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Sample records for chromatography time-scale peptide

  1. Towards Liquid Chromatography Time-Scale Peptide Sequencing and Characterization of Post-Translational Modifications in the Negative-Ion Mode Using Electron Detachment Dissociation Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Frank; Hørning, Ole B; Jensen, Søren S;

    2008-01-01

    in large-scale peptide characterization strategies. We successfully increased the EDD fragmentation efficiency (up to 9%), and demonstrate for the first time the utility of EDD-MS/MS in liquid chromatography time-scale experiments. Peptides and phosphopeptides were analyzed in both positive- and negative...

  2. Optimization of reversed-phase chromatography methods for peptide analytics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaf, Rushd; Baur, Daniel; Pfister, David

    2015-12-18

    The analytical description and quantification of peptide solutions is an essential part in the quality control of peptide production processes and in peptide mapping techniques. Traditionally, an important tool is analytical reversed phase liquid chromatography. In this work, we develop a model-based tool to find optimal analytical conditions in a clear, efficient and robust manner. The model, based on the Van't Hoff equation, the linear solvent strength correlation, and an analytical solution of the mass balance on a chromatographic column describing peptide retention in gradient conditions is used to optimize the analytical scale separation between components in a peptide mixture. The proposed tool is then applied in the design of analytical reversed phase liquid chromatography methods of five different peptide mixtures. PMID:26620597

  3. Affinity Purification of Insulin by Peptide-Ligand Affinity Chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The affinity heptapeptide (HWWWPAS) for insulin, selected from phage display library,was coupled to EAH Sepharose 4B gel and packed to a 1-mL column. The column was used for the affinity purification of insulin from protein mixture and commercial insulin preparation. It was observed that the minor impurity in the commercial insulin was removed by the affinity chromatography. Nearly 40 mg of insulin could be purified with the 1-mL affinity column. The results revealed the high specificity and capacity of the affinity column for insulin purification. Moreover, based on the analysis of the amino acids in the peptide sequence, shorter peptides were designed and synthesized for insulin chromatography. As a result, HWWPS was found to be a good alternative to HWWWPAS, while the other two peptides with three or four amino acids showed weak affinity for insulin. The results indicated that the peptide sequence of HWWWPAS was quite conservative for specific binding of insulin.

  4. Stereo-separations of Peptides by Capillary Electrophoresis and Chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Authors: Afzal Hussain, Iqbal Hussain, Mohamed F. Al-Ajmi & Imran Ali ### Abstract Small peptides (di-, tri-, tetra- penta- hexa etc. and peptides) control many chemical and biological processes. The biological importance of stereomers of peptides is of great value. The stereo-separations of peptides are gaining importance in biological and medicinal sciences and pharmaceutical industries. There is a great need of experimental protocols of stereo-separations of peptides. The vario...

  5. Occupational Cohort Time Scales

    OpenAIRE

    Deubner, David C.; Roth, H. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study explores how highly correlated time variables (occupational cohort time scales) contribute to confounding and ambiguity of interpretation. Methods: Occupational cohort time scales were identified and organized through simple equations of three time scales (relational triads) and the connections between these triads (time scale web). The behavior of the time scales was examined when constraints were imposed on variable ranges and interrelationships. Results: Constraints on ...

  6. Study on peptide-peptide interaction using high-performance affinity chromatography and quartz crystal microbalance biosensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Jia; HUANG YanYan; XIONG ShaoXiang; LIU GuoQuan; ZHAO Rui

    2007-01-01

    The specific interaction between sense and antisense peptides was studied by high-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) biosensor. Fragment 1-14 of human interferon-β (hlFN-β) was chosen as sense peptide and its three antisense peptides (AS-IFN 1,AS-IFN 2, and AS-IFN 3) were designed according to the degeneracy of genetic codes. The affinity column was prepared with sense peptide as ligand and the affinity chromatographic behavior was evaluated. Glu-substituted antisense peptide (AS-IFN 3) showed the strongest binding to immobilized sense peptide at pH 7.5. A quartz crystal microbalance-flow injection analysis (QCM-FIA) system was introduced to investigate the recognition process in real-time. The equilibrium dissociation constants between sense peptide and AS-IFN 1, AS-IFN 2 and AS-IFN 3 measured 2.08×10-4, 1.31×10-4 and 2.22×10-5 mol/L, respectively. The mechanism study indicated that the specific recognition between sense peptide and AS-IFN 3 was due to sequence-dependent and multi-modal affinity interaction.

  7. Determination of theoretical retention times for peptides analyzed by reversed- -phase high-performance liquid chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Dziuba

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available   Background. Peptides are important components of foods mainly due to their biological activity. The basic method of their identification is reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry (RP-HPLC-ESI-MS. Retention time (tR prediction in silico is very helpful in analysis of multicomponent peptide mixtures. One of problems associated with RP-HPLC-ESI-MS is deterioration of mass spectra quality by trifluoroacetic acid (TFA. This problem can be avoided through the use of chromatographic columns designed for work with low TFA concentrations in mobile phase. The objective of this study was to determine the correlations between peptide retention times predicted with the use of a program available on-line and experimental retention times obtained using the column working with low TFA concentrations. Material and methods. The set of synthetic peptides and bovine α-lactalbumin fragments (18 peptides was used in the experiment. Theoretical retention times were calculated using Sequence Specific Retention Calculator (SSRC program. The experimental retention times were measured via RP-HPLC-ESI-MS method using column working with low TFA content. The dependence between theoretical and experimental tR was expressed via empirical equations. Results. The best correlation between theoretical and experimental retention times of peptides containing at least four amino acid residues has been obtained when third order polynomial (R² = 0.9536. Prediction quality for di- and tripeptides was significantly lower. The method described can be applied for cysteine-containing peptides although our sample preparation procedure did not include modification of this amino acid, taken into attention by SSRC program. Conclusions. The results of this study validate the usefulness of a third degree polynomial as a simple function describing the correlation between peptide retention times predicted by an on

  8. Purification of Peptide Components including Melittin from Bee Venom using gel filtration chromatography and propionic acid/urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis

    OpenAIRE

    Young Chon Choi; Ki Rok, Kwon; Suk Ho, Choi

    2006-01-01

    Objectives : This study was conducted to carry out Purification of Melittin and other peptide components from Bee Venom using gel filtration chromatography and propionic acid/urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis Methods : Melittin and other peptide components were separated from bee venom by using gel filtration chromatography on Sephadex G-50 column in 0.05M ammonium acetate buffer. Results : Melittin and other peptide components were separated from bee venom by using gel filtration...

  9. Relative Quantification of Sites of Peptide and Protein Modification Using Size Exclusion Chromatography Coupled with Electron Transfer Dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Boer; Sharp, Joshua S.

    2016-08-01

    One difficult problem in the analysis of peptide modifications is quantifying isomeric modifications that differ by the position of the amino acid modified. HPLC separation using C18 reverse phase chromatography coupled with electron transfer dissociation (ETD) in tandem mass spectrometry has recently been shown to be able to relatively quantify how much of a given modification occurs at each amino acid position for isomeric mixtures; however, the resolution of reverse phase chromatography greatly complicates quantification of isomeric modifications by ETD because of the chromatographic separation of peptides with identical modifications at different sequence positions. Using peptide oxidation as a model system, we investigated the use of size exclusion chromatography coupled with ETD fragmentation to separate peptide sequences. This approach allows for the benefits of chromatographic separation of peptide sequences while ensuring co-elution of modification isomers for accurate relative quantification of modifications using standard data-dependent acquisitions. Using this method, the relative amount of modification at each amino acid can be accurately measured from single ETD MS/MS spectra in a standard data-dependent acquisition experiment.

  10. Relative Quantification of Sites of Peptide and Protein Modification Using Size Exclusion Chromatography Coupled with Electron Transfer Dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Boer; Sharp, Joshua S

    2016-08-01

    One difficult problem in the analysis of peptide modifications is quantifying isomeric modifications that differ by the position of the amino acid modified. HPLC separation using C18 reverse phase chromatography coupled with electron transfer dissociation (ETD) in tandem mass spectrometry has recently been shown to be able to relatively quantify how much of a given modification occurs at each amino acid position for isomeric mixtures; however, the resolution of reverse phase chromatography greatly complicates quantification of isomeric modifications by ETD because of the chromatographic separation of peptides with identical modifications at different sequence positions. Using peptide oxidation as a model system, we investigated the use of size exclusion chromatography coupled with ETD fragmentation to separate peptide sequences. This approach allows for the benefits of chromatographic separation of peptide sequences while ensuring co-elution of modification isomers for accurate relative quantification of modifications using standard data-dependent acquisitions. Using this method, the relative amount of modification at each amino acid can be accurately measured from single ETD MS/MS spectra in a standard data-dependent acquisition experiment. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27075875

  11. Enhanced separation and characterization of deamidated peptides with RP-ERLIC-based multidimensional chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Piliang; Qian, Jingru; Dutta, Bamaprasad; Cheow, Esther Sok Hwee; Sim, Kae Hwan; Meng, Wei; Adav, Sunil S; Alpert, Andrew; Sze, Siu Kwan

    2012-03-01

    Deamidation of asparaginyl residues in proteins produces a mixture of asparaginyl, n-aspartyl, and isoaspartyl residues, which affects the proteins' structure, function, and stability. Thus, it is important to identify and quantify the products to evaluate the effects in biological systems. It is still a challenging task to distinguish between the n-Asp and isoAsp deamidation products in a proteome-wide analysis because of their similar physicochemical properties. The quantification of the isomeric deamidated peptides is also rather difficult because of their coelution/poor separation in reverse-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC). We here propose a RP-ERLIC-MS/MS approach for separating and quantifying on a proteome-wide scale the three products related to deamidation of the same peptide. The key to the method is the use of RPLC in the first dimensional separation and ERLIC (electrostatic repulsion-hydrophilic interaction chromatography) in the second, with direct online coupling to tandem MS. The coelution of the three deamidation-related peptides in RPLC is then an asset, as they are collected in the same fraction. They are then separated and identified in the second dimension with ERLIC, which separates peptides on the basis of both pI and GRAVY values. The coelution of the three products in RPLC and their efficient separation in ERLIC were validated using synthetic peptides, and the performance of ERLIC-MS/MS was tested using peptide mixtures from two proteins. Applying this sequence to rat liver tissue, we identified 302 unique N-deamidated peptides, of which 20 were identified via all three deamidation-related products and 70 of which were identified via two of them. PMID:22239700

  12. Peptides Quantification by Liquid Chromatography with Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization and Selected Reaction Monitoring Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Lesur, Antoine; Varesio, Emmanuel; Domon, Bruno; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel analytical platform for peptides quantitative assays in biological matrices based on microscale liquid chromatography fractionation and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric detection using the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. The MALDI source was equipped with a high frequency Nd:YAG laser (1000 Hz) and mounted on a triple quadrupole / linear ion trap mass spectrometer (MALDI-QqQLIT). Compared to conventional LC-ESI-SRM/MS, the separated an...

  13. Statistical inference across time scales

    CERN Document Server

    Duval, Céline

    2011-01-01

    We investigate statistical inference across time scales. We take as toy model the estimation of the intensity of a discretely observed compound Poisson process with symmetric Bernoulli jumps. We have data at different time scales: microscopic, intermediate and macroscopic. We quantify the smooth statistical transition from a microscopic Poissonian regime to a macroscopic Gaussian regime. The classical quadratic variation estimator is efficient in both microscopic and macroscopic scales but surprisingly shows a substantial loss of information in the intermediate scale that can be explicitly related to the sampling rate. We discuss the implications of these findings beyond this idealised framework.

  14. Isolation and identification of antioxidant peptides derived from whey protein enzymatic hydrolysate by consecutive chromatography and Q-TOF MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiu-Xiang; Wu, Hui; Ling, Yu-Fang; Lu, Rong-Rong

    2013-08-01

    To isolate and identify antioxidant peptides from enzymatically hydrolysed whey protein, whey protein isolate was hydrolysed by different protease (trypsin, pepsin, alcalase 2·4L, promatex, flavourzyme, protease N). The hydrolysate generated by alcalase 2·4L had the highest antioxidant activities on 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals, superoxide radicals and in a linoleic acid peroxidation system induced by Fe2+. The IC50 values of DPPH and superoxide radical scavenging activities of the hydrolysate decreased significantly (6·89 and 38·88%, respectively) after treatment with macroporous adsorption resin. Seven different peptides showing strong antioxidant activities were isolated from the hydrolysate using consecutive chromatographic methods including gel filtration chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography. The molecular mass and amino acids sequences of the purified peptides were determined using a Quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer (Q-TOF MS). One of the antioxidative peptides, Trp-Tyr-Ser-Leu, displayed the highest DPPH radical scavenging activity (IC50=273·63 μm) and superoxide radical scavenging activity (IC50=558·42 μm). These results suggest that hydrolysates from whey proteins are good potential source of natural antioxidants. PMID:23876604

  15. Symmetric Differentiation on Time Scales

    OpenAIRE

    da Cruz, Artur M. C. Brito; Martins, Natalia; Delfim F. M. Torres

    2012-01-01

    We define a symmetric derivative on an arbitrary nonempty closed subset of the real numbers and derive some of its properties. It is shown that real-valued functions defined on time scales that are neither delta nor nabla differentiable can be symmetric differentiable.

  16. Purification and identification of O-GlcNAc-modified peptides using phosphate-based alkyne CLICK chemistry in combination with titanium dioxide chromatography and mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parker, Benjamin L; Gupta, Pankaj; Cordwell, Stuart;

    2011-01-01

    -containing peptides were enriched using titanium dioxide chromatography. Modified peptides were analyzed using a combination of higher energy collision dissociation for identification and electron transfer dissociation to localize the site of O-GlcNAc attachment. The enrichment method was developed and...

  17. Reversed-phase liquid chromatography of radiolabeled peptides using a C18 guard-PAK precolumn system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to avoid radioactive contamination of high-performance liquid chromatography columns and injectors, we have investigated the use of a Guard-PAK precolumn system for the chromatography of [125I] labeled peptides. Two gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs: (1) [D-Ala6-des-Gly10]-GnRH (GnRH-[Ala6]) and (2) [D-Ser(TBu)6-des-Gly10]-GnRH (GnRH-[Ser6]) and rat prolactin (r-PRL) were radiolabeled with 125I and subjected to reversed-phase liquid chromatography using a C18 Guard-PAK precolumn system. Major peak fractions of purified [125I]GnRH-[Ala6], [125I]GnRH-[Ser6], and [125I]r-PRL eluted at 24%, 28%, and 55% acetonitrile, respectively. Purified [125I]GnRH analogs showed specific high affinity binding to rat anterior pituitary gland membranes (specific activity: 1500-1700 Ci/mmol). Purified [125I]r-PRL showed high affinity binding to r-PRL antibody by RIA (specific activity: 70-75 microCi/micrograms). This rapid and efficient chromatographic method should be useful in the separation of a wide range of radiolabeled protein and peptide molecules

  18. Time Scales in Spectator Fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Schwarz, C; Bassini, R; Begemann-Blaich, M L; Gaff-Ejakov, S J; Gourio, D; Gross, C; Imme, G; Iori, I; Kleinevoss, U; Kunde, G J; Kunze, W D; Lynen, U; Maddalena, V; Mahi, M; Möhlenkamp, T; Moroni, A; Müller, W F J; Nociforo, C; Ocker, B; Odeh, T; Petruzzelli, F; Pochodzalla, J; Raciti, G; Riccobene, G; Romano, F; Saija, A; Schnittker, M; Schüttauf, A; Seidel, W; Serfling, V; Sfienti, C; Trautmann, W; Trzcinski, A; Verde, G; Wörner, A; Hong Fei Xi; Zwieglinski, B

    2001-01-01

    Proton-proton correlations and correlations of p-alpha, d-alpha, and t-alpha from spectator decays following Au + Au collisions at 1000 AMeV have been measured with an highly efficient detector hodoscope. The constructed correlation functions indicate a moderate expansion and low breakup densities similar to assumptions made in statistical multifragmentation models. In agreement with a volume breakup rather short time scales were deduced employing directional cuts in proton-proton correlations. PACS numbers: 25.70.Pq, 21.65.+f, 25.70.Mn

  19. Characterisation of tryptic peptides of phosphorylated tyrosine hydroxylase by high-pressure liquid chromatography electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, Mark E. [Molecular Structure and Detection Group, School of Environmental and Life Sciences, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia); Dickson, Phillip W. [School of Biomedical Science, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia); Dunkley, Peter R. [School of Biomedical Science, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia); Nagy-Felsobuki, Ellak I. von [Molecular Structure and Detection Group, School of Environmental and Life Sciences, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia)]. E-mail: ellak@newcastle.edu.au

    2005-03-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) is involved in the biosynthesis of catecholamines and is activated by phosphorylation. Phosphorylated TH was analysed using high-pressure liquid chromatography combined with electrospray mass spectrometry (HPLC ESI-MS). Two mass scanning methods were used to detect tryptic cleavage products of TH. In the positive electrospray ionisation mode (ESI+), the peptides that contain the phosphorylation sites of TH were identified. In the alternative method, a phosphopeptide was detected in the negative electrospray ionisation mode (ESI-) using single ion monitoring in combination with a sequential ESI+ switching experiment. A raised baseline interfered with detection of hydrophilic peptides in ESI-, with the signal-to-noise ratio indicating that the method was operating near the limit of detection for a conventional electrospray source. The switching method improved the certainty of identification of phosphopeptides.

  20. Characterisation of tryptic peptides of phosphorylated tyrosine hydroxylase by high-pressure liquid chromatography electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) is involved in the biosynthesis of catecholamines and is activated by phosphorylation. Phosphorylated TH was analysed using high-pressure liquid chromatography combined with electrospray mass spectrometry (HPLC ESI-MS). Two mass scanning methods were used to detect tryptic cleavage products of TH. In the positive electrospray ionisation mode (ESI+), the peptides that contain the phosphorylation sites of TH were identified. In the alternative method, a phosphopeptide was detected in the negative electrospray ionisation mode (ESI-) using single ion monitoring in combination with a sequential ESI+ switching experiment. A raised baseline interfered with detection of hydrophilic peptides in ESI-, with the signal-to-noise ratio indicating that the method was operating near the limit of detection for a conventional electrospray source. The switching method improved the certainty of identification of phosphopeptides

  1. Purification of Peptide Components including Melittin from Bee Venom using gel filtration chromatography and propionic acid/urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Chon Choi

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : This study was conducted to carry out Purification of Melittin and other peptide components from Bee Venom using gel filtration chromatography and propionic acid/urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis Methods : Melittin and other peptide components were separated from bee venom by using gel filtration chromatography on Sephadex G-50 column in 0.05M ammonium acetate buffer. Results : Melittin and other peptide components were separated from bee venom by using gel filtration chromatography on Sephadex G-50 column in 0.05M ammonium acetate buffer. The fractions obtained from gel filtration chromatography was analyzed by using SDS-PAGE and propionic acid/urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The melittin obtained from the gel filtration contained residual amount of phospholipase A2 and a protein with molecular weight of 6,000. The contaminating proteins were removed by the second gel filtration chromatography. Conclusion : Gel filtration chromatography and propionic acid/urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis are useful to separate peptide components including melittin from bee venom.

  2. Purification and identification of endogenous antioxidant and ACE-inhibitory peptides from donkey milk by multidimensional liquid chromatography and nanoHPLC-high resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenezini Chiozzi, Riccardo; Capriotti, Anna Laura; Cavaliere, Chiara; La Barbera, Giorgia; Piovesana, Susy; Samperi, Roberto; Laganà, Aldo

    2016-08-01

    Donkey milk is a valuable product for the food industry due to its nutraceutical, nutritional, and functional properties. In this work, the endogenous peptides from donkey milk were investigated for their antioxidant and ACE-inhibitory activities, combining a two-dimensional peptide fractionation strategy with high-resolution mass spectrometry, bioinformatics analysis, and in vitro assays. After extraction, the endogenous peptides were fractionated twice, first by polymeric reversed phase and then by hydrophilic interaction chromatography. Fractions were screened for the investigated bioactivities and only the most active ones were finally analyzed by nanoRP-HPLC-MS/MS; this approach allowed to reduce the total number of possible bioactive sequences. Results were further mined by in silico analysis using PeptideRanker, BioPep, and PepBank, which provided a bioactivity score to the identified peptides and matched sequences to known bioactive peptides, in order to select candidates for chemical synthesis. Thus, five peptides were prepared and then compared to the natural occurring ones, checking their retention times and fragmentation patterns in donkey milk alone and in spiked donkey milk samples. Pure peptide standards were finally in vitro tested for the specific bioactivity. In this way, two novel endogenous antioxidant peptides, namely EWFTFLKEAGQGAKDMWR and GQGAKDMWR, and two ACE-inhibitory peptides, namely REWFTFLK and MPFLKSPIVPF, were successfully validated from donkey milk. Graphical Abstract Analytical workflow for purification and identification of bioactive peptides from donkey milk sample. PMID:27325462

  3. Development of bio-analytical methods for the quantitative and qualitative analysis of labelled peptides and proteins via hyphenation of chromatography and mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Holste, Angela Sarah

    2014-01-01

    This PhD thesis was a Cotutelle between the Université de Pau et des Pays de l’Adour (UPPA) in Pau, France and the Christian-Albrechts University (CAU) in Kiel, Germany. In the course of this international collaboration, bio-analytical methods for the quantitative and qualitative analysis of labelled peptides and proteins were developed, which were based on the hyphenation of chromatography with mass spectrometry. Peptides and protein digests were lanthanide labelled using DOTA-based comp...

  4. Almost Periodic Time Scales and Almost Periodic Functions on Time Scales

    OpenAIRE

    Yongkun Li; Bing Li

    2015-01-01

    We propose some new concepts of almost periodic time scales and almost periodic functions on time scales and give some basic properties of these new types of almost periodic time scales and almost periodic functions on time scales. We also give some comments on a recent paper by Wang and Agarwal (2014) concerning a new almost periodic time scale.

  5. Peptide sequencing and characterization of post-translational modifications by enhanced ion-charging and liquid chromatography electron-transfer dissociation tandem mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Frank; Giessing, Anders; Ingrell, Christian R; Jensen, Ole N

    2007-01-01

    We have tested the effect of m-nitrobenzyl alcohol (m-NBA) as a method to increase the average charge state of protonated gas-phase molecular ions generated by ESI from tryptic peptides and phosphopeptides. Various concentrations of m-NBA were added to the mobile phases of a liquid chromatography...... Mascot score (24 units) than doubly charged peptides. m-NBA also increased the average charge state of phosphopeptides by up to 0.5 charge unit. The ease of implementation and the analytical benefits of charge enhancement of tryptic peptides by addition of m-NBA to the LC solvents suggest the general...

  6. Sequential enrichment of singly- and multiply-phosphorylated peptides with zwitterionic hydrophilic interaction chromatography material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Qianying; Yang, Kaiya; Xue, Xingya; Li, Xiuling; Guo, Zhimou; Shen, Aijin; Ke, Yanxiong; Lan, Minbo; Liang, Xinmiao

    2015-09-25

    An interesting and novel method for the selective and sequential enrichment of singly- and multiply-phosphorylated peptides with a zwitterionic material "Click TE-Cys" is presented. Retention mechanisms between phosphopeptides and Click TE-Cys are systematically investigated by checking the influence of acetonitrile content, pH value, and buffer concentration on the retention of phosphopeptides. Both hydrophilic interaction and electrostatic interaction are involved in retention between phosphopeptides and Click TE-Cys. Based on these results, an optimized method is established for selective enrichment of phosphopeptides using Click TE-Cys. This method not only exhibits high selectivity for phosphopeptides, but also fractionates singly- and multiply-phosphorylated peptides into two fractions. This method was evaluated using relatively complex samples, including peptide mixtures of α-casein and bovine serum albumin (BSA) at a molar ratio of 1:10 and skim milk. This efficient and optimized protocol has great potential for enriching multiply-phosphorylated peptides and could be a valuable tool for specific enrichment of phosphopeptides in phosphoproteome analysis. PMID:26298604

  7. Peptides quantification by liquid chromatography with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization and selected reaction monitoring detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesur, Antoine; Varesio, Emmanuel; Domon, Bruno; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2012-10-01

    We present a novel analytical platform for peptides quantitative assays in biological matrices based on microscale liquid chromatography fractionation and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric detection using the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. The MALDI source was equipped with a high frequency Nd:YAG laser (1000 Hz) and mounted on a triple quadrupole/linear ion trap mass spectrometer (MALDI-QqQ(LIT)). Compared to conventional LC-ESI-SRM/MS, the separated analytes are "time-frozen" onto the MALDI plate in fractions, and navigation through the LC chromatogram makes it possible to perform SRM experiments as well as enhanced product ion spectra acquisition for confirmatory analyses without time constraints. The LC spots were analyzed using different rastering speeds ranging from 0.25 to 4 mm/sec with the shortest analysis time of 425 ms/spot. Since the LC runs can be multiplexed and do not need a comprehensive investigation, the present platform offers a valuable alternative to LC-ESI-SRM/MS for high throughput proteomic analyses. In addition, the derivatization of the N-terminal α-amino group by sulfonation was found to be key for the fragmentation of singly charged peptides under low collision energy regime. Under such conditions, y-ion series were observed in the MS/MS spectra, and thus the design of SRM experiments was greatly simplified. The quantitative performance of the platform was compared to that of LC-ESI-SRM/MS by spiking yeast tryptic peptides in human plasma digests. Both platforms exhibited similar sensitivities, accuracy (within ±20%) and precision (under 20%) in the relative quantification mode. As a proof of principle, the relative and absolute quantification of proteins associated with glycolysis, glyoxylate and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycles over a growth time course of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on glucose media was successfully performed using isotopic dilution. PMID:22897511

  8. Highly efficient and selective enrichment of peptide subsets combining fluorous chemistry with reversed-phase chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    Ying, Wantao; Perlman, David H.; Li, Lei(Beijing Institute of Petrochemical Technology, Beijing, 102617, People's Republic of China); Théberge, Roger; Costello, Catherine E; McComb, Mark E.

    2009-01-01

    The selective capture of target peptides poses a great challenge to modern chemists and biologists, especially when enriching them from proteome samples possessing extremes in concentration dynamic range and sequence diversity. While approaches based on traditional techniques such as biotin-avidin pairing offer versatile tools to design strategies for selective enrichment, problems are still encountered due to sample loss or poor selectivity of enrichment. Here we show that the recently intro...

  9. Peptide mapping of 125I-labelled membrane protein of influenza viruses by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The resolution potential of reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for peptide analysis of hydrophobic viral membranes has been investigated, using as a model the membrane (M) protein of influenza virus. Proteolytic digests of 125I-labelled M protein CNBr fragments, extracted from radioiodinated whole virus, have been separated on a uBondapak C18 column with an isopropanol or acetonitrile solvent system. Peptide mapping of trypsin digests of M protein from A/PR/8/34 (H1N1) and A/chicken/Germany/N/49 (H10N7) viruses was identical, whereas Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease digests showed minor differences in at least two peptides. The results also show that HPLC is a powerful tool for the separation of proteolytic digests of viral proteins, since the peptide maps are highly reproducible and recovery was always greater than 85%. (Auth.)

  10. Stochastic dynamic equations on general time scales

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Bohner; Olexandr M. Stanzhytskyi; Anastasiia O. Bratochkina

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we construct stochastic integral and stochastic differential equations on general time scales. We call these equations stochastic dynamic equations. We provide the existence and uniqueness theorem for solutions of stochastic dynamic equations. The crucial tool of our construction is a result about a connection between the time scales Lebesgue integral and the Lebesgue integral in the common sense.

  11. Kalman plus weights: a time scale algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhall, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    KPW is a time scale algorithm that combines Kalman filtering with the basic time scale equation (BTSE). A single Kalman filter that estimates all clocks simultaneously is used to generate the BTSE frequency estimates, while the BTSE weights are inversely proportional to the white FM variances of the clocks. Results from simulated clock ensembles are compared to previous simulation results from other algorithms.

  12. Further investigation of a peptide extraction method with mesoporous silica using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yan; Wu, Dapeng; Guan, Yafeng

    2016-06-01

    Mobil Composition of Matter No. 41 (MCM-41) was the most frequently used mesoporous silica material to extract peptides from complex biological samples. However, there were confusing extraction conditions and large extraction efficiency variance among related reports, which resulted from unclear understanding about the interaction between the material and peptides. In this study, the extraction mechanism was investigated with one set of tryptic peptides by using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. Generally, hydrophobic interaction and electrostatic attraction were two major driving forces for extraction of peptides, while electrostatic repulsion greatly weakened the interaction between the material and peptides with isoelectric points below the pH. With most peptides positively charged and MCM-41 slightly negatively charged, most efficient extraction was obtained at pH 3, and it was proved that electrostatic and hydrophobic interaction acted in synergy for extraction of all the peptides. A mixed solution of acetonitrile with buffers of high pH or ion strength was demonstrated to be favorable for elution, which performed much better than the commonly used eluate (mixture of acetonitrile with 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid). Finally, under optimum conditions, it was found that extraction efficiency of MCM-41 for protein digest and human serum was greatly improved. PMID:27059091

  13. The perchlorate anion is more effective than the trifluoroacetate anion as an ion-pairing reagent for reversed-phase chromatography of peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Shibue, M.; Mant, C.T.; Hodges, R.S.

    2005-01-01

    The addition of salts, specifically sodium perchlorate (NaClO4), to mobile phases at acidic pH as ion-pairing reagents for reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) has been generally overlooked. To demonstrate the potential of NaClO4 as an effective anionic ion-pairing reagent, we applied RP-HPLC in the presence of 0–100 mM sodium chloride (NaCl), sodium trifluoroacetate (NaTFA) or NaClO4 to two mixtures of synthetic 18-residue peptides: a mixture of peptides with the s...

  14. Determination of aromatic and sulfur-containing amino acids, peptides, and proteins using high-performance liquid chromatography with photolytic electrochemical detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dou, Lin; Krull, I.S. (Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (USA))

    1990-12-01

    Aromatic amino acids, sulfur-containing amino acids, peptides containing such constituents, and proteins can now be detected in high-performance liquid chromatography by the use of on-line, postcolumn, continuous photolytic derivatization with electrochemical (HPLC-h{nu}-EC) detection. The overall approach is a very simple, reproducible, rapid, and fully automatable approach for the determination of certain amino acids, peptides, and proteins with excellent selectivity, sensitivity, and linearities of response. Dual-electrode response ratios, lamp-on/lamp-off behavior, and chromatographic capacity factors all contribute to the enhanced selectivity of the overall HPLC-h{nu}-EC determination for these particular classes of bioorganics and biopolymers. The analytical figures of merit, chromatography detection, and method validation approaches have all be optimally derived and demonstrated reproducible. Applications of the basic methodology to real-world samples are demonstrated and validated.

  15. Characterization and quantitative amino acids analysis of analgesic peptides in cinobufacini injection by size exclusion chromatography, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry and gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xu; Si, Nan; Bo, Gao; Hu, Hao; Yang, Jian; Bian, Baolin; Zhao, Hai Yu; Wang, Hongjie

    2015-01-01

    Cinobufacini injection that comes from the water extract of Bufo bufo gargarizans Cantor skin is widely used for cancer treatment in China. Peptide is one of its major types of constituents, however the biological effects and content of this injection are little reported. In present study, the analgesic effect of peptides was determined and evaluated by in-vivo models. To characterize and quantitatively analyze these peptides, a reliable and efficient method combining size exclusion chromatography and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry with amino acid analysis was developed. The peptides presented as a series of analogs with similar molecular weights mostly ranging from 2 to 8 kDa. The amino acid analysis by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed to determine both free and combined amino acids (FAA and CAA) in cinobufacini injection. This method achieved good linearity (R(2) , 0.9909-0.9999) and low limit of detection and quantification. FAA and CAA samples were efficiently analyzed by modified Phenomenex EZ: faast procedure. For the sample analysis, the method showed good repeatability (relative standard deviation, RSD ≤ 10%). For most FAA and CAA the mean recoveries were >80% with RSD <10%. The GC-MS based method is useful for quality assurance of both FAA and CAA in cinobufacini injection. PMID:24924921

  16. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) fingerprints and primary structure identification of corn peptides by HPLC-diode array detection and HPLC-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Chi Wang; Hui He; Jiu-liang Zhang; Xing Li; Zhi-li Ma

    2016-01-01

    Corn peptides (CPs) are reported to have many biological functions, such as facilitating alcohol metabolism, antioxidation, antitumor, antihypertension, and hepatoprotection. To develop a method for quality control, the high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) system was applied. Twenty-eight common peaks were found in all the CPs of corn samples from Enshi, China, based on which, a fingerprinting chromatogram was established for use in quality control in future research. Subsequently, t...

  17. Peptides from two sanguinovorous leeches analyzed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometric detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hirudo nipponica Whitman and Poecilobdella manillensis Lesson fall into the family of Hirudinidae Whitman, both of them are sanguinovorous leeches and used a anticoagulant medicines in China. Their medicinal parts are the dried bodies. However, the peptides in the dried body of the two leeches have not been very clear up to now. Objective: To analyze the peptides from two sanguinovorous leeches, H. nipponica and P. manillensis. Materials and Methods: In this article it is reported that the peptides were obtained from anticoagulant active extracted parts of dried bodies of the two leeches and their molecular weights were analyzed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry mass spectrometric detector online. Results: Three peptide components were identified from H. nipponica with their molecular weight separately 14998, 15988, and 15956, six peptide components were identified from P. manillensis with molecular weight 9590, 13642, 14998, 17631, 15988, and 16567. Two of peptides from P. manillensis have the same molecular weight 14998 and 15988 as that in H. nipponica. Conclusion: And the two peptides are the main peaks in the base peak ion chromatogram because they occupied a large ratio of total base peak area. Hence the composition of the extracted active part of the two leeches are very close, difference is in that the extract of P. manillensis has more small peptide peaks, but the extract of H. nipponica has not. Furthermore, the tryptic digestion hydrolysates of the extracted active part of each sample were analyzed and the results showed that there were four peaks which only exist in P. manillensis, but not in Hirudo nipponia. They may be the identified peak between the two leeches. This work support the viewpoint that P. manillensis can be used as a medicinal leech as H. nipponia and these peptide components of dried bodies of the two species leeches are a

  18. Peptide profiling of Internet-obtained Cerebrolysin using high performance liquid chromatography - electrospray ionization ion trap and ultra high performance liquid chromatography - ion mobility - quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevaert, Bert; D'Hondt, Matthias; Bracke, Nathalie; Yao, Han; Wynendaele, Evelien; Vissers, Johannes Petrus Cornelis; De Cecco, Martin; Claereboudt, Jan; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2015-09-01

    Cerebrolysin, a parenteral peptide preparation produced by controlled digestion of porcine brain proteins, is an approved nootropic medicine in some countries. However, it is also easily and globally available on the Internet. Nevertheless, until now, its exact chemical composition was unknown. Using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to ion trap and ultra high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) coupled to quadrupole-ion mobility-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (Q-IM-TOF MS), combined with UniProt pig protein database search and PEAKS de novo sequencing, we identified 638 unique peptides in an Internet-obtained Cerebrolysin sample. The main components in this sample originate from tubulin alpha- and beta-chain, actin, and myelin basic protein. No fragments of known neurotrophic factors like glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), neurotrophin nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) were found, suggesting that the activities reported in the literature are likely the result of new, hitherto unknown cryptic peptides with nootropic properties. PMID:26017115

  19. Separation of small molecular peptides with the same amino acid composition but different sequences by high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Peptidomics has emerged as a new discipline in recent years. Mass spectrometry (MS) is the most universal and efficient tool for structure identification of proteins and peptides. However,there is a limitation for the identification of peptides with the same amino acid composition but different se-quences because these peptides have identical mass spectra of molecular ions. This paper presents a high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS) method for the separation of small molecular peptides with the same amino acid composition but dif-ferent sequences. Two tripeptides of Gly-Ser-Phe and Gly-Phe-Ser were used as a model sample. The separation behavior has been investigated and the separation conditions have been optimized. Under the optimum conditions,good repeatability was achieved. The developed method could provide a helpful reference for the separation of other peptides with the same amino acid composition but different sequences in the study of proteomics and peptidomics.

  20. Structural Characterization of New Peptide Variants Produced by Cyanobacteria from the Brazilian Atlantic Coastal Forest Using Liquid Chromatography Coupled to Quadrupole Time-of-Flight Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Sanz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria from underexplored and extreme habitats are attracting increasing attention in the search for new bioactive substances. However, cyanobacterial communities from tropical and subtropical regions are still largely unknown, especially with respect to metabolite production. Among the structurally diverse secondary metabolites produced by these organisms, peptides are by far the most frequently described structures. In this work, liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization coupled to high resolution quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry with positive ion detection was applied to study the peptide profile of a group of cyanobacteria isolated from the Southeastern Brazilian coastal forest. A total of 38 peptides belonging to three different families (anabaenopeptins, aeruginosins, and cyanopeptolins were detected in the extracts. Of the 38 peptides, 37 were detected here for the first time. New structural features were proposed based on mass accuracy data and isotopic patterns derived from full scan and MS/MS spectra. Interestingly, of the 40 surveyed strains only nine were confirmed to be peptide producers; all of these strains belonged to the order Nostocales (three Nostoc sp., two Desmonostoc sp. and four Brasilonema sp..

  1. Some Nonlinear Dynamic Inequalities on Time Scales

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wei Nian Li; Weihong Sheng

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate some nonlinear dynamic inequalities on time scales, which provide explicit bounds on unknown functions. The inequalities given here unify and extend some inequalities in (B G Pachpatte, On some new inequalities related to a certain inequality arising in the theory of differential equation, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 251 (2000) 736--751).

  2. Some Nonlinear Integral Inequalities on Time Scales

    OpenAIRE

    Li Wei Nian; Sheng Weihong

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate some nonlinear integral inequalities on time scales. Our results unify and extend some continuous inequalities and their corresponding discrete analogues. The theoretical results are illustrated by a simple example at the end of this paper.

  3. Some Nonlinear Integral Inequalities on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wei Nian

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to investigate some nonlinear integral inequalities on time scales. Our results unify and extend some continuous inequalities and their corresponding discrete analogues. The theoretical results are illustrated by a simple example at the end of this paper.

  4. Multiple time scales is well named.

    OpenAIRE

    Gibbon, J.

    1999-01-01

    Staddon and Higa's article is a critique of scalar expectancy theory, and a proposed alternative, multiple time scales. The critique is generally flawed, both factually and logically. The alternative is bewildering in its flexibility, opaque in its quantitative description, and never addressed to real data.

  5. Short communication: Identification of iron-binding peptides from whey protein hydrolysates using iron (III)-immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography and reversed phase-HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Huerta, Elvia; Martínez Maqueda, Daniel; de la Hoz, Lucia; da Silva, Vera S Nunes; Pacheco, Maria Teresa Bertoldo; Amigo, Lourdes; Recio, Isidra

    2016-01-01

    Peptides with iron-binding capacity obtained by hydrolysis of whey protein with Alcalase (Novozymes, Araucaria, PR, Brazil), pancreatin, and Flavourzyme (Novozymes) were identified. Hydrolysates were subjected to iron (III)-immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography, and the bound peptides were sequenced by mass spectrometry. Regardless of the enzyme used, the domains f(42-59) and f(125-137) from β-lactoglobulin enclosed most of identified peptides. This trend was less pronounced in the case of peptides derived from α-lactalbumin, with sequences deriving from diverse regions. Iron-bound peptides exhibited common structural characteristics, such as an abundance of Asp, Glu, and Pro, as revealed by mass spectrometry and AA analysis. In conclusion, this characterization of iron-binding peptides helps clarify the relationship between peptide structure and iron-chelating activity and supports the promising role of whey protein hydrolysates as functional ingredients in iron supplementation treatments. PMID:26601589

  6. Identification of bradykinin: related peptides from Phyllomedusa nordestina skin secretion using electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry after a single-step liquid chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Conceição

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Amphibian skin secretions are a source of potential new drugs with medical and biotechnological applications. Rich in peptides produced by holocrine-type serous glands in the integument, these secretions play different roles, either in the regulation of physiological skin functions or in the defense against predators or microorganisms. The aim of the present work was to identify novel peptides with bradykinin-like structure and/or activity present in the skin of Phyllomedusa nordestina. In order to achieve this goal, the crude skin secretion of this frog was pre-fractionated by solid phase extraction and separated by reversed-phase chromatography. The fractions were screened for low-molecular-mass peptides and sequenced by mass spectrometry. It was possible to identify three novel bradykinin-related peptides, namely: KPLWRL-NH2 (Pnor 3, RPLSWLPK (Pnor 5 and VPPKGVSM (Pnor 7 presenting vascular activities as assessed by intravital microscopy. Pnor 3 and Pnor 7 were able to induce vasodilation. On the other hand, Pnor 5 was a potent vasoconstrictor. These effects were reproduced by their synthetic analogues.

  7. Analysis of aspartyl peptide degradation products by high-performance liquid chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Boni, Silvia; Oberthür, Christine; Hamburger, Matthias; Scriba, Gerhard K E

    2004-01-01

    A reversed-phase HPLC method for the analysis of degradation products of the model aspartyl tripeptides Phe-Asp-GlyNH2 and Gly-Asp-PheNH2 after incubation at pH 2 and 10 was developed. Most of the compounds could be separated with a gradient of acetonitrile in water containing 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid. Resolution of the isomeric pairs L-Phe-alpha-L-Asp-GlyNH2/L-Phe-beta-L-Asp-GlyNH2 and L-Phe-alpha-D-Asp-GlyOH/L-Phe-beta-D-Asp-GlyOH was achieved with a gradient of acetonitrile in phosphate buffer, pH 5.0. Under acidic conditions the major degradation pathway was cleavage of the peptide backbone amide bonds yielding dipeptides and amino acids, C-terminal deamidation as well as formation of succidinimyl peptides. At alkaline pH both deamidation of the C-terminal amide as well as isomerization and concomitant enantiomerization of Asp were observed. The peaks were identified both by reference substances and by online electrospray mass spectrometry. The results were compared to a previous developed capillary electrophoresis method. Diastereomeric pairs ofpeptides that could not be separated by capillary electrophoresis were resolved by HPLC while the separation of corresponding pairs of alpha- and beta-Asp peptides was not always achieved by HPLC in contrast to capillary electrophoresis illustrating that both techniques can be complimentary in peptide analysis. PMID:14753775

  8. Time scales and structures of wave interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Kartashova, Elena

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we give a general account of Wave Interaction Theory which by now consists of two parts: kinetic wave turbulence theory (WTT), using a statistical description of wave interactions, and the D-model recently introduced in \\emph{Kartashova, PRE \\textbf{86}: 041129 (2012)} describing interactions of distinct modes. Applying time scale analysis to weakly nonlinear wave systems modeled by the focusing nonlinear Sch\\"{o}dinger equation, we give an overview of the structures appearing in Wave Interaction Theory, their time scales and characteristic times. We demonstrate that kinetic cascade and D-cascade are not competing processes but rather two processes taking place at different time scales, at different characteristic levels of nonlinearity and due to different physical mechanisms. Taking surface water waves as an example we show that energy cascades in this system occur at much faster characteristic times than those required by the kinetic WTT but can be described as D-cascades. As D-model has no s...

  9. Liquidity crises on different time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradi, Francesco; Zaccaria, Andrea; Pietronero, Luciano

    2015-12-01

    We present an empirical analysis of the microstructure of financial markets and, in particular, of the static and dynamic properties of liquidity. We find that on relatively large time scales (15 min) large price fluctuations are connected to the failure of the subtle mechanism of compensation between the flows of market and limit orders: in other words, the missed revelation of the latent order book breaks the dynamical equilibrium between the flows, triggering the large price jumps. On smaller time scales (30 s), instead, the static depletion of the limit order book is an indicator of an intrinsic fragility of the system, which is related to a strongly nonlinear enhancement of the response. In order to quantify this phenomenon we introduce a measure of the liquidity imbalance present in the book and we show that it is correlated to both the sign and the magnitude of the next price movement. These findings provide a quantitative definition of the effective liquidity, which proves to be strongly dependent on the considered time scales.

  10. Advancement in stationary phase for peptide separation helps in protein identification: application to atheroma plaque proteomics using nano-chip liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delporte, Cédric; Noyon, Caroline; Raynal, Pierre; Dufour, Damien; Nève, Jean; Abts, Frederic; Haex, Martin; Zouaoui Boudjeltia, Karim; Van Antwerpen, Pierre

    2015-03-13

    In the last decades, proteomics has largely progressed. Mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography (LC) are generally used in proteomics. These techniques enable proper separation of peptides and good identification and/or quantification of them. Later, nano-scaled liquid chromatography, improvements of mass spectrometry resolution and sensitivity brought huge advancements. Enhancements in chemistry of chromatographic columns also brought interesting results. In the present work, the potency of identification of proteins by different nano-chip columns was studied and compared with classical LC column. The present study was applied to cardiovascular field where proteomics has shown to be highly helpful in research of new biomarkers. Protein extracts from atheroma plaques were used and proteomics data were compared. Results show that fewer spectra were acquired by the mass spectrometer when nano-chip columns were used instead of the classical ones. However, approximately 40% more unique peptides were identified by the recently optimized chip named Polaris-HR-chip-3C18 column, and 20% more proteins were identified. This fact leads to the identification of more low-abundance proteins. Many of them are involved in atheroma plaque development such as apolipoproteins, ceruloplasmin, etc. In conclusion, present data shows that recent developments of nanoLC column chemistry and dimensions enabled the improved detection and identification of low-abundance proteins in atheroma plaques. Several of them are of major interest in the field of cardiovascular disease. PMID:25680550

  11. Short-time scale behavior modeling within long-time scale fuel cycle evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, M.; Tsvetkov, P. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M Univ., 3133 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Lucas, S. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Typically, short-time and long-time scales in nuclear energy system behavior are accounted for with entirely separate models. However, long-term changes in system characteristics do affect short-term transients through material variations. This paper presents an approach to consistently account for short-time scales within a nuclear system lifespan. The reported findings and developments are of significant importance for small modular reactors and other nuclear energy systems operating in autonomous modes. It is necessary to simulate the short time-scale kinetic behavior of the reactor as well as the long time-scale dynamics that occur with fuel burnup. The former is modeled using the point kinetics equations, while the latter is modeled by the Bateman equations. (authors)

  12. Deciphering Time Scale Hierarchy in Reaction Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahata, Yutaka; Maeda, Satoshi; Teramoto, Hiroshi; Horiyama, Takashi; Taketsugu, Tetsuya; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki

    2016-03-01

    Markovian dynamics on complex reaction networks are one of the most intriguing subjects in a wide range of research fields including chemical reactions, biological physics, and ecology. To represent the global kinetics from one node (corresponding to a basin on an energy landscape) to another requires information on multiple pathways that directly or indirectly connect these two nodes through the entire network. In this paper we present a scheme to extract a hierarchical set of global transition states (TSs) over a discrete-time Markov chain derived from first-order rate equations. The TSs can naturally take into account the multiple pathways connecting any pair of nodes. We also propose a new type of disconnectivity graph (DG) to capture the hierarchical organization of different time scales of reactions that can capture changes in the network due to changes in the time scale of observation. The crux is the introduction of the minimum conductance cut (MCC) in graph clustering, corresponding to the dividing surface across the network having the "smallest" transition probability between two disjoint subnetworks (superbasins on the energy landscape) in the network. We present a new combinatorial search algorithm for finding this MCC. We apply our method to a reaction network of Claisen rearrangement of allyl vinyl ether that consists of 23 nodes and 66 links (saddles on the energy landscape) connecting them. We compare the kinetic properties of our DG to those of the transition matrix of the rate equations and show that our graph can properly reveal the hierarchical organization of time scales in a network. PMID:26641663

  13. Quantum time scales in alpha tunneling

    CERN Document Server

    Kelkar, N G; Nowakowski, M

    2008-01-01

    The theoretical treatment of alpha decay by Gamow is revisited by investigating the quantum time scales in tunneling. The time spent by an alpha particle in front of the barrier and traversing it before escape is evaluated using microscopic alpha nucleus potentials. The half-life of a nucleus is shown to correspond to the time spent by the alpha knocking in front of the barrier. Calculations for medium and super heavy nuclei show that from a multitude of available tunneling time definitions, the transmission dwell time gives the bulk of the lifetime of the decaying state, in most cases.

  14. Characterization of post-translationally modified peptides by hydrophilic interaction and reverse phase liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Hernandez, Oswaldo; Quintanilla-Lopez, Jesus Eduardo; Lebron-Aguilar, Rosa; Sanz, Maria Luz; Moreno, F Javier

    2016-01-01

    This work explores the use of both hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) and reverse phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) for the separation and subsequent characterization of bovine caseinomacropeptide (CMP) phosphopeptides and O-glycopeptides using a quadrupole-time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometer with electrospray ionization. Two neutral, ethylene bridged hybrid (BEH) amide and polyhydroxyethyl aspartamide (PHEA), and a zwitterionic, sulfobetaine (ZIC), stationary phases were used for the HILIC mode, whilst an octadecylsilane (C18) stationary phase was employed for the RPLC separation. Overall, developed HILIC-QTOF method using the ZIC or BEH amide stationary phases resulted to be the most efficient methods to separate and characterize post-translationally modified (PTM) peptides without the need of any previous fractionation or derivatization step. The separation of phosphopeptides and differently sialylated O-glycopeptides in the ZIC stationary phase was dominated by an electrostatic repulsion interaction mechanism between the negatively charged phosphate groups or sialic acid moieties and the negatively charged terminal sulfonate group of the stationary phase, whereas the separation of either non-modified peptides or neutral O-glycopeptides both free of basic amino acids was based on a partitioning mechanism. In neutral amide columns, the separation was mainly dominated by hydrophilic partitioning, leading to a higher retention of the post-translationally modified peptides than the unmodified counterparts due to the hydrophilicity provided by the phosphate groups and/or O-glycans. As a consequence, HILIC-ESI-QTOF MS operating in the positive ion mode is a powerful tool for the characterization of underivatized O-glycopeptides and phosphopeptides. PMID:26278355

  15. Various Time-Scales of Relaxation

    CERN Document Server

    Ali-Akbari, M; Ebrahim, H; Shahkarami, L

    2016-01-01

    Via gauge-gravity duality, relaxation of far-from-equilibrium initial states in a strongly coupled gauge theory has been investigated. In the system we consider in this paper there are two ways where the state under study can deviate from its equilibrium: anisotropic pressure and time-dependent expectation value of a scalar operator with \\Delta=2. In the gravity theory, this system corresponds to Einstein's general relativity with a non-trivial metric, including the anisotropy function, coupled to a massive scalar matter field. We study the effect of different initial configurations for scalar field and anisotropy function on physical processes such as thermalization, i.e. time evolution of event horizon, equilibration of the expectation value of scalar operator and isotropization. We also discuss time ordering of these time-scales.

  16. Time-scaling properties of city fires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → AnShan city fire sequence is featured by mono- and multi-fractal dynamics. → The monofractal scaling exponent α ∼ 1.0 indicates high degree of time-clusterization, decreasing with the loss. → The city-fire process is highly heterogeneous. → The appearance of the daily oscillation could be connected with the daily cycle of the anthropic activity. - Abstract: Time-scaling scale-invariant approaches have been used to feature the temporal distribution of city fire sequences recorded in the city of AnShan (China). Our findings reveal that the point process of the city fires is a fractal process with a high degree of time-clusterization of the events. The time-clustering phenomenon is visible for timescales larger than few hours. Furthermore, the fire process tends to be less time-clusterized with the increase of the loss. The application of multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis to the series of city-fires has revealed that the sequence is dynamically heterogeneous due to the different long-range time correlation properties for small and large interevent fluctuations.

  17. Compensation of gradient related effects when using capillary liquid chromatography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the absolute quantification of phosphorylated peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pröfrock, Daniel; Prange, Andreas

    2009-09-25

    The application of reversed phase liquid chromatography (RP-LC) hyphenated to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for the accurate quantification of bio-molecules via covalently bound hetero atoms such as phosphorus is restricted, due to the known effects of increasing amounts of organic solvents on the ionization behavior of certain elements. An approach for the compensation of variations in the elemental response, due to changes in the solvent composition during the RP gradient separation of phosphorylated peptides is described, which includes the application of a second, matched reversed gradient, that is mixed post-column with the RP column outflow before entering the LC-ICP-MS interface. The experimental design allows the application of gradient separations, while the element-specific detection is carried out under isocratic conditions with a constant organic solvent intake into the plasma. A constant elemental response is a general pre-requisite for the application of ICP-MS for the absolute quantification of peptides via their hetero atom content, especially when no corresponding high purity standards are available or natural mono-isotopic hetero element tags are utilized. As complementary technique LC-electrospray ionization linear ion trap mass spectrometry (ESI-QTRAP-MS) has been used for peptide identification and to elucidate their phosphorus stoichiometry. Highly reproducible separations have been obtained with retention time and peak area RSDs of 0.05% and 7.6% (n=6), respectively. Detection limits for phosphorus of 6 microg L(-1) (6 pg absolute), have been realized, which corresponds to approximately 200 fmol of an average molecular weight, singly phosphorylated peptide. In addition an automatic routine for flow injection analysis (FIA) at the end of each chromatographic separation has been developed, to calibrate each chromatographic separation, which allows absolute quantification of the separated species, whenever their tag

  18. A liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometric method on in vitro nerve agents poisoning characterization and reactivator efficacy evaluation by determination of specific peptide adducts in acetylcholinesterase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Long; Chen, Jia; Xu, Bin; Guo, Lei; Xie, Yan; Tang, Jijun; Xie, Jianwei

    2016-06-10

    The terroristic availability of highly toxic nerve agents (NAs) highlights the necessity for a deep understanding of their toxicities and effective medical treatments. A liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for a characterization of the NAs poisoning and an evaluation on the efficacy of reactivators in in vitro was developed for the first time. After exposure to sarin or VX and pepsin digestion, the specific peptides of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in a purified status, i.e. undecapeptide "GESAGAASVGM" in free, unaged, or aged status was identified and quantified. A key termination procedure is focused to make the reaction system "frozen" and precisely "capture" the poisoning, aging and spontaneous reactivation status of AChE, and the abundance of such specific peptides can thus be simultaneously measured. In our established method, as low as 0.72% and 0.84% inhibition level of AChE induced by 0.5nM sarin and VX can be detected from the measurement of peptide adducts, which benefits a confirmation of NAs exposure, especially at extremely low levels. Comparing with conventional colorimetric Ellman assays, our method provides not only enzyme activity and inhibition rate, but also the precise poisoning status of NAs exposed AChE. Based on the full information provided by this method, the efficacy of reactivators, such as HI-6, obidoxime and pralidoxime, in the typical treatment of NAs poisoned AChE in in vitro was further evaluated. Our results showed that this method is a promising tool for the characterization of NAs poisoning and the evaluation of reactivator efficacy. PMID:27179675

  19. Solution-phase-peptide synthesis via the Group-Assisted Purification (GAP) chemistry without using chromatography and recrystallization†

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Jianbin; An, Guanghui; Lin, Siqi; Xie, Jianbo; Zhou, Wei; Sun, Hao; Pan, Yi; Li, Guigen

    2014-01-01

    The solution phase synthesis of N-protected amino acids and peptides has been achieved through the Group-Assisted Purification (GAP) chemistry by avoiding disadvantages of other methods in regard to the difficult scale-up, expenses of solid and soluble polymers, etc. The GAP synthesis can reduce the use of solvents, silica gels, energy and manpower. In addition, the GAP auxiliary can be conveniently recovered for re-use and is of environmentally friendly benign by substantially reducing waste...

  20. Homoclinical Structure of Dynamic Equations on Time Scales

    OpenAIRE

    Fen, Mehmet Onur

    2016-01-01

    Homoclinic and heteroclinic motions in dynamics equations on time scales is investigated. The utilized time scale is a specific one such that it is a union of disjoint compact intervals. A numerical example that supports the theoretical results is presented.

  1. Solution-phase-peptide synthesis via the group-assisted purification (GAP) chemistry without using chromatography and recrystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianbin; An, Guanghui; Lin, Siqi; Xie, Jianbo; Zhou, Wei; Sun, Hao; Pan, Yi; Li, Guigen

    2014-02-01

    The solution phase synthesis of N-protected amino acids and peptides has been achieved through the Group-Assisted Purification (GAP) chemistry by avoiding disadvantages of other methods in regard to the difficult scale-up, expenses of solid and soluble polymers, etc. The GAP synthesis can reduce the use of solvents, silica gels, energy and manpower. In addition, the GAP auxiliary can be conveniently recovered for re-use and is environmentally friendly and benign, and substantially reduces waste production in academic labs and industry. PMID:24336500

  2. Absolute quantification of Pru av 2 in sweet cherry fruit by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry with the use of a stable isotope-labelled peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippoushi, Katsunari; Sasanuma, Motoe; Oike, Hideaki; Kobori, Masuko; Maeda-Yamamoto, Mari

    2016-08-01

    Pru av 2, a pathogenesis-related (PR) protein present in the sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) fruit, is the principal allergen of cherry and one of the chief causes of pollen food syndrome (oral allergy syndrome). In this study, a quantitative assay for this protein was developed with the use of the protein absolute quantification (AQUA) method, which consists of liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) employing TGC[CAM]STDASGK[(13)C6,(15)N2], a stable isotope-labelled internal standard (SIIS) peptide. This assay gave a linear relationship (r(2)>0.99) in a concentration range (2.3-600fmol/μL), and the overall coefficient of variation (CV) for multiple tests was 14.6%. Thus, the contents of this allergenic protein in sweet cherry products could be determined using this assay. This assay should be valuable for allergological investigations of Pru av 2 in sweet cherry and detection of protein contamination in foods. PMID:26988485

  3. Increased Depth and Breadth of Plasma Protein Quantitation via Two-Dimensional Liquid Chromatography/Multiple Reaction Monitoring-Mass Spectrometry with Labeled Peptide Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percy, Andrew J; Yang, Juncong; Chambers, Andrew G; Borchers, Christoph H

    2016-01-01

    Absolute quantitative strategies are emerging as a powerful and preferable means of deriving concentrations in biological samples for systems biology applications. Method development is driven by the need to establish new-and validate current-protein biomarkers of high-to-low abundance for clinical utility. In this chapter, we describe a methodology involving two-dimensional (2D) reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC), operated under alkaline and acidic pH conditions, combined with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM)-mass spectrometry (MS) (also called selected reaction monitoring (SRM)-MS) and a complex mixture of stable isotope-labeled standard (SIS) peptides, to quantify a broad and diverse panel of 253 proteins in human blood plasma. The quantitation range spans 8 orders of magnitude-from 15 mg/mL (for vitamin D-binding protein) to 450 pg/mL (for protein S100-B)-and includes 31 low-abundance proteins (defined as being application of our recently developed software tool-Qualis-SIS-for protein quantitation (via regression analysis of standard curves) and quality assessment of the resulting data. Overall, this chapter provides the blueprint for the replication of this quantitative proteomic method by proteomic scientists of all skill levels. PMID:26867735

  4. Multiple Time Scales and Longitudinal Measurements in Event History Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Danardono,

    2005-01-01

    A general time-to-event data analysis known as event history analysis is considered. The focus is on the analysis of time-to-event data using Cox's regression model when the time to the event may be measured from different origins giving several observable time scales and when longitudinal measurements are involved. For the multiple time scales problem, procedures to choose a basic time scale in Cox's regression model are proposed. The connections between piecewise constant hazards, time-depe...

  5. Synchronization in complex systems with multiple time scales

    OpenAIRE

    Bergner, André

    2011-01-01

    In the present work synchronization phenomena in complex dynamical systems exhibiting multiple time scales have been analyzed. Multiple time scales can be active in different manners. Three different systems have been analyzed with different methods from data analysis. The first system studied is a large heterogenous network of bursting neurons, that is a system with two predominant time scales, the fast firing of action potentials (spikes) and the burst of repetitive spikes followed by a qui...

  6. Time scales in Galveston Bay: An unsteady estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayson, Matthew D.; Gross, Edward S.; Hetland, Robert D.; Fringer, Oliver B.

    2016-04-01

    Estuarine time scales including the turnover, particle e-folding time, the age (calculated with a passive tracer), and residence time (calculated with Lagrangian particles) were computed using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model of Galveston Bay, a low-flow, partially stratified estuary. Time scales were computed during a time period when river flow varied by several orders of magnitude and all time scales therefore exhibited significant temporal variability because of the unsteadiness of the system. The spatial distributions of age and residence time were qualitatively similar and increased from 15 days in a shipping channel to >45 days in the upper estuary. Volume-averaged age and residence time decreased during high-flow conditions. Bulk time scales, including the freshwater and salinity turnover times, were far more variable due to the changing river discharge and salt flux through the estuary mouth. A criterion for calculating a suitable averaging time is discussed to satisfy a steady state assumption and to estimate a more representative bulk time scale. When scaled with a freshwater advective time, all time scales were approximately equal to the advective time scale during high-flow conditions and many times higher during low-flow conditions. The mean age, Lagrangian residence, and flushing times exhibited a relationship that was weakly dependent on the freshwater advective time scale demonstrating predictability even in an unsteady, realistic estuary.

  7. A new generalization of Ostrowski type inequality on time scales

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Wenjun

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we first extend a generalization of Ostrowski type inequality on time scales for functions whose derivatives are bounded and then unify corresponding continuous and discrete versions. We also point out some particular integral type inequalities on time scales as special cases.

  8. Time scales of supercooled water and implications for reversible polyamorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmer, David T.; Chandler, David

    2015-09-01

    Deeply supercooled water exhibits complex dynamics with large density fluctuations, ice coarsening and characteristic time scales extending from picoseconds to milliseconds. Here, we discuss implications of these time scales as they pertain to two-phase coexistence and to molecular simulations of supercooled water. Specifically, we argue that it is possible to discount liquid-liquid criticality because the time scales imply that correlation lengths for such behavior would be bounded by no more than a few nanometers. Similarly, it is possible to discount two-liquid coexistence because the time scales imply a bounded interfacial free energy that cannot grow in proportion to a macroscopic surface area. From time scales alone, therefore, we see that coexisting domains of differing density in supercooled water can be no more than nano-scale transient fluctuations.

  9. Temperature dependence of fluctuation time scales in spin glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kenning, Gregory G.; Bowen, J.; Sibani, Paolo;

    2010-01-01

    Using a series of fast cooling protocols we have probed aging effects in the spin glass state as a function of temperature. Analyzing the logarithmic decay found at very long time scales within a simple phenomenological barrier model, leads to the extraction of the fluctuation time scale of the s......-aging behavior in scaling aged TRM decay curves, as recently discussed theoretically~\\cite{Sibani09}.......Using a series of fast cooling protocols we have probed aging effects in the spin glass state as a function of temperature. Analyzing the logarithmic decay found at very long time scales within a simple phenomenological barrier model, leads to the extraction of the fluctuation time scale of the...... system at a particular temperature. This is the smallest dynamical time-scale, defining a lower-cut off in a hierarchical description of the dynamics.  We find that this fluctuation time scale, which is approximately equal to atomic spin fluctuation time scales near the transition temperature, follows a...

  10. AGN variability time scales and the discrete-event model

    OpenAIRE

    Favre, P; Courvoisier, T. J. -L.; Paltani, S.

    2005-01-01

    We analyse the ultraviolet variability time scales in a sample of 15 Type 1 Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) observed by IUE. Using a structure function analysis, we demonstrate the existence in most objects of a maximum variability time scale of the order of 0.02-1.00 year. We do not find any significant dependence of these maximum variability time scales on the wavelength, but we observe a weak correlation with the average luminosity of the objects. We also observe in several objects the existe...

  11. Phase synchronization of coupled chaotic multiple time scales systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The brushless dc motor (BLDCM) with multi-time scales is an electric machine. By coupled BLDCM, it is discovered that chaotic routes of the uncoupled systems influence synchronous result of coupled identical and nonidentical chaotic systems. Another multi-time scales form, Hindmarsh-Rose (HR) neurons, when the chaotic parameter is selected only in the range of the period-doubling route to chaos, phase synchronization can be predicted via Laypunov exponent. Finally, Laypunov exponent however cannot be used as a criterion for phase synchronization of coupled chaotic systems with either single or multi-time scales in our study

  12. Lyapunov functions for linear nonautonomous dynamical equations on time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zmorzynska Alexandra

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The existence of a Lyapunov function is established following a method of Yoshizawa for the uniform exponential asymptotic stability of the zero solution of a nonautonomous linear dynamical equation on a time scale with uniformly bounded graininess.

  13. A remark for dynamic equations on time scales

    OpenAIRE

    Akhmet, Marat; TURAN, Mehmet

    2010-01-01

    We give a proposal to generalize the concept of the differential equations on time scales, such that they can be more appropriate for the analysis of real world problems, and give more opportunities to increase the theoretical depth of investigation.

  14. BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEM TO DYNAMIC EQUATION ON TIME SCALE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we consider a nonlinear first-order boundary value problem on a time scale. The existence results of three positive solutions are obtained using fixed point theorems. Finally,examples are presented to illustrate the main results.

  15. Hydrodynamic Time Scales and Temporal Structure in GRBs

    OpenAIRE

    Sari, Re'em; Piran, Tsvi

    1995-01-01

    We calculate the hydrodynamic time scales for a spherical ultra-relativistic shell that is decelerated by the ISM and discuss the possible relations between these time scales and the observed temporal structure in $\\gamma$-ray bursts. We suggest that the bursts' duration is related to the deceleration time, the variability is related to the ISM inhomogeneities and precursors are related to internal shocks within the shell. Good agreement can be achieved for these quantities with reasonable, n...

  16. Enhanced sampling development for accessing long time scale protein dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Pierce, Levi C. T.

    2012-01-01

    Computational modeling has played a great role in solving many questions in biochemical and biomedical research. However, many biologically relevant processes occur on long time scales, which are inaccessible to conventional modeling techniques. Accessing these long time scales has been a great challenge for computational scientists, which has led to the development of numerous methods for enhanced sampling. In this work the well established accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) method is impl...

  17. Development of a capillary high performance liquid chromatography-ion trap-mass spectrometry method for the determination of VLIVP antihypertensive peptide in soybean crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchalska, Patrycja; García, M Concepción; Marina, M Luisa

    2014-04-18

    Soybean peptide VLIVP presents a very high antihypertensive activity (IC50 value 1.69μM), even higher than extensively studied IPP and VPP peptides from milk. Nevertheless, no much attention has been paid to this peptide and there is no method enabling its determination in soybeans. The aim of this work was the development of an analytical methodology for this purpose. A methodology consisting of the extraction of soybean proteins, their digestion with Protease P enzyme, their chromatographic separation using capillary-HPLC, and IT-MS detection was optimized. Protein extraction was performed by the use of high intensity focused ultrasounds to obtain a reduced extraction time. Optimization of chromatographic and mass spectrometry parameters enabled the separation of VLIVP peptide within just 7min and its sensitive detection. The analytical characteristics of the capillary-HPLC-IT-MS method were evaluated through the study of linearity, LOD, LOQ, study of the presence of matrix interferences, precision, and recovery. The method enabled to detect as low as 3.6ng of peptide and to determine as low as 12ng of peptide in 1g of soybean (as dry basis). Finally, the developed method was applied to the determination of the antihypertensive peptide VLIVP in different soybean varieties. The results showed the highest yield of VLIVP peptide in variety Mazowiecka II from Poland. PMID:24630980

  18. Time scales and species coexistence in chaotic flows

    CERN Document Server

    Galla, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Empirical observations in marine ecosystems have suggested a balance of biological and advection time scales as a possible explanation of species coexistence. To characterise this scenario, we measure the time to fixation in neutrally evolving populations in chaotic flows. Contrary to intuition the variation of time scales does not interpolate straightforwardly between the no-flow and well-mixed limits; instead we find that fixation is the slowest at intermediate Damk\\"ohler numbers, indicating long-lasting coexistence of species. Our analysis shows that this slowdown is due to spatial organisation on an increasingly modularised network. We also find that diffusion can either slow down or speed up fixation, depending on the relative time scales of flow and evolution.

  19. Wind power impacts and electricity storage - a time scale perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Karsten; Meibom, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Integrating large amounts of wind power in energy systems poses balancing challenges due to the variable and only partly predictable nature of wind. The challenges cover different time scales from intra-hour, intra-day/day-ahead to several days and seasonal level. Along with flexible electricity...... technologies – batteries, flow batteries, compressed air energy storage, electrolysis combined with fuel cells, and electric vehicles – are moreover categorised with respect to the time scales at which they are suited to support wind power integration. While all of these technologies are assessed suitable for...... demand options, various electricity storage technologies are being discussed as candidates for contributing to large-scale wind power integration and these also differ in terms of the time scales at which they can operate. In this paper, using the case of Western Denmark in 2025 with an expected 57% wind...

  20. Multiple time scales of fluvial processes—theory and applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Fluvial processes comprise water flow,sediment transport and bed evolution,which normally feature distinct time scales.The time scales of sediment transport and bed deformation relative to the flow essentially measure how fast sediment transport adapts to capacity region in line with local flow scenario and the bed deforms in comparison with the flow,which literally dictates if a capacity based and/or decoupled model is justified.This paper synthesizes the recently developed multiscale theory for sediment-l...

  1. Short—Time Scaling of Variable Ordering of OBDDs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龙望宁; 闵应骅; 等

    1997-01-01

    A short-time scaling criterion of variable ordering of OBDDs is proposed.By this criterion it is easy and fast to determine which one is better when several variable orders are given,especially when they differ 10% or more in resulted BDD size from each other.An adaptive variable order selection method,based on the short-time scaling criterion,is also presented.The experimental results show that this method is efficient and it makes the heuristic variable ordering methods more practical.

  2. Quantification of microRNA by DNA-Peptide Probe and Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry-Based Quasi-Targeted Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feifei; Yang, Ting; Chen, Yun

    2016-01-01

    The distorted and unique expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) in cancer makes them an attractive source of biomarkers. However, one of prerequisites for the application of miRNAs in clinical practice is to accurately profile their expression. Currently available assays normally require pre-enrichment, amplification, and labeling steps, and most of them are semiquantitative. In this study, we converted the signal of target miR-21 into reporter peptide by a DNA-peptide probe and the reporter peptide was ultimately quantified using LC-MS/MS-based targeted proteomics. Specifically, substrate peptide GDKAVLGVDPFR containing reporter peptide AVLGVDPFR and tryptic cleavage site (lysine at position 3) was first designed, followed by the conjugation with DNA sequence that was complementary to miR-21. The newly formed DNA-peptide probe was then hybridized with miR-21, which was biotinylated and attached to streptavidin agarose in advance. After trypsin digestion, the reporter peptide was released and monitored by a targeted proteomics assay. The obtained limit of quantification (LOQ) was 1 pM, and the detection dynamic range spanned ∼5 orders of magnitude. Using this assay, the developed quasi-targeted proteomics approach was applied to determine miR-21 level in breast cells and tissue samples. Finally, qRT-PCR was also performed for a comparison. This report grafted the strategy of targeted proteomics into miRNA quantification. PMID:26641144

  3. Single-molecule binding experiments on long time scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elenko, Mark P.; Szostak, Jack W.; van Oijen, Antoine M.

    2010-01-01

    We describe an approach for performing single-molecule binding experiments on time scales from hours to days, allowing for the observation of slower kinetics than have been previously investigated by single-molecule techniques. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy is used to image the b

  4. Exponential stability of dynamic equations on time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffoul Youssef N

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the exponential stability of the zero solution to a system of dynamic equations on time scales. We do this by defining appropriate Lyapunov-type functions and then formulate certain inequalities on these functions. Several examples are given.

  5. Holographic Brownian motion and time scales in strongly coupled plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Nata Atmaja; J. de Boer; M. Shigemori

    2010-01-01

    We study Brownian motion of a heavy quark in field theory plasma in the AdS/CFT setup and discuss the time scales characterizing the interaction between the Brownian particle and plasma constituents. In particular, the mean-free-path time is related to the connected 4-point function of the random fo

  6. Multiple time scales in the microwave ionization of Rydberg atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchleitner, A.; Delande, D.; Zakrzewski, J.; Mantegna, R.N.; Arndt, M.; Walther, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)]|[Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, 4 place Jussieu, Tour 12, 1 etage, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)]|[Instytut Fizyki Uniwersytetu Jagiellonskiego, ul. Reymonta 4, PL-30-059 Krakow (Poland)]|[Dipartimento di Energetica ed Applicazioni di Fisica, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, I-90128 Palermo (Italy)]|[Sektion Physik der Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    1995-11-20

    We investigate the time dependence of the ionization probability of Rydberg atoms driven by microwave fields, both numerically and experimentally. Our exact quantum results provide evidence for an algebraic decay law on suitably chosen time scales, a phenomenon that is considered to be the signature of nonhyperbolic scattering in unbounded classically chaotic motion. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital The} {ital American} {ital Physical} {ital Society}.

  7. Teaching about time by understanding Geologic Time Scales: The Geological Society of America Geologic Time Scale and its history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissman, J. W.; Walker, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    Geologic time scales, of one form or another, are used in most undergraduate geosciences courses, even including introductory physical geology or equivalent. However, satisfactory discussions of how geologic time scales originated, and how they have evolved to modern versions, are far too often conveniently or inconveniently left out of classroom discussions. Yet it is these kinds of discussions that have the potential of solidifying student appreciation of deep time and rates of geologic processes. We use the history and development of the Geological Society of America Geologic Time Scale, which reflects major developments in the fields of stratigraphy, geochronology, magnetic polarity stratigraphy, astrochronology, and chemostratigraphy, as a focus of how specific details of time scales can be used to teach about time. Advances in all of these fields have allowed many parts of the time scale to be calibrated to precisions approaching less than 0.05 %. Notable time intervals for which collaborative, multifaceted efforts have led to dramatic improvements in our understanding of the character and temporal resolution of key evolutionary events, in both marine and terrestrial environments, include the Triassic-Jurassic, Permo-Triassic, and Neoproterozoic-Phanerozoic boundaries (or transitions). Many of the details, but certainly not all, can be incorporated in discussions of how we know about geologic time in the classroom. For example, we presently understand that both the end-Permian ecological crisis and the biostratigraphic Permian-Triassic boundary, as calibrated by conodonts, lie within a ca. 700 ka long normal polarity chron. The reverse to normal polarity transition at the beginning of this chron is ca. 100 ka earlier than the ecological crisis and thus slightly older than the current estimate, based on high precision U-Pb zircon age determinations, of ca. 252.4 Ma for the Permian-Triassic boundary. This polarity transition occurred during the early part of

  8. Identification of bradykinin: related peptides from Phyllomedusa nordestina skin secretion using electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry after a single-step liquid chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    K Conceição; FM Bruni; JM Sciani; Konno, K; RL Melo; MM Antoniazzi; C Jared; M Lopes-Ferreira; DC Pimenta

    2009-01-01

    Amphibian skin secretions are a source of potential new drugs with medical and biotechnological applications. Rich in peptides produced by holocrine-type serous glands in the integument, these secretions play different roles, either in the regulation of physiological skin functions or in the defense against predators or microorganisms. The aim of the present work was to identify novel peptides with bradykinin-like structure and/or activity present in the skin of Phyllomedusa nordestina. In or...

  9. Mechanism and kinetics of peptide partitioning into membranes from all-atom simulations of thermostable peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Ulmschneider, Martin B.; Doux, Jacques P F; Killian, J. Antoinette; Smith, Jeremy C.; Ulmschneider, Jakob P.

    2010-01-01

    Partitioning properties of transmembrane (TM) polypeptide segments directly determine membrane protein folding, stability, and function, and their understanding is vital for rational design of membrane active peptides. However, direct determination of water-to-bilayer transfer of TM peptides has proved difficult. Experimentally, sufficiently hydrophobic peptides tend to aggregate, while atomistic computer simulations at physiological temperatures cannot yet reach the long time scales required...

  10. HMC algorithm with multiple time scale integration and mass preconditioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a variant of the HMC algorithm with mass preconditioning (Hasenbusch acceleration) and multiple time scale integration. We have tested this variant for standard Wilson fermions at β = 5.6 and at pion masses ranging from 380 MeV to 680 MeV. We show that in this situation its performance is comparable to the recently proposed HMC variant with domain decomposition as preconditioner. We give an update of the ''Berlin Wall'' figure, comparing the performance of our variant of the HMC algorithm to other published performance data. Advantages of the HMC algorithm with mass preconditioning and multiple time scale integration are that it is straightforward to implement and can be used in combination with a wide variety of lattice Dirac operators. (orig.)

  11. A time scale for electrical screening in pulsed gas discharges

    CERN Document Server

    Teunissen, Jannis; Ebert, Ute

    2014-01-01

    The Maxwell time is a typical time scale for the screening of an electric field in a medium with a given conductivity. We introduce a generalization of the Maxwell time that is valid for gas discharges: the \\emph{ionization screening time}, that takes the growth of the conductivity due to impact ionization into account. We present an analytic estimate for this time scale, assuming a planar geometry, and evaluate its accuracy by comparing with numerical simulations in 1D and 3D. We investigate the minimum plasma density required to prevent the growth of streamers with local field enhancement, and we discuss the effects of photoionization and electron detachment on ionization screening. Our results are especially relevant for the description of nanosecond pulsed discharges.

  12. Realization of a time-scale with an optical clock

    CERN Document Server

    Grebing, C; Dörscher, S; Häfner, S; Gerginov, V; Weyers, S; Lipphardt, B; Riehle, F; Sterr, U; Lisdat, C

    2015-01-01

    Optical clocks are not only powerful tools for prime fundamental research, but are also deemed for the re-definition of the SI base unit second as they surpass the performance of caesium atomic clocks in both accuracy and stability by more than an order of magnitude. However, an important obstacle in this transition has so far been the limited reliability of the optical clocks that made a continuous realization of a time-scale impractical. In this paper, we demonstrate how this dilemma can be resolved and that a time-scale based on an optical clock can be established that is superior to one based on even the best caesium fountain clocks. The paper also gives further proof of the international consistency of strontium lattice clocks on the $10^{-16}$ accuracy level, which is another prerequisite for a change in the definition of the second.

  13. Human learning: Power laws or multiple characteristic time scales?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gottfried Mayer-Kress

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The central proposal of A. Newell and Rosenbloom (1981 was that the power law is the ubiquitous law of learning. This proposition is discussed in the context of the key factors that led to the acceptance of the power law as the function of learning. We then outline the principles of an epigenetic landscape framework for considering the role of the characteristic time scales of learning and an approach to system identification of the processes of performance dynamics. In this view, the change of performance over time is the product of a superposition of characteristic exponential time scales that reflect the influence of different processes. This theoretical approach can reproduce the traditional power law of practice – within the experimental resolution of performance data sets - but we hypothesize that this function may prove to be a special and perhaps idealized case of learning.

  14. Terrestrial waters and sea level variations on interannual time scale

    OpenAIRE

    Llovel, W.; Becker, M.; Cazenave, A.; Jevrejeva, S.; R. Alkama; Decharme, B.; Douville, H.; Ablain, M.; Beckley, B

    2011-01-01

    On decadal to multidecadal time scales, thermal expansion of sea waters and land ice loss are the main contributors to sea level variations. However, modification of the terrestrial water cycle due to climate variability and direct anthropogenic forcing may also affect sea level. For the past decades, variations in land water storage and corresponding effects on sea level cannot be directly estimated from observations because these are almost unexistent at global continental scale. However, g...

  15. Isoperimetric problems on time scales with nabla derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida, Ricardo; Torres, Delfim F. M.

    2008-01-01

    We prove a necessary optimality condition for isoperimetric problems under nabla-differentiable curves. As a consequence, the recent results of [M.R. Caputo, A unified view of ostensibly disparate isoperimetric variational problems, Appl. Math. Lett. (2008), doi:10.1016/j.aml.2008.04.004], that put together seemingly dissimilar optimal control problems in economics and physics, are extended to a generic time scale. We end with an illustrative example of application of our main result to a dyn...

  16. Time-Scale Feature Extractions for Emotional Speech Characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Chetouani, Mohamed; Ammar, Mahdhaoui; Ringeval, Fabien

    2009-01-01

    Emotional speech characterization is an important issue for the understanding of interaction. This article discusses the time-scale analysis problem in feature extraction for emotional speech processing. We describe a computational framework for combining segmental and supra-segmental features for emotional speech detection. The statistical fusion is based on the estimation of local a posteriori class probabilities and the overall decision employs weighting factors directly related to the dur...

  17. MULTISCALE HOMOGENIZATION OF NONLINEAR HYPERBOLIC EQUATIONS WITH SEVERAL TIME SCALES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jean Louis Woukeng; David Dongo

    2011-01-01

    We study the multiscale homogenization of a nonlinear hyperbolic equation in a periodic setting. We obtain an accurate homogenization result. We also show that as the nonlinear term depends on the microscopic time variable, the global homogenized problem thus obtained is a system consisting of two hyperbolic equations. It is also shown that in spite of the presence of several time scales, the global homogenized problem is not a reiterated one.

  18. Variability Time Scales of Long and Short GRBs

    CERN Document Server

    Bhat, P N

    2013-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRB) are extremely energetic events and produce highly diverse light curves. Light curves are believed to be resulting from internal shocks reflecting the activities of the GRB central engine. Hence their temporal studies can potentially lead to an understanding of the GRB central engine and its evolution. The light curve variability time scale is an interesting parameter which most models attribute to a physical origin e.g., central engine activity, clumpy circum-burst medium, or relativistic turbulence. We develop a statistical method to estimate the GRB minimum variability time scale (MVT) for long and short GRBs detected by GBM. We find that the MVT of short bursts is distinctly shorter than that of long GRBs supporting the possibility of a more compact central engine of the former. We also find that MVT estimated by this method is consistent with the shortest rise time of the fitted pulses. Hence we use the fitted pulse rise times to study the evolution of burst variability time scale. ...

  19. Time scale interactions and the coevolution of humans and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivapalan, Murugesu; Blöschl, Günter

    2015-09-01

    We present a coevolutionary view of hydrologic systems, revolving around feedbacks between environmental and social processes operating across different time scales. This brings to the fore an emphasis on emergent phenomena in changing water systems, such as the levee effect, adaptation to change, system lock-in, and system collapse due to resource depletion. Changing human values play a key role in the emergence of these phenomena and should therefore be considered as internal to the system. Guidance is provided for the framing and modeling of these phenomena to test alternative hypotheses about how they arose. A plurality of coevolutionary models, from stylized to comprehensive system-of-system models, may assist strategic water management for long time scales through facilitating stakeholder participation, exploring the possibility space of alternative futures, and helping to synthesize the observed dynamics in a wide range of case studies. Future research opportunities lie in exploring emergent phenomena arising from time scale interactions through historical, comparative, and process studies of human-water feedbacks.

  20. Backpropagation and ordered derivatives in the time scales calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiffertt, John; Wunsch, Donald C

    2010-08-01

    Backpropagation is the most widely used neural network learning technique. It is based on the mathematical notion of an ordered derivative. In this paper, we present a formulation of ordered derivatives and the backpropagation training algorithm using the important emerging area of mathematics known as the time scales calculus. This calculus, with its potential for application to a wide variety of inter-disciplinary problems, is becoming a key area of mathematics. It is capable of unifying continuous and discrete analysis within one coherent theoretical framework. Using this calculus, we present here a generalization of backpropagation which is appropriate for cases beyond the specifically continuous or discrete. We develop a new multivariate chain rule of this calculus, define ordered derivatives on time scales, prove a key theorem about them, and derive the backpropagation weight update equations for a feedforward multilayer neural network architecture. By drawing together the time scales calculus and the area of neural network learning, we present the first connection of two major fields of research. PMID:20615808

  1. Surface charge measurements in barrier discharges on different time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Robert; Volkhausen, Christian; Benduhn, Johannes; Stollenwerk, Lars

    2015-09-01

    The deposition of surface charge in barrier discharges is a process that influences the ongoing discharge significantly. This contribution presents the measurement of absolute surface charge densities and their dynamics in a laterally extended setup. An electro-optic BSO crystal is used as dielectric. The absolute charge density on its surface is deduced from the change of polarisation of light passing the crystal. Using different temporal resolutions, the behavior of charge is investigated on three different time scales. The highest temporal resolution of the technique is in the order of hundreds of nanoseconds. Therefore it is possible for the first time to observe the charge deposition process during an active discharge. On the time scale of the applied voltage period (several microseconds), the conservation mechanisms of a lateral discharge pattern is investigated. For this, the influence of surface charge and metastable species in the volume is estimated. Further, the behavior of the surface charge spots on a variation of the external voltage and gas pressure is studied. Measurements on a time scale in the magnitude of seconds reveal charge decay and transport phenomena. This work was funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft.

  2. Improving the Geologic Time Scale (Jean Baptiste Lamarck Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradstein, Felix M.

    2010-05-01

    The Geologic Time Scale (GTS) provides the framework for the physical, chemical and biological processes on Earth. The time scale is the tool "par excellence" of the geological trade, and insight in its construction, strength, and limitations enhances its function and its utility. Earth scientists should understand how time scales are constructed and its myriad of physical and abstract data are calibrated, rather than merely using ages plucked from a convenient chart or card. Calibration to linear time of the succession of events recorded in the rocks on Earth has three components: (1) the standard stratigraphic divisions and their correlation in the global rock record, (2) the means of measuring linear time or elapsed durations from the rock record, and (3) the methods of effectively joining the two scales, the stratigraphic one and the linear one. Under the auspices of the International Commission on Stratigraphy (ICS), the international stratigraphic divisions and their correlative events are now largely standardized, especially using the GSSP (Global Stratigraphic Section and Point) concept. The means of measuring linear time or elapsed durations from the rock record are objectives in the EARTH TIME and GTS NEXT projects, that also are educating a new generation of GTS dedicated scientists. The U/Pb, Ar/Ar and orbital tuning methods are intercalibrated, and external error analysis improved. Existing Ar/Ar ages become almost 0.5% older, and U/Pb ages stratigraphically more realistic. The new Os/Re method has potential for directly dating more GSSP's and its correlative events. Such may reduce scaling uncertainty between the sedimentary levels of an age date and that of a stage boundary. Since 1981, six successive Phanerozoic GTS have been published, each new one achieving higher resolution and more users. The next GTS is scheduled for 2011/2012, with over 50 specialists taking part. New chapters include an expanded planetary time scale, sequence stratigraphy

  3. The Role of Time-Scales in Socio-hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blöschl, Günter; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2016-04-01

    Much of the interest in hydrological modeling in the past decades revolved around resolving spatial variability. With the rapid changes brought about by human impacts on the hydrologic cycle, there is now an increasing need to refocus on time dependency. We present a co-evolutionary view of hydrologic systems, in which every part of the system including human systems, co-evolve, albeit at different rates. The resulting coupled human-nature system is framed as a dynamical system, characterized by interactions of fast and slow time scales and feedbacks between environmental and social processes. This gives rise to emergent phenomena such as the levee effect, adaptation to change and system collapse due to resource depletion. Changing human values play a key role in the emergence of these phenomena and should therefore be considered as internal to the system in a dynamic way. The co-evolutionary approach differs from the traditional view of water resource systems analysis as it allows for path dependence, multiple equilibria, lock-in situations and emergent phenomena. The approach may assist strategic water management for long time scales through facilitating stakeholder participation, exploring the possibility space of alternative futures, and helping to synthesise the observed dynamics of different case studies. Future research opportunities include the study of how changes in human values are connected to human-water interactions, historical analyses of trajectories of system co-evolution in individual places and comparative analyses of contrasting human-water systems in different climate and socio-economic settings. Reference Sivapalan, M. and G. Blöschl (2015) Time scale interactions and the coevolution of humans and water. Water Resour. Res., 51, 6988-7022, doi:10.1002/2015WR017896.

  4. 色谱纯化和质谱分析法研究牛骨源咸味肽%Separation, Purification and Analysis of Salty Peptides Derived from Bovine Bone by Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李迎楠; 刘文营; 张顺亮; 成晓瑜

    2016-01-01

    以牛骨为研究对象,通过中空纤维超滤装置、Sephadex G-25凝胶色谱柱对相对分子质量小于5000的酶解产物进行初步分离,选用制备型及分析型高效液相色谱分析仪对咸味肽进行纯化、收集及分析。结果表明:收集得到牛骨源咸味肽为单一组分;用基质辅助激光解析电离-飞行时间质谱仪对咸味肽进行分析,得到其为相对分子质量均小于1000的短肽,其呈现咸味的物质质荷比值可能为679.5109。%The enzymatic hydrolysate of bovine bone with relative molecular weight < 5 000 was separated by hollow fiber ultrafiltration and Sephadex G-25 column chromatography. Two salty peptide fractions from the hydrolysate were purified by preparative high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and the pooled samples were analyzed by HPLC. The two fractions were found to consist of a single homogenous component. As analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS), both peptide fractions had a relative molecular weight less than 1000, the salty taste compound of which was m/z 679.510 9.

  5. The MOND limit from space-time scale invariance

    OpenAIRE

    Milgrom, Mordehai

    2008-01-01

    The MOND limit is shown to follow from a requirement of space-time scale invariance of the equations of motion for nonrelativistic, purely gravitational systems; i.e., invariance of the equations of motion under (t,r) goes to (qt,qr), in the limit a0 goes to infinity. It is suggested that this should replace the definition of the MOND limit based on the low-acceleration behavior of a Newtonian-MOND interpolating function. In this way, the salient, deep-MOND results--asymptotically flat rotati...

  6. Brownian motion at fast time scales and thermal noise imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rongxin

    This dissertation presents experimental studies on Brownian motion at fast time scales, as well as our recent developments in Thermal Noise Imaging which uses thermal motions of microscopic particles for spatial imaging. As thermal motions become increasingly important in the studies of soft condensed matters, the study of Brownian motion is not only of fundamental scientific interest but also has practical applications. Optical tweezers with a fast position-sensitive detector provide high spatial and temporal resolution to study Brownian motion at fast time scales. A novel high bandwidth detector was developed with a temporal resolution of 30 ns and a spatial resolution of 1 A. With this high bandwidth detector, Brownian motion of a single particle confined in an optical trap was observed at the time scale of the ballistic regime. The hydrodynamic memory effect was fully studied with polystyrene particles of different sizes. We found that the mean square displacements of different sized polystyrene particles collapse into one master curve which is determined by the characteristic time scale of the fluid inertia effect. The particle's inertia effect was shown for particles of the same size but different densities. For the first time the velocity autocorrelation function for a single particle was shown. We found excellent agreement between our experiments and the hydrodynamic theories that take into account the fluid inertia effect. Brownian motion of a colloidal particle can be used to probe three-dimensional nano structures. This so-called thermal noise imaging (TNI) has been very successful in imaging polymer networks with a resolution of 10 nm. However, TNI is not efficient at micrometer scale scanning since a great portion of image acquisition time is wasted on large vacant volume within polymer networks. Therefore, we invented a method to improve the efficiency of large scale scanning by combining traditional point-to-point scanning to explore large vacant

  7. Units of relativistic time scales and associated quantities

    OpenAIRE

    Klioner, S.; Capitaine, N.; Folkner, W.; Guinot, B.; Huang, T.-Y.; Kopeikin, S.; Pitjeva, E.; Seidelmann, P. K.; Soffel, M.

    2009-01-01

    This note suggests nomenclature for dealing with the units of various astronomical quantities that are used with the relativistic time scales TT, TDB, TCB and TCG. It is suggested to avoid wordings like "TDB units" and "TT units" and avoid contrasting them to "SI units". The quantities intended for use with TCG, TCB, TT or TDB should be called "TCG-compatible", "TCB-compatible", "TT-compatible" or "TDB-compatible", respectively. The names of the units second and meter for numerical values of ...

  8. Units of relativistic time scales and associated quantities

    CERN Document Server

    Klioner, S; Folkner, W; Guinot, B; Huang, T -Y; Kopeikin, S; Pitjeva, E; Seidelmann, P K; Soffel, M

    2009-01-01

    This note suggests nomenclature for dealing with the units of various astronomical quantities that are used with the relativistic time scales TT, TDB, TCB and TCG. It is suggested to avoid wordings like "TDB units" and "TT units" and avoid contrasting them to "SI units". The quantities intended for use with TCG, TCB, TT or TDB should be called "TCG-compatible", "TCB-compatible", "TT-compatible" or "TDB-compatible", respectively. The names of the units second and meter for numerical values of all these quantities should be used with out any adjectives. This suggestion comes from a special discussion forum created within IAU Commission 52 "Relativity in Fundamental Astronomy".

  9. Short time-scale variability in bright Seyfert galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-quality, long-slit CCD spectroscopic data were obtained to search for short time-scale (hour-day) variability in a sample of five Seyfert galaxies. The equivalent widths of all of the emission lines and the relative intensities of the Balmer lines were measured for each galaxy. No significant profile or flux variations were observed for any galaxy within errors, except for NGC 4151. The broad-line flux variation in NGC 4151 is attributed to continuum fluctuations. 21 refs

  10. Short time-scale variability in bright Seyfert galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xanthopoulos, E.; De robertis, M.M. (York University, Toronto (Canada))

    1991-04-01

    High-quality, long-slit CCD spectroscopic data were obtained to search for short time-scale (hour-day) variability in a sample of five Seyfert galaxies. The equivalent widths of all of the emission lines and the relative intensities of the Balmer lines were measured for each galaxy. No significant profile or flux variations were observed for any galaxy within errors, except for NGC 4151. The broad-line flux variation in NGC 4151 is attributed to continuum fluctuations. 21 refs.

  11. Isoperimetric problems on time scales with nabla derivatives

    CERN Document Server

    Almeida, Ricardo

    2008-01-01

    We prove a necessary optimality condition for isoperimetric problems under nabla-differentiable curves. As a consequence, the recent results of [M.R. Caputo, A unified view of ostensibly disparate isoperimetric variational problems, Appl. Math. Lett. (2008), doi:10.1016/j.aml.2008.04.004], that put together seemingly dissimilar optimal control problems in economics and physics, are extended to a generic time scale. We end with an illustrative example of application of our main result to a dynamic optimization problem from economics.

  12. A Convergent Online Single Time Scale Actor Critic Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Di Castro, D

    2009-01-01

    Actor-Critic based approaches were among the first to address reinforcement learning in a general setting. Recently, these algorithms have gained renewed interest due to their generality, good convergence properties, and possible biological relevance. In this paper, we introduce an online temporal difference based actor-critic algorithm which is proved to converge to a neighborhood of a local maximum of the average reward. Linear function approximation is used by the critic in order estimate the value function, and the temporal difference signal, which is passed from the critic to the actor. The main distinguishing feature of the present convergence proof is that both the actor and the critic operate on a similar time scale, while in most current convergence proofs they are required to have very different time scales in order to converge. Moreover, the same temporal difference signal is used to update the parameters of both the actor and the critic. A limitation of the proposed approach, compared to results a...

  13. The spur in pico-second time scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spur diffusion model of aqueous radiation chemistry, proposed in 1953, had run into difficulties with the development of pico-second pulse radiolysis in the late 1960s and early seventies. Using the same values for spur parameters, it was impossible to get good agreement with e-sub(aq) and OH decay in pico and nano second time scales as well as the steady state molecular product yield measurements. This inconsistency was removed by us by assuming that for a given number of dissociations, a number of radii values for the spur are possible, these radii values being related in a gaussian manner. This new approach proved highly successful in getting agreement between the predictions of the spur diffusion model and the pulse radiolysis results as well as the steady state molecular product yield measurements. Our computations have been extended to cover the entire range of spurs from a single dissociation spur to a thirty dissociation spur. Here again agreement with experimental results is good. This approach also gives interesting insights about the spur formation processes in pico and possibly femto second time scales. We have calculated rate constants for the reactions involving the 'precursor' of the hydrated electron with a number of ions. (author)

  14. Use of specific peptide biomarkers for quantitative confirmation of hidden allergenic peanut proteins Ara h 2 and Ara h 3/4 for food control by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Careri, M; Costa, A; Elviri, L; Lagos, J-B; Mangia, A; Terenghi, M; Cereti, A; Garoffo, L Perono

    2007-11-01

    A liquid chromatography-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS-MS) method based on the detection of biomarker peptides from allergenic proteins was devised for confirming and quantifying peanut allergens in foods. Peptides obtained from tryptic digestion of Ara h 2 and Ara h 3/4 proteins were identified and characterized by LC-MS and LC-MS-MS with a quadrupole-time of flight mass analyzer. Four peptides were chosen and investigated as biomarkers taking into account their selectivity, the absence of missed cleavages, the uniform distribution in the Ara h 2 and Ara h 3/4 protein isoforms together with their spectral features under ESI-MS-MS conditions, and good repeatability of LC retention time. Because of the different expression levels, the selection of two different allergenic proteins was proved to be useful in the identification and univocal confirmation of the presence of peanuts in foodstuffs. Using rice crisp and chocolate-based snacks as model food matrix, an LC-MS-MS method with triple quadrupole mass analyzer allowed good detection limits to be obtained for Ara h 2 (5 microg protein g(-1) matrix) and Ara h 3/4 (1 microg protein g(-1) matrix). Linearity of the method was established in the 10-200 microg g(-1) range of peanut proteins in the food matrix investigated. Method selectivity was demonstrated by analyzing tree nuts (almonds, pecan nuts, hazelnuts, walnuts) and food ingredients such as milk, soy beans, chocolate, cornflakes, and rice crisp. PMID:17899033

  15. Optimal Control Modification for Time-Scale Separated Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2012-01-01

    Recently a new optimal control modification has been introduced that can achieve robust adaptation with a large adaptive gain without incurring high-frequency oscillations as with the standard model-reference adaptive control. This modification is based on an optimal control formulation to minimize the L2 norm of the tracking error. The optimal control modification adaptive law results in a stable adaptation in the presence of a large adaptive gain. This study examines the optimal control modification adaptive law in the context of a system with a time scale separation resulting from a fast plant with a slow actuator. A singular perturbation analysis is performed to derive a modification to the adaptive law by transforming the original system into a reduced-order system in slow time. A model matching conditions in the transformed time coordinate results in an increase in the actuator command that effectively compensate for the slow actuator dynamics. Simulations demonstrate effectiveness of the method.

  16. Variation of atmospheric depth profile on different time scales

    CERN Document Server

    Wilczynska, B; Homola, P; Pekala, J; Risse, M; Wilczynski, H

    2006-01-01

    The vertical profile of atmospheric depth is an important element in extensive air shower studies. The depth of shower maximum is one of the most important characteristics of the shower. In the fluorescence technique of shower detection, the geometrical reconstruction provides the altitude of shower maximum, so that an accurate profile of atmospheric depth is needed to convert this altitude to the depth of shower maximum. In this paper the temporal variation of experimentally measured profiles of atmospheric depth at different sites is studied and implications for shower reconstruction are shown. The atmospheric profiles vary on time scales from hours to years. It is shown that the daily variation of the profile is as important as its seasonal variation and should be accounted for in air shower studies. For precise shower reconstruction, the daily profiles determined locally at the site of the air shower detector are recommended.

  17. Units of relativistic time scales and associated quantities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klioner, S. A.; Capitaine, N.; Folkner, W. M.; Guinot, B.; Huang, T.-Y.; Kopeikin, S. M.; Pitjeva, E. V.; Seidelmann, P. K.; Soffel, M. H.

    2010-01-01

    This note suggests nomenclature for dealing with the units of various astronomical quantities that are used with the relativistic time scales TT, TDB, TCB and TCG. It is suggested to avoid wordings like “TDB units” and “TT units” and avoid contrasting them to “SI units”. The quantities intended for use with TCG, TCB, TT or TDB should be called “TCG-compatible”, “TCB-compatible”, “TT-compatible” or “TDB-compatible”, respectively. The names of the units second and meter for numerical values of all these quantities should be used without any adjectives. This suggestion comes from a special discussion forum created within IAU Commission 52 “Relativity in Fundamental Astronomy”.

  18. Shock response of iron on nanosecond time scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments were performed using direct laser irradiation to induce shock waves in pure Fe foils tens of microns thick, using surface velocimetry to measure the response. Compared with experiments on much thicker samples, relatively strong elastic precursors were observed, though these could be caused by the strong texture of the foils rather than the shorter time scale. There was also evidence for the onset of the bcc to hcp phase transition, starting close to the static phase boundary. Radiation hydrodynamics and continuum mechanical simulations were performed to interpret the velocity data, comparing several equations of state with polymorphism and strength. The data were consistent with a phase change rate of the order of 109/s, driven by superpressurization of about 5 GPa. The rate may also depend on texture

  19. Monolithic porous polymer stationary phases in polyimide chips for the fast high-performance liquid chromatography separation of proteins and peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Levkin, Pavel A.; Eeltink, Sebastiaan; Stratton, Thomas R.; Brennen, Reid; Robotti, Karla; Yin, Hongfeng; Killeen, Kevin; Svec, Frantisek; Fréchet, Jean M.J.

    2008-01-01

    Poly(lauryl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) and poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) stationary phases in monolithic format have been prepared by thermally initiated free radical polymerization within polyimide chips featuring channels having a cross-section of 200×200 μm and a length of 6.8 cm. These chips were then used for the separation of a mixture of proteins including ribonuclease A, myoglobin, cytochrome c, and ovalbumin, as well as peptides. The separations were monitored by UV a...

  20. Role of relaxation time scale in noisy signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Alok Kumar; Chaudhury, Pinaki; Banik, Suman K

    2015-01-01

    Intra-cellular fluctuations, mainly triggered by gene expression, are an inevitable phenomenon observed in living cells. It influences generation of phenotypic diversity in genetically identical cells. Such variation of cellular components is beneficial in some contexts but detrimental in others. To quantify the fluctuations in a gene product, we undertake an analytical scheme for studying few naturally abundant linear as well as branched chain network motifs. We solve the Langevin equations associated with each motif under the purview of linear noise approximation and derive the expressions for Fano factor and mutual information in close analytical form. Both quantifiable expressions exclusively depend on the relaxation time (decay rate constant) and steady state population of the network components. We investigate the effect of relaxation time constraints on Fano factor and mutual information to indentify a time scale domain where a network can recognize the fluctuations associated with the input signal more reliably. We also show how input population affects both quantities. We extend our calculation to long chain linear motif and show that with increasing chain length, the Fano factor value increases but the mutual information processing capability decreases. In this type of motif, the intermediate components act as a noise filter that tune up input fluctuations and maintain optimum fluctuations in the output. For branched chain motifs, both quantities vary within a large scale due to their network architecture and facilitate survival of living system in diverse environmental conditions. PMID:25955500

  1. Role of relaxation time scale in noisy signal transduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Kumar Maity

    Full Text Available Intra-cellular fluctuations, mainly triggered by gene expression, are an inevitable phenomenon observed in living cells. It influences generation of phenotypic diversity in genetically identical cells. Such variation of cellular components is beneficial in some contexts but detrimental in others. To quantify the fluctuations in a gene product, we undertake an analytical scheme for studying few naturally abundant linear as well as branched chain network motifs. We solve the Langevin equations associated with each motif under the purview of linear noise approximation and derive the expressions for Fano factor and mutual information in close analytical form. Both quantifiable expressions exclusively depend on the relaxation time (decay rate constant and steady state population of the network components. We investigate the effect of relaxation time constraints on Fano factor and mutual information to indentify a time scale domain where a network can recognize the fluctuations associated with the input signal more reliably. We also show how input population affects both quantities. We extend our calculation to long chain linear motif and show that with increasing chain length, the Fano factor value increases but the mutual information processing capability decreases. In this type of motif, the intermediate components act as a noise filter that tune up input fluctuations and maintain optimum fluctuations in the output. For branched chain motifs, both quantities vary within a large scale due to their network architecture and facilitate survival of living system in diverse environmental conditions.

  2. The quenching time scale and quenching rate of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Lian, Jianhui; Zhang, Kai; Kong, Xu

    2016-01-01

    The average star formation rate (SFR) in galaxies has been declining since redshift of 2. A fraction of galaxies quench and become quiescent. We constrain two key properties of the quenching process: the quenching time scale and the quenching rate among galaxies. We achieve this by analyzing the galaxy number density profile in NUV-u color space and the distribution in NUV-u v.s. u-i color-color diagram with a simple toy-model framework. We focus on galaxies in three mass bins between 10 to 10 and 10 to 10.6 solar mass. In the NUV-u v.s. u-i color-color diagram, the red u-i galaxies exhibit a different slope from the slope traced by the star-forming galaxies. This angled distribution and the number density profile of galaxies in NUV-u space strongly suggest that the decline of the SFR in galaxies has to accelerate before they turn quiescent. We model this color-color distribution with a two-phase exponential decline star formation history. The models with an e-folding time in the second phase (the quenching p...

  3. Forecasting decadal and shorter time-scale solar cycle features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikpati, Mausumi

    2016-07-01

    Solar energetic particles and magnetic fields reach the Earth through the interplanetary medium and affect it in various ways, producing beautiful aurorae, but also electrical blackouts and damage to our technology-dependent economy. The root of energetic solar outputs is the solar activity cycle, which is most likely caused by dynamo processes inside the Sun. It is a formidable task to accurately predict the amplitude, onset and peak timings of a solar cycle. After reviewing all solar cycle prediction methods, including empirical as well as physical model-based schemes, I will describe what we have learned from both validation and nonvalidation of cycle 24 forecasts, and how to refine the model-based schemes for upcoming cycle 25 forecasts. Recent observations indicate that within a solar cycle there are shorter time-scale 'space weather' features, such as bursts of various forms of activity with approximately one year periodicity. I will demonstrate how global tachocline dynamics could play a crucial role in producing such space weather. The National Center for Atmospheric Research is sponsored by the National Science Foundation.

  4. Radionuclide time-scales and recent environmental changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    North America and European lakes have been used to monitor environmental changes such as land-use activities, acidification and chemical pollution specially heavy metals, halogenated organic substances and radioactive waste. In such studies radioactive dating using various combinations of low-level counting and spectrometry allows reconstruction of high resolution chronologies of recent sediments. Modelling recent environmental changes due to natural processes and man-made activities on regional and global scales and related consequences on the quality of aquatic life could be followed through systematic studies of lakes from different geographic and climatic regions. Isotope dilution alpha spectrometry using PIPS detectors, radon emanation using ionization chambers and sensitive Ge-gamma spectrometers are utilized to measure Pb-210,Ra-226, Cs-137,Cs-134, K-40 as well as other radionuclides. The mentioned nuclides are used to determine accumulation rates in protected lakes and to evaluate erosion from soils in connection with land-use activities. In such studies Pb-210 and Cs-137 fluxes give additional information on atmospheric and non-atmospheric inputs to lakes. The constructed time-scales (0 - 150 Yrs) allowed us to monitor the evolution of anthropogenic pollution and related loads in various regions. 1 tab.; 12 refs. (author)

  5. Thermopeaking in alpine streams: event characterization and time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolezzi, Guido; Siviglia, Annunziato; Toffolon, Marco; Maiolini, Bruno

    2010-05-01

    The present study provides a detailed quantification of the "thermopeaking" phenomenon, which consists of sharp intermittent alterations of stream thermal regime associated with hydropeaking releases from hydroelectricity plants. The study refers to the Noce River (Northern Italy), a typical hydropower-regulated Alpine stream, where water stored in highaltitude reservoirs often has a different temperature compared to the receiving bodies. The analysis is based on a river water temperature dataset that has been continuously collected for one year at 30' intervals in four different sections along the Noce River. A suitable threshold-based procedure is developed to quantify the main characteristics of thermopeaking, which is responsible for thermal alterations at different scales. The application of Wavelet Transform allows to separately investigate thermal regime alterations at sub-daily, daily and weekly scales. Moreover, at a seasonal scale, patterns of "warm" and "cold" thermopeaking can be clearly detected and quantified. The study highlights the relevance of investigating a variety of short-term alterations at multiple time scales for a better quantitative understanding of the complexity that characterises the river thermal regime. The outcomes of the analysis raise important interdisciplinary research questions concerning the effects of thermopeaking and of the related short- and medium-term effects on biological communities, which have been rather poorly investigated in ecological studies.

  6. Peptide Profile of Low-Fat Edam Cheese

    OpenAIRE

    Erdoğan KÜÇÜKÖNER

    1998-01-01

    Low-fat Edam cheese was manufactured using conventional cheese-making procedures using low-fat milk (1.5% fat). The cheese samples were aged for six months at 5 to 6°C. The cheese was analyzed for biochemical characteristics and peptide content. The peptide contents were determined with reverse phase chromatography. The association property of proteins and peptides in the soluble fraction of the cheese was determined using hydrophobic interaction chromatography. The overall peptide quantit...

  7. Time scale of diffusion in molecular and cellular biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcman, D.; Schuss, Z.

    2014-05-01

    Diffusion is the driver of critical biological processes in cellular and molecular biology. The diverse temporal scales of cellular function are determined by vastly diverse spatial scales in most biophysical processes. The latter are due, among others, to small binding sites inside or on the cell membrane or to narrow passages between large cellular compartments. The great disparity in scales is at the root of the difficulty in quantifying cell function from molecular dynamics and from simulations. The coarse-grained time scale of cellular function is determined from molecular diffusion by the mean first passage time of molecular Brownian motion to a small targets or through narrow passages. The narrow escape theory (NET) concerns this issue. The NET is ubiquitous in molecular and cellular biology and is manifested, among others, in chemical reactions, in the calculation of the effective diffusion coefficient of receptors diffusing on a neuronal cell membrane strewn with obstacles, in the quantification of the early steps of viral trafficking, in the regulation of diffusion between the mother and daughter cells during cell division, and many other cases. Brownian trajectories can represent the motion of a molecule, a protein, an ion in solution, a receptor in a cell or on its membrane, and many other biochemical processes. The small target can represent a binding site or an ionic channel, a hidden active site embedded in a complex protein structure, a receptor for a neurotransmitter on the membrane of a neuron, and so on. The mean time to attach to a receptor or activator determines diffusion fluxes that are key regulators of cell function. This review describes physical models of various subcellular microdomains, in which the NET coarse-grains the molecular scale to a higher cellular-level, thus clarifying the role of cell geometry in determining subcellular function.

  8. Nonequilibrium Physics at Short Time Scales: Formation of Correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is a happy situation when similar concepts and theoretical techniques can be applied to widely different physical systems because of a deep similarity in the situations being studied. The book illustrates this well; it focuses on the description of correlations in quantum systems out of equilibrium at very short time scales, prompted by experiments with short laser pulses in semiconductors, and in complex reactions in heavy nuclei. In both cases the experiments are characterized by nonlinear dynamics and by strong correlations out of equilibrium. In some systems there are also important finite-size effects. The book comprises several independent contributions of moderate length, and I sometimes felt that a more intensive effort in cross-coordination of the different contributions could have been of help. It is divided almost equally between theory and experiment. In the theoretical part, there is a thorough discussion both of the kinematic aspects (description of correlations) and the dynamical ones (evaluation of correlations). The experimental part is naturally divided according to the nature of the system: the interaction of pulsed lasers with matter on the one hand, and the correlations in finite-size systems (nanoparticles and nuclei) on the other. There is also a discussion on the dynamics of superconductors, a subject currently of great interest. Although an effort has been made to keep each contribution self-contained, I must admit that reading level is uneven. However, there are a number of thorough and stimulating contributions that make this book a useful introduction to the topic at the level of graduate students or researchers acquainted with quantum statistical mechanics. (book review)

  9. Science at the Time-scale of the Electron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murnane, Margaret

    2010-03-01

    Replace this text with your abstract Ever since the invention of the laser 50 years ago and its application in nonlinear optics, scientists have been striving to extend coherent laser beams into the x-ray region of the spectrum. Very recently however, the prospects for tabletop coherent sources, with attosecond pulse durations, at very short wavelengths even in the hard x-ray region of the spectrum at wavelengths advances are possible by taking nonlinear optics techniques to an extreme, and are the direct result of a new ability to manipulate electrons on the fastest, attosecond, time-scales of our natural world. My talk will discuss new experimental data that demonstrates high harmonic generation of laser-like, fully coherent, 10 attosecond duration, soft x-ray beams at photon energies around 0.5keV. Several applications will also be discussed, including making a movie of how electron orbitals in a molecule change shape as a molecule breaks apart, following how fast a magnetic material can flip orientation, understanding how fast heat flows in a nanocircuit, or building a microscope without lenses. [4pt] [1] T. Popmintchev et al., ``Phase matched upconversion of coherent ultrafast laser light into the soft and hard x-ray regions of the spectrum'', PNAS 106, 10516 (2009). [0pt] [2] C. LaOVorakiat et al., ``Ultrafast Soft X-Ray Magneto-Optics at the M-edge Using a Tabletop High-Harmonic Source'', Physical Review Letters 103, 257402 (2009). [0pt] [3] M. Siemens et al. ``Measurement of quasi-ballistic heat transport across nanoscale interfaces using ultrafast coherent soft x-ray beams'', Nature Materials 9, 26 (2010). [0pt] [4] K. Raines et al., ``Three-dimensional structure determination from a single view,'' Nature 463, 214 (2010). [0pt] [5] W. Li et al., ``Time-resolved Probing of Dynamics in Polyatomic Molecules using High Harmonic Generation'', Science 322, 1207 (2008).

  10. The Time Scale of Recombination Rate Evolution in Great Apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevison, Laurie S; Woerner, August E; Kidd, Jeffrey M; Kelley, Joanna L; Veeramah, Krishna R; McManus, Kimberly F; Bustamante, Carlos D; Hammer, Michael F; Wall, Jeffrey D

    2016-04-01

    We present three linkage-disequilibrium (LD)-based recombination maps generated using whole-genome sequence data from 10 Nigerian chimpanzees, 13 bonobos, and 15 western gorillas, collected as part of the Great Ape Genome Project (Prado-Martinez J, et al. 2013. Great ape genetic diversity and population history. Nature 499:471-475). We also identified species-specific recombination hotspots in each group using a modified LDhot framework, which greatly improves statistical power to detect hotspots at varying strengths. We show that fewer hotspots are shared among chimpanzee subspecies than within human populations, further narrowing the time scale of complete hotspot turnover. Further, using species-specific PRDM9 sequences to predict potential binding sites (PBS), we show higher predicted PRDM9 binding in recombination hotspots as compared to matched cold spot regions in multiple great ape species, including at least one chimpanzee subspecies. We found that correlations between broad-scale recombination rates decline more rapidly than nucleotide divergence between species. We also compared the skew of recombination rates at centromeres and telomeres between species and show a skew from chromosome means extending as far as 10-15 Mb from chromosome ends. Further, we examined broad-scale recombination rate changes near a translocation in gorillas and found minimal differences as compared to other great ape species perhaps because the coordinates relative to the chromosome ends were unaffected. Finally, on the basis of multiple linear regression analysis, we found that various correlates of recombination rate persist throughout the African great apes including repeats, diversity, and divergence. Our study is the first to analyze within- and between-species genome-wide recombination rate variation in several close relatives. PMID:26671457

  11. Two-phase micro- and macro-time scales in particle-laden turbulent channel flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing Wang; Michael Manhart

    2012-01-01

    The micro- and macro-time scales in two-phase turbulent channel flows are investigated using the direct numerical simulation and the Lagrangian particle trajectory methods for the fluid- and the particle-phases,respectively.Lagrangian and Eulerian time scales of both phases are calculated using velocity correlation functions.Due to flow anisotropy,micro-time scales are not the same with the theoretical estimations in large Reynolds number (isotropic) turbulence.Lagrangian macro-time scales of particle-phase and of fluid-phase seen by particles are both dependent on particle Stokes number.The fluid-phase Lagrangian integral time scales increase with distance from the wall,longer than those time scales seen by particles.The Eulerian integral macro-time scales increase in near-wall regions but decrease in out-layer regions.The moving Eulerian time scales are also investigated and compared with Lagrangian integral time scales,and in good agreement with previous measurements and numerical predictions.For the fluid particles the micro Eulerian time scales are longer than the Lagrangian ones in the near wall regions,while away from the walls the micro Lagrangian time scales are longer.The Lagrangian integral time scales are longer than the Eulerian ones.The results are useful for further understanding two-phase flow physics and especially for constructing accurate prediction models of inertial particle dispersion.

  12. Advances in the Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale--Developments and Integration with the Geologic Time Scale and Future Directions (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissman, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    We celebrate the 50th anniversary of the publication of the Vine-Matthews/Morley-Larochelle hypothesis (Vine and Matthews, Nature, 1963, v. 199, #4897, p. 947-949), which integrated marine magnetic anomaly data with a rapidly evolving terrestrial-based geomagnetic polarity time scale (GPTS). The five decades of research since 1963 have witnessed the expansion and refinement of the GPTS, to the point where ages of magnetochron boundaries, in particular in the Cenozoic, can be estimated with uncertainties better than 0.1%. This has come about by integrating high precision geochronology, cyclostratigraphy at different time scales, and magnetic polarity data of increased quality, allowing extension of the GPTS back into the Paleozoic. The definition of a high resolution GPTS across time intervals of major events in Earth history has been of particular interest, as a specific magnetochron boundary correlated across several localities represents a singular global datum. A prime example is the end Permian, when some 80 percent of genus-level extinctions and a range of 75 to 96 percent species- level extinctions took place in the marine environment, depending upon clade. Much our understanding of the Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB) is based on relatively slowly deposited marine sequences in Europe and Asia, yet a growing body of observations from continental sequences demonstrates a similar extinction event and new polarity data from some of these sequences are critical to refining the GPTS across the PTB and testing synchronicity of marine and terrestrial events. The data show that the end-Permian ecological crisis and the conodont calibrated biostratigraphic PTB both followed a key polarity reversal between a short interval (subchron) of reverse polarity to a considerably longer (chron) of normal polarity. Central European Basin strata (continental Permian and epicontinental Triassic) yield high-quality magnetic polarity stratigraphic records (Szurlies et al., 2003

  13. Input-output description of linear systems with multiple time-scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madriz, R. S.; Sastry, S. S.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that the study of systems evolving at multiple time-scales is simplified by studying reduced-order models of these systems valid at specific time-scales. The present investigation is concerned with an extension of results on the time-scale decomposition of autonomous systems to that of input-output systems. The results are employed to study conditions under which positive realness of a transfer function is preserved under singular perturbation. Attention is given to the perturbation theory for linear operators, the multiple time-scale structure of autonomous linear systems, the input-output description of two time-scale linear systems, the positive realness of two time-scale systems, and multiple time-scale linear systems.

  14. Simple setup for gas-phase H/D exchange mass spectrometry coupled to electron transfer dissociation and ion mobility for analysis of polypeptide structure on a liquid chromatographic time scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistarz, Ulrik H; Brown, Jeffery M; Haselmann, Kim F; Rand, Kasper D

    2014-12-01

    Gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) is a fast and sensitive, yet unharnessed analytical approach for providing information on the structural properties of biomolecules, in a complementary manner to mass analysis. Here, we describe a simple setup for ND3-mediated millisecond gas-phase HDX inside a mass spectrometer immediately after ESI (gas-phase HDX-MS) and show utility for studying the primary and higher-order structure of peptides and proteins. HDX was achieved by passing N2-gas through a container filled with aqueous deuterated ammonia reagent (ND3/D2O) and admitting the saturated gas immediately upstream or downstream of the primary skimmer cone. The approach was implemented on three commercially available mass spectrometers and required no or minor fully reversible reconfiguration of gas-inlets of the ion source. Results from gas-phase HDX-MS of peptides using the aqueous ND3/D2O as HDX reagent indicate that labeling is facilitated exclusively through gaseous ND3, yielding similar results to the infusion of purified ND3-gas, while circumventing the complications associated with the use of hazardous purified gases. Comparison of the solution-phase- and gas-phase deuterium uptake of Leu-Enkephalin and Glu-Fibrinopeptide B, confirmed that this gas-phase HDX-MS approach allows for labeling of sites (heteroatom-bound non-amide hydrogens located on side-chains, N-terminus and C-terminus) not accessed by classical solution-phase HDX-MS. The simple setup is compatible with liquid chromatography and a chip-based automated nanoESI interface, allowing for online gas-phase HDX-MS analysis of peptides and proteins separated on a liquid chromatographic time scale at increased throughput. Furthermore, online gas-phase HDX-MS could be performed in tandem with ion mobility separation or electron transfer dissociation, thus enabling multiple orthogonal analyses of the structural properties of peptides and proteins in a single automated LC-MS workflow. PMID:25375223

  15. Modelling financial markets with agents competing on different time scales and with different amount of information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlmuth, Johannes; Andersen, Jørgen Vitting

    2006-05-01

    We use agent-based models to study the competition among investors who use trading strategies with different amount of information and with different time scales. We find that mixing agents that trade on the same time scale but with different amount of information has a stabilizing impact on the large and extreme fluctuations of the market. Traders with the most information are found to be more likely to arbitrage traders who use less information in the decision making. On the other hand, introducing investors who act on two different time scales has a destabilizing effect on the large and extreme price movements, increasing the volatility of the market. Closeness in time scale used in the decision making is found to facilitate the creation of local trends. The larger the overlap in commonly shared information the more the traders in a mixed system with different time scales are found to profit from the presence of traders acting at another time scale than themselves.

  16. Structure and dating errors in the geologic time scale and periodicity in mass extinctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stothers, Richard B.

    1989-01-01

    Structure in the geologic time scale reflects a partly paleontological origin. As a result, ages of Cenozoic and Mesozoic stage boundaries exhibit a weak 28-Myr periodicity that is similar to the strong 26-Myr periodicity detected in mass extinctions of marine life by Raup and Sepkoski. Radiometric dating errors in the geologic time scale, to which the mass extinctions are stratigraphically tied, do not necessarily lessen the likelihood of a significant periodicity in mass extinctions, but do spread the acceptable values of the period over the range 25-27 Myr for the Harland et al. time scale or 25-30 Myr for the DNAG time scale. If the Odin time scale is adopted, acceptable periods fall between 24 and 33 Myr, but are not robust against dating errors. Some indirect evidence from independently-dated flood-basalt volcanic horizons tends to favor the Odin time scale.

  17. Almost Periodic Solutions for Neutral-Type BAM Neural Networks with Delays on Time Scales

    OpenAIRE

    Yongkun Li; Li Yang

    2013-01-01

    Using the existence of the exponential dichotomy of linear dynamic equations on time scales, a fixed point theorem and the theory of calculus on time scales, we obtain some sufficient conditions for the existence and exponential stability of almost periodic solutions for a class of neutral-type BAM neural networks with delays on time scales. Finally, a numerical example illustrates the feasibility of our results and also shows that the continuous-time neural network and its dis...

  18. Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equations and approximate dynamic programming on time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiffertt, John; Sanyal, Suman; Wunsch, Donald C

    2008-08-01

    The time scales calculus is a key emerging area of mathematics due to its potential use in a wide variety of multidisciplinary applications. We extend this calculus to approximate dynamic programming (ADP). The core backward induction algorithm of dynamic programming is extended from its traditional discrete case to all isolated time scales. Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equations, the solution of which is the fundamental problem in the field of dynamic programming, are motivated and proven on time scales. By drawing together the calculus of time scales and the applied area of stochastic control via ADP, we have connected two major fields of research. PMID:18632378

  19. Implementation of Time-Scale Transformation Based on Continuous Wavelet Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The basic objective of time-scale transformation is to compress or expand the signal in time field while keeping the same spectral properties.This paper presents two methods to derive time-scale transformation formula based on continuous wavelet transform.For an arbitrary given square-integrable function f(t),g(t) = f(t/λ) is derived by continuous wavelet transform and its inverse transform.The result shows that time-scale transformation may be obtained through the modification of the time-scale of wavelet function filter using equivalent substitution. The paper demonstrates the result by theoretic derivations and experimental simulation.

  20. Pseudospherical surfaces on time scales: a geometric definition and the spectral approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cieslinski, Jan L [Uniwersytet w Bialymstoku, Wydzial Fizyki, ul Lipowa 41, 15-424 Bialystok (Poland)

    2007-10-19

    We define and discuss the notion of pseudospherical surfaces in asymptotic coordinates on time scales. Thus we extend well-known notions of discrete pseudospherical surfaces and smooth pseudosperical surfaces on more exotic domains (e.g., the Cantor set). In particular, we present a new expression for the discrete Gaussian curvature which turns out to be valid for asymptotic nets on any time scale. We show that asymptotic Chebyshev nets on an arbitrary time scale have constant negative Gaussian curvature. We present also the quaternion-valued spectral problem (the Lax pair) and the Darboux-Baecklund transformation for pseudospherical surfaces (in asymptotic coordinates) on arbitrary time scales.

  1. Gas Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasek, Francis W.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    This review covers fundamental developments in gas chromatography during 1982 and 1983. Literature is considered under these headings: columns; liguid phases; solid supports; sorption processes and solvents; open tubular column gas chromatography; instrumentation; high-resolution columns and applications; other techniques; qualitative and…

  2. Quantifying the uncertainty of the annular mode time scale and the role of the stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junsu; Reichler, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    The proper simulation of the annular mode time scale may be regarded as an important benchmark for climate models. Previous research demonstrated that this time scale is systematically overestimated by climate models. As suggested by the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, this may imply that climate models are overly sensitive to external forcings. Previous research also made it clear that calculating the AM time scale is a slowly converging process, necessitating relatively long time series and casting doubts on the usefulness of the historical reanalysis record to constrain climate models in terms of the annular mode time scale. Here, we use long control simulations with the coupled and uncoupled version of the GFDL climate model, CM2.1 and AM2.1, respectively, to study the effects of internal atmospheric variability and forcing from the lower boundary on the stability of the annular mode time scale. In particular, we ask whether a model's annular mode time scale and dynamical sensitivity can be constrained from the 50-year-long reanalysis record. We find that internal variability attaches large uncertainty to the annular mode time scale when diagnosed from decadal records. Even under the fixed forcing conditions of our long control run at least 100 years of data are required in order to keep the uncertainty in the annular mode time scale of the Northern Hemisphere to 10 %; over the Southern Hemisphere, the required length increases to 200 years. If nature's annular mode time scale over the Northern Hemisphere is similarly variable, there is no guarantee that the historical reanalysis record is a fully representative target for model evaluation. Over the Southern Hemisphere, however, the discrepancies between model and reanalysis are sufficiently large to conclude that the model is unable to reproduce the observed time scale structure correctly. The effects of ocean coupling lead to a considerable increase in time scale and uncertainty in time scale, effects which

  3. Error estimates for asymptotic solutions of dynamic equations on time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gro Hovhannisyan

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available We establish error estimates for first-order linear systems of equations and linear second-order dynamic equations on time scales by using calculus on a time scales [1,4,5] and Birkhoff-Levinson's method of asymptotic solutions [3,6,8,9].

  4. Necessary optimality conditions for the calculus of variations on time scales

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Rui A. C.; Torres, Delfim F. M.

    2007-01-01

    We study more general variational problems on time scales. Previous results are generalized by proving necessary optimality conditions for (i) variational problems involving delta derivatives of more than the first order, and (ii) problems of the calculus of variations with delta-differential side conditions (Lagrange problem of the calculus of variations on time scales).

  5. Some inequalities of Ostrowski and Grüss type for triple integrals on time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazir Ahmad Mir

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we establish some inequalities of Ostrowski and Grüss type for triple integrals on arbitrary time scales involving three functions and their partial derivatives. We also discuss the discrete Ostrowski and Grüss type inequalities for triple sumon time scale.

  6. Some inequalities of Ostrowski and Grüss type for triple integrals on time scales

    OpenAIRE

    Nazir Ahmad Mir; Roman Ullah

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we establish some inequalities of Ostrowski and Grüss type for triple integrals on arbitrary time scales involving three functions and their partial derivatives. We also discuss the discrete Ostrowski and Grüss type inequalities for triple sumon time scale.

  7. The Delta-nabla Calculus of Variations for Composition Functionals on Time Scales

    OpenAIRE

    Dryl, Monika; Torres, Delfim F. M.

    2012-01-01

    We develop the calculus of variations on time scales for a functional that is the composition of a certain scalar function with the delta and nabla integrals of a vector valued field. Euler-Lagrange equations, transversality conditions, and necessary optimality conditions for isoperimetric problems, on an arbitrary time scale, are proved. Interesting corollaries and examples are presented.

  8. Time scales of spike-train correlation for neural oscillators with common drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examine the effect of the phase-resetting curve on the transfer of correlated input signals into correlated output spikes in a class of neural models receiving noisy superthreshold stimulation. We use linear-response theory to approximate the spike correlation coefficient in terms of moments of the associated exit time problem and contrast the results for type I vs type II models and across the different time scales over which spike correlations can be assessed. We find that, on long time scales, type I oscillators transfer correlations much more efficiently than type II oscillators. On short time scales this trend reverses, with the relative efficiency switching at a time scale that depends on the mean and standard deviation of input currents. This switch occurs over time scales that could be exploited by downstream circuits.

  9. Global and Local Color Time Scales to Encode Timeline Events in Ion Trajectories for Glassies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Sharif

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Glassy compounds lead directly to high ionic conductivity. Ionic conductivity generates ion trajectories. However, these trajectories have been represented by two-dimensional graph in order to visualize the timeline events in ion trajectories. This study addresses this problem by encoding the timeline events in ion trajectories with global and local color scales. Two time scales have been introduced namely Global Color Time Scale and Local Color Time Scale. The rainbow color has been chosen to represent global time scale meanwhile solid color has been used to generate local time scale. Based on evaluation, these techniques are successful in representing timeline events in ion trajectories for understanding the complicated heterogeneous movement of ion trajectories.

  10. Peptide dendrimers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Niederhafner, Petr; Šebestík, Jaroslav; Ježek, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 11, - (2005), 757-788. ISSN 1075-2617 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/03/1362 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : multiple antigen peptides * peptide dendrimers * synthetic vaccine * multipleantigenic peptides Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.803, year: 2005

  11. Global Exponential Stability of Delayed Cohen-Grossberg BAM Neural Networks with Impulses on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Yu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the theory of calculus on time scales, the homeomorphism theory, Lyapunov functional method, and some analysis techniques, sufficient conditions are obtained for the existence, uniqueness, and global exponential stability of the equilibrium point of Cohen-Grossberg bidirectional associative memory (BAM neural networks with distributed delays and impulses on time scales. This is the first time applying the time-scale calculus theory to unify the discrete-time and continuous-time Cohen-Grossberg BAM neural network with impulses under the same framework.

  12. Invited Review Article: The statistical modeling of atomic clocks and the design of time scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I will show how the statistical models that are used to describe the performance of atomic clocks are derived from their internal design. These statistical models form the basis for time scales, which are used to define international time scales such as International Atomic Time and Coordinated Universal Time. These international time scales are realized by ensembles of clocks at national laboratories such as the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and I will describe how ensembles of atomic clocks are characterized and managed.

  13. A wavelet based approach to measure and manage contagion at different time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Theo

    2015-10-01

    We decompose financial return series of US stocks into different time scales with respect to different market regimes. First, we examine dependence structure of decomposed financial return series and analyze the impact of the current financial crisis on contagion and changing interdependencies as well as upper and lower tail dependence for different time scales. Second, we demonstrate to which extent the information of different time scales can be used in the context of portfolio management. As a result, minimizing the variance of short-run noise outperforms a portfolio that minimizes the variance of the return series.

  14. Multi-time scale analysis of precipitation variation in Guyuan,China:1957-2005

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Morlet wavelet transformation is used in this paper to analyze the multi-time scale characteristics of precipitation data series from 1957 to 2005 in Guyuan region.The results showed that (1) the annual precipitation evolution process had obvious multi-time scale variation characteristics of 15-25 years,7-12 years and 3-6 years,and different time scales had different oscillation energy densities;(2) the periods at smaller time scales changed more frequently,which often nested in a biggish quasi periodic oscillations,so the concrete time domain should be analyzed if necessary;(3) the precipitation had three main periods (22-year,9-year and 4-year) and the 22-year period was especially outstanding,and the analysis of this main period reveals that the precipitation would be in a relative high water period until about 2012.

  15. ON GLOBAL ROBUST STABILITY FOR COMPETITIVE NEURAL NETWORKS WITH TIME DELAYS AND DIFFERENT TIME SCALES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, using the theory of topological degree and Liapunov functional methods, the authors study the competitive neural networks with time delays and different time scales and present some criteria of global robust stability for this neural network model.

  16. OSCILLATION CRITERIA FOR A FOURTH ORDER SUBLINEAR DYNAMIC EQUATION ON TIME SCALE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Some new criteria for the oscillation of a fourth order sublinear and/or linear dynamic equation on time scale are established. Our results are new for the corresponding fourth order differential equations as well as difference equations.

  17. The actor-critic algorithm as multi-time-scale stochastic approximation

    OpenAIRE

    Borkar, Vivek S.; Konda, Vijaymohan R

    1997-01-01

    The actor-critic algorithm of Barto and others for simulation-based optimization of Markov decision processes is cast as a two time Scale stochastic approximation. Convergence analysis, approximation issues and an example are studied.

  18. Existence Results for Higher-Order Boundary Value Problems on Time Scales

    OpenAIRE

    Sang Yanbin; Liu Jian

    2009-01-01

    By using the fixed-point index theorem, we consider the existence of positive solutions for the following nonlinear higher-order four-point singular boundary value problem on time scales , ; , ; , ; , , where , , , , , , , and is rd-continuous.

  19. Monotone Iterative Technique for First-Order Nonlinear Periodic Boundary Value Problems on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Ya-Hong

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the following nonlinear first-order periodic boundary value problem on time scales: , , . Some new existence criteria of positive solutions are established by using the monotone iterative technique.

  20. Monotone Iterative Technique for Partial Dynamic Equations of First Order on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiguang Wang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is concerned with the monotone iterative technique for partial dynamic equations of first order on time scales and for this purpose, the existence, uniqueness, and comparison results are also established.

  1. Time-scale invariances in preseismic electromagnetic radiation, magnetization and damage evolution of rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kawada

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the time-scale invariant changes in electromagnetic and mechanical energy releases prior to a rock failure or a large earthquake. The energy release processes are caused by damage evolutions such as crack propagation, motion of charged dislocation, area-enlargement of sheared asperities and repetitive creep-rate changes. Damage mechanics can be used to represent the time-scale invariant evolutions of both brittle and plastic damages. Irreversible thermodynamics applied to the damage mechanics reveals that the damage evolution produces the variations in charge, dipole and electromagnetic signals in addition to mechanical energy release, and yields the time-scale invariant patterns of Benioff electromagnetic radiation and cumulative Benioff strain-release. The irreversible thermodynamic framework of damage mechanics is also applicable to the seismo-magnetic effect, and the time-scale invariance is recognized in the remanent magnetization change associated with damage evolution prior to a rock failure.

  2. Global Uniform Asymptotic Stability of Competitive Neural Networks with Different-Time Scales and Delay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong; L(U) Shu; ZHONG Shou-ming

    2005-01-01

    The global uniform asymptotic stability of competitive neural networks with different time scales and delay is investigated. By the method of variation of parameters and the method of inequality analysis, the condition for global uniformly asymptotically stable are given. A strict Lyapunov function for the flow of a competitive neural system with different time scales and delay is presented. Based on the function, the global uniform asymptotic stability of the equilibrium point can be proved.

  3. Chaos control of single time-scale brushless DC motor with sliding mode control method

    OpenAIRE

    Uyaroğlu, Yılmaz; CEVHER, Barış

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the sliding mode control (SMC) scheme of single time-scale brushless DC motor (BLDCM) is investigated. The SMC method consists of 2 sections. To simplify the directive of the stability of the controlled single time-scale BLDCM in the sliding mode, first a special type of PI switching surface is adopted. Second, the SMC controller is obtained to guarantee the occurrence of the PI switching surface. The effectiveness of the theoretical analysis is evaluated by numerical...

  4. Interplay between multiple length and time scales in complex chemical systems

    OpenAIRE

    Bagchi, Biman; Chakravarty, Charusita

    2010-01-01

    Processes in complex chemical systems, such as macromolecules, electrolytes, interfaces, micelles and enzymes, can span several orders of magnitude in length and time scales. The length and time scales of processes occurring over this broad time and space window are frequently coupled to give rise to the control necessary to ensure specificity and the uniqueness of the chemical phenomena. A combination of experimental, theoretical and computational techniques that can address a multiplicity o...

  5. Ion Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulik, James D.; Sawicki, Eugene

    1979-01-01

    Accurate for the analysis of ions in solution, this form of analysis enables the analyst to directly assay many compounds that previously were difficult or impossible to analyze. The method is a combination of the methodologies of ion exchange, liquid chromatography, and conductimetric determination with eluant suppression. (Author/RE)

  6. Increasing temperature forcing reduces the Greenland Ice Sheet's response time scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applegate, Patrick J.; Parizek, Byron R.; Nicholas, Robert E.; Alley, Richard B.; Keller, Klaus

    2015-10-01

    Damages from sea level rise, as well as strategies to manage the associated risk, hinge critically on the time scale and eventual magnitude of sea level rise. Satellite observations and paleo-data suggest that the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) loses mass in response to increased temperatures, and may thus contribute substantially to sea level rise as anthropogenic climate change progresses. The time scale of GIS mass loss and sea level rise are deeply uncertain, and are often assumed to be constant. However, previous ice sheet modeling studies have shown that the time scale of GIS response likely decreases strongly with increasing temperature anomaly. Here, we map the relationship between temperature anomaly and the time scale of GIS response, by perturbing a calibrated, three-dimensional model of GIS behavior. Additional simulations with a profile, higher-order, ice sheet model yield time scales that are broadly consistent with those obtained using the three-dimensional model, and shed light on the feedbacks in the ice sheet system that cause the time scale shortening. Semi-empirical modeling studies that assume a constant time scale of sea level adjustment, and are calibrated to small preanthropogenic temperature and sea level changes, may underestimate future sea level rise. Our analysis suggests that the benefits of reducing greenhouse gas emissions, in terms of avoided sea level rise from the GIS, may be greatest if emissions reductions begin before large temperature increases have been realized. Reducing anthropogenic climate change may also allow more time for design and deployment of risk management strategies by slowing sea level contributions from the GIS.

  7. Time-scales of close-in exoplanet radio emission variability

    CERN Document Server

    See, V; Fares, R; Donati, J -F; Moutou, C

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the variability of exoplanetary radio emission using stellar magnetic maps and 3D field extrapolation techniques. We use a sample of hot Jupiter hosting stars, focusing on the HD 179949, HD 189733 and tau Boo systems. Our results indicate two time-scales over which radio emission variability may occur at magnetised hot Jupiters. The first is the synodic period of the star-planet system. The origin of variability on this time-scale is the relative motion between the planet and the interplanetary plasma that is co-rotating with the host star. The second time-scale is the length of the magnetic cycle. Variability on this time-scale is caused by evolution of the stellar field. At these systems, the magnitude of planetary radio emission is anticorrelated with the angular separation between the subplanetary point and the nearest magnetic pole. For the special case of tau Boo b, whose orbital period is tidally locked to the rotation period of its host star, variability only occurs on the time-scale of...

  8. A Study on Time-Scales Ratio and Turbulent Prandtl Number in Ducts of Industrial Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rokni, Masoud

    2006-01-01

    This investigation concerns numerical time-scales ratio and turbulent Prandtl number in fully developed turbulent flows in ducts of various cross-sections. The low Reynolds number version of a non-linear eddy viscosity model is proposed to predict the Reynolds stresses and the temperature field is...... solved using a two-equation heat flux model. The computed results compare satisfactory with the available experimental data. The time-scale ratio R is defined as the ratio between the dynamic time-scale (k/ε) and the scalar time-scale(0.5θθ/εθ). Based on existing DNS data and calculations in this work the...... ratio between the time-scales is found to be approximately 0.7. In light of this assumption an expression for the turbulent diffusivity is considered and the turbulent Prandtl number variation across the duct is studied. This study can also be regarded as engineering calculation methodic for ducts of...

  9. Multi-Wavelength Study of Sgr A*: The Short Time Scale Variability

    CERN Document Server

    Yusef-Zadeh, F; Roberts, D; Wardle, M; Reid, M; Dodds-Eden, K; Porquet, D; Grosso, N

    2010-01-01

    To understand the correlation and the radiation mechanism of flare emission in different wavelength bands, we have coordinated a number of telescopes to observe SgrA* simultaneously. We focus only on one aspect of the preliminary results of our multi-wavelength observing campaigns, namely, the short time scale variability of emission from SgrA* in near-IR, X-ray and radio wavelengths. The structure function analysis indicate most of the power spectral density is detected on hourly time scales in all wavelength bands. We also report minute time scale variability at 7 and 13mm placing a strong constraint on the nature of the variable emission. The hourly time scale variability can be explained in the context of a model in which the peak frequency of emission shifts toward lower frequencies as a self-absorbed synchrotron source expands adiabatically near the acceleration site. The short time scale variability, on the other hand, places a strong constraint on the size of the emitting region. Assuming that rapid m...

  10. New time-scale criteria for model simplification of bio-reaction systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Sang

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quasi-steady state approximation (QSSA based on time-scale analysis is known to be an effective method for simplifying metabolic reaction system, but the conventional analysis becomes time-consuming and tedious when the system is large. Although there are automatic methods, they are based on eigenvalue calculations of the Jacobian matrix and on linear transformations, which have a high computation cost. A more efficient estimation approach is necessary for complex systems. Results This work derived new time-scale factor by focusing on the problem structure. By mathematically reasoning the balancing behavior of fast species, new time-scale criteria were derived with a simple expression that uses the Jacobian matrix directly. The algorithm requires no linear transformation or decomposition of the Jacobian matrix, which has been an essential part for previous automatic time-scaling methods. Furthermore, the proposed scale factor is estimated locally. Therefore, an iterative procedure was also developed to find the possible multiple boundary layers and to derive an appropriate reduced model. Conclusion By successive calculation of the newly derived time-scale criteria, it was possible to detect multiple boundary layers of full ordinary differential equation (ODE models. Besides, the iterative procedure could derive the appropriate reduced differential algebraic equation (DAE model with consistent initial values, which was tested with simple examples and a practical example.

  11. Interplay between multiple length and time scales in complex chemical systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Biman Bagchi; Charusita Chakravarty

    2010-07-01

    Processes in complex chemical systems, such as macromolecules, electrolytes, interfaces, micelles and enzymes, can span several orders of magnitude in length and time scales. The length and time scales of processes occurring over this broad time and space window are frequently coupled to give rise to the control necessary to ensure specificity and the uniqueness of the chemical phenomena. A combination of experimental, theoretical and computational techniques that can address a multiplicity of length and time scales is required in order to understand and predict structure and dynamics in such complex systems. This review highlights recent experimental developments that allow one to probe structure and dynamics at increasingly smaller length and time scales. The key theoretical approaches and computational strategies for integrating information across time-scales are discussed. The application of these ideas to understand phenomena in various areas, ranging from materials science to biology, is illustrated in the context of current developments in the areas of liquids and solvation, protein folding and aggregation and phase transitions, nucleation and self-assembly.

  12. Micro- and nanosecond time scale, high power electrical wire explosion in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full Text: Experimental and magneto-hydro-dynamic simulation results of micro- and nanosecond time scale underwater electrical Al, Cu and W wires explosions are presented. A capacitor bank with stored energy up to 6 kJ was used in microsecond time scale experiments and water forming line generator with current amplitude up to 100 k A and pulse duration of 100 ns were used in nanosecond time scale experiments. Extremely high energy deposition of up to 60 times the atomization enthalpy was registered in nanosecond time scale explosions. A discharge channel evolution and surface temperature were analyzed by streak shadow imaging and using fast photo-diode with a set of interference filters, respectively. Microsecond time scale electrical explosion of cylindrical wire array showed extremely high pressure of converging shock waves at the axis, up to 0.2 Mbar. A 1D and 2D magneto hydro- dynamic simulation demonstrated good agreement with such experimental parameters as discharge channel current, voltage, radius, and temperature

  13. Micro- and nano- second time scale, high power electrical wire explosions in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinenko, Alon; Efimov, Sergey; Sayapin, Arkadii; Fedotov, Alexander; Gurovich, Viktor; Krasik, Yakov

    2006-10-01

    Experimental and magneto-hydro-dynamic simulation results of micro- and nanosecond time scale underwater electrical Al, Cu and W wires explosions are presented. A capacitor bank with stored energy up to 6 kJ (discharge current up to 80 kA with 2.5 μs quarter period) was used in microsecond time scale experiments and water forming line generator with current amplitude up to 100 kA and pulse duration of 100 ns were used in nanosecond time scale experiments. Extremely high energy deposition of up to 60 times the atomization enthalpy was registered in nanosecond time scale explosions. A discharge channel evolution and surface temperature were analyzed by streak shadow imaging and using fast photo-diode with a set of interference filters, respectively. Microsecond time scale electrical explosion of cylindrical wire array showed extremely high pressure of converging shock waves at the axis, up to 0.2 MBar. A 1D and 2D magneto-hydro-dynamic simulation demonstrated good agreement with such experimental parameters as discharge channel current, voltage, radius, and temperature.

  14. Subpicosecond conformational dynamics of small peptides probed by two-dimensional vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woutersen, Sander; Mu, Yuguang; Stock, Gerhard; Hamm, Peter

    2001-09-01

    The observation of subpicosecond fluctuations in the conformation of a small peptide in water is demonstrated. We use an experimental method that is specifically sensitive to conformational dynamics taking place on an ultrafast time scale. Complementary molecular-dynamics simulations confirm that the conformational fluctuations exhibit a subpicosecond component, the time scale and amplitude of which agree well with those derived from the experiment.

  15. Phosphopeptide elution times in reversed-phase liquid chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jeongkwon; Petritis, Konstantinos; Shen, Yufeng; Camp, David G.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    Elution time shifts between 33 different peptides and their corresponding phosphopeptides ranging from 4 amino acid residues to 35 amino acids in length were systematically investigated using high-resolution reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis with trifluoroacetic acid as the ion pairing agent. Observed peptide elution time shifts for a single phosphorylation ranged from −5.28 min (for pYVPML) to +0.59 min (for HRDpSGLLDSLGR). Peptides contain...

  16. Analytical biotechnology: Capillary electrophoresis and chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The papers describe the separation, characterization, and equipment required for the electrophoresis or chromatography of cyclic nucleotides, pharmaceuticals, therapeutic proteins, recombinant DNA products, pheromones, peptides, and other biological materials. One paper, On-column radioisotope detection for capillary electrophoresis, has been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base

  17. Ion chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarter, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    Similar in many ways to other liquid chromatographic techniques, ion chromatography (IC) is an invaluable method that is used all too rarely in chemical analysis. Its application is particularly promising in the analysis of inorganic anions, an area where more information is needed. Ion Chromatogrphy identifies the merits of this technique. Serving as a review and reference for experienced ion chromatographers and as a teaching aid for individuals new to the field, it provides the information necessary for determining the potential usefulness of IC for a given situation. Among the areas treated, this volume focuses on eluant-suppressed IC, especially for anion and cation analysis, single-column IC, plus ancillary techniques and applications, electrochemical, spectroscopic, and other detecting methods, ion chromatography exclusion (ICE), including its limits and applications.

  18. Characterization of foot-and-mouth disease virus's viral peptides with LC-ESI-MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peptides and proteins play a central role in numerous biological and physiological processes in living organisms. Viral capsid peptides are part of the viruses' outer shell of genetic materials. Viruses are recognized by immune system via capsid peptides. Depending on this property of capsid peptides, prototypes synthetic peptide-based vaccine can be developed. In this work, we synthesized three different viral peptide sequences of foot-and-mouth disease virus with microwave enhanced solid phase synthesis method. These peptides were characterized by using liquid chromatography electro spray interface mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS) with electro spray ionization. We briefly describe the essential facts for peptide characterization. (author)

  19. Time-scale and noise optimality in self-organized critical adaptive networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, Christian

    2012-02-01

    Recent studies have shown that adaptive networks driven by simple local rules can organize into "critical" global steady states, providing another framework for self-organized criticality (SOC). We focus on the important convergence to criticality and show that noise and time-scale optimality are reached at finite values. This is in sharp contrast to the previously believed optimal zero noise and infinite time-scale separation case. Furthermore, we discover a noise-induced phase transition for the breakdown of SOC. We also investigate each of these three effects separately by developing models that reveal three generically low-dimensional dynamical behaviors: time-scale resonance, a simplified version of stochastic resonance, which we call steady-state stochastic resonance, and noise-induced phase transitions. PMID:22463275

  20. Predicting Regional Drought on Sub-Seasonal to Decadal Time Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Siegfried; Wang, Hailan; Suarez, Max; Koster, Randal

    2011-01-01

    Drought occurs on a wide range of time scales, and within a variety of different types of regional climates. It is driven foremost by an extended period of reduced precipitation, but it is the impacts on such quantities as soil moisture, streamflow and crop yields that are often most important from a users perspective. While recognizing that different users have different needs for drought information, it is nevertheless important to understand that progress in predicting drought and satisfying such user needs, largely hinges on our ability to improve predictions of precipitation. This talk reviews our current understanding of the physical mechanisms that drive precipitation variations on subseasonal to decadal time scales, and the implications for predictability and prediction skill. Examples are given highlighting the phenomena and mechanisms controlling precipitation on monthly (e.g., stationary Rossby waves, soil moisture), seasonal (ENSO) and decadal time scales (PD and AMO).

  1. New definitions of exponential, hyperbolic and trigonometric functions on time scales

    CERN Document Server

    Cieslinski, Jan L

    2010-01-01

    We propose two new definitions of the exponential function on time scales. The first definition is based on the Cayley transformation while the second one is a natural extension of exact discretizations. Our eponential functions map the imaginary axis into the unit circle. Therefore, it is possible to define hyperbolic and trigonometric functions on time scales in a standard way. The resulting functions preserve most of the qualitative properties of the corresponding continuous functions. In particular, Pythagorean trigonometric identities hold exactly on any time scale. Dynamic equations satisfied by Cayley-motivated functions have a natural similarity to the corresponding diferential equations. The exact discretization is less convenient as far as dynamic equations and differentiation is concerned.

  2. Multiple-Time-Scales Hierarchical Frequency Stability Control Strategy of Medium-Voltage Isolated Microgrid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Zhuoli; Yang, Ping; Guerrero, Josep M.; Xu, Zhirong; C. Green, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    by microgrid energy management system (MEMS) within Zone A. Furthermore, based on the developed complete small-signal state-space model, sensitivity analysis of the eigenvalues is conducted in order to reveal the dynamic stability margin of the MV microgrid, and to identify the proper range of the......, it is more complex to control and manage. Thus in order to maintain the frequency stability in multiple-time-scales, a hierarchical control strategy is proposed. The proposed control architecture divides the system frequency in three zones: (A) stable zone, (B) precautionary zone and (C) emergency...... zone. In this way, dynamic stability control that cope with disturbances in short-time scale is implemented by microgrid central controller (MGCC) within Zone B and Zone C. Meanwhile, steady-state stability control to solve the peaks and valleys problem of loads and DGs in long-time scale is executed...

  3. Analytical expression for gas-particle equilibration time scale and its numerical evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anttila, Tatu; Lehtinen, Kari E. J.; Dal Maso, Miikka

    2016-05-01

    We have derived a time scale τeq that describes the characteristic time for a single compound i with a saturation vapour concentration Ceff,i to reach thermodynamic equilibrium between the gas and particle phases. The equilibration process was assumed to take place via gas-phase diffusion and absorption into a liquid-like phase present in the particles. It was further shown that τeq combines two previously derived and often applied time scales τa and τs that account for the changes in the gas and particle phase concentrations of i resulting from the equilibration, respectively. The validity of τeq was tested by comparing its predictions against results from a numerical model that explicitly simulates the transfer of i between the gas and particle phases. By conducting a large number of simulations where the values of the key input parameters were varied randomly, it was found out that τeq yields highly accurate results when i is a semi-volatile compound in the sense that the ratio of total (gas and particle phases) concentration of i to the saturation vapour concentration of i, μ, is below unity. On the other hand, the comparison of analytical and numerical time scales revealed that using τa or τs alone to calculate the equilibration time scale may lead to considerable errors. It was further shown that τeq tends to overpredict the equilibration time when i behaves as a non-volatile compound in a sense that μ > 1. Despite its simplicity, the time scale derived here has useful applications. First, it can be used to assess if semi-volatile compounds reach thermodynamic equilibrium during dynamic experiments that involve changes in the compound volatility. Second, the time scale can be used in modeling of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) to check whether SOA forming compounds equilibrate over a certain time interval.

  4. Controls on the Time Scale of Carbonate Neutralization of Carbon Dioxide Released to the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldeira, K.; Cao, L.

    2007-12-01

    Once released to the atmosphere, carbon dioxide is removed on a range of time scales. On the time scale of years to centuries, carbon dioxide removal from the atmosphere is dominated by transport processes within the ocean. On the time scale of hundreds of thousands of years, carbon dioxide removal from the atmosphere is dominated by processes related to the weathering of silicate rocks on land. Between these time scales, carbon dioxide removal is dominated by interactions involving carbonate minerals both on land and in the sea. Net dissolution of carbonate minerals (on land or in the sea) increases ocean alkalinity to an extent that exceeds the amount of carbon addition; the result is a transfer of carbon from the atmosphere to the ocean and moderation of the effects of added carbon on ocean chemical parameters such as pH and carbonate mineral saturation. There has been some controversy over how fast equilibration with carbonate minerals can neutralize carbon acidity, with claims ranging from the extreme and untenable claim that this process is essentially instantaneous to more plausible claims that the equilibration time scale may approach 10 kyr. Even within the domain of informed discourse, estimates of the carbonate neutralization timescale can vary by an order-of-magnitude. Here, in an effort to understand the sources of the lack of consensus on this issue, we examine how various processes (e.g., ocean transport, sediment pore water diffusion, carbonate-mineral dissolution, and carbonate weathering on land) influence the time scale for carbonate neutralization of carbon dioxide releases to the atmosphere.

  5. Global scale precipitation from monthly to centennial scales: empirical space-time scaling analysis, anthropogenic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, Isabel; Lovejoy, Shaun

    2016-04-01

    The characterization of precipitation scaling regimes represents a key contribution to the improved understanding of space-time precipitation variability, which is the focus here. We conduct space-time scaling analyses of spectra and Haar fluctuations in precipitation, using three global scale precipitation products (one instrument based, one reanalysis based, one satellite and gauge based), from monthly to centennial scales and planetary down to several hundred kilometers in spatial scale. Results show the presence - similarly to other atmospheric fields - of an intermediate "macroweather" regime between the familiar weather and climate regimes: we characterize systematically the macroweather precipitation temporal and spatial, and joint space-time statistics and variability, and the outer scale limit of temporal scaling. These regimes qualitatively and quantitatively alternate in the way fluctuations vary with scale. In the macroweather regime, the fluctuations diminish with time scale (this is important for seasonal, annual, and decadal forecasts) while anthropogenic effects increase with time scale. Our approach determines the time scale at which the anthropogenic signal can be detected above the natural variability noise: the critical scale is about 20 - 40 yrs (depending on the product, on the spatial scale). This explains for example why studies that use data covering only a few decades do not easily give evidence of anthropogenic changes in precipitation, as a consequence of warming: the period is too short. Overall, while showing that precipitation can be modeled with space-time scaling processes, our results clarify the different precipitation scaling regimes and further allow us to quantify the agreement (and lack of agreement) of the precipitation products as a function of space and time scales. Moreover, this work contributes to clarify a basic problem in hydro-climatology, which is to measure precipitation trends at decadal and longer scales and to

  6. Valuation of Credit Derivatives with Multiple Time Scales in the Intensity Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beom Jin Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose approximate solutions for pricing zero-coupon defaultable bonds, credit default swap rates, and bond options based on the averaging principle of stochastic differential equations. We consider the intensity-based defaultable bond, where the volatility of the default intensity is driven by multiple time scales. Small corrections are computed using regular and singular perturbations to the intensity of default. The effectiveness of these corrections is tested on the bond price and yield curve by investigating the behavior of the time scales with respect to the relevant parameters.

  7. Separation of time-scales and reparametrization invariance for aging systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that the generating functional describing the slow dynamics of spin glass systems is invariant under reparametrizations of the time. This result is general and applies for both infinite and short range models. It follows simply from the assumption that a separation between short time-scales and long time-scales exists in the system, and the constraints of causality and unitarity. Global time reparametrization invariance suggests that the low action excitations in a spin glass may be smoothly spatially varying time reparametrizations. These Goldstone modes may provide the basis for an analytic dynamical theory of short range spin glasses. (author)

  8. Can inertial electrostatic confinement work beyond the ion-ion collisional time scale?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inertial electrostatic confinement systems are predicated on a non-equilibrium ion distribution function. Coulomb collisions between ions cause this distribution to relax to a Maxwellian on the ion-ion collisional time-scale. The power required to prevent this relaxation and maintain the IEC configuration for times beyond the ion-ion collisional time scale is shown to be at least an order of magnitude greater than the fusion power produced. It is concluded that IEC systems show little promise as a basis for the development of commercial electric power plants

  9. Application of Time Scale to Parameters Tuning of Active Disturbance Rejection Controller for Induction Motor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO Li-wei; LIAO Xiao-zhong; ZHANG Yu-he

    2007-01-01

    Active disturbance rejection controller (ADRC) has good performance in induction motor (IM) control system, but controller parameter is difficult to tune. A method of tuning ADRC parameter by time scale is analyzed. The IM time scale is obtained by theoretical analysis. Combining the relations between scale time and ADRC parameters, ADRC parameter tuning in IM vector control based stator flux oriented is obtained. This parameter tuning method is validated by simulations and it provides a new technique for tuning of ADRC parameters of IM.

  10. Time-Scales for Non-Inductive Current Buildup in Low-Aspect-Ratio Toroidal Geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fundamental differences between inductive and non-inductive current buildup are clarified and the associated time-scales and other implications are discussed. A simulation is presented whereby the plasma current in a low-aspect-ratio torus is increased primarily by the self-generated bootstrap current with only 10% coming from external current drive. The maximum obtainable plasma current by this process is shown to scale with the toroidal field strength. The basic physics setting the time-scales can be obtained from a 1D analysis. Comparisons are made between the timescales found here and those reported in the experimental literature

  11. A new Geologic Time Scale, with special reference to Precambrian and Neogene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FelixM.Gradstein; JamesG.Ogg; AlanG.Smith; WouterBleeker; LucasJ.Lourens

    2004-01-01

    A Geologic Time Scale (GTS2004) is presented that integrates currently available stratigraphic and geochronologic information. Key features of the new scale are outlined, how it was constructed, and how it can be further improved. The accompanying International Stratigraphic Chart, issued under auspices of the International Commission on Stratigraphy (ICS), shows the current chronostratigraphic scale and ages with estimates of uncertainty for all stage boundaries. Special reference is made to the Precambrian part of the time scale, which is coming of age in terms of detail, and to the Neogene portion, which has attained an ultra-high-precision absolute-age calibration.

  12. On Qualitative Analysis of Delay Systems and $x^ = f (t, x, x^)$ on Time Scales

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yajun Ma; Yu Zhang; Jitao Sun

    2010-04-01

    Here we solve two problems presented in paper [9] (C C Tisdell and A Zaidi, Basic qualitative and quantitative results for solutions to nonlinear, dynamic equations on time scales with an application to economic modelling, Nonlinear Anal. 68 (2008) 3504–3524). We study existence and uniqueness of solutions for delay systems and first-order dynamic equations of the form $x^=f(t,x,x^)$ on time scales by using the Banach’s fixed-point theorem. Some examples are presented to illustrate the efficiency of the proposed results.

  13. Screening of TACE Peptide Inhibitors from Phage Display Peptide Library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    To obtain the recombinant tumor necrosis factor-α converting enzyme (TACE) ectodomain and use it as a selective molecule for the screening of TACE peptide inhibitors, the cDNA coding catalytic domain (T800) and full-length ectodomain (T1300) of TACE were amplified by RTPCR, and the expression plasmids were constructed by inserting T800 and T1300 into plasmid pET28a and pET-28c respectively. The recombinant T800 and T1300 were induced by IPTG, and SDSPAGE and Western blotting analysis results revealed that T800 and T1300 were highly expressed in the form of inclusion body. After Ni2+-NTA resin affinity chromatography, the recombinant proteins were used in the screening of TACE-binding peptides from phage display peptide library respectively. After 4 rounds of biopanning, the positive phage clones were analyzed by ELISA, competitive inhibition assay and DNA sequencing. A common amino acid sequence (TRWLVYFSRPYLVAT) was found and synthesized. The synthetic peptide could inhibit the TNF-α release from LPS-stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) up to 60.3 %. FACS analysis revealed that the peptide mediated the accumulation of TNF-α on the cell surface. These results demonstrate that the TACE-binding peptide is an effective antagonist of TACE.

  14. Atomic Force Microscope Mediated Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is used to inject a sample, provide shear-driven liquid flow over a functionalized substrate, and detect separated components. This is demonstrated using lipophilic dyes and normal phase chromatography. A significant reduction in both size and separation time scales is achieved with a 25-micron-length column scale, and one-second separation times. The approach has general applications to trace chemical and microfluidic analysis. The AFM is now a common tool for ultra-microscopy and nanotechnology. It has also been demonstrated to provide a number of microfluidic functions necessary for miniaturized chromatography. These include injection of sub-femtoliter samples, fluidic switching, and sheardriven pumping. The AFM probe tip can be used to selectively remove surface layers for subsequent microchemical analysis using infrared and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. With its ability to image individual atoms, the AFM is a remarkably sensitive detector that can be used to detect separated components. These diverse functional components of microfluidic manipulation have been combined in this work to demonstrate AFM mediated chromatography. AFM mediated chromatography uses channel-less, shear-driven pumping. This is demonstrated with a thin, aluminum oxide substrate and a non-polar solvent system to separate a mixture of lipophilic dyes. In conventional chromatographic terms, this is analogous to thin-layer chromatography using normal phase alumina substrate with sheardriven pumping provided by the AFM tip-cantilever mechanism. The AFM detection of separated components is accomplished by exploiting the variation in the localized friction of the separated components. The AFM tip-cantilever provides the mechanism for producing shear-induced flows and rapid pumping. Shear-driven chromatography (SDC) is a relatively new concept that overcomes the speed and miniaturization limitations of conventional liquid chromatography. SDC is based on a

  15. A multiple-time-scale approach to the control of ITBs on JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laborde, L.; Mazon, D.; Moreau, D. [EURATOM-CEA Association (DSM-DRFC), CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Moreau, D. [Culham Science Centre, EFDA-JET, Abingdon, OX (United Kingdom); Ariola, M. [EURATOM/ENEA/CREATE Association, Univ. Napoli Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Cordoliani, V. [Ecole Polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France); Tala, T. [EURATOM-Tekes Association, VTT Processes (Finland)

    2005-07-01

    The simultaneous real-time control of the current and temperature gradient profiles could lead to the steady state sustainment of an internal transport barrier (ITB) and so to a stationary optimized plasma regime. Recent experiments in JET have demonstrated significant progress in achieving such a control: different current and temperature gradient target profiles have been reached and sustained for several seconds using a controller based on a static linear model. It's worth noting that the inverse safety factor profile evolves on a slow time scale (resistive time) while the normalized electron temperature gradient reacts on a faster one (confinement time). Moreover these experiments have shown that the controller was sensitive to rapid plasma events such as transient ITBs during the safety factor profile evolution or MHD instabilities which modify the pressure profiles on the confinement time scale. In order to take into account the different dynamics of the controlled profiles and to better react to rapid plasma events the control technique is being improved by using a multiple-time-scale approximation. The paper describes the theoretical analysis and closed-loop simulations using a control algorithm based on two-time-scale state-space model. These closed-loop simulations using the full dynamic but linear model used for the controller design to simulate the plasma response have demonstrated that this new controller allows the normalized electron temperature gradient target profile to be reached faster than the one used in previous experiments. (A.C.)

  16. A multiple-time-scale approach to the control of ITBs on JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The simultaneous real-time control of the current and temperature gradient profiles could lead to the steady state sustainment of an internal transport barrier (ITB) and so to a stationary optimized plasma regime. Recent experiments in JET have demonstrated significant progress in achieving such a control: different current and temperature gradient target profiles have been reached and sustained for several seconds using a controller based on a static linear model. It's worth noting that the inverse safety factor profile evolves on a slow time scale (resistive time) while the normalized electron temperature gradient reacts on a faster one (confinement time). Moreover these experiments have shown that the controller was sensitive to rapid plasma events such as transient ITBs during the safety factor profile evolution or MHD instabilities which modify the pressure profiles on the confinement time scale. In order to take into account the different dynamics of the controlled profiles and to better react to rapid plasma events the control technique is being improved by using a multiple-time-scale approximation. The paper describes the theoretical analysis and closed-loop simulations using a control algorithm based on two-time-scale state-space model. These closed-loop simulations using the full dynamic but linear model used for the controller design to simulate the plasma response have demonstrated that this new controller allows the normalized electron temperature gradient target profile to be reached faster than the one used in previous experiments. (A.C.)

  17. QUALITATIVE BEHAVIORS OF LINEAR TIME-INVARIANT DYNAMIC EQUATIONS ON TIME SCALES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the type of singularity and qualitative structure of solutions to a time-invariant linear dynamic system on time scales. The results truly unify the qualitative behaviors of the system on the continuous and discrete times with any step size.

  18. Existence of Solutions for Nonlinear Four-Point -Laplacian Boundary Value Problems on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Topal SGulsan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We are concerned with proving the existence of positive solutions of a nonlinear second-order four-point boundary value problem with a -Laplacian operator on time scales. The proofs are based on the fixed point theorems concerning cones in a Banach space. Existence result for -Laplacian boundary value problem is also given by the monotone method.

  19. Anti-control of chaos of single time-scale brushless DC motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Zheng-Ming; Chang, Ching-Ming; Chen, Yen-Sheng

    2006-09-15

    Anti-control of chaos of single time-scale brushless DC motors is studied in this paper. In order to analyse a variety of periodic and chaotic phenomena, we employ several numerical techniques such as phase portraits, bifurcation diagrams and Lyapunov exponents. Anti-control of chaos can be achieved by adding an external constant term or an external periodic term. PMID:16893797

  20. Hardy inequality on time scales and its application to half-linear dynamic equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Řehák Pavel

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A time-scale version of the Hardy inequality is presented, which unifies and extends well-known Hardy inequalities in the continuous and in the discrete setting. An application in the oscillation theory of half-linear dynamic equations is given.

  1. How the constants in Hille-Nehari theorems depend on time scales

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řehák, Pavel

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 2006, - (2006), s. 1-15. ISSN 1687-1839 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA201/01/0079; GA ČR(CZ) GP201/01/P041 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : dynamic equation * time scales * oscillation criteria Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  2. OSCILLATION FOR NONLINEAR SECOND-ORDER DYNAMIC EQUATIONS ON TIME SCALES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Through the use of generalized Riccati transformation techniques, we establish some oscillation criteria for one type of nonlinear dynamic equation on time scales. Several examples, including a semilinear dynamic equation and a nonlinear Emden-Fowler dynamic equation, are also given to illustrate these criteria and to improve the results obtained in some references.

  3. The Available Time Scale: Measuring Foster Parents' Available Time to Foster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Donna J.; Orme, John G.; Rhodes, Kathryn W.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a new measure of available time specific to fostering, the Available Time Scale (ATS). It was tested with a national sample of 304 foster mothers and is designed to measure the amount of time foster parents are able to devote to fostering activities. The ATS has excellent reliability, and good support exists for its validity.…

  4. Time scale of scour around a pile in combined waves and current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Thor Ugelvig; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    The time scale of the scour process around a circular vertical pile is studied in combined waves and current. A series of tests were carried out in a flume with pile diameters 40 mm and 75 mm, in both steady current, waves and combined waves and current. In the combined wave and current flow regime...

  5. Space-time scaling invariant traveling wave solutions of some nonlinear fractional equations

    OpenAIRE

    HE, Tianlan; Fang, Hui

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a homogeneous principle is proposed to seek the space-time scaling invariant traveling wave solutions expressed by power functions for some fractional differential equations. Applying this principle to generalized fractional Benjamin-Ono equations and generalized fractional ZakharovKuznetsov equations, the traveling wave solutions expressed by power functions have been obtained under some parameter conditions.

  6. Mass action realizations of reaction kinetic system models on various time scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hangos, K M; Szederkenyi, G, E-mail: hangos@scl.sztaki.hu, E-mail: szeder@scl.sztaki.hu [Process Control Research Group, Computer and Automation Reseach Institute, Kende u. 13-17, H-1111 Budapest (Hungary)

    2011-01-01

    Complex chemical reaction networks often exhibit different dynamic behaviour on different time scales. A combined approach is proposed in this work for determining physically meaningful mass action realizations of complex chemical reaction networks that describe its dynamic behaviour on different time scales. This is achieved by appropriately reducing the detailed overall mass action kinetic scheme using quasi steady state assumptions fit to the particular time scale, and then searching for an optimal realization using mixed integer linear programing. Furthermore, the relationship between the properties (reversibility, deficiency, stability) of the obtained realizations of the same system on different time scales are also investigated and related to the same properties of the detailed overall model. It is shown that the reduced models obtained by quasi steady state assumptions may show exotic nonlinear behaviour, such as oscillations, when the original detailed is globally asymptotically stable. The proposed methods are illustrated by using a simple Michaelis-Menten type reaction kinetic example. The simplified versions of the well known Brusselator model have also been investigated and presented as a case study.

  7. Extension of the astronomically calibrated (polarity) time scale to the Miocene/Pliocene boundary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilgen, F.J.

    1991-01-01

    The early Pleistocene to late Pliocene astronormcally calibrated time scale of Shackleton et al. [1] and Hllgen [2] is extended to the Mlocene/Pllocene boundary This is done by correlating the detailed record of CaCO 3 cycles in the Trubl and the lower part of the overlying Narbone Formation (Rossel

  8. Natural variability of atmospheric temperatures and geomagnetic intensity over a wide range of time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Jon D

    2002-02-19

    The majority of numerical models in climatology and geomagnetism rely on deterministic finite-difference techniques and attempt to include as many empirical constraints on the many processes and boundary conditions applicable to their very complex systems. Despite their sophistication, many of these models are unable to reproduce basic aspects of climatic or geomagnetic dynamics. We show that a simple stochastic model, which treats the flux of heat energy in the atmosphere by convective instabilities with random advection and diffusive mixing, does a remarkable job at matching the observed power spectrum of historical and proxy records for atmospheric temperatures from time scales of one day to one million years (Myr). With this approach distinct changes in the power-spectral form can be associated with characteristic time scales of ocean mixing and radiative damping. Similarly, a simple model of the diffusion of magnetic intensity in Earth's core coupled with amplification and destruction of the local intensity can reproduce the observed 1/f noise behavior of Earth's geomagnetic intensity from time scales of 1 (Myr) to 100 yr. In addition, the statistics of the fluctuations in the polarity reversal rate from time scales of 1 Myr to 100 Myr are consistent with the hypothesis that reversals are the result of variations in 1/f noise geomagnetic intensity above a certain threshold, suggesting that reversals may be associated with internal fluctuations rather than changes in mantle thermal or magnetic boundary conditions. PMID:11875208

  9. Mixing and flushing time scales in the Azhikode Estuary, southwest coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Revichandran, C.; Pylee, A.

    Flushing time scales of the Azhikode Estuary, Kerala, India showed pronounced dry season and wet season signals as well as large inter-annual variation. Cumulative flushing time of the estuary varies from 4.8 tide cycles in April to 1.22 tide cycles...

  10. Fission time-scale from the measurement of pre-scission light particles and -ray multiplicities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Ramachandran; A Chatterjee; A Navin; K Mahata; A Shrivastava; V Tripathi; S Kailas; V Nanal; R G Pillay; A Saxena; R G Thomas; D R Chakrabarty; V M Datar; Suresh Kumar; P K Sahu

    2015-08-01

    An overview of the experimental result on simultaneous measurement of pre-scission neutron, proton, -particle and GDR -ray multiplicities for the reaction 28Si+175Lu at 159 MeV using the BARC–TIFR Pelletron–LINAC accelerator facility is given. The data were analysed using deformation-dependent particle transmission coefficients, binding energies and level densities which are incorporated in the code JOANNE2 to extract fission time-scales and mean deformation of the saddle-to-scission emitter. The neutron, light charged particle and GDR -ray multiplicity data could be explained consistently. The emission of neutrons seems to be favoured towards larger deformation as compared to charged particles. The pre-saddle time-scale is deduced as (0–2) × 10−21 s whereas the saddle-to-scission time-scale is (36–39) × 10−21 s. The total fission time-scale is deduced as (36–41) × 10−21 s.

  11. A limit set trichotomy for order-preserving systems on time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Poetzsche

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we derive a limit set trichotomy for abstract order-preserving 2-parameter semiflows in normal cones of strongly ordered Banach spaces. Additionally, to provide an example, Muller's theorem is generalized to dynamic equations on arbitrary time scales and applied to a model from population dynamics.

  12. Time scales: from Nabla calculus to Delta calculus and vice versa via duality

    OpenAIRE

    Caputo, M. Cristina

    2009-01-01

    In this note we show how one can obtain results from the nabla calculus from results on the delta calculus and vice versa via a duality argument. We provide applications of the main results to the calculus of variations on time scales.

  13. An Inverse Problem of the Calculus of Variations on Arbitrary Time Scales

    OpenAIRE

    Dryl, Monika; Malinowska, Agnieszka B.; Torres, Delfim F. M.

    2014-01-01

    We consider an inverse extremal problem for variational functionals on arbitrary time scales. Using the Euler-Lagrange equation and the strengthened Legendre condition, we derive a general form for a variational functional that attains a local minimum at a given point of the vector space.

  14. Towards a Unified Formulation of Dynamics and Thermodynamics I. From Microscopic to Macroscopic Time Scales

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Durand, P.; Paidarová, Ivana

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 111, č. 2 (2011), s. 225-236. ISSN 0020-7608 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100400501; GA AV ČR IAA401870702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : Liouville equation * time scales * chemical kinetics and dynamics Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.357, year: 2011

  15. POSITIVE SOLUTIONS TO A SECOND-ORDER m-POINT BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEM ON TIME SCALES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Yang; Chunfang Shen

    2009-01-01

    By a fixed point theorem in a cone,the existence of at least three positive solutions to a class of second-order multi-point boundary value problem for dynamic equation on time scales with the nonlinear term depends on the first order derivative is studied.

  16. DIRECTIONAL DERIVATIVE OF VECTOR FIELD AND REGULAR CURVES ON TIME SCALES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emin (O)zyilmaz

    2006-01-01

    The general idea in this paper is to study curves of the parametric equations where the parameter varies in a so-called time scale, which may be an arbitrary closed subset of the set of all real numbers. We introduce the directional derivative according to the vector fields.

  17. PERIODIC BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEM FOR NONLINEAR INTEGRO-DIFFERENTIAL EQUATION OF MIXED TYPE ON TIME SCALES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yepeng Xing; Qiong Wang; Valery G. Romanovski

    2009-01-01

    We prove several new comparison results and develop the monotone iterative tech-nique to show the existence of extremal solutions to a kind of periodic boundary value problem (PBVP) for nonlinear integro-differential equation of mixed type on time scales.

  18. 反相液相色谱-串联质谱法鉴定油菜蜂花粉中的蛋白质及活性肽%Application of reversed-phase liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in the identification of protein and bioactivity peptides from rape bee pollen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭静; 晏嘉泽; 郭明; 靳艳

    2014-01-01

    Based on the shotgun proteomic method,rape bee pollen protein was prepared with ultrasonic extraction and digested by trypsin,then separated and sequenced by reversed-phase liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry( RPLC-MS / MS),followed by protein data-base searching. After the above analysis,353 peptides were identified and the molecular biolog-ical functions of 239 proteins have been known. The identified molecular biological functions of these proteins mainly included binding activity,enzyme activity,transporter activity,inhibitor activity and so on. Five peptides were obtained after the screening and appropriate amino acid modification among the identified 353 peptides,according to the relationship between the sequence structure of the bioactivity peptide and angiotensin converting enzyme( ACE)inhibi-tor activity. The five peptides were speculated to have ACE inhibitor activity and synthesized to detect ACE inhibitor activity. The results showed that all of the five peptides had good ACE inhibitor activity. The peptides of AELDIVLALF and LAVNLIPFP among the five peptides dis-played especially good ACE inhibition with half maximal inhibitory concentration( IC 50 ) of (10. 65±0. 50)μmol / L and(23. 66±1. 08)μmol / L,respectively. This method is rapid,low-cost and achieves the goal of high-throughput screening of bioactivity peptides that greatly shorten the period of identification compared with traditional methods.%基于鸟枪法蛋白质组学分析方法,使用反相液相色谱-串联质谱(RPLC-MS / MS)系统分析油菜蜂花粉蛋白质的胰蛋白酶酶解产物,结合数据库检索,共鉴定到353条肽段。鉴定到的肽段所归属的蛋白质中有239个蛋白质可检索到其分子生物学功能,主要功能为结合活性、酶活性、运输活性、抑制活性等。根据血管紧张素转化酶( ACE)抑制肽活性与多肽构效之间的关系,从鉴定到的肽段中筛选并适当修饰后得到5

  19. A hybrid procedure for MSW generation forecasting at multiple time scales in Xiamen City, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Lilai, E-mail: llxu@iue.ac.cn [Key Lab of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1799 Jimei Road, Xiamen 361021 (China); Xiamen Key Lab of Urban Metabolism, Xiamen 361021 (China); Gao, Peiqing, E-mail: peiqing15@yahoo.com.cn [Xiamen City Appearance and Environmental Sanitation Management Office, 51 Hexiangxi Road, Xiamen 361004 (China); Cui, Shenghui, E-mail: shcui@iue.ac.cn [Key Lab of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1799 Jimei Road, Xiamen 361021 (China); Xiamen Key Lab of Urban Metabolism, Xiamen 361021 (China); Liu, Chun, E-mail: xmhwlc@yahoo.com.cn [Xiamen City Appearance and Environmental Sanitation Management Office, 51 Hexiangxi Road, Xiamen 361004 (China)

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: ► We propose a hybrid model that combines seasonal SARIMA model and grey system theory. ► The model is robust at multiple time scales with the anticipated accuracy. ► At month-scale, the SARIMA model shows good representation for monthly MSW generation. ► At medium-term time scale, grey relational analysis could yield the MSW generation. ► At long-term time scale, GM (1, 1) provides a basic scenario of MSW generation. - Abstract: Accurate forecasting of municipal solid waste (MSW) generation is crucial and fundamental for the planning, operation and optimization of any MSW management system. Comprehensive information on waste generation for month-scale, medium-term and long-term time scales is especially needed, considering the necessity of MSW management upgrade facing many developing countries. Several existing models are available but of little use in forecasting MSW generation at multiple time scales. The goal of this study is to propose a hybrid model that combines the seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA) model and grey system theory to forecast MSW generation at multiple time scales without needing to consider other variables such as demographics and socioeconomic factors. To demonstrate its applicability, a case study of Xiamen City, China was performed. Results show that the model is robust enough to fit and forecast seasonal and annual dynamics of MSW generation at month-scale, medium- and long-term time scales with the desired accuracy. In the month-scale, MSW generation in Xiamen City will peak at 132.2 thousand tonnes in July 2015 – 1.5 times the volume in July 2010. In the medium term, annual MSW generation will increase to 1518.1 thousand tonnes by 2015 at an average growth rate of 10%. In the long term, a large volume of MSW will be output annually and will increase to 2486.3 thousand tonnes by 2020 – 2.5 times the value for 2010. The hybrid model proposed in this paper can enable decision makers to

  20. A hybrid procedure for MSW generation forecasting at multiple time scales in Xiamen City, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We propose a hybrid model that combines seasonal SARIMA model and grey system theory. ► The model is robust at multiple time scales with the anticipated accuracy. ► At month-scale, the SARIMA model shows good representation for monthly MSW generation. ► At medium-term time scale, grey relational analysis could yield the MSW generation. ► At long-term time scale, GM (1, 1) provides a basic scenario of MSW generation. - Abstract: Accurate forecasting of municipal solid waste (MSW) generation is crucial and fundamental for the planning, operation and optimization of any MSW management system. Comprehensive information on waste generation for month-scale, medium-term and long-term time scales is especially needed, considering the necessity of MSW management upgrade facing many developing countries. Several existing models are available but of little use in forecasting MSW generation at multiple time scales. The goal of this study is to propose a hybrid model that combines the seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA) model and grey system theory to forecast MSW generation at multiple time scales without needing to consider other variables such as demographics and socioeconomic factors. To demonstrate its applicability, a case study of Xiamen City, China was performed. Results show that the model is robust enough to fit and forecast seasonal and annual dynamics of MSW generation at month-scale, medium- and long-term time scales with the desired accuracy. In the month-scale, MSW generation in Xiamen City will peak at 132.2 thousand tonnes in July 2015 – 1.5 times the volume in July 2010. In the medium term, annual MSW generation will increase to 1518.1 thousand tonnes by 2015 at an average growth rate of 10%. In the long term, a large volume of MSW will be output annually and will increase to 2486.3 thousand tonnes by 2020 – 2.5 times the value for 2010. The hybrid model proposed in this paper can enable decision makers to

  1. Simultaneous quantification of α-lactalbumin and β-casein in human milk using ultra-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry based on their signature peptides and winged isotope internal standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qi; Zhang, Jingshun; Ke, Xing; Lai, Shiyun; Li, Duo; Yang, Jinchuan; Mo, Weimin; Ren, Yiping

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, there is an increasing need to measure the concentration of individual proteins in human milk, instead of total human milk proteins. Due to lack of human milk protein standards, there are only few quantification methods established. The objective of the present work was to develop a simple and rapid quantification method for simultaneous determination of α-lactalbumin and β-casein in human milk using signature peptides according to a modified quantitative proteomics strategy. The internal standards containing the signature peptide sequences were synthesized with isotope-labeled amino acids. The purity of synthesized peptides as standards was determined by amino acid analysis method and area normalization method. The contents of α-lactalbumin and β-casein in human milk were measured according to the equimolar relationship between the two proteins and their corresponding signature peptides. The method validation results showed a satisfied linearity (R(2)>0.99) and recoveries (97.2-102.5% for α-lactalbumin and 99.5-100.3% for β-casein). The limit of quantification for α-lactalbumin and β-casein was 8.0mg/100g and 1.2mg/100g, respectively. CVs for α-lactalbumin and β-casein in human milk were 5.2% and 3.0%. The contents of α-lactalbumin and β-casein in 147 human milk samples were successfully determined by the established method and their contents were 205.5-578.2mg/100g and 116.4-467.4mg/100g at different lactation stages. The developed method allows simultaneously determination of α-lactalbumin and β-casein in human milk. The quantitative strategy based on signature peptide should be applicable to other endogenous proteins in breast milk and other body fluids. PMID:27295510

  2. The Global Monsoon across Time Scales: is there coherent variability of regional monsoons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P. X.; Wang, B.; Cheng, H.; Fasullo, J.; Guo, Z. T.; Kiefer, T.; Liu, Z. Y.

    2014-05-01

    Monsoon has earned increasing attention from the climate community since the last century, yet only recently regional monsoons have been recognized as a global system. It remains a debated issue, however, as to what extent and at which time scales the global monsoon can be viewed as a major mode of climate variability. For this purpose a PAGES Working Group (WG) was set up to investigate the concept of the global monsoon and its future research directions. The WG's synthesis is presented here. On the basis of observation and proxy data, the WG found that the regional monsoons can vary coherently, although not perfectly, at various time scales, ranging from interannual, interdecadal, centennial and millennial, up to orbital and tectonics time scales, conforming the global monsoon concept across time scales. Within the global monsoon system each subsystem has its own features depending on its geographic and topographic conditions. Discrimination of global and regional components in the monsoon system is a key to reveal the driving factors of monsoon variations, hence the global monsoon concept helps to enhance our understanding and to improve future projection of the regional monsoons. This paper starts with a historical review of the global monsoon concept in both modern and paleo-climatology, and an assessment of monsoon proxies used in regional and global scales. The main body of the paper is devoted to a summary of observation data at various time scales, providing evidence for the coherent global monsoon system. The paper concludes with a projection of future monsoon shifts into a warming world. The synthesis will be followed by a companying paper to discuss driving mechanisms and outstanding issues in the global monsoon studies.

  3. Time Scale Optimization and the Hunt for Astronomical Cycles in Deep Time Strata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Stephen R.

    2016-04-01

    A valuable attribute of astrochronology is the direct link between chronometer and climate change, providing a remarkable opportunity to constrain the evolution of the surficial Earth System. Consequently, the hunt for astronomical cycles in strata has spurred the development of a rich conceptual framework for climatic/oceanographic change, and has allowed exploration of the geologic record with unprecedented temporal resolution. Accompanying these successes, however, has been a persistent skepticism about appropriate astrochronologic testing and circular reasoning: how does one reliably test for astronomical cycles in stratigraphic data, especially when time is poorly constrained? From this perspective, it would seem that the merits and promise of astrochronology (e.g., a geologic time scale measured in ≤400 kyr increments) also serves as its Achilles heel, if the confirmation of such short rhythms defies rigorous statistical testing. To address these statistical challenges in astrochronologic testing, a new approach has been developed that (1) explicitly evaluates time scale uncertainty, (2) is resilient to common problems associated with spectrum confidence level assessment and 'multiple testing', and (3) achieves high statistical power under a wide range of conditions (it can identify astronomical cycles when present in data). Designated TimeOpt (for "time scale optimization"; Meyers 2015), the method employs a probabilistic linear regression model framework to investigate amplitude modulation and frequency ratios (bundling) in stratigraphic data, while simultaneously determining the optimal time scale. This presentation will review the TimeOpt method, and demonstrate how the flexible statistical framework can be further extended to evaluate (and optimize upon) complex sedimentation rate models, enhancing the statistical power of the approach, and addressing the challenge of unsteady sedimentation. Meyers, S. R. (2015), The evaluation of eccentricity

  4. A cardioactive peptide from the southern armyworm, Spodoptera eridania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, K; Hackett, M; Cirelli, M A; Schegg, K M; Wang, H; Shabanowitz, J; Hunt, D F; Schooley, D A

    1999-01-01

    A cardioactive peptide was isolated from extracts of whole heads of the southern armyworm, Spodoptera eridania. This peptide has the sequence ENFAVGCTPGYQRTADGRCKPTF (Mr = 2516.8), determined from both Edman sequencing and tandem mass spectrometry in combination with off-line micropreparative capillary liquid chromatography. This peptide, termed Spoer-CAP23, has excitatory effects on a semi-isolated heart from larval Manduca sexta, causing an inotropic effect at low concentrations of peptide and chronotropic and inotropic effects at high doses. The threshold concentration for stimulatory effects of the synthetic peptide on the semi-isolated heart was about 1 nM, suggesting a physiological role as a neuropeptide. PMID:10098624

  5. Separation of N-derivatized di- and tri-peptide stereoisomers by micro-liquid chromatography using a quinidine-based monolithic column - Analysis of l-carnosine in dietary supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiqin; Sánchez-López, Elena; Han, Hai; Wu, Huihui; Zhu, Peijie; Crommen, Jacques; Marina, Maria Luisa; Jiang, Zhengjin

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, a new analytical methodology was developed enabling the enantiomeric determination of N-derivatized di- and tri-peptides in dietary supplements using chiral micro-LC on a monolithic column consisting of poly(O-9-[2-(methacryloyloxy)-ethylcarbamoyl]-10,11-dihydroquinidine-co-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) (poly(MQD-co-HEMA-co-EDMA)). After optimization of the mobile phase conditions, a baseline resolution of the stereoisomers of 24 out of 53 N-derivatized di- and tri-peptides was obtained. 3,5-Dinitrobenzoyl- and 3,5-dichlorobenzoyl-peptide stereoisomers were separated with exceptionally high selectivity and resolution. The monolithic column was then applied to the quantitative analysis of l-carnosine and its enantiomeric impurity in three different commercial dietary supplements. Method validation demonstrated satisfactory results in terms of linearity, precision, selectivity, accuracy and limits of detection and quantification. The determined amounts of l-carnosine in commercial formulations were in agreement with the labeled content for all analyzed samples, and the enantiomeric impurity was found to be below the limit of detection (LOD), showing the potential of the poly(MQD-co-HEMA-co-EDMA) monolithic column as a reliable tool for the quality control of l-carnosine in dietary supplements by micro-LC. PMID:26410182

  6. Enrichment of Phosphopeptides via Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaney, Danielle L; Villén, Judit

    2016-01-01

    Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) is a frequently used method for the enrichment of phosphorylated peptides from complex, cellular lysate-derived peptide mixtures. Here we outline an IMAC protocol that uses iron-chelated magnetic beads to selectively isolate phosphorylated peptides for mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis. Under acidic conditions, negatively charged phosphoryl modifications preferentially bind to positively charged metal ions (e.g., Fe(3+), Ga(3+)) on the beads. After washing away nonphosphorylated peptides, a pH shift to basic conditions causes the elution of bound phosphopeptides from the metal ion. Under optimal conditions, very high specificity for phosphopeptides can be achieved. PMID:26933247

  7. Chaos anticontrol and synchronization of three time scales brushless DC motor system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge Zhengming E-mail: zmg@cc.nctu.edu.tw; Cheng Juiwen; Chen Yensheng

    2004-12-01

    Chaos anticontrol of three time scale brushless dc motors and chaos synchronization of different order systems are studied. Nondimensional dynamic equations of three time scale brushless DC motor system are presented. Using numerical results, such as phase diagram, bifurcation diagram, and Lyapunov exponent, periodic and chaotic motions can be observed. By adding constant term, periodic square wave, the periodic triangle wave, the periodic sawtooth wave, and kx vertical bar x vertical bar term, to achieve anticontrol of chaotic or periodic systems, it is found that more chaotic phenomena of the system can be observed. Then, by coupled terms and linearization of error dynamics, we obtain the partial synchronization of two different order systems, i.e. brushless DC motor system and rate gyroscope system.

  8. Relativistic astronomical time scales, relativistic scaling of astronomical constants, and the system of astronomical units

    CERN Document Server

    Klioner, S A

    2005-01-01

    The paper is devoted to a detailed explanation of relativistic scaling of astronomical quantities induced by times scales \\TDB and \\TT. It is argued that scaled time scales, scaled spatial coordinates and scaled masses should be considered as distinct quantities which themselves can be expressed in any units (rather then numerical values expressed in some non-SI units ("TDB units" and "TT units") as can be sometimes found in the literature). The system of astronomical units in the relativistic framework is discussed. The whole freedom in the definitions of the systems of astronomical units for TCB and TDB is demonstrated. A number of possible ways to freeze the freedom are shown and discussed. It is argued that in the near future one should probably think about converting AU into a defined quantity (by fixing its value in SI meters).

  9. Chaos anticontrol and synchronization of three time scales brushless DC motor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaos anticontrol of three time scale brushless dc motors and chaos synchronization of different order systems are studied. Nondimensional dynamic equations of three time scale brushless DC motor system are presented. Using numerical results, such as phase diagram, bifurcation diagram, and Lyapunov exponent, periodic and chaotic motions can be observed. By adding constant term, periodic square wave, the periodic triangle wave, the periodic sawtooth wave, and kx vertical bar x vertical bar term, to achieve anticontrol of chaotic or periodic systems, it is found that more chaotic phenomena of the system can be observed. Then, by coupled terms and linearization of error dynamics, we obtain the partial synchronization of two different order systems, i.e. brushless DC motor system and rate gyroscope system

  10. Modelling solar irradiance variability on time scales from minutes to months

    CERN Document Server

    Seleznyov, Andrey D; Krivova, Natalie A; 10.1051/0004-6361/200811138

    2013-01-01

    We analyze and model total solar irradiance variability on time scales from minutes to months, excluding variations due to p-mode oscillations, using a combination of convective and magnetic components. These include granulation, the magnetic network, faculae and sunspots. Analysis of VIRGO data shows that on periods of a day or longer solar variability depends on magnetic activity, but is nearly independent at shorter periods. We assume that only granulation affects the solar irradiance variability on time scales from minutes to hours. Granulation is described as a large sample of bright cells and dark lanes that evolve according to rules deduced from observations and radiation hydrodynamic simulations. Comparison of this model combined with a high time resolution magnetic-field based irradiance reconstruction, with solar data reveals a good correspondence except at periods of 10 to 30 hours. This suggests that the model is missing some power at these periods, which may be due to the absence of supergranulat...

  11. Multiple dynamical time-scales in networks with hierarchically nested modular organization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sitabhra Sinha; Swarup Poria

    2011-11-01

    Many natural and engineered complex networks have intricate mesoscopic organization, e.g., the clustering of the constituent nodes into several communities or modules. Often, such modularity is manifested at several different hierarchical levels, where the clusters defined at one level appear as elementary entities at the next higher level. Using a simple model of a hierarchical modular network, we show that such a topological structure gives rise to characteristic time-scale separation between dynamics occurring at different levels of the hierarchy. This generalizes our earlier result for simple modular networks, where fast intramodular and slow intermodular processes were clearly distinguished. Investigating the process of synchronization of oscillators in a hierarchical modular network, we show the existence of as many distinct time-scales as there are hierarchical levels in the system. This suggests a possible functional role of such mesoscopic organization principle in natural systems, viz., in the dynamical separation of events occurring at different spatial scales.

  12. Forced bursting and transition mechanism in CO oxidation with three time scales

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xiang-Hong; Bi Qin-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    The mathematical model of CO oxidation with three time scales on platinum group metals is investigated,in which order gaps between the time scales related to external perturbation and the rates associated with different chemical reaction steps exist.Forced bursters,such as point-point type forced bursting and point-cycle type forced bursting,are presented.The bifurcation mechanism of forced bursting is novel,and the phenomenon where two different kinds of spiking states coexist in point-cycle type forced bursting has not been reported in previous work.A double-parameter bifurcation set of the fast subsystem is explored to reveal the transition mechanisms of different forced bursters with parameter variation.

  13. Forced bursting and transition mechanism in CO oxidation with three time scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mathematical model of CO oxidation with three time scales on platinum group metals is investigated, in which order gaps between the time scales related to external perturbation and the rates associated with different chemical reaction steps exist. Forced bursters, such as point—point type forced bursting and point—cycle type forced bursting, are presented. The bifurcation mechanism of forced bursting is novel, and the phenomenon where two different kinds of spiking states coexist in point—cycle type forced bursting has not been reported in previous work. A double-parameter bifurcation set of the fast subsystem is explored to reveal the transition mechanisms of different forced bursters with parameter variation. (general)

  14. Small-time scale network traffic prediction based on a local support vector machine regression model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng Qing-Fang; Chen Yue-Hui; Peng Yu-Hua

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we apply the nonlinear time series analysis method to small-time scale traffic measurement data. The prediction-based method is used to determine the embedding dimension of the traffic data. Based on the reconstructed phase space, the local support vector machine prediction method is used to predict the traffic measurement data, and the BIC-based neighbouring point selection method is used to choose the number of the nearest neighbouring points for the local support vector machine regression model. The experimental results show that the local support vector machine prediction method whose neighbouring points are optimized can effectively predict the small-time scale traffic measurement data and can reproduce the statistical features of real traffic measurements.

  15. AN IMPROVED ALGORITHM OF GMM VOICE CONVERSION SYSTEM BASED ON CHANGING THE TIME-SCALE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Ying; Zhang Linghua

    2011-01-01

    This paper improves and presents an advanced method of the voice conversion system based on Gaussian Mixture Models (GMM) models by changing the time-scale of speech.The Speech Transformation and Representation using Adaptive Interpolation of weiGHTed spectrum (STRAIGHT) model is adopted to extract the spectrum features,and the GMM models are trained to generate the conversion function.The spectrum features of a source speech will be converted by the conversion function.The time-scale of speech is changed by extracting the converted features and adding to the spectrum.The conversion voice was evaluated by subjective and objective measurements.The results confirm that the transformed speech not only approximates the characteristics of the target speaker,but also more natural and more intelligible.

  16. Estimation of Capital Asset Pricing Model at Different Time Scales Application to French Stock Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najet Rhaiem

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research focus is on the estimation of the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM at different time scales for French’s stock market. The proposed methods makes possible to quantify the correlation between the return of a stock and its beta at different time scales. Our sample is composed of twenty six stocks that were actively traded over 2002-2005. The empirical results show that the relationship between the return of a stock and its beta becomes stronger as the scale increase, but the test of the linearity between the tow variables show that there is an important ambiguity. Therefore, the predictions of the CAPM are more relevant at a medium-term horizon in a multi-scale framework as compared to short time horizons.

  17. Time scales of epidemic spread and risk perception on adaptive networks

    CERN Document Server

    Zhong, Li-Xin; Ren, Fei; Li, Ping-Ping; Chen, Bi-Hui

    2010-01-01

    Incorporating dynamic contact networks and delayed awareness into a contagion model with memory, we study the spreading patterns of infectious diseases in connected populations. It is found that the spread of an infectious disease is not only related to the past exposures of an individual to the infected but also to the time scales of risk perception reflected in the social network adaptation. The epidemic threshold $p_{c}$ is found to decrease with the rise of the time scale parameter s and the memory length T, they satisfy the equation $p_{c} =\\frac{1}{T}+ \\frac{\\omega T}{a^s(1-e^{-\\omega T^2/a^s})}$. Both the lifetime of the epidemic and the topological property of the evolved network are considered. The standard deviation $\\sigma_{d}$ of the degree distribution increases with the rise of the absorbing time $t_{c}$, a power-law relation $\\sigma_{d}=mt_{c}^\\gamma$ is found.

  18. A Visual Method of Time Scale Determination using a PC for Radio Sources

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yong Huang; Jun-Hui Fan; Jing Pan

    2011-03-01

    Variability is one of the extremely observational properties. In the radio bands, variability is caused by the shock in the jet. In this case, emissions increase rapidly following an exponential curve, and then decrease rapidly also in an exponential curve. The variability time scale is important with regard to the physics carrying on in the jet. However, it is not easy to fit the light curve. In this paper, we proposed a method of light curve fitting on a PC machine, in which the theoretical exponential light curve is adopted to the observations using the least regression method. Using this method, anybody can fit the light curve and get the time scale by moving and clicking themouse.We also used this method to some light curves obtained from the archive and compared our results with those in the literature.

  19. On balanced approximations for time integration of multiple time scale systems

    CERN Document Server

    Knoll, D A; Margolin, L G; Mousseau, V A

    2003-01-01

    The effect of various numerical approximations used to solve linear and nonlinear problems with multiple time scales is studied in the framework of modified equation analysis (MEA). First, MEA is used to study the effect of linearization and splitting in a simple nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE), and in a linear partial differential equation (PDE). Several time discretizations of the ODE and PDE are considered, and the resulting truncation terms are compared analytically and numerically. It is demonstrated quantitatively that both linearization and splitting can result in accuracy degradation when a computational time step larger than any of the competing (fast) time scales is employed. Many of the issues uncovered on the simple problems are shown to persist in more realistic applications. Specifically, several differencing schemes using linearization and/or time splitting are applied to problems in nonequilibrium radiation-diffusion, magnetohydrodynamics, and shallow water flow, and their solut...

  20. Stability analysis of nonlinear systems by multiple time scaling. [using perturbation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morino, L.

    1974-01-01

    The asymptotic solution for the transient analysis of a general nonlinear system in the neighborhood of the stability boundary was obtained by using the multiple-time-scaling asymptotic-expansion method. The nonlinearities are assumed to be of algebraic nature. Terms of order epsilon to the 3rd power (where epsilon is the order of amplitude of the unknown) are included in the solution. The solution indicates that there is always a limit cycle which is stable (unstable) and exists above (below) the stability boundary if the nonlinear terms are stabilizing (destabilizing). Extension of the solution to include fifth order nonlinear terms is also presented. Comparisons with harmonic balance and with multiple-time-scaling solution of panel flutter equations are also included.

  1. Modes of correlated angular motion in live cells across three distinct time scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Particle tracking experiments with high speed digital microscopy yield the positions and trajectories of lipid droplets inside living cells. Angular correlation analysis shows that the lipid droplets have uncorrelated motion at short time scales (τ 10 ms, becomes persistent, indicating directed movement. The motion at all time scales is associated with the lipid droplets being tethered to and driven along the microtubule network. The point at which the angular correlation changes from anti-persistent to persistent motion corresponds to the cross over between sub-diffusive and super diffusive motion, as observed by mean square displacement analysis. Correct analysis of the angular correlations of the detector noise is found to be crucial in modelling the observed phenomena. (paper)

  2. Time-scale effects on the gain-loss asymmetry in stock indices

    CERN Document Server

    Sándor, Bulcsú

    2016-01-01

    The gain-loss asymmetry, observed in the inverse statistics of stock indices is present for logarithmic return levels that are over $2\\%$, and it is the result of the non-Pearson type auto-correlations in the index. These non-Pearson type correlations can be viewed also as functionally dependent daily volatilities, extending for a finite time interval. A generalized time-window shuffling method is used to show the existence of such auto-correlations. Their characteristic time-scale proves to be smaller (less than $25$ trading days) than what was previously believed. It is also found that this characteristic time-scale has decreased with the appearance of program trading in the stock market transactions. Connections with the leverage effect are also established.

  3. Virtual Testing of Large Composite Structures: A Multiple Length/Time-Scale Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigliotti, Luigi; Pinho, Silvestre T.

    2015-12-01

    This paper illustrates a multiple length/time-scale framework for the virtual testing of large composite structures. Such framework hinges upon a Mesh Superposition Technique (MST) for the coupling between areas of the structure modelled at different length-scales and upon an efficient solid-to-shell numerical homogenization which exploits the internal symmetries of Unit Cells (UCs). Using this framework, it is possible to minimize the areas of the structure modelled at the lowest- (and computationally demanding) scales and the computational cost required to calculate the homogenised to be used in the higher-scales subdomains of multiscale FE models, as well as to simulate the mechanical response of different parts of the structure using different solvers, depending on where they are expected to provide the most computationally efficient solution. The relevance and key-aspects of the multiple length/time-scale framework are demonstrated through the analysis of a real-sized aeronautical composite component.

  4. Virtual water trade and time scales for loss of water sustainability: a comparative regional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Prashant; Nishad, Shiv Narayan

    2015-01-01

    Assessment and policy design for sustainability in primary resources like arable land and water need to adopt long-term perspective; even small but persistent effects like net export of water may influence sustainability through irreversible losses. With growing consumption, this virtual water trade has become an important element in the water sustainability of a nation. We estimate and contrast the virtual (embedded) water trades of two populous nations, India and China, to present certain quantitative measures and time scales. Estimates show that export of embedded water alone can lead to loss of water sustainability. With the current rate of net export of water (embedded) in the end products, India is poised to lose its entire available water in less than 1000 years; much shorter time scales are implied in terms of water for production. The two cases contrast and exemplify sustainable and non-sustainable virtual water trade in long term perspective. PMID:25790964

  5. Factors Controlling Variability in the Oxidative Capacity of the Troposphere on Interannual to Interglacial Time Scales

    OpenAIRE

    Murray, Lee Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This thesis explores the natural forces controlling variability of the tropospheric oxidants on interannual to glacial-interglacial time scales. The oxidants (primarily OH and ozone) determine the lifetime of many trace gases of human interest, including air pollutants and long-lived greenhouse gases such as methane. The oxidants respond to meteorological conditions, precursor emissions (natural and anthropogenic), and surface and overhead stratospheric boundary conditions, all of which have ...

  6. Chaos synchronization and parameter identification of three time scales brushless DC motor system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Z.-M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 Ta Hsueh Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: zmg@cc.nctu.edu.tw; Cheng, J.-W. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 Ta Hsueh Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2005-04-01

    Chaotic anticontrol and chaos synchronization of brushless DC motor system are studied in this paper. Nondimensional dynamic equations of three time scale brushless DC motor system are presented. Using numerical results, such as phase diagram, bifurcation diagram, and Lyapunov exponent, periodic and chaotic motions can be observed. Then, chaos synchronization of two identical systems via additional inputs and Lyapunov stability theory are studied. And further, the parameter of the system is traced via adaptive control and random optimization method.

  7. Mixed-mode oscillations in a multiple time scale phantom bursting system

    OpenAIRE

    Krupa, Maciej; Vidal, Alexandre; Desroches, Mathieu; Clément, Frédérique

    2012-01-01

    38 pages, 16 figures. International audience In this work we study mixed mode oscillations in a model of secretion of GnRH (Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone). The model is a phantom burster consisting of two feedforward coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo systems, with three time scales. The forcing system (Regulator) evolves on the slowest scale and acts by moving the slow nullcline of the forced system (Secretor). There are three modes of dynamics: pulsatility (transient relaxation oscillation), su...

  8. New Insights on the Variability of Ecosystem Functioning Across Time Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, C.; Mahecha, M. D.; Frank, D. C.; Koutsoyiannis, D.

    2015-12-01

    Ecosystem functioning is monitored worldwide over several decades. However, a comparative in-depth characterization of the temporal variability of essential ecosystem processes, such as for example carbon assimilation and respiration is still lacking. The intra-annual (sub-diurnal, diurnal, and seasonal) variability of these processes can be well described by basic mechanisms such as the plant response to light. In contrast, the inter-annual variability and its origins and magnitude, remain highly uncertain. To date, there have only been a few attempts to investigate these issues across sites, ecosystems variables, and time scales, yet a general and comprehensive overview is outstanding. Here, we present a synthesis of a wide range of observations over Europe, namely: (i) eddy covariance measurements of carbon, energy, and water fluxes, (ii) satellite data of leaf area index and photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by plants, (iii) tree-ring widths, and (iv) dendrometer measurements of tree stem radius changes, and we analyze their variability from the half-hourly to the decadal time scale. Our analysis shows that all ecosystems can be characterized by three distinct regimes of variability (sub-daily, daily-seasonal, and seasonal-annual) confined within the ranges of the available resources, i.e., water (precipitation) and energy (radiation and temperature). We find a convergence of the range of variability of hydrometeorological drivers. Surprisingly, such convergence is not reflected in the variability of the ecosystem responses across sites. Although the magnitude of variability of ecosystem functioning varies across sites, the temporal dependences present the same characteristics over time scales spanning five orders of magnitude. We show that this behaviour can be well simulated by combining simple stochastic models with deterministic harmonics (diurnal and annual cycles). This allows us to statistically characterize the short- and long

  9. Diffusion Time-Scale Invariance, Markovization Processes and Memory Effects in Lennard-Jones Liquids

    OpenAIRE

    Yulmetyev, Renat M.; Mokshin, Anatolii V.; Hänggi, Peter

    2004-01-01

    We report the results of calculation of diffusion coefficients for Lennard-Jones liquids, based on the idea of time-scale invariance of relaxation processes in liquids. The results were compared with the molecular dynamics data for Lennard-Jones system and a good agreement of our theory with these data over a wide range of densities and temperatures was obtained. By calculations of the non-Markovity parameter we have estimated numerically statistical memory effects of diffusion in detail.

  10. Chaos synchronization and parameter identification of three time scales brushless DC motor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaotic anticontrol and chaos synchronization of brushless DC motor system are studied in this paper. Nondimensional dynamic equations of three time scale brushless DC motor system are presented. Using numerical results, such as phase diagram, bifurcation diagram, and Lyapunov exponent, periodic and chaotic motions can be observed. Then, chaos synchronization of two identical systems via additional inputs and Lyapunov stability theory are studied. And further, the parameter of the system is traced via adaptive control and random optimization method

  11. Chaos synchronization and parameters identification of single time scale brushless DC motors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaos synchronization and parameters identification of single time scale brushless dc motors are studied in this paper. In order to analyze a variety of periodic and chaotic phenomena, we employ several numerical techniques such as phase portrait, bifurcation diagram, and Lyapunov exponents. By the adaptive control, the improved backstepping design method, the Gerschgorin theorem, and by addition of a monitor, chaos synchronization of two identical BLDCM systems are presented. Then, by the adaptive control, and the random optimization method, parameters identification is approached

  12. A General Delta-Nabla Calculus of Variations on Time Scales with Application to Economics

    OpenAIRE

    Dryl, Monika; Torres, Delfim F. M.

    2014-01-01

    We consider a general problem of the calculus of variations on time scales with a cost functional that is the composition of a certain scalar function with delta and nabla integrals of a vector valued field. Euler-Lagrange delta-nabla differential equations are proved, which lead to important insights in the process of discretization. Application of the obtained results to a firm that wants to program its production and investment policies to reach a given production rate and to maximize its ...

  13. Millisecond time scale atmospheric light pulses associated with solar and magnetospheric activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogelman, H.

    1973-01-01

    By using a wide-angle photomultiplier system a class of millisecond time scale diffuse atmospheric light emission of terrestrial origin has been discovered. These fast atmospheric pulsation events also show damped oscillations around 10-kHz frequency, which distinguishes them from ordinary lightning-type events. Evidence is presented for the enhancement in the rate of these events induced by solar flare activity.

  14. Existence of Positive Solutions for Higher Order Boundary Value Problem on Time Scales

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE DA-PENG; LIU YANG; SUN MING-ZHE; Li Yong

    2013-01-01

    In this paper,we investigate the existence of positive solutions of a class higher order boundary value problems on time scales.The class of boundary value problems educes a four-point (or three-point or two-point) boundary value problems,for which some similar results are established.Our approach relies on the Krasnosel'skii fixed point theorem.The result of this paper is new and extends previously known results.

  15. On submersivity assumption for nonlinear control systems on homogeneous time scales

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kotta, U.; Rehák, Branislav; Wyrwas, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 1 (2011), s. 25-37. ISSN 1736-6046 Grant ostatní: ISPS(XE) PE 10022 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : time scale * nonlinear system * submersion * submersive system. Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory Impact factor: 0.488, year: 2011 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2011/TR/rehak-0366024.pdf

  16. Glottal closure instant and voice source analysis using time-scale lines of maximum amplitude

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Christophe D’Alessandro; Nicolas Sturmel

    2011-10-01

    1Time-scale representation of voiced speech is applied to voice quality analysis, by introducing the Line of Maximum Amplitude (LoMA) method. This representation takes advantage of the tree patterns observed for voiced speech periods in the time-scale domain. For each period, the optimal LoMA is computed by linking amplitude maxima at each scale of a wavelet transform, using a dynamic programming algorithm. A time-scale analysis of the linear acoustic model of speech production shows several interesting properties. The LoMA points to the glottal closure instants. The LoMA phase delay is linked to the voice open quotient. The cumulated amplitude along the LoMA is related to voicing amplitude. The LoMA spectral centre of gravity is an indication of voice spectral tilt. Following these theoretical considerations, experimental results are reported. Comparative evaluation demonstrates that the LoMA is an effective method for the detection of Glottal Closure Instants (GCI). The effectiveness of LoMA analysis for open quotient, amplitude and spectral tilt estimations is also discussed with the help of some examples.

  17. Building a minimum frustration framework for brain functions over long time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzi, Arturo; Flå, Tor; Peters, James F

    2016-08-01

    The minimum frustration principle (MFP) is a computational approach stating that, over the long time scales of evolution, proteins' free energy decreases more than expected by thermodynamical constraints as their amino acids assume conformations progressively closer to the lowest energetic state. This Review shows that this general principle, borrowed from protein folding dynamics, can also be fruitfully applied to nervous function. Highlighting the foremost role of energetic requirements, macromolecular dynamics, and above all intertwined time scales in brain activity, the MFP elucidates a wide range of mental processes from sensations to memory retrieval. Brain functions are compared with trajectories that, over long nervous time scales, are attracted toward the low-energy bottom of funnel-like structures characterized by both robustness and plasticity. We discuss how the principle, derived explicitly from evolution and selection of a funneling structure from microdynamics of contacts, is unlike other brain models equipped with energy landscapes, such as the Bayesian and free energy principles and the Hopfield networks. In summary, we make available a novel approach to brain function cast in a biologically informed fashion, with the potential to be operationalized and assessed empirically. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27114266

  18. Effects of moonlight on the capturability of frugivorous phyllostomid bats (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae at different time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco A. R. Mello

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Some bat species seem to be lunar phobic, i.e., they avoid flying in bright areas or during bright periods of the night; however, the evidence is still controversial. We think that part of this controversy comes from pooling data on bat captures and moonlight intensity according to broad categories, such as moon phases, which conceal the high variability among nights. Therefore, we used detailed, long-term field data on three phyllostomid bat species, in order to test the hypothesis of lunar phobia at two different time scales: 1 among nights, by pooling data of different nights according to moon phases and testing for differences in the distribution of captures; and 2 within a night, by analyzing the relationship between capturability and moonlight intensity (measured as illuminance in one-hour intervals for 29 individual nights. Although most captures of the studied bat species occurred in the first half of the night, their activity pattern varied largely among nights, and was not always unimodal as commonly assumed. At the larger time scale, all studied bat species showed evidence of lunar phobia, as they were more frequently captured on dark moon phases. Nevertheless, at the smaller time scale, only Carollia perspicillata (Linnaeus, 1758 was less frequently captured on brighter periods of the night. We propose that the unimodal activity pattern assumed for frugivorous phyllostomid bats may be an artifact of data organization, and that activity and lunar phobia are much more variable than previously assumed.

  19. A Black Hole Mass-Variability Time Scale Correlation at Submillimeter Wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Bower, Geoffrey C; Markoff, Sera; Gurwell, Mark A; Rao, Ramprasad; McHardy, Ian

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the light curves of 413 radio sources at submillimeter wavelengths using data from the Submillimeter Array calibrator database. The database includes more than 20,000 observations at 1.3 and 0.8 mm that span 13 years. We model the light curves as a damped random walk and determine a characteristic time scale $\\tau$ at which the variability amplitude saturates. For the vast majority of sources, primarily blazars and BL Lac objects, we find only lower limits on $\\tau$. For two nearby low luminosity active galactic nuclei, M81 and M87, however, we measure $\\tau=1.6^{+3.0}_{-0.9}$ days and $\\tau=45^{+61}_{-24}$ days, respectively ($2\\sigma$ errors). Including the previously measured $\\tau=0.33\\pm 0.16$ days for Sgr A*, we show an approximately linear correlation between $\\tau$ and black hole mass for these nearby LLAGN. Other LLAGN with spectra that peak in the submm are expected to follow this correlation. These characteristic time scales are comparable to the minimum time scale for emission processes...

  20. Multiband optical-NIR variability of blazars on diverse time-scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Aditi; Gupta, Alok C.; Bachev, R.; Strigachev, A.; Semkov, E.; Wiita, Paul J.; Böttcher, M.; Boeva, S.; Gaur, H.; Gu, M. F.; Peneva, S.; Ibryamov, S.; Pandey, U. S.

    2015-08-01

    To search for optical variability on a wide range of time-scales, we have carried out photometric monitoring of two flat spectrum radio quasars, 3C 454.3 and 3C 279, plus one BL Lac, S5 0716+714, all of which have been exhibiting remarkably high activity and pronounced variability at all wavelengths. CCD magnitudes in B, V, R, and I passbands were determined for ˜7000 new optical observations from 114 nights made during 2011-2014, with an average length of ˜4 h each, at seven optical telescopes: four in Bulgaria, one in Greece, and two in India. We measured multiband optical flux and colour variations on diverse time-scales. Discrete correlation functions were computed among B, V, R, and I observations, to search for any time delays. We found weak correlations in some cases with no significant time lags. The structure function method was used to estimate any characteristic time-scales of variability. We also investigated the spectral energy distribution of the three blazars using B, V, R, I, J, and K passband data. We found that the sources almost always follow a bluer-when-brighter trend. We discuss possible physical causes of the observed spectral variability.

  1. Estimation of Time Scales in Unsteady Flows in a Turbomachinery Rig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewalle, Jacques; Ashpis, David E.

    2004-01-01

    Time scales in turbulent and transitional flow provide a link between experimental data and modeling, both in terms of physical content and for quantitative assessment. The problem of interest here is the definition of time scales in an unsteady flow. Using representative samples of data from GEAE low pressure turbine experiment in low speed research turbine facility with wake-induced transition, we document several methods to extract dominant frequencies, and compare the results. We show that conventional methods of time scale evaluation (based on autocorrelation functions and on Fourier spectra) and wavelet-based methods provide similar information when applied to stationary signals. We also show the greater flexibility of the wavelet-based methods when dealing with intermittent or strongly modulated data, as are encountered in transitioning boundary layers and in flows with unsteady forcing associated with wake passing. We define phase-averaged dominant frequencies that characterize the turbulence associated with freestream conditions and with the passing wakes downstream of a rotor. The relevance of these results for modeling is discussed in the paper.

  2. Measuring collective behaviour of multicellular ensembles: role of space–time scales

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Rajesh; Somdatta Sinha

    2008-06-01

    Living systems are spectacular examples of spatiotemporally organized structures. During the development of complex organization there is dynamic equilibrium between the local and global processes acting at the intra- and intercellular levels in multiple space and time scales. Although in modelling studies such spatiotemporal systems can be described by different space–time scales and at many organizational levels, the experimental quantities measured and predictions useful for practical applications are at a macroscopic (coarser or averaged) level/scale; these are limited by the resolution of the measuring method and experimental protocol. In this work, we address whether the spatiotemporal collective dynamics exhibited by a multiscale system can discriminate between, or be borne out by, the coarse-grained and averaged measurements done at different spatial and temporal scales. Using a simple model of a ring of cells, we show that measurements of both spatial and spatiotemporal average behaviour in this multicellular ensemble can mask the variety of collective dynamics observed at other space–time scales, and exhibit completely different behaviours. Such outcomes of measurements can lead to incomplete and incorrect understanding of physiological functions and pathogenesis in multicell ensembles.

  3. Cromatografia unificada Unified chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carin von Mühlen

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The scope of this study encompasses an overview of the principles of unified chromatography as well as the principles of chromatographic techniques as applied to unified systems, which include gas chromatography, liquid chromatography, supercritical fluid chromatography, high temperature and high pressure liquid chromatography, micro-liquid chromatography, enhanced fluidity chromatography, and solvating gas chromatography. Theoretical considerations and individual instrumental parameters such as mobile phase, sample introduction system, columns, and detection system are also discussed. Future applications of this separation approach are discussed.

  4. Earth History databases and visualization - the TimeScale Creator system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogg, James; Lugowski, Adam; Gradstein, Felix

    2010-05-01

    The "TimeScale Creator" team (www.tscreator.org) and the Subcommission on Stratigraphic Information (stratigraphy.science.purdue.edu) of the International Commission on Stratigraphy (www.stratigraphy.org) has worked with numerous geoscientists and geological surveys to prepare reference datasets for global and regional stratigraphy. All events are currently calibrated to Geologic Time Scale 2004 (Gradstein et al., 2004, Cambridge Univ. Press) and Concise Geologic Time Scale (Ogg et al., 2008, Cambridge Univ. Press); but the array of intercalibrations enable dynamic adjustment to future numerical age scales and interpolation methods. The main "global" database contains over 25,000 events/zones from paleontology, geomagnetics, sea-level and sequence stratigraphy, igneous provinces, bolide impacts, plus several stable isotope curves and image sets. Several regional datasets are provided in conjunction with geological surveys, with numerical ages interpolated using a similar flexible inter-calibration procedure. For example, a joint program with Geoscience Australia has compiled an extensive Australian regional biostratigraphy and a full array of basin lithologic columns with each formation linked to public lexicons of all Proterozoic through Phanerozoic basins - nearly 500 columns of over 9,000 data lines plus hot-curser links to oil-gas reference wells. Other datapacks include New Zealand biostratigraphy and basin transects (ca. 200 columns), Russian biostratigraphy, British Isles regional stratigraphy, Gulf of Mexico biostratigraphy and lithostratigraphy, high-resolution Neogene stable isotope curves and ice-core data, human cultural episodes, and Circum-Arctic stratigraphy sets. The growing library of datasets is designed for viewing and chart-making in the free "TimeScale Creator" JAVA package. This visualization system produces a screen display of the user-selected time-span and the selected columns of geologic time scale information. The user can change the

  5. Systematic Land-Surface-Model Performance Evaluation on different time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahecha, M. D.; Jung, M.; Reichstein, M.; Beer, C.; Braakhekke, M.; Carvalhais, N.; Lange, H.; Lasslop, G.; Le Maire, G.; Seneviratne, S. I.; Vetter, M.

    2008-12-01

    Keeping track of the space--time evolution of CO2--, and H2O--fluxes between the terrestrial biosphere and atmosphere is essential to our understanding of current climate. Monitoring fluxes at site level is one option to characterize the temporal development of ecosystem--atmosphere interactions. Nevertheless, many aspects of ecosystem--atmosphere fluxes become meaningful only when interpreted in time over larger geographical regions. Empirical and process based models play a key role in spatial and temporal upscaling exercises. In this context, comparative model performance evaluations at site level are indispensable. We present a model evaluation scheme which investigates the model-data agreement separately on different time scales. Observed and modeled time series were decomposed by essentially non parametric techniques into subsignals (time scales) of characteristic fluctuations. By evaluating the extracted subsignals of observed and modeled C--fluxes (gross and net ecosystem exchange, GEE and NEE, and terrestrial ecosystem respiration, TER) separately, we obtain scale--dependent performances for the different evaluation measures. Our diagnostic model comparison allows uncovering time scales of model-data agreement and fundamental mismatch. We focus on the systematic evaluation of three land--surface models: Biome--BGC, ORCHIDEE, and LPJ. For the first time all models were driven by consistent site meteorology and compared to respective Eddy-Covariance flux observations. The results show that correct net C--fluxes may result from systematic (simultaneous) biases in TER and GEE on specific time scales of variation. We localize significant model-data mismatches of the annual-seasonal cycles in time and illustrate the recurrence characteristics of such problems. For example LPJ underestimates GEE during winter months and over estimates it in early summer at specific sites. Contrary, ORCHIDEE over-estimates the flux from July to September at these sites. Finally

  6. Quantifying nearshore morphological recovery time scales using argus video imaging: Palm Beach, Sydney and Duck, North Carolina

    OpenAIRE

    Ranasinghe, R.W.M.R.J.B.; Holman, R.; De Schipper, M.A.; Lippmann, T.; Wehof, J.; Duong, T.M.; Roelvink, D.; Stive, M.J.F.

    2012-01-01

    Time scales of post-storm nearshore morphological recovery and physical processes governing these time scales are poorly understood at present. The ability to predict nearshore morphological recovery time scales based on pre-, during- or post-resetting storm conditions is an essential requirement for building and validating scale aggregated models that operate at macro- and higher spatio-temporal scales. In this study, quality controlled ARGUS video derived beach states at Palm Beach, Sydney ...

  7. Qualification and application of a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric method for the determination of human Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 peptides in transgenic mouse plasma using micro-elution solid phase extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Young G; Hamm, Lee; Murakami, Stanley; Buirst, Kenji; Buonarati, Michael H; Cox, April; Regal, Kelly; Hunt, Kevin W; Scearce-Levie, Kimberly; Watts, Ryan J; Liu, Xingrong

    2014-05-01

    A liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) method was developed and applied for the determination of human Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 peptides in transgenic mouse plasma to support preclinical pharmacodynamics studies. The method consisted of micro-elution solid phase extraction for sample preparation and LC-MS/MS analysis in the negative ion mode using electrospray ionization for analysis. (15)N53-Aβ1-40 and (15)N55-Aβ1-42 peptides were used as internal standards. A quadratic regression (weighted 1/concentrations), with an equation y = ax(2) + bx + c, was used to fit calibration curves over the concentration range of 0.500-100 ng/mL for both Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 peptides. For quality control samples at 6.00, 40.0 and 80.0 ng/mL from the qualification experiment, the within-run accuracy ranged from -2.69 to 0.583 % with precision values ≤8.23 % for Aβ1-40. Within-run accuracy ranged from -4.83 to 10.1 % with precision values ≤8.87 % for Aβ1-42. Samples from a pharmacodynamics study using Tg2576 transgenic mice were analyzed by this qualified LC-MS/MS method and concentrations were compared to those generated by ELISA. The two methods were shown to be comparable for Aβ1-40 quantification of samples from the Tg2576 amyloid precursor protein transgenic mouse model, but varied slightly for Aβ1-42. PMID:23888333

  8. Intramolecular stable isotope distributions detect plant metabolic responses on century time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleucher, Jürgen; Ehlers, Ina; Augusti, Angela; Betson, Tatiana

    2014-05-01

    Plants respond to environmental changes on a vast range of time scales, and plant gas exchanges constitute important feedback mechanisms in the global C cycle. Responses on time scales of decades to centuries are most important for climate models, for prediction of crop productivity, and for adaptation to climate change. Unfortunately, responses on these timescale are least understood. We argue that the knowledge gap on intermediate time scales is due to a lack of adequate methods that can bridge between short-term manipulative experiments (e.g. FACE) and paleo research. Manipulative experiments in plant ecophysiology give information on metabolism on time scales up to years. However, this information cannot be linked to results from retrospective studies in paleo research, because little metabolic information can be derived from paleo archives. Stable isotopes are prominent tools in plant ecophysiology, biogeochemistry and in paleo research, but in all applications to date, isotope ratios of whole molecules are measured. However, it is well established that stable isotope abundance varies among intramolecular groups of biochemical metabolites, that is each so-called "isotopomer" has a distinct abundance. This intramolecular variation carries information on metabolic regulation, which can even be traced to individual enzymes (Schleucher et al., Plant, Cell Environ 1999). Here, we apply intramolecular isotope distributions to study the metabolic response of plants to increasing atmospheric [CO2] during the past century. Greenhouse experiments show that the deuterium abundance among the two positions in the C6H2 group of photosynthetic glucose depends on [CO2] during growth. This is observed for all plants using C3 photosynthesis, and reflects the metabolic flux ratio between photorespiration and photosynthesis. Photorespiration is a major C flux that limits assimilation in C3 plants, which encompass the overwhelming fraction of terrestrial photosynthesis and the

  9. Implications From a new Continuous Astronomically Calibrated Geological Time Scale Back to ˜ 42 Myrs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pälike, H.; Moore, T. C.; Backman, J.; Raffi, I.; Parés, J. M.; Lanci, L.; Shackleton, N. J.

    2003-12-01

    Precise, orbitally calibrated geological time scales form a pre-requisite to further our understanding of phase relationships between orbitally driven climatic processes, and to decipher the detailed mechanisms that interact to encode orbitally forced (Milankovitch) processes in the geological record. One of the great successes of ODP Leg 199 was the recovery of a high-resolution ( ˜1-2 cm/ky) biogenic sediment record, together with an uninterrupted set of geomagnetic chrons, as well as a detailed sequence of calcareous and siliceous biostratigraphic datum points. In addition, lithological measurements revealed clearly recognisable cycles that can be attributed to climatic change, driven by Milankovitch style orbital variations of the Earth. By integrating lithological, geochemical, and stable isotope data sets, we have now derived a long, astronomically calibrated, time scale from the Miocene into the latest Eocene from ODP Leg 199. Using additional data from ODP Legs 177 and 171B, we have generated a detailed continuous time scale back to ˜ 42 Myrs. We can contrast the encoding of astronomical forcing terms in sedimentary records from different ocean basins, latitudes, water-depths, and water masses. Our results show that the dominantly recorded orbital parameters vary as a function of the carbonate system response, with a very strong eccentricity component in the record from the deep equatorial Pacific, and a stronger obliquity component in the equatorial Atlantic. In addition, we investigate the phase relationship between astronomical forcing terms and carbonate preservation, with a potentially different response during "green-house" and "ice-house" conditions, separating the Oligocene and Eocene.

  10. On stabilized finite element methods for transient problems with varying time scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many engineering and scientific applications require a detailed analysis of strongly coupled continuum transport and chemical reaction physics with multiple time and length scales. These systems are characterized by the co-existence of different time scales at which not only advection and diffusion occur in typical flows but also the very short time scales for non-equilibrium chemical reactions. In typical flow applications an implicit time stepping scheme is often preferred to allow efficient and accurate treatment of the stiff diffusion terms. However, the stable and accurate finite element modeling of the reaction phase may require time steps which are orders of magnitude smaller than those normally required in an implicit flow solver. In this talk we investigate the impact of this very fine time scale resolution an stabilized Galerkin methods. Our main emphasis is on fully discrete formulations that can be identified with a Galerkin semi-discretization in space combined with an implicit time integration scheme. As an example of a problem where stabilization is invoked to circumvent saddle-point stability conditions we consider the unsteady Stokes equations, while a scalar advection-reaction-diffusion problem is used to illustrate the effects of small time steps for advective stabilization. We show that standard definitions of the stabilizing parameter τ and the weighting function may lead to conditional coercivity of the variational form associated with the fully discrete equation. This conditional coercivity and the potential loss of numerical stability for small time steps is observed both in stabilization of saddle-point problems and advection dominated problems. To derive improved stabilized methods we use time-space ideas to develop the fully discrete equations. (author)

  11. Loschmidt echo in many-spin systems: contrasting time scales of local and global measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangara, Pablo R; Bendersky, Denise; Levstein, Patricia R; Pastawski, Horacio M

    2016-06-13

    A local excitation in a quantum many-spin system evolves deterministically. A time-reversal procedure, involving the inversion of the signs of every energy and interaction, should produce the excitation revival. This idea, experimentally coined in nuclear magnetic resonance, embodies the concept of the Loschmidt echo (LE). While such an implementation involves a single spin autocorrelation M(1,1), i.e. a local LE, theoretical efforts have focused on the study of the recovery probability of a complete many-body state, referred to here as global or many-body LE MMB Here, we analyse the relation between these magnitudes, with regard to their characteristic time scales and their dependence on the number of spins N We show that the global LE can be understood, to some extent, as the simultaneous occurrence of N independent local LEs, i.e. MMB∼(M(1,1))(N/4) This extensive hypothesis is exact for very short times and confirmed numerically beyond such a regime. Furthermore, we discuss a general picture of the decay of M1,1 as a consequence of the interplay between the time scale that characterizes the reversible interactions (T(2)) and that of the perturbation (τ(Σ)). Our analysis suggests that the short-time decay, characterized by the time scale τ(Σ), is greatly enhanced by the complex processes that occur beyond T(2) This would ultimately lead to the experimentally observed T(3), which was found to be roughly independent of τ(Σ) but closely tied to T(2). PMID:27140970

  12. On the time-scales of magmatism at island-arc volcanoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, S P

    2002-12-15

    Precise information on time-scales and rates of change is fundamental to an understanding of natural processes and the development of quantitative physical models in the Earth sciences. U-series isotope studies are revolutionizing this field by providing time information in the range 10(2)-10(4) years, which is similar to that of many modern Earth processes. I review how the application of U-series isotopes has been used to constrain the time-scales of magma formation, ascent and storage beneath island-arc volcanoes. Different elements are distilled-off the subducting plate at different times and in different places. Contributions from subducted sediments to island-arc lava sources appear to occur some 350 kyr to 4 Myr prior to eruption. Fluid release from the subducting oceanic crust into the mantle wedge may be a multi-stage process and occurs over a period ranging from a few hundred kyr to less than one kyr prior to eruption. This implies that dehydration commences prior to the initiation of partial melting within the mantle wedge, which is consistent with recent evidence that the onset of melting is controlled by an isotherm and thus the thermal structure within the wedge. U-Pa disequilibria appear to require a component of decompression melting, possibly due to the development of gravitational instabilities. The preservation of large (226)Ra disequilibria permits only a short period of time between fluid addition and eruption. This requires rapid melt segregation, magma ascent by channelled flow and minimal residence time within the lithosphere. The evolution from basalt to basaltic andesite probably occurs rapidly during ascent or in magma reservoirs inferred from some geophysical data to lie within the lithospheric mantle. The flux across the Moho is broadly andesitic, and some magmas subsequently stall in more shallow crustal-level magma chambers, where they evolve to more differentiated compositions on time-scales of a few thousand years or less. PMID

  13. Multiscale Modeling of Human-Water Interactions: The Role of Time-Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloeschl, G.; Sivapalan, M.

    2015-12-01

    Much of the interest in hydrological modeling in the past decades revolved around resolving spatial variability. With the rapid changes brought about by human impacts on the hydrologic cycle, there is now an increasing need to refocus on time dependency. We present a co-evolutionary view of hydrologic systems, in which every part of the system including human systems, co-evolve, albeit at different rates. The resulting coupled human-nature system is framed as a dynamical system, characterized by interactions of fast and slow time scales and feedbacks between environmental and social processes. This gives rise to emergent phenomena such as the levee effect, adaptation to change and system collapse due to resource depletion. Changing human values play a key role in the emergence of these phenomena and should therefore be considered as internal to the system in a dynamic way. The co-evolutionary approach differs from the traditional view of water resource systems analysis as it allows for path dependence, multiple equilibria, lock-in situations and emergent phenomena. The approach may assist strategic water management for long time scales through facilitating stakeholder participation, exploring the possibility space of alternative futures, and helping to synthesise the observed dynamics of different case studies. Future research opportunities include the study of how changes in human values are connected to human-water interactions, historical analyses of trajectories of system co-evolution in individual places and comparative analyses of contrasting human-water systems in different climate and socio-economic settings. Reference Sivapalan, M. and G. Blöschl (2015) Time Scale Interactions and the Co-evolution of Humans and Water. Water Resour. Res., 51, in press.

  14. The Steppengrille (Gryllus spec./assimilis: selective filters and signal mismatch on two time scales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matti Michael Rothbart

    Full Text Available In Europe, several species of crickets are available commercially as pet food. Here we investigated the calling song and phonotactic selectivity for sound patterns on the short and long time scales for one such a cricket, Gryllus spec., available as "Gryllus assimilis", the Steppengrille, originally from Ecuador. The calling song consisted of short chirps (2-3 pulses, carrier frequency: 5.0 kHz emitted with a pulse period of 30.2 ms and chirp rate of 0.43 per second. Females exhibited high selectivity on both time scales. The preference for pulse period peaked at 33 ms which was higher then the pulse period produced by males. Two consecutive pulses per chirp at the correct pulse period were already sufficient for positive phonotaxis. The preference for the chirp pattern was limited by selectivity for small chirp duty cycles and for chirp periods between 200 ms and 500 ms. The long chirp period of the songs of males was unattractive to females. On both time scales a mismatch between the song signal of the males and the preference of females was observed. The variability of song parameters as quantified by the coefficient of variation was below 50% for all temporal measures. Hence, there was not a strong indication for directional selection on song parameters by females which could account for the observed mismatch. The divergence of the chirp period and female preference may originate from a founder effect, when the Steppengrille was cultured. Alternatively the mismatch was a result of selection pressures exerted by commercial breeders on low singing activity, to satisfy customers with softly singing crickets. In the latter case the prominent divergence between male song and female preference was the result of domestication and may serve as an example of rapid evolution of song traits in acoustic communication systems.

  15. Multi-dimensional liquid chromatography in proteomics-A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proteomics is the large-scale study of proteins, particularly their expression, structures and functions. This still-emerging combination of technologies aims to describe and characterize all expressed proteins in a biological system. Because of upper limits on mass detection of mass spectrometers, proteins are usually digested into peptides and the peptides are then separated, identified and quantified from this complex enzymatic digest. The problem in digesting proteins first and then analyzing the peptide cleavage fragments by mass spectrometry is that huge numbers of peptides are generated that overwhelm direct mass spectral analyses. The objective in the liquid chromatography approach to proteomics is to fractionate peptide mixtures to enable and maximize identification and quantification of the component peptides by mass spectrometry. This review will focus on existing multidimensional liquid chromatographic (MDLC) platforms developed for proteomics and their application in combination with other techniques such as stable isotope labeling. We also provide some perspectives on likely future developments.

  16. Enzymatic digestibility of peptides cross-linked by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Digestibility by proteolytic enzymes of peptides cross-linked by ionizing radiation was investigated. Small peptides of alanine and phenylalanine were chosen as model compounds and aminopeptidases and carboxypeptidases were used as proteolytic enzymes. Peptides exposed to γ-radiation in aqueous solution were analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography before and after hydrolysis by aminopeptidase M, leucine aminopeptidase carboxypeptidase A and carboxypeptidase Y. The results obtained clearly demonstrate the different actions of these enzymes on cross-linked aliphatic and aromatic peptides. Peptide bonds of cross-linked dipeptides of alanine were completely resistant to enzymatic hydrolysis whereas the enzymes, except for carboxypeptidase Y, cleaved all peptide bonds of cross-linked peptides of phenylalanine. The actions of the enzymes on these particular compounds are discussed in detail. (author)

  17. Gauss-Markov processes as space-time scaled stationary Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes

    OpenAIRE

    Barczy, Matyas; Kern, Peter

    2014-01-01

    We present a class of Gauss-Markov processes which can be represented as space-time scaled stationary Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes defined on the real line. To give examples, we study scaled Wiener bridges, Ornstein-Uhlenbeck type bridges, weighted Wiener bridges and so called F-Wiener bridges. By giving counterexamples, we also point out that this kind of representation does not hold in general, e.g., for a zero area Wiener bridge. To give a possible application, we show that our results can...

  18. Coevolution of strategy-selection time scale and cooperation in spatial prisoner's dilemma game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Zhihai; Wu, Zhi-Xi; Chen, Guanrong

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate a networked prisoner's dilemma game where individuals' strategy-selection time scale evolves based on their historical learning information. We show that the more times the current strategy of an individual is learnt by his neighbors, the longer time he will stick on the successful behavior by adaptively adjusting the lifetime of the adopted strategy. Through characterizing the extent of success of the individuals with normalized payoffs, we show that properly using the learned information can form a positive feedback mechanism between cooperative behavior and its lifetime, which can boost cooperation on square lattices and scale-free networks.

  19. Transport equation for the time scale of a turbulent scalar field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two-parametric turbulence models cause serious difficulties by modeling the near-wall flows due to absence of the natural boundary condition on the wall for dissipation of the ε turbulence energy and the εθ scalar field destruction. This difficulty may be overcome, if instead of the ε and εθ, as the second parameter of the model, to apply the time scales of the turbulent dynamic and scalar fields. The equation of the scalar field is derived and numerical coefficients included therein, are determined from the simplest problems on the turbulent heat transfer

  20. Chaotic phenomenon and the maximum predictable time scale of observation series of urban hourly water consumption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柳景青; 张士乔; 俞申凯

    2004-01-01

    The chaotic characteristics and maximum predictable time scale of the observation series of hourly water consumption in Hangzhou were investigated using the advanced algorithm presented here is based on the conventional Wolf's algorithm for the largest Lyapunov exponent. For comparison, the largest Lyapunov exponents of water consumption series with one-hour and 24-hour intervals were calculated respectively. The results indicated that chaotic characteristics obviously exist in the hourly water consumption system; and that observation series with 24-hour interval have longer maximum predictable scale than hourly series. These findings could have significant practical application for better prediction of urban hourly water consumption.

  1. Raman Spectra of Interchanging β lactamase Inhibitor Intermediates on the Millisecond Time Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Torkabadi, Hossein Heidari; Che, Tao; Shou, Jingjing; Shanmugam, Sivaprakash; Crowder, Michael W.; Robert A Bonomo; Pusztai-Carey, Marianne; Carey, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    Rapid mix - rapid freeze is a powerful method to study the mechanisms of enzyme-substrate reactions in solution. Here we report a protocol that combines this method with normal (non-resonance) Raman microscopy to enable us to define molecular details of intermediates at early time points. With this combined method, SHV-1, a class A β-lactamase, and tazobactam, a commercially available β-lactamase inhibitor, were rapidly mixed on the millisecond time-scale, then were flash-frozen by injecting ...

  2. Stability and periodicity of solutions for delay dynamic systems on time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Qiang Zhu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This article concerns the stability and periodicity of solutions to the delay dynamic system $$ x^{\\triangle}(t=A(t x(t + F(t, x(t, x(g(t+C(t $$ on a time scale. By the inequality technique for vectors, we obtain some stability criteria for the above system. Then, by using the Horn fixed point theorem, we present some conditions under which our system is asymptotically periodic and its periodic solution is unique. In particular, the periodic solution is positive under proper assumptions.

  3. Rotational relaxation time as unifying time scale for polymer and fiber drag reduction

    CERN Document Server

    Boelens, A M P

    2015-01-01

    Using hybrid Direct Numerical Simulation with Langevin dynamics, a comparison is performed between polymer and fiber stress tensors in turbulent flow. The stress tensors are found to be similar, suggesting a common drag reducing mechanism in the onset regime for both flexible polymers and rigid fibers. Since fibers do not have an elastic backbone this must be a viscous effect. Analysis of the viscosity tensor reveals that all terms are negligible, except the off-diagonal shear viscosity associated with rotation. Based on this analysis, we identify the rotational orientation time as the unifying time scale setting a new time criterion for drag reduction by both flexible polymers and rigid fibers.

  4. Kondo time scales for quantum dots: Response to pulsed bias potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The response of a quantum dot in the Kondo regime to rectangular pulsed bias potentials of various strengths and durations is studied theoretically. It is found that the rise time is faster than the fall time, and also faster than time scales normally associated with the Kondo problem. For larger values of the pulsed bias, one can induce dramatic oscillations in the induced current with a frequency approximating the splitting between the Kondo peaks that would be present in steady state. The effect persists in the total charge transported per pulse, which should facilitate the experimental observation of the phenomenon. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  5. DYNAMICS OF CHOICE: RELATIVE RATE AND AMOUNT AFFECT LOCAL PREFERENCE AT THREE DIFFERENT TIME SCALES

    OpenAIRE

    Aparicio, Carlos F; Baum, William M.

    2009-01-01

    To examine extended control over local choice, the present study investigated preference in transition as food-rate ratio provided by two levers changed across seven components within daily sessions, and food-amount ratio changed across phases. Phase 1 arranged a food-amount ratio of 4∶1 (i.e., the left lever delivered four pellets and the right lever one pellet); Phase 2 reversed the food-amount ratio to 1∶4, and in Phase 3 the food-amount ratio was 3∶2. At a relatively extended time scale, ...

  6. Tropical Pacific/Atlantic Ocean interactions at multi‐decadal time scales

    OpenAIRE

    Latif, Mojib

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of sea surface temperature (SST) observations suggests a pan‐oceanic interaction between the tropical Pacific and the Atlantic Ocean at multi‐decadal time scales, such that periods of anomalously high SSTs in the tropical Pacific are followed by a basin‐wide SST dipole in the Atlantic Ocean with a time delay of a few decades. The SST anomaly structure in the Atlantic Ocean is reminscent of variations in the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation. The two ocean basins are linked thro...

  7. A new approach to motion control of torque-constrained manipulators by using time-scaling of reference trajectories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno-Valenzuela, Javier; Orozco-Manriquez, Ernesto [Digital del IPN, CITEDI-IPN, Tijuana, (Mexico)

    2009-12-15

    We introduce a control scheme based on using a trajectory tracking controller and an algorithm for on-line time scaling of the reference trajectories. The reference trajectories are time-scaled according to the measured tracking errors and the detected torque/acceleration saturation. Experiments are presented to illustrate the advantages of the proposed approach

  8. A new approach to motion control of torque-constrained manipulators by using time-scaling of reference trajectories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We introduce a control scheme based on using a trajectory tracking controller and an algorithm for on-line time scaling of the reference trajectories. The reference trajectories are time-scaled according to the measured tracking errors and the detected torque/acceleration saturation. Experiments are presented to illustrate the advantages of the proposed approach

  9. 高效液相色谱法测定牡蛎大豆肽肉碱口服液中维生素B6含量的不确定度评定%Uncertainty evaluation of determination of vitamin B6 content in oyster soybean peptide carnitine oral liquid by high per- formance liquid chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庞学斌; 张伟; 邱颖姮; 邬晓鸥

    2015-01-01

    Objective Uncertainty evaluation of determination of vitamin B6 content in oyster soybean peptide carnitine oral liquid by high performance liquid chromatography(HPLC assay). Methods HPLC was adopted for the determination of vitamin B6 content. Mathematical model was established for the evaluation of uncertainty to quantize influential factors of uncertainty and evaluate the uncertainty factors further. Results The content of vitamin B6 in sample oral liquid was 0.498 mg/100mL,in which, the relative uncertaintyof vitamin B6 content was 0.024 9,the standard uncertainty was 0.0124 mg/100 mL,the expanded uncertainty was 0.024 8 mg/100 mL(k=2). Conclusion The calculation method is practical and reliable,being access to the uncertainty eval—uation of content of vitamin B6 in oyster soybean peptide carnitine oral liquid by high performance liquid chromatography. Upon the evaluation,it is found that the quantitative repetitive of the HPLC is the major impact.%目的:评定高效液相色谱法(HPLC法)测定牡蛎大豆肽肉碱口服液中维生素B6含量的不确定度。方法采用HPLC法测定试样中维生素B6的含量,根据建测量模型,确定影响不确定度的分量,并加以评定量化,得出合成不确定度和扩展不确定度。结果试样中维生素B6含量测得值为0.498 mg/100 mL,其中B6含量的相对不确定度为0.0249,标准不确定度为0.0124 mg/100 mL,扩展不确定度为0.0248 mg/100 mL(k=2)。结论建立的计算方法实用、可靠,可以用于HPLC法测定牡蛎大豆肽肉碱口服液中维生素B6含量的不确定度评定,经评定发现,高效液相色谱仪定量重复性对不确定度的影响最大。

  10. Time Scale Analysis of Interest Rate Spreads and Output Using Wavelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Gallegati

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper adds to the literature on the information content of different spreads for real activity by explicitly taking into account the time scale relationship between a variety of monetary and financial indicators (real interest rate, term and credit spreads and output growth. By means of wavelet-based exploratory data analysis we obtain richer results relative to the aggregate analysis by identifying the dominant scales of variation in the data and the scales and location at which structural breaks have occurred. Moreover, using the “double residuals” regression analysis on a scale-by-scale basis, we find that changes in the spread in several markets have different information content for output at different time frames. This is consistent with the idea that allowing for different time scales of variation in the data can provide a fruitful understanding of the complex dynamics of economic relationships between variables with non-stationary or transient components, certainly richer than those obtained using standard time domain methods.

  11. Network structure of cerebral cortex shapes functional connectivity on multiple time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honey, Christopher J.; Kötter, Rolf; Breakspear, Michael; Sporns, Olaf

    2007-01-01

    Neuronal dynamics unfolding within the cerebral cortex exhibit complex spatial and temporal patterns even in the absence of external input. Here we use a computational approach in an attempt to relate these features of spontaneous cortical dynamics to the underlying anatomical connectivity. Simulating nonlinear neuronal dynamics on a network that captures the large-scale interregional connections of macaque neocortex, and applying information theoretic measures to identify functional networks, we find structure–function relations at multiple temporal scales. Functional networks recovered from long windows of neural activity (minutes) largely overlap with the underlying structural network. As a result, hubs in these long-run functional networks correspond to structural hubs. In contrast, significant fluctuations in functional topology are observed across the sequence of networks recovered from consecutive shorter (seconds) time windows. The functional centrality of individual nodes varies across time as interregional couplings shift. Furthermore, the transient couplings between brain regions are coordinated in a manner that reveals the existence of two anticorrelated clusters. These clusters are linked by prefrontal and parietal regions that are hub nodes in the underlying structural network. At an even faster time scale (hundreds of milliseconds) we detect individual episodes of interregional phase-locking and find that slow variations in the statistics of these transient episodes, contingent on the underlying anatomical structure, produce the transfer entropy functional connectivity and simulated blood oxygenation level-dependent correlation patterns observed on slower time scales. PMID:17548818

  12. Finite-difference time-domain simulation of fusion plasmas at radiofrequency time scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simulation of dense plasmas in the radiofrequency range are typically performed in the frequency domain, i.e., by solving Laplace-transformed Maxwell's equations. This technique is well-suited for the study of linear heating and quasilinear evolution, but does not generalize well to the study of nonlinear phenomena. Conversely, time-domain simulation in this range is difficult because the time scale is long compared to the electron plasma wave period, and in addition, the various cutoff and resonance behaviors within the plasma insure that any explicit finite-difference scheme would be numerically unstable. To resolve this dilemma, explicit finite-difference Maxwell terms are maintained, but a carefully time-centered locally implicit method is introduced to treat the plasma current, such that all linear plasma dispersion behavior is faithfully reproduced at the available temporal and spatial resolution, despite the fact that the simulation time step may exceed the electron gyro and electron plasma time scales by orders of magnitude. Demonstrations are presented of the method for several classical benchmarks, including mode conversion to ion cyclotron wave, cyclotron resonance, propagation into a plasma-wave cutoff, and tunneling through low-density edge plasma

  13. Asymptotic properties of quantum dynamics in bounded domains at various time scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study a peculiar semiclassical limit of the dynamics of quantum states on a circle and in a box (infinitely deep potential well with rigid walls) as the Planck constant tends to zero and time tends to infinity. Our results describe the dynamics of coherent states on the circle and in the box at all time scales in semiclassical approximation. They give detailed information about all stages of quantum evolution in the semiclassical limit. In particular, we rigorously justify the fact that the spatial distribution of a wave packet is most often close to a uniform distribution. This fact was previously known only from numerical experiments. We apply the results obtained to a problem of classical mechanics: deciding whether the recently suggested functional formulation of classical mechanics is preferable to the traditional one. To do this, we study the semiclassical limit of Husimi functions of quantum states. Both formulations of classical mechanics are shown to adequately describe the system when time is not arbitrarily large. But the functional formulation remains valid at larger time scales than the traditional one and, therefore, is preferable from this point of view. We show that, although quantum dynamics in finite volume is commonly believed to be almost periodic, the probability distribution of the position of a quantum particle in a box has a limit distribution at infinite time if we take into account the inaccuracy in measuring the size of the box.

  14. Characterization of Microbial Fuel Cells at Microbially and Electrochemically Meaningful Time scales

    KAUST Repository

    Ren, Zhiyong

    2011-03-15

    The variable biocatalyst density in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) anode biofilm is a unique feature of MFCs relative to other electrochemical systems, yet performance characterizations of MFCs typically involve analyses at electrochemically relevant time scales that are insufficient to account for these variable biocatalyst effects. This study investigated the electrochemical performance and the development of anode biofilm architecture under different external loadings, with duplicate acetate-fed singlechamber MFCs stabilized at each resistance for microbially relevant time scales. Power density curves from these steady-state reactors generally showed comparable profiles despite the fact that anode biofilm architectures and communities varied considerably, showing that steady-state biofilm differences had little influence on electrochemical performance until the steady-state external loading was much larger than the reactor internal resistance. Filamentous bacteria were dominant on the anodes under high external resistances (1000 and 5000 Ω), while more diverse rod-shaped cells formed dense biofilms under lower resistances (10, 50, and 265 Ω). Anode charge transfer resistance decreased with decreasing fixed external resistances, but was consistently 2 orders of magnitude higher than the resistance at the cathode. Cell counting showed an inverse exponential correlation between cell numbers and external resistances. This direct link ofMFCanode biofilm evolution with external resistance and electricity production offers several operational strategies for system optimization. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  15. Interdecadal Variations of Phase Delays Between Two Ni(n)o Indices at Different Time Scales

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BIAN Jianchun; YANG Peicai

    2005-01-01

    Phase delays between two Nino indices-sea surface temperatures in Nino regions 1+2 and 3.4(1950-2001)-at different time scales are detected by wavelet analysis. Analysis results show that thereare two types of period bifurcations in the Nino indices and that period bifurcation points exist only in the region where the wavelet power is small. Interdecadal variation features of phase delays between the two indices vary with different time scales. In the periods of 40-72 months, the phase delay changes its sign in 1977: Nino 1+2 indices are 2-4 months earlier than Nino 3.4 indices before 1977, but 3-6 months later afterwards. In the periods of 20-40 months, however, the phase delay changes its sign in another way:Nino 1+2 indices are 1-4 months earlier before 1980 and during 1986-90, but 1-4 months later during 1980-83 and 1993-2001.

  16. Variability of Hydroclimate Extremes on Seasonal to Multidecadal Time Scales in the Western US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracken, C.; Rajagopalan, B.; Gangopadhyay, S.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the variability of flood risk on seasonal to multidecadal time scales is critical for a number of activities - such as infrastructure and water resources management, flood mitigation etc. This need is underscored in the Western US with the confluence of socio-economic growth leading to large potential flood damage and water quality impacts and stressed water resources. In this study we perform a systematic analysis of precipitation and streamflow extremes and their links to large scale climate variables. We perform a joint analysis using time and spectral domain methods between seasonal maximum precipitation and large scale climate variables such as sea surface temperatures and sea level pressures. The leading modes from these analyses will identify dominant patterns of variability in space and time. We also obtain insights into the moisture source and delivery mechanisms to various parts of Western US that produce extreme flooding events. We perform similar analysis on seasonal maximum flow to identify consistent mechanism. Existing methods for estimation of risk of extremes is based on extreme value analysis (EVA) assuming stationarity. Clearly the risk of extremes varies in time and space as a function of the strength of the strength of their drivers. Nonstationary EVA methods are emerging and we will apply these to model seasonal precipitation extremes in space incorporating the physical mechanisms identified from the analysis above. This modeling approach can generate nonstationary precipitation and flood frequency estimates at seasonal to multidecadal time scales for infrastructure operations, design and maintenance decisions.

  17. Neural control on multiple time scales: Insights from human stick balancing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.L.Cabrera

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The time-delayed feedback control mechanisms of the nervous system are continuously subjected to the effects of uncontrolled random perturbations (herein referred to as noise. In this setting the statistical properties of the fluctuations in the controlled variable(s can provide non-invasive insights into the nature of the underlying control mechanisms. We illustrate this concept through a study of stick balancing at the fingertip using high speed motion capture techniques. Experimental observations together with numerical studies of a stochastic delay differential equation demonstrate that on time scales short compared to the neural time delay ("fast control", parametric noise provides a non-predictive mechanism that transiently stabilizes the upright position of the balanced stick. Moreover, numerical simulations of a delayed random walker with a repulsive origin indicate that even an unstable fixed point can be transiently stabilized by the interplay between noise and time delay. In contrast, on time scales comparable to the neural time delay ("slow control", feedback and feedforward control mechanisms become more important. The relative contribution of the fast and slow control mechanisms to stick balancing is dynamic and, for example, depends on the context in which stick balancing is performed and the expertise of the balancer.

  18. A time-scale sensitometric method for evaluating screen - film systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An x-ray sensitometer is used to measure the characteristic curve of radiographic films exposed with fluorescent intensifying screens. The series of relative exposures, necessary to cover the full density range of the film, can be obtained by either time-scale or intensity-scale sensitometric methods. We have developed a convenient method of exposing film-screen systems for time-scale sensitometry. In this method, during exposure the x-ray kilovoltage, tube current and x-ray intensity remain constant and a geometric series of exposures of the film is modulated by varying the exposure time. This time variation can be obtained when a lead disc with different sector openings is rotated in front of the film system by a stepping motor. The conditions normally used are 70 kVp x-rays, 3.5 mm Al total filtration at the tube, and 2.4 m focal spot-film distance. This exposure latitude gives a complete characteristic curve of film-screen systems. (author)

  19. Turbulent time scales and the temperature variance dissipation rate in natural convection in lead-bismuth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turbulent heat transfer is of basic interest for the development and analysis of the lead-bismuth cooled accelerator-driven nuclear reactor concept. Results of a direct numerical simulation (DNS) for Rayleigh-Benard convection for the Rayleigh number Ra = 105 in a fluid with the Prandtl number Pr = 0,025, which corresponds to liquid lead-bismuth, are used to analyze turbulent time scales and the temperature variance dissipation rate. These results indicate that an application of the thermal or mixed time scale may considerably improve the standard heat flux model at this Rayleigh- and Prandtl numbers. Standard temperature variance dissipation rate model is investigated using the DNS results for Rayleigh-Benard convection at Pr equals 0,025, Ra equals 105. The analysis of the standard temperature variance dissipation rate model shows the importance of wall functions and the qualitatively good predictions by the standard model for this type of flow. Quantitatively this model over-predicts the results of direct numerical simulation by about 25%. The two-point correlation method is used to model the temperature variance dissipation rate. Comparison with DNS results shows qualitatively and quantitatively good predictions of the new model. The new temperature variance dissipation rate model leads therefore to an increased accuracy of turbulent heat flux models for this type of flow. An additional advantage is a minimal increase in model complexity which makes no special demands on model implementation into computer codes

  20. An 8 hour characteristic time-scale in submillimetre light curves of Sagittarius A*

    CERN Document Server

    Dexter, Jason; Bower, Geoffrey C; Marrone, Daniel P; Stone, Jordan; Plambeck, Richard; Doeleman, Sheperd S

    2013-01-01

    We compile and analyse long term (~10 year) submillimetre (1.3, 0.87, 0.43 mm, submm) wavelength light curves of the Galactic centre black hole, Sagittarius A*. The 0.87 and 0.43 mm data are taken from the literature, while the majority of the 1.3 mm light curve is from previously unpublished SMA and CARMA data. We use Monte Carlo simulations to show that on minute to few hour time-scales the variability is consistent with a red noise process with a 230 GHz power spectrum slope of 2.3+0.8-0.6 at 95% confidence. The light curve is de-correlated (white noise) on very long (month to year) times. In order to identify the transition time between red and white noise, we model the light curves as a stochastic damped random walk process. The models allow a quantitative estimate of this physical characteristic time-scale of 8-4+3 hours at 230 GHz at 95% confidence, with consistent results at 345 and 690 GHz. This corresponds to ~10 orbital times or ~1 inflow (viscous) time at R = 3 Rs, a typical radius producing the 2...

  1. Characterizing ecosystem-atmosphere interactions from short to interannual time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Mahecha

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Characterizing ecosystem-atmosphere interactions in terms of carbon and water exchange on different time scales is considered a major challenge in terrestrial biogeochemical cycle research. The respective time series are now partly comprising an observation period of one decade. In this study, we explored whether the observation period is already sufficient to detect cross relationships of the variables beyond the annual cycle as they are expected from comparable studies in climatology.

    We explored the potential of Singular System Analysis (SSA to extract arbitrary kinds of oscillatory patterns. The method is completely data adaptive and performs an effective signal to noise separation.

    We found that most observations (NEE, GPP, Reco, VPD, LE, H, u, P were influenced significantly by low frequency components (interannual variability. Furthermore we extracted a set of nonlinear relationships and found clear annual hysteresis effects except for the NEE-Rg relationship which turned out to be the sole linear relationship in the observation space. SSA provides a new tool to investigate these phenomena explicitly on different time scales. Furthermore, we showed that SSA has great potential for eddy covariance data processing since it can be applied as novel gap filling approach relying on the temporal time series structure only.

  2. Solar luminosity variation on short time scales - Observational evidence and basic mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temporal variations in total solar luminosity on time scales between 100 and 10 to the 9th sec are discussed. Following a brief historical review of solar constant measurements, observations of solar luminosity and its variations made by ground-level radiometry, radiometry from balloons, aircraft and rockets, continuous radiometry from space probes and satellites, measurements of reflected light from solar system bodies, and measurements of solar line depths and limb darkening are presented which demonstrate solar constant variations of less than 1.2% since 1962, no variation over a period of 30 years in the range 0.34 and 2.4 microns, and an influence of magnetic activity. Specific processes which may account for these variations are then examined, including heat flux perturbations due to local variations in thermal impedance, variations in convective heat transport efficiency, energy storage in magnetic fields, and variations in wave heating at the photosphere. Comparison of solar evidence with evidence of luminosity variations in other late-type stars indicates that magnetic activity can influence luminosity on time scales from days to tens of years. Future prospects for experimental observations from spacecraft and from the ground are indicated

  3. Formation of the Kuiper Belt by Long Time-Scale Migration of Jovian Planets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Li; Li-Yong Zhou; Yi-Sui Sun

    2006-01-01

    The orbital migration of Jovian planets is believed to have played an important role in shaping the Kuiper Belt. We investigate the effects of the long time-scale (2 × 107 yr) migration of Jovian planets on the orbital evolution of massless test particles that are initially located beyond 28 AU. Because of the slowness of the migration, Neptune's mean motion resonances capture test particles very efficiently. Taking into account the stochastic behavior during the planetary migration and for proper parameter values, the resulting concentration of objects in the 3:2 resonance is prominent, while very few objects enter the 2:1 resonance,thus matching the observed Kuiper Belt objects very well. We also find that such a long time-scale migration is favorable for exciting the inclinations of the test particles, because it makes the secular resonance possible to operate during the migration. Our analyses show that the v8 secular resonance excites the eccentricities of some test particles, so decreasing their perihelion distances, leading to close encounters with Neptune, which can then pump the inclinations up to 20°.

  4. A time-scale sensitometric method for evaluating screen - film systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goes, E.G.; Pela, C.A.; Ghilardi, N.T. [CIDRA - Centro de Instrumentacao, Dosimetria e Radioprotecao, DFM - FFCLRP - USP, Av. Bandeirantes, 3900-14040 901 Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    1997-10-01

    An x-ray sensitometer is used to measure the characteristic curve of radiographic films exposed with fluorescent intensifying screens. The series of relative exposures, necessary to cover the full density range of the film, can be obtained by either time-scale or intensity-scale sensitometric methods. We have developed a convenient method of exposing film-screen systems for time-scale sensitometry. In this method, during exposure the x-ray kilovoltage, tube current and x-ray intensity remain constant and a geometric series of exposures of the film is modulated by varying the exposure time. This time variation can be obtained when a lead disc with different sector openings is rotated in front of the film system by a stepping motor. The conditions normally used are 70 kVp x-rays, 3.5 mm Al total filtration at the tube, and 2.4 m focal spot-film distance. This exposure latitude gives a complete characteristic curve of film-screen systems. (author)

  5. A time-scale sensitometric method for evaluating screen - film systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Góes, E. G.; Pelá, C. A.; Ghilardi, Netto T.

    1997-10-01

    An x-ray sensitometer is used to measure the characteristic curve of radiographic films exposed with fluorescent intensifying screens. The series of relative exposures, necessary to cover the full density range of the film, can be obtained by either time-scale or intensity-scale sensitometric methods. We have developed a convenient method of exposing film - screen systems for time-scale sensitometry. In this method, during exposure the x-ray kilovoltage, tube current and x-ray intensity remain constant and a geometric series of exposures of the film is modulated by varying the exposure time. This time variation can be obtained when a lead disc with different sector openings is rotated in front of the film system by a stepping motor. The conditions normally used are 70 kVp x-rays, 3.5 mm Al total filtration at the tube, and 2.4 m focal spot - film distance. This exposure latitude gives a complete characteristic curve of film - screen systems.

  6. Radiocarbon dating of the Goti-Finiglacial boundary of the Swedish Time Scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wile working with the revision of the Swedish Time Scale, based on clay-varve chronology, mollusc shell of Portlandia arctica were found in the clay at Ekensberg, Stockholm, Sweden, deposited at the beginning of the Finiglacial epoch. The clay-varves have been connected with the revised Swedish Time Scale and the time for deposition is 10370 clay-varve years cal BP. Shells of bivalves, shell fragments and periostracum have been AMS radiocarbon-dated at the Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala. The 11 radiometric datings are grouped in two assemblages, one between 10500 and 11600 BP and one between 8200 and 9100 BP. These results are compared with the radiocarbon age obtained for a fish skeleton found in varved clay close to Ekensberg during the geological mapping of the area. The age of the fish is 8600 BP, which is in agreement with the periostracum datings. Reservoir effects and calibration of the radiocarbon ages to sidereal years are discussed. 32 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  7. Coarse-Grained Modeling of Genetic Circuits as a Function of the Inherent Time Scales

    CERN Document Server

    Labavic, Darka; Hildegard, Wolfhard Janke; Meyer-Ortmanns,

    2012-01-01

    From a coarse-grained perspective the motif of a self-activating species, activating a second species which acts as its own repressor, is widely found in biological systems, in particular in genetic systems with inherent oscillatory behavior. Here we consider a specific realization of this motif as a genetic circuit, in which genes are described as directly producing proteins, leaving out the intermediate step of mRNA production. We focus on the effect that inherent time scales on the underlying fine-grained scale can have on the bifurcation patterns on a coarser scale in time. Time scales are set by the binding and unbinding rates of the transcription factors to the promoter regions of the genes. Depending on the ratio of these rates to the decay times of the proteins, the appropriate averaging procedure for obtaining a coarse-grained description changes and leads to sets of deterministic equations, which differ in their bifurcation structure. In particular the desired intermediate range of regular limit cyc...

  8. New dissipative modes and decay time-scales in the equatorial troposphere with a leak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumakova, L.; Rosales, R. R.; Tabak, E. G.

    2012-12-01

    Much of our understanding of the equatorial tropospheric dynamics is based on the concept of discrete internal modes. However, discrete modes are a signature of systems of finite extent, while the atmosphere should be modeled as infinite and "is characterized by a single isolated eigenmode and a continuous spectrum" [1]. Is it then unphysical to use the classic rigid lid modes to model atmospheric phenomena? We propose the following approach to resolve this debate. We impose a radiation boundary condition at the top of the incompressible non-rotating troposphere in hydrostatic balance, reformulate this boundary condition as a pseudo-differential equation, and use it to compute the new discrete modes. For realistic values of the stratification, the decay time-scales for the first few modes range from an hour to a week, suggesting that the time-scale for some atmospheric phenomena may be primarily set up by the rate of energy loss through upwards propagating waves. On the mathematical side, we show that though these modes are not orthogonal, they are complete, and there is an easy way to project initial conditions onto them. [1] Lindzen, R., 2003: The interaction of waves and convection in the tropics. J. Atmos. Sci., 60, 3009-3020. The work of the authors was partially supported by grants from the NSF, as follows: NSF 0903008 (LC), DMS 1007967 and DMS 0907955 (RRR), DMS 0908077 (EGT).

  9. Multiband optical variability of three TeV blazars on diverse time-scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Alok C.; Agarwal, A.; Bhagwan, J.; Strigachev, A.; Bachev, R.; Semkov, E.; Gaur, H.; Damljanovic, G.; Vince, O.; Wiita, Paul J.

    2016-05-01

    We present our optical photometric observations of three TeV blazars, PKS 1510-089, PG 1553+113, and Mrk 501, taken using two telescopes in India, one in Bulgaria, one in Greece, and one in Serbia during 2012-2014. These observations covered a total of 95 nights with a total of 202 B filter frames, 247 images in V band, 817 in R band while 229 images were taken in the I filter. This work is focused on multiband flux and colour variability studies of these blazars on diverse time-scales which are useful in understanding the emission mechanisms. We studied the variability characteristics of above three blazars and found all to be active over our entire observational campaigns. We also searched for any correlation between the brightness of the sources and their colour indices. During the times of variability, no significant evidence for the sources to display spectral changes correlated with magnitude was found on time-scales of a few months. We briefly discuss the possible physical mechanisms most likely responsible for the observed flux variability.

  10. Phosphopeptide enrichment by immobilized metal affinity chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thingholm, Tine E.; Larsen, Martin R.

    2016-01-01

    binding capacity. After binding, the enriched phosphopeptides are released from the metal ions using alkaline buffers of pH 10–11, EDTA, or phosphate-containing buffers. Here we describe a protocol for IMAC using Fe 3+ for phosphopeptide enrichment. The principles are illustrated on a semi-complex peptide......Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) has been the method of choice for phosphopeptide enrichment prior to mass spectrometric analysis for many years and it is still used extensively in many laboratories. Using the affinity of negatively charged phosphate groups towards positively...... charged metal ions such as Fe3+, Ga3+, Al3+, Zr4+, and Ti4+ has made it possible to enrich phosphorylated peptides from peptide samples. However, the selectivity of most of the metal ions is limited, when working with highly complex samples, e.g., whole-cell extracts, resulting in contamination from...

  11. What Are the Time Scales for Carbonate Mineral Sequestration in the Subsurface?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steefel, C. I.; Landrot, G.; Bolton, E. W.; Pride, S. R.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral trapping of CO2 in the subsurface is acknowledged to be the most secure form of sequestration, but some studies have suggested that the process is extremely slow, perhaps on the order of 10,000 years or more. But what are the arguments for these long time scales based on? Certainly part of it has to do with the slow dissolution rates of silicates needed to provide a source of cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, and Fe2+) and alkalinity for carbonate precipitation. Rates of dissolution for many silicates are very slow (e.g., albitic plagioclase and chlorite), while other silicate minerals (anorthitic feldspar, olivine) dissolve appreciably faster. Determining which mineral is rate-limiting in the case of the faster dissolving silicates (is it the dissolving silicate or precipitating carbonate?), however, is not always straightforward without a careful analysis of dissolution and precipitation as a coupled process. We use micro-continuum modeling to address the issue of time scales for carbonate mineral trapping of CO2. Two sets of simulations have been carried out: 1) largely generic simulations at the centimeter scale that include heterogeneous distributions of both residually trapped scCO2 and reactive mineral phases (Ca-bearing plagioclase and chlorite), and 2) flow plus diffusion and pure diffusion simulations of the reactivity of a reservoir sandstone from a scCO2 pilot injection site at Cranfield, Mississippi. The first set of simulations are designed specifically to examine the assumption that the reservoir within which carbonate mineral precipitation might occur is well-mixed and therefore characterized everywhere by the low pH values typical of brine in equilibrium with supercritical CO2. Our analysis of physically and chemically heterogeneous subsurface materials, especially during the residual trapping stage, suggest that local chemical microenvironments can develop in which pH, alkalinity, and cation concentrations rise sufficiently high that substantial

  12. Variability of lightning flash and thunderstorm over East/Southeast Asia on the ENSO time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Tie; Di, Yuelun; Qie, Kai

    2016-03-01

    The variability of lightning flash and thunderstorm on the ENSO time scales over East/Southeast Asia was investigated by using 17-year (1995-2011) lightning data from the Optical Transient Detector (OTD) and Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS), and 14-year (1998-2011) Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite (TRMM) precipitation feature data. In addition, ERA-Interim reanalysis data of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) were used to present related environmental characteristics. It was found that the response of lightning flash to ENSO events shows remarkable seasonal and regional variations. The regions of positive (negative) lightning anomaly are mainly located at both sides of 5°-20°N (5°-15°N) in El Niño (La Niña) spring and winter, and located north of the equator in summer and autumn. There is a significantly positive correlation between lightning anomaly and the Oceanic Niño Index (ONI) over both East China and Indonesia during El Niño episodes, but no obvious correlation during La Niña episodes. The positive thunderstorm anomalies during El Niño periods are dispersed. The distribution of thunderstorm anomalies in La Niña summer and autumn is almost opposite to that in spring and winter. The correlation between thunderstorm anomaly and ONI is better over East China than that over Indonesia. In general, lightning variation follows thunderstorm intensity (number) variation over East China during El Niño (La Niña) episodes, and follows a combination of thunderstorm intensity and number variations over Indonesia on ENSO time scales. During ENSO time scales, variations of surface wind can be considered as one of the key factors to LAs. More lightning flashes present in the regions where warm moist flows intersection, and less in the regions where surface wind changes slightly or diverges. Dramatic lightning increases also occur with higher values of convective available potential energy (CAPE). In addition, higher (lower

  13. Using time scales to characterize phytoplankton assemblages in a deep subalpine lake during the thermal stratification period: Lake Iseo, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Clelia Luisa; Imberger, Jörg; Garibaldi, Letizia; Leoni, Barbara

    2016-03-01

    A combination of field observations and 3-D hydrodynamic simulations were used to identify the phytoplankton species and to estimate the various time scales of the dominant physical and biological processes in Lake Iseo, a deep subalpine lake located in northern Italy, during a stratified period (July 2010). By ordering the rate processes time scales, we derive a phytoplankton patch categorization and growth interpretation that provides a general framework for the spatial distribution of phytoplankton concentration in Lake Iseo and illuminates the characteristics of their ecological niches. The results show that the diurnal surface layer was well mixed, received strong diurnal radiation, had low phosphorus concentrations and the phytoplankton biomass was sustained by the green alga Sphaerocystis schroeterii. The vertical mixing time scales were much shorter than horizontal mixing time scales causing a depth-uniform chlorophyll a concentration. The horizontal patch scale was determined by horizontal dispersion balancing the phytoplankton growth time scale, dictating the success of the observed green algae. The strongly stratified nutrient-rich metalimnion had mild light conditions and Diatoma elongatum and Planktothrix rubescens made up the largest proportions of the total phytoplankton biomass at the intermediate and deeper metalimnetic layers. The vertical transport time scales were much shorter than horizontal transport and vertical dispersion leading to growth niche for the observed phytoplankton. The study showed that time-scale hierarchy mandates the essential phytoplankton attributes or traits for success in a particular section of the water column and/or water body.

  14. 采用高效液相色谱-质谱考察家福捕鸟蛛粗毒中多肽和蛋白质的多样性%Determination of peptide and protein diversity in venom of the spider Selenocosmia jiafu by high performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡朝暾; 肖震; 周熙; 陈佳; 陈波; 刘中华

    2015-01-01

    Selenocosmia jiafu( S. jiafu)is recently identified as a new species of spider in P. R. China. These medium bodied venomous spiders are distributed mainly in the hilly areas of southwest of China,mostly at Yunnan and Guangxi Provinces. In order to understand the composition of the S. jiafu venom,we performed a preliminary analysis of this venom using reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography ( RP-HPLC ), matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry( MALDI-TOF-MS)and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis( SDS-PAGE). The S. jiafu venom was separated by RP-HPLC in an analytical C18 column(phenomenex 100 Å,250 mm×4. 6 mm,5 μm)equilibra-ted with solution A( distilled water with 0. 1% trifluoroacetic acid),using a gradient from 0%to 50% of solution B( acetonitrile with 0. 1% trifluoroacetic acid)over 50 min with a flow rate of 1 mL/min. The isolated venom proteins were treated with in-gel digestion separated by SDS-PAGE and then identified by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry( LC-ESI-QTOF-MS)techniques. The results show that more than 40 fractions eluted were monitored at 215 nm in the RP-HPLC chromatogram of the venom of the spider S. jiafu. Most of the fractions were eluted with retention times of 5-15 min and 25-40 min,corresponding to 5% -15% and 25% -40% acetonitrile,respectively. The venom contains 238 peptides that follow a bimodal distribution,with about 62. 5% of the peptides having a rela-tive molecular mass of 3 000-4 500 and about 33. 2% of the peptides having a relative molecular mass of 1 000-3 000. This distribution model is rather different from those of peptides from oth-er tarantula spider venoms analyzed. To explore the relative molecular mass distribution of the venom proteins,the venom was analyzed by SDS-PAGE using standard protocols. Except for peptides with relative molecular mass lower than 10 000, the SDS

  15. Is there a break in scaling on centennial time scale in Holocene temperature records?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Tine; Rypdal, Kristoffer; Fredriksen, Hege-Beate

    2015-04-01

    A variety of paleoclimatic records have been used to study scaling properties of past climate, including ice core paleotemperature records and multi-proxy reconstructions. Records extending further back in time than the Holocene are divided into glacial/interglacial segments before analysis. The methods used to infer the scaling include the power spectral density (Lomb-Scargle periodogram and standard periodogram), detrended fluctuation analysis, wavelet variance analysis and the Haar fluctuation function. All the methods have individual strengths, weaknesses, uncertainties and biases, and for this reason it is useful to compare results from different methods when possible. Proxy-based reconstructions have limited spatial and temporal coverage, and must be used and interpreted with great care due to uncertainties. By elaborating on physical mechanisms for the actual climate fluctuations seen in the paleoclimatic temperature records as well as uncertainties in both data and methods, we demonstrate the possible pitfalls that may lead to the conclusion that the variability in temperature time series can be separated into different scaling regimes. Categorizing the Earth's surface temperature variability into a «macroweather» and "climate" regime has little or no practical meaning since the different components in the climate system are connected and interact on all time scales. Our most important result is that a break between two different scaling regimes at time scales around one century cannot be identified in Holocene climate. We do, however, observe departures from scaling, which can be attributed to variability such as a single internal quasi-periodic oscillation, an externally forced trend, or a combination of factors. If two scaling regimes are claimed to be present in one single time series, both regimes must be persistent. We show that the limited temporal resolution/length of the records significantly lowers the confidence for such persistence. A total of

  16. Influence of the prefactor to defect motion in α-Iron during long time scale simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a study of the influence of the prefactor in the Arrhenius equation for the long time scale motion of defects in α-Fe. It is shown that calculated prefactors vary widely between different defect types and it is thus important to determine these accurately when implementing on-the-fly kinetic Monte Carlo (otf-KMC) simulations. The results were verified by reproducing many events using Molecular Dynamics (MD) and Temperature-Accelerated Dynamics (TAD). The calculated prefactor was shown to increase the relative interstitial-vacancy diffusion rates by an order of magnitude compared to the assumption of a constant prefactor value and the ordering of the rate table for the interstitial defect migration mechanisms was also changed. In addition, low prefactor values were observed for the 4 interstitial dumbbells configuration with low barrier transitions. (paper)

  17. Evidence of Invariance of Time Scale at Critical Point in Ising Meanfield Equilibrium Equation of State

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muktish Acharyya; Ajanta Bhowal Acharyya

    2011-01-01

    We solve the equilibrium meanfield equation of state of Ising ferromagnet (obtained from Bragg-Williams theory) by Newton-Raphson method.The number of iterations required to get a convergent solution (within a specified accuracy) of equilibrium magnetisation, at any particular temperature, is observed to diverge in a power law fashion as the temperature approaches the critical value.This is identified as the critical slowing down.The exponent is also estimated.This value of the exponent is compared with that obtained from analytic solution.Besides this, the numerical results are also compared with some experimental results exhibiting satisfactory degree of agreement.It is observed from this study that the information of the invariance of time scale at the critical point is present in the meanfield equilibrium equation of state of Ising ferromagnet.

  18. The effect of polymer type on electric breakdown strength on a nanosecond time scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the concepts of fast polarization, effective electric field and electron impact ionization criterion, the effect of polymer type on electric breakdown strength (EBD) on a nanosecond time scale is investigated, and a formula that qualitatively characterizes the relation between the electric breakdown strength and the polymer type is derived. According to this formula, it is found that the electric breakdown strength decreases with an increase in the effective relative dielectric constants of the polymers. By calculating the effective relative dielectric constants for different types of polymers, the theoretical relation for the electric breakdown strengths of common polymers is predicted. To verify the prediction, the polymers of PE (polyethylene), PTFE (polytetrafluoroethelene), PMMA (organic glass) and Nylon are tested with a nanosecond-pulse generator. The experimental result shows EBD (PTFE) > EBD (PMMA) > EBD (Nylon) > EBD (PE). This result is consistent with the theoretical prediction. (atomic and molecular physics)

  19. Singular perturbations and time scales in the design of digital flight control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Desineni S.; Price, Douglas B.

    1988-01-01

    The results are presented of application of the methodology of Singular Perturbations and Time Scales (SPATS) to the control of digital flight systems. A block diagonalization method is described to decouple a full order, two time (slow and fast) scale, discrete control system into reduced order slow and fast subsystems. Basic properties and numerical aspects of the method are discussed. A composite, closed-loop, suboptimal control system is constructed as the sum of the slow and fast optimal feedback controls. The application of this technique to an aircraft model shows close agreement between the exact solutions and the decoupled (or composite) solutions. The main advantage of the method is the considerable reduction in the overall computational requirements for the evaluation of optimal guidance and control laws. The significance of the results is that it can be used for real time, onboard simulation. A brief survey is also presented of digital flight systems.

  20. Time-resolved and time-scale adaptive measures of spike train synchrony

    CERN Document Server

    Kreuz, Thomas; Greschner, Martin; Andrzejak, Ralph G

    2010-01-01

    A wide variety of approaches to estimate the degree of synchrony between two or more spike trains have been proposed. One of the most recent methods is the ISI-distance which extracts information from the interspike intervals (ISIs) by evaluating the ratio of the instantaneous firing rates. In contrast to most previously proposed measures it is parameter free and time-scale independent. However, it is not well suited to track changes in synchrony that are based on spike coincidences. Here we propose the SPIKE-distance, a complementary measure which is sensitive to spike coincidences but still shares the fundamental advantages of the ISI-distance. In particular, it is easy to visualize in a time-resolved manner and can be extended to a method that is also applicable to larger sets of spike trains. We show the merit of the SPIKE-distance using both simulated and real data.

  1. Small quantum absorption refrigerator in the transient regime: Time scales, enhanced cooling, and entanglement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brask, Jonatan Bohr; Brunner, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    A small quantum absorption refrigerator, consisting of three qubits, is discussed in the transient regime. We discuss time scales for coherent dynamics, damping, and approach to the steady state, and we study cooling and entanglement. We observe that cooling can be enhanced in the transient regime, in the sense that lower temperatures can be achieved compared to the steady-state regime. This is a consequence of coherent dynamics but can occur even when this dynamics is strongly damped by the dissipative thermal environment, and we note that precise control over couplings or timing is not needed to achieve enhanced cooling. We also show that the amount of entanglement present in the refrigerator can be much larger in the transient regime compared to the steady state. These results are of relevance to future implementations of quantum thermal machines.

  2. Multiple time scale population transfer-dynamics in coupled electronic states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kess, Martin; Brüning, Christoph; Engel, Volker, E-mail: voen@phys-chemie.uni-wuerzburg.de

    2014-10-17

    Highlights: • Two time-scales for vibronic population transfer are identified. • Rabi-like oscillations can be induced through constant vibronic coupling. • Population transfer is influenced by quantum phases. - Abstract: We regard the wave-packet dynamics in two electronic states which interact via a constant coupling element. Performing numerical calculations it is found that the time-dependent populations exhibit oscillatory variations with two characteristic periods. Whereas, as expected, one period is determined by the vibrational motion, it is shown that Rabi-type oscillations occur which are influenced by the parameters of the potential energy curves, the coupling and the amplitudes in the two states on one hand, and by the nuclear motion on the other. An analysis of the numerical results is performed within various levels of approximation.

  3. Modeling and Control of a Large Nuclear Reactor A Three-Time-Scale Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Shimjith, S R; Bandyopadhyay, B

    2013-01-01

    Control analysis and design of large nuclear reactors requires a suitable mathematical model representing the steady state and dynamic behavior of the reactor with reasonable accuracy. This task is, however, quite challenging because of several complex dynamic phenomena existing in a reactor. Quite often, the models developed would be of prohibitively large order, non-linear and of complex structure not readily amenable for control studies. Moreover, the existence of simultaneously occurring dynamic variations at different speeds makes the mathematical model susceptible to numerical ill-conditioning, inhibiting direct application of standard control techniques. This monograph introduces a technique for mathematical modeling of large nuclear reactors in the framework of multi-point kinetics, to obtain a comparatively smaller order model in standard state space form thus overcoming these difficulties. It further brings in innovative methods for controller design for systems exhibiting multi-time-scale property,...

  4. Optimal Control Modification Adaptive Law for Time-Scale Separated Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2010-01-01

    Recently a new optimal control modification has been introduced that can achieve robust adaptation with a large adaptive gain without incurring high-frequency oscillations as with the standard model-reference adaptive control. This modification is based on an optimal control formulation to minimize the L2 norm of the tracking error. The optimal control modification adaptive law results in a stable adaptation in the presence of a large adaptive gain. This study examines the optimal control modification adaptive law in the context of a system with a time scale separation resulting from a fast plant with a slow actuator. A singular perturbation analysis is performed to derive a modification to the adaptive law by transforming the original system into a reduced-order system in slow time. A model matching conditions in the transformed time coordinate results in an increase in the actuator command that effectively compensate for the slow actuator dynamics. Simulations demonstrate effectiveness of the method.

  5. On simulating flow with multiple time scales using a method of averages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margolin, L.G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The author presents a new computational method based on averaging to efficiently simulate certain systems with multiple time scales. He first develops the method in a simple one-dimensional setting and employs linear stability analysis to demonstrate numerical stability. He then extends the method to multidimensional fluid flow. His method of averages does not depend on explicit splitting of the equations nor on modal decomposition. Rather he combines low order and high order algorithms in a generalized predictor-corrector framework. He illustrates the methodology in the context of a shallow fluid approximation to an ocean basin circulation. He finds that his new method reproduces the accuracy of a fully explicit second-order accurate scheme, while costing less than a first-order accurate scheme.

  6. Control of modular multilevel converters based on time-scale analysis and orthogonal functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zarri, L.; Tani, A.; Mengoni, M.;

    2014-01-01

    Modular multilevel converter (MMC) is a promising multilevel topology for high-voltage applications that has been developed in recent years. The control of MMCs has been analyzed in detail in many papers, showing that the converter capacitors can be kept charged and balanced by controlling the...... circulating current of each leg. The set-point signal of the circulating current is probably the most difficult variable to choose. Typically, it is chosen in such a way to control the total energy and the energy unbalance of each leg. Although several theories are available, the control of the circulating...... current is still a complex task and cannot be fully tackled with traditional linear control techniques. In this paper a multiple time-scale analysis is proposed to determine an approximated model of the MMC that can be used to solve the control problem of the capacitor voltages. In addition, it is shown...

  7. Recurrence CFD - a novel approach to simulate multiphase flows with strongly separated time scales

    CERN Document Server

    Lichtenegger, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Classical Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) of long-time processes with strongly separated time scales is computationally extremely demanding if not impossible. Consequently, the state-of-the-art description of such systems is not capable of real-time simulations or online process monitoring. In order to bridge this gap, we propose a new method suitable to decouple slow from fast degrees of freedom in many cases. Based on the recurrence statistics of unsteady flow fields, we deduce a recurrence process which enables the generic representation of pseudo-periodic motion at high spatial and temporal resolution. Based on these fields, passive scalars can be traced by recurrence CFD. While a first, Eulerian Model A solves a passive transport equation in a classical implicit finite-volume environment, a second, Lagrangian Model B propagates fluid particles obeying a stochastic differential equation explicitly. Finally, this new concept is tested by two multiphase processes - a lab scale oscillating bubble column a...

  8. Impact of speculator's expectations of returns and time scales of investment on crude oil price behaviors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on time series of crude oil prices (daily spot), this paper analyses price fluctuation with two significant parameters τ (speculators' time scales of investment) and ε (speculators' expectations of return) by using Zipf analysis technique, specifically, by mapping τ-returns of prices into 3-alphabeted sequences (absolute frequencies) and 2-alphabeted sequences (relative frequencies), containing the fundamental information of price fluctuations. This paper empirically explores parameters and identifies various types of speculators' cognition patterns of price behavior. In order to quantify the degree of distortion, a feasible reference is proposed: an ideal speculator. Finally, this paper discusses the similarities and differences between those cognition patterns of speculators' and those of an ideal speculator. The resultant analyses identify the possible distortion of price behaviors by their patterns. (author)

  9. Fluctuations and time scales for bed-load sediment motion over a smooth bed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Francesco Ballio n; Alessio Radice

    2015-01-01

    Results are presented for experiments of bed-load sediment transport over a plane, smooth bed. The smooth-bed configuration, though not adequate for mimicking natural streams, enables the effects of bed roughness to be filtered out, thus, highlighting the role of flow turbulence for particle dynamics. Sediments were individually tracked along their paths, measuring position and velocity of the individual grains. A number of analyses were then applied to the data: probability density function, auto-correla-tion, and spectra of the grain velocity. Several Lagrangian time scales of particle motion were obtained and compared to available data for the turbulent flow field to determine a phenomenological inter-pretation of the process.

  10. A Mechanism for Stabilization of Dynamics in Nonlinear Systems with Different Time Scales

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez, Raquel M; Camacho, Erika T

    2009-01-01

    There are many natural, physical, and biological systems that exhibit multiple time scales. For example, the dynamics of a population of ticks can be described in continuous time during their individual life cycle yet discrete time is used to describe the generation of offspring. These characteristics cause the population levels to be reset periodically. A similar phenomenon can be observed in a sociological college drinking model in which the population is reset by the incoming class each year, as described in the 2006 work of Camacho et al. With the latter as our motivation we analytically and numerically investigate the mechanism by which solutions in certain systems with this resetting conditions stabilize. We further utilize the sociological college drinking model as an analogue to analyze certain one-dimensional and two-dimensional nonlinear systems, as we attempt to generalize our results to higher dimensions.

  11. Impulsive Periodic Boundary Value Problems for Dynamic Equations on Time Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric R. Kaufmann

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Let 𝕋 be a periodic time scale with period p such that 0,ti,T=mp∈𝕋, i=1,2,…,n, m∈ℕ, and 0

  12. Existence of positive solutions for semipositone dynamic system on time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Wei Zhang

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the following semipositone dynamic system on time scales $$displaylines{ -x^{DeltaDelta}(t=f(t,y+p(t, quad tin(0,T_{mathbb{T}},cr -y^{DeltaDelta}(t=g(t,x, quad tin(0,T_{mathbb{T}},cr x(0=x(sigma^{2}(T=0, cr alpha{y(0}-eta{y^{Delta}{(0}}= gamma{y(sigma(T}+delta{y^{Delta}(sigma(T}=0. }$$ Using fixed point index theory, we show the existence of at least one positive solution. The interesting point is the that nonlinear term is allowed to change sign and may tend to negative infinity.

  13. A characteristic time scale of tick quotes on foreign currency markets

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, A H

    2005-01-01

    This study investigates that a characteristic time scale on an exchange rate market (USD/JPY) is examined for the period of 1998 to 2000. Calculating power spectrum densities for the number of tick quotes per minute and averaging them over the year yield that the mean power spectrum density has a peak at high frequencies. Consequently it means that there exist the characteristic scales which dealers act in the market. A simple agent model to explain this phenomenon is proposed. This phenomena may be a result of stochastic resonance with exogenous periodic information and physiological fluctuations of the agents. This may be attributed to the traders' behavior on the market. The potential application is both quantitative characterization and classification of foreign currency markets.

  14. Psychological Momentum During and Across Sports Matches: Evidence for Interconnected Time Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Den Hartigh, Ruud J; Van Geert, Paul L; Van Yperen, Nico W; Cox, Ralf F; Gernigon, Christophe

    2016-02-01

    This study on psychological momentum (PM) in sports provides the first experimental test of an interconnection between short-term PM (during a match) and long-term PM (across a series of matches). Twenty-two competitive athletes were striving to win a prize during a rowing-ergometer tournament, consisting of manipulated races. As hypothesized, athletes who had developed long-term positive PM after two successful races were less sensitive to a negative momentum scenario in the third race, compared with athletes who had developed long-term negative PM after two unsuccessful races. More specifically, the exerted efforts, perceptions of momentum, and self-efficacy were higher for participants who had developed long-term positive PM, and their perceptions of momentum and self-efficacy decreased less rapidly. These results illustrate a typical complex dynamical systems property, namely interconnected time scales, and provide deeper insights into the dynamical nature of PM. PMID:27018560

  15. Generalized quantum kinetic expansion: Time scale separation between intra-cluster and inter-cluster kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For a general two-cluster network, a new methodology of the cluster-based generalized quantum kinetic expansion (GQKE) is developed in the matrix formalism under two initial conditions: the local cluster equilibrium and system-bath factorized states. For each initial condition, the site population evolution follows exactly a distinct closed equation, where all the four terms involved are systematically expanded over inter-cluster couplings. For the system-bath factorized initial state, the numerical investigation of the two models, a biased (2, 1)-site system and an unbiased (2, 2)-site system, verifies the reliability of the GQKE and the relevance of higher-order corrections. The time-integrated site-to-site rates and the time evolution of site population reveal the time scale separation between intra-cluster and inter-cluster kinetics. The population evolution of aggregated clusters can be quantitatively described by the approximate cluster Markovian kinetics

  16. Experimental investigation of atomic collisions in time scales varying from nanosecond to microseconds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the results from two experiments investigating collisions that differ in time scale by three orders of magnitude. The first experiment enables the determination of absolute total collision cross sections using a technique that measures a change in the loss rate of trapped atoms from a magneto optical trap (MOT). We also investigate light assisted collision processes between cold metastable neon atoms in the 3P2 metastable state within the MOT. A catalysis laser is scanned in frequency across the 3P2 - 3D3 cooling transition and the ionization rate was observed. Ionization spectra are obtained which demonstrate a dependence on the magnetic sublevels of the transition that the catalysis laser is exciting.

  17. Positive Solutions for Second-Order m-Point Boundary Value Problems on Time Scales

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wan Tong LI; Hong Rui SUN

    2006-01-01

    Let T be a time scale such that 0, T ∈ T. By means of the Schauder fixed point theorem and analysis method, we establish some existence criteria for positive solutions of the m-point boundary value problem on time scaleswhere a ∈ Cld((0, T),[0,∞)), f ∈ Cld([0, ∞) × [0, ∞),[0, ∞)), β,γ∈ [0, ∞), ξi ∈ (0, ρ(T)), b, ai ∈(0, ∞) (for i = 1,..., m - 2) are given constants satisfying some suitable hypotheses. We show that this problem has at least one positive solution for sufficiently small b > 0 and no solution for sufficiently large b. Our results are new even for the corresponding differential equation (T= R) and difference equation (T = Z).

  18. EISCAT incoherent scatter radar measurements of artificial ionospheric modification at sub-ms time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahcivan, H.; Nicolls, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    Efficient generation of ELF/VLF waves through the modulation of ionospheric currents requires reliable measurements of the modulated current for different heater parameters. Incoherent scatter radar (ISR) measurements of modified plasma densities/temperatures would be ideal in quantifying the heating and cooling cycles in response to modulated heating by high-power HF waves. Considering the ms time scales of ELF/VLF generation processes, it is necessary to resolve the heating and cooling cycles at sub-ms time scales. Such measurements using ISRs have largely been avoided due to the common knowledge that the instrument requires minutes of integration. We present herein the results of an epoch averaging experiment using EISCAT that provides 0.2 ms resolution ISR power measurements as a function of phase into the HF heater ON and OFF cycle. In ELF/VLF generation, it is the electron temperature (Te) modulation that results in the modulation of electron collision frequency/mobility and therefore the electrojet modulation. Assuming a reliable electron collision frequency for transport as a function of Te, it is necessary to measure Te and electron density (Ne) simultaneously to predict the ionospheric current modulation. This is possible if (1) two incoherent scatter radars operating at sufficiently different frequencies are used and if (2) the Debye length and Bragg wavelengths are comparable. For the experiment results presented here, the ionospheric volume modified by the EISCAT heater were probed by both EISCAT UHF and VHF incoherent scatter radars operating at 0.16 m and 0.67 m Bragg wavelengths. Considering Ne=1e9 e/m3 in the D region ionosphere, for electron temperature Te=300 K, the Debye length is 0.38 m, where as for Te=1000 K the Debye length is 0.69 m; these parameters are reasonably appropriate to extract Te/Ne from simultaneous UHF/VHF data. We successfully detected ISR power modulation both in the E and F region heated ionosphere. Our findings are as

  19. Origin of space-separated charges in photoexcited organic heterojunctions on ultrafast time scales

    CERN Document Server

    Janković, Veljko

    2016-01-01

    We present detailed investigation of ultrafast (sub-ps) exciton dynamics in the lattice model of a donor/acceptor heterojunction. Exciton generation by means of a photoexcitation, exciton dissociation, and further charge separation are treated on equal footing. The experimentally observed presence of space-separated charges at $\\lesssim 100$ fs after the photoexcitation is usually attributed to ultrafast transitions from excitons in the donor to charge transfer and charge separated states. Here, we show, however, that space-separated charges appearing on $\\lesssim 100$-fs time scales are predominantly directly optically generated. Our theoretical insights into the ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy challenge usual interpretations of pump-probe spectra in terms of ultrafast population transfer from donor excitons to space-separated charges.

  20. Attractors of relaxation discrete-time systems with chaotic dynamics on a fast time scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslennikov, Oleg V.; Nekorkin, Vladimir I.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, a new type of relaxation systems is considered. Their prominent feature is that they comprise two distinct epochs, one is slow regular motion and another is fast chaotic motion. Unlike traditionally studied slow-fast systems that have smooth manifolds of slow motions in the phase space and fast trajectories between them, in this new type one observes, apart the same geometric objects, areas of transient chaos. Alternating periods of slow regular motions and fast chaotic ones as well as transitions between them result in a specific chaotic attractor with chaos on a fast time scale. We formulate basic properties of such attractors in the framework of discrete-time systems and consider several examples. Finally, we provide an important application of such systems, the neuronal electrical activity in the form of chaotic spike-burst oscillations.

  1. Time-Scale and Time-Frequency Analyses of Irregularly Sampled Astronomical Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Roques

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available We evaluate the quality of spectral restoration in the case of irregular sampled signals in astronomy. We study in details a time-scale method leading to a global wavelet spectrum comparable to the Fourier period, and a time-frequency matching pursuit allowing us to identify the frequencies and to control the error propagation. In both cases, the signals are first resampled with a linear interpolation. Both results are compared with those obtained using Lomb's periodogram and using the weighted waveletZ-transform developed in astronomy for unevenly sampled variable stars observations. These approaches are applied to simulations and to light variations of four variable stars. This leads to the conclusion that the matching pursuit is more efficient for recovering the spectral contents of a pulsating star, even with a preliminary resampling. In particular, the results are almost independent of the quality of the initial irregular sampling.

  2. Intrinsic dynamics of heart regulatory systems on short time-scales: from experiment to modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Khovanov, I A; McClintock, P V E; Stefanovska, A

    2009-01-01

    We discuss open problems related to the stochastic modeling of cardiac function. The work is based on an experimental investigation of the dynamics of heart rate variability (HRV) in the absence of respiratory perturbations. We consider first the cardiac control system on short time scales via an analysis of HRV within the framework of a random walk approach. Our experiments show that HRV on timescales of less than a minute takes the form of free diffusion, close to Brownian motion, which can be described as a non-stationary process with stationary increments. Secondly, we consider the inverse problem of modeling the state of the control system so as to reproduce the experimentally observed HRV statistics of. We discuss some simple toy models and identify open problems for the modelling of heart dynamics.

  3. Generalization of the DLA process with different immiscible components by time-scale coarse graining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Postnikov, E B [Kursk State University, Theoretical Physics Department, Radishcheva st, 33, 305000, Kursk (Russian Federation); Ryabov, A B [MV Lomonosov Moscow State University, Physics Faculty, 119992 Moscow (Russian Federation); Loskutov, A [MV Lomonosov Moscow State University, Physics Faculty, 119992 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2007-10-05

    In the framework of the mean-field approximation we propose a new approach to the description of the growth of fractal structures which are formed as a result of the process of diffusion limited aggregation. Our approach is based on the coarse graining of the time scale which takes into account the property of discreteness of such structures. The obtained system of partial differential equations allows us to evaluate numerically the fractal dimension and the cluster density depending on the distance from the cluster center. The results are in a quite good agreement with values found by the direct numerical simulations. The proposed approach is generalized for the case of the cluster description with different immiscible particles.

  4. Generalization of the DLA process with different immiscible components by time-scale coarse graining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postnikov, E. B.; Ryabov, A. B.; Loskutov, A.

    2007-10-01

    In the framework of the mean-field approximation we propose a new approach to the description of the growth of fractal structures which are formed as a result of the process of diffusion limited aggregation. Our approach is based on the coarse graining of the time scale which takes into account the property of discreteness of such structures. The obtained system of partial differential equations allows us to evaluate numerically the fractal dimension and the cluster density depending on the distance from the cluster center. The results are in a quite good agreement with values found by the direct numerical simulations. The proposed approach is generalized for the case of the cluster description with different immiscible particles.

  5. Effects of demographic stochasticity on biological community assembly on evolutionary time scales

    KAUST Repository

    Murase, Yohsuke

    2010-04-13

    We study the effects of demographic stochasticity on the long-term dynamics of biological coevolution models of community assembly. The noise is induced in order to check the validity of deterministic population dynamics. While mutualistic communities show little dependence on the stochastic population fluctuations, predator-prey models show strong dependence on the stochasticity, indicating the relevance of the finiteness of the populations. For a predator-prey model, the noise causes drastic decreases in diversity and total population size. The communities that emerge under influence of the noise consist of species strongly coupled with each other and have stronger linear stability around the fixed-point populations than the corresponding noiseless model. The dynamics on evolutionary time scales for the predator-prey model are also altered by the noise. Approximate 1/f fluctuations are observed with noise, while 1/ f2 fluctuations are found for the model without demographic noise. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  6. Almost periodic dynamics for impulsive delay neural networks of a general type on almost periodic time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Agarwal, Ravi P.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we improve the new concepts of almost periodic time scales addressed in 2014 to introduce the new concepts of piecewise almost periodic functions. Then we establish some first results for the existence and exponential stability of almost periodic solution for a general type of delay neural networks with impulsive effects. The approaches are based on contraction principle and Gronwall-Bellman's inequality. In addition, the numerical example and simulations are provided to illustrate our time scale methods are feasible and effective. The obtained results are more general and comprehensive than the results obtained on periodic time scales before.

  7. Continent-scale global change attribution in European birds - combining annual and decadal time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Peter Søgaard; Böhning-Gaese, Katrin; Thorup, Kasper; Tøttrup, Anders P; Chylarecki, Przemysław; Jiguet, Frédéric; Lehikoinen, Aleksi; Noble, David G; Reif, Jiri; Schmid, Hans; van Turnhout, Chris; Burfield, Ian J; Foppen, Ruud; Voříšek, Petr; van Strien, Arco; Gregory, Richard D; Rahbek, Carsten

    2016-02-01

    Species attributes are commonly used to infer impacts of environmental change on multiyear species trends, e.g. decadal changes in population size. However, by themselves attributes are of limited value in global change attribution since they do not measure the changing environment. A broader foundation for attributing species responses to global change may be achieved by complementing an attributes-based approach by one estimating the relationship between repeated measures of organismal and environmental changes over short time scales. To assess the benefit of this multiscale perspective, we investigate the recent impact of multiple environmental changes on European farmland birds, here focusing on climate change and land use change. We analyze more than 800 time series from 18 countries spanning the past two decades. Analysis of long-term population growth rates documents simultaneous responses that can be attributed to both climate change and land-use change, including long-term increases in populations of hot-dwelling species and declines in long-distance migrants and farmland specialists. In contrast, analysis of annual growth rates yield novel insights into the potential mechanisms driving long-term climate induced change. In particular, we find that birds are affected by winter, spring, and summer conditions depending on the distinct breeding phenology that corresponds to their migratory strategy. Birds in general benefit from higher temperatures or higher primary productivity early on or in the peak of the breeding season with the largest effect sizes observed in cooler parts of species' climatic ranges. Our results document the potential of combining time scales and integrating both species attributes and environmental variables for global change attribution. We suggest such an approach will be of general use when high-resolution time series are available in large-scale biodiversity surveys. PMID:26486804

  8. Streamflow response of a small forested catchment on different time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zabaleta

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The hydrological response of a catchment to rainfall on different time scales is result of a complex system involving a range of physical processes which may operate simultaneously and have different spatial and temporal influences. This paper presents the analysis of streamflow response of a small humid-temperate catchment (Aixola, 4.8 km2 in the Basque Country on different time scales and discusses the role of the controlling factors. Firstly, daily time series analysis was used to establish a hypothesis on the general functioning of the catchment through the relationship between precipitation and discharge on an annual and multi-annual scale (2003–2008. Second, rainfall-runoff relationships and relationships among several hydrological variables, including catchment antecedent conditions, were explored at the event scale (222 events to check and improve the hypothesis. Finally, the evolution of electrical conductivity (EC during some of the monitored storm events (28 events was examined to identify the time-origin of waters. Quick response of the catchment to almost all the rainfall events as well as a considerable regulation capacity was deduced from the correlation and spectral analyses. These results agree with runoff event scale data analysis; however the event analysis revealed the non-linearity of the system, as antecedent conditions play a significant role in this catchment. Further, analysis at the event scale made possible to clarify factors controlling (precipitation, precipitation intensity and initial discharge the different aspects of the runoff response (runoff coefficient and discharge increase for this catchment. Finally, the evolution of EC of the waters enabled the time origin (event or pre-event waters of the quickflow to be established; specifically, the conductivity showed that pre-event waters usually represent a high percentage of the total discharge during runoff peaks. The importance of soil waters in the

  9. Approximate method for stochastic chemical kinetics with two-time scales by chemical Langevin equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fuke; Tian, Tianhai; Rawlings, James B; Yin, George

    2016-05-01

    The frequently used reduction technique is based on the chemical master equation for stochastic chemical kinetics with two-time scales, which yields the modified stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA). For the chemical reaction processes involving a large number of molecular species and reactions, the collection of slow reactions may still include a large number of molecular species and reactions. Consequently, the SSA is still computationally expensive. Because the chemical Langevin equations (CLEs) can effectively work for a large number of molecular species and reactions, this paper develops a reduction method based on the CLE by the stochastic averaging principle developed in the work of Khasminskii and Yin [SIAM J. Appl. Math. 56, 1766-1793 (1996); ibid. 56, 1794-1819 (1996)] to average out the fast-reacting variables. This reduction method leads to a limit averaging system, which is an approximation of the slow reactions. Because in the stochastic chemical kinetics, the CLE is seen as the approximation of the SSA, the limit averaging system can be treated as the approximation of the slow reactions. As an application, we examine the reduction of computation complexity for the gene regulatory networks with two-time scales driven by intrinsic noise. For linear and nonlinear protein production functions, the simulations show that the sample average (expectation) of the limit averaging system is close to that of the slow-reaction process based on the SSA. It demonstrates that the limit averaging system is an efficient approximation of the slow-reaction process in the sense of the weak convergence. PMID:27155630

  10. Variations of characteristic time scales in rotating stratified turbulence using a large parametric numerical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, D; Marino, R; Herbert, C; Pouquet, A

    2016-01-01

    We study rotating stratified turbulence (RST) making use of numerical data stemming from a large parametric study varying the Reynolds, Froude and Rossby numbers, Re, Fr and Ro in a broad range of values. The computations are performed using periodic boundary conditions on grids of 1024(3) points, with no modeling of the small scales, no forcing and with large-scale random initial conditions for the velocity field only, and there are altogether 65 runs analyzed in this paper. The buoyancy Reynolds number defined as R(B) = ReFr2 varies from negligible values to ≈ 10(5), approaching atmospheric or oceanic regimes. This preliminary analysis deals with the variation of characteristic time scales of RST with dimensionless parameters, focusing on the role played by the partition of energy between the kinetic and potential modes, as a key ingredient for modeling the dynamics of such flows. We find that neither rotation nor the ratio of the Brunt-Väisälä frequency to the inertial frequency seem to play a major role in the absence of forcing in the global dynamics of the small-scale kinetic and potential modes. Specifically, in these computations, mostly in regimes of wave turbulence, characteristic times based on the ratio of energy to dissipation of the velocity and temperature fluctuations, T(V) and T(P), vary substantially with parameters. Their ratio γ=T(V)/T(P) follows roughly a bell-shaped curve in terms of Richardson number Ri. It reaches a plateau - on which time scales become comparable, γ≈0.6 - when the turbulence has significantly strengthened, leading to numerous destabilization events together with a tendency towards an isotropization of the flow. PMID:26830757

  11. Climate scenarios for Olkiluoto on a time-scale of 120,000 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Posiva Oy is planning to dispose of spent nuclear fuel in a repository, to be constructed at a depth of 400 m in the crystalline bedrock at Olkiluoto, Finland. Planning the storage requires careful consideration of many aspects, including an assessment of long-term repository safety. For estimating possible climate states at Olkiluoto on a time-scale of 120,000 years, we analyze climate simulations of an Earth System Model of Intermediate Complexity (CLIMBER-2) coupled with an ice sheet model (SICOPOLIS). The simulations into the future clearly show that the onset of the next glaciation is strongly dependent on the Earth's orbital variations and the atmospheric CO2 concentration. It is evident that due to global warming, the climate of the next centuries will be warmer and wetter than at present. Most likely, due to global warming and low variations in the Earth's orbit around the sun, the present interglacial will last for at least the next 30,000 years. Further, the future simulations showed that the insolation minima on the Northern Hemisphere 50,000-60,000 and 90,000-100,000 years after the present hold a potential for the onset of the next glaciation. Hence, on a time-scale of 120,000 years, one must take into account climate periods lasting several thousand years having the following features: an interglacial climate, a periglacial climate, a climate with an ice sheet margin near Olkiluoto, a glacial climate with an ice sheet covering Olkiluoto, and a climate with Olkiluoto being depressed below sea level after glaciation due to isostatic depression. Due to the uncertainties related to the evolution of the future climate, it is recommended the simulations into the far future to be used only qualitatively. Quantitative information about glacial climate is achieved from the reconstructions and simulations of the past climate. (orig.)

  12. Climate scenarios for Olkiluoto on a time-scale of 100,000 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Posiva Oy is planning to dispose of spent nuclear fuel in a repository, to be constructed at a depth of 400 m in the crystalline bedrock at Olkiluoto, Finland. Planning the storage requires careful consideration of many aspects, including an assessment of long-term repository safety. For estimating possible climate states at Olkiluoto on a time-scale of 100,000 years, we analyze climate simulations of an Earth System Model of Intermediate Complexity (CLIMBER-2) coupled with an ice sheet model (SICOPOLIS). The simulations into the future clearly show that the onset of the next glaciation is strongly dependent on the Earth's orbital variations and the atmospheric CO2 concentration. It is evident that due to global warming, the climate of the next centuries will be warmer and wetter than at present. Most likely, due to global warming and low variations in the Earth's orbit around the sun, the present interglacial will last for at least the next 30,000 years. Further, the future simulations showed that the insolation minima on the Northern Hemisphere 50,000-60,000 and 90,000-100,000 years after the present hold a potential for the onset of the next glaciation. Hence, on a time-scale of 100,000 years, one must take into account climate periods lasting several thousand years having the following features: an interglacial climate, a periglacial climate, a climate with an ice sheet margin near Olkiluoto, a glacial climate with an ice sheet covering Olkiluoto, and a climate with Olkiluoto being depressed below sea level after glaciation due to isostatic depression. Due to the uncertainties related to the evolution of the future climate, it is recommended the simulations into the far future to be used only qualitatively. Quantitative information about glacial climate is achieved from the reconstructions and simulations of the past climate. (orig.)

  13. Sediment fining processes in a mountain stream at multiple time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bouteiller, Caroline; Mathys, Nicolle; Klotz, Sebastien

    2015-04-01

    Downstream fining of sediment is observed in most gravel bed rivers, and is attributed to two mechanisms. The first one is an apparent fining that results from a collective effect called selective sorting: smaller grains travel further downstream while larger grains deposit preferentially upstream. The second one is generally referred to as abrasion and encompasses all the fining processes that affect each grain during its travel along the stream. The latter type of processes is dominant in the mountainous streams of the Draix observatory and is the focus of this study. Draix catchments are characterized by hard climatic conditions with winter frost and storm-induced floods, and a very erodible lithology (marl). During the floods, at the time scale of a few minutes, sediment size is reduced by surface abrasion and fragmentation due to the collisions between grains. In between the floods, at the time scale of a few weeks to months, sediments that remain exposed on bars at low flow are affected by weathering due to frost/thaw and wetting/drying alternations, which also reduces their size. Using field measurements, we measured the global sediment fining rate that results from both short-term (flood) and long-term (low flow) processes. The very high value obtained (51%/km) reflects the combination of the soft lithology with hard climatic conditions. We then combined various field and laboratory experiments to quantify the efficiency of each fining process (surface abrasion and fragmentation during a flood, frost/thaw weathering and wetting/drying weathering). Results indicate that short-term and long-term processes are equally efficient and that both are needed to explain the in-situ global fining rates. We finally propose a simplified model to describe the observed fining patterns, which we use to predict the system response to changes in the hydrological or climatic regime.

  14. Climate scenarios for Olkiluoto on a time-scale of 120,000 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pimenoff, N.; Venaelaeinen, A.; Jaervinen, H. [Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki (Finland)

    2011-12-15

    Posiva Oy is planning to dispose of spent nuclear fuel in a repository, to be constructed at a depth of 400 m in the crystalline bedrock at Olkiluoto, Finland. Planning the storage requires careful consideration of many aspects, including an assessment of long-term repository safety. For estimating possible climate states at Olkiluoto on a time-scale of 120,000 years, we analyze climate simulations of an Earth System Model of Intermediate Complexity (CLIMBER-2) coupled with an ice sheet model (SICOPOLIS). The simulations into the future clearly show that the onset of the next glaciation is strongly dependent on the Earth's orbital variations and the atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration. It is evident that due to global warming, the climate of the next centuries will be warmer and wetter than at present. Most likely, due to global warming and low variations in the Earth's orbit around the sun, the present interglacial will last for at least the next 30,000 years. Further, the future simulations showed that the insolation minima on the Northern Hemisphere 50,000-60,000 and 90,000-100,000 years after the present hold a potential for the onset of the next glaciation. Hence, on a time-scale of 120,000 years, one must take into account climate periods lasting several thousand years having the following features: an interglacial climate, a periglacial climate, a climate with an ice sheet margin near Olkiluoto, a glacial climate with an ice sheet covering Olkiluoto, and a climate with Olkiluoto being depressed below sea level after glaciation due to isostatic depression. Due to the uncertainties related to the evolution of the future climate, it is recommended the simulations into the far future to be used only qualitatively. Quantitative information about glacial climate is achieved from the reconstructions and simulations of the past climate. (orig.)

  15. Multiple time scales in the microscopic dynamics of simple and complex liquids as studied by radiation scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.J.Bermejo

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Experimental investigations into the time-scales spanned by the microscopic dynamics of simple (metallic and molecular liquids, as explored by neutron scattering and muon spin rotation experiments are reviewed.

  16. EXISTENCE AND MULTIPLE EXISTENCE OF POSITIVE SOLUTIONS TO SECOND-ORDER m-POINT BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEM ON TIME SCALES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    By different fixed point theorems in cones, sufficient conditions for the existence and multiple existence of positive solutions to a class of second-order multi-point boundary value problem for dynamic equation on time scales are obtained.

  17. Subpicosecond conformational dynamics of small peptides probed by two-dimensional vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woutersen, Sander; Mu, Yuguang; Stock, Gerhard; Hamm, Peter

    2001-01-01

    The observation of subpicosecond fluctuations in the conformation of a small peptide in water is demonstrated. We use an experimental method that is specifically sensitive to conformational dynamics taking place on an ultrafast time scale. Complementary molecular-dynamics simulations confirm that the conformational fluctuations exhibit a subpicosecond component, the time scale and amplitude of which agree well with those derived from the experiment. PMID:11553784

  18. Assessments of Drought Impacts on Vegetation in China with the Optimal Time Scales of the Climatic Drought Index

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng Li; Tao Zhou; Xiang Zhao; Kaicheng Huang; Shan Gao; Hao Wu; Hui Luo

    2015-01-01

    Drought is expected to increase in frequency and severity due to global warming, and its impacts on vegetation are typically extensively evaluated with climatic drought indices, such as multi-scalar Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI). We analyzed the covariation between the SPEIs of various time scales and the anomalies of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), from which the vegetation type-related optimal time scales were retrieved. The results indicated ...

  19. Existence and Global Exponential Stability of Equilibrium Solution to Reaction-Diffusion Recurrent Neural Networks on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaihong Zhao

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The existence of equilibrium solutions to reaction-diffusion recurrent neural networks with Dirichlet boundary conditions on time scales is proved by the topological degree theory and M-matrix method. Under some sufficient conditions, we obtain the uniqueness and global exponential stability of equilibrium solution to reaction-diffusion recurrent neural networks with Dirichlet boundary conditions on time scales by constructing suitable Lyapunov functional and inequality skills. One example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of our results.

  20. Biosynthetic engineering of nonribosomal peptide synthetases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kries, Hajo

    2016-09-01

    From the evolutionary melting pot of natural product synthetase genes, microorganisms elicit antibiotics, communication tools, and iron scavengers. Chemical biologists manipulate these genes to recreate similarly diverse and potent biological activities not on evolutionary time scales but within months. Enzyme engineering has progressed considerably in recent years and offers new screening, modelling, and design tools for natural product designers. Here, recent advances in enzyme engineering and their application to nonribosomal peptide synthetases are reviewed. Among the nonribosomal peptides that have been subjected to biosynthetic engineering are the antibiotics daptomycin, calcium-dependent antibiotic, and gramicidin S. With these peptides, incorporation of unnatural building blocks and modulation of bioactivities via various structural modifications have been successfully demonstrated. Natural product engineering on the biosynthetic level is not a reliable method yet. However, progress in the understanding and manipulation of biosynthetic pathways may enable the routine production of optimized peptide drugs in the near future. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27465074

  1. Influence of time scale wind speed data on sustainability analysis for irrigating greenhouse crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz Méndez, Rodrigo; García Llaneza, Joaquín; Peillón, Manuel; Perdigones, Alicia; Sanchez, Raul; Tarquis, Ana M.; Garcia, Jose Luis

    2014-05-01

    Appropriate water supply at crop/farm level, with suitable costs, is becoming more and more important. Energy management is closely related to water supply in this context, being wind energy one of the options to be considered, using wind pumps for irrigation water supply. Therefore, it is important to characterize the wind speed frequency distribution to study the technical feasibility to use its energy for irrigation management purpose. The general objective of this present research is to analyze the impact of time scale recorded wind speed data in the sustainability for tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) grown under greenhouse at Cuban conditions using drip irrigation system. For this porpoise, a daily estimation balance between water needs and water availability was used to evaluate the feasibility of the most economic windmill irrigation system. Several factors were included: wind velocity (W, m/s) in function of the time scale averaged, flow supplied by the wind pump as a function of the elevation height (H, m) and daily greenhouse evapotranspiration. Monthly volumes of water required for irrigation (Dr, m3/ha) and in the water tank (Vd, m3), as well as the monthly irrigable area (Ar, ha), were estimated by cumulative deficit water budgeting taking in account these factors. Three-hourly wind velocity (W3h, m/s) data from 1992 till 2008 was available for this study. The original data was grouped in six and twelve hourly data (W6h and W12h respectively) as well as daily data (W24h). For each time scale the daily estimation balance was applied. A comparison of the results points out a need for at least three-hourly data to be used mainly in the months in which mean wind speed are close or below the pumps threshold speed to start-up functioning. References Manuel Esteban Peillon Mesa, Ana Maria Tarquis Alfonso, José Luis García Fernández, and Raúl Sánchez Calvo. The use of wind pumps for irrigating greenhouse tomato crops: a case study in Cuba. Geophysical

  2. Analysis of illegal peptide biopharmaceuticals frequently encountered by controlling agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhee, Celine; Janvier, Steven; Desmedt, Bart; Moens, Goedele; Deconinck, Eric; De Beer, Jacques O; Courselle, Patricia

    2015-09-01

    Recent advances in genomics, recombinant expression technologies and peptide synthesis have led to an increased development of protein and peptide therapeutics. Unfortunately this goes hand in hand with a growing market of counterfeit and illegal biopharmaceuticals, including substances that are still under pre-clinical and clinical development. These counterfeit and illegal protein and peptide substances could imply severe health threats as has been demonstrated by numerous case reports. The Belgian Federal Agency for Medicines and Health Products (FAMHP) and customs are striving, together with their global counterparts, to curtail the trafficking and distributions of these substances. At their request, suspected protein and peptide preparations are analysed in our Official Medicines Control Laboratory (OMCL). It stands to reason that a general screening method would be beneficiary in the battle against counterfeit and illegal peptide drugs. In this paper we present such general screening method employing liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for the identification of counterfeit and illegal injectable peptide preparations, extended with a subsequent quantification method using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (UHPLC-DAD). The screening method, taking only 30 min, is able to selectively detect 25 different peptides and incorporates the proposed minimum of five identification points (IP) as has been recommended for sports drug testing applications. The group of peptides represent substances which have already been detected in illegal and counterfeit products seized by different European countries as well as some biopharmaceutical peptides which have not been confiscated yet by the controlling agencies, but are already being used according to the many internet users forums. Additionally, we also show that when applying the same LC gradient, it is also possible to quantify these peptides without the need for

  3. Cooling and exhumation of continents at billion-year time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, T.; Bowring, S. A.; Perron, T.; Mahan, K. H.; Dudas, F. O.

    2011-12-01

    more. Deeper xenoliths record cooling at progressively younger times at similar rates and time-scales. From orogony to eruption of xenoliths onto the surface, the lithospheric thermal history constructed using this technique may exceed a billion years. Combining this cooling history with a lithosphere thermal model yields an estimate for the average integrated rate of craton erosion between 0.00-<0.0025 km/Ma across the orogen; a range far lower than the geologically recent to present day rates for continental erosion (<0.005-0.1 km/Ma). This marks the first ever determination of continental exhumation rates on time-scales that approach the age of the continents themselves and has implications for secular cooling of the asthenosphere.

  4. Variability of interconnected wind plants: correlation length and its dependence on variability time scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Martin, Clara M.; Lundquist, Julie K.; Handschy, Mark A.

    2015-04-01

    The variability in wind-generated electricity complicates the integration of this electricity into the electrical grid. This challenge steepens as the percentage of renewably-generated electricity on the grid grows, but variability can be reduced by exploiting geographic diversity: correlations between wind farms decrease as the separation between wind farms increases. But how far is far enough to reduce variability? Grid management requires balancing production on various timescales, and so consideration of correlations reflective of those timescales can guide the appropriate spatial scales of geographic diversity grid integration. To answer ‘how far is far enough,’ we investigate the universal behavior of geographic diversity by exploring wind-speed correlations using three extensive datasets spanning continents, durations and time resolution. First, one year of five-minute wind power generation data from 29 wind farms span 1270 km across Southeastern Australia (Australian Energy Market Operator). Second, 45 years of hourly 10 m wind-speeds from 117 stations span 5000 km across Canada (National Climate Data Archive of Environment Canada). Finally, four years of five-minute wind-speeds from 14 meteorological towers span 350 km of the Northwestern US (Bonneville Power Administration). After removing diurnal cycles and seasonal trends from all datasets, we investigate dependence of correlation length on time scale by digitally high-pass filtering the data on 0.25-2000 h timescales and calculating correlations between sites for each high-pass filter cut-off. Correlations fall to zero with increasing station separation distance, but the characteristic correlation length varies with the high-pass filter applied: the higher the cut-off frequency, the smaller the station separation required to achieve de-correlation. Remarkable similarities between these three datasets reveal behavior that, if universal, could be particularly useful for grid management. For high

  5. Observation of quantum particles on a large space-time scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, L. J.

    1994-10-01

    A quantum particle observed on a sufficiently large space-time scale can be described by means of classical particle trajectories. The joint distribution for large-scale multiple-time position and momentum measurements on a nonrelativistic quantum particle moving freely in R v is given by straight-line trajectories with probabilities determined by the initial momentum-space wavefunction. For large-scale toroidal and rectangular regions the trajectories are geodesics. In a uniform gravitational field the trajectories are parabolas. A quantum counting process on free particles is also considered and shown to converge in the large-space-time limit to a classical counting process for particles with straight-line trajectories. If the quantum particle interacts weakly with its environment, the classical particle trajectories may undergo random jumps. In the random potential model considered here, the quantum particle evolves according to a reversible unitary one-parameter group describing elastic scattering off static randomly distributed impurities (a quantum Lorentz gas). In the large-space-time weak-coupling limit a classical stochastic process is obtained with probability one and describes a classical particle moving with constant speed in straight lines between random jumps in direction. The process depends only on the ensemble value of the covariance of the random field and not on the sample field. The probability density in phase space associated with the classical stochastic process satisfies the linear Boltzmann equation for the classical Lorentz gas, which, in the limit h→0, goes over to the linear Landau equation. Our study of the quantum Lorentz gas is based on a perturbative expansion and, as in other studies of this system, the series can be controlled only for small values of the rescaled time and for Gaussian random fields. The discussion of classical particle trajectories for nonrelativistic particles on a macroscopic spacetime scale applies also to

  6. Phosphopeptide Enrichment by Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thingholm, Tine E; Larsen, Martin R

    2016-01-01

    Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) has been the method of choice for phosphopeptide enrichment prior to mass spectrometric analysis for many years and it is still used extensively in many laboratories. Using the affinity of negatively charged phosphate groups towards positively charged metal ions such as Fe(3+), Ga(3+), Al(3+), Zr(4+), and Ti(4+) has made it possible to enrich phosphorylated peptides from peptide samples. However, the selectivity of most of the metal ions is limited, when working with highly complex samples, e.g., whole-cell extracts, resulting in contamination from nonspecific binding of non-phosphorylated peptides. This problem is mainly caused by highly acidic peptides that also share high binding affinity towards these metal ions. By lowering the pH of the loading buffer nonspecific binding can be reduced significantly, however with the risk of reducing specific binding capacity. After binding, the enriched phosphopeptides are released from the metal ions using alkaline buffers of pH 10-11, EDTA, or phosphate-containing buffers. Here we describe a protocol for IMAC using Fe(3+) for phosphopeptide enrichment. The principles are illustrated on a semi-complex peptide mixture. PMID:26584922

  7. The purification of affinity-labelled active-site peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The isolation of the labelled peptide from the protein digest, following the affinity labelling of the active sites of enzymes or antibodies, is described. Single-step affinity chromatography utilises the affinity of the native enzymes or antibody for the ligand used to label the same protein. The labelled peptide is the only one in the digest that displays affinity for the immobilised protein and can be released with eluants that dissociate the protein-ligand complex. (Auth.)

  8. A Novel Lactic Acid Bacteria Growth-stimulating Peptide from Broad Bean (Vicia faba .) Protein Hydrolysates

    OpenAIRE

    Ping Xiao; Yuan Liu; Rizwan-ur-Rehman; Ran Kang; Yanping Wang

    2015-01-01

    In this study, broad bean protein hydrolysates (BPH) produced by alcalase with strong-stimulating activity for lactic acid bacteria (LAB) was first time reported. In order to obtain the key peptide that have growth-stimulating activity for lactic acid bacteria (LAB), gel filtration chromatography and Reverse Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography (RP-HPLC) were applied to isolate and purify the peptides from BPH. Finally, F4-2 elicited the highest activity for LAB, corresponding to amin...

  9. Adaptive sliding mode observer for induction motor using two-time-scale approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mezouar, A.; Fellah, M.K.; Hadjeri, S. [Intelligent Control and Electrical Power Systems Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Sciences Engineering, Djillali Liabes University (22 000) Sidi Bel Abbes (Algeria)

    2007-04-15

    This paper presents an original method for the design of a robust adaptive sliding mode current and flux observer for induction motor drive using two-time-scale approach. This approach, based on the singular perturbation theory, decomposes the original system of the observer error dynamics into separate slow and fast subsystems of lower dimensions and permits a simple design and sequential determination of the observer gains. For the proposed observer, the rotor speed signal is assumed to be available. The stator currents and rotor flux are observed on the stationary reference frame using sliding mode concept, and the adaptive rotor time-constant is derived from Lyapunov stability theory using measured and estimated currents and estimated rotor flux. The control algorithm is based on the indirect field-oriented sliding mode control to keep the machine field oriented. The control-observer scheme seeks to provide asymptotic tracking of speed and rotor flux in spite of the presence of an uncertain load torque and unknown value of the rotor resistance. The effectiveness of this control algorithm has been successfully verified through computer simulations. (author)

  10. The time scales of the climate-economy feedback and the climatic cost of growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is based on the perception that the inertia of climate and socio-economic systems are key parameters in the climate change issue. In a first part, it develops and implements a new approach based on a simple integrated model with a particular focus on an innovative transient impact and adaptation modelling. In a second part, a climate-economy feedback is defined and characterized. It is found that: (i) it has a 70-year characteristic time, which is long when compared to the system's other time-scales, and it cannot act as a natural damping process of climate change; (ii) mitigation has to be anticipated since the feedback of an emission reduction on the economy is significant only after a 20-year delay and really efficient after a one-century delay; (iii) the IPCC methodology, that neglects the feedback from impacts to emissions, is acceptable up to 2100, whatever is the level of impacts. This analysis allows also to define a climatic cost of growth as the additional climate change damages due to the additional emissions linked to economic growth. Usefully, this metric for climate change damages is particularly independent of the baseline scenario. (orig.)

  11. Optically stimulated phosphorescence in orthoclase feldspar over the millisecond to second time scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past, time-resolved IR stimulated luminescence (TR-IRSL) curves from feldspar have mainly been measured over a few hundred μs with the purpose of estimating the lifetimes of the components. In this study, we present the decay form of time-resolved IRSL and IR stimulated phosphorescence (IRSP) from orthoclase feldspar covering over 8 orders of magnitude (50 ns to ∼7 s). A detailed characterisation of the slowly decaying signals (ms to s time scales) from feldspar is undertaken to obtain further insight into the role of re-trapping in both the IR stimulated luminescence (IRSL) and the relatively more stable post-IR IRSL signals. The decay form of the different signals examined here shows a weak dependence on preheat temperature and a strong dependence on stimulation temperature. Interestingly, the IRSP curves show a conspicuous kink of which the position is linearly dependent on the on-time duration. The data on thermal dependence of these signals might suggest that the decay behaviour of the time-resolved IRSL and phosphorescence signals mainly reflect the occupancy of electrons in the band tail states with a significant contribution from the shallow traps. This interpretation is supported by thermoluminescence (TL) curves showing the photo-transfer effect during short IR and post-IR IR stimulations.

  12. Evidence for non-diverging time-scales in glass-forming liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Gregory

    2013-03-01

    One perceived important signature of the ``ideal'' glass transition and of the complex fluid nature of glass-forming liquids remains the apparent divergence of the dynamics at temperatures above zero Kelvin. Recently, however, this perception has been increasingly challenged both through experiments and in new theories of the dynamics of glass forming systems. In this presentation we summarize some of the prior evidence suggesting that time scales actually do not diverge in glasses that are aged into equilibrium, perhaps 15 K below the conventional glass transition temperature Tg. We then show new results from an extremely densified glass, 20 Ma old Jamaican amber, in which we were able to obtain the upper bound to the relaxation times through a step-wise temperature scan in which the stress relaxation response of the amber was measured both below and above the fictive temperature TF . We find that in the case of the upper bound responses at T>TF , there is a strong deviation of the response from the Super-Arrhenius Vogel-Fulcher behavior and this persists to the fictive temperature which is some 33.8 K below Tg. The results are compared to the parabolic model of Chandler and co-workers and we find the model to be consistent with our results if the value of Tx in the model is taken to be the calorimetric glass transition temperature. The significance of the results will be discussed. We acknowledge NSF grants DMR-0804438 and DMR-1207070 for support of this work

  13. Analysis and modelling of variability and covariability of population spike trains across multiple time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyamzin, Dmitry R; Garcia-Lazaro, Jose A; Lesica, Nicholas A

    2012-01-01

    As multi-electrode and imaging technology begin to provide us with simultaneous recordings of large neuronal populations, new methods for modelling such data must also be developed. We present a model of responses to repeated trials of a sensory stimulus based on thresholded Gaussian processes that allows for analysis and modelling of variability and covariability of population spike trains across multiple time scales. The model framework can be used to specify the values of many different variability measures including spike timing precision across trials, coefficient of variation of the interspike interval distribution, and Fano factor of spike counts for individual neurons, as well as signal and noise correlations and correlations of spike counts across multiple neurons. Using both simulated data and data from different stages of the mammalian auditory pathway, we demonstrate the range of possible independent manipulations of different variability measures, and explore how this range depends on the sensory stimulus. The model provides a powerful framework for the study of experimental and surrogate data and for analyzing dependencies between different statistical properties of neuronal populations. PMID:22578115

  14. Saharan dust deposition may affect phytoplankton growth in the Mediterranean sea at ecological time scales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachele Gallisai

    Full Text Available The surface waters of the Mediterranean Sea are extremely poor in the nutrients necessary for plankton growth. At the same time, the Mediterranean Sea borders with the largest and most active desert areas in the world and the atmosphere over the basin is subject to frequent injections of mineral dust particles. We describe statistical correlations between dust deposition over the Mediterranean Sea and surface chlorophyll concentrations at ecological time scales. Aerosol deposition of Saharan origin may explain 1 to 10% (average 5% of seasonally detrended chlorophyll variability in the low nutrient-low chlorophyll Mediterranean. Most of the statistically significant correlations are positive with main effects in spring over the Eastern and Central Mediterranean, conforming to a view of dust events fueling needed nutrients to the planktonic community. Some areas show negative effects of dust deposition on chlorophyll, coinciding with regions under a large influence of aerosols from European origin. The influence of dust deposition on chlorophyll dynamics may become larger in future scenarios of increased aridity and shallowing of the mixed layer.

  15. Mastering Uncertainty and Risk at Multiple Time Scales in the Future Electrical Grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bent, Russell W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Backhaus, Scott N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-10

    Today's electrical grids enjoy a relatively clean separation of spatio-temporal scales yielding a compartmentalization of grid design, optimization, control and risk assessment allowing for the use of conventional mathematical tools within each area. In contrast, the future grid will incorporate time-intermittent renewable generation, operate via faster electrical markets, and tap the latent control capability at finer grid modeling scales; creating a fundamentally new set of couplings across spatiotemporal scales and requiring revolutionary advances in mathematics techniques to bridge these scales. One example is found in decade-scale grid expansion planning in which today's algorithms assume accurate load forecasts and well-controlled generation. Incorporating intermittent renewable generation creates fluctuating network flows at the hourly time scale, inherently linking the ability of a transmission line to deliver electrical power to hourly operational decisions. New operations-based planning algorithms are required, creating new mathematical challenges. Spatio-temporal scales are also crossed when the future grid's minute-scale fluctuations in network flows (due to intermittent generation) create a disordered state upon which second-scale transient grid dynamics propagate effectively invalidating today's on-line dynamic stability analyses. Addressing this challenge requires new on-line algorithms that use large data streams from new grid sensing technologies to physically aggregate across many spatial scales to create responsive, data-driven dynamic models. Here, we sketch the mathematical foundations of these problems and potential solutions.

  16. The evolutionary time scale of Sakurai's object A test of convection theory?

    CERN Document Server

    Herwig, F

    2001-01-01

    Sakurai's object (V4334 Sgr) is a born again AGB star following a very late thermal pulse. So far no stellar evolution models have been able to explain the extremely fast evolution of this star, which has taken it from the pre-white dwarf stage to its current appearance as a giant within only a few years. A very high stellar mass can be ruled out as the cause of the fast evolution. Instead the evolution time scale has now been found in stellar models by making the assumption that the convective efficiency for element mixing in the He-flash convection zone during the very late thermal pulse is smaller than predicted by the mixing-length theory. As a result the main energy generation from fast convective proton capture will occur at a larger mass coordinate, closer to the surface and the expansion to the giant state can be accelerated to a few years, as required by past observations of V4334 Sgr. Assuming a mass of V4334 Sgr of 0.604M_sun which is consistent with a distance of 4kpc, a reduction of the MLT mixin...

  17. US stock market efficiency over weekly, monthly, quarterly and yearly time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, E.; Aguilar-Cornejo, M.; Femat, R.; Alvarez-Ramirez, J.

    2014-11-01

    In financial markets, the weak form of the efficient market hypothesis implies that price returns are serially uncorrelated sequences. In other words, prices should follow a random walk behavior. Recent developments in evolutionary economic theory (Lo, 2004) have tailored the concept of adaptive market hypothesis (AMH) by proposing that market efficiency is not an all-or-none concept, but rather market efficiency is a characteristic that varies continuously over time and across markets. Within the AMH framework, this work considers the Dow Jones Index Average (DJIA) for studying the deviations from the random walk behavior over time. It is found that the market efficiency also varies over different time scales, from weeks to years. The well-known detrended fluctuation analysis was used for the characterization of the serial correlations of the return sequences. The results from the empirical showed that interday and intraday returns are more serially correlated than overnight returns. Also, some insights in the presence of business cycles (e.g., Juglar and Kuznets) are provided in terms of time variations of the scaling exponent.

  18. Mixed-mode oscillations in a multiple time scale phantom bursting system

    CERN Document Server

    Krupa, Maciej; Desroches, Mathieu; Clément, Frédérique

    2012-01-01

    In this work we study mixed mode oscillations in a model of secretion of GnRH (Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone). The model is a phantom burster consisting of two feedforward coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo systems, with three time scales. The forcing system (Regulator) evolves on the slowest scale and acts by moving the slow nullcline of the forced system (Secretor). There are three modes of dynamics: pulsatility (transient relaxation oscillation), surge (quasi steady state) and small oscillations related to the passage of the slow nullcline through a fold point of the fast nullcline. We derive a variety of reductions, taking advantage of the mentioned features of the system. We obtain two results; one on the local dynamics near the fold in the parameter regime corresponding to the presence of small oscillations and the other on the global dynamics, more specifically on the existence of an attracting limit cycle. Our local result is a rigorous characterization of small canards and sectors of rotation in the case of fo...

  19. Field Experience with and Potential for Multi-time Scale Grid Transactions from Responsive Commercial Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila; Ghatikar, Girish

    2014-08-01

    The need for and concepts behind demand response are evolving. As the electric system changes with more intermittent renewable electric supply systems, there is a need to allow buildings to provide more flexible demand. This paper presents results from field studies and pilots, as well as engineering estimates of the potential capabilities of fast load responsiveness in commercial buildings. We present a sector wide analysis of flexible loads in commercial buildings, which was conducted to improve resource planning and determine which loads to evaluate in future demonstrations. These systems provide important capabilities for future transactional systems. The field analysis is based on results from California, plus projects in the northwest and east coast. End-uses considered include heating, ventilation, air conditioning and lighting. The timescales of control include day-ahead, as well as day-of, 10-minute ahead and even faster response. This technology can provide DR signals on different times scales to interact with responsive building loads. We describe the latency of the control systems in the building and the round trip communications with the wholesale grid operators.

  20. Modeling and simulation of nuclear fuel in scenarios with long time scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa, Carlos E.; Bodmann, Bardo E.J., E-mail: eduardo.espinosa@ufrgs.br, E-mail: bardo.bodmann@ufrgs.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (DENUC/PROMEC/UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear. Programa de Pos Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear reactors play a key role in defining the energy matrix. A study by the Fraunhofer Society shows in different time scales for long periods of time the distribution of energy sources. Regardless of scale, the use of nuclear energy is practically constant. In these scenarios, the nuclear fuel behavior over time is of interest. For kinetics of long-term scales, changing the chemical composition of fuel is significant. Thus, it is appropriate to consider fission products called neutron poisons. Such products are of interest in the nuclear reactor, since they become parasitic neutron absorbers and result in long thermal heat sources. The objective of this work is to solve the kinetics system coupled to neutron poison products. To solve this system, we use similar ideas to the method of Adomian decomposition. Initially, one separates the system of equations as the sum of a linear part and a non-linear part in order to solve a recursive system. The nonlinearity is treated as Adomian polynomial. We present numerical results of the effects of changing the power of a reactor, scenarios such as start-up and shut-down. For these results we consider time dependent reactivity, such as linear reactivity, quadratic polynomial and oscillatory. With these results one can simulate the chemical composition of the fuel due to the reuse of the spent fuel in subsequent cycles. (author)

  1. Asymptotic Convergence of the Solutions of a Dynamic Equation on Discrete Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Diblík

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates a dynamic equation Δy(tn=β(tn[y(tn−j−y(tn−k] for n→∞, where k and j are integers such that k>j≥0, on an arbitrary discrete time scale T:={tn} with tn∈ℝ, n∈ℤn0−k∞={n0−k,n0−k+1,…}, n0∈ℕ, tn

  2. Size-selective sorting in bubble streaming flows: Particle migration on fast time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thameem, Raqeeb; Rallabandi, Bhargav; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2015-11-01

    Steady streaming from ultrasonically driven microbubbles is an increasingly popular technique in microfluidics because such devices are easily manufactured and generate powerful and highly controllable flows. Combining streaming and Poiseuille transport flows allows for passive size-sensitive sorting at particle sizes and selectivities much smaller than the bubble radius. The crucial particle deflection and separation takes place over very small times (milliseconds) and length scales (20-30 microns) and can be rationalized using a simplified geometric mechanism. A quantitative theoretical description is achieved through the application of recent results on three-dimensional streaming flow field contributions. To develop a more fundamental understanding of the particle dynamics, we use high-speed photography of trajectories in polydisperse particle suspensions, recording the particle motion on the time scale of the bubble oscillation. Our data reveal the dependence of particle displacement on driving phase, particle size, oscillatory flow speed, and streaming speed. With this information, the effective repulsive force exerted by the bubble on the particle can be quantified, showing for the first time how fast, selective particle migration is effected in a streaming flow. We acknowledge support by the National Science Foundation under grant number CBET-1236141.

  3. SCALABLE PERCEPTUAL AUDIO REPRESENTATION WITH AN ADAPTIVE THREE TIME-SCALE SINUSOIDAL SIGNAL MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Al-Moussawy Raed; Yin Junxun; Song Shaopeng

    2004-01-01

    This work is concerned with the development and optimization of a signal model for scalable perceptual audio coding at low bit rates. A complementary two-part signal model consisting of Sines plus Noise (SN) is described. The paper presents essentially a fundamental enhancement to the sinusoidal modeling component. The enhancement involves an audio signal scheme based on carrying out overlap-add sinusoidal modeling at three successive time scales,large, medium, and small. The sinusoidal modeling is done in an analysis-by-synthesis overlapadd manner across the three scales by using a psychoacoustically weighted matching pursuits.The sinusoidal modeling residual at the first scale is passed to the smaller scales to allow for the modeling of various signal features at appropriate resolutions. This approach greatly helps to correct the pre-echo inherent in the sinusoidal model. This improves the perceptual audio quality upon our previous work of sinusoidal modeling while using the same number of sinusoids. The most obvious application for the SN model is in scalable, high fidelity audio coding and signal modification.

  4. The time scales of the climate-economy feedback and the climatic cost of growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallegatte, Stephane [CIRED - CNRM, Nogent-sur-Marne (France)

    2005-04-01

    This paper is based on the perception that the inertia of climate and socio-economic systems are key parameters in the climate change issue. In a first part, it develops and implements a new approach based on a simple integrated model with a particular focus on an innovative transient impact and adaptation modelling. In a second part, a climate-economy feedback is defined and characterized. It is found that: (i) it has a 70-year characteristic time, which is long when compared to the system's other time-scales, and it cannot act as a natural damping process of climate change; (ii) mitigation has to be anticipated since the feedback of an emission reduction on the economy is significant only after a 20-year delay and really efficient after a one-century delay; (iii) the IPCC methodology, that neglects the feedback from impacts to emissions, is acceptable up to 2100, whatever is the level of impacts. This analysis allows also to define a climatic cost of growth as the additional climate change damages due to the additional emissions linked to economic growth. Usefully, this metric for climate change damages is particularly independent of the baseline scenario. (orig.)

  5. Atomistic surface erosion and thin film growth modelled over realistic time scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present results of atomistic modelling of surface growth and sputtering using a multi-time scale molecular dynamics-on-the-fly kinetic Monte Carlo scheme which allows simulations to be carried out over realistic experimental times. The method uses molecular dynamics to model the fast processes and then calculates the diffusion barriers for the slow processes on-the-fly, without any preconceptions about what transitions might occur. The method is applied to the growth of metal and oxide materials at impact energies typical for both vapour deposition and magnetron sputtering. The method can be used to explain growth processes, such as the filling of vacancies and the formation of stacking faults. By tuning the variable experimental parameters on the computer, a parameter set for optimum crystalline growth can be determined. The method can also be used to model sputtering where the particle interactions with the surface occur at a higher energy. It is shown how a steady state can arise in which interstitial clusters are continuously being formed below the surface during an atom impact event which also recombine or diffuse to the surface between impact events. For fcc metals the near surface region remains basically crystalline during the erosion process with a pitted topography which soon attains a steady state roughness.

  6. A SKOS-based multilingual thesaurus of geological time scale for interoperability of online geological maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaogang; Carranza, Emmanuel John M.; Wu, Chonglong; van der Meer, Freek D.; Liu, Gang

    2011-10-01

    The usefulness of online geological maps is hindered by linguistic barriers. Multilingual geoscience thesauri alleviate linguistic barriers of geological maps. However, the benefits of multilingual geoscience thesauri for online geological maps are less studied. In this regard, we developed a multilingual thesaurus of geological time scale (GTS) to alleviate linguistic barriers of GTS records among online geological maps. We extended the Simple Knowledge Organization System (SKOS) model to represent the ordinal hierarchical structure of GTS terms. We collected GTS terms in seven languages and encoded them into a thesaurus by using the extended SKOS model. We implemented methods of characteristic-oriented term retrieval in JavaScript programs for accessing Web Map Services (WMS), recognizing GTS terms, and making translations. With the developed thesaurus and programs, we set up a pilot system to test recognitions and translations of GTS terms in online geological maps. Results of this pilot system proved the accuracy of the developed thesaurus and the functionality of the developed programs. Therefore, with proper deployments, SKOS-based multilingual geoscience thesauri can be functional for alleviating linguistic barriers among online geological maps and, thus, improving their interoperability.

  7. Modeling and simulation of nuclear fuel in scenarios with long time scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear reactors play a key role in defining the energy matrix. A study by the Fraunhofer Society shows in different time scales for long periods of time the distribution of energy sources. Regardless of scale, the use of nuclear energy is practically constant. In these scenarios, the nuclear fuel behavior over time is of interest. For kinetics of long-term scales, changing the chemical composition of fuel is significant. Thus, it is appropriate to consider fission products called neutron poisons. Such products are of interest in the nuclear reactor, since they become parasitic neutron absorbers and result in long thermal heat sources. The objective of this work is to solve the kinetics system coupled to neutron poison products. To solve this system, we use similar ideas to the method of Adomian decomposition. Initially, one separates the system of equations as the sum of a linear part and a non-linear part in order to solve a recursive system. The nonlinearity is treated as Adomian polynomial. We present numerical results of the effects of changing the power of a reactor, scenarios such as start-up and shut-down. For these results we consider time dependent reactivity, such as linear reactivity, quadratic polynomial and oscillatory. With these results one can simulate the chemical composition of the fuel due to the reuse of the spent fuel in subsequent cycles. (author)

  8. Southern ocean SST variability and its relationship with ENSO on inter-decadal time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Li; Du, Yan; Zhang, Lan

    2013-06-01

    Empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis reveals a co-variability of Sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the Southern Hemisphere (0°-60°S). In the South Indian and Atlantic Oceans, there is a subtropical dipole pattern slanted in the southwest-northeast direction. In the South Pacific Ocean, a meridional tripole structure emerges, whose middle pole co-varies with the dipoles in the South Indian and Atlantic Oceans and is used in this study to track subtropical Pacific variability. The South Indian and Atlantic Ocean dipoles and the subtropical Pacific variability are phase-locked in austral summer. On the inter-decadal time scales, the dipoles in the South Indian and Atlantic Oceans weaken in amplitude after 1979/1980. No such weakening is found in the subtropical South Pacific Ocean. Interestingly, despite the reduced amplitude, the correlation of the Indian Ocean and Atlantic dipoles with El Niño and Southern Oscillation (ENSO) are enhanced after 1979/1980. The same increase in correlation is found for subtropical South Pacific variability after 1979/1980. These inter-decadal modulations imply that the Southern Hemisphere participates in part of the climate shift in the late 1970s. The correlation between Southern Hemisphere SST and ENSO reduces after 2000.

  9. Relationship between oceanic heat content and sea surface height on interannual time scale

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Linlin; SUN Che; HU Dunxin

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between heat content and sea surface height (SSH) in the global ocean on the interannual time scale is examined with satellite altimeter measurements,historical hydrography,and model assimilation outputs.Results show that correlation between altimetric SSH and heat content in the upper 700 m calculated from Ishii data is geographically nonuniform.In the tropical ocean,heat content and SSH are strongly correlated and exhibit nearly the same interannual variations.In the polar ocean,their correlation is relatively weak.Further analysis with Simple Ocean Data Assimilation outputs shows that such nonuniform distribution is not from dynamical origin but from the limited integral depth selected to calculate heat content.The integral depth of 700 m is inadequate to capture variation of the deep main thermocline in the polar region.The halosteric effect also contributes to the nonuniform pattern of correlation,because saline contraction becomes significant in the polar ocean owing to low temperature.

  10. Multiple time scales in cataclysmic binaries. The low-field magnetic dwarf nova DO Draconis

    CERN Document Server

    Andronov, I L; Han, W; Kim, Y; Yoon, J -N

    2008-01-01

    We study the variability of the cataclysmic variable DO Dra, on time-scales of between minutes and decades. The characteristic decay time dt/dm=0.902(3) days/mag was estimated from our 3 nights of CCD R observations. The quiescent data show a photometric wave with a cycle about 303(15)d. We analyzed the profile of the composite (or mean) outburst. We discovered however, that a variety of different outburst heights and durations had occurred, contrary to theoretical predictions. With increasing maximum brightness, we find that the decay time also increases; this is in contrast to the model predictions, which indicate that outbursts should have a constant shape. This is interpreted as representing the presence of outburst-to-outburst variability of the magnetospheric radius. A presence of a number of missed weak narrow outbursts is predicted from this statistical relationship. A new type of variability is detected, during 3 subsequent nights in 2007: periodic (during one nightly run) oscillations with rapidly-d...

  11. Application of matched filters in time-scale domain for elastography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHEN Bin; WAN Mingxi; SUN Yongmei

    2001-01-01

    Elasticity imaging offers the possibility of detecting changes in elastic properties and assesses the biomechanical properties of soft tissue with increased sensitivity and spatial resolution compared with conventional palpation. However, the range of applied strains is limited by the concomitant increase of echo signal decorrelation. The decorrelation is mainly introduced by diffuse scattering, while the regular scattering is highly correlated. Because the regular scattering and diffuse scattering localize with different patterns in different ranges of time-scale plane, a new method is put forward to detect the regular scattering with matched filters based on wavelet transform using Generalized Likelihood Ratio Test (GLRT). The simulation results illustrate that the change in estimated mean interscatterer spacing introduced by a SNR of -10 dB is 1.1 ± 2.8%. Thus, by tracking the highly correlated regular scattering,the internal strain can be estimated based on the change in interscatterer spacing under the condition of large surface deformation. The experiment studies show that the internal strain can be estimated up to 10% applied deformation in phantom and 5% strain in porcine liver.

  12. Combined Statistical Analyses of Peptide Intensities and Peptide Occurrences Improves Identification of Significant Peptides from MS-based Proteomics Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; McCue, Lee Ann; Waters, Katrina M.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Metz, Thomas O.; Varnum, Susan M.; Pounds, Joel G.

    2010-11-01

    Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based (LC-MS) proteomics uses peak intensities of proteolytic peptides to infer the differential abundance of peptides/proteins. However, substantial run-to-run variability in peptide intensities and observations (presence/absence) of peptides makes data analysis quite challenging. The missing abundance values in LC-MS proteomics data are difficult to address with traditional imputation-based approaches because the mechanisms by which data are missing are unknown a priori. Data can be missing due to random mechanisms such as experimental error, or non-random mechanisms such as a true biological effect. We present a statistical approach that uses a test of independence known as a G-test to test the null hypothesis of independence between the number of missing values and the experimental groups. We pair the G-test results evaluating independence of missing data (IMD) with a standard analysis of variance (ANOVA) that uses only means and variances computed from the observed data. Each peptide is therefore represented by two statistical confidence metrics, one for qualitative differential observation and one for quantitative differential intensity. We use two simulated and two real LC-MS datasets to demonstrate the robustness and sensitivity of the ANOVA-IMD approach for assigning confidence to peptides with significant differential abundance among experimental groups.

  13. Human peptide transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Brodin, Birger; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen;

    2002-01-01

    Peptide transporters are epithelial solute carriers. Their functional role has been characterised in the small intestine and proximal tubules, where they are involved in absorption of dietary peptides and peptide reabsorption, respectively. Currently, two peptide transporters, PepT1 and PepT2, wh...

  14. Effects of changes in vegetation on precipitation in the northern Tianshan Mountains evaluated using multiple time scales

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Qinming Qinming Sun; Tong Liu; Zhiquan Han; Yongping Wu; Bai-Lian Li

    2016-04-01

    This study used a combination of the wavelet cross-correlation technique and numerical analysis ofvegetative feedback to study the role of climate–vegetation feedback from 1981 to 2009 in the northernTianshan Mountains, Xinjiang Province, China. The study area included the Irtysh River, the Bortalaand Ili River valleys, the northern slopes of the Tianshan Mountains, and the western Junggar Basin.The feedback effects of changes in vegetation on precipitation appeared to vary in these five regionswhen different time scales are used to examine them. The most useful time scale was generally found tobe 4–6 months. Time lag was another characteristic of this process, and the optimal time lag was 3–4months. Nevertheless, optimal time scale and time lag did not differ significantly in these five regions. Inthis way, the correct time scale of the effects of variations in vegetation on precipitation in this cold, aridarea was found. This time scale and time lag can be assessed through wavelet cross-correlation analysis.Then numerical analysis can be used to improve the accuracy of the analysis.

  15. Climatic changes on orbital and sub-orbital time scale recorded by the Guliya ice core in Tibetan Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚檀栋; 徐柏青; 蒲健辰

    2001-01-01

    Based on ice core records in the Tibetan Plateau and Greenland, the features and possible causes of climatic changes on orbital and sub-orbital time scale were discussed. Orbital time scale climatic change recorded in ice core from the Tibetan Plateau is typically ahead of that from polar regions, which indicates that climatic change in the Tibetan Plateau might be earlier than polar regions. The solar radiation change is a major factor that dominates the climatic change on orbital time scale. However, climatic events on sub-orbital time scale occurred later in the Tibetan Plateau than in the Arctic Region, indicating a different mechanism. For example, the Younger Dryas and Heinrich events took place earlier in Greenland ice core record than in Guliya ice core record. It is reasonable to propose the hypothesis that these climatic events were affected possibly by the Laurentide Ice Sheet. Therefore, ice sheet is critically important to climatic change on sub-orbital time scale in some ice ages.

  16. Artificial neural networks for the prediction of peptide drift time in ion mobility mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plasencia Manolo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an increasing usage of ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IMMS in proteomics. IMMS combines the features of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS and mass spectrometry (MS. It separates and detects peptide ions on a millisecond time-scale. IMS separates peptide ions based on drift time that is determined by the collision cross-section of each peptide ion in a given experiment condition. A peptide ion's collision cross-section is related to the ion size and shape resulted from the peptide amino acid sequence and their modifications. This inherent relation between the drift time of peptide ion and peptide sequence indicates that the drift time of peptide ions can be used to infer peptide sequence and therefore, for peptide identification. Results This paper describes an artificial neural networks (ANNs regression model for the prediction of peptide ion drift time in IMMS. Each peptide in this work was represented using three descriptors (i.e., molecular weight, sequence length and a two-dimensional sequence index. An ANN predictor consisting of four input nodes, three hidden nodes and one output node was constructed for peptide ion drift time prediction. For the model training and testing, a 10-fold cross-validation strategy was employed for three datasets each containing different charge states. Dataset one contains 212 singly-charged peptide ions, dataset two has 306 doubly-charged peptide ions, and dataset three has 77 triply-charged peptide ions. Our proposed method achieved 94.4%, 93.6% and 74.2% prediction accuracy for singly-, doubly- and triply-charged peptide ions, respectively. Conclusions An ANN-based method has been developed for predicting the drift time of peptide ions in IMMS. The results achieved here demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the prediction model. This work can enhance the confidence of protein identification by combining with current database search approaches for protein identification.

  17. Analysis of Wind Power and Load Data at Multiple Time Scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coughlin, Katie; Eto, J.H.

    2010-12-20

    In this study we develop and apply new methods of data analysis for high resolution wind power and system load time series, to improve our understanding of how to characterize highly variable wind power output and the correlations between wind power and load. These methods are applied to wind and load data from the ERCOT region, and wind power output from the PJM and NYISO areas. We use a wavelet transform to apply mathematically well-defined operations of smoothing and differencing to the time series data. This approach produces a set of time series of the changes in wind power and load (or ?deltas?), over a range of times scales from a few seconds to approximately one hour. A number of statistical measures of these time series are calculated. We present sample distributions, and devise a method for fitting the empirical distribution shape in the tails. We also evaluate the degree of serial correlation, and linear correlation between wind and load. Our examination of the data shows clearly that the deltas do not follow a Gaussian shape; the distribution is exponential near the center and appears to follow a power law for larger fluctuations. Gaussian distributions are frequently used in modeling studies. These are likely to over-estimate the probability of small to moderate deviations. This in turn may lead to an over-estimation of the additional reserve requirement (hence the cost) for high penetration of wind. The Gaussian assumption provides no meaningful information about the real likelihood of large fluctuations. The possibility of a power law distribution is interesting because it suggests that the distribution shape for of wind power fluctuations may become independent of system size for large enough systems.

  18. Determination of paleoseismic activity over a large time-scale: Fault scarp dating with 36Cl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozafari Amiri, Nasim; Tikhomirov, Dmitry; Sümer, Ökmen; Özkaymak, Çaǧlar; Uzel, Bora; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Vockenhuber, Christof; Sözbilir, Hasan; Akçar, Naki

    2016-04-01

    Bedrock fault scarps are the most direct evidence of past earthquakes to reconstruct seismic activity in a large time-scale using cosmogenic 36Cl dating if built in carbonates. For this method, a surface along the fault scarp with a minimum amount of erosion is required to be chosen as an ideal target point. The section of the fault selected for sampling should cover at least two meters of the fault surface from the lower part of the scarp, where intersects with colluvium wedge. Ideally, sampling should be performed on a continuous strip along the direction of the fault slip direction. First, samples of 10 cm high and 15 cm wide are marked on the fault surface. Then, they are collected using cutters, hammer and chisel in a thickness of 3 cm. The main geometrical factors of scarp dip, scarp height, top surface dip and colluvium dip are also measured. Topographic shielding in the sampling spot is important to be estimated as well. Moreover, density of the fault scarp and colluvium are calculated. The physical and chemical preparations are carried in laboratory for AMS and chemical analysis of the samples. A Matlab® code is used for modelling of seismically active periods based on increasing production rate of 36Cl following each rupture, when a buried section of a fault is exposed. Therefore, by measuring the amount of cosmogenic 36Cl versus height, the timing of major ruptures and their offsets are determined. In our study, Manastır, Mugırtepe and Rahmiye faults in Gediz graben, Priene-Sazlı, Kalafat and Yavansu faults in Büyük Menderes graben and Ören fault in Gökava half-graben have been examined in the seismically active region of Western Turkey. Our results reconstruct at least five periods of high seismic activity during the Holocene time, three of which reveal seismic ruptures beyond the historical pre-existing data.

  19. A short-time scale colloidal system reveals early bacterial adhesion dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Beloin

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of bacteria on abiotic surfaces has important public health and sanitary consequences. However, despite several decades of study of bacterial adhesion to inert surfaces, the biophysical mechanisms governing this process remain poorly understood, due, in particular, to the lack of methodologies covering the appropriate time scale. Using micrometric colloidal surface particles and flow cytometry analysis, we developed a rapid multiparametric approach to studying early events in adhesion of the bacterium Escherichia coli. This approach simultaneously describes the kinetics and amplitude of early steps in adhesion, changes in physicochemical surface properties within the first few seconds of adhesion, and the self-association state of attached and free-floating cells. Examination of the role of three well-characterized E. coli surface adhesion factors upon attachment to colloidal surfaces--curli fimbriae, F-conjugative pilus, and Ag43 adhesin--showed clear-cut differences in the very initial phases of surface colonization for cell-bearing surface structures, all known to promote biofilm development. Our multiparametric analysis revealed a correlation in the adhesion phase with cell-to-cell aggregation properties and demonstrated that this phenomenon amplified surface colonization once initial cell-surface attachment was achieved. Monitoring of real-time physico-chemical particle surface properties showed that surface-active molecules of bacterial origin quickly modified surface properties, providing new insight into the intricate relations connecting abiotic surface physicochemical properties and bacterial adhesion. Hence, the biophysical analytical method described here provides a new and relevant approach to quantitatively and kinetically investigating bacterial adhesion and biofilm development.

  20. A multi-time scale, non-linear approach to understanding soil respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, N. R.; Phillips, C.; Risk, D. A.

    2010-12-01

    To understand the processes that drive soil respiration and to make accurate predictions about global carbon cycling and potential climate feedbacks, it is critical that we develop accurate models that are useful on a range of timescales. There is, however, little agreement on the functional form and parameters that should be associated with modeling total soil respiration. Field data provides the most realistic platform for this assessment, but the environmental controls on soil respiration have been difficult to estimate in the field with good accuracy due to a combination of factors, including: (1) physical and biological uncertainties that are present in the field (ie. heat and gas diffusion, nutrient and substrate limitation); (2) the absence of a standardized and theoretically sound method for calculating model parameters using field data, and; (3) the absence of suitable long term, high temporal resolution respiration data from field studies, which is now becoming more available. This research focuses on multi-time scale non-linear analysis techniques, and their role in guiding the development of new soil respiration models that accurately predict respiration on a range of timescales. Using a physical model as a proxy of real world conditions, we focus on the confounding effect of physical factors, such as heat and gas diffusion and CO2 production depth, which have been found to be the cause of a considerable amount of error in past studies. Preliminary results show that for estimating temperature sensitivity, the non-linear approach is the best (compared to the typical log transform linear approach) in all circumstances, although caution should be exercised when analyzing short time series (i.e. diel) data because the lag and damping cause by gas diffusion may affect estimates. This work also examines moisture sensitivity parameters and the confounding effects of moisture on temperature sensitivity estimates. Finally we provide an evaluation of temporal

  1. Global Precipitation Analyses at Time Scales of Monthly to 3-Hourly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Robert F.; Huffman, George; Curtis, Scott; Bolvin, David; Nelkin, Eric; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Global precipitation analysis covering the last few decades and the impact of the new TRMM precipitation observations are discussed. The 20+ year, monthly, globally complete precipitation analysis of the World Climate Research Program's (WCRP/GEWEX) Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) is used to explore global and regional variations and trends and is compared to the much shorter TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) tropical data set. The GPCP data set shows no significant trend in precipitation over the twenty years, unlike the positive trend in global surface temperatures over the past century. Regional trends are also analyzed. A trend pattern that is a combination of both El Nino and La Nina precipitation features is evident in the Goodyear data set. This pattern is related to an increase with time in the number of combined months of El Nino and La Nina during the Goodyear period. Monthly anomalies of precipitation are related to ENRON variations with clear signals extending into middle and high latitudes of both hemispheres. The GPCP daily, 1 degree latitude-longitude analysis, which is available from January 1997 to the present is described and the evolution of precipitation patterns on this time scale related to El Nino and La Nina is described. Finally, a TRMM-based Based analysis is described that uses TRMM to calibrate polar-orbit microwave observations from SSM/I and geosynchronous OR observations and merges the various calibrated observations into a final, Baehr resolution map. This TRMM standard product will be available for the entire TRMM period (January Represent). A real-time version of this merged product is being produced and is available at 0.25 degree latitude-longitude resolution over the latitude range from 50 deg. N -50 deg. S. Examples will be shown, including its use in monitoring flood conditions.

  2. Arctic energy budget in relation to sea-ice variability on monthly to annual time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krikken, Folmer; Hazeleger, Wilco

    2015-04-01

    The strong decrease in Arctic sea-ice in recent years has triggered a strong interest in Arctic sea-ice predictions on seasonal to decadal time scales. Hence, it is key to understand physical processes that provide enhanced predictability beyond persistence of sea ice anomalies. The authors report on an analysis of natural variability of Arctic sea-ice from an energy budget perspective, using 15 CMIP5 climate models, and comparing these results to atmospheric and oceanic reanalyses data. We quantify the persistence of sea ice anomalies and the cross-correlation with the surface and top energy budget components. The Arctic energy balance components primarily indicate the important role of the seasonal sea-ice albedo feedback, in which sea-ice anomalies in the melt season reemerge in the growth season. This is a robust anomaly reemergence mechanism among all 15 climate models. The role of ocean lies mainly in storing heat content anomalies in spring, and releasing them in autumn. Ocean heat flux variations only play a minor role. The role of clouds is further investigated. We demonstrate that there is no direct atmospheric response of clouds to spring sea-ice anomalies, but a delayed response is evident in autumn. Hence, there is no cloud-ice feedback in late spring and summer, but there is a cloud-ice feedback in autumn, which strengthens the ice-albedo feedback. Anomalies in insolation are positively correlated with sea-ice variability. This is primarily a result of reduced multiple-reflection of insolation due to an albedo decrease. This effect counteracts the sea-ice albedo effect up to 50%. ERA-Interim and ORAS4 confirm the main findings from the climate models.

  3. BOOK REVIEW: Nonequilibrium Physics at Short Time Scales: Formation of Correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peliti, L.

    2005-02-01

    It is a happy situation when similar concepts and theoretical techniques can be applied to widely different physical systems because of a deep similarity in the situations being studied. The book illustrates this well; it focuses on the description of correlations in quantum systems out of equilibrium at very short time scales, prompted by experiments with short laser pulses in semiconductors, and in complex reactions in heavy nuclei. In both cases the experiments are characterized by nonlinear dynamics and by strong correlations out of equilibrium. In some systems there are also important finite-size effects. The book comprises several independent contributions of moderate length, and I sometimes felt that a more intensive effort in cross-coordination of the different contributions could have been of help. It is divided almost equally between theory and experiment. In the theoretical part, there is a thorough discussion both of the kinematic aspects (description of correlations) and the dynamical ones (evaluation of correlations). The experimental part is naturally divided according to the nature of the system: the interaction of pulsed lasers with matter on the one hand, and the correlations in finite-size systems (nanoparticles and nuclei) on the other. There is also a discussion on the dynamics of superconductors, a subject currently of great interest. Although an effort has been made to keep each contribution self-contained, I must admit that reading level is uneven. However, there are a number of thorough and stimulating contributions that make this book a useful introduction to the topic at the level of graduate students or researchers acquainted with quantum statistical mechanics.

  4. Ecotonal Control on Vadose-Zone Fluxes in Arid Regions Over Very Long Time Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, F. M.; Walvoord, M. A.; Sandvig, R.

    2003-12-01

    Recent studies indicate that vegetation plays an important role in regulating recharge in semiarid and arid basins over very long time scales. Several lines of evidence from desert floor environments in the southwestern United States suggest that vegetation has established essentially permanent upward hydraulic gradients, effectively precluding diffuse recharge since the transition from woodland to xeric scrub in the early Holocene. However, less xeric vegetation (such as the pygmy piñon and juniper forest) may support significant diffuse recharge. We show comparative water potential and porewater chemistry profiles collected from various vegetation communities in the Chihuahuan Desert of west Texas. The modeled soil water (vapor and liquid) flux regimes illustrate a conversion from substantial downward fluxes under the mixed woodland to upward fluxes under grassland and xeric scrub. Model results also indicated a trend in increasing drying front propagation depth from the grassland to recently-encroached xeric scrub to well-established xeric scrub. Drying fronts are the result of upward soil water fluxes initiated up to 16 thousand years ago in the xeric scrub community. In contrast, the nearby woodland community supports active, and likely episodic, recharge on the order of 5 to 15 mm yr-1. The mechanism by which some vegetation takes up essentially all seasonally available moisture within the root zone, preventing downward soil water fluxes for periods of thousands of years, but adjacent vegetation communities regularly permit downward fluxes, remains to be determined. Nevertheless, these results suggest that understanding the relation between vegetation community and vadose-zone hydrological processes may be the most profitable avenue toward quantifying diffuse groundwater recharge. We hypothesize that vegetation type may be a reasonable proxy for estimating recharge in semiarid and arid basins. Ongoing research is intended to test the hypothesis of ecotonal

  5. Possible petrological controls on the location and time scale of slow slip in SW Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, S.; Mizukami, T.; Yokoyama, H.; Hiramatsu, Y.; Arai, S.; Kawahara, H.; Nagaya, T.

    2014-12-01

    To examine the possibility that there was a petrological control on the location and nature of episodic tremor and slip (ETS), we compared the petrological characteristics of wedge mantle material to the results of recent geophysical observations in the Shikoku area, southwest Japan. This study revealed a close relationship between predicted mineral assemblages in the mantle wedge and the characteristics of slow slip behaviour recorded in the Shikoku area: Short-term ETSs take place in the antigorite +olivine stability field and silent long-term slow slip events (SSEs) take place in the antigorite+brucite stability field. The petrology of the mantle wedge may be an important control on the fluid pressure along the subduction interface and influence the time scales of SSEs. The Cretaceous Sanbagawa oceanic subduction complex of SW Japan preserves fragments of the former mantle wedge in contact with subducted slab units. P-T paths and peak P-T conditions show this belt formed as the result of subduction of a young slab under relatively warm conditions. These characteristics make the Sanbagawa belt a good analogue to modern warm subduction zones such as the Philippine Sea subduction zone beneath SW Japan and offer the possibility of directly examining the former plate boundary. Mantle wedge units derived from shallow depths show evidence for widely developed primary brucite and antigorite. In contrast, units derived from greater depths and higher peak temeratures consist dominantly of antigorite and olivine. Observations of the natural serpentinites suggest that the shallow serpentinite with brucite shows higher absorbency of water and provides fluid pathways that can reduce the fluid pore pressure on the subduction boundary.

  6. What is the Time Scale for Orbital Forcing of the Martian Water Cycle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, M. H.

    2003-01-01

    Calculation of the periodic variations in the martian orbital parameters by Ward and subsequent refinements to the theory have inspired numerous models of variation of the martian water cycle. Most of these models have focused on variations in planetary obliquity on a both a short-term (110 kyr) time scale as well as larger oscillations occuring over millions of years. To a lesser extent, variations in planetary eccentricity have also been considered. The third and fastest mode of variation, the precession of the longitude of perihelion, has generally been deemphasized because, among the three parameters, it is the only one that does not change the integrated annual insolation. But as a result of this precession, the asymmetry in peak summer insolation between the poles exceeds 50%, with the maximum cycling between poles every 25.5 kyrs. The relative contribution of these different elements to orbital forcing of climate takes on particular importance in the context of apparently recent waterrelated features such as gullies or polar layered deposits (PLD). Christensen, for example, recently indentified mantling of heavily gullied crater walls as residual dust-covered snow deposits that were responsible for the formation of the gullies in a previous epoch. Christensen assumed that the snow was originally deposited at a period of high obliquity which was stabilized against sublimation by a lag deposit of dust. It is suggested here that not obliquity, but the shortterm oscillations associated with precession of the perihelion may play the dominant role in the formation of gullies, major strata in the polar layered deposits (PLD), and other water-related features.

  7. Estimating the flood frequency distribution at seasonal and annual time scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Baratti

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We propose an original approach to infer the flood frequency distribution at seasonal and annual time scale. Our purpose is to estimate the peak flow that is expected for an assigned return period T, independently of the season in which it occurs (i.e. annual flood frequency regime, as well as in different selected sub-yearly periods (i.e. seasonal flood frequency regime. While a huge literature exists on annual flood frequency analysis, few studies have focused on the estimation of seasonal flood frequencies despite the relevance of the issue, for instance when scheduling along the months of the year the construction phases of river engineering works directly interacting with the active river bed, like for instance dams. An approximate method for joint frequency analysis is presented here that guarantees consistency between fitted annual and seasonal distributions, i.e. the annual cumulative distribution is the product of the seasonal cumulative distribution functions, under the assumption of independence among floods in different seasons. In our method the parameters of the seasonal frequency distributions are fitted by maximising an objective function that accounts for the likelihoods of both seasonal and annual peaks. Differently from previous studies, our procedure is conceived to allow the users to introduce subjective weights to the components of the objective function in order to emphasize the fitting of specific seasons or of the annual peak flow distribution. An application to the time series of the Blue Nile daily flows at Sudan-Ethiopia border is presented.

  8. Estimating the flood frequency distribution at seasonal and annual time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Baratti

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We propose an original approach to infer the flood frequency distribution at seasonal and annual time scale. Our purpose is to estimate the peak flow that is expected for an assigned return period T, independently of the season in which it occurs (i.e. annual flood frequency regime, as well as in different selected sub-yearly periods (i.e. seasonal flood frequency regime. While a huge literature exists on annual flood frequency analysis, few studies have focused on the estimation of seasonal flood frequencies despite the relevance of the issue, for instance when scheduling along the months of the year the construction phases of river engineering works directly interacting with the active river bed, like for instance dams. An approximate method for joint frequency analysis is presented here that guarantees consistency between fitted annual and seasonal distributions, i.e. the annual cumulative distribution is the product of the seasonal cumulative distribution functions, under the assumption of independence among floods in different seasons. In our method the parameters of the seasonal frequency distributions are fitted by maximising an objective function that accounts for the likelihoods of both seasonal and annual peaks. In contrast to previous studies, our procedure is conceived to allow the users to introduce subjective weights to the components of the objective function in order to emphasize the fitting of specific seasons or of the annual peak flow distribution. An application to the time series of the Blue Nile daily flows at the Sudan–Ethiopia border is presented.

  9. Geochemical evolution and time scale of seawater intrusion into the coastal aquifer of Israel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dynamics of seawater intrusion into a coast is commonly estimated by a rise in salinity and/or by theoretical hydrological models. Estimations using radioactive isotopes are reported only in several works. Here we present an attempt to quantify the geochemical processes and the time scale of seawater intrusion into a coastal aquifer from the changes in the major ions composition of the waters and the natural distribution of the cosmogenic isotopes Carbon 14 and tritium. Saline and brackish groundwaters were sampled from observation and pumping wells in the Israeli coastal aquifer. In addition, detailed profiles across the fresh-saline groundwater interface (resolution of 10 cm) were provided using a Multi Layer Sampler (MLS) that was installed three times in this zone. All groundwater samples were analyzed for their chemical composition, stable carbon and oxygen isotopes, Carbon 14 CDIC in the dissolved inorganic carbon) and tritium activity. The coastal rock was analyzed for its chemical contents and stable and radioactive carbon isotope composition of the carbonate and of the organic matter. The chemical and the stable isotope data revealed three distinct water types (end members) that are placed in different zones in the coastal aquifer: 1. Slightly modified Mediterranean seawater with its salinity (SWS); 2. Slightly diluted (with up to 20% fresh groundwater) saline groundwater (SDS); and 3. Fresh groundwater (FGW). The SWS waters show in most cases excess in total alkalinity and DIC and depletion in Carbon 13 and Carbon 14 C with respect to normal seawater, indicating that anaerobic oxidation of organic matter is the first diagenetic reaction that affect seawater during its penetration into the bottom sediments. Later on, the SWS waters dilutes, gain Ca 2+ and Sr 2+ and deplete in K+ suggesting that mixing with fresh water and cation exchange are the main diagenetic processes that transforms SWS into SDS. At the fresh-saline water interface, SDS waters show

  10. A hypothesis linking chrysophyte microfossils to lake carbon dynamics on ecological and evolutionary time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Alexander P.; Siver, Peter A.

    2013-12-01

    Chrysophyte algae are common in the plankton of oligotrophic lakes and produce a rich microfossil record of siliceous cysts and scales. Paleolimnological investigations and phytoplankton records suggest that chrysophyte populations are increasing in a wide range of boreal and arctic lakes, ultimately representing one component of the limnological response to contemporary global changes. However, the exact mechanisms responsible for widespread increases of chrysophyte populations remain elusive. We hypothesize that recent increases in chrysophytes are related to rising pCO2 in lakes, in part because these algae lack carbon concentrating mechanisms and therefore rely on diffusive entry of CO2 to Rubisco during photosynthesis. We assessed the abundance of modern sediment chrysophyte microfossils in relation to summer CO2 relative saturation in 46 New England (USA) lakes, revealing significant positive relationships for both cysts and scales. These observations imply that correlations between chrysophytes and limnological conditions including low pH, oligotrophy, and elevated dissolved organic matter are ultimately underscored by the high pCO2 associated with these conditions. In lakes where chrysophyte populations have expanded over recent decades, we infer that increasingly heterotrophic conditions with respect to CO2 have stimulated production by these organisms. This linkage is supported by the remarkable abundance and diversity of chrysophytes from middle Eocene lake sediments, deposited under atmospheric CO2 concentrations significantly higher than present. The Eocene assemblages suggest that any chrysophyte-CO2 connection borne out of results from modern and sub-recent sediments also operated on evolutionary time scales, and thus the absence of carbon concentrating mechanisms appears to be an ancient feature within the group. Chrysophyte microfossils may potentially provide important insights concerning the temporal dynamics of carbon cycling in aquatic

  11. Hydrolysis of Whey Protein Isolate with Bacillus licheniformis Protease: Fractionation and Identification of Aggregating Peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creusot, N.P.; Gruppen, H.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this work was to identify the dominant aggregating peptides from a whey protein hydrolysate (degree of hydrolysis of 6.8%) obtained with Bacillus licheniformis protease. The aggregating peptides were fractionated with preparative reversed-phase chromatography and identified with liq

  12. The Influence of Time Scale on the Quantitative Study of Soil and Water Conservation Effect of Grassland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoxia; WU; Zhujun; GU

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of time scale effects is conducive to further understanding of vegetation water and soil conservation mechanism.Based on the observation data of the grass covered and bare soil( control) experimental plots located in Hetian Town,Changting County of Fujian Province from 2007 to 2010,the characteristics of 4 parameters( precipitation,vegetation,RE and SE) were analyzed at precipitation event,month,season,and annual scales,and then the linear regression models were established to describe the relationships between RE( SE)and its influencing factors of precipitation and vegetation. RE( SE) means the ratio of runoff depth( soil loss) of grass covered plot to that of the control plot. Results show that these 4 parameters presented different magnitude and variation on different time scales. RE and SE were relatively stable either within or among different time scales due to their ratios reducing the influence of other factors. The coupling of precipitation and vegetation led to better water conservation effect at lower RE( 0. 7) REs at precipitation event scale as well as at annual scale( R2> 0. 78). For the soil conservation effect,precipitation or / and vegetation was / were the dominated influence factor( s) at precipitation event and annual scales,and the grass LAI could basically describe the positive conservation effect( SE 0. 55),while the maximum 30 min intensity( I30) could describe the negative conservation effect more accurately( SE >1,R2> 0. 79). More uncertainties( R2≈0. 4) exist in the models of both RE and SE at two moderate time scales( month and season). Consequently,factors influencing water and soil conservation effect of grass present different variation and coupling characteristics on different time scales,indicating the importance of time scale at the study on water and soil conservation.

  13. Fun with Paper Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Dava; Hounshell, Paul B.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses paper chromatographic techniques and provides examples of typical classroom activities. Includes description of retardation values obtained during chromatography exercises and suggests using them for math lessons. (JN)

  14. Delta-Nabla Type Maximum Principles for Second-Order Dynamic Equations on Time Scales and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Some delta-nabla type maximum principles for second-order dynamic equations on time scales are proved. By using these maximum principles, the uniqueness theorems of the solutions, the approximation theorems of the solutions, the existence theorem, and construction techniques of the lower and upper solutions for second-order linear and nonlinear initial value problems and boundary value problems on time scales are proved, the oscillation of second-order mixed delat-nabla differential equations is discussed and, some maximum principles for second order mixed forward and backward difference dynamic system are proved.

  15. A Correction to the Hydrodynamic Limit of Boundary Driven Weakly Asymmetric Exclusion Processes in a Quasi-Static Time Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, E.; Landim, C.

    2016-06-01

    We consider a one-dimensional, weakly asymmetric, boundary driven exclusion process on the interval [0,N]\\cap {Z} in the quasi-static time scale N^2 ɛ ^{-1}_N, where 1≪ ɛ ^{-1}_N ≪ N^{1/4}. We assume that the external field and the chemical potentials, which fix the density at the boundaries, evolve smoothly in the macroscopic time scale. We derive an equation which describes the evolution of the density up to the order ɛ _N.

  16. Positive solutions to a generalized second-order three-point boundary-value problem on time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Luo

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Let $mathbb{T}$ be a time scale with $0,T in mathbb{T}$. We investigate the existence and multiplicity of positive solutions to the nonlinear second-order three-point boundary-value problem $$displaylines{ u^{Delta abla}(t+a(tf(u(t=0,quad tin[0, T]subset mathbb{T},cr u(0=eta u(eta,quad u(T=alpha u(eta }$$ on time scales $mathbb{T}$, where 0, 0less than $alpha$ less than $frac{T}{eta}$, 0 less than $eta$ less than $frac{T-alphaeta}{T-eta}$ are given constants.

  17. Angiotensin I converting enzyme inhibitory peptide extracted from freshwater zooplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Kwon; Lee, Min-Su; Park, Heum Gi; Kim, Se-Kwon; Byun, Hee-Guk

    2010-04-01

    In this study, hydrolysates obtained from the freshwater rotifer Brachionus calyciflonus were investigated for angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides. Freshwater rotifer protein was hydrolyzed using six separate enzymes in a batch reactor. The peptic hydrolysate had the highest ACE inhibitory activity compared to the other hydrolysates. The highest ACE inhibitory peptide was separated using Sephadex G-25 column chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography on a C18 column. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) value of purified ACE inhibitory peptide was 40.01 microg/mL. ACE inhibitory peptide was identified as being seven amino acid residues of Ala-Gln-Gly-Glu-Arg-His-Arg by N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis. The IC(50) value of purified ACE inhibitory peptide was 47.1 microM, and Lineweaver-Burk plots suggested that the peptide purified from rotifer protein acts as a competitive inhibitor against ACE. The results of this study suggest that peptides derived from freshwater rotifers may be beneficial as antihypertension compounds in functional foods or as pharmaceuticals. PMID:20170338

  18. Tracing time scales of fluid residence and migration in the crust (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokochi, R.; Sturchio, N. C.; Purtschert, R.; Jiang, W.; Lu, Z.; Müller, P.; Yang, G.; Kennedy, B. M.

    2013-12-01

    Crustal fluids (water, gas and oil) mediate chemical reactions, and they may transport, concentrate or disperse elements in the crust; the fluids are often valuable resources in their own right. In this context, determining the time scales of fluid transport and residence time is essential for understanding geochemical cycle of elements, as well as risk and resource management. Crustal fluids contain stable and radioactive noble gases indigenous to the fluid, which may be of magmatic or atmospheric origin of various ages. In addition, radiogenic and nucleogenic noble gases (both stable and radioactive) are continuously produced by the decay of U, Th and K and related nuclear reactions in the crust at known rates and in known relative proportions. They may be released from their production sites and incorporated into the fluid, acting as natural spikes to trace fluid flow. The concentrations of a noble gas isotope in a crustal fluid in a system devoid of phase separation or mixing varies as a function of decay time and supply from the production sites into the fluids. The release rate of noble gases from the production sites in minerals to the fluid phase may be determined uniquely through the studies of noble gas radionuclides (Yokochi et al., 2012), which is fundamental to the behavior of volatile elements in geochemistry. A pilot study of noble gas radionuclides in an active geothermal system was performed at Yellowstone National Park (Yokochi et al., 2013). Prior studies of the Yellowstone system using stable noble gas isotopes show that the thermal fluids contain a mixture of atmospheric, mantle, and crustal components. Noble gas radionuclide measurements provide new chronometric constraints regarding the subsurface residence times of Yellowstone thermal fluids. Upper limits on deep thermal fluid mean residence times, estimated from 39Ar/40Ar* ratios, range from 118 to 137 kyr for features in the Gibbon and Norris Geyser Basin areas, and are about 16 kyr in

  19. SIMAC - A phosphoproteomic strategy for the rapid separation of mono-phosphorylated from multiply phosphorylated peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thingholm, Tine E; Jensen, Ole N; Robinson, Phillip J;

    2008-01-01

    spectrometric analysis, such as immobilized metal affinity chromatography or titanium dioxide the coverage of the phosphoproteome of a given sample is limited. Here we report a simple and rapid strategy - SIMAC - for sequential separation of mono-phosphorylated peptides and multiply phosphorylated peptides from...... and an optimized titanium dioxide chromatographic method. More than double the total number of identified phosphorylation sites was obtained with SIMAC, primarily from a three-fold increase in recovery of multiply phosphorylated peptides....

  20. Peptide-Carrier Conjugation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Paul Robert

    To produce antibodies against synthetic peptides it is necessary to couple them to a protein carrier. This chapter provides a nonspecialist overview of peptide-carrier conjugation. Furthermore, a protocol for coupling cysteine-containing peptides to bovine serum albumin is outlined.......To produce antibodies against synthetic peptides it is necessary to couple them to a protein carrier. This chapter provides a nonspecialist overview of peptide-carrier conjugation. Furthermore, a protocol for coupling cysteine-containing peptides to bovine serum albumin is outlined....

  1. Liquid Chromatography in 1982.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, David H.

    1982-01-01

    Reviews trends in liquid chromatography including apparatus, factors affecting efficient separation of a mixture (peak sharpness and speed), simplified problem-solving, adsorption, bonded phase chromatography, ion selectivity, and size exclusion. The current trend is to control chemical selectivity by the liquid phase. (Author/JN)

  2. Climate Change and Its Effects on Runoff of Kaidu River,Xinjiang, China: A Multiple Time-scale Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jianhua; CHEN Yaning; JI Minhe; LU Feng

    2008-01-01

    This paper applied an integrated method combining grey relation analysis, wavelet analysis and statistical analysis to study climate change and its effects on runoff of the Kaidu River at multi-time scales. Major findings are as follows: 1) Climatic factors were ranked in the order of importance to annual runoff as average annual temperature, average temperature in autumn, average temperature in winter, annual precipitation, precipitation in flood season, av-erage temperature in summer, and average temperature in spring. The average annual temperature and annual precipi-tation were selected as the two representative factors that impact the annual runoff. 2) From the 32-year time scale, the annual runoff and the average annual temperature presented a significantly rising trend, whereas the annual precipita-tion showed little increase over the period of 1957-2002. By changing the time scale from 32-year to 4-year, we ob-served nonlinear trends with increasingly obvious oscillations for annual runoff, average annual temperature, and an-nual precipitation. 3) The changes of the runoff and the regional climate are closely related, indicating that the runoff change is the result of the regional climate changes. With time scales ranging from 32-year, 16-year, 8-year and to 4-year, there are highly significant linear correlations between the annual runoff and the average annual temperature and the annual precipitation.

  3. Assessments of Drought Impacts on Vegetation in China with the Optimal Time Scales of the Climatic Drought Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Drought is expected to increase in frequency and severity due to global warming, and its impacts on vegetation are typically extensively evaluated with climatic drought indices, such as multi-scalar Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI. We analyzed the covariation between the SPEIs of various time scales and the anomalies of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI, from which the vegetation type-related optimal time scales were retrieved. The results indicated that the optimal time scales of needle-leaved forest, broadleaf forest and shrubland were between 10 and 12 months, which were considerably longer than the grassland, meadow and cultivated vegetation ones (2 to 4 months. When the optimal vegetation type-related time scales were used, the SPEI could better reflect the vegetation’s responses to water conditions, with the correlation coefficients between SPEIs and NDVI anomalies increased by 5.88% to 28.4%. We investigated the spatio-temporal characteristics of drought and quantified the different responses of vegetation growth to drought during the growing season (April–October. The results revealed that the frequency of drought has increased in the 21st century with the drying trend occurring in most of China. These results are useful for ecological assessments and adapting management steps to mitigate the impact of drought on vegetation. They are helpful to employ water resources more efficiently and reduce potential damage to human health caused by water shortages.

  4. A novel way to detect correlations on multi-time scales, with temporal evolution and for multi-variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Naiming; Xoplaki, Elena; Zhu, Congwen; Luterbacher, Juerg

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, two new methods, Temporal evolution of Detrended Cross-Correlation Analysis (TDCCA) and Temporal evolution of Detrended Partial-Cross-Correlation Analysis (TDPCCA), are proposed by generalizing DCCA and DPCCA. Applying TDCCA/TDPCCA, it is possible to study correlations on multi-time scales and over different periods. To illustrate their properties, we used two climatological examples: i) Global Sea Level (GSL) versus North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO); and ii) Summer Rainfall over Yangtze River (SRYR) versus previous winter Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). We find significant correlations between GSL and NAO on time scales of 60 to 140 years, but the correlations are non-significant between 1865–1875. As for SRYR and PDO, significant correlations are found on time scales of 30 to 35 years, but the correlations are more pronounced during the recent 30 years. By combining TDCCA/TDPCCA and DCCA/DPCCA, we proposed a new correlation-detection system, which compared to traditional methods, can objectively show how two time series are related (on which time scale, during which time period). These are important not only for diagnosis of complex system, but also for better designs of prediction models. Therefore, the new methods offer new opportunities for applications in natural sciences, such as ecology, economy, sociology and other research fields.

  5. [Multiple time scales analysis of spatial differentiation characteristics of non-point source nitrogen loss within watershed].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mei-bing; Chen, Xing-wei; Chen, Ying

    2015-07-01

    Identification of the critical source areas of non-point source pollution is an important means to control the non-point source pollution within the watershed. In order to further reveal the impact of multiple time scales on the spatial differentiation characteristics of non-point source nitrogen loss, a SWAT model of Shanmei Reservoir watershed was developed. Based on the simulation of total nitrogen (TN) loss intensity of all 38 subbasins, spatial distribution characteristics of nitrogen loss and critical source areas were analyzed at three time scales of yearly average, monthly average and rainstorms flood process, respectively. Furthermore, multiple linear correlation analysis was conducted to analyze the contribution of natural environment and anthropogenic disturbance on nitrogen loss. The results showed that there were significant spatial differences of TN loss in Shanmei Reservoir watershed at different time scales, and the spatial differentiation degree of nitrogen loss was in the order of monthly average > yearly average > rainstorms flood process. TN loss load mainly came from upland Taoxi subbasin, which was identified as the critical source area. At different time scales, land use types (such as farmland and forest) were always the dominant factor affecting the spatial distribution of nitrogen loss, while the effect of precipitation and runoff on the nitrogen loss was only taken in no fertilization month and several processes of storm flood at no fertilization date. This was mainly due to the significant spatial variation of land use and fertilization, as well as the low spatial variability of precipitation and runoff. PMID:26710649

  6. Time Scales of the European Surface Air Temperature Variability: The Role of the 7-8 Year Cycle

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jajcay, Nikola; Hlinka, Jaroslav; Kravtsov, S.; Tsonis, A.A.; Paluš, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 2 (2016), s. 902-909. ISSN 0094-8276 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH14001 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : 7-8 year cycle * air temperature variability * annual cycle amplitude * cross-scale interactions * seasonality * time scales Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology

  7. Time scale of entropic segregation of flexible polymers in confinement: Implications for chromosome segregation in filamentous bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Arnold, Axel; Jun, Suckjoon

    2007-01-01

    We report molecular dynamics simulations of the segregation of two overlapping chains in cylindrical confinement. We find that the entropic repulsion between the chains can be sufficiently strong to cause segregation on a time scale that is short compared to the one for diffusion. This result implies that entropic driving forces are sufficiently strong to cause rapid bacterial chromosome segregation.

  8. An LMI Approach to Stability for Linear Time-Varying System with Nonlinear Perturbation on Time Scales

    OpenAIRE

    Kanit Mukdasai; Piyapong Niamsup

    2011-01-01

    We consider Lyapunov stability theory of linear time-varying system and derive sufficient conditions for uniform stability, uniform exponential stability, -uniform stability, and h-stability for linear time-varying system with nonlinear perturbation on time scales. We construct appropriate Lyapunov functions and derive several stability conditions. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  9. An LMI Approach to Stability for Linear Time-Varying System with Nonlinear Perturbation on Time Scales

    OpenAIRE

    Mukdasai, Kanit; Niamsup, Piyapong

    2011-01-01

    We consider Lyapunov stability theory of linear time-varying system and derive sufficient conditions for uniform stability, uniform exponential stability, -uniform stability, and h-stability for linear time-varying system with nonlinear perturbation on time scales. We construct appropriate Lyapunov functions and derive several stability conditions. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  10. Native American Students' Understanding of Geologic Time Scale: 4th-8th Grade Ojibwe Students' Understanding of Earth's Geologic History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Younkyeong; Karahan, Engin; Roehrig, Gillian

    2016-01-01

    Geologic time scale is a very important concept for understanding long-term earth system events such as climate change. This study examines forty-three 4th-8th grade Native American--particularly Ojibwe tribe--students' understanding of relative ordering and absolute time of Earth's significant geological and biological events. This study also…

  11. Existence of Positive Solutions for Second-Order m-Point Boundary Value Problems on Time Scales

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pei-guang Wang; Ying Wang

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates the existence of positive solutions of the m-point boundary value problem for second-order dynamic equations on time scales, and obtain the result that the problem has at least one positive solution by using functional-type cone expansion-compression fixed point theorem.

  12. Assessments of Drought Impacts on Vegetation in China with the Optimal Time Scales of the Climatic Drought Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Zhou, Tao; Zhao, Xiang; Huang, Kaicheng; Gao, Shan; Wu, Hao; Luo, Hui

    2015-07-01

    Drought is expected to increase in frequency and severity due to global warming, and its impacts on vegetation are typically extensively evaluated with climatic drought indices, such as multi-scalar Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI). We analyzed the covariation between the SPEIs of various time scales and the anomalies of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), from which the vegetation type-related optimal time scales were retrieved. The results indicated that the optimal time scales of needle-leaved forest, broadleaf forest and shrubland were between 10 and 12 months, which were considerably longer than the grassland, meadow and cultivated vegetation ones (2 to 4 months). When the optimal vegetation type-related time scales were used, the SPEI could better reflect the vegetation's responses to water conditions, with the correlation coefficients between SPEIs and NDVI anomalies increased by 5.88% to 28.4%. We investigated the spatio-temporal characteristics of drought and quantified the different responses of vegetation growth to drought during the growing season (April-October). The results revealed that the frequency of drought has increased in the 21st century with the drying trend occurring in most of China. These results are useful for ecological assessments and adapting management steps to mitigate the impact of drought on vegetation. They are helpful to employ water resources more efficiently and reduce potential damage to human health caused by water shortages. PMID:26184243

  13. Modeling of sediment flux at short, middle and long time scale in alpine torrents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazotti, Benoît.; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Loye, Alexandre; Bardou, Eric

    2010-05-01

    Sediments management has become an important issue in the alpine regions since all deposits of material must be removed from sediment traps to keep their efficiency. However, this is not sustainable to evacuate those deposits over long distances. The goals of this work is to quantify the sediment supply of alpine torrents and active gullies in order to make suatinable management over the long term. From a case study situated in the region of Zinal, Valais, Switzerland, we will try to give general recommendation. Several approaches are tested to create a model able to estimate the sediment budget at short, middle and long time scale. After a general analysis of the catchment rendering a geomorphological map (process and location), a quantitative assessment of sediment production is performed. Besides, a qualitative representation of sediment transport processes is created that enable the modelling of sediment cascade. Several new methods are tested combining field work and remote sensing data (DEM, Lidar acquisition and aerial photos). The torrent activity (maximum erosion volume) is estimated with the Slope Local Base Level (SLBL) constrained with field observations (e.g. presence of outcrop). Downstream and cross-sectional topographic profiles along the streams enable to determine their overall dynamics. The model is then composed of homogeneous sections of the torrent. Erosion rates are defined according to the activity observed on time series of aerial photos, historical data, etc. The climate forcing is also considered for assessing torrential dynamics in the prospective sediment balances. The preliminary conclusion is that 6 sets of information implemented in the model enable estimating the quantity of sediments transport by the torrents ((1) the geomorphologic map, (2) the division of the torrent in homogeneous sections, (3) the longitudinal profile of the torrent, (4) the calculation of the maximum volume mobilized by the torrent (with the SLBL), (5) the

  14. Biosphere-atmosphere exchange of CO2 in relation to climate: a cross-biome analysis across multiple time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Montagnani

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The biosphere-atmosphere flux of CO2 responds to climatic variability at time scales from seconds to years and longer. Quantifying the strength of the interaction between the flux and climate variables at multiple frequencies is necessary to begin understanding the climatic controls on the dynamics of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Orthonormal wavelet transformation (OWT can quantify the interaction between flux and microclimate at multiple frequencies while expressing time series variance in few energetic wavelet coefficients, offering a low-dimensional view of the measured climate-flux interaction. The variability of the net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE, gross ecosystem productivity (GEP and ecosystem respiration (RE, and their co-variability with dominant climatic drivers, are explored with a global dataset consisting of 253 eddy covariance research sites. Results demonstrate that the NEE and GEP wavelet spectra are similar amongst plant functional types (PFT at weekly and shorter time scales, but significant divergence appeared among PFT at the biweekly and longer time scales, at which NEE and GEP are relatively less variable than climate. The RE spectra rarely differ among PFT across time scales. On average, RE spectra had greater low frequency (monthly to interannual variability than NEE, GEP and climate. The low frequency Fourier coefficients of eight sites with more than eight years of data were compared against CANOAK ecosystem model simulations. Both measurements and theory demonstrate that "multi-annual" spectral peaks in flux may emerge at low (4+ years time scales. Biological responses to climate and other internal system dynamics provide the likely explanation for observed multi-annual variability, but data records must be lengthened and measurements of ecosystem state must be made, and made available, to disentangle the mechanisms responsible for these patterns.

  15. Peptide Bond Isomerization in High-Temperature Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, Chris; Pomès, Régis; García, Angel E

    2016-04-12

    Force fields for molecular simulation are generally optimized to model macromolecules such as proteins at ambient temperature and pressure. Nevertheless, elevated temperatures are frequently used to enhance conformational sampling, either during system setup or as a component of an advanced sampling technique such as temperature replica exchange. Because macromolecular force fields are now put upon to simulate temperatures and time scales that greatly exceed their original design specifications, it is appropriate to re-evaluate whether these force fields are up to the task. Here, we quantify the rates of peptide bond isomerization in high-temperature simulations of three octameric peptides and a small fast-folding protein. We show that peptide octamers with and without proline residues undergo cis/trans isomerization every 1-5 ns at 800 K with three classical atomistic force fields (AMBER99SB-ILDN, CHARMM22/CMAP, and OPLS-AA/L). On the low microsecond time scale, these force fields permit isomerization of nonprolyl peptide bonds at temperatures ≥500 K, and the CHARMM22/CMAP force field permits isomerization of prolyl peptide bonds ≥400 K. Moreover, the OPLS-AA/L force field allows chiral inversion about the Cα atom at 800 K. Finally, we show that temperature replica exchange permits cis peptide bonds developed at 540 K to subsequently migrate back to the 300 K ensemble, where cis peptide bonds are present in 2 ± 1% of the population of Trp-cage TC5b, including up to 4% of its folded state. Further work is required to assess the accuracy of cis/trans isomerization in the current generation of protein force fields. PMID:26866899

  16. PeptideAtlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — PeptideAtlas is a multi-organism, publicly accessible compendium of peptides identified in a large set of tandem mass spectrometry proteomics experiments. Mass...

  17. Peptider holder krabben rask

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchmann, Kurt

    Antimikrobielle Peptider har hos mere primitive dyr en vigtig funktion i organismernes immunforsvar Udgivelsesdato: 1. februar......Antimikrobielle Peptider har hos mere primitive dyr en vigtig funktion i organismernes immunforsvar Udgivelsesdato: 1. februar...

  18. Molecular dynamics simulations of helical antimicrobial peptides in SDS micelles: what do point mutations achieve?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2005-01-01

    We report long time scale simulations of the 18-residue helical antimicrobial peptide ovispirin-1 and its analogs novispirin-G10 and novispirin-T7 in SDS micelles. The SDS micelle serves as an economical and effective model for a cellular membrane. Ovispirin, which is initially placed along a mic...

  19. Peptide biomarkers as evidence of perchlorate biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Reema; Crawford, Ronald L; Paszczynski, Andrzej J

    2011-02-01

    Perchlorate is a known health hazard for humans, fish, and other species. Therefore, it is important to assess the response of an ecosystem exposed to perchlorate contamination. The data reported here show that a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach for the detection of perchlorate-reducing enzymes can be used to measure the ability of microorganisms to degrade perchlorate, including determining the current perchlorate degradation status. Signature peptides derived from chlorite dismutase (CD) and perchlorate reductase can be used as biomarkers of perchlorate presence and biodegradation. Four peptides each derived from CD and perchlorate reductase subunit A (PcrA) and seven peptides derived from perchlorate reductase subunit B (PcrB) were identified as signature biomarkers for perchlorate degradation, as these sequences are conserved in the majority of the pure and mixed perchlorate-degrading microbial cultures examined. However, chlorite dismutase signature biomarker peptides from Dechloromonas agitata CKB were found to be different from those in other cultures used and should also be included with selected CD biomarkers. The combination of these peptides derived from the two enzymes represents a promising perchlorate presence/biodegradation biomarker system. The biomarker peptides were detected at perchlorate concentrations as low as 0.1 mM and at different time points both in pure cultures and within perchlorate-reducing environmental enrichment consortia. The peptide biomarkers were also detected in the simultaneous presence of perchlorate and an alternate electron acceptor, nitrate. We believe that this technique can be useful for monitoring bioremediation processes for other anthropogenic environmental contaminants with known metabolic pathways. PMID:21115710

  20. Peptide Nucleic Acid Synthons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  1. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  2. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  3. Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  4. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangshun Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms.

  5. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  6. Factors Affecting the Inter-annual to Centennial Time Scale Variability of All Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Abdul; Brönnimann, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The All Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall (AISMR) is highly important for the livelihood of more than 1 billion people living in the Indian sub-continent. The agriculture of this region is heavily dependent on seasonal (JJAS) monsoon rainfall. An early start or a slight delay of monsoon, or an early withdrawal or prolonged monsoon season may upset the farmer's agricultural plans, can cause significant reduction in crop yield, and hence economic loss. Understanding of AISMR is also vital because it is a part of global atmospheric circulation system. Several studies show that AISMR is influenced by internal climate forcings (ICFs) viz. ENSO, AMO, PDO etc. as well as external climate forcings (ECFs) viz. Greenhouse Gases, volcanic eruptions, and Total Solar Irradiance (TSI). We investigate the influence of ICFs and ECFs on AISMR using recently developed statistical technique called De-trended Partial-Cross-Correlation Analysis (DPCCA). DPCCA can analyse a complex system of several interlinked variables. Often, climatic variables, being cross correlated, are simultaneously tele-connected with several other variables and it is not easy to isolate their intrinsic relationship. In the presence of non-stationarities and background signals the calculated correlation coefficients can be overestimated and erroneous. DPCCA method removes the non-stationarities and partials out the influence of background signals from the variables being cross correlated and thus give a robust estimate of correlation. We have performed the analysis using NOAA Reconstructed SSTs and homogenised instrumental AISMR data set from 1854-1999. By employing the DPCCA method we find that there is a statistically insignificant negative intrinsic relation (by excluding the influence of ICFs, and ECFs except TSI) between AISMR and TSI on decadal to centennial time scale. The ICFs considerably modulate the relation between AISMR and solar activity between 50-80 year time scales and transform this relationship

  7. Phosphopeptide elution times in reversed-phase liquid chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeongkwon; Petritis, Konstantinos; Shen, Yufeng; Camp, David G.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-11-16

    Elution time shifts between 33 different peptides and their corresponding phosphopeptides ranging from 4 amino acid residues to 35 amino acids in length were systematically investigated utilizing a high resolution reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) system. Observed peptide elution time shifts for a single phosphorylation ranged from -5.28 min (for pYVPML) to +0.59 min (for HRDpSGLLDSLGR). Peptides containing a phosphotyrosine residue displayed a significant decrease in elution time following phosphorylation compared to their similar-sized peptides with phosphoserine or phosphothreonine residues. While the observed elution time generally decreased due to phosphorylation, five peptides displayed increased elution time as a result of phosphorylation. For large peptides (≥ 18 amino acids), the elution time shifts due to single phosphorylation were limited (ranging between -0.48 min and +0.03 min), while the elution time shifts for small peptides (< 18 amino acids) were characterized by a larger deviation (ranging between -5.28 min and +0.59 min). The predictive capability for the observed RPLC elution time change due to phosphorylation has been suggested, which will aid in assigning confident phosphopeptide identifications and their subsequent confirmation.

  8. Modelling the water balance of a precise weighable lysimeter for short time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fank, Johann; Klammler, Gernot; Rock, Gerhard

    2015-04-01

    Precise knowledge of the water fluxes between the atmosphere and the soil-plant system and the percolation to the groundwater system is of great importance for understanding and modeling water, solute and energy transfer in the atmosphere-plant-soil-groundwater system. Weighable lysimeters yield the most precise and realistic measures for the change of stored water volume (ΔS), Precipitation (P) which can be rain, irrigation, snow and dewfall and evapotranspiration (ET) as the sum of soil evaporation, evaporation of intercepted water and transpiration. They avoid systematic errors of standard gauges and class-A pans. Lysimeters with controlled suction at the lower boundary allow estimation of capillary rise (C) and leachate (L) on short time scales. Precise weighable large scale (surface >= 1 m2) monolithic lysimeters avoiding oasis effects allow to solve the water balance equation (P - ET - L + C ± ΔS = 0) for a 3D-section of a natural atmosphere-plant-soil-system for a certain time period. Precision and accuracy of the lysimeter measurements depend not only on the precision of the weighing device but also on external conditions, which cannot be controlled or turned off. To separate the noise in measured data sets from signals the adaptive window and adaptive threshold (AWAT) filter (Peters et al., 2014) is used. The data set for the years 2010 and 2011 from the HYDRO-lysimeter (surface = 1 m2, depth = 1 m) in Wagna, Austria (Klammler and Fank, 2014) with a resolution of 0,01 mm for the lysimeter scale and of 0,001 mm for the leachate tank scale is used to evaluate the water balance. The mass of the lysimeter and the mass of the leachate tank is measured every two seconds. The measurements are stored as one minute arithmetic means. Based on calculations in a calibration period from January to May 2010 with different widths of moving window the wmax - Parameter for the AWAT filter was set to 41 minutes. A time series for the system mass ('upper boundary') of the

  9. Recent development of multi-dimensional chromatography strategies in proteome research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jia; Gao, Mingxia; Deng, Chunhui; Zhang, Xiangming

    2008-04-15

    As a complementary approach to two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE), multi-dimensional chromatography separation methods have been widely applied in all kinds of biological sample investigations. Multi-dimensional liquid chromatography (MDLC) coupled with bio-mass spectrometry (MS) is playing important roles in proteome research due to its high speed, high resolution and high sensitivity. Proteome analysis strategies mainly include bottom-up and top-down approaches which carry out biological sample separation based on peptide and protein levels, respectively. Electrophoretic methods combined with liquid chromatography like IEF-HPLC and HPLC-SDS-PAGE have been successful applied for protein separations. As for MDLC strategy, ion-exchange chromatography (IEX) together with reversed phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) is still a most widely used chromatography in proteome analysis, other chromatographic methods are also frequently used in protein pre-fractionations, while affinity chromatography is usually adopted for specific functional protein analysis. Recent MDLC technologies and applications to variety of proteome analysis have been achieved great development. A digest peptide-based approach as so-called "bottom-up" and intact protein-based approach "top-down" analysis of proteome samples were briefly reviewed in this paper. The diversity of combinations of different chromatography modes to set up MDLC systems was demonstrated and discussed. Novel developments of MDLC techniques such as high-abundance protein depletion and chromatography array were also included in this review. PMID:18289947

  10. Novel antifungal peptides from Ceylon spinach seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H; Ng, T B

    2001-11-01

    Two novel antifungal peptides, designated alpha- and beta-basrubrins, respectively, were isolated from seeds of the Ceylon spinach Basella rubra. The purification procedure involved saline extraction, (NH(4))(2)SO(4) precipitation, ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, ion exchange chromatography on CM-cellulose and FPLC-gel filtration on Superdex peptide column. alpha- and beta-basrubrins exhibited a molecular weight of 4.3 and 5 kDa, respectively. They inhibited translation in a rabbit reticulocyte system with an IC(50) value of 400 and 100 nM, respectively. alpha- and beta-basrubrin inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcriptase by (79.4 +/- 7.8)% and (54.6 +/- 3.6)%, respectively, at a concentration of 400 microM, and (10.56 +/- 0.92)% and (2.12 +/- 0.81)%, respectively, at a concentration of 40 microM. Both alpha- and beta-basrubrins exerted potent antifungal activity toward Botrytis cinerea, Mycosphaerella arachidicola, and Fusarium oxysporum. PMID:11688973

  11. Microscopic description of quantum Lorentz gas and extension of the Boltzmann equation to entire space-time scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, K.; Kanki, K.; Tanaka, S.; Petrosky, T.

    2016-02-01

    Irreversible processes of weakly coupled one-dimensional quantum perfect Lorentz gas are studied on the basis of the fundamental laws of physics in terms of the complex spectral analysis associated with the resonance state of the Liouville-von Neumann operator. Without any phenomenological operations, such as a coarse-graining of space-time, or a truncation of the higher order correlation, we obtained irreversible processes in a purely dynamical basis in all space and time scale including the microscopic atomic interaction range that is much smaller than the mean-free length. Based on this solution, a limitation of the usual phenomenological Boltzmann equation, as well as an extension of the Boltzmann equation to entire space-time scale, is discussed.

  12. Theoretical prediction of hydrated electron behaviour in pico-second time scales in the presence of scavengers in aqueous radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work involves the prediction of the variation of [e-sub(aq)] and [OH] in the subnanosecond and nanosecond time scales in aqueous solutions containing high concentrations of ethanol and OH-. In an earlier paper, spur diffusion model calculations had been done assuming that the size of a spur for a given number of dissociations varies in a Gaussian manner, obtaining excellent agreement with experimental e-sub(aq) and OH decay in pico and nanosecond time scales and also predicting accurately the variation of molecular product yield with increasing scavenger concentration. The same model has been used in the present work. Comparison with experimental data, where available, gives good agreement. (author)

  13. Reference evapotranspiration models using different time scales in the Jaboticabal region of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Buzinaro Caporusso

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to compare 18 reference evapotranspiration models to the standard Penman-Monteith model in the Jaboticabal, São Paulo, region for the following time scales: daily, 5-day, 15-day and seasonal. A total of 5 years of daily meteorological data was used for the following analyses: accuracy (mean absolute percentage error, Mape, precision (R2 and tendency (bias (systematic error, SE. The results were also compared at the 95% probability level with Tukey’s test. The Priestley-Taylor (1972 method was the most accurate for all time scales, the Tanner-Pelton (1960 method was the most accurate in the winter, and the Thornthwaite (1948 method was the most accurate of the methods that only used temperature data in the equations.

  14. Full-scale and time-scale heating experiments at Stripa: preliminary results. Technical project report No. 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two full-scale heating experiments and a time-scale heating experiment have recently been started in granite 340 meters below surface. The purpose of the full-scale heating experiments is to assess the near-field effects of thermal loading for the design of an underground repository of nuclear wastes. That of the time-scale heating experiments is to obtain field data of the interaction between heaters and its effect on the rock mass during a period of about two years, which corresponds to about twenty years of full-scale operation. Geological features of the rock around each experiment have been mapped carefully, and temperatures, stresses and displacements induced in the rock by heating have been calculated in advance of the experiments. Some 800 different measurements are recorded at frequent intervals by a computer system situated underground. These data can be compared at any time with predictions made earlier on video display units underground

  15. Stabilization of large drainage basins over geological time scales : Cenozoic West Africa, hot spot swell growth, and the Niger River

    OpenAIRE

    Chardon, Dominique; Grimaud, J. L.; Rouby, D.; BEAUVAIS, Anicet; Christophoul, F.

    2016-01-01

    Reconstructing the evolving geometry of large river catchments over geological time scales is crucial to constraining yields to sedimentary basins. In the case of Africa, it should further help deciphering the response of large cratonic sediment routing systems to Cenozoic growth of the basin-and-swell topography of the continent. Mapping of dated and regionally correlated lateritic paleolandscape remnants complemented by onshore sedimentological archives allows the reconstruction...

  16. A method to extend flamelet manifolds for prediction of NOx and long time scale species with tabulated chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Boucher, Aymeric; Bertier, Nicolas; Dupoirieux, Francis

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulation is currently used to help design low NOx devices for aircraft engines. In order to improve the prediction of pollutant species, combustion models based on tabulated chemistry have been commonly used in recent years. However, the short time scales of usual flamelet manifolds can lead to errors concerning the NO prediction in post flame area, as shown in this paper. Thus, a new method is proposed to extend the manifold in order to describe the evolution of species with a lo...

  17. Power of the power-laws: lessons from unification of small and large time scales for evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Chowdhury, Debashish; Stauffer, Dietrich; Kunwar, Ambarish

    2002-01-01

    We develop a ``unified'' model that describes both ``micro'' and ``macro'' evolutions within a single theoretical framework. The eco-system is described as a dynamic network; the population dynamics at each node of this network describes the ``micro''-evolution over ecological time scales (i.e., birth, ageing and natural death of individual organisms) while the appearance of new nodes, the slow changes of the links and the disappearance of existing nodes accounts for the ``macro'' evolution o...

  18. Anti-control of chaos of single time scale brushless dc motors and chaos synchronization of different order systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anti-control of chaos of single time scale brushless dc motors (BLDCM) and chaos synchronization of different order systems are studied in this paper. By addition of an external nonlinear term, we can obtain anti-control of chaos. Then, by addition of the coupling terms, by the use of Lyapunov stability theorem and by the linearization of the error dynamics, chaos synchronization between a third-order BLDCM and a second-order Duffing system are presented

  19. Wavelet decomposed dual-time scale crystal plasticity FE model for analyzing cyclic deformation induced crack nucleation in polycrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A microstructure sensitive criterion for dwell fatigue crack initiation in polycrystalline alloys is proposed in this paper. Local stress peaks due to load shedding from time dependent plastic deformation fields in neighboring grains are responsible for crack initiation in dwell fatigue. A calibrated and experimentally validated crystal plasticity finite element model (CFEM) is employed for predicting slip system level stresses and strains. Vital microstructural features related to the grain morphology and crystallographic orientations are accounted for in the FEM by construction of microstructures that are statistically equivalent to those observed in OIM scans. The output of the FEM is used to evaluate the crack initiation condition in the post processing stage. The functional form of the criterion is motivated from the similarities in the stress fields and crack evolution criteria ahead of a crack tip and dislocation pile-up. A specific model is developed for estimating the pile-up length necessary for the nucleation criterion using the notion of geometrically necessary dislocations. The crack nucleation criterion is calibrated and validated by using experimental data obtained from ultrasonic crack monitoring techniques. In order to be able to model a large number of cycles to failure initiation, a dual-time scaling algorithm is proposed using wavelet induced decomposition. The algorithm decouples the governing equations into two sets of problems corresponding to two different time scales. One is a long time scale (low frequency) problem characterizing a cycle-averaged solution, while the other is a short time scale (high frequency) problem for a remaining oscillatory portion. The method significantly reduces the computational time till crack initiation

  20. Existence of at Least Two Periodic Solutions for a Competition System of Plankton Allelopathy on Time Scales

    OpenAIRE

    Hui Fang

    2012-01-01

    We study a competition system of the growth of two species of plankton with competitive and allelopathic effects on each other on time scales. With the help of Mawhin’s continuation theorem of coincidence degree theory, a set of easily verifiable criteria is obtained for the existence of at least two periodic solutions for this model. Some new existence results are obtained. An example and numerical simulation are given to illustrate the validity of our results.

  1. A Study on Evalution of Local Time Scale%本地时标评价方法的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄艳; 高源

    2012-01-01

    Apparently, whether local time scale runs good depends on how it is close to international standard time UTC, but it is more important that the consistency of the second definition reproduced by local time scale and by standard time UTC. Based on the concept defined by BIPM about International Atomic Time (TAI) and Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) , it is proposed that fractional frequency difference and time stability are the technical criteria to evaluate the local time scale. The argument above is proved by data analysis from six worldwide timekeeping laboratories with fractional frequency difference and time stability, and then this dissertation give some specific analysis about the relationship between each laboratory' s time scale generation program and the two indexes.%本地时标UTC(k)运行好坏取决于其与国际标准时间UTC的靠近程度,实际上,本地时标所复现的秒定义与UTC所复现的秒定义之间的一致程度应是更重要的衡量指标.根据国际计量局关于国际标准时间TAI和UTC的定义,提出了相对频率偏差(频率准确度)和时间稳定度是评价本地时标优劣的技术指标.通过对国内外6个守时实验室相对频率偏差、时间稳定度两项指标分析证明了上述观点,并对各实验室时标实现方案进行了简要评述.

  2. Assessing the Impacts of Sea Level Rise on Salinity Intrusion and Transport Time Scales in a Tidal Estuary, Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Wen-Cheng Liu; Hong-Ming Liu

    2014-01-01

    Global climate change has resulted in a gradual sea level rise. Sea level rise can cause saline water to migrate upstream in estuaries and rivers, thereby threatening freshwater habitat and drinking-water supplies. In the present study, a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model was established to simulate salinity distributions and transport time scales in the Wu River estuary of central Taiwan. The model was calibrated and verified using tidal amplitudes and phases, time-series water surface e...

  3. Liquid Chromatography on chip

    OpenAIRE

    Faure, Karine

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Liquid chromatography is one of the most powerful separation techniques as illustrated by its leading role in analytical sciences through both academic and industrial communities. Its implementation in microsystems appears to be crucial in the development of ?TAS. If electrophoretic techniques have been widely used in miniaturized devices, liquid chromatography has faced multiple challenges in the downsizing process. During the past five years significant breakthroughs...

  4. Gas chromatography in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akapo, S. O.; Dimandja, J. M.; Kojiro, D. R.; Valentin, J. R.; Carle, G. C.

    1999-01-01

    Gas chromatography has proven to be a very useful analytical technique for in situ analysis of extraterrestrial environments as demonstrated by its successful operation on spacecraft missions to Mars and Venus. The technique is also one of the six scientific instruments aboard the Huygens probe to explore Titan's atmosphere and surface. A review of gas chromatography in previous space missions and some recent developments in the current environment of fiscal constraints and payload size limitations are presented.

  5. Estimation of Dynamic VaR in Chinese Stock Markets Based on Time Scale and Extreme Value Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The accuracy and time scale invariance of value-at-risk (VaR) measurement methods for different stock indices and at different confidence levels are tested. Extreme value theory (EVT) is applied to model the extreme tail of standardized residual series of daily/weekly indices losses, and parametric and nonparametric methods are used to estimate parameters of the general Pareto distribution (GPD), and dynamic VaR for indices of three stock markets in China. The accuracy and time scale invariance of risk measurement methods through back-testing approach are also examined. Results show that not all the indices accept time scale invariance; there are some differences in accuracy between different indices at various confidence levels. The most powerful dynamic VaR estimation methods are EVT-GJR-Hill at 97.5% level for weekly loss to Shanghai stock market, and EVT-GARCH-MLE (Hill) at 99.0% level for weekly loss to Taiwan and Hong Kong stock markets, respectively.

  6. Multiple time scale evaluation of the energy balance during the maize growing season, and a new reason for energy imbalance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO JianXia; BIAN LinGen; DAI YongJiu

    2009-01-01

    Energy imbalance is a common problem associated with the measurement of surface energy using the eddy covariance method. In the evaluation of the energy balance, people usually pay more attention to the statistical result that the effective energy (the sum of sensible and latent heat) is systematically lower than the available energy (the difference of net radiation and ground heat flux). However, little attention has been paid to the existence of the reversed situation when the effective energy is larger than the available energy or their contribution to the overall energy closure rate. In this paper, based on the analysis of the energy balance on multiple time scales across the maize growth season, we con clude that the non-synchronization of energy components is the main reason for the existence of the reversed case. By shifting the phase of the effective energy components half an hour ahead, the rates of energy closure over all time scales are improved and dramatically reduce the number of the half-hourly samples when the energy ratio exceeds 1 or is below 0.5. According to the characteristics of the energy distribution and transformation over multiple time scales, latent heat is always the main type of energy cost, and the residual of the energy balance increases with the growth of the maize plant surpassing the sensible heat for seventy days. It is suggested that the heat storage and photosynthetic energy play an important role in the energy balance during the growing period of maize.

  7. Sequential Elution from IMAC (SIMAC): An Efficient Method for Enrichment and Separation of Mono- and Multi-phosphorylated Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thingholm, Tine E; Larsen, Martin R

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoproteomics relies on methods for efficient purification and sequencing of phosphopeptides from highly complex biological systems, especially when using low amounts of starting material. Current methods for phosphopeptide enrichment, e.g., Immobilized Metal ion Affinity Chromatography and titanium dioxide chromatography provide varying degrees of selectivity and specificity for phosphopeptide enrichment. The number of multi-phosphorylated peptides identified in most published studies is rather low. Here we describe a protocol for a strategy that separates mono-phosphorylated peptides from multiply phosphorylated peptides using Sequential elution from Immobilized Metal ion Affinity Chromatography. The method relies on the initial enrichment and separation of mono- and multi-phosphorylated peptides using Immobilized Metal ion Affinity Chromatography and a subsequent enrichment of the mono-phosphorylated peptides using titanium dioxide chromatography. The two separate phosphopeptide fractions are then subsequently analyzed by mass spectrometric methods optimized for mono-phosphorylated and multi-phosphorylated peptides, respectively, resulting in improved identification of especially multi-phosphorylated peptides from a minimum amount of starting material. PMID:26584924

  8. [Plant signaling peptides. Cysteine-rich peptides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowski, Maciej; Kowalczyk, Stanisław

    2015-01-01

    Recent bioinformatic and genetic analyses of several model plant genomes have revealed the existence of a highly abundant group of signaling peptides that are defined as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs). CRPs are usually in size between 50 and 90 amino acid residues, they are positively charged, and they contain 4-16 cysteine residues that are important for the correct conformational folding. Despite the structural differences among CRP classes, members from each class have striking similarities in their molecular properties and function. The present review presents the recent progress in research on signaling peptides from several families including: EPF/EPFL, SP11/SCR, PrsS, RALF, LURE, and some other peptides belonging to CRP group. There is convincing evidence indicating multiple roles for these CRPs as signaling molecules during the plant life cycle, ranging from stomata development and patterning, self-incompatibility, pollen tube growth and guidance, reproductive processes, and nodule formation. PMID:26281357

  9. Nontargeted identification of peptides and disinfection byproducts in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yanan; Xu, Ying; Li, Feng; Jmaiff, Lindsay; Hrudey, Steve E; Li, Xing-Fang

    2016-04-01

    A broad range of organic compounds are known to exist in drinking water sources and serve as precursors of disinfection byproducts (DBPs). Epidemiological findings of an association of increased risk of bladder cancer with the consumption of chlorinated water has resulted in health concerns about DBPs. Peptides are thought to be an important category of DBP precursors in water. However, little is known about the actual presence of peptides and their DBPs in drinking water because of their high sample complexity and low concentrations. To address this challenge and identify peptides and non-chlorinated/chlorinated peptide DBPs from large sets of organic compounds in water, we developed a novel high throughput analysis strategy, which integrated multiple solid phase extraction (SPE), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation, and non-target identification using precursor ion exclusion (PIE) high resolution mass spectrometry (MS). After MS analysis, structures of candidate compounds, particularly peptides, were obtained by searching against the Human Metabolome Database (HMDB). Using this strategy, we successfully detected 625 peptides (out of 17,205 putative compounds) and 617 peptides (out of 13,297) respectively in source and finished water samples. The source and finished water samples had 501 peptides and amino acids in common. The remaining 116 peptides and amino acids were unique to the finished water. From a subset of 30 putative compounds for which standards were available, 25 were confirmed using HPLC-MS analysis. By analyzing the peptides identified in source and finished water, we successfully confirmed three disinfection reaction pathways that convert peptides into toxic DBPs. PMID:27090718

  10. Periodic Solutions for Shunting Inhibitory Cellular Neural Networks of Neutral Type with Time-Varying Delays in the Leakage Term on Time Scales

    OpenAIRE

    Yongkun Li; Lei Wang; Yu Fei

    2014-01-01

    A class of shunting inhibitory cellular neural networks of neutral type with time-varying delays in the leakage term on time scales is proposed. Based on the exponential dichotomy of linear dynamic equations on time scales, fixed point theorems, and calculus on time scales we obtain some sufficient conditions for the existence and global exponential stability of periodic solutions for that class of neural networks. The results of this paper are completely new and complementary to the previous...

  11. Pseudo almost periodic solutions for neutral type high-order Hopfield neural networks with mixed time-varying delays and leakage delays on time scales

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yongkun; Meng, Xiaofang; Xiong, Lianglin

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a class of neutral type high-order Hopfield neural networks with mixed time-varying delays and leakage delays on time scales is proposed. Based on the exponential dichotomy of linear dynamic equations on time scales, Banach's fixed point theorem and the theory of calculus on time scales, some sufficient conditions are obtained for the existence and global exponential stability of pseudo almost periodic solutions for this class of neural networks. Our results are completely new....

  12. Periodic Solutions for Shunting Inhibitory Cellular Neural Networks of Neutral Type with Time-Varying Delays in the Leakage Term on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongkun Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A class of shunting inhibitory cellular neural networks of neutral type with time-varying delays in the leakage term on time scales is proposed. Based on the exponential dichotomy of linear dynamic equations on time scales, fixed point theorems, and calculus on time scales we obtain some sufficient conditions for the existence and global exponential stability of periodic solutions for that class of neural networks. The results of this paper are completely new and complementary to the previously known results even if the time scale =ℝ or ℤ. Moreover, we present illustrative numerical examples to show the feasibility of our results.

  13. Physicochemical properties determining the detection probability of tryptic peptides in Fourier transform mass spectrometry. A correlation study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Michael L; Savitski, Mikhail M; Kjeldsen, Frank;

    2004-01-01

    Sequence verification and mapping of posttranslational modifications require nearly 100% sequence coverage in the "bottom-up" protein analysis. Even in favorable cases, routine liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry detects from protein digests peptides covering 50-90% of the sequence. Here we...... investigated the reasons for limited peptide detection, considering various physicochemical aspects of peptide behavior in liquid chromatography-Fourier transform mass spectrometry (LC-FTMS). No overall correlation was found between the detection probability and peptide mass. In agreement with literature data...... correlation between pI and signal response. An explanation of this paradoxal behavior was found through the observation that more acidic tryptic peptide lengths tend to be longer. Longer peptides tend to acquire higher average charge state in positive mode electrospray ionization than more basic but shorter...

  14. Two urinary peptides associated closely with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Zhang

    Full Text Available To monitor of type 2 diabetes more simply, conveniently and noninvasively, we are trying to identify the potential urinary peptides that associated with different stages of glucose control in type 2 diabetes mellitus.Firstly, we collected urine samples from type 2 diabetic patients and normal controls. These type 2 diabetic patients were divided into two groups according to fasting plasma glucose (FPG and hemoglobin A1c% (HbA1c, respectively. Magnetic beads based weak cation exchange chromatography (MB-WCX was used to condense urinary peptides. The eluates were then analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS. Subsequently, ClinProt was used to profile and screen the polypeptide patterns based on different methods of grouping in diabetic patients and normal controls. Finally, the amino acid sequences of differentially expressed peptides were identified by nano-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and the protein sources of the corresponding peptide were matched in IPI Human database.Proteomics analysis found two up-regulated peptide (m/z 2756.1 and m/z 3223.2 representations in diabetic subjects, and the two peptides increased with increases in the amount of glycosylated hemoglobin. Further, the parallelism between m/z 3223.2 and glycosylated hemoglobin was better than the parallelism between m/z 2756.1 and glycosylated hemoglobin. Area under the receiver operating characteristic of the two peptides was 0.722 and 0.661, respectively. The above-mentioned peptide m/z 2756.1 was further identified as fragment of fibrinogen alpha chain precursor and m/z 3223.2 was fragment of prothrombin precursor.These results suggested the two urinary biomarkers enable monitor of type 2 diabetes patients with different stages of glucose control.

  15. Plant signalling peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Wiśniewska, Justyna; Trejgell, Alina; Tretyn, Andrzej

    2003-01-01

    Biochemical and genetic studies have identified peptides that play crucial roles in plant growth and development, including defence mechanisms in response to wounding by pests, the control of cell division and expansion, and pollen self-incompatibility. The first two signalling peptides to be described in plants were tomato systemin and phytosulfokine (PSK). There is also biochemical evidence that natriuretic peptide-like molecules, immunologically-relatedt o those found ...

  16. Polycyclic peptide therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeriswyl, Vanessa; Heinis, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Owing to their excellent binding properties, high stability, and low off-target toxicity, polycyclic peptides are an attractive molecule format for the development of therapeutics. Currently, only a handful of polycyclic peptides are used in the clinic; examples include the antibiotic vancomycin, the anticancer drugs actinomycin D and romidepsin, and the analgesic agent ziconotide. All clinically used polycyclic peptide drugs are derived from natural sources, such as soil bacteria in the case of vancomycin, actinomycin D and romidepsin, or the venom of a fish-hunting coil snail in the case of ziconotide. Unfortunately, nature provides peptide macrocyclic ligands for only a small fraction of therapeutic targets. For the generation of ligands of targets of choice, researchers have inserted artificial binding sites into natural polycyclic peptide scaffolds, such as cystine knot proteins, using rational design or directed evolution approaches. More recently, large combinatorial libraries of genetically encoded bicyclic peptides have been generated de novo and screened by phage display. In this Minireview, the properties of existing polycyclic peptide drugs are discussed and related to their interesting molecular architectures. Furthermore, technologies that allow the development of unnatural polycyclic peptide ligands are discussed. Recent application of these technologies has generated promising results, suggesting that polycyclic peptide therapeutics could potentially be developed for a broad range of diseases. PMID:23355488

  17. Efficient multiple time scale method for modeling compressible vapor plume dynamics inside transient keyhole during fiber laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Shengyong; Chen, Xin; Li, Wen; Shao, Xinyu; Gong, Shuili

    2016-03-01

    Efficient coupling modeling of multiple time scale interactions between keyhole, weld pool and compressible vapor plume during laser welding has long been limited. To address this problem, we present a highly efficient multiple time scale method combining a novel dual-time stepping and Ghost Fluid interpolation strategy with incompressible and compressible fluid solvers, which allows us predicting the compressible plume dynamics inside transient keyhole in fiber laser welding for the first time. In our method, the compressible dynamic vapor inside the transient keyhole is solved with a Roe scheme based algorithm and the incompressible molten liquid of weld pool is calculated by a Projection method. A novel temperature dependent boundary condition of vapor plume is also proposed for the consideration of the dynamic evaporation phenomena on the transient keyhole wall. It is found that the time dependent distributions of vapor plume characteristics, including temperature, pressure, velocity, density and Mach number distributions inside the transient keyhole induced by laser welding can be reasonably predicted by comparing to experimental and literature data. It is also shown that the proposed multiple time scale method is around 60 times faster than the vapor plume modeling method using a single nanosecond scale time step. For the vapor plume in a typical fiber laser welding process, the results indicate that the peak pressure can be greater than 2.0 atmospheric pressures; the average density is around 0.15-0.3 kg/m3 which is much smaller than the air density; and the local Mach number can be greater than 0.8 or even 1.0 Mach which demonstrates the necessity to treat the vapor plume as a compressible fluid.

  18. Revealing less derived nature of cartilaginous fish genomes with their evolutionary time scale inferred with nuclear genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adina J Renz

    Full Text Available Cartilaginous fishes, divided into Holocephali (chimaeras and Elasmoblanchii (sharks, rays and skates, occupy a key phylogenetic position among extant vertebrates in reconstructing their evolutionary processes. Their accurate evolutionary time scale is indispensable for better understanding of the relationship between phenotypic and molecular evolution of cartilaginous fishes. However, our current knowledge on the time scale of cartilaginous fish evolution largely relies on estimates using mitochondrial DNA sequences. In this study, making the best use of the still partial, but large-scale sequencing data of cartilaginous fish species, we estimate the divergence times between the major cartilaginous fish lineages employing nuclear genes. By rigorous orthology assessment based on available genomic and transcriptomic sequence resources for cartilaginous fishes, we selected 20 protein-coding genes in the nuclear genome, spanning 2973 amino acid residues. Our analysis based on the Bayesian inference resulted in the mean divergence time of 421 Ma, the late Silurian, for the Holocephali-Elasmobranchii split, and 306 Ma, the late Carboniferous, for the split between sharks and rays/skates. By applying these results and other documented divergence times, we measured the relative evolutionary rate of the Hox A cluster sequences in the cartilaginous fish lineages, which resulted in a lower substitution rate with a factor of at least 2.4 in comparison to tetrapod lineages. The obtained time scale enables mapping phenotypic and molecular changes in a quantitative framework. It is of great interest to corroborate the less derived nature of cartilaginous fish at the molecular level as a genome-wide phenomenon.

  19. Resonant scattering of outer zone relativistic electrons by multiband EMIC waves and resultant electron loss time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Binbin; Cao, Xing; Zou, Zhengyang; Zhou, Chen; Gu, Xudong; Bortnik, Jacob; Zhang, Jichun; Fu, Song; Zhao, Zhengyu; Shi, Run; Xie, Lun

    2015-09-01

    To improve our understanding of the role of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in radiation belt electron dynamics, we perform a comprehensive analysis of EMIC wave-induced resonant scattering of outer zone relativistic (>0.5 MeV) electrons and resultant electron loss time scales with respect to EMIC wave band, L shell, and wave normal angle model. The results demonstrate that while H+-band EMIC waves dominate the scattering losses of ~1-4 MeV outer zone relativistic electrons, it is He+-band and O+-band waves that prevail over the pitch angle diffusion of ultrarelativistic electrons at higher energies. Given the wave amplitude, EMIC waves at higher L shells tend to resonantly interact with a larger population of outer zone relativistic electrons and drive their pitch angle scattering more efficiently. Obliquity of EMIC waves can reduce the efficiency of wave-induced relativistic electron pitch angle scattering. Compared to the frequently adopted parallel or quasi-parallel model, use of the latitudinally varying wave normal angle model produces the largest decrease in H+-band EMIC wave scattering rates at pitch angles ~5 MeV. At a representative nominal amplitude of 1 nT, EMIC wave scattering produces the equilibrium state (i.e., the lowest normal mode under which electrons at the same energy but different pitch angles decay exponentially on the same time scale) of outer belt relativistic electrons within several to tens of minutes and the following exponential decay extending to higher pitch angles on time scales from rate, can dominate the scattering loss of 5-10 MeV electrons in the entire region of the outer zone, which should be considered in future modeling of the outer zone relativistic electron dynamics.

  20. Modeling evaporation, ion-beam assist, and magnetron sputtering of thin metal films over realistic time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, S.; Smith, R.; Kenny, S. D.; Walls, J. M.

    2012-07-01

    A long-time-scale dynamics technique has been used to model the evaporation, ion-beam assist, and magnetron sputtering of thin metal films over realistic time scales. Two fcc metals have been investigated: silver and aluminum. We illustrate how the technique can be used to model growth of these films over experimental time scales, while investigating individual growth mechanisms and surface diffusion events. Long-time dynamics is achieved through an on-the-fly kinetic Monte Carlo method, which determines diffusion pathways and barriers, in parallel, with no prior knowledge of the involved transitions. It was found that Ag has the ability to grow smooth surfaces, using several mechanisms including multiple-atom concerted motion, exchange mechanisms, and damage and repair systems. Ag {111} and {100} grew dense, complete, and crystalline film when sputtering was simulated, whereas evaporation produced incomplete layers. The inclusion of Ar in the ion-beam-assisted evaporation of Ag {111} aided growth by transferring more energy to the surface atoms allowing increased diffusion. Al {111}, however, shows slightly different patterns; growth via evaporation and magnetron sputtering shows only slight differences and the inclusion of the ion-beam assist actually damages the film beyond repair, producing subsurface Ar clusters where Al atoms were displaced creating voids throughout the film. Al {100}, similar to Ag {100}, grows denser and more complete film when grown via sputtering rather than evaporation. Results show that the energy of the deposition method used plays a vital role in the resulting thin film and substrate quality.

  1. Probing the hard and intermediate states of X-ray binaries using short time-scale variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skipper, Chris J.; McHardy, Ian M.

    2016-05-01

    Below an accretion rate of approximately a few per cent of the Eddington accretion rate, X-ray binary systems are not usually found in the soft spectral state. However, at accretion rates a factor of a few lower still, in the hard state, there is another spectral transition which is well observed but not well understood. Below {˜ }0.5-1 per cent of the Eddington accretion rate (dot{m}_crit), the spectral index hardens with increasing accretion rate, but above dot{m}_crit, although still in the hard state, the spectral index softens with increasing accretion rate. Here we use a combination of X-ray spectral fitting and a study of short time-scale spectral variability to examine the behaviour of three well-known X-ray binaries: Cygnus X-1, GX 339-4 and XTE J1118+480. In Cygnus X-1 we find separate hard and soft continuum components, and show using root mean square (rms) spectra that the soft component dominates the variability. The spectral transition at dot{m}_crit is clearly present in the hard-state hardness-intensity diagrams of Cygnus X-1. Above dot{m}_crit, GX 339-4 shows similar softer-when-brighter behaviour at both long and short time-scales. Similarly, XTE J1118+480, which remains well below dot{m}_crit, has harder-when-brighter behaviour on all time-scales. We interpret these results in terms of two continuum components: a hard power law which dominates the spectra when the accretion rate is low, probably arising from Comptonization of cyclo-synchrotron photons from the corona, and a soft power law which dominates at higher accretion rates, arising from Comptonization of seed photons from the accretion disc.

  2. Photoperiod Regulates vgf-Derived Peptide Processing in Siberian Hamsters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Noli

    Full Text Available VGF mRNA is induced in specific hypothalamic areas of the Siberian hamster upon exposure to short photoperiods, which is associated with a seasonal decrease in appetite and weight loss. Processing of VGF generates multiple bioactive peptides, so the objective of this study was to determine the profile of the VGF-derived peptides in the brain, pituitary and plasma from Siberian hamsters, and to establish whether differential processing might occur in the short day lean state versus long day fat. Antisera against short sequences at the C- or N- termini of proVGF, as well as against NERP-1, TPGH and TLQP peptides, were used for analyses of tissues, and both immunohistochemistry and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA coupled with high-performance liquid (HPLC or gel chromatography were carried out. VGF peptide immunoreactivity was found within cortex cholinergic perikarya, in multiple hypothalamic nuclei, including those containing vasopressin, and in pituitary gonadotrophs. ELISA revealed that exposure to short day photoperiod led to a down-regulation of VGF immunoreactivity in the cortex, and a less pronounced decrease in the hypothalamus and pituitary, while the plasma VGF levels were not affected by the photoperiod. HPLC and gel chromatography both confirmed the presence of multiple VGF-derived peptides in these tissues, while gel chromatography showed the presence of the VGF precursor in all tissues tested except for the cortex. These observations are consistent with the view that VGF-derived peptides have pleiotropic actions related to changing photoperiod, possibly by regulating cholinergic systems in the cortex, vasopressin hypothalamic pathways, and the reproductive axis.

  3. Scalar wave propagation in random amplifying media: Influence of localization effects on length and time scales and threshold behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a detailed discussion of scalar wave propagation and light intensity transport in three-dimensional random dielectric media with optical gain. The intrinsic length and time scales of such amplifying systems are studied and comprehensively discussed as well as the threshold characteristics of single- and two-particle propagators. Our semianalytical theory is based on a self-consistent Cooperon resummation, representing the repeated self-interference, and incorporates as well optical gain and absorption, modeled in a semianalytical way by a finite imaginary part of the dielectric function. Energy conservation in terms of a generalized Ward identity is taken into account.

  4. A General Systems Theory for Chaos, Quantum Mechanics and Gravity for Dynamical Systems of all Space-Time Scales

    OpenAIRE

    Selvam, A. M.

    2005-01-01

    Non-local connections, i. e. long-range space-time correlations intrinsic to the observed subatomic dynamics of quantum systems is also exhibited by macro-scale dynamical systems as selfsimilar fractal space-time fluctuations and is identified as self-organized criticality. The author has developed a general systems theory for the observed self-organized criticality applicable to dynamical systems of all space-time scales based on the concept that spatial integration of enclosed small-scale f...

  5. Life in the Frequency Domain: the Biological Impacts of Changes in Climate Variability at Multiple Time Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Michael E; Woods, H Arthur; Wang, George; Fey, Samuel B; Vasseur, David A; Telemeco, Rory S; Marshall, Katie; Pincebourde, Sylvain

    2016-07-01

    Over the last few decades, biologists have made substantial progress in understanding relationships between changing climates and organism performance. Much of this work has focused on temperature because it is the best kept of climatic records, in many locations it is predicted to keep rising into the future, and it has profound effects on the physiology, performance, and ecology of organisms, especially ectothermic organisms which make up the vast majority of life on Earth. Nevertheless, much of the existing literature on temperature-organism interactions relies on mean temperatures. In reality, most organisms do not directly experience mean temperatures; rather, they experience variation in temperature over many time scales, from seconds to years. We propose to shift the focus more directly on patterns of temperature variation, rather than on means per se, and present a framework both for analyzing temporal patterns of temperature variation and for incorporating those patterns into predictions about organismal biology. In particular, we advocate using the Fourier transform to decompose temperature time series into their component sinusoids, thus allowing transformations between the time and frequency domains. This approach provides (1) standardized ways of visualizing the contributions that different frequencies make to total temporal variation; (2) the ability to assess how patterns of temperature variation have changed over the past half century and may change into the future; and (3) clear approaches to manipulating temporal time series to ask "what if" questions about the potential effects of future climates. We first summarize global patterns of change in temperature variation over the past 40 years; we find meaningful changes in variation at the half day to yearly times scales. We then demonstrate the utility of the Fourier framework by exploring how power added to different frequencies alters the overall incidence of long-term waves of high and low

  6. Studies of Ocean Predictability at Decade to Century Time Scales Using a Global Ocean General Circulation Model in a Parallel Computing Environment; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this report are to determine the structure of oceanic natural variability at time scales of decades to centuries, characterize the physical mechanisms responsible for the variability; determine the relative importance of heat, fresh water, and moment fluxes on the variability; determine the predictability of the variability on these times scales

  7. 高效液相色谱-串联质谱法测定养殖环境沉积物中多肽类抗生素残留量%Determination of Peptide Antibiotics Residues in Sediment From Aquaculture Environment by High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱卓真; 罗冬莲; 罗方方; 叶玫; 汤水粉

    2016-01-01

    A new method for the determination of peptide antibiotics in sediment from aquaculture environment by high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was developed. The target analytes in sediments were ultrasonically extracted twice with citrate buffer solution and methol mixture (3∶ 4, V/ V), followed by complexation with 0. 5 g of Na2 EDTA, purification with 5 mL of methyl isobutyl ketone, and clean-up with HLB-SPE column. The analytes were separated on a MGII C18 column by gradient elution with 0. 1% formaic acid-0. 1% formaic acid acetonitrile as mobile phase, detected in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) with electrospray ionization (ESI) under positive ion mode, and quantified by external standard method. The calibration curves were linear (R2 >0. 999) over a concentration range of 10 -10000μg / L for colistin and bacitracin and 4-4000 μg / L for virginiamycin M1 . The limits of detection (S / N = 3) were 5 μg / kg for colistin and bacitracin and 2 μg / kg for virginiamycin M1 . The limits of quantification (S / N=10) was 10 μg / kg for colistin and bacitracin and 4 μg / kg for virginiamycin M1 . At three spiked levels, the recoveries ranged from 79. 7% to 91. 6% (RSD=1. 9% -10. 8% ), showing high sensitivity, good reproducibility and wide applicability.%建立了测定水产养殖环境沉积物中多肽类抗生素残留量的高效液相色谱串联质谱法。沉积物经10 mL甲醇-柠檬酸-Na2 HPO4溶液(3∶4, V/ V)超声提取2次,0.5 g 乙二胺四乙酸二钠络合除杂,5 mL 甲基异丁基甲酮净化,HLB 固相萃取柱进一步富集净化,MGII C18色谱柱分离,0.1%甲酸与0.1%甲酸-乙腈梯度洗脱,ESI+电离,多反应监测模式(MRM)监测,外标法定量。粘菌素和杆菌肽在10~10000μg/ L 范围内,维吉尼霉素 M1在4~4000μg/ L 范围内,线性回归系数均大于0.999,方法检出限为2~5μg/ kg,方法定量限为4~10μg/ kg。在3个浓度添加水平下,多肽类抗生素回收率79.7%~91.6%,

  8. Insulin C-peptide test

    Science.gov (United States)

    C-peptide ... the test depends on the reason for the C-peptide measurement. Ask your health care provider if ... C-peptide is measured to tell the difference between insulin produced by the body and insulin injected ...

  9. Towards generation of bioactive peptides from meat industry waste proteins: Generation of peptides using commercial microbial proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, Kate; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din; McConnell, Michelle; Carne, Alan

    2016-10-01

    Five commercially available food-grade microbial protease preparations were evaluated for their ability to hydrolyse meat myofibrillar and connective tissue protein extracts to produce bioactive peptides. A bacterial-derived protease (HT) extensively hydrolysed both meat protein extracts, producing peptide hydrolysates with significant in vitro antioxidant and ACE inhibitor activities. The hydrolysates retained bioactivity after simulated gastrointestinal hydrolysis challenge. Gel permeation chromatography sub-fractionation of the crude protein hydrolysates showed that the smaller peptide fractions exhibited the highest antioxidant and ACE inhibitor activities. OFFGEL electrophoresis of the small peptides of both hydrolysates showed that low isoelectric point peptides had antioxidant activity; however, no consistent relationship was observed between isoelectric point and ACE inhibition. Cell-based assays indicated that the hydrolysates present no significant cytotoxicity towards Vero cells. The results indicate that HT protease hydrolysis of meat myofibrillar and connective tissue protein extracts produces bioactive peptides that are non-cytotoxic, should be stable in the gastrointestinal tract and may contain novel bioactive peptide sequences. PMID:27132822

  10. Climate response to changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide and solar irradiance on the time scale of days to weeks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent studies show that fast climate response on time scales of less than a month can have important implications for long-term climate change. In this study, we investigate climate response on the time scale of days to weeks to a step-function quadrupling of atmospheric CO2 and contrast this with the response to a 4% increase in solar irradiance. Our simulations show that significant climate effects occur within days of a stepwise increase in both atmospheric CO2 content and solar irradiance. Over ocean, increased atmospheric CO2 warms the lower troposphere more than the surface, increasing atmospheric stability, moistening the boundary layer, and suppressing evaporation and precipitation. In contrast, over ocean, increased solar irradiance warms the lower troposphere to a much lesser extent, causing a much smaller change in evaporation and precipitation. Over land, both increased CO2 and increased solar irradiance cause rapid surface warming that tends to increase both evaporation and precipitation. However, the physiological effect of increased atmospheric CO2 on plant stomata reduces plant transpiration, drying the boundary layer and decreasing precipitation. This effect does not occur with increased solar irradiance. Therefore, differences in climatic effects from CO2 versus solar forcing are manifested within days after the forcing is imposed. (letter)

  11. Joint amplitude and frequency demodulation analysis based on intrinsic time-scale decomposition for planetary gearbox fault diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhipeng; Lin, Xuefeng; Zuo, Ming J.

    2016-05-01

    Planetary gearbox vibration signals feature complex modulations, thus leading to intricate sideband structure and resulting in difficulty in fault characteristic frequency identification. Intrinsic time-scale decomposition has unique merits, such as high adaptability to changes in signals, low computational complexity, good capability to suppress mode mixing and to preserve temporal information of transients, and excellent suitability for mono-component decomposition of complex multi-component signals. In order to address the issue with planetary gearbox fault diagnosis due to the multiple modulation sources, a joint amplitude and frequency demodulation analysis method is proposed, by exploiting the merits of intrinsic time-scale decomposition. The signal is firstly decomposed into a series of mono-component proper rotational components. Then the one with its instantaneous frequency fluctuating around the gear meshing frequency or its harmonics is selected as the sensitive component. Next, Fourier transformation is applied to the instantaneous amplitude and instantaneous frequency of the sensitive component to obtain the amplitude and frequency demodulated spectra respectively. Finally, a planetary gearbox fault is diagnosed by matching the peaks in the amplitude and frequency demodulated spectra with the theoretical gear fault characteristic frequencies. The proposed method is illustrated by a numerical simulated signal, and further validated by lab experimental signals of a planetary gearbox. The localized faults of sun, planet and ring gears are diagnosed, showing the effectiveness of the method.

  12. Multiple Time-scale Characteristics of Runoff Variations in Middle Reaches of Huolin River and Their Effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Xiaoning; DENG Wei; ZHANG Shuqing

    2007-01-01

    The Huolin River is one of the most important water sources for Xianghai wetland, Horqin wetland, and Chaganhu wetland in the western Songnen Plain of Northeast China. The annual runoff series of 46 years at Baiyunhushuo Hydrologic Station, which is located in the middle reaches of the Huolin River, were analyzed by using wavelet analysis. Main objective was to discuss the periodic characteristics of the runoff, and examine the temporal patterns of the Huolin River recharging to the floodplain wetlands in the lower reaches of the river, and the corresponding effects of recharging variation on the environmental evolution of the wetlands. The results show that the annual runoff varied mainly at three time scales. The intensities of periodical signals at different time scales were strongly characterized by local distribution in its time frequency domain. The interdecadal variation at a scale of more than 30yr played a leading role in the temporal pattern of runoff variation, and at this scale, the runoff at Baiyunhushuo Hydrologic Station varied in turn of flood, draught and flood. Accordingly, the landscape of the floodplain wetlands presented periodic features, especially prominent before the 1990s. Compared with intense human activities, the runoff periodic pattern at middle (10-20yr) and small (l-10yr) scales, which has relatively low energy, exerted unobvious effects on the environmental evolution of the floodplain wetlands, especially after the 1990s.

  13. AE index forecast at different time scales through an ANN algorithm based on L1 IMF and plasma measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallocchia, G.; Amata, E.; Consolini, G.; Marcucci, M. F.; Bertello, I.

    2008-02-01

    The AE index is known to have two main components, one directly driven by the solar wind and the other related to the magnetotail unloading process. As regards the role played by the IMF and solar wind parameters, recently several authors used artificial neural networks (ANN) to forecast AE from solar wind data. Following this track, in this paper we present a study of the AE forecast at different time scales, from 5 min to 1 h, in order to check whether the performance of the ANN prediction varies significantly as a function of the AE time resolution.The study is based on a new ANN Elman network with Bz (in GSM) and Vx as inputs, one hidden layer containing four neurons, four context units and one output neuron. We find that the forecast AE values, during disturbed AE periods, result to be always smaller than the experimental values; on the other hand, the algorithm performance improves as the time scale increases, i.e. the total standard deviation (calculated over a test data set) between the forecast and the Kyoto AE decreases as the averaging time increases. Under the hypothesis that this decrease follows an exponential law, we find that the 1 h scale normalised standard deviation is 0.975, very close to the asymptotic value of 0.95 for an infinite averaging time. We interpret our results in the sense that the unloading component of the AE variations cannot be predicted from IMF and solar wind parameters only.

  14. Kinetic paths, time scale, and underlying landscapes: A path integral framework to study global natures of nonequilibrium systems and networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Zhang, Kun; Wang, Erkwang

    2010-09-01

    We developed a general framework to quantify three key ingredients for dynamics of nonequilibrium systems through path integrals in length space. First, we identify dominant kinetic paths as the ones with optimal weights, leading to effective reduction of dimensionality or degrees of freedom from exponential to polynomial so large systems can be treated. Second, we uncover the underlying nonequilibrium potential landscapes from the explorations of the state space through kinetic paths. We apply our framework to a specific example of nonequilibrium network system: lambda phage genetic switch. Two distinct basins of attractions emerge. The dominant kinetic paths from one basin to another are irreversible and do not follow the usual steepest descent or gradient path along the landscape. It reflects the fact that the dynamics of nonequilibrium systems is not just determined by potential gradient but also the residual curl flux force, suggesting experiments to test theoretical predictions. Third, we have calculated dynamic transition time scales from one basin to another critical for stability of the system through instantons. Theoretical predictions are in good agreements with wild type and mutant experiments. We further uncover the correlations between the kinetic transition time scales and the underlying landscape topography: the barrier heights along the dominant paths. We found that both the dominant paths and the landscape are relatively robust against the influences of external environmental perturbations and the system tends to dissipate less with less fluctuations. Our general framework can be applied to other nonequilibrium systems.

  15. Dynamics of condensate formation in stochastic transport with pair-factorized steady states: Nucleation and coarsening time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Hannes; Janke, Wolfhard

    2016-05-01

    Driven diffusive systems such as the zero-range process (ZRP) and the pair-factorized steady states (PFSS) stochastic transport process are versatile tools that lend themselves to the study of transport phenomena on a generic level. While their mathematical structure is simple enough to allow significant analytical treatment, they offer a variety of interesting phenomena. With appropriate dynamics, the ZRP and PFSS models feature a condensation transition where, for a supercritical density, the translational symmetry breaks spontaneously and excess particles form a single-site or spatially extended condensate, respectively. In this paper we numerically study the typical time scales of the two stages of this condensation process: Nucleation and coarsening. Nucleation is the first stage of condensation where the bulk system relaxes to its stationary distribution and droplet nuclei form in the system. These droplets then gradually grow or evaporate in the coarsening regime to coalesce in a single condensate when the system finally relaxes to the stationary state. We use the ZRP condensation model to discuss the choice of the estimation method for the nucleation time scale and present scaling exponents for the ZRP and PFSS condensation models with respect to the choice of the typical droplet nuclei mass. We then proceed to present scaling exponents in the coarsening regime of the ZRP for partially asymmetric dynamics and the PFSS model for symmetric and asymmetric dynamics.

  16. Time scales of the European surface air temperature variability: The role of the 7-8 year cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jajcay, Nikola; Hlinka, Jaroslav; Kravtsov, Sergey; Tsonis, Anastasios A.; Paluš, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Air temperature variability on different time scales exhibits recurring patterns and quasi-oscillatory phenomena. Climate oscillations with the period about 7-8 years have been observed in many instrumental records in Europe. Although these oscillations are weak if considering their amplitude, they might have nonnegligible influence on temperature variability on shorter time scales due to cross-scale interactions recently observed by Paluš (2014). In order to quantify the cross-scale influence, we propose a simple conditional mean approach which estimates the effect of the cycle with the period close to 8 years on the amplitude of the annual cycle in surface air temperature (SAT) in the range 0.7-1.4°C and the effect on the overall variability of the SAT anomalies (SATA) leads to the changes 1.5-1.7°C in the annual SATA means. The strongest effect in the winter SATA means reaches 4-5°C in central European station and reanalysis data.

  17. Climate impact of beef: an analysis considering multiple time scales and production methods without use of global warming potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierrehumbert, R. T.; Eshel, G.

    2015-08-01

    An analysis of the climate impact of various forms of beef production is carried out, with a particular eye to the comparison between systems relying primarily on grasses grown in pasture (‘grass-fed’ or ‘pastured’ beef) and systems involving substantial use of manufactured feed requiring significant external inputs in the form of synthetic fertilizer and mechanized agriculture (‘feedlot’ beef). The climate impact is evaluated without employing metrics such as {{CO}}2{{e}} or global warming potentials. The analysis evaluates the impact at all time scales out to 1000 years. It is concluded that certain forms of pastured beef production have substantially lower climate impact than feedlot systems. However, pastured systems that require significant synthetic fertilization, inputs from supplemental feed, or deforestation to create pasture, have substantially greater climate impact at all time scales than the feedlot and dairy-associated systems analyzed. Even the best pastured system analyzed has enough climate impact to justify efforts to limit future growth of beef production, which in any event would be necessary if climate and other ecological concerns were met by a transition to primarily pasture-based systems. Alternate mitigation options are discussed, but barring unforseen technological breakthroughs worldwide consumption at current North American per capita rates appears incompatible with a 2 °C warming target.

  18. Synaptic dynamics on different time scales in a parallel fiber feedback pathway of the weakly electric fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, John E; Maler, Leonard

    2004-02-01

    Synaptic dynamics comprise a variety of interacting processes acting on a wide range of time scales. This enables a synapse to perform a large array of computations, from temporal and spatial filtering to associative learning. In this study, we describe how changing synaptic gain via long-term plasticity can act to shape the temporal filtering of a synapse through modulation of short-term plasticity. In the weakly electric fish, parallel fibers from cerebellar granule cells provide massive feedback inputs to the pyramidal neurons of the electrosensory lateral line lobe. We demonstrate a long-term synaptic enhancement (LTE) of these synapses that is biochemically similar to the presynaptic long-term potentiation expressed by parallel fibers in the mammalian cerebellum. Using a novel stimulation protocol and a simple modeling paradigm, we then quantify the changes in short-term plasticity during the induction of LTE and show that these changes can be explained by gradual changes in only one model parameter, that which is associated with the baseline probability of transmitter release. These changes lead to a shift in the spike frequency preference of the synapse, suggesting that long-term plasticity is not only involved in controlling the gain of the parallel fiber synapse, but also provides a means of controlling synaptic filtering over multiple time scales. PMID:14602840

  19. Climate response to changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide and solar irradiance on the time scale of days to weeks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Long; Bala, Govindasamy; Caldeira, Ken

    2012-09-01

    Recent studies show that fast climate response on time scales of less than a month can have important implications for long-term climate change. In this study, we investigate climate response on the time scale of days to weeks to a step-function quadrupling of atmospheric CO2 and contrast this with the response to a 4% increase in solar irradiance. Our simulations show that significant climate effects occur within days of a stepwise increase in both atmospheric CO2 content and solar irradiance. Over ocean, increased atmospheric CO2 warms the lower troposphere more than the surface, increasing atmospheric stability, moistening the boundary layer, and suppressing evaporation and precipitation. In contrast, over ocean, increased solar irradiance warms the lower troposphere to a much lesser extent, causing a much smaller change in evaporation and precipitation. Over land, both increased CO2 and increased solar irradiance cause rapid surface warming that tends to increase both evaporation and precipitation. However, the physiological effect of increased atmospheric CO2 on plant stomata reduces plant transpiration, drying the boundary layer and decreasing precipitation. This effect does not occur with increased solar irradiance. Therefore, differences in climatic effects from CO2 versus solar forcing are manifested within days after the forcing is imposed.

  20. Time scaling relations for step bunches from models with step-step attractions (B1-type models)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasteva, A.; Popova, H.; Akutsu, N.; Tonchev, V.

    2016-03-01

    The step bunching instability is studied in three models of step motion defined in terms of ordinary differential equations (ODE). The source of instability in these models is step-step attraction, it is opposed by step-step repulsion and the developing surface patterns reflect the balance between the two. The first model, TE2, is a generalization of the seminal model of Tersoff et al. (1995). The second one, LW2, is obtained from the model of Liu and Weeks (1998) using the repulsions term to construct the attractions one with retained possibility to change the parameters in the two independently. The third model, MM2, is a minimal one constructed ad hoc and in this article it plays a central role. New scheme for scaling the ODE in vicinal studies is applied towards deciphering the pre-factors in the time-scaling relations. In all these models the patterned surface is self-similar - only one length scale is necessary to describe its evolution (hence B1-type). The bunches form finite angles with the terraces. Integrating numerically the equations for step motion and changing systematically the parameters we obtain the overall dependence of time-scaling exponent β on the power of step-step attractions p as β = 1/(3+p) for MM2 and hypothesize based on restricted set of data that it is β = 1/(5+p) for LW2 and TE2.