WorldWideScience

Sample records for chromatography-electron spin resonance

  1. Single spin magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrachtrup, Jörg; Finkler, Amit

    2016-08-01

    Different approaches have improved the sensitivity of either electron or nuclear magnetic resonance to the single spin level. For optical detection it has essentially become routine to observe a single electron spin or nuclear spin. Typically, the systems in use are carefully designed to allow for single spin detection and manipulation, and of those systems, diamond spin defects rank very high, being so robust that they can be addressed, read out and coherently controlled even under ambient conditions and in a versatile set of nanostructures. This renders them as a new type of sensor, which has been shown to detect single electron and nuclear spins among other quantities like force, pressure and temperature. Adapting pulse sequences from classic NMR and EPR, and combined with high resolution optical microscopy, proximity to the target sample and nanoscale size, the diamond sensors have the potential to constitute a new class of magnetic resonance detectors with single spin sensitivity. As diamond sensors can be operated under ambient conditions, they offer potential application across a multitude of disciplines. Here we review the different existing techniques for magnetic resonance, with a focus on diamond defect spin sensors, showing their potential as versatile sensors for ultra-sensitive magnetic resonance with nanoscale spatial resolution.

  2. Spin Resonance Strength Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courant, E. D.

    2009-08-01

    In calculating the strengths of depolarizing resonances it may be convenient to reformulate the equations of spin motion in a coordinate system based on the actual trajectory of the particle, as introduced by Kondratenko, rather than the conventional one based on a reference orbit. It is shown that resonance strengths calculated by the conventional and the revised formalisms are identical. Resonances induced by radiofrequency dipoles or solenoids are also treated; with rf dipoles it is essential to consider not only the direct effect of the dipole but also the contribution from oscillations induced by it.

  3. Spin resonance strength calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courant,E.D.

    2008-10-06

    In calculating the strengths of depolarizing resonances it may be convenient to reformulate the equations of spin motion in a coordinate system based on the actual trajectory of the particle, as introduced by Kondratenko, rather than the conventional one based on a reference orbit. It is shown that resonance strengths calculated by the conventional and the revised formalisms are identical. Resonances induced by radiofrequency dipoles or solenoids are also treated; with rf dipoles it is essential to consider not only the direct effect of the dipole but also the contribution from oscillations induced by it.

  4. Spin coupling and resonance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zielinski, M.L.; van Lenthe, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    The resonating block localize wave function (RBLW) method is introduced, a resonating modification of the block localized wave functions introduced by Mo et al. [Mo, Y.; Peyerimhoff, S. D. J. Chem. Phys. 1998, 109, 1687].This approach allows the evaluation of resonance energies following Pauling’s r

  5. Spin-orbit ferromagnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    In conventional magnetic resonance techniques the magnitude and direction of the oscillatory magnetic field are (at least approximately) known. This oscillatory field is used to probe the properties of a spin ensemble. Here, I will describe experiments that do the inverse. I will discuss how we use a magnetic resonance technique to map out the current-induced effective magnetic fields in the ferromagnetic semiconductors (Ga,Mn)As and (Ga,Mn)(As,P). These current-induced fields have their origin in the spin-orbit interaction. Effective magnetic fields are observed with symmetries which resemble the Dresselhaus and Rashba spin-orbit interactions and which depend on the diagonal and off-diagonal strain respectively. Ferromagnetic semiconductor materials of different strains, annealing conditions and concentrations are studied and the results compared with theoretical calculations. Our original study measured the rectification voltage coming from the product of the oscillatory magnetoresistance, during magnetisation precession, and the alternating current. More recently we have developed an impedance matching technique which enables us to extract microwave voltages from these high resistance (10 k Ω) samples. In this way we measure the microwave voltage coming from the product of the oscillating magneto-resistance and a direct current. The direct current is observed to affect the magnetisation precession, indicating that anti-damping as well as field-like torques can originate from the spin-orbit interaction.

  6. Spin gravitational resonance and graviton detection

    CERN Document Server

    Quach, James Q

    2016-01-01

    We develop a gravitational analogue of spin magnetic resonance, called spin gravitational resonance, whereby a gravitational wave interacts with a magnetic field to produce a spin transition. In particular, an external magnetic field separates the energy spin states of a spin-1/2 particle, and the presence of the gravitational wave produces a perturbation in the components of the magnetic field orthogonal to the gravitational wave propagation. In this framework we test Dyson's conjecture that individual gravitons cannot be detected. Although we find no fundamental laws preventing single gravitons being detected with spin gravitational resonance, we show that it cannot be used in practice, in support of Dyson's conjecture.

  7. Simple classical approach to spin resonance phenomena

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordon, R A

    1977-01-01

    A simple classical method of describing spin resonance in terms of the average power absorbed by a spin system is discussed. The method has several advantages over more conventional treatments, and a number of important spin resonance phenomena, not normally considered at the introductory level...

  8. Observation of a Hybrid Spin Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, M.; Allgower, C.; Ahrens, L.; Alessi, J.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Chu, C. M.; Courant, E. D.; Glenn, J. W.; Huang, H.; Jeon, D.; Kponou, A. E.; Krueger, K.; Luccio, A.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Lee, S. Y.; Ratner, L.; Reece, K.; Roser, T.; Spinka, H.; Syphers, M. J.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D. G.; van Asselt, W.; Williams, N.; Yokosawa, A.

    2000-02-01

    A new type of spin depolarization resonance has been observed at the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). This spin resonance is identified as a strong closed-orbit sideband around the dominant intrinsic spin resonance. The strength of the resonance was proportional to the 9th harmonic component of the horizontal closed orbit and proportional to the vertical betatron oscillation amplitude. This ``hybrid'' spin resonance cannot be overcome by the partial snake at the AGS, but it can be corrected by the harmonic orbit correctors.

  9. Electron Spin Resonance at the Level of 1 04 Spins Using Low Impedance Superconducting Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, C.; Sigillito, A. J.; Lyon, S. A.; Petta, J. R.

    2017-01-01

    We report on electron spin resonance measurements of phosphorus donors localized in a 200 μ m2 area below the inductive wire of a lumped element superconducting resonator. By combining quantum limited parametric amplification with a low impedance microwave resonator design, we are able to detect around 2 ×1 04 spins with a signal-to-noise ratio of 1 in a single shot. The 150 Hz coupling strength between the resonator field and individual spins is significantly larger than the 1-10 Hz coupling rates obtained with typical coplanar waveguide resonator designs. Because of the larger coupling rate, we find that spin relaxation is dominated by radiative decay into the resonator and dependent upon the spin-resonator detuning, as predicted by Purcell.

  10. Theoretical foundations of electron spin resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Harriman, John E

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical Foundations of Electron Spin Resonance deals with the theoretical approach to electron paramagnetic resonance. The book discusses electron spin resonance in applications related to polyatomic, probably organic, free radicals in condensed phases. The book also focuses on essentially static phenomena, that is, the description and determination of stationary-state energy levels. The author reviews the Dirac theory of the electron in which a four-component wave function is responsible for the behavior of the electron. The author then connects this theory with the nonrelativistic wave f

  11. Composite spin-1 resonances at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Low, Matthew; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the signal of composite spin-1 resonances at the LHC. Motivated by the possible observation of a diboson resonance in the 8 TeV LHC data, we demonstrate that vector resonances from composite Higgs models are able to describe the data. We pay particular attention to the role played by fermion partial compositeness, which is a common feature in composite Higgs models. The parameter space that is both able to account for the diboson excess and passes electroweak precision and flavor tests is explored. Finally, we make projections for signals of such resonances at the 13 TeV run of the LHC.

  12. Undergraduate Electron-Spin-Resonance Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, James S.

    1980-01-01

    Describes the basic procedures for use of an electron-spin resonance spectrometer and potassium azide (KN3) in an experiment which extends from the phase of sample preparation (crystal growth, sample mounting, and orientation) through data taking to the stages of calculation and theoretical explanation. (Author/DS)

  13. Theory of electrically controlled resonant tunneling spin devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David Z. -Y.; Cartoixa, Xavier

    2004-01-01

    We report device concepts that exploit spin-orbit coupling for creating spin polarized current sources using nonmagnetic semiconductor resonant tunneling heterostructures, without external magnetic fields. The resonant interband tunneling psin filter exploits large valence band spin-orbit interaction to provide strong spin selectivity.

  14. Spin and Resonant States in QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Kirchbach, M

    2003-01-01

    I make the case that the nucleon excitations do not exist as isolated higher spin states but are fully absorbed by (K/2,K/2)x [(1/2,0)+(0,1/2)] multiplets taking their origin from the rotational and vibrational excitations of an underlying quark--diquark string. The Delta(1232) spectrum presents itself as the exact replica (up to Delta (1600)) of the nucleon spectrum with the K- clusters being shifted upward by about 200 MeV. QCD inspired arguments support legitimacy of the quark-diquark string. The above K multiplets can be mapped (up to form-factors) onto Lorentz group representation spaces of the type \\psi_{\\mu_1...\\mu_K}, thus guaranteeing covariant description of resonant states. The quantum \\psi_{\\mu_1...\\mu_K} states are of multiple spins at rest, and of undetermined spins elsewhere.

  15. Electron-Spin Resonance in Boron Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Charles; Venturini, Eugene L.; Azevedo, Larry J.; Emin, David

    1987-01-01

    Samples exhibit Curie-law behavior in temperature range of 2 to 100 K. Technical paper presents studies of electron-spin resonance of samples of hot pressed B9 C, B15 C2, B13 C2, and B4 C. Boron carbide ceramics are refractory solids with high melting temperatures, low thermal conductives, and extreme hardnesses. They show promise as semiconductors at high temperatures and have unusually large figures of merit for use in thermoelectric generators.

  16. Proton Spin Structure in the Resonance Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. R. Wesselmann; K. Slifer; S. Tajima; A. Aghalaryan; A. Ahmidouch; R. Asaturyan; F. Bloch; W. Boeglin; P. Bosted; C. Carasco; R. Carlini; J. Cha; J. P. Chen; M. E. Christy; L. Cole; L. Coman; D. Crabb; S. Danagoulian; D. Day; J. Dunne; M. Elaasar; R. Ent; H. Fenker; E. Frlez; L. Gan; D. Gaskell; J. Gomez; B. Hu; M. K. Jones; J. Jourdan; C. Keith; C. E. Keppel; M. Khandaker; A. Klein; L. Kramer; Y. Liang; J. Lichtenstadt; R. Lindgren; D. Mack; P. McKee; D. McNulty; D. Meekins; H. Mkrtchyan; R. Nasseripour; I. Niculescu; K. Normand; B. Norum; D. Pocanic; Y. Prok; B. Raue; J. Reinhold; J. Roche; D. Rohe; O. A. Rondon; N. Savvinov; B. Sawatzky; M. Seely; I. Sick; C. Smith; G. Smith; S. Stepanyan; L. Tang; G. Testa; W. Vulcan; K. Wang; G. Warren; S. Wood; C. Yan; L. Yuan; Junho Yun; Markus Zeier; Hong Guo Zhu

    2006-10-11

    The RSS collaboration has measured the spin structure functions g{sub 1} and g{sub 2} of the proton at Jefferson Lab using the lab's polarized electron beam, the Hall C HMS spectrometer and the UVa polarized solid target. The asymmetries A{sub parallel} and A{sub perp} were measured at the elastic peak and in the region of the nucleon resonances (1.085 GeV < W < 1.910 GeV) at an average four momentum transfer of Q{sup 2} = 1.3 GeV{sup 2}. The extracted spin structure functions and their kinematic dependence make a significant contribution in the study of higher-twist effects and polarized duality tests.

  17. Proton Spin Structure in the Resonance Region

    CERN Document Server

    Wesselmann, F R; Ahmidouch, A; Asaturyan, R; Bloch, Felix; Boeglin, W; Bosted, P; Carasco, C C; Carlini, R; Cha, J; Chen, J P; Christy, M E; Cole, L; Coman, L; Crabb, D; Danagulyan, S; Day, D; Dunne, J; Elaasar, M; Ent, R; Fenker, H; Frlez, E; Gan, L; Gaskell, D; Gómez, J; Hu, B; Jones, M K; Jourdan, J; Keith, C; Keppel, C E; Khandaker, M; Klein, A; Kramer, L; Liang, Y; Lichtenstadt, J; Lindgren, R; Mack, D; McKee, P; McNulty, D; Meekins, D; Mkrtchyan, H; Nasseripour, R; Niculescu, I; Normand, K; Norum, B; Pocanic, D; Prok, Y; Raue, B; Reinhold, J; Roche, J; Rohe, D; Rondon, O A; Savvinov, N; Sawatzky, B; Seely, M; Sick, I; Slifer, K J; Smith, C; Smith, G; Stepanyan, S; Tajima, S; Tang, L; Testa, G; Vulcan, W; Wang, K; Warren, G; Wood, S; Yan, C; Yuan, L; Yun, J; Zeier, M; Zhu, H

    2006-01-01

    The RSS collaboration has measured the spin structure functions g_1 and g_2 of the proton at Jefferson Lab using the lab's polarized electron beam, the Hall C HMS spectrometer and the UVa polarized solid target. The asymmetries A_parallel and A_perp were measured at the elastic peak and in the region of the nucleon resonances (1.085 GeV < W < 1.910 GeV) at an average four momentum transfer of Q^2 = 1.3 GeV^2. The extracted spin structure functions and their kinematic dependence make a significant contribution in the study of higher-twist effects and polarized duality tests.

  18. Two-Dimensional Electron-Spin Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Jack H.

    2000-03-01

    The extension of the concepts of 2D-NMR to ESR posed significant technological challenges, especially for liquids. ESR relaxation times are very short, as low as 10-15 ns. for T_2's. Spectral bandwidths are 100-250 MHz for nitroxide spin labels. Adequate coverage is obtained with 3-5 ns. π/2 (9-17 GHz) microwave pulses into a small low Q resonator. Dead-times are currently 25-30 ns. Additional requirements are rapid phase shifting for phase cycling, nsec. data acquisition, and fast repetition rates (10-100 kHz). 2D-ELDOR (electron-electron double resonance), which is a 3-pulse 2D-exchange experiment, takes about 30 minutes with just 0.5 nanomole spin-probe in solution (SNR 200). 2D-ELDOR is very useful in studies of molecular dynamics and local structure in complex fluids. For such media, the slow rotational dynamics requires a theory based upon the stochastic Liouville equation which enables quantitative interpretation of 2D-ELDOR experiments. In studies of spin-probes in a liquid crystal new insights could be obtained on the dynamic structure in different phases. One obtains, in addition to ordering and reorientation rates of the probes, details of the local dynamic cage: its orienting potential and (slow) relaxation rate. 2D-ELDOR overcomes the loss of resolution resulting from microscopically ordered but macroscopically disordered complex fluids. This is illustrated by studies of the dynamic structure of lipid membrane vesicles, and the effects of adding a peptide. The short dead times enable the observation of both the bulk lipids and the more immobilized lipids that coat (or are trapped) by the (aggregates of) peptides. Also, new developments of multi-quantum (2D) FT-ESR from nitroxide spin labels interacting by dipolar interactions show considerable promise in measuring distances of ca. 15-70A in macromolecules.

  19. Simulations of Resonant Intraband and Interband Tunneling Spin Filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David; Cartoixa-Soler, Xavier; McGill, T. C.; Smith, Darryl L.; Schulman, Joel N.

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews resonant intraband and interband tunneling spin filters It explores the possibility of building a zero-magnetic-field spin polarizer using nonmagnetic III-V semiconductor heterostructures. It reviews the extensive simulations of quantum transport in asymmetric InAs/GaSb/AlSb resonant tunneling structures with Rashba spin splitting and proposes a. new device concept: side-gated asymmetric Resonant Interband Tunneling Diode (a-RITD).

  20. Spin resonance strength calculation through single particle tracking for RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Dutheil, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Huang, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Meot, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ranjbar, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    The strengths of spin resonances for the polarized-proton operation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider are currently calculated with the code DEPOL, which numerically integrates through the ring based on an analytical approximate formula. In this article, we test a new way to calculate the spin resonance strengths by performing Fourier transformation to the actual transverse magnetic fields seen by a single particle traveling through the ring. Comparison of calculated spin resonance strengths is made between this method and DEPOL.

  1. Rotation Axis Variation Due To Spin Orbit Resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Gallavotti, G

    1993-01-01

    Abstract: rotation axis variation due to spin orbit resonance: conference report; keywords: planetary precession, rigid body, chaos, KAM, Arnold diffusion, averaging, celestial mechanics, classical mechanics, large deviations

  2. Exploration of Horizontal Intrinsic Spin Resonances in the AGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fanglei; Lee, S. Y.; Ahrens, Leif A.; Bai, Mei; Brown, Kevin; Courant, Ernest D.; Glenn, Joseph W.; Huang, Haixin; Luccio, Alfredo; Mackay, William W.; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Roser, Thomas; Tepikian, Steven; Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Wood, Jeff; Yip, Yin; Okamura, Masahiro; Takano, Junpei

    2006-04-01

    Siberian snakes have been employed to overcome spin resonances during polarized proton acceleration. Considering limited space in the AGS, strong partial snakes that rotate the spin by less than 180 degrees can be used to avoid the spin imperfection and intrinsic resonances in low energy accelerators. However, the tilt of spin away from the vertical direction may become sensitive to horizontal betatron motion which can also cause spin depolarization. These resonances, called horizontal intrinsic spin resonances, have been observed in simulations. Preliminary measurements with beam were also carried out in AGS 2005 polarized proton run. During the AGS 2006 run, we plan to explore the details about the horizontal intrinsics resonances further. This paper describes the experimental methods and the latest results.

  3. Resonance fluorescence and electron spin in semiconductor quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yong

    2009-11-18

    The work presented in this dissertation contains the first observation of spin-resolved resonance fluorescence from a single quantum dot and its application of direct measurement of electron spin dynamics. The Mollow triplet and the Mollow quintuplet, which are the hallmarks of resonance fluorescence, are presented as the non-spin-resolved and spin-resolved resonance fluorescence spectrum, respectively. The negligible laser background contribution, the near pure radiative broadened spectrum and the anti-bunching photon statistics imply the sideband photons are background-free and near transform-limited single photons. This demonstration is a promising step towards the heralded single photon generation and electron spin readout. Instead of resolving spectrum, an alternative spin-readout scheme by counting resonance fluorescence photons under moderate laser power is demonstrated. The measurements of n-shot time-resolved resonance fluorescence readout are carried out to reveal electron spin dynamics of the measurement induced back action and the spin relaxation. Hyperfine interaction and heavy-light hole mixing are identified as the relevant mechanisms for the back action and phonon-assistant spin-orbit interaction dominates the spin relaxation. After a detailed discussion on charge-spin configurations in coupled quantum dots system, the single-shot readout on electron spin are proposed. (orig.)

  4. Rotational-resonance distance measurements in multi-spin systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeven, Aswin; Williamson, Philip T F; Zimmermann, Herbert; Ernst, Matthias; Meier, Beat H

    2004-06-01

    It is demonstrated that internuclear distances can be evaluated from rotational-resonance (RR) experiments in uniformly (13)C-labelled compounds. The errors in the obtained distances are less than 10% without the need to know any parameters of the spin system except the isotropic chemical shifts of all spins. We describe the multi-spin system with a simple fictitious spin-1/2 model. The influence of the couplings to the passive spins (J and dipolar coupling) is described by an empirical constant offset from the rotational-resonance condition. Using simulated data for a three-spin system, we show that the two-spin model describes the rotational-resonance transfer curves well as long as none of the passive spins is close to a rotational-resonance condition with one of the active spins. The usability of the two-spin model is demonstrated experimentally using a sample of acetylcholine perchlorate with labelling schemes of various levels of complexity. Doubly-, triply-, and fully labelled compounds lead to strongly varying RR polarization-transfer curves but the evaluated distances using the two-spin model are identical within the expected error limits and coincide with the distance from the X-ray structure. Rotational-resonance distance measurements in fully labelled compounds allow, in particular, the measurement of weak couplings in the presence of strong couplings.

  5. Single-electron Spin Resonance in a Quadruple Quantum Dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Tomohiro; Nakajima, Takashi; Delbecq, Matthieu R.; Amaha, Shinichi; Yoneda, Jun; Takeda, Kenta; Allison, Giles; Ito, Takumi; Sugawara, Retsu; Noiri, Akito; Ludwig, Arne; Wieck, Andreas D.; Tarucha, Seigo

    2016-08-01

    Electron spins in semiconductor quantum dots are good candidates of quantum bits for quantum information processing. Basic operations of the qubit have been realized in recent years: initialization, manipulation of single spins, two qubit entanglement operations, and readout. Now it becomes crucial to demonstrate scalability of this architecture by conducting spin operations on a scaled up system. Here, we demonstrate single-electron spin resonance in a quadruple quantum dot. A few-electron quadruple quantum dot is formed within a magnetic field gradient created by a micro-magnet. We oscillate the wave functions of the electrons in the quantum dots by applying microwave voltages and this induces electron spin resonance. The resonance energies of the four quantum dots are slightly different because of the stray field created by the micro-magnet and therefore frequency-resolved addressable control of each electron spin resonance is possible.

  6. Electron spin resonance detected by a superconducting qubit

    CERN Document Server

    Kubo, Y; Grezes, C; Umeda, T; Isoya, J; Sumiya, H; Yamamoto, T; Abe, H; Onoda, S; Ohshima, T; Jacques, V; Dréau, A; Roch, J -F; Auffeves, A; Vion, D; Esteve, D; Bertet, P

    2012-01-01

    A new method for detecting the magnetic resonance of electronic spins at low temperature is demonstrated. It consists in measuring the signal emitted by the spins with a superconducting qubit that acts as a single-microwave-photon detector, resulting in an enhanced sensitivity. We implement this new type of electron-spin resonance spectroscopy using a hybrid quantum circuit in which a transmon qubit is coupled to a spin ensemble consisting of NV centers in diamond. With this setup we measure the NV center absorption spectrum at 30mK at an excitation level of \\thicksim15\\,\\mu_{B} out of an ensemble of 10^{11} spins.

  7. Spin measurement and neutron resonance spectroscopy for ^155Gd

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baramsai, Bayarbadrakh; Mitchell, G. E.; Chyzh, A.; Dashdorj, D.; Walker, C.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Keksis, A. L.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Wouters, J. M.; Ullmann, J. L.; Viera, D. J.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Becvar, F.; Krticka, M.

    2009-05-01

    The ^155Gd(n,γ) reaction has been measured with the DANCE calorimeter at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The highly segmented calorimeter provided detailed multiplicity distributions of the capture γ - rays. With this information the spins of the neutron capture resonances have been determined. The improved sensitivity of this method allowed the determination of the spins of even weak and unresolved resonances. With these new spin assignments as well as previously determined resonance parameters, level spacings and neutron strength functions are determined separately for s-wave resonances with J = 1 and 2.

  8. Induction-detection electron spin resonance with spin sensitivity of a few tens of spins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artzi, Yaron; Twig, Ygal; Blank, Aharon [Schulich Faculty of Chemistry Technion—Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2015-02-23

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) is a spectroscopic method that addresses electrons in paramagnetic materials directly through their spin properties. ESR has many applications, ranging from semiconductor characterization to structural biology and even quantum computing. Although it is very powerful and informative, ESR traditionally suffers from low sensitivity, requiring many millions of spins to get a measureable signal with commercial systems using the Faraday induction-detection principle. In view of this disadvantage, significant efforts were made recently to develop alternative detection schemes based, for example, on force, optical, or electrical detection of spins, all of which can reach single electron spin sensitivity. This sensitivity, however, comes at the price of limited applicability and usefulness with regard to real scientific and technological issues facing modern ESR which are currently dealt with conventional induction-detection ESR on a daily basis. Here, we present the most sensitive experimental induction-detection ESR setup and results ever recorded that can detect the signal from just a few tens of spins. They were achieved thanks to the development of an ultra-miniature micrometer-sized microwave resonator that was operated at ∼34 GHz at cryogenic temperatures in conjunction with a unique cryogenically cooled low noise amplifier. The test sample used was isotopically enriched phosphorus-doped silicon, which is of significant relevance to spin-based quantum computing. The sensitivity was experimentally verified with the aid of a unique high-resolution ESR imaging approach. These results represent a paradigm shift with respect to the capabilities and possible applications of induction-detection-based ESR spectroscopy and imaging.

  9. Angular dependent study on ferromagnetic resonance and spin excitations by spin rectification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yichao; Fan, Xiaolong, E-mail: fanxiaolong@lzu.edu.cn; Zhao, Xiaobing; Rao, Jinwei; Zhou, Hengan; Guo, Dangwei; Xue, Desheng [The Key Lab for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Gui, Y. S.; Hu, C.-M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada)

    2015-01-14

    We report angular dependent spin rectification spectra which are applied to studying spin excitations in single permalloy stripe. Based on planar Hall effect, those spin excitations generate special resonant dc Hall voltages, which have been characterized as functions of the amplitude and direction of applied magnetic field. Through high angular resolution 2D mappings, the evolutions of different spin excitation can be directly presented, and the dynamic magnetic parameters such as the gyromagnetic ratio, effective exchange field, as well as the quantized numbers of standing spin waves can be accurately determined through fitting the angular evolution of each resonance.

  10. PREFACE: Muon spin rotation, relaxation or resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffner, Robert H.; Nagamine, Kanetada

    2004-10-01

    To a particle physicist a muon is a member of the lepton family, a heavy electron possessing a mass of about 1/9 that of a proton and a spin of 1/2, which interacts with surrounding atoms and molecules electromagnetically. Since its discovery in 1937, the muon has been put to many uses, from tests of special relativity to deep inelastic scattering, from studies of nuclei to tests of weak interactions and quantum electrodynamics, and most recently, as a radiographic tool to see inside heavy objects and volcanoes. In 1957 Richard Garwin and collaborators, while conducting experiments at the Columbia University cyclotron to search for parity violation, discovered that spin-polarized muons injected into materials might be useful to probe internal magnetic fields. This eventually gave birth to the modern field of muSR, which stands for muon spin rotation, relaxation or resonance, and is the subject of this special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter. Muons are produced in accelerators when high energy protons (generally >500 MeV) strike a target like graphite, producing pions which subsequently decay into muons. Most experiments carried out today use relatively low-energy (~4 MeV), positively-charged muons coming from pions decaying at rest in the skin of the production target. These muons have 100% spin polarization, a range in typical materials of about 180 mg cm-2, and are ideal for experiments in condensed matter physics and chemistry. Negatively-charged muons are also occasionally used to study such things as muonic atoms and muon-catalysed fusion. The muSR technique provides a local probe of internal magnetic fields and is highly complementary to inelastic neutron scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance, for example. There are four primary muSR facilities in the world today: ISIS (Didcot, UK), KEK (Tsukuba, Japan), PSI (Villigen, Switzerland) and TRIUMF (Vancouver, Canada), serving about 500 researchers world-wide. A new facility, JPARC (Tokai, Japan

  11. Resonant spin tunneling in small antiferromagnetic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luis, F.; del Barco, E.; Hernández, J. M.; Remiro, E.; Bartolomé, J.; Tejada, J.

    1999-05-01

    The paper reports a detailed experimental study on magnetic relaxation of natural horse-spleen ferritin. ac susceptibility measurements performed on three samples of different concentration show that dipole-dipole interactions between uncompensated moments play no significant role. Furthermore, the distribution of relaxation times in these samples has been obtained from a scaling of experimental χ'' data, obtained at different frequencies. The average uncompensated magnetic moment per protein is compatible with a disordered arrangement of atomic spins throughout the core, rather than with surface disorder. The observed field dependence of the blocking temperature suggests that magnetic relaxation is faster at zero field than at intermediate field values. This is confirmed by the fact that the magnetic viscosity peaks at zero field, too. Using the distribution of relaxation times obtained independently, we show that these results cannot be explained in terms of classical relaxation theory. The most plausible explanation of these results is the existence, near zero field, of resonant magnetic tunneling between magnetic states of opposite orientation, which are thermally populated.

  12. Numerical simulation study on spin resonant depolarization due to spin-orbit coupling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lan Jie-Qin; Xu Hong-Liang

    2012-01-01

    The spin polarization phenomenon in lepton circular accelerators had been known for many years.It provides a new approach for physicists to study the spin feature of fundamental particles and the dynamics of spin-orbit coupling,such as spin resonances.We use numerical simulation to study the features of spin under the modulation of orbital motion in an electron storage ring.The various cases of depolarization due to spin-orbit coupling through an emitting photon and misalignment of magnets in the ring are discussed.

  13. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Gennady P.; Chernobrod, Boris M.

    2007-12-11

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of unpaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  14. Single spin detection by magnetic resonance force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugar, D; Budakian, R; Mamin, H J; Chui, B W

    2004-07-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is well known as a powerful technique for visualizing subsurface structures with three-dimensional spatial resolution. Pushing the resolution below 1 micro m remains a major challenge, however, owing to the sensitivity limitations of conventional inductive detection techniques. Currently, the smallest volume elements in an image must contain at least 10(12) nuclear spins for MRI-based microscopy, or 10(7) electron spins for electron spin resonance microscopy. Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) was proposed as a means to improve detection sensitivity to the single-spin level, and thus enable three-dimensional imaging of macromolecules (for example, proteins) with atomic resolution. MRFM has also been proposed as a qubit readout device for spin-based quantum computers. Here we report the detection of an individual electron spin by MRFM. A spatial resolution of 25 nm in one dimension was obtained for an unpaired spin in silicon dioxide. The measured signal is consistent with a model in which the spin is aligned parallel or anti-parallel to the effective field, with a rotating-frame relaxation time of 760 ms. The long relaxation time suggests that the state of an individual spin can be monitored for extended periods of time, even while subjected to a complex set of manipulations that are part of the MRFM measurement protocol.

  15. Chirality-sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance effects induced by indirect spin-spin coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbacz, P.; Buckingham, A. D.

    2016-11-01

    It is predicted that, for two spin-1/2 nuclei coupled by indirect spin-spin coupling in a chiral molecule, chirality-sensitive induced electric polarization can be observed at the frequencies equal to the sum and difference between the spin resonance frequencies. Also, an electric field oscillating at the difference frequency can induce spin coherences which allow the direct discrimination between enantiomers by nuclear magnetic resonance. The dominant contribution to the magnitude of these expected chiral effects is proportional to the permanent electric dipole moment and to the antisymmetric part of the indirect spin-spin coupling tensor of the chiral molecule. Promising compounds for experimental tests of the predictions are derivatives of 1,3-difluorocyclopropene.

  16. Acoustic spin pumping in magnetoelectric bulk acoustic wave resonator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. I. Polzikova

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We present the generation and detection of spin currents by using magnetoelastic resonance excitation in a magnetoelectric composite high overtone bulk acoustic wave (BAW resonator (HBAR formed by a Al-ZnO-Al-GGG-YIG-Pt structure. Transversal BAW drives magnetization oscillations in YIG film at a given resonant magnetic field, and the resonant magneto-elastic coupling establishes the spin-current generation at the Pt/YIG interface. Due to the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE this BAW-driven spin current is converted to a dc voltage in the Pt layer. The dependence of the measured voltage both on magnetic field and frequency has a resonant character. The voltage is determined by the acoustic power in HBAR and changes its sign upon magnetic field reversal. We compare the experimentally observed amplitudes of the ISHE electrical field achieved by our method and other approaches to spin current generation that use surface acoustic waves and microwave resonators for ferromagnetic resonance excitation, with the theoretically expected values.

  17. Observation of spin diffusion in zero-field magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suter, D.; Jarvie, T.P.; Sun, B.; Pines, A.

    1987-07-06

    We report the measurement of spin diffusion at zero field, observed by two-dimensional deuterium magnetic resonance of a polycrystalline sample. This demonstrates for the first time an appealing feature of pulsed zero-field magnetic resonance, namely the potential for structure determination in solids without the need for single crystals or oriented samples.

  18. Splitting of the Dipole and Spin Dipole Resonances in Pb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Sam M.

    2000-10-01

    The response to different neutrino flavors of a supernova neutrino detector based on Pb depends on the position of the spin-dipole resonance(Fuller, Fowler and McLaughlin, Phys. Rev. D59,085005(1999)). In this talk I will present a phenomenolgical model that allows one to extract the splitting of the dipole and spin-dipole resonances from the variation with bombarding energy of the L=1 resonance in (p,n) reactions. This model has been applied previously to the Zr isotopes (Sam M. Austin, Phys. Rev. C, submitted). The dipole splitting for ^208Pb is determined from available data on the (p,n) reaction for bombarding energies between 45 to 200 MeV. It is found to be 4.7±2.0 MeV, with the spin-dipole resonance lying at lower excitation energy.

  19. Experimental Verification of Predicted Oscillations Near a Spin Resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morozov, V.S.; /Michigan U.; Chao, A.W.; /Michigan U. /SLAC; Krisch, A.D.; Leonova, M.A.; Raymond, R.S.; Sivers, D.W.; Wong, V.K.; /Michigan U.; Ganshvili, A.; /Julich, Forschungszentrum /Erlangen - Nuremberg U.; Gebel, R.; Lehrach, A.; Lorentz, B.; Maier, R.; Prasuhn, D.; Stockhorst, H.; Welsch, D.; /Julich, Forschungszentrum; Hinterberger, F.; Ulbrich, K.; /Bonn U., HISKP; Schnase, A.; /JAEA, Ibaraki; Stephenson, E.J.; /Indiana U., IUCF; Brantjes, N.P.M.; Onderwater, C.J.G.; /Groningen U.

    2011-12-06

    The Chao matrix formalism allows analytic calculations of a beam's polarization behavior inside a spin resonance. We recently tested its prediction of polarization oscillations occurring in a stored beam of polarized particles near a spin resonance. Using a 1.85?GeV/c polarized deuteron beam stored in COSY, we swept a new rf solenoid's frequency rather rapidly through 400 Hz during 100 ms, while varying the distance between the sweep's end frequency and the central frequency of an rf-induced spin resonance. Our measurements of the deuteron's polarization for sweeps ending near and inside the resonance agree with the Chao formalism's predicted oscillations.

  20. Telling the spin of the di-photon resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Fabbrichesi, Marco; Urbano, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    We argue that the spin of the 750 GeV resonance can be determined at the 99.7% confidence level in the di-photon channel with as few as 10 fb$^{-1}$ of luminosity. This result is true if the resonance is produced by gluon fusion (independently of the selection cuts) while an appropriate choice of selection cuts is needed if quark production is sub-dominantly present--which is the case of the Kaluza-Klein gravitational excitation under the hypothesis of a spin-2 resonance. A proportionally larger luminosity is required if the model for the spin-2 resonance includes a dominant production by quarks or in the absence of an efficient separation of the signal from the background.

  1. Suppression of electron spin-echo envelope modulation peaks in double quantum coherence electron spin resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonora, Marco; Becker, James; Saxena, Sunil

    2004-10-01

    We show the use of the observer blind spots effect for the elimination of electron spin-echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) peaks in double quantum coherence (DQC) electron spin resonance (ESR). The suppression of ESEEM facilitates the routine and unambiguous extraction of distances from DQC-ESR spectra. This is also the first demonstration of this challenging methodology on commercial instrumentation.

  2. Double-spin-flip resonance of rhodium nuclei at positive and negative spin temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuoriniemi, J.T.; Knuuttila, T.A.; Lefmann, K.

    2000-01-01

    Sensitive SQUID-NMR measurements were used to study the mutual interactions in the highly polarized nuclear-spin system of rhodium metal. The dipolar coupling gives rise to a weak double-spin-flip resonance. The observed frequency shifts allow deducing separately the dipolarlike contribution...

  3. Resonant and Time-Resolved Spin Noise Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xinlin; Pursley, Brennan; Sih, Vanessa

    Spin noise spectroscopy is a technique which can probe the system while it remains in equilibrium. It was first demonstrated in atomic gases and then in solid state systems. Most existing spin noise measurement setups digitize the spin fluctuation signal and then analyze the power spectrum. Recently, pulsed lasers have been used to expand the bandwidth of accessible dynamics and allow direct time-domain correlation measurements. Here we develop and test a model for ultrafast pulsed laser spin noise measurements as well as a scheme to measure spin lifetimes longer than the laser repetition period. For the resonant spin noise technique, analog electronics are used to capture correlations from the extended pulse train, and the signal at a fixed time delay is measured as a function of applied magnetic field.

  4. Study of spin resonances in the accelerators with snakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.Y. (Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (USA))

    1989-05-05

    Spin resonances in the circular accelerators with snakes are studied to understand the nature of snake resonances. We analyze the effect of snake configuration, and the snake superperiod on the resonance. Defining the {ital critical} {ital resonance} {ital strength} {epsilon}{sub {ital c}} as the maximum tolerable resonance strength without losing the beam polarization after passing through the resonance, we found that {epsilon}{sub {ital c}} is a sensitive function of the snake configuration, the snake superperiod at the first order snake resonance, the higher order snake resonance conditions and the spin matching condition. Under properly designed snake configuration, the critical resonance strength {epsilon}{sub {ital c}} is found to vary linearly with {ital N}{sub {ital S}} as {l angle}{epsilon}{sub {ital c}}{r angle}=(1/{pi})sin{sup {minus}1}(cos {pi}{nu}{sub z}{vert bar}{sup 1/2})N{sub S}, where {nu}{vert bar}{sub z} and N{sub S} are the betatron tune and the number of snakes respectively. We also study the effect of overlapping intrinsic and imperfection resonances. The imperfection resonance should be corrected to a magnitude of insignificance (e.g., {epsilon}{le}0.1 for two snakes case) to maintain proper polarization.

  5. Electron spin resonance and spin-valley physics in a silicon double quantum dot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xiaojie; Ruskov, Rusko; Xiao, Ming; Tahan, Charles; Jiang, HongWen

    2014-05-14

    Silicon quantum dots are a leading approach for solid-state quantum bits. However, developing this technology is complicated by the multi-valley nature of silicon. Here we observe transport of individual electrons in a silicon CMOS-based double quantum dot under electron spin resonance. An anticrossing of the driven dot energy levels is observed when the Zeeman and valley splittings coincide. A detected anticrossing splitting of 60 MHz is interpreted as a direct measure of spin and valley mixing, facilitated by spin-orbit interaction in the presence of non-ideal interfaces. A lower bound of spin dephasing time of 63 ns is extracted. We also describe a possible experimental evidence of an unconventional spin-valley blockade, despite the assumption of non-ideal interfaces. This understanding of silicon spin-valley physics should enable better control and read-out techniques for the spin qubits in an all CMOS silicon approach.

  6. Spin Motion and Resonances in Accelerators and Storage Rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courant,E.

    2008-01-01

    Some of the basic aspects of the spin dynamics of accelerators and storage rings are reviewed. Since the components of spin parallel and perpendicular to the particle velocity behave differently it is desirable to reformulate the equations of spin motion in a frame of reference that exhibits this difference explicitly. The conventional treatment employs a coordinate system derived from a reference orbit. An alternate coordinate system, based on the actual trajectory of the particle, leads to simplified equations of spin motion but, contrary to a conjecture presented in a previous note, resonance strengths calculated by the conventional and the revised formalisms are identical, as pointed out by Kondratenko. Resonances induced by radiofrequency dipoles or solenoids are also treated; with rf dipoles it is essential to consider not only the direct effect of the dipole but also the contribution from oscillations induced by it.

  7. Reaching the quantum limit of sensitivity in electron spin resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienfait, A.; Pla, J. J.; Kubo, Y.; Stern, M.; Zhou, X.; Lo, C. C.; Weis, C. D.; Schenkel, T.; Thewalt, M. L. W.; Vion, D.; Esteve, D.; Julsgaard, B.; Mølmer, K.; Morton, J. J. L.; Bertet, P.

    2016-03-01

    The detection and characterization of paramagnetic species by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is widely used throughout chemistry, biology and materials science, from in vivo imaging to distance measurements in spin-labelled proteins. ESR relies on the inductive detection of microwave signals emitted by the spins into a coupled microwave resonator during their Larmor precession. However, such signals can be very small, prohibiting the application of ESR at the nanoscale (for example, at the single-cell level or on individual nanoparticles). Here, using a Josephson parametric microwave amplifier combined with high-quality-factor superconducting microresonators cooled at millikelvin temperatures, we improve the state-of-the-art sensitivity of inductive ESR detection by nearly four orders of magnitude. We demonstrate the detection of 1,700 bismuth donor spins in silicon within a single Hahn echo with unit signal-to-noise ratio, reduced to 150 spins by averaging a single Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill sequence. This unprecedented sensitivity reaches the limit set by quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field instead of thermal or technical noise, which constitutes a novel regime for magnetic resonance. The detection volume of our resonator is ˜0.02 nl, and our approach can be readily scaled down further to improve sensitivity, providing a new versatile toolbox for ESR at the nanoscale.

  8. Neutron resonance spin echo with longitudinal DC fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krautloher, Maximilian; Kindervater, Jonas; Keller, Thomas; Häußler, Wolfgang

    2016-12-01

    We report on the design, construction, and performance of a neutron resonance spin echo (NRSE) instrument employing radio frequency (RF) spin flippers combining RF fields with DC fields, the latter oriented parallel (longitudinal) to the neutron propagation direction (longitudinal NRSE (LNRSE)). The advantage of the longitudinal configuration is the inherent homogeneity of the effective magnetic path integrals. In the center of the RF coils, the sign of the spin precession phase is inverted by a π flip of the neutron spins, such that non-uniform spin precession at the boundaries of the RF flippers is canceled. The residual inhomogeneity can be reduced by Fresnel- or Pythagoras-coils as in the case of conventional spin echo instruments (neutron spin echo (NSE)). Due to the good intrinsic homogeneity of the B0 coils, the current densities required for the correction coils are at least a factor of three less than in conventional NSE. As the precision and the current density of the correction coils are the limiting factors for the resolution of both NSE and LNRSE, the latter has the intrinsic potential to surpass the energy resolution of present NSE instruments. Our prototype LNRSE spectrometer described here was implemented at the resonance spin echo for diverse applications (RESEDA) beamline at the MLZ in Garching, Germany. The DC fields are generated by B0 coils, based on resistive split-pair solenoids with an active shielding for low stray fields along the beam path. One pair of RF flippers at a distance of 2 m generates a field integral of ˜0.5 Tm. The LNRSE technique is a future alternative for high-resolution spectroscopy of quasi-elastic excitations. In addition, it also incorporates the MIEZE technique, which allows to achieve spin echo resolution for spin depolarizing samples and sample environments. Here we present the results of numerical optimization of the coil geometry and first data from the prototype instrument.

  9. Spin-isospin resonances in nuclei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fujiwara, M; Akimune, H; Daito, [No Value; Ejiri, H; Fujita, Y; Greenfield, MB; Harakeh, MN; Inomata, T; Janecke, J; Nakayama, S; Takemura, N; Tamii, A; Tanaka, M; Toyokawa, H; Yosoi, M

    1996-01-01

    Spin-isospin excitations in nuclei have been investigated via the (He-3,t) reaction at 450 MeV. The volume integrals of the effective interactions J(sigma tau) and J(tau) for the (He-3,t) reaction at 450 MeV have been empirically determined to be 172+/-17 MeV-fm(3) and 53+/-5 MeV-fm(3), respectively

  10. Decomposition of nuclear magnetic resonance spin-spin coupling constants into active and passive orbital contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräfenstein, Jürgen; Tuttle, Tell; Cremer, Dieter

    2004-06-01

    The theory of the J-OC-PSP (decomposition of J into orbital contributions using orbital currents and partial spin polarization) method is derived to distinguish between the role of active, passive, and frozen orbitals on the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin-spin coupling mechanism. Application of J-OC-PSP to the NMR spin-spin coupling constants of ethylene, which are calculated using coupled perturbed density functional theory in connection with the B3LYP hybrid functional and a [7s,6p,2d/4s,2p] basis set, reveal that the well-known pi mechanism for Fermi contact (FC) spin coupling is based on passive pi orbital contributions. The pi orbitals contribute to the spin polarization of the sigma orbitals at the coupling nuclei by mediating spin information between sigma orbitals (spin-transport mechanism) or by increasing the spin information of a sigma orbital by an echo effect. The calculated FC(pi) value of the SSCC (1)J(CC) of ethylene is 4.5 Hz and by this clearly smaller than previously assumed.

  11. High-spin molecular resonances in 12C + 12C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uegaki, E.; Abe, Y.

    2016-05-01

    Resonances observed in the 12C + 12C collisions are studied with a molecular model. At high spins J = 10-18, a stable dinuclear configuration is found to be an equator-equator touching one. Firstly, normal modes have been solved around the equilibrium, with spin J and K-quantum number being specified for rotation of the whole system. Secondly, with respect to large centrifugal energy, Coriolis coupling has been diagonalized among low-lying 11 states of normal-mode excitations, which brings K-mixing. The analyses of decay widths and excitation functions have been done. The molecular ground state exhibits alignments of the orbital angular momentum and the 12C spins, while some of the molecular excited states exhibit disalignments with small widths. Those results are surprisingly in good agreement with the experiments, which will light up a new physical picture of the highspin 12C + 12C resonances.

  12. Electron spin resonance studies on reduction process of nitroxyl spin radicals used in molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhas, M. Kumara; Benial, A. Milton Franklin, E-mail: miltonfranklin@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, NMSSVN College, Nagamalai, Madurai-625019, Tamilnadu (India); Jawahar, A. [Department of Chemistry, NMSSVN College, Nagamalai, Madurai-625019, Tamilnadu (India)

    2014-04-24

    The Electron spin resonance studies on the reduction process of nitroxyl spin probes were carried out for 1mM {sup 14}N labeled nitroxyl radicals in pure water and 1 mM concentration of ascorbic acid as a function of time. The electron spin resonance parameters such as signal intensity ratio, line width, g-value, hyperfine coupling constant and rotational correlation time were determined. The half life time was estimated for 1mM {sup 14}N labeled nitroxyl radicals in 1 mM concentration of ascorbic acid. The ESR study reveals that the TEMPONE has narrowest line width and fast tumbling motion compared with TEMPO and TEMPOL. From the results, TEMPONE has long half life time and high stability compared with TEMPO and TEMPOL radical. Therefore, this study reveals that the TEMPONE radical can act as a good redox sensitive spin probe for molecular imaging.

  13. Randomized benchmarking of quantum gates implemented by electron spin resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Daniel K.; Feng, Guanru; Rahimi, Robabeh; Baugh, Jonathan; Laflamme, Raymond

    2016-06-01

    Spin systems controlled and probed by magnetic resonance have been valuable for testing the ideas of quantum control and quantum error correction. This paper introduces an X-band pulsed electron spin resonance spectrometer designed for high-fidelity coherent control of electron spins, including a loop-gap resonator for sub-millimeter sized samples with a control bandwidth ∼40 MHz. Universal control is achieved by a single-sideband upconversion technique with an I-Q modulator and a 1.2 GS/s arbitrary waveform generator. A single qubit randomized benchmarking protocol quantifies the average errors of Clifford gates implemented by simple Gaussian pulses, using a sample of gamma-irradiated quartz. Improvements in unitary gate fidelity are achieved through phase transient correction and hardware optimization. A preparation pulse sequence that selects spin packets in a narrowed distribution of static fields confirms that inhomogeneous dephasing (1 / T2∗) is the dominant source of gate error. The best average fidelity over the Clifford gates obtained here is 99.2 % , which serves as a benchmark to compare with other technologies.

  14. Spin dipole and quadrupole resonances in sup 40 Ca

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, F.T.; Love, W.G. (The University of Georgia, Athens, GA (USA)); Bimbot, L. (The University of Paris, Orsay, (France)); Fergerson, R.W.; Glashausser, C.; Green, A. (Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ (USA)); Jones, K. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (USA)); Nanda, S. (Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (USA) The University of Georgia, Athens, GA (USA))

    1989-11-01

    Angular distributions of the double differential cross section {ital d}{sup 2}{sigma}/d{Omega} dE({sigma}) and the spin-flip probability {ital S}{sub {ital nn}} have been measured for inclusive proton inelastic scattering from {sup 40}Ca at 319 MeV. Excitation energies ({omega}) up to about 40 MeV have been investigated over the angular range from 3.5{degree} to 12{degree} in the laboratory (0.3 to 0.9 fm{sup {minus}1}). Here, multipole decompositions of angular distributions of {sigma}{ital S}{sub {ital nn}} for the {sup 40}Ca({ital {rvec p}},{ital {rvec p}} {prime}) reaction at 319 MeV have been performed in order to compare {Delta}{ital S}=1 strength observed with sum rules. In contrast to the well-known quenching of Gamow-Teller and {ital M}1 resonances, the spin-dipole resonance has a total measured strength which is larger than that predicted by the energy-weighted sum rule. The spin-dipole strength distribution supports asymmetric widths predicted by calculations including 2p-2h mixing. The spin-quadrupole resonance is observed near {omega}=35 MeV and its total strength for {omega}{lt}40 MeV estimated.

  15. On properties of low-lying spin-1 hadron resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizhov, M. V.

    2017-03-01

    Properties of low-lying spin-1 hadron resonances are described in the review. It is shown how the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model can be extended in the chiral invariant way by new tensor interactions. New mass formulas are obtained, which are not based on unitary symmetry groups but involve particles from different multiplets even with opposite parity. They all are in good agreement with experimental data. Dynamic properties of spin-1 mesons confirmed by the calculations performed using the QCD sum rule technique and the lattice calculations are understood and explained.

  16. RESPECT: Neutron Resonance Spin-Echo Spectrometer for Extreme Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Georgii, Robert; Pfleiderer, Christian; Böni, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We propose the design of a Resonance SPin-echo spECtrometer for exTreme studies, RESPECT, that is ideally suited for the exploration of non-dispersive processes such as diffusion, crystallization, slow dynamics, tunneling processes, crystal electric field excitations, and spin fluctuations. It is a variant of the conventional neutron spin-echo technique (NSE) by i) replacing the long precession coils by pairs of longitudinal neutron spin-echo coils combined with RF-spin flippers and ii) by stabilizing the neutron polarization with small longitudinal guide fields that can in addition be used as field subtraction coils thus allowing to adjust the field integrals over a range of 8 orders of magnitude. Therefore, the dynamic range of RESPECT can in principle be varied over 8 orders of magnitude in time, if neutrons with the required energy are made available. Similarly as for existing NSE-spectrometers, spin echo times of up to approximately 1 microsecond can be reached if the divergence and the correction elemen...

  17. Analysis and approximations for crossing two nearby spin resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranjbar, V. H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-01-07

    Solutions to the T-BMT spin equation have to date been confined to the single resonance crossing. However, in reality most cases of interest concern the overlapping of several resonances. To date there has been several serious studies of this problem; however, a good analytical solution or even approximation has eluded the community. We show that the T-BMT equation can be transformed into a Hill’s like equation. In this representation it can be shown that, while the single resonance crossing represents the solution to the Parabolic Cylinder equation, the overlapping case becomes a parametric type of resonance. We present possible approximations for both the non-accelerating case and accelerating case.

  18. Electron spin resonance in a two-dimensional Fermi liquid with spin-orbit coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Saurabh; Imran, Muhammad; Maslov, Dmitrii L.

    2016-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) is usually viewed as a single-particle phenomenon protected from the effect of many-body correlations. We show that this is not the case in a two-dimensional Fermi liquid (FL) with spin-orbit coupling (SOC). Depending on whether the in-plane magnetic field is below or above some critical value, ESR in such a system probes up to three chiral-spin collective modes, augmented by the spin mode in the presence of the field, or the Silin-Leggett mode. All the modes are affected by both SOC and FL renormalizations. We argue that ESR can be used as a probe not only for SOC but also for many-body physics.

  19. Inversion of electron spin resonance signal in coals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poklonski, N. A.; Vyrko, S. A.; Poklonskaya, O. N.; Lapchuk, N. M.; Munkhtsetseg, S.

    2013-07-01

    Samples of coal from the Donetsk basin (carbon content ~90 mass%) in both lump and powder forms were studied by continuous-wave electron spin resonance (ESR) at room temperature in air. Inversion of the ESR signal (being in phase with modulation of the constant magnetic field) with an increase of lump size along the magnetic component of the microwave field was observed in the cavity of the radiospectrometer.

  20. Single crystal nuclear magnetic resonance in spinning powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pell, Andrew J.; Pintacuda, Guido; Emsley, Lyndon

    2011-10-01

    We present a method for selectively exciting nuclear magnetic resonances (NMRs) from well-defined subsets of crystallites from a powdered sample under magic angle spinning. Magic angle spinning induces a time dependence in the anisotropic interactions, which results in a time variation of the resonance frequencies which is different for different crystallite orientations. The proposed method exploits this by applying selective pulses, which we refer to as XS (for crystallite-selective) pulses, that follow the resonance frequencies of nuclear species within particular crystallites, resulting in the induced flip angle being orientation dependent. By selecting the radiofrequency field to deliver a 180 ○ pulse for the target orientation and employing a train of such pulses combined with cogwheel phase cycling, we obtain a high degree of orientational selectivity with the resulting spectrum containing only contributions from orientations close to the target. Typically, this leads to the selection of between 0.1% and 10% of the crystallites, and in extreme cases to the excitation of a single orientation resulting in single crystal spectra of spinning powders. Two formulations of this method are described and demonstrated with experimental examples on [1 - 13C]-alanine and the paramagnetic compound Sm2Sn2O7.

  1. Spin tune in the single resonance model with a pair of Siberian snakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber, D.P.; Vogt, M.; Jaganathan, R. [Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Chennai (India)

    2005-03-01

    Snake ''resonances'' are classified in terms of the invariant spin field and the amplitude dependent spin tune. Exactly at snake ''resonance'' there is no continuous invariant spin field at most orbital amplitudes. (orig.)

  2. RESPECT: Neutron resonance spin-echo spectrometer for extreme studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgii, R.; Kindervater, J.; Pfleiderer, C.; Böni, P.

    2016-11-01

    We propose the design of a REsonance SPin-echo spECtrometer for exTreme studies, RESPECT, that is ideally suited for the exploration of non-dispersive processes such as diffusion, crystallization, slow dynamics, tunneling processes, crystal electric field excitations, and spin fluctuations. It is a variant of the conventional neutron spin-echo technique (NSE) by (i) replacing the long precession coils by pairs of longitudinal neutron spin-echo coils combined with RF-spin flippers and (ii) by stabilizing the neutron polarization with small longitudinal guide fields that can in addition be used as field subtraction coils thus allowing to adjust the field integrals over a range of 8 orders of magnitude. Therefore, the dynamic range of RESPECT can in principle be varied over 8 orders of magnitude in time, if neutrons with the required energy are made available. Similarly as for existing NSE-spectrometers, spin echo times of up to approximately 1 μs can be reached if the divergence and the correction elements are properly adjusted. Thanks to the optional use of neutron guides and the fact that the currents for the correction coils are much smaller than in standard NSE, intensity gains of at least one order of magnitude are expected, making the concept of RESPECT also competitive for operation at medium flux neutron sources. RESPECT can also be operated in a MIEZE configuration allowing the investigation of relaxation processes in depolarizing environments as they occur when magnetic fields are applied at the sample position, i.e. for the investigation of the dynamics of flux lines in superconductors, magnetic fluctuations in ferromagnetic materials, and samples containing hydrogen.

  3. Spin amplification in solution magnetic resonance using radiation damping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walls, Jamie D; Huang, Susie Y; Lin, Yung-Ya

    2007-08-07

    The sensitive detection of dilute solute spins is critical to biomolecular NMR. In this work, a spin amplifier for detecting dilute solute magnetization is developed using the radiation damping interaction in solution magnetic resonance. The evolution of the solvent magnetization, initially placed along the unstable -z direction, is triggered by the radiation damping field generated by the dilute solute magnetization. As long as the radiation damping field generated by the solute is larger than the corresponding thermal noise field generated by the sample coil, the solute magnetization can effectively trigger the evolution of the water magnetization under radiation damping. The coupling between the solute and solvent magnetizations via the radiation damping field can be further improved through a novel bipolar gradient scheme, which allows solute spins with chemical shift differences much greater than the effective radiation damping field strength to affect the solvent magnetizations more efficiently. Experiments performed on an aqueous acetone solution indicate that solute concentrations on the order of 10(-5) that of the solvent concentration can be readily detected using this spin amplifier.

  4. Resonant optical control of the spin of a single Cr atom in a quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafuente-Sampietro, A.; Utsumi, H.; Boukari, H.; Kuroda, S.; Besombes, L.

    2017-01-01

    A Cr atom in a semiconductor host carries a localized spin with an intrinsic large spin to strain coupling, which is particularly promising for the development of hybrid spin-mechanical systems and coherent mechanical spin driving. We demonstrate here that the spin of an individual Cr atom inserted in a semiconductor quantum dot can be controlled optically. We first show that a Cr spin can be prepared by resonant optical pumping. Monitoring the time dependence of the intensity of the resonant fluorescence of the quantum dot during this process permits us to probe the dynamics of the optical initialization of the Cr spin. Using this initialization and readout technique we measured a Cr spin relaxation time at T =5 K in the microsecond range. We finally demonstrate that, under a resonant single-mode laser field, the energy of any spin state of an individual Cr atom can be independently tuned by using the optical Stark effect.

  5. Oxidative reactions during early stages of beer brewing studied by electron spin resonance and spin trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiksen, Anne M; Festersen, Rikke M; Andersen, Mogens L

    2008-09-24

    An electron spin resonance (ESR)-based method was used for evaluating the levels of radical formation during mashing and in sweet wort. The method included the addition of 5% (v/v) ethanol together with the spin trap alpha-4-pyridyl(1-oxide)- N- tert-butylnitrone (POBN) to wort, followed by monitoring the rate of formation of POBN spin adducts during aerobic heating of the wort. The presence of ethanol makes the spin trapping method more selective and sensitive for the detection of highly reactive radicals such as hydroxyl and alkoxyl radicals. Samples of wort that were collected during the early stages of the mashing process gave higher rates of spin adduct formation than wort samples collected during the later stages. The lower oxidative stability of the early wort samples was confirmed by measuring the rate of oxygen consumption during heating of the wort. The addition of Fe(II) to the wort samples increased the rate of spin adduct formation, whereas the addition of Fe(II) during the mashing had no effect on the oxidative stability of the wort samples. Analysis of the iron content in the sweet wort samples demonstrated that iron added during the mashing had no effect on the iron level in the wort. The moderate temperatures during the early steps of mashing allow the endogenous malt enzymes to be active. The potential antioxidative effects of different redox-active enzymes during mashing were tested by measuring the rate of spin adduct formation in samples of wort. Surprisingly, a high catalase dosage caused a significant, 20% reduction of the initial rate of radical formation, whereas superoxide dismutase had no effect on the oxidation rates. This suggests that hydrogen peroxide and superoxide are not the only intermediates that play a role in the oxidative reactions occurring during aerobic oxidation of sweet wort.

  6. Resonant excitation of coupled skyrmions by spin-transfer torque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Y. Y.; Wang, H.; Yang, T.; Zhang, Z. D.

    2016-12-01

    Resonant excitations of coupled skyrmions in Co/Ru/Co nanodisks activated by spin-transfer torque (STT) have been studied by micromagnetic simulations. It is found that STT is an effective method to manipulate skyrmion dynamics. Unlike the dynamics driven by a microwave field, two skyrmions with opposite chiralities move synchronously in the same direction when they are driven by STT, which makes it easier to observe the dynamics of coupled skyrmions in experiments. Resonant excitations of coupled skyrmions can be controlled by changing the frequency or amplitude ratio of a dual-frequency alternating current (AC). In addition, the magnetostatic interaction between the two skyrmions plays an important role in the dynamics of coupled skyrmions.

  7. Dual-frequency ferromagnetic resonance to measure spin current coupling in multilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adur, Rohan; Du, Chunhui; Wang, Hailong; Manuilov, Sergei A.; Yang, Fengyuan; Hammel, P. Chris

    2014-08-01

    Spin pumping is a method for injecting a pure spin current into a non-magnetic metal (NM) by inducing precession of a neighboring ferromagnet (FM) at its ferromagnetic resonance frequency. A popular method to detect spin current uses the Inverse Spin Hall Effect (ISHE) to convert the spin current to a detectable charge current and hence a voltage. In order to better understand the role of time independent and high frequency contributions to spin pumping, we sought to detect we attempt to detect spin currents by using a second microwave frequency to detect changes in linewidth of a second ferromagnet due to the spin-torque induced by the spin current from the first ferromagnet. This dual resonance is achieved by pairing a custom broadband coplanar transmission line with the high-Q resonant cavity of a commercial electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer. This technique is general enough that it should enable the investigation of spin currents in any FM-NM-FM system, for any orientation of external field, and is not sensitive to voltage artifacts often found in ISHE measurements. We find that the condition for simultaneous resonance generates a dc spin current that is too small to produce a measurable change in linewidth of the second ferromagnet, confirming the dominance of ac spin currents in linewidth enhancement measurements.

  8. Extrinsic spin Hall effect induced by resonant skew scattering in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Aires; Rappoport, Tatiana G; Cazalilla, Miguel A; Castro Neto, A H

    2014-02-14

    We show that the extrinsic spin Hall effect can be engineered in monolayer graphene by decoration with small doses of adatoms, molecules, or nanoparticles originating local spin-orbit perturbations. The analysis of the single impurity scattering problem shows that intrinsic and Rashba spin-orbit local couplings enhance the spin Hall effect via skew scattering of charge carriers in the resonant regime. The solution of the transport equations for a random ensemble of spin-orbit impurities reveals that giant spin Hall currents are within the reach of the current state of the art in device fabrication. The spin Hall effect is robust with respect to thermal fluctuations and disorder averaging.

  9. Measuring absolute spin polarization in dissolution-DNP by Spin PolarimetrY Magnetic Resonance (SPY-MR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuichoud, Basile; Milani, Jonas; Chappuis, Quentin; Bornet, Aurélien; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Jannin, Sami

    2015-11-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization at 1.2 K and 6.7 T allows one to achieve spin temperatures on the order of a few millikelvin, so that the high-temperature approximation (ΔEPolarimetrY Magnetic Resonance (SPY-MR), is illustrated for various pairs of (13)C spins (I, S) in acetate and pyruvate.

  10. Nuclear Tuning and Detuning of the Electron Spin Resonance in a Quantum Dot: Theoretical Consideration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Danon, J.; Nazarov, Y.V.

    2008-01-01

    We study nuclear spin dynamics in a quantum dot close to the conditions of electron spin resonance. We show that at a small frequency mismatch, the nuclear field detunes the resonance. Remarkably, at larger frequency mismatch, its effect is opposite: The nuclear system is bistable, and in one of the

  11. Electron Spin Resonance and Related Phenomena in Low-Dimensional Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Fanciulli, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Deals with the discussion of the development of spin resonance in low dimensional structures, such as two-dimensional electron systems, quantum wires, and quantum dots. This title discusses opportunities for spin resonance techniques, with emphasis on fundamental physics, nanoelectronics, spintronics, and quantum information processing

  12. Electron spin resonance and transient photocurrent measurements on microcrystalline silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dylla, T.

    2004-09-01

    The electronic properties of microcrystalline silicon ({mu}c-Si:H) films have been studied using electron spin resonance (ESR), transient photocurrent time-of-flight (TOF) techniques, and electrical conductivity measurements. Structural properties were determined by Raman spectroscopy. A wide range of structure compositions, from highly crystalline films with no discernable amorphous content, to predominantly amorphous films with no crystalline phase contributions, was investigated. Models and possible explanations concerning the nature and energetic distribution of electronic defects as a function of film composition are discussed. It is shown that the spin density N{sub S} in {mu}c-Si:H films is linked strongly to the structure composition of the material. Both reversible and irreversible changes in the ESR signal and dark conductivity due to atmospheric effects are found in {mu}c-Si:H. The porous structure of highly crystalline material facilitates in-diffusion of atmospheric gases, which strongly affects the character and/or density of surface states. Two contributing processes have been identified, namely adsorption and oxidation. Both processes lead to an increase of N{sub S}. Measurements on n-type {mu}c-Si:H films were used as a probe of the density of gap states, confirming that the spin density NS is related to the density of defects. The results confirm that for a wide range of structural compositions, the doping induced Fermi level shift in {mu}c-Si:H is governed by compensation of defect states, for doping concentrations up to the dangling bond spin density. At higher concentrations a doping efficiency close to unity was found, confirming that in {mu}c-Si:H the measured spin densities represent the majority of gap states (N{sub S}=N{sub DB}). By applying the TOF technique to study pin solar cells based on {mu}c-Si:H, conclusive hole drift mobility data were obtained. Despite the predominant crystallinity of these samples, the temperature-dependence of

  13. Thermal History of Archaeological Objects, Studied by Electron Spin Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoll, Jens; Tani, Atsushi

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is a sensitive tool for distinguishing between "burned" and "unburned" states of archaeological objects. Prehistoric heating conditions, such as the temperature, atmosphere, time of exposure to heat, and when the heating took place, can be studied by this method with some success. ESR "reporters," such as (a) radiation defects, (b) pyrolytic defects, and (c) transition metal ions, can even reflect changes induced at relatively low temperatures (e.g., in the range of 200° C for objects containing organic compounds). Several ESR heating markers are so stable that samples dating back to the ages when fire first began to be used can be analyzed today. An overview is presented of the literature concerning objects, such as stone, soil, pottery, and plant and animal products.

  14. Implementation of State Transfer Hamiltonians in Spin Chains with Magnetic Resonance Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Cappellaro, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear spin systems and magnetic resonance techniques have provided a fertile platform for experimental investigation of quantum state transfer in spin chains. From the first observation of polarization transfer, predating the formal definition of quantum state transfer, to the realization of state transfer simulations in small molecules and in larger solid-state spin systems, the experiments have drawn on the strengths of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), in particular on its long history o...

  15. Nucleon Spin Structure Functions in the Resonance Region and the Duality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Yu-Bing; FENG Qing-Guo

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the nucleon spin structure function gl and the difference between the proton and neutrontargets gp1 - gn1 , based on quark model calculation. Quark-hadron duality for the nucleon spin structure function is alsoanalyzed. Effects of the △(1232) and Roper P11(1440) resonances on the spin structure function and on the differencegn1 - gn1 are mentioned. The results of different models for the Roper resonance are also addressed.

  16. Electron spin resonance in Eu-based iron pnictides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug von Nidda, H.-A.; Kraus, S.; Schaile, S.; Dengler, E.; Pascher, N.; Hemmida, M.; Eom, M. J.; Kim, J. S.; Jeevan, H. S.; Gegenwart, P.; Deisenhofer, J.; Loidl, A.

    2012-09-01

    The phase diagrams of EuFe2-xCoxAs2 (0≤x≤0.4) and EuFe2As2-yPy (0≤y≤0.43) are investigated by Eu2+ electron spin resonance (ESR) in single crystals. From the temperature dependence of the linewidth ΔH(T) of the exchange narrowed ESR line, the spin-density wave (SDW) (TTSDW) are clearly distinguished. At T>TSDW the isotropic linear increase of the linewidth is driven by the Korringa relaxation which measures the conduction-electron density of states at the Fermi level. For Trate from 8 Oe/K at x=y=0 down to 3 Oe/K at the onset of superconductivity. For x>0.2 and y>0.3 it remains nearly constant. Comparative ESR measurements on single crystals of the Eu diluted SDW compound Eu0.2Sr0.8Fe2As2 and superconducting (SC) Eu0.22Sr0.78Fe1.72Co0.28As2 corroborate the leading influence of the ligand field on the Eu2+ spin relaxation in the SDW regime as well as the Korringa relaxation in the normal metallic regime. A coherence peak is not detected in the latter compound below Tc=21 K, which is in agreement with the expected complex anisotropic SC gap structure. In contrast, indications for phase coexistence and BCS-type superconductivity are found in EuFe2As1.57P0.43.

  17. Spin Resonance Effect on Pair Production in Rotating Electric Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Chul Min

    2016-01-01

    We advance a new analytical method for the Dirac equation in two-dimensional, homogeneous, time-dependent electric fields, which expresses the Cauchy problem of the two-component spinor and its derivative as the time-ordered integral of the transition rate of the time-dependent eigenspinors and the time-dependent energy eigenvalues. The in-vacuum at later times evolves from that at the past infinity and continuously make transitions between eigenspinors and between positive and negative frequencies of the time-dependent energy eigenvalues. The production of electron and positron pairs is given by the coefficient of the negative frequency at the future infinity which evolves from the positive frequency at the past infinity. In the adiabatic case when the time scale for the rotation of eigenspinors and energy eigenvalues is much longer than the electron Compton time, we find the spin-resonance effect on the pair production, which is simply determined by the spin rotation, the pair production without the change ...

  18. Exploration of horizontal intrinsic spin resonances with two partial Siberian snakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, F.; Ahrens, L. A.; Bai, M.; Brown, K.; Courant, E. D.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J. W.; Huang, H.; Lee, S. Y.; Luccio, A. U.; Mackay, W. W.; Ptitsyn, V.; Roser, T.; Takano, J.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.

    2007-04-01

    Two partial Siberian snakes were used to avoid all the spin imperfection and vertical intrinsic resonances in the alternating gradient synchrotron (AGS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. However, the horizontal betatron motion can cause polarization loss resulting from the nonvertical stable spin direction in the presence of two partial snakes. This type of resonance, called a horizontal intrinsic spin resonance, was observed and systematically studied in the AGS. A simplified analytic model and numerical simulation have been developed to compare with experimental data. Properties of the horizontal intrinsic resonance are discussed.

  19. Spin motion at and near orbital resonance in storage rings with Siberian snakes I. At orbital resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber, D.P.; Vogt, M.

    2006-12-15

    Here, and in a sequel, we invoke the invariant spin field to provide an in-depth study of spin motion at and near low order orbital resonances in a simple model for the effects of vertical betatron motion in a storage ring with Siberian Snakes. This leads to a clear understanding, within the model, of the behaviour of the beam polarization at and near so-called snake resonances in proton storage rings. (orig.)

  20. Spin motion at and near orbital resonance in storage rings with Siberian Snakes. Part I: at orbital resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Barber, D P

    2006-01-01

    Here, and in a sequel, we invoke the invariant spin field to provide an in--depth study of spin motion at and near low order orbital resonances in a simple model for the effects of vertical betatron motion in a storage ring with Siberian Snakes. This leads to a clear understanding, within the model, of the behaviour of the beam polarisation at and near so--called snake resonances in proton storage rings.

  1. Impurities and electron spin relaxations in nanodiamonds studied by multi-frequency electron spin resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Franklin; Takahashi, Susumu

    2014-03-01

    Nano-sized diamond or nanodiamond is a fascinating material for potential applications of fluorescence imaging and magnetic sensing of biological systems via nitrogen-vacancy defect centers in diamonds. Sensitivity of the magnetic sensing strongly depends on coupling to surrounding environmental noises, thus understanding of the environment is critical to realize the application. In the present study, we employ multi-frequency (X-band, 115 GHz and 230 GHz) continuous-wave (cw) and pulsed electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy to investigate impurity contents and spin relaxation properties in various sizes of nanodiamonds. Spectra taken with our home-built 230/115 GHz cw/pulsed ESR spectrometer shows presence of two major impurity contents; single substitutional nitrogen impurities (P1) also common in bulk diamonds and paramagnetic impurities (denoted as X) unique to nanodiamonds. The ESR measurement also shows a strong dependence of the population ratio between P1 and X on particle size. Furthermore, we will discuss the nature of spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of nanodiamonds studied by pulsed ESR measurements at X-band, 115 GHz and 230 GHz.

  2. Ferromagnetic Resonance and Spin Hall Torque for Nanometric Thick Magnetic Insulator |Normal Metal Bilayers System

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    In bilayer system, consists of ferromagnetic insulator, high spin orbit coupling normal metal (FM|NM), a new ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) damping that depends on varying the thickness of the normal metal observed. This new enhancement in the damping attributed to magnetic proximity effect (MPE) at the interface, which is verified by the increases in the real part of spin mixing conductance. Spin pumping phenomena occurs when pure spin current can flow into the normal metal when the ferromagn...

  3. Resonance measurement of nonlocal spin torque in a three-terminal magnetic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Lin; Wang, Chen; Cui, Yong-Tao; Liu, Luqiao; Swander, A; Sun, J Z; Buhrman, R A; Ralph, D C

    2012-04-06

    A pure spin current generated within a nonlocal spin valve can exert a spin-transfer torque on a nanomagnet. This nonlocal torque enables new design schemes for magnetic memory devices that do not require the application of large voltages across tunnel barriers that can suffer electrical breakdown. Here we report a quantitative measurement of this nonlocal spin torque using spin-torque-driven ferromagnetic resonance. Our measurement agrees well with the prediction of an effective circuit model for spin transport. Based on this model, we suggest strategies for optimizing the strength of nonlocal torque.

  4. Measuring absolute spin polarization in dissolution-DNP by Spin PolarimetrY Magnetic Resonance (SPY-MR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuichoud, Basile; Milani, Jonas; Chappuis, Quentin; Bornet, Aurélien; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Jannin, Sami

    2015-11-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization at 1.2 K and 6.7 T allows one to achieve spin temperatures on the order of a few millikelvin, so that the high-temperature approximation (Δ E spy'), provided perturbations due to second-order (strong coupling) effects are properly taken into account. If spin S is suitably discreet and does not affect the relaxation of spin I, this provides an elegant way of measuring spin polarizations 'on the fly' in a broad range of molecules, thus obviating the need for laborious measurements of signal intensities at thermal equilibrium. The method, dubbed Spin PolarimetrY Magnetic Resonance (SPY-MR), is illustrated for various pairs of 13 C spins (I, S) in acetate and pyruvate.

  5. Mechanism of spin diffusion in electron spin resonance spectra of trapped electrons in aqueous glasses. Electron--Electron double resonance studies. [. gamma. -rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, D.P.; Kevan, L.

    1977-05-19

    Electron--electron double resonance (ELDOR) has been used to test the validity of the noninteracting spin packet model for inhomogeneously broadened ESR lines. For trapped electrons in 10M NaOD/D/sub 2/O glassy ice the saturation of field-swept ELDOR spectra fits the above mentioned model in contrast to earlier work on trapped electrons in protiated matrices. In the protiated matrix spin diffusion produces significant interaction between the spin packets. The difference between the protiated and deuterated matrices suggests that nuclear relaxation is the mechanism for spin diffusion. The deuterated matrices show no structure in frequency-swept ELDOR spectra due to deuteron spin--flip transitions whereas structure due to proton spin--flips is seen in protiated matrices.

  6. Disentangling the Spin-Parity of a Resonance via the Gold-Plated Decay Mode

    CERN Document Server

    Modak, Tanmoy; Sinha, Rahul; Cheng, Hai-Yang; Yuan, Tzu-Chiang

    2014-01-01

    Searching for new resonances and finding out their properties is an essential part of any existing or future particle physics experiment. The nature of a new resonance is characterized by its spin, charge conjugation, parity, and its couplings with the existing particles of the Standard Model. If a new resonance is found in the four lepton final state produced via two intermediate $Z$ bosons, the resonance could be a new heavy scalar or a $Z'$ boson or even a higher spin particle. In such cases the step by step methodology as enunciated in this paper can be followed to determine the spin, parity and the coupling to two $Z$ bosons of the parent particles, in a fully model-independent way. In our approach we show how three uni-angular distributions and few experimentally measurable observables can conclusively tell us about the spin, parity as well as the couplings of the new resonance to two $Z$ bosons.

  7. Bipolar tetraether lipids: chain flexibility and membrane polarity gradients from spin-label electron spin resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartucci, R; Gambacorta, A; Gliozzi, A; Marsh, D; Sportelli, L

    2005-11-15

    Membranes of thermophilic Archaea are composed of unique tetraether lipids in which C40, saturated, methyl-branched biphytanyl chains are linked at both ends to polar groups. In this paper, membranes composed of bipolar lipids P2 extracted from the acidothermophile archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus are studied. The biophysical basis for the membrane formation and thermal stability is investigated by using electron spin resonance (ESR) of spin-labeled lipids. Spectral anisotropy and isotropic hyperfine couplings are used to determine the chain flexibility and polarity gradients, respectively. For comparison, similar measurements have been carried out on aqueous dispersions of diacyl reference lipid dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine and also of diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine, which has methyl-branched chains. At a given temperature, the bolaform lipid chains are more ordered and less flexible than in normal bilayer membranes. Only at elevated temperatures (80 degrees C) does the flexibility of the chain environment in tetraether lipid assemblies approach that of fluid bilayer membranes. The height of the hydrophobic barrier formed by a monolayer of archaebacterial lipids is similar to that in conventional fluid bilayer membranes, and the permeability barrier width is comparable to that formed by a bilayer of C16 lipid chains. At a mole ratio of 1:2, the tetraether P2 lipids mix well with dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine lipids and stabilize conventional bilayer membranes. The biological as well as the biotechnological relevance of the results is discussed.

  8. Quantum Computing Using Pulse-Based Electron-Nuclear Double Resonance (endor):. Molecular Spin-Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kazuo; Nakazawa, Shigeki; Rahimi, Robabeh D.; Nishida, Shinsuke; Ise, Tomoaki; Shimoi, Daisuke; Toyota, Kazuo; Morita, Yasushi; Kitagawa, Masahiro; Carl, Parick; Höfner, Peter; Takui, Takeji

    2009-06-01

    Electrons with the spin quantum number 1/2, as physical qubits, have naturally been anticipated for implementing quantum computing and information processing (QC/QIP). Recently, electron spin-qubit systems in organic molecular frames have emerged as a hybrid spin-qubit system along with a nuclear spin-1/2 qubit. Among promising candidates for QC/QIP from the materials science side, the reasons for why electron spin-qubits such as molecular spin systems, i.e., unpaired electron spins in molecular frames, have potentialities for serving for QC/QIP will be given in the lecture (Chapter), emphasizing what their advantages or disadvantages are entertained and what technical and intrinsic issues should be dealt with for the implementation of molecular-spin quantum computers in terms of currently available spin manipulation technology such as pulse-based electron-nuclear double resonance (pulsed or pulse ENDOR) devoted to QC/QIP. Firstly, a general introduction and introductory remarks to pulsed ENDOR spectroscopy as electron-nuclear spin manipulation technology is given. Super dense coding (SDC) experiments by the use of pulsed ENDOR are also introduced to understand differentiating QC ENDOR from QC NMR based on modern nuclear spin technology. Direct observation of the spinor inherent in an electron spin, detected for the first time, will be shown in connection with the entanglement of an electron-nuclear hybrid system. Novel microwave spin manipulation technology enabling us to deal with genuine electron-electron spin-qubit systems in the molecular frame will be introduced, illustrating, from the synthetic strategy of matter spin-qubits, a key-role of the molecular design of g-tensor/hyperfine-(A-)tensor molecular engineering for QC/QIP. Finally, important technological achievements of recently-emerging CD ELDOR (Coherent-Dual ELectron-electron DOuble Resonance) spin technology enabling us to manipulate electron spin-qubits are described.

  9. Two dimensional electron spin resonance: Structure and dynamics of biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Sunil; Freed, Jack H.

    1998-03-01

    The potential of two dimensional (2D) electron spin resonance (ESR) for measuring the structural properties and slow dynamics of labeled biomolecules will be presented. Specifically, it will be shown how the recently developed method of double quantum (DQ) 2D ESR (S. Saxena and J. H. Freed, J. Chem. Phys. 107), 1317, (1997) can be used to measure large interelectron distances in bilabeled peptides. The need for DQ ESR spectroscopy, as well as the challenges and advantages of this method will be discussed. The elucidation of the slow reorientational dynamics of this peptide (S. Saxena and J. H. Freed, J. Phys. Chem. A, 101) 7998 (1997) in a glassy medium using COSY and 2D ELDOR ESR spectroscopy will be demonstrated. The contributions to the homogeneous relaxation time, T_2, from the overall and/or internal rotations of the nitroxide can be distinguished from the COSY spectrum. The growth of spectral diffusion cross-peaks^2 with mixing time in the 2D ELDOR spectra can be used to directly determine a correlation time from the experiment which can be related to the rotational correlation time.

  10. Mechanical detection of electron spin resonance beyond 1 THz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Hideyuki [Organization of Advanced Science and Technology, Kobe University, 1-1, Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Ohmichi, Eiji [Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Ohta, Hitoshi [Molecular Photoscience Research Center, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2015-11-02

    We report the cantilever detection of electron spin resonance (ESR) in the terahertz (THz) region. This technique mechanically detects ESR as a change in magnetic torque that acts on the cantilever. The ESR absorption of a tiny single crystal of Co Tutton salt, Co(NH{sub 4}){sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}⋅6H{sub 2}O, was observed in frequencies of up to 1.1 THz using a backward travelling wave oscillator as a THz-wave source. This is the highest frequency of mechanical detection of ESR till date. The spectral resolution was evaluated with the ratio of the peak separation to the sum of the half-width at half maximum of two absorption peaks. The highest resolution value of 8.59 ± 0.53 was achieved at 685 GHz, while 2.47 ± 0.01 at 80 GHz. This technique will not only broaden the scope of ESR spectroscopy application but also lead to high-spectral-resolution ESR imaging.

  11. Multipartite Spin Entangled States in Quantum Dots with a Quantum Databus Based on Nano Electro-Mechanical Resonator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Zhi-Cheng; TU Tao; GUO Guo-Ping

    2011-01-01

    We propose an efficient method to create multipartite spin entangled states in quantum dots coupled to a nano electro-mechanical resonator array. Our method, based on the interaction between electron spins confined in quantum dots and the motion of magnetized nano electro-mechanical resonators, can enable a coherent spin-spin coupling over long distances and in principle be applied to an arbitrarily large number of electronic spins.%@@ We propose an efficient method to create multipartite spin entangled states in quantum dots coupled to a nano electro-mechanical resonator array.Our method, based on the interaction between electron spins confined in quantum dots and the motion of magnetized nano electro-mechanical resonators, can enable a coherent spin-spin coupling over long distances and in principle be applied to an arbitrarily large number of electronic spins.

  12. Bistability and steady-state spin squeezing in diamond nanostructures controlled by a nanomechanical resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yong-Hong; Zhang, Xue-Feng; Song, Jie; Wu, E.

    2016-06-01

    As the quantum states of nitrogen vacancy (NV) center can be coherently manipulated and obtained at room temperature, it is important to generate steady-state spin squeezing in spin qubits associated with NV impurities in diamond. With this task we consider a new type of a hybrid magneto-nano-electromechanical resonator, the functionality of which is based on a magnetic-field induced deflection of an appropriate cantilever that oscillates between NV spins in diamond. We show that there is bistability and spin squeezing state due to the presence of the microwave field, despite the damping from mechanical damping. Moreover, we find that bistability and spin squeezing can be controlled by the microwave field and the parameter Vz. Our scheme may have the potential application on spin clocks, magnetometers, and other measurements based on spin-spin system in diamond nanostructures.

  13. A quantum spin transducer based on nano electro-mechancial resonator arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Rabl, P; Koppens, F H; Harris, J G E; Zoller, P; Lukin, M D

    2009-01-01

    Implementation of quantum information processing faces the contradicting requirements of combining excellent isolation to avoid decoherence with the ability to control coherent interactions in a many-body quantum system. For example, spin degrees of freedom of electrons and nuclei provide a good quantum memory due to their weak magnetic interactions with the environment. However, for the same reason it is difficult to achieve controlled entanglement of spins over distances larger than tens of nanometers. Here we propose a universal realization of a quantum data bus for electronic spin qubits where spins are coupled to the motion of magnetized mechanical resonators via magnetic field gradients. Provided that the mechanical system is charged, the magnetic moments associated with spin qubits can be effectively amplified to enable a coherent spin-spin coupling over long distances via Coulomb forces. Our approach is applicable to a wide class of electronic spin qubits which can be localized near the magnetized tip...

  14. Induction-Detection Electron Spin Resonance with Sensitivity of 1000 Spins: En Route to Scalable Quantum Computations

    CERN Document Server

    Blank, Aharon; Shklyar, Roman; Twig, Ygal

    2013-01-01

    Spin-based quantum computation (QC) in the solid state is considered to be one of the most promising approaches to scalable quantum computers. However, it faces problems such as initializing the spins, selectively addressing and manipulating single spins, and reading out the state of the individual spins. We have recently sketched a scheme that potentially solves all of these problems5. This is achieved by making use of a unique phosphorus-doped 28Si sample (28Si:P), and applying powerful new electron spin resonance (ESR) techniques for parallel excitation, detection, and imaging in order to implement QCs and efficiently obtain their results. The beauty of our proposed scheme is that, contrary to other approaches, single-spin detection sensitivity is not required and a capability to measure signals of ~100-1000 spins is sufficient to implement it. Here we take the first experimental step towards the actual implementation of such scheme. We show that, by making use of the smallest ESR resonator constructed to ...

  15. Electron Spin Resonance of Tetrahedral Transition Metal Oxyanions (MO4n-) in Solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenblatt, M.

    1980-01-01

    Outlines general principles in observing sharp electron spin resonance (ESR) lines in the solid state by incorporating the transition metal ion of interest into an isostructural diamagnetic host material in small concentration. Examples of some recent studies are described. (CS)

  16. Driving and detecting ferromagnetic resonance in insulators with the spin Hall effect.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sklenar, Joseph; Zhang, Wei; Jungfleisch, Matthias B.; Jiang, Wanjun; Chang, Houchen; Pearson, John E.; Wu, Mingzhong; Ketterson, John B.; Hoffmann, Axel

    2015-11-06

    We demonstrate the generation and detection of spin-torque ferromagnetic resonance in Pt/Y3Fe5O12 (YIG) bilayers. A unique attribute of this system is that the spin Hall effect lies at the heart of both the generation and detection processes and no charge current is passing through the insulating magnetic layer. When the YIG undergoes resonance, a dc voltage is detected longitudinally along the Pt that can be described by two components. One is the mixing of the spin Hall magnetoresistance with the microwave current. The other results from spin pumping into the Pt being converted to a dc current through the inverse spin Hall effect. The voltage is measured with applied magnetic field directions that range in-plane to nearly perpendicular. We find that for magnetic fields that are mostly out-of-plane, an imaginary component of the spin mixing conductance is required to model our data.

  17. Sealed magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance probe and process for spectroscopy of hazardous samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Herman M.; Washton, Nancy M.; Mueller, Karl T.; Sears, Jr., Jesse A.; Townsend, Mark R.; Ewing, James R.

    2016-06-14

    A magic-angle-spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe is described that includes double containment enclosures configured to seal and contain hazardous samples for analysis. The probe is of a modular design that ensures containment of hazardous samples during sample analysis while preserving spin speeds for superior NMR performance and convenience of operation.

  18. Pseudomultidimensional NMR by spin-state selective off-resonance decoupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Christy Rani R; Riek, Roland

    2003-12-24

    An alternate technique for accurately monitoring the chemical shift in multidimensional NMR experiments using spin-state selective off-resonance decoupling is presented here. By applying off-resonance decoupling on spin S during acquisition of spin I, we scaled the scalar coupling J(I,S) between the spins, and the residual scalar coupling turns out to be a function of the chemical shift of spin S. Thus, the chemical shift information of spin S is indirectly retained, without an additional evolution period and the accompanying polarization transfer elements. The detection of the components of the doublet using spin-state selection enables an accurate measurement of the residual scalar coupling and a precise value for the chemical shift, concomitantly. The spin-state selection further yields two subspectra comprising either one of the two components of the doublet and thereby avoiding the overlap problems that arise from off-resonance decoupling. In general, spin-state selective off-resonance decoupling can be incorporated into any pulse sequence. Here, the concept of spin-state selective off-resonance decoupling is applied to 3D (13)C or (15)N-resolved [(1)H,(1)H]-NOESY experiments, adding the chemical shift of the heavy atom attached to the hydrogen ((13)C or (15)N nuclei) with high resolution resulting in a pseudo-4D. These pseudo-4D heavy-atom resolved [(1)H, (1)H]-NOESY experiments contain chemical shift information comparable to that of 4D (13)C or (15)N-resolved [(1)H,(1)H]-NOESY, but with an increase in chemical shift resolution by 1-2 orders of magnitude.

  19. Extrinsic Spin Hall Effect Induced by Resonant Skew Scattering in Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Aires; Rappoport, Tatiana G.; Cazalilla, Miguel A.; Castro Neto, A. H.

    2015-03-01

    We show that the extrinsic spin Hall effect can be engineered in monolayer graphene by decoration with small doses of adatoms, molecules, or nanoparticles originating local spin-orbit perturbations. The analysis of the single impurity scattering problem shows that intrinsic and Rashba spin-orbit local couplings enhance the spin Hall effect via skew scattering of charge carriers in the resonant regime. The solution of the transport equations for a random ensemble of spin-orbit impurities reveals that giant spin Hall currents are within the reach of the current state of the art in device fabrication. The spin Hall effect is robust with respect to thermal fluctuations and disorder averaging. The author acknowledges support from the National Research Foundation-Competitive Research Programme through Grant No. R-144-000-295-281.

  20. Voltage-controlled spin selection in a magnetic resonant tunneling diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slobodskyy, A; Gould, C; Slobodskyy, T; Becker, C R; Schmidt, G; Molenkamp, L W

    2003-06-20

    We have fabricated all II-VI semiconductor resonant tunneling diodes based on the (Zn,Mn,Be)Se material system, containing dilute magnetic material in the quantum well, and studied their current-voltage characteristics. When subjected to an external magnetic field the resulting spin splitting of the levels in the quantum well leads to a splitting of the transmission resonance into two separate peaks. This is interpreted as evidence of tunneling transport through spin polarized levels, and could be the first step towards a voltage controlled spin filter.

  1. Phonon-magnon resonant processes with relevance to acoustic spin pumping

    KAUST Repository

    Deymier, P. A.

    2014-12-23

    The recently described phenomenon of resonant acoustic spin pumping is due to resonant coupling between an incident elastic wave and spin waves in a ferromagnetic medium. A classical one-dimensional discrete model of a ferromagnet with two forms of magnetoelastic coupling is treated to shed light on the conditions for resonance between phonons and magnons. Nonlinear phonon-magnon interactions in the case of a coupling restricted to diagonal terms in the components of the spin degrees of freedom are analyzed within the framework of the multiple timescale perturbation theory. In that case, one-phonon-two-magnon resonances are the dominant mechanism for pumping. The effect of coupling on the dispersion relations depends on the square of the amplitude of the phonon and magnon excitations. A straightforward analysis of a linear phonon-magnon interaction in the case of a magnetoelastic coupling restricted to off-diagonal terms in the components of the spins shows a one-phonon to one-magnon resonance as the pumping mechanism. The resonant dispersion relations are independent of the amplitude of the waves. In both cases, when an elastic wave with a fixed frequency is used to stimulate magnons, application of an external magnetic field can be used to approach resonant conditions. Both resonance conditions exhibit the same type of dependency on the strength of an applied magnetic field.

  2. Structure and decay properties of spin-dipole giant resonances within a semimicroscopical approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moukhai, EA; Rodin, VA; Urin, MH

    1999-01-01

    A semimicroscopical approach is applied to calculate: (i) strength functions for the charge-exchange spin-dipole giant resonances in the Pb-208 parent nucleus; (ii) partial and total branching ratios for the direct proton decay of the resonance in Bi-208. The approach is based on continuum-RPA calcu

  3. Is Asteroid 951 Gaspra in a Resonant State with Its Spin Increasing Due to YORP?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubincam, David Parry; Rowlands, David D.; Ray, Richard D.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Asteroid 951 Gaspra appears to be in an obliquity resonance with its spin increasing due to the YORP effect. Gaspra, an asteroid 5.8 km in radius, is a prograde rotator with a rotation period of 7.03 hours. A three million year integration indicates its orbit is stable over at least this time span. From its known shape and spin axis orientation and assuming a uniform density, Gaspra's axial precession period turns out to be nearly commensurate with its orbital precession period, which leads to a resonance condition with consequent huge variations in its obliquity. At the same time its shape is such that the Yarkovsky-O'Keefe-Radzievskii-Paddack effect (YORP effect for short) is increasing its spin rate. The YORP cycle normally leads from spin-up to spin-down and then repeating the cycle; however, it appears possible that resonance trapping can at least temporarily interrupt the YORP cycle, causing spin-up until the resonance is exited. This behavior may partially explain why there is an excess of fast rotators among small asteroids. YORP may also be a reason for small asteroids entering resonances in the first place.

  4. Effect of the Spin 3/2 Nucleon Resonances in Kaon Photoproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arifi, A. J.; Mart, T.

    2016-08-01

    We have studied two different formulations of spin 3/2 nucleon resonance by means of kaon photoproduction on the proton γp→K+Λ. The formulations of spin 3/2 nucleon resonances proposed by Adelseck (model A) and Pascalutsa (model B) have been used in deriving the scattering amplitudes. The amplitudes are calculated by means of the relevant Feynman diagrams for the process. All nucleon resonances with spin up to 3/2 listed by the Particle Data Group are included in the model. Both formulations are then compared with the experimental data, which include differential cross section and polarization observables, through X2 minimization. It is found that the Pascalutsa's formulation of the spin 3/2 leads to a better agreement with the experimental data.

  5. Development of neutron resonance spin flipper for high resolution NRSE spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaguchi, Masaaki; Hino, Masahiro; Kawabata, Yuji; Hayashida, Hirotoshi; Tasaki, Seiji; Maruyama, Ryuji; Yamazaki, Dai; Ebisawa, Toru; Torikai, Naoya

    2006-11-01

    Neutron spin echo (NSE) is one of the techniques with the highest energy resolution for measurement of quasi-elastic scattering. In neutron resonance spin echo (NRSE), two separated neutron resonance spin flippers (RSFs) replace a homogeneous static magnetic field for spin precession in a conventional NSE. We have made a new type of RSF with pure aluminum wires in order to reduce the scattering from the surface. Test experiments have been performed at cold neutron beam line MINE1 at JRR-3M reactor in JAERI and the beam line CN3 at KUR The spin-flip probability was higher than 0.95 at a neutron wavelength of 0.81 nm and a RSF frequency of 100 kHz.

  6. Observation of vacuum-enhanced electron spin resonance of levitated nanodiamonds

    CERN Document Server

    Hoang, Thai M; Bang, Jaehoon; Li, Tongcang

    2015-01-01

    Electron spins of diamond nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers are important quantum resources for nanoscale sensing and quantum information. Combining such NV spin systems with levitated optomechanical resonators will provide a hybrid quantum system for many novel applications. Here we optically levitate a nanodiamond and demonstrate electron spin control of its built-in NV centers in low vacuum. We observe that the strength of electron spin resonance (ESR) is enhanced when the air pressure is reduced. To better understand this novel system, we also investigate the effects of trap power and measure the absolute internal temperature of levitated nanodiamonds with ESR after calibration of the strain effect. Our results show that optical levitation of nanodiamonds in vacuum not only can improve the mechanical quality of its oscillation, but also enhance the ESR contrast, which pave the way towards a novel levitated spin-optomechanical system for studying macroscopic quantum mechanics. The results also indicate potenti...

  7. Observation of vacuum-enhanced electron spin resonance of optically levitated nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tongcang; Hoang, Thai; Ahn, Jonghoon; Bang, Jaehoon

    Electron spins of diamond nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers are important quantum resources for nanoscale sensing and quantum information. Combining such NV spin systems with levitated optomechanical resonators will provide a hybrid quantum system for many novel applications. Here we optically levitate a nanodiamond and demonstrate electron spin control of its built-in NV centers in low vacuum. We observe that the strength of electron spin resonance (ESR) is enhanced when the air pressure is reduced. To better understand this novel system, we also investigate the effects of trap power and measure the absolute internal temperature of levitated nanodiamonds with ESR after calibration of the strain effect. Our results show that optical levitation of nanodiamonds in vacuum not only can improve the mechanical quality of its oscillation, but also enhance the ESR contrast, which pave the way towards a novel levitated spin-optomechanical system for studying macroscopic quantum mechanics. The results also indicate potential applications of NV centers in gas sensing.

  8. Note: High sensitivity pulsed electron spin resonance spectroscopy with induction detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twig, Ygal; Dikarov, Ekaterina; Hutchison, Wayne D; Blank, Aharon

    2011-07-01

    Commercial electron spin resonance spectroscopy and imaging systems make use of the so-called "induction" or "Faraday" detection, which is based on a radio frequency coil or a microwave resonator. The sensitivity of induction detection does not exceed ~3 × 10(8) spins/√Hz. Here we show that through the use of a new type of surface loop-gap microresonators (inner size of 20 μm), operating at cryogenic temperatures at a field of 0.5 T, one can improve upon this sensitivity barrier by more than 2 orders of magnitude and reach spin sensitivities of ~1.5 × 10(6) spins/√Hz or ~2.5 × 10(4) spins for 1 h.

  9. Dynamic neutron scattering on incoherent systems using efficient resonance spin flip techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Häussler, Wolfgang [Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching, Germany and Physik-Department E21, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Kredler, Lukas [Physik-Department E21, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    We have performed numerical ray-tracing Monte-Carlo-simulations of incoherent dynamic neutron scattering experiments. We intend to optimize the efficiency of incoherent measurements depending on the fraction of neutrons scattered without and with spin flip at the sample. In addition to conventional spin echo, we have numerically and experimentally studied oscillating intensity techniques. The results point out the advantages of these different spin echo variants and are an important prerequisite for neutron resonance spin echo instruments like RESEDA (FRM II, Munich), to choose the most efficient technique depending on the scattering vector range and the properties of the sample system under study.

  10. Electrically detected electron spin resonance in a high-mobility silicon quantum well.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunami, Junya; Ooya, Mitsuaki; Okamoto, Tohru

    2006-08-11

    The resistivity change due to electron spin resonance (ESR) absorption is investigated in a high-mobility two-dimensional electron system formed in a Si/SiGe heterostructure. Results for a specific Landau level configuration demonstrate that the primary cause of the ESR signal is a reduction of the spin polarization, not the effect of electron heating. The longitudinal spin relaxation time T1 is obtained to be of the order of 1 ms in an in-plane magnetic field of 3.55 T. The suppression of the effect of the Rashba fields due to high-frequency spin precession explains the very long T1.

  11. The quantum mechanics correspondence principle for spin systems and its application for some magnetic resonance problems

    CERN Document Server

    Henner, Victor; Belozerova, Tatyana

    2015-01-01

    Problems of interacting quantum magnetic moments become exponentially complex with increasing number of particles. As a result, classical equations are often used but the validity of reduction of a quantum problem to a classical problem should be justified. In this paper we formulate the correspondence principle, which shows that the classical equations of motion for a system of dipole interacting spins have identical form with the quantum equations. The classical simulations based on the correspondence principle for spin systems provide a practical tool to study different macroscopic spin physics phenomena. Three classical magnetic resonance problems in solids are considered as examples - free induction decay (FID), spin echo and the Pake doublet.

  12. Disentangling the spin-parity of a resonance via the gold-plated decay mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modak, Tanmoy; Sahoo, Dibyakrupa; Sinha, Rahul; Cheng, Hai-Yang; Yuan, Tzu-Chiang

    2016-03-01

    Searching for new resonances and finding out their properties is an essential part of any existing or future particle physics experiment. The nature of a new resonance is characterized by its spin, charge conjugation, parity, and its couplings with the existing particles of the Standard Model. If a new resonance is found in the four lepton final state produced via two intermediate Z bosons, the resonance could be a new heavy scalar or a Z‧ boson or even a higher spin particle. In such cases a step by step methodology as enunciated in this paper can be followed to determine the spin, parity and the coupling to two Z bosons of the parent particles, in a fully model-independent way. In our approach we show how three uni-angular distributions and a few experimentally measurable observables can conclusively tell us about the spin, parity as well as the couplings of the new resonance to two Z bosons. We have performed a numerical analysis to validate our approach and showed how the uni-angular observables can be used to disentangle the spin parity as well as the coupling of the resonance. Supported in part by MOST (Taiwan)(103-2112-M-001-005 (HYC), 101-2112-M-001-005-MY3 (TCY))

  13. Electrical detection of the spin resonance of a single electron in a silicon field-effect transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, M; Martin, I; Yablonovitch, E; Jiang, H W

    2004-07-22

    The ability to manipulate and monitor a single-electron spin using electron spin resonance is a long-sought goal. Such control would be invaluable for nanoscopic spin electronics, quantum information processing using individual electron spin qubits and magnetic resonance imaging of single molecules. There have been several examples of magnetic resonance detection of a single-electron spin in solids. Spin resonance of a nitrogen-vacancy defect centre in diamond has been detected optically, and spin precession of a localized electron spin on a surface was detected using scanning tunnelling microscopy. Spins in semiconductors are particularly attractive for study because of their very long decoherence times. Here we demonstrate electrical sensing of the magnetic resonance spin-flips of a single electron paramagnetic spin centre, formed by a defect in the gate oxide of a standard silicon transistor. The spin orientation is converted to electric charge, which we measure as a change in the source/drain channel current. Our set-up may facilitate the direct study of the physics of spin decoherence, and has the practical advantage of being composed of test transistors in a conventional, commercial, silicon integrated circuit. It is well known from the rich literature of magnetic resonance studies that there sometimes exist structural paramagnetic defects near the Si/SiO2 interface. For a small transistor, there might be only one isolated trap state that is within a tunnelling distance of the channel, and that has a charging energy close to the Fermi level.

  14. Rf Depolarizing Resonances In The Presence Of A Full Siberian Snake And Full Snake Spin-flipping

    CERN Document Server

    Blinov, B B

    2000-01-01

    Frequent polarization reversals, or spin-flips, of a stored polarized beam in high energy scattering asymmetry experiments may greatly reduce systematic errors of spin asymmetry measurements. A spin-flipping technique is being developed by using rf magnets running at a frequency close to the spin precession frequency, thereby creating spin-depolarizing resonances; the spin can then be flipped by ramping the rf magnet's frequency through the resonance. We studied, at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility Cooler Ring, properties of such rf depolarizing resonances in the presence of a nearly-full Siberian snake and their possible application for spin- flipping. By using an rf-solenoid magnet, we reached a 98.7 ± 1% efficiency of spin-flipping. However, an rf-dipole magnet is more practical at high energies; hence, studies of spin-flipping by an rf-dipole are underway at IUCF.

  15. Methodological considerations of electron spin resonance spin trapping techniques for measuring reactive oxygen species generated from metal oxide nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Min Sook; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Park, Soo Jin; Lee, Ah Young; Song, Mi Ryoung; Cho, Myung-Haing; Kim, Jun Sung

    2016-05-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analyses of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated on the surfaces of nanomaterials are important for understanding their toxicity and toxic mechanisms, which are in turn beneficial for manufacturing more biocompatible nanomaterials in many industrial fields. Electron spin resonance (ESR) is a useful tool for detecting ROS formation. However, using this technique without first considering the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials and proper conditions of the spin trapping agent (such as incubation time) may lead to misinterpretation of the resulting data. In this report, we suggest methodological considerations for ESR as pertains to magnetism, sample preparation and proper incubation time with spin trapping agents. Based on our results, each spin trapping agent should be given the proper incubation time. For nanomaterials having magnetic properties, it is useful to remove these nanomaterials via centrifugation after reacting with spin trapping agents. Sonication for the purpose of sample dispersion and sample light exposure should be controlled during ESR in order to enhance the obtained ROS signal. This report will allow researchers to better design ESR spin trapping applications involving nanomaterials.

  16. Reversal of spin polarization in Fe/GaAs (001) driven by resonant surface states: First-principles calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Chantis, Athanasios N; Belashchenko, Kirill D.; Smith, Darryl L.; Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.; van Schilfgaarde, Mark; Albers, Robert C

    2007-01-01

    A minority-spin resonant state at the Fe/GaAs(001) interface is predicted to reverse the spin polarization with voltage bias of electrons transmitted across this interface. Using a Green's function approach within the local spin density approximation we calculate spin-dependent current in a Fe/GaAs/Cu tunnel junction as a function of applied bias voltage. We find a change in sign of the spin polarization of tunneling electrons with bias voltage due to the interface minority-spin resonance. Th...

  17. Spin pumping through a topological insulator probed by x-ray detected ferromagnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, A. I.; Baker, A. A.; Collins-McIntyre, L. J.; Hesjedal, T.; van der Laan, G.

    2016-02-01

    In the field of spintronics, the generation of a pure spin current (without macroscopic charge flow) through spin pumping of a ferromagnetic (FM) layer opens up the perspective of a new generation of dissipation-less devices. Microwave driven ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) can generate a pure spin current that enters adjacent layers, allowing for both magnetization reversal (through spin-transfer torque) and to probe spin coherence in non-magnetic materials. However, standard FMR is unable to probe multilayer dynamics directly, since the measurement averages over the contributions from the whole system. The synchrotron radiation-based technique of x-ray detected FMR (XFMR) offers an elegant solution to this drawback, giving access to element-, site-, and layer-specific dynamical measurements in heterostructures. In this work, we show how XFMR has provided unique information to understand spin pumping and spin transfer torque effects through a topological insulator (TI) layer in a pseudo-spin valve heterostructure. We demonstrate that TIs function as efficient spin sinks, while also allowing a limited dynamic coupling between ferromagnetic layers. These results shed new light on the spin dynamics of this novel class of materials, and suggest future directions for the development of room temperature TI-based spintronics.

  18. Strong Coupling of a Donor Spin Ensemble to a Volume Microwave Resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Brendon; Tyryshkin, Alexei; Lyon, Stephen

    We achieve the strong coupling regime between an ensemble of phosphorus donor spins (5e13 total donors) in highly enriched 28-Si (50 ppm 29-Si) and a standard dielectric resonator. Spins were polarized beyond Boltzmann equilibrium to a combined electron and nuclear polarization of 120 percent using spin selective optical excitation of the no-phonon bound exciton transition. We observed a spin ensemble-resonator splitting of 580 kHz (2g) in a cavity with a Q factor of 75,000 (κ loss rates respectively). The spin ensemble has a long dephasing time (9 μs) providing a wide window for viewing the time evolution of the coupled spin ensemble-cavity system described by the Tavis-Cummings model The free induction decay shows repeated collapses and revivals revealing a coherent and complete exchange of excitations between the superradiant state of the spin ensemble and the cavity (about 10 cycles are resolved). This exchange can be viewed as a swap of information between a long lived spin ensemble memory qubit (T2 ~ 2 ms) and a cavity

  19. Spin-orbit-induced strong coupling of a single spin to a nanomechanical resonator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pályi, András; Struck, P R; Rudner, Mark

    2012-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the deflection-induced coupling of an electron spin to vibrational motion due to spin-orbit coupling in suspended carbon nanotube quantum dots. Our estimates indicate that, with current capabilities, a quantum dot with an odd number of electrons can serve as a realiza......We theoretically investigate the deflection-induced coupling of an electron spin to vibrational motion due to spin-orbit coupling in suspended carbon nanotube quantum dots. Our estimates indicate that, with current capabilities, a quantum dot with an odd number of electrons can serve...

  20. Spin transfer driven resonant expulsion of a magnetic vortex core for efficient rf detector

    CERN Document Server

    Menshawy, Samh; Merazzo, Karla J; Vila, Laurent; Ferreira, Ricardo; Cyrille, Marie-Claire; Ebels, Ursula; Bortolotti, Paolo; Kermorvant, Julien; Cros, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Spin transfer magnetization dynamics have led to considerable advances in Spintronics, including opportunities for new nanoscale radiofrequency devices. Among the new functionalities is the radiofrequency(rf) detection using the spin diode rectification effect in spin torque nano-oscillators (STNOs). In this study, we focus on a new phenomenon, the resonant expulsion of a magnetic vortex in STNOs. This effect is observed when the excitation vortex radius, due to spin torques associated to rf currents, becomes larger than the actual radius of the STNO. This vortex expulsion is leading to a sharp variation of the voltage at the resonant frequency. Here we show that the detected frequency can be tuned by different parameters; furthermore, a simultaneous detection of different rf signals can be achieved by real time measurements with several STNOs having different diameters. This result constitutes a first proof-of-principle towards the development of a new kind of nanoscale rf threshold detector.

  1. Spin polarized surface resonance bands in single layer Bi on Ge(1 1 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottegoni, F.; Calloni, A.; Bussetti, G.; Camera, A.; Zucchetti, C.; Finazzi, M.; Duò, L.; Ciccacci, F.

    2016-05-01

    The spin features of surface resonance bands in single layer Bi on Ge(1 1 1) are studied by means of spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and inverse photoemission spectroscopy. We characterize the occupied and empty surface states of Ge(1 1 1) and show that the deposition of one monolayer of Bi on Ge(1 1 1) leads to the appearance of spin-polarized surface resonance bands. In particular, the C 3v symmetry, which Bi adatoms adopt on Ge(1 1 1), allows for the presence of Rashba-like occupied and unoccupied electronic states around the \\overline{\\text{M}} point of the Bi surface Brillouin zone with a giant spin-orbit constant |{α\\text{R}}| =≤ft(1.4+/- 0.1\\right) eV · Å.

  2. Renormalization and additional degrees of freedom within the chiral effective theory for spin-1 resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Kampf, Karol; Trnka, Jaroslav

    2009-01-01

    We study in detail various aspects of the renormalization of the spin-1 resonance propagator in the effective field theory framework. First, we briefly review the formalisms for the description of spin-1 resonances in the path integral formulation with the stress on the issue of propagating degrees of freedom. Then we calculate the one-loop 1-- meson self-energy within the Resonance chiral theory in the chiral limit using different methods for the description of spin-one particles, namely the Proca field, antisymmetric tensor field and the first order formalisms. We discuss in detail technical aspects of the renormalization procedure which are inherent to the power-counting non-renormalizable theory and give a formal prescription for the organization of both the counterterms and one-particle irreducible graphs. We also construct the corresponding propagators and investigate their properties. We show that the additional poles corresponding to the additional one-particle states are generated by loop corrections...

  3. Site directed spin labelling and pulsed dipolar electron paramagnetic resonance (double electron-electron resonance) of force activation in muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fajer, Piotr G [Institute of Molecular Biophysics, Department of Biological Science, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States)

    2005-05-11

    The recent development of site specific spin labelling and advances in pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance(EPR) have established spin labelling as a viable structural biology technique. Specific protein sites or whole domains can be selectively targeted for spin labelling by cysteine mutagenesis. The secondary structure of the proteins is determined from the trends in EPR signals of labels attached to consecutive residues. Solvent accessibility or label mobility display periodicities along the labelled polypeptide chain that are characteristic of {beta}-strands (periodicity of 2 residues) or {alpha}-helices (3.6 residues). Low-resolution 3D structure of proteins is determined from the distance restraints. Two spin labels placed within 60-70 A of each other create a local dipolar field experienced by the other spin labels. The strength of this field is related to the interspin distance, {proportional_to} r{sup -3}. The dipolar field can be measured by the broadening of the EPR lines for the short distances (8-20 A) or for the longer distances (17-70 A) by the pulsed EPR methods, double electron-electron resonance(DEER) and double quantum coherence (DQC). A brief review of the methodology and its applications to the multisubunit muscle protein troponin is presented below.

  4. Detection of reactive oxygen species in isolated, perfused lungs by electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Schudt Christian; Schermuly Ralph T; Ghofrani Hossein A; Schütte Hartwig; Schäfer Rolf U; Tiyerili Vedat; Fuchs Beate; Kuzkaya Nermin; Weissmann Norbert; Sydykov Akylbek; Egemnazarow Bakytbek; Seeger Werner; Grimminger Friedrich

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background The sources and measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in intact organs are largely unresolved. This may be related to methodological problems associated with the techniques currently employed for ROS detection. Electron spin resonance (ESR) with spin trapping is a specific method for ROS detection, and may address some these technical problems. Methods We have established a protocol for the measurement of intravascular ROS release from isolated buffer-perfused and v...

  5. The Spin Structure of the Proton in the Resonance Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renee Fatemi

    2002-01-01

    Inclusive double spin asymmetries have been measured for {rvec p}({rvec e},e{prime}) using the CLAS detector and a polarized {sup 15}NH{sub 3} target at Jefferson Lab in 1998. The virtual photon asymmetry A{sub 1}, the longitudinal spin structure function, g{sub 1} (x, Q{sup 2}), and the first moment {Gamma}{sub 1}{sup p}, have been extracted for a Q{sup 2} range of 0.15-2.0 GeV{sup 2}. These results provide insight into the low Q{sup 2} evolution of spin dependent asymmetries and structure functions as well as the transition of {Gamma}{sub 1}{sup p} from the photon point, where the Gerasimov, Drell and Hearn Sum Rule is expected to be satisfied, to the deep inelastic region.

  6. The Spin Structure of the Proton in the Resonance Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fatemi, Renee H. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Inclusive double spin asymmetries have been measured for $\\vec{p}$($\\vec{e}$,e') using the CLAS detector and a polarized 15NH3 target at Jefferson Lab in 1998. The virtual photon asymmetry A1, the longitudinal spin structure function, g1 (x, Q2), and the first moment Γ$1\\atop{p}$, have been extracted for a Q2 range of 0.15-2.0 GeV2. These results provide insight into the low Q2 evolution of spin dependent asymmetries and structure functions as well as the transition of Γ$1\\atop{p}$ from the photon point, where the Gerasimov, Drell and Hearn Sum Rule is expected to be satisfied, to the deep inelastic region.

  7. On The $Q^2$ Dependence of The Spin Structure Function In The Resonance Region

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Z; Li, Zhenping; Li, Zhujun

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, we show what we can learn from the CEBAF experiments on spin-structure functions, and the transition from the Drell-Hearn-Gerasimov sum rule in the real photon limit to the spin dependent sum rules in the deep inelastic scattering, and how the asymmetry $A_1(x,Q^2)$ approaches the scaling limit in the resonance region. The spin structure function in the resonance region alone can not determine the spin-dependent sum rule due to the kinematic restriction of the resonance region. The integral $\\int_0^1 \\frac {A_1(x,Q^2)F_2(x,Q^2)}{2x(1+R(x,Q^2))}dx$ is estimated from $Q^2=0$ to $2.5$ GeV$^2$. The result shows that there is a region where both contributions from the baryon resonances and the deep inelastic scattering are important, thus provides important information on the high twist effects on the spin dependent sum rule.

  8. Effects of magnetohydrodynamics matter density fluctuations on the solar neutrino resonant spin-flavor precession

    CERN Document Server

    Reggiani, N; Colonia, J H; De Holanda, P C

    1998-01-01

    Taking into account the stringent limits from helioseismology observations on possible matter density fluctuations described by magnetohydrodynamics theory, we find the corresponding time variations of solar neutrino survival probability due to the resonant spin-flavor precession phenomenon with amplitude of order O(10%). We discuss the physics potential of high statistics real time experiments, like as Superkamiokande, to observe the effects of such magnetohydrodynamics fluctuations on their data. We conclude that these observations could be thought as a test of the resonant spin-flavor precession solution to the solar neutrino anomaly.

  9. High-sensitivity Q-band electron spin resonance imaging system with submicron resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtirberg, Lazar; Twig, Ygal; Dikarov, Ekaterina; Halevy, Revital; Levit, Michael; Blank, Aharon

    2011-04-01

    A pulsed electron spin resonance (ESR) microimaging system operating at the Q-band frequency range is presented. The system includes a pulsed ESR spectrometer, gradient drivers, and a unique high-sensitivity imaging probe. The pulsed gradient drivers are capable of producing peak currents ranging from ˜9 A for short 150 ns pulses up to more than 94 A for long 1400 ns gradient pulses. Under optimal conditions, the imaging probe provides spin sensitivity of ˜1.6 × 108 spins/√Hz or ˜2.7 × 106 spins for 1 h of acquisition. This combination of high gradients and high spin sensitivity enables the acquisition of ESR images with a resolution down to ˜440 nm for a high spin concentration solid sample (˜108 spins/μm3) and ˜6.7 μm for a low spin concentration liquid sample (˜6 × 105 spins/μm3). Potential applications of this system range from the imaging of point defects in crystals and semiconductors to measurements of oxygen concentration in biological samples.

  10. High temperature spin dynamics in linear magnetic chains, molecular rings, and segments by nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adelnia, Fatemeh; Lascialfari, Alessandro [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano and INSTM, Milano (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Pavia and INSTM, Pavia (Italy); Mariani, Manuel [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Ammannato, Luca; Caneschi, Andrea; Rovai, Donella [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Firenze and INSTM, Firenze (Italy); Winpenny, Richard; Timco, Grigore [School of Chemistry, The University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Corti, Maurizio, E-mail: maurizio.corti@unipv.it; Borsa, Ferdinando [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Pavia and INSTM, Pavia (Italy)

    2015-05-07

    We present the room temperature proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (NSLR) results in two 1D spin chains: the Heisenberg antiferromagnetic (AFM) Eu(hfac){sub 3}NITEt and the magnetically frustrated Gd(hfac){sub 3}NITEt. The NSLR as a function of external magnetic field can be interpreted very well in terms of high temperature spin dynamics dominated by a long time persistence of the decay of the two-spin correlation function due to the conservation of the total spin value for isotropic Heisenberg chains. The high temperature spin dynamics are also investigated in Heisenberg AFM molecular rings. In both Cr{sub 8} closed ring and in Cr{sub 7}Cd and Cr{sub 8}Zn open rings, i.e., model systems for a finite spin segment, an enhancement of the low frequency spectral density is found consistent with spin diffusion but the high cut-off frequency due to intermolecular anisotropic interactions prevents a detailed analysis of the spin diffusion regime.

  11. Wave function collapses in a single spin magnetic resonance force microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, G P; Tsifrinovich, V I

    2004-01-01

    We study the effects of wave function collapses in the oscillating cantilever driven adiabatic reversals (OSCAR) magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) technique. The quantum dynamics of the cantilever tip (CT) and the spin is analyzed and simulated taking into account the magnetic noise on the spin. The deviation of the spin from the direction of the effective magnetic field causes a measurable shift of the frequency of the CT oscillations. We show that the experimental study of this shift can reveal the information about the average time interval between the consecutive collapses of the wave function

  12. Persistent spin excitations in doped antiferromagnets revealed by resonant inelastic light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, C. J.; Nowadnick, E. A.; Wohlfeld, K.; Kung, Y. F.; Chen, C.-C.; Johnston, S.; Tohyama, T.; Moritz, B.; Devereaux, T. P.

    2014-02-01

    How coherent quasiparticles emerge by doping quantum antiferromagnets is a key question in correlated electron systems, whose resolution is needed to elucidate the phase diagram of copper oxides. Recent resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) experiments in hole-doped cuprates have purported to measure high-energy collective spin excitations that persist well into the overdoped regime and bear a striking resemblance to those found in the parent compound, challenging the perception that spin excitations should weaken with doping and have a diminishing effect on superconductivity. Here we show that RIXS at the Cu L3-edge indeed provides access to the spin dynamical structure factor once one considers the full influence of light polarization. Further we demonstrate that high-energy spin excitations do not correlate with the doping dependence of Tc, while low-energy excitations depend sensitively on doping and show ferromagnetic correlations. This suggests that high-energy spin excitations are marginal to pairing in cuprate superconductors.

  13. Spin and parity assignments for Mo94,95 neutron resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, S. A.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Becker, J. A.; Bečvář, F.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Haight, R. C.; Krtička, M.; Jandel, M.; Mitchell, G. E.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Parker, W. E.; Reifarth, R.; Rundberg, R. S.; Sharapov, E. I.; Tomandl, I.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wu, C. Y.

    2007-12-01

    The γ rays following the Mo94,95(n,γ) reactions were measured as a function of incident neutron energy by the time-of-flight method with the DANCE (Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments) array of 160 BaF2 scintillation detectors at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The targets were enriched samples: 91.59% Mo94 and 96.47% Mo95. The γ-ray multiplicities and energy spectra for different multiplicities were measured in s- and p-wave resonances up to En=10 keV for Mo94 and up to En=2 keV for Mo95. Definite spins and parities were assigned in Mo96 for about 60% of the resonances, and tentative spins and parities were assigned for the remaining resonances. In Mo95 the parities were determined for the observed resonances, confirming previously known assignments.

  14. Dynamic detection of spin accumulation in ferromagnet-semiconductor devices by ferromagnetic resonance (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Paul A.; Liu, Changjiang; Patel, Sahil; Peterson, Tim; Geppert, Chad C.; Christie, Kevin; Stecklein, Gordon; Palmstrøm, Chris J.

    2016-10-01

    A distinguishing feature of spin accumulation in ferromagnet-semiconductor devices is its precession in a magnetic field. This is the basis for detection techniques such as the Hanle effect, but these approaches become ineffective as the spin lifetime in the semiconductor decreases. For this reason, no electrical Hanle measurement has been demonstrated in GaAs at room temperature. We show here that by forcing the magnetization in the ferromagnet to precess at resonance instead of relying only on the Larmor precession of the spin accumulation in the semiconductor, an electrically generated spin accumulation can be detected up to 300 K. The injection bias and temperature dependence of the measured spin signal agree with those obtained using traditional methods. We further show that this new approach enables a measurement of short spin lifetimes (techniques. The measurements were carried out on epitaxial Heusler alloy (Co2FeSi or Co2MnSi)/n-GaAs heterostructures. Lateral spin valve devices were fabricated by electron beam and photolithography. We compare measurements carried out by the new FMR-based technique with traditional non-local and three-terminal Hanle measurements. A full model appropriate for the measurements will be introduced, and a broader discussion in the context of spin pumping experimenments will be included in the talk. The new technique provides a simple and powerful means for detecting spin accumulation at high temperatures. Reference: C. Liu, S. J. Patel, T. A. Peterson, C. C. Geppert, K. D. Christie, C. J. Palmstrøm, and P. A. Crowell, "Dynamic detection of electron spin accumulation in ferromagnet-semiconductor devices by ferromagnetic resonance," Nature Communications 7, 10296 (2016). http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms10296

  15. Conditions of Passage and Entrapment of Terrestrial Planets in Spin-Orbit Resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-10

    May 25 ABSTRACT The dynamical evolution of terrestrial planets resembling Mercury in the vicinity of spin-orbit resonances is investigated using... planet and assuming a zero obliquity. We find that a Mercury -like planet with a current value of orbital eccentricity (0.2056) is always captured in... Mercury rarely fails to align itself into this state of unstable equilibrium before it traverses 2:1 resonance. Key words: celestial mechanics – planets

  16. High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (HRMAS NMR) for Studies of Reactive Fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic Resonance (HRMAS NMR) for Studies of Reactive Fabrics 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W911SR-11-C-0047 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...ECBC-TR-1326 HIGH RESOLUTION MAGIC ANGLE SPINNING NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE (HRMAS NMR) FOR STUDIES OF REACTIVE FABRICS David J. McGarvey...unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT An analytical chemistry method is described for measuring the reactivity and permeation of

  17. Cross polarization from spins I=12 to spins S=1 in nuclear magnetic resonance with magic angle sample spinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, Karthik; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2006-05-21

    Spin locking of the nuclear magnetization of a spin with S=1 such as deuterium in the presence of a radio-frequency field under magic angle spinning (MAS) is described in terms of adiabatic modulations of the energy levels. In a brief initial period, part of the initial density operator nutates about the Hamiltonian and is dephased. The remaining spin-locked state undergoes persistent oscillatory transfer processes between various coherences with a periodicity given by the rotation of the sample. While all crystallites in the powder undergo such periodic transfer processes, the phases of the oscillations depend on the angle gamma of the crystallites. The angle gamma is the azimuthal angle defining the orientation of the unique axis of the quadrupolar interaction tensor in a rotor-fixed frame. The theory is extended to describe cross-polarization between spins S=1 and I=12 under MAS. There are four distinct Hartmann-Hahn matching conditions that correspond to four zero-quantum matching conditions, all of which are shifted and broadened compared to their spin S=12 counterparts. These matching conditions are further split into a family of sideband conditions separated by the spinning frequency. The theory allows the calculation of both shifts and broadening factors of the matching conditions, as verified by simulations and experiments.

  18. Unraveling multi-spin effects in rotational resonance nuclear magnetic resonance using effective reduced density matrix theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SivaRanjan, Uppala; Ramachandran, Ramesh, E-mail: rramesh@iisermohali.ac.in [Department of Chemical Sciences, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER) Mohali, Sector 81, Manauli, P.O. Box-140306, Mohali, Punjab (India)

    2014-02-07

    A quantum-mechanical model integrating the concepts of reduced density matrix and effective Hamiltonians is proposed to explain the multi-spin effects observed in rotational resonance (R{sup 2}) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. Employing this approach, the spin system of interest is described in a reduced subspace inclusive of its coupling to the surroundings. Through suitable model systems, the utility of our theory is demonstrated and verified with simulations emerging from both analytic and numerical methods. The analytic results presented in this article provide an accurate description/interpretation of R{sup 2} experimental results and could serve as a test-bed for distinguishing coherent/incoherent effects in solid-state NMR.

  19. Unraveling multi-spin effects in rotational resonance nuclear magnetic resonance using effective reduced density matrix theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    SivaRanjan, Uppala; Ramachandran, Ramesh

    2014-02-01

    A quantum-mechanical model integrating the concepts of reduced density matrix and effective Hamiltonians is proposed to explain the multi-spin effects observed in rotational resonance (R2) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. Employing this approach, the spin system of interest is described in a reduced subspace inclusive of its coupling to the surroundings. Through suitable model systems, the utility of our theory is demonstrated and verified with simulations emerging from both analytic and numerical methods. The analytic results presented in this article provide an accurate description/interpretation of R2 experimental results and could serve as a test-bed for distinguishing coherent/incoherent effects in solid-state NMR.

  20. Unraveling multi-spin effects in rotational resonance nuclear magnetic resonance using effective reduced density matrix theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SivaRanjan, Uppala; Ramachandran, Ramesh

    2014-02-07

    A quantum-mechanical model integrating the concepts of reduced density matrix and effective Hamiltonians is proposed to explain the multi-spin effects observed in rotational resonance (R(2)) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. Employing this approach, the spin system of interest is described in a reduced subspace inclusive of its coupling to the surroundings. Through suitable model systems, the utility of our theory is demonstrated and verified with simulations emerging from both analytic and numerical methods. The analytic results presented in this article provide an accurate description/interpretation of R(2) experimental results and could serve as a test-bed for distinguishing coherent/incoherent effects in solid-state NMR.

  1. An automated framework for NMR resonance assignment through simultaneous slice picking and spin system forming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Ahmed; Guo, Xianrong; Jing, Bing-Yi; Gao, Xin

    2014-06-01

    Despite significant advances in automated nuclear magnetic resonance-based protein structure determination, the high numbers of false positives and false negatives among the peaks selected by fully automated methods remain a problem. These false positives and negatives impair the performance of resonance assignment methods. One of the main reasons for this problem is that the computational research community often considers peak picking and resonance assignment to be two separate problems, whereas spectroscopists use expert knowledge to pick peaks and assign their resonances at the same time. We propose a novel framework that simultaneously conducts slice picking and spin system forming, an essential step in resonance assignment. Our framework then employs a genetic algorithm, directed by both connectivity information and amino acid typing information from the spin systems, to assign the spin systems to residues. The inputs to our framework can be as few as two commonly used spectra, i.e., CBCA(CO)NH and HNCACB. Different from the existing peak picking and resonance assignment methods that treat peaks as the units, our method is based on 'slices', which are one-dimensional vectors in three-dimensional spectra that correspond to certain ([Formula: see text]) values. Experimental results on both benchmark simulated data sets and four real protein data sets demonstrate that our method significantly outperforms the state-of-the-art methods while using a less number of spectra than those methods. Our method is freely available at http://sfb.kaust.edu.sa/Pages/Software.aspx.

  2. A new Skyrme energy density functional for a better description of spin-isospin resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roca-Maza, X., E-mail: xavier.roca.maza@mi.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sez. di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Colò, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sez. di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics China, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); Cao, Li-Gang [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics China, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); School of Mathematics and Physics, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, ITP, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator of Lanzhou, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Sagawa, H. [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics China, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); Center for Mathematics and Physics, University of Aizu, Aizu-Wakamatsu, Fukushima 965-8580 (Japan); RIKEN, Nishina Center, Wako, 351-0198 (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    A correct determination of the isospin and spin-isospin properties of the nuclear effective interaction should lead to an accurate description of the Gamow-Teller resonance (GT), the Spin Dipole Resonance (SDR), the Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) or the Antianalog Giant Dipole Resonance (AGDR), among others. A new Skyrme energy density functional named SAMi is introduced with the aim of going a step forward in setting the bases for a more precise description of spin-isospin resonances [1, 2]. In addition, we will discuss some new features of our analysis on the AGDR in {sup 208}Pb [3] as compared with available experimental data on this resonance [4, 5, 6], and on the GDR [7]. Such study, guided by a simple yet physical pocket formula, has been developed by employing the so called SAMi-J family of systematically varied interactions. This set of interactions is compatible with experimental data for values of the symmetry energy at saturation J and slope parameter L falling in the ranges 31−33 MeV and 75−95 MeV, respectively.

  3. Spin-orbit-induced strong coupling of a single spin to a nanomechanical resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palyi, Andras [University of Konstanz (Germany); Eoetvoes University, Budapest (Hungary); Struck, Philipp R.; Burkard, Guido [University of Konstanz (Germany); Rudner, Mark [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Flensberg, Karsten [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2012-07-01

    We theoretically investigate the coupling of electron spin to vibrational motion due to curvature-induced spin-orbit coupling in suspended carbon nanotube quantum dots. Our estimates indicate that, with current capabilities, a quantum dot with an odd number of electrons can serve as a realization of the Jaynes-Cummings model of quantum electrodynamics in the strong-coupling regime. A quantized flexural mode of the suspended tube plays the role of the optical mode and we identify two distinct two-level subspaces, at small and large magnetic field, which can be used as qubits in this setup. The strong intrinsic spin-mechanical coupling allows for detection, as well as manipulation of the spin qubit, and may yield enhanced performance of nanotubes in sensing applications.

  4. Narrow heavy-hole cyclotron resonances split by the cubic Rashba spin-orbit interaction in strained germanium quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Failla, M.; Myronov, M.; Morrison, C.; Leadley, D. R.; Lloyd-Hughes, J.

    2015-07-01

    The spin-orbit interaction was found to split the cyclotron resonance of heavy holes confined in high-mobility, compressively strained germanium quantum wells. The interference between coherent spin-split cyclotron resonances was tracked on picosecond time scales using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. Analysis in the time domain, or using a time-frequency decomposition based on the Gabor-Morlet wavelet, was necessary when the difference between cyclotron frequencies was comparable to the linewidth. The cubic Rashba spin-orbit coefficient β was determined via two methods: (i) the magnetic-field dependence of the cyclotron frequencies, and (ii) the spin-resolved subband densities. An enhanced β and spin polarization was created by tailoring the strain to enhance the spin-orbit interaction. The amplitude modulation of the narrow, interfering cyclotron resonances is a signature of spin coherences persisting for more than 10 ps.

  5. Magnetic defects in chemically converted graphene nanoribbons: electron spin resonance investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singamaneni, Srinivasa Rao, E-mail: ssingam@ncsu.edu [INPAC – Institute for Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry, Semiconductor Physics Laboratory, K.U. Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B–3001 Leuven (Belgium); Materials Science Division, Army Research Office, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709 (United States); Department of Material Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Stesmans, Andre [INPAC – Institute for Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry, Semiconductor Physics Laboratory, K.U. Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B–3001 Leuven (Belgium); Tol, Johan van [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, 1800 E. Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States); Kosynkin, D. V. [Department of Chemistry, Smalley Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Rice University, MS-222, 6100 Main Street, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Tour, James M. [Department of Chemistry, Smalley Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Rice University, MS-222, 6100 Main Street, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Smalley Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Rice University, MS-222, 6100 Main Street, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Smalley Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Rice University, MS-222, 6100 Main Street, Houston, Texas 77005, USA. (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Electronic spin transport properties of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) are influenced by the presence of adatoms, adsorbates and edge functionalization. To improve the understanding of the factors that influence the spin properties of GNRs, local (element) spin-sensitive techniques such as electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy are important for spintronics applications. Here, we present results of multi-frequency continuous wave (CW), pulse and hyperfine sublevel correlation (HYSCORE) ESR spectroscopy measurements performed on oxidatively unzipped graphene nanoribbons (GNRs), which were subsequently chemically converted (CCGNRs) with hydrazine. ESR spectra at 336 GHz reveal an isotropic ESR signal from the CCGNRs, of which the temperature dependence of its line width indicates the presence of localized unpaired electronic states. Upon functionalization of CCGNRs with 4-nitrobenzene diazonium tetrafluoroborate, the ESR signal is found to be 2 times narrower than that of pristine ribbons. NH{sub 3} adsorption/desorption on CCGNRs is shown to narrow the signal, while retaining the signal intensity and g value. The electron spin-spin relaxation process at 10 K is found to be characterized by slow (163 ns) and fast (39 ns) components. HYSCORE ESR data demonstrate the explicit presence of protons and {sup 13}C atoms. With the provided identification of intrinsic point magnetic defects such as proton and {sup 13}C has been reported, which are roadblocks to spin travel in graphene-based materials, this work could help in advancing the present fundamental understanding on the edge-spin (or magnetic)-based transport properties of CCGNRs.

  6. Magnetic defects in chemically converted graphene nanoribbons: electron spin resonance investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasa Rao Singamaneni

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Electronic spin transport properties of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs are influenced by the presence of adatoms, adsorbates and edge functionalization. To improve the understanding of the factors that influence the spin properties of GNRs, local (element spin-sensitive techniques such as electron spin resonance (ESR spectroscopy are important for spintronics applications. Here, we present results of multi-frequency continuous wave (CW, pulse and hyperfine sublevel correlation (HYSCORE ESR spectroscopy measurements performed on oxidatively unzipped graphene nanoribbons (GNRs, which were subsequently chemically converted (CCGNRs with hydrazine. ESR spectra at 336 GHz reveal an isotropic ESR signal from the CCGNRs, of which the temperature dependence of its line width indicates the presence of localized unpaired electronic states. Upon functionalization of CCGNRs with 4-nitrobenzene diazonium tetrafluoroborate, the ESR signal is found to be 2 times narrower than that of pristine ribbons. NH3 adsorption/desorption on CCGNRs is shown to narrow the signal, while retaining the signal intensity and g value. The electron spin-spin relaxation process at 10 K is found to be characterized by slow (163 ns and fast (39 ns components. HYSCORE ESR data demonstrate the explicit presence of protons and 13C atoms. With the provided identification of intrinsic point magnetic defects such as proton and 13C has been reported, which are roadblocks to spin travel in graphene-based materials, this work could help in advancing the present fundamental understanding on the edge-spin (or magnetic-based transport properties of CCGNRs.

  7. On the spin and parity of a single-produced resonance at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolognesi, Sara; Gao, Yanyan; Gritsan, Andrei V.; Melnikov, Kirill; Schulze, Markus; Tran, Nhan V.; Whitbeck, Andrew

    2012-11-01

    The experimental determination of the properties of the newly discovered boson at the Large Hadron Collider is currently the most crucial task in high energy physics. We show how information about the spin, parity, and, more generally, the tensor structure of the boson couplings can be obtained by studying angular and mass distributions of events in which the resonance decays to pairs of gauge bosons, $ZZ, WW$, and $\\gamma \\gamma$. A complete Monte Carlo simulation of the process $pp \\to X \\to VV \\to 4f$ is performed and verified by comparing it to an analytic calculation of the decay amplitudes $X \\to VV \\to 4f$. Our studies account for all spin correlations and include general couplings of a spin $J=0,1,2$ resonance to Standard Model particles. We also discuss how to use angular and mass distributions of the resonance decay products for optimal background rejection. It is shown that by the end of the 8 TeV run of the LHC, it might be possible to separate extreme hypotheses of the spin and parity of the new boson with a confidence level of 99% or better for a wide range of models. We briefly discuss the feasibility of testing scenarios where the resonances is not a parity eigenstate.

  8. Temperature Regulating System for Use with an Electron Spin Resonance Spectrometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, J.

    1965-01-01

    A servosystem that controls the sample temperature in an electron spin resonance spectrometer is described. It is based upon the regulation of the combination of two nitrogen gas flows of different temperatures. The temperature can be preset with an accuracy to about 1 degC between -140 and 100°C...

  9. Phosphorus-doped thin silica films characterized by magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, H.J.; Skibsted, J.; Kristensen, Martin

    2001-01-01

    Magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of 31P and 29Si have been achieved for a thin silica film doped with only 1.8% 31P and deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition on a pure silicon wafer. The observation of a symmetric 31P chemical shift tensor is consistent...

  10. Resonance induced spin-selective transport behavior in carbon nanoribbon/nanotube/nanoribbon heterojunctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiang-Hua [School of Physics and Microelectronics Science, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Department of Electrical and Information Engineering, Hunan Institute of Engineering, Xiangtan 411101 (China); Wang, Ling-Ling, E-mail: llwang@hnu.edu.cn [School of Physics and Microelectronics Science, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Li, Xiao-Fei, E-mail: xf.li@uestc.edu.cn [School of Physics and Microelectronics Science, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); School of Optoelectronic Information, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, Sichuan 610054 (China); Chen, Tong; Li, Quan [School of Physics and Microelectronics Science, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2015-09-04

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) are attractive in spintronics. Here, we propose GNR/CNT/GNR heterojunctions constructed by attaching zigzag-GNRs at the side-wall of CNT for spintronic devices. The thermal stability and electronic transport properties were explored using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations and nonequilibrium Green's function methods, respectively. Results demonstrate that the sp{sup 3}-hybridized contacts formed at the interface assure a good thermal stability of the system and make the CNT to be regarded as resonator. Only the electron of one spin-orientation and resonant energy is allowed to transport, resulting in the remarkable spin-selective transport behavior at the ferromagnetic state. - Highlights: • The new mechanism for spin-selective transport in molecular junction is proposed. • The two sp{sup 3} contacts formed between CNT and GNR can be regarded as electronic isolators. • The two isolators make the CNT act as a resonator. • Only the electron of one spin-orientation and resonant energy can form standing wave and transport through the whole junction.

  11. Electric-field-induced interferometric resonance of a one-dimensional spin-orbit-coupled electron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jingtao; Chen, Yuansen; Chen, Gang; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang; Nori, Franco

    2016-01-01

    The efficient control of electron spins is of crucial importance for spintronics, quantum metrology, and quantum information processing. We theoretically formulate an electric mechanism to probe the electron spin dynamics, by focusing on a one-dimensional spin-orbit-coupled nanowire quantum dot. Owing to the existence of spin-orbit coupling and a pulsed electric field, different spin-orbit states are shown to interfere with each other, generating intriguing interference-resonant patterns. We also reveal that an in-plane magnetic field does not affect the interval of any neighboring resonant peaks, but contributes a weak shift of each peak, which is sensitive to the direction of the magnetic field. We find that this proposed external-field-controlled scheme should be regarded as a new type of quantum-dot-based interferometry. This interferometry has potential applications in precise measurements of relevant experimental parameters, such as the Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit-coupling strengths, as well as the Landé factor. PMID:27966598

  12. Electric-field-induced interferometric resonance of a one-dimensional spin-orbit-coupled electron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jingtao; Chen, Yuansen; Chen, Gang; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang; Nori, Franco

    2016-12-01

    The efficient control of electron spins is of crucial importance for spintronics, quantum metrology, and quantum information processing. We theoretically formulate an electric mechanism to probe the electron spin dynamics, by focusing on a one-dimensional spin-orbit-coupled nanowire quantum dot. Owing to the existence of spin-orbit coupling and a pulsed electric field, different spin-orbit states are shown to interfere with each other, generating intriguing interference-resonant patterns. We also reveal that an in-plane magnetic field does not affect the interval of any neighboring resonant peaks, but contributes a weak shift of each peak, which is sensitive to the direction of the magnetic field. We find that this proposed external-field-controlled scheme should be regarded as a new type of quantum-dot-based interferometry. This interferometry has potential applications in precise measurements of relevant experimental parameters, such as the Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit-coupling strengths, as well as the Landé factor.

  13. Introduction to Spin Label Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanson, Michelle; Sood, Abha; Torok, Fanni; Torok, Marianna

    2013-01-01

    An undergraduate laboratory exercise is described to demonstrate the biochemical applications of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The beta93 cysteine residue of hemoglobin is labeled by the covalent binding of 3-maleimido-proxyl (5-MSL) and 2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-oxyl-3-methyl methanethiosulfonate (MTSL), respectively. The excess…

  14. High precision beam momentum determination in a synchrotron using a spin resonance method

    CERN Document Server

    Goslawski, P; Gebel, R; Hartmann, M; Kacharava, A; Lehrach, A; Lorentz, B; Maier, R; Mielke, M; Papenbrock, M; Prasuhn, D; Stassen, R; Stein, H J; Stockhorst, H; Ströher, H; Wilkin, C

    2009-01-01

    In order to measure the mass of the eta meson with high accuracy using the d+p -> 3He+eta reaction, the momentum of the circulating deuteron beam in the Cooler Synchrotron COSY of the Forschungszentrum Juelich has to be determined with unprecedented precision. This has been achieved by studying the spin dynamics of the polarized deuteron beam. By depolarizing the beam through the use of an artificially induced spin resonance, it was possible to evaluate its momentum p with a precision of dp/p < 10-4 for a momentum of roughly 3 GeV/c. Different possible sources of error in the application of the spin resonance method are discussed in detail and its possible use during a standard experiment is considered.

  15. Nuclear spin conversion of water inside fullerene cages detected by low-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamone, Salvatore, E-mail: s.mamone@soton.ac.uk; Concistrè, Maria; Carignani, Elisa; Meier, Benno; Krachmalnicoff, Andrea; Johannessen, Ole G.; Denning, Mark; Carravetta, Marina; Whitby, Richard J.; Levitt, Malcolm H., E-mail: mhl@soton.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Lei, Xuegong; Li, Yongjun [Department of Chemistry, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Goh, Kelvin; Horsewill, Anthony J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-21

    The water-endofullerene H{sub 2}O@C{sub 60} provides a unique chemical system in which freely rotating water molecules are confined inside homogeneous and symmetrical carbon cages. The spin conversion between the ortho and para species of the endohedral H{sub 2}O was studied in the solid phase by low-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance. The experimental data are consistent with a second-order kinetics, indicating a bimolecular spin conversion process. Numerical simulations suggest the simultaneous presence of a spin diffusion process allowing neighbouring ortho and para molecules to exchange their angular momenta. Cross-polarization experiments found no evidence that the spin conversion of the endohedral H{sub 2}O molecules is catalysed by {sup 13}C nuclei present in the cages.

  16. Characterizing Si:P quantum dot qubits with spin resonance techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Chen, Chin-Yi; Klimeck, Gerhard; Simmons, Michelle Y.; Rahman, Rajib

    2016-01-01

    Quantum dots patterned by atomically precise placement of phosphorus donors in single crystal silicon have long spin lifetimes, advantages in addressability, large exchange tunability, and are readily available few-electron systems. To be utilized as quantum bits, it is important to non-invasively characterise these donor quantum dots post fabrication and extract the number of bound electron and nuclear spins as well as their locations. Here, we propose a metrology technique based on electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements with the on-chip circuitry already needed for qubit manipulation to obtain atomic scale information about donor quantum dots and their spin configurations. Using atomistic tight-binding technique and Hartree self-consistent field approximation, we show that the ESR transition frequencies are directly related to the number of donors, electrons, and their locations through the electron-nuclear hyperfine interaction. PMID:27550779

  17. Resonance-inclined optical nuclear spin polarization of liquids in diamond structures

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Qiong; Jelezko, Fedor; Retzker, Alex; Plenio, Martin B

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of molecules in a solution at room temperature has potential to revolutionize nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging. The prevalent methods for achieving DNP in solutions are typically most effective in the regime of small interaction correlation times between the electron and nuclear spins, limiting the size of accessible molecules. To solve this limitation, we design a mechanism for DNP in the liquid phase that is applicable for large interaction correlation times. Importantly, while this mechanism makes use of a resonance condition similar to solid-state DNP, the polarization transfer is robust to a relatively large detuning from the resonance due to molecular motion. We combine this scheme with optically polarized nitrogen vacancy (NV) center spins in nanodiamonds to design a setup that employs optical pumping and is therefore not limited by room temperature electron thermal polarisation. We illustrate numerically the effectiveness of the model in a flow cel...

  18. Resonant mixing of optical orbital and spin angular momentum by using chiral silicon nanosphere clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jarro, Ahmed; Biris, Claudiu G; Panoiu, Nicolae C

    2016-04-01

    We present an in-depth analysis of the resonant intermixing between optical orbital and spin angular momentum of Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beams, mediated by chiral clusters made of silicon nanospheres. In particular, we establish a relationship between the spin and orbital quantum numbers characterizing the LG beam and the order q of the rotation symmetry group q of the cluster of nanospheres for which resonantly enhanced coupling between the two components of the optical angular momentum is observed. Thus, similar to the case of diffraction grating-mediated transfer of linear momentum between optical beams, we demonstrate that clusters of nanospheres that are invariant to specific rotation transformations can efficiently transfer optical angular momentum between LG beams with different quantum numbers. We also discuss the conditions in which the resonant interaction between LG beams and a chiral cluster of nanospheres leads to the generation of superchiral light.

  19. Analysis of the transient response of nuclear spins in GaAs with/without nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasly, Mahmoud; Lin, Zhichao; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Uemura, Tetsuya

    2016-05-01

    As an alternative to studying the steady-state responses of nuclear spins in solid state systems, working within a transient-state framework can reveal interesting phenomena. The response of nuclear spins in GaAs to a changing magnetic field was analyzed based on the time evolution of nuclear spin temperature. Simulation results well reproduced our experimental results for the transient oblique Hanle signals observed in an all-electrical spin injection device. The analysis showed that the so called dynamic nuclear polarization can be treated as a cooling tool for the nuclear spins: It works as a provider to exchange spin angular momentum between polarized electron spins and nuclear spins through the hyperfine interaction, leading to an increase in the nuclear polarization. In addition, a time-delay of the nuclear spin temperature with a fast sweep of the external magnetic field produces a possible transient state for the nuclear spin polarization. On the other hand, the nuclear magnetic resonance acts as a heating tool for a nuclear spin system. This causes the nuclear spin temperature to jump to infinity: i.e., the average nuclear spins along with the nuclear field vanish at resonant fields of 75As, 69Ga and 71Ga, showing an interesting step-dip structure in the oblique Hanle signals. These analyses provide a quantitative understanding of nuclear spin dynamics in semiconductors for application in future computation processing.

  20. Analysis of the transient response of nuclear spins in GaAs with/without nuclear magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Rasly

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available As an alternative to studying the steady-state responses of nuclear spins in solid state systems, working within a transient-state framework can reveal interesting phenomena. The response of nuclear spins in GaAs to a changing magnetic field was analyzed based on the time evolution of nuclear spin temperature. Simulation results well reproduced our experimental results for the transient oblique Hanle signals observed in an all-electrical spin injection device. The analysis showed that the so called dynamic nuclear polarization can be treated as a cooling tool for the nuclear spins: It works as a provider to exchange spin angular momentum between polarized electron spins and nuclear spins through the hyperfine interaction, leading to an increase in the nuclear polarization. In addition, a time-delay of the nuclear spin temperature with a fast sweep of the external magnetic field produces a possible transient state for the nuclear spin polarization. On the other hand, the nuclear magnetic resonance acts as a heating tool for a nuclear spin system. This causes the nuclear spin temperature to jump to infinity: i.e., the average nuclear spins along with the nuclear field vanish at resonant fields of 75As, 69Ga and 71Ga, showing an interesting step-dip structure in the oblique Hanle signals. These analyses provide a quantitative understanding of nuclear spin dynamics in semiconductors for application in future computation processing.

  1. Signal-background interference for a singlet spin-0 digluon resonance at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Stephen P

    2016-01-01

    Dijet mass distributions can be used to search for spin-0 resonances that couple to two gluons. I show that there is a substantial impact on such searches from the interference between the resonant signal and the continuum QCD background amplitudes. The signal dijet mass distribution is qualitatively modified by this interference, compared to the naive expectation from considering only the pure resonant contribution, even if the total width of the resonance is minimal and very small compared to the experimental dijet mass resolution. The impact becomes more drastic as the total width of the resonance increases. These considerations are illustrated using examples relevant to the 750 GeV diphoton excess recently observed at the LHC.

  2. Field-assisted electron transport through a symmetric double-well structure with spin-orbit coupling and the Fano-resonance induced spin filtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Cun-Xi; Nie Yi-Hang; Liang Jiu-Qing

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated theoretically the field-driven electron-transport through a double-quantum-well semiconductor-heterostructure with spin-orbit coupling. The numerical results demonstrate that the transmission spectra are divided into two sets due to the bound-state level-splitting and each set contains two asymmetric resonance peaks which may be selectively suppressed by changing the difference in phase between two driving fields. When the phase difference changes from O to π, the dip of asymmetric resonance shifts from one side of resonance peak to the other side and the asymmetric Fano resonance degenerates into the symmetric Breit-Wigner resonance at a critical value of phase difference. Within a given range of incident electron energy, the spin polarization of transmission current is completely governed by the phase difference which may be used to realize the tunable spin filtering.

  3. Distinguishing black-hole spin-orbit resonances by their gravitational wave signatures. II: Full parameter estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Trifirò, Daniele; Gerosa, Davide; Berti, Emanuele; Kesden, Michael; Littenberg, Tyson; Sperhake, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational waves from coalescing binary black holes encode the evolution of their spins prior to merger. In the post-Newtonian regime and on the precession timescale, this evolution has one of three morphologies, with the spins either librating around one of two fixed points ("resonances") or circulating freely. In this work we perform full parameter estimation on resonant binaries with fixed masses and spin magnitudes, changing three parameters: a conserved "projected effective spin" $\\xi$ and resonant family $\\Delta\\Phi=0,\\pi$ (which uniquely label the source); the inclination $\\theta_{JN}$ of the binary's total angular momentum with respect to the line of sight (which determines the strength of precessional effects in the waveform); and the signal amplitude. We demonstrate that resonances can be distinguished for a wide range of binaries, except for highly symmetric configurations where precessional effects are suppressed. Motivated by new insight into double-spin evolution, we introduce new variables t...

  4. Towards achieving strong coupling in three-dimensional-cavity with solid state spin resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Floch, J.-M.; Delhote, N.; Aubourg, M.; Madrangeas, V.; Cros, D.; Castelletto, S.; Tobar, M. E.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the microwave magnetic field confinement in several microwave three-dimensional (3D)-cavities, using a 3D finite-element analysis to determine the best design and achieve a strong coupling between microwave resonant cavity photons and solid state spins. Specifically, we design cavities for achieving strong coupling of electromagnetic modes with an ensemble of nitrogen vacancy (NV) defects in diamond. We report here a novel and practical cavity design with a magnetic filling factor of up to 4 times (2 times higher collective coupling) than previously achieved using one-dimensional superconducting cavities with a small mode volume. In addition, we show that by using a double-split resonator cavity, it is possible to achieve up to 200 times better cooperative factor than the currently demonstrated with NV in diamond. These designs open up further opportunities for studying strong and ultra-strong coupling effects on spins in solids using alternative systems with a wider range of design parameters. The strong coupling of paramagnetic spin defects with a photonic cavity is used in quantum computer architecture, to interface electrons spins with photons, facilitating their read-out and processing of quantum information. To achieve this, the combination of collective coupling of spins and cavity mode is more feasible and offers a promising method. This is a relevant milestone to develop advanced quantum technology and to test fundamental physics principles.

  5. Parallel ferromagnetic resonance and spin-wave excitation in exchange-biased NiFe/IrMn bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, Marcos Antonio de, E-mail: marcossharp@gmail.com [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia, 74001-970 (Brazil); Pelegrini, Fernando [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia, 74001-970 (Brazil); Alayo, Willian [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Pelotas, 96010-900 (Brazil); Quispe-Marcatoma, Justiniano; Baggio-Saitovitch, Elisa [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rio de Janeiro, 22290-180 (Brazil)

    2014-10-01

    Ferromagnetic Resonance study of sputtered Ru(7 nm)/NiFe(t{sub FM})/IrMn(6 nm)/Ru(5 nm) exchange-biased bilayers at X and Q-band microwave frequencies reveals the excitation of spin-wave and NiFe resonance modes. Angular variations of the in-plane resonance fields of spin-wave and NiFe resonance modes show the effect of the unidirectional anisotropy, which is about twice larger for the spin-wave mode due to spin pinning at the NiFe/IrMn interface. At Q-band frequency the angular variations of in-plane resonance fields also reveal the symmetry of a uniaxial anisotropy. A modified theoretical model which also includes the contribution of a rotatable anisotropy provides a good description of the experimental results.

  6. Probing ultrafast spin dynamics through a magnon resonance in the antiferromagnetic multiferroic HoMnO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowlan, P.; Trugman, S. A.; Bowlan, J.; Zhu, J.-X.; Hur, N. J.; Taylor, A. J.; Yarotski, D. A.; Prasankumar, R. P.

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate an approach for directly tracking antiferromagnetic (AFM) spin dynamics by measuring ultrafast changes in a magnon resonance. We test this idea on the multiferroic HoMnO3 by optically photoexciting electrons, after which changes in the spin order are probed with a THz pulse tuned to a magnon resonance. This reveals a photoinduced change in the magnon line shape that builds up over 5-12 picoseconds, which we show to be the spin-lattice thermalization time, indicating that electrons heat the spins via phonons. We compare our results to previous studies of spin-lattice thermalization in ferromagnetic manganites, giving insight into fundamental differences between the two systems. Our work sheds light on the microscopic mechanism governing spin-phonon interactions in AFMs and demonstrates a powerful approach for directly monitoring ultrafast spin dynamics.

  7. Magnetic field dependence of the neutron spin resonance in CeB6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portnichenko, P. Y.; Demishev, S. V.; Semeno, A. V.; Ohta, H.; Cameron, A. S.; Surmach, M. A.; Jang, H.; Friemel, G.; Dukhnenko, A. V.; Shitsevalova, N. Yu.; Filipov, V. B.; Schneidewind, A.; Ollivier, J.; Podlesnyak, A.; Inosov, D. S.

    2016-07-01

    In zero magnetic field, the famous neutron spin resonance in the f -electron superconductor CeCoIn5 is similar to the recently discovered exciton peak in the nonsuperconducting CeB6. A magnetic field splits the resonance in CeCoIn5 into two components, indicating that it is a doublet. Here we employ inelastic neutron scattering (INS) to scrutinize the field dependence of spin fluctuations in CeB6. The exciton shows a markedly different behavior without any field splitting. Instead, we observe a second field-induced magnon whose energy increases with field. At the ferromagnetic zone center, however, we find only a single mode with a nonmonotonic field dependence. At low fields, it is initially suppressed to zero together with the antiferromagnetic order parameter, but then reappears at higher fields inside the hidden-order phase, following the energy of an electron spin resonance (ESR). This is a unique example of a ferromagnetic resonance in a heavy-fermion metal seen by both ESR and INS consistently over a broad range of magnetic fields.

  8. Resonant Charge Current in a Rashba Ring Induced by Spin-Dependent Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Zhan-Feng; LI Hong

    2008-01-01

    A one-dimensional ring subject to Rashba spin-orbit coupling is investigated. When it is attached to a lead with spin-dependent chemical potential, there will be charge current in the ring. The charge current response is resonantly maximized when the Fermi energy of the lead is equal to any energy level of the 1D ring. And if two probes are attached to the ring, the electric voltage between them creates sawtooth-like wave, which indicates the direction of the charge current. A ferromagnetic lead can also induce persistent charge current, which can be detected by magnetization intensity measurement.

  9. Conduction electron spin resonance in Mg 1 - x Al x B2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likodimos, V.; Koutandos, S.; Pissas, M.; Papavassiliou, G.; Prassides, K.

    2003-01-01

    Conduction electron spin resonance is employed to study the interplay of the electronic and structural properties in the normal state of Mg 1 - x Al x B2 alloys as a function of Al-doping for 0 <= x <= 1. The x-dependence of the spin susceptibility reveals considerable reduction of the total density of states N(EF) with increasing Al concentration, complying with theoretical predictions for a predominant filling effect of the hole σ bands by electron doping. The CESR linewidth exhibits significant broadening, especially prominent in the high-Al-content region, indicative of the presence of enhanced structural disorder, consistent with the presence of compositional fluctuations.

  10. High-pressure magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, David W.; Turcu, Romulus V. F.; Sears, Jesse A.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Burton, Sarah D.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2011-10-01

    A high-pressure magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR capability, consisting of a reusable high-pressure MAS rotor, a high-pressure rotor loading/reaction chamber for in situ sealing and re-opening of the high-pressure MAS rotor, and a MAS probe with a localized RF coil for background signal suppression, is reported. The unusual technical challenges associated with development of a reusable high-pressure MAS rotor are addressed in part by modifying standard ceramics for the rotor sleeve by abrading the internal surface at both ends of the cylinder. In this way, not only is the advantage of ceramic cylinders for withstanding very high-pressure utilized, but also plastic bushings can be glued tightly in place so that other removable plastic sealing mechanisms/components and O-rings can be mounted to create the desired high-pressure seal. Using this strategy, sealed internal pressures exceeding 150 bars have been achieved and sustained under ambient external pressure with minimal loss of pressure for 72 h. As an application example, in situ13C MAS NMR studies of mineral carbonation reaction intermediates and final products of forsterite (Mg 2SiO 4) reacted with supercritical CO 2 and H 2O at 150 bar and 50 °C are reported, with relevance to geological sequestration of carbon dioxide.

  11. High-pressure magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoyt, David W.; Turcu, Romulus V. F.; Sears, Jesse A.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Burton, Sarah D.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2011-10-01

    A high-pressure magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR capability, consisting of a reusable high-pressure MAS rotor, a high-pressure rotor loading/reaction chamber for in situ sealing and re-opening of the high-pressure MAS rotor, and a MAS probe with a localized RF coil for background signal suppression, is reported. The unusual technical challenges associated with development of a reusable high-pressure MAS rotor are addressed in part by modifying standard ceramics for the rotor sleeve by abrading the internal surface at both ends of the cylinder. In this way, not only is the advantage of ceramic cylinders for withstanding very high-pressure utilized, but also plastic bushings can be glued tightly in place so that other removable plastic sealing mechanisms/components and O-rings can be mounted to create the desired high-pressure seal. Using this strategy, sealed internal pressures exceeding 150 bars have been achieved and sustained under ambient external pressure with minimal loss of pressure for 72 h. Finally, as an application example, in situ13C MAS NMR studies of mineral carbonation reaction intermediates and final products of forsterite (Mg2SiO4) reacted with supercritical CO2 and H2O at 150 bar and 50 °C are reported, with relevance to geological sequestration of carbon dioxide.

  12. Electron spin resonance and electron nuclear double resonance of photogenerated polarons in polyfluorene and its fullerene composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marumoto, K.; Kato, M.; Kondo, H.; Kuroda, S.; Greenham, N. C.; Friend, R. H.; Shimoi, Y.; Abe, S.

    2009-06-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) and electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) of photogenerated polarons in poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) (PFO) and its composite with fullerene (C60) using variable photoexcitation energy up to 4.1 eV are reported. For PFO, a light-induced ESR (LESR) signal (g=2.003) is observed below 60 K, and its transient response and excitation spectrum indicate that the observed spins are photogenerated polarons on PFO. For the PFO-C60 composite, two LESR signals of photogenerated positive polarons on PFO (g1=2.003) and radical anions on C60 (g2=1.999) , respectively, are observed below 120 K, which are caused by photoinduced electron transfer from PFO to C60 . A remarkable enhancement of the LESR signals in the excitation spectrum at ˜2.8eV is observed compared with the case of pure PFO. The bimolecular-recombination kinetics of photogenerated charge carriers in the composite are confirmed by the dependence of the LESR on excitation-light intensity and by the decay dynamics. Light-induced ENDOR (LENDOR) signals are clearly observed for excitation around 2.8 eV owing to the highly efficient photoinduced electron transfer in the composite. Broad LENDOR shifts directly reflect the spin-density distribution of the polarons in PFO. We have determined its maximum shift using LENDOR-induced ESR, and have evaluated the maximum spin density on the carbon site coupled to the proton as 0.032. This value is consistent with the theoretical result obtained by Pariser-Parr-Pople (PPP) model, where the spatial extent of the polarons is calculated as ˜3 monomer units of PFO. The calculated LESR spectra of PFO based on the PPP model are consistent with the experimental spectra, which confirm the above spatial extension of the polaron in PFO.

  13. Electron spin resonance studies on PS, PP and PS/PP blends under gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes, Jacobo E-mail: reyesj@camelot.rect.ucv.ve; Albano, Carmen E-mail: calbano@ivic.vealbanoc@camelot.rect.ucv.ve; Claro, Marjorie; Moronta, Delfin

    2003-06-01

    Electron spin resonance studies on polystyrene (PS), polypropylene (PP) and on 80/20 PS/PP blends with and without compatibilizer (block SBS), at 7.5 wt%, irradiated with gamma rays from a {sup 60}Co source at a dose rate of 4.8 kGy/h and at integral irradiation doses of 10, 25, 50, 60, 70, 400, 800 and 1300 kGy in the presence of air and at room temperature are reported. Dependence of resonance line width, Hpp, resonance line shapes, K, and resonance line intensity, Ipp, on the integral dose of irradiation is investigated. Nature of free radicals after 10 days of air storage is discussed.

  14. An automated framework for NMR resonance assignment through simultaneous slice picking and spin system forming

    KAUST Repository

    Abbas, Ahmed

    2014-04-19

    Despite significant advances in automated nuclear magnetic resonance-based protein structure determination, the high numbers of false positives and false negatives among the peaks selected by fully automated methods remain a problem. These false positives and negatives impair the performance of resonance assignment methods. One of the main reasons for this problem is that the computational research community often considers peak picking and resonance assignment to be two separate problems, whereas spectroscopists use expert knowledge to pick peaks and assign their resonances at the same time. We propose a novel framework that simultaneously conducts slice picking and spin system forming, an essential step in resonance assignment. Our framework then employs a genetic algorithm, directed by both connectivity information and amino acid typing information from the spin systems, to assign the spin systems to residues. The inputs to our framework can be as few as two commonly used spectra, i.e., CBCA(CO)NH and HNCACB. Different from the existing peak picking and resonance assignment methods that treat peaks as the units, our method is based on \\'slices\\', which are one-dimensional vectors in three-dimensional spectra that correspond to certain (N, H) values. Experimental results on both benchmark simulated data sets and four real protein data sets demonstrate that our method significantly outperforms the state-of-the-art methods while using a less number of spectra than those methods. Our method is freely available at http://sfb.kaust.edu.sa/Pages/Software.aspx. © 2014 Springer Science+Business Media.

  15. Spin resonance in EuTiO3 probed by time-domain GHz ellipsometry

    OpenAIRE

    van Mechelen, Jacobus Lodevicus Martinu; van der Marel, Dirk; Crassee, Iris; Kolodiazhnyi, T.

    2011-01-01

    We show an example of a purely magnetic spin resonance in EuTiO3 and the resulting new record high Faraday rotation of 590 deg/mm at 1.6 T for 1 cm wavelengths probed by a novel technique of magneto-optical GHz time-domain ellipsometry. From our transmission measurements of linear polarized light we map out the complex index of refraction in the GHz to THz range. We observe a strong resonant absorption by magnetic dipole transitions involving the Zeeman split S=7/2 magnetic energy levels of t...

  16. A Drabkin-type spin resonator as tunable neutron beam monochromator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piegsa, F.M., E-mail: florian.piegsa@phys.ethz.ch [ETH Zürich, Institute for Particle Physics, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Ries, D. [ETH Zürich, Institute for Particle Physics, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Filges, U.; Hautle, P. [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2015-09-11

    A Drabkin-type spin resonator was designed and successfully implemented at the multi-purpose beam line BOA at the spallation neutron source SINQ at the Paul Scherrer Institute. The device selectively acts on the magnetic moment of neutrons within an adjustable velocity band and hence can be utilized as a tunable neutron beam monochromator. Several neutron time-of-flight (TOF) spectra have been recorded employing various settings in order to characterize its performance. In a first test application the velocity dependent transmission of a beryllium filter was determined. In addition, we demonstrate that using an exponential current distribution in the spin resonator coil the side-maxima in the TOF spectra usually associated with a Drabkin setup can be strongly suppressed.

  17. Neutron resonance spin flippers: static coils manufactured by electrical discharge machining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, N; Wagner, J N; Dogu, M; Fuchs, C; Kredler, L; Böni, P; Häußler, W

    2014-07-01

    Radiofrequency spin flippers (RFSF) are key elements of Neutron Resonance Spin Echo (NRSE) spectrometers, which allow performing controlled manipulations of the beam polarization. We report on the design and test of a new type of RFSF which originality lies in the new manufacturing technique for the static coil. The largely automated procedure ensures reproducible construction as well as an excellent homogeneity of the neutron magnetic resonance condition over the coil volume. Two salient features of this concept are the large neutron window and the closure of the coil by a μ-metal yoke which prevents field leakage outside of the coil volume. These properties are essential for working with large beams and enable new applications with coils tilted with respect to the beam axis such as neutron Larmor diffraction or the study of dispersive excitations by inelastic NRSE.

  18. Neutron Resonance Spin Flippers: Static Coils Manufactured by Electrical Discharge Machining

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, N; Dogú, M; Fuchs, C; Kredler, L; Böni, P; Häussler, W

    2014-01-01

    Radiofrequency spin flippers (RFSF) are key elements of Neutron Resonance Spin Echo (NRSE) spectrometers, which allow performing controlled manipulations of the beam polarization. We report on the design and test of a new type of RFSF which originality lies in the new manufacturing technique for the static coil. The largely automated procedure ensures reproducible construction as well as an excellent homogeneity of the neutron magnetic resonance condition over the coil volume. Two salient features of this concept are the large neutron window and the closure of the coil by a $\\mu$-metal yoke which prevents field leakage outside of the coil volume. These properties are essential for working with large beams and enable new applications with coils tilted with respect to the beam axis such as neutron Larmor diffraction or the study of dispersive excitations by inelastic NRSE.

  19. Spin transport, magnetoresistance, and electrically detected magnetic resonance in amorphous hydrogenated silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutch, Michael J.; Lenahan, Patrick M.; King, Sean W.

    2016-08-01

    We report on a study of spin transport via electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) and near-zero field magnetoresistance (MR) in silicon nitride films. Silicon nitrides have long been important materials in solid state electronics. Although electronic transport in these materials is not well understood, electron paramagnetic resonance studies have identified a single dominating paramagnetic defect and have also provided physical and chemical descriptions of the defects, called K centers. Our EDMR and MR measurements clearly link the near-zero field MR response to the K centers and also indicate that K center energy levels are approximately 3.1 eV above the a-SiN:H valence band edge. In addition, our results suggest an approach for the study of defect mediated spin-transport in inorganic amorphous insulators via variable electric field and variable frequency EDMR and MR which may be widely applicable.

  20. Resonant Transmission of Electron Spin States through Multiple Aharonov-Bohm Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutright, Jim; Hedin, Eric; Joe, Yong

    2011-10-01

    An Aharonov-Bohm (AB) ring with embedded quantum dots (QD) in each arm and one -dimensional nanowires attached as leads acts as a primitive cell in this analysis. When a tunable, external magnetic field is parallel to the surface area of the ring it causes Zeeman splitting in the energy levels of the QDs. An electron that traverses these energy levels has the potential to interfere with other electrons and to produce spin polarized output. It is already known that upon output the transmission of the electrons through this system will have a resonant peak at each Zeeman split energy level. A system where multiple AB rings are connected in series is studied, to see how having the electrons pass through multiple, identical rings effects the resonant peaks in the transmission and the degree of spin polarization.

  1. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy for the study of nanomaterial-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei He

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Many of the biological applications and effects of nanomaterials are attributed to their ability to facilitate the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Electron spin resonance (ESR spectroscopy is a direct and reliable method to identify and quantify free radicals in both chemical and biological environments. In this review, we discuss the use of ESR spectroscopy to study ROS generation mediated by nanomaterials, which have various applications in biological, chemical, and materials science. In addition to introducing the theory of ESR, we present some modifications of the method such as spin trapping and spin labeling, which ultimately aid in the detection of short-lived free radicals. The capability of metal nanoparticles in mediating ROS generation and the related mechanisms are also presented.

  2. OBTAINING THE CRITICAL DRAW RATIO OF DRAW RESONANCE IN MELT SPINNING FOR POWER LAW POLYMER FLUIDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A direct difference method has been developed for Non-Newtonian power law fluids to solve the simultaneous non-linear partial differential equations of melt spinning,and to determine the critical draw ratio for draw resonance.The results show that for shear thin fluids,the logarithm of the critical draw ratio has a well defined linear relationship with the power index for isothermal and uniform tension melt spinning.When the power index approaches zero,the critical draw ratio points at unity,indicating no melt spinning can be processed stably for such fluids.For shear thick fluids.the critical draw ratio increases in a more rapid Way with increasing the power index.

  3. Electron spin resonance absorption spectrum of trivalent gadolinium in the oxide YAIG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, S.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL); Marshall, T.; Serway, R.A.

    1978-01-01

    The electron spin resonance absorption spectrum of trivalent gadolinium in single crystals of yttrium-aluminium garnet is re-investigated at X-band and Q-band wavelengths. Fine structure spectral parameters deduced from Q-band wavelength measurements are found to predict satisfactorily spectral observations at both wavelengths. A list of spectral parameters deduced from data taken at 77/sup 0/K is given.

  4. Electron spin resonance study of the demagnetization fields of the ferromagnetic and paramagnetic films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.I. Gimazov, Yu.I. Talanov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of the electron spin resonance study of the La1-xCaxMnO3 manganite and the diphenyl-picrylhydrazyl thin films for the magnetic field parallel and perpendicular to plane of the films are presented. The temperature dependence of the demagnetizing field is obtained. The parameters of the Curie-Weiss law are estimated for the paramagnetic thin film.

  5. Integer spin resonance crossing at VEPP-4M with conservation of beam polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Barladyan, A K; Glukhov, S A; Glukhovchenko, Yu M; Karnaev, S E; Levichev, E B; Nikitin, S A; Nikolaev, I B; Okunev, I N; Piminov, P A; Shamov, A G; Zhuravlev, A N

    2015-01-01

    A recently proposed method to preserve the electron beam polarization at the VEPP-4M collider during acceleration with crossing the integer spin resonance energy E=1763 MeV has been successfully applied. It is based on full decompensation of $ 0.6\\times3.3$ Tesla$\\times$meter integral of the KEDR detector longitudinal magnetic field due to s 'switched-off' state of the anti-solenoids.

  6. Direct proton decay and microscopic structure of the spin-dipole resonance in Bi-208

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akimune, H; Daito, [No Value; Fujita, Y; Fujiwara, M; Harakeh, MN; Janecke, J; Yosoi, M

    2000-01-01

    The microscopic structure of the spin-dipole resonance (SDR) at E-x = 21.1 MeV in Bi-208 has been investigated in the Pb-208(He-3,t)Bi-208 reaction at E(He-3) = 450 MeV and very forward scattering angles. Protons emitted due to the decay of the SDR were measured in solid-state detectors in coinciden

  7. Magnetic resonance findings in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis using a spin echo magnetization transfer sequence: preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROCHA ANTÔNIO JOSÉ DA

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the magnetic resonance (MR findings of five patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS using a spin-echo sequence with an additional magnetization transfer (MT pulse on T1-weighted images (T1 SE/MT. These findings were absent in the control group and consisted of hyperintensity of the corticospinal tract. Moreover we discuss the principles and the use of this fast but simple MR technique in the diagnosis of ALS

  8. Spin-current resonances in a magnetically inhomogeneous 2D conducting system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charkina, O. V.; Kalinenko, A. N.; Kopeliovich, A. I.; Pyshkin, P. V.; Yanovsky, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    The high-frequency transport in a two-dimensional conducting ring having an inhomogeneous collinear magnetic structure has been considered in the hydrodynamic approximation. It is shown that the frequency dependence on the radial electric conductivity of the ring exhibits resonances corresponding to new hybrid oscillations in such systems. The oscillation frequencies are essentially dependent on the applied electromagnetic field and the spin state of the system.

  9. Electron spin resonance of YbRh{sub 2}Si{sub 2} under pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sichelschmidt, J.; Wykhoff, J.; Gruner, T.; Krellner, C.; Klingner, C.; Geibel, C.; Steglich, F. [MPI Chem. Physik fester Stoffe, Dresden (Germany); Krug von Nidda, H.A.; Zakharov, D.; Loidl, A. [EP V, EKM, Univ. Augsburg (Germany); Fazlishanov, I. [E.K. Zavoisky Physical Technical Inst., Kasan (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-01

    We investigated the electron spin resonance (ESR) in the heavy-fermion metal YbRh{sub 2}Si{sub 2} by applying hydrostatic pressure up to 3 GPa. We found that pressure increases the temperature dependence of the g factor and broadens the ESR line. These effects are similar to those observed in Yb(Rh{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}){sub 2}Si{sub 2} where Co substitution for Rh induces chemical pressure. However, the effect of chemical and external pressure on the ESR is not identical indicating the relevance of Co induced disorder on the spin dynamics. We compare our pressure ESR results with the behavior of the Gd ESR in CeAl{sub 3}. This reveals a similar behavior pointing on one hand to a local character Yb{sup 3+}-ESR, on the other hand on the properties of a heavy quasiparticle spin resonance upon changing the hybridization strength between 4f and conduction electrons. Both findings are consistent with the properties of a collective 4f-conduction electron spin mode which is supported by the Kondo effect.

  10. Split window resonances for the photoionization of spin-orbit coupled subshell states in alkali atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koide, M. [Department of Science and Technology, Meisei University, Tokyo 191-8656 (Japan)]. E-mail: mkoide@galaxy.ocn.ne.jp; Koike, F. [School of Medicine, Kitasato University, Kanagawa 228-8555 (Japan); Azuma, Y. [PhotonFactory, IMSS, KEK, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Nagata, T. [Department of Science and Technology, Meisei University, Tokyo 191-8656 (Japan)

    2005-06-15

    We study the origin of dual window-type 3s->4p photoexcitation resonances of potassium atoms that have been observed previously [M. Koide et al., J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 71 (2002) 1676] by means of photoion spectroscopy. We also consider the sub-valence shell photoexcitations of other alkali metal atoms. In potassium 3p photoionizations, the photoion energy levels may be labeled by their total angular momenta, and they are well separated due to the spin-orbit couplings in 3p subshells. The system of a photoion and a photoelectron is therefore a superposition of different total spin states if expressed in terms of the LS-coupling scheme. The ionization continuum may couple with several intermediate discrete states with different total spin quantum numbers, giving a possibility to observe split resonance structures in the spectra of 3s->np photoexcitations and in other alkali-atom photoexcitations. We discuss the dual window-type resonances in potassium, rubidium, and cesium atoms.

  11. Spin and valley dependent line-type resonant peaks in electrically and magnetically modulated silicene quantum structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanshan; Guo, Yong

    2017-02-01

    A barrier with a tunable spin-valley dependent energy gap in silicene could be used as a spin and valley filter. Meanwhile, special resonant modes in unique quantum structure can act as energy filters. Hence we investigate valley and spin transport properties in the potential silicene quantum structures, i.e., single ferromagnetic barrier, single electromagnetic barrier and double electric barriers. Our quantum transport calculation indicates that quantum devices of high accuracy and efficiency (100% polarization), based on modulated silicene quantum structures, can be designed for valley, spin and energy filtering. These intriguing features are revealed by the spin, valley dependent line-type resonant peaks. In addition, line-type peaks in different structure depend on spin and valley diversely. The filter we proposed is controllable by electric gating.

  12. Dynamic nuclear spin polarization in the resonant laser excitation of an InGaAs quantum dot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Högele, A; Kroner, M; Latta, C; Claassen, M; Carusotto, I; Bulutay, C; Imamoglu, A

    2012-05-11

    Resonant optical excitation of lowest-energy excitonic transitions in self-assembled quantum dots leads to nuclear spin polarization that is qualitatively different from the well-known optical orientation phenomena. By carrying out a comprehensive set of experiments, we demonstrate that nuclear spin polarization manifests itself in quantum dots subjected to finite external magnetic field as locking of the higher energy Zeeman transition to the driving laser field, as well as the avoidance of the resonance condition for the lower energy Zeeman branch. We interpret our findings on the basis of dynamic nuclear spin polarization originating from noncollinear hyperfine interaction and find excellent agreement between experiment and theory. Our results provide evidence for the significance of noncollinear hyperfine processes not only for nuclear spin diffusion and decay, but also for buildup dynamics of nuclear spin polarization in a coupled electron-nuclear spin system.

  13. Discrimination between spin-dependent charge transport and spin-dependent recombination in π-conjugated polymers by correlated current and electroluminescence-detected magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavand, Marzieh; Baird, Douglas; van Schooten, Kipp; Malissa, Hans; Lupton, John M.; Boehme, Christoph

    2016-08-01

    Spin-dependent processes play a crucial role in organic electronic devices. Spin coherence can give rise to spin mixing due to a number of processes such as hyperfine coupling, and leads to a range of magnetic field effects. However, it is not straightforward to differentiate between pure single-carrier spin-dependent transport processes which control the current and therefore the electroluminescence, and spin-dependent electron-hole recombination which determines the electroluminescence yield and in turn modulates the current. We therefore investigate the correlation between the dynamics of spin-dependent electric current and spin-dependent electroluminescence in two derivatives of the conjugated polymer poly(phenylene-vinylene) using simultaneously measured pulsed electrically detected (pEDMR) and optically detected (pODMR) magnetic resonance spectroscopy. This experimental approach requires careful analysis of the transient response functions under optical and electrical detection. At room temperature and under bipolar charge-carrier injection conditions, a correlation of the pEDMR and the pODMR signals is observed, consistent with the hypothesis that the recombination currents involve spin-dependent electronic transitions. This observation is inconsistent with the hypothesis that these signals are caused by spin-dependent charge-carrier transport. These results therefore provide no evidence that supports earlier claims that spin-dependent transport plays a role for room-temperature magnetoresistance effects. At low temperatures, however, the correlation between pEDMR and pODMR is weakened, demonstrating that more than one spin-dependent process influences the optoelectronic materials' properties. This conclusion is consistent with prior studies of half-field resonances that were attributed to spin-dependent triplet exciton recombination, which becomes significant at low temperatures when the triplet lifetime increases.

  14. Phase-resolved detection of the spin Hall angle by optical ferromagnetic resonance in perpendicularly magnetized thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capua, Amir; Wang, Tianyu; Yang, See-Hun; Rettner, Charles; Phung, Timothy; Parkin, Stuart S. P.

    2017-02-01

    The conversion of charge current to spin current by the spin Hall effect is of considerable current interest from both fundamental and technological perspectives. Measurement of the spin Hall angle, especially for atomically thin systems with large magnetic anisotropies, is not straightforward. Here we demonstrate a hybrid phase-resolved optical-electrical ferromagnetic resonance method that we show can robustly determine the spin Hall angle in heavy-metal/ferromagnet bilayer systems with large perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. We present an analytical model of the ferromagnetic resonance spectrum in the presence of the spin Hall effect, in which the spin Hall angle can be directly determined from the changes in the amplitude response as a function of the spin current that is generated from a dc charge current passing through the heavy-metal layer. Increased sensitivity to the spin current is achieved by operation under conditions for which the magnetic potential is shallowest at the "Smit point." Study of the phase response reveals that the spin Hall angle can be reliably extracted from a simplified measurement that does not require scanning over time or magnetic field but rather only on the dc current. The method is applied to the Pt-Co/Ni/Co system whose spin Hall angle was to date characterized only indirectly and that is especially relevant for spin-orbit torque devices.

  15. Sub-optical resolution of single spins using magnetic resonance imaging at room temperature in diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Shin, Chang; Kolesov, Roman; Balasubramanian, Gopalakrishnan; Jelezko, Fedor; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Hemmer, Philip R; 10.1016/j.jlumin.2009.12.006

    2010-01-01

    There has been much recent interest in extending the technique of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) down to the level of single spins with sub-optical wavelength resolution. However, the signal to noise ratio for images of individual spins is usually low and this necessitates long acquisition times and low temperatures to achieve high resolution. An exception to this is the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color center in diamond whose spin state can be detected optically at room temperature. Here we apply MRI to magnetically equivalent NV spins in order to resolve them with resolution well below the optical wavelength of the readout light. In addition, using a microwave version of MRI we achieved a resolution that is 1/270 size of the coplanar striplines, which define the effective wavelength of the microwaves that were used to excite the transition. This technique can eventually be extended to imaging of large numbers of NVs in a confocal spot and possibly to image nearby dark spins via their mutual magnetic interactio...

  16. Electric dipole spin resonance in systems with a valley-dependent g factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rančić, Marko J.; Burkard, Guido

    2016-05-01

    In this theoretical study we qualitatively and quantitatively investigate the electric dipole spin resonance (EDSR) in a single Si/SiGe quantum dot in the presence of a magnetic field gradient, e.g., produced by a ferromagnet. We model a situation in which the control of electron spin states is achieved by applying an oscillatory electric field, inducing real-space oscillations of the electron inside the quantum dot. One of the goals of our study is to present a microscopic theory of valley-dependent g factors in Si/SiGe quantum dots and investigate how valley relaxation combined with a valley-dependent g factor leads to a novel electron spin dephasing mechanism. Furthermore, we discuss the interplay of spin and valley relaxations in Si/SiGe quantum dots. Our findings suggest that the electron spin dephases due to valley relaxation, and are in agreement with recent experimental studies [Nat. Nanotechnol. 9, 666 (2014), 10.1038/nnano.2014.153].

  17. Advances and applications of dynamic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baltisberger, J.H.

    1993-06-01

    This dissertation describes nuclear magnetic resonance experiments and theory which have been developed to study quadrupolar nuclei (those nuclei with spin greater than one-half) in the solid state. Primarily, the technique of dynamic-angle spinning (DAS) is extensively reviewed and expanded upon in this thesis. Specifically, the improvement in both the resolution (two-dimensional pure-absorptive phase methods and DAS angle choice) and sensitivity (pulse-sequence development), along with effective spinning speed enhancement (again through choice of DAS conditions or alternative multiple pulse schemes) of dynamic-angle spinning experiment was realized with both theory and experimental examples. The application of DAS to new types of nuclei (specifically the {sup 87}Rb and {sup 85}Rb nuclear spins) and materials (specifically amorphous solids) has also greatly expanded the possibilities of the use of DAS to study a larger range of materials. This dissertation is meant to demonstrate both recent advances and applications of the DAS technique, and by no means represents a comprehensive study of any particular chemical problem.

  18. Photoinduced charge carriers in conjugated polymer-fullerene composites studied with light-induced electron-spin resonance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dyakonov, V.; Zoriniants, G.; Scharber, M.C.; Brabec, C.J.; Janssen, R.A.J.; Hummelen, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    Detailed studies on photoinduced spins in conjugated polymer/fullerene composites using (cw) light-induced electron-spin-resonance (LESR) technique are reported. Two overlapping LESR lines are observed, from positive polarons on the polymer chains and negative charges on the fullerene moieties. Micr

  19. Photoinduced charge carriers in conjugated polymer–fullerene composites studied with light-induced electron-spin resonance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dyakonov, V.; Zoriniants, G.; Scharber, M.; Brabec, C.J.; Janssen, R.A.J.; Hummelen, J.C.; Sariciftci, N.S.

    1999-01-01

    Detailed studies on photoinduced spins in conjugated polymer/fullerene composites using (cw) light-induced electron-spin-resonance (LESR) technique are reported. Two overlapping LESR lines are observed, from positive polarons on the polymer chains and negative charges on the fullerene moieties. Micr

  20. Mechanism of initiation of oxidation in mayonnaise enriched with fish oil as studied by electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, M.K.; Jacobsen, Charlotte; Skibsted, L.H.

    2000-01-01

    Electron spin resonance spectroscopy (spin trapping technique) has been used to identify the most important single factor for initiation of lipid oxidation in mayonnaise enriched with fish oil. Low pH increases the formation of radicals during incubation under mildly accelerated conditions at 37 ...

  1. Bodily tides near the 1:1 spin-orbit resonance. Correction to Goldreich's dynamical model

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, James G

    2012-01-01

    Spin-orbit coupling is often described in the "MacDonald torque" approach which has become the textbook standard. Within this method, a concise expression for the additional tidal potential, derived by MacDonald (1964; Rev. Geophys. 2, 467), is combined with an assumption that the Q factor is frequency-independent (i.e., that the geometric lag angle is constant in time). This makes the approach unphysical because MacDonald's derivation of the said formula was implicitly based on keeping the time lag frequency-independent, which is equivalent to setting Q to scale as the inverse tidal frequency. The contradiction requires the MacDonald treatment of both non-resonant and resonant rotation to be rewritten. The non-resonant case was reconsidered by Efroimsky & Williams (2009; CMDA 104, 257), in application to spin modes distant from the major commensurabilities. We continue this work by introducing the necessary alterations into the MacDonald-torque-based model of falling into a 1:1 resonance. (For the origin...

  2. Non-local detection of spin dynamics via spin rectification effect in yttrium iron garnet/SiO2/NiFe trilayers near simultaneous ferromagnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wee Tee Soh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The spin rectification effect (SRE, a phenomenon that generates dc voltages from ac microwave fields incident onto a conducting ferromagnet, has attracted widespread attention due to its high sensitivity to ferromagnetic resonance (FMR as well as its relevance to spintronics. Here, we report the non-local detection of yttrium iron garnet (YIG spin dynamics by measuring SRE voltages from an adjacent conducting NiFe layer up to 200 nm thick. In particular, we detect, within the NiFe layer, SRE voltages stemming from magnetostatic surface spin waves (MSSWs of the adjacent bulk YIG which are excited by a shorted coaxial probe. These non-local SRE voltages within the NiFe layer that originates from YIG MSSWs are present even in 200 nm-thick NiFe films with a 50 nm thick SiO2 spacer between NiFe and YIG, thus strongly ruling out the mechanism of spin-pumping induced inverse spin Hall effect in NiFe as the source of these voltages. This long-range influence of YIG dynamics is suggested to be mediated by dynamic fields generated from YIG spin precession near YIG/NiFe interface, which interacts with NiFe spins near the simultaneous resonance of both spins, to generate a non-local SRE voltage within the NiFe layer.

  3. Non-local detection of spin dynamics via spin rectification effect in yttrium iron garnet/SiO2/NiFe trilayers near simultaneous ferromagnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soh, Wee Tee; Peng, Bin; Ong, C. K.

    2015-08-01

    The spin rectification effect (SRE), a phenomenon that generates dc voltages from ac microwave fields incident onto a conducting ferromagnet, has attracted widespread attention due to its high sensitivity to ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) as well as its relevance to spintronics. Here, we report the non-local detection of yttrium iron garnet (YIG) spin dynamics by measuring SRE voltages from an adjacent conducting NiFe layer up to 200 nm thick. In particular, we detect, within the NiFe layer, SRE voltages stemming from magnetostatic surface spin waves (MSSWs) of the adjacent bulk YIG which are excited by a shorted coaxial probe. These non-local SRE voltages within the NiFe layer that originates from YIG MSSWs are present even in 200 nm-thick NiFe films with a 50 nm thick SiO2 spacer between NiFe and YIG, thus strongly ruling out the mechanism of spin-pumping induced inverse spin Hall effect in NiFe as the source of these voltages. This long-range influence of YIG dynamics is suggested to be mediated by dynamic fields generated from YIG spin precession near YIG/NiFe interface, which interacts with NiFe spins near the simultaneous resonance of both spins, to generate a non-local SRE voltage within the NiFe layer.

  4. Non-local detection of spin dynamics via spin rectification effect in yttrium iron garnet/SiO{sub 2}/NiFe trilayers near simultaneous ferromagnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soh, Wee Tee, E-mail: a0046479@u.nus.edu; Ong, C. K. [Center for Superconducting and Magnetic Materials, Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117551 (Singapore); Peng, Bin [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2015-08-15

    The spin rectification effect (SRE), a phenomenon that generates dc voltages from ac microwave fields incident onto a conducting ferromagnet, has attracted widespread attention due to its high sensitivity to ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) as well as its relevance to spintronics. Here, we report the non-local detection of yttrium iron garnet (YIG) spin dynamics by measuring SRE voltages from an adjacent conducting NiFe layer up to 200 nm thick. In particular, we detect, within the NiFe layer, SRE voltages stemming from magnetostatic surface spin waves (MSSWs) of the adjacent bulk YIG which are excited by a shorted coaxial probe. These non-local SRE voltages within the NiFe layer that originates from YIG MSSWs are present even in 200 nm-thick NiFe films with a 50 nm thick SiO{sub 2} spacer between NiFe and YIG, thus strongly ruling out the mechanism of spin-pumping induced inverse spin Hall effect in NiFe as the source of these voltages. This long-range influence of YIG dynamics is suggested to be mediated by dynamic fields generated from YIG spin precession near YIG/NiFe interface, which interacts with NiFe spins near the simultaneous resonance of both spins, to generate a non-local SRE voltage within the NiFe layer.

  5. Non-resonant wave front reversal of spin waves used for microwave signal processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasyuchka, V I; Chumak, A V; Hillebrands, B [Fachbereich Physik and Forschungszentrum OPTIMAS, Technische Universitaet Kaiserslautern, 67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Melkov, G A; Moiseienko, V A [Department of Radiophysics, National Taras Shevchenko University of Kiev, 01033 Kiev (Ukraine); Slavin, A N, E-mail: vasyuchka@physik.uni-kl.d [Department of Physics, Oakland University, Rochester, MI 48309 (United States)

    2010-08-18

    It is demonstrated that non-resonant ({omega}{sub s} {ne} {omega}{sub p}/2) wave front reversal (WFR) of spin-wave pulses (carrier frequency {omega}{sub s}) caused by pulsed parametric pumping (carrier frequency {omega}{sub p}) can be effectively used for microwave signal processing. When the spectral width {Omega}{sub s} of the signal is wider than the frequency band {Omega}{sub p} of signal amplification by pumping ({Omega}{sub s} >> {Omega}{sub p}), the non-resonant WFR can be used for the analysis of the signal spectrum. In the opposite case ({Omega}{sub s} << {Omega}{sub p}) the non-resonant WFR can be used for active (with amplification) filtering of the input signal.

  6. Studying lipid-protein interactions with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of spin-labeled lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Páli, Tibor; Kóta, Zoltán

    2013-01-01

    Spin label electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of lipid-protein interactions reveals crucial features of the structure and assembly of integral membrane proteins. Spin label EPR spectroscopy is the technique of choice to characterize the protein-solvating lipid shell in its highly dynamic nature, because the EPR spectra of lipids that are spin labeled close to the terminal methyl end of their acyl chains display two spectral components, those corresponding to lipids directly contacting the protein and those corresponding to lipids in the bulk fluid bilayer regions of the membrane. In this chapter, typical spin label EPR procedures are presented that allow determination of the stoichiometry of interaction of spin-labeled lipids with the intra-membranous region of membrane proteins or polypeptides, as well as the association constant of the spin-labeled lipid with respect to the host lipid. The lipids giving rise to the so-called immobile spectral component in the EPR spectrum of such samples are identified as the motionally restricted first-shell lipids solvating membrane proteins in biomembranes. Stoichiometry and selectivity are directly related to the structure of the intra-membranous sections of membrane-associated proteins or polypeptides and can be used to study the state of assembly of such proteins in the membrane. Since these characteristics of lipid-protein interactions are discussed in detail in the literature [see Marsh (Eur Biophys J 39:513-525, 2010) for a most recent review], here we focus more on how to spin label model and biomembranes and how to measure and analyze the two-component EPR spectra of spin-labeled lipids in phospholipid bilayers that contain proteins or polypeptides. After a description of how to prepare spin-labeled model and native biological membranes, we present the reader with computational procedures for determining the molar fraction of motionally restricted lipids when both, one, or none of the pure isolated-mobile or

  7. Rotor Design for High Pressure Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turcu, Romulus VF; Hoyt, David W.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Sears, Jesse A.; Loring, John S.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Hu, Jian Z.

    2013-01-01

    High pressure magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with a sample spinning rate exceeding 2.1 kHz and pressure greater than 165 bar has never been realized. In this work, a new sample cell design is reported, suitable for constructing cells of different sizes. Using a 7.5 mm high pressure MAS rotor as an example, internal pressure as high as 200 bar at a sample spinning rate of 6 kHz is achieved. The new high pressure MAS rotor is re-usable and compatible with most commercial NMR set-ups, exhibiting low 1H and 13C NMR background and offering maximal NMR sensitivity. As an example of its many possible applications, this new capability is applied to determine reaction products associated with the carbonation reaction of a natural mineral, antigorite ((Mg,Fe2+)3Si2O5(OH)4), in contact with liquid water in water-saturated supercritical CO2 (scCO2) at 150 bar and 50 deg C. This mineral is relevant to the deep geologic disposal of CO2, but its iron content results in too many sample spinning sidebands at low spinning rate. Hence, this chemical system is a good case study to demonstrate the utility of the higher sample spinning rates that can be achieved by our new rotor design. We expect this new capability will be useful for exploring solid-state, including interfacial, chemistry at new levels of high-pressure in a wide variety of fields.

  8. Rotor design for high pressure magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcu, Romulus V. F.; Hoyt, David W.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Sears, Jesse A.; Loring, John S.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2013-01-01

    High pressure magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with a sample spinning rate exceeding 2.1 kHz and pressure greater than 165 bar has never been realized. In this work, a new sample cell design is reported, suitable for constructing cells of different sizes. Using a 7.5 mm high pressure MAS rotor as an example, internal pressure as high as 200 bar at a sample spinning rate of 6 kHz is achieved. The new high pressure MAS rotor is re-usable and compatible with most commercial NMR set-ups, exhibiting low 1H and 13C NMR background and offering maximal NMR sensitivity. As an example of its many possible applications, this new capability is applied to determine reaction products associated with the carbonation reaction of a natural mineral, antigorite ((Mg,Fe2+)3Si2O5(OH)4), in contact with liquid water in water-saturated supercritical CO2 (scCO2) at 150 bar and 50 °C. This mineral is relevant to the deep geologic disposal of CO2, but its iron content results in too many sample spinning sidebands at low spinning rate. Hence, this chemical system is a good case study to demonstrate the utility of the higher sample spinning rates that can be achieved by our new rotor design. We expect this new capability will be useful for exploring solid-state, including interfacial, chemistry at new levels of high-pressure in a wide variety of fields.

  9. Thickness dependence of spin torque ferromagnetic resonance in Co{sub 75}Fe{sub 25}/Pt bilayer films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganguly, A.; Barman, A., E-mail: abarman@bose.res.in [Thematic Unit of Excellence on Nanodevice Technology, Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Material Sciences, S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block JD, Sec III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700 098 (India); Kondou, K., E-mail: kkondou@riken.jp [RIKEN-CEMS, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Sukegawa, H.; Mitani, S. [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Kasai, S. [RIKEN-CEMS, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Niimi, Y. [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Otani, Y. [RIKEN-CEMS, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan)

    2014-02-17

    The spin Hall angle of Pt in Co{sub 75}Fe{sub 25}/Pt bilayer films was experimentally investigated by means of the spin-torque ferromagnetic resonance and the modulation of damping measurements. By comparing the present results with the Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20}/Pt system, we found that the ferromagnetic layer underneath the Pt one greatly affects the estimation of the spin Hall angle. We also discuss the spin diffusion length of Pt and the ferromagnetic thickness dependence of the Gilbert damping coefficient.

  10. Spin-analysis of s-channel diphoton resonances at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, M.C.; Ravindran, V. [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Jhunsi, Allahabad (India). Regional Centre for Accelerator-Based Particle Physics; Mathews, P. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata (India); Pankov, A.A.; Tsytrinov, A.V. [Technical Univ. of Gomel (Belarus). The Abdus Salam ICTP Affiliated Centre; Paver, N. [Trieste Univ. (Italy); INFN-Trieste Section, Trieste (Italy)

    2011-08-15

    The high mass neutral quantum states envisaged by theories of physics beyond the standard model can at the hadron colliders reveal themselves through their decay into a pair of photons. Once such a peak in the diphoton invariant mass distribution is discovered, the determination of its spin through the distinctive photon angular distributions is needed in order to identify the associated nonstandard dynamics. We here discuss the discrimination of the spin-2 Randall- Sundrum graviton excitation against the hypothesis of a spin-0 exchange giving the same number of events under the peak, by means of the angular analysis applied to resonant diphoton events expected to be observed at the LHC. The spin-0 hypothesis is modelled by an effective interaction of a high mass gauge singlet scalar particle interacting with the standard model fields. The basic observable of our analysis is the symmetrically integrated angular asymmetry A{sub CE}, calculated for both graviton and scalar s-channel exchanges to next-to-leading order in QCD. (orig.)

  11. Measurement of untruncated nuclear spin interactions via zero- to ultralow-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, J. W.; Sjolander, T. F.; King, J. P.; Ledbetter, M. P.; Levine, E. H.; Bajaj, V. S.; Budker, D.; Pines, A.

    2015-12-01

    Zero- to ultralow-field nuclear magnetic resonance (ZULF NMR) provides a new regime for the measurement of nuclear spin-spin interactions free from the effects of large magnetic fields, such as truncation of terms that do not commute with the Zeeman Hamiltonian. One such interaction, the magnetic dipole-dipole coupling, is a valuable source of spatial information in NMR, though many terms are unobservable in high-field NMR, and the coupling averages to zero under isotropic molecular tumbling. Under partial alignment, this information is retained in the form of so-called residual dipolar couplings. We report zero- to ultralow-field NMR measurements of residual dipolar couplings in acetonitrile-2-13C aligned in stretched polyvinyl acetate gels. This permits the investigation of dipolar couplings as a perturbation on the indirect spin-spin J coupling in the absence of an applied magnetic field. As a consequence of working at zero magnetic field, we observe terms of the dipole-dipole coupling Hamiltonian that are invisible in conventional high-field NMR. This technique expands the capabilities of zero- to ultralow-field NMR and has potential applications in precision measurement of subtle physical interactions, chemical analysis, and characterization of local mesoscale structure in materials.

  12. Resonance-inclined optical nuclear spin polarization of liquids in diamond structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Q.; Schwarz, I.; Jelezko, F.; Retzker, A.; Plenio, M. B.

    2016-02-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of molecules in a solution at room temperature has the potential to revolutionize nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging. The prevalent methods for achieving DNP in solutions are typically most effective in the regime of small interaction correlation times between the electron and nuclear spins, limiting the size of accessible molecules. To solve this limitation, we design a mechanism for DNP in the liquid phase that is applicable for large interaction correlation times. Importantly, while this mechanism makes use of a resonance condition similar to solid-state DNP, the polarization transfer is robust to a relatively large detuning from the resonance due to molecular motion. We combine this scheme with optically polarized nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center spins in nanodiamonds to design a setup that employs optical pumping and is therefore not limited by room temperature electron thermal polarization. We illustrate numerically the effectiveness of the model in a flow cell containing nanodiamonds immobilized in a hydrogel, polarizing flowing water molecules 4700-fold above thermal polarization in a magnetic field of 0.35 T, in volumes detectable by current NMR scanners.

  13. How terrestrial planets traverse spin-orbit resonances: A camel goes through a needle's eye

    CERN Document Server

    Makarov, Valeri V

    2011-01-01

    The dynamical evolution of terrestrial planets resembling Mercury in the vicinity of spin-orbit resonances is investigated using comprehensive harmonic expansions of the tidal torque with accurate expressions for the frequency-dependent quality factors and Love numbers. The torque equations are integrated numerically with a small step in time, taking into account the oscillating triaxial torque components but neglecting the layered structure of the planet and assuming a zero obliquity. We find that a Mercury-like planet with its current value of orbital eccentricity (0.2056) is always captured in the 3:2 resonance, and invariably traverses all higher resonances. The circumstances of a resonance passage are remarkable, in that it happens very quickly, in a sudden lunge. Considering the phase space parameters at the times of periastron, a Mercury-like planet can traverse the resonance only if its angle with respect to the star is close to $\\pm\\pi/2$, i.e., if the planet is positioned sidewise, with the longest ...

  14. Anisotropy of superconducting MgB2 as seen in electron spin resonance and magnetization data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, F; Jánossy, A; Fehér, T; Murányi, F; Garaj, S; Forró, L; Petrovic, C; Bud'ko, S L; Lapertot, G; Kogan, V G; Canfield, P C

    2001-07-23

    We observed the conduction electron spin resonance (CESR) in fine powders of MgB2 both in the superconducting and normal states. The Pauli susceptibility is chi(s) = 2.0 x 10(-5) emu/mole in the temperature range of 450 to 600 K. The spin relaxation rate has an anomalous temperature dependence. The CESR measured below T(c) at several frequencies suggests that MgB2 is a strongly anisotropic superconductor with the upper critical field, H(c2), ranging between 2 and 16 T. The high-field reversible magnetization data of a randomly oriented powder sample are well described assuming that MgB2 is an anisotropic superconductor with H(ab)(c2)/H(c)(c2) approximately 6-9.

  15. Theoretical approaches to control spin dynamics in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Eugene Stephane Mananga

    2015-12-01

    This article reviews theoretical approaches for controlling spin dynamics in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance. We present fundamental theories in the history of NMR, namely, the average Hamiltonian and Floquet theories. We also discuss emerging theories such as the Fer and Floquet-Magnus expansions. These theories allow one to solve the time-dependent Schrodinger equation, which is still the central problem in spin dynamics of solid-state NMR. Examples from the literature that highlight several applications of these theories are presented, and particular attention is paid to numerical integrators and propagator operators. The problem of time propagation calculated with Chebychev expansion and the future development of numerical directions with the Cayley transformation are considered. The bibliography includes 190 references.

  16. Electrical conductivity and electron-spin resonance in oxidatively stabilized polyacrylonitrile subjected to elevated temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, N. R.

    1981-01-01

    Electrical conductivity and electron spin resonance measurements are presented for oxidatively stabilized polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fibers subjected to heat treatment at temperatures ranging from 700 to 950 K. Conductivity measurements made at temperatures between 77 and 523 K reveal that PAN fibers heat treated in vacuum behave as semiconductors, with a room-temperature conductivity dominated by the contributions of impurity states, with an activation energy of 88 kcal/mole. A decrease in conductivity is observed upon air which is attributed to a decrease in the electron-phonon scattering time. ESR spectra indicate that conducting pathways having metallic properties are formed at temperatures as low as 715 K, although the contribution of these pathways to the room-temperature conductivity is extremely small next to the contribution of localized spin centers.

  17. Spin-torque diode radio-frequency detector with voltage tuned resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skowroński, Witold, E-mail: skowron@agh.edu.pl; Frankowski, Marek; Stobiecki, Tomasz [AGH University of Science and Technology, Department of Electronics, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Wrona, Jerzy [AGH University of Science and Technology, Department of Electronics, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Singulus Technologies, Kahl am Main 63796 (Germany); Ogrodnik, Piotr [Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, ul. Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warsaw (Poland); AGH University of Science and Technology, Department of Electronics, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Barnaś, Józef [Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, ul. Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Smoluchowskiego 17, 60-179 Poznań (Poland)

    2014-08-18

    We report on a voltage-tunable radio-frequency (RF) detector based on a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ). The spin-torque diode effect is used to excite and/or detect RF oscillations in the magnetic free layer of the MTJ. In order to reduce the overall in-plane magnetic anisotropy of the free layer, we take advantage of the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy at the interface between ferromagnetic and insulating layers. The applied bias voltage is shown to have a significant influence on the magnetic anisotropy, and thus on the resonance frequency of the device. This influence also depends on the voltage polarity. The obtained results are accounted for in terms of the interplay of spin-transfer-torque and voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy effects.

  18. Observation of thermal spin-transfer torque via ferromagnetic resonance in magnetic tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaohui; Bai, Lihui; Chen, Xiaobin; Guo, Hong; Fan, X. L.; Xue, D. S.; Houssameddine, D.; Hu, C.-M.

    2016-08-01

    The thermal spin-transfer torque (TSTT) in magnetic tunneling junctions (MTJs) was systematically studied using electrical detection of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR). Evidence for the existence of TSTT in MTJs is observed. A temperature difference was applied across an MTJ acting as a TSTT on the free layer of the MTJ. The FMR of the free layer was then excited by a microwave current and electrically detected as a dc voltage. We found that the FMR line shape was changed by the TSTT, indicated by the ratio of dispersive and Lorentz components of the FMR spectra (D /L ). D /L increases by increasing the temperature difference. In addition, we analyze the magnetization orientation dependence of TSTT and provide solid evidence that this dependence differs from the magnetization orientation dependence of spin-transfer torque driven by a dc bias.

  19. High-Efficiency Resonant RF Spin Rotator with Broad Phase Space Acceptance for Pulsed Polarized Cold Neutron Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Seo, P -N; Bowman, J D; Chupp, T E; Crawford, C; Dabaghyan, M; Dawkins, M; Freedman, S J; Gentile, T; Gericke, M T; Gillis, R C; Greene, G L; Hersman, F W; Jones, G L; Kandes, M; Lamoreaux, S; Lauss, B; Leuschner, M B; Mahurin, R; Mason, M; Mei, J; Mitchell, G S; Nann, H; Page, S A; Penttila, S I; Ramsay, W D; Bacci, A Salas; Santra, S; Sharma, M; Smith, T B; Snow, W M; Wilburn, W S; Zhu, H

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a radio-frequency resonant spin rotator to reverse the neutron polarization in a 9.5 cm x 9.5 cm pulsed cold neutron beam with high efficiency over a broad cold neutron energy range. The effect of the spin reversal by the rotator on the neutron beam phase space is compared qualitatively to RF neutron spin flippers based on adiabatic fast passage. The spin rotator does not change the kinetic energy of the neutrons and leaves the neutron beam phase space unchanged to high precision. We discuss the design of the spin rotator and describe two types of transmission-based neutron spin-flip efficiency measurements where the neutron beam was both polarized and analyzed by optically-polarized 3He neutron spin filters. The efficiency of the spin rotator was measured to be 98.0+/-0.8% on resonance for neutron energies from 3.3 to 18.4 meV over the full phase space of the beam. As an example of the application of this device to an experiment we describe the integration of the RF spin rotator into an app...

  20. Spin Structure Functions of the Deuteron Measured with CLAS in and above the Resonance Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dharmawardane, Kahanawita [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2004-05-01

    Spin structure functions of the nucleon in the region of large x and small to moderate Q2 continue to be of high current interest. The first moment of the spin structure function g1, γ1, goes through a rapid transition from the photon point (Q2=0), where it is constrained by the Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn sum rule, to the deep inelastic limit where it is sensitive to the nucleon spin fraction carried by quarks. The interesting behavior in the transition region is dominated by baryon resonance excitations. We concluded an experiment to measure these observables for deuterium as part of the ''EG1'' run group in Jefferson Lab's Hall B. We used a highly polarized electron beam with energies from 1.6 GeV to 5.7 GeV and a cryogenic polarized ND3 target together with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) to accumulate over 11 billion events. In this thesis, we present results for the spin structure function g$d\\atop{1}$ (x,Q2), as well as its first moment, γ$d\\atop{1}$(Q2) in and above the resonance region over a Q2 range from 0.05 to 5 Gev2, based on the data taken with beam energies of 1.6 and 5.7 GeV. We also extract the behavior of A$d\\atop{1}$(x) at large x. Our data are consistent with the Hyperfine-perturbed quark model calculation which predicts that A$d\\atop{1}$ (x → 1) → 1. We also see evidence for duality in g$d\\atop{1}$ (x, Q2) at Q2 > GeV2.

  1. Helium Droplets as Nano-Cryostats for Molecular Spectroscopy: Aggregation, State Selection and Electron Spin Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Wolfgang E.

    2009-06-01

    Droplets of about 10^{4} helium atoms generated in a supersonic expansion, represent a nanometer-sized superfluid medium of 0.4 K temperature and can be doped with one or several atoms or molecules that may form complexes in this cold environment. Using two-laser excitation schemes, we were able to identify the alkali trimers K_3, Rb_3, K_2Rb and KRb_2 in their lowest quartet states formed on helium droplets loaded with potassium and rubidium atoms and assign several excited states that underlie both Jahn-Teller and spin-orbit coupling. As helium provides a gentle and only weakly perturbing matrix, it appeared desirable to look for ways to measure fine and hyperfine structure directly in the microwave or radiofrequency regime. In preparation for experiments involving optical detection of electron spin transitions in cold molecules, we studied the electronic spin relaxation in alkali atoms and molecules that reside on the surface of a droplet. Measurements of the circular dichroism in the presence of a magnetic field showed that the populations of Zeeman sublevels in alkali atoms are not thermalized, while for dimers and trimers a temperature of 0.4 K was found, implicitly providing a first determination of the droplet's surface temperature. Optical detection of spin resonance is achieved in an optical pump-probe experiment with the electron spin transition induced in a microwave cavity in a magnetic field between the pump and probe regions. With the pump laser depleting a particular spin state by desorption of the species from the droplet beam or by optical pumping, the probe laser detects the successful spin flip induced by the microwave field. Examples will be presented showing up to 50 Rabi cycles of an electron spin transition on an alkali doped helium droplet during the flight time of 57 μs through the cavity. J. Nagl, G. Auböck, A. W. Hauser, O. Allard, C. Callegari, and W. E. Ernst, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 063001(2008)} G. Auböck, J. Nagl, C. Callegari, and

  2. Electron spin resonance of Er{sup 3+} in YBiPt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, G.B. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Rao, D. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Barberis, G.E. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Rettori, C. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Duro, R.J. [La Coruna Univ., Ferrol (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Industrial; Sarrao, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Fisk, Z. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)]|[Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Nat. High Magnetic Field Lab.; Oseroff, S. [California State Univ., San Diego (United States). Dept. of Physics; Thompson, J.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)]|[Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Nat. High Magnetic Field Lab.

    1996-07-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) experiments at 4.15 K of Er{sup 3+} in YBiPt show that Er{sup 3+} is in a site of cubic local symmetry, with a {Gamma}{sup (3)}{sub 8} ground state and an overall crystal field splitting of {proportional_to}85(10) K. We inferred from the spectra the existence of lattice distortions at the rare-earth (RE) site. These results may help in understanding the heavy-fermion system YbBiPt, which has the same structure as YBiPt. (orig.).

  3. Rapid spin-lattice relaxation time mapping incorporating flip angle calibration in quantitative magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhongliang Zu; Qi Liu; Yanming Yu; Song Gao; Shanglian Bao

    2008-01-01

    Driven equilibrium single pulse observation of T1(DESPOT1)is a rapid spin-lattice relaxation constant(T1)mapping technique in magnetic resonance imaging(MRI).However,DESPOT1 is very sensitive to flip angle(FA)inhomogeneity,resulting in T1 inaccuracy.Here,a five-point DESPOTl method is proposed to reduce the sensitivity to FA inhomogeneity through FA measurement and calibra-tion.Phantom and in vivo experiments are performed to validate the technique.As a result.a rapid and accurate T1 mapping is acquired by using the proposed five-point DESPOT1 method.

  4. Spin-dependent transport and recombination in solar cells studied by pulsed electrically detected magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrends, Jan

    2009-11-11

    This thesis deals with spin-dependent transport and recombination of charge carriers in solar cells. A systematic study on the influence of localized paramagnetic states which act as trapping and recombination centres for photogenerated charge carriers, is presented for three different types of solar cells. The central technique used in this thesis is electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR). The capabilities of pulsed (p) EDMR were extended with regard to the detection sensitivity. These improvements allowed pEDMR measurements on fully processed devices from cryogenic to room temperature. The instrumental upgrades also set the stage for pEDMR measurements at different resonance frequencies. In high-efficiency solar cells based on the heterojunction between hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and crystalline silicon (c-Si), recombination via performancelimiting interface states could directly be measured electrically for the first time. The identification of these defects could be achieved by exploiting their orientation with regard to the surface. In thin-film solar cells based on hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon ({mu}-Si:H) the situation is more complex due to the heterogeneous and disordered structure of the material itself. In addition, these cells are multilayer-systems comprising three different silicon layers with different doping levels and microstructures. By combining a systematic alteration of the sample structure with the information extracted from deconvoluting spectrally overlapping signals in the time domain, it was possible to assign the spin-dependent signals to defects in the individual layers of the solar cells. Benefiting from the instrumental improvements, recombination via dangling bond states in silicon-based solar cells could be investigated by pEDMR at room temperature for the first time. In organic bulk heterojunction solar cells based on MEH-PPV and PCBM two different spin-dependent mechanisms coexist. Both processes

  5. Dynamic molecular structure of DPPC-DLPC-cholesterol ternary lipid system by spin-label electron spin resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Yun-Wei; Shimoyama, Yuhei; Feigenson, Gerald W; Freed, Jack H

    2004-10-01

    The hydrated ternary lamellar lipid mixture of dipalmitoyl-PC/dilauroyl-PC/cholesterol (DPPC/DLPC/Chol) has been studied by electron spin resonance (ESR) to reveal the dynamic structure on a molecular level of the different phases that exist and coexist over virtually the full range of composition. The spectra for more than 100 different compositions at room temperature were analyzed by nonlinear least-squares fitting to provide the rotational diffusion rates and order parameters of the end-chain labeled phospholipid 16-PC. The ESR spectra exhibit substantial variation as a function of composition, even though the respective phases generally differ rather modestly from each other. The Lalpha and Lbeta phases are clearly distinguished, with the former exhibiting substantially lower ordering and greater motional rates, whereas the well-defined Lo phase exhibits the greatest ordering and relatively fast motional rates. Typically, smaller variations occur within a given phase. The ESR spectral analysis also yields phase boundaries and coexistence regions which are found to be consistent with previous results from fluorescence methods, although new features are found. Phase coexistence regions were in some cases confirmed by observing the existence of isosbestic points in the absorption mode ESR spectra from the phases. The dynamic structural properties of the DPPC-rich Lbeta and DLPC-rich Lalpha phases, within their two-phase coexistence region do not change with composition along a tie-line, but the ratio of the two phases follows the lever rule in accordance with thermodynamic principles. The analysis shows that 16-PC spin-label partitions nearly equally between the Lalpha and Lbeta phases, making it a useful probe for studying such coexisting phases. Extensive study of two-phase coexistence regions requires the determination of tie-lines, which were approximated in this study. However, a method is suggested to accurately determine the tie-lines by ESR.

  6. Spin-orbital interaction of photons and fine splitting of levels in ring dielectric resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Bliokh, K Y

    2004-01-01

    We consider eigen modes of a ring resonator made of a circular dielectric waveguide. Taking into account the polarization corrections, which are responsible for the interaction of polarization and orbital properties of electromagnetic waves (spin-orbital interaction of photons), results in fine splitting of the levels of scalar approximation. The basic features of this fine structure of the levels are quite similar to that of electron levels in an atom. Namely: 1) sublevels of the fine structure are defined by an additional quantum number: product of helicity of the wave and its orbital moment; 2) each level of the scalar approximation splits into N sublevels (N is the principal quantum number); 3) each level of the fine structure remains twice degenerated due to local axial symmetry of the waveguide. Numerical estimations show that the described fine splitting of levels may be observed in optic-fiber ring resonators.

  7. Spin Resonance in EuTiO3 Probed by Time-Domain Gigahertz Ellipsometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mechelen, J. L. M.; van der Marel, D.; Crassee, I.; Kolodiazhnyi, T.

    2011-05-01

    We show an example of a purely magnetic spin resonance in EuTiO3 and the resulting new record high Faraday rotation of 590°/mm at 1.6 T for 1 cm wavelengths probed by a novel technique of magneto-optical gigahertz time-domain ellipsometry. From our transmission measurements of linear polarized light, we map out the complex index of refraction n=γμ in the gigahertz to terahertz range. We observe a strong resonant absorption by magnetic dipole transitions involving the Zeeman split S=7/2 magnetic energy levels of the Eu2+ ions, which causes a very large dichroism for circular polarized radiation.

  8. Photon strength functions in 177Lu: Study of scissors resonance in high-spin region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bečvář F.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The nucleus 177Lu is characteristic by an unusually high value of the thermal-neutron capturing state spin, J = 13/2, and by distinct low-energy rotational bands built on the 7/2+ ground state and the 9/2− level at 150 keV. The γ cascades connecting the capturing state with the members of these bands carry unique information about the role of identical M1 scissors-mode resonances, built according to Brink hypothesis assumingly on each energy level, even in conditions of fast nuclear rotation. With this motivation we measured a set of spectra of two-step γ cascades following the thermal neutron capture in 176Lu. The measurement was performed at neutron beam of the LWR-15 Reactor in Řež. From the analysis of these spectra the common parameters of the scissors resonances were deduced. The obtained results are discussed.

  9. Spin-dependent electron transport through a magnetic resonant tunneling diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havu, P.; Tuomisto, N.; Väänänen, R.; Puska, M. J.; Nieminen, R. M.

    2005-06-01

    Electron-transport properties in nanostructures can be modeled, for example, by using the semiclassical Wigner formalism or the quantum-mechanical Green’s function formalism. We compare the performance and the results of these methods in the case of magnetic resonant-tunneling diodes. We have implemented the two methods within the self-consistent spin-density-functional theory. Our numerical implementation of the Wigner formalism is based on the finite-difference scheme whereas for the Green’s function formalism the finite-element method is used. As a specific application, we consider the device studied by Slobodskyy [Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 246601 (2003)] and analyze their experimental results. The Wigner and Green’s function formalisms give similar electron densities and potentials but, surprisingly, the former method requires much more computer resources in order to obtain numerically accurate results for currents. Both of the formalisms can be used to model magnetic resonant tunneling diode structures.

  10. Coherent zero-field magnetization resonance in a dipolar spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenxian; Yi, S.; Chapman, M. S.; You, J. Q.

    2015-08-01

    With current magnetic-field shielding and high-precision detection in dipolar spinor Bose-Einstein condensates, it is possible to experimentally detect the low- or zero-field nonsecular dipolar dynamics. Here we analytically investigate the zero-field nonsecular magnetic dipolar interaction effect, with an emphasis on magnetization dynamics in a spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensate under the single spatial mode approximation within the mean-field theory. Due to the biaxial nature of the dipolar interaction, a novel resonance occurs in the condensate magnetization oscillation, in contrast to the previous assumption of a conserved magnetization in strong magnetic fields. Furthermore, we propose a dynamical-decoupling detection method for such a resonance, which cancels the stray magnetic fields in experiment but restores the magnetization dynamics. Our results shed light on the dipolar systems and may find potential applications beyond cold atoms.

  11. Spin-orbit-induced resonances and threshold anomalies in a reduced dimension Fermi gas

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Su-Ju

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the reflection and transmission probabilities in a one-dimensional Fermi gas with an equal mixing of the Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling (RD-SOC) produced by an external Raman laser field. These probabilities are computed over multiple relevant energy ranges within the pseudo-potential approximation. Strong scattering resonances are found whenever the incident energy approaches either a scattering threshold or a quasi-bound state attached to one of the energetically closed higher dispersion branches. A striking difference is demonstrated between two very different regimes set by the Raman laser intensity, namely between scattering for the single- minimum dispersion versus the double-minimum dispersion at the lowest threshold. The presence of RD-SOC together with the Raman field fundamentally changes the scattering behavior and enables the realization of very different one-dimensional theoretical models in a single experimental setup when combined with a confinement-induced resonance.

  12. Bodily tides near the 1:1 spin-orbit resonance: correction to Goldreich's dynamical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, James G.; Efroimsky, Michael

    2012-12-01

    Spin-orbit coupling is often described in an approach known as " the MacDonald torque", which has long become the textbook standard due to its apparent simplicity. Within this method, a concise expression for the additional tidal potential, derived by MacDonald (Rev Geophys 2:467-541, 1994), is combined with a convenient assumption that the quality factor Q is frequency-independent (or, equivalently, that the geometric lag angle is constant in time). This makes the treatment unphysical because MacDonald's derivation of the said formula was, very implicitly, based on keeping the time lag frequency-independent, which is equivalent to setting Q scale as the inverse tidal frequency. This contradiction requires the entire MacDonald treatment of both non-resonant and resonant rotation to be rewritten. The non-resonant case was reconsidered by Efroimsky and Williams (Cel Mech Dyn Astron 104:257-289, 2009), in application to spin modes distant from the major commensurabilities. In the current paper, we continue this work by introducing the necessary alterations into the MacDonald-torque-based model of falling into a 1-to-1 resonance. (The original version of this model was offered by Goldreich (Astron J 71:1-7, 1996). Although the MacDonald torque, both in its original formulation and in its corrected version, is incompatible with realistic rheologies of minerals and mantles, it remains a useful toy model, which enables one to obtain, in some situations, qualitatively meaningful results without resorting to the more rigorous (and complicated) theory of Darwin and Kaula. We first address this simplified model in application to an oblate primary body, with tides raised on it by an orbiting zero-inclination secondary. (Here the role of the tidally-perturbed primary can be played by a satellite, the perturbing secondary being its host planet. A planet may as well be the perturbed primary, its host star acting as the tide-raising secondary). We then extend the model to a

  13. Angstrom-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Single Molecules via Wave-Function Fingerprints of Nuclear Spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wen-Long; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2016-08-01

    Single-molecule sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and angstrom resolution of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the highest challenges in magnetic microscopy. Recent development in dynamical-decoupling- (DD) enhanced diamond quantum sensing has enabled single-nucleus NMR and nanoscale NMR. Similar to conventional NMR and MRI, current DD-based quantum sensing utilizes the "frequency fingerprints" of target nuclear spins. The frequency fingerprints by their nature cannot resolve different nuclear spins that have the same noise frequency or differentiate different types of correlations in nuclear-spin clusters, which limit the resolution of single-molecule MRI. Here we show that this limitation can be overcome by using "wave-function fingerprints" of target nuclear spins, which is much more sensitive than the frequency fingerprints to the weak hyperfine interaction between the targets and a sensor under resonant DD control. We demonstrate a scheme of angstrom-resolution MRI that is capable of counting and individually localizing single nuclear spins of the same frequency and characterizing the correlations in nuclear-spin clusters. A nitrogen-vacancy-center spin sensor near a diamond surface, provided that the coherence time is improved by surface engineering in the near future, may be employed to determine with angstrom resolution the positions and conformation of single molecules that are isotope labeled. The scheme in this work offers an approach to breaking the resolution limit set by the "frequency gradients" in conventional MRI and to reaching the angstrom-scale resolution.

  14. Cooling a mechanical resonator with nitrogen-vacancy centres using a room temperature excited state spin-strain interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macquarrie, E. R.; Otten, M.; Gray, S. K.; Fuchs, G. D.

    2017-02-01

    Cooling a mechanical resonator mode to a sub-thermal state has been a long-standing challenge in physics. This pursuit has recently found traction in the field of optomechanics in which a mechanical mode is coupled to an optical cavity. An alternate method is to couple the resonator to a well-controlled two-level system. Here we propose a protocol to dissipatively cool a room temperature mechanical resonator using a nitrogen-vacancy centre ensemble. The spin ensemble is coupled to the resonator through its orbitally-averaged excited state, which has a spin-strain interaction that has not been previously studied. We experimentally demonstrate that the spin-strain coupling in the excited state is 13.5+/-0.5 times stronger than the ground state spin-strain coupling. We then theoretically show that this interaction, combined with a high-density spin ensemble, enables the cooling of a mechanical resonator from room temperature to a fraction of its thermal phonon occupancy.

  15. Electron Spin Resonance and optical absorption spectroscopic studies of manganese centers in aluminium lead borate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    SivaRamaiah, G.; LakshmanaRao, J.

    2012-12-01

    Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) and optical absorption studies of 5Al2O3 + 75H3BO3 + (20-x)PbO + xMnSO4 (where x = 0.5, 1,1.5 and 2 mol% of MnSO4) glasses at room temperature have been studied. The ESR spectrum of all the glasses exhibits resonance signals with effective isotropic g values at ≈2.0, 3.3 and 4.3. The ESR resonance signal at isotropic g ≈ 2.0 has been attributed to Mn2+ centers in an octahedral symmetry. The ESR resonance signals at isotropic g ≈ 3.3 and 4.3 have been attributed to the rhombic symmetry of the Mn2+ ions. The zero-field splitting parameter (zfs) has been calculated from the intensities of the allowed hyperfine lines. The optical absorption spectrum exhibits an intense band in the visible region and it has been attributed to 5Eg → 5T2g transition of Mn3+centers in an octahedral environment. The optical band gap and the Urbach energies have been calculated from the ultraviolet absorption edges.

  16. Charge order and low frequency spin dynamics in lanthanum cuprates revealed by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grafe, H.J.; Vyalikh, A.; Vavilova, J.; Buchner, B. [IFW Dresden, Institute for Solid State Research, Dresden (Germany); Curro, N.J. [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA (United States); Young, B.L. [Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Gu, G.D.; Hucker, M. [Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Vavilova, J. [Kazan Zavoiskiy Physical-Technical Institute, Kazan (Russian Federation)

    2010-10-15

    We report detailed {sup 17}O, {sup 139}La, and {sup 63,65}Cu Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) measurements in a stripe ordered La{sub 1.875}Ba{sub 0.125}CuO{sub 4} single crystal and in oriented powder samples of La{sub 1.8-x}Eu{sub 0.2}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4}. We observe a partial wipe out of the {sup 17}O NMR intensity and a simultaneous drop of the {sup 17}O electric field gradient (EFG) at low temperatures where the spin stripe order sets in. In contrast, the {sup 63,65}Cu intensity is completely wiped out at the same temperature. The drop of the {sup 17}O quadrupole frequency is compatible with a charge stripe order. The {sup 17}O spin lattice relaxation rate shows a peak similar to that of the {sup 139}La, which is of magnetic origin. This peak is doping dependent and is maximal at x {approx} 1/8. (authors)

  17. Hyperpolarization of 29Si by Resonant Nuclear Spin Transfer from Optically Hyperpolarized 31P Donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dluhy, Phillip; Salvail, Jeff; Saeedi, Kamyar; Thewalt, Mike; Simons, Stephanie

    2014-03-01

    Recent developments in nanomedicine have allowed nanoparticles of silicon containing hyperpolarized 29Si to be imaged in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging. The extremely long relaxation times and isotropy of the Si lattice make polarized 29Si isotopes ideal for these sorts of imaging methods. However, one of the major difficulties standing in the path of widespread adoption of these techniques is the slow rate at which the 29Si is hyperpolarized and the limited maximum hyperpolarization achievable. In this talk, I will describe an effective method for hyperpolarization of the 29Si isotopes using resonant optical pumping of the donor bound exciton transitions to polarize the 31P donor nuclei, and a choice of static magnetic field that conserves energy during spin flip flops between donor nuclear and 29Si spins to facilitate diffusion of this polarization. Using this method, we are able to polarize greater than 10% of the 29Si centers in 64 hours without seeing saturation of the 29Si polarization.

  18. Phase diagram and neutron spin resonance of superconducting NaFe1 -xCuxAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Guotai; Song, Yu; Zhang, Rui; Lin, Lifang; Xu, Zhuang; Tian, Long; Chi, Songxue; Graves-Brook, M. K.; Li, Shiliang; Dai, Pengcheng

    2017-02-01

    We use transport and neutron scattering to study the electronic phase diagram and spin excitations of NaFe1 -xCuxAs single crystals. Similar to Co- and Ni-doped NaFeAs, a bulk superconducting phase appears near x ≈2 % with the suppression of stripe-type magnetic order in NaFeAs. Upon further increasing Cu concentration the system becomes insulating, culminating in an antiferromagnetically ordered insulating phase near x ≈50 % . Using transport measurements, we demonstrate that the resistivity in NaFe1 -xCuxAs exhibits non-Fermi-liquid behavior near x ≈1.8 % . Our inelastic neutron scattering experiments reveal a single neutron spin resonance mode exhibiting weak dispersion along c axis in NaFe0.98Cu0.02As . The resonance is high in energy relative to the superconducting transition temperature Tc but weak in intensity, likely resulting from impurity effects. These results are similar to other iron pnictides superconductors despite that the superconducting phase in NaFe1 -xCuxAs is continuously connected to an antiferromagnetically ordered insulating phase near x ≈50 % with significant electronic correlations. Therefore, electron correlations is an important ingredient of superconductivity in NaFe1 -xCuxAs and other iron pnictides.

  19. Air oxidation of the kerogen/asphaltene vanadyl porphyrins: an electron spin resonance study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIRJANA S. PAVLOVIC

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available The thermal behavior of vanadyl porphyrins was studied by electron spin resonance during heating of kerogens, isolated from the La Luna (Venezuela and Serpiano (Switzerland bituminous rocks, at 25°C for 1 to 20 days in the presence of air. During the thermal treatment of the kerogens, the vanadyl porphyrins resonance signals decrease monotonically and become quite small after 6 days of heating. Concomitantly, new vanadyl signals appear and, at longer heating times, dominate the spectrum. It is suggested that the secondary vanadyl species must have been formed from vanadyl porphyrins. Similar conversions of vanadyl porphyrins are observed under the same experimental conditions for asphaltenes extracted from the La Luna and Serpiano rocks, and floating asphalt from the Dead Sea (Israel. A comparison of the spin-Hamiltonian parameters for vanadyl porphyrins and the vanadyl compounds obtained during pyrolysis of the kerogens/asphaltenes suggests that the latter are of a non-porphyrin type. For comparison a study was conducted on Western Kentucky No. 9 coal enriched with vanadium (>>400 ppm from six mines. All the coal samples show only the presence of predominant by non-porphyrin vanadyl compounds, similar to those generated through laboratory heating of the kerogens/asphaltenes in air. In addition, some samples also contain a minor amount of vanadyl porphyrins.

  20. Molecular dynamics in rod-like liquid crystals probed by muon spin resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Iain; Scheuermann, Robert; Sedlak, Kamil; Stoykov, Alexey

    2011-08-01

    Muoniated spin probes were produced by the addition of muonium (Mu) to two rod-like liquid crystals: N-(4-methoxybenzylidene)-4'-n-butylaniline (MBBA) and cholesteryl nonanoate (CN). Avoided level crossing muon spin resonance spectroscopy was used to characterize the muoniated spin probes and to probe dynamics at the molecular level. In MBBA Mu adds predominantly to the carbon of the bridging imine group and the muon and methylene proton hyperfine coupling constants (hfccs) of the resulting radical shift in the nematic phase due to the dipolar hyperfine coupling, the ordering of the molecules along the applied magnetic field and fluctuations about the local director. The amplitude of these fluctuations in in the nematic phase of MBBA is determined from the temperature dependence of the methylene proton hfcc. Mu adds to the double bond of the steroidal ring system of CN and the temperature dependence of the Δ(1) line width provides information about the amplitude of the fluctuations about the local director in the chiral nematic phase and the slow isotropic reorientation in the isotropic phase.

  1. High-Precision Calibration of Electron Beam Energy from the Hefei Light Source Using Spin Resonant Depolarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Jie-Qin; Xu, Hong-Liang

    2014-12-01

    The electron beam energy at the Hefei Light Source (HLS) in the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory is highly precisely calibrated by using the method of spin resonant depolarization for the first time. The spin tune and the beam energy are determined by sweeping the frequency of a radial rf stripline oscillating magnetic field to artificially excite a spin resonance and depolarize the beam. The resonance signal is recognized by observing the sudden change of the Touschek loss counting rate of the beam. The possible systematic errors of the experiment are presented and the accuracy of the calibrated energy is shown to be about 10-4. A series of measurements show that the energy stability of the machine is of the order of 9 × 10-3.

  2. WURST-QCPMG sequence and "spin-lock" in 14N nuclear quadrupole resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorovič, Alan; Apih, Tomaž

    2013-08-01

    14N nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) is a promising method for the analysis of pharmaceuticals or for the detection of nitrogen based illicit compounds, but so far, the technique is still not widely used, mostly due to the very low sensitivity. This problem is already acute in the preliminary NQR stage, when a compound is being examined for the first time and the NQR frequencies are being searched for, by scanning a wide frequency range step-by-step. In the present work, we experimentally show how to increase the efficiency of this initial stage by using a combination of a wideband excitation achieved with frequency swept pulses (WURST) and a "spin-lock" state obtained with a quadrupolar-CPMG (QCPMG) sequence. In the first part we show that WURST pulses provide a much larger excitation bandwidth compared to common rectangular pulses. This increased bandwidth allows to increase the frequency step and reduces the total number of steps in a scanning stage. In the second part we show that the "spin-lock" decay time T2eff obtained with the WURST-QCPMG combination is practically identical with the T2eff obtained with the most common "spin-lock" sequence, the SLSE, despite a very different nature and length of excitation pulses. This allows for a substantial S/N increase through echo averaging in every individual step and really allows to exploit all the advantages of the wider excitation in the NQR frequency scanning stage. Our experimental results were obtained on a sample of trinitrotoluene, but identical behavior is expected for all compounds where a "spin-lock" state can be created.

  3. Spin labeling and Double Electron-Electron Resonance (DEER) to Deconstruct Conformational Ensembles of HIV Protease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Thomas M.; Fanucci, Gail E.

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of macromolecular conformational equilibrium in biological systems is oftentimes essential to understand function, dysfunction, and disease. For the past few years, our lab has been utilizing site-directed spin labeling (SDSL), coupled with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, to characterize the conformational ensemble and ligand-induced conformational shifts of HIV-1 protease (HIV-1PR). The biomedical importance of characterizing the fractional occupancy of states within the conformational ensemble critically impacts our hypothesis of a conformational selection mechanism of drug-resistance evolution in HIV-1PR. The purpose of the following chapter is to give a timeline perspective of our SDSL EPR approach to characterizing conformational sampling of HIV-1PR. We provide detailed instructions for the procedure utilized in analyzing distance profiles for HIV-1PR obtained from pulsed electron–electron double resonance (PELDOR). Specifically, we employ a version of PELDOR known as double electron–electron resonance (DEER). Data are processed with the software package “DeerAnalysis” (http://www.epr.ethz.ch/software), which implements Tikhonov regularization (TKR), to generate a distance profile from electron spin-echo amplitude modulations. We assign meaning to resultant distance profiles based upon a conformational sampling model, which is described herein. The TKR distance profiles are reconstructed with a linear combination of Gaussian functions, which is then statistically analyzed. In general, DEER has proven powerful for observing structural ensembles in proteins and, more recently, nucleic acids. Our goal is to present our advances in order to aid readers in similar applications. PMID:26477251

  4. Observation of overlapping spin-1 and spin-3 $\\overline{D}^0 K^-$ resonances at mass $2.86 {\\rm GeV}/c^2$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; van den Brand, Johannes; Bressieux, Joël; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Busetto, Giovanni; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Ciba, Krzystof; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gavrilov, Gennadii; Geraci, Angelo; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hunt, Philip; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kaballo, Michael; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kozlinskiy, Alexandr; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leo, Sabato; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lopez-March, Neus; Lowdon, Peter; Lu, Haiting; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martens, Aurelien; Martín Sánchez, Alexandra; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Moggi, Niccolò; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Oggero, Serena; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pazos Alvarez, Antonio; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perez Trigo, Eliseo; Perret, Pascal; Perrin-Terrin, Mathieu; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Roa Romero, Diego; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruffini, Fabrizio; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrie, Mauro; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Seco, Marcos; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Sparkes, Ailsa; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Subbiah, Vijay Kartik; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szilard, Daniela; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; Voss, Helge; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wu, Suzhi; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zvyagin, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The resonant substructure of $B_s^0 \\rightarrow \\overline{D}^0 K^- \\pi^+$ decays is studied using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $3.0\\,{\\rm fb}^{-1}$ of $pp$ collision data recorded by the LHCb detector. An excess at $m(\\overline{D}^0 K^-) \\approx 2.86 {\\rm GeV}/c^2$ is found to be an admixture of spin-1 and spin-3 resonances. Therefore the $D^*_{sJ}(2860)^-$ state previously observed in inclusive $e^+e^- \\rightarrow \\overline{D}^0 K^- X$ and $pp \\rightarrow \\overline{D}^0 K^- X$ processes consists of at least two particles. This is the first observation of a heavy flavoured spin-3 resonance, and the first time that any spin-3 particle has been seen to be produced in $B$ decays. The masses and widths of the new states and of the $D^*_{s2}(2573)^-$ meson are measured, giving the most precise determinations to date.

  5. Observation of overlapping spin-1 and spin-3 D0K- resonances at mass 2.86 GeV/c2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H-M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, Rf; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gavrilov, G; Geraci, A; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mapelli, A; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A

    2014-10-17

    The resonant substructure of B(s)(0) → D(0)K(-)π(+) decays is studied using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb(-1) of pp collision data recorded by the LHCb detector. An excess at m(D(0)K(-))≈ 2.86 GeV/c(2) is found to be an admixture of spin-1 and spin-3 resonances. Therefore, the D(sJ)*(2860)(-) state previously observed in inclusive e(+)e(-) → D(0)K(-)X and pp → D(0)K(-)X processes consists of at least two particles. This is the first observation of a heavy flavored spin-3 resonance, and the first time that any spin-3 particle has been seen to be produced in B decays. The masses and widths of the new states and of the D(s2)*(2573)(-) meson are measured, giving the most precise determinations to date.

  6. Double-finger-gate controlled spin-resolved resonant quantum transport in the presence of a Rashba-Zeeman gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chi-Shung; Tseng, Shu-Ting; Gudmundsson, Vidar; Cheng, Shun-Jen

    2015-03-04

    We investigate double finger gate (DFG) controlled spin-resolved resonant transport properties in an n-type quantum channel with a Rashba-Zeeman (RZ) subband energy gap. By appropriately tuning the DFG in the strong Rashba coupling regime, resonant state structures in conductance can be found that are sensitive to the length of the DFG system. Furthermore, a hole-like bound state feature below the RZ gap and an electron-like quasi-bound state feature at the threshold of the upper spin branch can be found that is insensitive to the length of the DFG system.

  7. Spin-dependent Breit-Wigner and Fano resonances in photon-assisted electron transport through a semiconductor heterostructure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Li-Yun; Zhou Bin

    2011-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the electron transmission through a seven-layer semiconductor heterostructure with the Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling under two applied oscillating fields. Numerical results show that both of the spindependent symmetric Breit-Wigner and the asymmetric Fano resonances appear and that the properties of these two types of resonance peaks are dependent on the amplitude and the relative phases of the two applied oscillating fields.The modulation of the spin-polarization efficiency of transmitted electrons by the relative phase is also discussed.

  8. Noninvasive measurements of regional cerebral perfusion in preterm and term neonates by magnetic resonance arterial spin labeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miranda Gimenez-Ricco, Maria Jo; Olofsson, K; Sidaros, Karam

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic resonance arterial spin labeling (ASL) at 3 Tesla has been investigated as a quantitative technique for measuring regional cerebral perfusion (RCP) in newborn infants. RCP values were measured in 49 healthy neonates: 32 preterm infants born before 34 wk of gestation and 17 term-born neon......Magnetic resonance arterial spin labeling (ASL) at 3 Tesla has been investigated as a quantitative technique for measuring regional cerebral perfusion (RCP) in newborn infants. RCP values were measured in 49 healthy neonates: 32 preterm infants born before 34 wk of gestation and 17 term...

  9. Sensitive determination of the spin polarization of optically pumped alkali-metal atoms using near-resonant light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhichao; Long, Xingwu; Yuan, Jie; Fan, Zhenfang; Luo, Hui

    2016-09-01

    A new method to measure the spin polarization of optically pumped alkali-metal atoms is demonstrated. Unlike the conventional method using far-detuned probe light, the near-resonant light with two specific frequencies was chosen. Because the Faraday rotation angle of this approach can be two orders of magnitude greater than that with the conventional method, this approach is more sensitive to the spin polarization. Based on the results of the experimental scheme, the spin polarization measurements are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical predictions, thereby demonstrating the feasibility of this approach.

  10. Identification and dosimetric features of γ-irradiated cefadroxil by electron spin resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydaş, Canan; Polat, Mustafa; Korkmaz, Mustafa

    2008-01-01

    In the present work, electron spin resonance (ESR) identification of γ-irradiated cefadroxil monohydrate (CM), duricef capsule (DC) and duricef suspension (DS) and their potential use as normal and/or accidental dosimetric materials were investigated in the dose range of 1-25 kGy. Although unirradiated samples did not exhibit any ESR signals, irradiated samples were observed to present ESR spectra with many resonance lines originating from radiation induced radical or radicals. Dose-response curves associated with the resonance peak heights of CM ( I1, I2) and DS ( I3, I4, I5, I6) were found to follow linear and power functions of applied radiation dose, respectively. Simulation calculations were performed to determine the structure and spectral parameters of the radiation-induced radicalic species involved in the formation of experimental ESR spectrum of CM using, as input, the room temperature signal intensity data obtained for a sample irradiated at dose of 10 kGy. Kinetic behaviors and activation energies of the radicalic species were also calculated using the data obtained from annealing studies performed at five different temperatures. The presence of detectable signal intensities even after a storage period of 100 days was considered as providing an opportunity in the discrimination of irradiated CM and DS from unirradiated ones. Basing on room temperature signal intensity decay and dose-response data, it was concluded that CM and DS present the features of a good dosimetric material.

  11. Resonant Spin-Flavor Conversion of Supernova Neutrinos: Dependence on Electron Mole Fraction

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshida, T; Kimura, K; Yokomakura, H; Kawagoe, S; Kajino, T

    2009-01-01

    Detailed dependence of resonant spin-flavor (RSF) conversion of supernova neutrinos on electron mole fraction Ye is investigated. Supernova explosion forms a hot-bubble and neutrino-driven wind region of which electron mole fraction exceeds 0.5 in several seconds after the core collapse. When a higher resonance of the RSF conversion is located in the innermost region, flavor change of the neutrinos strongly depends on the sign of 1-2Ye. At an adiabatic high RSF resonance the flavor conversion of bar{nu}_e -> nu_{mu,tau} occurs in Ye 0.5 and inverted mass hierarchy. In other cases of Ye values and mass hierarchies, the conversion of nu_e -> bar{nu}_{mu,tau} occurs. The final bar{nu}_e spectrum is evaluated in the cases of Ye 0.5 taking account of the RSF conversion. Based on the obtained result, time variation of the event number ratios of low bar{nu}_e energy to high bar{nu}_e energy is discussed. In normal mass hierarchy, an enhancement of the event ratio should be seen in the period when the electron frac...

  12. Investigation of radiosterilization of Benzydamine Hydrochloride by electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çolak, Şeyda

    2016-10-01

    The use of ionizing radiation for sterilization of pharmaceuticals is an attractive and growing technology. In the present work, the spectroscopic and kinetic features of the radicals induced in gamma irradiated solid Benzydamine Hydrochloride (BH) sample is investigated in the dose range of 3-34 kGy at different temperatures using Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Gamma irradiated BH indicated eight resonance peaks centered at g=2.0029 originating from two different radical species. Decay activation energy of the radical mostly responsible from central intense resonance line was calculated to be 25.6±1.5 kJ/mol by using the signal intensity decay data derived from annealing studies performed at high temperatures. A linear function of the applied dose was found to describe best the experimental dose-response data. However, the discrimination of irradiated BH from unirradiated one was possible even 3 months after storage at normal conditions. Basing on these findings it was concluded that BH and BH containing drugs could be safely sterilized by gamma radiation and that ESR spectroscopy could be successfully used as a potential technique for monitoring their radiosterilizations.

  13. Polarization dependence of transition intensities in double resonance experiments: unresolved spin doublets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, Vladimir S; Field, Robert W

    2008-01-07

    The polarization dependence of transition intensities in multiple resonance spectroscopic experiments can provide information useful for making rotational assignments. A formalism to describe the polarization dependence of transition intensities in multiple resonance experiments, particularly for cases when two rotational/fine structure quantum numbers are needed to specify the state of the system, is presented. The formalism is presented in a form usable both when the transitions between the underlying fine structure components are experimentally resolved, as well as when they are unresolved, to form composite lines. This sort of treatment is necessary for cases when the two quantum numbers that specify the fine structure differ significantly, such as is the case at low N, when the difference between J and N becomes comparable to the value of J. Ratios of transition intensities in different experimentally convenient polarization arrangements are evaluated for the case of composite N transitions formed by combining the spin components of a doublet system. The formalism is expressed in a form easily extendable to accommodate experimental cases of more than two excitation steps, or a combination of excitation steps and an external static electric field. This polarization diagnostic has been experimentally applied to assign spectral features in double resonance Rydberg spectra of CaF.

  14. One-electron versus electron-electron interaction contributions to the spin-spin coupling mechanism in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: analysis of basic electronic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräfenstein, Jürgen; Cremer, Dieter

    2004-12-22

    For the first time, the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin-spin coupling mechanism is decomposed into one-electron and electron-electron interaction contributions to demonstrate that spin-information transport between different orbitals is not exclusively an electron-exchange phenomenon. This is done using coupled perturbed density-functional theory in conjunction with the recently developed J-OC-PSP [=J-OC-OC-PSP: Decomposition of J into orbital contributions using orbital currents and partial spin polarization)] method. One-orbital contributions comprise Ramsey response and self-exchange effects and the two-orbital contributions describe first-order delocalization and steric exchange. The two-orbital effects can be characterized as external orbital, echo, and spin transport contributions. A relationship of these electronic effects to zeroth-order orbital theory is demonstrated and their sign and magnitude predicted using simple models and graphical representations of first order orbitals. In the case of methane the two NMR spin-spin coupling constants result from totally different Fermi contact coupling mechanisms. (1)J(C,H) is the result of the Ramsey response and the self-exchange of the bond orbital diminished by external first-order delocalization external one-orbital effects whereas (2)J(H,H) spin-spin coupling is almost exclusively mitigated by a two-orbital steric exchange effect. From this analysis, a series of prediction can be made how geometrical deformations, electron lone pairs, and substituent effects lead to a change in the values of (1)J(C,H) and (2)J(H,H), respectively, for hydrocarbons.

  15. Spin-locking of half-integer quadrupolar nuclei in nuclear magnetic resonance of solids: creation and evolution of coherences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbrook, Sharon E; Wimperis, Stephen

    2004-02-08

    Spin-locking of half-integer quadrupolar nuclei, such as 23Na (I=3/2) and 27Al (I=5/2), is of renewed interest owing to the development of variants of the multiple-quantum and satellite-transition magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance experiments that either utilize spin-locking directly or offer the possibility that spin-locked states may arise. However, the large magnitude and, under MAS, the time dependence of the quadrupolar interaction often result in complex spin-locking phenomena that are not widely understood. Here we show that, following the application of a spin-locking pulse, a variety of coherence transfer processes occur on a time scale of approximately 1/omegaQ before the spin system settles down into a spin-locked state which may itself be time dependent if MAS is performed. We show theoretically for both spin I=3/2 and 5/2 nuclei that the spin-locked state created by this initial rapid dephasing typically consists of a variety of single- and multiple-quantum coherences and nonequilibrium population states and we discuss the subsequent evolution of these under MAS. In contrast to previous work, we consider spin-locking using a wide range of radio frequency field strengths, i.e., a range that covers both the "strong-field" (omega1 > omegaQPAS and "weak-field" (omega1 spin-locking experiments on NaNO2, NaNO3, and Al(acac)3, under both static and MAS conditions, are used to illustrate and confirm the results of the theoretical discussion.

  16. Electron spin resonance spectral study of PVC and XLPE insulation materials and their life time analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsy, M. A.; Shwehdi, M. H.

    2006-03-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) study is carried out to characterize thermal endurance of insulating materials used in power cable industry. The presented work provides ESR investigation and evaluation of widely used cable insulation materials, namely polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE). The results confirm the fact that PVC is rapidly degrades than XLPE. The study also indicates that colorants and cable's manufacturing processes enhance the thermal resistance of the PVC. It also verifies the powerfulness and the importance of the ESR-testing of insulation materials compared to other tests assumed by International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Standard 216-procedure, e.g. weight loss (WL), electric strength (ES) or tensile strength (TS). The estimated thermal endurance parameters by ESR-method show that the other standard methods overestimate these parameters and produce less accurate thermal life time curves of cable insulation materials.

  17. Electron spin resonance dating of teeth from Western Brazilian megafauna - preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, Angela, E-mail: angela.kinoshita@usc.br [Departamento de Fisica, FFCLRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto-SP (Brazil); Universidade Sagrado Coracao, Rua Irma Arminda 10-50, 17011-160 Bauru - Sao Paulo (Brazil); Jose, Flavio A. [Departamento de Fisica, FFCLRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto-SP (Brazil); Sundaram, Dharani; Paixao, Jesus da S.; Soares, Isabella R.M. [Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, Departamento de Geologia Geral, 78090-000 Cuiaba-MT (Brazil); Figueiredo, Ana Maria [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), 05422-970 Sao Paulo-SP (Brazil); Baffa, Oswaldo [Departamento de Fisica, FFCLRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto-SP (Brazil)

    2011-09-15

    Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) was applied to determine ages of Haplomastodon teeth from Western Brazilian Megafauna. The Equivalent Doses (D{sub e}) of (1.3 {+-} 0.2)kGy, (800 {+-} 100)Gy and (140 {+-} 20)Gy were found and the software ROSY ESR dating was employed to convert D{sub e} in age, using isotope concentrations determined by neutron activation analysis (NAA) and other information, resulting in (500 {+-} 100)ka, (320 {+-} 50) and (90 {+-} 10)ka considering the Combination Uptake (CU) model for Uranium uptake, set as an Early Uptake (EU) for dentine and Linear Uptake (LU) for enamel. There are scarce reports about Pleistocene Megafauna in this area. This paper presents the first dating of megafauna tooth and this study could contribute to improve the knowledge about the paleoclimate and paleoenvironment of this region and prompt more investigations in this area.

  18. Analysis of electron spin resonance spectra of irradiated gingers: Organic radical components derived from carbohydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaoki, Rumi, E-mail: yamaoki@gly.oups.ac.j [Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Kimura, Shojiro [Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Ohta, Masatoshi [Faculty of Engineering, Niigata University, 8050 Igarashi 2-Nocho, Nishi-ku, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan)

    2010-04-15

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectral characterizations of gingers irradiated with electron beam were studied. Complex asymmetrical spectra (near g=2.005) with major spectral components (line width=2.4 mT) and minor signals (at 6 mT apart) were observed in irradiated gingers. The spectral intensity decreased considerably 30 days after irradiation, and continued to decrease steadily thereafter. The spectra simulated on the basis of characteristics of free radical components derived from carbohydrates in gingers are in good agreement with the observed spectra. Analysis showed that shortly after irradiation the major radical components of gingers were composed of radical species derived from amylose and cellulose, and the amylose radicals subsequently decreased considerably. At 30 days after irradiation, the major radical components of gingers were composed of radical species derived from cellulose, glucose, fructose or sucrose.

  19. Photoswitchable Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast by Improved Light-Driven Coordination-Induced Spin State Switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dommaschk, Marcel; Peters, Morten; Gutzeit, Florian; Schütt, Christian; Näther, Christian; Sönnichsen, Frank D; Tiwari, Sanjay; Riedel, Christian; Boretius, Susann; Herges, Rainer

    2015-06-24

    We present a fully reversible and highly efficient on-off photoswitching of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast with green (500 nm) and violet-blue (435 nm) light. The contrast change is based on intramolecular light-driven coordination-induced spin state switch (LD-CISSS), performed with azopyridine-substituted Ni-porphyrins. The relaxation time of the solvent protons in 3 mM solutions of the azoporphyrins in DMSO was switched between 3.5 and 1.7 s. The relaxivity of the contrast agent changes by a factor of 6.7. No fatigue or side reaction was observed, even after >100,000 switching cycles in air at room temperature. Electron-donating substituents at the pyridine improve the LD-CISSS in two ways: better photostationary states are achieved, and intramolecular binding is enhanced.

  20. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy of an atomically thin material using a single-spin qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovchinsky, I.; Sanchez-Yamagishi, J. D.; Urbach, E. K.; Choi, S.; Fang, S.; Andersen, T. I.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Bylinskii, A.; Kaxiras, E.; Kim, P.; Park, H.; Lukin, M. D.

    2017-02-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials offer a promising platform for exploring condensed matter phenomena and developing technological applications. However, the reduction of material dimensions to the atomic scale poses a challenge for traditional measurement and interfacing techniques that typically couple to macroscopic observables. We demonstrate a method for probing the properties of 2D materials via nanometer-scale nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectroscopy using individual atomlike impurities in diamond. Coherent manipulation of shallow nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers enables the probing of nanoscale ensembles down to approximately 30 nuclear spins in atomically thin hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). The characterization of low-dimensional nanoscale materials could enable the development of new quantum hybrid systems, combining atomlike systems coherently coupled with individual atoms in 2D materials.

  1. Coupling molecular spin centers to microwave planar resonators: towards integration of molecular qubits in quantum circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonizzoni, C; Ghirri, A; Bader, K; van Slageren, J; Perfetti, M; Sorace, L; Lan, Y; Fuhr, O; Ruben, M; Affronte, M

    2016-11-14

    We present spectroscopic measurements looking for the coherent coupling between molecular magnetic centers and microwave photons. The aim is to find the optimal conditions and the best molecular features to achieve the quantum strong coupling regime, for which coherent dynamics of hybrid photon-spin states take place. To this end, we used a high critical temperature YBCO superconducting planar resonator working at 7.7 GHz and at low temperatures to investigate three molecular mononuclear coordination compounds, namely (PPh4)2[Cu(mnt)2] (where mnt(2-) = maleonitriledithiolate), [ErPc2](-)TBA(+) (where pc(2-) is the phtalocyaninato and TBA(+) is the tetra-n-butylammonium cation) and Dy(trensal) (where H3trensal = 2,2',2''-tris(salicylideneimino)triethylamine). Although the strong coupling regime was not achieved in these preliminary experiments, the results provided several hints on how to design molecular magnetic centers to be integrated into hybrid quantum circuits.

  2. Photosynthetic Potential of Planets in 3:2 Spin Orbit Resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, S P; Forgan, D H; Raven, J A; Cockell, C S

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthetic life requires sufficient photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) to metabolise. On Earth, plant behaviour, physiology and metabolism are sculpted around the night-day cycle by an endogenous biological circadian clock. The evolution of life was influenced by the Earth-Sun orbital dynamic, which generates the photo-environment incident on the planetary surface. In this work the unusual photo-environment of an Earth-like planet (ELP) in 3:2 spin orbit resonance is explored. Photo-environments on the ELP are longitudinally differentiated, in addition to differentiations relating to latitude and depth (for aquatic organisms) which are familiar on Earth. The light environment on such a planet could be compatible with Earth's photosynthetic life although the threat of atmospheric freeze-out and prolonged periods of darkness would present significant challenges. We emphasise the relationship between the evolution of life on a planetary body with its orbital dynamics.

  3. Detection of irradiated fruits and vegetables by gas-chromatographic methods and electron spin-resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farag, S.E.A. (National Centre for Radiation Research and Technology, Cairo (Egypt))

    1993-01-01

    Gas chromatographic methods detected some hydrocarbons esp. 17:1, 16:2, 15:0 and 14:1 in irradiated, Avocado, Papaya, Mangoes with 0.75, 1.5, 3.0 kGy and Apricot with 0.5 and 3.0 kGy. The detection of hydrocarbons was clearly at high doses but the low doses need more sensitive conditions using Liquid-Liquid-Gas chromatographic method as used here. Using Electron Spin-Resonance, produce a specific signal from irradiated onion (dried leaves) as well as apricot (hard coat of kernels) after some weeks of irradiation process but not clear with the other foodstuffs. (orig.)

  4. ESR (electron spin resonance)-determined osmotic behavior of bull spermatozoa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, J.; Kleinhans, F.W.; Spitzer, V.J.; Critser, J.K. (Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (USA). Dept. of Medical Research); Horstman, L. (Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN (USA). School of Veterinary Medicine); Mazur, P. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Our laboratories are pursuing a fundamental approach to the problems of semen cryopreservation. For many cell types (human red cells, yeast, HeLa) it has been demonstrated that there is an optimum cooling rate for cryopreservation. Faster rates allow insufficient time for cell dehydration and result in intracellular ice formation and cell death. It is possible to predict this optimal rate provided that the cell acts as an ideal osmometer and several other cell parameters are known such as the membrane hydraulic conductivity. It is the purpose of this work to examine the osmotic response of bull sperm to sucrose and NaCl utilizing electron spin resonance (ESR) to measure cell volume. For calibration purposes we also measured the ESR response of human red cells (RBC), the osmotic response of which is well documented with other methods. 15 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Photosynthetic potential of planets in 3 : 2 spin-orbit resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, S. P.; Mead, A. J.; Forgan, D. H.; Raven, J. A.; Cockell, C. S.

    2014-10-01

    Photosynthetic life requires sufficient photosynthetically active radiation to metabolize. On Earth, plant behaviour, physiology and metabolism are sculpted around the night-day cycle by an endogenous biological circadian clock. The evolution of life was influenced by the Earth-Sun orbital dynamic, which generates the photo-environment incident on the planetary surface. In this work, the unusual photo-environment of an Earth-like planet (ELP) in 3 : 2 spin-orbit resonance is explored. Photo-environments on the ELP are longitudinally differentiated, in addition to differentiations related to latitude and depth (for aquatic organisms) which are familiar on Earth. The light environment on such a planet could be compatible with Earth's photosynthetic life although the threat of atmospheric freeze-out and prolonged periods of darkness would present significant challenges. We emphasize the relationship between the evolution of life on a planetary body with its orbital dynamics.

  6. Electron spin resonance study of chloroplast photosynthetic activity in the presence of amphiphilic amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sersen, F; Balgavý, P; Devínsky, F

    1990-12-01

    Electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR) was used to study the effects of amphiphilic amines of the carbamate, amide, and ester type and amine oxide on the photosynthetic system of spinach chloroplasts. The ESR signal II connected to the photosynthetic center PS II donor side was observed to diminish in the presence of amines, whereas that of PS I remained unchanged. The inhibition of PS II increased with the increasing of amine concentration. In the presence of amines, the light: dark chloroplast ESR signals ratio as well as the intensity of the ESR signal of unbound Mn2+ increased. It is suggested that the amphiphilic amines affect the structure of PS II and the electron transfer to PS I. The effects of the amines tested on the photosynthetic system correlate with their potency to perturb the lipid membrane structure.

  7. High-efficiency Resonant rf Spin Rotator with Broad Phase Space Acceptance for Pulsed Polarized Cold Neutron Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, P. -N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Barron-Palos, L. [Arizona State University; Bowman, J. D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Chupp, T. E. [University of Michigan; Crawford, C. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Dabaghyan, M. [University of New Hampshire; Dawkins, M. [Indiana University; Freedman, S. J. [University of California; Gentile, T. R. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Gericke, M. T. [University of Manitoba, Canada; Gillis, R. C. [University of Manitoba, Canada; Greene, G. L. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Hersman, F. W. [University of New Hampshire; Jones, G. L. [Hamilton College, New York; Kandes, M. [University of Michigan; Lamoreaux, S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lauss, B. [University of California, Berkeley; Leuschner, M. B. [Indiana University; Mahurin, R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Mason, M. [University of New Hampshire; Mei, J. [Indiana University; Mitchell, G. S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Nann, H. [Indiana University; Page, S. A. [University of Manitoba, Canada; Penttila, S. I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Ramsay, W. D. [University of Manitoba & TRIUMF, Canada; Salas Bacci, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Santra, S. [Indiana University; Sharma, M. [University of Michigan; Smith, T. B. [University of Dayton, Ohio; Snow, W. [Indiana University; Wilburn, W. S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Zhu, H. [University of New Hampshire

    2008-01-01

    High precision fundamental neutron physics experiments have been proposed for the intense pulsed spallation neutron beams at JSNS, LANSCE, and SNS to test the standard model and search for new physics. Certain systematic effects in some of these experiments have to be controlled at the few ppb level. The NPD Gamma experiment, a search for the small parity-violating {gamma}-ray asymmetry A{sub Y} in polarized cold neutron capture on parahydrogen, is one example. For the NPD Gamma experiment we developed a radio-frequency resonant spin rotator to reverse the neutron polarization in a 9.5 cm x 9.5 cm pulsed cold neutron beam with high efficiency over a broad cold neutron energy range. The effect of the spin reversal by the rotator on the neutron beam phase space is compared qualitatively to rf neutron spin flippers based on adiabatic fast passage. We discuss the design of the spin rotator and describe two types of transmission-based neutron spin-flip efficiency measurements where the neutron beam was both polarized and analyzed by optically polarized {sup 3}He neutron spin filters. The efficiency of the spin rotator was measured at LANSCE to be 98.8 {+-} 0.5% for neutron energies from 3 to 20 meV over the full phase space of the beam. Systematic effects that the rf spin rotator introduces to the NPD Gamma experiment are considered.

  8. Development of high-pressure, high-field and multifrequency electron spin resonance system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, T; Taketani, A; Tomita, T; Okubo, S; Ohta, H; Uwatoko, Y

    2007-06-01

    The electron spin resonance (ESR) system which covers the magnetic field region up to 16 T, the quasicontinuous frequency region from 60 to 700 GHz, the temperature region from 1.8 to 4.2 K, and the hydrostatic pressure region up to 1.1 GPa has been developed. This is the first pulsed high-field and multifrequency ESR system with the pressure region over 1 GPa as far as we know. Transmission ESR spectra under hydrostatic pressure can be obtained by combining a piston-cylinder-type pressure cell and the pulsed magnetic field ESR apparatus. The pressure cell consists of a NiCrAl cylinder and sapphire or zirconia inner parts. The use of sapphire or zirconia as inner parts enables us to observe ESR under pressure because these inner parts have high transmittance for the electromagnetic wave with millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths. We have successfully applied this system for the pressure dependence measurements of an isolated spin system NiSnCl(6)6H(2)O up to 1.1 GPa. It was found that the single ion anisotropy parameter D of this compound strongly depends on pressure. The parameter D is approximately proportional to the pressure up to 0.75 GPa, and the relation between D and the pressure can be used for the pressure calibration of this high-field and high-pressure ESR system.

  9. High resolution triple resonance micro magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy of nanoliter sample volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauckmann, J Ole; Janssen, J W G Hans; Kentgens, Arno P M

    2016-02-14

    To be able to study mass-limited samples and small single crystals, a triple resonance micro-magic angle spinning (μMAS) probehead for the application of high-resolution solid-state NMR of nanoliter samples was developed. Due to its excellent rf performance this allows us to explore the limits of proton NMR resolution in strongly coupled solids. Using homonuclear decoupling we obtain unprecedented (1)H linewidths for a single crystal of glycine (Δν(CH2) = 0.14 ppm) at high field (20 T) in a directly detected spectrum. The triple channel design allowed the recording of high-resolution μMAS (13)C-(15)N correlations of [U-(13)C-(15)N] arginine HCl and shows that the superior (1)H resolution opens the way for high-sensitivity inverse detection of heteronuclei even at moderate spinning speeds and rf-fields. Efficient decoupling leads to long coherence times which can be exploited in many correlation experiments.

  10. Assessment of fluidity of different invasomes by electron spin resonance and differential scanning calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragicevic-Curic, Nina; Friedrich, Manfred; Petersen, Silvia; Scheglmann, Dietrich; Douroumis, Dennis; Plass, Winfried; Fahr, Alfred

    2011-06-30

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of membrane-softening components (terpenes/terpene mixtures, ethanol) on fluidity of phospholipid membranes in invasomes, which contain besides phosphatidylcholine and water, also ethanol and terpenes. Also mTHPC was incorporated into invasomes in order to study its molecular interaction with phospholipids in vesicular membranes. Fluidity of bilayers was investigated by electron spin resonance (ESR) using spin labels 5- and 16-doxyl stearic acid and by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Addition of 1% of a single terpene/terpene mixture led to significant fluidity increase around the C16 atom of phospholipid acyl chains comprising the vesicles. However, it was not possible to differentiate between the influences of single terpenes or terpene mixtures. Incorporation of mTHPC into the bilayer of vesicles decreased fluidity near the C16 atom of acyl chains, indicating its localization in the inner hydrophobic zone of bilayers. These results are in agreement with DSC measurements, which showed that terpenes increased fluidity of bilayers, while mTHPC decreased fluidity. Thus, invasomes represent vesicles with very high membrane fluidity. However, no direct correlation between fluidity of invasomes and their penetration enhancing ability was found, indicating that besides fluidity also other phenomena might be responsible for improved skin delivery of mTHPC.

  11. Spin torque resonant vortex core expulsion for an efficient radio-frequency detection scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cros, V.; Jenkins, A. S.; Lebrun, R.; Bortolotti, P.; Grimaldi, E.; Tsunegi, S.; Kubota, H.; Yakushiji, K.; Fukushima, A.; Yuasa, S.

    It has been proposed by Tulaparkur et al.[1ref] that a high frequency detector based on the so called spin-diode effect in spin transfer oscillators could eventually replace conventional Schottky diodes, due to their nanoscale size, frequency tunability, and large output sensitivity. Although a promising candidate for ICT applications, the output voltage generated from this effect is consistently low. Here we present a scheme for a new type of spintronics-based high frequency detector based on the expulsion of the vortex core of a magnetic tunnel junction. The resonant expulsion of the core leads to a large and sharp change in resistance associated with the difference in magnetoresistance between the vortex ground state and the final C-state, which is predominantly in either the parallel or anti-parallel direction relative to the polariser layer. Interestingly, this reversible effect is independent of the incoming rf current amplitude, offering a compelling perspective for a fast real-time rf threshold detector. REF : EU FP7 Grant (MOSAIC No. ICT-FP7-317950 is acknowledged.

  12. Visibility of lipid resonances in HR-MAS spectra of brain biopsies subject to spinning rate variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Precht, C; Diserens, G; Oevermann, A; Vermathen, M; Lang, J; Boesch, C; Vermathen, P

    2015-12-01

    Lipid resonances from mobile lipids can be observed by ¹H NMR spectroscopy in multiple tissues and have also been associated with malignancy. In order to use lipid resonances as a marker for disease, a reference standard from a healthy tissue has to be established taking the influence of variable factors like the spinning rate into account. The purpose of our study was to investigate the effect of spinning rate variation on the HR-MAS pattern of lipid resonances in non-neoplastic brain biopsies from different regions and visualize polar and non-polar lipids by fluorescence microscopy using Nile Red staining. ¹H HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy demonstrated higher lipid peak intensities in normal sheep brain pure white matter biopsies compared to mixed white and gray matter biopsies and pure gray matter biopsies. High spinning rates increased the visibility particularly of the methyl resonances at 1.3 and the methylene resonance at 0.89 ppm in white matter biopsies stronger compared to thalamus and brainstem biopsies, and gray matter biopsies. The absence of lipid droplets and presence of a large number of myelin sheaths observed in white matter by Nile Red fluorescence microscopy suggest that the observed lipid resonances originate from the macromolecular pool of lipid protons of the myelin sheath's plasma membranes. When using lipid contents as a marker for disease, the variable behavior of lipid resonances in different neuroanatomical regions of the brain and at variable spinning rates should be considered. The findings may open up interesting possibilities for investigating lipids in myelin sheaths.

  13. Characterization of Al2O3-Supported Manganese Oxides by Electron Spin Resonance and Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kijlstra, W.S.; Poels, E.K.; Bliek, A.; Weckhuysen, B.M.; Schoonheydt, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    Alumina-supported manganese oxides, used as catalysts for the selective catalytic reduction of NO, were characterized by combined electron spin resonance and diffuse reflectance spectroscopies. Upon impregnation of the acetate precursor solution, the [Mn(H2O)6]^2+ complex interacts strongly with sur

  14. Identification of Copper(II) Complexes in Aqueous Solution by Electron Spin Resonance: An Undergraduate Coordination Chemistry Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micera, G.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Background, procedures, and results are provided for an experiment which examines, through electron spin resonance spectroscopy, complex species formed by cupric and 2,6-dihydroxybenzoate ions in aqueous solutions. The experiment is illustrative of several aspects of inorganic and coordination chemistry, including the identification of species…

  15. Molecular structure and vibrational spectra of spin-crossover complexes in solution and colloidal media: resonance Raman and time-resolved resonance Raman studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Clare; Callaghan, Philip L; Ciunik, Zbigniew; Coates, Colin G; Døssing, Anders; Hazell, Alan; McGarvey, John J; Schenker, Sabine; Toftlund, Hans; Trautwein, Alfred X; Winkler, Heiner; Wolny, Juliusz A

    2004-07-12

    The spin-crossover system [Fe(btpa)](PF(6))(2) (btpa = N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)-6,6'-bis(aminomethyl)-2,2'-bipyridine) and the predominantly low-spin species [Fe(b(bdpa))](PF(6))(2) ((b(bdpa) = N,N'-bis(benzyl)-N,N'-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-6,6'-bis(aminomethyl)-2,2'-bipyridine) have been characterized by means of X-ray diffraction. The unit cell of [Fe(btpa)](PF(6))(2) contains two crystallographically independent molecules revealing octahedral low-spin and quasi-seven-coordinated high-spin structures. The unit cell of [Fe(b(bdpa))](PF(6))(2) contains two crystallographically independent molecules one of which corresponds to a low-spin structure, while the other reveals a disordering. On the basis of magnetic susceptibility and Mössbauer measurements, it has been proposed that this disorder involves low-spin and high-spin six-coordinated molecules. The structures of [Zn(btpa)](PF(6))(2) and [Ru(btpa)](PF(6))(2) have been determined also. Pulsed laser photoperturbation, coupled here with time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy (TR(3)), has been used to investigate, for the first time by this technique, the relaxation dynamics in solution on nanosecond and picosecond time scales of low-spin, LS ((1)A) --> high-spin, HS ((5)T) electronic spin-state crossover in these Fe(II) complexes. For the nanosecond experiments, use of a probe wavelength at 321 nm, falling within the pi-pi transition of the polypyridyl backbone of the ligands, enabled the investigation of vibrational modes of both LS and HS isomers, through coupling to spin-state-dependent angle changes of the backbone. Supplementary investigations of the spin-crossover (SCO) equilibrium in homogeneous solution and in colloidal media assisted the assignment of prominent features in the Raman spectra of the LS and HS isomers. The relaxation data from the nanosecond studies confirm and extend earlier spectrophotometric findings, (Schenker, S.; Stein, P. C.; Wolny, J. A.; Brady, C.; McGarvey, J. J

  16. Resonant tunneling between two-dimensional layers accounting for spin-orbit interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozhansky, I. V.; Averkiev, N. S.; Lähderanta, E.

    2016-05-01

    We present a theory of quantum tunneling between two-dimensional (2D) layers with Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction (SOI) in the layers. Accounting for SOI in the layers leads to a complex pattern in the tunneling characteristic with typical features corresponding to SOI energy. The resonant features strongly depend on the SOI parameters; for clear experimental observation the SOI characteristic energy should exceed the resonant broadening related to the particles' quantum lifetime in the layers. It appears that the experiments on hole tunneling are favorable to meet this criterion. We also consider a promising candidate for observing the effect, that is, p -doped SiGe strained heterostructures. As supported by our calculations, small adjustments of the parameters for experimentally studied AlGaAs/GaAs p -type quantum walls or designing a 2D-2D tunneling experiment for recently fabricated SiGe structures are very likely to reveal the SOI features in the 2D-2D tunneling.

  17. Magnetic phase transitions in ferrite nanoparticles characterized by electron spin resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores-Arias, Yesica, E-mail: yeika01@hotmail.com; Vázquez-Victorio, Gabriela; Ortega-Zempoalteca, Raul; Acevedo-Salas, Ulises; Valenzuela, Raul [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Ammar, Souad [Laboratoires ITODYS, Université de Paris-Diderot, PRES Sorbonne Paris Cité, CNRS-UMR 7086, 75205 Paris Cedex (France)

    2015-05-07

    Ferrite magnetic nanoparticles in the composition Zn{sub 0.7}Ni{sub 0.3}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} were synthesized by the polyol method, with an average size of 8 nm. Electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements were carried out at a frequency of 9.45 GHz in the 100–500 K temperature range. Obtained results exhibited a characteristic ESR signal in terms of resonance field, H{sub res}, linewidth, ΔH, and peak ratio, R, for each magnetic phase. At low temperatures, the ferrimagnetic phase showed low H{sub res}, broad ΔH, and asymmetric R. At high temperatures, these parameters exhibited opposite values: high H{sub res}, small ΔH, and R ∼ 1. For intermediate temperatures, a different phase was observed, which was identified as a superparamagnetic phase by means of zero-field cooling-field cooling and hysteresis loops measurements. The observed differences were explained in terms of the internal fields and especially due to the cubic anisotropy in the ordered phase.

  18. Quaternary dating by electron spin resonance (ESR applied to human tooth enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvajal Eduar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results obtained from using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR to analyse tooth enamel found at the Aguazuque archaeological site (Cundinamarca, Colombia, located on the savannah near Bogota at 4° 37' North and 74°17' West. It was presumed that the tooth enamel came from a collective burial consisting of 23 people, involving men, women and children. The tooth enamel was irradiated with gamma rays and the resulting free radicals were measured using an electron spin resonance (ESR X-band spectrometer to obtain a signal intensity compared to absorbed doses curve. Fitting this curve allowed the mean archaeological dose accumulated in the enamel during the period that it was buried to be estimated, giving a 2.10 ± 0.14 Gyvalue. ROSY software was used for estimating age, giving a mean 3,256 ± 190y before present (BP age. These results highlight EPR's potential when using the quaternary ancient ruins dating technique in Colombia and its use with other kinds of samples like stalagmites, calcite, mollusc shells and reefs.

  19. Resonant optical spectroscopy and coherent control of C r4 + spin ensembles in SiC and GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehl, William F.; Diler, Berk; Whiteley, Samuel J.; Bourassa, Alexandre; Son, N. T.; Janzén, Erik; Awschalom, David D.

    2017-01-01

    Spins bound to point defects are increasingly viewed as an important resource for solid-state implementations of quantum information and spintronic technologies. In particular, there is a growing interest in the identification of new classes of defect spin that can be controlled optically. Here, we demonstrate ensemble optical spin polarization and optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) of the S = 1 electronic ground state of chromium (C r4 + ) impurities in silicon carbide (SiC) and gallium nitride (GaN). Spin polarization is made possible by the narrow optical linewidths of these ensembles (73% of the overall optical emission is contained with the defects' zero-phonon lines. These characteristics make this semiconductor-based, transition metal impurity system a promising target for further study in the ongoing effort to integrate optically active quantum states within common optoelectronic materials.

  20. Pulsed electrically detected magnetic resonance study of spin relaxation and recombination in thin-film silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fehr, Matthias; Behrends, Jan; Schnegg, Alexander; Lips, Klaus; Rech, Bernd [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Silizium Photovoltaik, Berlin (Germany); Astakhov, Oleksander; Finger, Friedhelm [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). IEF-5 Photovoltaik

    2009-07-01

    We have investigated the influence of paramagnetic states on electronic transport processes in thin-film pin solar cells with pulsed Electrically Detected Magnetic Resonance (pEDMR) at X-Band frequency and low temperature (10 K). The solar cells consist of an intrinsic microcrystalline absorber layer and amorphous or microcrystalline n/p contacting layers. In addition to the identification of the participating paramagnetic centres by their g-factors, pEDMR can be used to study the dynamics of the electronic processes in detail. We present measurements of modified EPR pulse sequences in order to identify the dominating relaxation mechanisms within correlated solid-state spin-pairs. By this technique a monitoring of the spin and charge motion is possible. In the outlook we present measurements of the electron spin echo envelope and critically discuss modulations in terms of dipolar coupling within the spin-pairs or hyperfine couplings to surrounding nuclei.

  1. Single-pulse terahertz coherent control of spin resonance in the canted antiferromagnet YFeO3, mediated by dielectric anisotropy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Zuanming; Mics, Zoltán; Ma, Guohong;

    2013-01-01

    We report on the coherent control of terahertz (THz) spin waves in a canted antiferromagnet yttrium orthoferrite, YFeO3, associated with a quasiferromagnetic (quasi-FM) spin resonance at a frequency of 0.3 THz, using a single-incident THz pulse. The spin resonance is excited impulsively...... by the magnetic field component of the THz pulse. The intrinsic dielectric anisotropy of YFeO3 in the THz range allows for coherent control of both the amplitude and the phase of the excited spin wave. The coherent control is based on simultaneous generation of two interfering phase-shifted spin waves whose...... amplitudes and relative phase, dictated by the dielectric anisotropy of the YFeO3 crystal, can be controlled by varying the polarization of the incident THz pulse with respect to the crystal axes. The spatially anisotropic decay of the THz-excited FM spin resonance in YFeO3, leading to an increasingly linear...

  2. Black hole spin inferred from 3:2 epicyclic resonance model of high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Sramkova, E; Kotrlova, A; Bakala, P; Abramowicz, M; Stuchlik, Z; Goluchova, K; Kluzniak, W

    2015-01-01

    Estimations of black hole spin in the three Galactic microquasars GRS 1915+105, GRO J1655-40, and XTE J1550-564 have been carried out based on spectral and timing X-ray measurements and various theoretical concepts. Among others, a non-linear resonance between axisymmetric epicyclic oscillation modes of an accretion disc around a Kerr black hole has been considered as a model for the observed high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (HF QPOs). Estimates of spin predicted by this model have been derived based on the geodesic approximation of the accreted fluid motion. Here we assume accretion flow described by the model of a pressure-supported torus and carry out related corrections to the mass-spin estimates. We find that for dimensionless black hole spin a0.9, in which case the resonant eigenfrequencies rapidly decrease as the torus thickness increases. We conclude that the assumed non-geodesic effects shift the lower limit of the spin, implied for the three microquasars by the epicyclic model and independ...

  3. Application of the elliptically polarized radio frequency fields in spin-3/2 nuclear quadrupole resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sklyar, Anna; Ostafin, Michal; Nogaj, Boleslaw [Dept. of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz Univ., Poznan (Poland); Sinyavsky, Nikolay [Baltic State Academy, Kaliningrad (Russian Federation)

    2009-09-15

    A possibility to excite the spin-3/2 quadrupolar nuclei in sites with a non-zero asymmetry parameter of the electric field gradient (EFG) tensor by means of an elliptically polarized radio frequency (RF) magnetic fields is discussed. Closed analytical formulas for the intensities of nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) nutation spectra and nutation, frequencies of powder samples were obtained. Characteristic singularities in the nutation spectra were determined which allow the measurement of the asymmetry parameter {eta}. It was found that in the general case of {eta} {ne} 0 the excitation of the nuclear spins in +m and -m states by using the circularly polarized RF fields is not fully selective. (orig.)

  4. Election Spin Resonance Studies of Free Radical Formation and Oxygen Consumption of Lens Epithelium During Ultraviolet Exposure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    A long life election spin resonance (ESR) signal at g=2.0006 was observed in the normal lens epithelium and cortical fibers. During ultraviolet (UV) exposure, a new ESR signal at g = 2.0060 was found in the lens epithelium. But this specific signal was not detected in the lens cortical fibers. This suggested that lens epithelial cells were more susceptible to the free radical formation which was induced by UV light. By means of ESR spin probe oxymetry, the oxygen uptake of lens epithelial cells was meas...

  5. Systematic evaluation of heteronuclear spin decoupling in solid-state NMR at the rotary-resonance conditions in the regime of fast magic-angle spinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Kshama; Madhu, P K; Agarwal, Vipin

    2016-09-01

    The performance of heteronuclear spin decoupling sequences in solid-state NMR severely degrades when the proton radiofrequency (RF) nutation frequencies (ν1) are close to or at multiples of magic-angle spinning (MAS) frequency (νr) that are referred to as rotary-resonance recoupling conditions (ν1=n·νr). Recently, two schemes, namely, PISSARRO and rCW(ApA), have been shown to be less affected by the problem of MAS and RF interference, specifically at the n=2 rotary-resonance recoupling condition, especially in the fast MAS regime. Here, we systematically evaluate the loss in intensity of several heteronuclear spin decoupling sequences at the n=1, 2 conditions compared to high-power decoupling in the fast-MAS regime. We propose that in the fast-MAS regime (above 40kHz) the entire discussion about RF and MAS interference can be avoided by using appropriate low-power decoupling sequences which give comparable performance to decoupling sequences with high-power (1)H irradiation of ca.195kHz.

  6. Detection of reactive oxygen species in isolated, perfused lungs by electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissmann, Norbert; Kuzkaya, Nermin; Fuchs, Beate; Tiyerili, Vedat; Schäfer, Rolf U; Schütte, Hartwig; Ghofrani, Hossein A; Schermuly, Ralph T; Schudt, Christian; Sydykov, Akylbek; Egemnazarow, Bakytbek; Seeger, Werner; Grimminger, Friedrich

    2005-01-01

    Background The sources and measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in intact organs are largely unresolved. This may be related to methodological problems associated with the techniques currently employed for ROS detection. Electron spin resonance (ESR) with spin trapping is a specific method for ROS detection, and may address some these technical problems. Methods We have established a protocol for the measurement of intravascular ROS release from isolated buffer-perfused and ventilated rabbit and mouse lungs, combining lung perfusion with the spin probe l-hydroxy-3-carboxy-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine (CPH) and ESR spectroscopy. We then employed this technique to characterize hypoxia-dependent ROS release, with specific attention paid to NADPH oxidase-dependent superoxide formation as a possible vasoconstrictor pathway. Results While perfusing lungs with CPH over a range of inspired oxygen concentrations (1–21 %), the rate of CP• formation exhibited an oxygen-dependence, with a minimum at 2.5 % O2. Addition of superoxide dismutase (SOD) to the buffer fluid illustrated that a minor proportion of this intravascular ROS leak was attributable to superoxide. Stimulation of the lungs by injection of phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) into the pulmonary artery caused a rapid increase in CP• formation, concomitant with pulmonary vasoconstriction. Both the PMA-induced CPH oxidation and the vasoconstrictor response were largely suppressed by SOD. When the PMA challenge was performed at different oxygen concentrations, maximum superoxide liberation and pulmonary vasoconstriction occurred at 5 % O2. Using a NADPH oxidase inhibitor and NADPH-oxidase deficient mice, we illustrated that the PMA-induced superoxide release was attributable to the stimulation of NADPH oxidases. Conclusion The perfusion of isolated lungs with CPH is suitable for detection of intravascular ROS release by ESR spectroscopy. We employed this technique to demonstrate that 1) PMA

  7. Detection of reactive oxygen species in isolated, perfused lungs by electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schudt Christian

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sources and measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS in intact organs are largely unresolved. This may be related to methodological problems associated with the techniques currently employed for ROS detection. Electron spin resonance (ESR with spin trapping is a specific method for ROS detection, and may address some these technical problems. Methods We have established a protocol for the measurement of intravascular ROS release from isolated buffer-perfused and ventilated rabbit and mouse lungs, combining lung perfusion with the spin probe l-hydroxy-3-carboxy-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine (CPH and ESR spectroscopy. We then employed this technique to characterize hypoxia-dependent ROS release, with specific attention paid to NADPH oxidase-dependent superoxide formation as a possible vasoconstrictor pathway. Results While perfusing lungs with CPH over a range of inspired oxygen concentrations (1–21 %, the rate of CP• formation exhibited an oxygen-dependence, with a minimum at 2.5 % O2. Addition of superoxide dismutase (SOD to the buffer fluid illustrated that a minor proportion of this intravascular ROS leak was attributable to superoxide. Stimulation of the lungs by injection of phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA into the pulmonary artery caused a rapid increase in CP• formation, concomitant with pulmonary vasoconstriction. Both the PMA-induced CPH oxidation and the vasoconstrictor response were largely suppressed by SOD. When the PMA challenge was performed at different oxygen concentrations, maximum superoxide liberation and pulmonary vasoconstriction occurred at 5 % O2. Using a NADPH oxidase inhibitor and NADPH-oxidase deficient mice, we illustrated that the PMA-induced superoxide release was attributable to the stimulation of NADPH oxidases. Conclusion The perfusion of isolated lungs with CPH is suitable for detection of intravascular ROS release by ESR spectroscopy. We employed this technique to

  8. Theory for cross effect dynamic nuclear polarization under magic-angle spinning in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance: the importance of level crossings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Kent R; Tycko, Robert

    2012-08-28

    We present theoretical calculations of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) due to the cross effect in nuclear magnetic resonance under magic-angle spinning (MAS). Using a three-spin model (two electrons and one nucleus), cross effect DNP with MAS for electron spins with a large g-anisotropy can be seen as a series of spin transitions at avoided crossings of the energy levels, with varying degrees of adiabaticity. If the electron spin-lattice relaxation time T(1e) is large relative to the MAS rotation period, the cross effect can happen as two separate events: (i) partial saturation of one electron spin by the applied microwaves as one electron spin resonance (ESR) frequency crosses the microwave frequency and (ii) flip of all three spins, when the difference of the two ESR frequencies crosses the nuclear frequency, which transfers polarization to the nuclear spin if the two electron spins have different polarizations. In addition, adiabatic level crossings at which the two ESR frequencies become equal serve to maintain non-uniform saturation across the ESR line. We present analytical results based on the Landau-Zener theory of adiabatic transitions, as well as numerical quantum mechanical calculations for the evolution of the time-dependent three-spin system. These calculations provide insight into the dependence of cross effect DNP on various experimental parameters, including MAS frequency, microwave field strength, spin relaxation rates, hyperfine and electron-electron dipole coupling strengths, and the nature of the biradical dopants.

  9. Effect of Fermi surface nesting on resonant spin excitations in Ba(1-x)K(x)Fe2As2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellan, J-P; Rosenkranz, S; Goremychkin, E A; Chung, D Y; Todorov, I S; Kanatzidis, M G; Eremin, I; Knolle, J; Chubukov, A V; Maiti, S; Norman, M R; Weber, F; Claus, H; Guidi, T; Bewley, R I; Osborn, R

    2011-10-21

    We report inelastic neutron scattering measurements of the resonant spin excitations in Ba(1-x)K(x)Fe(2)As(2) over a broad range of electron band filling. The fall in the superconducting transition temperature with hole doping coincides with the magnetic excitations splitting into two incommensurate peaks because of the growing mismatch in the hole and electron Fermi surface volumes, as confirmed by a tight-binding model with s(±)-symmetry pairing. The reduction in Fermi surface nesting is accompanied by a collapse of the resonance binding energy and its spectral weight, caused by the weakening of electron-electron correlations.

  10. Effect of Fermi surface nesting on resonant spin excitations in Ba{<_1-x}K{<_x}Fe{<_2}As{<_2}.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellan, J.-P.; Rosenkranz, S.; Goremychkin, E.A.; Chung, D.Y.; Todorov, I.S.; Kanatzidis, M.G.; Eremin, I.; Knolle, J.; Chubukov, A.V.; Maiti, s.; Norman, M.R.; Weber, F.; Claus, H.; Guidi, T.; Bewley, R.I.; Osborn, R. (Materials Science Division); (Northwestern Univ.); (Ruhr Univ.); (Max-Planck-Institut fur Physik komplexer Systeme); (Univ. Wisconsin-Madison); (Rutherford AppletonLab)

    2011-01-01

    We report inelastic neutron scattering measurements of the resonant spin excitations in Ba{sub 1-x}K{sub x}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} over a broad range of electron band filling. The fall in the superconducting transition temperature with hole doping coincides with the magnetic excitations splitting into two incommensurate peaks because of the growing mismatch in the hole and electron Fermi surface volumes, as confirmed by a tight-binding model with s{sub {+-}}-symmetry pairing. The reduction in Fermi surface nesting is accompanied by a collapse of the resonance binding energy and its spectral weight, caused by the weakening of electron-electron correlations.

  11. Generation of constant-amplitude radio-frequency sweeps at a tunnel junction for spin resonance STM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, William; Baumann, Susanne; Lutz, Christopher P.; Heinrich, Andreas J.

    2016-07-01

    We describe the measurement and successful compensation of the radio-frequency transfer function of a scanning tunneling microscope over a wide frequency range (15.5-35.5 GHz) and with high dynamic range (>50 dB). The precise compensation of cabling resonances and attenuations is critical for the production of constant-voltage frequency sweeps for electric-field driven electron spin resonance (ESR) experiments. We also demonstrate that a well-calibrated tunnel junction voltage is necessary to avoid spurious ESR peaks that can arise due to a non-flat transfer function.

  12. Identification of irradiated wheat by germination test, DNA comet assay and electron spin resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Adilson C.; Freund, Maria Teresa L.; Villavicencio, Ana Lúcia C. H.; Delincée, Henry; Arthur, Valter

    2002-03-01

    In several countries, there has been an increase in the use of radiation for food processing thus improving the quality and sanitary conditions, inhibiting pathogenic microorganisms, delaying the natural aging process and so extending product lifetime. The need to develop analytical methods to detect these irradiated products is also increasing. The goal of this research was to identify wheat irradiated using different radiation doses. Seeds were irradiated with a gamma 60Co source (Gammacell 220 GC) in the Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura and the Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares. Dose rate used were 1.6 and 5.8kGy/h. Applied doses were 0.0, 0.10, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 1.0, and 2.0kGy. After irradiation, seeds were analysed over a 6 month period. Three different detection methods were employed to determine how irradiation had modified the samples. Screening methods consisted of a germination test measuring the inhibition of shooting and rooting and analysis of DNA fragmentation. The method of electron spin resonance spectroscopy allowed a better dosimetric evaluation. These techniques make the identification of irradiated wheat with different doses possible.

  13. Characterization of molecular mobility in seed tissues: an electron paramagnetic resonance spin probe study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitink, J; Hemminga, M A; Hoekstra, F A

    1999-06-01

    The relationship between molecular mobility (tauR) of the polar spin probe 3-carboxy-proxyl and water content and temperature was established in pea axes by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and saturation transfer EPR. At room temperature, tauR increased during drying from 10(-11) s at 2.0 g water/g dry weight to 10(-4) s in the dry state. At water contents below 0.07 g water/g dry weight, tauR remained constant upon further drying. At the glass transition temperature, tauR was constant at approximately 10(-4) s for all water contents studied. Above Tg, isomobility lines were found that were approximately parallel to the Tg curve. The temperature dependence of tauR at all water contents studied followed Arrhenius behavior, with a break at Tg. Above Tg the activation energy for rotational motion was approximately 25 kJ/mol compared to 10 kJ/mol below Tg. The temperature dependence of tauR could also be described by the WLF equation, using constants deviating considerably from the universal constants. The temperature effect on tauR above Tg was much smaller in pea axes, as found previously for sugar and polymer glasses. Thus, although glasses are present in seeds, the melting of the glass by raising the temperature will cause only a moderate increase in molecular mobility in the cytoplasm as compared to a huge increase in amorphous sugars.

  14. Protection of dehydrated chicken meat by natural antioxidants as evaluated by electron spin resonance spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, L R; Månsson, L; Bertelsen, G; Huynh-Ba, T; Skibsted, L H

    2000-11-01

    Dehydrated chicken meat (a(w) = 0.20-0.35) made from mechanically deboned chicken necks can be protected against oxidative deterioration during storage by rosemary extract (at a sensory acceptable level of 1000 ppm, incorporated prior to drying). The efficiency of the rosemary extract was similar to that obtained by synthetic antioxidants in a reference product (70 ppm butylated hydroxyanisole and 70 ppm octyl gallate). Tea extract and coffee extract were less efficient than rosemary and synthetic antioxidants. Among the natural antioxidants tested, grape skin extract provided the least protection against oxidative changes in dehydrated chicken meat. Radicals in the product, quantified by direct measurement by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometry, developed similarly to headspace ethane, pentane, and hexanal, and to oxygen depletion both in unprotected and protected products. The ESR signal intensity and headspace hexanal both correlated with the sensory descriptor "rancidity" as evaluated by a trained sensory panel. Hexanal, as a secondary lipid oxidation product, showed an exponential dependence on the level of radicals in the product in agreement with a chain reaction mechanism for autoxidation, and direct ESR measurement may be used in quality control of dehydrated food products.

  15. Comparison of defects in crystalline oxide semiconductor materials by electron spin resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, Tokiyoshi, E-mail: toki@rins.ryukoku.ac.jp; Kimura, Mutsumi [Department of Electronics and Informatics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Ryukoku University, 1-438, 1-5 Yokotani, Seta Oe-Cho, Otsu, Shiga 520-2194, Japan and Joint Research Center for Science and Technology, Ryukoku University, 1-5 Yokotani, Seta Oe-Cho, Otsu, Shiga 520-2194 (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    Defects in crystalline InGaZnO{sub 4} (IGZO) induced by plasma were investigated using electron spin resonance (ESR). Thermal stabilities and g factors of two ESR signals (A and B observed at g = 1.939 and 2.003, respectively) in IGZO were different from those of the ESR signals observed in component materials such as Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} (signal observed at g = 1.969), In{sub 2}O{sub 3} (no signal), and ZnO (signal observed at g = 1.957). Signal A in IGZO increased upon annealing at 300 °C for 1 h, but decreased when annealing was continued for more than 2 h. On the other hand, signal B decreased upon annealing at 300 °C for 1 h. The ESR signal in ZnO decayed in accordance with a second-order decay model with a rate constant of 2.1 × 10{sup −4} s{sup −1}; however, this phenomenon was not observed in other materials. This difference might have been due to randomly formed IGZO lattices such as asymmetrical (Ga, Zn)O and In-O layers. Defects in signals A and B in IGZO were formed in trap states (at the deep level) and tail states, respectively.

  16. Electron spin resonance study of chromium(V) formation and decomposition by basalt-inhabiting bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalabegishvili, Tamaz L; Tsibakhashvili, Nelly Y; Holman, Hoi-Ying N

    2003-10-15

    Bacterial reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) compounds may produce reactive intermediates Cr(V) and Cr(IV), which can affect the mobility and toxicity of chromium in environments. To address this important subject, we conducted an electron spin resonance (ESR) study to understand the kinetics of the formation and decomposition of Cr(V) during Cr(VI) reduction by different gram-positive Cr(VI)-tolerant bacteria, which were isolated from polluted basalts from the United States of America and the Republic of Georgia. Results from our batch experiments show that during Cr(VI) reduction, the macromolecules at the cell wall of these bacteria could act as an electron donor to Cr(VI) to form a stable square-pyramidal Cr(V) complexes, which were reduced further probably via a one-electron transfer pathway to form Cr(IV) and Cr(III) compounds. The Cr(V) peak at the ESR spectrum possessed superhyperfine splitting characteristic of the Cr(V) complexes with diol-containing molecules. It appears that the kinetics of Cr(V) formation and decomposition depended on the bacterial growth phase and on the species. Both formation and decomposition of Cr(V) occurred more quickly when Cr(VI) was added at the exponential phase. In comparison with other gram-positive bacteria from the republic of Georgia, the formation and decomposition of Cr(V) in Arthrobacter species from the Unites States was significantly slower.

  17. Electron spin resonance and thermoluminescence in powder form of clear fused quartz: effects of grinding

    CERN Document Server

    Ranjbar, A H; Randle, K

    1999-01-01

    Clear fused quartz (CFQ) tubes were powdered either manually by using a mortar and pestle (for coarse production) or mechanically, using a micronising mill (for fine production). A high and multisignal electron spin resonance (ESR) background was found in the fine powder even after annealing it at 900 deg. C for 20 min. In the case of the coarse powder, the signal (ESR background) varied inversely with particle size and was quite high for particle sizes lower than 38 mu m. In a subsidiary experiment, using fine SiO sub 2 powder (99.8% pure, with the particle size of approx 0.007 mu m), manufactured by using flame hydrolysis, only a weak background signal was found. The sup 6 sup 0 Co gamma-ray irradiated powders (approx 22 Gy) were subjected to ESR analysis or thermoluminescence (TL) readout. The ESR intensity of the coarse powder varied directly with particle size. Thus, the intensity for a particle size of 20-38 mu m was very low and almost the same as the unirradiated intensity. In TL readout the results w...

  18. Identification of. gamma. -irradiated spices by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchiyama, Sadao; Kawamura, Yoko; Saito, Yukio (National Inst. of Hygienic Sciences, Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-12-01

    The electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometry spectra of white (WP), black (BP) and red (Capsicum annuum L. var. frutescerns L., RP) peppers each had a principal signal with a g-value of 2.0043, and the intensities of the principal signals were increased not only by {gamma}-irradiation but also by heating. Irradiated RP also showed a minor signal -30G from the principal one, and the intensity of the minor signal increased linearly with increasing dose from 10 to 50 kGy. Since the minor signal was observed in RP irradiated at 10 kGy and stored for one year, but did not appear either after heating or after exposure to this signal is unique to {gamma}-irradiated RP and should therefore be useful for the identification of {gamma}-irradiated spices of Capsicum genus, such as paprika and chili pepper. The computer simulation of the ESR spectra suggested that the minor signal should be assigned to methyl radical and the principal signal mainly to a combination of phenoxyl and peroxyl radicals. Such minor signals were found in {gamma}-irradiated allspice and cinnamon among 10 kinds of other spices. (author).

  19. Electron spin resonance. Part two: a diagnostic method in the environmental sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Christopher J

    2011-01-01

    A review is presented of some of the ways in which electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy may be useful to investigate systems of relevance to the environmental sciences. Specifically considered are: quantititave ESR, photocatalysis for pollution control; sorption and mobility of molecules in zeolites; free radicals produced by mechanical action and by shock waves from explosives; measurement of peroxyl radicals and nitrate radicals in air; determination of particulate matter polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), soot and black carbon in air; estimation of nitrate and nitrite in vegetables and fruit; lipid-peroxidation by solid particles (silica, asbestos, coal dust); ESR of soils and other biogenic substances: formation of soil organic matter carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) and no-till farming; detection of reactive oxygen species in the photosynthetic apparatus of higher plants under light stress; molecular mobility and intracellular glasses in seeds and pollen; molecular mobility in dry cotton; characterisation of the surface of carbon black used for chromatography; ESR dating for archaeology and determining seawater levels; measurement of the quality of tea-leaves by ESR; green-catalysts and catalytic media; studies of petroleum (crude oil); fuels; methane hydrate; fuel cells; photovoltaics; source rocks; kerogen; carbonaceous chondrites to find an ESR-based marker for extraterrestrial origin; samples from the Moon taken on the Apollo 11 and Apollo 12 missions to understand space-weathering; ESR studies of organic matter in regard to oil and gas formation in the North Sea; solvation by ionic liquids as green solvents, ESR in food and nutraceutical research.

  20. Investigation of defects in In–Ga–Zn oxide thin film using electron spin resonance signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nonaka, Yusuke; Kurosawa, Yoichi; Komatsu, Yoshihiro; Ishihara, Noritaka; Oota, Masashi; Nakashima, Motoki; Hirohashi, Takuya; Takahashi, Masahiro; Yamazaki, Shunpei [Semiconductor Energy Laboratory Co., Ltd., 398 Hase, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0036 (Japan); Obonai, Toshimitsu; Hosaka, Yasuharu; Koezuka, Junichi [Advanced Film Device, Inc., 161-2 Masuzuka, Tsuga-machi, Tochigi, Tochigi 328-0114 (Japan); Yamauchi, Jun [Semiconductor Energy Laboratory Co., Ltd., 398 Hase, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0036 (Japan); Emeritus Professor of Kyoto University, Oiwake-cho, Kitashirakawa, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2014-04-28

    In–Ga–Zn oxide (IGZO) is a next-generation semiconductor material seen as an alternative to silicon. Despite the importance of the controllability of characteristics and the reliability of devices, defects in IGZO have not been fully understood. We investigated defects in IGZO thin films using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. In as-sputtered IGZO thin films, we observed an ESR signal which had a g-value of g = 2.010, and the signal was found to disappear under thermal treatment. Annealing in a reductive atmosphere, such as N{sub 2} atmosphere, generated an ESR signal with g = 1.932 in IGZO thin films. The temperature dependence of the latter signal suggests that the signal is induced by delocalized unpaired electrons (i.e., conduction electrons). In fact, a comparison between the conductivity and ESR signal intensity revealed that the signal's intensity is related to the number of conduction electrons in the IGZO thin film. The signal's intensity did not increase with oxygen vacancy alone but also with increases in both oxygen vacancy and hydrogen concentration. In addition, first-principle calculation suggests that the conduction electrons in IGZO may be generated by defects that occur when hydrogen atoms are inserted into oxygen vacancies.

  1. Ternary complexes of albumin-Mn(II)-bilirubin and Electron Spin Resonance studies of gallstones

    CERN Document Server

    Chikvaidze, E N; Kirikashvili, I N; Mamniashvili, G I

    2009-01-01

    The stability of albumin-bilirubin complex was investigated depending on pH of solution. It was shown that the stability of complex increases in presence of Mn(II) ions. It was also investigated the paramagnetic composition of gallstones by the electron spin resonance (ESR) method. It turned out that all investigated gallstones contain a free bilirubin radical-the stable product of its radical oxidation. Accordingly the paramagnetic composition gallstones could be divided on three main types: cholesterol, brown pigment and black pigment stones. ESR spectra of cholesterol stones is singlet with g=2.003 and splitting between components 1.0 mT. At the same time the brown gallstones, besides aforementioned signal contain the ESR spectrum which is characteristics for Mn(II) ion complexes with inorganic compounds and, finally, in the black pigment stones it was found out Fe(III) and Cu(II) complexes with organic compounds and a singlet of bilirubin free radical. It is supposed that crystallization centers of gallst...

  2. Resonant Ultrasound studies of spin- and orbital ordering transitions in RVO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, M.; Yan, J.-Q.; Ren, Y.; Sales, B. C.; Mandrus, D.; Keppens, V.

    2013-03-01

    RVO3 perovskites (R = rare earth) have been shown to undergo multiple spin and orbital transitions due to the Jahn-Teller active V3+ electrons. We have initiated a study of the elastic response of RVO3, (R = Dy, Gd, Ce) as well as Y1-xLaxVO3 (x = 0.05, 0.3, 1) using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy. The temperature-dependence of the elastic response is dominated by the ordering transitions, with transition temperatures that change with the size of the rare earth. For CeVO3 and LaVO3, two transitions are observed, separated by 17K and 2K, respectively. DyVO3 and Y0.95La0.05VO3 show three transitions below 220K while GdVO3 only shows one. The full elastic tensor of Y0 . 7 La0.3VO3 has also been determined from 300K to 50K, yielding the temperature dependence of the 9 orthorhombic elastic moduli. Work at ORNL was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  3. Low-lying even parity meson resonances and spin-flavor symmetry revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Recio, C.; Geng, L. S.; Nieves, J.; Salcedo, L. L.; Wang, En; Xie, Ju-Jun

    2013-05-01

    We review and extend the model derived in Garcia-Recio et al. [Phys. Rev. D 83, 016007 (2011)] to address the dynamics of the low-lying even-parity meson resonances. This model is based on a coupled-channels spin-flavor extension of the chiral Weinberg-Tomozawa Lagrangian. This interaction is then used to study the S-wave meson-meson scattering involving members not only of the π octet, but also of the ρ nonet. In this work, we study in detail the structure of the SU(6)-symmetry-breaking contact terms that respect (or softly break) chiral symmetry. We derive the most general local (without involving derivatives) terms consistent with the chiral-symmetry-breaking pattern of QCD. After introducing sensible simplifications to reduce the large number of possible operators, we carry out a phenomenological discussion of the effects of these terms. We show how the inclusion of these pieces leads to an improvement of the description of the JP=2+ sector, without spoiling the main features of the predictions obtained in the original model in the JP=0+ and JP=1+ sectors. In particular, we find a significantly better description of the IG(JPC)=0+(2++), 1-(2++) and the I(JP)=(1)/(2)(2+) sectors, which correspond to the f2(1270), a2(1320), and K2*(1430) quantum numbers, respectively.

  4. Theory of two-dimensional Fourier transform electron spin resonance for ordered and viscous fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sanghyuk; Budil, David E.; Freed, Jack H.

    1994-10-01

    A comprehensive theory for interpreting two-dimensional Fourier transform (2D-FT) electron spin resonance (ESR) experiments that is based on the stochastic Liouville equation is presented. It encompasses the full range of motional rates from fast through very slow motions, and it also provides for microscopic as well as macroscopic molecular ordering. In these respects it is as sophisticated in its treatment of molecular dynamics as the theory currently employed for analyzing cw ESR spectra. The general properties of the pulse propagator superoperator, which describes the microwave pulses in Liouville space, are analyzed in terms of the coherence transfer pathways appropriate for COSY (correlation spectroscopy), SECSY (spin-echo correlation spectroscopy), and 2D-ELDOR (electron-electron double resonance) sequences wherein either the free-induction decay (FID) or echo decay is sampled. Important distinctions are made among the sources of inhomogeneous broadening, which include (a) incomplete spectral averaging in the slow-motional regime, (b) unresolved superhyperfine structure and related sources, and (c) microscopic molecular ordering but macroscopic disorder (MOMD). The differing effects these sources of inhomogeneous broadening have on the two mirror image coherence pathways observed in the dual quadrature 2D experiments, as well as on the auto vs crosspeaks of 2D-ELDOR, is described. The theory is applied to simulate experiments of nitroxide spin labels in complex fluids such as membrane vesicles, where the MOMD model applies and these distinctions are particularly relevant, in order to extract dynamic and ordering parameters. The recovery of homogeneous linewidths from FID-based COSY experiments on complex fluids with significant inhomogeneous broadening is also described. The theory is applied to the ultraslow motional regime, and a simple method is developed to determine rotational rates from the broadening of the autopeaks of the 2D-ELDOR spectra as a

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance Knight shifts in the presence of strong spin-orbit and crystal-field potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisson, D. M.; Curro, N. J.

    2016-07-01

    In recent years there has been increasing interest in materials with strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC). Nuclear magnetic resonance is a valuable microscopic probe of such systems because of the hyperfine interactions between the nuclear spins and the electron degrees of freedom. In materials with weak SOC the NMR Knight shift contains two contributions: one from the electron orbital susceptibility and the other from the electron spin susceptibility. These contributions can be separated by plotting the Knight shift versus the bulk susceptibility and extracting the slope and intercept. Here we examine the case where the SOC is non-negligible, in which case the slope and intercept are no longer simply related to these two contributions. These results have important implications for NMR studies of heavy fermions, as well as 4d and 5d systems.

  6. Superoxide Anion Radical Production in the Tardigrade Paramacrobiotus richtersi, the First Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spin-Trapping Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Aleksandar G; Guidetti, Roberto; Turi, Ana; Pavicevic, Aleksandra; Giovannini, Ilaria; Rebecchi, Lorena; Mojovic, Milos

    2015-01-01

    Anhydrobiosis is an adaptive strategy that allows withstanding almost complete body water loss. It has been developed independently by many organisms belonging to different evolutionary lines, including tardigrades. The loss of water during anhydrobiotic processes leads to oxidative stress. To date, the metabolism of free radicals in tardigrades remained unclear. We present a method for in vivo monitoring of free radical production in tardigrades, based on electron paramagnetic resonance and spin-trap DEPMPO, which provides simultaneous identification of various spin adducts (i.e., different types of free radicals). The spin trap can be easily absorbed in animals, and tardigrades stay alive during the measurements and during 24-h monitoring after the treatment. The results show that hydrated specimens of the tardigrade Paramacrobiotus richtersi produce the pure superoxide anion radical ((•)O2(-)). This is an unexpected result, as all previously examined animals and plants produce both superoxide anion radical and hydroxyl radical ((•)OH) or exclusively hydroxyl radical.

  7. Study of a DNA Duplex by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Molecular Dynamics Simulations. Validation of Pulsed Dipolar Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Distance Measurements Using Triarylmethyl-Based Spin Labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomzov, Alexander A; Sviridov, Eugeniy A; Shernuykov, Andrey V; Shevelev, Georgiy Yu; Pyshnyi, Dmitrii V; Bagryanskaya, Elena G

    2016-06-16

    Pulse dipole-dipole electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy (double electron-electron resonance [DEER] or pulse electron-electron double resonance [PELDOR] and double quantum coherence [DQC]) allows for measurement of distances in biomolecules and can be used at low temperatures in a frozen solution. Recently, the possibility of distance measurement in a nucleic acid at a physiological temperature using pulse EPR was demonstrated. In these experiments, triarylmethyl (TAM) radicals with long memory time of the electron spin served as a spin label. In addition, the duplex was immobilized on modified silica gel particles (Nucleosil DMA); this approach enables measurement of interspin distances close to 4.5 nm. Nevertheless, the possible influence of TAM on the structure of a biopolymer under study and validity of the data obtained by DQC are debated. In this paper, a combination of molecular dynamics (MD) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods was used for verification of interspin distances measured by the X-band DQC method. NMR is widely used for structural analysis of biomolecules under natural conditions (room temperature and an aqueous solution). The ultraviolet (UV) melting method and thermal series (1)H NMR in the range 5-95 °C revealed the presence of only the DNA duplex in solution at oligonucleotide concentrations 1 μM to 1.1 mM at temperatures below 40 °C. The duplex structures and conformation flexibility of native and TAM-labeled DNA complexes obtained by MD simulation were the same as the structure obtained by NMR refinement. Thus, we showed that distance measurements at physiological temperatures by the X-band DQC method allow researchers to obtain valid structural information on an unperturbed DNA duplex using terminal TAM spin labels.

  8. Delayed Double Resonance Between Quadrupolar Levels: Observation of a Nuclear Spin Emission Signal in s-Triazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manallah, B.

    1986-02-01

    A delayed double resonance experiment was carried out using a Robinson-type continuous wave spectrometer. The sample chosen was s-triazine at liquid helium temperature, where the relaxation times are of the order of ten hours. Line pairings between the two Nitrogen-14 NQR sites were confirmed. Emission signals from ν- transitions were observed after successively saturating first the ν- line and then the ν+ line. The results are understood in terms of a simple model of spin population dynamics.

  9. Phospholipid bilayer relaxation dynamics as revealed by the pulsed electron-electron double resonance of spin labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syryamina, V. N.; Dzuba, S. A.

    2012-10-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy in the form of pulsed electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR) was applied to 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) phospholipid bilayers containing lipids that were spin-labeled at different carbon positions along the lipid acyl chain. Pulsed ELDOR detects motionally induced spin flips of nitrogen nuclei in the nitroxide spin labels, which manifests itself as magnetization transfer (MT) in the nitroxide EPR spectrum. The MT effect was observed over a wide temperature range (100-225 K) on a microsecond time scale. In line with a previous study on molecular glasses [N. P. Isaev and S. A. Dzuba, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 094508 (2011), 10.1063/1.3633241], the motions that induce MT effect were suggested to have the same nature as those in dielectric secondary (β) Johari-Goldstein fast relaxation. The results were compared with literature dielectric relaxation data for POPC bilayers, revealing some common features. Molecular motions resulting in MT are faster for deeper spin labels in the membrane interior. The addition of cholesterol to the bilayer suppresses the lipid motions near the steroid nucleus and accelerates the lipid motions beyond the steroid nucleus, in the bilayer interior. This finding was attributed to the lipid acyl chains being more ordered near the steroid nucleus and less ordered in the bilayer interior. The motions are absent in dry lipids, indicating that the motions are determined by intermolecular interactions in the bilayer.

  10. Effect of temperature and glassy states on the molecular mobility of solutes in frozen tuna muscle as studied by electron spin resonance spectroscopy with spin probe detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlien, Vibeke; Andersen, Mogens L; Jouhtimäki, Saara; Risbo, Jens; Skibsted, Leif H

    2004-04-21

    The mobility of solutes in frozen food systems (tuna muscle, sarcoplasmic protein fraction of tuna muscle, and carbohydrate-water) has been studied using the temperature dependence of the shape of electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra of the spin probe 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl (TEMPOL). The spin probe was incorporated into the tuna meat from an aqueous solution of TEMPOL or by contact with a layer of TEMPOL crystals. The melting/freezing of freeze-concentrated solutes in frozen tuna meat was observed to take place over a range of temperatures from -25 to -10 degrees C. Lower temperatures gave ESR powder spectra due to the decreased mobility of the spin probe, and the temperature dependence of the mobility of the spin probe did not show abrupt changes at the glass transition temperatures of the systems. The mobility of nonglass forming solutes is concluded to be decoupled from the glass forming components. Similar behavior was also observed for TEMPOL in frozen, aqueous carbohydrate systems. The temperature dependence of the mobility of TEMPOL in the frozen systems was analyzed using the Arrhenius equation, and the logarithm of the Arrhenius preexponential factor tau(a) was found to be linearly correlated with the activation energy for all of the tuna and carbohydrate samples, indicating a common molecular mechanism for the observed mobility of TEMPOL in all of the systems. The linear correlation also suggests that the observed mobility of TEMPOL in the frozen aqueous systems is dominated by enthalpy-entropy compensation effects, where the mobility of TEMPOL is thermodynamically strongly coupled to the closest surrounding molecules.

  11. Two-loop QCD Correction to Massive Spin-2 Resonance $ \\to q ~ \\bar{q} ~ g $

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, Taushif; Mathews, Prakash; Rana, Narayan; Ravindran, V

    2016-01-01

    Two-loop QCD correction to massive spin-2 Graviton decaying to $q ~ + ~ \\bar{q}~ + ~g$ is presented considering a generic universal spin-2 coupling to the SM through the conserved energy-momentum tensor. Such a massive spin-2 particle can arise in extra-dimensional models. The ultraviolet and infrared structure of the QCD amplitudes are studied. In dimensional regularisation, the infrared pole structure is in agreement with Catani's proposal, confirming the universal factorization property of QCD amplitudes, even with the spin-2 tensorial coupling. This computation now completes the full two-loop QCD corrections for the production of a spin-2 in association with a jet.

  12. Electron spin resonance investigaton of semiconductor materials for application in thin-film silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Lihong

    2012-07-01

    In the present work, hydrogenated silicon and its alloys silicon carbide and silicon oxide have been investigated using electron spin resonance (ESR). The microstructure of these materials ranges from highly crystalline to amorphous. The correlation between the paramagnetic defects, microstructure, optical and electrical properties has been discussed. Correspondingly, these properties were characterized by the spin density (N{sub S}), g-value and the lineshape of ESR spectra, Infrared (I{sup IR}{sub C}) and/or Raman crystallinity (I{sup RS}{sub C}) as well as optical absorption and electrical dark conductivity ({sigma}{sub D}). 1. As the light absorber, Si layers essentially should have low defect density and good stability against light exposure. The spin density (N{sub S}) measured by ESR is often used as a measure for the paramagnetic defect density (N{sub D}) in the material. However, ESR sample preparation procedures can potentially cause discrepancy between N{sub S} and N{sub D}. Using Mo-foil, Al-foil and ZnO:Al-covered glass as sacrificial substrates, {mu}c-Si:H and a-Si:H films were deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), and ESR powder samples have been prepared with corresponding procedures. Possible preparation-related metastability and instability effects have been investigated in terms of substrate dependence, HCl-etching and atmosphere exposure. A sequence of 'preparation - annealing - air-exposure - annealing' has been designed to investigate the metastability and instability effects. N{sub S} after post-preparation air exposure is higher than in the annealed states, especially for the highly crystalline {mu}c-Si:H material the discrepancy reached one order of magnitude. Low temperature ESR measurements at 40 K indicated that atmospheric exposure leads to a redistribution of the defect states which in turn influence the evaluated N{sub S}. In annealed conditions the samples tend to have lower N{sub S} presumably due

  13. Electron Spin Resonance on Mobile and Confined States in Gated Modulation Doped Si/SiGe Heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jianhua; Malissa, H.; Lu, Tzu-Ming; Shankar, S.; Tyryshkin, A. M.; Lyon, S. A.; Chen, Hung-Ming; Kuan, Chieh-Hsiung

    2010-03-01

    Electron spins in quantum dots in Si/SiGe heterostructures are promising qubits but controlling and measuring spins in gated dots is challenging. Fortunately, electrons confined into natural quantum dots by interface disorder can capture the spin physics with minimal processing, exhibiting long T1 and T2 at the Si/SiO2 interface^1. Natural quantum dots in the Si/SiGe system may be similarly useful. As a first step, we have fabricated a 2.2 x 13mm^2 Hall bar on a Si/SiGe substrate gated with an Al gate above an Al2O3 insulator, and performed electron spin resonance (ESR) at gate voltages above and below threshold. The ESR signal arising from the Si quantum well evolves with gate voltage, and its intensity (spin susceptibility) is measured as a function of temperature down to 0.4K. The susceptibility follows a Pauli dependence when the gate is biased above threshold, while it is Curie-like below threshold, indicating an evolution from a mobile 2D system towards localized states confined in natural dots by the intrinsic disorder in the quantum well. This work is supported by LPS and ARO. [1] S. Shankar, et al., Physica E, 40, 1659-1661 (2008).

  14. Electron spin resonance studies on intact cells and isolated lipid droplets from fatty acid-modified L1210 murine leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, I; Burns, C P; Spector, A A

    1982-07-01

    It has been suggested that the formation of cytoplasmic lipid droplets may produce an artifact and be responsible for the differences in membrane physical properties detected in lipid-modified cells using fluorescence polarization or spin label probes. To investigate this, the electron spin resonance spectra of lipid droplets isolated from the cytoplasm of L1210 leukemia cells were compared with spectra obtained from the intact cell. Mice bearing the L1210 leukemia were fed diets containing either 16% sunflower oil or 16% coconut oil in order to modify the fatty acid composition of the tumor. A microsome-rich fraction prepared from L1210 cells grown in animals fed the sunflower oil-rich diet contained more polyenoic fatty acids (52 versus 29%), while microsomes from L1210 cells grown in animals fed the coconut oil-rich diets contained more monoenoic fatty acids (37 versus 12%). The order parameter calculated for lipid droplets labeled with the 5-nitroxystearic acid spin probe was only about one-half that of intact cells, whereas it was similar to that obtained for pure triolein droplets suspended in buffer. Order parameters of the inner hyperfine splittings calculated from the spectra of cells grown in the sunflower oil-fed animals [0.543 +/- 0.001 (S.E.)] were lower than those from the cells grown in animals fed the coconut oil diets (0.555 +/- 0.002) (p less than 0.005). In contrast, the order parameters of the lipid droplets isolated from the cells grown in animals fed sunflower oil (0.303 +/- 0.029) or coconut oil (0.295 +/- 0.021) were not significantly different, indicating that motion of a spin label probe in the highly fluid cytoplasmic lipid droplets is not affected by these types of modifications in cellular fatty acid composition. Therefore, the electron spin resonance changes that are observed in the intact cells cannot be due to localization of the probe in cytoplasmic lipid droplets. These results support the conclusion that the electron spin

  15. PREFACE: 13th International Conference on Muon Spin Rotation, Relaxation and Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The 13th International Conference on Muon Spin Rotation, Relaxation and Resonance (μSR2014) organized by the Laboratory for Muon Spin Spectroscopy, Paul Scherrer Institute in collaboration with the University of Zurich and the University of Fribourg, was held in Grindelwald, Switzerland from 1st to 6th June 2014. The conference provided a forum for researchers from around the world with interests in the applications of μSR to study a wide range of topics including condensed matter physics, materials and molecular sciences, chemistry and biology. Polarized muons provide a unique and versatile probe of matter, enabling studies at the atomic level of electronic structure and dynamics in a wide range of systems. The conference was the thirteenth in a series, which began in Rorschach in 1978 and it took place for the third time in Switzerland. The previous conferences were held in Cancun, Mexico (2011), Tsukuba, Japan (2008), Oxford, UK (2005), Williamsburg, USA (2002), Les Diablerets, Switzerland (1999), Nikko, Japan (1996), Maui, USA (1993), Oxford, UK (1990), Uppsala, Sweden (1986), Shimoda, Japan (1983), Vancouver, Canada (1980), and Rorschach, Switzerland (1978). These conference proceedings contain 67 refereed publications from presentations covering magnetism, superconductivity, chemistry, semiconductors, biophysics and techniques. The conference logo, displayed in the front pages of these proceedings, represents both the location of μSR2014 in the Alps and the muon-spin rotation technique. The silhouette represents the famous local mountains Eiger, Mönch and Jungfrau as drawn by the Swiss painter Ferdinand Hodler and the apple with arrow is at the same time a citation of the Wilhelm Tell legend and a remembrance of the key role played by the muon spin and the asymmetric muon decay (which for the highest positron energy has an apple like shape). More than 160 participants (including 32 registered as students and 13 as accompanying persons) from 19 countries

  16. Floquet-Magnus expansion for general N-coupled spins systems in magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mananga, Eugene Stephane; Charpentier, Thibault

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we present a theoretical perturbative approach for describing the NMR spectrum of strongly dipolar-coupled spin systems under fast magic-angle spinning. Our treatment is based on two approaches: the Floquet approach and the Floquet-Magnus expansion. The Floquet approach is well known in the NMR community as a perturbative approach to get analytical approximations. Numerical procedures are based on step-by-step numerical integration of the corresponding differential equations. The Floquet-Magnus expansion is a perturbative approach of the Floquet theory. Furthermore, we address the " γ -encoding" effect using the Floquet-Magnus expansion approach. We show that the average over " γ " angle can be performed for any Hamiltonian with γ symmetry.

  17. Electron spin resonance investigaton of semiconductor materials for application in thin-film silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Lihong

    2012-07-01

    In the present work, hydrogenated silicon and its alloys silicon carbide and silicon oxide have been investigated using electron spin resonance (ESR). The microstructure of these materials ranges from highly crystalline to amorphous. The correlation between the paramagnetic defects, microstructure, optical and electrical properties has been discussed. Correspondingly, these properties were characterized by the spin density (N{sub S}), g-value and the lineshape of ESR spectra, Infrared (I{sup IR}{sub C}) and/or Raman crystallinity (I{sup RS}{sub C}) as well as optical absorption and electrical dark conductivity ({sigma}{sub D}). 1. As the light absorber, Si layers essentially should have low defect density and good stability against light exposure. The spin density (N{sub S}) measured by ESR is often used as a measure for the paramagnetic defect density (N{sub D}) in the material. However, ESR sample preparation procedures can potentially cause discrepancy between N{sub S} and N{sub D}. Using Mo-foil, Al-foil and ZnO:Al-covered glass as sacrificial substrates, {mu}c-Si:H and a-Si:H films were deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), and ESR powder samples have been prepared with corresponding procedures. Possible preparation-related metastability and instability effects have been investigated in terms of substrate dependence, HCl-etching and atmosphere exposure. A sequence of 'preparation - annealing - air-exposure - annealing' has been designed to investigate the metastability and instability effects. N{sub S} after post-preparation air exposure is higher than in the annealed states, especially for the highly crystalline {mu}c-Si:H material the discrepancy reached one order of magnitude. Low temperature ESR measurements at 40 K indicated that atmospheric exposure leads to a redistribution of the defect states which in turn influence the evaluated N{sub S}. In annealed conditions the samples tend to have lower N{sub S} presumably due

  18. Microscopic properties of degradation-free capped GdN thin films studied by electron spin resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimokawa, Tokuro [Center for Collaborative Research and Technology Development, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe, Hyogo 657-8501 (Japan); Fukuoka, Yohei [Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe, Hyogo 657-8501 (Japan); Fujisawa, Masashi [Research Center for Low Temperature Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ohokayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Zhang, Weimin; Okubo, Susumu; Ohta, Hitoshi, E-mail: hohta@kobe-u.ac.jp [Molecular Photoscience Research Center, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe, Hyogo 657-8501 (Japan); Sakurai, Takahiro [Center for Supports to Research and Education Activities, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe, Hyogo 657-8501 (Japan); Vidyasagar, Reddithota; Yoshitomi, Hiroaki; Kitayama, Shinya; Kita, Takashi [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2015-01-28

    The microscopic magnetic properties of high-quality GdN thin films have been investigated by electron spin resonance (ESR) and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements. Detailed temperature dependence ESR measurements have shown the existence of two ferromagnetic components at lower temperatures, which was not clear from the previous magnetization measurements. The temperature, where the resonance shift occurs for the major ferromagnetic component, seems to be consistent with the Curie temperature obtained from the previous magnetization measurement. On the other hand, the divergence of line width is observed around 57 K for the minor ferromagnetic component. The magnetic anisotropies of GdN thin films have been obtained by the analysis of FMR angular dependence observed at 4.2 K. Combining the X-ray diffraction results, the correlation between the magnetic anisotropies and the lattice constants is discussed.

  19. Persistent free radical ESR signals in marine bivalve tissues. [Electron Spin Resonance (ESR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehlorn, R.J. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering); Mendez, A.T. (Fundacion Educativa Ana G. Mendez, Rio Piedras (Puerto Rico)); Higashi, R. (California Univ., Bodega Bay, CA (United States). Bodega Marine Lab.); Fan, T. (California Univ., Davis, CA (United States))

    1992-08-01

    Freeze-dried homogenates of the oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae collected from waters in Puerto Rico near urban and industrial sites as well as at relatively pristine locations yielded electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra characteristic of free radicals as well as spectral components of transition metal ions, dominated by manganese. The magnitudes of these ESR signals and the concentrations of trace elements (determined by X-ray fluorescence) varied considerably among oyster samples, masking any potential correlation with polluted waters. Laboratory studies were initiated to identify the factors controlling the magnitudes of the tissue free radical ESR signals. Another mollusc, Mytilus californianus collected at the Bodega Marine laboratory in northern California, was fractionated into goneds and remaining tissue. Freeze-dried homogenates of both fractions exhibited ESR signals that increased gradually with time. ESR signals were observed in freeze-dried perchloric acid (PCA) precipitates of the homogenates, delipidated PCA precipitates, and in chloroform extracts of these precipitates. Acid hydrolysis to degrade proteins to amino acids produced a residue, which yielded much larger ESR free radical signals after freeze-drying. Freshly thawed homogenates of Crassostrea rhizophorae also exhibited ESR signals. A laboratory model of copper stress in Crassostrea rhizophorae was developed to study the effect of this transition metal on dssue free radicals. Preliminary results suggested that sublethal copper exposure had little effect on tissue fire radicals, except possibly for a signal enhancement in an oyster fraction that was enriched in kidney granules. Since kidney granules are known to accumulate heavy metals in mussels and probably other marine bivalves, this signal enhancement may prove to be an indicator of free radical processes associated with heavy metal deposition in molluscs.

  20. Propofol allows precise quantitative arterial spin labelling functional magnetic resonance imaging in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Karen M; Blau, Christoph W; Kelly, Michael E; O'Herlihy, Colm; O'Connell, P R; Jones, James F X; Kerskens, Christian M

    2010-07-15

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) techniques highlight cerebral vascular responses which are coupled to changes in neural activation. However, two major difficulties arise when employing these techniques in animal studies. First is the disturbance of cerebral blood flow due to anaesthesia and second is the difficulty of precise reproducible quantitative measurements. These difficulties were surmounted in the current study by using propofol and quantitative arterial spin labelling (QASL) to measure relative cerebral blood volume of labelled water (rCBV(lw),) mean transit time (MTT) and capillary transit time (CTT). The ASL method was applied to measure the haemodynamic response in the primary somatosensory cortex following forepaw stimulation in the rat. Following stimulation an increase in signal intensity and rCBV(lw) was recorded, this was accompanied by a significant decrease in MTT (1.97+/-0.06s to 1.44+/-0.04s) and CTT (1.76+/-0.06s to 1.39+/-0.07s). Two animals were scanned repeatedly on two different experimental days. Stimulation in the first animal was applied to the same forepaw during the initial and repeat scan. In the second animal stimulation was applied to different forepaws on the first and second days. The control and activated ASL signal intensities, rCBVlw on both days were almost identical in both animals. The basal MTT and CTT during the second scan were also very similar to the values obtained during the first scan. The MTT recorded from the animal that underwent stimulation to the same paw during both scanning sessions was very similar on the first and second days. In conclusion, propofol induces little physiological disturbance and holds potential for longitudinal QASL fMRI studies.

  1. Electron doping evolution of the neutron spin resonance in NaFe1 -xCoxAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chenglin; Lv, Weicheng; Tan, Guotai; Song, Yu; Carr, Scott V.; Chi, Songxue; Matsuda, M.; Christianson, A. D.; Fernandez-Baca, J. A.; Harriger, L. W.; Dai, Pengcheng

    2016-05-01

    Neutron spin resonance, a collective magnetic excitation coupled to superconductivity, is one of the most prominent features shared by a broad family of unconventional superconductors including copper oxides, iron pnictides, and heavy fermions. In this paper, we study the doping evolution of the resonances in NaFe1 -xCoxAs covering the entire superconducting dome. For the underdoped compositions, two resonance modes coexist. As doping increases, the low-energy resonance gradually loses its spectral weight to the high-energy one but remains at the same energy. By contrast, in the overdoped regime we only find one single resonance, which acquires a broader width in both energy and momentum but retains approximately the same peak position even when Tc drops by nearly a half compared to optimal doping. These results suggest that the energy of the resonance in electron overdoped NaFe1 -xCoxAs is neither simply proportional to Tc nor the superconducting gap but is controlled by the multiorbital character of the system and doped impurity scattering effect.

  2. Spin resonance transport properties of a single Au atom in S-Au-S junction and Au-Au-Au junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fangyuan, Wang; Guiqin, Li

    2016-07-01

    The spin transport properties of S-Au-S junction and Au-Au-Au junction between Au nanowires are investigated with density functional theory and the non-equilibrium Green's function. We mainly focus on the spin resonance transport properties of the center Au atom. The breaking of chemical bonds between anchor atoms and center Au atom significantly influences their spin transmission characteristics. We find the 0.8 eV orbital energy shift between anchor S atoms and the center Au atom can well protect the spin state stored in the S-Au-S junction and efficiently extract its spin state to the current by spin resonance mechanism, while the spin interaction of itinerant electrons and the valence electron of the center Au atom in the Au-Au-Au junction can extract the current spin information into the center Au atom. Fermi energy drift and bias-dependent spin filtering properties of the Au-Au-Au junction may transform information between distance, bias, and electron spin. Those unique properties make them potential candidates for a logical nanocircuit. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grants No. 2011CB921602) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants No. 20121318158).

  3. Mechanical back-action of a spin-wave resonance in a magnetoelastic thin film on a surface acoustic wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowtham, P. G.; Labanowski, D.; Salahuddin, S.

    2016-07-01

    Surface acoustic waves (SAWs) traveling on the surface of a piezoelectric crystal can, through the magnetoelastic interaction, excite traveling spin-wave resonance in a magnetic film deposited on the substrate. This spin-wave resonance in the magnetic film creates a time-ynamic surface stress of magnetoelastic origin that acts back on the surface of the piezoelectric and modifies the SAW propagation. Unlike previous analyses that treat the excitation as a magnon-phonon polariton, here the magnetoelastic film is treated as a perturbation modifying boundary conditions on the SAW. We use acoustical perturbation theory to find closed-form expressions for the back-action surface stress and strain fields and the resultant SAW velocity shifts and attenuation. We demonstrate that the shear stres fields associated with this spin-wave back-action also generate effective surface currents on the piezoelectric both in phase and out of phase with the driving SAW potential. Characterization of these surface currents and their applications in determination of the magnetoelastic coupling are discussed. The perturbative calculation is carried out explicitly to first order (a regime corresponding to many experimental situations of current interest) and we provide a sketch of the implications of the theory at higher order.

  4. Angular correlation, spin alignment, and systematics of mis-matched {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C inelastic scattering resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuosmaa, A.H.; Wiedenhoever, I.; Caggiano, J.; Carpenter, M.P.; Devlin, M.; Heinz, A.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Kondev, F.; Lauritsen, T.; Sarantites, D.G.; Sobotka, L.G.; Battacharyya, P

    2003-10-09

    Particle gamma-ray angular correlation measurements have been used to study the spin alignment and magnetic-substate population parameters for the 2{sup +}{sub 1} (4.443 MeV) state in {sup 12}C, populated in the {sup 12}C({sup 12}C,{sup 12}C[0{sup +}{sub 2}]){sup 12}C(2{sup +}{sub 1}) inelastic scattering reaction in the vicinity of a prominent, narrow peak in the scattering excitation function. The data show a strong alignment of the spin with the orbital angular momentum, and suggest that the cross section peak corresponds to a spin 14{sup +} resonance at E{sub c.m.}=28.0 MeV. This energy is close to that where a strong peak is also observed in the 0{sup +}{sub 1}+0{sup +}{sub 2} excitation function. A comparison between the data for these two channels lends some support to recent theoretical calculations of resonance behavior for angular-momentum-mismatched channels in {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C inelastic scattering.

  5. Direct Microscopic Study of Doubly Polarized Atomic-Hydrogen by Electron-Spin Resonance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Yperen, G.H.; Silvera, I.F.; Walraven, J.T.M.; Berkhout, J.; Brisson, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    By means of ESR in a high magnetic field the hyperfine states of a gas of spin-polarized atomic hydrogen are directly probed. This allows a direct determination of the spin-state populations and nuclear polarization. The unusual ESR line shape is attributed to field inhomogeneities. The temperature

  6. Electron Spin Resonance Study of Organic Interfaces in Ion Gel-Gated Rubrene Single-Crystal Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yuki; Tsuji, Masaki; Yomogida, Yohei; Takenobu, Taishi; Iwasa, Yoshihiro; Marumoto, Kazuhiro

    2013-04-01

    Organic interfaces of rubrene single crystals (RSCs) in ion gel-gated electric double-layer transistors (EDLTs) were investigated by electron spin resonance (ESR). The EDLTs were fabricated by laminating ion-gel films onto RSCs. Clear ESR signals due to field-injected holes in RSCs were successfully observed at low gate voltages, showing a high spin concentration due to the high capacitance of EDLTs. The analyses of anisotropic ESR signals and its gate-voltage dependence show that the bulk molecular orientation at RSCs' interfaces is preserved without forming deep trapping levels, which demonstrate that organic interfaces in RSC-EDLTs are clean and undamaged under a strong electric field in EDLTs.

  7. Depth profiles of pulmonary surfactant protein B in phosphatidylcholine bilayers, studied by fluorescence and electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cruz, A; Casals, C; Plasencia, I;

    1998-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant-associated protein B (SP-B) has been isolated from porcine lungs and reconstituted in bilayers of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) or egg yolk phosphatidylcholine (PC) to characterize the extent of insertion of the protein into phospholipid bilayers. The parameters...... for the interaction of SP-B with DPPC or PC using different reconstitution protocols have been estimated from the changes induced in the fluorescence emission spectrum of the single protein tryptophan. All the different reconstituted SP-B-phospholipid preparations studied had similar Kd values for the binding....... These differences in the extent of insertion lead to qualitative and quantitative differences in the effect of the protein on the mobility of the phospholipid acyl chains, as studied by spin-label electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, and could represent different functional stages in the surfactant cycle...

  8. A dual-mode microwave resonator for double electron-electron spin resonance spectroscopy at W-band microwave frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkach, Igor; Sicoli, Giuseppe; Höbartner, Claudia; Bennati, Marina

    2011-04-01

    We present a dual-mode resonator operating at/near 94 GHz (W-band) microwave frequencies and supporting two microwave modes with the same field polarization at the sample position. Numerical analysis shows that the frequencies of both modes as well as their frequency separation can be tuned in a broad range up to GHz. The resonator was constructed to perform pulsed ELDOR experiments with a variable separation of "pump" and "detection" frequencies up to Δ ν = 350 MHz. To examine its performance, test ESE/PELDOR experiments were performed on a representative biradical system.

  9. Electron spin resonance study of the single-ion anisotropy in the pyrochlore antiferromagnet Gd2Sn2O7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazkov, V. N.; Smirnov, A. I.; Sanchez, J. P.; Forget, A.; Colson, D.; Bonville, P.

    2006-02-01

    Single-ion anisotropy is of importance for the magnetic ordering of the frustrated pyrochlore antiferromagnets Gd2Ti2O7 and Gd2Sn2O7. The anisotropy parameters for Gd2Sn2O7 were measured using the electron spin resonance technique. The anisotropy was found to be of the easy plane type, with the main constant D = 140 mK. This value is 35% smaller than the value of the corresponding anisotropy constant of the related compound Gd2Ti2O7.

  10. Real-time In Situ Electron Spin Resonance Measurements on Fungal Spores of Penicillium digitatum during Exposure of Oxygen Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Ishikawa, Kenji; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Tamiya, Kazuhiro; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Ohta, Takayuki; Ito, Masafumi; Iseki, Sachiko; Takeda, Keigo; Kondo, Hiroki; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru

    2012-01-01

    We report the kinetic analysis of free radicals on fungal spores of Penicillium digitatum interacted with atomic oxygen generated plasma electric discharge using real time in situ electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements. We have obtained information that the ESR signal from the spores was observed and preliminarily assignable to semiquinone radical with a g-value of around 2.004 and a line width of approximately 5G. The decay of the signal is possibly linked to the inactivation of the fungal spore. The real-time in situ ESR has proven to be a useful method to elucidate plasma-induced surface reactions on biological specimens.

  11. Exploring Structure, Dynamics, and Topology of Nitroxide Spin-Labeled Proteins Using Continuous-Wave Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altenbach, Christian; López, Carlos J; Hideg, Kálmán; Hubbell, Wayne L

    2015-01-01

    Structural and dynamical characterization of proteins is of central importance in understanding the mechanisms underlying their biological functions. Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) combined with continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance (CW EPR) spectroscopy has shown the capability of providing this information with site-specific resolution under physiological conditions for proteins of any degree of complexity, including those associated with membranes. This chapter introduces methods commonly employed for SDSL and describes selected CW EPR-based methods that can be applied to (1) map secondary and tertiary protein structure, (2) determine membrane protein topology, (3) measure protein backbone flexibility, and (4) reveal the existence of conformational exchange at equilibrium.

  12. Multi-frequency force-detected electron spin resonance in the millimeter-wave region up to 150 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmichi, E.; Tokuda, Y.; Tabuse, R.; Tsubokura, D.; Okamoto, T.; Ohta, H.

    2016-07-01

    In this article, a novel technique is developed for multi-frequency force-detected electron spin resonance (ESR) in the millimeter-wave region. We constructed a compact ESR probehead, in which the cantilever bending is sensitively detected by a fiber-optic Fabry-Perot interferometer. With this setup, ESR absorption of diphenyl-picrylhydrazyl radical (<1 μg) was clearly observed at multiple frequencies of up to 150 GHz. We also observed the hyperfine splitting of low-concentration Mn2+ impurities(˜0.2%) in MgO.

  13. Spin Correlation for pp Elastic Scattering at θc.m.=π2 in the Energy Region of Dibaryon Resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, T. S.; Glass, G.; Hiebert, J. C.; Kenefick, R. A.; Northcliffe, L. C.; Tippens, W. B.; Boissevain, J. G. J.; Jarmer, J. J.; Simmons, J. E.; Tripard, G. E.; Fitzgerald, D.; Holt, J.; Mokhtari, A.

    1982-10-01

    Precise measurements are reported of the spin-correlation parameter ANN for 500-800 MeV pp elastic scattering at θc.m.=π2. While not reproducing the large value of ANN reported earlier at 697 MeV, the data show a pronounced maximum in the 90° triplet-to-singlet ratio near the location of the reported 3F3 dibaryon resonance. In contradiction with an earlier report, structure is not found in the moduli of the singlet and triplet amplitudes.

  14. Real-time in situ electron spin resonance measurements on fungal spores of Penicillium digitatum during exposure of oxygen plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Kenji; Mizuno, Hiroko; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Tamiya, Kazuhiro; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Ohta, Takayuki; Ito, Masafumi; Iseki, Sachiko; Takeda, Keigo; Kondo, Hiroki; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru

    2012-07-01

    We report the kinetic analysis of free radicals on fungal spores of Penicillium digitatum interacted with atomic oxygen generated plasma electric discharge using real time in situ electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements. We have obtained information that the ESR signal from the spores was observed and preliminarily assignable to semiquinone radical with a g-value of around 2.004 and a line width of approximately 5G. The decay of the signal is possibly linked to the inactivation of the fungal spore. The real-time in situ ESR has proven to be a useful method to elucidate plasma-induced surface reactions on biological specimens.

  15. Cross polarization, magic-angle spinning /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of soil humic fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saiz-Jimenez, C.; Hawkins, B.L.; Maciel, G.E.

    1986-01-01

    Cross polarization, magic-angle spinning /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to characterize humic fractions isolated from different soils. The humic acid fractions are more aromatic than the humin fractions, probably due to the higher polysaccharide content of humins. However, fulvic acid fractions are more aromatic than the corresponding humic acid and humin fractions. These results can be interpreted in terms of the isolation procedure, because the high affinity of Polyclar AT for phenols results in higher aromaticities as compared with other isolation methods (e.g. charcoal).

  16. Electron spin resonance (ESR) dating of hominid-bearing deposits in the Caverna delle Fate, Ligure, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falgueres, Christophe; Yokoyama, Yuji; Bibron, Roland

    1990-07-01

    Stalagmitic floors interstratified with Mousterian deposits from the Caverna delle Fate (Italy) have been dated by the electron spin resonance (ESR) method. Three samples dated fall between 60,000 and 74,000 yr and indicate the age of the Mousterian deposits. They are in good agreement with ages determined by nondestructive γ-ray spectrometry of the human remains from 231Pa/ 235U and 230Th /234U ratios, which are, respectively, 75,000 -14,000+21,000 and 82,000 -25,000+36,000 yr. These dates are consistent with the morphological characteristics of the bones as Neanderthal remains.

  17. Quantum computers based on electron spins controlled by ultrafast off-resonant single optical pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Susan M; Fu, Kai-Mei C; Ladd, Thaddeus D; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2007-07-27

    We describe a fast quantum computer based on optically controlled electron spins in charged quantum dots that are coupled to microcavities. This scheme uses broadband optical pulses to rotate electron spins and provide the clock signal to the system. Nonlocal two-qubit gates are performed by phase shifts induced by electron spins on laser pulses propagating along a shared waveguide. Numerical simulations of this scheme demonstrate high-fidelity single-qubit and two-qubit gates with operation times comparable to the inverse Zeeman frequency.

  18. Ultracold few fermionic atoms in needle-shaped double wells: spin chains and resonating spin clusters from microscopic Hamiltonians emulated via antiferromagnetic Heisenberg and t-J models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yannouleas, Constantine; Brandt, Benedikt B.; Landman, Uzi

    2016-07-01

    Advances with trapped ultracold atoms intensified interest in simulating complex physical phenomena, including quantum magnetism and transitions from itinerant to non-itinerant behavior. Here we show formation of antiferromagnetic ground states of few ultracold fermionic atoms in single and double well (DW) traps, through microscopic Hamiltonian exact diagonalization for two DW arrangements: (i) two linearly oriented one-dimensional, 1D, wells, and (ii) two coupled parallel wells, forming a trap of two-dimensional, 2D, nature. The spectra and spin-resolved conditional probabilities reveal for both cases, under strong repulsion, atomic spatial localization at extemporaneously created sites, forming quantum molecular magnetic structures with non-itinerant character. These findings usher future theoretical and experimental explorations into the highly correlated behavior of ultracold strongly repelling fermionic atoms in higher dimensions, beyond the fermionization physics that is strictly applicable only in the 1D case. The results for four atoms are well described with finite Heisenberg spin-chain and cluster models. The numerical simulations of three fermionic atoms in symmetric DWs reveal the emergent appearance of coupled resonating 2D Heisenberg clusters, whose emulation requires the use of a t-J-like model, akin to that used in investigations of high T c superconductivity. The highly entangled states discovered in the microscopic and model calculations of controllably detuned, asymmetric, DWs suggest three-cold-atom DW quantum computing qubits.

  19. Cavity spin optodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Brahms, N

    2010-01-01

    The dynamics of a large quantum spin coupled parametrically to an optical resonator is treated in analogy with the motion of a cantilever in cavity optomechanics. New spin optodynamic phenonmena are predicted, such as cavity-spin bistability, optodynamic spin-precession frequency shifts, coherent amplification and damping of spin, and the spin optodynamic squeezing of light.

  20. Evaluation of cartilage composition and degradation by high-resolution magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Jürgen; Huster, Daniel; Fuchs, Beate; Naji, Lama; Kaufmann, Jörn; Arnold, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    Rheumatic diseases are accompanied by a progressive destruction of the cartilage layers of the joints. Although the number of patients suffering from rheumatic diseases is steadily increasing, degradation mechanisms of cartilage are not yet understood, and methods for early diagnosis are not available. Although some information on pathogenesis could be obtained from the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of degradation products in the supernatants of cartilage specimens incubated with degradation-causing agents, the most direct information on degradation processes would come from the native cartilage as such. To obtain highly resolved NMR spectra of cartilage, application of the recently developed high-resolution magic-angle spinning (HR-MAS) NMR technique is advisable to obtain small line-widths of individual cartilage resonances. This technique is nowadays commercially available for most NMR spectrometers and has the considerable advantage that the same pulse sequences as in high-resolution NMR can be applied. Except for a MAS spinning equipment, no solid-state NMR hardware is required. Therefore, this method can be easily implemented. Here, we describe the most important requirements that are necessary to record HR-MAS NMR spectra. The capabilities of the HR-MAS technique are discussed for the 1H and 13C NMR spectra of cartilage.

  1. Prospects for Spin-1 Resonance Search at 13 TeV LHC and the ATLAS Diboson Excess

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, Tomohiro; Nojiri, Mihoko M

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by ATLAS diboson excess around 2 TeV, we investigate a phenomenology of spin-1 resonances in a model where electroweak sector in the SM is weakly coupled to strong dynamics. The spin-1 resonances, W' and Z', are introduced as effective degree of freedoms of the dynamical sector. We explore several theoretical constraints by investigating the scalar potential as well as current bounds from the LHC and precision measurements. It is found that the main decay modes are V' -> VV and V' -> Vh, and the width is narrow enough so that the ATLAS diboson excess can be explained. In order to investigate future prospects, we also perform collider simulations at the 13 TeV LHC, and obtain a model independent expected exclusion limit for the process pp -> W' -> WZ -> JJ. We show that parameter regions where the diboson excess can be explained still exit, and are within a reach of the LHC RUN2 at the integrated luminosity of 10 fb-1.

  2. Prospects for spin-1 resonance search at 13 TeV LHC and the ATLAS diboson excess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Tomohiro; Kitahara, Teppei; Nojiri, Mihoko M.

    2016-02-01

    Motivated by ATLAS diboson excess around 2 TeV, we investigate a phenomenology of spin-1 resonances in a model where electroweak sector in the SM is weakly coupled to strong dynamics. The spin-1 resonances, W' and Z', are introduced as effective degrees of freedom of the dynamical sector. We explore several theoretical constraints by investigating the scalar potential of the model as well as the current bounds from the LHC and precision measurements. It is found that the main decay modes are V' → VV and V' → Vh, and the V' width is narrow enough so that the ATLAS diboson excess can be explained. In order to investigate future prospects, we also perform collider simulations at √{s}=13 TeV LHC, and obtain a model independent expected exclusion limit for σ( pp → W' → WZ → JJ). We find a parameter space where the diboson excess can be∫ explained, and are within a reach of the LHC at int dt{L}=10{fb}^{-1}} and √{s}=13 TeV.

  3. Optical-optical double resonance, laser induced fluorescence, and revision of the signs of the spin-spin constants of the boron carbide (BC) free radical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunahori, Fumie X. [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Franklin College, Franklin, Indiana 46131 (United States); Nagarajan, Ramya; Clouthier, Dennis J., E-mail: dclaser@uky.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506-0055 (United States)

    2015-12-14

    The cold boron carbide free radical (BC X {sup 4}Σ{sup −}) has been produced in a pulsed discharge free jet expansion using a precursor mixture of trimethylborane in high pressure argon. High resolution laser induced fluorescence spectra have been obtained for the B {sup 4}Σ{sup −}–X {sup 4}Σ{sup −} and E {sup 4}Π–X {sup 4}Σ{sup −} band systems of both {sup 11}BC and {sup 10}BC. An optical-optical double resonance (OODR) scheme was implemented to study the finer details of both band systems. This involved pumping a single rotational level of the B state with one laser and then recording the various allowed transitions from the intermediate B state to the final E state with a second laser by monitoring the subsequent E–X ultraviolet fluorescence. In this fashion, we were able to prove unambiguously that, contrary to previous studies, the spin-spin constant λ is negative in the ground state and positive in the B {sup 4}Σ{sup −} excited state. It has been shown that λ″ < 0 is in fact expected based on a semiempirical second order perturbation theory calculation of the magnitude of the spin-spin constant. The OODR spectra have also been used to validate our assignments of the complex and badly overlapped E {sup 4}Π–X {sup 4}Σ{sup −} 0-0 and 1-0 bands of {sup 11}BC. The E–X 0-0 band of {sup 10}BC was found to be severely perturbed. The ground state main electron configuration is …3σ{sup 2}4σ{sup 2}5σ{sup 1}1π{sup 2}2π{sup 0} and the derived bond lengths show that there is a 0.03 Å contraction in the B state, due to the promotion of an electron from the 4σ antibonding orbital to the 5σ bonding orbital. In contrast, the bond length elongates by 0.15 Å in the E state, a result of promoting an electron from the 5σ bonding orbital to the 2π antibonding orbitals.

  4. Optical-optical double resonance, laser induced fluorescence, and revision of the signs of the spin-spin constants of the boron carbide (BC) free radical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunahori, Fumie X.; Nagarajan, Ramya; Clouthier, Dennis J.

    2015-12-01

    The cold boron carbide free radical (BC X 4Σ-) has been produced in a pulsed discharge free jet expansion using a precursor mixture of trimethylborane in high pressure argon. High resolution laser induced fluorescence spectra have been obtained for the B 4Σ--X 4Σ- and E 4Π-X 4Σ- band systems of both 11BC and 10BC. An optical-optical double resonance (OODR) scheme was implemented to study the finer details of both band systems. This involved pumping a single rotational level of the B state with one laser and then recording the various allowed transitions from the intermediate B state to the final E state with a second laser by monitoring the subsequent E-X ultraviolet fluorescence. In this fashion, we were able to prove unambiguously that, contrary to previous studies, the spin-spin constant λ is negative in the ground state and positive in the B 4Σ- excited state. It has been shown that λ″ < 0 is in fact expected based on a semiempirical second order perturbation theory calculation of the magnitude of the spin-spin constant. The OODR spectra have also been used to validate our assignments of the complex and badly overlapped E 4Π-X 4Σ- 0-0 and 1-0 bands of 11BC. The E-X 0-0 band of 10BC was found to be severely perturbed. The ground state main electron configuration is …3σ24σ25σ11π22π0 and the derived bond lengths show that there is a 0.03 Å contraction in the B state, due to the promotion of an electron from the 4σ antibonding orbital to the 5σ bonding orbital. In contrast, the bond length elongates by 0.15 Å in the E state, a result of promoting an electron from the 5σ bonding orbital to the 2π antibonding orbitals.

  5. Optical-optical double resonance, laser induced fluorescence, and revision of the signs of the spin-spin constants of the boron carbide (BC) free radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunahori, Fumie X; Nagarajan, Ramya; Clouthier, Dennis J

    2015-12-14

    The cold boron carbide free radical (BC X (4)Σ(-)) has been produced in a pulsed discharge free jet expansion using a precursor mixture of trimethylborane in high pressure argon. High resolution laser induced fluorescence spectra have been obtained for the B (4)Σ(-)-X (4)Σ(-) and E (4)Π-X (4)Σ(-) band systems of both (11)BC and (10)BC. An optical-optical double resonance (OODR) scheme was implemented to study the finer details of both band systems. This involved pumping a single rotational level of the B state with one laser and then recording the various allowed transitions from the intermediate B state to the final E state with a second laser by monitoring the subsequent E-X ultraviolet fluorescence. In this fashion, we were able to prove unambiguously that, contrary to previous studies, the spin-spin constant λ is negative in the ground state and positive in the B (4)Σ(-) excited state. It has been shown that λ″ < 0 is in fact expected based on a semiempirical second order perturbation theory calculation of the magnitude of the spin-spin constant. The OODR spectra have also been used to validate our assignments of the complex and badly overlapped E (4)Π-X (4)Σ(-) 0-0 and 1-0 bands of (11)BC. The E-X 0-0 band of (10)BC was found to be severely perturbed. The ground state main electron configuration is …3σ(2)4σ(2)5σ(1)1π(2)2π(0) and the derived bond lengths show that there is a 0.03 Å contraction in the B state, due to the promotion of an electron from the 4σ antibonding orbital to the 5σ bonding orbital. In contrast, the bond length elongates by 0.15 Å in the E state, a result of promoting an electron from the 5σ bonding orbital to the 2π antibonding orbitals.

  6. Ferromagnetic resonance study of interface coupling for spin waves in narrow NiFe/Ru/NiFe multilayer nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, P.; Haghshenasfard, Z.; Cottam, M. G.; Adeyeye, A. O.

    2016-12-01

    A systematic investigation is presented for the magnetization dynamics in trilayer nanowires, consisting of two permalloy (Ni80Fe20 ) layers separated by a nonmagnetic Ru spacer layer. The width of the wires ranges from 90 to 190 nm. By varying the Ru thickness between 0.7 and 2.0 nm, the interlayer coupling can be effectively controlled, modifying the corresponding magnetic ground state and the spin-wave dynamics. By contrast with previous work on coupled trilayer nanowires with larger widths (270 nm and more), the focus here is on nanowire arrays where the strong shape anisotropy competes with the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interactions and biquadratic exchange interactions across the Ru interface, as well as dipolar interactions and Zeeman energy. As a result, the spin-wave spectrum is found to be drastically modified. Ferromagnetic resonance and hysteresis loop measurements are reported over a wide range of applied magnetic fields, showing that the overall magnetization alignment between the permalloy layers may be parallel, antiparallel, or in a spin-flop state, depending on the overall interlayer coupling. The experimental results for different stripe widths are successfully analyzed using a microscopic dipole-dipole theory and micromagnetic simulations.

  7. Electron spin resonance and optical absorption spectroscopic studies of Cu{sup 2+} ions in aluminium lead borate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SivaRamaiah, G., E-mail: gsivaram7@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics, Government College for Men, Kadapa 516004 (India); LakshmanaRao, J., E-mail: jlrao46@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati 517502 (India)

    2013-02-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is for the first time to study optical absorption and EPR in these glasses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The thermal properties are new and interesting in this glass system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is for the first time to report three optical bands for Cu{sup 2+} in oxide glasses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The interesting optical results are due to excellent sample preparation. - Abstract: Electron Spin Resonance and optical absorption spectral studies of Cu{sup 2+} ions in 5 Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + 75 B{sub 2}O{sub 3} + (20-z) PbO + z CuO (where z = 0.1-1.5 mol.% of CuO) glasses have been reported. The EPR spectra of all the glasses show resonance signals characteristic of Cu{sup 2+} ions at both room and low temperatures. The number of spins and Gibbs energy were calculated at different concentrations and temperatures. From the plot of the ratio of logarithmic number of spins and absolute temperature and the reciprocal of absolute temperature, the entropy and enthalpy have been evaluated. The optical absorption spectra of all the glasses exhibit three bands and these bands have been assigned to {sup 2}B{sub 1g} {yields} {sup 2}E{sub g}, {sup 2}B{sub 1g} {yields} {sup 2}B{sub 2g}, and {sup 2}B{sub 1g} {yields} {sup 2}A{sub 1g} transitions in the decreasing order of energy. It is for the first time to observe three optical absorption bands for Cu{sup 2+} ions in oxide glasses. Such type of results is due to excellent sample preparation. From the EPR and optical absorption spectroscopies data, the molecular orbital coefficients have been evaluated.

  8. Spin polarized low energy electron microscopy of quantum well resonances in Fe films on the Cu-covered W(110) surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiang; Altman, M S

    2013-07-01

    Spin polarized low energy electron microscopy has been used to investigate the quantum size effect (QSE) in electron reflectivity from Fe films grown on a pseudomorphic Cu layer on a W(110) surface. Intensity oscillations caused by the QSE as functions of Fe film thickness and incident electron energy identify quantum well resonance conditions in the film. Evaluation of these intensity oscillations using the phase accumulation model provides information on the unoccupied spin polarized band structure in the Fe film above the vacuum level. We also find evidence that the presence of the non-magnetic Cu layer shifts spin polarized quantum well resonances in the Fe layer uniformly downward in energy by 1.1eV compared to Fe/W(110) films without an interface Cu layer, suggesting that the Cu layer gives a small degree of control over the quantum well resonances.

  9. Hybrid approaches to magnetic resonance thermometry using the proton resonance frequency shift and the spin-lattice relaxation time T1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diakite, Mahamadou

    Minimally invasive thermal therapy under Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) guidance is becoming popular with several applications in the process of getting FDA approval. The ability to determine in near real-time the temperature map of a tumor and its surrounding tissue makes MR thermometry very attractive and well suited for thermal treatment. The proton resonance frequency shift (PRF) is currently the gold standard method for temperature monitoring using MRI. However, its incapacity to measure temperature in fatty tissue limits the scope of its applicability. The spin lattice relaxation time T1, on the other hand, has shown good temperature sensitivity and works well in all types of tissues. In this dissertation, we have addressed a number of challenges currently affecting MRI thermometry. A non-CPMG Turbo Spin Echo (TSE) sequence has been implemented to monitor the temperature rise due to the high RF power deposition inherent to this sequence at high field (3T and higher). This new implementation allows TSE sequences to be used safely without altering their high contrast properties which make them appealing in clinical settings. Tissue damage assessment during thermal therapy is critical for the safety of the patient. We have developed a new hybrid PRF-T1 sequence that has the capability to provide simultaneously in near real-time the temperature map and T1 information, which is a good indication of the state of the tissue. The simplicity and the real-time capability of the newly developed sequence make it an ideal tool for tissue damage assessment. Temperature monitoring during thermal therapy in organs with large fat content have been hindered by the lack of an MRI thermometry method that can provide simultaneous temperature in fat and aqueous tissue. A new sequence and acquisition scheme have been developed to address this issue. In sum, this dissertation proposed several pulse sequence implementation techniques and an acquisition scheme to overcome some of

  10. Electron Spin Resonance Spectra of Photogenerated Polarons in Poly(Paraphenylene Vinylene)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Kazuhiro; Kuroda, Shin-ichi; Shimoi, Yukihiro; Abe, Shuji; Noguchi, Takanobu; Ohnishi, Toshihiro

    1996-12-01

    Light-induced ESR (LESR) measurements have been performed on undoped poly(parapheny- lene vinylene) (PPV) down to 4 K. The ESR signal increases significantly for the excitation energy above 3.1 3.2 eV, as in the case of the excitation spectra of photocarriers reported in PPV derivatives. The anisotropic light-induced ESR spectra in oriented samples are well reproduced by the spectra calculated using a theoretical polaron spin distribution in the case of finite electron-electron interaction. These spectral features indicate that the observed spins are photogenerated polarons.

  11. Spin Diffusion in Trapped Clouds of Cold Atoms with Resonant Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Georg Morten; Pethick, C. J.

    2011-01-01

    We show that puzzling recent experimental results on spin diffusion in a strongly interacting atomic gas may be understood in terms of the predicted spin diffusion coefficient for a generic strongly interacting system. Three important features play a central role: (a) Fick’s law for diffusion mus...... be modified to allow for the trapping potential; (b) the diffusion coefficient is inhomogeneous, due to the density variations in the cloud; and (c) the diffusion approximation fails in the outer parts of the cloud, where the mean free path is long....

  12. Two-dimensional electron-electron double resonance and electron spin-echo study of solute dynamics in smectics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorcester, Jeff; Rananavare, Shankar B.; Freed, Jack H.

    1989-05-01

    Electron spin-echo (ESE) and two-dimensional electron-electron double resonance (2D ELDOR) experiments have been performed as a function of director orientation and temperature in the smectic A phase of the liquid crystal S2 for the spin-probe PD-tempone(2×10-3 M). Over the entire temperature range studied (288-323 K) we observe significant 2D ELDOR cross peaks only for ΔMI =±1 indicative of 14N spin-relaxation and negligible Heisenberg exchange. From the angular dependent 14N spin-relaxation rates we obtain the dipolar spectral densities at the hyperfine (hf) frequency, whereas from a combination of ESE and 2D ELDOR we obtain the dipolar and Zeeman-dipolar spectral densities at zero frequency. The angular dependent spectral densities were successfully decomposed into their basic components in accordance with theory. The angular dependent spectral densities at the hf frequency are not predicted by a model of anisotropic rotational diffusion in a nematic orienting potential, but are consistent with predictions of a model due to Moro and Nordio of solute rototranslational diffusion in a McMillan-type potential. The angular dependence also indicates that order director fluctuations in the smectic phase are suppressed at frequencies on the order of 10 MHz. An additional contribution to solute reorientation due to cooperative hydrocarbon chain fluctuations is suggested to account for the behavior of the observed spectral densities at zero frequency. An evaluation of the relevance of several other dynamical models to this experimental work is also presented.

  13. Multi-resonance orbital model of high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations: possible high-precision determination of black hole and neutron star spin

    CERN Document Server

    Stuchlik, Zdenek; Torok, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Using known frequencies of the twin-peak high-frequency quasiperiodic oscillations (HF QPOs) and known mass of the central black hole, the black-hole dimensionless spin can be determined by assuming a concrete version of the resonance model. However, a wide range of observationally limited values of the black hole mass implies low precision of the spin estimates. We discuss the possibility of higher precision of the black hole spin measurements in the framework of a multi-resonance model inspired by observations of more than two HF QPOs in the black hole systems, which are expected to occur at two (or more) different radii of the accretion disc. For the black hole systems we focus on the special case of duplex frequencies, when the top, bottom, or mixed frequency is common at two different radii where the resonances occur giving triple frequency sets. The sets of triple frequency ratios and the related spin are given. The strong resonance model for "magic" values of the black hole spin means that two (or more...

  14. Nonlinear magnetization dynamics of antiferromagnetic spin resonance induced by intense terahertz magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Mukai, Y; Yamamoto, T; Kageyama, H; Tanaka, K

    2016-01-01

    We report on the nonlinear magnetization dynamics of a HoFeO3 crystal induced by a strong terahertz magnetic field resonantly enhanced with a split ring resonator and measured with magneto-optical Kerr effect microscopy. The terahertz magnetic field induces a large change (~40%) in the spontaneous magnetization. The frequency of the antiferromagnetic resonance decreases in proportion to the square of the magnetization change. A modified Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation with a phenomenological nonlinear damping term quantitatively reproduced the nonlinear dynamics.

  15. Examination of gamma-irradiated fruits and vegetables by electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desrosiers, M.F.; McLaughlin, W.L. (National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NML), Gaithersburg, MD (USA). Center for Radiation Research)

    1989-01-01

    The ESR spectra of the seeds, pits, shells, and skins of a variety of irradiated fruits and vegetables were measured. All spectra, control and irradiated, contained a single resonance with a g-factor of 2.00. Additional resonances due to Mn{sup 2+} were observed for the drupelets of blackberries and red raspberries. An unusual radiation-induced radical was observed for irradiated mango seed; however, the signal decayed completely within a few days. It was concluded that only in a few specialized cases could the ESR resonances observed be suitable for postirradiation monitoring or dosimetry. (author).

  16. Examination of gamma-irradiated fruits and vegetables by electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desrosiers, Marc F.; McLaughlin, William L.

    The ESR spectra of the seeds, pits, shells, and skins of a variety of irradiated fruits and vegetables were measured. All spectra, control and irradiated, contained a single resonance with a g-factor of 2.00. Additional resonances due to Mn 2+ were observed for the drupelets of blackberries and red raspberries. An unusual radiation-induced radical was observed for irradiated mango seed; however, the signal decayed completely within a few days. It was concluded that only in a few specialized cases could the ESR resonances observed be suitable for postirradiation monitoring or dosimetry.

  17. Two-Loop QCD Correction to massive spin-2 resonance $\\rightarrow$ 3 gluons

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, Taushif; Mathews, Prakash; Rana, Narayan; Ravindran, V

    2014-01-01

    We present the ${\\cal O}(\\alpha_s^3)$ virtual QCD corrections to the process $h \\rightarrow g+g+g$ due to interference of born and two-loop amplitudes, where $h$ is a massive spin-2 particle and $g$ is the gluon. We assume that the SM fields couple to $h$ through the SM energy momentum tensor. Our result constitutes one of the ingredients to full NNLO QCD contribution to production of a massive spin-2 particle along with a jet in the scattering process at the LHC. In particular, this massive spin-2 could be a KK mode of a ADD graviton in large extra dimensional model or a RS KK mode in warped extra dimensional model or a generic massive spin-2. In addition, it provides an opportunity to study the ultraviolet and infrared structures of QCD amplitudes involving tensorial coupling resulting from energy momentum operator. Using dimensional regularization, we find that infrared poles of this amplitude are in agreement with the proposal by Catani confirming the factorization property of QCD amplitudes with tensoria...

  18. Devices and process for high-pressure magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, David W; Sears, Jr., Jesse A; Turcu, Romulus V.F.; Rosso, Kevin M; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2014-04-08

    A high-pressure magic angle spinning (MAS) rotor is detailed that includes a high-pressure sample cell that maintains high pressures exceeding 150 bar. The sample cell design minimizes pressure losses due to penetration over an extended period of time.

  19. Sensitizing solid state nuclear magnetic resonance of dilute nuclei by spin-diffusion assisted polarization transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupulescu, Adonis; Frydman, Lucio

    2011-10-01

    Recent years have witnessed efforts geared at increasing the sensitivity of NMR experiments, by relying on the suitable tailoring and exploitation of relaxation phenomena. These efforts have included the use of paramagnetic agents, enhanced (1)H-(1)H incoherent and coherent transfers processes in 2D liquid state spectroscopy, and homonuclear (13)C-(13)C spin diffusion effects in labeled solids. The present study examines some of the opportunities that could open when exploiting spontaneous (1)H-(1)H spin-diffusion processes, to enhance relaxation and to improve the sensitivity of dilute nuclei in solid state NMR measurements. It is shown that polarization transfer experiments executed under sufficiently fast magic-angle-spinning conditions, enable a selective polarization of the dilute low-γ spins by their immediate neighboring protons. Repolarization of the latter can then occur during the time involved in monitoring the signal emitted by the low-γ nuclei. The basic features involved in the resulting approach, and its potential to improve the effective sensitivity of solid state NMR measurements on dilute nuclei, are analyzed. Experimental tests witness the advantages that could reside from utilizing this kind of approach over conventional cross-polarization processes. These measurements also highlight a number of limitations that will have to be overcome for transforming selective polarization transfers of this kind into analytical methods of choice.

  20. Decoherence dynamics of a single spin versus spin ensemble

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobrovitski, V.V.; Feiguin, A.E.; Awschalom, D.D.; Hanson, R.

    2008-01-01

    We study decoherence of central spins by a spin bath, focusing on the difference between measurement of a single central spin and measurement of a large number of central spins (as found in typical spin-resonance experiments). For a dilute spin bath, the single spin demonstrates Gaussian free-induct

  1. Large Mn25 single-molecule magnet with spin S = 51/2: magnetic and high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic characterization of a giant spin state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugesu, Muralee; Takahashi, Susumu; Wilson, Anthony; Abboud, Khalil A; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Hill, Stephen; Christou, George

    2008-10-20

    The synthesis and structural, spectroscopic, and magnetic characterization of a Mn25 coordination cluster with a large ground-state spin of S = 51/2 are reported. Reaction of MnCl2 with pyridine-2,6-dimethanol (pdmH2) and NaN3 in MeCN/MeOH gives the mixed valence cluster [Mn25O18(OH)2(N3)12(pdm)6(pdmH)6]Cl2 (1; 6Mn(II), 18Mn(III), Mn(IV)), which has a barrel-like cage structure. Variable temperature direct current (dc) magnetic susceptibility data were collected in the 1.8-300 K temperature range in a 0.1 T field. Variable-temperature and -field magnetization (M) data were collected in the 1.8-4.0 K and 0.1-7 T ranges and fit by matrix diagonalization assuming only the ground state is occupied at these temperatures. The fit parameters were S = 51/2, D = -0.020(2) cm(-1), and g = 1.87(3), where D is the axial zero-field splitting parameter. Alternating current (ac) susceptibility measurements in the 1.8-8.0 K range and a 3.5 G ac field oscillating at frequencies in the 50-1500 Hz range revealed a frequency-dependent out-of-phase (chi(M)'') signal below 3 K, suggesting 1 to be a single-molecule magnet (SMM). This was confirmed by magnetization vs dc field sweeps, which exhibited hysteresis loops but with no clear steps characteristic of resonant quantum tunneling of magnetization (QTM). However, magnetization decay data below 1 K were collected and used to construct an Arrhenius plot, and the fit of the thermally activated region above approximately 0.5 K gave U(eff)/k = 12 K, where U(eff) is the effective relaxation barrier. The g value and the magnitude and sign of the D value were independently confirmed by detailed high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (HFEPR) spectroscopy on polycrystalline samples. The combined studies confirm both the high ground-state spin S = 51/2 of complex 1 and that it is a SMM that, in addition, exhibits QTM.

  2. Progress in spin dynamics solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance with the application of Floquet-Magnus expansion to chemical shift anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mananga, Eugene Stephane

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present an historical overview of theoretical approaches used for describing spin dynamics under static or rotating experiments in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance. The article gives a brief historical overview for major theories in nuclear magnetic resonance and the promising theories. We present the first application of Floquet-Magnus expansion to chemical shift anisotropy when irradiated by BABA pulse sequence.

  3. 电子自旋共振扫描隧道显微镜%Electron spin resonance scanning tunneling microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭阳; 李健梅; 陆兴华

    2015-01-01

    It is highly expected that the future informatics will be based on the spins of in-dividual electrons. The development of elementary information unit will eventually leads to novel single-molecule or single-atom devices based on electron spins;the quantum computer in the fu-ture can be constructed with single electron spins as the basic quantum bits. However, it is still a great challenge in detection and manipulation of a single electron spin, as well as its coherence and entanglement. As an ideal experimental tool for such tasks, the development of electron spin resonance scanning tunneling microscope (ESR-STM) has attracted great attention for decades. This paper briefly introduces the basic concept of ESR-STM. The development history of this in-strument and recent progresses are reviewed. The underlying mechanism is explored and summa-rized. The challenges and possible solutions are discussed. Finally, the prospect of future direction and applications are presented.%单电子自旋极有可能发展成为未来信息学的基础。以电子自旋为核心的新型单分子或单原子器件将最终成为基本信息单元,基于单电子的自旋态将有可能构筑未来量子计算机的量子比特。但是,如何实现对单个电子自旋及其相干态和纠缠态的测量和控制,目前仍然是一个很大的挑战。作为调控单个电子自旋的重要实验手段,电子自旋共振扫描隧道显微镜的发展一直备受关注。文章简要介绍了电子自旋共振扫描隧道显微镜的基本概念,阐述了其发展历史和最新进展,归纳了机理探索的研究成果,论述了该设备研发面临的挑战与对策,并对未来的发展和应用做了展望。

  4. A method for reducing the effects of motion contamination in arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanenbaum, Aaron B; Snyder, Abraham Z; Brier, Matthew R; Ances, Beau M

    2015-10-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a noninvasive method to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF). Arterial spin labeling is susceptible to artifact generated by head motion; this artifact is propagated through the subtraction procedure required to calculate CBF. We introduce a novel strategy for mitigating this artifact based on weighting tag/control volumes according to a noise estimate. We evaluated this strategy (DVARS weighting) in application to both pulsed ASL (PASL) and pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) in a cohort of normal adults (N=57). Application of DVARS weighting significantly improved test-retest repeatability as assessed by the intra-class correlation coefficient. Before the application of DVARS weighting, mean gray matter intra-class correlation (ICC) between subsequent ASL runs was 0.48 and 0.51 in PASL and pCASL, respectively. With weighting, ICC was significantly improved to 0.63 and 0.58.

  5. Valley and spin resonant tunneling current in ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic/ferromagnetic silicene junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaser Hajati

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We study the transport properties in a ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic/ferromagnetic (FNF silicene junction in which an electrostatic gate potential, U, is attached to the nonmagnetic region. We show that the electrostatic gate potential U is a useful probe to control the band structure, quasi-bound states in the nonmagnetic barrier as well as the transport properties of the FNF silicene junction. In particular, by introducing the electrostatic gate potential, both the spin and valley conductances of the junction show an oscillatory behavior. The amplitude and frequency of such oscillations can be controlled by U. As an important result, we found that by increasing U, the second characteristic of the Klein tunneling is satisfied as a result of the quasiparticles chirality which can penetrate through a potential barrier. Moreover, it is found that for special values of U, the junction shows a gap in the spin and valley-resolve conductance and the amplitude of this gap is only controlled by the on-site potential difference, Δz. Our findings of high controllability of the spin and valley transport in such a FNF silicene junction may improve the performance of nano-electronics and spintronics devices.

  6. A theoretical investigation of Ferromagnetic Resonance Linewidth and damping constants in coupled trilayer and spin valve systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Layadi, A. [LESIMS, Departement de Physique, Université Ferhat Abbas, Sétif 19000 (Algeria)

    2015-05-15

    The ferromagnetic resonance intrinsic field linewidth ΔH is investigated for a multilayer system such as a coupled trilayer and a spin valve structure. The magnetic coupling between two ferromagnetic layers separated by a nonmagnetic interlayer will be described by the bilinear J{sub 1} and biquadratic J{sub 2} coupling parameters. The interaction at the interface of the first ferromagnetic layer with the antiferromagnetic one is account for by the exchange anisotropy field, H{sub E}. A general formula is derived for the intrinsic linewidth ΔH. The explicit dependence of ΔH with H{sub E}, J{sub 1} and J{sub 2} will be highlighted. Analytical expressions for each mode field linewidth are found in special cases. Equivalent damping constants will be discussed.

  7. Low temperature properties of the electron spin resonance in YbRh{sub 2}Si{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sichelschmidt, J.; Wykhoff, J.; Krellner, C.; Geibel, C.; Steglich, F. [Max Planck Institute of Chemical Physics of Solids, Dresden (Germany); Kambe, T. [Department of Physics, Okayama University, Okayama (Japan); Fazlishanov, I. [E.K. Zavoisky Physical-Technical Insitute, Kazan (Russian Federation); Zakharov, D.; Krug von Nidda, H.A. [Experimental Physics V, Center for Electronic Correlations and Magnetism, University of Augsburg (Germany); Skvortsova, A.; Belov, S.; Kutuzov, A.; Kochelaev, B.I. [Theoretical Physics Departement, Kazan State University (Russian Federation); Pashchenko, V.; Lang, M. [Physikalisches Institut, Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt (Germany)

    2010-03-15

    We present the field and temperature behavior of the narrow electron spin resonance (ESR) response in YbRh{sub 2}Si{sub 2} well below the single ion Kondo temperature. The ESR g-factor reflects a Kondo-like field and temperature evolution of the Yb{sup 3+} magnetism. Measurements toward low temperatures (> 0.5 K) have shown distinct crossover anomalies of the ESR parameters upon approaching the regime of a well-defined heavy Fermi liquid. Comparison with the field dependence of specific heat and electrical resistivity reveal that the ESR parameters can be related to quasiparticle mass and cross section and, hence, contain inherent heavy electron properties. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  8. Probing temperature-driven spin reorientation transition of GdFeCo film by Kerr loops and ferromagnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Wei, E-mail: hewei@aphy.iphy.ac.cn; Liu, Hao-Liang; Cai, Jian-Wang; Cheng, Zhao-Hua, E-mail: zhcheng@aphy.iphy.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Magnetism and Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wu, Hong-Ye [Department of Physics, Baotou Teachers College, Baotou 014030 (China)

    2015-01-26

    The magnetic anisotropy is of both scientific and technological interest for magneto-optical material GdFeCo film. We characterize the magnetic anisotropy of a 20 nm GdFeCo film from 265 K to 320 K via Kerr loops and ferromagnetic resonance. With increasing temperature, both of the first-order uniaxial magnetic anisotropy and shape anisotropy increase. However, the competition between them causes a temperature-driven spin reorientation transition (SRT) and the effective perpendicular magnetic anisotropy decrease from 2.22 × 10{sup 4 }ergs/cm{sup 3} (288 K) to −1.56 × 10{sup 4 }ergs/cm{sup 3} (317 K). The positive second-order uniaxial magnetic anisotropy determines an easy-cone state as the mediated state during SRT.

  9. Characterization and identification of gamma-irradiated sauces by electron spin resonance spectroscopy using different sample pretreatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Kashif; Ahn, Jae-Jun; Kwon, Joong-Ho

    2013-06-01

    Tomato ketchup, barbeque sauce, sweet chili sauce, and spaghetti sauce were gamma irradiated at 0, 1, 5, and 10 kGy. Electron spin resonance (ESR) technique was used to characterize the irradiated sauces, targeting radiation-induced cellulose radicals and using a modified sample pretreatment method. The samples were first washed with water, and then the residues were extracted with alcohol. The non-irradiated sauces exhibited the single central signal, whose intensity showed a significant increase on irradiation. The ESR spectra from the radiation-induced cellulose radicals, with two side peaks (g=2.02012 and g=1.98516) equally spaced (± 3 mT) from the central signal, were also observed in the irradiated sauces. The improvements in the central (natural) and radiation-induced (two side peaks corresponding to the cellulose radicals) signal intensities were obvious, when compared with routine freeze-drying and alcoholic-extraction techniques.

  10. Electron spin resonance (ESR) study of VO{sup 2+} doped germanium dioxide synthesized via the sol-gel process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendez-Vivar, J.; Arroyo, R. [Univ. Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa (Mexico). Dept. de Quimica

    1994-12-31

    VOSO{sub 4}{center_dot}3H{sub 2}O was used as doping agent to prepare GeO{sub 2} xerogels, via the sol-gel process. Samples were analyzed by Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA), Differential Thermal Analysis, (DTA), Diffuse reflectance (UV-Vis) spectroscopy and electron spin resonance (ESR). Study of thermally treated samples was performed. VO{sup 2+} were found in V{sub 2}O{sub 5} at 350 C. VO{sup 2+} ions were incorporated in the GeO{sub 2} network after thermal treatment at 700 C. From the results the authors propose that VO{sup 2+} acts as crystal former in these samples.

  11. Host-guest interaction between new nitrooxoisoaporphine and β-cyclodextrins: Synthesis, electrochemical, electron spin resonance and molecular modeling studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Cruz, Fernanda; Aguilera-Venegas, Benjamín; Lapier, Michel; Sobarzo-Sánchez, Eduardo; Uriarte Villares, Eugenio; Olea-Azar, Claudio

    2013-02-01

    A new nitrooxoisoaporphine derivative was synthetized and characterized by cyclic voltammetry and electron spin resonance. Its aqueous solubility was improved by complexes formation with β-cyclodextrin, heptakis(2,6-di-O-methyl)-β-cyclodextrin and (2-hydroxypropyl)-β-cyclodextrin. In order to assess the inclusion degree reached by nitrooxoisoaporphine in cyclodextris cavity, the stability constants of formation of the complexes were determined by phase-solubility measurements obtaining in all cases a type-AL diagram. Moreover, electrochemical studies were carried out, where the observed change in the EPC value indicated a lower feasibility of the nitro group reduction. Additionally, a detailed spatial configuration is proposed for inclusion of derivate within the cyclodextrins cavity by 2D NMR techniques. Finally, these results are further interpreted by means of molecular modeling studies. Thus, theoretical results are in complete agreement with the experimental data.

  12. Comparison effects and electron spin resonance studies of α-Fe2O4 spinel type ferrite nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayrakdar, H; Yalçın, O; Cengiz, U; Özüm, S; Anigi, E; Topel, O

    2014-11-11

    α-Fe2O4 spinel type ferrite nanoparticles have been synthesized by cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) assisted hydrothermal route by using NaOH solution. Electron spin resonance (ESR/EPR) measurements of α-Fe2O4 nanoparticles have been performed by a conventional x-band spectrometer at room temperature. The comparison effect of nanoparticles prepared by using CTAB and EDTA in different α-doping on the structural and morphological properties have been investigated in detail. The effect of EDTA-assisted synthesis for α-Fe2O4 nanoparticles are refined, and thus the spectroscopic g-factor are detected by using ESR signals. These samples can be considered as great benefits for magnetic recording media, electromagnetic and drug delivery applications.

  13. Critical Electron-Paramagnetic-Resonance Spin Dynamics in NiCl2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birgeneau, R.J.; Rupp, L.W.; Guggenheim, H.J.;

    1973-01-01

    We have studied the critical behavior of the electron-paramagnetic-resonance linewidth in the planar XY antiferromagnet NiCl2; it is found that the linewidth diverges like ξ∼(T-TN)-0.7 rather than ξ5/2 predicted by the current random-phase-approximation theory.......We have studied the critical behavior of the electron-paramagnetic-resonance linewidth in the planar XY antiferromagnet NiCl2; it is found that the linewidth diverges like ξ∼(T-TN)-0.7 rather than ξ5/2 predicted by the current random-phase-approximation theory....

  14. Investigation of water and methanol sorption in monovalent- and multivalent-ion-exchanged nafion membranes using electron spin resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Jamie S; Budil, David E

    2009-08-06

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy was used to monitor the local environment of 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidone N-oxide (TEMPONE) spin probe in Li(+), Ca(2+), and Al(3+) ion-exchanged Nafion 117 membranes swollen with mixed methanol/water solvent at varying compositions. The (14)N hyperfine splitting, a(N), which reflects the local polarity of the nitroxide probe, remains nearly steady at higher solvent contents but increases substantially at lower solvent contents, reflecting close contact with the ions. The rotational rate (R) of the probe increased with solvent content, depending strongly on the amount of solvent at low contents but increasing more gradually at higher solvent contents, similar to the behavior of previously measured solvent translation diffusion coefficients. The rotational rate data from water-containing membranes were fitted using the Fujita free-volume diffusion model, which indicated that multivalent ions tend to increase the free volume fraction of the polymer while decreasing that of the solvent phase. Methanol-containing membranes exhibited greater variation with different exchange ions, but the data could not be fit using the free-volume model, suggesting that the assumption of two phases underlying the free-volume model might not apply to this case. The difference in the trends of swelling between water and methanol is consistent with previous results that have indicated different patterns of penetration for the two solvents. The results are interpreted in terms of changes in membrane morphology with higher-valence ions.

  15. Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) Studies on the Formation of Roasting-Induced Antioxidative Structures in Coffee Brews at Different Degrees of Roast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekedam, E.K.; Schols, H.A.; Cämmerer, B.; Kroh, L.W.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.; Smit, G.

    2008-01-01

    The antioxidative properties of coffee brew fractions were studied using electron spin resonance spectroscopy using 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidin-1-oxyl (TEMPO) and Fremy¿s salt (nitrosodisulfonate) as stabilized radicals. TEMPO was scavenged by antioxidants formed during roasting and not by chlor

  16. Translational dynamics and magnetic resonance principles of pulsed gradient spin echo NMR

    CERN Document Server

    Callaghan, Paul T

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance can be used to measure how molecules diffuse and flow, thus revealing information about their interactions with the surrounding environment. This book teaches the basic physics behind the method, imparting deeper understanding to the practitioner, whether in academia, industry or medical science.

  17. Measurement of parity-nonconserving rotation of neutron spin in the 0.734-eV p-wave resonance of $^{139}La$

    CERN Document Server

    Haseyama, T; Bowman, J D; Delheij, P P J; Funahashi, H; Ishimoto, S; Jones, G; Masaike, A; Masuda, Y; Matsuda, Y; Morimoto, K; Muto, S; Penttil\\"a, S I; Pomeroy, V R; Sakai, K; Sharapov, E I; Smith, D A; Yuan, V W

    2002-01-01

    The parity nonconserving spin rotation of neutrons in the 0.734-eV p-wave resonance of $^{139}La$ was measured with the neutron transmission method. Two optically polarized $^3He$ cells were used before and behind a a 5-cm long $^{139}La$ target as a polarizer and an analyzer of neutron spin. The rotation angle was carefully measured by flipping the direction of $^3He$ polarization in the polarizer in sequence. The peak-to-peak value of the spin rotation was found to be $ (7.4 \\pm 1.1) \\times 10^{-3} $ rad/cm which was consistent with the previous experiments. But the result was statisticallly improved. The s-p mixing model gives the weak matrix element as $xW = (1.71 \\pm 0.25)$ meV. The value agrees well with the one deduced from the parity-nonconserving longitudinal asymmetry in the same resonance.

  18. Magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus and process for high-resolution in situ investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Sears, Jr., Jesse A.; Hoyt, David W.; Mehta, Hardeep S.; Peden, Charles H. F.

    2015-11-24

    A continuous-flow (CF) magic angle sample spinning (CF-MAS) NMR rotor and probe are described for investigating reaction dynamics, stable intermediates/transition states, and mechanisms of catalytic reactions in situ. The rotor includes a sample chamber of a flow-through design with a large sample volume that delivers a flow of reactants through a catalyst bed contained within the sample cell allowing in-situ investigations of reactants and products. Flow through the sample chamber improves diffusion of reactants and products through the catalyst. The large volume of the sample chamber enhances sensitivity permitting in situ .sup.13C CF-MAS studies at natural abundance.

  19. Two-Qubit Geometric Phase Gate for Quantum Dot Spins using Cavity Polariton Resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Puri, Shruti; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2012-01-01

    We describe a design to implement a two-qubit geometric phase gate, by which a pair of electrons confined in adjacent quantum dots are entangled. The entanglement is a result of the Coulomb exchange interaction between the optically excited exciton-polaritons and the localized spins. This optical coupling, resembling the electron-electron Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) inter- actions, offers high speed, high fidelity two-qubit gate operation with moderate cavity quality factor Q. The errors due to the finite lifetime of the polaritons can be minimized by optimizing the optical pulse parameters (duration and energy). The proposed design, using electrostatic quantum dots, maximizes entanglement and ensures scalability.

  20. Electron spin resonance insight into broadband absorption of the Cu3Bi(SeO32O2Br metamagnet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zorko

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Metamagnets, which exhibit a transition from a low-magnetization to a high-magnetization state induced by the applied magnetic field, have recently been highlighted as promising materials for controllable broadband absorption. Here we show results of a multifrequency electron spin resonance (ESR investigation of the Cu3Bi(SeO32O2Br planar metamagnet on the kagome lattice. Its mixed antiferromagnetic/ferromagnetic phase is stabilized in a finite range of applied fields around 0.8 T at low temperatures and is characterized by enhanced microwave absorption. The absorption signal is non-resonant and its boundaries correspond to two critical fields that determine the mixed phase. With decreasing temperature these increase like the sublattice magnetization of the antiferromagnetic phase and show no frequency dependence between 100 and 480 GHz. On the contrary, we find that the critical fields depend on the magnetic-field sweeping direction. In particular, the higher critical field, which corresponds to the transition from the mixed to the ferromagnetic phase, shows a pronounced hysteresis effect, while such a hysteresis is absent for the lower critical field. The observed hysteresis is enhanced at lower temperatures, which suggests that thermal fluctuations play an important role in destabilizing the highly absorbing mixed phase.

  1. Stochastic resonance and nonequilibrium dynamic phase transition of Ising spin system driven by a joint external field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao Yuan-Zhi; Zhong Wei-Rong; Lin Guang-Ming; Li Jian-Can

    2005-01-01

    The dynamic response and stochastic resonance of a kinetic Ising spin system (ISS) subject to the joint action of an external field of weak sinusoidal modulation and stochastic white-noise are studied by solving the mean-field equation of motion based on Glauber dynamics. The periodically driven stochastic ISS shows that the characteristic stochastic resonance as well as nonequilibrium dynamic phase transition (NDPT) occurs when the frequency ω and amplitude h0 of driving field, the temperature t of the system and noise intensity D are all specifically in accordance with each other in quantity. There exist in the system two typical dynamic phases, referred to as dynamic disordered paramagnetic and ordered ferromagnetic phases respectively, corresponding to a zero- and a unit-dynamic order parameter. The NDPT boundary surface of the system which separates the dynamic paramagnetic phase from the dynamic ferromagnetic phase in the 3D parameter space of h0-t-D is also investigated. An interesting dynamical ferromagnetic phase with an intermediate order parameter of 0.66 is revealed for the first time in the ISS subject to the perturbation of a joint determinant and stochastic field. The intermediate order dynamical ferromagnetic phase is dynamically metastable in nature and owns a peculiar characteristic in its stability as well as the response to external driving field as compared with a fully order dynamic ferromagnetic phase.

  2. Influence of optical coherence on the electron spin in singly charged InP quantum dots excited by resonant laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomimoto, Shinichi; Kawana, Keisuke; Murakami, Akira; Masumoto, Yasuaki

    2012-06-01

    We have experimentally studied the spin dynamics of excitons, electrons, and trions in charge-tunable InP/InGaP quantum dots (QDs) excited by picosecond resonant laser pulses by observing the time-resolved Kerr rotation. In singly charged QDs, inversion of the spin polarization direction of doped electrons is found to be caused simply by variation in the pulse intensity, which is accompanied by an abrupt change of the spin coherence time. This phenomenon is reproduced by density-matrix calculations allowing for the reaction on the QD electron-trion four-level system during its coherent radiation emission. This result means that the optical coherence is another critical factor affecting electron spin coherence.

  3. Storage of hydrogen spin polarization in long-lived 13C2 singlet order and implications for hyperpolarized magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yesu; Theis, Thomas; Liang, Xiaofei; Wang, Qiu; Zhou, Pei; Warren, Warren S

    2013-07-03

    Hyperpolarized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful technique enabling real-time monitoring of metabolites at concentration levels not accessible by standard MRI techniques. A considerable challenge this technique faces is the T1 decay of the hyperpolarization upon injection into the system under study. Here we show that A(n)A'(n)XX' spin systems such as (13)C2-1,2-diphenylacetylene ((13)C2-DPA) sustain long-lived polarization for both (13)C and (1)H spins with decay constants of almost 4.5 min at high magnetic fields of up to 16.44 T without spin-locking; the T1 of proton polarization is only 3.8 s. Therefore, storage of the proton polarization in a (13)C2-singlet state causes a 69-fold extension of the spin lifetime. Notably, this extension is demonstrated with proton-only pulse sequences, which can be readily implemented on standard clinical scanners.

  4. Effects of finite pulse width on two-dimensional Fourier transform electron spin resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhichun; Crepeau, Richard H.; Freed, Jack H.

    2005-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) Fourier transform ESR techniques, such as 2D-ELDOR, have considerably improved the resolution of ESR in studies of molecular dynamics in complex fluids such as liquid crystals and membrane vesicles and in spin labeled polymers and peptides. A well-developed theory based on the stochastic Liouville equation (SLE) has been successfully employed to analyze these experiments. However, one fundamental assumption has been utilized to simplify the complex analysis, viz. the pulses have been treated as ideal non-selective ones, which therefore provide uniform irradiation of the whole spectrum. In actual experiments, the pulses are of finite width causing deviations from the theoretical predictions, a problem that is exacerbated by experiments performed at higher frequencies. In the present paper we provide a method to deal with the full SLE including the explicit role of the molecular dynamics, the spin Hamiltonian and the radiation field during the pulse. The computations are rendered more manageable by utilizing the Trotter formula, which is adapted to handle this SLE in what we call a "Split Super-Operator" method. Examples are given for different motional regimes, which show how 2D-ELDOR spectra are affected by the finite pulse widths. The theory shows good agreement with 2D-ELDOR experiments performed as a function of pulse width.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of DNP enhancements in a rotor spinning at the magic angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perras, Frédéric A; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek

    2016-03-01

    Simulations performed on model, static, samples have shown that the microwave power is non-uniformly distributed in the magic angle spinning (MAS) rotor when using conventional dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) instrumentation. Here, we applied the stray-field magic angle spinning imaging (STRAFI-MAS) experiment to generate a spatial map of the DNP enhancements in a full rotor, which is spun at a low rate in a commercial DNP-MAS NMR system. Notably, we observed that the enhancement factors produced in the center of the rotor can be twice as large as those produced at the top of the rotor. Surprisingly, we observed that the largest enhancement factors are observed along the axis of the rotor as opposed to against its walls, which are most directly irradiated by the microwave beam. We lastly observed that the distribution of enhancement factors can be moderately improved by degassing the sample and increasing the microwave power. The inclusion of dielectric particles greatly amplifies the enhancement factors throughout the rotor. The STRAFI-MAS approach can provide useful guidance for optimizing the access of microwave power to the sample, and thereby lead to further increases in sensitivity of DNP-MAS NMR.

  6. Resonances of Spin-1/2 Fermions in Eddington-Inspired Born-Infeld Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qi-Ming; Zhao, Li; Du, Yun-Zhi; Gu, Bao-Min

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the fermionic resonances for both chiralities in five-dimensional Eddington-inspired Born-Infeld (EiBI) theory. In order to localize fermion on the brane, it needs to be considered the Yukawa coupling between the fermion and the background scalar field. In our models, since the background scalar field has kink, double kink, or anti-kink solution, the system has rich resonant Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes structure. The massive KK fermionic modes feel a volcano potential, which result in a fermionic zero mode and a set of continuous massive KK modes. The inner structure of the branes and a free parameter in background scalar field influence the resonant behaviors of the massive KK fermions. Supported in part by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11075065, the Huo Ying-Dong Education Foundation of Chinese Ministry of Education under Grant No. 121106 and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities under Grant No. lzujbky-2014-31

  7. Study of leading strange meson resonances and spin-orbit splittings in K/sup -/p. -->. K/sup -/. pi. /sup +/n at 11 GeV/c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honma, A.K.

    1980-11-01

    The results from a high-statistics study of K..pi.. elastic scattering in the reaction K/sup -/p ..-->.. K/sup -/..pi../sup +/n are presented. The data for this analysis are taken from an 11-GeV/c K/sup -/p experiment performed on the Large Aperture Solenoidal Spectrometer (LASS) facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). By selecting the very forward produced K/sup -/..pi../sup +/ events, a sample consisting of data for the K..pi.. ..-->.. K..pi.. elastic scattering reaction was extracted. The angular distribution for this meson-meson scattering is studied by use of both a spherical harmonic moments analysis and a partial-wave analysis (PWA). The previously established leading natural spin-parity strange meson resonances (the J/sup P/ = 1/sup -/ K*(895), the 2/sup +/ K*(1430), and the 3/sup -/ K*(1780)) are observed in the results from both the moments analysis and the PWA. In addition, evidence for a new spin 4/sup -/ K* resonance with a mass of 2080 MeV and a width of about 225 MeV is presented. The results from the PWA confirm the existence of a 0/sup +/ kappa (1490) and propose the existence of a second scalar meson resonance, the 0/sup +/ kappa' (1900). Structure in the P-wave amplitude indicates resonance behavior in the mass region near 1700 MeV. In two of the four ambiguous solutions for the mass region above 1800 MeV, there is strong evidence for another P-wave resonant structure near 2100 MeV. The observed strange meson resonances are found to have a natural interpretation in terms of states predicted by the quark model. In particular, the mass splittings of the leading trajectory natural spin-parity strange meson states and the mass splittings between the spin-orbit triplet states are discussed. 59 figures, 17 tables.

  8. Measurement of ep-->ep[pi]0 beam spin asymmetries above the resonance region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Masi, Rita; Garcon, Michel; Zhao, Bo; Amaryan, Moscov; Amaryan, Moskov; Ambrozewicz, Pawel; Anghinolfi, Marco; Asryan, Gegham; Avagyan, Harutyun; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes; Baillie, Nathan; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Ball, James; Baltzell, Nathan; Baturin, Vitaly; Battaglieri, Marco; Bedlinskiy, Ivan; Bellis, Matthew; Benmouna, Nawal; Berman, Barry; Bertin, Pierre; Biselli, Angela; Blaszczyk, Lukasz; Bouchigny, Sylvain; Boyarinov, Sergey; Bradford, Robert; Branford, Derek; Briscoe, William; Brooks, William; Bultmann, S.; Bueltmann, Stephen; Bultmann, S.; Bueltmann, Stephen; Burkert, Volker; Butuceanu, Cornel; Calarco, John; Careccia, Sharon; Carman, Daniel; Casey, Liam; Chen, Shifeng; Cheng, Lu; Cole, Philip; Collins, Patrick; Coltharp, Philip; Crabb, Donald; Crede, Volker; Dashyan, Natalya; De Sanctis, Enzo; De Vita, Raffaella; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Deur, Alexandre; Dharmawardane, Kahanawita; Dickson, Richard; Djalali, Chaden; Dodge, Gail; Donnelly, Joseph; Doughty, David; Dugger, Michael; Dzyubak, Oleksandr; Egiyan, Hovanes; Egiyan, Kim; Elfassi, Lamiaa; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Eugenio, Paul; Fedotov, Gleb; Feldman, Gerald; Fradi, Ahmed; Funsten, Herbert; Gavalian, Gagik; Gilfoyle, Gerard; Giovanetti, Kevin; Girod, Francois-Xavier; Goetz, John; Gonenc, Atilla; Gothe, Ralf; Griffioen, Keith; Guidal, Michel; Guler, Nevzat; Guo, Lei; Gyurjyan, Vardan; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hakobyan, Hayk; Hanretty, Charles; Hersman, F.; Hicks, Kenneth; Hleiqawi, Ishaq; Holtrop, Maurik; Hyde, Charles; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Ishkhanov, Boris; Isupov, Evgeny; Ito, Mark; Jenkins, David; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Johnstone, John; Joo, Kyungseon; Juengst, Henry; Kalantarians, Narbe; Kellie, James; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kim, Wooyoung; Klein, Andreas; Klein, Franz; Klimenko, Alexei; Kossov, Mikhail; Krahn, Zebulun; Kramer, Laird; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuhn, Joachim; Kuhn, Sebastian; Kuleshov, Sergey; Lachniet, Jeff; Laget, Jean; Langheinrich, Jorn; Lawrence, David; Lee, Tsung-Shung; Livingston, Kenneth; Lu, Haiyun; MacCormick, Marion; Markov, Nikolai; Mattione, Paul; Mazouz, Malek; McKinnon, Bryan; Mecking, Bernhard; Mestayer, Mac; Meyer, Curtis; Mibe, Tsutomu; Michel, Bernard; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Mirazita, Marco; Miskimen, Rory; Mokeev, Viktor; Moreno, Brahim; Moriya, Kei; Morrow, Steven; Moteabbed, Maryam; Munevar Espitia, Edwin; Mutchler, Gordon; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Nasseripour, Rakhsha; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Niczyporuk, Bogdan; Niroula, Megh; Niyazov, Rustam; Nozar, Mina; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ostrovidov, Alexander; Park, Kijun; Pasyuk, Evgueni; Paterson, Craig; Pereira, Sergio; Pierce, Joshua; Pivnyuk, Nikolay; Pocanic, Dinko; Pogorelko, Oleg; Pozdnyakov, Sergey; Price, John; Procureur, Sebastien; Prok, Yelena; Protopopescu, Dan; Raue, Brian; Ricco, Giovanni; Ripani, Marco; Ritchie, Barry; Ronchetti, Federico; Rosner, Guenther; Rossi, Patrizia; Sabatie, Franck; Salamanca, Julian; Salgado, Carlos; Santoro, Joseph; Sapunenko, Vladimir; Schumacher, Reinhard; Serov, Vladimir; Sharabian, Youri; Sharov, Dmitri; Shvedunov, Nikolay; Smith, Elton; Smith, Lee; Sober, Daniel; Sokhan, Daria; Stavinsky, Aleksey; Stepanyan, Samuel; Stepanyan, Stepan; Stokes, Burnham; Stoler, Paul; Strakovski, Igor; Strauch, Steffen; Taiuti, Mauro; Tedeschi, David; Tkabladze, Avtandil; Tkachenko, Svyatoslav; Tur, Clarisse; Ungaro, Maurizio; Vineyard, Michael; Vlassov, Alexander; Voutier, Eric; Watts, Daniel; Weinstein, Lawrence; Weygand, Dennis; Williams, Michael; Wolin, Elliott; Wood, Michael; Yegneswaran, Amrit; Zana, Lorenzo; Zhang, Jixie; Zhao, Zhiwen

    2008-04-01

    The beam spin asymmetry (BSA) in the exclusive reaction e-vector p-->eppi0 was measured with the CEBAF 5.77 GeV polarized electron beam and Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). The xB,Q2,t, and phi dependences of the pi0 BSA are presented in the deep inelastic regime. The asymmetries are fitted with a sinphi function and their amplitudes are extracted. Overall, they are of the order of 0.04â 0.11 and roughly independent of t. This is the signature of a nonzero longitudinal-transverse interference. The implications concerning the applicability of a formalism based on generalized parton distributions, as well as the extension of a Regge formalism at high photon virtualities, are discussed.

  9. YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} microwave resonators for strong collective coupling with spin ensembles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghirri, A., E-mail: alberto.ghirri@nano.cnr.it [Istituto Nanoscienze - CNR, Centro S3, via Campi 213/a, 41125 Modena (Italy); Bonizzoni, C.; Affronte, M. [Dipartimento Fisica, Informatica e Matematica, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia and Istituto Nanoscienze - CNR, Centro S3, via Campi 213/a, 41125 Modena (Italy); Gerace, D.; Sanna, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pavia, via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Cassinese, A. [CNR-SPIN and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli Federico II, 80138 Napoli (Italy)

    2015-05-04

    Coplanar microwave resonators made of 330 nm-thick superconducting YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} have been realized and characterized in a wide temperature (T, 2–100 K) and magnetic field (B, 0–7 T) range. The quality factor (Q{sub L}) exceeds 10{sup 4} below 55 K and it slightly decreases for increasing fields, remaining 90% of Q{sub L}(B=0) for B = 7 T and T = 2 K. These features allow the coherent coupling of resonant photons with a spin ensemble at finite temperature and magnetic field. To demonstrate this, collective strong coupling was achieved by using di(phenyl)-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)iminoazanium organic radical placed at the magnetic antinode of the fundamental mode: the in-plane magnetic field is used to tune the spin frequency gap splitting across the single-mode cavity resonance at 7.75 GHz, where clear anticrossings are observed with a splitting as large as ∼82 MHz at T = 2 K. The spin-cavity collective coupling rate is shown to scale as the square root of the number of active spins in the ensemble.

  10. Capulets and Montagues: distinguishing the rival families of black-hole spin-orbit resonances by their gravitational-wave signatures

    CERN Document Server

    Gerosa, Davide; Kesden, Michael; Berti, Emanuele; Sperhake, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    If binary black holes form following the successive core collapses of sufficiently massive binary stars, precessional dynamics may align their spins $\\mathbf S_1$ and $\\mathbf S_2$ and the orbital angular momentum $\\mathbf L$ into a plane in which they jointly precess about the total angular momentum $\\mathbf J$. These spin orientations are known as spin-orbit resonances since $\\mathbf S_1$, $\\mathbf S_2$, and $\\mathbf L$ all precess at the same frequency to maintain their planar configuration. Two families of such spin-orbit resonances exist, alike in dignity but differentiated by whether the components of the two spins in the orbital plane are either aligned or antialigned. The fraction of binary black holes in each family is determined by the stellar evolution of their progenitors, so if gravitational-wave detectors could measure this fraction they could provide important insights into astrophysical formation scenarios for binary black holes. In this paper, we show that even under the conservative assumpti...

  11. Robust upward dispersion of the neutron spin resonance in the heavy fermion superconductor Ce1-xYbxCoIn5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yu; van Dyke, John; Lum, I. K.; White, B. D.; Jang, Sooyoung; Yazici, Duygu; Shu, L.; Schneidewind, A.; Čermák, Petr; Qiu, Y.; Maple, M. B.; Morr, Dirk K.; Dai, Pengcheng

    2016-09-01

    The neutron spin resonance is a collective magnetic excitation that appears in the unconventional copper oxide, iron pnictide and heavy fermion superconductors. Although the resonance is commonly associated with a spin-exciton due to the d(s+/-)-wave symmetry of the superconducting order parameter, it has also been proposed to be a magnon-like excitation appearing in the superconducting state. Here we use inelastic neutron scattering to demonstrate that the resonance in the heavy fermion superconductor Ce1-xYbxCoIn5 with x=0, 0.05 and 0.3 has a ring-like upward dispersion that is robust against Yb-doping. By comparing our experimental data with a random phase approximation calculation using the electronic structure and the momentum dependence of the -wave superconducting gap determined from scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) for CeCoIn5, we conclude that the robust upward-dispersing resonance mode in Ce1-xYbxCoIn5 is inconsistent with the downward dispersion predicted within the spin-exciton scenario.

  12. Mineral Carbonation in Wet Supercritical CO2: An in situ High-Pressure Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcu, R. V.; Hoyt, D. H.; Sears, J. A.; Rosso, K. M.; Felmy, A. R.; Hu, J. Z.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms and kinetics of mineral carbonation reactions relevant to sequestering carbon dioxide as a supercritical fluid (scCO2) in geologic formations is crucial for accurately predicting long-term storage risks. In situ probes that provide molecular-level information at geologically relevant temperatures and pressures are highly desirable and challenging to develop. Magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) is a powerful tool for obtaining detailed molecular structure and dynamics information of a system regardless whether the system is in a solid, a liquid, a gaseous, a supercritical state, or a mixture thereof. However, MAS NMR under scCO2 conditions has never been realized due to the tremendous technical difficulties of achieving and maintaining high pressure within a fast spinning MAS sample rotor. In this work, we report development of a unique high pressure MAS NMR capability capable of handling fluid pressure exceeding 170 bars and temperatures up to 80°C, and its application to mineral carbonation in scCO2 under geologically relevant temperatures and pressures. Mineral carbonation reactions of the magnesium silicate mineral forsterite and the magnesium hydroxide brucite reacted with scCO2 (up to 170 bar) and containing variable content of H2O (at, below, and above saturation in scCO2) were investigated at 50 to 70°C. In situ 13C MAS NMR spectra show peaks corresponding to the reactants, intermediates, and the magnesium carbonation products in a single spectrum. For example, Figure 1 shows the reaction dynamics, i.e., the formation and conversion of reaction intermediates, i.e., HCO3- and nesquehonite, to magnesite as a function of time at 70°C. This capability offers a significant advantage over traditional ex situ 13C MAS experiments on similar systems, where, for example, CO2 and HCO3- are not directly observable.

  13. Solution-state dynamics of sugar-connected spin probes in sucrose solution as studied by multiband (L-, X-, and W-band) electron paramagnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Kôichi; Ito, Tomohiro; Tada, Mika; Aoyama, Masaaki; Sato, Shingo; Onodera, Jun ichi; Ohya, Hiroaki

    2003-07-01

    A multiband (L-band, 0.7GHz; X-band, 9.4GHz; and W-band, 94GHz) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study was performed for two glycosidated spin probes, 4-(alpha,beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-TEMPO (Glc-TEMPO) and 4-(alpha,beta-D-lactopyranosyloxy)-TEMPO (Lac-TEMPO), and one non-glycosylated spin probe, 4-hydroxy-TEMPO (TEMPOL), where TEMPO=2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxyl, to characterize fundamental hydrodynamic properties of sugar-connected spin probes. The linewidths of these spin probes were investigated in various concentrations of sucrose solutions (0-50wt%). The multiband approach has allowed full characterization of the linewidth parameters, providing insights into the molecular shapes of the spin probes in sucrose solution. The analysis based on the fast-motional linewidth theory has yielded anisotropy parameters of rho(x) approximately 2.6 and rho(y) approximately 0.9 for Glc-TEMPO, and rho(x) approximately 4.2 and rho(y) approximately 0.9 for Lac-TEMPO. These values indicate that the glycosidated spin probes have a prolate-type molecular shape elongated along the x-axis (NO(rad) axis) with Lac-TEMPO elongated more remarkably, consistent with their molecular structures. The interaction parameters k (the ratios of the effective hydrodynamic volumes to the real ones) corrected for the difference in molecular shape have been estimated and found to have the relation k(TEMPOL)spin probes can have stronger hydrogen bonding to water. Glycosidated spin probes are expected to be useful for probing sugar-involving interactions, which commonly occur in biological systems. Thus this study will provide an indispensable basis for such spin-probe studies.

  14. Theory of electron spin resonance in bulk topological insulators Bi2Se3, Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, O.; Basko, D. M.

    2016-04-01

    We report a theoretical study of electron spin resonance in bulk topological insulators, such as Bi2Se3, Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3. Using the effective four-band model, we find the electron energy spectrum in a static magnetic field and determine the response to electric and magnetic dipole perturbations, represented by oscillating electric and magnetic fields perpendicular to the static field. We determine the associated selection rules and calculate the absorption spectra. This enables us to separate the effective orbital and spin degrees of freedom and to determine the effective g factors for electrons and holes.

  15. One-Shot Measurement of Spin-Lattice Relaxation Times in the Off-Resonance Rotating Frame of Reference with Applications to Breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbanks, Ethan Jefferson

    1994-01-01

    Off-resonance spin locking makes use of the novel relaxation time T_{1rho} ^{rm off}, which may be useful in characterizing breast disease. Knowledge of T _{rm 1rho}^{rm off} is essential for optimization of spin -locking imaging methods. The purpose of this work was to develop an optimal imaging technique for in vivo measurement of T_{rm 1rho}^ {rm off}. Measurement of T _{1rho}^{rm off } using conventional methods requires long exam times which are not suitable for patients. Exam time may be shortened by utilizing a one-shot method developed by Look and Locker, making in vivo measurements possible. The imaging method consisted of a 180^circ inversion pulse followed by a series of small-angle alpha pulses to tip a portion of the longitudinal magnetization into the transverse plane for readout. During each relaxation interval (between alpha pulses), a spin-locking pulse was applied off-resonance to achieve T_ {1rho}^{rm off} relaxation. The value of T_{rm 1rho}^{rm off} was then determined using a three-parameter non-linear least-squares fitting procedure. Values of T_ {1rho}^{rm off} were measured for normal and pathologic breast tissues at several resonant offsets. These measurements revealed that image contrast can be manipulated by altering the resonant offset of the spin-locking pulse. Whereas T _1 relaxation times were nearly identical for normal and cancerous tissues, T_{1 rho}^{rm off} relaxation times differed significantly. These results may be useful in improving image contrast in magnetic resonance imaging.

  16. Molecular imaging by optically-detected electron spin resonance of nitrogen-vacancies in nanodiamond

    CERN Document Server

    Hegyi, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Molecular imaging refers to a class of noninvasive biomedical imaging techniques with the sensitivity and specificity to image biochemical variations in-vivo. An ideal molecular imaging technique visualizes a biochemical target according to a range of criteria, including high spatial and temporal resolution, high contrast relative to non-targeted tissues, depth-independent penetration into tissue, lack of harm to the organism under study, and low cost. Because no existing molecular imaging modality is ideal for all purposes, new imaging approaches are needed. Here we demonstrate a novel molecular imaging approach, called nanodiamond imaging, that uses nanodiamonds containing nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers as an imaging agent, and image nanodiamond targets in pieces of chicken breast. Nanodiamonds can be tagged with biologically active molecules so they bind to specific receptors; their distribution can then be quantified in-vivo via optically-detected magnetic resonance of the NVs. In effect, we are demo...

  17. First Measurement of the Double Spin Asymmetry in $\\vec{e}\\vec{p}\\to e' \\pi^+ n$ in the Resonance Region

    CERN Document Server

    De Vita, R

    2002-01-01

    The double spin asymmetry in the $\\vec{e}\\vec{p}\\to e' \\pi^+ n$ reaction has been measured for the first time in the resonance region for four-momentum transfer $Q^2=0.35-1.5$ GeV$^2$. Data were taken at Jefferson Lab with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) using a 2.6 GeV polarized electron beam incident on a polarized solid NH$_3$ target. Comparison with predictions of phenomenological models shows strong sensitivity to resonance contributions. Helicity-1/2 transitions are found to be dominant in the second and third resonance regions. The measured asymmetry is consistent with a faster rise with $Q^2$ of the helicity asymmetry $A_1$ for the $F_{15}(1680)$ resonance than expected from the analysis of the unpolarized data.

  18. First Measurement of the Beam Normal Single Spin Asymmetry in $Δ$ Resonance Production by $Q_{\\rm weak}$

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuruzzaman, nfn [Hampton Univ., Hampton, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-08-01

    The beam normal single spin asymmetry ($B_{\\rm n}$) is generated in the scattering of transversely polarized electrons from unpolarized nuclei. The asymmetry arises from the interference of the imaginary part of the two-photon exchange with the one-photon exchange amplitude. The $Q_{\\rm weak}$ experiment has made the first measurement of $B_{\\rm n}$ in the production of the $\\Delta$(1232) resonance, using the $Q_{\\rm weak}$ apparatus in Hall-C at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The final transverse asymmetry, corrected for backgrounds and beam polarization, is $B_{\\rm n}$ = 43 $\\pm$ 16 ppm at beam energy 1.16 GeV at an average scattering angle of about 8.3 degrees, and invariant mass of 1.2 GeV. The measured preliminary $B_{\\rm n}$ agrees with a preliminary theoretical calculation. $B_{\\rm n}$ for the $\\Delta$ is the only known observable that is sensitive to the $\\Delta$ elastic form-factors ($\\gamma$*$\\Delta\\Delta$) in addition to the generally studied transition form-factors ($\\gamma$*N$\\Delta$), but extracting this information will require significant theoretical input.

  19. Electron spin-resonance study on Ce{sup 3+} in BaLiF{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaga, M. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Gifu University, Gifu (Japan); Honda, M. [Faculty of Science, Naruto University of Education, Naruto (Japan); Shimamura, K.; Fukuda, T. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Yosida, T. [Nakanihon Automotive College, Kamo (Japan)

    2000-07-10

    Three distinct Ce{sup 3+} sites in BaLiF{sub 3} crystals estimated from the optical spectra are associated with configurations of Ce{sup 3+} accompanied by different charge compensators. This assignment is consistent with the electron spin-resonance (ESR) result that there are two tetragonal Ce{sup 3+} centres distorted along the [001] axis and two orthorhombic Ce{sup 3+} centres distorted along the [110] axis in the absence of the cubic centre. The configurations of the Ce{sup 3+} centres correspond to the substitution for Ba{sup 2+} ions along the [001] and [110] axes with Li{sup +} ions and the Ba{sup 2+}-ion vacancies along the [001] and [110] axes. The dominant component of the Ce{sup 3+} luminescence spectrum with the peak at {approx}320 nm and the large Stokes shift energy ({approx}8300 cm{sup -1}) is assigned as due to the substitution for a Ba{sup 2+} ion along the [001] axis with a Li{sup +} ion. As the ionic radius (0.74 A) of Li{sup +} is much smaller than that (1.60 A) of Ba{sup 2+}, the Li substitution produces more space, resulting in the large lattice relaxation in the 5d excited state of Ce{sup 3+}. (author)

  20. Accuracy of dose planning for prostate radiotherapy in the presence of metallic implants evaluated by electron spin resonance dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, G.G.; Kinoshita, A.; de Oliveira, H.F.; Guimarães, F.S.; Amaral, L.L.; Baffa, O.

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the main approaches to cure prostate cancer, and its success depends on the accuracy of dose planning. A complicating factor is the presence of a metallic prosthesis in the femur and pelvis, which is becoming more common in elderly populations. The goal of this work was to perform dose measurements to check the accuracy of radiotherapy treatment planning under these complicated conditions. To accomplish this, a scale phantom of an adult pelvic region was used with alanine dosimeters inserted in the prostate region. This phantom was irradiated according to the planned treatment under the following three conditions: with two metallic prostheses in the region of the femur head, with only one prosthesis, and without any prostheses. The combined relative standard uncertainty of dose measurement by electron spin resonance (ESR)/alanine was 5.05%, whereas the combined relative standard uncertainty of the applied dose was 3.35%, resulting in a combined relative standard uncertainty of the whole process of 6.06%. The ESR dosimetry indicated that there was no difference (P>0.05, ANOVA) in dosage between the planned dose and treatments. The results are in the range of the planned dose, within the combined relative uncertainty, demonstrating that the treatment-planning system compensates for the effects caused by the presence of femur and hip metal prostheses. PMID:26017344

  1. Accuracy of dose planning for prostate radiotherapy in the presence of metallic implants evaluated by electron spin resonance dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, G.G. [Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Kinoshita, A. [Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Universidade Sagrado Coração, Bauru, SP (Brazil); Oliveira, H.F. de; Guimarães, F.S.; Amaral, L.L. [Serviço de Radioterapia, Hospital das Clínicas, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Baffa, O. [Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2015-05-26

    Radiotherapy is one of the main approaches to cure prostate cancer, and its success depends on the accuracy of dose planning. A complicating factor is the presence of a metallic prosthesis in the femur and pelvis, which is becoming more common in elderly populations. The goal of this work was to perform dose measurements to check the accuracy of radiotherapy treatment planning under these complicated conditions. To accomplish this, a scale phantom of an adult pelvic region was used with alanine dosimeters inserted in the prostate region. This phantom was irradiated according to the planned treatment under the following three conditions: with two metallic prostheses in the region of the femur head, with only one prosthesis, and without any prostheses. The combined relative standard uncertainty of dose measurement by electron spin resonance (ESR)/alanine was 5.05%, whereas the combined relative standard uncertainty of the applied dose was 3.35%, resulting in a combined relative standard uncertainty of the whole process of 6.06%. The ESR dosimetry indicated that there was no difference (P>0.05, ANOVA) in dosage between the planned dose and treatments. The results are in the range of the planned dose, within the combined relative uncertainty, demonstrating that the treatment-planning system compensates for the effects caused by the presence of femur and hip metal prostheses.

  2. Influence of Metallic Molar Ratio on the Electron Spin Resonance and Thermal Diffusivity of Zn–Al Layered Double Hydroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Ahmed Ali Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The coprecipitation method was used to prepare Zn–Al layered double hydroxide (Zn–Al–NO3-LDH at pH 7.5 and different Zn2+/Al3+ molar ratios of 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6. The elemental, structural, and textural properties of prepared samples were studied. The crystallinity of prepared LDH nanostructure decreases as Zn2+/Al3+ molar ratio increases. The electron spin resonance (ESR spectroscopy of different LDH samples showed new ESR spectra. These spectra were produced due to the presence of different phases with formed LDH such as ZnO phase and ZnAl2O4 spinel. At low Zn2+/Al3+ molar ratio, the ESR signals were produced from the presence of free nitrate anions in the LDH interlayer. Above Zn2+/Al3+ = 2, the ESR signals were attributed to the existence of ZnO phase and ZnAl2O4 spinel in the samples. Because the nuclear magnetic moment of 67Zn is lower than 27Al, the increasing in Zn2+/Al3+ molar ratio causes a reduction of the magnetic activity of ZnAl2O4 spinel. Thermal diffusivity versus in situ temperature showed nonlinear relation for different samples due to the changing in the water content of LDH as temperature increases. The dc conductivity of samples decreased as Zn2+/Al3+ molar ratio.

  3. Electron spin resonance dating of fault gouge from Desamangalam, Kerala: Evidence for Quaternary movement in Palghat gap shear zone

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T K Gundu Rao; C P Rajendran; George Mathew; Biju John

    2002-06-01

    The field investigations in the epicentral area of the 1994 Wadakkancheri (Desamangalam), Kerala, earthquake (M 4.3) indicate subtle, but clearly recognizable expressions of geologically recent fault zone, consisting of fracture sets showing brittle displacement and a gouge zone. The fracture zone confines to the crystalline basement, and is spatially coincident with the elongation of the isoseismals of the 1994 mainshock and a 10-km-long WNW-ESE trending topographic lineament. The preliminary results from the electron spin resonance (ESR) dating on the quartz grains from the fault gouge indicate that the last major faulting in this site occurred 430 ± 43 ka ago. The experiments on different grain sizes of quartz from the gouge showed consistent decrease in age to a plateau of low values, indicating that ESR signals in finer grains were completely zeroed at the time of faulting due to frictional heat. The results show a relatively young age for displacement on the fault that occurs within a Precambrian shear zone. Discrete reactivated faults in such areas may be characterized by low degree of activity, but considering the ESR age of the last significant faulting event, the structure at Desamangalam may be categorized as a potentially active fault capable of generating moderate earthquakes, separated by very long periods of quiescence.

  4. Electron spin resonance investigation of H2(+), HD(+), and D2(+) isolated in neon matrices at 2 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correnti, Matthew D; Dickert, Kyle P; Pittman, Mark A; Felmly, John W; Banisaukas, John J; Knight, Lon B

    2012-11-28

    Various isotopologues of nature's simplest molecule, namely H(2)(+), HD(+), and D(2)(+), have been isolated in neon matrices at 2 K for the first time and studied by electron spin resonance (ESR). Over many years, hundreds of matrix isolation experiments employing a variety of deposition conditions and ion generation methods have been tried to trap the H(2)(+) cation radical in our laboratory. The molecule has been well characterized in the gas phase and by theoretical methods. The observed magnetic parameters for H(2)(+) in neon at 2 K are: g(∥) ≈ g(⊥) = 2.0022(1); A(iso)(H) = 881(7) MHz; and A(dip)(H) = 33(3) MHz. Reasonable agreement with gas phase values of the isotropic hyperfine interaction (A(iso)) is observed; however, the neon matrix dipolar hyperfine interaction (A(dip)) is noticeably below the gas phase value. The smaller matrix value of A(dip) is attributable to motional averaging of the H(2)(+) radical in the neon matrix trapping site--an occurrence that would prevent the full extent of the hyperfine anisotropy from being measured for a powder pattern type ESR sample.

  5. Voxel-Wise Functional Connectomics Using Arterial Spin Labeling Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: The Role of Denoising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaoyun; Connelly, Alan; Calamante, Fernando

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate voxel-wise functional connectomics using arterial spin labeling (ASL) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Since ASL signal has an intrinsically low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), the role of denoising is evaluated; in particular, a novel denoising method, dual-tree complex wavelet transform (DT-CWT) combined with the nonlocal means (NLM) algorithm is implemented and evaluated. Simulations were conducted to evaluate the performance of the proposed method in denoising images and in detecting functional networks from noisy data (including the accuracy and sensitivity of detection). In addition, denoising was applied to in vivo ASL datasets, followed by network analysis using graph theoretical approaches. Efficiencies cost was used to evaluate the performance of denoising in detecting functional networks from in vivo ASL fMRI data. Simulations showed that denoising is effective in detecting voxel-wise functional networks from low SNR data and/or from data with small total number of time points. The capability of denoised voxel-wise functional connectivity analysis was also demonstrated with in vivo data. We concluded that denoising is important for voxel-wise functional connectivity using ASL fMRI and that the proposed DT-CWT-NLM method should be a useful ASL preprocessing step.

  6. Evaluation of Cancer Metabolomics Using ex vivo High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning (HRMAS) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuss, Taylor L; Cheng, Leo L

    2016-03-22

    According to World Health Organization (WHO) estimates, cancer is responsible for more deaths than all coronary heart disease or stroke worldwide, serving as a major public health threat around the world. High resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has demonstrated its usefulness in the identification of cancer metabolic markers with the potential to improve diagnosis and prognosis for the oncology clinic, due partially to its ability to preserve tissue architecture for subsequent histological and molecular pathology analysis. Capable of the quantification of individual metabolites, ratios of metabolites, and entire metabolomic profiles, HRMAS MRS is one of the major techniques now used in cancer metabolomic research. This article reviews and discusses literature reports of HRMAS MRS studies of cancer metabolomics published between 2010 and 2015 according to anatomical origins, including brain, breast, prostate, lung, gastrointestinal, and neuroendocrine cancers. These studies focused on improving diagnosis and understanding patient prognostication, monitoring treatment effects, as well as correlating with the use of in vivo MRS in cancer clinics.

  7. First Measurement of the Beam Normal Single Spin Asymmetry in $\\Delta$ Resonance Production by $Q_{\\rm weak}$

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2015-01-01

    The beam normal single spin asymmetry ($B_{\\rm n}$) is generated in the scattering of transversely polarized electrons from unpolarized nuclei. The asymmetry arises from the interference of the imaginary part of the two-photon exchange with the one-photon exchange amplitude. The $Q_{\\rm weak}$ experiment has made the first measurement of $B_{\\rm n}$ in the production of the $\\Delta$(1232) resonance, using the $Q_{\\rm weak}$ apparatus in Hall-C at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The final transverse asymmetry, corrected for backgrounds and beam polarization, is $B_{\\rm n}$ = 43 $\\pm$ 16 ppm at beam energy 1.16 GeV at an average scattering angle of about 8.3 degrees, and invariant mass of 1.2 GeV. The measured preliminary $B_{\\rm n}$ agrees with a preliminary theoretical calculation. $B_{\\rm n}$ for the $\\Delta$ is the only known observable that is sensitive to the $\\Delta$ elastic form-factors ($\\gamma$*$\\Delta\\Delta$) in addition to the generally studied transition form-factors ($\\gamma$*N...

  8. Electron spin resonance study of Er-concentration effect in GaAs;Er,O containing charge carriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmasry, F. [Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Okubo, S. [Molecular Photoscience Research Center, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Ohta, H., E-mail: hoht@kobe-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Molecular Photoscience Research Center, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Fujiwara, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2014-05-21

    Er-concentration effect in GaAs;Er,O containing charge carriers (n-type, high resistance, p-type) has been studied by X-band Electron spin resonance (ESR) at low temperature (4.7 K < T < 18 K). Observed A, B, and C types of ESR signals were identical to those observed previously in GaAs:Er,O without carrier. The local structure around Er-2O centers is not affected by carriers because similar angular dependence of g-values was observed in both cases (with/without carrier). For temperature dependence, linewidth and lineshape analysis suggested the existence of Er dimers with antiferromagnetic exchange interaction of about 7 K. Moreover, drastic decrease of ESR intensity for C signal in p-type sample was observed and it correlates with the decrease of photoluminescence (PL) intensity. Possible model for the Er-2O trap level in GaAs:Er,O is discussed from the ESR and PL experimental results.

  9. Electron spin resonance evaluation of pure CaSO4 and as a phosphor doped with P and Dy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus, E F O; Rossi, A M; Lopes, R T

    2002-01-01

    Polycrystalline CaSO4 powder, doped with different elements but mainly rare earths, is one of the most interesting thermoluminescent (TL) materials. Although many electron spin resonance (ESR) analyses have been reported for these materials few studies have been published about the potential of CaSO4 for ESR dosimetry; almost all studies used CaSO4:Dy with a very low Dy concentration as the material for TL measurements. Pure CaSO4 from Merck was used to prepare CaSO4:Dy and CaSO4:P:Dy with different Dy concentrations. Samples were annealed at 600 degrees C for 1 h before irradiation in a Gammacell 220 irradiator with a 60Co gamma source at a dose rate of 100 Gy x min(-1). The ESR spectra of the pure CaSO4 and CaSO4 doped with P and Dy show the lines usually observed with these types of material, with the factor g around 2.036 and an intense line at g = 2.0011 found only in the pure material. This line, probably an axial SO4-, grows linearly with absorbed dose until 1.0 kGy and shows good stability with time. The line should be stabilized by matrix impurities because it can be removed by a simple treatment with hot sulphuric acid.

  10. Entanglement dynamics of Nitrogen-vacancy centers spin ensembles coupled to a superconducting resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yimin; You, Jiabin; Hou, Qizhe

    2016-02-23

    Exploration of macroscopic quantum entanglement is of great interest in both fundamental science and practical application. We investigate a hybrid quantum system that consists of two nitrogen-vacancy centers ensembles (NVE) coupled to a superconducting coplanar waveguide resonator (CPWR). The collective magnetic coupling between the NVE and the CPWR is employed to generate macroscopic entanglement between the NVEs, where the CPWR acts as the quantum bus. We find that, this NVE-CPWR hybrid system behaves as a system of three coupled harmonic oscillators, and the excitation prepared initially in the CPWR can be distributed into these two NVEs. In the nondissipative case, the entanglement of NVEs oscillates periodically and the maximal entanglement always keeps unity if the CPWR is initially prepared in the odd coherent state. Considering the dissipative effect from the CPWR and NVEs, the amount of entanglement between these two NVEs strongly depends on the initial state of the CPWR, and the maximal entanglement can be tuned by adjusting the initial states of the total system. The experimental feasibility and challenge with currently available technology are discussed.

  11. Spin-Density-Wave-Type Ordering of LaCoGe Revealed by 59Co- and 139La-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karube, Kosuke; Hattori, Taisuke; Ishida, Kenji; Tamura, Nobuhiko; Deguchi, Kazuhiko; Sato, Noriaki K.

    2013-08-01

    The low-temperature magnetic properties of LaCoGe with the tetragonal CeFeSi-type structure were investigated by 59Co- and 139La-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements. The nuclear spin--lattice relaxation rate divided by the temperature, 1/(T1T), gradually increases with decreasing temperature and shows a kink at approximately 18 K, below which an inhomogeneous internal field appears at the Co nuclear site. These results indicate that antiferromagnetic ordering occurs below TN˜ 18 K. However, an internal field was not observed at the La nuclear site below TN. Taking all NMR results into account, we conclude that spin-density-wave (SDW)-type ordering occurs, where magnetic correlations are of the checkerboard type [\\mbi{Q}=(π,π)] in the ab-plane and have a long periodicity along the c-axis with inhomogeneous ordered moments pointing to the c-axis.

  12. Inter-spin distance determination using L-band (1-2 GHz) non-adiabatic rapid sweep electron paramagnetic resonance (NARS EPR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittell, Aaron W.; Hustedt, Eric J.; Hyde, James S.

    2012-08-01

    Site-directed spin-labeling electron paramagnetic resonance (SDSL EPR) provides insight into the local structure and motion of a spin probe strategically attached to a molecule. When a second spin is introduced to the system, macromolecular information can be obtained through measurement of inter-spin distances either by continuous wave (CW) or pulsed electron double resonance (ELDOR) techniques. If both methodologies are considered, inter-spin distances of 8-80 Å can be experimentally determined. However, there exists a region at the upper limit of the conventional X-band (9.5 GHz) CW technique and the lower limit of the four-pulse double electron-electron resonance (DEER) experiment where neither method is particularly reliable. The work presented here utilizes L-band (1.9 GHz) in combination with non-adiabatic rapid sweep (NARS) EPR to address this opportunity by increasing the upper limit of the CW technique. Because L-band linewidths are three to seven times narrower than those at X-band, dipolar broadenings that are small relative to the X-band inhomogeneous linewidth become observable, but the signal loss, due to the frequency dependence of the Boltzmann factor, has made L-band especially challenging. NARS has been shown to increase sensitivity by a factor of five, and overcomes much of this loss, making L-band distance determination more feasible [1]. Two different systems are presented, and distances of 18-30 Å have been experimentally determined at physiologically relevant temperatures. Measurements are in excellent agreement with a helical model and values determined by DEER.

  13. Irreversible magnetic-field dependence of ferromagnetic resonance and inverse spin Hall effect voltage in CoFeB/Pt bilayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Il; Seo, Min-Su; Choi, Yeon Suk; Park, Seung-Young

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic field (H) sweeping direction dependences of the mixed voltage Vmix induced by the inverse-spin Hall effect(ISHE) and spin-rectified effect (SRE) in a CoFeB (5 nm)/Pt (10 nm) bilayer structure are investigated using the ferromagnetic resonance in the TE mode cavities and coplanar waveguide methods. Conventionally, the magnitude of ISHE voltage VISH (symmetric) excluding the SRE (antisymmetric component) was unavoidably separated from the fitting curve of Vmix (a sum of a symmetric and an antisymmetric part) for one direction of H-source. By studying the ratio of the two voltage parts with the bi-directional H sweeping, the optimized VISH (no SRE condition) value which also include a well-defined spin Hall angle can be obtained via the linear response relation of ISHE and SRE components.

  14. Critical assessment of electron spin resonance studies on Cu(I)-NO complexes in Cu-ZSM-5 zeolites prepared by solid- and liquid-state ion exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umamaheswari, V; Hartmann, Martin; Pöppl, Andreas

    2005-10-27

    Cu(I)-NO adsorption complexes were formed over Cu-ZSM-5 zeolites prepared by (i) solid-state ion exchange of NH(4)-ZSM-5 with CuCl and (ii) liquid-state ion exchange of ZSM-5 with Cu(CH(3)COO)(2). Electron spin resonance spectroscopy revealed the formation of two different Cu(I)-NO species A and B in both systems, whose spin Hamiltonian parameters are comparable with those already reported for the Cu(I)-NO species formed over 66% Cu(II) liquid-state ion-exchanged Cu-ZSM-5 materials. The population of the species A and B differs for the two systems studied. Formation of species B is more favored in the solid-state ion-exchanged Cu-ZSM-5 when compared to the liquid-state exchanged zeolite. The X-, Q- and W-band electron spin resonance spectra recorded at 6 and 77 K reveal the presence of a rigid geometry of the adsorption complexes at 6 K and a dynamic complex structure at higher temperatures such as 77 K. This is indicated by the change in the spin Hamiltonian parameters of the formed Cu(I)-NO species in both the liquid- and solid-state ion-exchanged Cu-ZSM-5 zeolites from 6 to 77 K. Possible models for the motional effects found at elevated temperatures are discussed. The temperature dependence of the electron spin phase memory time measured by two-pulse electron spin-echo experiments indicates, likewise, the onset of a motional process of the adsorbed NO molecules at temperatures above 10 K. The studies support previous assignments where the NO complexes are formed at two different Cu(I) cationic sites in the ZSM-5 framework and highlight that multifrequency electron spin resonance experiments at low temperatures are essential for reliable determination of the spin Hamiltonian parameters of the formed adsorption complexes for further comparison with Cu(I)-NO complex structures predicted by quantum chemical calculations.

  15. In vivo determination of cerebral hemodynamics and bioenergetics using spin-echo magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oja, Joni Marcus Eric

    1999-08-01

    It is well known that the transverse relaxation time, T 2, is dependent on the oxygenation state of blood. Two biophysical mechanisms have been proposed to explain this interdependency. In the diffusion model, oxygenation effects are accounted for by water diffusion through field gradients inside and outside, of the erythrocytes, whereas in the exchange model, the oxygenation effect is thought to be due to the exchange of water between erythrocytes and plasma. Careful in vitro studies with blood have shown that the exchange model fits best to the obtained data in preference to the diffusion model. During brain activation, local increases in blood flow exceed the oxygen demand, resulting in less deoxygenated blood in the capillary and venous compartments. Due to this, blood is less paramagnetic in these activated brain regions, lengthening T2, which in turn increases the signal intensities of the corresponding voxels in the MR image. Thus the measured blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) image contrast is a complex function of many physiological parameters, such as tissue morphometry, blood volume, blood flow, oxygenation and oxygen metabolism. All of these parameters contribute to the tissue magnetization influencing the transverse relaxation rate. Until now, no exact equations have been available which would relate these hemodynamic variables to a single MRI observable parameter, namely T 2, in a manner in which absolute units can be used. A fundamental theory was developed to explain measured spin-echo BOLD effects, and it was tested in animals and humans. In animal studies, blood oxygenation was altered by regulating arterial oxygen or carbon dioxide tension. This resulted in changes in blood volume, flow and blood magnetization, which in turn was reflected in T2. Using analytical expressions derived from the theory, the transverse relaxation rate was related to the oxygen saturation and extraction and quantification of microvascular cerebral blood volume was

  16. Resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    an impetus or drive to that account: change, innovation, rupture, or discontinuity. Resonances: Historical Essays on Continuity and Change explores the historiographical question of the modes of interrelation between these motifs in historical narratives. The essays in the collection attempt to realize...... theoretical consciousness through historical narrative ‘in practice’, by discussing selected historical topics from Western cultural history, within the disciplines of history, literature, visual arts, musicology, archaeology, philosophy, and theology. The title Resonances indicates the overall perspective...

  17. Electron spin resonance study of a La sub 0 sub . sub 7 Ca sub 0 sub . sub 3 MnO sub 3 single crystal

    CERN Document Server

    Joh, K W; Lee, C E; Hur, N H; Ri, H C

    2003-01-01

    Comprehensive measurements of electron spin resonance were carried out on a La sub 0 sub . sub 7 Ca sub 0 sub . sub 3 MnO sub 3 single crystal over a wide temperature range covering the ferromagnetic as well as the paramagnetic phases. Our analysis of the asymmetric lineshapes indicates that the phase segregation of good and poor conducting regions persists far above the ferromagnetic-paramagnetic phase transition temperature.

  18. Electron spin resonance of the phosphorescent triplet states of p-phenylphenol and p-phenylphenolate ion in stretched polyvinyl alcohol films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Mikio; Higuchi, Jiro

    1980-05-01

    Using a stretched polyvinyl alcohol film as a host, electron spin resonance (ESR) of the phosphorescent triplet states of p-phenylphenol and p-phenylphenolate ion has been studied by changing the pH of the medium as an example of the application of ESR to an acid-base equilibrium. In assigning ESR spectra of aromatic acid and conjugated base, the present method is demonstrated to be most convenient and useful.

  19. Measurements of gluon spin-sensitive quantities at the Z{sup 0} resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, C.G.

    1993-10-01

    Measurements have been made of the scaled jet energies (x{sub 1}, x{sub 2}, x{sub 3}) and the Ellis-Karliner angle (cos{theta}{sub EK}), which are sensitive to the spill of the gluon, in the 3-jet hadronic events from the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation at the Z{sup 0} resonance. The experiment is performed with the SLD detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The data used in this analysis was collected during the 1992 physics run, which includes 10,252 hadronic Z{sup 0} events that have CDC information written out. Only charged tracks measured in the central drift chamber are used for the measurements of the above variables. The raw data are found to be in good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulations passing the same set of track and event selection cuts. A bin-to-bin correction is done for the distributions of x{sub 1}, x{sub 2}, x{sub 3}, and cos{theta}{sub EK} to account for the effects of hadronization, detector acceptance and resolution. The corrected data is compared to the parton level distributions of x{sub 1}, x{sub 2}, x{sub 3}, and cos{theta}{sub EK} simulated from the vector QCD model and the scalar gluon model respectively. The systematic errors, calculated for all the bins in these distributions, are obtained by comparing the results from different sets of track and event selection cuts, from different hadronization models and from different Monte Carlo programs. Good agreement is found between data and the vector QCD model. The scalar gluon model strongly disagrees with the data.

  20. Sign of inverse spin Hall voltages generated by ferromagnetic resonance and temperature gradients in yttrium iron garnet platinum bilayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreier, Michael; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.; Vasyuchka, Vitaliy I.; Flipse, Joost; Uchida, Ken-ichi; Lotze, Johannes; Lauer, Viktor; Chumak, Andrii V.; Serga, Alexander A.; Daimon, Shunsuke; Kikkawa, Takashi; Saitoh, Eiji; van Wees, Bart J.; Hillebrands, Burkard; Gross, Rudolf; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.

    2015-01-01

    We carried out a concerted effort to determine the absolute sign of the inverse spin Hall effect voltage generated by spin currents injected into a normal metal. We focus on yttrium iron garnet (YIG)vertical bar platinum bilayers at room temperature, generating spin currents by microwaves and temper

  1. Distinguishing S-plus-minus and S-plus-plus electron pairing symmetries by neutron spin resonances in superconducting Sodium-Iron-Cobalt-Arsenic (transitional temperature = 18 Kelvin)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Tanmoy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Balatsky, Alexander V. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhang, Chenglin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee; Li, Haifeng [Institut fur Festkorperforschung, Julich, Germany; Su, Yiki [The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee; Nethertom, Tucker [The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee; Redding, Caleb [The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee; Carr, Scott [The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee; Schneidewind, Astrid [Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz, Garching, Germany; Faulhaber, Enrico [Gemeinsame Forschergruppe HZB, Berlin, Germany; Li, Shiliang [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; Yao, Daoxin [Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China; Bruckel, Thomas [Institut fur Festkorperforschung, Julich, Germany; Dai, Pengchen [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; Sobolev, Oleg [Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz, Garching, Germany

    2012-06-05

    A determination of the superconducting (SC) electron pairing symmetry forms the basis for establishing a microscopic mechansim for superconductivity. For iron pnictide superconductors, the s{sup {+-}}-pairing symmetry theory predicts the presence of a sharp neutron spin resonance at an energy below the sum of hole and electron SC gap energies (E {le} 2{Delta}). Although the resonances have been observed for various iron pnictide superconductors, they are broad in energy and can also be interpreted as arising from the s{sup ++}-pairing symmetry with E {ge} 2{Delta}. Here we use inelastic neutron scattering to reveal a sharp resonance at E = 7 meV in the SC NaFe{sub 0.935}Co{sub 0.045}As (T{sub c} = 18 K). By comparing our experiments with calculated spin-excitations spectra within the s{sup {+-}} and s{sup ++}-pairing symmetries, we conclude that the resonance in NaFe{sub 0.935}Co{sub 0.045}As is consistent with the s{sup {+-}}-pairing symmetry, thus eliminating s{sup ++}-pairing symmetry as a candidate for superconductivity.

  2. Population and coherence transfer in half-integer quadrupolar spin systems induced by simultaneous rapid passages of the satellite transitions: A static and spinning single crystal nuclear magnetic resonance study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Hartmut; Iuga, Dinu; Verhagen, Rieko; Kentgens, Arno P. M.

    2001-02-01

    situations. Further we will demonstrate the greater flexibility of a DFS compared to a CAM pulse to manipulate the adiabaticity and thus to maximize the transfer efficiency. Finally, the 27Al resonance in an α-Al2O3 single crystal will be inspected to demonstrate that the efficiency of DFS-induced population and coherence transfer in spin-5/2 systems depends on the direction of the DFS.

  3. A method for accurate electron-atom resonances: The complex-scaled multiconfigurational spin-tensor electron propagator method for the $^2P\\, \\mbox{Be}^{-}$ shape resonance problem

    CERN Document Server

    Tsednee, Tsogbayar; Yeager, Danny L

    2015-01-01

    We propose and develop the complex scaled multiconfigurational spin-tensor electron propagator (CMCSTEP) technique for theoretical determination of resonance parameters with electron-atom/molecule systems including open-shell and highly correlated atoms and molecules. The multiconfigurational spin-tensor electron propagator method (MCSTEP) developed and implemented by Yeager his coworkers in real space gives very accurate and reliable ionization potentials and attachment energies. The CMCSTEP method uses a complex scaled multiconfigurational self-consistent field (CMCSCF) state as an initial state along with a dilated Hamiltonian where all of the electronic coordinates are scaled by a complex factor. CMCSCF was developed and applied successfully to resonance problems earlier. We apply the CMCSTEP method to get $^2 P\\,\\mbox{Be}^{-}$ shape resonance parameters using $14s11p5d$, $14s14p2d$, and $14s14p5d$ basis sets with a $2s2p3d$\\,CAS. The obtained value of the resonance parameters are compared to previous res...

  4. Use of magnetic hysteresis properties and electron spin resonance spectroscopy for the identification of volcanic ash: a preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawse, Archana; Beske-Diehl, Suzanne; Marshall, S. A.

    1998-03-01

    This initial study investigates the possible use of hysteresis parameters and electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy to identify and correlate volcanic ash. ESR and hysteresis properties are sensitive to characteristics such as the chemical composition, mineralogy, and grain size and shape. These characteristics are determined by the tectonic setting of the volcano and by the magmatic and eruptive history of the volcanic ash. Hysteresis properties and ESR spectra, therefore, should be distinct for each ash eruption and may help to identify the eruptive source of the ash and to correlate ash from unknown sources. We conducted ESR spectroscopy at room temperature and magnetic hysteresis measurements on 19 samples of a single ash, the 1974 October 14 eruption of the Fuego volcano, Guatemala, and on single samples of ash obtained from eight different volcanoes. The Fuego ash samples were obtained at increasing distances from the volcano. For the single Fuego ash, ESR spectra and hysteresis parameters become increasingly similar as the distance from the volcano increases. At distances greater than 30km, ESR spectra and hysteresis properties are uniform. The variability of magnetic and ESR properties with distance from Fuego is due to the preferential fall-out of phenocrysts closer to the volcano. At large distances, the ash is more uniform, containing more glass and microcrystals. All eight ash samples from the different volcanoes can be distinguished from the distal Fuego 1974 October 14 ash using ESR spectra and hysteresis parameters. These results suggest that ESR and hysteresis measurements have a potential to be used as tools to identify distal ash when used in conjunction with geochemical, mineralogical and/or other types of data.

  5. Near-interface Si substrate 3d metal contamination during atomic layer deposition processing detected by electron spin resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, A. P. D.; Stesmans, A.; Hiller, D.; Zacharias, M.

    2012-06-01

    A K- and Q-band electron spin resonance (ESR) study has been carried out on (100)Si/SiO2 entities manufactured by low temperature (150 °C) atomic layer deposition (ALD) of a high-quality SiO2 layer on Si using 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, H2O, and ozone in a three-step process. Whereas previous work has demonstrated the high quality of the deposited SiO2 layer, the current ESR analysis reports on the tracing of growth-related contamination of near interface Si substrate layers by two transition metals. This includes, first, detection of the signal of interstitial Cr+ (S = 5/2) impurities in c-Si, characterized by an isotropic central g value of 1.9980 ± 0.0002, an isotropic 53Cr (I = 3/2) hyperfine interaction of splitting Aiso = 11.8 G, and cubic crystal field splitting parameter a = +32.2 G, well in agreement with the known bulk c-Si case; A small anisotropic contribution to the hyperfine interaction has additionally been revealed. The total Cr+ defect density is inferred as ˜5 × 1011 cm-2. Second, a single signal is observed at isotropic g = 2.070 ± 0.001, corresponding to interstitial Fe impurities (Fei)0 (S = 1) positioned in a c-Si matrix. Defect density depth profiling reveals the impurities to be confined to a few μm thick Si substrate top layer, the density decaying exponential-like from the Si/SiO2 interface inward the Si substrate. The total of the results points to a contamination of reactor-environment origin, connected with the layer deposition process. It concerns a weak contamination, in which detection the ESR technique emerges as a powerful technique able to unveil very low levels of contamination of near-surface Si substrate layers.

  6. Applications of electron spin resonance to some problems of radiation chemistry; Applications de la resonance paramagnetique electronique a quelques problemes de chimie sous rayonnements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chachaty, C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-06-01

    The electron spin resonance (E.S.R.) spectra of gamma irradiated polar organic glasses, at 77 K, shows a single line centered at g {approx} 2, attributed to solvated electrons. The radicals produced on scavenging this species by electron acceptors, such as aromatic hydrocarbons, nitro-compounds and azines have been studied by E.S.R. In most cases, the radicals from these solutes, the spectra of which are observed after elimination by warming of the radicals from the matrices, are produced by protonation of the anions formed by scavenging of electrons at 77 K. Thus, in the case of glassy solutions of nitro-compounds, the radicals R NO{sub 2}H are formed. They are characterized by a{sub N} = 15 G (nitrobenzene) or a{sub N} = 28 G (nitro-alkane). These radicals are also generated by U.V, photolysis at room temperature of solutions of nitro-compounds in alcohols and are shown to be the precursors of nitroxide radicals R - N - R (with N - O) observed simultaneously. Gamma irradiation of solutions of pyridine and of the three diazines, in alcohol glasses at 77 K, produces the radical formed by hydrogen addition to these compounds. The value of the coupling constant of the additional proton (7-10 G) indicates that it is bound to a nitrogen in the sp{sup 2} hydridation state. One has shown, taking pyridine as an example, that the addition to a carbon gives a much greater value of the coupling constant, of the order of 50-60 G. (author) [French] Les spectres de resonance paramagnetique electronique (R.P.E.) obtenus apres irradiation gamma, a 77 K, de verres organiques polaires tels que les alcools, comportent une bande unique centree a g {approx} 2, attribuable aux electrons solvates. On etudie par R.P.E. les radicaux provenant de leur capture par des solutes ayant une affinite electronique, en particulier les hydrocarbures aromatiques, les composes nitres et les azines. En general, les radicaux provenant de ces solutes, dont on observe les spectres apres elimination

  7. The spin chemistry and magnetic resonance of H2@C60. From the Pauli principle to trapping a long lived nuclear excited spin state inside a buckyball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turro, Nicholas J; Chen, Judy Y-C; Sartori, Elena; Ruzzi, Marco; Marti, Angel; Lawler, Ronald; Jockusch, Steffen; López-Gejo, Juan; Komatsu, Koichi; Murata, Yasujiro

    2010-02-16

    One of the early triumphs of quantum mechanics was Heisenberg's prediction, based on the Pauli principle and wave function symmetry arguments, that the simplest molecule, H(2), should exist as two distinct species-allotropes of elemental hydrogen. One allotrope, termed para-H(2) (pH(2)), was predicted to be a lower energy species that could be visualized as rotating like a sphere and possessing antiparallel ( upward arrow downward arrow) nuclear spins; the other allotrope, termed ortho-H(2) (oH(2)), was predicted to be a higher energy state that could be visualized as rotating like a cartwheel and possessing parallel ( upward arrow upward arrow) nuclear spins. This remarkable prediction was confirmed by the early 1930s, and pH(2) and oH(2) were not only separated and characterized but were also found to be stable almost indefinitely in the absence of paramagnetic "spin catalysts", such as molecular oxygen, or traces of paramagnetic impurities, such as metal ions. The two allotropes of elemental hydrogen, pH(2) and oH(2), may be quantitatively incarcerated in C(60) to form endofullerene guest@host complexes, symbolized as pH(2)@C(60) and oH(2)@C(60), respectively. How does the subtle difference in nuclear spin manifest itself when hydrogen allotropes are incarcerated in a buckyball? Can the incarcerated "guests" communicate with the outside world and vice versa? Can a paramagnetic spin catalyst in the outside world cause the interconversion of the allotropes and thereby effect a chemical transformation inside a buckyball? How close are the measurable properties of H(2)@C(60) to those computed for the "quantum particle in a spherical box"? Are there any potential practical applications of this fascinating marriage of the simplest molecule, H(2), with one of the most beautiful of all molecules, C(60)? How can one address such questions theoretically and experimentally? A goal of our studies is to produce an understanding of how the H(2) guest molecules incarcerated in

  8. Spin-Mechatronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Mamoru; Saitoh, Eiji; Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the interconversion phenomena between spin and mechanical angular momentum in moving objects. In particular, the recent results on spin manipulation and spin-current generation by mechanical motion are examined. In accelerating systems, spin-dependent gauge fields emerge, which enable the conversion from mechanical angular momentum into spins. Such a spin-mechanical effect is predicted by quantum theory in a non-inertial frame. Experiments which confirm the effect, i.e., the resonance frequency shift in nuclear magnetic resonance, the stray field measurement of rotating metals, and electric voltage generation in liquid metals, are discussed.

  9. Measurement of the 3He Spin Structure Functions in the Resonance Region: A Test of Quark-Hadron Duality on the Neutron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solvignon, Patricia [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2006-08-01

    One of the biggest challenges in the study of the nucleon structure is the understanding of the transition from partonic degrees of freedom to hadronic degrees of freedom. In 1970, Bloom and Gilman noticed that structure function data taken at SLAC in the resonance region average to the scaling curve of deep inelastic scattering (DIS). Early theoretical interpretations suggested that these two very different regimes can be linked under the condition that the quark-gluon and quark-quark interactions are suppressed. Substantial efforts are ongoing to investigate this phenomenon both experimentally and theoretically. Quark-hadron duality has been confirmed for the unpolarized structure function F2 of the proton and the deuteron using data from the experimental Hall C at Jefferson Lab (JLab). Indications of duality have been seen for the proton polarized structure function g1 and the virtual photon asymmetry A1 at JLab Hall B and HERMES. Because of the different resonance behavior, it is expected that the onset of duality for the neutron will happen at lower momentum transfer than for the proton. Now that precise spin structure data in the DIS region are available at large x, data in the resonance region are greatly needed in order to test duality in spin-dependent structure functions. The goal of experiment E01-012 was to provide such data on the neutron (3He) in the moderate momentum transfer (Q2) region, 1.0 < Q2 < 4.0 (GeV/c2), where duality is expected to hold. The experiment ran successfully in early 2003 at Jefferson Lab in Hall B. It was an inclusive measurement of longitudinally polarized electrons scattering from a longitudinally or transversely polarized 3He target. Asymmetries and cross section differences were measured in order to extract the 3He spin structure function g1 and virtual photon asymmetry A1 in the resonance region. A test

  10. Ferromagnetic resonance study of the half-Heusler alloy NiMnSb. The benefit of using NiMnSb as a ferromagnetic layer in pseudo-spin-valve based spin-torque oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riegler, Andreas

    2011-11-25

    Since the discovery of spin torque in 1996, independently by Berger and Slonczewski, and given its potential impact on information storage and communication technologies, (e.g. through the possibility of switching the magnetic configuration of a bit by current instead of a magnetic field, or the realization of high frequency spin torque oscillators (STO)), this effect has been an important field of spintronics research. One aspect of this research focuses on ferromagnets with low damping. The lower the damping in a ferromagnet, the lower the critical current that is needed to induce switching of a spin valve or induce precession of its magnetization. In this thesis ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) studies of NiMnSb layers are presented along with experimental studies on various spin-torque (ST) devices using NiMnSb. NiMnSb, when crystallized in the half-Heusler structure, is a half-metal which is predicted to have 100% spin polarization, a consideration which further increases its potential as a candidate for memory devices based on the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect. The FMR measurements show an outstandingly low damping factor for NiMnSb, in low 10{sup -3} range. This is about a factor of two lower than permalloy and well comparable to lowest damping for iron grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). According to theory the 100% spin polarization properties of the bulk disappear at interfaces where the break in translational symmetry causes the gap in the minority spin band to collapse but can remain in other crystal symmetries such as (111). Consequently NiMnSb layers on (111)(In,Ga)As buffer are characterized in respect of anisotropies and damping. The FMR measurements on these samples indicates a higher damping that for the 001 samples, and a thickness dependent uniaxial in-plane anisotropy. Investigations of the material for device use is pursued by considering sub-micrometer sized elements of NiMnSb on 001 substrates, which were fabricated by electron

  11. Comparison of cerebral blood flow measurement with [15O]-water positron emission tomography and arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Audrey P; Jahanian, Hesamoddin; Holdsworth, Samantha J; Zaharchuk, Greg

    2016-05-01

    Noninvasive imaging of cerebral blood flow provides critical information to understand normal brain physiology as well as to identify and manage patients with neurological disorders. To date, the reference standard for cerebral blood flow measurements is considered to be positron emission tomography using injection of the [(15)O]-water radiotracer. Although [(15)O]-water has been used to study brain perfusion under normal and pathological conditions, it is not widely used in clinical settings due to the need for an on-site cyclotron, the invasive nature of arterial blood sampling, and experimental complexity. As an alternative, arterial spin labeling is a promising magnetic resonance imaging technique that magnetically labels arterial blood as it flows into the brain to map cerebral blood flow. As arterial spin labeling becomes more widely adopted in research and clinical settings, efforts have sought to standardize the method and validate its cerebral blood flow values against positron emission tomography-based cerebral blood flow measurements. The purpose of this work is to critically review studies that performed both [(15)O]-water positron emission tomography and arterial spin labeling to measure brain perfusion, with the aim of better understanding the accuracy and reproducibility of arterial spin labeling relative to the positron emission tomography reference standard.

  12. Multichannel molecular state and rectified short-range boundary condition for spin-orbit-coupled ultracold fermions near p -wave resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiaoling

    2017-03-01

    We study the interplay of spin-orbit coupling (SOC) and strong p -wave interactions to the scattering property of spin-1/2 ultracold Fermi gases. Based on a two-channel square-well potential generating p -wave resonance, we show that the presence of an isotropic SOC, even for its length being much longer than the potential range, can greatly modify the p -wave short-range boundary condition (BC). As a result, the conventional p -wave BC cannot predict the induced molecules near p -wave resonances, which can be fully destroyed due to strong interference between the s - and p -wave channels. By analyzing the intrinsic reasons for the breakdown of the conventional BC, we propose a p -wave BC that can excellently reproduce the exact molecule solutions and also equally apply for a wide class of single-particle potentials besides SOC. This work reveals the significant effect of SOC on both the short- and long-range properties of fermions near p -wave resonances, paving the way for future explorations of interesting few- and many-body physics in such systems.

  13. Search for a narrow, spin-2 resonance decaying to a pair of Z bosons in the qqbarℓ+ℓ- final state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Aguilo, E.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Staykova, Z.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Mohammadi, A.; Reis, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Marcken, G.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Soares Jorge, L.; Sznajder, A.; Anjos, T. S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, S.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, D.; Zhang, L.; Zhu, B.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Khalil, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Karjalainen, A.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Shreyber, I.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Ferro, C.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Juillot, P.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sordini, V.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Anagnostou, G.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Jussen, R.; Klein, K.

    2013-01-01

    Results are presented from a search for a narrow, spin-2 resonance decaying into a pair of Z bosons, with one Z-boson decaying into leptons (e+e- or μ+μ-) and the other into jets. An example of such a resonance is the Kaluza-Klein graviton, GKK, predicted in Randall-Sundrum models. The analysis is based on a 4.9 fb-1 sample of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. Kinematic and topological properties including decay angular distributions are used to discriminate between signal and background. No evidence for a resonance is observed, and upper limits on the production cross sections times branching fractions are set. In two models that predict Z-boson spin correlations in graviton decays, graviton masses are excluded lower than a value which varies between 610 and 945 GeV, depending on the model and the strength of the graviton couplings.

  14. Search for a narrow, spin-2 resonance decaying to a pair of Z bosons in the $q\\bar{q}^{l^+ l^-}$ final state

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aguilo, Ernest; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hammer, Josef; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Pernicka, Manfred; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Christine; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Walzel, Gerhard; Widl, Edmund; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Bansal, Monika; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Luyckx, Sten; Mucibello, Luca; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Selvaggi, Michele; Staykova, Zlatka; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dero, Vincent; Gay, Arnaud; Hreus, Tomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Reis, Thomas; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Marcken, Gil; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Garcia, Guillaume; Grunewald, Martin; Klein, Benjamin; Lellouch, Jérémie; Marinov, Andrey; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Verwilligen, Piet; Walsh, Sinead; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Ceard, Ludivine; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Militaru, Otilia; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Schul, Nicolas; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Alves, Gilvan; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; Martins, Thiago; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Custódio, Analu; Da Costa, Eliza Melo; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Oguri, Vitor; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Soares Jorge, Luana; Sznajder, Andre; Souza Dos Anjos, Tiago; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Lagana, Caio; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Tcholakov, Vanio; Trayanov, Rumen; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Meng, Xiangwei; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Jian; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Xiao, Hong; Xu, Ming; Zang, Jingjing; Zhang, Zhen; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Guo, Shuang; Guo, Yifei; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Teng, Haiyun; Wang, Dayong; Zhang, Linlin; Zhu, Bo; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Osorio Oliveros, Andres Felipe; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Plestina, Roko; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Duric, Senka; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Morovic, Srecko; Attikis, Alexandros; Galanti, Mario; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Khalil, Shaaban; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Müntel, Mait; Raidal, Martti; Rebane, Liis; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Heikkinen, Mika Aatos; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Ungaro, Donatella; Wendland, Lauri; Banzuzi, Kukka; Karjalainen, Ahti; Korpela, Arja; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Choudhury, Somnath; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Millischer, Laurent; Nayak, Aruna; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Shreyber, Irina; Titov, Maksym; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Benhabib, Lamia; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Bluj, Michal; Broutin, Clementine; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Daci, Nadir; Dahms, Torsten; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Haguenauer, Maurice; Miné, Philippe; Mironov, Camelia; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Paganini, Pascal; Sabes, David; Salerno, Roberto; Sirois, Yves; Veelken, Christian; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Bloch, Daniel; Bodin, David; Brom, Jean-Marie; Cardaci, Marco; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Drouhin, Frédéric; Ferro, Cristina; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Juillot, Pierre; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Van Hove, Pierre; Fassi, Farida; Mercier, Damien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Bondu, Olivier; Boudoul, Gaelle; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Sordini, Viola; Tschudi, Yohann; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Anagnostou, Georgios; Beranek, Sarah; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heracleous, Natalie; Hindrichs, Otto; Jussen, Ruediger; Klein, Katja; Merz, Jennifer; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Perieanu, Adrian; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Sprenger, Daniel; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Caudron, Julien; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Kreuzer, Peter; Magass, Carsten; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Olschewski, Mark; Papacz, Paul; Pieta, Holger; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Steggemann, Jan; Teyssier, Daniel; Weber, Martin; Bontenackels, Michael; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Nowack, Andreas; Perchalla, Lars; Pooth, Oliver; Sauerland, Philip; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Behr, Joerg; Behrenhoff, Wolf; Behrens, Ulf; Bergholz, Matthias; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Castro, Elena; Costanza, Francesco; Dammann, Dirk; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Flucke, Gero; Geiser, Achim; Glushkov, Ivan; Gunnellini, Paolo; Habib, Shiraz; Hauk, Johannes; Hellwig, Gregor; Jung, Hannes; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kleinwort, Claus; Kluge, Hannelies; Knutsson, Albert; Krämer, Mira; Krücker, Dirk; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lange, Wolfgang; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Marienfeld, Markus; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Olzem, Jan; Perrey, Hanno; Petrukhin, Alexey; Pitzl, Daniel; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Riedl, Caroline; Ron, Elias; Rosin, Michele; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Schmidt, Ringo; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Sen, Niladri; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stein, Matthias; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Autermann, Christian; Blobel, Volker; Draeger, Jula; Enderle, Holger; Erfle, Joachim; Gebbert, Ulla; Görner, Martin; Hermanns, Thomas; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Kaschube, Kolja; Kaussen, Gordon; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Lange, Jörn; Mura, Benedikt; Nowak, Friederike; Peiffer, Thomas; Pietsch, Niklas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Schröder, Matthias; Schum, Torben; Seidel, Markus; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Thomsen, Jan; Vanelderen, Lukas; Barth, Christian; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Guthoff, Moritz; Hackstein, Christoph; Hartmann, Frank; Hauth, Thomas; Heinrich, Michael; Held, Hauke; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz; Honc, Simon; Katkov, Igor; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Martschei, Daniel; Mueller, Steffen; Müller, Thomas; Niegel, Martin; Nürnberg, Andreas; Oberst, Oliver; Oehler, Andreas; Ott, Jochen; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Ratnikov, Fedor; Ratnikova, Natalia; Röcker, Steffen; Scheurer, Armin; Schilling, Frank-Peter; Schott, Gregory; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Troendle, Daniel; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weiler, Thomas; Zeise, Manuel; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Manolakos, Ioannis; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Mavrommatis, Charalampos; Ntomari, Eleni; Gouskos, Loukas; Mertzimekis, Theodoros; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Evangelou, Ioannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Patras, Vaios; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Karancsi, János; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Dhingra, Nitish; Gupta, Ruchi; Kaur, Manjit; Mehta, Manuk Zubin; Nishu, Nishu; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Sharma, Archana; Singh, Jasbir; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Varun; Shivpuri, Ram Krishen; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Choudhury, Rajani Kant; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kumar, Vineet; Mehta, Pourus; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Aziz, Tariq; Ganguly, Sanmay; Guchait, Monoranjan; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Dugad, Shashikant; Arfaei, Hessamaddin; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Hashemi, Majid; Hesari, Hoda; Jafari, Abideh; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Abbrescia, Marcello; Barbone, Lucia; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Lusito, Letizia; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Marangelli, Bartolomeo; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pacifico, Nicola; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Singh, Gurpreet; Venditti, Rosamaria; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Meneghelli, Marco; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Odorici, Fabrizio; Perrotta, Andrea; Primavera, Federica; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Frosali, Simone; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Fabbricatore, Pasquale; Musenich, Riccardo; Tosi, Silvano; Benaglia, Andrea; De Guio, Federico; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Martelli, Arabella; Massironi, Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Sala, Silvano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Cavallo, Nicola; De Cosa, Annapaola; Dogangun, Oktay; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bisello, Dario; Branca, Antonio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Kanishchev, Konstantin; Lacaprara, Stefano; Lazzizzera, Ignazio; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Vanini, Sara; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zumerle, Gianni; Gabusi, Michele; Ratti, Sergio P; Riccardi, Cristina; Torre, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Lucaroni, Andrea; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Nappi, Aniello; Romeo, Francesco; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiezia, Aniello; Taroni, Silvia; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Kraan, Aafke; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Fanelli, Cristiano; Grassi, Marco; Longo, Egidio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Sigamani, Michael; Soffi, Livia; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Costa, Marco; Demaria, Natale; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Mazza, Giovanni; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; Marone, Matteo; Montanino, Damiana; Penzo, Aldo; Schizzi, Andrea; Heo, Seong Gu; Kim, Tae Yeon; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Chang, Sunghyun; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kong, Dae Jung; Park, Hyangkyu; Ro, Sang-Ryul; Son, Dong-Chul; Son, Taejin; Kim, Jae Yool; Kim, Zero Jaeho; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lee, Kyong Sei; Moon, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Keun; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Chawon; Park, Inkyu; Park, Sangnam; Ryu, Geonmo; Cho, Yongjin; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Min Suk; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Jongseok; Lee, Sungeun; Seo, Hyunkwan; Yu, Intae; Bilinskas, Mykolas Jurgis; Grigelionis, Ignas; Janulis, Mindaugas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Magaña Villalba, Ricardo; Martínez-Ortega, Jorge; Sánchez-Hernández, Alberto; Villasenor-Cendejas, Luis Manuel; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Reyes-Santos, Marco A; Krofcheck, David; Bell, Alan James; Butler, Philip H; Doesburg, Robert; Reucroft, Steve; Silverwood, Hamish; Ahmad, Muhammad; Ansari, Muhammad Hamid; Asghar, Muhammad Irfan; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khalid, Shoaib; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Qazi, Shamona; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Boimska, Bozena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Gokieli, Ryszard; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Wrochna, Grzegorz; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Almeida, Nuno; Bargassa, Pedrame; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Seixas, Joao; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Belotelov, Ivan; Bunin, Pavel; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Kozlov, Guennady; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Savina, Maria; Shmatov, Sergey; Smirnov, Vitaly; Volodko, Anton; Zarubin, Anatoli; Evstyukhin, Sergey; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Matveev, Viktor; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Erofeeva, Maria; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Kossov, Mikhail; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Bunichev, Viacheslav; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Markina, Anastasia; Obraztsov, Stepan; Perfilov, Maxim; Petrushanko, Sergey; Popov, Andrey; Sarycheva, Ludmila; Savrin, Viktor; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Grishin, Viatcheslav; Kachanov, Vassili; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Korablev, Andrey; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Djordjevic, Milos; Ekmedzic, Marko; Krpic, Dragomir; Milosevic, Jovan; Aguilar-Benitez, Manuel; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Arce, Pedro; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Ferrando, Antonio; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Merino, Gonzalo; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Santaolalla, Javier; Soares, Mara Senghi; Willmott, Carlos; Albajar, Carmen; Codispoti, Giuseppe; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Brun, Hugues; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Chuang, Shan-Huei; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Felcini, Marta; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Gonzalez Sanchez, Javier; Graziano, Alberto; Jorda, Clara; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Sobron Sanudo, Mar; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benitez, Jose F; Bernet, Colin; Bianchi, Giovanni; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Christiansen, Tim; Coarasa Perez, Jose Antonio; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; De Roeck, Albert; Di Guida, Salvatore; Dobson, Marc; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Frisch, Benjamin; Funk, Wolfgang; Georgiou, Georgios; Giffels, Manuel; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Giunta, Marina; Glege, Frank; Gomez-Reino Garrido, Robert; Govoni, Pietro; Gowdy, Stephen; Guida, Roberto; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Hartl, Christian; Harvey, John; Hegner, Benedikt; Hinzmann, Andreas; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kaadze, Ketino; Karavakis, Edward; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Lecoq, Paul; Lee, Yen-Jie; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Lourenco, Carlos; Magini, Nicolo; Maki, Tuula; Malberti, Martina; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moser, Roland; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mulders, Martijn; Musella, Pasquale; Nesvold, Erik; Orimoto, Toyoko; Orsini, Luciano; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Perez, Emmanuelle; Perrozzi, Luca; Petrilli, Achille; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Pimiä, Martti; Piparo, Danilo; Polese, Giovanni; Quertenmont, Loic; Racz, Attila; Reece, William; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovelli, Chiara; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Santanastasio, Francesco; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Segoni, Ilaria; Sekmen, Sezen; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Worm, Steven; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Gabathuler, Kurt; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; König, Stefan; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Meier, Frank; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Sibille, Jennifer; Bäni, Lukas; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; Casal, Bruno; Chanon, Nicolas; Deisher, Amanda; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Dünser, Marc; Eugster, Jürg; Freudenreich, Klaus; Grab, Christoph; Hits, Dmitry; Lecomte, Pierre; Lustermann, Werner; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Mohr, Niklas; Moortgat, Filip; Nägeli, Christoph; Nef, Pascal; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pape, Luc; Pauss, Felicitas; Peruzzi, Marco; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Rossini, Marco; Sala, Leonardo; Sanchez, Ann - Karin; Starodumov, Andrei; Stieger, Benjamin; Takahashi, Maiko; Tauscher, Ludwig; Thea, Alessandro; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Treille, Daniel; Urscheler, Christina; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Wehrli, Lukas; Amsler, Claude; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Visscher, Simon; Favaro, Carlotta; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Millan Mejias, Barbara; Otiougova, Polina; Robmann, Peter; Snoek, Hella; Tupputi, Salvatore; Verzetti, Mauro; Chang, Yuan-Hann; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Li, Syue-Wei; Lin, Willis; Liu, Zong-Kai; Lu, Yun-Ju; Mekterovic, Darko; Singh, Anil; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Bartalini, Paolo; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Dietz, Charles; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Kao, Kai-Yi; Lei, Yeong-Jyi; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Majumder, Devdatta; Petrakou, Eleni; Shi, Xin; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Wan, Xia; Wang, Minzu; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Karaman, Turker; Karapinar, Guler; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Sogut, Kenan; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Latife Nukhet; Vergili, Mehmet; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Aliev, Takhmasib; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Deniz, Muhammed; Gamsizkan, Halil; Guler, Ali Murat; Ocalan, Kadir; Ozpineci, Altug; Serin, Meltem; Sever, Ramazan; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yalvac, Metin; Yildirim, Eda; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Isildak, Bora; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Ozkorucuklu, Suat; Sonmez, Nasuf; Cankocak, Kerem; Levchuk, Leonid; Bostock, Francis; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Frazier, Robert; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Kreczko, Lukasz; Metson, Simon; Newbold, Dave M; Nirunpong, Kachanon; Poll, Anthony; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Vincent J; Williams, Thomas; Basso, Lorenzo; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Jackson, James; Kennedy, Bruce W; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Tomalin, Ian R; Womersley, William John; Bainbridge, Robert; Ball, Gordon; Beuselinck, Raymond; Buchmuller, Oliver; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Cutajar, Michael; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Gilbert, Andrew; Guneratne Bryer, Arlo; Hall, Geoffrey; Hatherell, Zoe; Hays, Jonathan; Iles, Gregory; Jarvis, Martyn; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Marrouche, Jad; Mathias, Bryn; Nandi, Robin; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Papageorgiou, Anastasios; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Pioppi, Michele; Raymond, David Mark; Rogerson, Samuel; Rose, Andrew; Ryan, Matthew John; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Sparrow, Alex; Stoye, Markus; Tapper, Alexander; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Wakefield, Stuart; Wardle, Nicholas; Whyntie, Tom; Chadwick, Matthew; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Martin, William; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Scarborough, Tara; Charaf, Otman; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Heister, Arno; St John, Jason; Lawson, Philip; Lazic, Dragoslav; Rohlf, James; Sperka, David; Sulak, Lawrence; Alimena, Juliette; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Cutts, David; Ferapontov, Alexey; Heintz, Ulrich; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kukartsev, Gennadiy; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Luk, Michael; Narain, Meenakshi; Nguyen, Duong; Segala, Michael; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Speer, Thomas; Tsang, Ka Vang; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Dolen, James; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Houtz, Rachel; Ko, Winston; Kopecky, Alexandra; Lander, Richard; Miceli, Tia; Pellett, Dave; Ricci-tam, Francesca; Rutherford, Britney; Searle, Matthew; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Tripathi, Mani; Vasquez Sierra, Ricardo; Andreev, Valeri; Cline, David; Cousins, Robert; Duris, Joseph; Erhan, Samim; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Jarvis, Chad; Plager, Charles; Rakness, Gregory; Schlein, Peter; Traczyk, Piotr; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Babb, John; Clare, Robert; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Giordano, Ferdinando; Hanson, Gail; Jeng, Geng-Yuan; Liu, Hongliang; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Nguyen, Harold; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Sturdy, Jared; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wilken, Rachel; Wimpenny, Stephen; Andrews, Warren; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; Evans, David; Golf, Frank; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Lebourgeois, Matthew; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Mangano, Boris; Padhi, Sanjay; Palmer, Christopher; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Sudano, Elizabeth; Tadel, Matevz; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Barge, Derek; Bellan, Riccardo; Campagnari, Claudio; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; Danielson, Thomas; Flowers, Kristen; Geffert, Paul; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Kalavase, Puneeth; Koay, Sue Ann; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Lowette, Steven; Mccoll, Nickolas; Pavlunin, Viktor; Rebassoo, Finn; Ribnik, Jacob; Richman, Jeffrey; Rossin, Roberto; Stuart, David; To, Wing; West, Christopher; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Chen, Yi; Di Marco, Emanuele; Duarte, Javier; Gataullin, Marat; Ma, Yousi; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Rogan, Christopher; Spiropulu, Maria; Timciuc, Vladlen; Veverka, Jan; Wilkinson, Richard; Xie, Si; Yang, Yong; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Akgun, Bora; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carroll, Ryan; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Jang, Dong Wook; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Paulini, Manfred; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Drell, Brian Robert; Edelmaier, Christopher; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Heyburn, Bernadette; Luiggi Lopez, Eduardo; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Ulmer, Keith; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Eggert, Nicholas; Gibbons, Lawrence Kent; Heltsley, Brian; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Kreis, Benjamin; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Ryd, Anders; Salvati, Emmanuele; Sun, Werner; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Vaughan, Jennifer; Weng, Yao; Winstrom, Lucas; Wittich, Peter; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bloch, Ingo; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Chetluru, Vasundhara; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gao, Yanyan; Green, Dan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Kilminster, Benjamin; Klima, Boaz; Kunori, Shuichi; Kwan, Simon; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Musienko, Yuri; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Prokofyev, Oleg; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Sharma, Seema; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Tan, Ping; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vidal, Richard; Whitmore, Juliana; Wu, Weimin; Yang, Fan; Yumiceva, Francisco; Yun, Jae Chul; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Das, Souvik; De Gruttola, Michele; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Dobur, Didar; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Field, Richard D; Fisher, Matthew; Fu, Yu; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Gartner, Joseph; Hugon, Justin; Kim, Bockjoo; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Kypreos, Theodore; Low, Jia Fu; Matchev, Konstantin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Remington, Ronald; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Sellers, Paul; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Snowball, Matthew; Yelton, John; Zakaria, Mohammed; Gaultney, Vanessa; Hewamanage, Samantha; Lebolo, Luis Miguel; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Chen, Jie; Diamond, Brendan; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Jenkins, Merrill; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Dorney, Brian; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Vodopiyanov, Igor; Adams, Mark Raymond; Anghel, Ioana Maria; Apanasevich, Leonard; Bai, Yuting; Bazterra, Victor Eduardo; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Callner, Jeremy; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Khalatyan, Samvel; Lacroix, Florent; Malek, Magdalena; O'Brien, Christine; Silkworth, Christopher; Strom, Derek; Varelas, Nikos; Akgun, Ugur; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Duru, Firdevs; Griffiths, Scott; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Newsom, Charles Ray; Norbeck, Edwin; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Sen, Sercan; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yetkin, Taylan; Yi, Kai; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bolognesi, Sara; Fehling, David; Giurgiu, Gavril; Gritsan, Andrei; Guo, Zijin; Hu, Guofan; Maksimovic, Petar; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Swartz, Morris; Whitbeck, Andrew; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Grachov, Oleg; Kenny Iii, Raymond Patrick; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Tinti, Gemma; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Zhukova, Victoria; Barfuss, Anne-Fleur; Bolton, Tim; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Shrestha, Shruti; Svintradze, Irakli; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Boutemeur, Madjid; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Kellogg, Richard G; Kirn, Malina; Kolberg, Ted; Lu, Ying; Marionneau, Matthieu; Mignerey, Alice; Pedro, Kevin; Peterman, Alison; Skuja, Andris; Temple, Jeffrey; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Twedt, Elizabeth; Apyan, Aram; Bauer, Gerry; Bendavid, Joshua; Busza, Wit; Butz, Erik; Cali, Ivan Amos; Chan, Matthew; Dutta, Valentina; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kim, Yongsun; Klute, Markus; Krajczar, Krisztian; Li, Wei; Luckey, Paul David; Ma, Teng; Nahn, Steve; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Rudolph, Matthew; Stephans, George; Stöckli, Fabian; Sumorok, Konstanty; Sung, Kevin; Velicanu, Dragos; Wenger, Edward Allen; Wolf, Roger; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Yoon, Sungho; Zanetti, Marco; Cooper, Seth; Dahmes, Bryan; De Benedetti, Abraham; Franzoni, Giovanni; Gude, Alexander; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Pastika, Nathaniel; Rusack, Roger; Sasseville, Michael; Singovsky, Alexander; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Cremaldi, Lucien Marcus; Kroeger, Rob; Perera, Lalith; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sanders, David A; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Butt, Jamila; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Eads, Michael; Keller, Jason; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Malbouisson, Helena; Malik, Sudhir; Snow, Gregory R; Baur, Ulrich; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Jain, Supriya; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Shipkowski, Simon Peter; Smith, Kenneth; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Haley, Joseph; Nash, David; Trocino, Daniele; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Anastassov, Anton; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Ofierzynski, Radoslaw Adrian; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael; Stoynev, Stoyan; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Antonelli, Louis; Berry, Douglas; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kolb, Jeff; Lannon, Kevin; Luo, Wuming; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Morse, David Michael; Pearson, Tessa; Planer, Michael; Ruchti, Randy; Slaunwhite, Jason; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Vuosalo, Carl; Williams, Grayson; Winer, Brian L; Adam, Nadia; Berry, Edmund; Elmer, Peter; Gerbaudo, Davide; Halyo, Valerie; Hebda, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Hunt, Adam; Jindal, Pratima; Lopes Pegna, David; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Raval, Amita; Safdi, Ben; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zuranski, Andrzej; Acosta, Jhon Gabriel; Brownson, Eric; Huang, Xing Tao; Lopez, Angel; Mendez, Hector; Oliveros, Sandra; Ramirez Vargas, Juan Eduardo; Zatserklyaniy, Andriy; Alagoz, Enver; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bolla, Gino; Bortoletto, Daniela; De Mattia, Marco; Everett, Adam; Hu, Zhen; Jones, Matthew; Koybasi, Ozhan; Kress, Matthew; Laasanen, Alvin T; Leonardo, Nuno; Maroussov, Vassili; Merkel, Petra; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Zablocki, Jakub; Zheng, Yu; Guragain, Samir; Parashar, Neeti; Adair, Antony; Boulahouache, Chaouki; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; Chung, Yeon Sei; Covarelli, Roberto; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Miner, Daniel Carl; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Zielinski, Marek; Bhatti, Anwar; Ciesielski, Robert; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Lungu, Gheorghe; Malik, Sarah; Mesropian, Christina; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Patel, Rishi; Rekovic, Vladimir; Robles, Jorge; Rose, Keith; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Seitz, Claudia; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Cerizza, Giordano; Hollingsworth, Matthew; Spanier, Stefan; Yang, Zong-Chang; York, Andrew; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Montalvo, Roy; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Safonov, Alexei; Sakuma, Tai; Sengupta, Sinjini; Suarez, Indara; Tatarinov, Aysen; Toback, David; Akchurin, Nural; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Jeong, Chiyoung; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Roh, Youn; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Florez, Carlos; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Johns, Willard; Johnston, Cody; Kurt, Pelin; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Sharma, Monika; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Balazs, Michael; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wood, John; Yohay, Rachel; Gollapinni, Sowjanya; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sakharov, Alexandre; Anderson, Michael; Belknap, Donald; Borrello, Laura; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Friis, Evan; Gray, Lindsey; Grogg, Kira Suzanne; Grothe, Monika; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Klukas, Jeffrey; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Leonard, Jessica; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Palmonari, Francesco; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Ross, Ian; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Swanson, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    Results are presented from a search for a narrow, spin-2 resonance decaying into a pair of Z bosons, with one Z-boson decaying into leptons (e+e- or mu+mu-) and the other into jets. An example of such a resonance is the Kaluza--Klein graviton, G[KK], predicted in Randall--Sundrum models. The analysis is based on a 4.9 inverse femtobarn sample of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. Kinematic and topological properties, including decay angular distributions as a novel feature of the analysis, are used to discriminate between signal and background. No evidence for a resonance is observed, and upper limits on the production cross sections times branching fractions are set. In two models that predict Z-boson spin correlations in graviton decays, graviton masses are excluded lower than a value which varies between 610 and 945 GeV, depending on the model and the strength of the graviton couplings.

  15. Spin lock composite and shaped pulses for efficient and robust pumping of dark states in magnetic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Theis, Thomas; Wu, Tung-Lin; Warren, Warren S

    2013-01-01

    Long-lived (symmetry protected) hyperpolarized spin states offer important new opportunities (for example, in clinical MR imaging), but existing methods for producing these states are limited by either excess energy dissipation or high sensitivity to inhomogeneities. We extend recent work on continuous-wave irradiation of nearly-equivalent spins (spin-lock induced crossing) by designing composite pulse and adiabatic shaped-pulse excitations which overcome the limitations. These composite and adiabatic pulses differ drastically from the traditional solutions in two-level systems. We also show this works in chemically equivalent spin pairs, which has the advantage of allowing for polarization transfer from and to remote spins. The approach is broadly applicable to systems where varying excitation strength induces an avoided crossing to a dark state, and thus to many other spectroscopic regimes.

  16. Broadband electron spin resonance in a nanosized La{sub 0.25}Ca{sub 0.75}MnO{sub 3} manganite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernàndez-Martínez, Antoni; García-Santiago, Antoni, E-mail: agarciasan@ub.edu; Hernàndez, Joan Manel [Grup de Magnetisme, Departament de Física Fonamental, Facultat de Física, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, planta 4, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Institut de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia IN2UB, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, planta 3, edifici nou, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Zhang, Tao [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2014-08-07

    The microwave response of a nanogranular La{sub 0.25}Ca{sub 0.75}MnO{sub 3} manganite has been studied by means of broadband electron spin resonance experiments performed in a commercial magnetic properties measurement system magnetometer using two purpose-built probes. The results concur with the hydrodynamic model for spin-glass systems and allow to determine the gyromagnetic ratio and the effective uniaxial magnetic anisotropy constant in a wide range of temperatures. The thermal behavior of both magnitudes provides information about structural transitions and magnetic interactions within the nanosized grains that make the sample. The experiments enable to corroborate the validity of the applied model in this kind of magnetic systems.

  17. Characterization of free radicals by electron spin resonance spectroscopy in biochars from pyrolysis at high heating rates and at high temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2016-01-01

    The concentration and type of free radicals from the decay (termination stage) of pyrolysis at slow and fast heating rates and at high temperatures (above 1000°C) in biomass char have been studied. A room temperature electron spin resonance spectroscopy study was conducted on original wood......, herbaceous biomass, holocelluloses, lignin and their chars, prepared at high temperatures in a wire mesh reactor, an entrained flow reactor, and a tubular reactor. The radical concentrations in the chars from the decay stage range up between 7·1016 and 1.5·1018 spins g -1. The results indicated...... that the biomass major constituents (cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin) had a minor effect on remaining radical concentrations comparedto potassium and silica contents. The higher radical concentrations in the wheat straw chars from thedecay stage of pyrolysis in the entrained flow reactor compared to the wood...

  18. Intercomparison of peroxy radical measurements obtained at atmospheric conditions by laser-induced fluorescence and electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hofzumahaus

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of hydroperoxy radical (HO2 and organic peroxy radical (RO2 concentrations were performed by two different techniques in the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR in Jülich, Germany. The first technique was the well-established Matrix Isolation Electron Spin Resonance (MIESR, which provides absolute measurements with a time resolution of 30 min and high accuracy (10%, 2 σ. The other technique, ROxLIF, has been newly developed. It is based on the selective chemical conversion of ROx radicals (HO2 and RO2 to OH, which is detected with high sensitivity by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF. ROxLIF is calibrated by quantitative photolysis of water vapor at 185 nm and provides ambient measurements at a temporal resolution of 1 min and accuracy of 20% (2 σ. The measurements of HO2 and RO2 obtained by the two techniques were compared for two types of atmospheric simulation experiments. In one experiment, HO2 and CH3O2 radicals were produced by photooxidation of methane in air at tropospheric conditions. In the second experiment, HO2 and C2H5O2 were produced by ozonolysis of 1-butene in air at dark conditions. The radical concentrations were within the range of 16 to 100 pptv for HO2 and 12 to 45 pptv for RO2. Good agreement was found in the comparison of the ROxLIF and MIESR measurements within their combined experimental uncertainties. Linear regressions to the combined data set yield slopes of 1.02±0.13 (1 σ for RO2 and 0.98±0.08 (1 σ for HO2 without significant offsets. The results confirm the calibration of the ROxLIF instrument and demonstrate that it can be applied with good accuracy for measurements of atmospheric peroxy radical concentrations.

  19. Wide-Dynamic-Range Cantilever Magnetometry Using a Fiber-Optic Interferometer and its Application to High-frequency Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, Hideyuki; Ohmichi, Eiji; Ohta, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    We present a method of broadening the dynamic range of optical interferometric detection of cantilever displacement. The key idea of this system is to use a wavelength-tunable laser source. The wavelength is subject to proportional-integral control, which is used to keep the cavity detuning constant during a measurement. Under this control, the change in wavelength is proportional to the cantilever displacement. Using this technique, we can measure large displacements ($>1\\ \\mathrm{\\mu m}$) without degradation of sensitivity. We apply this technique to high-frequency electron spin resonance spectroscopy and succeed in removing an irregular background signal that arises from the constantly varying sensitivity of the interferometer.

  20. Wide-dynamic-range cantilever magnetometry using a fiber-optic interferometer and its application to high-frequency electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hideyuki; Okamoto, Tsubasa; Ohmichi, Eiji; Ohta, Hitoshi

    2016-12-01

    We present a method of broadening the dynamic range of optical interferometric detection of cantilever displacement. The key idea of this method is the use of a wavelength-tunable laser source. The wavelength is subject to proportional-integral control, which is used to keep the cavity detuning constant. Under this control, the change in wavelength is proportional to the cantilever displacement. Using this technique, we can measure large displacements (>1 µm) without degrading the sensitivity. We apply this technique to high-frequency electron spin resonance spectroscopy and succeed in removing an irregular background signal that arises from the constantly varying sensitivity of the interferometer.

  1. New phase diagram for (U,Th)Be sub 13 : A muon-spin-resonance and H sub C 1 study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heffner, R.H.; Smith, J.L.; Willis, J.O. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (USA)); Birrer, P.; Baines, C.; Gygax, F.N.; Hitti, B.; Lippelt, E.; Ott, H.R.; Schenck, A. (Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich, c/o Paul Scherrer Institute, CH 5232 Villigen (Switzerland)); Knetsch, E.A.; Mydosh, J.A. (Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratorium der Rijksuniversiteit Leiden, 2300 RA Leiden (The Netherlands)); MacLaughlin, D.E. (University of California, Riverside, CA (USA))

    1990-11-26

    Zero-field muon-spin-resonance and lower-critical-field data are presented for a wide range of Th concentrations in U{sub 1{minus}{ital x}}Th{sub {ital x}}Be{sub 13}, spanning the region where both a superconducting and a second, lower-temperature phase transition are observed. Overall {ital T}-{ital x} phase boundaries are assigned and discussed according to the nature of the lower phase transition. Arguments for associating the lower phase with a possible magnetic (time-reversal--violating) superconducting state are given.

  2. (13C-(13c homonuclear recoupling in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance at a moderately high magic-angle-spinning frequency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venus Singh Mithu

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional (13C-(13C correlation experiments are widely employed in structure determination of protein assemblies using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance. Here, we investigate the process of (13C-(13C magnetisation transfer at a moderate magic-angle-spinning frequency of 30 kHz using some of the prominent second-order dipolar recoupling schemes. The effect of isotropic chemical-shift difference and spatial distance between two carbons and amplitude of radio frequency on (1H channel on the magnetisation transfer efficiency of these schemes is discussed in detail.

  3. Spin Polarization of Carriers in InGaAs Self-Assembled Quantum Rings Inserted in GaAs-AlGaAs Resonant Tunneling Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsi Gordo, V.; Gobato, Y. Galvão; Galeti, H. V. A.; Brasil, M. J. S. P.; Taylor, D.; Henini, M.

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we have investigated transport and polarization resolved photoluminescence (PL) of n-type GaAs-AlGaAs resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs) containing a layer of InGaAs self-assembled quantum rings (QRs) in the quantum well (QW). All measurements were performed under applied voltage, magnetic fields up to 15 T and using linearly polarized laser excitation. It was observed that the QRs' PL intensity and the circular polarization degree (CPD) oscillate periodically with applied voltage under high magnetic fields at 2 K. Our results demonstrate an effective voltage control of the optical and spin properties of InGaAs QRs inserted into RTDs.

  4. Endor, triple resonance and electron spin echo envelope modulation of 14N in sulphur and selenium coordinated copper(II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttcher, R.; Kirmse, R.; Stach, J.; Reijerse, E. J.; Keijzers, C. P.

    1986-08-01

    Single-crystal ENDOR and TRIPLE resonance studies on "long-range" coupled 14N nuclei are reported for Cu(II) complexes in four host lattices: bis(diethyldithiocarbamato)Ni(II) and Zn(II), bis(diethyldiselenocarbamato)Zn(II) and tetra- n-butylammonium(maleonitriledithiolato)(diethyldithiocarbamato)Ni(II). The ENDOR spectra are unusual because the 14N nuclear quadrupole interaction exceeds the hyperfine coupling and the nuclear Zeeman interaction. The spectra are analyzed in detail and correlated with the molecular structures of the host compounds. According to the TRIPLE experiments the 14N hyperfine tensor components are negative. The populations of the nitrogen orbitals are evaluated from the quadrupole coupling tensors. In order to compare these double resonance methods with pulsed techniques, electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) is applied to a powder of one of the systems.

  5. 核磁共振中的量子控制∗%Quantum control of nuclear magnetic resonance spin systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李俊; 崔江煜; 杨晓东; 罗智煌; 潘健; 余琦; 李兆凯; 彭新华; 杜江峰

    2015-01-01

    With the development of quantum information science, the active manipulation of quantum systems is becoming an important research frontier. To build realistic quantum information processors, one of the challenges is to implement arbitrary desired operations with high precision on quantum systems. A large number of quantum control methods and relevant numerical techniques have been put forward in recent years, such as quantum optimal control and quantum feedback control. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin systems offer an excellent testbed to develop benchmark tools and techniques for controlling quantum systems. In this review paper, we briefly introduce some of the basic control ideas developed for NMR systems in recent years. We first explain, for the liquid spin systems, the physics of various couplings and the causes of relaxation effects. These mechanisms govern the system dynamics, and thus are crucial for constructing rigorous and efficient control models. We also identify three types of available control means: 1) raido-frequency fields as coherent controls; 2) phase cycling, gradient fields and relaxation effects as non-unitary controls; 3) radiation damping effect as feedback control mechanism. Then, we elucidate some important control tasks, which may arise from the conventional NMR spectroscopy (e.g., pulse design and polarization transfer) or from quantum information science (e.g., algorithmic cooling and pseudo-pure state preparation). In the last part, we review some of the most important control methods that are applicable to NMR control tasks. For systems with a relatively small number of spins, it is possible to use analytic optimal control theory to realize the target unitary operations. However, for larger systems, numerical methods are necessary. The gradient ascent pulse engineering algorithm and pulse compiler techniques are the most successful techniques for implementing complicated quantum networks currently. There are some interesting

  6. Off-resonance effects in (14)N NQR signals from the pulsed spin-locking (PSL) and three-pulse echo sequence; a study for monoclinic TNT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, John A S; Rowe, Michael D; Althoefer, Kaspar; Peirson, Neil F; Barras, Jamie

    2015-10-01

    In NQR detection applications signal averaging by the summation of rapidly regenerated signals from multiple pulse sequences of the pulsed spin-locking (PSL) type is often used to improve sensitivity. It is important to characterise and if possible minimise PSL sequence off-resonance effects since they can make it difficult to optimise detection performance. We illustrate this with measurements of the variation of the decay time T2e and the amplitude of PSL signal trains with pulse spacing and excitation offset frequency for the 870 kHz ν+(14)N NQR line of monoclinic TNT under carefully stabilised temperature conditions. We have also carried out a similar study of signals from monoclinic TNT and 1H-1,2,3-triazole generated by a three-pulse echo sequence and the results are shown to agree well with a theoretical treatment appropriate to polycrystalline NQR samples such as TNT for which spin I=1, asymmetry parameter η≠0 and T1≫T2. Based on this theory we derive simple models for calculating TNT PSL signal trains and hence the pulse spacing and off-resonance dependence of signal amplitude and T2e which we compare to our experimental data. We discuss the influence of PSL echo summation on off-resonance effects in detected signal intensity and show how a phase-alternated multiple pulse sequence can be used in combination with the PSL sequence to eliminate variation in detection performance due to off-resonance effects.

  7. Electron spin resonance study of free radicals produced from ethanol and acetaldehyde after exposure to a Fenton system or to brain and liver microsomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonthier, B.; Jeunet, A.; Barret, L. (Departement de Toxicologie, C.H.R.U. de Grenoble, (France))

    1991-09-01

    Free radical formation from ethanol and acetaldehyde was studied in the presence of a spin-trap and a NADPH generating system with a chemical model, Fenton's reagent, or by enzymatic oxidation of these solvents by rat liver and brain microsomes. The free radicals were detected by electron spin resonance spectroscopy (E.S.R.), using the spin-trapping agent, alpha-(4-pyridyl l-oxide)-N-tertbutyl-nitrone (POBN). Under such conditions, the hydroxyethyl radical derived from ethanol was obtained after both incubation in liver and brain microsomes as well as after exposure to the Fenton system. Enzymatic inhibition and activation showed that the mixed function oxidase system plays an important role in the generation of such a radical, even in the brain. Under all the experimental conditions acetaldehyde could also generate a free radical deriving directly from the parent molecule and modified by enzymatic activation or inhibition. A second, longer lasting radical was also observed in the presence of acetaldehyde. On the basis of a comparative study to a known process causing lipoperoxidation, its lipidic origin was suggested.

  8. Characterization of quantum algorithms by quantum process tomography using quadrupolar spins in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampermann, H; Veeman, W S

    2005-06-01

    NMR quantum computing with qubit systems represented by nuclear spins (I=12) in small molecules in liquids has led to the most successful experimental quantum information processors so far. We use the quadrupolar spin-32 sodium nuclei of a NaNO3 single crystal as a virtual two-qubit system. The large quadrupolar coupling in comparison with the environmental interactions and the usage of strongly modulating pulses allow us to manipulate the system fast enough and at the same time keeping the decoherence reasonably slow. The experimental challenge is to characterize the "calculation" behavior of the quantum processor by process tomography which is here adapted to the quadrupolar spin system. The results of a selection of quantum gates and algorithms are presented as well as a detailed analysis of experimental results.

  9. Contribution to the study of molecular movements in cyclohexane by electron spin resonance and electron-nuclear double resonance using a radical probe; Contribution a l'etude des mouvements moleculaires dans le cyclohexane par resonance paramagnetique electronique et double resonance electronique-nucleaire a l'aide d'une sonde radicalaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volino, F. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    Solutions of stable free radicals of the nitroxide type have been studied as a function of temperature. In the plastic or globular state, the cyclohexane molecules have rapid rotational and diffusional movements. They transmit this movement to dissolved free radicals. Conversely, measurements by electron spin resonance of the absolute movement of the radicals, and by electron nuclear double resonance of their movement relative to the cyclohexane molecules give very precise methods for local analyses of the movement present in the cyclohexane matrix. The principle of these techniques makes up the 'radical probe method'. (author) [French] Des solutions de radicaux libres stables, du type nitroxyde dans le cyclohexane ont ete etudiees, en fonction de la temperature. Les molecules de cyclohexane, dans l'etat plastique ou globulaire, sont animees de mouvements rapides de rotation sur elles-memes et de diffusion. Elles transmettent leur mobilite aux radicaux libres dissous. Reciproquement, la mesure du mouvement absolu des radicaux, a l'aide de la resonance paramagnetique electronique, et celle du mouvement relatif des radicaux et des molecules de cyclohexane par double resonance electronique-nucleaire, constituent des methodes tres precises pour analyser localement les mouvements presents dans la matrice de cyclohexane. Ce principe et ces techniques constituent la 'methode de la sonde radicalaire'. (auteur)

  10. Effect of ‘Al’ concentration on spin-dependent resonant tunnelling in InAs/Ga$_{1−y}$Al$_y$As symmetrical double-barrier heterostructures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L BRUNO CHANDRASEKAR; K GNANASEKAR; M KARUNAKARAN; R CHANDRAMOHAN

    2016-10-01

    The effect of ‘Al’ concentration on spin-dependent tunnelling in strained non-magnetic symmetric double-barrier semiconductor has been theoretically investigated. The separation between spin-up and spin-down components, barrier transparency, polarization efficiency and tunnelling lifetime were calculated using the transfer matrix approach. The separation between spin-up and spin-down resonances and tunnelling lifetime were reportedfor the first time in the case of InAs/Ga$_{1−y}$Al$_y$As heterostructures for various ‘Al’ concentrations and for various barrier widths. Cent percentage polarization can be obtained in this strained non-magnetic double-barriersemiconductor even without any external field.

  11. Quantum dynamical calculations in clusters of spin-1/2 particles: resonant coherent quantum tunneling on the magnetization reversal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García-Pablos, D.; García, N.; Serena, P.A.; Raedt, H. De

    1996-01-01

    We investigate the reversal of magnetization and the coherence of tunneling when an external magnetic field is rotated instantaneously in systems of a few (N) spin 1/2 particles described by an anisotropic Heisenberg Hamiltonian at T=0. The temporal evolution is calculated by a numerically exact sol

  12. Quantum dynamical calculations in clusters of spin 1/2 particles : Resonant coherent quantum tunneling on the magnetization reversal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García-Pablos, D.; García, N.; Serena, P.A.; Raedt, H. De

    1996-01-01

    We investigate the reversal of magnetization and the coherence of tunneling when an external magnetic field is rotated instantaneously in systems of a few (N) spin 1/2 particles described by an anisotropic Heisenberg Hamiltonian at T=0. The temporal evolution is calculated by a numerically exact sol

  13. Collective spin-excitations in Cu L and O K edge resonant inelastic X-ray scattering from Sr{sub 14}Cu{sub 24}O{sub 41}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, Thorsten; Schlappa, Justina; Vernay, F.; Strocov, V.; Thielemann, B.; Ronnow, H.; Mesot, J.; Delley, B.; Patthey, L. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Ilakovac, V. [UPMC, Paris (France)

    2009-07-01

    The spin-ladder/spin-chain compound Sr{sub 14}Cu{sub 24}O{sub 41} is a low-dimensional spin system, which is known for its complex interplay between charge and spin degrees of freedom. One of the subsystems is formed by 2-leg ladders Cu{sub 2}O{sub 3}, which have the properties of a spin liquid with a finite spin gap. Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) is a powerful probe of the electronic ground state and the low-energy excitation spectrum of transition-metal oxides, being directly sensitive to the valence electron configuration. Using RIXS at the Cu L{sub 3} and O K edge of Sr{sub 14}Cu{sub 24}O{sub 41} we observe collective spin-excitations from the ladders, which we assign to two-triplon modes. At the Cu L{sub 3} resonance the dispersion of the modes was mapped out depending on the momentum transfer with excellent sensitivity over almost the entire first Brillouin-zone, in contrast to inelastic neutron scattering. Site-sensitive RIXS at the O K edge of the chain- and ladder-subsystems give insight into the character of the holes.

  14. Subjective and objective image qualities: a comparison of sagittal T2 weighted spin-echo and turbo-spin-eco sequences in magnetic resonance imaging of the spine by use of a subjective ranking system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goerres, G. [Institut fuer diagnostische Radiologie, Departement Radiologie, Universitaetskliniken, Kantonsspital Basel (Switzerland); Mader, I. [Radiologische Gemeinschaftspraxis Dres. Siems, Grossmann, Bayreuth (Germany); Proske, M. [Klinikum Rosenheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie

    1998-12-31

    We evaluated the subjective image impression of two different magnetic resonance (MR) sequences by using a subjective ranking system. This ranking system was based on 20 criteria describing several tissue characteristics such as the signal intensity of normal anatomical structures and the changes of signal intensities and shape of lesions as well as artefacts. MR of the vertebral spine was performed in 48 female and 52 male patients (mean age 44.8 years) referred consecutively for investigation of a back problem. Ninety-six pathologies were found in 82 patients. Sagittal and axial T1 weighted spin-echo before and after administration of Gadolinium (Gd-DOTA), and sagittal T2 weighted spin-echo (T2wSE) and Turbo-spin-echo (TSE) sequences were performed by means of surface coils. Using the subjective ranking system the sagittal T2wSE and sagittal TSE were compared. Both sequences were suitable for identification of normal anatomy and pathologic changes and there was no trend for increased detection of disease by one imaging sequence over the other. We found that sagittal TSE sequences can replace sagittal T2wSE sequences in spinal MR and that artefacts at the cervical and lumbar spine are less frequent using TSE, thus confirming previous studies. In this study, our ranking system reveiled, that there are differences between the subjective judgement of image qualities and objective measurement of SNR. However, this approach may not be helpful to compare two different MR sequences as it is limited to the anatomical area investigated and is time consuming. The subjective image impression, i.e. the quality of images, may not always be represented by physical parameters such as a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), radiologists should try to define influences of image quality also by subjective parameters. (orig.)

  15. Microscopic studies of nonlocal spin dynamics and spin transport (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adur, Rohan; Du, Chunhui; Cardellino, Jeremy; Scozzaro, Nicolas; Wolfe, Christopher S.; Wang, Hailong; Herman, Michael; Bhallamudi, Vidya P.; Pelekhov, Denis V.; Yang, Fengyuan; Hammel, P. Chris, E-mail: hammel@physics.osu.edu [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    Understanding the behavior of spins coupling across interfaces in the study of spin current generation and transport is a fundamental challenge that is important for spintronics applications. The transfer of spin angular momentum from a ferromagnet into an adjacent normal material as a consequence of the precession of the magnetization of the ferromagnet is a process known as spin pumping. We find that, in certain circumstances, the insertion of an intervening normal metal can enhance spin pumping between an excited ferromagnetic magnetization and a normal metal layer as a consequence of improved spin conductance matching. We have studied this using inverse spin Hall effect and enhanced damping measurements. Scanned probe magnetic resonance techniques are a complementary tool in this context offering high resolution magnetic resonance imaging, localized spin excitation, and direct measurement of spin lifetimes or damping. Localized magnetic resonance studies of size-dependent spin dynamics in the absence of lithographic confinement in both ferromagnets and paramagnets reveal the close relationship between spin transport and spin lifetime at microscopic length scales. Finally, detection of ferromagnetic resonance of a ferromagnetic film using the photoluminescence of nitrogen vacancy spins in neighboring nanodiamonds demonstrates long-range spin transport between insulating materials, indicating the complexity and generality of spin transport in diverse, spatially separated, material systems.

  16. Microscopic studies of nonlocal spin dynamics and spin transport (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adur, Rohan; Du, Chunhui; Cardellino, Jeremy; Scozzaro, Nicolas; Wolfe, Christopher S.; Wang, Hailong; Herman, Michael; Bhallamudi, Vidya P.; Pelekhov, Denis V.; Yang, Fengyuan; Hammel, P. Chris

    2015-05-01

    Understanding the behavior of spins coupling across interfaces in the study of spin current generation and transport is a fundamental challenge that is important for spintronics applications. The transfer of spin angular momentum from a ferromagnet into an adjacent normal material as a consequence of the precession of the magnetization of the ferromagnet is a process known as spin pumping. We find that, in certain circumstances, the insertion of an intervening normal metal can enhance spin pumping between an excited ferromagnetic magnetization and a normal metal layer as a consequence of improved spin conductance matching. We have studied this using inverse spin Hall effect and enhanced damping measurements. Scanned probe magnetic resonance techniques are a complementary tool in this context offering high resolution magnetic resonance imaging, localized spin excitation, and direct measurement of spin lifetimes or damping. Localized magnetic resonance studies of size-dependent spin dynamics in the absence of lithographic confinement in both ferromagnets and paramagnets reveal the close relationship between spin transport and spin lifetime at microscopic length scales. Finally, detection of ferromagnetic resonance of a ferromagnetic film using the photoluminescence of nitrogen vacancy spins in neighboring nanodiamonds demonstrates long-range spin transport between insulating materials, indicating the complexity and generality of spin transport in diverse, spatially separated, material systems.

  17. Rapid direct analysis to discriminate geographic origin of extra virgin olive oils by flash gas chromatography electronic nose and chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melucci, Dora; Bendini, Alessandra; Tesini, Federica; Barbieri, Sara; Zappi, Alessandro; Vichi, Stefania; Conte, Lanfranco; Gallina Toschi, Tullia

    2016-08-01

    At present, the geographical origin of extra virgin olive oils can be ensured by documented traceability, although chemical analysis may add information that is useful for possible confirmation. This preliminary study investigated the effectiveness of flash gas chromatography electronic nose and multivariate data analysis to perform rapid screening of commercial extra virgin olive oils characterized by a different geographical origin declared in the label. A comparison with solid phase micro extraction coupled to gas chromatography mass spectrometry was also performed. The new method is suitable to verify the geographic origin of extra virgin olive oils based on principal components analysis and discriminant analysis applied to the volatile profile of the headspace as a fingerprint. The selected variables were suitable in discriminating between "100% Italian" and "non-100% Italian" oils. Partial least squares discriminant analysis also allowed prediction of the degree of membership of unknown samples to the classes examined.

  18. Electron paramagnetic resonance and Mössbauer spectroscopy and density functional theory analysis of a high-spin Fe(IV)-oxo complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rupal; Lacy, David C; Bominaar, Emile L; Borovik, A S; Hendrich, Michael P

    2012-06-13

    High-spin Fe(IV)-oxo species are known to be kinetically competent oxidants in non-heme iron enzymes. The properties of these oxidants are not as well understood as the corresponding intermediate-spin oxidants of heme complexes. The present work gives a detailed characterization of the structurally similar complexes [Fe(IV)H(3)buea(O)](-), [Fe(III)H(3)buea(O)](2-), and [Fe(III)H(3)buea(OH)](-) (H(3)buea = tris[(N'-tert-butylureaylato)-N-ethylene]aminato) using Mössbauer and dual-frequency/dual-mode electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies. The [Fe(IV)H(3)buea(O)](-) complex has a high-spin (S = 2) configuration imposed by the C(3)-symmetric ligand. The EPR spectra of the [Fe(IV)H(3)buea(O)](-) complex presented here represent the first documented examples of an EPR signal from an Fe(IV)-oxo complex, demonstrating the ability to detect and quantify Fe(IV) species with EPR spectroscopy. Quantitative simulations allowed the determination of the zero-field parameter, D = +4.7 cm(-1), and the species concentration. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of the zero-field parameter were found to be in agreement with the experimental value and indicated that the major contribution to the D value is from spin-orbit coupling of the ground state with an excited S = 1 electronic configuration at 1.2 eV. (17)O isotope enrichment experiments allowed the determination of the hyperfine constants ((17)O)A(z) = 10 MHz for [Fe(IV)H(3)buea(O)](-) and ((17)O)A(y) = 8 MHz, ((17)O)A(z) = 12 MHz for [Fe(III)H(3)buea(OH)](-). The isotropic hyperfine constant (((17)O)A(iso) = -16.8 MHz) was derived from the experimental value to allow a quantitative determination of the spin polarization (ρ(p) = 0.56) of the oxo p orbitals of the Fe-oxo bond in [Fe(IV)H(3)buea(O)](-). This is the first experimental determination for non-heme complexes and indicates significant covalency in the Fe-oxo bond. High-field Mössbauer spectroscopy gave an (57)Fe A(dip) tensor of (+5.6, +5

  19. Measuring the spin polarization of alkali-metal atoms using nuclear magnetic resonance frequency shifts of noble gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. H. Liu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We report a novel method of measuring the spin polarization of alkali-metal atoms by detecting the NMR frequency shifts of noble gases. We calculated the profile of 87Rb D1 line absorption cross sections. We then measured the absorption profile of the sample cell, from which we calculated the 87Rb number densities at different temperatures. Then we measured the frequency shifts resulted from the spin polarization of the 87Rb atoms and calculated its polarization degrees at different temperatures. The behavior of frequency shifts versus temperature in experiment was consistent with theoretical calculation, which may be used as compensative signal for the NMRG closed-loop control system.

  20. Measuring the spin polarization of alkali-metal atoms using nuclear magnetic resonance frequency shifts of noble gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, X. H.; Luo, H.; Qu, T. L., E-mail: qutianliang@nudt.edu.cn; Yang, K. Y.; Ding, Z. C. [College of Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

    2015-10-15

    We report a novel method of measuring the spin polarization of alkali-metal atoms by detecting the NMR frequency shifts of noble gases. We calculated the profile of {sup 87}Rb D1 line absorption cross sections. We then measured the absorption profile of the sample cell, from which we calculated the {sup 87}Rb number densities at different temperatures. Then we measured the frequency shifts resulted from the spin polarization of the {sup 87}Rb atoms and calculated its polarization degrees at different temperatures. The behavior of frequency shifts versus temperature in experiment was consistent with theoretical calculation, which may be used as compensative signal for the NMRG closed-loop control system.

  1. Use of paramagnetic chelated metal derivatives of polysaccharides and spin-labeled polysaccharides as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bligh, S.W.; Harding, C.T.; Sadler, P.J.; Bulman, R.A.; Bydder, G.M.; Pennock, J.M.; Kelly, J.D.; Latham, I.A.; Marriott, J.A. (Department of Chemistry, Birkbeck College, London (England))

    1991-02-01

    Soluble and insoluble polysaccharides were derivatized with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) and/or spin-labeled with 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO). Polysaccharides derivatized with DTPA were prepared via cyanogen bromide activation, coupling to a diamine linker, and to DTPA anhydride. Spin-labeled polysaccharides were also prepared via cyanogen bromide activation. The extent of derivatization for dextran (18 kDa) was about 120 glucose units per DTPA, and for cellulose and starch about 15-30 units per DTPA. For spin-labeled polysaccharides, the average loading ranged from 1 nitroxide per 16 glucose units for starch to 181 for dextran (82 kDa). These derivatized paramagnetic polysaccharides were shown to be more effective relaxants than the small paramagnetic molecules alone. Both soluble and insoluble polysaccharide-linker-DTPA-Gd(3) complexes were effectively cleared from the body (rats) after oral administration. After intravenous administration, the biodistribution of dextran-linker-DTPA-Gd(3) complexes differed significantly from that of GdDTPA. Reduction of the nitroxide by ascorbic acid was retarded in the polysaccharide derivatives, particularly in starch derivatized with both nitroxide and linker-DTPA-Cu(2). These agents showed contrast enhancement in the gastrointestinal tract of rabbits.

  2. Crocus sativus Petals: Waste or Valuable Resource? The Answer of High-Resolution and High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righi, Valeria; Parenti, Francesca; Tugnoli, Vitaliano; Schenetti, Luisa; Mucci, Adele

    2015-09-30

    Intact Crocus sativus petals were studied for the first time by high-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (HR-MAS NMR) spectroscopy, revealing the presence of kinsenoside (2) and goodyeroside A (3), together with 3-hydroxy-γ-butyrolactone (4). These findings were confirmed by HR-NMR analysis of the ethanol extract of fresh petals and showed that, even though carried out rapidly, partial hydrolysis of glucopyranosyloxybutanolides occurs during extraction. On the other hand, kaempferol 3-O-sophoroside (1), which is "NMR-silent" in intact petals, is present in extracts. These results suggest to evaluate the utilization of saffron petals for phytopharmaceutical and nutraceutical purposes to exploit a waste product of massive production of commercial saffron and point to the application of HR-MAS NMR for monitoring bioactive compounds directly on intact petals, avoiding the extraction procedure and the consequent hydrolysis reaction.

  3. Superlattice structure of Ce{sup 3+}-doped BaMgF{sub 4} fluoride crystals - x-ray diffraction, electron spin-resonance, and optical investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaga, M.; Hattori, K. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Gifu University, Gifu (Japan); Kodama, N. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Resource Science, Akita University, Akita (Japan); Ishizawa, N. [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama (Japan); Honda, M. [Faculty of Science, Naruto University of Education, Naruto (Japan); Shimamura, K.; Fukuda, T. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan)

    2001-09-14

    The x-ray diffraction patterns for Ce{sup 3+}-doped BaMgF{sub 4} (BMF) crystals suggest the existence of superlattice structure. The superlattice model is consistent with the characterization of the 4f{sup 1} ground state of Ce{sup 3+} as a probe ion using the electron spin-resonance (ESR) technique. The distinct Ce{sup 3+} luminescence spectra with different peak energies and lifetimes also support the superlattice model. Although the detailed superlattice structure could not be analysed using the diffraction spots, a model has been proposed, taking into account the eight Ce{sup 3+} polyhedra with different anion coordinations in the unit cell of the BMF crystal obtained from the ESR experiments. (author)

  4. Electron spin resonance of Er sup 3+ ions in Er sub z Y sub 1 minus z Ba sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, M.X.; Barak, J.; Bhagat, S.M. (Department of Physics, Center for Superconductivity Research, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland (USA)); Gupta, L.C.; Rajarajan, A.K.; Vijayaraghavan, R. (Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Bombay (India))

    1991-11-15

    We report electron spin resonance measurements on Er{sub {ital z}}Y{sub 1{minus}{ital z}}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6} powdered samples for 0.02{le}{ital z}{le}1 at 36 GHz and 1.3{lt}{ital T}{lt}77 K. For {ital z}{ge} (R18)0.6 a single highly distorted line, {ital L}{sub 1}, is observed and interpreted in terms of a Kubo--Toyabe stochastic model. For lower {ital z} a partially resolved second line appears on the low field side of {ital L}{sub 1}. The data are best represented as the sum of two Kubo--Toyabe lines.

  5. Dating human occupation at Toca do Serrote das Moendas, São Raimundo Nonato, Piauí-Brasil by electron spin resonance and optically stimulated luminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Angela; Skinner, Anne R; Guidon, Niede; Ignacio, Elaine; Felice, Gisele Daltrini; Buco, Cristiane de A; Tatumi, Sonia; Yee, Márcio; Figueiredo, Ana Maria Graciano; Baffa, Oswaldo

    2014-12-01

    Excavation of Toca do Serrote das Moendas, in Piauí state, Brazil revealed a great quantity of fossil wild fauna associated with human remains. In particular, fossils of a cervid (Blastocerus dichotomus) were found, an animal frequently pictured in ancient rock wall paintings. In a well-defined stratum, two loose teeth of this species were found in close proximity to human bones. The teeth were independently dated by electron spin resonance (ESR) in two laboratories. The ages obtained for the teeth were 29 ± 3 ka (thousands of years) and 24 ± 1 ka. The concretion layer capping this stratum was dated by optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) of the quartz grains to 21 ± 3 ka. As these values were derived independently in three different laboratories, using different methods and equipment, these results are compelling evidence of early habitation in this area.

  6. Towards real-time metabolic profiling of a biopsy specimen during a surgical operation by 1H high resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotto Martial

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Providing information on cancerous tissue samples during a surgical operation can help surgeons delineate the limits of a tumoral invasion more reliably. Here, we describe the use of metabolic profiling of a colon biopsy specimen by high resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to evaluate tumoral invasion during a simulated surgical operation. Case presentation Biopsy specimens (n = 9 originating from the excised right colon of a 66-year-old Caucasian women with an adenocarcinoma were automatically analyzed using a previously built statistical model. Conclusions Metabolic profiling results were in full agreement with those of a histopathological analysis. The time-response of the technique is sufficiently fast for it to be used effectively during a real operation (17 min/sample. Metabolic profiling has the potential to become a method to rapidly characterize cancerous biopsies in the operation theater.

  7. Low-temperature carrier dynamics in high-mobility organic transistors of alkylated dinaphtho-thienothiophene as investigated by electron spin resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, Yutaro; Tanaka, Hisaaki, E-mail: htanaka@nuap.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Kuroda, Shin-ichi [Department of Applied Physics, Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Shimoi, Yukihiro [Nanosystem Research Institute (NRI), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Takimiya, Kazuo [Emergent Molecular Function Research Group, RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2014-07-21

    Charge carriers in high-mobility organic thin-film transistors of alkylated dinaphtho-thienothiophene (C{sub 10}-DNTT) have been directly observed by field-induced electron spin resonance (FI-ESR) down to 4 K. FI-ESR spectra of π-electron hole carriers of C{sub 10}-DNTT exhibited clear anisotropy, indicating a highly organized end-on molecular orientation at the device interface. The intra-grain and inter-grain carrier motion were probed by the motional narrowing effect of the ESR spectra. The intra-grain motion was clearly observed even at 4 K, showing intrinsically high mobility of C{sub 10}-DNTT crystallites. On the other hand, significantly low activation energy of ∼10 meV for inter-grain carrier hopping, compared with pristine DNTT, was observed, which shows that the alkyl substitution drastically enhances the carrier mobility of DNTT system.

  8. Mixture diffusion of adsorbed organic compounds in metal-organic frameworks as studied by magic-angle spinning pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gratz, Marcel; Hertel, Stefan; Wehring, Markus; Stallmach, Frank [Faculty of Physics and Earth Science, University of Leipzig, Linnestrasse 5, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Galvosas, Petrik, E-mail: petrik.galvosas@vuw.ac.nz [MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, SCPS, Victoria University of Wellington, 6012 Wellington (New Zealand)

    2011-04-15

    The magic-angle spinning (MAS) and pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG NMR) techniques have been combined using a commercially available microimaging system providing a gradient in the magic-angle direction of up to {+-}2.6 T m{sup -1}, together with a narrow bore MAS probe. By narrowing the spectral linewidths, detection of the single and mixed molecular species adsorbed in porous material and their respective mobilities becomes possible. Here, we report on protocols for MAS PFG NMR measurements, new methods for the indispensable sample alignment along the MAS rotational axis and gradient direction and first experimental results of diffusion studies on n-hexane and benzene adsorbed in the metal-organic framework MOF-5.

  9. Application of electron spin resonance for evaluation of the level of free radicals in the myometrium in full-term pregnancy with normal labour and uterine inertia

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V V Zyrianov; A Ye Sumovskaya; A A Shostak

    2003-02-01

    In order to identify and quantify free radicals in the tissues of patients with normal physiological and pathological states of births, we developed a method to evaluate the amount of free radicals in myometrium of subplacental area and from body of uterus, using electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Analysis of the concentration of free radicals in the myometrium in full-term pregnancy with normal labour and during uterine inertia was studied. The activities of Ca2+-ATPase, cytochrome oxidase and succinate dehydrogenase in samples of these tissues were tested too. Low free radical concentrations in these tissues were associated with disturbances in contractile activity of myometrium along with reduction of Ca2+-ATPase, cytochrome oxidase and succinate dehydrogenase activity. There proved to be an association between the level of free radicals in the tissues and alteration in the physiological processes.

  10. Cross-sections, spin observables, and helicity amplitudes of the {pi}{sup +}d{r_reversible}pp reaction at the isobar resonance and below

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dortmans, P.J.; Canton, L.; Amos, K.

    1997-06-01

    We have calculated the {pi}{sup +}d{r_reversible} pp reaction cross sections and spin observables from threshold to the {Delta} resonance by considering three types of mechanisms; the impulse (absorption) mechanism, {Delta} rescattering and s-wave {pi} N rescattering. The effect of final state interactions have been included also. While traditionally the first two mechanisms have been included within a sound theoretical basis, the {pi}N s-wave rescattering generally has been treated phenomenologically using a {pi}{pi}NN coupling constant fitted to the low-energy pion-nucleon data. Herein, we treat the isovector component of such a pion rescattering process as being mediated by the {rho}--exchange. Also, in those absorption mechanisms where the pion enters directly without rescattering, we employ a phenomenological cut-off scaling governed by the nucleon coordinates, since at the pion-nucleon vertex the nucleon itself may be off mass shell. Th energy dependence of the total cross section is well explained by the combined effects of the three mechanisms, but we find that this observable is not sensitive enough to give useful insight into fine details of the reaction. We calculated the spin observables of {pi}{sup +}d{r_reversible} pp at a variety of energies spanning the {Delta} resonance, finding such sensitivity to fine details of the calculation that we cannot obtain a complete agreement with the vast experimental data base. A better understanding of the importance of the various aspects of the reaction was obtained when the calculated helicity amplitudes were compared with those extracted via phase-shift-analyses of the {pi}{sup +}d{r_reversible} pp reaction data. (authors). 29 refs., 1 tab., 9 figs.

  11. Spin exchange broadening of magnetic resonance lines in a high-sensitivity rotating K-Rb-(21)Ne co-magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yao; Quan, Wei; Zou, Sheng; Lu, Yan; Duan, Lihong; Li, Yang; Zhang, Hong; Ding, Ming; Fang, Jiancheng

    2016-11-10

    Atomic co-magnetometers can be utilized for high-precision angular velocity sensing or fundamental physics tests. The sensitivity of a co-magnetometer determines the angle random walk of an angular velocity sensor and the detection limit for a fundamental physics test. A high-sensitivity K-Rb-(21)Ne co-magnetometer, which is utilized for angular velocity sensing, is presented in this paper. A new type of spin relaxation of Rb atom spins, which can broaden the zero-field magnetic resonance lines of the co-magnetometer, is discovered. Further studies show that the spin relaxation of Rb atoms is caused by a high Rb electron magnetization field. With this discovery, the total relaxation rate of Rb atoms is optimized to improve the sensitivity of the co-magnetometer. Moreover, its sensitivity is optimized by suppressing various noises. Especially, to suppress laser-related noises, the co-magnetometer is designed such that the sensitive axis of the co-magnetometer can be fixed to the direction in which the projection input of the earth's rotation is 0. This is called a rotating co-magnetometer. A magnetic field sensitivity of 1.0 fT/Hz(-1/2)@5 Hz, which is equal to an angular velocity sensitivity of 2.1 × 10(-8) rad s(-1) Hz(-1/2)@5 Hz, is demonstrated using a spherical vapour cell with a diameter of 14 mm.

  12. Tuning the Kondo effect in YbRh{sub 2}Si{sub 2}: Electron spin resonance under pressure and doping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wykhoff, Jan; Sichelschmidt, J.; Krellner, C.; Geibel, C.; Steglich, F. [MPl for Chemical Physics of Solids, Dresden (Germany); Zakharov, D.V.; Krug von Nidda, H.A.; Loidl, A. [EP V, EKM, University of Augsburg (Germany); Fazlizhanov, I. [E.K. Zavoisky Physical Technical Institute, Kazan (Russian Federation)

    2009-07-01

    The observation of a well defined Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) signal below the Kondo temperature T{sub K} in the heavy-fermion compound YbRh{sub 2}Si{sub 2} refutes a common believe that concentrated rare earth ions in Kondo-lattice intermetallic compounds would be ESR silent in the Kondo regime. The signal shows distinct properties of the Yb{sup 3+} 4f spin and, hence, should contain valuable microscopic information on the dynamical Kondo coupling to the conduction electrons. We investigated the effect of tuning the 4f - conduction electron hybridization strength by Co-doping and hydrostatic pressure up to 3 GPa. Both stabilize antiferromagnetic order, lead to a reduction of T{sub K}, and yield pronounced changes in the ESR parameters. By comparing the quantitatively different effect of pressure and Co doping on the ESR parameters we found a relation of the zero temperature residual ESR linewidth to the residual resistivity and the linear in temperature slope of the linewidth as was similarly reported for the La-doping case.

  13. Regional and voxel-wise comparisons of blood flow measurements between dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) and arterial spin labeling (ASL) in brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Carissa M; Pope, Whitney B; Zaw, Taryar; Qiao, Joe; Naeini, Kourosh M; Lai, Albert; Nghiemphu, Phioanh L; Wang, J J; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Ellingson, Benjamin M

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate the regional and voxel-wise correlation between dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) and arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF) in patients with brain tumors. Thirty patients with histologically verified brain tumors were evaluated in the current study. DSC-MRI was performed by first using a preload dose of gadolinium contrast, then collecting a dynamic image acquisition during a bolus of contrast, followed by posthoc contrast agent leakage correction. Pseudocontinuous ASL was collected using 30 pairs of tag and control acquisition using a 3-dimensional gradient-echo spin-echo (GRASE) acquisition. All images were registered to a high-resolution anatomical atlas. Average CBF measurements within regions of contrast-enhancement and T2 hyperintensity were evaluated between the two modalities. Additionally, voxel-wise correlation between CBF measurements obtained with DSC and ASL were assessed. Results demonstrated a positive linear correlation between DSC and ASL measurements of CBF when regional average values were compared; however, a statistically significant voxel-wise correlation was only observed in around 30-40% of patients. These results suggest DSC and ASL may provide regionally similar, but spatially different measurements of CBF.

  14. Fourier transform infrared and electron spin resonance examinations of kerogen from the Gunflint stromatolitic cherts (Middle Precambrian, Ontario, Canada and related materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IVANA R. TONSA

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Kerogen occurrences in stromatolitic cherts from the Middle Precambrian Gunflint Formation and related rocks have been investigated by the use of elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared and electron spin reconance spectroscopies. Particular attention was paid to the structural properties of the Schreiber kerogen to allow comparison with biologically controlled kerogens from Paleozoic carbonaceous rocks. The low atomic H/C ratios (0.5 of the Schreiber kerogen indicates that this material has reached a high level of maturity. The Fourier transform infrared/electron spin resonance examinations revealed that the Schreiber kerogen contains predominantly aromatic/polyaromatic structures similar to those found in mature kerogens from Paleozoic carbonaceous rocks. The evidence from this organogeochemical comparison indicates that the Schrei-ber kerogen and mature kerogens from Paleozoic/Mesozoic carbonaceous rocks have sufficient similarity to suggest a similar origin. Consequently, this work gives strong support to the hypothesis that if the Schreiber kerogen is of biotic origin than it is derived from the remnants of various microbial organisms (mainly phytoplanktons including a minor contribution of subtidal (stromatolite-building cyanobacteria.

  15. Spin depolarization of N{sub 2}{sup +} ({sup 2}{sigma}{sup +}) in collisions with {sup 3}He in a magnetic field: general behaviour and zero energy Feshbach resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillon, G; Stoecklin, T [Institut des Sciences Moleculaires, CNRS-UMR 5255, 351 cours de la Liberation 33405 Talence (France); Voronin, A [Institute of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka, Moscow 142432 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: t.stoecklin@ism.u-bordeaux1.fr

    2009-10-15

    We give a brief account of the effect of a magnetic field on the spin-depolarization cross sections of N{sub 2}{sup +}({sup 2}{sigma}) in collisions with {sup 3}He at very low collision energy. The fundamental states of the two nuclear spin isomers of N{sub 2}{sup +} are shown to respond quite differently to the application of the field. When the applied magnetic field increases, the spin depolarization cross sections are found to monotonously decrease for the fundamental para level N=0 of N{sub 2}{sup +}, whereas they monotonously increase for the fundamental ortho level N=1 of N{sub 2}{sup +}. This effect is found to be amplified around the resonances and an explanation based on the different mechanism of spin flipping acting for these two levels is proposed. We also explore the tuning of zero energy Feshbach resonances by examining the variation of the scattering length as a function of the magnetic field. We use the Smith Q matrix to calculate the lifetimes of the complexes associated with these resonances and discuss the law of variation as a function of the magnetic field of the Q matrix eigenvalues across such resonances.

  16. Functional turbo spin echo magnetic resonance imaging versus tomography for evaluating cervical spine involvement in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostveen, JCM; Roozeboom, AR; van de Laar, MAFJ; Heeres, J; den Boer, JA; Lindeboom, SF

    1998-01-01

    Study Design. Comparison of findings in plain radiography and conventional tomography with findings in plain radiography and magnetic resonance imaging of the upper cervical spine in consecutive patients with rheumatoid arthritis and with known or suspected abnormalities of the cervical spine. Objec

  17. High-pressure, high-temperature magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance devices and processes for making and using same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Hu, Mary Y.; Townsend, Mark R.; Lercher, Johannes A.; Peden, Charles H. F.

    2015-10-06

    Re-usable ceramic magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR rotors constructed of high-mechanic strength ceramics are detailed that include a sample compartment that maintains high pressures up to at least about 200 atmospheres (atm) and high temperatures up to about least about 300.degree. C. during operation. The rotor designs minimize pressure losses stemming from penetration over an extended period of time. The present invention makes possible a variety of in-situ high pressure, high temperature MAS NMR experiments not previously achieved in the prior art.

  18. Evaluation of tumor blood flow after feeder embolization in meningiomas by arterial spin-labeling perfusion magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaji, Hiroshi; Koizumi, Shinichiro; Sakai, Naoto; Yamasaki, Tomohiro; Hiramatsu, Hisaya; Kanoko, Yusuke; Kamiya, Mika; Yamashita, Shuhei; Takehara, Yasuo; Sakahara, Harumi; Namba, Hiroki

    2013-10-01

    Preoperative embolization changes the amount of blood flow and pattern of flow distribution in meningioma. Tumor blood flow was investigated in eight meningioma patients before and after embolization using arterial spin-labeling (ASL) perfusion imaging. Although blood flow was significantly reduced in the whole tumor after embolization, changes in flow distribution patterns varied from one case to another. The findings suggest that evaluation of post-embolization tumor blood flow by ASL perfusion imaging would be useful in the surgical planning of meningioma.

  19. Dynamical evolution and spin-orbit resonances of potentially habitable exoplanets. The case of GJ 667C

    CERN Document Server

    Makarov, Valeri V

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the dynamical evolution of the potentially habitable super-earth GJ 667Cc in the multiple system of at least two exoplanets orbiting a nearby M dwarf, paying special attention to its spin-orbital state. The published radial velocities for this star are re-analyzed and evidence is found for additional periodic signals, which could be taken for two additional planets on eccentric orbits. Such systems are not dynamically viable and break up quickly in numerical integrations. Limiting the scope to the two originally detected planets, we assess the dynamical stability of the system and find no evidence for bounded chaos in the orbital motion. The orbital eccentricity of the planets b and c is found to change cyclicly in the range 0.06 - 0.28 and 0.05 - 0.25, respectively, with a period of approximately 0.46 yr. Taking the eccentricity variation into account, numerical integrations are performed of the differential equations modeling the spin-orbit interaction of the planet GJ 667Cc with its host sta...

  20. Study by electron spin resonance of the free radicals created under irradiation in glycine; Etude par la technique de resonance paramagnetique electronique des radicaux crees sous irradiation dans la glycine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomet, P.; Rassat, A.; Servoz-Gavin, P.; Choudens, H. de [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-07-01

    The free radicals created by different radiations in glycine are measured by electron spin resonance and their number is evaluated in function of the absorbed dose. This number decreases when the LET of the radiations increases ; in other words,high LET radiations gives less radiochemical effects; in contrary with the fact that high LET radiations creates more damage in biological materials. The decreasing with time of the number of free radicals and the speed of this decrease is a function of temperature; by the study of the kinetics of this decrease, an attempt has been made to prove the presence of three radicals. (authors) [French] Les radicaux crees par divers rayonnements dans la glycine sont detectes par resonance paramagnetique electronique et leur nombre est evalue en fonction de la dose. Ce nombre varie dans le sens inverse du T.E.L moyen, c'est-a-dire que les rayonnements de T.E.L eleves donnent des effets radiochimiques plus petits alors que les effets radiobiologiques sont importants avec des T.E.L eleves. La decroissance dans le temps du nombre de radicaux est observee et la vitesse de diminution des radicaux est liee a la temperature. Etudiant la cinetique de recombinaison, on peut faire l'hypothese de l'existence de 3 radicaux. (auteurs)

  1. Self-consistent relativistic QRPA studies of soft modes and spin-isospin resonances in unstable nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paar, N. [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Darmstadt (Germany); University of Zagreb, Physics Department, Faculty of Science (Croatia); University of Washington, Institute for Nuclear Theory, Seattle (United States); Niksic, T. [University of Zagreb, Physics Department, Faculty of Science (Croatia); University of Washington, Institute for Nuclear Theory, Seattle (United States); Marketin, T.; Vretenar, D. [University of Zagreb, Physics Department, Faculty of Science (Croatia); Ring, P. [Physik-Department der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany)

    2005-09-01

    The excitation phenomena in unstable nuclei are investigated in the framework of the relativistic quasiparticle random-phase approximation (RQRPA) in the relativistic Hartree-Bogolyubov model (RHB) which is extended to include effective interactions with explicit density-dependent meson-nucleon couplings. The properties of the pygmy dipole resonance (PDR) are examined in {sup 132}Sn and within isotopic chains, showing that already at moderate proton-neutron asymmetry the PDR peak energy is located above the neutron emission threshold. A method is suggested for determining the size of the neutron skin within an isotopic chain, based on the measurement of the excitation energies of the Gamow-Teller resonance relative to the isobaric analog state. In addition, for the first time the relativistic RHB+RQRPA model, with tensor {omega} meson-nucleon couplings, is employed in calculations of {beta}-decay half-lives of nuclei of the relevance for the r-process. (orig.)

  2. Dependence of nuclear quadrupole resonance transitions on the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for nuclides with half-integer spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Herman

    2016-09-01

    Allowed transition energies and eigenstate expansions have been calculated and tabulated in numerical form as functions of the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for the zero field Hamiltonian of quadrupolar nuclides with I = 3 / 2 , 5 / 2 , 7 / 2, and 9 / 2. These results are essential to interpret nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectra and extract accurate values of the electric field gradient tensors. Applications of NQR methods to studies of electronic structure in heavy element systems are proposed.

  3. Dynamical Evolution and Spin-Orbit Resonances of Potentially Habitable Exoplanets. The Case of GJ 667C

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-10

    on habitability and atmosphere properties. The major planets of the solar system, with the notable exception of Venus and Mercury , rotate at...energy. The lat- ter kind of librations is expected to damp relatively quickly for Mercury -like planets (Peale 2005), with a characteristic damp- ing...is even shorter than that for Mercury . The planet is certain to be in one of the low-order resonances, that is, its current rotation with respect to

  4. Spin-noise correlations and spin-noise exchange driven by low-field spin-exchange collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellis, A. T.; Loulakis, M.; Kominis, I. K.

    2014-09-01

    The physics of spin-exchange collisions have fueled several discoveries in fundamental physics and numerous applications in medical imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance. We report on the experimental observation and theoretical justification of spin-noise exchange, the transfer of spin noise from one atomic species to another. The signature of spin-noise exchange is an increase of the total spin-noise power at low magnetic fields, on the order of 1 mG, where the two-species spin-noise resonances overlap. The underlying physical mechanism is the two-species spin-noise correlation induced by spin-exchange collisions.

  5. Studies of spin relaxation and molecular dynamics in liquid crystals by two-dimensional Fourier transform electron spin resonance. II. Perdeuterated-tempone in butoxy benzylidene octylaniline and dynamic cage effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastry, V. S. S.; Polimeno, Antonino; Crepeau, Richard H.; Freed, Jack H.

    1996-10-01

    Two-dimensional Fourier transform (2D-FT)-electron spin resonance (ESR) studies on the small globular spin probe perdeuterated tempone (PDT) in the liquid crystal solvent 4O,8 (butoxy benzylidene octylaniline) are reported. These experiments, over the temperature range of 95 °C to 24 °C, cover the isotropic (I), nematic (N), smectic A (SA), smectic B (SB), and crystal (C) phases. The 2D-ELDOR (two-dimensional electron-electron double resonance) spectra confirm the anomalously rapid reorientation of PDT, especially in the lower temperature phases. The model of a slowly relaxing local structure (SRLS) leads to generally very good non-linear least squares (NLLS) global fits to the sets of 2D-ELDOR spectra obtained at each temperature. These fits are significantly better than those achieved by the standard model of Brownian reorientation in a macroscopic orienting potential. The SRLS model is able to account for anomalies first observed in an earlier 2D-ELDOR study on PDT in a different liquid crystal in its smectic phases. Although it is instructional to extract the various spectral densities from the COSY (correlation spectroscopy) and 2D-ELDOR spectra, the use of NLLS global fitting to a full set of 2D-ELDOR spectra is shown to be more reliable and convenient for obtaining optimum model parameters, especially in view of possible (incipient) slow motional effects from the SRLS or dynamic cage. The cage potential is found to remain fairly constant at about kBT over the various phases (with only a small drop in the SB phase), but its asymmetry increases with decreasing temperature T. This value is significantly larger than the weak macroscopic orienting potential which increases from 0.1 to 0.3kBT with decreasing T. The cage relaxation rate, given by Rc is about 3×107 s-1 in the I phase, but increases to about 108 s-1 in the SA, SB, and C phases. The rotational diffusion tensor for PDT shows only a small T-independent asymmetry, and its mean rotational diffusion

  6. Backward production of a spin-parity 1/sup +/ K rho resonance at 128 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Gavillet, P; Díaz, J; Dionisi, C; Engelen, J J; Foster, B; Grossmann, P; Gurtu, A; Hemingway, R J; Jongejans, B; Kittel, E W; Losty, Michael J; Marin, J C; Massaro, G G G; Mazzucato, M; McDowell, W L; Montanet, Lucien; Pagiola, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vergeest, J S M; Voorthuis, H

    1978-01-01

    A (K pi pi )/sup +/ mass enhancement is observed in the reactions K /sup -/p to Xi /sup -/K/sup 0+//sub pi //sup +/ pi /sup 0-/ when events with a small (K/sup -/ to Xi /sup -/) four momentum transfer squared are selected. The signal is also visible in the reaction K/sup -/p to Xi /sup -/ pi /sup +/+neutrals. The enhancement, centered at 1.28 GeV, is seen to decay preferentially into K rho with spin-parity JP=1/sup +/. The cross section for K/sup -/p to Xi /sup -/C/sup + /(1.28) with C/sup +/ to K rho at 4.15 GeV/c incident K/sup -/ momentum is (6.2+or-0.6) mu b. (11 refs).

  7. Electron paramagnetic resonance studies of magnetically aligned phospholipid bilayers utilizing a phospholipid spin label: the effect of cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Paresh C; Nusair, Nisreen A; Inbaraj, Johnson J; Lorigan, Gary A

    2005-08-15

    X-band EPR spectroscopy has been employed to study the dynamic properties of magnetically aligned phospholipid bilayers (bicelles) utilizing a variety of phosphocholine spin labels (n-PCSL) as a function of cholesterol content. The utilization of both perpendicular and parallel aligned bicelles in EPR spectroscopy provides a more detailed structural and orientational picture of the phospholipid bilayers. The magnetically aligned EPR spectra of the bicelles and the hyperfine splitting values reveal that the addition of cholesterol increases the phase transition temperature and alignment temperature of the DMPC/DHPC bicelles. The corresponding molecular order parameter, Smol, of the DMPC/DHPC bicelles increased upon addition of cholesterol. Cholesterol also decreased the rotational motion and increased the degree of anisotropy in the interior region of the bicelles. This report reveals that the dynamic properties of DMPC/DHPC bicelles agree well with other model membrane systems and that the magnetically aligned bicelles are an excellent model membrane system.

  8. Dependence of nuclear quadrupole resonance transitions on the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for nuclides with half-integer spins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Herman

    2016-09-01

    Allowed transition energies and eigenstate expansions have been calculated and tabulated in numerical form as functions of the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for the zero field Hamiltonian of quadrupolar nuclides with I = 3/2, 5/2, 7/2, and 9/2. These results may be used to interpret nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectra and extract accurate values of the electric field gradient tensors. Applications of NQR methods to studies of electronic structure in heavy element systems are proposed. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Heavy Element Chemistry program.

  9. Structural and dynamic study of the tetramerization region of non-erythroid alpha-spectrin: a frayed helix revealed by site-directed spin labeling electron paramagnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qufei; Fung, L W-M

    2009-01-13

    The N-terminal region of alpha-spectrin is responsible for its association with beta-spectrin in a heterodimer, forming functional tetramers. Non-erythroid alpha-spectrin (alphaII-spectrin) has a significantly higher association affinity for beta-spectrin than the homologous erythroid alpha-spectrin (alphaI-spectrin). We have previously determined the solution structure of the N-terminal region of alphaI-spectrin by NMR methods, but currently no structural information is available for alphaII-spectrin. We have used cysteine scanning, spin labeling electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) methods to study the tetramerization region of alphaII-spectrin. EPR data clearly show that, in alphaII-spectrin, the first nine N-terminal residues were unstructured, followed by an irregular helix (helix C'), frayed at the N-terminal end, but rigid at the C-terminal end, which merges into the putative triple-helical structural domain. The region corresponding to the important unstructured junction region linking helix C' to the first structural domain in alphaI-spectrin was clearly structured. On the basis of the published model for aligning helices A', B', and C', important interactions among residues in helix C' of alphaI- and alphaII-spectrin and helices A' and B' of betaI- and betaII-spectrin are identified, suggesting similar coiled coil helical bundling for spectrin I and II in forming tetramers. The differences in affinity are likely due to the differences in the conformation of the junction regions. Equilibrium dissociation constants of spin-labeled alphaII and betaI complexes from ITC measurements indicate that residues 15, 19, 37, and 40 are functionally important residues in alphaII-spectrin. Interestingly, all four corresponding homologous residues in alphaI-spectrin (residues 24, 28, 46, and 49) have been reported to be clinically significant residues involved in hematological diseases.

  10. Electron transfer flavoprotein domain II orientation monitored using double electron-electron resonance between an enzymatically reduced, native FAD cofactor, and spin labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Michael A; Kathirvelu, Velavan; Majtan, Tomas; Frerman, Frank E; Eaton, Gareth R; Eaton, Sandra S

    2011-03-01

    Human electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) is a soluble mitochondrial heterodimeric flavoprotein that links fatty acid β-oxidation to the main respiratory chain. The crystal structure of human ETF bound to medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase indicates that the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) domain (αII) is mobile, which permits more rapid electron transfer with donors and acceptors by providing closer access to the flavin and allows ETF to accept electrons from at least 10 different flavoprotein dehydrogenases. Sequence homology is high and low-angle X-ray scattering is identical for Paracoccus denitrificans (P. denitrificans) and human ETF. To characterize the orientations of the αII domain of P. denitrificans ETF, distances between enzymatically reduced FAD and spin labels in the three structural domains were measured by double electron-electron resonance (DEER) at X- and Q-bands. An FAD to spin label distance of 2.8 ± 0.15 nm for the label in the FAD-containing αII domain (A210C) agreed with estimates from the crystal structure (3.0 nm), molecular dynamics simulations (2.7 nm), and rotamer library analysis (2.8 nm). Distances between the reduced FAD and labels in αI (A43C) were between 4.0 and 4.5 ± 0.35 nm and for βIII (A111C) the distance was 4.3 ± 0.15 nm. These values were intermediate between estimates from the crystal structure of P. denitrificans ETF and a homology model based on substrate-bound human ETF. These distances suggest that the αII domain adopts orientations in solution that are intermediate between those which are observed in the crystal structures of free ETF (closed) and ETF bound to a dehydrogenase (open).

  11. Combination of high-resolution magic angle spinning proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and microscale genomics to type brain tumor biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzika, A Aria; Astrakas, Loukas; Cao, Haihui; Mintzopoulos, Dionyssios; Andronesi, Ovidiu C; Mindrinos, Michael; Zhang, Jiangw