paper reports on the port of the ATLAS software stack onto these new prototype ARM64 servers. This included building the "external" packages that the ATLAS software relies on. Patches were needed to introduce this new architecture into the build as well as patches that correct for platform specific code that caused failures on non-x86 architectures. These patches were applied such that porting to further platforms will need no or only very little adj...

  9. Thermodynamic Equilibrium Diagrams of Sulphur-Chromium System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The chemical and electrochemical equilibria in the presence of gaseous phase were investigated. Many substances, which consisted of sulphur and chromium, were considered. Various thermodynamic equilibria were calculated in different pressures. Calculation results were shown as log p―1/T and E―T diagrams. These diagrams may be used to study the corrosion of chromium in sulphur-containing circumstances. The diagrams are also used to thermodynami-cally determine the existence area of various substances and so on.

  10. Stereology of carbide phase in modified hypereutectic chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Suchoń

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In paper are presented results of studies of carbide phase stereology modified hypereutectic wear resistance chromium cast iron which contains carbon about 3,5% and chromium about 25%. Three substances were applied to the modification: boron carbide (B4C, ferroniobium (FeNb and mixture of ferroniobium and rare-earth (RE. The measurements of geometrical features of carbides were conducted on microsection taken from castings wich were cooled with various velocities.

  11. SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ACTIVITIES FOR CHROMIUM IN THE 100 AREAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PETERSEN SW

    2009-07-02

    {sm_bullet} Primary Objective: Protect the Columbia River - Focus is control and treatment of contamination at or near the shoreline, which is influenced by bank storage {sm_bullet} Secondary Objective: Reduce hexavalent chromium to <48 parts per billion (ppb) in aquifer (drinking water standard) - Large plumes with isolated areas of high chromium concentrations (> 40,000 ppb), - Unknown source location(s); probably originating in reactor operation areas

  12. Chromium Ions Improve Moisure Resistance of Epoxy Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Clair, A. K.; St. Clair, T. L.; Stoakley, D. M.; Singh, J. J.; Sprinkle, D. R.

    1986-01-01

    Broad spectrum of thermosetting epoxy resins used on commercial and military aircraft, primarily as composite matrices and adhesives. In new technique, chromium-ion containing epoxy with improved resistance to moisture produced where chromium ions believed to prevent absorption of water molecules by coordinating themselves to hydroxyl groups on epoxy chain. Anticipated that improved epoxy formulation useful as composite matrix resin, adhesive, or casting resin for applications on commercial and advanced aircraft. Improvement made without sacrifice in mechanical properties of polymer.

  13. Performance of chromium nitride based coatings under plastic processing conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Cunha, l.; Andritschky, M.; Pischow, K.; Wang, Z.(Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing, China); Zarychta, A.; Miranda, A. S.; A.M. Cunha

    2000-01-01

    Chromium nitride based coatings were produced in the form of monolithic and multilayer coatings, by DC and RF reactive magnetron sputtering. These coatings were deposited onto stainless steel and tool steel substrates. Chromium nitride coatings have;proved to be wear and corrosion resistant. The combination of these characteristics was necessary to protect surfaces during plastic processing. In order to select the best coatings, some mechanical and tribological tests were performed. Har...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix Xii to Part 266 - Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery Furnaces XII Appendix XII to Part 266... FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. XII Appendix XII to Part 266—Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may...

  15. Lime enhanced chromium removal in advanced integrated wastewater pond system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadesse, I; Isoaho, S A; Green, F B; Puhakka, J A

    2006-03-01

    The removal of trivalent chromium from a combined tannery effluent in horizontal settling tanks and subsequent Advanced Integrated Wastewater Pond System (AIWPS) reactors was investigated. The raw combined effluent from Modjo tannery had pH in the range of 11.2-12. At this pH, a trivalent chromium removal of 46-72% was obtained in the horizontal settling tanks after a one-day detention time. Trivalent chromium precipitated as chromium hydroxide, Cr(OH)3. 58-95% Cr(III) was removed in the advanced facultative pond (AFP) where the water column pH of 7.2-8.4 was close to pH 8, which is the optimum precipitation pH for trivalent chromium. Chromium removals in the secondary facultative pond (SFP) and maturation pond (MP) were 30-50% and 6-16%, respectively. With Cr(III) concentration of 0.2-0.8 mg/l in the final treated effluent, the AIWPS preceded by horizontal settling tanks produced effluent that could easily meet most of the current Cr(III) discharge limits to receive water bodies.

  16. Experimental skin deposition of chromium on the hands following handling of samples of leather and metal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P.; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl;

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chromium is an important skin sensitizer. Exposure to it has been regulated in cement, and recently in leather. Studies on the deposition of chromium ions on the skin as a result of handling different chromium-containing materials are sparse, but could improve the risk assessment...... of contact sensitization and allergic contact dermatitis caused by chromium. Objectives: To determine whether the handling of chromium-containing samples of leather and metal results in the deposition of chromium onto the skin. Methods: Five healthy volunteers participated. For 30 min, they handled samples...... of leather and metal known to contain and release chromium. Skin deposition of chromium was assessed with the acid wipe sampling technique. Results: Acid wipe sampling of the participants' fingers showed chromium deposition on the skin in all participants who had been exposed to leather (range 0.01–0.20 µg...

  17. [Chromium content in foods and dietary intake estimation in the Northwest of Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grijalva Haro, M I; Ballesteros Vázquez, M N; Cabrera Pacheco, R M

    2001-03-01

    Chromium is an indispensable nutrient for the carbohydrates and lipids metabolism. In this study the chromium content in the twenty main foods of the diet from Northwestern Mexico was determined, as well as the daily mean intake which was estimated based on the food intake basket of this region. Chromium content was analyzed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry using the graphite furnace technique and previous digestion of foods in microwave oven. The chromium mean intake was estimated considering the chromium daily mean intake for person per day and the chromium content of the foods analyzed in this study. The range chromium content in the foods analyzed was between 0.0004 and 0.1641 microgram/g dry weight. White cheese showed the highest chromium content followed by pasta soup, wheat tortilla, bread and meat. The main foods chromium contributors in the diet were: wheat tortilla (20%), white cheese (11%), corn tortilla (11%), pasta soup (10%), milk (10%), meat (9%) and white bread (8%). The daily chromium intake was 30.43 +/- 1.6 micrograms/d. Chromium values obtained in the food analyzed are considered low. Moreover, chromium intake obtained from the diet is not enough to meet the safety and adequate daily chromium intake. Therefore, the population from the Northwestern Mexico has a suboptimal dietary chromium intake.

  18. Time-of-flight mass measurements of neutron-rich chromium isotopes up to N = 40 and implications for the accreted neutron star crust

    CERN Document Server

    Meisel, Z; Ahn, S; Bazin, D; Brown, B A; Browne, J; Carpino, J F; Chung, H; Cyburt, R H; Estradé, A; Famiano, M; Gade, A; Langer, C; Matoš, M; Mittig, W; Montes, F; Morrissey, D J; Pereira, J; Schatz, H; Schatz, J; Scott, M; Shapira, D; Sieja, K; Smith, K; Stevens, J; Tan, W; Tarasov, O; Towers, S; Wimmer, K; Winkelbauer, J R; Yurkon, J; Zegers, R G T

    2016-01-01

    We present the mass excesses of 59-64Cr, obtained from recent time-of-flight nuclear mass measurements at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. The mass of 64Cr is determined for the first time, with an atomic mass excess of -33.48(44) MeV. We find a significantly different two-neutron separation energy S2n trend for neutron-rich isotopes of chromium, removing the previously observed enhancement in binding at N=38. Additionally, we extend the S2n trend for chromium to N=40, revealing behavior consistent with the previously identified island of inversion in this region. We compare our results to state-of-the-art shell-model calculations performed with a modified Lenzi-Nowacki-Poves-Sieja interaction in the fp shell, including the g9/2 and d5/2 orbits for the neutron valence space. We employ our result for the mass of 64Cr in accreted neutron star crust network calculations and find a reduction in the strength and depth of electron-capture heating from the A=64 isobaric...

  19. Chromium-chromium interaction in a binuclear mixed-valent Cr(I)-Cr(II) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzamly, Ahmed; Gorelsky, Serge I; Gambarotta, Sandro; Korobkov, Ilia; Le Roy, Jennifer; Murugesu, Muralee

    2014-11-03

    A mixed-valent Cr(I)-Cr(II) binuclear complex, {κ(1),κ(2),κ(3)-N,P,P-cyclo[(Ph)PCH2N(CH2Ph)CH2]}2(CrCl2)[Cr(μ-Cl)(AlClMe2)]·4toluene (1), of a P2N2 cyclic ligand was obtained upon treatment of the chromium precursor with alkylaluminum. Complex 1 was accessible from either its trivalent or divalent precursors, and density functional theory calculations revealed the presence of only σ- and π-orbital interactions in the Cr-Cr bond.

  20. High tumor uptake of (64)Cu

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær; Persson, Morten; Madsen, Jacob;

    2013-01-01

    The use of copper-based positron emission tomography (PET) tracers in cancer studies is increasing. However, as copper has previously been found in high concentrations in human tumor tissue in vivo, instability of PET tracers could result in tumor accumulation of non-tracer-bound radioactive copper...... that may influence PET measurements. Here we determine the degree of (64)Cu uptake in five commonly used human cancer xenograft models in mice. Additionally, we compare copper accumulation in tumor tissue to gene expression of human copper transporter 1 (CTR1)....

  1. Spectral distributions in /sup 64/Cu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delfini, M.G.; Brussaard, P.J. (Rijksuniversiteit Utrecht (Netherlands). Fysisch Lab.)

    1985-01-01

    The density of states of the nucleus /sup 64/Cu has been calculated in a 1f2p configuration space and broken down according to the contributions of 1fsub(7/2) zero- and one-hole components. This is achieved without a shell-model diagonalisation and thus it represents a convenient and simple procedure for evaluating a priori the truncation of a shell-model configuration space. The results of an m-scheme calculation and a jj-scheme calculation are compared.

  2. CALVES GROWTH INFANT OF BREED NELLORE SUPPLEMENTED WITH CHROMIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. C. Lima

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated the growth of nursling Nelore calves supplemented with chromium during creep feeding. The study was conducted using 131 Nelore calves with an average age of 60 days and average adjusted initial weight of 75 kg; considering that all calves were accompanied by their mothers. Therefore, the experimental groups were defined as T1: 35 males supplemented with chromium; T2: 34 males without chromium, T3: 30 females supplemented with chromium and T4: 32 females supplemented without chromium. The experimental period lasted from 60 days of age to 210 days (weaning, the animals were kept in two pickets of Panicum maximum cv. Mombasa provided with troughs for the creep feeding system, which permitted calves exclusive access to the concentrate formula based on 75% of TDN and 20% of crude protein, with 35% of soybean meal, 63% of corn and 2% of mineral nucleus containing 10 mg of chromium chelate for each kg of the product. The data were subjected to the analysis of variance, using the software R (R Development Core Team, 2013. In the evaluation of the live weight at 150 days of age, no significant difference was found in the use of chromium in males and females (regardless of sex. However, in the analysis between sexes, females’ live weights were lower than males’ live weight (p = 0.04, being 131.1 kg and 138.1 kg respectively. In the evaluation of live weight at 210 days there was no significant difference between males and females (p = 0.07, but there was a difference (p = 0.03 in the use of chrome in the evaluated treatments. So, it could be concluded that the creep feeding system with chrome chelate supplementation promoted an improvement in male and females calves’ growth for average daily weight gain and weaning weight, with a positive influence on the weight of cows.

  3. Nitridation of chromium powder in ammonia atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Li; Qiang Zhen; Rong Li

    2015-01-01

    CrN powder was synthesized by nitriding Cr metal in ammonia gas flow, and its chemical reaction mechanism and nitridation process were studied. Through thermodynamic calculations, the Cr−N−O predominance diagrams were constructed for different tempera-tures. Chromium nitride formed at 700−1200°C under relatively higher nitrogen and lower oxygen partial pressures. Phases in the products were then investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), and the Cr2N content varied with reaction temperature and holding time. The results indicate that the Cr metal powder nitridation process can be explained by a diffusion model. Further, Cr2N formed as an intermediate product because of an incomplete reaction, which was observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). After nitriding at 1000°C for 20 h, CrN powder with an average grain size of 63 nm was obtained, and the obtained sample was analyzed by using a scanning electron microscope (SEM).

  4. Chromium increases pancreatic metallothionein in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis-Heredia, M J; Quintanilla-Vega, B; Sierra-Santoyo, A; Hernández, J M; Brambila, E; Cebrián, M E; Albores, A

    2000-01-03

    The ability of chromium (Cr) salts to increase metallothionein (MT) levels in rat liver, kidney and pancreas, and its relationship with the presence of toxic effects are reported here. Rats were injected subcutaneously with 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, or 50 mg K2Cr2O7/kg and sacrificed 24 h later. Total Cr accumulation followed a dose-dependent pattern, levels in kidney being higher than those in liver or pancreas, suggesting different tissue bioavailabilities and accumulation patterns. Cr(IV) administration resulted in a tissue-specific MT induction: pancreas and liver showed five- and 3.5-fold MT increases, respectively; no increase was observed in the kidney. A positive correlation was observed between zinc and MT concentrations in liver, and between total Cr and MT concentrations in pancreas. Serum alpha-amylase activity showed a dose-dependent increase starting from 20 mg/kg, whereas serum glucose levels increased at doses higher than 30 mg/kg. Serum aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase activities were increased in a dose-dependent manner, from 20 and 30 mg/kg, respectively. Our results showed that treatment with Cr(VI) can induce MT synthesis in pancreas and suggests a subsequent binding of Cr to MT. Also, pancreas is a target organ for Cr toxicity, and the usefulness of alpha-amylase activity as a sensitive biomarker of Cr toxicity in human exposed populations merits further study.

  5. Can elevated chromium induce somatopsychic responses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovrincevic, I; Leung, F Y; Alfieri, M A; Grace, D M

    1996-01-01

    The possible somatopsychological effects of chromium (Cr) was investigated in a population of patients, from a surgical ward of our hospital, who required total parenteral nutrition (TPN) solutions, and who became exposed to various amounts of this metal from this treatment. The study involved a questionnaire as well as biochemical tests which included serum Cr and other selected trace metals. The renal status for all eligible patients was within normal parameters. The patient population varied in age, pathology, surgical treatment, and duration on TPN. The results showed that every patient who received TPN had an increased serum Cr level; some increases were up to 50-fold above the normal reference level for serum Cr. Although statistical analysis failed to show any significant statistical relationship between an increased serum Cr and the investigated somatopsychological disturbances, this effect cannot be ruled out since one case did show all the dream disturbances. Considering these cases, the action of sedative medications that may suppress the effects of Cr, cannot be ruled out. As Cr(III) may be potentially genotoxic at high concentrations, infusion of this metal over long time periods should be avoided. Supplementation of Cr in TPN solutions appears to be unnecessary for short-term TPN because this metal is a known contaminant of these solutions. Efforts are required to find TPN nutrients with low or no Cr contamination.

  6. Hexavalent Chromium Reduction and Its Distribution in the Cell and Medium by Chromium Resistant Fusarium solani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousumi Sen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, batch biosorption of Cr(VI was studied using the fungal strain isolated from soil. The fungal strain was characterized as Fusarium solani. The total Cr distribution in the biomass (fungus and in the media obtained from the experiment conducted at 500 mg l -1 initial Cr(VI concentration and pH 5.0. The results indicated both intracellular and extracellular accumulation and enzymatic reduction of Cr(VI and this was supported by the Transmission Electron Microscopic (TEM observation at the same Cr(VI concentration and pH value. Chromium elution from Fusarium solani containing Cr was then tried out using a number of chromium eluting reagents and a maximum Cr could be eluted using 0.5N sodium hydroxide solution without destructing the biomass structure. The total Cr was recovered by pH adjustment from both biomass and media was found to be 44% of the initial Cr(VI concentration (500 mg l-1.

  7. Spectroscopic study for a chromium-adsorbed montmorillonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurtay, Maidina ·; Tuersun, Maierdan ·; Cai, Yuanfeng; Açıkgöz, Muhammed; Wang, Hongtao; Pan, Yuguan; Zhang, Xiaoke; Ma, Xiaomei

    2017-02-01

    Samples of purified montmorillonite with trace amounts of quartz were subjected to different concentrations of chromium sulphate solutions for one week to allow cation exchange. The chromium-bearing montmorillonites were verified and tested using powder X-ray diffractometry (XRD), X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometry and Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to explore the occupation sites of the chromium. The ESR spectra recorded before and after the chromium exchange show clear differences: a strong and broad resonance with two shoulders at the lower magnetic field side was present to start, and its intensity as well as that of the ferric iron resonance, increased with the concentration of added chromium. The signals introduced by the chromium, for example at g = 1.975 and 2.510 etc., suggested that the chromium had several occupational sites. The ESR peak with g = 2.510 in the second derivative spectrum suggested that Cr3+ was weakly bounded to TOT with the form of [Cr(H2O)3]3+ in hexagonal cavities. This was verified by comparing the FTIR spectra of the pure and modified montmorillonite. The main resonance centred at g = 1.975 indicated that the majority of Cr3+ occupied the interlayer region as [Cr(H2O)6]3+. The substitution of Ca2 + by Cr3+ also greatly affected the vibration of the hydrogens associate to water, ranged from 3500 to 2600 cm-1 in FTIR. Furthermore, the presence of two diffraction lines in the XRD results (specifically those with d-values of 1.5171 and 1.2673 nm) and the calculations of the size of the interlayer space suggested the presence of two types of montmorillonite with different hydration cations in the sample exposed to 0.2 M chromium sulphate. The two diffraction lines were assigned to [Cr(H2O)6]3+ and [Cr(H2O)3O3]3+, respectively. This also suggested that the species of hydration cation was constrained by the concentration of the chromium solution.

  8. A possible role for chromium(III) in genotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snow, E.T. (New York Univ. Medical Center, Tuxedo (United States))

    1991-05-01

    Chromium is found in the environment in two major forms: reduced Cr{sup III} and Cr{sup VI}, or chromate. Chromate, the most biologically active species, is readily taken up by living cells and reduced intracellularly, via reactive intermediates, to stable Cr{sup III} species. Cr{sup III}, the most abundant form of chromium in the environment, does not readily cross cell membranes and is relatively inactive in vivo. However, intracellular Cr{sup III} can react slowly with both nucleic acids and proteins and can be genotoxic. The authors have investigated the genotoxicity of Cr{sup III} in vitro using a DNA replication assay and in vivo by CaCl{sub 2}-mediated transfection of chromium-treated DNA into Escherichia coli. These results suggest that Cr{sup III} alters the interaction between the DNA template and the polymerase such that the binding strength of the DNA polymerase is increased and the fidelity of DNA replication is decreased. These interactions may contribute to the mutagenicity of chromium ions in vivo and suggest that Cr{sup III} can contribute to chromium-mediated carcinogenesis.

  9. Low-chromium reduced-activation ferritic steels for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Kenik, E.A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Development of reduced-activation ferritic steels has concentrated on high-chromium (8-10 wt% Cr) steels. However, there are advantages for a low-chromium steel, and initial ORNL studies on reduced-activation steels were on compositions with 2.25 to 12% Cr. Those studies showed an Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.25V-0.1C (2 1/4Cr-2WV) steel to have the highest strenglth of the steels studied. Although this steel had the best strength, Charpy impact properties were inferior to those of an Fe-9Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C (9Cr-2WVTa) and an Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.1C (2 1/4Cr-2W) steel. Therefore, further development of the low-chromium Cr-W steels was required. These results indicate that it is possible to develop low-chromium reduced-activation ferritic steels that have tensile and impact properties as good or better than those of high-chromium (7-9% Cr) steels. Further improvement of properties should be possible by optimizing the composition.

  10. Enhancement of chromium uptake in tanning using oxazolidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundarapandiyan, S; Brutto, Patrick E; Siddhartha, G; Ramesh, R; Ramanaiah, B; Saravanan, P; Mandal, A B

    2011-06-15

    Monocyclic and bicyclic oxazolidines were offered at three different junctures of chrome tanning process viz. prior to BCS offer, along with BCS and after basification. It was found that oxazolidine when offered after basification brought about better chromium uptake and reduction of chromium load in the wastewater. Offer of oxazolidine was also varied. Increase in offer of oxazolidine from 0.25% to 1% was found to enhance the chromium uptake and decrease the chromium load in wastewater. But the increase in uptake was not proportionate to the increase in oxazolidine offer more than 0.75%. Offer of 1% Zoldine ZA 78 (monocyclic oxazolidine) and Zoldine ZE (bicyclic oxazolidine) after basification brought about 63.4% and 73.1% enhancement in chrome content in leather compared to control where oxazolidine was not offered. The tone of the wetblue was found to be altered moderately. However this did not call for any process adjustments in wet-finishing. The oxazolidine treated leathers were found to be immensely fuller and tighter. It was found experimentally that offer of 1% of oxazolidine facilitated reduction in the offer of syntans administered for filling and grain tightening by around 46%. Oxazolidine could bring about significant reduction in cost of chemicals apart from resulting environmental benefits due to enhancement of chromium uptake during tanning.

  11. Bioaccumulation and biosorption of chromium by Aspergillus niger MTCC 2594.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandana Mala, John Geraldine; Unni Nair, Balachandran; Puvanakrishnan, Rengarajulu

    2006-06-01

    Chromium toxicity is of prime concern due to chrome tanning processes in the leather sector. Chrome tanning results in the discharge of toxic levels of chromium causing pollution hazards. Chromium levels of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) were high above permissible limits in chrome samples after chrome tanning. The potential of Aspergillus niger MTCC 2594 to accumulate chromium as well as its biosorption capacity is investigated in this study. Bioaccumulation of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in the spent chrome liquor has resulted in a 75-78% reduction of the initial Cr content in 24-36 h. A. niger biomass is found to be very effective in the biosorption of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in spent chrome liquor. Maximum adsorption of 83% for biosorption of Cr(III) at 48 h and 79% of Cr(VI) at 36 h in spent chrome liquor is observed. The biosorption characteristics fit well with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms and the adsorption parameters are evaluated. The biosorption of Cr also follows Lagergren kinetics. A. niger biomass is effectively used for the biosorption of chromium with 79-83% Cr removal in 36-48 h.

  12. Microbial exudate promoted dissolution and transformation of chromium containing minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, E. M.; Sun, J.; Tang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Because of its utility in many industrial processes, chromium has become the second most common metal contaminant in the United States. The two most common oxidation states of chromium in nature are Cr(III), which is highly immobile, and Cr(VI), which is highly mobile and toxic. In both natural and engineered environments, the most common remediation of Cr(VI) is through reduction, which results in chromium sequestration in the low solubility mixed Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxide phases. Consequently, the stability of these minerals must be examined to assess the fate of chromium in the subsurface. We examined the dissolution of mixed Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides in the presence of common microbial exudates, including the siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB; a common organic ligand secreted by most microbes with high affinity for ferric iron and other trivalent metal ions) and oxalate (a common organic acid produced by microbes). The solids exhibited incongruent dissolution with preferential leaching of Fe from the solid phase. Over time, this leads to a more Cr rich mineral, which is known to be more soluble than the corresponding mixed mineral phase. We are currently investigating the structure of the reacted mineral phases and soluble Cr(III) species, as well as the potential oxidation and remobilization of the soluble Cr species. Results from this study will provide insights regarding the long term transport and fate of chromium in the natural environment in the presence of microbial activities.

  13. Effective bioleaching of chromium in tannery sludge with an enriched sulfur-oxidizing bacterial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jing; Gou, Min; Tang, Yue-Qin; Li, Guo-Ying; Sun, Zhao-Yong; Kida, Kenji

    2016-10-01

    In this study, a sulfur-oxidizing community was enriched from activated sludge generated in tannery wastewater treatment plants. Bioleaching of tannery sludge containing 0.9-1.2% chromium was investigated to evaluate the effectiveness of the enriched community, the effect of chromium binding forms on bioleaching efficiency, and the dominant microbes contributing to chromium bioleaching. Sludge samples inoculated with the enriched community presented 79.9-96.8% of chromium leaching efficiencies, much higher than those without the enriched community. High bioleaching efficiencies of over 95% were achieved for chromium in reducible fraction, while 60.9-97.9% were observed for chromium in oxidizable and residual fractions. Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, the predominant bacteria in the enriched community, played an important role in bioleaching, whereas some indigenous heterotrophic species in sludge might have had a supporting role. The results indicated that A. thiooxidans-dominant enriched microbial community had high chromium bioleaching efficiency, and chromium binding forms affected the bioleaching performance.

  14. Development of a coprecipitation system for the speciation/preconcentration of chromium in tap waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karatepe, Aslihan, E-mail: karatepea@gmail.com [Nevsehir University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Department of Chemistry, 50000 Nevsehir (Turkey); Korkmaz, Esra [Bozok University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Department of Chemistry, Yozgat (Turkey); Soylak, Mustafa [Erciyes University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Chemistry Department, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Elci, Latif [Pamukkale University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Department of Chemistry, 20020 Denizli (Turkey)

    2010-01-15

    A method for the speciation of chromium(III), chromium(VI) and determination of total chromium based on coprecipitation of chromium(III) with dysprosium hydroxide has been investigated and applied to tap water samples. Chromium(III) was quantitatively recovered by the presented method, while the recovery values for chromium(VI) was below 10%. The influences of analytical parameters including amount of dysprosium(III), pH, centrifugation speed and sample volume for the quantitative precipitation were examined. No interferic effects were observed from alkali, earth alkali and some transition metals for the analyte ions. The detection limits (k = 3, N = 15) were 0.65 {mu}g/L for chromium(III) and 0.78 {mu}g/L for chromium(VI). The validation of the presented method was checked by the analysis of certified reference materials.

  15. Process for improving moisture resistance of epoxy resins by addition of chromium ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    St.clair, A. K.; Stoakley, D. M.; St.clair, T. L.; Singh, J. J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A process for improving the moisture resistance properties of epoxidized TGMDA and DGEBA resin system by chemically incorporating chromium ions is described. The addition of chromium ions is believed to prevent the absorption of water molecules.

  16. CHROMIUM ELECTROANALYSIS AT SCREEN PRINTED ELECTRODE MODIFIED BY THIN FILMS OF NICKEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    A rapid and potentially cost-effective electrochemical method is reported for analysis of chromium (VI) and Chromium(III) using a nickel modified screen printed carbon ink electrode. Electrochemical characteristics of nickel modified electrode as well voltammetric behavior f...

  17. Reduction of chromium oxide from slags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutiérrez-Paredes, J.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Experimental and theoretical work were performed to estimate the effect of slag basicity and amount of reducing agents on the reduction of chromium oxide from the slag which interacted with molten steel at 1,600 °C. The slag system contained CaO, MgO, SiO2, CaF2 and Cr2O3 together with Fe-alloys (Fe-Si and Fe-Si-Mg. The CaF2 and MgO contents in the slags were 10 mass % each; Cr2O3 was 25%. The amount of the ferroalloys ranged from 12.5 to 50 g per 100 g of slag. The (CaO+MgO/SiO2 ratio was held at 1 and 2. The Cr yield was determined using both Fe-alloys as reducing agents. Some estimations were made to determine the theoretical effect of temperature, slag basicity, (CaO+MgO/SiO2, and amount of reducing agents in the slag on the chromium recovery. The FACT (Facility for the Analysis of Chemical Thermodynamics computational package is used to determine the equilibrium between the slag and molten steel.

    En el presente trabajo se realiza un estudio teórico y experimental para determinar el efecto de la basicidad de la escoria y la cantidad de agentes reductores sobre la reducción de óxidos de cromo contenidos en la escoria, la cual está en contacto con acero líquido a 1.600 °C. La escoria se prepara con los reactivos CaO, MgO, SiO2, CaF2 y ferroaleaciones (Fe-Si y Fe-Si-Mg. Los contenidos de CaF2 y MgO en la escoria son de 10 %, cada uno, y el de Cr2O3 es 25 %. La cantidad de la ferroaleación varía de 12,5 a 50 g por cada 100 g de escoria. La relación (CaO+MgO/SiO2 tiene los valores de 1 y 2. Se determina la eficiencia de recuperación de cromo empleando los dos tipos de ferroaleaciones. Se realizaron cálculos para determinar el efecto teórico de la temperatura, la basicidad de la escoria, (CaO+MgO/SiO2, y la cantidad de agentes reductores sobre la reducci

  18. Effects of irradiation on chromium's behavior in ferritic/martensitic FeCr alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinfu HE; Wen YANG; Zhehao QU; Sheng FAN

    2009-01-01

    The effects of irradiation on chromium performance under different temperatures in Fe-20at%Cr were modeled by modified Marlowe code. Chromium precipitation was observed in FeCr alloy after irradiation; interstitial Chromium atoms are the preferred formation of mixed FeCr dumbbells in the direction ofand; interstitial chromium atoms congregated on {111} and {110} plane. The results are compared with experiment observations and are useful to understanding the irradiation performances of FeCr alloy.

  19. A study of the process of desorption of hexavalent chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.B. Amorim

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work the process of desorption of hexavalent chromium, a toxic metal ion, from the marine algae Sargassum sp, following biosorption experiments 2³ factorial design was studied. A technique was applied to three eluents: HCl, H2SO4 and EDTA. Three factors of importance were evaluated: concentration of eluent, the ratio between mass of biosorbent and volume of eluent (S/L and process time. A statistical analysis of the experimental results showed that the three variables evaluated are significant for all three eluents. The models for chromium desorption were validated, as the results agreed well with the observed values. Through use of the response surface methodology, a factorial design based optimization technique; it was possible to identify the most suitable eluent and the interval of values for the process variables that resulted in the most significant desorption of chromium, which is relevant information for work aiming at process optimization.

  20. Bioabsorption of chromium from retan chrome liquor by cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandi, M; Shashirekha, V; Swamy, Mahadeswara

    2009-01-01

    The bioaccumulation of chromium from retan chrome liquor by Spirulina fusiformis was investigated under laboratory as well as field conditions. At the optimal conditions, metal ion uptake increased with initial metal ion concentration up to 300mg/l. The effect on various physico-chemical parameters like total solids (TS), total dissolved solids (TDS), total suspended solids (TSS), chlorides, sulphates, phenols, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biochemical studies related to biomass, chlorophyll-a and protein were also carried out. The present study indicates that S. fusiformis is very effective in removal of chromium (93-99%) besides removing other toxicants from retan chrome liquor. The sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and FTIR studies indicate the interaction/complexation between Cr and alga. The mechanism involved in bioaccumulation of chromium is also discussed. The process when upgraded can be applied for detoxification of tannery effluents.

  1. Extraction of Chromium from Carbon Ferrochromium Residual Wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarevskiy, P. P.; Gizatulin, R. A.; Romanenko, Yu E.; Valuev, D. V.; Valueva, A. V.; Serikbol, A.

    2015-09-01

    This work reports the problem of processing residual wastes after producing carbon ferrochrome by recycling dust using a hydrometallurgical method with the purpose of extracting the basic component - chromium, The X-ray diffraction analysis results, chemical and granulometric compositions of dust from the carbon ferrochrome production are given, The method for the production of chemical-enrichment concentrate (CEC) by processing ferrous dust is described, with obtaining a middling product - sodium mono-chromate with its further reduction to chromium hydroxide, followed by autoclave leaching, and resulting in the production of chemically enriched chrome concentrate, The plant used for autoclave leaching and filtering is schematically depicted, The smelting process of metallic chromium using the ladle aluminothermic method is described,

  2. Studies of removal of chromium by model constructed wetland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mant

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Chromium is a pollutant present in tannery wastewater, its removal is necessary for protection of the environment. Penisetum purpureum, Brancharia decumbens and Phragmites australis were grown hydroponically in experimental gravel beds to determine their potential for the phytoremediation of solutions containing 10 and 20 mg Cr dm-3. These concentrations, similar to tannery wastewater after initial physico-chemical treatment were used with the aim of developing an economic secondary treatment to protect the environment. All the systems achieved removal efficiencies of 97 - 99.6% within 24 hours. P. purpureum and B. decumbens removed 78.1% and 68.5% respectively within the first hour. Both P. purpureum and B. decumbens were tolerant of the concentrations of chromium applied, but P. purpureum showed the greatest potential because its faster growth and larger biomass achieved a much greater chromium removal over the whole length of time of the experiment.

  3. Electron magnetic resonance investigation of chromium diffusion in yttria powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biasi, R.S. de, E-mail: rsbiasi@ime.eb.b [Secao de Engenharia Mecanica e de Materiais, Instituto Militar de Engenharia, Pr. General Tiburcio, 80, 22290-270 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Grillo, M.L.N., E-mail: mluciag@uerj.b [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, 20550-013 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2010-03-01

    The electron magnetic resonance (EMR) technique was used to investigate the diffusion of chromium in yttria (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) powders. The EMR absorption intensity was measured for several annealing times and three different temperatures of isothermal annealing: 1273, 1323 and 1373 K. The activation temperature for diffusion, calculated from the experimental data using a theoretical model based on the Fick equation, was found to be E{sub A}=342+-5 kJ mol{sup -1}. This value is larger than the activation energy for the diffusion of chromium in rutile (TiO{sub 2}), periclase (MgO) and cobalt monoxide (CoO) and smaller than the activation energy for the diffusion of chromium in chrysoberyl (BeAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}).

  4. Chromium Resistant Bacteria: Impact on Plant Growth in Soil Microcosm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayel Hanane

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Three chromium resistant bacterial strains, Pseudomonas fluorescens PF28, Enterobacter amnigenus EA31 and Enterococcus gallinarum S34 isolated from tannery waste contaminated soil were used in this study. All strains could resist a high concentration of K2Cr2O7 that is up to 300 mg/L. The effect of these strains on clover plants (Trifolium campestre in the presence of two chromium salts CrCl3 and K2Cr2O7 was studied in soil microcosm. Application of chromium salts adversely affected seed germination, root and shoot length. Bacterial inoculation improved the growth parameters under chromate stress when compared with non inoculated respective controls. There was observed more than 50% reduction of Cr(VI in inoculated soil microcosms, as compared to the uninoculated soil under the same conditions. The results obtained in this study are significant for the bioremediation of chromate pollution.

  5. Cyclotron production of {sup 64}Cu by deuteron irradiation of {sup 64}Zn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas, K. [Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Joint Research Centre, European Commission, TP 500, I-21020 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See,) (Italy)]. E-mail: kamel.abbas@jrc.it; Kozempel, J. [Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Joint Research Centre, European Commission, TP 500, I-21020 Ispra (VA) (Italy); Charles University Prague, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic and Nuclear Chemistry, 128 43 Prague (Czech Republic); Bonardi, M. [LASA, Radiochemistry Laboratory, University and INFN, via F.lli Cervi 201, I-20090 Segrate (MI) (Italy); Groppi, F. [LASA, Radiochemistry Laboratory, University and INFN, via F.lli Cervi 201, I-20090 Segrate (MI) (Italy); Alfarano, A. [Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Joint Research Centre, European Commission, TP 500, I-21020 Ispra (VA) (Italy); Holzwarth, U. [Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Joint Research Centre, European Commission, TP 500, I-21020 Ispra (VA) (Italy); Simonelli, F. [Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Joint Research Centre, European Commission, TP 500, I-21020 Ispra (VA) (Italy); Hofman, H. [Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Joint Research Centre, European Commission, TP 500, I-21020 Ispra (VA) (Italy); Horstmann, W. [Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Joint Research Centre, European Commission, TP 500, I-21020 Ispra (VA) (Italy); Menapace, E. [ENEA, Applied Physics Division, Bologna (Italy); Leseticky, L. [Charles University Prague, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic and Nuclear Chemistry, 128 43 Prague (Czech Republic); Gibson, N. [Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Joint Research Centre, European Commission, TP 500, I-21020 Ispra (VA) (Italy)

    2006-09-15

    The short-lived (12.7 h half-life) {sup 64}Cu radioisotope is both a {beta} {sup +} and a {beta} {sup -} emitter. This property makes {sup 64}Cu a promising candidate for novel medical applications, since it can be used simultaneously for therapeutic application of radiolabelled biomolecules and for diagnosis with PET. Following previous work on {sup 64}Cu production by deuteron irradiation of natural zinc, we report here the production of this radioisotope by deuteron irradiation of enriched {sup 64}Zn. In addition, yields of other radioisotopes such as {sup 61}Cu, {sup 67}Cu, {sup 65}Zn, {sup 69m}Zn, {sup 66}Ga and {sup 67}Ga, which were co-produced in this process, were also measured. The evaporation code ALICE-91 and the transport code SRIM 2003 were used to determine the excitation functions and the stopping power, respectively. All the nuclear reactions yielding the above-mentioned radioisotopes were taken into account in the calculations both for the natural and enriched Zn targets. The experimental and calculated yields were shown to be in reasonable agreement. The work was carried out at the Scanditronix MC-40 Cyclotron of the Institute for Health and Consumer Protection of the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission (Ispra site, Italy). The irradiations were carried out with 19.5 MeV deuterons, the maximum deuteron energy obtainable with the MC-40 cyclotron.

  6. Calculated Radioactivity Yields of Cu-64 from Proton-Bombarded Ni-64 Targets Using SRIM Codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Kambali

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The End-Of-Bombardment (EOB Yields from 64Ni(p,n64Cu nuclear reaction have been calculated for optimizing irradiation parameters that correspond to future 64Cu radionuclide production using the BATAN’s 26.5-MeV cyclotron in Serpong. Enriched Ni target thickness, proton beam current and irradiation time which play significant role in the success of the Positron Emission Tomography (PET radionuclide were also discussed in this paper. For a 26.5-MeV proton beam, the optimum target thickness for 64Cu production was nearly 1.5 mm with yields up to 560 mCi/µA.hr at the end of the irradiation. The comparisons with some selected experimental data indicated that the much-lower-than-expected EOB yields were mainly due to incorrect target thickness prepared for the irradiation. Nevertheless, these calculations were in good agreement with the previous predicted data with a maximum difference of less than 10%. The discrepancies were mostly due to different cross-section data employed in the calculations.

  7. Improvement on simultaneous determination of chromium species in aqueous solution by ion chromatography and chemiluminescence detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Liao, Y.P.; Jons, O.

    1997-01-01

    A sensitive method for the simultaneous determination of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) was chromatography and chemiluminescence detection. Two Dionex ion-exchange guard columns in series, CG5 and AG7, were used to separate chromium(III) from chromium(VI). Chromium(VI) was reduced by potassium......, the stabilities of reductant and luminol solutions were studied. The linear range of the calibration curve for chromium(III) and chromium(VI) was 1-400 mu g l(-1). The detection limit was 0.12 mu g l(-1) for chromium(III) and 0.09 mu g l(-1) for chromium(VI), respectively. The precision at the 20 mu g l(-1) level...... was 1.4% for chromium(III) and 2.5% for chromium(VI), respectively. The accuracy of the chromium(III) determination was determined by analysis of the NIST standard reference material 1643c, Trace elements in water with the result 19.1 +/- 1.0 mu g Cr(III) l(-1) (certified value 19.0 +/- 0.6 mu g Cr...

  8. 21 CFR 73.3110a - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.3110a Section... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3110a Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide (Pigment Blue 36) (CAS Reg....

  9. Experimental study on 830 MPa grade pipeline steel containing chromium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Ren; Shuai Zhang; Shuang Wang; Wen-yue Liu

    2009-01-01

    The diversity of microstructure and properties of 830 Mpa grade pipeline steel containing chromium was investigated by optical microscope and transmission electron microscopy. The main microstructures were multiple configurations, containing lath bainite and granule bainite. Mechanical properties test results showed that the yield strength and tensile strength improved with in-creasing chromium content. The toughness and elongation decreased at the same time, so temper process was introduced. Appling proper temper parameters, the values of toughness and elongation were improved dramatically, and the strength decreased slightly.

  10. Fractionation behavior of chromium isotopes during coprecipitation with calcium carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodler, Alexandra; Sánchez-Pastor, Nuria; Fernández-Díaz, Lurdes;

    2015-01-01

    Interest in chromium (Cr) isotope incorporation into carbonates arises from the observation that Cr isotopic composition of carbonates could be used as a paleoclimate proxy to elucidate past fluctuations of oxygen contents in atmosphere and hydrosphere. The use of Cr isotopes to track paleoenviro......Interest in chromium (Cr) isotope incorporation into carbonates arises from the observation that Cr isotopic composition of carbonates could be used as a paleoclimate proxy to elucidate past fluctuations of oxygen contents in atmosphere and hydrosphere. The use of Cr isotopes to track...

  11. Use of chitosan for chromium removal from exhausted tanning baths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaro, Raffaele; Fabbricino, Massimiliano; Lanzetta, Rosa; Mancino, Anna; Naviglio, Biagio; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Sartorio, Roberto; Tomaselli, Michele; Tortora, Gelsomina

    2008-01-01

    A novel approach, based on chitosan heavy-metal sequestrating ability, is proposed for chromium(III) removal from spent tanning liquor. Experimental results, obtained at lab-scale using real wastewater, are presented and discussed. Resulting efficiencies are extremely high, and strongly dependent on chitosan dose and pH value. Comparative analyses with other polysaccharides is also carried out showing that amine groups are more efficient than carboxyl and sulphate ones. Chromium recovery from sorption complexes and chitosan regeneration is finally proposed to optimize the whole process.

  12. Primary and secondary crystallization of modified hypoeutectic chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Studnicki

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents investigations of crystallization of modified hypoeutectic wear resistant chromium cast iron which contains carbon about 2% and chromium on three levels (12%, 18% and 25%. Three substances were applied to the modification ( boron carbide (B4C, ferroniobium (FeNb and mixture of ferroniobium and mischmetal (RE. The investigations of crystallization were conducted the DTA method in DTA-C and DTA-Is testers. The influence on the course of the process of primary and secondary crystallization was observed.

  13. Urinary levels of nickel and chromium associated with dental restoration by nickel-chromium based alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo; Xia, Gang; Cao, Xin-Ming; Wang, Jue; Xu, Bi-Yao; Huang, Pu; Chen, Yue; Jiang, Qing-Wu

    2013-03-01

    This paper aims to investigate if the dental restoration of nickel-chromium based alloy (Ni-Cr) leads to the enhanced excretions of Ni and Cr in urine. Seven hundred and ninety-five patients in a dental hospital had single or multiple Ni-Cr alloy restoration recently and 198 controls were recruited to collect information on dental restoration by questionnaire and clinical examination. Urinary concentrations of Ni and Cr from each subject were measure by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Compared to the control group, the urinary level of Ni was significantly higher in the patient group of dental restoration. Potential short- and long-term effects of Ni-Cr alloy restoration need to be investigated.

  14. Fertilizers and Mixed Crop Cultivation of Chromium Tolerant and Sensitive Plants under Chromium Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Dheeba

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Zea mays (maize and Vigna radiata (green gram are found to be the chromium (Cr tolerant and sensitive plants, respectively. In the present paper, we investigate the reduction of the toxicity of Cr in the sensitive plants by the mixed crop cultivation in the field using various amendments. Further, the potassium dichromate was used as the source of hexavalent Cr. The results indicated that Cr adversely affects both the growth and yield of plants. The soil properties vary with Cr and different fertilizer amendments and the yield of both plants were affected by Cr. We conclude that metal accumulation of seeds of green gram was higher than corn and the application of single fertilizer either farm yard manure (FYM or nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium (NPK enhances the growth and yield of both the tolerant and sensitive plants in the mixed crop cultivations.

  15. Spatial distribution of chromium in soils contaminated by chromium-containing slag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Shun-hong; PENG Bing; YANG Zhi-hui; CHAI Li-yuan; XU You-ze; SU Chang-qing

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the metal chromium (Cr) contamination of soil at a chromium-containing slag site by ferrochromium production, the contaminated sites, under slag heap, in the vicinity of slag heap and arable soils near the outlet of sewer channel, and unpolluted site 5 km away from one ferroalloy plant in Hunan Province, China, were selected. The concentrations of total Cr and water soluble Cr in bulk soil samples and profile depth samples were determined. The results show that the soils in the vicinity of slag heap have the highest total Cr content followed by the soils under the slag heap and near the outlet of sewer channel of the factory. The mean concentrations of total Cr in the top soils at above three contaminated locations exceed the critical level of Secondary Environmental Quality Standard for Soil in China by 3.5, 5.4 and 1.8 times. In most Cr polluted soils, total Cr has a relative accumulation in soil depth of 40-60 cm, but this trend is not found in unpolluted soils. The average concentrations of water soluble Cr (Ⅵ) in top soils under slag heap and in the vicinity of slag heap are 176.9 times and 52.7 times higher than that in the uncontaminated soils, respectively. However, water soluble Cr (Ⅵ) contents in soils near sewer channel are all low and the values are close to that in the uncontaminated soils. Although water soluble Cr (Ⅵ) content in soil profiles decreases with soil depths, it in soils under slag heap maintains a high level even at a depth of 100-150 cm. The results imply that the transportation of Cr (Ⅵ) can result in a potential risk of groundwater system in this area.

  16. 10 CFR 455.64 - Life-cycle cost methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Life-cycle cost methodology. 455.64 Section 455.64 Energy..., Hospitals, Units of Local Government, and Public Care Institutions § 455.64 Life-cycle cost methodology. (a) The life-cycle cost methodology under § 455.63(b) of this part is a systematic comparison of...

  17. 19 CFR 146.64 - Entry for warehouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Entry for warehouse. 146.64 Section 146.64 Customs... (CONTINUED) FOREIGN TRADE ZONES Transfer of Merchandise From a Zone § 146.64 Entry for warehouse. (a) Foreign... status may not be entered for warehouse from a zone. Merchandise in nonprivileged foreign...

  18. 47 CFR 64.1140 - Carrier liability for slamming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carrier liability for slamming. 64.1140 Section 64.1140 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES... Providers § 64.1140 Carrier liability for slamming. (a) Carrier Liability for Charges. Any...

  19. 47 CFR 64.903 - Cost allocation manuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cost allocation manuals. 64.903 Section 64.903... RULES RELATING TO COMMON CARRIERS Allocation of Costs § 64.903 Cost allocation manuals. (a) Each... mid-sized incumbent local exchange carriers is required to file a cost allocation manual...

  20. 27 CFR 18.64 - Photographic copies of records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Photographic copies of records. 18.64 Section 18.64 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... Reports § 18.64 Photographic copies of records. Proprietors may record, copy, or reproduce...

  1. 48 CFR 9904.413-64 - Transition method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ....413-64 Section 9904.413-64 Federal Acquisition Regulations System COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD... ACCOUNTING STANDARDS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS 9904.413-64 Transition method. (a) To be acceptable, any... shall be consistent with the provisions of this Standard and shall be approved by the...

  2. 36 CFR 64.15 - Financial reporting requirements and reimbursements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Financial reporting requirements and reimbursements. 64.15 Section 64.15 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE... RIGHTS-OF-WAY § 64.15 Financial reporting requirements and reimbursements. Payments to applicants...

  3. 7 CFR 201.64 - Pure live seed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pure live seed. 201.64 Section 201.64 Agriculture..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Tolerances § 201.64 Pure live seed. The tolerance for pure live seed shall be determined...

  4. 39 CFR 6.4 - Attendance by conference telephone call.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Attendance by conference telephone call. 6.4 Section 6.4 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE U.S. POSTAL SERVICE MEETINGS (ARTICLE VI) § 6.4 Attendance by conference telephone call. For regularly scheduled meetings...

  5. 40 CFR 53.64 - Test procedure: Static fractionator test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test procedure: Static fractionator test. 53.64 Section 53.64 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Performance Characteristics of Class II Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 § 53.64 Test procedure:...

  6. A 64x64 Low Noise Cryogenic Readout Multiplexer for Far IR Focal-Plane Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to investigate the feasibility of developing a low noise, two-side buttable, 64x64 readout multiplexer with the following key design features: 1- By far...

  7. Physiological, biochemical and histometric responses of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus L.) by dietary organic chromium (chromium picolinate) supplementation

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Chromium has been recognized as a new and important micro-nutrient, essential for both human and animal nutrition. This study was conducted to evaluate the appropriateness and/or the use of safety level of dietary chromium picolinate (Cr-Pic), and its effects on the physiological responses, the histometric characteristics, and the chemical analysis of dorsal muscles of mono-sex Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus. A total of 420 fingerlings (28.00 ± 0.96 g) were randomly distributed into 21 f...

  8. Chromium(VI) release from leather and metals can be detected with a diphenylcarbazide spot test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Johansen, Jeanne D.; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2015-01-01

    Along with chromium, nickel and cobalt are the clinically most important metal allergens. However, unlike for nickel and cobalt, there is no validated colorimetric spot test that detects chromium. Such a test could help both clinicians and their patients with chromium dermatitis to identify culprit...... at 0.5 ppm without interference from other pure metals, alloys, or leather. A market survey using the test showed no chromium(VI) release from work tools (0/100). However, chromium(VI) release from metal screws (7/60), one earring (1/50), leather shoes (4/100) and leather gloves (6/11) was observed. We...

  9. Reactor target from metal chromium for "pure" high-intensive artificial neutrino source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrin, V. N.; Kozlova, Yu. P.; Veretenkin, E. P.; Logachev, A. V.; Logacheva, A. I.; Lednev, I. S.; Okunkova, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents the first results of development of manufacturing technology of metallic chromium targets from highly enriched isotope 50Cr for irradiation in a high flux nuclear reactor to obtain a compact high intensity neutrino source with low content of radionuclide impurities and minimum losses of enriched isotope. The main technological stages are the hydrolysis of chromyl fluoride, the electrochemical reduction of metallic chromium, the hot isostatic pressing of chromium powder and the electrical discharge machining of chromium bars. The technological stages of hot isostatic pressing of chromium powder and of electrical discharge machining of Cr rods have been tested.

  10. The oxidation and reduction of chromium of stainless steels in an eletric arc furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Arh

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The oxidation of chromium during the elaboration of stainless steels occurs with oxygen in solution blown inthe melt and with oxides in the slag. A higher content of silicon in the furnace charge decreases the extent of oxidation of chromium, however, the efficient reduction of chromium from the slag is of essential importance for a minimal loss of chromium. In this survey, the theory of the oxidation of chromium, its reduction from the slag and the conditions for the formation of foaming slag are discussed.

  11. Absorption Reduction Capacity with Chromium (Cr and Cadmium (Cd Contaminants of Vetiver Phytoremediation Process on Compost Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahamad Zubair

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to analyze the large of reduction capacity of chromium metals and cadmium in the soil compost media and absorption capacity of chrome and cadmium in phytoremediation process of vetiver; to compare the reduction-absorption capacities of chromium and cadmium metals in phytoremediation process of vetiver (Vetivera zizanioides. The study was carried out for 2 months with a range of sampling every 7 days, and then analyzed by using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS. Contaminants used as artificial contaminants containing heavy metals chromium (Cr and cadmium (Cd. This study is an experimental research includes two variables. First, the variations of Cr concentrations used were 400 ppm, 600 ppm and 800 ppm and Cd concentrations used were 40 ppm, 60 ppm, 800 ppm. Secondly, the variations of total plant are 3, 6, and 9 plant. The period of observation is made every week. Planting media used is compost soil with compost and clay composition of 20%, 30% and 40%. The results of study showed that there are a significant relationship between the reduction capacity of Cr and Cd of compost soil and the absorption capacity of Cr and Cd for vetiver (Vetiveria zizanioides. The higher of Cr and Cd decreases in soil followed by increased levels of Cr and Cd in vetiver (Vetiveria zizanioides. The capacity of Cr reduction varies between 57% - 86% and Cd 36% - 64% where as the absorption capacity of vetiver on Cr between 38% - 75% and Cd between 34%-74%. The capacity of reduction-absorption of Cr is relatively higher than Cd in phytoremediation process of vetiver.

  12. 64层CT技术及发展趋势

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于明涛; 唐东生

    2005-01-01

    64层CT是目前CT技术发展的最前沿产品。目前各公司已经发布的64层CT机器有Siemens的SOMATOM Sensation64,GE的Light Speed VCT,Toshiba的Aquilion 64和其心脏型Aquilion 64 CFX,其中:Siemens和GE已在国内发布产品,并办理了国家SDA注册,Toshiba是在美国发布,在国内还没有动静。

  13. Chromium(VI) transport and fate in unsaturated zone and aquifer: 3D Sandbox results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xingmin; Sobecky, Patricia A; Zhao, Lanpo; Crawford, Patrice; Li, Mingtang

    2016-04-01

    The simulation of Cr(VI) behavior in an unsaturated zone and aquifer, using a 3D experimental set-up were performed to illustrate the distribution, transport and transformation of Cr(VI), and further to reveal the potential harm of Cr(VI) after entering the groundwater. The result indicated that chromium(VI) was transported in the vertical direction, meanwhile, was transported in the horizontal direction under the influence of groundwater flow. The direction and distance away from the pollution source zone had great effect on the chromium(VI) concentration. At the sampling sites near the pollution source zone, there was a sudden increase of chromium(VI) concentration. The concentration of chromium(III) concentration in some random effluent samples was not detected. Chromium had not only transported but also had fraction and specie transformation in the unsaturated zone and aquifer. The relative concentration of residue fraction chromium was decreased with time. The content of Fe-Mn oxide fraction chromium was increased with time. The relative content of exchangeable and carbonate-bound fraction chromium was lower and the content variations were not obvious. Chromium(VI) (91-98%) was first reduced to chromium(III) rapidly. The oxidation reaction occurred later and the relative content of chromium(VI) was increased again. The presence of manganese oxides under favorable soil conditions can promote the reoxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI).

  14. 75 FR 67100 - Superalloy Degassed Chromium From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    ... superalloy degassed chromium from Japan (70 FR 76030). The Commission is conducting a review to determine..., subparts A, D, E, and F (19 CFR part 207), as most recently amended at 74 FR 2847 (January 16, 2009). \\1... rule 201.15(b)(19 CFR 201.15(b)), 73 FR 24609 (May 5, 2008). This advice was developed in...

  15. 76 FR 8773 - Superalloy Degassed Chromium From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ... applicable deadline.'' (75 FR 80457). Accordingly, pursuant to section 751(c) of the Tariff Act of 1930 (19 U... COMMISSION Superalloy Degassed Chromium From Japan AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission... Japan would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material injury. On December 22,...

  16. Effects of chromium picolinate supplementation in type 2 diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niladê Rosinski Rocha

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The effects of chromium picolinate in Type 2 diabetic patients are investigated.  Seventeen Type 2 diabetic patients were randomly divided into two groups. The experimental group received fiber-rich hypocaloric diet and chromium picolinate whereas the control group received fiber-rich hypocaloric diet and placebo. The chromium picolinate was offered twice a day at the dose of 100 μg. Anthropometric data such as blood pressure, fasting glycemia and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c were measured and these parameters were evaluated again after 90 days. No difference was reported in rates of body weight, waist, hip, body mass index, blood pressure and fasting glycemia (Control vs. Experimental groups after treatment. However, a decrease (p = 0.0405 of HbA1c occurred in the experimental group when the pre- and post-treatment rates were compared. HbA1c data showed that chromium picolinate improved the glycemic control in Type 2 diabetes.

  17. Cobalt chromium stents versus stainless steel stents in diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Ahmed Tantawy

    2014-03-01

    Conclusions: We concluded that no significant statistical difference was found between the two stents (cobalt-chromium alloy bare metal stent versus conventional bare metal stainless steel stent in diabetic patients regarding (initial procedural success, in-hospital complications, the incidence of ISR at follow up, event-free survival at follow up.

  18. Intestinal absorption of chromium as affected by wheat bran

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keim, K.S.; Holloway, C.L.; Hegsted, M.

    1986-03-01

    This study was designed to investigate the influence of dietary fiber, as found in wheat bran, on the absorption of chromium. Twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups of 10. The control was fed a semi-purified diet containing casein, methionine, cornstarch, sucrose, corn oil, mineral and vitamin mix, and choline bitartrate. The experimental group was fed the same diet but with soft red winter wheat bran added to a level of 35% of the diet at the expense of sucrose. To determine chromium absorption and uptake by selected tissues, rats were fasted for 24 hr, fed 5 g of the respective diet, 2 hr later intubated with 100..mu..Ci of Cr-51of sacrificed 24 hr later. The rats wee housed in metabolic cages after the Cr-51 intubation. The addition of wheat brand to the diet did not significantly affect chromium absorption as measured by percent dose of Cr-51 in the 24 hr urine. The percent dose in the control group was 0.68 +/- 0.20% (mean +/- SEM) and in the experimental group 0.63 +/- 0.24% (mean +/-SEM) (N.S.). The cr-51 uptake of liver, spleen, jejunum, and blood was not statistically different between groups. These results indicate that dietary fiber as found in wheat bran does not impair intestinal absorption of chromium.

  19. Domestic Production Issues in Chromium and Platinum-Group Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    Protection Agency. OPA 87-005. Washington: Government Printing Office, May 1987. 16. Foley, Jeffrey Y. and James C. Barker . Chromite Deposits Along...Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers, 1976. 52. Stowe, Clive W. Evolution of Chromium Ore Fields. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold Company

  20. Spin-wave and critical neutron scattering from chromium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage; Axe, J.D.; Shirane, G.

    1971-01-01

    Chromium and its dilute alloys are unique examples of magnetism caused by itinerant electrons. The magnetic excitations have been studied by inelastic neutron scattering using a high-resolution triple-axis spectrometer. Spin-wave peaks in q scans at constant energy transfer ℏω could, in general, ...

  1. New alloys to conserve critical elements. [replacing chromium in steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Previous studies and surveys on availability of domestic reserves have shown that chromium is a most critical element within the U.S. metal industry. More precisely, the bulk of chromium is consumed in the production of stainless steels, specifically Type 304 stainless steel (304SS) which contains 18% Cr. The present paper deals with means of reducing chromium in commercial stainless steels by substituting more abundant or less expensive elements with the intent of maintaining the properties of 304SS. The discussion focuses on some of the oxidation and corrosion properties of new substitute stainless steels with only 12% Cr, which represents a potential saving of 33% of the chromium consumed in the production of 304SS. The alloying elements substituted for Cr in 304SS are selected according to their potential for protective oxide formation during high-temperature oxidation; these are Al, Si, Ti, Y, and misch metal which is 99.7% rare-earth metals containing 50 to 55% cerium. Other alloying elements to impart corrosion resistance are Mn, Mo, and V.

  2. Microbial biotechnology for remediation of aquatic habitats polluted with chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viorica Coşier

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Chromium may occur in nine different forms of oxidation ranging from ?II to +VI, with forms II, III and VI as the most commonly encountered. In Cluj county, chromium pollution dates well back in time and has caused important dysfunction to the mechanical-biological wastewater purification station of the city of Cluj (Coşier & Diţă 1996. The purpose of this study was to develop one microbial method able to reduce hexavalent chromium (mobile, permeable to cell membrane, carcinogenic and mutagenic (Ishikawa et al 1994 to the trivalent form (insoluble and an essential element for humans (Song et al 2006. Different sources of chromium-reducing bacteria and many sources of carbon and energy added to the Kvasnikov mineral basal medium (Komori et al 1990 with increasing amount of chromate (200- 1000 mg/l were tested. Two bacterial strains, able to reduce even 1000 mg chromate/l, were isolated in pure culture. For one of these bacterial strains, we determined the optimum conditions for the reduction of Cr (VI.

  3. Oxidation resistant, thoria-dispersed nickel-chromium-aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranow, S.; Klingler, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Modified thoria-dispersed nickel-chromium alloy has been developed that exhibits greatly improved resistance to high-temperature oxidation. Additions of aluminum have been made to change nature of protective oxide scale entirely and to essentially inhibit oxidation at temperatures up to 1260 C.

  4. DANGER OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM AND STRATEGY FOR THE REMEDITATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniruddha Roy

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Some metals as micronutrients have a major role in the life and growth process of plants and animals. However, certain forms of some metals may also act as toxic material even in relatively small quantities. Chromium is such a metal, whose concentration above a certain limit may cause a serious problem to the health of living organisms. Chromium (Cr may occur in several chemical forms in organic and inorganic systems. In biological systems only Cr (III and Cr (VI are significant. Among these two states, trivalent chromium (Cr-III is considered as an essential component, while hexavalent Chromium (Cr-VI in biological system has been detected as responsible for so many diseases, even some specific forms of cancer. This paper intends to present the adverse effect of Cr(VI on environment as well as on human beings and also try to find a way out to dissolve the problem by a newly developed efficient and cost effective technique.

  5. FEATURES OF CHROMIUM DOPING OF WEAR-RESISTANT CAST IRON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Netrebko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work analysis of the influence of chromium on the process of carbide formation, changes in chemical composition of the metal substrate in the areas adjacent to the carbides and at the hardness of iron while economy nickel and manganesealloying.

  6. Structure and morphology studies of chromium film at elevated temperature in hypersonic environment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G M Hegde; V Kulkarni; M Nagaboopathy; K P J Reddy

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents the after shock heated structural and morphological studies of chromium film coated on hypersonic test model as a passive drag reduction element. The structural changes and the composition of phases of chromium due to shock heating (2850 K) are characterized using X-ray diffraction studies. Surface morphology changes of chromium coating have been studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) before and after shock heating. Significant amount of chromium ablation and sublimation from the model surface is noticed from SEM micrographs. Traces of randomly oriented chromium oxides formed along the coated surface confirm surface reaction of chromium with oxygen present behind the shock. Large traces of amorphous chromium oxide phases are also observed.

  7. Preparation and Characterization of Plasma-Sprayed Ultrafine Chromium Oxide Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Feng; JIANG Xianliang; YU Yueguang; ZENG Keli; REN Xianjing; LI Zhenduo

    2007-01-01

    Ultrafine chromium oxide coatings were prepared by plasma spraying with ultrafine feedstock. Processing parameters of plasma spraying were optimized. Optical microscope (OM) was used to observe the microstructure of the ultrafine chromium oxide coatings. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the morphology and particle size of ultrafine powder feedstock as well as to examine the microstructure of the chromium oxide coating. In addition, hardness and bonding strength of the ultrafine chromium oxide coatings were measured.The results showed that the optimized plasma spraying parameters were suitable for ultrafine chromium oxide coating and the properties and microstructure of the optimized ultrafine chromium oxide coating were superior compared to conventional chromium oxide wear resistant coatings.

  8. Investigations on the fracture toughness of austempered ductile iron alloyed with chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, P. Prasad; Putatunda, Susil K

    2003-04-15

    An investigation was carried out to examine the influence of chromium content on the plane strain fracture toughness of austempered ductile iron (ADI). ADIs containing 0, 0.3 and 0.5 wt.% chromium were austempered over a range of temperatures to produce different microstructures. The microstructures were characterized by optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Plane strain fracture toughness of all these materials was determined and correlated with microstructure and chromium content. The chromium content was found to influence the fracture toughness through its influence on the processing window. Since the chromium addition shifts the processing window to shorter durations, the higher chromium alloys at higher austempering temperatures tend to fall outside of the processing window, resulting in less than optimum microstructure and inferior fracture toughness. A small chromium addition of 0.3 wt.% was found to be beneficial for the fracture toughness of ADI.

  9. Ailanthus Altissima and Phragmites Australis for chromium removal from a contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, Ezio; Fratino, Umberto; Petrella, Andrea; Torretta, Vincenzo; Rada, Elena Cristina

    2016-08-01

    The comparative effectiveness for hexavalent chromium removal from irrigation water, using two selected plant species (Phragmites australis and Ailanthus altissima) planted in soil contaminated with hexavalent chromium, has been studied in the present work. Total chromium removal from water was ranging from 55 % (Phragmites) to 61 % (Ailanthus). After 360 days, the contaminated soil dropped from 70 (initial) to 36 and 41 mg Cr/kg (dry soil), for Phragmites and Ailanthus, respectively. Phragmites accumulated the highest amount of chromium in the roots (1910 mg Cr/kg(dry tissue)), compared with 358 mg Cr/kg(dry tissue) for Ailanthus roots. Most of chromium was found in trivalent form in all plant tissues. Ailanthus had the lowest affinity for Cr(VI) reduction in the root tissues. Phragmites indicated the highest chromium translocation potential, from roots to stems. Both plant species showed good potentialities to be used in phytoremediation installations for chromium removal.

  10. Comparison of Two Kinds of 64Cu Labelled Octreotide Analogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAN Zhen-yi1;LIANG Ji-xin1;HU Ji2;LUO Hong-yi1;QING Jing2;CHEN Yu-qing2;LI Guang2;LI Hong-yu1,2

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Octreotide analogues DOTA-TOC and DOTA-TATE were labeled with 64Cu. The influences of the ratio of peptide mass to 64Cu activity, pH value, temperature and reaction time on labeling yield were investigated. The optimum labeling was determined. In vitro stability tests in saline and 10% bovine serum had been carried out. Biodistribution of the two radiolabelled compounds in normal mice and Micro PET imaging in nude mice bearing U87MG tumor had been evaluated. The results showed that the labeling yields of 64Cu-DOTA-TOC and 64Cu-DOTA-TATE were higher than 95%. Two kinds of octreotide analogues labeled with 64Cu were quite stable in saline and decomposed slowly in 10% bovine serum at 37 ℃. Biodistribution results in normal mice showed that two 64Cu labelled tracers had similar profiles. Both of the compounds washed out from the blood quickly. High uptake of radioactivity in liver and kidneys indicated the tracers were excreted via both hepatobiliary system and renal system. At the same time, compared to 64Cu-DOTA-TOC, higher radioactivity accumulation of 64Cu-DOTA-TATE in liver and kidneys was observed. Micro PET images of U87MG tumor-bearing nude mice with 64Cu-DOTA-TOC and 64Cu-DOTA-TATE showed the tumors very clearly. The radioactivity uptake of 64Cu-DOTA-TATE in tumor was higher than that of 64Cu-DOTA-TOC. This work has paved the way for further preclinical and clinical application of 64Cu-DOTA-TOC and 64Cu-DOTA-TATE as PET tumor imaging agents.

  11. Laboratory scale studies on removal of chromium from industrial wastes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Chromium being one of the major toxic pollutants is discharged from electroplating and chrome tanning processes and is also found in the effluents of dyes, paint pigments, manufacturing units etc. Chromium exists in aqueous systems in both trivalent (Cr 3+) and hexavalent (Cr 6+) forms. The hexavalent form is carcinogenic and toxic to aquatic life, whereas Cr3+ is however comparatively less toxic. This study was undertaken to investigate the total chromium removal from industrial effluents by chemical means in order to achieve the Pakistan NEQS level of 1 mg/L by the methods of reduction and precipitation. The study was conducted in four phases.In phase I, the optimum pH and cost effective reducing agent among the four popular commercial chemicals was selected. As a result, pH of 2 was found to be most suitable and sodium meta bisulfate was found to be the most cost effective reducing agent respectively. Phase II showed that lower dose of sodium meta bisulfate was sufficient to obtain 100 % efficiency in reducing Cr6+ to Cr3+, and it was noted that reaction time had no significance in the whole process. A design curve for reduction process was established which can act as a tool for treatment of industrial effluents.Phase III studies indicated the best pH was 8.5 for precipitation of Cr 3+ to chromium hydroxide by using lime. An efficiency of 100 % was achievable and a settling time of 30 minutes produced clear effluent. Finally in Phase IV actual waste samples from chrome tanning and electroplating industries, when precipitated at pH of 12 gave 100 % efficiency at a settling time of 30 minutes and confirmed that chemical means of reduction and precipitation is a feasible and viable solution for treating chromium wastes from industries.

  12. Arsenic and chromium topsoil levels and cancer mortality in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Olivier; Fernández-Navarro, Pablo; Martín-Méndez, Iván; Bel-Lan, Alejandro; Locutura, Juan F; López-Abente, Gonzalo

    2016-09-01

    Spatio-temporal cancer mortality studies in Spain have revealed patterns for some tumours which display a distribution that is similar across the sexes and persists over time. Such characteristics would be common to tumours that shared risk factors, including the chemical soil composition. The objective of the present study is to assess the association between levels of chromium and arsenic in soil and the cancer mortality. This is an ecological cancer mortality study at municipal level, covering 861,440 cancer deaths in 7917 Spanish mainland towns from 1999 to 2008. Chromium and arsenic topsoil levels (partial extraction) were determined by ICP-MS at 13,317 sampling points. To estimate the effect of these concentrations on mortality, we fitted Besag, York and Mollié models, which included, as explanatory variables, each town's chromium and arsenic soil levels, estimated by kriging. In addition, we also fitted geostatistical-spatial models including sample locations and town centroids (non-aligned data), using the integrated nested Laplace approximation (INLA) and stochastic partial differential equations (SPDE). All results were adjusted for socio-demographic variables and proximity to industrial emissions. The results showed a statistical association in men and women alike, between arsenic soil levels and mortality due to cancers of the stomach, pancreas, lung and brain and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL). Among men, an association was observed with cancers of the prostate, buccal cavity and pharynx, oesophagus, colorectal and kidney. Chromium topsoil levels were associated with mortality among women alone, in cancers of the upper gastrointestinal tract, breast and NHL. Our results suggest that chronic exposure arising from low levels of arsenic and chromium in topsoil could be a potential risk factor for developing cancer.

  13. Activated carbon adsorption for chromium treatment and recovery; Adsorbimento di cromo su carboni attivi a scopo di recupero e decontaminazione

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baroncelli, F.; Castelli, S.; De Francesco, M. [ENEA, Casaccia (Italy). Area Energia e Innovazione

    1994-05-01

    The capability of actived carbon systems to adsorb chromium from wastewater of galvanic industry is valued. Batch tests and column tests are carried out with good results. An activated carbon with acidic surface oxides can adsorb both chromate and chromium (III); chromate is reduced in situ and then adsorbed as chromium (III). Chromium can be desorbed from carbon by an acid or basic treatment obtaining respectively chromium (III) or chromate solutions. Carbon can be regenerated many times without evident signs of deterioration.

  14. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by ferrous iron: A process of chromium isotope fractionation and its relevance to natural environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing, Lasse Nørbye; Dideriksen, Knud; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane;

    2011-01-01

    Stable chromium (Cr) isotopes can be used as a tracer for changing redox conditions in modern marine systems and in the geological record. We have investigated isotope fractionation during reduction of Cr(VI)aq by Fe(II)aq. Reduction of Cr(VI)aq by Fe(II)aq in batch experiments leads to significant...

  15. Raman spectroscopy of supported chromium oxide catalysts : determination of chromium-oxygen bond distances and bond orders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Wachs, I.E.

    1996-01-01

    An empirical correlation is described for relating Raman stretching frequencies of chromium—oxygen (Cr—O) bonds to their bond lengths in chromium oxide reference compounds. An exponential fit of crystallographically determined Cr—O bond lengths to Cr—O Raman symmetric stretching frequencies (800–130

  16. Chromium, chromium isotopes and selected trace elements, western Mojave Desert, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izbicki, John A. [U.S. Geological Survey, 4165 Spruance Road, Suite O, San Diego, CA 92123 (United States)], E-mail: jaizbick@usgs.gov; Ball, James W. [U.S. Geological Survey, 3215 Marine Street, Boulder, Colorado, CO 80303 (United States); Bullen, Thomas D. [U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road, Building 15, McKelvey Building, MS-420, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Sutley, Stephen J. [Denver Federal Center, P.O. Box 25046, MS-964, Denver, CO 80225-0046 (United States)

    2008-05-15

    Chromium(VI) concentrations in excess of the California Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of 50 {mu}g/L occur naturally in alkaline, oxic ground-water in alluvial aquifers in the western Mojave Desert, southern California. The highest concentrations were measured in aquifers eroded from mafic rock, but Cr(VI) as high as 27 {mu}g/L was measured in aquifers eroded from granitic rock. Chromium(VI) concentrations did not exceed 5 {mu}g/L at pH < 7.5 regardless of geology. {delta}{sup 53}Cr values in native ground-water ranged from 0.7 to 5.1 per mille and values were fractionated relative to the average {delta}{sup 53}Cr composition of 0 per mille in the earth's crust. Positive {delta}{sup 53}Cr values of 1.2 and 2.3 per mille were measured in ground-water recharge areas having low Cr concentrations, consistent with the addition of Cr(VI) that was fractionated on mineral surfaces prior to entering solution. {delta}{sup 53}Cr values, although variable, did not consistently increase or decrease with increasing Cr concentrations as ground-water flowed down gradient through more oxic portions of the aquifer. However, increasing {delta}{sup 53}Cr values were observed as dissolved O{sub 2} concentrations decreased, and Cr(VI) was reduced to Cr(III), and subsequently removed from solution. As a result, the highest {delta}{sup 53}Cr values were measured in water from deep wells, and wells in discharge areas near dry lakes at the downgradient end of long flow paths through alluvial aquifers. {delta}{sup 53}Cr values at an industrial site overlying mafic alluvium having high natural background Cr(VI) concentrations ranged from -0.1 to 3.2 per mille . Near zero {delta}{sup 53}Cr values at the site were the result of anthropogenic Cr. However, mixing with native ground-water and fractionation of Cr within the plume increased {delta}{sup 53}Cr values at the site. Although {delta}{sup 53}Cr was not necessarily diagnostic of anthropogenic Cr, it was possible to identify the extent

  17. A computational investigation of boron-doped chromium and chromium clusters by density functional theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The geometries,stabilities and electronic properties of Crn and CrnB(n=2-9) clusters have been systematically investigated by density functional theory.The results suggest that the lowest energy structures for CrnB clusters can be obtained by substituting one Cr atom in Crn+1 clusters with B atom.The geometries of CrnB clusters are similar to that of Crn+1 clusters except for local structural distortion.The second-order difference and fragmentation energy show Cr4,Cr6,Cr8,Cr3B,Cr5B and Cr8B cluster are the most stable among these studied clusters.The impurity B increases the stabilities of chromium cluster.When B is doped on the Crn clusters,cluster geometry does dominate positive role in enhancing their stability.The doped B atom does not change the coupling way of the Cr site in Crn clusters,but breaks the symmetry and the Cr atoms are no longer equivalent.The doped B atom increases the total magnetic moments of Crn in most cases.

  18. Urinary levels of nickel and chromium associated with dental restoration by nickel-chromium based alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Chen; Gang Xia; Xin-Ming Cao; Jue Wang; Bi-Yao Xu; Pu Huang; Yue Chen; Qing-Wu Jiang

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate if the dental restoration of nickel-chromium based alloy (Ni-Cr) leads to the enhanced excretions of Ni and Cr in urine. Seven hundred and ninety-five patients in a dental hospital had single or multiple Ni-Cr alloy restoration recently and 198 controls were recruited to collect information on dental restoration by questionnaire and clinical examination. Urinary concentrations of Ni and Cr from each subject were measure by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Compared to the control group, the urinary level of Ni was significantly higher in the patient group of 〈 1 month of the restoration duration, among which higher Ni excretions were found in those with either a higher number of teeth replaced by dental alloys or a higher index of metal crown not covered with the porcelain. Urinary levels of Cr were significantly higher in the three patient groups of 〈1, 1 to 〈3 and 3 to 〈6 months, especially in those with a higher metal crown exposure index. Linear curve estimations showed better relationships between urinary Ni and Cr in patients within 6-month groups. Our data suggested significant increased excretions of urinary Ni and Cr after dental restoration. Potential short- and long-term effects of Ni-Cr alloy restoration need to be investigated.

  19. A metastable chromium carbide powder obtained by carburization of a metastable chromium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loubiere, S. [Univ. Paul-Sabatier, Toulouse (France). Lab. de Chimie des Materiaux Inorganique; Laurent, C. [Univ. Paul-Sabatier, Toulouse (France). Lab. de Chimie des Materiaux Inorganique; Bonino, J.P. [Univ. Paul-Sabatier, Toulouse (France). Lab. de Chimie des Materiaux Inorganique; Rousset, A. [Univ. Paul-Sabatier, Toulouse (France). Lab. de Chimie des Materiaux Inorganique

    1996-10-15

    A metastable Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2-x} carbide powder is prepared by carburization of a metastable chromium oxide in H{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} atmosphere under the appropriate conditions (temperature, dwell time and CH{sub 4} content). A very high specific surface area (greater than 210 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}) of the starting oxide is necessary to avoid the formation of the sole stable Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} phase. The transformation from the stable Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} to the metastable Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2-x} is observed for the first time. The driving force could be an epitaxial effect between Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2-x} and the surrounding graphite layer. This is consistent with the observation that the formation of graphite layers by CH{sub 4} cracking is easier in the Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2-x}-containing powders. (orig.)

  20. Chromium(VI) but not chromium(III) species decrease mitoxantrone affinity to DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicka, Anna M; Stojek, Zbigniew; Hepel, Maria

    2013-01-31

    Binding of mitoxantrone (MXT) to double-stranded DNA has been investigated as a model drug-DNA binding system to evaluate the effects of various forms of chromium on the binding properties. We have found that Cr(III), which binds strongly to DNA, does not affect the MXT affinity to DNA. In contrast, Cr(VI), in the form of chromate ions CrO(4)(2-), decreases the MXT affinity to DNA despite electrostatic repulsions with phosphate-deoxyribose chains of DNA. The MXT-DNA binding constant was found to decrease from (1.96 ± 0.005) × 10(5) to (0.77 ± 0.018) × 10(5) M(-1) for Cr(VI) concentration changing from 0 to 30 μM. The influence of Cr(VI) on MXT-DNA binding has been attributed to the oxidation of guanine residue, thus interrupting the intercalation of MXT into the DNA double helix at the preferential CpG intercalation site. This supposition is corroborated by the observed increase in the MXT binding site size from 2 bp (base pairs) to 4-6 bp in the presence of Cr(VI). The measurements of the MXT-DNA binding constant and the MXT binding site size on a DNA molecule have been carried out using spectroscopic, voltammetric, and nanogravimetric techniques, providing useful information on the mechanism of the interactions.

  1. Maximum availability and mineralogical control of chromium released from AOD slag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junguo; Liu, Bao; Zeng, Yanan; Wang, Ziming; Gao, Zhiyuan

    2017-03-01

    AOD (argon oxygen decarburization) slag is the by-product in the stainless steel refining process. Chromium existing in AOD slag can leach out and probably poses a serious threat to the environment. To assess the leaching toxicity of chromium released from AOD slag, the temperature-dependent maximum availability leaching test was performed. To determine the controlling mineralogical phases of chromium released from AOD slag, a Visual MINTEQ simulation was established based on Vminteq30 and the FactSage 7.0 database. The leaching tests indicated that the leaching availability of chromium was slight and mainly consisted of trivalent chromium. Aging of AOD slag under the atmosphere can oxidize trivalent chromium to hexavalent chromium, which could be leached out by rainwater. According to the simulation, the chromium concentration in leachates was controlled by the freely soluble pseudo-binary phases in the pH = 7.0 leaching process and controlled by the Cr2O3 phase in the pH = 4.0 leaching process. Chromium concentrations were underestimated when the controlling phases were determined to be FeCr2O4 and MgCr2O4. Facilitating the generation of the insoluble spinel-like phases during the cooling and disposal process of the molten slag could be an effective approach to decreasing the leaching concentration of chromium and its environmental risk.

  2. Finished leather waste chromium acid extraction and anaerobic biodegradation of the products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Maria J; Almeida, Manuel F; Pinho, Sílvia C; Santos, Isabel C

    2010-06-01

    Due to the amounts of chromium in the leachate resulting from leather leaching tests, chromium sulfate tanned leather wastes are very often considered hazardous wastes. To overcome this problem, one option could be recovering the chromium and, consequently, lowering its content in the leather scrap. With this objective, chromium leather scrap was leached with sulfuric acid solutions at low temperature also aiming at maximizing chromium removal with minimum attack of the leather matrix. The effects of leather scrap dimension, sulfuric acid and sodium sulfate concentration in the solutions, as well as extraction time and temperature on chromium recovery were studied, and, additionally, organic matrix degradation was evaluated. The best conditions found for chromium recovery were leather scrap conditioning using 25mL of concentrated H(2)SO(4)/L solution at 293 or 313K during 3 or 6days. Under such conditions, 30-60+/-5% of chromium was recovered and as low as 3-6+/-1% of the leather total organic carbon (TOC) was dissolved. Using such treatment, the leather scrap area and volume are reduced and the residue is a more brittle material showing enhanced anaerobic biodegradability. Although good recovery results were achieved, due to the fact that the amount of chromium in eluate exceeded the threshold value this waste was still hazardous. Thus, it needs to be methodically washed in order to remove all the chromium de-linked from collagen.

  3. Black and green pigments based on chromium-cobalt spinels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliziario, Sayonara A., E-mail: sayonaraea@iq.unesp.br [Departamento de Fisico-Quimica, Instituto de Quimica, UNESP - Univ Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Quimica, CCEN, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Campus I, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Andrade, Jeferson M. de [Departamento de Quimica, CCEN, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Campus I, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Lima, Severino J.G. [Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, CT, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Campus I, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Paskocimas, Carlos A. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, CT, Natal, RN (Brazil); Soledade, Luiz E.B. [Departamento de Quimica, CCEN, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Campus I, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Hammer, P.; Longo, E. [Departamento de Fisico-Quimica, Instituto de Quimica, UNESP - Univ Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Souza, Antonio G.; Santos, Ieda M.G. [Departamento de Quimica, CCEN, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Campus I, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {yields} Co(Co{sub 2-x}Cr{sub x})O{sub 4} powders with different chromium concentrations (x = 0, 0.25 and 1) were prepared by the polymeric precursor method. {yields} Co(CoCr)O{sub 4} and Co(Co{sub 1.75}Cr{sub 0.25})O{sub 4} displayed a dark color and CoCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} was green. {yields} The colors were related to the different oxidation states of Cr and Co. {yields} Cobalt enrichment result in an increasing presence of Co(III) and a decrease amount of Cr(VI). - Abstract: Chromium and cobalt oxides are widely used in the manufacture of industrial pigments. In this work, the Co(Co{sub 2-x}Cr{sub x})O{sub 4} powders with different chromium concentrations (x = 0, 0.25 and 1) were synthesized by the polymeric precursor method, heat treatment between 600 and 1000 deg. C. These powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, colorimetry, UV-vis absorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. Even with the addition of chromium, the XRD patterns revealed that all powders crystallize in a single spinel cubic structure. The spinels with higher cobalt amount, Co(CoCr)O{sub 4} and Co(Co{sub 1.75}Cr{sub 0.25})O{sub 4}, displayed a dark color, without the Co{sup 3+} reduction observed in Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} between 900 and 950 deg. C. The spinel with higher chromium amount, CoCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}, was green. The colors were directly related to the occupation of tetrahedral and octahedral sites by the chromophores, as well as to the different oxidation states of chromium and cobalt. The different optical band gap values estimated from UV-vis spectra suggested the existence of intermediary energy levels within the band gap. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed an increasing presence of Co(III) and a decreasing amount of Cr(VI) with cobalt enrichment.

  4. 40 CFR 405.64 - Pretreatment standards for existing sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS DAIRY PRODUCTS PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Natural and Processed Cheese Subcategory § 405.64 Pretreatment standards for existing sources. Any existing source subject...

  5. Tetravalent chromium (Cr(4+)) as laser-active ion for tunable solid-state lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seas, A.; Petricevic, V.; Alfano, Robert R.

    1993-01-01

    Major accomplishments under NASA grant NAG-1-1346 are summarized. (1) numerical modeling of the four mirror astigmatically compensated, Z-fold cavity was performed and several design parameters to be used for the construction of a femtosecond forsterite laser were revealed by simulation. (2) femtosecond pulses from a continuous wave mode-locked chromium doped forsterite laser were generated. The forsterite laser was actively mode-locked using an acousto-optic modulator operating at 78 MHz with two Brewster high dispersion glass prisms for intra-cavity chirp compensation. Transform-limited sub-100-fs pulses were routinely generated in the TEM(sub 00) mode with 85 mW of continuous power tunable over 1230-1280 nm. The shortest pulses of 60-fs pulsewidth were measured. (3) Self-mode-locked operation of the Cr:forsterite laser was achieved. Synchronous pumping was used to mode lock the forsterite laser resulting in picosecond pulses, which in turn provided the starting mechanism for self-mode-locking. The pulses generated had an FWHM of 105 fs and were tunable between 1230-1270 nm. (4) Numerical calculations indicated that the pair of SF 14 prisms used in the cavity compensated for quadratic phase but introduced a large cubic phase term. Further calculations of other optical glasses indicated that a pair of SFN 64 prisms can introduce the same amount of quadratic phase as SF 14 prisms but introduce a smaller cubic phase. When the SF 14 prisms were replaced by SFN 64 prisms the pulsewidth was reduced to 50 fs. Great improvement was observed in the stability of the self mode-locked forsterite laser and in the ease of achieving mode locking. Using the same experimental arrangement and a new forsterite crystal with improved FOM the pulse width was reduced to 36 fs.

  6. Performance Analysis of MTD64, our Tiny Multi-Threaded DNS64 Server Implementation: Proof of Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábor Lencse

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the performance of MTD64 is measured and compared to that of the industry standard BIND in order to check the correctness of the design concepts of MTD64, especially of the one that we use a new thread for each request. For the performance measurements, our earlier proposed dns64perf program is enhanced as dns64perf2, which one is also documented in this paper. We found that MTD64 seriously outperformed BIND and hence our design principles may be useful for the design of a high performance production class DNS64 server. As an additional test, we have also examined the effect of dynamic CPU frequency scaling to the performance of the implementations.

  7. Performance traits and metabolic responses in goats (Capra hircus) supplemented with inorganic trivalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, Sudipto; Mondal, Souvik; Samanta, Saikat; Ghosh, Tapan Kumar

    2009-11-01

    The effects of supplemental chromium (Cr) as chromic chloride hexahydrate in incremental dose levels (0, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 mg/day for 240 days) on metabolism of nutrients and trace elements were determined in dwarf Bengal goats (Capra hircus, castrated males, average age 3 months, n = 24, initial mean body weight 6.4 +/- 0.22 kg). Live weight increased linearly (p < 0.05) with the level of supplemental Cr. Organic matter and crude protein digestibility, intake of total digestible nutrients, and retention of N (g/g N intake) increased (p < 0.05) in a dose-dependent linear manner. Serum cholesterol and tryacylglycerol concentrations changed inversely with the dose of supplemental Cr (p < 0.01). Supplemental Cr positively influenced retention of copper and iron (p < 0.05) causing linear increase (p < 0.01) in their serum concentrations. It was concluded that Cr supplementation may improve utilization of nutrients including the trace elements and may also elicit a hypolidemic effect in goats. However, further study with regards to optimization of dose is warranted.

  8. Removal of Chromium with The Complexing Agents from Industrial Effluents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Prameena Sheeja

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Human activities and consequent developments have brought about the spectre of an overwhelming degradation of all facets of the natural environment-physical, chemical, biological and social. Environmental pollution, especially by chemicals, is one of the most significant factors in the degradation of the biosphere components. Among all chemical contaminants, heavy metals are believed to be of special ecological, biological and health significance. Unlike organic pollutants, the majority of which are susceptible to biological degradation, metal ions do not degrade into harmless end products. Chemical precipitation is a simple and economical method, and hence, has been widely used. The reduction of chromium (VI to chromium (III can be done with the help of ferrous sulphate. The precipitation was carried out in the presence and absence of complexing agents such as ammonium chloride, tartrate and citrate.

  9. Internal Friction In The PFN Ceramics With Chromium Dopand

    OpenAIRE

    Zachariasz R.; Bochenek D.; Bruś B.

    2015-01-01

    An aim of this work was to determine an influence of an admixture, the chromium (for x from 0.01 to 0.06), on the mechanical properties of the PFN ceramics. The ceramics with chemical composition Pb(Fe0.5−xCrxNb0.5)O3 was synthesized in two steps from simple oxides PbO, Fe2O3, Nb2O5, Cr2O3. The first stage was based on obtaining the FeNbO4 from the Fe2O3 and Nb2O5 simple oxides. At this stage an admixture in a form the Cr2O3 chromium oxide was added to the solution. In the second stage the Pb...

  10. Separation of no-carrier-added Cu-64 from a proton irradiated Ni-64 enriched nickel target

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Xiaolin; Jacobsen, U.; Jørgensen, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    are then absorbed on an anion exchange column. Co and Ni are removed from the column by eluting with 72% ethanol-0.3mol/l HCl. Finally, the Cu-64 is eluted with water. For separating Ni from Co isotopes and recovering the Ni-64 target, the eluate of 72% ethanol-0.3 mol/l HCl is evaporated to dryness, the residue...... a cyclotron. The decontamination of Co in Cu fraction is higher than 99% and recoveries of Cu-64 and Ni-64 are higher than 95%. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  11. Preparation of Silica Modified with 2-Mercaptoimidazole and its SorptionProperties of Chromium(III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Budiman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Modified silica gel was prepared to remove the heavy metal of chromium(III from water sample. Silica gel was used as supporting material and the 2-mercaptoimidazole was immobilized onto surface silica so that the silica would have selective properties to adsorb the heavy metal chromium(III through the formation of coordination compound between the 2-mercaptoimidazole and chromium(III. The characterization of modified silica gel was carried out by analyzing the Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrum of this material in order to ensure the immobilization of 2-mercaptoimidazole onto the surface. The effect of pH solution, initial concentration of chromium(III, and interaction time were investigated in batch mode to find the adsorption properties of chromium(III onto modified silica. The condition optimum of these parameters was applied to determine the removal percentage of chromium(III in water sample using the modified silica gel

  12. Determination of Chromium(III) Picolinate Using High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Ultraviolet Spectrophotometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Il; Woo, Dong Jin; Kang, Dae Kyung [EASY BIO System, Inc, Chonan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Myung Hee [Pollin, Inc, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Gun Jo [Korea Food and Drug Administration, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Ki Won [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-10-15

    Cr-(pic){sub 3} has been widely used as food additives, drugs, and feed additives. Accordingly, its determination method should be established. In the present paper, we have studied the determination method of chromium(III) picolinate accurately using ESI-MS on-lined with HPLC. Chromium(III) picolinate in feed products was determined successfully. Chromium(III) is very well known as an essential mineral. It is suggested as a cofactor in the maintenance of both normal lipid and carbohydrate metabolism by assisting the action of insulin on a cell membrane. According to the National Research Council, the daily recommended intake of chromium(III) is 50-200 μg. Several organic chromium(III) complexes have been reported to have significantly higher absorption and tissue incorporation activity than inorganic salts such as chromium(III) chloride.

  13. Biological monitoring of occupational exposure to different chromium compounds at various valency states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutti, A.; Pedroni, C.; Arfini, G.; Franchini, I.; Minoia, C.; Micoli, G.; Baldi, C.

    1984-01-01

    Chromium concentrations in the air were measured in seven different workroom environments, where exposure to water soluble hexavalent or trivalent compounds was expected. Urinary excretion of chromium was measured before and after the same arbitrarily chosen working day. End-of-shift urinary chromium and its increase above pre-exposure levels were closely related to the concentration of water soluble chromium (VI) in the air. The values corresponding to 50 micrograms m-3 in the air, which is the current threshold limit value in most countries, were 29.8 and 12.2 micrograms g-1 of creatinine, respectively. Urinary chromium in workers exposed to water insoluble chromates or to water soluble chromic (III) sulphate was definitely higher than that observed in subjects not occupationally exposed to chromium compounds, but it cannot be recommended as short-term exposure test for evaluation of the job-related hazard.

  14. Bioconcentration of chromium in edible mushrooms: influence of environmental and genetic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, M A; Alonso, J; Melgar, M J

    2013-08-01

    Chromium concentrations were determined in 167 samples of wild edible mushrooms, collected from three different sites (urban, traffic and pastureland areas) in Lugo (NW Spain). The hymenophore (H) and the rest of the fruiting body (RFB) were analysed separately. The analyses were performed using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The highest mean chromium levels (mg/kg dry weight) of 3.5 and 8.0, 4.5 and 6.2, and 6.2 and 4.3 were found in Lycoperdon utriforme, Coprinus comatus and Agaricus campestris in H and RFB, respectively. The highest concentrations of chromium were observed in terrestrial saprophytic species in relation to mycorrhizal species. With respect to the underlying substrates, chromium concentration was lowest in the pastureland area (24.6 mg/kg dw). All mushroom species were bioexclusors of chromium (BCFmushrooms harvested from the areas investigated poses no toxicological risk to human health due to chromium.

  15. Innovative soil treatment process design for removal of trivalent chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stallings, J.H. [Air Force, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH (United States). Aeronautical Systems Center; Durkin, M.E. [Hughes Missile Systems Co., Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A soil treatment process has been developed as part of a US Air Force environmental compliance project at Air Force Plant 44, Tucson, AZ for treating soil contaminated with heavy metals including trivalent chromium, cadmium, copper, and nickel. The process was designed to treat a total of 133,000 tons of soil in a 400 ton per day facility. Features of the soil treatment process include physical treatment and separation, and a chemical treatment process of the remaining fines using a hypochlorite leach allowing chromium to be solubilized at a high pH. After treating, fines are washed in three stage countercurrent thickeners and chromium hydroxide cake is recovered as a final produce from the leach solution. Treatability studies were conducted, laboratory and a pilot plant was built. Process design criteria and flow sheet, material balances, as well as preliminary equipment selection and sizing for the facility have been completed. Facility was designed for the removal of Cr at a concentration of an average of 1230 mg/kg from the soil and meeting a risk based clean-closure limit of 400 mg/kg of Cr. Capital costs for the 400 tpd plant were estimated at 9.6 million with an operating and maintenance cost of $54 per ton As process is most economic for large quantities of soil with relatively low concentrations of contaminants, it was not used in final closure when the estimated volume of contaminated soil removed dropped to 65,000 tons and concentration of chromium increased up to 4000 mg/kg. However, the process could have application in situations where economics and location warrant.

  16. Chromium speciation in solid matrices and regulation: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unceta, N. [University of the Basque Country, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Vitoria-Gasteiz (Spain); Seby, F. [Ultra Traces Analyses Aquitaine (UT2A), Helioparc Pau-Pyrenees, Pau (France); Malherbe, J.; Donard, O.F.X. [Universite de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour, Helioparc Pau-Pyrenees, Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique Bio-Inorganique et Environnement, IPREM, UMR CNRS 5254, Pau (France)

    2010-06-15

    In recent years, the extensive use of chromium in industrial processes has led to the promotion of several directives and recommendations by the European Union, that try to limit and regulate the presence of Cr(VI) in the environment and to protect industrial workers using chromium and end-users of manufactured products. As a consequence, new standard methods and analytical procedures have been published at the EU level for Cr(VI) determination in soil, sludge, sediment, and similar waste materials, workplace atmospheres, cement, packaging materials, industrially produced samples, and corrosion-protection layers on some components of vehicles and electrical and electronic equipment. The objective of this article is to summarize the different directives and recommendations and to critically review the currently existing standard methods and the methods published in the literature for chromium speciation in the above mentioned solid matrices, putting the emphasis on the different extraction procedures which have been developed for each matrix. Particular attention has been paid to Cr(III) and Cr(VI) inter-conversions that can occur during extraction and efforts to minimize these unwanted reactions. Although the use of NaOH-Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solutions with hot plate extraction seems to be the more widespread procedure, species transformation can still occur and several studies suggest that speciated isotope-dilution mass spectrometry (SIDMS) could be a suitable tool for correction of these interconversions. Besides, recent studies have proved the role of Cr(III) in chromium toxicology. As a consequence, the authors suggest an update of standard methods in the near future. (orig.)

  17. Technology Demonstration of the Zero Emissions Chromium Electroplating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    blanket technology for electroplating tanks. When no liquid blanket is used, evaporation of water, especially during warm weather conditions, requires...0.007 0.004 0.002 Tank 12A had noticeable blobs floating on the surface and also at the interfacial layer of PRD fluid and the chromium acid solution...Tank 12B did not have any such blobs . All the parts removed after plating looked fairly good. There were no visible streaks, water breaks, etc. The

  18. Recovery of Chromium from Waste Taning Liquors by Magnesium Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood M. Barbooti

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This is a case study of AL-Za’afaraniya tanning factory, 15 km to the south of Baghdad, to spot light on simple chemical treatment of the discharged water to solve the environmental problems associated with its chromium content management. The treatment was extended to the recovery and reuse of chromium. Chromium was precipitated by the addition of magnesium oxide which also aid as a neutralizer for the acidic effluent. The laboratory treatment was carried out to find the optimum conditions. The wastewater samples were taken from the outline area of the tannery. Box-Wilson method was adopted to find useful relationships between the operating variables (temperature, mixing period and magnesium oxide dose and the pH and chromium content of effluent. The experimental data were successfully fitted to second order polynomial mathematical models for the treatment. The most favorable operating conditions for the treatment were: temperature, 30 ºC; mixing period, 50 min and magnesium oxide concentration, 3000 mg/L. On using the optimum conditions a mathematical model simulating the operation for the treatment was obtained as follows:Cr = 6.0848 – 0.001839 X11 – 0.105334 X12 – 0.041038 X13pH = 10.29086 – 0.001223 X11 – 0.140043 X12 – 0.00953 X13Experimentally Cr concentration was decreased to about (0.5 mg/L in wastewater after raising the pH value to (7.35 by adding magnesium oxide.

  19. THE WEAR RESISTANCE INCREASE OF CHROMIUM CAST IRON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Ilyushenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the tests on the wear resistance of chromium cast irons of different compositions obtained in sand forms. It has been shown that increase of the wear resistance and mechanical properties of the cast iron is possible to obtain using the casting in metal molds. A further increase in wear resistance of parts produced in metal molds is possible by changing the technological parameters of casting and alloying by titanium.

  20. Evidence of weak ferromagnetism in chromium(III) oxide particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez-Vazquez, Carlos E-mail: qfmatcvv@usc.es; Banobre-Lopez, Manuel; Lopez-Quintela, M.A.; Hueso, L.E.; Rivas, J

    2004-05-01

    The low temperature (4chromium(III) oxide particles have been studied. A clear evidence of the presence of weak ferromagnetism is observed below 250 K. The magnetisation curves as a function of the applied field show coercive fields due to the canted antiferromagnetism of the particles. Around 55 K a maximum is observed in the zero-field-cooled curves; this maximum can be assumed as a blocking temperature, similarly to ultrafine ferromagnetic particles.

  1. 15 CFR 6.4 - Adjustments to penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 6.4 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce CIVIL MONETARY PENALTY INFLATION ADJUSTMENTS § 6.4 Adjustments to penalties. The civil monetary penalties provided by law within the... Sensing Policy Act of 1992, from $11,000 to $11,000. (2) 15 U.S.C. 5658(c), Land Remote Sensing Policy...

  2. 33 CFR 64.33 - Marking by the Coast Guard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Marking by the Coast Guard. 64.33 Section 64.33 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO... Marking by the Coast Guard. (a) The District Commander may mark for the protection of maritime...

  3. 31 CFR 103.64 - Special rules for casinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... money laundering and terrorist financing risks posed by the products and services provided by the casino... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special rules for casinos. 103.64 Section 103.64 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance...

  4. 47 CFR 64.1301 - Per-payphone compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Per-payphone compensation. 64.1301 Section 64... compensation. (a) Interim access code and subscriber 800 calls. In the absence of a negotiated agreement to pay... on Remand in CC Docket No. 96-128, FCC 02-292, must pay default compensation to payphone...

  5. 27 CFR 25.64 - Maintenance of notice file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Maintenance of notice file. 25.64 Section 25.64 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU... of notice file. The brewer shall maintain the approved Brewer's Notice, Form 5130.10, and...

  6. 46 CFR 64.63 - Minimum emergency venting capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Minimum emergency venting capacity. 64.63 Section 64.63... emergency venting capacity. (a) The total emergency venting capacity (Q) of the relief devices of an... ASME Code, 1974 edition, or 315. (b) The total emergency venting capacity (Q) of an insulated...

  7. 50 CFR 20.64 - Foreign export permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Foreign export permits. 20.64 Section 20... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Importations § 20.64 Foreign export permits. No... such birds are accompanied by export permits, tags, or other documentation required by...

  8. 40 CFR 426.64 - Pretreatment standards for existing sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pretreatment standards for existing sources. 426.64 Section 426.64 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GLASS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Automotive Glass...

  9. 33 CFR 64.31 - Determination of hazard to navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Determination of hazard to navigation. 64.31 Section 64.31 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION MARKING OF STRUCTURES, SUNKEN VESSELS AND OTHER OBSTRUCTIONS...

  10. 30 CFR 816.64 - Use of explosives: Blasting schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Use of explosives: Blasting schedule. 816.64... ACTIVITIES § 816.64 Use of explosives: Blasting schedule. (a) General requirements. (1) The operator shall conduct blasting operations at times approved by the regulatory authority and announced in the...

  11. 7 CFR 1730.64 - Power purchase agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Power purchase agreements. 1730.64 Section 1730.64 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Power purchase agreements. Nothing in this subpart requires the borrower to enter into purchase...

  12. 27 CFR 5.64 - Legibility of mandatory information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Legibility of mandatory information. 5.64 Section 5.64 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU... this part to appear in any written, printed, or graphic advertisement shall be in lettering or...

  13. 47 CFR 64.2401 - Truth-in-Billing Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Truth-in-Billing Requirements. 64.2401 Section... (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS RULES RELATING TO COMMON CARRIERS Truth-in-Billing Requirements for Common Carriers § 64.2401 Truth-in-Billing Requirements. (a) Bill organization. Telephone bills shall be...

  14. 47 CFR 64.2345 - Primary advertising classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Primary advertising classification. 64.2345 Section 64.2345 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES... advertising classification. A primary advertising classification is assigned at the time of the...

  15. 44 CFR 64.3 - Flood Insurance Maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flood Insurance Maps. 64.3... HOMELAND SECURITY INSURANCE AND HAZARD MITIGATION National Flood Insurance Program COMMUNITIES ELIGIBLE FOR THE SALE OF INSURANCE § 64.3 Flood Insurance Maps. (a) The following maps may be prepared by...

  16. 9 CFR 3.64 - Care in transit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Care in transit. 3.64 Section 3.64 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE STANDARDS Specifications for the Humane Handling, Care, Treatment and Transportation of...

  17. Chromium related degradation of solid oxide fuel cells; Chrom-bezogene Degradation von Festoxid-Brennstoffzellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, Anita

    2011-05-04

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) offer a high potential for application as an auxiliary power unit (APU) for heavy goods vehicles as well as combined heat and power (CHP) systems. SOFCs are especially attractive due to their high efficiencies and the use of different fuel types. However, optimization in terms of long term stability and costs are still necessary. This work characterized the degradation of SOFCs with lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) cathodes under chromium influence. Galvanostatic cell tests were carried out at 800 C with operation times from 250 - 3000 h and variation of the chromium source and current density. The current densities of j = 0 (A)/(cm{sup 2}), j = 0,3 (A)/(cm{sup 2}) and j = 0,5 (A)/(cm{sup 2}) were applied. The high temperature ferritic alloy Crofer22APU was used as a chromium source. Variation of the chromium source was realized by coating the Crofer22APU insert with the chromium retention layer Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} and the cathode contact layer LCC10. Cell degradation was analyzed with regard to cell voltage, current density and area specific resistance (ASR). Microstructural alterations of the cathode as well as chromium content and distribution across the cell were investigated after completion of the cell tests. For cells with a chromium source present and operation with a nonzero current density, the course of cell degradation was divided into three phases: a run-in, weak linear degradation and strong linear degradation. A decrease of the chromium release rate by means of different coatings stretched the course of degradation along the timescale. Strong degradation, which is characterized by a significant increase in ASR as well as a decrease of current density at the operating point, was only observed when a chromium source in the setup was comb ined with operation of the cell with a non-zero current density. Operation of the cell with a chromium source but no current density caused a degradation of current density at the

  18. Adsorptive stripping voltammetric determination of chromium in gallium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palrecha, M M; Mathur, P K

    1997-12-19

    The electroanalytical chemistry of trace metals has progressed strongly with the development of cathodic stripping voltammetry (CSV) preceded by adsorption collection of organic metal complexes. A sensitive method for the determination of trace amount of chromium in gallium is described. Gallium is dissolved in sodium hydroxide containing hydrogen peroxide. The method is based on the catalytic activity of nitrate ions on the reduction of Cr(III)TTHA (triethylene tetramine-N,N,N',N'',N''',N'''-hexaacetic acid) complex. The sensitivity of this method is further improved by adsorption preconcentration of Cr(III)TTHA complex at a hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE). The Cr(III) formed at the electrode surface by the reduction of Cr(VI), which is present in the bulk solution, is immediately complexed by TTHA. The adsorbed complex is then reduced at a peak potential of - 1.26 V, and the peak height of Cr(III) reduction is measured. The determination limit was restricted by the amount of chromium present in the reagent blank solution. The method is suitable for the determination of chromium at level as low as 0.2 mug g(-1) (with about 50 mg of sample) and a relative standard deviation of 15%.

  19. The chromium site in doped glassy lithium tetraborate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, T.D. [Department of Engineering Physics, Air Force Institute of Technology, 2950 Hobson Way, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433 (United States); Echeverria, E.; Beniwal, Sumit [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 855 North 16th Street, Theodore Jorgensen Hall, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588-0299 (United States); Adamiv, V.T.; Burak, Ya. V.; Enders, Axel [Institute of Physical Optics, 23 Dragomanov Street, Lviv 79005 (Ukraine); Petrosky, J.C.; McClory, J.W. [Department of Engineering Physics, Air Force Institute of Technology, 2950 Hobson Way, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433 (United States); Dowben, P.A., E-mail: pdowben1@unl.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 855 North 16th Street, Theodore Jorgensen Hall, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588-0299 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, we find that Cr substitutes primarily in the Li{sup +} site as a dopant in lithium tetraborate Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} glasses, in this case 98.4Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}–1.6Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} or nominally Li{sub 1.98}Cr{sub 0.025}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}. This strong preference for a single site is nonetheless accompanied by site distortions and some site disorder, helping explain the optical properties of chromium doped Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} glasses. The resulting O coordination shell has a contraction of the Cr–O bond lengths as compared to the Li–O bond lengths. There is also an increase in the O coordination number. - Graphical abstract: Lithium tetraborate: labeled are the B1 and B2 sites, where the latter correspond to BO{sub 3} and BO{sub 4} structures respectively. - Highlights: • Adoption of the Li + site for chromium dopants in lithium tetraborate identified. • Increased oxygen coordination for glass over the crystalline lithium tetraborate. • Distortions about the doping chromium characterized. • Local bond order is preserved in spite of the glassy nature.

  20. Chromium and manganese interactions in streptozocin-diabetic rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, M.L.; Jarrett, C.R.; Adeleye, B.O.; Stoecker, B.J. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater (United States))

    1991-03-15

    Weanling male rats were fed casein-based diets low in chromium and manganese ({minus}Cr-MN) or supplemented with 1 ppm chromium as chromium chloride (+Cr) and/or 55 ppm manganese as manganous carbonate in a factorial design. After 7 weeks on the experimental diets, half of the rats in each group were injected on 2 consecutive days with 55 mg/kg streptozocin (STZ) in citrate buffer pH 4. Four weeks after injection, serum glucose in the diabetic group supplement with both Cr and Mn was not different from non-diabetic animals; however, diabetic animals in {minus}Cr groups or in the +Cr-Mn group had significantly elevated serum glucose. Serum insulin was reduced by STZ. A significant interaction between Mn and diabetes affected serum cortisol concentrations. More new tissue was formed on a polyvinyl sponge inserted under the skin in +Mn animals. In this study, the STZ animals were more sensitive than the control animals to dietary Cr and Mn concentrations.

  1. Magnesium, zinc, and chromium nutriture and physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukaski, H C

    2000-08-01

    Magnesium, zinc, and chromium are mineral elements required in modest amounts to maintain health and optimal physiologic function. For physically active persons, adequate amounts of these micronutrients are needed in the diet to ensure the capacity for increased energy expenditure and work performance. Most physically active individuals consume diets that provide amounts of magnesium and zinc sufficient to meet population standards. Women tend to consume less of these minerals than is recommended, in part because they eat less food than men. Inadequate intakes of magnesium and zinc have been reported for participants in activities requiring restriction of body weight. Dietary chromium is difficult to estimate because of a lack of appropriate reference databases. Acute, intense activity results in short-term increases in both urine and sweat losses of minerals that apparently diminish during recovery in the days after exercise. Supplemental magnesium and zinc apparently improve strength and muscle metabolism. However, evidence is lacking as to whether these observations relate to impaired nutritional status or a pharmacologic effect. Chromium supplementation of young men and women does not promote muscle accretion, fat loss, or gains in strength. Physically active individuals with concerns about meeting guidelines for nutrient intake should be counseled to select and consume foods with high nutrient densities rather than to rely on nutritional supplements. The indiscriminate use of mineral supplements can adversely affect physiologic function and impair health.

  2. Fabrication of chitosan-magnetite nanocomposite strip for chromium removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureshkumar, Vaishnavi; Kiruba Daniel, S. C. G.; Ruckmani, K.; Sivakumar, M.

    2016-02-01

    Environmental pollution caused by heavy metals is a serious threat. In the present work, removal of chromium was carried out using chitosan-magnetite nanocomposite strip. Magnetite nanoparticles (Fe3O4) were synthesized using chemical co-precipitation method at 80 °C. The nanoparticles were characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction spectrometer, atomic force microscope, dynamic light scattering and vibrating sample magnetometer, which confirm the size, shape, crystalline nature and magnetic behaviour of nanoparticles. Atomic force microscope revealed that the particle size was 15-30 nm and spherical in shape. The magnetite nanoparticles were mixed with chitosan solution to form hybrid nanocomposite. Chitosan strip was casted with and without nanoparticle. The affinity of hybrid nanocomposite for chromium was studied using K2Cr2O7 (potassium dichromate) solution as the heavy metal solution containing Cr(VI) ions. Adsorption tests were carried out using chitosan strip and hybrid nanocomposite strip at different time intervals. Amount of chromium adsorbed by chitosan strip and chitosan-magnetite nanocomposite strip from aqueous solution was evaluated using UV-visible spectroscopy. The results confirm that the heavy metal removal efficiency of chitosan-magnetite nanocomposite strip is 92.33 %, which is higher when compared to chitosan strip, which is 29.39 %.

  3. Foam separation of chromium (Ⅵ) from aqueous solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAO Cai-shan; DING Yan

    2009-01-01

    Removal of chromium (Ⅵ) dissolved in water by intermittent foam separation was implemented with cetyl trimethy-ammonium bromide as surfactant. The influence of various factors on removal efficiency was systematically studied. The removal efficiency has a maximum value near pH 4.0; thus, most experiments were carried out at pH 4.0. The orthogonal experiment was conducted to confirm the optimal operating parameters. The orthogonal experimental results show that when the liquid feed concentration is 10 mg/L, the pH value of feed solution is 4.00, air flow rates 0.9 L/min, surfactant dosage is 300 mg/L, the maximum removal efficiency of chromium (Ⅵ) reaches 97.80%, and condense multiple reaches 1711. The kinetic test indicates that the foam separation of chromium is a first-order process. The equivalent rate constant calculated from the slope is 0.406 4, and the equivalent rate equation is obtained.

  4. Fabrication of Carbon Nanotube - Chromium Carbide Composite Through Laser Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ze; Gao, Yibo; Liang, Fei; Wu, Benxin; Gou, Jihua; Detrois, Martin; Tin, Sammy; Yin, Ming; Nash, Philip; Tang, Xiaoduan; Wang, Xinwei

    2016-03-01

    Ceramics often have high hardness and strength, and good wear and corrosion resistance, and hence have many important applications, which, however, are often limited by their poor fracture toughness. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may enhance ceramic fracture toughness, but hot pressing (which is one typical approach of fabricating CNT-ceramic composites) is difficult to apply for applications that require localized heat input, such as fabricating composites as surface coatings. Laser beam may realize localized material sintering with little thermal effect on the surrounding regions. However, for the typical ceramics for hard coating applications (as listed in Ref.[1]), previous work on laser sintering of CNT-ceramic composites with mechanical property characterizations has been very limited. In this paper, research work has been reported on the fabrication and characterization of CNT-ceramic composites through laser sintering of mixtures of CNTs and chromium carbide powders. Under the studied conditions, it has been found that laser-sintered composites have a much higher hardness than that for plasma-sprayed composites reported in the literature. It has also been found that the composites obtained by laser sintering of CNTs and chromium carbide powder mixtures have a fracture toughness that is ~23 % higher than the material obtained by laser sintering of chromium carbide powders without CNTs.

  5. Response of soil catalase activity to chromium contamination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zofia St(e)pniewska; Agnieszka Woli(n)ska; Joanna Ziomek

    2009-01-01

    The impact of chromium (III) and (VI) forms on soil catalase activity is presented.The Orthic Podzol, Haplic Phaeozem and Mollic Gleysol from different depths were used in the experiment.The soil samples were amended with solution of Cr(III) using CrCl3, and with Cr(VI) using K2Cr2O7 in the concentration range from 0 to 20 mg/kg, whereas the samples without the addition of chromium served as control.Catalase activity was assayed by one of the commonly used spectrophotometric methods.As it is demonstrated in the experiment, both Cr(III) and Cr(VI) forms have ability to reduce soil catalase activity.A chromium dose of 20 mg/kg caused the inhibition of catalase activity and the corresponding contamination levels ranged from 75% to 92% for Cr(III) and 68% to 76% for Cr(VI), with relation to the control.Catalase activity reached maximum in the soil material from surface layers (0-25 cm), typically characterized by the highest content of organic matter creating favorable conditions for microorganisms.

  6. Achieving Zero Stress in Iridium, Chromium, and Nickle Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadway, David M.; Weimer, Jeffrey; Gurgew, Danielle; Lis, Tomasz; Ramsey, Brian D.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Ames, A.; Bruni, R.

    2015-01-01

    We examine a method for achieving zero intrinsic stress in thin films of iridium, chromium, and nickel deposited by magnetron sputter deposition. The examination of the stress in these materials is motivated by efforts to advance the optical performance of light-weight x-ray space telescopes into the regime of sub-arc second resolution that rely on control of the film stress to values within 10-100 MPa. A characteristic feature of the intrinsic stress behavior in chromium and nickel is their sensitivity to the magnitude and sign of the intrinsic stress with argon gas pressure, including the existence of a critical pressure that results in zero film stress. This critical pressure scales linearly with the film's density. While the effect of stress reversal with argon pressure has been previously reported by Hoffman and others for nickel and chromium, we have discovered a similar behavior for iridium. Additionally, we have identified zero stress in iridium shortly after island coalescence. This feature of film growth is used for achieving a total internal stress of -2.89 MPa for a 15.8 nm thick iridium film. The surface roughness of this low-stress film was examined using scanning probe microscopy (SPM) and x-ray reflectivity (XRR) at CuKa and these results presented and discussed.

  7. Simultaneously Recovering High-Purity Chromium and Removing Organic Pollutants from Tannery Effluent

    OpenAIRE

    Jie Zong; Yan-Chun Li; Kang Hu

    2016-01-01

    Chromium pollution is a serious issue because of carcinogenic toxicities of the pollutants and low recovery rate of chromium because of the presence of organic, such as protein and fat. In this work, high recovery rate and high purity of the chromium ion were successfully prepared by the way of acid enzyme, flocculant, and Fenton oxidation. The experiments were characterized by TG, TOC, UV-VIS, and SEM. In the work, the tannery waste chrome liquor was used as experimental material. The result...

  8. Adsorption of Chromium(VI) from Aqueous Solutions by Coffee Polyphenol-Formaldehyde/Acetaldehyde Resins

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Removal of chromium(VI) from wastewater is essential as it is toxic. Thus, removal of chromium(VI) was performed using coffee polyphenol-formaldehyde/acetaldehyde resins as adsorbents. Adsorbent resins were prepared by condensation of decaffeinated coffee powder with formaldehyde/acetaldehyde and used for the removal of Cr(VI) ions from aqueous solutions. A simple and sensitive solid phase extraction procedure was applied for the determination of chromium at trace levels by spectroscopic meth...

  9. USE OF TWO DIGESTION METHODS IN THE EVALUATION OF CHROMIUM CONTENT IN CATTLE'S MEAT SUPPLEMENTED WITH CHROMIUM CHELATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. L. T. de Andrade

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to analyze the chromium content in beef using two digestion methods. There were used samples from 24 18-month-old male cattle, and twelve of them were supplemented and twelve were not supplemented with chromium chelate. These samples were evaluated by atomic absorption spectroscopy, previously submitted to digestion method using nitric acid (65% with hydrogen peroxide (35% and to digestion method, using solution of nitric perchloric acid in the proportion 3:1. Immediately after the slaughter, the carcasses were sent to sanitary maturation. After 24 hours, samples between 12th and 13th rib in the muscle Longissimus Thoracis were taken. For evaluation, it was used completely randomized design (Die and analysis of variance (ANOVA at 5% of significance level. The results didn't evidenced any significant difference (p>0,05 between the (cromo content, regardless the supplementation. The same happened with the digestion methods used.

  10. Advantages and Disadvantages of Chromium Salt%铬盐功过论(续)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王全杰

    2012-01-01

    对铬及其对人类的利害关系进行了详细的论述,包括铬与人体健康,铬在畜禽业中的应用,富铬农副产品的应用,铬鞣剂的不可取代性等。%Chromium as well as its advantages and disadvantages were introduced in detail,including chromium and human health,application in Livestock and Poultry Industry,Rich chromium agricultural and sideline products,Irreplaceable performance of chromium tanning agent,etc.

  11. Advantages and Disadvantages of Chromium Salt%铬盐功过论

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王全杰

    2012-01-01

    Chromium as well as its advantages and disadvantages were introduced in detail, including chromium and human health, application in Livestock and Poultry Industry, Rich chromium agricultural and sideline products, Irreplaceable performance of chromium tanning agent, etc.%对铬及其对人类的利害关系进行了详细的论述,包括铬与人体健康,铬在畜禽业中的应用,富铬农副产品的应用,铬鞣剂的不可取代性等。

  12. Determination of total chromium in tanned leather samples used in car industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiner, Michaela; Rezić, Iva; Ujević, Darko; Steffan, Ilse

    2011-03-01

    Despite the high competition of synthetic fibers leather is nowadays still widely used for many applications. In order to ensure a sufficient stability of the skin matrix against many factors, such as microbial degradation, heat and sweat, a tanning process is indispensable. Using chromium (III) for this purpose offers a multitude of advantages, thus this way of tanning is widely applied. During the use of chromium tanned leather as clothing material as well as for decoration/covering purposes, chromium is extracted from the leather and may then cause nocuous effects to human skin, e.g. allergic reactions. Thus the knowledge of the total chromium content of leather samples expected to come into prolonged touch with human skin is very important. In car industry leather is used as cover for seats, steering wheel and gearshift lever The chromium contents often chromium tanned leather samples used in car industry were determined. First all samples were dried at 65 degrees C overnight and then cut in small pieces using a ceramic knife, weighed and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma--optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) after acidic microwave assisted digestion. The total chromium amounts found were in the range from 19 mg/g up to 32 mg/g. The extraction yield of chromium from leather samples in sweat is approximately 2-7%. Thus especially during long journeys in summer chromium can be extracted in amounts which may cause nocuous effects for example on the palm of the hands or on the back.

  13. The regeneration and recycle of chromium etching solutions using concentrator cell membrane technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Abdul J; Ganguli, Bijita; Grimes, Susan M

    2006-02-01

    The regeneration of chromium (VI) and the recovery of etched copper from chromium etching solutions by electrodialysis is improved by the addition of a concentrator cell in the catholyte chamber. The concentrator media used are ion-exchange resins or activated carbon cloth. The maximum percentages for the regeneration of chromium and recovery of copper in these systems is however less than 80% and 90% respectively because of the competition between the processes of oxidation of Cr(III) and electrodeposition of copper. A novel combination of electrolysis with electrodialysis and concentrator cell technology is developed that achieves 92% chromium regeneration and 90% copper recovery.

  14. Chromium status and glucose tolerance in Saudi men with and without coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alissa, Eman M; Bahjri, Suhad M; Ahmed, Waqar H; Al-Ama, Nabeel; Ferns, Gordon A A

    2009-12-01

    Chromium deficiency is associated with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and dyslipidemia. Hence, the objective of the current study was to investigate chromium status among Saudi men with and without established cardiovascular disease (CVD) and its relationship to glucose tolerance, lipid profile and other established CVD risk factors. We measured serum and urine chromium concentrations, fasted lipid profile, plasma glucose, and serum lipid peroxide in 130 Saudi men with an established history of myocardial infarction and 130 age-matched controls without established CVD. Patients with established CVD had higher serum triglycerides (p < 0.05) and plasma glucose (p < 0.0001) and lower serum and urinary chromium concentrations (p < 0.0001) than controls. Serum chromium was inversely correlated with plasma glucose among cases and controls (r = -0.189, p < 0.05 and r = -0.354, p < 0.00001, respectively). Plasma glucose (OR 1.127, CI 1.0-1.269, p < 0.05), serum chromium (OR 0.99, CI 0.985-0.995, p < 0.0001), and urinary chromium (OR 0.988, CI 0.981-0.995, p < 0.001) were independently associated with the presence of established coronary disease applying this model. While chromium metabolism appears to be altered in individuals with CVD, it is unclear whether chromium supplementation would be effective in CVD prevention among patients with IGT. This would need to be tested in long-term outcome trials.

  15. The risk implications of the distribution of chromium forms in environmental media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, L.A.; Petroff, D.M.; Batey, J.C. [Eckenfelder Inc., Nashville, TN (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Chromium exhibits multiple oxidation (valence) states, ranging from ({minus}2) to (+6). Under natural conditions, however, chromium typically exists in the Cr(III) (trivalent) and/or Cr(VI) (hexavalent) form, with the hexavalent form exhibiting higher solubility and much greater toxicity than the trivalent form. Due to the large differences in toxicity, the distribution of chromium oxidation states (Cr(III) and Cr(VI)) in site media is potentially of great importance to the calculation of site risk levels, and thus ultimately to cleanup activities. Despite its importance, chromium oxidation states are often not available for media samples collected at waste sites. Typical assumptions regarding the chromium distribution in site media are presented. Actual chromium distribution data from media from baseline investigations of several waste sites are also presented for groundwater, surface water, and soil and compared in terms of background chromium levels and the nature of site wastes. The differences in toxicity of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) are briefly discussed. Risk estimates and risk-based cleanup levels generated using different assumptions for the distribution of chromium in site media for a selected example site are then given. These risk-based cleanup levels are compared to various state regulatory limits, MCLs, and Practical Quantitation Limits (PQLs) for chromium.

  16. The prevalence of chromium allergy in Denmark is currently increasing as a result of leather exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, J P; Jensen, P; Carlsen, B C;

    2009-01-01

    previously been demonstrated among Danish construction workers. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the development of chromium allergy among patients with dermatitis tested between 1985 and 2007 in Denmark. Furthermore, to determine causative exposures in patients with chromium allergy. PATIENTS AND METHODS......: A retrospective analysis of patch test data was performed (n = 16,228) and charts from patients with chromium allergy were reviewed. Comparisons were made using a chi(2) test. Logistic regression analyses were used to test for associations. RESULTS: The prevalence of chromium allergy decreased significantly from...

  17. Chromium Isotopes in Marine Carbonates - an Indicator for Climatic Change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, R.; Gaucher, C.

    2010-12-01

    Chromium (Cr) stable isotopes experience an increased interest as a tracer of Cr (VI) reduction in groundwater and thus showed their potential as a monitor of remediation of anthropogenic and natural contamination in water (Berna et al., 2009; Izbicki et al., 2008). Chromium stable isotopes in Fe-rich chemical sediments (BIFs and Fe-cherts) have recently also been used as a tracer for Earth's atmospheric oxygenation through time (Frei et al., 2009). We have applied the Cr isotope system to organic-rich carbonates from a late Ediacaran succession in Uruguay (Polanco Formation), from which we have previously analyzed BIFs with extremely fractionated (δ53Cr up to 5.0 ‰) Cr isotope signatures that are part of an underlying deep water clastic sediment (shale-dominated) sequence (Yerbal Formation) deposited in a glacio-marine environment (Gaucher et al.,2004). δ53Cr values of organic rich carbonates correlate with positive and negative carbon isotope excursions (δ13C PDB between -3 and +3 ‰) and with systematic changes in strontium isotope compositions, commonly interpreted as to reflect fluctuations in organic (photosynthetic algae) production related to fluctuations in atmospheric oxygen and weathering intensities, respectively. Slightly positively fractioned δ53Cr values (up to +0.25‰), paralleling positive (δ13C PDB and 87Sr/86Sr ratio excursions would thereby trace elevated atmospheric oxygen levels/pulses possibly related to glacier retreat/melting stages that caused bioproductivity to increase. While the causal link between these multiple isotopic tracers and the mechanisms of Cr stripping into carbonates has to be further investigated in detail, the first indications from this study point to a potentially promising use of stable Cr isotopes in organic-rich carbonates to monitor fluctuations of atmospheric oxygen, particularly over the Neoproterozoic and Phanerozoic ice age periods. E.C. Berna et al. (2010) Cr stable isotopes as indicators of Cr

  18. 75 FR 50688 - Special Conditions: Erickson Air-Crane Incorporated S-64E and S-64F Rotorcraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-17

    ... (Erickson Air-Crane) model S-64E and S-64F rotorcraft. These rotorcraft have novel or unusual design features associated with being transport category rotorcraft designed only for use in heavy external-load.... The rotorcraft does not have a passenger compartment and is not designed to transport passengers....

  19. Exploring ligand recognition, selectivity and dynamics of TPR domains of chloroplast Toc64 and mitochondria Om64 from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahi, Rashmi; Whelan, James; Vrielink, Alice

    2014-06-01

    The study aims to gain insight into the mode of ligand recognition by tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains of chloroplast translocon at the outer envelope of chloroplast (Toc64) and mitochondrial Om64, two paralogous proteins that mediate import of proteins into chloroplast and mitochondria, respectively. Chaperone proteins associate with precursor proteins in the cytosol to maintain them in a translocation competent conformation and are recognized by Toc64 and Om64 that are located on the outer membrane of the target organelle. Heat shock proteins (Hsp70) and Hsp90 are two chaperones, which are known to play import roles in protein import. The C-termini of these chaperones are known to interact with the TPR domain of chloroplast Toc64 and mitochondrial Om64 in Arabidopsis thaliana (At). Using a molecular dynamics approach and binding energy calculations, we identify important residues involved in the interactions. Our findings suggest that the TPR domain from AtToc64 has higher affinity towards C-terminal residues of Hsp70. The interaction occurs as the terminal helices move towards each other enclosing the cradle on interaction of AtHsp70 with the TPR domain. In contrast, the TPR domain from AtOm64 does not discriminate between the C-termini of Hsp70 and Hsp90. These binding affinities are discussed with respect to our knowledge of protein targeting and specificity of protein import into endosymbiotic organelles in plant cells.

  20. Test Program for the Performance Analysis of DNS64 Servers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábor Lencse

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In our earlier research papers, bash shell scripts using the host Linux command were applied for testing the performance and stability of different DNS64 server imple­mentations. Because of their inefficiency, a small multi-threaded C/C++ program (named dns64perf was written which can directly send DNS AAAA record queries. After the introduction to the essential theoretical background about the structure of DNS messages and TCP/IP socket interface programming, the design decisions and implementation details of our DNS64 performance test program are disclosed. The efficiency of dns64perf is compared to that of the old method using bash shell scripts. The result is convincing: dns64perf can send at least 95 times more DNS AAAA record queries per second. The source code of dns64perf is published under the GNU GPLv3 license to support the work of other researchers in the field of testing the performance of DNS64 servers.

  1. Deformed shell model studies of spectroscopic properties of 64Zn and 64Ni and the positron double beta decay of 64Zn

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Sahu; V K B Kota

    2014-04-01

    The spectroscopic properties of 64Zn and 64Ni are calculated within the framework of the deformed shell model (DSM) based on Hartree–Fock states. GXPF1A interaction in 1 $f_{7/2}$, 2$p_{3/2}$, 1$f_{5/2}$ and 2$p_{1/2}$ space with 40Ca as the core is employed. After ensuring that DSM gives good description of the spectroscopic properties of low-lying levels in these two nuclei considered, nuclear transition matrix elements (NTME) for the neutrinoless positron double beta decay (0 + and 0 +EC) of 64Zn are calculated. The two-neutrino positron double beta decay halflife is also calculated for this nucleus.

  2. Iron-rich Oklahoma clays as a natural source of chromium in monitoring wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Dane; Apblett, Allen; Materer, Nicholas F

    2011-12-01

    Water samples, drawn from groundwater monitoring wells located southeast of Oklahoma City, OK, were found to contain elevated concentrations of total chromium with an apparent source localized to the area surrounding each well. Since these monitoring wells are located in areas with no historic chromium usage, industrial sources of chromium were ruled out. Water testing was performed on twelve monitoring wells in the area that historically had elevated total chromium concentrations ranging from 10-4900 micrograms per litre. Filtered water samples were found to be free of chromium contamination, indicating that the source of the chromium is the suspended solids. Analysis of these solids by acid digestion and a sequential extraction technique revealed that the chromium was primarily associated with iron-containing solids. X-ray diffraction identified goethite, an iron oxide hydroxide, as the dominant iron-containing phase in the suspended solids. The mineralogy in this region is dominated by interbedded red-bed sandstone and mudstone whose mineral content includes mixed-layer illite-smectite, hematite, goethite, gypsum and dolomite. Elemental analysis of soil samples collected as a function of depth in the locale of the monitoring wells indicated that the iron rich clays contain a natural source of chromium. The elevated levels of total chromium are most likely due to the dissolution of silica and alumina from the chromium containing iron clays in the basic well water, resulting in the release of fine suspended solids that naturally have high chromium concentrations. These results should be applicable to other areas containing iron-rich clays.

  3. 32 CFR 516.64 - Comprehensive remedies plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... AND PUBLIC RELATIONS LITIGATION Remedies in Procurement Fraud and Corruption § 516.64 Comprehensive... investigation involving fraud or corruption that relates to Army procurement activities. When possible, these.... (4) Consideration of each criminal, civil, contractual, and administrative remedy available,...

  4. 27 CFR 479.64 - Procedure for approval of application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE DEVICES, AND CERTAIN OTHER FIREARMS Tax on Making Firearms Application to Make A Firearm § 479.64 Procedure...

  5. 47 CFR 27.64 - Protection from interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.64 Protection from interference. Wireless Communications Service (WCS) stations operating in full accordance with applicable FCC rules and... provided against interference caused by tropospheric and ionospheric propagation of signals....

  6. 47 CFR 64.611 - Internet-based TRS registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 64.611 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES... the TRS Numbering Directory; and (iii) Maintain such information in their internal databases and in...; and (iv) An explanation emphasizing the importance of maintaining accurate, up-to-date...

  7. Comparison of bifunctional chelates for {sup 64}Cu antibody imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Cara L.; Crisp, Sarah; Bensimon, Corinne [MDS Nordion, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Yapp, Donald T.T.; Ng, Sylvia S.W. [British Columbia Cancer Agency Research Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); University of British Columba, The Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Sutherland, Brent W. [British Columbia Cancer Agency Research Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Gleave, Martin [Prostate Centre at Vancouver General Hospital, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Jurek, Paul; Kiefer, Garry E. [Macrocyclics Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Improved bifunctional chelates (BFCs) are needed to facilitate efficient {sup 64}Cu radiolabeling of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) under mild conditions and to yield stable, target-specific agents. The utility of two novel BFCs, 1-Oxa-4,7,10-triazacyclododecane-5-S-(4-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-4,7,10-triacetic acid (p-SCN-Bn-Oxo-DO3A) and 3,6,9,15-tetraazabicyclo[9.3.1]pentadeca-1(15),11,13-triene-4-S-(4-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-3,6,9-triacetic acid (p-SCN-Bn-PCTA), for mAb imaging with {sup 64}Cu were compared to the commonly used S-2-(4-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-tetraacetic acid (p-SCN-Bn-DOTA). The BFCs were conjugated to trastuzumab, which targets the HER2/neu receptor. {sup 64}Cu radiolabeling of the conjugates was optimized. Receptor binding was analyzed using flow cytometry and radioassays. Finally, PET imaging and biodistribution studies were done in mice bearing either HER2/neu-positive or HER2/neu-negative tumors. {sup 64}Cu-Oxo-DO3A- and PCTA-trastuzumab were prepared at room temperature in >95% radiochemical yield (RCY) in <30 min, compared to only 88% RCY after 2 h for the preparation of {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab under the same conditions. Cell studies confirmed that the immunoreactivity of the mAb was retained for each of the bioconjugates. In vivo studies showed that {sup 64}Cu-Oxo-DO3A- and PCTA-trastuzumab had higher uptake than the {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab at 24 h in HER2/neu-positive tumors, resulting in higher tumor to background ratios and better tumor images. By 40 h all three of the {sup 64}Cu-BFC-trastuzumab conjugates allowed for clear visualization of the HER2/neu-positive tumors but not the negative control tumor. The antibody conjugates of PCTA and Oxo-DO3A were shown to have superior {sup 64}Cu radiolabeling efficiency and stability compared to the analogous DOTA conjugate. In addition, {sup 64}Cu-PCTA and Oxo-DO3A antibody conjugates may facilitate earlier imaging with greater target to background ratios than

  8. Development of Production Procedure of 64Cu on Cyclotron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG; Ji-xin; CHEN; Yu-qing; LI; Guang; DENG; Xue-song; SHEN; Yi-jia; QIAO; Lai-cheng; LIU; Yu-ping; JIANG; Hua; LI; Gui-qun

    2013-01-01

    Due to intermediate half-life(12.7 h)and favourable coordination chemistry,64Cu is an important emerging medical radionuclide that is suitable for labeling a wide range of radiopharmaceuticals for PET imaging and radiotherapy of tumor.The aim of this study is to develop the procedure for 64Cu production on Cyclone-30 cyclotron providing energy from 15-30 MeV.

  9. Water Impingement Erosion of Deep-Rolled Ti64

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Ma

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the Liquid Impingement Erosion (LIE performances of deep-rolling (DR treated and non-treated Ti64 were investigated. Various erosion stages, from the incubation to the terminal erosion stages, could be observed. A full factorial design of experiments was used to study the effect of DR process parameters (Feed Rate, Spindle Velocity, Number of Passes, Pressure on the residual stress distribution, microhardness and surface roughness of the treated Ti64 specimens. The DR-treated Ti64 specimens exhibited improved surface microhardness, surface roughness, and large magnitude of compressive residual stresses, which were attributed to the amount of cold work induced by the DR process. Although DR improved the mechanical properties of the Ti64, the results showed that the treatment has little or no effect on the LIE performance of Ti64 but different damage modes were observed in these two cases. Evolution of the erosion stages was described based on water-hammer pressure, stress waves, radial wall jetting, and hydraulic penetration modes. The initial erosion stages were mainly influenced by water-hammer pressure and stress waves, whereas the intermediate erosion stages were influenced by the combination of the four modes together. The final erosion stages contain the four modes, however the erosion was greatly driven by the radial jetting and hydraulic penetration modes, where more material was removed. The failure mechanism of the final stages of the LIE test of both DR-treated and non-treated Ti64 was characterized as fatigue fracture. However, a brittle fracture behavior was observed in the initial and intermediate erosion stages of the DR-treated Ti64, whereas a ductile fracture behavior was observed in the non-treated Ti64. This was concluded from the micrographs of the LIE damage through different erosion stages.

  10. High temperature oxidation of iron-chromium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikkelsen, Lars

    2003-06-15

    The high temperature oxidation of the ferritic alloy Fe78Cr22 has been investigated in the present work. The effect of small alloying additions of cerium and/or silicon was also investigated. The alloys were oxidized at 973, 1173 and 1373 K in either air or a hydrogen/argon mixture. The various reaction atmospheres contained between 0.02 and 50% water vapour. The oxide scales formed on the various alloys at 973 K consisted of thin chromia layers. The oxide scales grown on the alloys at 1173 K also consisted of a chromia layer. The microstructure of the chromia scales was found to depend on the reaction atmosphere. The chromia scales grown in hydrogen/argon atmospheres formed oxide whiskers and oxide ridges at the surface of the scales, while the chromia scales grown in air formed larger oxide grains near the surface. This difference in oxide microstructure was due to the vaporization of chromium species from the chromia scales grown in air. Two different growth mechanisms are proposed for the growth of oxide whiskers. The growth rate of the chromia scales was independent of the oxygen activity. This is explained by a growth mechanism of the chromia scales, where the growth is governed by the diffusion of interstitial chromium. The addition of silicon to the iron-chromium alloy resulted in the formation of silica particles beneath the chromia scale. The presence of silicon in the alloy was found to decrease the growth rate of the chromia scale. This is explained by a blocking mechanism, where the silica particles beneath the chromia scale partly block the outwards diffusion of chromium from the alloy to the chromia scale. The addition of cerium to the iron-chromium alloy improved the adhesion of the chromia scale to the alloy and decreased the growth rate of chromia. It was observed that the minimum concentration of cerium in the alloy should be 0.3 at.% in order to observe an effect of the cerium addition. The effect of cerium is explained by the &apos

  11. Porting of $\\mu$CernVM to AArch64

    CERN Document Server

    Scheffler, Felix

    2016-01-01

    $\\mu$CernVM is a virtual appliance that contains a stripped-down Linux OS connecting to a CernVM-Filesystem (CVMFS) repository that resides on a dedicated web server. In contrast to “usual” VMs, anything that is needed from this repository is only downloaded on demand, aggressively cached and eventually released again. Currently, $\\mu$CernVM is only distributed for x86-64. Recently, ARM (market leader in mobile computing) has started to enter the server market, which is still dominated by x86-64 infrastructure. However, in terms of performance/watt, AArch64 (latest ARM 64bit architecture) is a promising alternative. Facing millions of jobs to compute every day, it is thus desirable to have an HEP virtualisation solution for AArch64. In this project, $\\mu$CernVM was successfully ported to AArch64. Native and virtualised runtime performance was evaluated using ROOT6 and CMS benchmarks. It was found that VM performance is inferior to host performance across all tests. Respective numbers greatly vary between...

  12. Noncarcinogenic effects of chromium: Update to health-assessment document. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Victery, W.; Lee, S.D.; Mushak, P.; Piscator, M.

    1990-04-01

    The document updates the 1984 Health Assessment Document for Chromium by addressing issues regarding noncarcinogenic health effects of chromium: oxidation states and persistence of these states in the environment, sampling and analytical methodology to differentiate these oxidation states and amounts at submicrogram ambient air levels, the degree of human exposure to chromium in the environment, both short-term and long-term, in vivo reduction of Cr (VI) to Cr (III), and effects from environmentally relevant levels on pulmonary function and renal function. Trivalent chromium is chemically stable; Cr (VI) is readily reduced to Cr (III). Oxidation state of chromium in ambient air depends on proximity to sources emitting one form over the other. Reliable monitoring methods to speciate oxidation states at ambient air levels below 1 microgram/cu m are not available. Ambient levels of total chromium (obtained from EPA's National Air Data Branch) range from a high of 0.6 microgram/cu m to below the detection limit of 0.005 microgram/cu m. Reduction of hexavalent chromium in vivo occurs in several organ systems and therefore, small amounts of inhaled Cr (VI) will be reduced before systemic absorption can occur. Trivalent chromium is an essential trace metal which potentiates actions of insulin-mediated glucose transport.

  13. Measuring cytotoxicity by bioluminescence imaging outperforms the standard chromium-51 release assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mobin A Karimi

    Full Text Available The chromium-release assay developed in 1968 is still the most commonly used method to measure cytotoxicity by T cells and by natural killer cells. Target cells are loaded in vitro with radioactive chromium and lysis is determined by measuring chromium in the supernatant released by dying cells. Since then, alternative methods have been developed using different markers of target cell viability that do not involve radioactivity. Here, we compared and contrasted a bioluminescence (BLI-based cytotoxicity assay to the standard radioactive chromium-release assay using an identical set of effector cells and tumor target cells. For this, we stably transduced several human and murine tumor cell lines to express luciferase. When co-cultured with cytotoxic effector cells, highly reproducible decreases in BLI were seen in an effector to target cell dose-dependent manner. When compared to results obtained from the chromium release assay, the performance of the BLI-based assay was superior, because of its robustness, increased signal-to-noise ratio, and faster kinetics. The reduced/delayed detection of cytotoxicity by the chromium release method was attributable to the association of chromium with structural components of the cell, which are released quickly by detergent solubilization but not by hypotonic lysis. We conclude that the (BLI-based measurement of cytotoxicity offers a superior non-radioactive alternative to the chromium-release assay that is more robust and quicker to perform.

  14. The temperature gradient on section of casting in process of primary crystallization of chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Studnicki

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The methodology of defining in article was introduced the temperature gradient in process of primary crystallization during cooling the casting from chromium cast iron on basis of measurements of thermal field in test DTA-K3. Insert also the preliminary results of investigations of influence temperature gradient on structure of studied wear resistance chromium cast iron.

  15. Hexavalent chromium removal from wastewater using aniline formaldehyde condensate coated silica gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P Albino; Ray, Manabendra; Chakraborty, Saswati

    2007-05-08

    A resinous polymer, aniline formaldehyde condensate (AFC) coated on silica gel was used as an adsorbent in batch system for removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution by considering the effects of various parameters like reaction pH, dose of AFC coated silica gel, initial Cr(VI) concentration and aniline to formaldehyde ratio in AFC synthesis. The optimum pH for total chromium [Cr(VI) and Cr(III)] adsorption was observed as 3. Total chromium adsorption was second order and equilibrium was achieved within 90-120 min. Aniline to formaldehyde ratio of 1.6:1 during AFC synthesis was ideal for chromium removal. Total chromium adsorption followed Freundlich's isotherm with adsorption capacity of 65 mg/g at initial Cr(VI) 200mg/L. Total chromium removal was explained as combinations of electrostatic attraction of acid chromate ion by protonated AFC, reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) and bond formation of Cr(III) with nitrogen atom of AFC. Almost 40-84% of adsorbed chromium was recovered during desorption by NaOH, EDTA and mineral acids. AFC coated silica gel can be effectively used for treatment of chromium containing wastewaters as an alternative.

  16. Environmental optimization of chromium recovery from tannery sludge using a life cycle assessment approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiliç, Eylem; Puig, Rita; Baquero, Grau; Font, Joaquim; Colak, Selime; Gürler, Deniz

    2011-08-15

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) was used to evaluate the environmental impact of an oxidative chromium recovery method from tannery sludge, in comparison with the usual landfilling process. Three improvement options (water reduction, byproduct use and anaerobic sludge digestion) were considered. The results showed that the proposed chromium recovery process would be better environmentally than conventional landfilling in all the evaluated impact categories if the amount of chromium recovered was 43 kg per ton of sludge. This amount could be recovered if the chromium concentration was about 20 times higher than that considered in this study. Alternatively, a lower chromium concentration would produce a better result if the recovery method was optimized and implemented at industrial rather than laboratory scale, and if more accurate data were provided on environmental credits for avoiding the chromium production process. Thus, the recovery method is environmentally beneficial when tannery sludge contains a chromium concentration of about 100,000 ppm. According to the literature, such concentrations are not unusual. The results could serve as the basis for further environmental improvements in chromium recovery and tannery sludge management and should be used in decision-making processes, especially for end-of-pipe treatments.

  17. The temperature gradient on section of casting in process of primary crystallization of chromium cast iron

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The methodology of defining in article was introduced the temperature gradient in process of primary crystallization during cooling the casting from chromium cast iron on basis of measurements of thermal field in test DTA-K3. Insert also the preliminary results of investigations of influence temperature gradient on structure of studied wear resistance chromium cast iron.

  18. Tribological properties of the two-step thermally deposited chromium films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazauskas, A.; Baltrusaitis, J.; Grigaliunas, V.; Baltusnikas, A.; Abakeviciene, B.; Polcar, T.

    2013-01-01

    Chromium thin films were prepared on glass substrate via a two-step thermal deposition and their structural, chemical and tribological properties were determined. The X-ray diffraction pattern of the two-step thermally deposited chromium film showed the presence of well-defined body-centered cubic C

  19. Suppression of interference in the AAS determination of chromium by use of ammonium bifluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purushottam, A; Naidu, P P; Lal, S S

    1973-07-01

    Addition of 1% of ammonium bifluoride successfully suppresses interference by diverse ions in the atomic-absorption determination of chromium(VI). If the sample solutions also contain chromium(III) addition of 1% of ammonium bifluoride and 0.2% of sodium sulphate is recommended for the suppression.

  20. Leaching behavior of chromium in chrome shaving generated in tanning process and its stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Mehmet; Ozverdi, Arzu

    2008-08-15

    In this study, leaching properties and pollution potential of chromium in chrome shaving (CS), which is a solid residue of leather industry, containing 2.27% Cr were investigated and thermal stabilization procedure was applied to the CS for chromium immobilization. For this purpose, firstly, effects of the liquid/solid ratio, contact time, pH and sequential extraction on the leaching behavior of chromium in the CS were studied. It was determined that the CS-caused chromium pollution is a hazardous material for environment. Thermal stabilization procedure was applied to the CS in the temperature range of 250-500 degrees C for the chromium immobilization. Effective stabilization of chromium in the CS was achieved by heating of CS at 350 degrees C under CO(2) atmosphere. Leaching experiments were also carried out with the samples obtained from the stabilization process and the results compared with that of the CS. Also, TCLP test method was applied to the samples to determine pollution potentials and discharge situations of the CS and its stabilization products. While the chromium concentrations in the test solutions of all samples stabilized thermally at above 350 degrees C were below the USEPA regulatory limit of 5 mg/l, the concentration of chromium leached out from the CS was 30-fold bigger than the USEPA regulatory limit.

  1. Reduction of tetravalent chromium induced optical loss in Nd:Cr:GSGG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pertica, A.J.; Marion, J.E.; Stokowski, S.E. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (US))

    1989-10-20

    We report on methods for eliminating of optical absorption in neodymium, chromium doped gadolinium scandium gallium garnet (Nd;Cr:GSGG) due to tetravalent chromium at the laser wavelength. These methods include doping of the crystal melt with specific additive as well as post growth heat treatments.

  2. Kinetics of chromium ion absorption by cross-linked polyacrylate films

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    Three cross-linked ion exchange membranes were studied as to their ability to absorb chromium ion from aqueous chromium III nitrate solutions. Attention was given to the mechanism of absorption, composition of the absorbed product, and the chemical bonding. The membranes were: calcium polyacrylate, polyacrylic acid, and a copolymer of acrylic acid and vinyl alcohol. For the calcium polyacrylate and the copolymer, parabolic kinetics were observed, indicating the formation of a chromium polyacrylate phase as a coating on the membrane. The rate of absorption is controlled by the diffusion of the chromium ion through this coating. The product formed in the copolymer involves the formation of a coordination complex of a chromium ion with 6 carboxylic acid groups from the same molecule. The absorption of the chromium ion by the polyacrylic acid membranes appears to be more complicated, involving cross-linking. This is due to the coordination of the chromium ion with carboxylic acid groups from more than one polymer molecule. The absorption rate of the chromium ion by the calcium salt membrane was found to be more rapid than that by the free polyacrylic acid membrane.

  3. Redox Equilibria of Chromium in Calcium Silicate Base Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzayousef-Jadid, A.-M.; Schwerdtfeger, Klaus

    2009-08-01

    The oxidation state of chromium has been determined at 1600 °C in CaO-SiO2-CrO x melts with CaO/SiO2 ratios (mass pct) of 0.66, 0.93, and 1.10, and 0.15 to 3.00 pct Cr2O3 (initial). A few experiments were also carried out with CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-CrO x melts at 1430 °C. The slag samples were equilibrated with gas phases of controlled oxygen pressure. Two techniques were applied to determine the oxidation state: thermogravimetry and quenching of the samples with subsequent wet chemical analysis. In the low-oxygen pressure range, the chromium is mainly divalent. In the high-oxygen pressure range, it is trivalent and hexavalent. It was found that the Cr3+/Cr2+ and Cr6+/Cr3+ ratios depend on oxygen pressure at a constant CaO/SiO2 ratio and a constant content of total chromium, according to the ideal law of mass action. According to the respective chemical reactions, these ratios change proportional to p_{{{text{O}}2 }}{}^{1/4} or p_{{{text{O}}_{ 2} }}{}^{3/4}, respectively. They also increase with increasing basicity. The data are used to compute the fractions of the different ions in the melt. There is a certain range of oxygen pressure in which all three valence states, Cr2+, Cr3+, and Cr6+, coexist. The color of the solidified slag samples is described and is explained with the help of transmission spectra.

  4. Chromium speciation in coal and biomass co-combustion products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stam, Arthur F; Meij, Ruud; Te Winkel, Henk; Eijk, Ronald J van; Huggins, Frank E; Brem, Gerrit

    2011-03-15

    Chromium speciation is vital for the toxicity of products resulting from co-combustion of coal and biomass. Therefore, understanding of formation processes has been studied using a combination of X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy and thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. The influence of cofiring on Cr speciation is very dependent on the type of fuel. Cr(VI) contents in the investigated fly ash samples from coal and cofiring average around 7% of the total chromium. An exception is cofiring 7-28% wood for which ashes exhibited Cr(VI) concentrations of 12-16% of the total chromium. Measurements are in line with thermodynamic predictions: RE factors of Cr around 1 are in line with volatile Cr only above 1400 °C; lower Cr(VI) concentrations with lower oxygen content and Cr(III) dissolved in aluminosilicate glass. Stability of Cr(VI) below 700 °C does not correlate with Cr(VI) concentrations found in the combustion products. It is indicated that Cr(VI) formation is a high-temperature process dependent on Cr evaporation (mode of occurrence in fuel, promoted by organic association), oxidation (local oxygen content), and formation of solid chromates (promoted by presence of free lime (CaO) in the ash). CaCrO(4)(s) is a probable chemical form but, given different leachable fractions (varying from 25 to 100%), different forms of Cr(VI) must be present. Clay-bound Cr is likely to dissolve in the aluminosilicate glass phase during melting of the clay.

  5. Chromium(III) complexes of naturally occurring ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shahawi, M. S.

    1995-02-01

    Chromium(III) complexes prepared from CrCl 3Py 3 and anhydrous CrCl 3 with L(-)-threonine, nicotinic acid, glycine, D(-)-penicillamine, L(-)-cysteine and L(-)-cystine have been characterized. The magnetic moments (3.4-4.05 B.M.) are close to the spin only value for a d3 chromium(III) ion in octahedral or pseudo octahedral symmetry. In the electronic spectra two sharp peaks are observed at (15.9-19.8) × 10 3 and (22.0-26.7) × 10 3 cm -1 and are assigned to d-d transitions in the pseudo octahedral configuration. The parameters ( Dq, B, β35) and the interelectronic repulsion parameter with the ionic charge, Z∗, are calculated and place the ligand in the middle of the spectrochemical series. In the circular dichroism spectra three Cotton effects are observed in the forbidden band of the optically active chelates and are assigned to the 2E( 2Eg), 2A 2( 2T 1g) and2E( 2T 1g) while that in the spin allowed band are a result of the splitting of the 4A 2g( 4T 2g) to 4A 1( 4T 2g) and4E( 4T 2g) transitions. The structure of threonine, cystine and cysteine chelates are likely to be fac since strong and well defined Cotton effects are observed. The Cotton effects of penicillamine chelates are weak suggesting formation of the mer structure. Prolonged heating or bubbling air through the solution of CrCl 3Py 3 containing L(-)-threonine, glycine or nicotinic acid for several hours enhances chromium(VI) formation.

  6. Chromium Isotopes Record Fluctuations in Precambrian Biospheric Oxygenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, R.; Gaucher, C.; Poulton, S. W.; Canfield, D. E.

    2009-12-01

    There is a direct relationship between life, oxygen, and the surface chemistry of the Earth. Geochemical data suggest that oxygenation of the Earth's atmosphere occurred in two broad steps, near the beginning and the end of the Proterozoic Eon (2500 to 542 million years ago), but the details of this history are unclear. The geochemical behaviour of chromium (Cr) is highly sensitive to the redox state of the surface environment as oxidative weathering processes produce the oxidised hexavalent [Cr(VI)] form. Oxidation of reduced trivaltent [Cr(III)] chromium on land is accompanied by an isotopic fractionation, leading to enrichment of the mobile hexavalent form in the heavier isotope. The fractionated Cr isotope signature is then tranfered by riverine transport to the sea. Here, we use Cr stable isotopes from banded iron formations (BIFs) to track the presence of Cr(VI) in Precambrian oceans, providing a time-resolved picture of the oxygenation history of Earth’s atmosphere-hydrosphere system. Fractionated Cr isotopes indicate the accumulation of Cr(VI) in ocean surface waters ~2.8 to 2.6 billion years (Gyr) ago and a likely transient elevation in atmospheric and surface ocean oxygen prior to the first great rise of oxygen 2.45-2.2 Gyr ago (the Great Oxidation Event; GOE). In contrast, Cr isotopes in ~1.88 Gyr old BIFs are not fractionated, indicating a major decline in atmospheric oxygen and demonstrating that the GOE did not lead to a unidirectional stepwise increase in atmospheric oxygen. In the late Neoproterozoic, ~800 to 542 million years (Myr) ago, we observe strong positive fractionations in Cr isotopes (δ53Cr up to +4.9 ‰) providing independent support for increased surface oxygenation at this time. This may have stimulated rapid evolution of macroscopic multicellular life. Our chromium isotope data thus provide new insights into the oxygenation history of the Earth, and highlight its use as a powerful redox tracer in aquatic systems.

  7. Chromium removal from electroplating wastewater by coir pith.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suksabye, Parinda; Thiravetyan, Paitip; Nakbanpote, Woranan; Chayabutra, Supanee

    2007-03-22

    Coir pith is a by-product from padding used in mattress factories. It contains a high amount of lignin. Therefore, this study investigated the use of coir pith in the removal of hexavalent chromium from electroplating wastewater by varying the parameters, such as the system pH, contact time, adsorbent dosage, and temperature. The maximum removal (99.99%) was obtained at 2% (w/v) dosage, particle size <75microm, at initial Cr(VI) 1647mgl(-1), system pH 2, and an equilibrium time of 18h. The adsorption isotherm of coir pith fitted reasonably well with the Langmuir model. The maximum Cr(VI) adsorption capacity of coir pith at 15, 30, 45 and 60 degrees C was 138.04, 197.23, 262.89 and 317.65mgCr(VI)g(-1) coir pith, respectively. Thermodynamic parameters indicated an endothermic process and the adsorption process was favored at high temperature. Desorption studies of Cr(VI) on coir pith and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) suggested that most of the chromium bound on the coir pith was in Cr(III) form due to the fact that the toxic Cr(VI) adsorbed on the coir pith by electrostatic attraction was easily reduced to less toxic Cr(III). Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometry analysis indicated that the carbonyl (CO) groups and methoxy (O-CH(3)) groups from the lignin structure in coir pith may be involved in the mechanism of chromium adsorption. The reduced Cr(III) on the coir pith surface may be bound with CO groups and O-CH(3) groups through coordinate covalent bonding in which a lone pair of electrons in the oxygen atoms of the methoxy and carbonyl groups can be donated to form a shared bond with Cr(III).

  8. Chromium removal from electroplating wastewater by coir pith

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suksabye, Parinda [The Joint School of Energy and Environment, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, 91 Pracha-Utit Road, Bangmod, Thungkru, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand); Thiravetyan, Paitip [Division of Biotechnology, School of Bioresources and Technology, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, 83 Moo. 8 Thakham, Bangkhuntien, Bangkok 10150 (Thailand)]. E-mail: paitip.thi@kmutt.ac.th; Nakbanpote, Woranan [Pilot Plant Development and Training Institute, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, 83 Moo. 8 Thakham, Bangkhuntien, Bangkok 10150 (Thailand); Chayabutra, Supanee [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Silpaorn University, 6 Rajamankhanai Road, Amphoe Muang, Nakorn Pathom Province, Bangkok 73000 (Thailand)

    2007-03-22

    Coir pith is a by-product from padding used in mattress factories. It contains a high amount of lignin. Therefore, this study investigated the use of coir pith in the removal of hexavalent chromium from electroplating wastewater by varying the parameters, such as the system pH, contact time, adsorbent dosage, and temperature. The maximum removal (99.99%) was obtained at 2% (w/v) dosage, particle size <75 {mu}m, at initial Cr(VI) 1647 mg l{sup -1}, system pH 2, and an equilibrium time of 18 h. The adsorption isotherm of coir pith fitted reasonably well with the Langmuir model. The maximum Cr(VI) adsorption capacity of coir pith at 15, 30, 45 and 60 deg. C was 138.04, 197.23, 262.89 and 317.65 mg Cr(VI) g{sup -1} coir pith, respectively. Thermodynamic parameters indicated an endothermic process and the adsorption process was favored at high temperature. Desorption studies of Cr(VI) on coir pith and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) suggested that most of the chromium bound on the coir pith was in Cr(III) form due to the fact that the toxic Cr(VI) adsorbed on the coir pith by electrostatic attraction was easily reduced to less toxic Cr(III). Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometry analysis indicated that the carbonyl (C=O) groups and methoxy (O-CH{sub 3}) groups from the lignin structure in coir pith may be involved in the mechanism of chromium adsorption. The reduced Cr(III) on the coir pith surface may be bound with C=O groups and O-CH{sub 3} groups through coordinate covalent bonding in which a lone pair of electrons in the oxygen atoms of the methoxy and carbonyl groups can be donated to form a shared bond with Cr(III)

  9. MICROSTRUCTURE AND CORROSION RESISTANCE OF CHROMIUM NITRIDES OBTAINED BY VACUUM GAS NITRIDING OF ELECTROLYTIC CHROMIUM DEPOSITED ON AISI H13 STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Cifuentes

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this scientific research paper, the microstructure and corrosion resistance of chromium nitrides obtained from a duplex treatment consisting of an electroplated hard chromium coating applied on a steel AISI H13 follow by a thermochemical treatment in vacuum using NH3 as precursor gas of nitrogen, is evaluated. This type of duplex treatments combine the benefits of each individual treatment in order to obtain, with this synergic effect, compounds type CrxN more economic than those obtained by other kind of treatments e.g. physical vapor deposition (PVD. The results obtained by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD indicate the surface and subsurface transformation of the electrolytic hard chromium coating by formation of CrN and Cr2N phases. Likewise, potentiodynamic polarization tests indicate an increase in corrosion resistance of such kind of compounds in comparison with the obtained results with electroplated hard chromium.

  10. Chromium removal by zeolite-rich materials obtained from an exhausted FCC catalyst: Influence of chromium incorporation on the sorbent structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Maximiliano R; Pereyra, Andrea M; Torres Sánchez, Rosa M; Basaldella, Elena I

    2013-10-15

    A spent FCC catalyst was converted into a zeolitic mixture, and the product obtained was afterward used as trapping material for Cr(III) species frequently found in aqueous solutions. Eventual changes in the sorbent structure produced by Cr incorporation were studied by different characterization techniques such as point of zero charge determinations (PZC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), and infrared absorption (FTIR). The XRD and FTIR analyses indicated that chromium incorporation produces an amorphization of the material, and PZC measurements show no surface adsorption of charged chromium species. SEM and EDX analyses clearly show that after chromium sorption, the initial microspheroidal catalyst morphology was maintained, and the presence of chromium species was mainly detected in the outer microsphere surface, where the zeolite crystals were hydrothermally grown.

  11. Type 2 diabetic rats on diet supplemented with chromium malate show improved glycometabolism, glycometabolism-related enzyme levels and lipid metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Feng

    Full Text Available Our previous study showed that chromium malate improved the regulation of blood glucose in mice with alloxan-induced diabetes. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of chromium malate on glycometabolism, glycometabolism-related enzymes and lipid metabolism in type 2 diabetic rats. Our results showed that fasting blood glucose, serum insulin level, insulin resistance index and C-peptide level in the high dose group had a significant downward trend when compared with the model group, chromium picolinate group and chromium trichloride group. The hepatic glycogen, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glucokinase, Glut4, phosphor-AMPKβ1 and Akt levels in the high dose group were significantly higher than those of the model, chromium picolinate and chromium trichloride groups. Chromium malate in a high dose group can significantly increase high density lipoprotein cholesterol level while decreasing the total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels when compared with chromium picolinate and chromium trichloride. The serum chromium content in chromium malate and chromium picolinate group is significantly higher than that of the chromium trichloride group. The results indicated that the curative effects of chromium malate on glycometabolism, glycometabolism-related enzymes and lipid metabolism changes are better than those of chromium picolinate and chromium trichloride. Chromium malate contributes to glucose uptake and transport in order to improved glycometabolism and glycometabolism-related enzymes.

  12. Chromium Renderserver: Scalable and Open Source Remote RenderingInfrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Brian; Ahern, Sean; Bethel, E. Wes; Brugger, Eric; Cook,Rich; Daniel, Jamison; Lewis, Ken; Owen, Jens; Southard, Dale

    2007-12-01

    Chromium Renderserver (CRRS) is software infrastructure thatprovides the ability for one or more users to run and view image outputfrom unmodified, interactive OpenGL and X11 applications on a remote,parallel computational platform equipped with graphics hardwareaccelerators via industry-standard Layer 7 network protocolsand clientviewers. The new contributions of this work include a solution to theproblem of synchronizing X11 and OpenGL command streams, remote deliveryof parallel hardware-accelerated rendering, and a performance analysis ofseveral different optimizations that are generally applicable to avariety of rendering architectures. CRRSis fully operational, Open Sourcesoftware.

  13. Evaluating Foraminifera as an Archive for Seawater Chromium Isotopic Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Planavsky, N.; Hull, P. M.; Tripati, A.; Reinhard, C.; Zou, H.; Elder, L. E.; Henehan, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years there has been growing interest in using chromium isotopes (δ53Cr) as a proxy to investigate the redox evolution of Earth's ocean-atmosphere system throughout geological history. Potential archives for seawater δ53Cr that have been identified to date include iron formations and organic-rich siliciclastic sediments. However, these types of sediments are not common and they are discontinuous over geologic time. As a result, alternative types of archives are needed. Here we evaluate the utility of foraminifera tests as a recorder of seawater δ53Cr. Core-tops used were from different ocean basins. Mono-specific samples of Globigerinoides sacculifer, Orbulina universa, Pulleniatina obliquiloculata, Globoratalia crassula-crassaformis, Globoratalia truncatulinoides, and Globigerinella siphonifera were isolated to investigate inter-species isotope fractionation. Chromium concentrations were measured by isotope dilution method to be 0.1-0.3 μg/g. The δ53Cr values of these species range from 0.2‰ to 2.4‰, with an analytical uncertainty of 0.3‰ (95% confidence). Despite the high analytical uncertainty due to the extremely low levels of Cr present, there is still large detectable variation in foraminiferal δ53Cr values, which overlap presently available seawater values (Bonnand et al., 2013; Scheiderich et al., 2015). Possible explanations for such variations in foraminiferal δ53Cr values include heterogeneity of seawater δ53Cr in the modern oceans, and/or photobiochemical redox cycling of Cr in the surface oceans. Therefore, care should be taken when using foraminifera to reconstruct past seawater δ53Cr values. ReferencesBonnand, P., James, R., Parkinson, I., Connelly, D., Fairchild, I., 2013. The chromium isotopic composition of seawater and marine carbonates. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 382: 10-20. Scheiderich, K., Amini, M., Holmden, C., Francois, R., 2015. Global variability of chromium isotopes in seawater demonstrated by Pacific

  14. Adsorption of chromium ion (VI) by acid activated carbon

    OpenAIRE

    A. A. Attia; Khedr,S. A.; Elkholy,S. A.

    2010-01-01

    The activated carbon produced from olive stones was chemically activated using sulfuric acid, (OS-S), and utilized as an adsorbent for the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution in the concentration range 4-50 mg/L. Adsorption experiments were carried out in a batch process and various experimental parameters such as effect of contact time, initial chromium ion concentration, carbon dosage, and pH on percentage removal have been studied. Adsorption results obtained for activated carbon (OS-S...

  15. Structural, morphological and optical properties of chromium oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babukutty, Blessy; Parakkal, Fasalurahman; Nair, Swapna S., E-mail: swapna.s.nair@gmail.com [School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Department of Physics, Central University of Kerala, Kasaragod 671314 (India); Bhalero, G. M. [UGC-DAE, IGCAR, Kalpakkam, TamilNadu (India); Aravind, P. B. [Cochin University of Science and Technology(CUSAT), Cochin (India)

    2015-06-24

    Chromium oxide nanoparticles are synthesized by reduction route from chloride precursors with surfactant, trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO). Structural and morphological characterization are analyzed using X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Transmission Electron micrographs show that the average grain size lies in the range 5nm to 10nm. Optical characterization has been done by UV-VIS spectrophotometer. Distinct optical absorptions of Cr{sup 3+} ions show hinting towards the presence of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Presence of oxygen is also confirmed from Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) studies.

  16. Isocyanide and Phosphine Oxide Coordination in Binuclear Chromium Pacman Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Charlotte J; Nichol, Gary S; Arnold, Polly L; Love, Jason B

    2013-12-01

    The new binuclear chromium Pacman complex [Cr2(L)] of the Schiff base pyrrole macrocycle H4L has been synthesized and structurally characterized. Addition of isocyanide, C≡NR (R = xylyl, (t)Bu), or triphenylphosphine oxide donors to [Cr2(L)] gives contrasting chemistry with the formation of the new coordination compounds [Cr2(μ-CNR)(L)], in which the isocyanides bridge the two Cr(II) centers, and [Cr2(OPPh3)2(L)], a Cr(II) phosphine oxide adduct with the ligands exogenous to the cleft.

  17. MODELING THE RATE-CONTROLLED SORPTION OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, D.B.; Stollenwerk, K.G.

    1985-01-01

    Sorption of chromium VI on the iron-oxide- and hydroxide-coated surface of alluvial material was numerically simulated with rate-controlled reactions. Reaction kinetics and diffusional processes, in the form of film, pore, and particle diffusion, were simulated and compared with experimental results. The use of empirically calculated rate coefficients for diffusion through the reacting surface was found to simulate experimental data; pore or particle diffusion is believed to be a possible rate-controlling mechanism. The use of rate equations to predict conservative transport and rate- and local-equilibrium-controlled reactions was shown to be feasible.

  18. CHROMIUM EXTRACTION BY MICROEMULSIONS IN TWO- AND THREE-PHASE SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. R. O. Melo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Microemulsion systems were used to remove chromium from an aqueous solution obtained from acid digestion of tannery sludge. The systems were composed by: coconut oil soap as surfactant, 1-butanol as cosurfactant, kerosene as the oil phase, and chromium solution as the aqueous phase. Two- and three-phase microemulsion extraction methods were investigated in the experiments. Viscosity, effective diameter of the droplets, and extraction and re-extraction efficiencies were evaluated for each system. Two- and three-phase systems showed small variations in droplet diameter, which can be attributed to the formation of micellar structures. Chromium recovery efficiencies for the studied systems were over 96%. The re-extraction step showed that the stripping solution used can release more than 96% of the chromium from the microemulsion phase. Experimental results confirm that chromium can be recovered efficiently using microemulsion systems.

  19. Detergents and bleaches are sources of chromium contact dermatitis in Israel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingber, A; Gammelgaard, Bente; David, M

    1998-01-01

    Total chromium levels were determined in 38 detergents and 12 bleaches on the market in Israel (45 locally produced, 5 imported). The samples were analyzed by Zeeman-corrected graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Chromium levels were higher than 5 ppm in 28 (56%) of the 50 products......, from 1 to 5 ppm in 16 (32%), and lower than 1 ppm in only 6 (12%). Among the 5 imported products, only 1 had a chromium level below 1 ppm and the other 4 (1 from Germany, 3 from the USA) had high levels. Since a most 90% of the detergents and bleaches examined contained chromium levels higher than 1...... ppm, it is concluded that these consumer products may be the cause of the high incidence of chromium sensitivity in Israel....

  20. Development of Alkaline Oxidative Dissolution Methods for Chromium (III) Compounds Present in Hanford Site Tank Sludges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NN Krot; VP Shilov; AM Fedoseev; NA Budantseva; MV Nikonov; AB Yusov; AYu Garnov; IA Charushnikova; VP Perminov; LN Astafurova; TS Lapitskaya; VI Makarenkov

    1999-07-02

    The high-level radioactive waste sludge in the underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site contains various chromium(III)solid phases. Dissolution and removal of chromium from tank waste sludges is desirable prior to high-level waste vitrification because increased volume is required to incorporate the residual chromium. Unfortunately, dissolution of chromium from the sludge to form Cr(OH){sub 4}{sup {minus}} through treatment with heated NaOH solution (also used to dissolve aluminum phases and metathesize phosphates to sodium salts) generally has been unsuccessful in tests with both simulated and genuine Hanford waste sludges. Oxidative dissolution of the Cr(III) compounds to form soluble chromate has been proposed as an alternative chromium solid phase dissolution method and results of limited prior testing have been reported.

  1. Bioremediation of the soils contaminated with cadmium and chromium, by the earthworm Eisenia fetida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Aseman

    2016-01-01

    Results: There was a significant correlation between the reduction of chromium and cadmium metals in the soils and the accumulation of chromium and cadmium metals in the worm’s body. A significant decline of chromium levels of the soil was observed in the days 21 and 42 during the study compared to the initial amount of 0.1 mg/g. On the other hand, chromium concentration of the soil decreased from 0.14 to 0.1 mg/g after 42 days. Conclusion: said the research indicated that increased mortality of worms in the soil at a concentration of 0.08 mg/g of chromium, using the worms for bioremediation is not recommended. Although, this method is effective to remove cadmium from the soils having cadmium with concentrations of 0.04 and 0.08 mg/g but it needs further investigation.

  2. Direct and combined methods for the determination of chromium, copper, and nickel in honey by electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez García, J C; Barciela García, J; Herrero Latorre, C; García Martín, S; Peña Crecente, R M

    2005-08-24

    In the present work, direct methods for the determination of chromium, copper, and nickel in honey by electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy were developed using experimental design as an optimization tool. Once the optimum conditions for the individual methods were established, a direct method for the combined determination of the three elements was optimized using the response surface tool. Palladium was used as chemical modifier in all cases. Honey was diluted in water, hydrogen peroxide, and nitric acid. Triton X-100 was added to minimize the matrix effect and the viscosity of the sample. The RSD (better than 10%) and the analytical recovery (98-103%) were acceptable for all of the developed methods. Calibration graphs were used in the four methods to determine the concentration of the analytes in the sample. The detection limits of the combined method (0.21, 0.35, and 0.37 microg L(-)(1) for Cr, Cu, and Ni, respectively) were similar to those obtained for the individual methods (LOD = 0.17, 0.21, 0.33 microg L(-)(1) for Cr, Cu, and Ni, respectively). The direct-combined proposed method has been applied to the determination of chromium, copper, and nickel content in representative honey samples from Galicia (northwestern Spain). The concentrations found in the analyzed samples were in the range of (5.75 +/- 0.64)-(26.4 +/- 0.38) ng g(-)(1) of Cr, (79 +/- 7.8)-(2049 +/- 80) ng g(-)(1) of Cu, and (12.6 +/- 1.36)-(172 +/- 6.88) ng g(-)(1) of Ni.

  3. Chromium related degradation of solid oxide fuel cells; Chrom-bezogene Degradation von Festoxid-Brennstoffzellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, Anita

    2011-05-04

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) offer a high potential for application as an auxiliary power unit (APU) for heavy goods vehicles as well as combined heat and power (CHP) systems. SOFCs are especially attractive due to their high efficiencies and the use of different fuel types. However, optimization in terms of long term stability and costs are still necessary. This work characterized the degradation of SOFCs with lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) cathodes under chromium influence. Galvanostatic cell tests were carried out at 800 C with operation times from 250 - 3000 h and variation of the chromium source and current density. The current densities of j = 0 (A)/(cm{sup 2}), j = 0,3 (A)/(cm{sup 2}) and j = 0,5 (A)/(cm{sup 2}) were applied. The high temperature ferritic alloy Crofer22APU was used as a chromium source. Variation of the chromium source was realized by coating the Crofer22APU insert with the chromium retention layer Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} and the cathode contact layer LCC10. Cell degradation was analyzed with regard to cell voltage, current density and area specific resistance (ASR). Microstructural alterations of the cathode as well as chromium content and distribution across the cell were investigated after completion of the cell tests. For cells with a chromium source present and operation with a nonzero current density, the course of cell degradation was divided into three phases: a run-in, weak linear degradation and strong linear degradation. A decrease of the chromium release rate by means of different coatings stretched the course of degradation along the timescale. Strong degradation, which is characterized by a significant increase in ASR as well as a decrease of current density at the operating point, was only observed when a chromium source in the setup was comb ined with operation of the cell with a non-zero current density. Operation of the cell with a chromium source but no current density caused a degradation of current density at the

  4. Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045 and N06696), Nickel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) plate, sheet and strip

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045 and N06696), Nickel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) plate, sheet and strip

  5. Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045, and N06696), Nikel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) seamless pipe and tube

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045, and N06696), Nikel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) seamless pipe and tube

  6. Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045, and N06696), Nickel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) rod, bar, and wire

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045, and N06696), Nickel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) rod, bar, and wire

  7. Speciation of chromium in bread and breakfast cereals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathebula, Mpho Wendy; Mandiwana, Khakhathi; Panichev, Nikolas

    2017-02-15

    Bread and breakfast cereals are a major constituents of the human diet, yet their Cr(VI) content is not known. Chromium(VI) was determined in these products by high resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometer (HR-CS AAS) after leaching Cr(VI) with 0.10molL(-1) Na2CO3. The results showed that 33-73% of total Cr (58.17±5.12μgkg(-1)-156.1±6.66μgkg(-1)) in bread exist as Cr(VI) and the highest total Cr content was found in brown bread. It was shown that Cr(III) is oxidized to Cr(VI) during toasting of bread. Chromium(VI) content in breakfast cereals ranged between 20.4±4μgkg(-1) and 470.4±68μgkg(-1). Therefore, it can be concluded that bread and breakfast cereals contains Cr(VI) which does not exceed maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) of 0.003mgkg(-1)bw(-1)day(-1) through daily consumption of half a bowl (65g) of breakfast cereal and four slices of toasted (122g) or untoasted bread (160g).

  8. Biosorption of aqueous chromium(VI) by Tamarindus indica seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, G S; Bhuptawat, Hitendra Kumar; Chaudhari, Sanjeev

    2006-05-01

    The effectiveness of low cost agro-based materials namely, Tamarindus indica seed (TS), crushed coconut shell (CS), almond shell (AS), ground nut shell (GS) and walnut shell (WS) were evaluated for Cr(VI) removal. Batch test indicated that hexavalent chromium sorption capacity (q(e)) followed the sequence q(e)(TS) > q(e)(WS) > q(e)(AS) > q(e)(GS) > q(e)(CS). Due to high sorptive capacity, tamarind seed was selected for detailed sorption studies. Sorption kinetic data followed first order reversible kinetic fit model for all the sorbents. The equilibrium conditions were achieved within 150 min under the mixing conditions employed. Sorption equilibria exhibited better fit to Freundlich isotherms (R>0.92) than Langmuir isotherm (R approximately = 0.87). Hexavalent chromium sorption by TS decreased with increase in pH, and slightly reduced with increase in ionic strength. Cr(VI) removal by TS seems to be mainly by chemisorption. Desorption of Cr(VI) from Cr(VI) laden TS was quite less by distilled water and HCl. Whereas with NaOH, maximum desorption achieved was about 15.3%. When TS was used in downflow column mode, Cr(VI) removal was quite good but head loss increased as the run progressed and was stopped after 200 h.

  9. Structural effects of metallic chromium on its electrochemical behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VELIMIR RADMILOVIC

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Chromium dissolution in aqueous sulfuric acid solution of pH 1 was studied electrochemically on chromium electrodes with different crystallographic structures. A slow potentiodynamic method was used for the electrochemical measurements in deaerated solutions (purgedwith nitrogen,while the Cr(III ions in the solution after the corrosion were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. Three electrode materials with a very dominant crystallite orientation resembling single crystal structures (i.e., 111 and 110 confirmed by the electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD, were used in the experiments. The (111 structures were somewhat more active electrochemically (both anodic and cathodic than the (110 structure. However, Cr electrochemically deposited in standard plating bath, assumed from literature data to has also the (111 structure, was more than 4 times active for anodic dissolution and, by the same number, less active for cathodic hydrogen evolution. The concentrations of Cr(III ions determined in the solution after definite times of corrosion of all the materials showed almost two times larger dissolution rates than observed electrochemically by three different electrochemical methods (Wagner–Traud, Stern–Geary, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. This is explained by the simultaneous occurrence of potential independent chemical dissolution of Cr, by a direct reaction of metallic Cr with H2O molecules, proposed a long time ago by Kolotyrkin and coworkers.

  10. Pseudo-Stem Banana Fibers: Characterization and Chromium Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Becker

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, pseudo-stems of the banana tree were collected, characterized and used as adsorbent materials for the removal of the chromium ions from aqueous solution. The characterization of pseudo-stems by FTIR suggests the presence of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. The predominant groups were carbonyls (0.312 ± 0.010 mmol g–1 adsorbent, phenols (0.237 ± 0.021 mmol g–1 adsorbent, lactones (0.041 ± 0.003 mmol g–1 adsorbent and basic groups (0.096 ± 0.006 mmol g–1 adsorbent. The textural propriety of the adsorbent, surface area, pore volume and pore diameter were found to be 0.383 m2 g–1, 0.003525 cm3 g–1 and 368.3 Å, respectively. The pHpzc value was found 7.5 and so the adsorption assays of chromium removal from solution were more efficiently at acidic pH values. The experiments show that approximately 95% and 78% of the Cr (VI was removed from solution by untreated and treated fiber, respectively, in 300 minutes of the contact time.

  11. Internal Friction In The PFN Ceramics With Chromium Dopand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachariasz R.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available An aim of this work was to determine an influence of an admixture, the chromium (for x from 0.01 to 0.06, on the mechanical properties of the PFN ceramics. The ceramics with chemical composition Pb(Fe0.5−xCrxNb0.5O3 was synthesized in two steps from simple oxides PbO, Fe2O3, Nb2O5, Cr2O3. The first stage was based on obtaining the FeNbO4 from the Fe2O3 and Nb2O5 simple oxides. At this stage an admixture in a form the Cr2O3 chromium oxide was added to the solution. In the second stage the PbO lead oxide and the doped FeNbO4 (obtained earlier were synthetized. The sintering of ceramic samples PFCN type was carried out by free sintering method. Temperature measurements of the internal friction were conducted on a computer-controlled automatic resonant mechanical spectrometer (heating cycle with 3 deg/min.

  12. Study of effect of chromium on titanium dioxide phase transformation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Bellifa; L Pirault-Roy; C Kappenstein; A Choukchou-Braham

    2014-05-01

    MTi samples with different atomic chromium percentages were synthesized by sol–gel method and calcined at 400 °C under air. The effects of Cr and temperature on titanium dioxide phase transition were studied. In situ measurement showed the presence of anatase phase for all samples at temperature < 500 °C. Without Cr content, the anatase–rutile transition takes place at 600 °C and the rutile fraction increases with increase of temperature. In the presence of Cr content, rutile phase appeared at 700 °C. Cr2O3 phase was shown only in the case of CrTi20 content at 800 °C which indicates that the segregation remains modest. We have also studied the anatase–rutile transition kinetics by using in situ X-ray measurements. It was found that the anatase phase stability increases as the chromium content increases. Results confirm that the transformation of anatase–rutile is of first order.

  13. Cytogenetic studies of chromium (III) oxide nanoparticles on Allium cepa root tip cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Deepak; Rajeshwari, A; Jadon, Pradeep Singh; Chaudhuri, Gouri; Mukherjee, Anita; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan; Mukherjee, Amitava

    2015-12-01

    The current study evaluates the cytogenetic effects of chromium (III) oxide nanoparticles on the root cells of Allium cepa. The root tip cells of A. cepa were treated with the aqueous dispersions of Cr2O3 nanoparticles (NPs) at five different concentrations (0.01, 0.1, 1, 10, and 100μg/mL) for 4hr. The colloidal stability of the nanoparticle suspensions during the exposure period were ascertained by particle size analyses. After 4hr exposure to Cr2O3 NPs, a significant decrease in mitotic index (MI) from 35.56% (Control) to 35.26% (0.01μg/mL), 34.64% (0.1μg/mL), 32.73% (1μg/mL), 29.6% (10μg/mL) and 20.92% (100μg/mL) was noted. The optical, fluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscopic analyses demonstrated specific chromosomal aberrations such as-chromosome stickiness, chromosome breaks, laggard chromosome, clumped chromosome, multipolar phases, nuclear notch, and nuclear bud at different exposure concentrations. The concentration-dependent internalization/bio-uptake of Cr2O3 NPs may have contributed to the enhanced production of anti oxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase to counteract the oxidative stress, which in turn resulted in observed chromosomal aberrations and cytogenetic effects. These results suggest that A. cepa root tip assay can be successfully applied for evaluating environmental risk of Cr2O3 NPs over a wide range of concentrations.

  14. Chromium behavior during cement-production processes: A clinkerization, hydration, and leaching study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinyoung, Suthatip [Department of Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok, 10140 (Thailand); Songsiriritthigul, Prayoon [Synchrotron Light Research Institute, PO Box 93 Nakhon Ratchasima, 30000 (Thailand); School of Physics, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima, 30000 (Thailand); Asavapisit, Suwimol, E-mail: suwimol_s@hotmail.com [Environmental Technology, School of Energy and Materials, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok, 10140 (Thailand); National Center of Excellence for Environmental and Hazardous Waste Management, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok, 10140 (Thailand); Kajitvichyanukul, Puangrat, E-mail: puangratk@nu.ac.th [National Center of Excellence for Environmental and Hazardous Waste Management, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok, 10140 (Thailand); Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Naresuan University, Phitsanulok, 65000 (Thailand)

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: {yields} Behavior of chromium during cement-production processes. {yields} Formation of new chromium compounds in clinker with chromium oxidation states of +3, +4.6, +5, and +6. {yields} Addition of chromium altered the composition of the clinker phases, setting time, and compressive strength of hydrated mixes. {yields} Cr{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 6} were leached during leaching tests, whereas other species remained in the mortar. - Abstract: The behavior of chromium during the production of cement clinker, during the hydration of cement and during the leaching of cement mortars was investigated. The microstructures of clinker and mortar properties were investigated using free lime, XRD, SEM/EDS, and TG/DTA techniques. Chromium was found to be incorporated in the clinker phase. The formation of new chromium compounds such as Ca{sub 6}Al{sub 4}Cr{sub 2}O{sub 15}, Ca{sub 5}Cr{sub 3}O{sub 12}, Ca{sub 5}Cr{sub 2}SiO{sub 12}, and CaCr{sub 2}O{sub 7}, with chromium oxidation states of +3, +4.6, +5, and +6, respectively, was detected. After the hydration process, additional chromium compounds were identified in the mortar matrix, including Ca{sub 5}(CrO{sub 4}){sub 3}OH, CaCrO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O, and Al{sub 2}(OH){sub 4}CrO{sub 4}, with chromium oxidation states of +4.6, +6, and +6, respectively. Additionally, some species of chromium, such as Cr{sup 3+} from Ca{sub 6}Al{sub 4}Cr{sub 2}O{sub 15} and Cr{sup 6+} from CaCr{sub 2}O{sub 7}, CaCrO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O, and Al{sub 2}(OH){sub 4}CrO{sub 4}, were leached during leaching tests, whereas other species remained in the mortar. The concentrations of chromium that leached from the mortar following U.S. EPA Method 1311 and EA NEN 7375:2004 leaching tests were higher than limits set by the U.S. EPA and the Environment Agency of England and Wales related to hazardous waste disposal in landfills. Thus, waste containing chromium should not be allowed to mix with raw materials in the cement manufacturing process.

  15. Chromium treatment has no effect in patients with type 2 diabetes in a Western population : a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleefstra, N.; Houweling, S.T.; Bakker, S.J.; Gans, R.O.; Meyboom-de Jong, B.; Bilo, H.J.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Chromium treatment has been reported to improve glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. However, concern exists about the possible toxic effects of chromium picolinate. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of chromium treatment in the form of chromium yeast on glyc

  16. Chromium treatment has no effect in patients with type 2 diabetes in a western population - A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleefstra, Nanne; Gans, Rijk O. B.; Houweling, Sebastiaan T.; Meyboom-de Jong, Betty; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Bilo, Henk J. G.; Verhoeven, Simon

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - Chromium treatment has been reported to improve glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. However, concern exists about the possible toxic effects of chromium picolinate. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of chromium treatment in the form of chromium yeast on gly

  17. Concentrations of Mercury, Lead, Chromium, Cadmium, Arsenic and Aluminum in Irrigation Water Wells and Wastewaters Used for Agriculture in Mashhad, Northeastern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Sadeghi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Contamination of water by toxic chemicals has become commonly recognized as an environmental concern. Based on our clinical observation in Mashhad, northeastern Iran, many people might be at risk of exposure to high concentrations of toxic heavy metals in water. Because wastewater effluents as well as water wells have been commonly used for irrigation over the past decades, there has been some concern on the toxic metal exposure of crops and vegetables irrigated with the contaminated water.Objective: To measure the concentrations of mercury, lead, chromium, cadmium, arsenic and aluminium in irrigation water wells and wastewaters used for agriculture in Mashhad, northeastern Iran.Methods: 36 samples were taken from irrigation water wells and a wastewater refinery in North of Mashhad at four times—May 2008, March 2009, and June and July 2010. Atomic absorption spectrometry was used to measure the concentration of toxic metals. Graphite furnace was used for the measurement of lead, chromium, cadmium and aluminum. Mercury and arsenic concentrations were measured by mercury/hydride system.Results: Chromium, cadmium, lead and arsenic concentrations in the samples were within the standard range. The mean±SD concentration of mercury in irrigation wells (1.02±0.40 μg/L exceeded the FAO maximum permissible levels. The aluminum concentration in irrigation water varied significantly from month to month (p=0.03. All wastewater samples contained high mercury concentrations (6.64±2.53 μg/L.Conclusion: For high mercury and aluminum concentrations, the water sources studied should not be used for agricultural use. Regular monitoring of the level of heavy metals in water and employing the necessary environmental interventions in this area are strongly recommended.

  18. Precise determination of neutron binding energy of 64Cu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telezhnikov, S. A.; Granja, C.; Honzatko, J.; Pospisil, S.; Tomandl, I.

    2016-05-01

    The neutron binding energy in 64Cu has been accurately measured in thermal neutron capture. A composite target of natural Cu and NaCl was used on a high flux neutron beam using a large measuring time. The γ-ray spectrum emitted in the ( n, γ) reaction was measured with a HPGe detector in large statistics (up to 106 events per channel). Intrinsic limitations of HPGe detectors, which restrict the accuracy of energy calibration, were determined. The value B n of 64Cu was determined as 7915.867(24) keV.

  19. Investigation of total and hexavalent chromium in filtered and unfiltered groundwater samples at the Tucson International Airport Superfund Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman, Fred; McCleskey, R. Blaine; Hermosillo, Edyth

    2016-01-01

    Potential health effects from hexavalent chromium in groundwater have recently become a concern to regulators at the Tucson International Airport Area Superfund site. In 2016, the U.S. Geological Survey sampled 46 wells in the area to characterize the nature and extent of chromium in groundwater, to understand what proportion of total chromium is in the hexavalent state, and to determine if substantial differences are present between filtered and unfiltered chromium concentrations. Results indicate detectable chromium concentrations in all wells, over 75 % of total chromium is in the hexavalent state in a majority of wells, and filtered and unfiltered results differ substantially in only a few high-turbidity total chromium samples.

  20. Solid waste removes toxic liquid waste: adsorption of chromium(VI) by iron complexed protein waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathima, Nishtar Nishad; Aravindhan, Rathinam; Rao, Jonnalagadda Raghava; Nair, Balachandran Unni

    2005-04-15

    The leather processing industry generates huge amounts of wastes, both in solid and liquid form. Fleshing from animal hides/skins is one such waste that is high in protein content. In this study, raw fleshing has been complexed with iron and is used for removal of chromium(VI). The effect of pH and the initial concentration of chromium(VI) on the removal of Cr(IV) by iron treated fleshing is presented. Iron treatment is shown to greatly improve adsorption of the fleshing for hexavalent chromium. The ultimate adsorption capacity of iron treated fleshing is 51 mg of chromium(VI) per gram of fleshing. That of untreated fleshing is 9 mg/g such that iron treatment increases the adsorption capacity of fleshing by 10-fold. The measured adsorption kinetics is well described by a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The uptake of chromium(VI) by fleshing is best described by the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) studies show that the iron is incorporated into the protein matrix. Shifts in XPS spectra suggest that dichromate binding occurs with iron at active adsorption sites and that iron treated fleshing removes chromium(VI) without reducing it to chromium(III).

  1. Removal of chromium(VI) from aqueous solutions by polymer inclusion membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowski, Cezary A; Walkowiak, Wladyslaw

    2002-11-01

    The transport through polymer inclusion membranes (PIMs) was found as the effective and selective method of chromium(VI) anions removal from chloride acidic aqueous solutions. The optimal PIMs content was as follows: 41 wt% of cellulose triacetate as the support, 23 wt% of tri-n-octylamine as the ionic carrier, and 36 wt% of o-nitrophenyl pentyl ether as the plasticizer. The results obtained show a linear decrease of permeability coefficient and initial flux values with source phase pH increase. Also linear decrease of initial flux in log-log scale with chromium(VI) concentration increase was observed. Value of slope of this relationship was found to be 0.96 which indicates a first order of chromium(VI) reaction with tri-n-octylamine at membrane/aqueous source interface. Transport of chromium(VI) through PIMs reduces the concentration of chromium(VI) in source aqueous phase from 1.0 to 0.0028 ppm, which is below permissible limit in drinking water in Poland. Competitive transport of chromium(VI), cadmium(II), zinc(II), and iron(III) from acidic aqueous solution across PIMs was found to be efficient for chromium(VI) (99%), and cadmium(II) (99%).

  2. Reduction of chromium (VI by the indirect action of Thiobacillus thioparus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Donati

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available The microbial reduction of chromium(VI to chromium(III has been one of the most widely studied forms of metal bioremediation. Recently, we have found that Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Thiobacillus thiooxidans, growing on elemental sulphur, can indirectly promote chromium(VI reduction by producing reducing agents such as sulphite and thiosulphate, which abiotically reduce chromium(VI. Those species of Thiobacillus are acidophilic bacteria which grow optimally at pH values lower than 4. However, most of those reducing agents are stabilised at higher pH values. Thus, the present paper reports on the ability to reduce chromium(VI using another specie of Thiobacilli, Thiobacillus thioparus, which is able to grow at pH close to 7.0. T. thioparus cultures were carried out in a fermentation vessel containing medium and sulphur as the sole energy source and maintained at 30ºC and 400 rpm. The pH was adjusted to 6.0, 7.0 or 8.0 and maintained with the automatic addition of KOH. Our results show high chromium (VI reduction values (close to 100% at the end of bacterial growth at the three pH values. The results of these experiments are very promising for development of a microbiological process to be used in the detoxification of chromium(VI-polluted effluents.

  3. [In vitro percutaneous absorption of chromium powder and the effect of skin cleanser].

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostin, F; Crosera, M; Adami, G; Malvestio, A; Rosani, R; Bovenzi, M; Maina, G; Filon, F Larese

    2007-01-01

    Occupational chromium dermatitis occurs frequently among cement and metal workers, workers dealing with leather tanning and employees in the ceramic industry. The present study, using an in-vitro system, evaluated percutaneous absorption of chromium powder and the effect of rapid skin decontamination with a common detergent. Experiments were performed using the Franz diffusion cell method with human skin. Physiological solution was used as receiving phase and a suspension of chromium powder in synthetic sweat was used as donor phase. The tests were performed without or with decontamination using the cleanser 30 minutes after the start of exposure. The amount of chromium permeated through the skin was analysed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy and Electro Thermal Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. Speciation analysis and measurements of chromium skin content were also performed. We calculated a permeation flux of 0.843 +/- 0.25 ng cm(-2) h(-1) and a lag time of 1.1 +/- 0.7 h. The cleaning procedure significantly increased chromium skin content, whereas skin passage was not increased. These results showed that chromium powder can pass through the skin and that skin decontamination did not decrease skin absorption. Therefore, it is necessary to prevent skin contamination when using toxic agents.

  4. Efficiency of Removing Chromium from Plating Industry Wastewater using the Electrocoagulation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borghe-ei S.M.1 PhD,

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aims Chromium is one of the most important metallic pollutants in plating industry wastewater. This toxic metal is a serious threat to human health and to the environment due to its cumulative effects and non-degradability. This research intended to study the effects of pH, contact time, and voltage on the degree of chromium removal from wastewater of plating industry by using the electrocoagulation method. Materials & Methods This laboratory research conducted from late May to late November 2012. A 1000cc reactor at laboratory scale was used that included 4 aluminum electrodes of 90% purity, dimensions of 5 by 10cm, and thickness of 1mm, with parallel arrangement. Synthetic chromium-bearing wastewater was prepared at the initial concentration of 50mg/l. The process is done at pH values of 3, 7, and 9, electric potentials of 20, 30, and 40 volts contact durations of 20, 40, 60, and 80 minutes. Findings The degree of chromium reduction did not change linearly with time in the solution and strongly depended on the pH. The efficiency of chromium removal in the samples had an ascending trend with increases in voltage from 20 to 30 and 40 volts. The degree of chromium removal increased at longer contact times. Conclusion Lower pH, more contact time and higher voltages are effective factors in the chromium removal from wastewater by coagulation method.

  5. Chromium in water, suspended particles, sediments and biota in the Iraja River estuary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeiffer, W.C.; Fiszman, M.; de Lacerda, L.D.; van Weerfelt, M.; Carbonell, N.

    1982-11-01

    Analyses of chromium concentrations in waters, suspended particles, bottom sediments, fish (Poecilia reticulata), plants (Paspalum vaginatum, Sesuvium portulacastrum, Philoxeros vermicularis), soils and barnacles (Balanus sp.) were performed from August 1976 to September 1980 in samples collected from the Iraja River and inside its estuary in Guanabara Bay (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil). Sediments and water from the Iraja River showed chromium concentrations of 17536 and 23.39 ppm--a thousand times higher than the published data for freshwater systems. Chromium removed from solution by bottom sediments reaches Guanabara Bay linked to particulate matter. Fish and emergent grass inside the river concentrate chromium from water and/or sediment, returning the metal to the system as detritus. Soil and plants inside the estuary concentrate chromium thirty and ten times higher than in the control area. The vegetal community exhibits a concentration factor smaller than that related to soil and prevents the return of chromium to the estuarine waters. Inside the Guanabara Bay, Balanus sp. appears to be an effective biological monitor as it concentrates chromium in soft tissues 10/sup 3/ times higher than values found in suspended particles (0.012 ..mu..g ml/sup -1/).

  6. High Chromium Tolerant Bacterial Strains from Palar River Basin: Impact of Tannery Pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sundar

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The basic survey study on tanneries and its pollution in the Palar river basin of Vellore District showed that it has been contaminated with heavy metals especially chromium and salts. This study is to improve our understanding to find the Cr contamination level and the ecology of heavy metal tolerance of the native bacterial flora of our study area. Chromium tolerant strains were isolated from contaminated sediments, water and effluents of various tanneries. The minimum and maximum concentration of chromium sediments was in the range of 47.4 and 682.4 mg/L, with an average of 306.285 mg/L in the study area. Sixty-eight chromium resistant bacterial strains were isolated and Maximum Tolerance Concentration (MTC studies have indicated that the tolerance concentrations of the isolates were in the range of 100-3300 mg/L. These bacterial isolates were also checked for their resistance to other heavy metals like Ni, Pb, Zn, Fe and Cd. Eighty percent of the isolates showed resistance to Ni, Pb, Zn, Fe at 100 ppm level and 45% had shown resistance to Cd. The isolates also had shown tolerance to salt (NaCl up to 9%. Significant note was found in the concentration of chromium and in the chromium tolerance ability of the bacteria in the study area and these chromium tolerance bacteria can be used as the indicator for the Cr contamination.

  7. Determination of Chromium(III), Chromium(VI), and Chromium(III) acetylacetonate in water by ion-exchange disk extraction/metal furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamakura, Nao, E-mail: minnie04_tb@yahoo.co.jp; Inui, Tetsuo; Kitano, Masaru; Nakamura, Toshihiro

    2014-03-01

    A new method for the separate determination of Chromium(III) (Cr(III)), Chromium(VI) (Cr(VI)), and Cr(III) acetylacetonate (Cr(acac){sub 3}) in water was developed using a cation-exchange extraction disk (CED) and an anion-exchange extraction disk (AED) combined with metal furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (MFAAS). A 100-mL water sample was adjusted to pH 5.6 and passed through the CED placed on the AED. Cr(acac){sub 3} and Cr(III) were adsorbed on the CED, and Cr(VI) was adsorbed on the AED. The adsorbed Cr(acac){sub 3} was eluted with 50 mL of carbon tetrachloride, followed by the elution of Cr(III) with 50 mL of 3 mol L{sup −1} nitric acid. Cr(VI) was eluted with 50 mL of 3 mol L{sup −1} nitric acid. The chemical species of Cr eluted from the CED with carbon tetrachloride was identified as Cr(acac){sub 3} using infrared spectroscopy. The eluate of Cr(acac){sub 3} was diluted to 100 mL with carbon tetrachloride, and those of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) were diluted to 100 mL with deionized water. All of the solutions were subsequently analyzed by MFAAS. The calibration curve for the Cr(acac){sub 3} aqueous solutions exhibited good linearity in the range of 0.1 to 1 ng. The detection limit of Cr, which corresponded to three times the standard deviation (n = 10) of the blank values, was 20 pg. The recovery test for Cr(III), Cr(VI), and Cr(acac){sub 3} exhibited desirable results (96.0%–107%) when 5 μg of each species (50 μg L{sup −1}) was added to 100 mL water samples (i.e., tap water, rainwater, and bottled drinking water). In a humic acid solution, Cr(acac){sub 3} was quantitatively recovered (103%), but Cr(III) and Cr(VI) exhibited poor recoveries (i.e., 84.8% and 78.4%, respectively). - Highlights: • A determination method of Cr(III), Cr(VI), and Cr(III) acetylacetonate in water was developed. • The combination of ion-exchange resin disks with metal furnace AAS was used. • No effect of humic acid on the recovery of Cr(III) acetylacetonate was

  8. Chromium behavior during cement-production processes: a clinkerization, hydration, and leaching study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinyoung, Suthatip; Songsiriritthigul, Prayoon; Asavapisit, Suwimol; Kajitvichyanukul, Puangrat

    2011-07-15

    The behavior of chromium during the production of cement clinker, during the hydration of cement and during the leaching of cement mortars was investigated. The microstructures of clinker and mortar properties were investigated using free lime, XRD, SEM/EDS, and TG/DTA techniques. Chromium was found to be incorporated in the clinker phase. The formation of new chromium compounds such as Ca(6)Al(4)Cr(2)O(15), Ca(5)Cr(3)O(12), Ca(5)Cr(2)SiO(12), and CaCr(2)O(7), with chromium oxidation states of +3, +4.6, +5, and +6, respectively, was detected. After the hydration process, additional chromium compounds were identified in the mortar matrix, including Ca(5)(CrO(4))(3)OH, CaCrO(4)·2H(2)O, and Al(2)(OH)(4)CrO(4), with chromium oxidation states of +4.6, +6, and +6, respectively. Additionally, some species of chromium, such as Cr(3+) from Ca(6)Al(4)Cr(2)O(15) and Cr(6+) from CaCr(2)O(7), CaCrO(4)·2H(2)O, and Al(2)(OH)(4)CrO(4), were leached during leaching tests, whereas other species remained in the mortar. The concentrations of chromium that leached from the mortar following U.S. EPA Method 1311 and EA NEN 7375:2004 leaching tests were higher than limits set by the U.S. EPA and the Environment Agency of England and Wales related to hazardous waste disposal in landfills. Thus, waste containing chromium should not be allowed to mix with raw materials in the cement manufacturing process.

  9. Portable x-ray fluorescence for the analysis of chromium in nail and nail clippings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, David E B; Ware, Chris S

    2017-03-01

    Assessment of chromium content in human nail or nail clippings could serve as an effective biomarker of chromium status. The feasibility of a new portable x-ray fluorescence (XRF) approach to chromium measurement was investigated through analysis of nail and nail clipping phantoms. Five measurements of 180s (real time) duration were first performed on six whole nail phantoms having chromium concentrations of 0, 2, 5, 10, 15, and 20µg/g. Using nail clippers, these phantoms were then converted to nail clippings, and assembled into different mass groups of 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100mg for additional measurements. The amplitude of the chromium Kα characteristic x-ray energy peak was examined as a function of phantom concentration for all measurement conditions to create a series of calibration lines. The minimum detection limit (MDL) for chromium was also calculated for each case. The chromium MDL determined from the whole nail intact phantoms was 0.88±0.03µg/g. For the clipping phantoms, the MDL ranged from 1.2 to 3.3µg/g, depending on the mass group analyzed. For the 40mg clipping group, the MDL was 1.2±0.1µg/g, and higher mass collections did not improve upon this result. This MDL is comparable to chromium concentration levels seen in various studies involving human nail clippings. Further improvements to the portable XRF technique would be required to detect chromium levels expected from the lower end of a typical population.

  10. Technological progress on detoxification and comprehensive utilization of chromium-containing slag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柴立元; 何德文; 于霞; 刘恢; 闵小波; 陈为亮

    2002-01-01

    Chromium salt is an important industrial material, but vast waste slag containing chrome(Ⅵ) is brought out in the process of its production. The slag is seriously harmful to environments and human health. The technologies on detoxification and comprehensive utilization of chromium-containing slag were summarized abroad and at home. And various methods were also described for the detoxification mechanism, technology process, and practical application effects in detail. A new concept for detoxification of chromium-containing slag, furthermore, was put forward by using microorganism.

  11. Analysis of Nanometer Structure for Chromium Atoms in Gauss Standing Laser Wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wen-Tao; ZHU Bao-Hua; XIONG Xian-Ming

    2010-01-01

    @@ The equation of motion of two-level chromium atoms in Gauss standing laser wave is discussed and the distribution of chromium atoms is given under different transverse velocity conditions.The results show that the focusing position of atoms will be affected by the transverse velocity of atoms.Based on the four-order Runge-Kutta method,the locus of chromium atoms in Gauss standing laser wave is simulated.The three-dimensional characteristics of nanometer structures are stimulated under perfect and emanative conditions.

  12. STUDY ON MORPHOLOGY OF CHROMIUM IN CHILLED Cu-0.14%-2.0%Cr ALLOYS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.W.Yang; Z.K.Fan

    2004-01-01

    The morphology of chromium in chilled Cu-Cr alloys with 0.14%-2.0% Cr has been studied. The results showed that eutectic Cr phase takes a fibrous shape, and pre-eutectic Cr is dendritic in the studied chilled Cu-Cr alloy. During solute treatment of the eutectic and super-eutectic Cu-Cr alloys, only part of chromium particles dissolved in copper phase,some fiber and dendritic chromium still remained. Forging before solute treatment can reduce the size of primary Cr particles, which benefits the aging structure.

  13. Peat and coconut fiber as biofilters for chromium adsorption from contaminated wastewaters

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Batch adsorption experiments were performed for the removal of chromium (III) and chromium (VI) ions from aqueous solutions using Canadian peat and coconut fiber. The Langmuir model was used to describe the adsorption isotherm. The maximum adsorption for peat reached 18.75 mg/g for Cr(III) and 8.02 mg/g for Cr(VI), whereas the value for fiber was slightly higher and reached 19.21 mg/g for Cr(III) and 9.54 mg/g for Cr(VI). Both chromium forms could be easily eluted from the materials. The adso...

  14. Growth of magnetic cobalt/chromium nano-arrays by atom-optical lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atoneche, F; Malik, D; Kirilyuk, A; Toonen, A J; Etteger, A F van; Rasing, Th, E-mail: f.atoneche@science.ru.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen, Institute for Molecules and Materials, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2011-07-06

    Arrays of magnetic cobalt/chromium (Co-Cr) nanolines are grown by depositing an atomic beam of Co-Cr alloy through a laser standing wave (SW) at {lambda}/2 = 212.8 nm onto a substrate. During deposition, only the chromium atoms are resonantly affected by the optical potential created by the SW, causing a periodic modulation of the chromium concentration and consequently of the magnetic properties. Magnetic force microscopy and magneto-optical Kerr effect studies reveal a patterned magnetic structure on the substrate surface.

  15. Growth of magnetic cobalt/chromium nano-arrays by atom-optical lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atoneche, F.; Malik, D.; Kirilyuk, A.; Toonen, A. J.; van Etteger, A. F.; Rasing, Th

    2011-07-01

    Arrays of magnetic cobalt/chromium (Co-Cr) nanolines are grown by depositing an atomic beam of Co-Cr alloy through a laser standing wave (SW) at λ/2 = 212.8 nm onto a substrate. During deposition, only the chromium atoms are resonantly affected by the optical potential created by the SW, causing a periodic modulation of the chromium concentration and consequently of the magnetic properties. Magnetic force microscopy and magneto-optical Kerr effect studies reveal a patterned magnetic structure on the substrate surface.

  16. Proposed adsorption-diffusion model for characterizing chromium(VI) removal using dried water hyacinth roots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, Debasish; Mukherjee, Paramartha; Bandyopadhyay, Amitava [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Calcutta, Kolkata (India); Das, Sudip Kumar [Department of Chemical Technology, University of Calcutta, Kolkata (India)

    2010-08-15

    Experiments have been carried out to characterize the adsorption of chromium(VI) in the aqueous phase onto dried roots of water hyacinth. Results revealed a very high degree of removal efficiency ({proportional_to}100%). Theoretical analyzes are also made for describing the sorption and diffusion processes. The effective pore diffusivity of chromium(VI) in the water hyacinth roots is determined by a suitable global optimization technique. The depth of penetration, on the other hand, has been estimated for various initial concentrations of chromium(VI). Theoretically predicted concentration profiles are in excellent agreement with the experimental values. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  17. 7 CFR 984.64 - Disposition of substandard walnuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Reserve Walnuts § 984.64 Disposition of substandard walnuts. Substandard walnuts may be disposed of only for manufacture into oil, livestock feed, or such... trade in such markets. Wherever free and reserve percentages are in effect, the kernelweight of...

  18. 42 CFR 414.64 - Payment for medical nutrition therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... of this chapter. (c) Effective date of payment. Medicare pays suppliers of medical nutrition therapy... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for medical nutrition therapy. 414.64... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM PAYMENT FOR PART B MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Physicians...

  19. 28 CFR 79.64 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.64... cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed primary lung cancer must be supported by...

  20. Phenotype-gene: 64 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 64 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u3ria224u1063i decreased efficiency...5 Oct. Plant Cell 17(10):2633-46. http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u16141450i decreased efficiency

  1. 45 CFR 98.64 - Reallotment and redistribution of funds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT FUND Financial Management § 98.64 Reallotment and redistribution of funds. (a) According to the... paragraph the term “State” means the 50 States and the District of Columbia. Territorial and tribal grantees... will be based on the State's financial report to ACF for the Child Care and Development Fund...

  2. 32 CFR 64.2 - Applicability and scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN MANAGEMENT AND MOBILIZATION OF REGULAR AND RESERVE RETIRED MILITARY MEMBERS § 64.2 Applicability and scope. This part: (a) Applies to the Office of the Secretary of Defense, the Military Departments...

  3. Application of 64 channel laser for free space interconnections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yung-Hsien; Lin, Yen-Heng; Chiang, Chia-Chin; Tsao, Shyh-Lin

    2006-08-01

    We analyze and simulate the optical properties of the frequency hopping wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) laser. In order to design the multi-channel wavelength hopping laser as the light source of optics to the x(OTTx), our investigation describes how to design, simulate of 64×64 Array Waveguide Grating (AWG) on the silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrate. The achieved AWG has a channel spacing of 0.4 nm (50GHz) with its spectrum centered at 1550.52 nm. The number of arrayed waveguides is 266 and the length difference is 9.89μm. We find out an optimal value of waveguide separation at the junction between arrayed waveguides region and free propagation region. In order to get a better uniformity for 64 channel outputs while insertion loss and crosstalk are taken into account, we also describe the improved design by using tapered waveguide structure at the both ends of AWG. The experimental results show the flatness can be improved to 0.71 dB which is very close to our previous simulation works. We also analyze the concentration effect of doping Er, cross-talk and thermal effect in SOI waveguide. We investigate the optical sphericity mirror station (BS) and relay station (RS) in OTTx system. We use the uniformity for 64 channel outputs as the light source of wavelength hopping laser of this system. The optic signals convert to the receiving signal by 4G over OTTx signal converting technique in this system.

  4. 48 CFR 9904.412-64 - Transition method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transition method. 9904... ACCOUNTING STANDARDS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS 9904.412-64 Transition method. To be acceptable, any method of... previously provided for, shall not be redundantly provided for under revised methods. Conversely, costs...

  5. Test Area C-64 Range Environmental Assessment, Revision 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    at TA C-64 are designed to test, verify, validate, demonstrate, or prove that the new or improved hardware, system, software , explosive, or munition... grasshoppers and crickets) and small vertebrates (e.g., snakes, lizards, birds, mice, and sometimes bats). They often utilize the tree line or utility

  6. 47 CFR 64.1300 - Payphone compensation obligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payphone compensation obligation. 64.1300... compensation obligation. (a) For purposes of this subpart, a Completing Carrier is a long distance carrier or... parties by contract. (c) The compensation obligation set forth herein shall not apply to calls...

  7. 47 CFR 64.1310 - Payphone compensation procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payphone compensation procedures. 64.1310... compensation procedures. (a) Unless the payphone service provider consents to an alternative compensation... not unreasonably withhold its consent to an alternative compensation arrangement. (1) Each...

  8. Automation of (64)Cu production at Turku PET Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elomaa, Viki-Veikko; Jurttila, Jori; Rajander, Johan; Solin, Olof

    2014-07-01

    At Turku PET Centre automation for handling solid targets for the production of (64)Cu has been built. The system consists of a module for moving the target from the irradiation position into a lead transport shield and a robotic-arm assisted setup for moving the target within radiochemistry laboratory. The main motivation for designing automation arises from radiation hygiene.

  9. 47 CFR 64.1002 - International settlements policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS RULES RELATING TO COMMON CARRIERS International Settlements Policy and Modification... accounting rate modification, filed pursuant to § 64.1001, that includes a settlement rate that is at or... behavior that is harmful to U.S. customers. Carriers and other parties filing complaints must support...

  10. 41 CFR 60-300.64 - Show cause notices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Show cause notices. 60... VETERANS General Enforcement and Complaint Procedures § 60-300.64 Show cause notices. When the Deputy Assistant Secretary has reasonable cause to believe that the contractor has violated the Act or this...

  11. 41 CFR 60-250.64 - Show cause notices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Show cause notices. 60... VETERANS General Enforcement and Complaint Procedures § 60-250.64 Show cause notices. When the Deputy Assistant Secretary has reasonable cause to believe that the contractor has violated the Act or this...

  12. 41 CFR 60-741.64 - Show cause notices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Show cause notices. 60... INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES General Enforcement and Complaint Procedures § 60-741.64 Show cause notices. When the Deputy Assistant Secretary has reasonable cause to believe that the contractor has...

  13. Preparation of ~(64)Ni-Gd-Cu Target

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The three-layer-sandwich targets of 64Ni-Gd-Cu needed in the physics experiment were prepared. The middle layers are thin ferromagnetic Gd layers of about 1.7 mg/cm2, recoil stopper layers are thick crystallized and defect-free Cu layers of about 12

  14. 49 CFR 230.64 - Leaks under lagging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Leaks § 230.64 Leaks under lagging. The steam locomotive owner and/or operator shall take out of service at once any boiler that has developed a leak under the lagging due to a crack in the shell, or...

  15. 64. Venezia filmifestivalil kuuleb palju inglise keelt / Andris Feldmanis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Feldmanis, Andris, 1982-

    2007-01-01

    Eesti mängufilm, Mati Undi romaani "Sügisballi" ekraniseering (režissöör Veiko Õunpuu, produtsent Katrin Kissa) valiti esimese Eesti filmina homme algava Venezia 64. filmifestivali konkursiprogrammi Orizzonti. Festivali võistluskava filmidest

  16. 43 CFR 12.64 - Matching or cost sharing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ....64 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior ADMINISTRATIVE AND AUDIT REQUIREMENTS AND COST PRINCIPLES FOR ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and... (usually as indirect costs) in accordance with the cost principles specified in § 12.62, in the same way...

  17. 27 CFR 40.64 - Articles of partnership or association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Articles of partnership or....64 Articles of partnership or association. Every partnership or association, before commencing... § 40.62, a true copy of the articles of partnership or association, if any, or certificate...

  18. Biochemical characterization of a glucoamylase from Saccharomycopsis fibuligera R64

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Natalia, Dessy; Vidilaseris, Keni; Satrimafitrah, Pasjan; Ismaya Purkan, Wangsa T.; Permentier, Hjalmar; Fibriansah, Guntur; Puspasari, Fernita; Nurachman, Zeily; Dijkstra, Bauke; Soemitro, Soetijoso

    2011-01-01

    Glucoamylase from the yeast Saccharomycopsis fibuligera R64 (GLL1) has successfully been purified and characterized. The molecular mass of the enzyme was 56,583 Da as determined by mass spectrometry. The purified enzyme demonstrated optimum activity in the pH range of 5.6-6.4 and at 50A degrees C. T

  19. TCM Treatment of Thromboangiitis Obliterans -A Report of 64 Cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    门军章; 门九章

    2005-01-01

    @@ Thromboangiitis Obliterans (TAO), a common peripheral vascular disease with a long illness course and grave sufferings, can cause acromelic gangrene, ulcer and even amputation at the late stage. We have for many years used TCM syndrome differentiation to diagnose and treat the disease with good therapeutic results. The treatment of 64 TAO cases from 2001 to 2002 is reported as follows.

  20. 7 CFR 982.64 - Creditable promotion and advertising reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Creditable promotion and advertising reports. 982.64... promotion and advertising reports. Each handler shall file such reports of creditable promotion including paid advertising conducted pursuant to § 982.58 as recommended by the Board and approved by...

  1. Electrochemical reduction of hexavalent chromium in ground water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bansal, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Electrochemical reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr{sup +6}) to its trivalent state (Cr{sup +3}) is showing promising results in treating ground water at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) Main Site. An electrolytic cell using stainless-steel and brass electrodes has been found to offer the most efficient reduction while yielding the least amount of precipitate. Trials have successfully lowered concentrations of Cr{sup +6} to below 11 parts per billion (micrograms/liter), the California state standard. We ran several trials to determine optimal voltage for running the cell; each trial consisted of applying a voltage between 6V and 48V for ten minutes through samples obtained at Treatment Facility C(TFC). No conclusive data has been obtained yet.

  2. Fracture and Delamination of Chromium Thin Films on Polymer Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordill, M. J.; Taylor, A.; Schalko, J.; Dehm, G.

    2010-04-01

    New emerging technologies in the field of flexible electronic devices require that metal films adhere well and flex with polymer substrates. Common thin film materials used for these applications include copper (Cu) with an adhesion interlayer of chromium (Cr). Copper can be quite ductile and easily move with the polymer substrate. However, Cr is more brittle and fractures at lower strains than Cu. This study aims to examine the fracture and subsequent buckling and delamination of strained Cr films on polyimide (PI). In-situ scanning electron microscope (SEM) straining is used to systematically study the influence of film thickness on fracture and buckling strains. Film fracture and delamination depend on film thickness, and increases in crack and buckle density with decreasing thickness are explored by a shear lag model.

  3. Hexavalent Chromium Removal by Litchi chinensis Sonn Peel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismael Acosta-Rodriguez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: We studied the Chromium (VI removal capacity in aqueous solution by the litchi peel. Approach: We use the diphenylcarbazide method to evaluate the metal concentration. Results: The highest biosorption of the metal (50 mg L-1 occurs within 6 min, at pH of 1 and 28°C. According to temperature, the highest removal was observed at 40 and 50°C, in 45 min, when the metal (1 g L-1 was completely adsorbed. At the analyzed concentrations of Cr (VI, litchi peel, showed excellent removal capacity, besides it removes efficiently the metal in situ (100% removal, 5 days of incubation, 5 and 10 g of biomass. After 1 h of incubation the studied biomass reduces 1.0 g of Cr (VI with the simultaneous production of Cr (III. Conclusion: The shell can be used to eliminate it from industrial wastewater."

  4. Investigation of hexavalent chromium sorption in serpentine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpouras, Thanasis; Chrysochoou, Maria; Dermatas, Dimitris

    2017-02-01

    In this study the removal of hexavalent chromium (Cr6 +) by serpentine sediments was investigated in order to delineate Cr6 + sorption behavior in aquifers with ultramafic geologic background. Batch experiments were conducted in order to determine the influence of several parameters on Cr6 + removal, including the pH of the sediment solution, mineralogy, sediment's particle size and Cr6 + initial concentration. The results showed that Cr6 + removal was due to both adsorption and reduction phenomena. Reduction was attributed to the presence of a magnetic fraction in the sediment, mostly related to magnetite, which contributed almost 50% of the total removal in the pH range 3-7. Adsorption behavior was dominated by the finer sediment fraction (d transport modeling.

  5. Polyaniline coating with various substrates for hexavalent chromium removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Bin; Xu, Cuixia; Sun, Dezhi; Wang, Qiang; Gu, Hongbo; Zhang, Xin; Weeks, Brandon L.; Hopper, Jack; Ho, Thomas C.; Guo, Zhanhu; Wei, Suying

    2015-04-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) contamination is increasingly serious in surface water and groundwater, therefore, its removal attracts increasing attention due to its highly toxic to human health. The cost effective and sustainable adsorbents are urgently needed for the remediation of Cr(VI) pollution. Polyanline (PANI), a conductive polymer, has demonstrated a great performance on Cr(VI) removal. But the recycling is the challenge for its application due to its small size. The PANI coating with various substrates is an effective approach to solve this problem. The synthesis methods and applications of the PANI coated magnetic Fe3O4, carbon fabric and cellulose composites for the Cr(VI) removal were reviewed. Finally, this review analyzed the Cr(VI) removal mechanisms by the PANI composites considering the substrate and the PANI coating.

  6. Chromium Renderserver: scalable and open remote rendering infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Brian; Ahern, Sean; Bethel, E Wes; Brugger, Eric; Cook, Rich; Daniel, Jamison; Lewis, Ken; Owen, Jens; Southard, Dale

    2008-01-01

    Chromium Renderserver (CRRS) is software infrastructure that provides the ability for one or more users to run and view image output from unmodified, interactive OpenGL and X11 applications on a remote, parallel computational platform equipped with graphics hardware accelerators via industry-standard Layer 7 network protocols and client viewers. The new contributions of this work include a solution to the problem of synchronizing X11 and OpenGL command streams, remote delivery of parallel hardware accelerated rendering, and a performance analysis of several different optimizations that are generally applicable to a variety of rendering architectures. CRRS is fully operational, Open Source software. imagery and sending it to a remote viewer.

  7. Tuning ferromagnetism in zinc oxide nanoparticles by chromium doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Palvinder; Pandey, S. K.; Kumar, Sanjeev; Negi, N. S.; Chen, C. L.; Rao, S. M.; Wu, M. K.

    2015-11-01

    Zn1- x Cr x O nanoparticles with x = 0.0, 0.01, 0.03 and 0.05 were synthesized by the sol-gel technique. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies reveal that chromium (Cr) incorporates into the ZnO crystal lattice without disturbing the parent hexagonal (wurtzite) structure. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements show that the average size of these nanoparticles is in the range 15-25 nm. Optical absorption studies show that the band gap of ZnO nanoparticles varies with Cr doping. Photoluminescence (PL) studies depict the presence of defects in Cr-doped nanoparticles. Undoped ZnO exhibits diamagnetic behavior while Cr-doped ZnO samples exhibit weak ferromagnetism to anti-ferromagnetism depending on the Cr content.

  8. Nanotwin hardening in a cubic chromium oxide thin film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuma Suzuki

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available NaCl-type (B1 chromium oxide (CrO has been expected to have a high hardness value and does not exist as an equilibrium phase. We report a B1-based Cr0.67O thin film with a thickness of 144 nm prepared by pulsed laser deposition as an epitaxial thin film on a MgO single crystal. The thin film contained a number of stacking faults and had a nanotwinned structure composed of B1 with disordered vacancies and corundum structures. The Cr0.67O thin film had a high indentation hardness value of 44 GPa, making it the hardest oxide thin film reported to date.

  9. Identification Trial of Crystallization Parameters of Modified Chromium Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Studnicki

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In the paper results of researches of abrasion-resisting chromium cast iron inoculated with boron carbide B4C primary crystallization are presented. The main aim of work was make an attempt to identification of crystallization parameters that changed in reason of inoculation. Essential primary crystallization parameters, with the help of which, will be possible to evaluate the inoculation capacity were searched. It was found that in the result of inoculant actions characteristic temperatures were changed and time of primary crystallization was decreased. For tests the new broadened Derivative Thermal Analysis method, in which three samples with different solidification module were applied, was used. Thanks to this inoculation capacity in casts with significant diversified self-cooling ranges was possible to observe.

  10. Tetravalent chromium doped laser materials and NIR tunable lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfano, Robert R. (Inventor); Petricevic, Vladimir (Inventor); Bykov, Alexey (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A method is described to improve and produce purer Cr.sup.4+-doped laser materials and lasers with reduced co-incorporation of chromium in any other valence states, such as Cr.sup.3+, Cr.sup.2+, Cr.sup.5+, and Cr.sup.6+. The method includes: 1) certain crystals of olivine structure with large cation (Ca) in octahedral sites such as Cr.sup.4+:Ca.sub.2GeO.sub.4, Cr.sup.4+:Ca.sub.2SiO.sub.4, Cr.sup.4+:Ca.sub.2Ge.sub.xSi.sub.1-xO.sub.4 (where 0NIR laser applications.

  11. Semisolid Slurry Preparation of Die Steel with High Chromium Content

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO Wei-min; ZHAO Ai-min; ZHANG Li-juan; ZHONG Xue-you

    2004-01-01

    The semisolid slurry preparation of die steels Cr12 and Cr12MoV with high chromium content was studied. The results show that the semisolid slurry of both steels with solid of 40 %-60 % can be made by electromagnetic stirring method and is easy to be discharged from the bottom little hole of the stirring chamber. The sizes of the spherical primary austenite in the slurry of die steels Cr12 and Cr12MoV are 50-100 μm and 80-150 μm, respectively. The homogeneous temperature field and solute field for both steel melts are obtained. The strong temperature fluctuation in the melt with many fine primary austenite grains occurs and the remelting of the secondary arm roots at the same time is accelerated because of the electromagnetic stirring. These are the most important reasons for deposition of spherical primary austenite grains.

  12. Characterization of electrocoagulation for removal of chromium and arsenic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parga, J.R.; Valverde, V. [Institute of Technology of Saltillo, Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Science, V. Carranza 2400, Saltillo Coah., C.P. 25280 (Mexico); Cocke, D.L.; Gomes, J.A.G.; Kesmez, M.; Moreno, H. [Lamar University, Gill Chair of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Beaumont, TX 77710 (United States); Weir, M.; Mencer, D. [Wilkes University, Dept. of Chemistry, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18766 (United States)

    2005-05-01

    Protection of the global environment and, in particular, providing a sustainable source of clean water is a necessity for human survival. The wide use of heavy metals by modern industries has generated by-products containing heavy metals. Specifically, large quantities of chromium and arsenic containing compounds are being discharged into the environment. This study has been conducted to determine the feasibility of an electrocoagulation (EC) process using air injection to remove these inorganic elements with iron electrodes. Powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission Moessbauer spectroscopy were used to characterize the solid products formed at iron electrodes during EC. The results of this study suggest that magnetite particles and amorphous iron oxyhydroxides are present in the examined EC products. The field pilot-scale study demonstrated the removal of Cr(VI)/Cr(III) and As(III)/As(V) with an efficiency of more than 99 % from both wastewater and wells. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  13. Adsorption of hexavalent chromium by graphite–chitosan binary composite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    RAJENDRA S DONGRE

    2016-06-01

    Graphite chitosan binary (GCB) composite was prepared for hexavalent chromium adsorption from studied water. GCB was characterized by TGA, FTIR, SEM and X-ray diffraction techniques.Wide porous sorptive surface of 3.89 m$^2$ g$^{−1}$ and absorptive functionalities of GCB was due to 20% (w/w) graphite support on chitosan evidenced from FTIR and SEM that impart maximum adsorption at pH 4, agitation with 200 rpm for 180 min. Adsorption studies revealed intraparticle diffusion models and best-fitted kinetics was pseudo 2nd order one. A wellfitted Langmuir isotherm model suggested monolayer adsorption with an adsorption capacity ($q_m$) of 105.6 mg g$^{−1}$ and $R^2 = 0.945$. Sorption mechanisms based on metal ionic interactions, intrusion/diffusion and chemisorptions onto composite. This graphite chitosan binary composite improve sorbent capacity for Cr(VI).

  14. Microbial reduction of hexavalent chromium by landfill leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yarong; Low, Gary K-C; Scott, Jason A; Amal, Rose

    2007-04-02

    The reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in municipal landfill leachates (MLL) and a non-putrescible landfill leachate (NPLL) was investigated. Complete Cr(VI) reduction was achieved within 17 days in a MLL when spiked with 100 mg l(-1) Cr(VI) or less. In the same period, negligible Cr(VI) reduction was observed in NPLL. In MLL, Cr(VI) reduction was demonstrated to be a function of initial Cr(VI) concentration and bacterial biomass and organic matter concentrations. The bacteria were observed to tolerate 250 mg l(-1) Cr(VI) in MLL and had an optimal growth activity at pH 7.4 in a growth medium. The MLL also possessed an ability to sequentially reduce Cr(VI) over three consecutive spiking cycles.

  15. Chromium as resonant donor impurity in PbTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, M. D.; Levin, E. M.; Jaworski, C. M.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.; Heremans, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    We synthesize and perform structural, thermoelectric, magnetic, and 125Te NMR characterization measurements on chromium-doped PbTe. 125Te NMR and magnetic measurements show that Pb1-xCrxTe is a solid solution up to x = 0.4 at.% and forms an n-type dilute paramagnetic semiconductor. The Cr level is resonant and pins the Fermi level about 100 meV into the conduction band at liquid nitrogen temperatures and below, but it moves into the gap as the temperature increases to 300 K. 125Te NMR spectra exhibit a Knight shift that correlates well with Hall effect measurements and resolve peaks of Te near Cr. Magnetic behavior indicates that Cr exists mainly as Cr2+. No departure from the Pisarenko relation for PbTe is observed. Secondary Cr2Te3 and Cr3+δTe4 phases are present in samples with x > 0.4%.

  16. Chromium as Resonant Donor Impurity in PbTe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, M.D.; Levin, Evgenii; Jaworski, C.M.; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus; Heremans, J.P.

    2012-01-25

    We synthesize and perform structural, thermoelectric, magnetic, and 125Te NMR characterization measurements on chromium-doped PbTe. 125Te NMR and magnetic measurements show that Pb1−xCrxTe is a solid solution up to x = 0.4 at.% and forms an n-type dilute paramagnetic semiconductor. The Cr level is resonant and pins the Fermi level about 100 meV into the conduction band at liquid nitrogen temperatures and below, but it moves into the gap as the temperature increases to 300 K. 125Te NMR spectra exhibit a Knight shift that correlates well with Hall effect measurements and resolve peaks of Te near Cr. Magnetic behavior indicates that Cr exists mainly as Cr2+. No departure from the Pisarenko relation for PbTe is observed. Secondary Cr2Te3 and Cr3+δTe4 phases are present in samples with x > 0.4%.

  17. Ab initio calculation of chromium oxide containing Ti dopant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maldonado, Frank [Grupo de Fisicoquimica de Materiales, Universidad Tecnica Particular de Loja, Apartado 11-01-608, Loja (Ecuador); Novillo, Corina [Escuela de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Tecnica Particular de Loja, Apartado 11-01-608, Loja (Ecuador); Stashans, Arvids, E-mail: arvids@utpl.edu.ec [Grupo de Fisicoquimica de Materiales, Universidad Tecnica Particular de Loja, Apartado 11-01-608, Loja (Ecuador)

    2012-01-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructure changes in chromium oxide due to the Ti doping. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Discovery of magnetism in Ti-doped {alpha}-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Explanation of the origin of n-type electrical conductivity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Detailed analysis of electronic properties and density of states. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As to authors' knowledge, Ti-doped crystal is studied for the first time by the DFT. - Abstract: First-principles computations based on the density functional theory within the generalised gradient approximation and introduced intra-atomic interaction term for strongly correlated electrons (DFT + U method) has been used in this work. Ti impurity doping in the {alpha}-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystal has been carried out considering single defect model within the periodic crystalline structure. Atomic displacements, Bader charges on atoms have been computed showing that Ti dopant converts the chemical bonding in its neighbourhood into more ionic one. The defect-local microstructure is such as there exist general tendency of atomic rearrangements away with respect to the Ti imperfection. It is found that defect incorporation produces some local changes upon the band structure of the material and also induces a metallic state. That implies n-type electrical conductivity in the Ti-doped {alpha}-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystals and relates our work directly to a number of experimental studies in this area. Our results provide evidence over change in magnetic moments in the vicinity of defect, which means that the chromium oxide doped with Ti impurity might not act as an antiferromagnetic substance.

  18. Fluctuations in Precambrian atmospheric oxygenation recorded by chromium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Robert; Gaucher, Claudio; Poulton, Simon W.; Canfield, Don E.

    2009-09-01

    Geochemical data suggest that oxygenation of the Earth's atmosphere occurred in two broad steps. The first rise in atmospheric oxygen is thought to have occurred between ~2.45 and 2.2Gyr ago, leading to a significant increase in atmospheric oxygen concentrations and concomitant oxygenation of the shallow surface ocean. The second increase in atmospheric oxygen appears to have taken place in distinct stages during the late Neoproterozoic era (~800-542Myr ago), ultimately leading to oxygenation of the deep ocean ~580Myr ago, but details of the evolution of atmospheric oxygenation remain uncertain. Here we use chromium (Cr) stable isotopes from banded iron formations (BIFs) to track the presence of Cr(VI) in Precambrian oceans, providing a time-resolved picture of the oxygenation history of the Earth's atmosphere-hydrosphere system. The geochemical behaviour of Cr is highly sensitive to the redox state of the surface environment because oxidative weathering processes produce the oxidized hexavalent [Cr(VI)] form. Oxidation of reduced trivalent [Cr(III)] chromium on land is accompanied by an isotopic fractionation, leading to enrichment of the mobile hexavalent form in the heavier isotope. Our fractionated Cr isotope data indicate the accumulation of Cr(VI) in ocean surface waters ~2.8 to 2.6Gyr ago and a likely transient elevation in atmospheric and surface ocean oxygenation before the first great rise of oxygen 2.45-2.2Gyr ago (the Great Oxidation Event). In ~1.88-Gyr-old BIFs we find that Cr isotopes are not fractionated, indicating a decline in atmospheric oxygen. Our findings suggest that the Great Oxidation Event did not lead to a unidirectional stepwise increase in atmospheric oxygen. In the late Neoproterozoic, we observe strong positive fractionations in Cr isotopes (δ53Cr up to +4.9‰), providing independent support for increased surface oxygenation at that time, which may have stimulated rapid evolution of macroscopic multicellular life.

  19. Probing neutrino nature at Borexino detector with chromium neutrino source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobkow, W.; Blaut, A. [University of Wroclaw, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Wroclaw (Poland)

    2016-10-15

    In this paper, we indicate a possibility of utilizing the intense chromium source (∝370 PBq) in probing the neutrino nature in low energy neutrino experiments with the ultra-low threshold and background real-time Borexino detector located near the source (∝8 m). We analyse the elastic scattering of electron neutrinos (Dirac or Majorana, respectively) on the unpolarised electrons in the relativistic neutrino limit. We assume that the incoming neutrino beam is the superposition of left-right chiral states produced by the chromium source. Left chiral neutrinos may be detected by the standard V - A and non-standard scalar S{sub L}, pseudoscalar P{sub L}, tensor T{sub L} interactions, while right chiral ones partake only in the exotic V + A and S{sub R}, P{sub R}, T{sub R} interactions. Our model-independent study is carried out for the flavour (current) neutrino eigenstates. We compute the expected event number for the standard V - A interaction of the left chiral neutrinos using the current experimental values of standard couplings and in the case of left-right chiral superposition. We show that the significant decrement in the event number due to the interference terms between the standard and exotic interactions for the Majorana neutrinos may appear. We also demonstrate how the presence of the exotic couplings affects the energy spectrum of outgoing electrons, both for the Dirac and Majorana cases. The 90 % C.L. sensitivity contours in the planes of corresponding exotic couplings are found. The presence of interferences in the Majorana case gives the stronger constraints than for the Dirac neutrinos, even if the neutrino source is placed outside the detector. (orig.)

  20. High-valent imido complexes of manganese and chromium corroles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Nicola Y; Eikey, Rebecca A; Loring, Megan I; Abu-Omar, Mahdi M

    2005-05-16

    The oxidation reaction of M(tpfc) [M = Mn or Cr and tpfc = tris(pentafluorophenyl)corrole] with aryl azides under photolytic or thermal conditions gives the first examples of mononuclear imido complexes of manganese(V) and chromium(V). These complexes have been characterized by NMR, mass spectrometry, UV-vis, EPR, elemental analysis, and cyclic voltammetry. Two X-ray structures have been obtained for Mn(tpfc)(NMes) and Cr(tpfc)(NMes) [Mes = 2,4,6-(CH(3))(3)C(6)H(2)]. Short metal-imido bonds (1.610 and 1.635 Angstroms) as well as nearly linear M-N-C angles are consistent with triple M triple-bond NR bond formation. The kinetics of nitrene [NR] group transfer from manganese(V) corroles to various organic phosphines have been defined. Reduction of the manganese(V) corrolato complex affords phosphine imine and Mn(III) with reaction rates that are sensitive to steric and electronic elements of the phosphine substrate. An analogous manganese complex with a variant corrole ligand containing bromine atoms in the beta-pyrrole positions, Mn(Br(8)tpfc)(NAr), has been prepared and studied. Its reaction with PEt(3) is 250x faster than that of the parent tpfc complex, and its Mn(V/IV) couple is shifted by 370 mV to a more positive potential. The EPR spectra of chromium(V) imido corroles reveal a rich signal at ambient temperature consistent with Cr(V) triple-bond NR (d(1), S = 1/2) containing a localized spin density in the d(xy) orbital, and an anisotropic signal at liquid nitrogen temperature. Our results demonstrate the synthetic utility of organic aryl azides in the preparation of mononuclear metal imido complexes previously considered elusive, and suggest strong sigma-donation as the underlying factor in stabilizing high-valent metals by corrole ligands.

  1. Threshold behavior of interaction potential for the system 7Li + 64Ni: Comparison with 6Li + 64Ni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Md. Moin; Das, Mili; Roy, Subinit; Sinha, M.; Pradhan, M. K.; Basu, P.; Datta, U.; Ramachandran, K.; Shrivastava, A.

    2016-09-01

    The elastic scattering angular distributions for the system 7Li + 64Ni were measured in the bombarding energy range of 12 MeV ≤Elab ≤ 26.4 MeV. A phenomenological optical model analysis was performed for the measured data. The strengths of the fitted potential components at the surface were estimated to extract their variation with energy. Further analyses of the measured angular distributions were performed with a hybrid potential composed of a renormalized folded real and a phenomenological imaginary potential. Both the model potentials predict similar energy dependent behavior for the effective interaction potential around the barrier. Unlike the heavy targets, 7Li + 64Ni does not show a normal threshold behavior. It also does not clearly exhibit a behavior similar to 6Li + 64Ni. The real potential for 7Li + 64Ni does not exhibit any significant energy dependence and the imaginary potential strength remains almost independent of energy above the Coulomb barrier (∼ 14 MeV). However, at energies below the barrier, a sudden drop in the imaginary potential strength is observed.

  2. Estudio vascular renal por TC multidetector de 64 canales 64-Multidetector row CT for the Renal Vascular Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Stoisa

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Mostrar las diversas variantes anatómicas vasculares tanto arteriales como venosas en el estudio angiográfico renal por tomografìa computada multidetector (TCMD de 64 canales, dada su implicancia en un eventual planeamiento quirúrgico. Material y métodos: Evaluamos retrospectivamente 26 estudios realizados con tomógrafo Philips Brilliance de 64 canales. Se obtuvieron secuencias sin contraste y postcontraste e.v. en fases arterial y venosa, administrado con bomba inyectora doble cabezal. Para una fase arterial apropiada se utilizó técnica de bolus track. Las imágenes fueron posteriormente procesadas en Workstation Philips Brilliance 190P en un tiempo promedio de 30 minutos y reconstruidas con técnicas MIP y volumétrica. Resultados: Dentro de las variantes anatómicas arteriales, encontramos: bifurcaciones prehiliares (n=3, arterias accesorias (n=4 y arterias polares (n=9. Dentro de las variantes venosas fueron halladas: venas renales múltiples (n=5, venas circumaórticas (n=2, retroaórticas (n=2 y vena tributaria lumbar prominente (n=1. Conclusión: El estudio vascular renal adquiere importancia en el planeamiento quirúrgico en casos de nefrectomías parciales, laparoscópicas y en el transplante renal. Esto otorga suma utilidad al estudio de TCMD de 64 canales por su eficacia diagnóstica, dada la alta calidad de las reconstrucciones obtenidas, llegando a igualar a la angiografía digital, sin ser un método invasivo.Purpose: To show the wide range of anatomical vascular variants, arterial and venous, that can be seen in the angiographic renal study using 64-multidetector-row computed tomography (64-MDCT, due to its importance in an eventual surgical planning. Material and Methods: We have evaluated retrospectively 26 studies that have been done using a 64 channels Philips Brilliance CT scanner. We have obtained non enhanced and both in arterial and venous enhanced sequences. For the injection of the contrast material we

  3. 40 CFR 749.68 - Hexavalent chromium-based water treatment chemicals in cooling systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... proprietorship, association, or any other business entity; any State or political subdivision thereof; any municipality; any interstate body; and any department, agency, or instrumentality of the Federal Government... the following language: WARNING: This product contains hexavalent chromium. Inhalation of...

  4. RESEARCH AND APPLICATION OF AS-CAST WEAR RESISTANCE HIGH CHROMIUM CAST IRON

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    The influence of alloy elements, such as boron and silicon, on the microstructure and properties of as-cast high chromium cast iron is studied. The results show that boron and silicon have a great effect on the mechanical properties and the wear resistance. Through proper addition of boron and silicon, the properties of as-cast high chromium cast iron can be improved effectively. Through analyzing the distribution of elements by scanning electron microscope, it has been shown that the addition of boron and silicon lowers the mass fraction of chromium saturated in as-cast austenite, and makes it unstable and liable to be transformed into martensite. The as-cast high chromium cast iron with proper content of boron and silicon is suitable for the manufacture of lining for asphalt concrete mixer and its wear resistance is 14 times that of lining made of low alloy white cast iron.

  5. Methods to Develop Inhalation Cancer Risk Estimates for Chromium and Nickel Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document summarizes the approaches and rationale for the technical and scientific considerations used to derive inhalation cancer risks for emissions of chromium and nickel compounds from electric utility steam generating units.

  6. Preconcentration and Determination of Chromium Species Using Octadecyl Silica Membrane Disks and Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MOGHIMI Ali; SABER-TEHRANI Mohammad; WAQIF-HUSAIN Syed; MOHAMMADHOSSEINI Majid

    2007-01-01

    A novel and selective method for the fast determination of trace amounts of chromium species in water samples has been developed.The procedure is based on the selective formation of chromium diethyldithiocarbamate complexes at different pH in the presence of Mn(Ⅱ) as an enhancement agent of chromium signals followed by elutionwith organic eluents and determination by atomic flame absorption spectrometry.The maximum capacity of the employed disks was found to be (3964±3) μg and (376±2) μg for Cr(Ⅲ) and Cr(Ⅵ),respectively.The detection limit of the proposed method is 49 and 43 ng·L-1 for Cr(Ⅲ) and Cr(Ⅵ),respectively.The proposed method was successfully applied for determination of chromium species Cr(Ⅲ) and Cr(Ⅵ) in different water samples.

  7. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION ON CHROMIUM(VI REMOVAL FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTION USING ACTIVATED CARBON RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE XEROGELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eghe A. Oyedoh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of chromium(VI metal ion in aqueous solutions by activated carbon resorcinol formaldehyde xerogels (ACRF was investigated. The results showed that pore structure, surface area and the adsorbent surface chemistry are important factors in the control of the adsorption of chromium(VI metal ions. The isotherm parameters were obtained from plots of the isotherms and from the application of Langmuir and Freundlich Isotherms. Based on regression analysis, the Langmuir isotherm model was the best fit. The maximum adsorption capacity of ACRF for chromium (VI was 241.9 mg/g. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model was the best fit to the experimental data for the adsorption of chromium metal ions by activated carbon resorcinol formaldehyde xerogels. The thermodynamics of Cr(VI ions adsorption onto ACRF was a spontaneous and endothermic process.

  8. Remediation of Nitrate and ChromiumContaminated Groundwater by Zero-valent IronPRB

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Through continuous flow experimentation, the reactivity characteristics of zero-valent iron (Fe0)-PRB with ground watercontaminated by nitrate, chromium and the combination of nitrate and chromium were investigated. The results showed thatnitrate could be effectively deoxidized by zero-valent iron. NO2- -N was the transitional deoxidization product, while NH4+-Nwas the main final product in the effluent. Chromium could be deoxidized by zero-valent iron more effectively for the chromiumcontaminated ground water which was treated by PRB. The redox products such as Fe3+ and Cr(III) precipitated on the packingmedia during the process. For the treatment of ground water contaminated by both nitrate and chromium, the results showed thatthe Cr(VI) removal efficiency by the zero-valent iron was not affected by the co-existence of NO3- -N, while the NO3- -N removalefficiency decreased with the existence of Cr(VI).

  9. THE INVESTIGATION ON PLASMA ARC TREATMENT OF CHROMIUM PLATED ALLOY STRUCTURE STEEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X.M. Fan; J.W. Huang; K.H. Wang; Q. Liu

    2005-01-01

    The technology of plasma arc was used to modify the interface adhesion between chromium coating and steel substrate. The interface microstructure was studied as a function of plasma arc processing parameters. Microstructure analysis was performed by optical microscopy,scanning electron microscopy and electron probe. The microhardness distribution along the depth of a cross-section of the chromium coating and the substrate was measured. The results show the energy density of transferred plasma arc is obviously higher than plasma non-transferred arc. The molten interface was obtained by plasma transferred arc. Interfaces between chromium coating and steel substrate can be divided by plasma non-transferred arc into three classes: non-molten, a little molten and molten. Good interface bonding was obtained by proper process parameters. The microhardness of chromium coating decreases with increasing energy density of plasma arc.

  10. Reduction of chromium oxides with calcium carbide during thestainless steelmaking process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Arh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available An efficient reduction of chromium from slag requires an appropriate reduction agent for the given steelmaking technology. The usual slag reduction praxis consists of carbon injections and additions of ferrosilicon and aluminum.Reduction of chromium containing slags with calcium carbide is an appealing alternative. Calcium carbide is a strong reduction agent that unlike ferrosilicon and aluminum also provides the possibility of foaming slag formation.Experimental work regarding chromium slag reduction with calcium carbide towards usual slag reduction praxis is described in this work. The results show that higher reduction rates in the stage of refining period of the melt and higher level of overall chromium reduction from slag can be reached with the blowing of CaC2.

  11. Mechanoactivation of chromium silicide formation in the SiC-Cr-Si system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlasova M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The processes of simultaneous grinding of the components of a SiC-Cr-Si mixture and further temperature treatment in the temperature range 1073-1793 K were studied by X-ray phase analysis, IR spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and X-ray microanalysis. It was established that, during grinding of the mixture, chromium silicides form. A temperature treatment completes the process. Silicide formation proceeds within the framework of the diffusion of silicon into chromium. In the presence of SiO2 in the mixture, silicide formation occurs also as a result of the reduction of silica by silicon and silicon carbide. The sintering of synthesized composite SiC-chromium silicides powders at a high temperature under a high pressure (T = 2073 K, P = 5 GPa is accompanied by the destruction of cc-SiC particles, the cc/3 transition in silicon carbide and deformation distortions of the lattices of chromium silicides.

  12. Removal of chromium from electroplating industry effluents by ion exchange resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaco, Sofia A; Fernandes, Sandra; Quina, Margarida M; Ferreira, Licínio M

    2007-06-18

    Effluent discharged from the chromium electroplating industry contains a large number of metals, including chromium, copper, nickel, zinc, manganese and lead. The ion exchange process is an alternative technique for application in the treatment of industrial wastewater containing heavy metals and indeed it has proven to be very promising in the removal and recovery of valuable species. The main objective of the present work is to evaluate the performance of commercial ion exchange resins for removing chromium trivalent from industrial effluents, and for this purpose two resins were tested: a chelating exchange resin (Diaion CR11) and a weak cationic resin (Amberlite IRC86). In order to evaluate the sorption capacity of the resins some equilibrium experiments were carried out, being the temperature and pH the main variables considered. The chromium solutions employed in the experiments were synthetic solutions and industrial effluents. In addition, a transient test was also performed as an attempt to understand the kinetic behaviour of the process.

  13. Ecotoxicological tests with cadmium and chromium using postlarvae of silverside Odontesthes (Austromenidia regia regia Hildebrand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovana Vera

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, the mean effective concentrations (EC50% of cadmium (Cd+2 and chromium (Cr+6 using postlarvae of the silverside fish Odontesthes (Austromenidia regia regia were determined. The postlarvae were exposed to different concentrations of the metals, between 0,142 and 1,208 mg.L–1 of cadmium and between 0,53 and 33,74 mg.L–1 of chromium. The mean effective concentrations (EC50% obtained were 0,648 mg.L–1 of cadmium (at 96 h and 2,68 mg.L–1 of chromium (at 96 h. Comparatively, cadmium is more toxic than chromium, and silverside is more tolerant than other organisms.

  14. Intracellular chromium localization and cell physiological response in the unicellular alga Micrasterias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volland, Stefanie, E-mail: Stefanie.Volland@stud.sbg.ac.at [Plant Physiology Division, Cell Biology Department, University of Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstr 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Luetz, Cornelius, E-mail: cornelius.luetz@uibk.ac.at [Institute of Botany, University of Innsbruck, Sternwartestrasse 15, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Michalke, Bernhard, E-mail: bernhard.michalke@helmholtz-muenchen.de [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Centre for Environmental Health, Institute of Ecological Chemistry, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Luetz-Meindl, Ursula, E-mail: ursula.luetz-meindl@sbg.ac.at [Plant Physiology Division, Cell Biology Department, University of Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstr 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria)

    2012-03-15

    Various contaminants like metals and heavy metals are constantly released into the environment by anthropogenic activities. The heavy metal chromium has a wide industrial use and exists in two stable oxidation states: trivalent and hexavalent. Chromium can cause harm to cell metabolism and development, when it is taken up by plants instead of necessary micronutrients such as for example iron. The uptake of Cr VI into plant cells has been reported to be an active process via carriers of essential anions, while the cation Cr III seems to be taken up inactively. Micrasterias denticulata, an unicellular green alga of the family Desmidiaceae is a well-studied cell biological model organism. Cr III and VI had inhibiting effects on its cell development, while cell division rates were only impaired by Cr VI. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed ultrastructural changes such as increased vacuolization, condensed cytoplasm and dark precipitations in the cell wall after 3 weeks of Cr VI treatment. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI) were applied to measure intracellular chromium distribution. Chromium was only detected after 3 weeks of 10 {mu}M Cr VI treatment in electron dense precipitations found in bag-like structures along the inner side of the cell walls together with iron and elevated levels of oxygen, pointing toward an accumulation respectively extrusion of chromium in form of an iron-oxygen compound. Atomic emission spectroscopy (EMS) revealed that Micrasterias cells are able to accumulate considerable amounts of chromium and iron. During chromium treatment the Cr:Fe ratio shifted in favor of chromium, which implied that chromium may be taken up instead of iron. Significant and rapid increase of ROS production within the first 5 min of treatment confirms an active Cr VI uptake. SOD and CAT activity after Cr VI treatment did not show a response, while the glutathione pool determined by immuno-TEM decreased

  15. Bioremediation of the Soils Contaminated with Cadmium and Chromium, by the Earthworm Eisenia fetida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Aseman- Bashiz1

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important environmental problems in the world is the soils contamination by heavy metals in the industrial areas, and especially the contamination of the agricultural lands. The use of earthworms to bioremediate the soils results in reducing the pollutants concentration through a bioaccumulation mechanism on the contaminants in the earthworm's body. Hence, the present study aimed to prove the biological effectiveness of Eisenia fetida earthworms in bioremediation the soils contaminated with chromium and cadmium. Concentration of chromium and cadmium pollution in soil was determined to be 0.04 mg/g and 0.08 mg/g respectively. 30 worms were added to 500 g soil samples. Chromium and cadmium concentration in soil and in the body of worms was measured at two time periods of 21 and 42 days. To measure the concentration of chromium and cadmium we used ICP spectrometry. Software in usage was SPSS version 17. There was a significant correlation between the reduction of chromium and cadmium metals in the soils and the accumulation of chromium and cadmium metals in the worm’s body. A significant decline of chromium levels of the soil was observed in the days 21 and 42 during the study compared to initial amount of 0.1 mg/g. on the other hand chromium concentration of the soil decreased from 0.14 mg/g to 0.1 mg/g after 42 days. Comparison of mortality in two different time periods showed that by passing the time and by increase in soil chromium and cadmium concentrations the death toll of worms rises. The increased mortality of worms in the soil at a concentration of 0.08 mg/g of chromium, say that using the worms for bioremediation is not recommended at such concentration of chromium but using the worms for the removal of cadmium at concentrations of 0.04 mg/g and 0.08 mg/g in the soil is recommended.

  16. Physiological, biochemical and histometric responses of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus L.) by dietary organic chromium (chromium picolinate) supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrim, Ahmed I

    2014-05-01

    Chromium has been recognized as a new and important micro-nutrient, essential for both human and animal nutrition. This study was conducted to evaluate the appropriateness and/or the use of safety level of dietary chromium picolinate (Cr-Pic), and its effects on the physiological responses, the histometric characteristics, and the chemical analysis of dorsal muscles of mono-sex Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus. A total of 420 fingerlings (28.00 ± 0.96 g) were randomly distributed into 21 fiberglass tanks representing seven treatments at a rate of 20 fish m(-3). The control fish group (T1) was fed a Cr-Pic free basal diet. Other fish groups were fed the basal diet supplemented with 200 (T2), 400 (T3), 600 (T4), 800 (T5), 1000 (T6) and 1200 μg Cr-Pic kg(-1) diet (T7). Diets were offered to fish at a feeding rate of 3% of life body weight for 12 weeks. Results revealed that blood hematological parameters (hemoglobin, red blood cells, packed cell volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, blood platelets, and white blood cells lymphocytes); serum biochemical measurements (total testosterone, high density lipoprotein, total protein, albumin, and globulin); and the dry matter and crude protein of the fish dorsal muscles all have significantly increased (P ⩽ 0.05) in the T3 treatment compared with the other treatments. Meanwhile, no significant differences were found among all treatments with regard to the histometric characteristics. It can be concluded that Cr-Pic at 400 μg kg(-1) diet (T3) seems to be the most appropriate level for O. niloticus fingerlings.

  17. Physiological, biochemical and histometric responses of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus L. by dietary organic chromium (chromium picolinate supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed I. Mehrim

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Chromium has been recognized as a new and important micro-nutrient, essential for both human and animal nutrition. This study was conducted to evaluate the appropriateness and/or the use of safety level of dietary chromium picolinate (Cr-Pic, and its effects on the physiological responses, the histometric characteristics, and the chemical analysis of dorsal muscles of mono-sex Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus. A total of 420 fingerlings (28.00 ± 0.96 g were randomly distributed into 21 fiberglass tanks representing seven treatments at a rate of 20 fish m−3. The control fish group (T1 was fed a Cr-Pic free basal diet. Other fish groups were fed the basal diet supplemented with 200 (T2, 400 (T3, 600 (T4, 800 (T5, 1000 (T6 and 1200 μg Cr-Pic kg−1 diet (T7. Diets were offered to fish at a feeding rate of 3% of life body weight for 12 weeks. Results revealed that blood hematological parameters (hemoglobin, red blood cells, packed cell volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, blood platelets, and white blood cells lymphocytes; serum biochemical measurements (total testosterone, high density lipoprotein, total protein, albumin, and globulin; and the dry matter and crude protein of the fish dorsal muscles all have significantly increased (P ⩽ 0.05 in the T3 treatment compared with the other treatments. Meanwhile, no significant differences were found among all treatments with regard to the histometric characteristics. It can be concluded that Cr-Pic at 400 μg kg−1 diet (T3 seems to be the most appropriate level for O. niloticus fingerlings.

  18. Microcalorimetric Study on Effect of Chromium(Ⅲ) and Chromium(Ⅵ) Species on the Growth of Escherichia coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO,Jun; WANG,Yan-Xin; TIAN,Lin; WANG,Fei; CHEN,Hui-Lun; XU,Chao-Qian; SU,Chun-Li; CAI,Ming-Fa; MASKOW,Thomas; ZARAY,Gyula

    2008-01-01

    The effects of Cr(Ⅲ) and Cr(Ⅵ) species ( Cr2O2-7, CrO2-4 and Cr3+) on the growth of Escherichia coli (E.coli) have been investigated in detail by microcalorimetry at 37 ℃. Parameters including the growth rate constant (k),inhibitory ratio (Ⅰ), half-inhibitory concentration (IC50), total heat output (Qtotal), time of the maximum heat production (tlog) in the log phase have been obtained. The results showed that Cr(Ⅵ) and Cr(Ⅲ) had the inhibition effect on the growth of E. coli in aquatic environment; however, the inhibitory ratio of Cr(Ⅲ) to E. coli was smaller than that of Cr(Ⅵ). The k values of E. coli in the presence of Cr(Ⅵ) and at high concentrations of Cr(Ⅲ) were decreased with increasing the concentrations of these chromium species. Among the three chromium species investigated,Cr2O2-7 was found to be the most poisonous species against E. coli with an IC50 value of 35.52 μg·mL-1. CrO42- exhibited moderate toxicity on E. coli with an IC50 of 50.24 μg·mL-1, and Cr3+ had the lowest toxicity with an IC50 of 84.30 μg·mL-1. Microcalorimetry can provide a convenient, sensitive and reliable method to study the effect of various metal species on the growth of bacteria or other microorganisms.

  19. Mechanical Property of Low Chromium Semi-Steel Grinding Ball Prepared by Cross Rolling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Li-min; MENG De-liang; NIE Pu-lin; LIU Jian-hua

    2004-01-01

    The preparing method, rolling technology and mechanical properties of low chromium semi-steel grinding ball by cross rolling were studied. The results show that when the low chromium semi-steel bar is forged from 55 mm to 50 mm, cross-rolled into grinding ball at 1 000-1 050 ℃, air cooled and tempered at 550 ℃ for 2 h, the best mechanical properties, especially the abrasive resistance under the action of hard abrasive, can be obtained.

  20. Microstructure and Property of High Carbonic-Chromium Cast Steel with Different Hot Deformation Ratio

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Tao; WANG Jiu-liang; ZHANG Run-jun; CHAO Guo-hua; LIU Jian-hua

    2004-01-01

    The microstructure and properties of high carbonic-chromium cast steel subjected to different hot deformation ratios were studied. The experimental results show that the microstructure and properties of high carbonic-chromium cast steel are obviously improved after hot deformation, and the best mechanical properties of the cast steel can be obtained under hot deformation ratio of 40 %-50 %, which leads to the morphology change of eutectic carbide and the precipitation of granular carbides.

  1. Biodegradation of nickel and chromium from space maintainers: An in vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Bhaskar V; Subba Reddy V

    2010-01-01

    Band materials are often used in the practice of pediatric dentistry. Nickel and Chromium are the main ingredients of these materials. The potential health hazards of nickel and chromium and their compounds have been the focus of attention for more than 100 years. It has established that these metals could cause hypersensitivity. The study was undertaken to analyze in vitro biodegradation of space maintainers made out of stainless steel band materials from manufacturers Dentaurum and Unitek. ...

  2. Characterization of the chromium retention potential of non polluted aquifer solids in an industrial site

    OpenAIRE

    Reynal, Caroline; Kedziorek, Monika A.M.; Rollin, Claire; Bourg, Alain.C.M.

    2003-01-01

    National audience; A hydrogeochemical study of an industrial site where sulfuric acid and copper sulfate ("bouillie bordelaise") are manufactured showed that the phreatic aquifer is contaminated by copper, sulfate, chromium, arsenic and has an acid pH Field observations and laboratory experiments, both necessary if we are to understand the processes controlling tranfers at the solid-liquid interface, were used to investigate the behaviour of chromium. In the field, monitoring the mixing of po...

  3. Peat and coconut fiber as biofilters for chromium adsorption from contaminated wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henryk, Kołoczek; Jarosław, Chwastowski; Witold, Żukowski

    2016-01-01

    Batch adsorption experiments were performed for the removal of chromium (III) and chromium (VI) ions from aqueous solutions using Canadian peat and coconut fiber. The Langmuir model was used to describe the adsorption isotherm. The maximum adsorption for peat reached 18.75 mg/g for Cr(III) and 8.02 mg/g for Cr(VI), whereas the value for fiber was slightly higher and reached 19.21 mg/g for Cr(III) and 9.54 mg/g for Cr(VI). Both chromium forms could be easily eluted from the materials. The adsorption of chromium forms to organic matter could be explained in terms of formation of donor-acceptor chemical covalent bound with hydroxyl groups as ligands and chromium as the central atom in the formed complex. The chromate-reducing activities were monitored with the use of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The results showed that both adsorption and reduction occurred simultaneously and the maximum adsorption capacity of hexavalent chromium being equal to 95% for fiber and 92% for peat was obtained at pH 1.5. The reduction of Cr(VI) in wastewaters began immediately and disappeared after 20 h. Both materials contained yeast and fungi species which can be responsible for reduction of chromium compounds, due to their enzymatic activity (Chwastowski and Koloczek (Acta Biochim Pol 60: 829-834, 2013)). The reduction of Cr(VI) is a two-phase process, the first phase being rapid and based on chemical reaction and the second phase having biological features. After the recovery step, both types of organic materials can be used again for chromium adsorption without any loss in the metal uptake. Both of the materials could be used as biofilters in the wastewater treatment plants.

  4. Self-focusing in chromium-doped potassium niobate single ceramic crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo T, J.; Gonzalez M, S.; Aguirre L, A.; Hernandez, M.B.; Aguilar M, J.A. [Instituto de Fisica y Matematicas, Universidad Tecnologica de la Mixteca, 69000, Huajuapan de Leon, Oaxaca (Mexico); Hernandez A, J. [lFUNAM, PO Box 20-364, 01000 Mexico, DF (Mexico)]. e-mail: jaimec@mixteco.utm.mx

    2006-07-01

    The self-focusing and nonlinear optical absorption in a chromium-doped potassium niobate single ceramic crystal have been investigated. The third-order electric susceptibility X{sup (3)} at continuous 532 nm radiation is estimated based on a band transport model describing photo refractive properties for this electro-optic material. An anisotropic behavior on its nonlinear optical absorption properties has also been observed due to the presence of chromium ions. (Author)

  5. The influence of solidification speed during heating on allotropic transformations of chromium cast iron casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Przybył

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The unique stand to founding dilatometric samples ("on ready” which solidify with different cooling speeds was presented. The dilatometric investigations, X-ray, metallographic they disclosed the occurrence in matrix of chromium cast iron of considerable quantity of austenite in dependence from concentration of chromium (18% and 23% and the speed of solidification. Castings these despite large part of austenite mark with high hardness in raw state.

  6. Cytotoxicity and genome-wide microarray analysis of intestinal smooth muscle cells in response to hexavalent chromium induction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Fang JIN; Yuan-Yuan WANG; Zi-Dong ZHANG; Yi-Meng YUAN; Yi-Rui HU; Yang-Feng WEI; Jian NI

    2013-01-01

    Chronic ingestion of high concentrations of hexavalent chromium [Cr(Ⅵ)] in drinking water induces intestinal tumors in mice; however,information on its toxicity on intestinal smooth muscle cells is limited.The present study aimed to assess the in vitro and in vivo toxicological effects of Cr(Ⅵ) on intestinal smooth muscle cells.Human intestinal smooth muscle cells (HISM cells) were cultured with different concentrations of Cr(Ⅵ) to evaluate effects on cell proliferation ability,oxidative stress levels,and antioxidant system.Furthermore,tissue sections in Cr(Ⅵ) exposed rabbits were analyzed to evaluate toxicity on intestinal muscle cells in vivo.Gene chips were utilized to assess differential gene expression profiles at the genome-wide level in 1 μmol/L Cr(Ⅵ) treated cells.Intestinal tissue biopsy results showed that Cr(Ⅵ) increased the incidences of diffuse epithelial hyperplasia in intestinal jejunum but caused no obvious damage to the structure of the muscularis.Cell proliferation analysis revealed that high concentrations (≥64 μmol/L) but not low concentrations of Cr(Ⅵ) (≤16 μmol/L) significantly inhibited the growth of HISM cells.For oxidative stress levels,the expression of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) was elevated at high concentrations (≥64 μmol/L) but not at low concentrations of Cr(Ⅵ) (≤ 16 μmol/L).In addition,dose-dependent increases in the activity of oxidized glutathione (GSSH)/total-glutathione (T-GSH) were also observed.Gene chip screened 491 differentially expressed genes including genes associated with cell apoptosis,oxidations,and cytoskeletons.Some of these differentially expressed genes may be unique to smooth muscle cells in response to Cr(Ⅵ) induction.

  7. Standardization of {sup 64}Cu using an improved decay scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amiot, M.N., E-mail: marie-noelle.amiot@cea.fr [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel (LNE-LNHB), CE Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Be, M.M.; Branger, T.; Cassette, P.; Lepy, M.C.; Menesguen, Y. [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel (LNE-LNHB), CE Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Da Silva, I. [CNRS-CEMHTI, Site cyclotron, 45071 Orleans Cedex (France)

    2012-08-21

    A {sup 64}Cu solution was standardized by means of liquid scintillation counting. The activity of the solution was also determined with an ionization chamber whose response was simulated by using a Monte Carlo code. The photon emission intensities including K X-rays were determined to be I{sub 511}=35.1 (3)%; I{sub 1346}=0.472 (12)%, IK{alpha}=14.41 (15)%, IK{beta}=2.01 (3)%, respectively. {sup 64}Cu half-life was also determined as 12.718 (23) h. The new decay scheme used in the present work was established following the EURAMET 1085 exercise where a good agreement between activity measurement techniques was found.

  8. A 64 Bits Rotor Enhanced Block Cipher (Rebc3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed ElShafee

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives a new proposed cryptosystem (REBC3 that is designed to take advantages of the new generation of 64bits microprocessors which commercially known as x64 systems. The old version REBC2,which was published in Africon 2007. REBC2 was basically developed for the 32bits microprocessors which is commercially known as x86 systems. REBC3 like REBC2 use the concept of rotor enhanced blockcipher which was initially proposed by the author in [NRSC 2002] on the first version of REBC. REBC2 used the same concept from a another point of view, which is using rotors to achieve two basiccryptographic operations; permutation, and substitution. Round key is generated using rotor too, which is used to achieve ciphertext key dependency. To enhance non-linearity and to resist linear cryptanalysis,REBC3 has a variable block, and key lengths. Each round has its own block length which depends on round the key and round key length. Dependency is based upon the previous round generated key. Rotors implemented using successive affine transformation . The 32 bits version was proposed in KAMFEE cipher, then the 64bits version was proposed in KAMFEE-X64 cipher. This achieved memory-less, normalized ciphertext statistics, and small processing speed trend. The strength of this system is compared with the REBC2 and RIJNDAEL (AES ciphers.REBC3 cipher gives excellent results from security characteristics and statistical point of view of. So authors suggests to use REBC3 in the area of banking and electronic fund transfer.

  9. 6.4 Billion Yuan for NSFC Projects in 2008

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ NSFC President Prof.Chen Yiyu announced at NSFC's Sixth Plenary Session of the General Assembly that a budget of 53.59 billon yuan,which is an increased of 25% to that of last year,was approved by the government for the fiscal year 2008.In practice,NSFC,based on the demand of national budgeting reform and the development of basic research,will arrange a funding plan of 6.4 billion yuan.

  10. Critical trace elements in brewing technology. Pt. 2. Occurrence of arsenic, lead, cadmium, chromium, mercury and selenium in beer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donhauser, S.; Wagner, D.; Jacob, F.

    1987-01-01

    A study of 100 beer samples gave a representative cross-section of the amount of critical trace elements in beers. The following average values were obtained. Arsenic 6,4 ..mu..g/l, chromium 7,5 ..mu..g/l, lead 1,6 ..mu..g/l, mercury < 0,5 ..mu..g/l, cadmium 0,2 ..mu..g/l, selenium 1,2 ..mu..g/l. The drinking water limit value was just exceeded with two beers and by more than two-fold with one beer. The concentration of elements in the other beers were mostly well below the legal norm of the drinking water regulations. Separation of the samples according to beer container showed no significant difference with respect to trace element content between glass bottles and cans. Only 3 piece tinplate cans with a soldered body seam, which must have been damaged, contained beer with higher lead values. The trace element content of individual beer types did not differ from one another. An evaluation of the weakly intake of thee critical elements in beer, using these measured values, shows no cause for concern about health. (orig.)

  11. Membrane Made of Cellulose Acetate with Polyacrylic Acid Reinforced with Carbon Nanotubes and Its Applicability for Chromium Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Sánchez-Márquez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Membranes made of carbon nanotubes and cellulose acetate with polyacrylic acid were designed in order to study their properties and their applicability for chromium removal. The membranes were prepared by phase inversion method using cellulose acetate and polyacrylic acid. Carbon nanotubes were added to the membrane during their process of synthesis in proportions of 1% by weight. The pores in the material are formed in layers, giving the effect of depth and forming a network. Both the carbon nanotubes and membranes were characterized by IR, Raman, and SEM spectroscopy. In addition, the concentration of acidic and basic sites and the surface charge in the materials were determined. The concentration of acid sites for oxidized nanotubes was 4.0 meq/g. The removal of Cr(VI was studied as a function of contact time and of initial concentration of Cr(VI. The removal of Cr(VI (~90% mainly occurs in a contact time from 32 to 64 h when the initial concentration of Cr(VI is 1 mg/L.

  12. Effect of Chromium(VI Toxicity on Enzymes of Nitrogen Metabolism in Clusterbean (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Punesh Sangwan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metals are the intrinsic component of the environment with both essential and nonessential types. Their excessive levels pose a threat to plant growth and yield. Also, some heavy metals are toxic to plants even at very low concentrations. The present investigation (a pot experiment was conducted to determine the affects of varying chromium(VI levels (0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 mg chromium(VI kg−1 soil in the form of potassium dichromate on the key enzymes of nitrogen metabolism in clusterbean. Chromium treatment adversely affect nitrogenase, nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, glutamine synthetase, and glutamate dehydrogenase in various plant organs at different growth stages as specific enzyme activity of these enzymes decreased with an increase in chromium(VI levels from 0 to 2.0 mg chromium(VI kg−1 soil and 4.0 mg chromium(VI kg−1 soil was found to be lethal to clusterbean plants. In general, the enzyme activity increased with advancement of growth to reach maximum at flowering stage and thereafter decreased at grain filling stage.

  13. The influence of substrate temperature on the tribo- mechanical properties of chromium nitride thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merie, V. V.; Negrea, G.; Modi, E.

    2016-08-01

    Different nitrides such as titanium nitride, chromium nitride and so on are used in a widespread range of applications such as cutting tools, medical implants, and microelectromechanical devices and all that due to their mechanical, physical and chemical properties. The aim of this study is to obtain chromium nitride thin films and to characterize them by atomic force microscopy investigations. The chromium nitride thin films were deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering on silicon substrates. During the deposition process, the discharge current, the argon and nitrogen flows, the pressure inside the chamber and the deposition time were kept constant. A chromium target with a purity of 99.95 % was used. Some of the films were deposited after a chromium buffer layer was previously deposited on the silicon substrate. The deposition was carried out when substrate temperature was at room temperature, at 300 and 500°C respectively. Once the films were deposited, atomic force microscopy investigations were performed in order to emphasize the influence of the substrate temperature on the topographical, mechanical and tribological characteristics. The results pointed out an important influence of the substrate temperature on topographical, mechanical and tribological properties of the investigated chromium nitride thin films.

  14. Fabrication of Unique Magnetic Bionanocomposite for Highly Efficient Removal of Hexavalent Chromium from Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yunlei; Qiu, Xun; Chen, Dongyun; Li, Najun; Xu, Qingfeng; Li, Hua; He, Jinghui; Lu, Jianmei

    2016-08-01

    Biotreatment of hexavalent chromium has attracted widespread interest due to its cost effective and environmental friendliness. However, the difficult separation of biomass from aqueous solution and the slow hexavalent chromium bioreduction rate are bottlenecks for biotechnology application. In this approach, a core-shell structured functional polymer coated magnetic nanocomposite was prepared for enriching the hexavalent chromium. Then the nanocomposite was connected to the bacteria via amines on bacterial (Bacillus subtilis ATCC-6633) surface. Under optimal conditions, a series of experiments were launched to degrade hexavalent chromium from the aqueous solution using the as-prepared bionanocomposite. Results showed that B. subtilis@Fe3O4@mSiO2@MANHE (BFSM) can degrade hexavalent chromium from the water more effectively (a respectable degradation efficiency of about 94%) when compared with pristine B. subtilis and Fe3O4@mSiO2@MANHE (FSM). Moreover, the BFSM could be separated from the wastewater by magnetic separation technology conveniently due to the Fe3O4 core of FSM. These results indicate that the application of BFSM is a promising strategy for effective treating wastewater containing hexavalent chromium.

  15. Chromium (III Removal and Recovery from Tannery Wastewater by Precipitation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abass Esmaeili

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromium (III salts are the most widely used chemicals for tanning processes, but 60-70% of total chromium salts reacts with the hides. In the other word, about 30-40% of the chromium amount remains in the solids and liquid wastes (especially spent tanning solutions. Therefore, the removal and recovery of the chromium content of these wastewaters are necessary for environmental protection and economic reasons. Removal and recovery of chromium were carried out by using precipitation process. For this purpose, three precipitating agents calcium hydroxide, sodium hydroxide and magnesium oxide were used. The effects of pH, stirring time, settling rate and sludge volume were studied in batch experiments. Results show that the optimum pH is 8-9 and the good sludge with high settling rate and lower volume obtain by the MgO precipitating agent. Hence the MgO is a good precipitating agent for removal and recovery of chromium from tanning wastewater.

  16. Chromium redistribution in thermally aged and irradiated ferritic-martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camus, E.; Wanderka, N.; Welzel, S.; Wollenberger, H. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin GmbH (Germany); Materna-Morris, E. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Postfach 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1998-07-15

    Ferritic-martensitic steels containing 8-12 at.% chromium are considered as structural materials for spallation sources and fusion reactors. Materials will be subjected to intense damage rates, e.g. 50-100 dpa per year at full power. Therefore, the behavior under irradiation of these steels must be investigated. Our earlier dual-beam irradiation results on the DIN 1.4914 steel showed a decomposition into chromium-enriched and chromium-depleted regions. The mean concentration of the chromium-depleted regions was found to be 5.19{+-}0.32 at.% after irradiation at 500 C to a fluence of 50 dpa, as measured by atom probe field-ion microscopy. The chromium distribution in the matrix of the DIN 1.4914 steel after thermal ageing at temperatures between 400 and 600 C has been investigated for times up to 17000 h. The carbides were characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy and extraction replicas. The concentrations of the constituents of the matrix were measured by means of atom probe. The mean chromium concentrations in the matrix are found to be 8.66{+-}0.32, 4.5{+-}0.3, and 7.2{+-}0.4 at.%, after ageing at 400, 500, and 600 C, respectively. The matrix contains virtually no carbon. The results are discussed in terms of phase decomposition and species segregation. (orig.) 15 refs.

  17. Alpha -tocopherol supplementation on chromium toxicity : a study on rat liver and kidney cell membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Membrane damage is one of the important consequence of chromium, an environmental toxicant, to produce cytotoxicity. α-tocopherol, a membrane protectant can be used to reduce the chromium-induced membrane damage. In the present study, the impact of chromium in presence and absence of α-tocopherol was studied on plasma membrane of liver and kidney in male Wistar rats (80 - 100g body weight). Significant increase in membrane cholesterol level as well as significant decrease in membrane phospholipid level in chromium exposed ( 0.8 mg /100g body weight/d, i.p., for 4 weeks) animals suggest structural alteration of both liver and kidney plasma memebrane. The alkaline phosphatase, total ATPase and Na+-K+-ATPase activities of plasma membrane were significantly decreased in both liver and kidney after chromium treatment. However, α-tocopherol (30 mg / 100g diet) supplementation can restrict the changes in these membrane-bound enzyme activities. Thus, the usefulness of dietary supplementation of α-tocopherol to restrain the chromium-induced membrane damage is suggested.

  18. Influence of dietary supplementation of chromium on the carcass traits of crossbred pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guikinglung Pamei

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to assess the influence of chromium on the carcass traits in crossbred (Large White Yorkshire X Landrace pigs fed with swill feeding for a period of 5 months. Early-weaned crossbred piglets (n=24 were selected for this study, and the piglets were randomly divided into three equal groups; Group I, II, and III. The piglets were reared by following standard health coverage protocols. The feeds of Group I and II were supplemented with chromium in the form of chromium tripicolinate at 0.1 and 0.2 mg/kg of swill feed respectively, and Group III was kept as control. Carcass weight, carcass length, and bone percentage showed no significant difference among the three groups. However, better dressing percentage was observed in Group I (p<0.05. Liver and kidney weights were reduced in chromium supplemented groups (p<0.05. Chromium supplemented groups showed lower backfat thickness and fat percentage (p<0.01; whereas, loin eye areas and muscle percentage were increased as compared to the control group. Thus, it was concluded that chromium supplementation in feed of crossbred piglets influenced positively in their carcass traits.

  19. Ability of Bacillus mucilaginosus GY03 Strain to Adsorb Chromium Ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ye; LIAN Bin

    2005-01-01

    A research with Bacillus mucilaginosus cultured in nitrogen-free medium for forming a flocculant material to adsorb Cr+6 was conducted to determine the effects of different pH, volume, treatment time, and chromium (Ⅵ) concentrations on chromium (Ⅵ) adsorption by microbial flocculant (MBF), which was produced from the B. mucilaginosus GY03 strain. The results showed that MBF had outstanding flocculation on chromium (Ⅵ). Based on the results of a oneway experiment and actual wastewater treatment conditions, the optimum conditions, obtained by using orthogonal experiments, for chromium (Ⅵ) adsorption by MBF were: Cr6+ solution pH of 9, flocculant material volume of 15 mL,treatment time of 12 h and chromium ion concentration of 30 mg L-1. The results demonstrated that the MBF produced from GY03 could be used in the chromium-containing wastewater treatment. Meanwhile, after extraction and analysis of the MBF polysaccharides, it was found that MBF was mainly composed of glycoprotein. Analysis on constituents of monosaccharide showed that polysaccharides of B. mucilaginosus were composed of rhamnose, glucose etc. Thus, because it was applied over a wide range of pH, in small amounts and had a rapid flocculation speed the flocculant used in this experiment had a vast field of application potential.

  20. Immobilization in cement mortar of chromium removed from water using titania nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husnain, Ahmed; Qazi, Ishtiaq Ahmed; Khaliq, Wasim; Arshad, Muhammad

    2016-05-01

    Because of the high toxicity of chromium, particularly as Cr (VI), it is removed from industrial effluents before their discharge into water bodies by a variety of techniques, including adsorption. Ultimate disposal of the sludge or the adsorbate, however, is a serious problem. While titania, in nanoparticle form, serves as a very good adsorbent for chromium, as an additive, it also helps to increase the compressive strength of mortar and concrete. Combining these two properties of the material, titania nanoparticles were used to adsorb chromium and then added to mortar up to a concentration of 20% by weight. The compressive strength of the resulting mortar specimens that replaced 15% of cement with chromium laden titania showed an improved strength than that without titania, thus confirming that this material had positive effect on the mortar strength. Leachate tests using the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP) confirmed that the mortar sample chromium leachate was well within the permissible limits. The proposed technique thus offers a safe and viable method for the ultimate disposal of toxic metal wastes, in general, and those laden waste chromium, in particular.

  1. Photocatalysis with chromium-doped TiO2: bulk and surface doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ould-Chikh, Samy; Proux, Olivier; Afanasiev, Pavel; Khrouz, Lhoussain; Hedhili, Mohamed N; Anjum, Dalaver H; Harb, Moussab; Geantet, Christophe; Basset, Jean-Marie; Puzenat, Eric

    2014-05-01

    The photocatalytic properties of TiO2 modified by chromium are usually found to depend strongly on the preparation method. To clarify this problem, two series of chromium-doped titania with a chromium content of up to 1.56 wt % have been prepared under hydrothermal conditions: the first series (Cr:TiO2) is intended to dope the bulk of TiO2, whereas the second series (Cr/TiO2) is intended to load the surface of TiO2 with Cr. The catalytic properties have been compared in the photocatalytic oxidation of formic acid. Characterization data provides evidence that in the Cr/TiO2 catalysts chromium is located on the surface of TiO2 as amorphous CrOOH clusters. In contrast, in the Cr:TiO2 series, chromium is mostly dissolved in the titania lattice, although a minor part is still present on the surface. Photocatalytic tests show that both series of chromium-doped titania demonstrate visible-light-driven photo-oxidation activity. Surface-doped Cr/TiO2 solids appear to be more efficient photocatalysts than the bulk-doped Cr:TiO2 counterparts.

  2. The Magnetic Cataclysmic Variable LSQ1725-64

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, J T; Dennihy, E; O'Donoghue, D; Clemens, J C; Reichart, D E; Moore, J P; LaCluyze, A P; Haislip, J B; Ivarsen, K V

    2016-01-01

    We present new photometry and spectroscopy of the 94m eclipsing binary LSQ1725-64 that provide insight into the fundamental parameters and evolutionary state of this system. We confirm that LSQ1725-64 is a magnetic cataclysmic variable whose white dwarf has a surface-averaged magnetic field strength of $12.5 \\pm 0.5$ MG measured from Zeeman splitting. The spectral type and colour of the secondary, as well as the eclipse length, are consistent with other secondaries that have not yet evolved through the period minimum expected for cataclysmic variables. We observe two different states of mass transfer and measure the transition between the two to occur over about 45 orbital cycles. In the low state, we observe photometric variations that we hypothesize to arise predominantly from two previously heated magnetic poles of the white dwarf. Our precise eclipse measurements allow us to determine binary parameters of LSQ1725-64 and we find it contains a high mass ($0.97 \\pm 0.03\\ M_{\\odot}$) white dwarf if we assume ...

  3. Effect of some non functional surfactants and electrolytes on the hexavalent chromium reduction by glycerol. A mechanistic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, A.; Ghosh, S.K.; Saha, R.; Nandi, R.; Saha, B. [Burdwan Univ., WB (India). Dept. of Chemistry; Gosh, T. [A.B.N. Seal College, Coochbehar, WB (India). Dept. of Chemistry

    2011-11-15

    Hexavalent chromium is a widespread environmental contaminant and a known human carcinogen. Kinetics of reduction of hexavalent chromium by bio-molecule glycerol in micellar media have been studied spectrophotometrically. The cytoplasmic reduction of hexavalent chromium to trivalent chromium occurs in micro-heterogeneous systems. In vitro, the micelles are considered to mimic the cellular membranes. The electron transfer processes occurring in the micellar systems is considered as model to obtain insight into the electron transport process prevailing in biological systems. Micellar media is also a probe to establish the mechanistic paths of reduction of hexavalent chromium to trivalent chromium. Effects of electrolytes common to biological system are studied to establish the proposed reaction mechanism strongly. (orig.)

  4. Genesis and transport of hexavalent chromium in the system ophiolitic rocks - groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchegolikhina, Anastasia; Guadagnini, Laura; Guadagnini, Alberto

    2015-04-01

    Our study aims at contributing to the quantification and characterization of chromium transport processes from host rocks and soil matrices to groundwater. We focus on dissolved hexavalent chromium detected in groundwaters of geological regions with ophiolitic rocks (ophiolites and serpentinites) inclusions due to its critical ecological impact. (Oze et al., 2004). Despite the large number of analyses on the occurrence of high concentrations of hazardous hexavalent chromium ions in natural waters, only few studies were performed with the objective of identifying and investigating the geochemical reactions which could occur in the natural system rock - groundwater - dissolved chromium (Fantoni et al., 2002, Stephen and James, 2004, Lelli et al., 2013). In this context, there is a need for integration of results obtained from diverse studies in various regions and settings to improve our knowledge repository. Our theoretical analyses are grounded and driven by practical scenarios detected in subsurface reservoirs exploited for civil and industrial use located in the Emilia-Romagna region (Italy). Available experimental datasets are complemented with data from other international regional-scale settings (Altay mountains region, Russia). Modeling of chromium transformation and migration particularly includes characterization of the multispecies geochemical system. A key aspect of our study is the analysis of the complex competitive sorption processes governing heavy metal evolution in groundwater. The results of the research allow assessing the critical qualitative features of the mechanisms of hexavalent chromium ion mobilization from host rocks and soils and the ensuing transformation and migration to groundwater under the influence of diverse environmental factors. The study is then complemented by the quantification of the main sources of uncertainty associated with prediction of heavy metal contamination levels in the groundwater system explored. Fantoni, D

  5. Fluctuations in Precambrian atmospheric oxygenation recorded by chromium isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Robert; Gaucher, Claudio; Poulton, Simon W; Canfield, Don E

    2009-09-10

    Geochemical data suggest that oxygenation of the Earth's atmosphere occurred in two broad steps. The first rise in atmospheric oxygen is thought to have occurred between approximately 2.45 and 2.2 Gyr ago, leading to a significant increase in atmospheric oxygen concentrations and concomitant oxygenation of the shallow surface ocean. The second increase in atmospheric oxygen appears to have taken place in distinct stages during the late Neoproterozoic era ( approximately 800-542 Myr ago), ultimately leading to oxygenation of the deep ocean approximately 580 Myr ago, but details of the evolution of atmospheric oxygenation remain uncertain. Here we use chromium (Cr) stable isotopes from banded iron formations (BIFs) to track the presence of Cr(VI) in Precambrian oceans, providing a time-resolved picture of the oxygenation history of the Earth's atmosphere-hydrosphere system. The geochemical behaviour of Cr is highly sensitive to the redox state of the surface environment because oxidative weathering processes produce the oxidized hexavalent [Cr(VI)] form. Oxidation of reduced trivalent [Cr(III)] chromium on land is accompanied by an isotopic fractionation, leading to enrichment of the mobile hexavalent form in the heavier isotope. Our fractionated Cr isotope data indicate the accumulation of Cr(VI) in ocean surface waters approximately 2.8 to 2.6 Gyr ago and a likely transient elevation in atmospheric and surface ocean oxygenation before the first great rise of oxygen 2.45-2.2 Gyr ago (the Great Oxidation Event). In approximately 1.88-Gyr-old BIFs we find that Cr isotopes are not fractionated, indicating a decline in atmospheric oxygen. Our findings suggest that the Great Oxidation Event did not lead to a unidirectional stepwise increase in atmospheric oxygen. In the late Neoproterozoic, we observe strong positive fractionations in Cr isotopes (delta(53)Cr up to +4.9 per thousand), providing independent support for increased surface oxygenation at that time, which may

  6. Trivalent chromium removal from aqueous solutions by a sol–gel synthesized silica adsorbent functionalized with sulphonic acid groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Gonzalez, Sergio Efrain [Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Universidad de Guadalajara, Blvd. Marcelino García Barragán # 1421, esq. Calzada Olímpica, C.P. 44430 Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico); Carbajal-Arizaga, Gregorio Guadalupe [Departamento de Química, CUCEI, Universidad de Guadalajara, Blvd. Marcelino García Barragán # 1421, esq. Calzada Olímpica, C.P. 44430 Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico); Manriquez-Gonzalez, Ricardo [Departamento de Madera, Celulosa y Papel, CUCEI, Universidad de Guadalajara, Km 15.5, carretera Guadalajara-Nogales, Las Agujas, C.P. 45020 Zapopan, Jalisco (Mexico); De la Cruz-Hernandez, Wencel [Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Km 107 carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, C.P. 22830 Ensenada, Baja California (Mexico); Gomez-Salazar, Sergio, E-mail: sergio.gomez@cucei.udg.mx [Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Universidad de Guadalajara, Blvd. Marcelino García Barragán # 1421, esq. Calzada Olímpica, C.P. 44430 Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Corpuscular sulphonic acid-functionalized silica holds improved uptake of chromium. • Mesopores on adsorbent facilitate (CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2}Cr{sup +} ion uptake on sulphonate sites. • Formation of chromium acetate sulphonate complex proposed from XPS results. • Fixed bed chromium uptake results suggest potential industrial use. - Abstract: A high capacity hybrid silica adsorbent was synthesized via sol–gel processing with sulphonic acid groups as trivalent chromium complex ions chelators from aqueous solutions. The synthesis included co-condensation of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) with 3-(mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane (MPS), and oxidation of thiol to sulphonic acid groups. Chromium uptake kinetic, batch and fixed-bed experiments were performed to assess the removal of this metal from aqueous solutions. {sup 13}C, {sup 29}Si CPMAS NMR, FTIR, XPS were used to characterize the adsorbent structure and the nature of chromium complexes on the adsorbent surface. Chromium maximum uptake was obtained at pH 3 (72.8 mg/g). Elemental analysis results showed ligand density of 1.48 mmol sulphonic groups/g. About 407 mL of Cr(III) solution (311 mg/L) were treated to breakthrough point reaching ≤0.06 mg/L at the effluent. These results comply with USEPA regulation for chromium concentration in drinking water (≤0.1 mg/L). The adsorbent shows potential to be used in chromium separations to the industrial level.

  7. Study on the Cultivation of Chromium-enriched Yeast%富铬酵母的研制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王盛良; 黄杰; 黄薇; 孙桂菊

    2001-01-01

    This paper offered a method to get organic chromium nutrient bycultivating chromium-enriched yeast. It was found that the solution of low consistency promoted the growth of yeast, and with increasing the chromium concentration in culture,the chromium content of chromium-enriched yeast would increase. The solution of chromium-enriched and normal brewer' s yeast was measured by ultraviolet spectrometry with in 200~320nm wavelength range. A characteristic ultraviolet absorption peak appeared at 260nm. The organic chromium was about 97.6% of the total chromium in chromium-enriched yeast.%研究了富铬酵母的培养方法,发现培养基中低浓度的铬(<100mg/kg)对酵母生长起促进作用,且随着铬浓度的增加酵母对铬的富集作用亦增加。用200~320nm波长范围对富铬酵母及普通酵母溶液进行紫外扫描,发现在260nm处有一特征的吸收峰。富铬酵母中有机铬占总铬量的97.6%.

  8. Beneficial effect of chromium-rich yeast on glucose tolerance and blood lipids in elderly subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offenbacher, E G; Pi-Sunyer, F X

    1980-11-01

    Twenty-four volunteers, mean age 78, including eight mildly non-insulin-dependent diabetics, were randomly allocated to one of two groups and were fed (daily for 8 wk) 9 g of either chromium-rich brewers' yeast (experimental) or chromium-poor torula yeast (control). Before and after yeast supplementation, the serum glucose and insulin response to 100 g oral glucose was measured at 30 min intervals for 2 h. Fasting serum cholesterol, total lipids, and triglycerides were also determined. In the total experimental group (normals + diabetics) and in both the diabetic and nondiabetic experimental subgroups, glucose tolerance improved significantly and insulin output decreased after supplementation. Cholesterol and total lipids fell significantly after supplementation in the total experimental group. The cholesterol decrease was particularly marked in hypercholesterolemic subjects (cholesterol > 300 mg/dl). In the control group, no significant change in glucose tolerance, insulin, triglycerides, or total lipids was found. Cholesterol was significantly lowered in the nondiabetic but not in the diabetic group. Thus, chromium-rich brewers' yeast improved glucose tolerance and total lipids in elderly subjects, while chromium-poor torula yeast did not. An improvement in insulin sensitivity also occurred with brewers' yeast supplementation. This supports the thesis that elderly people may have a low level of chromium and that an effective source for chromium repletion, such as brewers' yeast, may improve their carbohydrate tolerance and total lipids. The improvement in serum cholesterol in some control subjects, as well as in the total experimental group, also suggests the presence of a hypocholesterolemic factor other than chromium in both brewers' and torula yeast.

  9. Influence of the chromium and ytterbium co-doping on the photoluminescence of zinc selenide crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    I Radevici

    2014-01-01

    The luminescent properties of ZnSe, ZnSe:Cr (0.05 at.%Cr), ZnSe:Yb (0.03 at.%Yb) and ZnSe:Cr:Yb (0.05 at.%Cr, 0.05 at.%Yb) crystals, doped during the growth process by the chemical vapor transport method, were studied within the temperature in-terval of 6-300 K. At the 6 K temperature in the visible spectral range 2 bands were observed:a band in the excitonic spectral region and a band of self-activated luminescence. It was shown that co-doping of zinc selenide crystals with the chromium and ytterbium led to the combination of the impurities influence on the photoluminescent properties. At the liquid helium temperature in the middle in-frared range of the spectra of the ytterbium and chromium co-doped crystal a band with the maximum localized at 1.7 µm was ob-served, which was overlapped with a complex band in the middle-IR spectral range, characteristic for the chromium doped ZnSe crys-tals. On the basis of obtained data an interaction mechanism of the chromium and ytterbium co-doping impurities was proposed. Guided by the existent model of the ytterbium ion incorporation in the selenide sublattice of the ZnSe crystals, an assumption about stabilization of single charged chromium ions in the zinc sublattice crystal nodes, by means of formation of the local charge compen-sating clusters, was made. It was assumed that the resonant energy transfer from one chromium ion to another, which led to the con-centration quenching of the IR emission in the ZnSe:Cr PL spectra, would lead to the broadening of the IR emission in the spectra of ytterbium and chromium co-doped zinc selenide crystals.

  10. Photocatalysis with chromium-doped TiO2: Bulk and surface doping

    KAUST Repository

    Ould-Chikh, Samy

    2014-04-15

    The photocatalytic properties of TiO2 modified by chromium are usually found to depend strongly on the preparation method. To clarify this problem, two series of chromium-doped titania with a chromium content of up to 1.56 wt % have been prepared under hydrothermal conditions: the first series (Cr:TiO2) is intended to dope the bulk of TiO2, whereas the second series (Cr/TiO2) is intended to load the surface of TiO2 with Cr. The catalytic properties have been compared in the photocatalytic oxidation of formic acid. Characterization data provides evidence that in the Cr/TiO2 catalysts chromium is located on the surface of TiO2 as amorphous CrOOH clusters. In contrast, in the Cr:TiO 2 series, chromium is mostly dissolved in the titania lattice, although a minor part is still present on the surface. Photocatalytic tests show that both series of chromium-doped titania demonstrate visible-light-driven photo-oxidation activity. Surface-doped Cr/TiO2 solids appear to be more efficient photocatalysts than the bulk-doped Cr:TiO2 counterparts. It\\'s classified! The photocatalytic properties of TiO2 modified by chromium depend strongly on the preparation method. To clarify this problem, two types of modified titania are discussed: one with CrIII doped in the bulk and one with CrOOH clusters on the TiO2 surface (see picture). Both series show visible-light-driven photo-oxidation activity. However, surface modification appears to be a more efficient strategy. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Selective and sensitive detection of chromium(VI) in waters using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weldy, Effie; Wolff, Chloe; Miao, Zhixin; Chen, Hao

    2013-09-01

    From 2000 through 2011, there were 14 criminal cases of violations of the Clean Water Act involving the discharge of chromium, a toxic heavy metal, into drinking and surface water sources. As chromium(VI), a potential carcinogen present in the environment, represents a significant safety concern, it is currently the subject of an EPA health risk assessment. Therefore, sensitive and selective detection of this species is highly desired. This study reports the analysis of chromium(VI) in water samples by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) following its reduction and complexation with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC). The reduction and subsequent complexation produce a characteristic [Cr(III)O]-PDC complex which can be detected as a protonated ion of m/z 507 in the positive ion mode. The detection is selective to chromium(VI) under acidic pH, even in the presence of chromium(III) and other metal ions, providing high specificity. Different water samples were examined, including deionized, tap, and river waters, and sensitive detection was achieved. In the case of deionized water, quantification over the concentration range of 3.7 to 148ppb gave an excellent correlation coefficient of 0.9904 using the enhanced MS mode scan. Using the single-reaction monitoring (SRM) mode (monitoring the characteristic fragmentation of m/z 507 to m/z 360), the limit of detection (LOD) was found to be 0.25ppb. The LOD of chromium(VI) for both tap and river water samples was determined to be 2.0ppb. A preconcentration strategy using simple vacuum evaporation of the aqueous sample was shown to further improve the ESI signal by 15 fold. This method, with high sensitivity and selectivity, should provide a timely solution for the real-world analysis of toxic chromium(VI).

  12. Improvements in determinations using the Cu-64 annihilation gamma rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlin, Bryan E; Zeisler, Rolf

    2009-12-01

    The method of gammagamma coincidence counting has been applied to the determination of Cu via the (64)Cu annihilation gamma rays. Preliminary experiments show that at least an order of magnitude reduction in (24)Na interference may be obtained by employing the 511-511 keV coincidence peak rather than the singles 511-keV peak. The effect of the sample matrix on the yield of (24)Na pair-production events was investigated by a combination of experimental measurements and Monte Carlo calculations.

  13. Performance/Power Space Exploration for Binary64 Division Units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nannarelli, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The digit-recurrence division algorithm is used in several high-performance processors because it provides good tradeoffs in terms of latency, area and power dissipation. In this work we develop a minimally redundant radix-8 divider for binary64 (double-precision) aiming at obtaining better energy...... efficiency in the performance-per-watt space. The results show that the radix-8 divider, when compared to radix-4 and radix-16 units, requires less energy to complete a division for high clock rates....

  14. Pressure-driven formation and stabilization of superconductive chromium hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shuyin; Jia, Xiaojing; Frapper, Gilles; Li, Duan; Oganov, Artem R.; Zeng, Qingfeng; Zhang, Litong

    2015-01-01

    Chromium hydride is a prototype stoichiometric transition metal hydride. The phase diagram of Cr-H system at high pressures remains largely unexplored due to the challenges in dealing with the high activation barriers and complications in handing hydrogen under pressure. We have performed an extensive structural study on Cr-H system at pressure range 0 ∼ 300 GPa using an unbiased structure prediction method based on evolutionary algorithm. Upon compression, a number of hydrides are predicted to become stable in the excess hydrogen environment and these have compositions of Cr2Hn (n = 2–4, 6, 8, 16). Cr2H3, CrH2 and Cr2H5 structures are versions of the perfect anti-NiAs-type CrH with ordered tetrahedral interstitial sites filled by H atoms. CrH3 and CrH4 exhibit host-guest structural characteristics. In CrH8, H2 units are also identified. Our study unravels that CrH is a superconductor at atmospheric pressure with an estimated transition temperature (T c) of 10.6 K, and superconductivity in CrH3 is enhanced by the metallic hydrogen sublattice with T c of 37.1 K at 81 GPa, very similar to the extensively studied MgB2. PMID:26626579

  15. Chromium Extraction from Sewage Sludge Using Polyepoxysuccinic Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li-Hua; ZHU Zhi-Liang

    2012-01-01

    An environmentally benign biodegradable chelant,polyepoxysuccinic acid (PESA),was used to separate heavy metals from sewage sludge from the Shanghai Taopu Wastewater Treatment Plant,China,based on chemical extraction technology.The extraction of chromium (Cr) from sewage sludge with an aqueous solution of PESA was studied under various conditions.It was found that the extraction of Cr using PESA was more efficient than that using ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and S,S-ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid (EDDS) under similar conditions.PESA was capable of extracting Cr from the sewage sludge,and the extraction efficiency was obviously dependent on both the pH and the concentration of the chelating reagent.The extraction efficiency decreased gradually with increasing pH,and the dependence on pH decreased as the concentration of PESA increased.The extraction efficiency reached 58% under conditions of pH =4 and a ratio of PESA to total heavy metals of 10∶1.The extraction efficiency was maintained above 40% within the pH range from 1 to 7 at the high ratio of PESA to total heavy metals of 10∶1.Comparing the contents of heavy metals in the sewage sludge before and after the extraction,it was found that the extracted Cr came mainly from the reducible and oxidizable fractions.

  16. Inhibition by chromium and cadmium of anaerobic acidogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, H Q; Fang, H H

    2001-01-01

    The effects of chromium (III) and cadmium on the anaerobic acidogenesis of a simulated dairy waste were examined using serum vials. At Cd dosages less than 20 mg/l, the acidogenesis process was enhanced by the dosage, resulting in a higher degree of acidification, protein conversion, and hydrogen production than the control. At dosages over 20-mg/l, Cd inhibited the acidogenesis. The Cr (III) dosage of 5 mg/l reduced overall volatile fatty acid and alcohol generation, degree of acidification, conversions of lactose, lipid and protein, and total biogas production, with the exception of accumulation of hydrogen and propionate. At dosages exceeding 5 mg/l, Cr (III) had a severe inhibition on the acidogenesis. The Cd concentrations which caused a 50% reduction in total volatile fatty acid and alcohol production, degree of acidification and cumulative gas production were higher than the corresponding values caused by Cr (III), suggesting that Cr (III) was more toxic to acidogenic bacteria than Cd.

  17. Enhanced chromium adsorption capacity via plasma modification of natural zeolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagomoc, Charisse Marie D.; Vasquez, Magdaleno R., Jr.

    2017-01-01

    Natural zeolites such as mordenite are excellent adsorbents for heavy metals. To enhance the adsorption capacity of zeolite, sodium-exchanged samples were irradiated with 13.56 MHz capacitively coupled radio frequency (RF) argon gas discharge. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] was used as the test heavy metal. Pristine and plasma-treated zeolite samples were soaked in 50 mg/L Cr solution and the amount of adsorbed Cr(VI) on the zeolites was calculated at predetermined time intervals. Compared with untreated zeolite samples, initial Cr(VI) uptake was 70% higher for plasma-treated zeolite granules (50 W 30 min) after 1 h of soaking. After 24 h, all plasma-treated zeolites showed increased Cr(VI) uptake. For a 2- to 4-month period, Cr(VI) uptake increased about 130% compared with untreated zeolite granules. X-ray diffraction analyses between untreated and treated zeolite samples revealed no major difference in terms of its crystal structure. However, for plasma-treated samples, an increase in the number of surface defects was observed from scanning electron microscopy images. This increase in the number of surface defects induced by plasma exposure played a crucial role in increasing the number of active sorption sites on the zeolite surface.

  18. Adsorption of chromium ion (VI by acid activated carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Attia

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The activated carbon produced from olive stones was chemically activated using sulfuric acid, (OS-S, and utilized as an adsorbent for the removal of Cr(VI from aqueous solution in the concentration range 4-50 mg/L. Adsorption experiments were carried out in a batch process and various experimental parameters such as effect of contact time, initial chromium ion concentration, carbon dosage, and pH on percentage removal have been studied. Adsorption results obtained for activated carbon (OS-S were compared with the acid-treated commercial activated carbon (CAC-S. The optimum efficiency shows that the Cr(VI uptake being attained at pH 1.5. The equilibrium adsorption data was better fitted to the Langmuir adsorption model. The results of kinetic models showed that the pseudo-first-order kinetic model was found to correlate the experimental data well. It was concluded that activated carbon produced from olive stones (OS-S has an efficient adsorption capacity compared to (CAC-S sample.

  19. Microstructure Evolution and Grain Growth Kinetics in Annealed Nanocrystalline Chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chojnowski, Grzegorz [Warsaw University; Przenioslo, Radoslaw [Warsaw University; Sosnowska, Izabela [Warsaw University; Bukowski, Mirko [University of Saarbrucken, Saarbrucken, Germany; Natter, Harald [University of Saarbrucken, Saarbrucken, Germany; Hempelmann, Rolf [University of Saarbrucken, Saarbrucken, Germany; Fitch, Andrew [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF); Urban, Volker S [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    The kinetics of thermal evolution of the microstructure of nanocrystalline chromium (nano-Cr) has been studied by time-resolved synchrotron radiation techniques: high-resolution powder diffraction and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The as-prepared electrodeposited nano-Cr with average grain size of 27 nm shows the same bcc structure as {alpha}-Cr. The nano-Cr cubic lattice parameter thermal expansion is the same as that of reference polycrystalline {alpha}-Cr. Annealing of nano-Cr at temperatures above 400 C leads to a grain growth process with the final grain size not exceeding 125 nm even at a temperature of 700 C. The single power-law behavior is observed by SAXS in as-prepared nano-Cr changes during annealing above 400 C. In nano-Cr samples annealed at temperatures between 400 and 700 C, the low-q part of the SAXS signal shows a Porod-type behavior while the high-q part shows a power-law Q-{alpha} with the exponent {alpha} < 4. This effect is probably due to changes of the grain surface roughness during grain growth.

  20. Elementary surface processes during reactive magnetron sputtering of chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monje, Sascha; Corbella, Carles, E-mail: carles.corbella@rub.de; Keudell, Achim von [Research Group Reactive Plasmas, Ruhr-University Bochum, Universitystr. 150, 44801 Bochum (Germany)

    2015-10-07

    The elementary surface processes occurring on chromium targets exposed to reactive plasmas have been mimicked in beam experiments by using quantified fluxes of Ar ions (400–800 eV) and oxygen atoms and molecules. For this, quartz crystal microbalances were previously coated with Cr thin films by means of high-power pulsed magnetron sputtering. The measured growth and etching rates were fitted by flux balance equations, which provided sputter yields of around 0.05 for the compound phase and a sticking coefficient of O{sub 2} of 0.38 on the bare Cr surface. Further fitted parameters were the oxygen implantation efficiency and the density of oxidation sites at the surface. The increase in site density with a factor 4 at early phases of reactive sputtering is identified as a relevant mechanism of Cr oxidation. This ion-enhanced oxygen uptake can be attributed to Cr surface roughening and knock-on implantation of oxygen atoms deeper into the target. This work, besides providing fundamental data to control oxidation state of Cr targets, shows that the extended Berg's model constitutes a robust set of rate equations suitable to describe reactive magnetron sputtering of metals.

  1. Spectroscopic analysis of the interaction between chromium (III) and apoovotransferrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Yingqi [Department of Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology and Molecular Engineering of Ministry of Education, Institute of Molecular Science, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Liu Bin [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology and Molecular Engineering of Ministry of Education, Institute of Molecular Science, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Yang Binsheng, E-mail: yangbs@sxu.edu.c [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology and Molecular Engineering of Ministry of Education, Institute of Molecular Science, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China)

    2010-12-15

    Ovotransferrin (OTf) is a main member of the transferrin family that functions both as an iron transporter and an antibacterial agent. In this study, the thermodynamic property of the interaction between chromium (III) and ovotransferrin was investigated. The conditional binding constants for Cr{sup 3+} binding to the protein were determined by difference UV spectroscopy and were found to be log K{sub C}=13.08{+-}0.24 and log K{sub N}=5.65{+-}0.12. It was found that Cr{sup 3+} preferentially binds to the C-terminal site over the N-terminal site under these experimental conditions. The conformational changes in apoovotransferrin (apoOTf) during Cr{sup 3+} binding were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy using 2-p-toluidinylnaphthalene-6-sulfonate (TNS) as the fluorescence probe and by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The results show that a large conformational change in apoOTf can be attributed to binding of Cr{sup 3+} to the N-terminal site, instead of the C-terminal site. In addition, the binding of Cr{sup 3+} to apoOTf stabilizes the structure of OTf as determined by guanidine hydrochloride denaturation studies. These findings help advance our understanding of the biological effects of Cr{sup 3+}.

  2. Chromium Diffusion Doping on ZnSe Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journigan, Troy D.; Chen, K.-T.; Chen, H.; Burger, A.; Schaffers, K.; Page, R. H.; Payne, S. A.

    1997-01-01

    Chromium doped zinc selenide crystal have recently been demonstrated to be a promising material for near-IR room temperature tunable lasers which have an emission range of 2-3 micrometers. In this study a new diffusion doping process has been developed for incorporation of Cr(+2) ion into ZnSe wafers. This process has been successfully performed under isothermal conditions, at temperatures above 800 C. Concentrations in excess of 10(exp 19) Cr(+2) ions/cu cm, an order of magnitude larger than previously reported in melt grown ZnSe material, have been obtained by diffusion doping, as estimated from optical absorption measurements. The diffusivity was estimated to be about 10(exp -8) sq cm/sec using a thin film diffusion model. Resistivity was derived from current-voltage measurements and in the range of 10(exp 13) and 10(exp 16) omega-cm. The emission spectra and temperature dependent lifetime data will also be presented and discussed.

  3. Solution growth of silicon carbide using unary chromium solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyasaka, Ryo; Kawanishi, Sakiko; Narumi, Taka; Sasaki, Hideaki; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Maeda, Masafumi

    2017-02-01

    Solution growth of silicon carbide (SiC) using unary chromium (Cr) solvent was studied because the system enables a high solubility difference and a low degree of supersaturation, which would lead to rapid growth with a stabilized growth interface. The liquidus composition at SiC saturation in a quasi-binary Cr-SiC system was studied at 1823-2173 K. The measured carbon (C) contents are in good agreement with the thermodynamic evaluation using the sub-regular solution model. In addition, growth experiments using a unary Cr solvent were performed by the bottom-seeded travelling solvent method. The obtained growth rates at 1803-1923 K with a temperature difference of 15-70 K were proportional to the solubility difference between the seed and source temperatures, indicating that the growth was controlled by the mass transfer of C in the solution. The maximum growth rate of 720 μm/h at 1803 K was much higher than the growth rate by Si-rich solvents, suggesting that the Cr-rich solvent is suitable for the rapid growth at a low temperature.

  4. Extractive removal of chromium (VI) from industrial waste solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Archana; Pal, Chandana; Sahu, K K

    2008-11-30

    Extractive removal of Cr (VI) was carried out from chloride solutions using cyanex 923 mixed with kerosene. The efficiency of this extractant was studied under various experimental conditions, such as concentration of different mineral acids in the aqueous phase, concentration of cyanex 923 and Cr (VI) present in the initial aqueous feed, temperature and time of extraction, organic to aqueous (O/A) phase ratio. Percentage Cr (VI) extraction decreases with the increase in temperature at varying concentration of cyanex 923. The interference of the impurities usually associated with Cr (VI) such as Cr (III), Cu, Ni, Fe (II), Zn, Chloride and sulphate, etc., were examined under the optimized conditions and only Zn was found to interfere. Under the optimum experimental conditions 98.6-99.9% of Cr (VI) was extracted in 3-5 min at O/A of 2 with the initial feed concentration of 1g/L of Cr (VI). The extracted Cr (VI) was quantitatively stripped with 1M NaOH and the organic phase obtained after the stripping of Cr (VI) was washed with dilute HCl solution to neutralize any NaOH trapped/adhered to the solvent and then with distilled water. This regenerated solvent was reused in succeeding extraction of chromium (VI). Finally a few experiments were performed with the synthetic effluent from an electroplating industry.

  5. Kinetics of hexavalent chromium reduction by iron metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huijing QIAN; Yanjun WU; Yong LIU; Xinhua XU

    2008-01-01

    The kinetics of Cr(Ⅵ) reduction to Cr(Ⅲ) by metallic iron (Fe0) was studied in batch reactors for a range of reactant concentrations, pH and temperatures. Nearly 86.8% removal efficiency for Cr(Ⅵ) was achieved when Fe0 concentration was 6 g/L (using commercial iron powder (200 mesh) I n 120 min). The reduction ofhexavalent chro-mium took place on the surface of the iron particles following pseudo-first order kinetics. The rate of Cr(Ⅵ) reduction increased with increasing Fe0 addition and temperature but inversely with initial pH. The pseudo-first-order rate coeffi-cients (kobs) were determined as 0.0024, 0.010, 0.0268 and 0.062 8 min-1 when iron powder dosages were 2, 6, 10 and 14 g/L at 25℃ and pH 5.5, respectively. According to the Arrehenius equation, the apparent activation energy of 26.5 kJ/mol and pre-exponential factor of 3 330 min-1 were obtained at the temperature range of 288-308 K. Different Fe0 types were compared in this study. The reactivity was in the order starch-stabilized Fe0 nanoparticlesFe0 nano-particlesFe0 powderFe0 filings. Electrochemical analysis of the reaction process showed that Cr(Ⅲ) and Fe(Ⅲ) hydroxides should be the dominant final products.

  6. Alleviation of chromium toxicity by hydrogen sulfide in barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Shafaqat; Farooq, Muhammad Ahsan; Hussain, Sabir; Yasmeen, Tahira; Abbasi, G H; Zhang, Guoping

    2013-10-01

    A hydroponic experiment was carried out to examine the effect of hydrogen sulfide (H2 S) in alleviating chromium (Cr) stress in barley. A 2-factorial design with 6 replications was selected, including 3 levels of NaHS (0 μM, 100 μM, and 200 μM) and 2 levels of Cr (0 μM and 100 μM) as treatments. The results showed that NaHS addition enhances plant growth and photosynthesis slightly compared with the control. Moreover, NaHS alleviated the inhibition in plant growth and photosynthesis by Cr stress. Higher levels of NaHS exhibited more pronounced effects in reducing Cr concentrations in roots, shoots, and leaves. Ultrastructural examination of plant cells supported the facts by indication of visible alleviation of cell disorders in both root and leaf with exogenous application of NaHS. An increased number of plastoglobuli, disintegration, and disappearance of thylakoid membranes and starch granules were visualized inside the chloroplast of Cr-stressed plants. Starch accumulation in the chloroplasts was also noticed in the Cr-treated cells, with the effect being much less in Cr + NaHS-treated plants. Hence, it is concluded that H2 S produced from NaHS can improve plant tolerance under Cr stress.

  7. Probing neutrino nature at Borexino detector with chromium neutrino source

    CERN Document Server

    Sobków, W

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we indicate a possibility of utilizing the intense chromium source ($\\sim 370 PBq$) in probing the neutrino nature in low energy neutrino experiments with the ultra-low threshold and background real-time Borexino detector located near the source ($\\sim 8 m$). We analyze the elastic scattering of electron neutrinos (Dirac or Majorana, respectively) on the unpolarized electrons in the relativistic neutrino limit. We assume that the incoming neutrino beam is the superposition of left-right chiral states. Left chiral neutrinos may be detected by the standard $V A$ and non-standard scalar $S_L$, tensor $T_L$ interactions, while right chiral ones partake only in the exotic $V + A$ and $S_R, T_R$ interactions. Our model-independent study is carried out for the flavour (current) neutrino eigenstates. We compute the expected event number for the standard $V-A$ interaction of the left chiral neutrinos using the current experimental values of standard couplings and in the case of left-right chiral superpo...

  8. Distribution of chromium contamination and microbial activity in soil aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K; Wan, Jiamin; Hazen, Terry C; Schwartz, Egbert; Firestone, Mary K; Sutton, Stephen R; Newville, Matthew; Olson, Keith R; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Rao, William

    2003-01-01

    Biogeochemical transformations of redox-sensitive chemicals in soils can be strongly transport-controlled and localized. This was tested through experiments on chromium diffusion and reduction in soil aggregates that were exposed to chromate solutions. Reduction of soluble Cr(VI) to insoluble Cr(II) occurred only within the surface layer of aggregates with higher available organic carbon and higher microbial respiration. Sharply terminated Cr diffusion fronts develop when the reduction rate increases rapidly with depth. The final state of such aggregates consists of a Cr-contaminated exterior, and an uncontaminated core, each having different microbial community compositions and activity. Microbial activity was significantly higher in the more reducing soils, while total microbial biomass was similar in all of the soils. The small fraction of Cr(VI) remaining unreduced resides along external surfaces of aggregates, leaving it potentially available to future transport down the soil profile. Using the Thiele modulus, Cr(VI) reduction in soil aggregates is shown to be diffusion rate- and reaction rate-limited in anaerobic and aerobic aggregates, respectively. Thus, spatially resolved chemical and microbiological measurements are necessary within anaerobic soil aggregates to characterize and predict the fate of Cr contamination. Typical methods of soil sampling and analyses that average over redox gradients within aggregates can erase important biogeochemical spatial relations necessary for understanding these environments.

  9. Effect of recasting on the elastic modulus of metal-ceramic systems from nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirković Nemanja

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Elastic modulus of metal-ceramic systems determines their flexural strength and prevents damages on ceramics during mastication. Recycling of basic alloys is often a clinical practice, despite the possible effects on the quality of the future metal-ceramic dentures. This research was done to establish recasting effects of nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys on the elastic modulus of metalceramic systems in making fixed partial dentures. Methods. The research was performed as an experimental study. Six metal-ceramic samples of nickel-chromium alloy (Wiron 99 and cobalt-chromium alloy (Wirobond C were made. Alloy residues were recycled through twelve casting generations with the addition of 50% of new alloy on the occasion of every recasting. Three- point bending test was used to determine elastic modulus, recommended by the standard ISO 9693:1999. Fracture load for damaging ceramic layer was recorded on the universal testing machine (Zwick, type 1464, with the speed of 0,05 mm/min. Results. The results of this research revealed significant differences between elasticity modules of metal-ceramic samples in every examined recycle generation. Recasting had negative effect on the elastic modulus of the examined alloys. This research showed the slight linear reduction of elastic modulus up to the 6th generation of recycling. After the 6th recycling there was a sudden fall of elastic modulus. Conclusion. Recasting of nickelchromium and cobalt-chromium alloys is not recommended because of the reduced elastic modulus of these alloys. Instead of reusing previously recasted alloys, the alloy residues should be returned to the manufacturer. .

  10. Microbeam x-ray absorption spectroscopy study of chromium in large-grain uranium dioxide fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieszczynski, C.; Kuri, G.; Bertsch, J.; Martin, M.; Borca, C. N.; Delafoy, Ch; Simoni, E.

    2014-09-01

    Synchrotron-based microprobe x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to study the local atomic structure of chromium in chromia-doped uranium dioxide (UO2) grains. The specimens investigated were a commercial grade chromia-doped UO2 fresh fuel pellet, and materials from a spent fuel pellet of the same batch, irradiated with an average burnup of ~40 MW d kg-1. Uranium L3-edge and chromium K-edge XAS have been measured, and the structural environments of central uranium and chromium atoms have been elucidated. The Fourier transform of uranium L3-edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure shows two well-defined peaks of U-O and U-U bonds at average distances of 2.36 and 3.83 Å. Their coordination numbers are determined as 8 and 11, respectively. The chromium Fourier transform extended x-ray absorption fine structure of the pristine UO2 matrix shows similar structural features with the corresponding spectrum of the irradiated spent fuel, indicative of analogous chromium environments in the two samples studied. From the chromium XAS experimental data, detectable next neighbor atoms are oxygen and uranium of the cation-substituted UO2 lattice, and two distinct subshells of chromium and oxygen neighbors, possibly because of undissolved chromia particles present in the doped fuels. Curve-fitting analyses using theoretical amplitude and phase-shift functions of the closest Cr-O shell and calculations with ab initio computer code FEFF and atomic clusters generated from the chromium-dissolved UO2 structure have been carried out. There is a prominent reduction in the length of the adjacent Cr-O bond of about 0.3 Å in chromia-doped UO2 compared with the ideal U-O bond length in standard UO2 that would be expected because of the change in effective Coulomb interactions resulting from replacing U4+ with Cr3+ and their ionic size differences. The contraction of shortest Cr-U bond is ~0.1 Å relative to the U-U bond length in bulk UO2. The difference in the

  11. Hard Chromium Electroplating and Improvement the Properties by the Thermo Chemical Treatments (Solid Carburizing of Low Carbon Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Salloum Abbas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research the hard chromium electroplating process, which is one of the common methods of overlay coating was used, by using chromium acid as source of chromium and sulphuric acid as catalyst since the ratio between chromic acid and sulphuric acid is (100 : 1 consequently. Plating process was made by applying current of density (40 Amp / dm2 and the range of solution temperature was (50 – 55oC with different time periods (1-5 hr. A low carbon steel type (Ck15 was used as substrate for hard chromium electroplating. Solid carburization was carried out for hard chromium plating specimen at temperature (925oC with time duration (2 hr to be followed with quenching and tempering. The phase analysis was conducted by using X– ray diffraction. The examination results show that the chromium carbides in plating layer were (Cr23C6, Cr7C3. The microhardness of hard chromium plating specimen was measured, and the results show that the high hardness was about (907HV. After solid carburization the hardness values increase and the results show that the higher hardness for chromium plating layer on low carbon steel surface was (1276 HV. Wear apparatus type (Pin on Disc was used to study dry sliding wear properties of low carbon steel (As received and hard chromium plating specimens and solid carburized. The effect of applied normal load on wear rate was studied with weighting method using five normal loads (5, 10, 15, 20, 25 N at constant sliding speed (2.198 m / sec. The results reveal that the wear rate increases with the increasing of applied normal load. A good improvement in wear resistance was noticed for hard chromium plating specimens as compared with substrate specimen. It was also seen that, the improvement in wear resistance was (94% as compared with substrate metal when carburizing treatment is carried out on hard chromium plating specimens.

  12. Simultaneously Recovering High-Purity Chromium and Removing Organic Pollutants from Tannery Effluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromium pollution is a serious issue because of carcinogenic toxicities of the pollutants and low recovery rate of chromium because of the presence of organic, such as protein and fat. In this work, high recovery rate and high purity of the chromium ion were successfully prepared by the way of acid enzyme, flocculant, and Fenton oxidation. The experiments were characterized by TG, TOC, UV-VIS, and SEM. In the work, the tannery waste chrome liquor was used as experimental material. The results showed that the percentage of reduction of TOC in the tannery waste chrome liquor by method of Fenton oxidation, acid enzyme, and the flocculant was 71.15%, 65.26%, and 22.05%, respectively. Therefore, the organism content of chrome tanning waste liquid was greatly reduced through the pretreatment. And the application experiment showed that the properties and grain surface and fibers of the tanned leather with commercial chromium powder and chrome tanning agent prepared from the chromium waste liquid treated with Fenton are nearly the same.

  13. Thermodynamics of chromium in UO{sub 2} fuel: A solubility model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riglet-Martial, Ch., E-mail: chantal.martial@cea.fr [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, Direction de l’Energie Nucléaire, Département d’Etudes des Combustibles, Centre d’Etudes de Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Martin, Ph. [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, Direction de l’Energie Nucléaire, Département d’Etudes des Combustibles, Centre d’Etudes de Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Testemale, D. [Université Grenoble Alpes, Institut NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Institut NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Sabathier-Devals, C.; Carlot, G.; Matheron, P.; Iltis, X.; Pasquet, U.; Valot, C. [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, Direction de l’Energie Nucléaire, Département d’Etudes des Combustibles, Centre d’Etudes de Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Delafoy, C. [AREVA NP SAS, 10 rue Juliette Recamier, 69456 Lyon Cedex 06 (France); Largenton, R. [EDF R and D, Mechanics and Material Component Department, Avenue des Renardières, 77818 Moret sur Loing Cedex (France)

    2014-04-01

    The solubility and speciation of chromium in doped uranium oxide are measured in carefully controlled temperature and oxygen potential conditions using electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and scanning electron spectroscopy (SEM). The examination of the samples by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) provides evidence that (i) chromium is soluble in the UO{sub 2} matrix under the +3 oxidation state only regardless of the sintering conditions which is in accordance with a soluble species of type CrO{sub 3/2} and (ii) soluble chromium exhibits octahedral symmetry with 6 atoms of oxygen forming CrO{sub 6} patterns in the UO{sub 2} structure. In consistency with all available experimental information including previously published data, the solubility of chromium in UO{sub 2} corresponding to each two-phase field with either Cr, CrO and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} may be described in the ranges 1500 °C < T < 2000 °C and −460 < μ{sub O2} < −360 kJ/mol using the standard thermodynamic equations governing solubility equilibria. The characteristic parameters of the solubility laws in UO{sub 2} for the three chromium phases are derived.

  14. Competition of Chromium on Iron binding sites in the biological system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    *F. S. Rehmani

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Hexavalent chromium is mutagenic and neurotoxic. Trivalent Chromium is involved in the enzymes of glucose metabolism. Chromium is generally found in +3 oxidation state and sometimes it competes for the binding sites of iron in the biological system, when the concentration of chromium exceeds above the normal, it inhibits the absorption of iron and iron deficiency leads diseases such as anemia, tinnitus and depression. Salicylicdhydroxamic acid a hydroxamate type siderophore is used as a drug in the chelation therapy of iron overload patients. The complex formation of Cr(III and Fe(III with salicyclic hydroxamate were studied potentiometrically at different temperatures and data was subjected to computer programs. The stability constant (log beta values and thermodynamic stabilities were calculated. It was found that salicyclic hydroxamate forms 1:1 complex at pH 3 and 1:2 complex at pH 4 with Cr(III and Fe(III, respectively. The stability constant (Log beta and thermodynamic stabilities of Cr(III Salicyclic hydroxamate complexes are close to Fe(III Salicyclic hydroxamate complexes. It was observed from the stability constant values that after chelating therapy the concentration of chromium become low and deficiency symptoms appear resulting diabetes.

  15. Sodium corrosion behavior of austenitic alloys and selective dissolution of chromium and nickel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, T.; Mutoh, I.; Yagi, T.; Ikenaga, Y.

    1986-06-01

    The corrosion behavior of six austenitic alloys and reference Type 316 stainless steel (SS) has been examined in a flowing sodium environment at 700°C for up to about 4000 h. The alloys with a range of nickel content between ~ 15 and 43 wt% were designed and manufactured with an expectation of improved swelling resistance during fast neutron irradiation, compared to reference Type 316 SS. The corrosion loss of the alloys at zero downstream position and the concentrations of chromium, nickel and iron in the surface region were determined as a function of corrosion time. The selective dissolution of nickel and chromium played an important role in sodium corrosion of the alloys. During the initial period, accelerated corrosion took place and selective dissolution of chromium and nickel proceeded at a rapid rate. During the subsequent period, the overall corrosion rate and depletion of chromium and nickel decreased with increasing time until the corrosion rate and the surface concentrations of chromium, nickel and iron, which depended on composition of the alloys, reached the steady-state after about 2000 h. Also, the corrosion rate increased with increasing original nickel content of the alloys. Microstructural examination revealed surface attack of the alloys with higher nickel contents, in particular for the two precipitation strengthened Fe-Ni alloys. The alloys showed a trend of increasing carbon and nitrogen contents.

  16. Removal of chromium and toxic ions present in mine drainage by Ectodermis of Opuntia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera, Hector [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Facultad de Quimica, Paseo Colon interseccion Paseo Tollocan S/N, C.P. 50120, Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Urena-Nunez, Fernando [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P.18-1027, Col. Escandon, Delegacion Miguel Hidalgo, C.P. 11801, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Bilyeu, Bryan [University of North Texas, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, P.O. Box 305310, Denton, TX 76203-5310 (United States); Barrera-Diaz, Carlos [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Facultad de Quimica, Paseo Colon interseccion Paseo Tollocan S/N, C.P. 50120, Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: cbarrera@uaemex.mx

    2006-08-25

    This work presents conditions for hexavalent and trivalent chromium removal from aqueous solutions using natural, protonated and thermally treated Ectodermis of Opuntia. A removal of 77% of Cr(VI) and 99% of Cr(III) can be achieved. The sorbent material is characterized using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, before and after the contact with the chromium containing aqueous media. The results obtained from the characterization techniques indicate that the metal ion remains on the surface of the sorbent material. The percentage removal is found to depend on the initial chromium concentration and pH. The Cr(VI) and Cr(III) uptake process is maximum at pH 4, using 0.1 g of sorbent per liter of aqueous solution. The natural Ectodermis of Opuntia showed a chromium adsorption capacity that was adequately described by the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Finally, an actual mine drainage sample that contained Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe Zn, Ni and Pb was tested under optimal conditions for chromium removal and Ectodermis of Opuntia was found to be a suitable sorbent material. The use of this waste material for the treatment of metal-containing aqueous solutions as well as mine drainage is effective and economical.

  17. Anaerobic bio-removal of uranium (VI) and chromium (VI): Comparison of microbial community structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Monica [Centro de Ciencias do Mar, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Faleiro, Maria Leonor [IBB - Centro de Biomedicina Molecular e Estrutural, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Chaves, Sandra; Tenreiro, Rogerio [Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciencias, Centro de Biodiversidade, Genomica Integrativa e Funcional (BioFIG), Campus de FCUL, Campo Grande 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Santos, Erika [Centro de Ciencias do Mar, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Costa, Maria Clara, E-mail: mcorada@ualg.pt [Centro de Ciencias do Mar, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal)

    2010-04-15

    Several microbial communities, obtained from uranium contaminated and non-contaminated samples, were investigated for their ability to remove uranium (VI) and the cultures capable for this removal were further assessed on their efficiency for chromium (VI) removal. The highest efficiency for removal of both metals was observed on a consortium from a non-contaminated soil collected in Monchique thermal place, which was capable to remove 91% of 22 mg L{sup -1} U(VI) and 99% of 13 mg L{sup -1} Cr(VI). This study revealed that uranium (VI) removing communities have also ability to remove chromium (VI), but when uranium (VI) was replaced by chromium (VI) several differences in the structure of all bacterial communities were observed. TGGE and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene showed that the uranium (VI) removing bacterial consortia are mainly composed by members of Rhodocyclaceae family and Clostridium genus. On the other hand, bacteria from Enterobacteriaceae family were detected in the community with ability for chromium (VI) removal. The existence of members of Enterobacteriaceae and Rhodocyclaceae families never reported as chromium or uranium removing bacteria, respectively, is also a relevant finding, encouraging the exploitation of microorganisms with new abilities that can be useful for bioremediation.

  18. Synchrotron-based analysis of chromium distributions in multicrystalline silicon for solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Mallory Ann; Hofstetter, Jasmin; Morishige, Ashley E.; Coletti, Gianluca; Lai, Barry; Fenning, David P.; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2015-05-18

    Chromium (Cr) can degrade silicon wafer-based solar cell efficiencies at concentrations as low as 10(10) cm(-3). In this contribution, we employ synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy to study chromium distributions in multicrystalline silicon in as-grown material and after phosphorous diffusion. We complement quantified precipitate size and spatial distribution with interstitial Cr concentration and minority carrier lifetime measurements to provide insight into chromium gettering kinetics and offer suggestions for minimizing the device impacts of chromium. We observe that Cr-rich precipitates in as-grown material are generally smaller than iron-rich precipitates and that Cri point defects account for only one-half of the total Cr in the as-grown material. This observation is consistent with previous hypotheses that Cr transport and CrSi2 growth are more strongly diffusion-limited during ingot cooling. We apply two phosphorous diffusion gettering profiles that both increase minority carrier lifetime by two orders of magnitude and reduce [Cr-i] by three orders of magnitude to approximate to 10(10) cm(-3). Some Cr-rich precipitates persist after both processes, and locally high [Cri] after the high-temperature process indicates that further optimization of the chromium gettering profile is possible. (C) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC.

  19. Alternatives for hard chromium plating: Nanostructured coatings for severe-service valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernhes, L. [Department of Engineering Physics, Ecole Polytechnique, C.P. 6079, Succ. Centre Ville, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3C 3A7 (Canada); Velan Inc., 7007 Côte de Liesse, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H4T 1X8 (Canada); Azzi, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Notre Dame University-Louize (Lebanon); Klemberg-Sapieha, J.E., E-mail: jsapieha@polymtl.ca [Department of Engineering Physics, Ecole Polytechnique, C.P. 6079, Succ. Centre Ville, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3C 3A7 (Canada)

    2013-07-15

    In this paper, a variety of chromium-free protective coatings were evaluated as alternatives for hard chromium (HC) electroplating for valve applications, such as nanostructured cobalt-phosphor (NCP) deposited by electroplating and tungsten/tungsten carbide (W/WC) prepared by chemical vapor deposition. A series of laboratory tests including hardness, micro scratch, pin-on-disk and electrochemical polarization measurements were performed in order to compare the performance of the different coatings. In addition, mechanical resistance and fatigue resistance were evaluated using prototype valves with coated ball under severe tribo-corrosion conditions. It was shown that W/WC coating exhibits superior resistance to wear and corrosion due to high hardness and high resistance to pitting, respectively while NCP exhibits better wear resistance than HC with alumina ball and low corrosion potential which allow to use it as protective (sacrificial) coating. Both nanostructured coatings exhibited attractive tribo-mechanical and functional characteristics compared to hard chromium. - Highlights: • Tungsten/tungsten carbide (W/WC) and cobalt-phosphor (NCP) coatings are compared with hard chromium (HC). • NCP and W/WC offer better tribological properties (wear rate and friction coefficient) than HC. • W/WC has demonstrated a robust corrosion behavior with a breakdown potential greater than 1 V. • NCP and W/WC are potential candidates to replace hard chromium as protective coating.

  20. Compliance of a cobalt chromium coronary stent alloy – the COVIS trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwinger Robert HG

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cobalt chromium coronary stents are increasingly being used in percutaneous coronary interventions. There are, however, no reliable data about the characteristics of unfolding and visibility of this stent alloy in vivo. The aim of this study is to compare cobalt chromium coronary stents with conventional stainless steel stents using intracoronary ultrasound. Methods Twenty de novo native coronary stenoses ≤ 20 mm in length (target vessel reference diameter ≥ 2.5 and ≤ 4.0 mm received under sequential intracoronary ultrasound either a cobalt chromium stent (Multi-Link Vision®; n = 10 or a stainless steel stent (Multi-Link Zeta®; n = 10. Results For optimal unfolding, the cobalt chromium stent requires a higher balloon deployment pressure (13.90 ± 2.03 atm than the stainless steel stent (11.50 ± 2.12 atm. Furthermore, the achieved target vessel diameter of the cobalt chromium stent (Visibility-Index QCA/IVUS Multi-Link Vision®1.13 / Multi-Link Zeta® 1.04 is more easily overrated by Quantitative Coronary Analysis. Conclusion These data indicate that stent material-specific recommendations for optimal implantation pressure and different stent material with an equal design should both be considered in interpreting QCA-analysis.