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Sample records for chromatium

  1. Acclimation of the photosynthetic response of Chromatium vinosum to light-limiting conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez, O; Van Gemerden, H; Mas, J

    1998-01-01

    The photosynthetic response of the purple sulfur bacterium Chromatium vinosum DSM 185 to different degrees of illumination was analyzed. The microorganism was grown in continuous culture, and samples were taken from the effluent of the culture and incubated at different irradiances to determine the

  2. Utilization of reducing power in light-limited cultures of Chromatium vinosum DSM 185

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez, O; Van Gemerden, H; Mas, J

    1998-01-01

    This study describes how the phototrophic organism Chromatium vinosum, when grown under different degrees of light limitation, distributes the reducing power initially present in the medium as hydrogen sulfide. Under all the conditions of illumination tested, sulfur was the major store of reducing p

  3. PHOSPHATE-LIMITED GROWTH OF CHROMATIUM-VINOSUM IN CONTINUOUS CULTURE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MAS, J; VANGEMERDEN, H

    1992-01-01

    Chromatium vinosum DSM 185 was grown in continuous culture at a constant dilution rate of 0.071 h-1 with sulfide as the only electron donor. The organism was subjected to conditions ranging from phosphate limitation (S(R-phosphate) = 2.7-mu-M and S(R-sulfide) = 1.8 mM) to sulfide limitation (S(R-pho

  4. Studies on bacterial chromatophores II. Energy transfer and photooxidative bleaching of bacteriochlorophyll in relation to structure in normal and carotenoid-depleted Chromatium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bril, C.

    1963-01-01

    Electronic energy transfer, fluorescence emission spectra and photooxidative bleaching of bacteriochlorophyll in Chromatium chromatophores were shown to be affected by detergent action and by inhibition of normal carotenoid synthesis in the parent cells. These phenomena are discussed in relation to

  5. Chromatium species: an emerging bioindicator of crude oil pollution of tidal mud flats in the Niger Delta mangrove ecosystem, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essien, J P; Antai, S P

    2009-06-01

    Establishing microbiological indices for the monitoring of environmental decay by crude oil pollution in the Niger Delta region has been a major concern of our current researches. Chromatium species, a purple, Gram positive pleomorphic, motile, microaerophlic sulfur bacterium offers a good potential for use in the assessment of the short term effects of oil pollution of tidal mud flats in the Niger Delta mangrove ecosystem. Its response to the November 22, 2003 spillage at the Qua Iboe Estuary and the adjoining Cross River Estuary was investigated. Our results have revealed that the sulphur bacterium is easily identified and widely distributed in the epipellic sediment of the mangrove ecosystem but very sensitive to hydrocarbon pollution. The bacterium was readily detected in the tidal mud flats containing as much as 2.0 mg kg(-1) but not detected in sediment with THC level of 3.65 mg kg(-1) and above. It is thus, suggestive that the threshold and lethal limits of effect of hydrocarbons against the sulfur bacterium lies between 2.04 and 3.65 mg kg(-1). These imply that in any case of crude oil pollution that Chromatium is not detected during monitoring the THC levels of the sediment may have been raised to a level close to or above 3.65 mg kg(-1). Statistical analysis of the relationship between THC level and density of Chromatium in sediment revealed a significant (p mangrove ecosystem as against an insignificant (p > 0.05) relationship (r = -0.41) recorded for the Cross River mangrove ecosystem which served as the control. The result indicates that oil pollution affect the homeostatic status of Chromatium in tidal mud flats despite its even distribution (R2 = 71.4%). The finding though not definitive may contribute to the hierarchical process of oil pollution assessment in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria. However, its effective utilization will require not only the development of a selective medium for enumeration and isolation of the bacterium but also the

  6. Study on Culturing and Training Chromatium in CSTR by Coke Oven Gas and Desulfurization in coal%着色细菌在CSTR反应器中的培养及对煤脱硫作用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王德强; 郑明东; 黄继萍

    2003-01-01

    着色细菌在CSTR反应器中进行驯化和富集培养,培养基为含H2S、CO2和氨态氮的煤气(其中H2S含量为2.0 g/m3).结果发现细菌生长良好,同时可以在体内积累硫磺,揭示了其利用无机硫的作用.同时在CSTR反应器中进行了煤脱硫研究,煤粉中加入适当水分,考察了其对硫化亚铁的分解作用及影响因素.

  7. Studies on the natural state of bacteriochlorophyll

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, J.B.; Gier, J. de; Bril, C.

    1959-01-01

    Aqueous extracts of the Thiorhodacea Chromatium strain D, and the Athiorhodaceae Rhodopseudomonas spheroides, Rhodospirillum ntolischianum and Rhodospirillum rubrura were disintegrated by supersonic vibration as well as, in two additional experiments, by detergent action. The 850 m/~ maximum of the

  8. Effects of Grazing by the Free-Living Soil Amoebae Acanthamoeba castellanii, Acanthamoeba polyphaga, and Hartmannella vermiformis on Various Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Weekers, Peter H. H.; Paul l.E. Bodelier; Wijen, John P. H.; Vogels, Godfried D.

    1993-01-01

    Cultures of 10 different bacteria were used to serve as food sources for axenically grown Acanthamoeba castellanii, Acanthamoeba polyphaga, and Hartmannella vermiformis. The nonpigmented enterobacteriaceae Escherichia coli K-12 and Klebsiella aerogenes appeared to be excellent feed to all three amoebae. Hardly any growth or ammonium production was observed in tests with Chromatium vinosum and Serratia marcescens, which share the presence of pigmented compounds. Distinct differences in net amm...

  9. Characterization of purple and green photosynthetic bacteria isolated from the lagoon of Agatti Atoll (Lakshadweep Sea)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.; Chandramohan, D.

    suspende d in sucros e solution showe d marke d peak s a t 749 , 486 , 42 3 an d 380 nm. The methanoli c extracts of cells showed peaks at 666 and 435 nm. When th e character s o f thes e culture s wer e com hyphenminus pared with thos e of photosyntheti c... characters , cell size and ability for photo hyphenminus autotroph y permit the m to be tentatively identified as Chromatium violascens. The possibilit y o f identifying th e presen t strai n a s either Chr. warmingii o r Chr. buderi whic h ar e als o...

  10. Lanthanide behavior in hypersaline evaporation ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California, Mexico - an environment with halophiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choumiline, K.; López-Cortés, A.; Grajeda-Muñoz, M.; Shumilin, E.; Sapozhnikov, D.

    2013-12-01

    Lanthanides are known, in some cases, to be sensitive to changes in water column or sediment chemistry, a fact that allows them to be used as environmental fingerprints. Nevertheless, the behavior of these elements in hypersaline environments is insufficiently understood, especially in those colonized by bacteria, archaea and eukarya halophiles. Extreme environments like the mentioned exist in the artificially-controlled ponds of the 'Exportadora de Sal' salt-producing enterprise located in Guerrero Negro (Baja California, Mexico). Sediment cores from various ponds were collected, subsampled and measured by ICP-MS and INAA. This allowed differencing the behavior of lanthanides and trace elements under a water column salinity gradient along the evaporation sequence of ponds. Sediment profiles (30 mm long), obtained in Pond 5, dominated by Ca and Mg precipitation and at the same time rich in organic matter due to bacterial mat presence, showed highs and lows of the shale-normalized patterns along different in-core depths. Two groups of elements could be distinguished with similar trends: set A (La, Ce, Pr and Nd) and set B (Sm, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb and Lu). The first 'group A' had two prominent peaks at 15 mm and around 22 mm, whereas the 'group B' showed only slight increase at 15 mm and none at 22 mm. Microscopic analyses of prokaryotic cells of a stratified mat in Pond 5 (collected in 2004) showed filamentous bacteria and cyanobacteria with a cell abundance and morphotype richness maxima of prokaryotic cells in a chemocline from 3 mm to 7 mm depth which co-exists nine morphotypes of aerobic and anaerobic prokaryotes Microcoleus chthonoplastes, Leptolyngbya, Cyanothece, Geitlerinema, Spirulina, Chloroflexus, Beggiatoa, Chromatium and Thioploca. Below the 7 mm depth, oxygenic photosynthesis depletes and sulfur reducing compounds increase. The highs of the shale-normalized lanthanide contents of the 'group A' (at 15 mm depth) seem to correlate with the

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the peripheral light-harvesting complex LH2 from Marichromatium purpuratum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranston, Laura J; Roszak, Aleksander W; Cogdell, Richard J

    2014-06-01

    LH2 from the purple photosynthetic bacterium Marichromatium (formerly known as Chromatium) purpuratum is an integral membrane pigment-protein complex that is involved in harvesting light energy and transferring it to the LH1-RC `core' complex. The purified LH2 complex was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method at 294 K. The crystals diffracted to a resolution of 6 Å using synchrotron radiation and belonged to the tetragonal space group I4, with unit-cell parameters a=b=109.36, c=80.45 Å. The data appeared to be twinned, producing apparent diffraction symmetry I422. The tetragonal symmetry of the unit cell and diffraction for the crystals of the LH2 complex from this species reveal that this complex is an octamer.

  12. Thioredoxins in evolutionarily primitive organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, B. B.

    1986-01-01

    Thioredoxins are low molecular weight redox proteins, alternating between the S-S (oxidized) and SH (reduced) states, that function in a number of biochemical processes, including DNA synthesis, DNA replication, and enzyme regulation. Until recently, reduced ferredoxin was known to serve as the source of reducing power for the reduction of thioredoxins only in oxygenic photosynthetic cells. In all other organisms, the source of hydrogen (electrons) for thioredoxin reduction was considered to be NADPH. It was found that Clostridium pasteurianum, an anaerobic organism normally living in the soil unexposed to light, resembles photosynthetic cells in using ferredoxin for the reduction of thioredoxin. The results reveal the existence of a pathway in which ferredoxin, provides the reducing power for the reduction of thioredoxin via the flavoprotein enzyme, ferredoxinthioredoxin reductase. In related studies, it was found that Chromatium vinosum, an anaerobic photosynthetic purple sulfur bacterium, resembles evolutionarily more advanced micro-organisms in having an NADP-thioredoxin system composed of a single thioredoxin which is reduced by NADPH via NADP-thioredoxin reductase. The adoption of the NADP-thioredoxin system by Chromatium seems appropriate in view of evidence tha the organi sm utilizes ATP-driven reverse electron transport. Finally, results of research directed towards the identification of target enzymes of the ferredoxin/thioredoxin system in a cyanobacterium (Nostoc muscorum), show that thioredoxin-linked photosynthetic enzymes of cyanobateria are similar to those of chloroplasts. It now seems that the ferredoxin/thioredoxin system functions in regulating CO2 assimilation via the reductive pentose phosphate cycle in oxygenic but not anoxygenic photosynthetic cells.

  13. Bioavailability of a potato chromium complex to the laboratory rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, H.K.

    1985-01-01

    Research objectives were to study the effect of food source, preparation method and chemical form on bioavailability of chromium. Chromium concentration in potatoes was determined and tubers labeled either intrinsically or extrinsically with radioactive chromate. A labeled chromium complexes was isolated from preparations of raw, baked or fried potatoes and chromatographed on gel permeation media. Availability of the potato chromium complex to the rat was examined in three feeding studies. Animals were dosed with radioactive extrinsically or intrinsically labeled potato extract or with chromate. A labeled chromium complex was isolated from gastrointestinal contents of rats and chromatographed. Potato pulp and peel contained 1.63 and 2.70 ..mu..g Cr/g tissue respectively. True and apparent absorption from extrinsically labeled feedings were 33.4 +/- 4.7 and 29.8 +/- 11.2% respectively, and no differences existed between absorption from raw and cooked potatoes. Absorption from the extrinsic labeled potatoes differed significantly from absorption of inorganic chromatium. Apparent absorption of raw (11.1 +/- 7.9%) and cooked (-0.7 +/- 2.8%) intrinsically labeled feedings differed significantly. Absorption of inorganic chromium was 17.8% (true) and 11.5% (apparent). Examination of the chromium complex isolated from gastrointestinal tract contents showed enlargement of the complex in the stomach after consumption.

  14. Scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry for quick detection of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in environmental water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chengjun; Jiang, Fenghua; Gao, Wei; Li, Xiaoyun; Yu, Yanzhen; Yin, Xiaofei; Wang, Yong; Ding, Haibing

    2016-03-01

    Detection of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria has largely been dependent on targeted gene sequencing technology or traditional cell cultivation, which usually takes from days to months to carry out. This clearly does not meet the requirements of analysis for time-sensitive samples and/or complicated environmental samples. Since energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) can be used to simultaneously detect multiple elements in a sample, including sulfur, with minimal sample treatment, this technology was applied to detect sulfur-oxidizing bacteria using their high sulfur content within the cell. This article describes the application of scanning electron microscopy imaging coupled with EDS mapping for quick detection of sulfur oxidizers in contaminated environmental water samples, with minimal sample handling. Scanning electron microscopy imaging revealed the existence of dense granules within the bacterial cells, while EDS identified large amounts of sulfur within them. EDS mapping localized the sulfur to these granules. Subsequent 16S rRNA gene sequencing showed that the bacteria detected in our samples belonged to the genus Chromatium, which are sulfur oxidizers. Thus, EDS mapping made it possible to identify sulfur oxidizers in environmental samples based on localized sulfur within their cells, within a short time (within 24 h of sampling). This technique has wide ranging applications for detection of sulfur bacteria in environmental water samples.

  15. Quick Detection of Sulfur Bacteria in Environmental Water Sample with SEM(scanning electron microscopy) coupled with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, C.; Ding, H.; Wang, Y.; Jiang, F.; Li, X.; Gao, W.; Yin, X.

    2015-12-01

    Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria play important roles in global sulfur cycle. Sulfur bacteria detection has been largely dependent on targeted gene sequencing technology or traditional cell cultivation which usually takes from days to months to finish. This cannot meet the requirements of some time-sensitive samples and/or complicated environmental samples. Since Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry (EDS) can be used to simultaneously detect multiple elements including sulfur in a sample with minimal sample treatment, the technology was applied to detect sulfur bacteria through the high sulfur content in the bacteria cell. We report the application of SEM (scanning electron microscopy) imaging coupled with EDS mapping for direct and quick detection of sulfur oxidizer in contaminated environmental water samples. The presence of sulfur bacteria can be confirmed within 24 hours after sampling. Subsequent 16S RNA gene sequencing results found the bacteria detected had over 99% similarity to Chromatium Okenii, confirming the bacterium was a sulfur oxidizer. The developed technique made it possible to quickly detect sulfur oxidizer in environmental sample and could have wide applications in sulfur bacteria detection in environmental water samples.

  16. Carotenoid-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in LH2 complexes studied with 10-fs time resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polli, Dario; Cerullo, Giulio; Lanzani, Guglielmo; De Silvestri, Sandro; Hashimoto, Hideki; Cogdell, Richard J

    2006-04-01

    In this report, we present a study of carotenoid-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer processes in two peripheral light-harvesting complexes (known as LH2) from purple bacteria. We use transient absorption spectroscopy with approximately 10 fs temporal resolution, which is necessary to observe the very fast energy relaxation processes. By comparing excited-state dynamics of the carotenoids in organic solvents and inside the LH2 complexes, it has been possible to directly evaluate their energy transfer efficiency to the bacteriochlorophylls. In the case of okenone in the LH2 complex from Chromatium purpuratum, we obtained an energy transfer efficiency of etaET2=63+/-2.5% from the optically active excited state (S2) and etaET1=61+/-2% from the optically dark state (S1); for rhodopin glucoside contained in the LH2 complex from Rhodopseudomonas acidophila these values become etaET2=49.5+/-3.5% and etaET1=5.1+/-1%. The measurements also enabled us to observe vibrational energy relaxation in the carotenoids' S1 state and real-time collective vibrational coherence initiated by the ultrashort pump pulses. Our results are important for understanding the dynamics of early events of photosynthesis and relating it to the structural arrangement of the chromophores.

  17. 210Pb and 210Po, manganese and iron cycling across the O2/H2S interface of a permanently anoxic fjord: Framvaren, Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarzenski, Peter W.; McKee, Brent A.; Sorensen, Kai; Todd, James F.

    1999-01-01

    Vertical profiles of dissolved and particulate 210Po and 210b were measured across the redox transition zone at Station F1 in Framvaren Fjord, Norway. In this fjord, a sharp decrease in pH above the O2/H2S interface facilitates the aerobic dissolution of MnO2. In contrast, Fe(II) concentrations begin to increase only at the O2/H2S interface depth. Activity profiles reveal that dissolved 210Po and 210Pb are sequestered efficiently by particulates in surface waters. As polonium-210 and lead-210 activities descend down into the aerobic manganese reduction (AMR) zone, they are remobilized during the reductive dissolution of the carrier phase oxyhydroxides. Both 210Po and 210Pb are highly enriched at the O2/H2S interface where an active community of microbes, such as anoxygenic phototrophs (e.g., Chromatium, Chlorobium sp.), thrives. The coincident peaks in 210Po, 210Pb and microbial biomass suggest a strong biological influence on the behavior of these radionuclides. There is a strong covariance between the vertical distribution of Mn and Pb, indicating that their redox cycling is closely coupled and is likely microbially mediated.

  18. Scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry for quick detection of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in environmental water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chengjun; Jiang, Fenghua; Gao, Wei; Li, Xiaoyun; Yu, Yanzhen; Yin, Xiaofei; Wang, Yong; Ding, Haibing

    2017-01-01

    Detection of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria has largely been dependent on targeted gene sequencing technology or traditional cell cultivation, which usually takes from days to months to carry out. This clearly does not meet the requirements of analysis for time-sensitive samples and/or complicated environmental samples. Since energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) can be used to simultaneously detect multiple elements in a sample, including sulfur, with minimal sample treatment, this technology was applied to detect sulfur-oxidizing bacteria using their high sulfur content within the cell. This article describes the application of scanning electron microscopy imaging coupled with EDS mapping for quick detection of sulfur oxidizers in contaminated environmental water samples, with minimal sample handling. Scanning electron microscopy imaging revealed the existence of dense granules within the bacterial cells, while EDS identified large amounts of sulfur within them. EDS mapping localized the sulfur to these granules. Subsequent 16S rRNA gene sequencing showed that the bacteria detected in our samples belonged to the genus Chromatium, which are sulfur oxidizers. Thus, EDS mapping made it possible to identify sulfur oxidizers in environmental samples based on localized sulfur within their cells, within a short time (within 24 h of sampling). This technique has wide ranging applications for detection of sulfur bacteria in environmental water samples.

  19. Influence of environmental factors on growth and pigment synthesis by purple thiobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. О. Pavlova

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of different environmental factors on growth and pigment biosynthesis by particular strains of purple thiobacteria was investigated. These strains belong to the genus Chromatium, Thiocystis, Thiocapsa and Lamprocystis and were isolated from Yavoriv sulphur mine. Calcium, magnesium, manganese, iron and sodium chloride should be included in the medium for optimal growth of these bacteria. Addition of these elements entails increasing the biomass production and synthesis of carotenoids and bacteriochlorophyll a. Initial concentration of inoculum and electron donor has essential influence on growth of purple thiobacteria. Early in the development of culture, sulphide was oxidized, and then the growth impairment and destruction of cells under exposure of light were observed. For the optimization of bacteria growth the electron donor (sulphide must be added many times during the cultivation process in the concentration, which is not exceed an inhibition dose. The additional bringing of the electron donor in the medium promotes the raise of cells’ biomass. The acetate introduction in the medium has positive influence on the pigments’ biosynthesis. The essential factor of growth and pigments’ biosynthesis is the light intensity. Peak gain of the culture growth was observed under 400 lx. The amplification of light exposure is accompanied by the decrease of growth and content of pigments in cells. Oxygen inhibits the synthesis of pigments in all strains

  20. Elementary Energy Transfer Pathways in Allochromatium vinosum Photosynthetic Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüer, Larry; Carey, Anne-Marie; Henry, Sarah; Maiuri, Margherita; Hacking, Kirsty; Polli, Dario; Cerullo, Giulio; Cogdell, Richard J

    2015-11-01

    Allochromatium vinosum (formerly Chromatium vinosum) purple bacteria are known to adapt their light-harvesting strategy during growth according to environmental factors such as temperature and average light intensity. Under low light illumination or low ambient temperature conditions, most of the LH2 complexes in the photosynthetic membranes form a B820 exciton with reduced spectral overlap with LH1. To elucidate the reason for this light and temperature adaptation of the LH2 electronic structure, we performed broadband femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy as a function of excitation wavelength in A. vinosum membranes. A target analysis of the acquired data yielded individual rate constants for all relevant elementary energy transfer (ET) processes. We found that the ET dynamics in high-light-grown membranes was well described by a homogeneous model, with forward and backward rate constants independent of the pump wavelength. Thus, the overall B800→B850→B890→ Reaction Center ET cascade is well described by simple triexponential kinetics. In the low-light-grown membranes, we found that the elementary backward transfer rate constant from B890 to B820 was strongly reduced compared with the corresponding constant from B890 to B850 in high-light-grown samples. The ET dynamics of low-light-grown membranes was strongly dependent on the pump wavelength, clearly showing that the excitation memory is not lost throughout the exciton lifetime. The observed pump energy dependence of the forward and backward ET rate constants suggests exciton diffusion via B850→ B850 transfer steps, making the overall ET dynamics nonexponential. Our results show that disorder plays a crucial role in our understanding of low-light adaptation in A. vinosum.

  1. Genetic Construction of Truncated and Chimeric Metalloproteins Derived from the Alpha Subunit of Acetyl-CoA Synthase from Clostridium thermoaceticum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huay-Keng Loke; Xiangshi Tan; Paul A. Lindahl

    2002-06-28

    In this study, a genetics-based method is used to truncate acetyl-coenzyme A synthase from Clostridium thermoaceticum (ACS), an alpha2beta2 tetrameric 310 kda bifunctional enzyme. ACS catalyzes the reversible reduction of CO2 to CO and the synthesis of acetyl-CoA from CO (or CO2 in the presence of low-potential reductants), CoA, and a methyl group bound to a corrinoid-iron sulfur protein (CoFeSP). ACS contains 7 metal-sulfur clusters of 4 different types called A, B, C, and D. The B, C, and D clusters are located in the 72 kda beta subunit while the A-cluster, a Ni-X-Fe4S4 cluster that serves as the active site for acetyl-CoA synthase activity, is located in the 82 kda alpha subunit. The extent to which the essential properties of the cluster, including catalytic, redox, spectroscopic, and substrate-binding properties, were retained as ACS was progressively truncated was determined. Acetyl-CoA synthase catalytic activity remained when the entire alpha subunit was removed, as long as CO, rather than CO2 and a low-potential reductant, was used as a substrate. Truncating an {approx} 30 kda region from the N-terminus of the alpha subunit yielded a 49 kda protein that lacked catalytic activity but exhibited A-cluster-like spectroscopic, redox, and CO binding properties. Further truncation afforded a 23 kda protein that lacked recognizable A-cluster properties except for UV-vis spectra typical of [Fe4S4]2+ clusters. Two chimeric proteins were constructed by fusing the gene encoding a ferredoxin from Chromatium vinosum to genes encoding the 49 kda and 82 kda fragments of the alpha subunit. The chimeric proteins exhibited EPR signals that were not the simple sum of the signals from the separate proteins, suggesting magnetic interactions between clusters. This study highlights the potential for using genetics to simplify the study of complex multi-centered metalloenzymes and to generate new complex metalloenzymes with interesting properties.

  2. Organic geochemistry of endoevaporitic environments: Microbial diversity and lipid biomarkers from gypsum deposits at the E.S.S.A Salt Works, Guerrero Negro, Baja, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, M. B.; Des Marais, D. J.; Jahnke, L. L.; Turk, K. A.; Kubo, M. D.

    2006-12-01

    We report lipid biomarker distributions and microbial diversity of endoevaporitic microbial communities from the gypsum crystallizer pond (Pond #9; ~170 % salinity) at the Exportadora de Sal, (ESSA) salt works in Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico. According to phylogenetic analysis using 16S rRNA sequences, gypsum crusts from this system host stratified communities of unicellular cyanobacteria (orange Euhalothece), filamentous cyanobacteria (green Oscillatoria), purple sulfur bacteria (Chromatium), and other halophilic microorganisms. Lipids collected from spatially discrete horizons of the crust indicate a shift in C16, C18 and C19 fatty acids from lower concentrations in the upper aerobic layers to higher concentrations in the deeper anaerobic zones of the crust. Compound specific isotopic analyses (CSIA) of fatty acids differentiate the more abundant C16, C18 and C19 homologues as isotopically lighter (~ -20% to -25% δ13C VPDB) from C15, C17 and C20 homologues which are isotopically heavier (~ -14% to -19% δ13C VPDB) and occur in lower abundance. CSIA of multiple compound classes reveals that gypsum domain lipids have significantly lighter δ13C values than those of lipids from the laminated benthic microbial mats living at lower salinities (i.e. ~100% to 115% salinity) in the ESSA system. This isotopic effect is consistent with intensive internal nutrient cycling within the crust. Squalane/squalene were detected in extracts from the gypsum crust indicating the presence of archaea. Diploptene is the most abundant triterpenoid of the C28 C32 hopanoids. Branched alkanes with quaternary substituted carbons (BAQCs) were also detected. These compounds have been linked with sulfur oxidizing microbial activity, which is known to be a major respiratory process in the crust's internal O2 budget (Sørensen et al., 2004). Abundant organosulfur compounds (OSC) and thiacycloalkanes in extracts indicate a vigorous internal sulfur cycle that influences both

  3. NMR of proteins (4Fe-4S): structural properties and intramolecular electron transfer; RMN de proteines (4Fe-4S): proprietes structurales et transfert electronique intramoleculaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, J.G.

    1996-10-17

    NMR started to be applied to Fe-S proteins in the seventies. Its use has recently been enlarged as the problems arising from the paramagnetic polymetallic clusters ware overcome. Applications to [4Fe-4S] are presented herein. The information derived thereof deepens the understanding of the redox properties of these proteins which play a central role in the metabolism of bacterial cells. The secondary structure elements and the overall folding of Chromatium vinosum ferredoxin (Cv Fd) in solution have been established by NMR. The unique features of this sequence have been shown to fold as an {alpha} helix at the C-terminus and as a loop between two cysteines ligand of one cluster: these two parts localize in close proximity from one another. The interaction between nuclear and electronic spins is a source of additional structural information for (4Fe-AS] proteins. The conformation of the cysteine-ligands, as revealed by the Fe-(S{sub {gamma}}-C{sub {beta}}-H{sub {beta}})Cys dihedral angles, is related to the chemical shifts of the signals associated with the protons of these residues. The longitudinal relaxation times of the protons depend on their distance to the cluster. A quantitative relationship has been established and used to show that the solution structure of the high-potential ferredoxin from Cv differs significantly from the crystal structure around Phe-48. Both parameters (chemical shifts and longitudinal relaxation times) give also insight into the electronic and magnetic properties of the [4Fe-4S] clusters. The rate of intramolecular electron transfer between the two [4FE-4S] clusters of ferredoxins has been measured by NMR. It is far slower in the case of Cv Fd than for shorter ferredoxins. The difference may be associated with changes in the magnetic and/or electronic properties of one cluster. The strong paramagnetism of the [4Fe-4S] clusters, which originally limited the applicability of NMR to proteins containing these cofactors, has been proven

  4. Tapetes microbianos del Salar de Llamará, norte de Chile Microbial mats from the Llamará salt flat, northern Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CECILIA DEMERGASSO

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Se estudiaron las comunidades estratificadas de microorganismos fotosintéticos que se encuentran en el Salar de Llamará ubicado en el desierto de Atacama, norte de Chile, mediante métodos microscópicos y espectrofotométricos. El espesor de la zona fótica de los tapetes descritos varió entre 8 y 30 mm lo cual podría atribuirse a la granulometría y la composición mineralógica de los sedimentos. Se diferencian tres tipos de tapetes. El primero con una única capa pigmentada de color verde; el segundo con capas de colores verde y naranja y un tercero en el que se observa, además de las capas verde y naranja, una de color púrpura. En uno de los sitios muestreados no se encontraron capas pigmentadas. Debajo de la zona pigmentada el sedimento es de color blanco, excepto en uno de los sectores donde se observó una coloración negra atribuible a sulfuro de hierro. Los microorganismos predominantes de la capa naranja fueron diatomeas y cianobacterias unicelulares principalmente de los grupos Cyanothece y Synechococcus. Las cianobacterias filamentosas Microccoleus sp. y Oscillatoria sp. fueron las más abundantes en la capa verde. No se observaron diatomeas en los sitios estudiados donde la salinidad del agua intersticial osciló entre 12 y 33 %. En la capa verde de estos sitios predominaron las cianobacterias cocoides, de los grupos Synechococcus, Cyanothece y Gloeocapsa y del género Gloeobacter, sobre las cianobacterias filamentosas. La capa púrpura estuvo compuesta principalmente por bacterias fototróficas anoxigénicas similares a células de los géneros Chromatium y Thiocapsa. Los espectros de absorción revelaron que la clorofila a es el pigmento más abundante en la mayoría de las muestras analizadas. Los valores integrados de clorofila a y bacterioclorofila a alcanzaron 230 y 144 mg m-2 en el espesor de la zona pigmentada, respectivamente. También se detectaron abundantes microorganismos no fotosintéticos en los tapetes