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  1. Chromatin inactivation precedes de novo dna methylation during the progressive epigenetic silencing of the rassf1a promoter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strunnikova Maria; Schagdarsurengin, Undraga; Kehlen, Astrid; Garbe, James C.; Stampfer, Martha R.; Dammann, Reinhard

    2005-02-23

    Epigenetic inactivation of the RASSF1A tumor suppressor by CpG island methylation was frequently detected in cancer. However, the mechanisms of this aberrant DNA methylation are unknown. In the RASSF1A promoter, we characterized four Sp1 sites, which are frequently methylated in cancer. We examined the functional relationship between DNA methylation, histone modification, Sp1 binding, and RASSF1A expression in proliferating human mammary epithelial cells. With increasing passages, the transcription of RASSF1A was dramatically silenced. This inactivation was associated with deacetylation and lysine 9 trimethylation of histone H3 and an impaired binding of Sp1 at the RASSF1A promoter. In mammary epithelial cells that had overcome a stress-associated senescence barrier, a spreading of DNA methylation in the CpG island promoter was observed. When the RASSF1A-silenced cells were treated with inhibitors of DNA methyltransferase and histone deacetylase, binding of Sp1 and expression of RASSF1 A reoccurred. In summary, we observed that histone H3 deacetylation and H3 lysine 9 trimethylation occur in the same time window as gene inactivation and precede DNA methylation. Our data suggest that in epithelial cells, histone inactivation may trigger de novo DNA methylation of the RASSF1A promoter and this system may serve as a model for CpG island inactivation of tumor suppressor genes.

  2. Turnover of bacterial glutamine synthetase: oxidative inactivation precedes proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, R L; Oliver, C N; Fulks, R M; Stadtman, E R

    1981-04-01

    We partially purified a preparation from Escherichia coli that proteolytically degrades the enzyme glutamine synthetase [L-glutamate:ammonia ligase (ADP-forming), EC 6.3.1.2]. The degradation is at least a two-step process. First, the glutamine synthetase undergoes an oxidative modification. This modification leads to loss of catalytic activity and also renders the protein susceptible to proteolytic attack in the second step. The oxidative step displays characteristics of a mixed-function oxidation, requiring both molecular oxygen and a reduced nucleotide. This step can also be catalyzed by a purified, mammalian cytochrome P-450 system, as well as by a model system consisting of ascorbic acid and oxygen. Catalase blocks this oxidative modification step. Thus, the overall process of proteolytic degradation can be observed only if care is taken to remove catalase activity from the extracts. The inactivation reaction is dependent on the state of adenylylation of the glutamine synthetase, suggesting that this a physiologically important reaction. If so, then mixed-function oxidases are now implicated in the process of intracellular protein turnover.

  3. Chromatin looping and eRNA transcription precede the transcriptional activation of gene in the β-globin locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yea Woon; Lee, Sungkung; Yun, Jangmi; Kim, AeRi

    2015-03-18

    Enhancers are closely positioned with actively transcribed target genes by chromatin looping. Non-coding RNAs are often transcribed on active enhancers, referred to as eRNAs (enhancer RNAs). To explore the kinetics of enhancer-promoter looping and eRNA transcription during transcriptional activation, we induced the β-globin locus by chemical treatment and analysed cross-linking frequency between the β-globin gene and locus control region (LCR) and the amount of eRNAs transcribed on the LCR in a time course manner. The cross-linking frequency was increased after chemical induction but before the transcriptional activation of gene in the β-globin locus. Transcription of eRNAs was increased in concomitant with the increase in cross-linking frequency. These results show that chromatin looping and eRNA transcription precedes the transcriptional activation of gene. Concomitant occurrence of the two events suggests functional relationship between them.

  4. Inactivation of brain mitochondrial Lon protease by peroxynitrite precedes electron transport chain dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanyer, Lee; Jørgensen, Wenche; Hori, Osamu;

    2008-01-01

    shown to degrade oxidatively modified aconitase in vitro and may thus play a role in defending against the accumulation of oxidized matrix proteins in mitochondria. Using an assay system that allowed us to distinguish between basal and ATP-stimulated Lon protease activity, we have shown in isolated non......-synaptic rat brain mitochondria that Lon protease is highly susceptible to oxidative inactivation by peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)). This susceptibility was more pronounced with regard to ATP-stimulated activity, which was inhibited by 75% in the presence of a bolus addition of 1mM ONOO(-), whereas basal unstimulated......The accumulation of oxidatively modified proteins has been shown to be a characteristic feature of many neurodegenerative disorders and its regulation requires efficient proteolytic processing. One component of the mitochondrial proteolytic system is Lon, an ATP-dependent protease that has been...

  5. Unique sex chromosome systems in Ellobius: How do male XX chromosomes recombine and undergo pachytene chromatin inactivation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveevsky, Sergey; Bakloushinskaya, Irina; Kolomiets, Oxana

    2016-07-18

    Most mammalian species have heteromorphic sex chromosomes in males, except for a few enigmatic groups such as the mole voles Ellobius, which do not have the Y chromosome and Sry gene. The Ellobius (XX ♀♂) system of sex chromosomes has no analogues among other animals. The structure and meiotic behaviour of the two X chromosomes were investigated for males of the sibling species Ellobius talpinus and Ellobius tancrei. Their sex chromosomes, despite their identical G-structure, demonstrate short synaptic fragments and crossover-associated MLH1 foci in both telomeric regions only. The chromatin undergoes modifications in the meiotic sex chromosomes. SUMO-1 marks a small nucleolus-like body of the meiotic XX. ATR and ubiH2A are localized in the asynaptic area and the histone γH2AFX covers the entire XX bivalent. The distribution of some markers of chromatin inactivation differentiates sex chromosomes of mole voles from those of other mammals. Sex chromosomes of both studied species have identical recombination and meiotic inactivation patterns. In Ellobius, similar chromosome morphology masks the functional heteromorphism of the male sex chromosomes, which can be seen at meiosis.

  6. Unique sex chromosome systems in Ellobius: How do male XX chromosomes recombine and undergo pachytene chromatin inactivation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveevsky, Sergey; Bakloushinskaya, Irina; Kolomiets, Oxana

    2016-01-01

    Most mammalian species have heteromorphic sex chromosomes in males, except for a few enigmatic groups such as the mole voles Ellobius, which do not have the Y chromosome and Sry gene. The Ellobius (XX ♀♂) system of sex chromosomes has no analogues among other animals. The structure and meiotic behaviour of the two X chromosomes were investigated for males of the sibling species Ellobius talpinus and Ellobius tancrei. Their sex chromosomes, despite their identical G-structure, demonstrate short synaptic fragments and crossover-associated MLH1 foci in both telomeric regions only. The chromatin undergoes modifications in the meiotic sex chromosomes. SUMO-1 marks a small nucleolus-like body of the meiotic XX. ATR and ubiH2A are localized in the asynaptic area and the histone γH2AFX covers the entire XX bivalent. The distribution of some markers of chromatin inactivation differentiates sex chromosomes of mole voles from those of other mammals. Sex chromosomes of both studied species have identical recombination and meiotic inactivation patterns. In Ellobius, similar chromosome morphology masks the functional heteromorphism of the male sex chromosomes, which can be seen at meiosis. PMID:27425629

  7. KAT7/HBO1/MYST2 Regulates CENP-A Chromatin Assembly by Antagonizing Suv39h1-Mediated Centromere Inactivation

    OpenAIRE

    Ohzeki, Jun-ichirou; Shono, Nobuaki; Otake, Koichiro; Martins, Nuno M. C.; Kugou, Kazuto; Kimura, Hiroshi; Nagase, Takahiro; Larionov, Vladimir; Earnshaw, William C.; Masumoto, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Summary Centromere chromatin containing histone H3 variant CENP-A is required for accurate chromosome segregation as a foundation for kinetochore assembly. Human centromere chromatin assembles on a part of the long α-satellite (alphoid) DNA array, where it is flanked by pericentric heterochromatin. Heterochromatin spreads into adjacent chromatin and represses gene expression, and it can antagonize centromere function or CENP-A assembly. Here, we demonstrate an interaction between CENP-A assem...

  8. Inactivation of intergenic enhancers by EBNA3A initiates and maintains polycomb signatures across a chromatin domain encoding CXCL10 and CXCL9.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie L Harth-Hertle

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV causes a persistent infection in human B cells by establishing specific transcription programs to control B cell activation and differentiation. Transcriptional reprogramming of EBV infected B cells is predominantly driven by the action of EBV nuclear antigens, among them the transcriptional repressor EBNA3A. By comparing gene expression profiles of wt and EBNA3A negative EBV infected B cells, we have previously identified a broad array of cellular genes controlled by EBNA3A. We now find that genes repressed by EBNA3A in these cells are significantly enriched for the repressive histone mark H3K27me3, which is installed by Polycomb group (PcG proteins. This PcG-controlled subset of genes also carries H3K27me3 marks in a variety of other tissues, suggesting that the commitment to PcG silencing is an intrinsic feature of these gene loci that can be used by EBNA3A. In addition, EBNA3A targets frequently reside in co-regulated gene clusters. To study the mechanism of gene repression by EBNA3A and to evaluate the relative contribution of PcG proteins during this process, we have selected the genomic neighbors CXCL10 and CXCL9 as a model for co-repressed and PcG-controlled genes. We show that EBNA3A binds to CBF1 occupied intergenic enhancers located between CXCL10 and CXCL9 and displaces the transactivator EBNA2. This impairs enhancer activity, resulting in a rapid transcriptional shut-down of both genes in a CBF1-dependent manner and initiation of a delayed gain of H3K27me3 marks covering an extended chromatin domain. H3K27me3 marks increase gradually and are maintained by EBNA3A. Our study provides direct evidence that repression by EBNA3A requires CBF1 and that EBNA3A and EBNA2 compete for access to CBF1 at identical genomic sites. Most importantly, our results demonstrate that transcriptional silencing by EBNA3A precedes the appearance of repressive PcG marks and indicate that both events are triggered by loss of enhancer

  9. Inactivation of intergenic enhancers by EBNA3A initiates and maintains polycomb signatures across a chromatin domain encoding CXCL10 and CXCL9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harth-Hertle, Marie L; Scholz, Barbara A; Erhard, Florian; Glaser, Laura V; Dölken, Lars; Zimmer, Ralf; Kempkes, Bettina

    2013-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) causes a persistent infection in human B cells by establishing specific transcription programs to control B cell activation and differentiation. Transcriptional reprogramming of EBV infected B cells is predominantly driven by the action of EBV nuclear antigens, among them the transcriptional repressor EBNA3A. By comparing gene expression profiles of wt and EBNA3A negative EBV infected B cells, we have previously identified a broad array of cellular genes controlled by EBNA3A. We now find that genes repressed by EBNA3A in these cells are significantly enriched for the repressive histone mark H3K27me3, which is installed by Polycomb group (PcG) proteins. This PcG-controlled subset of genes also carries H3K27me3 marks in a variety of other tissues, suggesting that the commitment to PcG silencing is an intrinsic feature of these gene loci that can be used by EBNA3A. In addition, EBNA3A targets frequently reside in co-regulated gene clusters. To study the mechanism of gene repression by EBNA3A and to evaluate the relative contribution of PcG proteins during this process, we have selected the genomic neighbors CXCL10 and CXCL9 as a model for co-repressed and PcG-controlled genes. We show that EBNA3A binds to CBF1 occupied intergenic enhancers located between CXCL10 and CXCL9 and displaces the transactivator EBNA2. This impairs enhancer activity, resulting in a rapid transcriptional shut-down of both genes in a CBF1-dependent manner and initiation of a delayed gain of H3K27me3 marks covering an extended chromatin domain. H3K27me3 marks increase gradually and are maintained by EBNA3A. Our study provides direct evidence that repression by EBNA3A requires CBF1 and that EBNA3A and EBNA2 compete for access to CBF1 at identical genomic sites. Most importantly, our results demonstrate that transcriptional silencing by EBNA3A precedes the appearance of repressive PcG marks and indicate that both events are triggered by loss of enhancer activity. PMID

  10. Reprogramming chromatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehrensberger, Andreas Hasso; Svejstrup, Jesper Qualmann

    2012-01-01

    attributed to high kinetic barriers that affect all cells equally and can only be overcome by rare stochastic events. The barriers to reprogramming are likely to involve transformations of chromatin state because (i) inhibitors of chromatin-modifying enzymes can enhance the efficiency of reprogramming...... and (ii) knockdown or knock-out of chromatin-modifying enzymes can lower the efficiency of reprogramming. Here, we review the relationship between chromatin state transformations (chromatin reprogramming) and cellular reprogramming, with an emphasis on transcription factors, chromatin remodeling factors...

  11. KAT7/HBO1/MYST2 Regulates CENP-A Chromatin Assembly by Antagonizing Suv39h1-Mediated Centromere Inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohzeki, Jun-Ichirou; Shono, Nobuaki; Otake, Koichiro; Martins, Nuno M C; Kugou, Kazuto; Kimura, Hiroshi; Nagase, Takahiro; Larionov, Vladimir; Earnshaw, William C; Masumoto, Hiroshi

    2016-06-01

    Centromere chromatin containing histone H3 variant CENP-A is required for accurate chromosome segregation as a foundation for kinetochore assembly. Human centromere chromatin assembles on a part of the long α-satellite (alphoid) DNA array, where it is flanked by pericentric heterochromatin. Heterochromatin spreads into adjacent chromatin and represses gene expression, and it can antagonize centromere function or CENP-A assembly. Here, we demonstrate an interaction between CENP-A assembly factor M18BP1 and acetyltransferase KAT7/HBO1/MYST2. Knocking out KAT7 in HeLa cells reduced centromeric CENP-A assembly. Mitotic chromosome misalignment and micronuclei formation increased in the knockout cells and were enhanced when the histone H3-K9 trimethylase Suv39h1 was overproduced. Tethering KAT7 to an ectopic alphoid DNA integration site removed heterochromatic H3K9me3 modification and was sufficient to stimulate new CENP-A or histone H3.3 assembly. Thus, KAT7-containing acetyltransferases associating with the Mis18 complex provides competence for histone turnover/exchange activity on alphoid DNA and prevents Suv39h1-mediated heterochromatin invasion into centromeres. PMID:27270040

  12. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiehle, Laura; Breiling, Achim

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) is a valuable method to investigate protein-DNA interactions in vivo. Since its discovery it has been indispensable to identify binding sites and patterns of a variety of DNA-interacting proteins, such as transcription factors and regulators, modified histones, and epigenetic modifiers. The Polycomb repressors were the first proteins that have been mapped using this technique, which provided the mechanistic basis for the understanding of their biological function. Cross-linked (XChIP) or native (NChIP) chromatin from tissues or cultured cells is fragmented and the protein of interest is immunoprecipitated using a specific antibody. The co-precipitated DNA is then purified and subjected to analysis by region-specific PCR, DNA microarray (ChIP-on-chip), or next-generation sequencing (ChIP-seq). The assay can therefore produce information about the localization of the analyzed protein at specific candidate loci or throughout the entire genome. In this chapter, we provide a detailed protocol of the basic standard ChIP assay and some remarks about variations. PMID:27659971

  13. A role for chromatin topology in imprinted domain regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, William A; Sachani, Saqib S; White, Carlee R; Mann, Mellissa R W

    2016-02-01

    Recently, many advancements in genome-wide chromatin topology and nuclear architecture have unveiled the complex and hidden world of the nucleus, where chromatin is organized into discrete neighbourhoods with coordinated gene expression. This includes the active and inactive X chromosomes. Using X chromosome inactivation as a working model, we utilized publicly available datasets together with a literature review to gain insight into topologically associated domains, lamin-associated domains, nucleolar-associating domains, scaffold/matrix attachment regions, and nucleoporin-associated chromatin and their role in regulating monoallelic expression. Furthermore, we comprehensively review for the first time the role of chromatin topology and nuclear architecture in the regulation of genomic imprinting. We propose that chromatin topology and nuclear architecture are important regulatory mechanisms for directing gene expression within imprinted domains. Furthermore, we predict that dynamic changes in chromatin topology and nuclear architecture play roles in tissue-specific imprint domain regulation during early development and differentiation.

  14. Chromatin is wonderful stuff.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. van Driel

    2007-01-01

    Chromatin molecules have properties that set them aside from all other biomacromolecules in the cell. (i) Chromosomes, which are single chromatin molecules, are the largest macromolecules in eukaryotic cells. (ii) Chromatin molecules carry the cell's genetic and epigenetic information and all contro

  15. Optical Flashes Preceding GRBs

    OpenAIRE

    Paczynski, Bohdan

    2001-01-01

    Only one optical flash associated with a gamma-ray burst has been detected so far by ROTSE. There are also upper limits obtained by several groups for several bursts. Recent model calculations indicate a possibility that optical flash may precede the main GRB. Such flashes are undetectable in the currently popular observing mode, with optical instruments responding to GRB triggers. There is a need to develop all sky optical monitoring system capable of recognizing flashes in real time, and mo...

  16. Chromatin Structure and Function

    CERN Document Server

    Wolffe, Alan P

    1999-01-01

    The Third Edition of Chromatin: Structure and Function brings the reader up-to-date with the remarkable progress in chromatin research over the past three years. It has been extensively rewritten to cover new material on chromatin remodeling, histone modification, nuclear compartmentalization, DNA methylation, and transcriptional co-activators and co-repressors. The book is written in a clear and concise fashion, with 60 new illustrations. Chromatin: Structure and Function provides the reader with a concise and coherent account of the nature, structure, and assembly of chromatin and its active

  17. Where splicing joins chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Hnilicová, Jarmila; Staněk, David

    2011-01-01

    There are numerous data suggesting that two key steps in gene expression—transcription and splicing influence each other closely. For a long time it was known that chromatin modifications regulate transcription, but only recently it was shown that chromatin and histone modifications play a significant role in pre-mRNA splicing. Here we summarize interactions between splicing machinery and chromatin and discuss their potential functional significance. We focus mainly on histone acetylation and...

  18. Prenucleosomes and Active Chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuong, Mai T.; Fei, Jia; Ishii, Haruhiko; Kadonaga, James T.

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin consists of nucleosomes as well as nonnucleosomal histone-containing particles. Here we describe the prenucleosome, which is a stable conformational isomer of the nucleosome that associates with ~80 bp DNA. Prenucleosomes are formed rapidly upon the deposition of histones onto DNA and can be converted into canonical nucleosomes by an ATP-driven chromatin assembly factor such as ACF. Different lines of evidence reveal that there are prenucleosome-sized DNA-containing particles with histones in the upstream region of active promoters. Moreover, p300 acetylates histone H3K56 in prenucleosomes but not in nucleosomes, and H3K56 acetylation is found at active promoters and enhancers. These findings therefore suggest that there may be prenucleosomes or prenucleosome-like particles in the upstream region of active promoters. More generally, we postulate that prenucleosomes or prenucleosome-like particles are present at dynamic chromatin, whereas canonical nucleosomes are at static chromatin. PMID:26767995

  19. Reprogramming the chromatin landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miranda, Tina B; Voss, Ty C; Sung, Myong-Hee;

    2013-01-01

    , mechanistic details defining the cellular interactions between ER and GR are poorly understood. We investigated genome-wide binding profiles for ER and GR upon coactivation and characterized the status of the chromatin landscape. We describe a novel mechanism dictating the molecular interplay between ER...... and GR. Upon induction, GR modulates access of ER to specific sites in the genome by reorganization of the chromatin configuration for these elements. Binding to these newly accessible sites occurs either by direct recognition of ER response elements or indirectly through interactions with other factors...

  20. Chromatin replication and epigenome maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alabert, Constance; Groth, Anja

    2012-01-01

    initiates, whereas the replication process itself disrupts chromatin and challenges established patterns of genome regulation. Specialized replication-coupled mechanisms assemble new DNA into chromatin, but epigenome maintenance is a continuous process taking place throughout the cell cycle. If DNA...

  1. Chromatin chemistry goes cellular.

    OpenAIRE

    W. Fischle; D. Schwarzer; Mootz, H.

    2015-01-01

    Analysing post-translational modifications of histone proteins as they occur within chromatin is challenging due to their large number and chemical diversity. A major step forward has now been achieved by using split intein chemistry to engineer functionalized histones within cells.

  2. Chromatin assembly using Drosophila systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyodorov, Dmitry V; Levenstein, Mark E

    2002-05-01

    To successfully study chromatin structure and activity in vitro, it is essential to have a chromatin assembly system that will prepare extended nucleosome arrays with highly defined protein content that resemble bulk chromatin isolated from living cell nuclei in terms of periodicity and nucleosome positioning. The Drosophila ATP-dependent chromatin assembly system described in this unit meets these requirements. The end product of the reaction described here has highly periodic extended arrays with physiologic spacing and positioning of the nucleosomes.

  3. Proteomic interrogation of human chromatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana P Torrente

    Full Text Available Chromatin proteins provide a scaffold for DNA packaging and a basis for epigenetic regulation and genomic maintenance. Despite understanding its functional roles, mapping the chromatin proteome (i.e. the "Chromatome" is still a continuing process. Here, we assess the biological specificity and proteomic extent of three distinct chromatin preparations by identifying proteins in selected chromatin-enriched fractions using mass spectrometry-based proteomics. These experiments allowed us to produce a chromatin catalog, including several proteins ranging from highly abundant histone proteins to less abundant members of different chromatin machinery complexes. Using a Normalized Spectral Abundance Factor approach, we quantified relative abundances of the proteins across the chromatin enriched fractions giving a glimpse into their chromosomal abundance. The large-scale data sets also allowed for the discovery of a variety of novel post-translational modifications on the identified chromatin proteins. With these comparisons, we find one of the probed methods to be qualitatively superior in specificity for chromatin proteins, but inferior in proteomic extent, evidencing a compromise that must be made between biological specificity and broadness of characterization. Additionally, we attempt to identify proteins in eu- and heterochromatin, verifying the enrichments by characterizing the post-translational modifications detected on histone proteins from these chromatin regions. In summary, our results provide insights into the value of different methods to extract chromatin-associated proteins and provide starting points to study the factors that may be involved in directing gene expression and other chromatin-related processes.

  4. Effects of fast neutrons on chromatin: dependence on chromatin structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radu, L. [Dept. of Molecular Genetics, V. Babes National Inst., Bd. Timisoara, Bucharest (Romania); Constantinescu, B. [Dept. of Cyclotron, H. Hulubei National Inst., Bucharest (Romania); Gazdaru, D. [Dept. of Biophysics, Physics Faculty, Univ. of Bucharest (Romania)

    2002-07-01

    The effects of fast neutrons (10-100 Gy) on chromatin extracted from normal (liver of Wistar rats) and tumor (Walker carcinosarcoma maintained on Wistar rats) tissues were compared. The spectroscopic assays used were (i) chromatin intrinsic fluorescence, (ii) time-resolved fluorescence of chromatin-proflavine complexes, and (iii) fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between dansyl chloride and acridine orange coupled to chromatin. For both normal and tumor chromatin, the intensity of intrinsic fluorescence specific for acidic and basic proteins decreased with increasing dose. The relative contributions of the excited-state lifetime of proflavine bound to chromatin were reduced upon fast-neutron irradiation, indicating a decrease in the proportion of chromatin DNA available for ligand binding. The Forster energy transfer efficiencies were also modified by irradiation. These effects were larger for chromatin from tumor tissue. In the range 0-100 Gy, fast neutrons induced alterations in DNA and acidic and basic proteins, as well as in global chromatin structure. The radiosensitivity of chromatin extracted from tumor tissue seems to be higher than that of chromatin extracted from normal tissue, probably because of its higher euchromatin (loose)-heterochromatin (compact) ratio. (author)

  5. Organizing Pneumonia Preceding Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshiaki Kinoshita; Atsuhiko Sakamoto; Kouko Hidaka

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis patients are susceptible to interstitial lung disease, and joint manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis usually precede lung involvements by several years. Organizing pneumonia, as the first manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis, is extremely rare, and its clinical features remain currently unknown. We present a case and a literature review of patients who were pathologically diagnosed with organizing pneumonia first and met the diagnostic criteria of rheumatoid arthritis...

  6. Cas9 Functionally Opens Chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Barkal, Amira A.; Srinivasan, Sharanya; Hashimoto, Tatsunori; Gifford, David K.; Sherwood, Richard I.

    2016-01-01

    Using a nuclease-dead Cas9 mutant, we show that Cas9 reproducibly induces chromatin accessibility at previously inaccessible genomic loci. Cas9 chromatin opening is sufficient to enable adjacent binding and transcriptional activation by the settler transcription factor retinoic acid receptor at previously unbound motifs. Thus, we demonstrate a new use for Cas9 in increasing surrounding chromatin accessibility to alter local transcription factor binding.

  7. Cas9 Functionally Opens Chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Barkal, Amira A.; Srinivasan, Sharanya; Gifford, David K.; Sherwood, Richard I.; Hashimoto, Tatsunori Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Using a nuclease-dead Cas9 mutant, we show that Cas9 reproducibly induces chromatin accessibility at previously inaccessible genomic loci. Cas9 chromatin opening is sufficient to enable adjacent binding and transcriptional activation by the settler transcription factor retinoic acid receptor at previously unbound motifs. Thus, we demonstrate a new use for Cas9 in increasing surrounding chromatin accessibility to alter local transcription factor binding.

  8. Cas9 Functionally Opens Chromatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amira A Barkal

    Full Text Available Using a nuclease-dead Cas9 mutant, we show that Cas9 reproducibly induces chromatin accessibility at previously inaccessible genomic loci. Cas9 chromatin opening is sufficient to enable adjacent binding and transcriptional activation by the settler transcription factor retinoic acid receptor at previously unbound motifs. Thus, we demonstrate a new use for Cas9 in increasing surrounding chromatin accessibility to alter local transcription factor binding.

  9. Weak Precedence Story Parsing Grammar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张松懋

    1995-01-01

    Story understanding is one of the important branches of natural language understanding research in AI techniques.The story understanding approach based on Story Parsing Grammar (SPG) involves that SPG is used to represent different abstracting processes of stories with different levels in story understanding and that the story understanding process is converted to the recognition process of stories using the syntactic parser of SPG.This kind of story understanding is called story parsing.In this paper,firstly a subclass of SPG,called Weak Precedence SPG(WPSPG),is defined.Afterwards the syntactic parsing algorithm of WPSPG is studied.An example of story parsing is also given.

  10. Chromatin Flavors: Chromatin composition and domain organization in Drosophila melanogaster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G. van Bemmel (Joke)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractChromatin was originally identified by W. Flemming in 1882 as not much more than the stainable substance of the cell nucleus. Flemming named this substance according to the Greek word “chroma”, meaning color. In 1911 chromatin was characterized as proteins, named histones, that were atta

  11. Epigenetics & chromatin: Interactions and processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Henikoff (Steven); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractOn 11 to 13 March 2013, BioMed Central will be hosting its inaugural conference, Epigenetics & Chromatin: Interactions and Processes, at Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, MA, USA. Epigenetics & Chromatin has now launched a special article series based on the general themes of the confer

  12. Chromatin, epigenetics and stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roloff, Tim C; Nuber, Ulrike A

    2005-03-01

    Epigenetics is a term that has changed its meaning with the increasing biological knowledge on developmental processes. However, its current application to stem cell biology is often imprecise and is conceptually problematic. This article addresses two different subjects, the definition of epigenetics and chromatin states of stem and differentiated cells. We describe mechanisms that regulate chromatin changes and provide an overview of chromatin states of stem and differentiated cells. Moreover, a modification of the current epigenetics definition is proposed that is not restricted by the heritability of gene expression throughout cell divisions and excludes translational gene expression control. PMID:15819395

  13. Vernalization-mediated chromatin changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zografos, Brett R; Sung, Sibum

    2012-07-01

    Proper flowering time is vital for reproductive fitness in flowering plants. In Arabidopsis, vernalization is mediated primarily through the repression of a MADS box transcription factor, FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). The induction of a plant homeodomain-containing protein, VERNALIZATION INSENSITIVE 3 (VIN3), by vernalizing cold is required for proper repression of FLC. One of a myriad of changes that occurs after VIN3 is induced is the establishment of FLC chromatin at a mitotically repressed state due to the enrichment of repressive histone modifications. VIN3 induction by cold is the earliest known event during the vernalization response and includes changes in histone modifications at its chromatin. Here, the current understanding of the vernalization-mediated chromatin changes in Arabidopsis is discussed, with a focus on the roles of shared chromatin-modifying machineries in regulating VIN3 and FLC gene family expression during the course of vernalization.

  14. Brain Function and Chromatin Plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Dulac, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    The characteristics of epigenetic control, including the potential for long-lasting, stable effects on gene expression that outlive an initial transient signal, could be of singular importance for post-mitotic neurons, which are subject to changes with short- to long-lasting influence on their activity and connectivity. Persistent changes in chromatin structure are thought to contribute to mechanisms of epigenetic inheritance. Recent advances in chromatin biology offer new avenues to investig...

  15. Inactivation of Caliciviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Nims

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Caliciviridae family of viruses contains clinically important human and animal pathogens, as well as vesivirus 2117, a known contaminant of biopharmaceutical manufacturing processes employing Chinese hamster cells. An extensive literature exists for inactivation of various animal caliciviruses, especially feline calicivirus and murine norovirus. The caliciviruses are susceptible to wet heat inactivation at temperatures in excess of 60 °C with contact times of 30 min or greater, to UV-C inactivation at fluence ≥30 mJ/cm2, to high pressure processing >200 MPa for >5 min at 4 °C, and to certain photodynamic inactivation approaches. The enteric caliciviruses (e.g.; noroviruses display resistance to inactivation by low pH, while the non-enteric species (e.g.; feline calicivirus are much more susceptible. The caliciviruses are inactivated by a variety of chemicals, including alcohols, oxidizing agents, aldehydes, and β-propiolactone. As with inactivation of viruses in general, inactivation of caliciviruses by the various approaches may be matrix-, temperature-, and/or contact time-dependent. The susceptibilities of the caliciviruses to the various physical and chemical inactivation approaches are generally similar to those displayed by other small, non-enveloped viruses, with the exception that the parvoviruses and circoviruses may require higher temperatures for inactivation, while these families appear to be more susceptible to UV-C inactivation than are the caliciviruses.

  16. Precede-and-command revisited revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwart, Cornelius

    2015-01-01

    Basing his argumentation on an analysis of condition C effects, Bruening (2014) proposes to replace the familiar notion of c-command underlying dependency relations with a precede-and-command condition, which defines dependency relations as precedence relations within a local domain (phase). In this

  17. Single Molecule Studies of Chromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeans, C; Thelen, M P; Noy, A

    2006-02-06

    In eukaryotic cells, DNA is packaged as chromatin, a highly ordered structure formed through the wrapping of the DNA around histone proteins, and further packed through interactions with a number of other proteins. In order for processes such as DNA replication, DNA repair, and transcription to occur, the structure of chromatin must be remodeled such that the necessary enzymes can access the DNA. A number of remodeling enzymes have been described, but our understanding of the remodeling process is hindered by a lack of knowledge of the fine structure of chromatin, and how this structure is modulated in the living cell. We have carried out single molecule experiments using atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study the packaging arrangements in chromatin from a variety of cell types. Comparison of the structures observed reveals differences which can be explained in terms of the cell type and its transcriptional activity. During the course of this project, sample preparation and AFM techniques were developed and optimized. Several opportunities for follow-up work are outlined which could provide further insight into the dynamic structural rearrangements of chromatin.

  18. Chromatin remodelers and their roles in chromatin organization

    OpenAIRE

    Strålfors, Annelie

    2012-01-01

    The DNA in the eukaryotic nucleus is organized into a complex DNA-protein structure called chromatin. The basic repeating unit of chromatin is the nucleosome, which consists of 147 bp of DNA wrapped around a histone protein octamer. The nucleosomes form a “beads on a string” structure, which can be folded into higherorder structures that allow an extensive degree of DNA compaction. This compaction is so effective that 2 meters of DNA can fit into the human cell nucleus with a ...

  19. Biphasic Chromatin Structure and FISH Signals Reflect Intranuclear Order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti P. Chaudhuri

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: One of the two parental allelic genes may selectively be expressed, regulated by imprinting, X-inactivation or by other less known mechanisms. This study aims to reflect on such genetic mechanisms. Materials and Methods: Slides from short term cultures or direct smears of blood, bone marrow and amniotic fluids were hybridized with FISH probes singly, combined or sequentially. Two to three hundred cells were examined from each preparation. Results and Aignificance: A small number of cells (up to about 5%, more frequent in leukemia cases, showed the twin features: (1 nuclei with biphasic chromatin, one part decondensed and the other condensed; and (2 homologous FISH signals distributed equitably in those two regions. The biphasic chromatin structure with equitable distribution of the homologous FISH signals may correspond to the two sets of chromosomes, supporting observations on ploidywise intranuclear order. The decondensed chromatin may relate to enhanced transcriptions or advanced replications. Conclusions: Transcriptions of only one of the two parental genomes cause allelic exclusion. Genomes may switch with alternating monoallelic expression of biallelic genes as an efficient genetic mechanism. If genomes fail to switch, allelic exclusion may lead to malignancy. Similarly, a genome-wide monoallelic replication may tilt the balance of heterozygosity resulting in aneusomy, initiating early events in malignant transformation and in predicting cancer mortality.

  20. Senataxin controls meiotic silencing through ATR activation and chromatin remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Abrey J; Becherel, Olivier J; Luff, John E; Graham, Mark E; Richard, Derek; Lavin, Martin F

    2015-01-01

    Senataxin, defective in ataxia oculomotor apraxia type 2, protects the genome by facilitating the resolution of RNA-DNA hybrids (R-loops) and other aspects of RNA processing. Disruption of this gene in mice causes failure of meiotic recombination and defective meiotic sex chromosome inactivation, leading to male infertility. Here we provide evidence that the disruption of Setx leads to reduced SUMOylation and disruption of protein localization across the XY body during meiosis. We demonstrate that senataxin and other DNA damage repair proteins, including ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein-interacting partner, are SUMOylated, and a marked downregulation of both ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein-interacting partner and TopBP1 leading to defective activation and signaling through ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein occurs in the absence of senataxin. Furthermore, chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4, a component of the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase chromatin remodeler that interacts with both ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein and senataxin was not recruited efficiently to the XY body, triggering altered histone acetylation and chromatin conformation in Setx (-/-) pachytene-staged spermatocytes. These results demonstrate that senataxin has a critical role in ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein- and chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4-mediated transcriptional silencing and chromatin remodeling during meiosis providing greater insight into its critical role in gene regulation to protect against neurodegeneration. PMID:27462424

  1. Guarding against Collateral Damage during Chromatin Transactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altmeyer, Matthias; Lukas, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    Signal amplifications are vital for chromatin function, yet they also bear the risk of transforming into unrestrained, self-escalating, and potentially harmful responses. Examples of inbuilt limitations are emerging, revealing how chromatin transactions are confined within physiological boundaries....

  2. Chromatin structure regulates gene conversion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Jason Cummings

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Homology-directed repair is a powerful mechanism for maintaining and altering genomic structure. We asked how chromatin structure contributes to the use of homologous sequences as donors for repair using the chicken B cell line DT40 as a model. In DT40, immunoglobulin genes undergo regulated sequence diversification by gene conversion templated by pseudogene donors. We found that the immunoglobulin Vlambda pseudogene array is characterized by histone modifications associated with active chromatin. We directly demonstrated the importance of chromatin structure for gene conversion, using a regulatable experimental system in which the heterochromatin protein HP1 (Drosophila melanogaster Su[var]205, expressed as a fusion to Escherichia coli lactose repressor, is tethered to polymerized lactose operators integrated within the pseudo-Vlambda donor array. Tethered HP1 diminished histone acetylation within the pseudo-Vlambda array, and altered the outcome of Vlambda diversification, so that nontemplated mutations rather than templated mutations predominated. Thus, chromatin structure regulates homology-directed repair. These results suggest that histone modifications may contribute to maintaining genomic stability by preventing recombination between repetitive sequences.

  3. Predicting chromatin organization using histone marks

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Jialiang; Marco, Eugenio; Pinello, Luca; Yuan, Guo-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide mapping of three dimensional chromatin organization is an important yet technically challenging task. To aid experimental effort and to understand the determinants of long-range chromatin interactions, we have developed a computational model integrating Hi-C and histone mark ChIP-seq data to predict two important features of chromatin organization: chromatin interaction hubs and topologically associated domain (TAD) boundaries. Our model accurately and robustly predicts these feat...

  4. Impact of Chromatin on HIV Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Agosto, Luis M.; Matthew Gagne; Henderson, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin influences Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) integration and replication. This review highlights critical host factors that influence chromatin structure and organization and that also impact HIV integration, transcriptional regulation and latency. Furthermore, recent attempts to target chromatin associated factors to reduce the HIV proviral load are discussed.

  5. INTEGRATED APPROACH TO GENERATION OF PRECEDENCE RELATIONS AND PRECEDENCE GRAPHS FOR ASSEMBLY SEQUENCE PLANNING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    An integrated approach to generation of precedence relations and precedence graphs for assembly sequence planning is presented, which contains more assembly flexibility. The approach involves two stages. Based on the assembly model, the components in the assembly can be divided into partially constrained components and completely constrained components in the first stage, and then geometric precedence relation for every component is generated automatically. According to the result of the first stage, the second stage determines and constructs all precedence graphs. The algorithms of these two stages proposed are verified by two assembly examples.

  6. Optimal Solutions for the Temporal Precedence Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Makris, Christos; Sioutas, Spyros;

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we refer to the Temporal Precedence Problem on Pure Pointer Machines . This problem asks for the design of a data structure, maintaining a set of stored elements and supporting the following two operations: insert and precedes . The operation insert (a) introduces a new element...... a in the structure, while the operation precedes (a,b) returns true iff element a was inserted before element b temporally. In [11] a solution was provided to the problem with worst-case time complexity O (log log n ) per operation and O(n log log n) space, where n is the number of elements inserted. It was also......,b) operation in O (log log d ) time, where d is the temporal distance between the elements a and b ....

  7. Chromatin Dynamics of Circadian Transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Aguilar-Arnal, Lorena; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The molecular circadian clock orchestrates the daily cyclical expression of thousands of genes. Disruption of this transcriptional program leads to a variety of pathologies, including insomnia, depression and metabolic disorders. Circadian rhythms in gene expression rely on specific chromatin transitions which are ultimately coordinated by the molecular clock. As a consequence, a highly plastic and dynamic circadian epigenome can be delineated across different tissues and cell types. Intrigui...

  8. Sleep Disturbance Preceding Completed Suicide in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Tina R.; Bridge, Jeffrey A.; Brent, David A.

    2008-01-01

    We examined sleep difficulties preceding death in a sample of adolescent suicide completers as compared with a matched sample of community control adolescents. Sleep disturbances were assessed in 140 adolescent suicide victims with a psychological autopsy protocol and in 131 controls with a similar semistructured psychiatric interview. Rates of…

  9. On the Rhetoric and Precedents of Racism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Victor

    1999-01-01

    Considers contribution of rhetorical training of the Aztecs prior to the European conquest as well as other early philosophers from the Americas. Encourages breaking precedent in order to battle racism by looking to rhetorical training developed in the Americas and Puerto Rico in addition to the European thinkers. (SC)

  10. Reversible heat inactivation of copper sites precedes thermal unfolding of molluscan (Rapana thomasiana) hemocyanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idakieva, Krassimira; Meersman, Filip; Gielens, Constant

    2012-05-01

    Hemocyanin (Hc) is a type-3 copper protein, containing dioxygen-binding active sites consisting of paired copper atoms. In the present study the thermal unfolding of the Hc from the marine mollusc Rapana thomasiana (RtH) has been investigated by combining differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. Two important stages in the unfolding pathway of the Hc molecule were discerned. A first event, with nonmeasurable heat absorption, occurring around 60°C, lowers the binding of dioxygen to the type-3 copper groups. This pretransition is reversible and is ascribed to a slight change in the tertiary structure. In a second stage, with midpoint around 80°C, the protein irreversibly unfolds with a loss of secondary structure and formation of amorphous aggregates. Experiments with the monomeric structural subunits, RtH1 and RtH2, indicated that the heterogeneity in the process of thermal denaturation can be attributed to the presence of multiple 50kDa functional units with different stability. In accordance, the irreversible unfolding of a purified functional unit (RtH2-e) occurred at a single transition temperature. At slightly alkaline pH (Tris buffer) the C-terminal β-sheet rich domain of the functional unit starts to unfold before the α-helix-rich N-terminal (copper containing) domain, triggering the collapse of the global protein structure. Even around 90°C some secondary structure is preserved as shown by the FTIR spectra of all investigated samples, confirming the high thermostability of molluscan Hc.

  11. Proteomics of a fuzzy organelle: interphase chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustatscher, Georg; Hégarat, Nadia; Wills, Karen L H; Furlan, Cristina; Bukowski-Wills, Jimi-Carlo; Hochegger, Helfrid; Rappsilber, Juri

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin proteins mediate replication, regulate expression, and ensure integrity of the genome. So far, a comprehensive inventory of interphase chromatin has not been determined. This is largely due to its heterogeneous and dynamic composition, which makes conclusive biochemical purification difficult, if not impossible. As a fuzzy organelle, it defies classical organellar proteomics and cannot be described by a single and ultimate list of protein components. Instead, we propose a new approach that provides a quantitative assessment of a protein's probability to function in chromatin. We integrate chromatin composition over a range of different biochemical and biological conditions. This resulted in interphase chromatin probabilities for 7635 human proteins, including 1840 previously uncharacterized proteins. We demonstrate the power of our large-scale data-driven annotation during the analysis of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) regulation in chromatin. Quantitative protein ontologies may provide a general alternative to list-based investigations of organelles and complement Gene Ontology. PMID:24534090

  12. Chromatin Modification and Remodeling in Heart Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Delgado-Olguín

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In organogenesis, cell types are specified from determined precursors as morphogenetic patterning takes place. These events are largely controlled by tissue-specific transcription factors. These transcription factors must function within the context of chromatin to activate or repress target genes. Recent evidence suggests that chromatin-remodeling and -modifying factors may have tissue-specific function. Here we review the potential roles for chromatin-remodeling and -modifying proteins in the development of the mammalian heart.

  13. Transcriptional networks and chromatin remodeling controlling adipogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersbæk, Rasmus; Nielsen, Ronni; Mandrup, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Adipocyte differentiation is tightly controlled by a transcriptional cascade, which directs the extensive reprogramming of gene expression required to convert fibroblast-like precursor cells into mature lipid-laden adipocytes. Recent global analyses of transcription factor binding and chromatin...... remodeling have revealed 'snapshots' of this cascade and the chromatin landscape at specific time-points of differentiation. These studies demonstrate that multiple adipogenic transcription factors co-occupy hotspots characterized by an open chromatin structure and specific epigenetic modifications....... Such transcription factor hotspots are likely to represent key signaling nodes which integrate multiple adipogenic signals at specific chromatin sites, thereby facilitating coordinated action on gene expression....

  14. Monoallelic chromatin conformation flanking long-range silenced domains in cancer-derived and normal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenic Di Paola

    Full Text Available Epigenetic inactivation of chromatin plays an important role in determining cell phenotype in both normal and cancer cells, but our knowledge is still incomplete with respect to any potential monoallelic nature of the phenomenon. We have genotyped DNA isolated from chromatin of two colorectal cancer-derived lines and a culture of normal human intestinal epithelial cells (HIEC, which was immunoprecipitated with antibodies to acetylated vs. methylated histone H3K9, and presented the data as B allele frequency differences over multiple single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP moving window averages. [B allele is an arbitrary term defined as one of the two alleles at any given SNP, named A and B]. Three different validation tests confirmed that peaks exhibiting differences represented monoallelic domains. These complementary tests confirmed the following: 1 genes in the regions of high B allele frequency difference were expressed monoallelically; 2 in normal cells all five imprinting control regions which carried heterozygous SNPs were characterized by B allele difference peaks; and 3 the haplotypes in the B allele difference peaks were faithfully maintained in the chromatin immunoprecipitated with the respective antibodies. In both samples most of the monoallelic domains were found at the boundaries between regions of open and closed chromatin. With respect to the cancer line, this supports the established concept of conformation spreading, but the results from the normal cells were unexpected. Since these cells were polyclonal, the monoallelic structures were probably not determined by random choice as occurs in X-inactivation, so we propose that epigenetic inactivation in some domains may be heritable and polymorphic in normal human cells.

  15. The architects of crenarchaeal chromatin : A biophysical characterization of chromatin proteins from Sulfolobus solfataricus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, Rosalie Paula Catharina

    2014-01-01

    Understanding of chromatin organization and compaction in Archaea is currently limited. The genome of several megabasepairs long is folded by a set of small chromatin proteins to fit into the micron-sized cell. A first step in understanding archaeal chromatin organization is to study the action of i

  16. Computational strategies to address chromatin structure problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perišić, Ognjen; Schlick, Tamar

    2016-01-01

    While the genetic information is contained in double helical DNA, gene expression is a complex multilevel process that involves various functional units, from nucleosomes to fully formed chromatin fibers accompanied by a host of various chromatin binding enzymes. The chromatin fiber is a polymer composed of histone protein complexes upon which DNA wraps, like yarn upon many spools. The nature of chromatin structure has been an open question since the beginning of modern molecular biology. Many experiments have shown that the chromatin fiber is a highly dynamic entity with pronounced structural diversity that includes properties of idealized zig-zag and solenoid models, as well as other motifs. This diversity can produce a high packing ratio and thus inhibit access to a majority of the wound DNA. Despite much research, chromatin's dynamic structure has not yet been fully described. Long stretches of chromatin fibers exhibit puzzling dynamic behavior that requires interpretation in the light of gene expression patterns in various tissue and organisms. The properties of chromatin fiber can be investigated with experimental techniques, like in vitro biochemistry, in vivo imagining, and high-throughput chromosome capture technology. Those techniques provide useful insights into the fiber's structure and dynamics, but they are limited in resolution and scope, especially regarding compact fibers and chromosomes in the cellular milieu. Complementary but specialized modeling techniques are needed to handle large floppy polymers such as the chromatin fiber. In this review, we discuss current approaches in the chromatin structure field with an emphasis on modeling, such as molecular dynamics and coarse-grained computational approaches. Combinations of these computational techniques complement experiments and address many relevant biological problems, as we will illustrate with special focus on epigenetic modulation of chromatin structure. PMID:27345617

  17. A microscopic analysis of Arabidopsis chromatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemse, J.J.

    2007-01-01

    Genetic information of eukaryotic organisms is stored as DNA in the nuclei of their cells. Nuclear DNA is associated with several proteins, which together form chromatin. The most abundant chromatin proteins arehistones,they arrange the initial packaging step of the DNA. DNA

  18. Expression-dependent folding of interphase chromatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansjoerg Jerabek

    Full Text Available Multiple studies suggest that chromatin looping might play a crucial role in organizing eukaryotic genomes. To investigate the interplay between the conformation of interphase chromatin and its transcriptional activity, we include information from gene expression profiles into a polymer model for chromatin that incorporates genomic loops. By relating loop formation to transcriptional activity, we are able to generate chromosome conformations whose structural and topological properties are consistent with experimental data. The model particularly allows to reproduce the conformational variations that are known to occur between highly and lowly expressed chromatin regions. As previously observed in experiments, lowly expressed regions of the simulated polymers are much more compact. Due to the changes in loop formation, the distributions of chromatin loops are also expression-dependent and exhibit a steeper decay in highly active regions. As a results of entropic interaction between differently looped parts of the chromosome, we observe topological alterations leading to a preferential positioning of highly transcribed loci closer to the surface of the chromosome territory. Considering the diffusional behavior of the chromatin fibre, the simulations furthermore show that the higher the expression level of specific parts of the chromatin fibre is, the more dynamic they are. The results exhibit that variations of loop formation along the chromatin fibre, and the entropic changes that come along with it, do not only influence the structural parameters on the local scale, but also effect the global chromosome conformation and topology.

  19. Chromatin dynamics resolved with force spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chien, Fan-Tso

    2011-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, genomic DNA is organized in chromatin fibers composed of nucleosomes as structural units. A nucleosome contains 1.7 turns of DNA wrapped around a histone octamer and is connected to the adjacent nucleosomes with linker DNA. The folding of chromatin fibers effectively increases t

  20. Chromatin challenges during DNA replication and repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Anja; Rocha, Walter; Verreault, Alain;

    2007-01-01

    the challenge of maintenance, cells have evolved efficient nucleosome-assembly pathways and chromatin-maturation mechanisms that reproduce chromatin organization in the wake of DNA replication and repair. The aim of this Review is to describe how these pathways operate and to highlight how the epigenetic...

  1. Chromatin Remodelers: From Function to Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gernot Längst

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin remodelers are key players in the regulation of chromatin accessibility and nucleosome positioning on the eukaryotic DNA, thereby essential for all DNA dependent biological processes. Thus, it is not surprising that upon of deregulation of those molecular machines healthy cells can turn into cancerous cells. Even though the remodeling enzymes are very abundant and a multitude of different enzymes and chromatin remodeling complexes exist in the cell, the particular remodeling complex with its specific nucleosome positioning features must be at the right place at the right time in order to ensure the proper regulation of the DNA dependent processes. To achieve this, chromatin remodeling complexes harbor protein domains that specifically read chromatin targeting signals, such as histone modifications, DNA sequence/structure, non-coding RNAs, histone variants or DNA bound interacting proteins. Recent studies reveal the interaction between non-coding RNAs and chromatin remodeling complexes showing importance of RNA in remodeling enzyme targeting, scaffolding and regulation. In this review, we summarize current understanding of chromatin remodeling enzyme targeting to chromatin and their role in cancer development.

  2. Chromatin-modifying proteins in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fog, Cathrine K; Jensen, Klaus T; Lund, Anders Henrik

    2007-01-01

    -despite the fact that all cells in the organism contain the same genetic information. A large amount of data gathered over the last decades has demonstrated that deregulation of chromatin-modifying proteins is etiologically involved in the development and progression of cancer. Here we discuss how epigenetic...... alterations influence cancer development and review known cancer-associated alterations in chromatin-modifying proteins....

  3. A Long-Distance Chromatin Affair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Denker, Annette; de Laat, Wouter

    2015-01-01

    Changes in transcription factor binding sequences result in correlated changes in chromatin composition locally and at sites hundreds of kilobases away. New studies demonstrate that this concordance is mediated via spatial chromatin interactions that constitute regulatory modules of the human genome

  4. Chromatin domain boundaries: insulators and beyond

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gong Hong WEI; De Pei LIU; Chih Chuan LIANG

    2005-01-01

    The eukaryotic genome is organized into functionally and structurally distinct domains, representing regulatory units for gene expression and chromosome behavior. DNA sequences that mark the border between adjacent domains are the insulators or boundary elements, which are required in maintenance of the function of different domains. Some insulators need others enable to play insulation activity. Chromatin domains are defined by distinct sets of post-translationally modified histones. Recent studies show that these histone modifications are also involved in establishment of sharp chromatin boundaries in order to prevent the spreading of distinct domains. Additionally, in some loci, the high-order chromatin structures for long-range looping interactions also have boundary activities, suggesting a correlation between insulators and chromatin loop domains. In this review, we will discuss recent progress in the field of chromatin domain boundaries.

  5. Computational strategies to address chromatin structure problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perišić, Ognjen; Schlick, Tamar

    2016-06-01

    While the genetic information is contained in double helical DNA, gene expression is a complex multilevel process that involves various functional units, from nucleosomes to fully formed chromatin fibers accompanied by a host of various chromatin binding enzymes. The chromatin fiber is a polymer composed of histone protein complexes upon which DNA wraps, like yarn upon many spools. The nature of chromatin structure has been an open question since the beginning of modern molecular biology. Many experiments have shown that the chromatin fiber is a highly dynamic entity with pronounced structural diversity that includes properties of idealized zig-zag and solenoid models, as well as other motifs. This diversity can produce a high packing ratio and thus inhibit access to a majority of the wound DNA. Despite much research, chromatin’s dynamic structure has not yet been fully described. Long stretches of chromatin fibers exhibit puzzling dynamic behavior that requires interpretation in the light of gene expression patterns in various tissue and organisms. The properties of chromatin fiber can be investigated with experimental techniques, like in vitro biochemistry, in vivo imagining, and high-throughput chromosome capture technology. Those techniques provide useful insights into the fiber’s structure and dynamics, but they are limited in resolution and scope, especially regarding compact fibers and chromosomes in the cellular milieu. Complementary but specialized modeling techniques are needed to handle large floppy polymers such as the chromatin fiber. In this review, we discuss current approaches in the chromatin structure field with an emphasis on modeling, such as molecular dynamics and coarse-grained computational approaches. Combinations of these computational techniques complement experiments and address many relevant biological problems, as we will illustrate with special focus on epigenetic modulation of chromatin structure.

  6. Extensive Variation in Chromatin States Across Humans

    KAUST Repository

    Kasowski, M.

    2013-10-17

    The majority of disease-associated variants lie outside protein-coding regions, suggesting a link between variation in regulatory regions and disease predisposition. We studied differences in chromatin states using five histone modifications, cohesin, and CTCF in lymphoblastoid lines from 19 individuals of diverse ancestry. We found extensive signal variation in regulatory regions, which often switch between active and repressed states across individuals. Enhancer activity is particularly diverse among individuals, whereas gene expression remains relatively stable. Chromatin variability shows genetic inheritance in trios, correlates with genetic variation and population divergence, and is associated with disruptions of transcription factor binding motifs. Overall, our results provide insights into chromatin variation among humans.

  7. Phosphorylation-dependent regulation of plant chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Bigeard, Jean

    2014-07-10

    In eukaryotes, most of the DNA is located in the nucleus where it is organized with histone proteins in a higher order structure as chromatin. Chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins contribute to DNA-related processes such as replication and transcription as well as epigenetic regulation. Protein functions are often regulated by PTMs among which phosphorylation is one of the most abundant PTM. Phosphorylation of proteins affects important properties, such as enzyme activity, protein stability, or subcellular localization. We here describe the main specificities of protein phosphorylation in plants and review the current knowledge on phosphorylation-dependent regulation of plant chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins. We also outline some future challenges to further elucidate protein phosphorylation and chromatin regulation.

  8. Chromatin Domains: The Unit of Chromosome Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Jesse R; Gorkin, David U; Ren, Bing

    2016-06-01

    How eukaryotic chromosomes fold inside the nucleus is an age-old question that remains unanswered today. Early biochemical and microscopic studies revealed the existence of chromatin domains and loops as a pervasive feature of interphase chromosomes, but the biological implications of such organizational features were obscure. Genome-wide analysis of pair-wise chromatin interactions using chromatin conformation capture (3C)-based techniques has shed new light on the organization of chromosomes in interphase nuclei. Particularly, the finding of cell-type invariant, evolutionarily conserved topologically associating domains (TADs) in a broad spectrum of cell types has provided a new molecular framework for the study of animal development and human diseases. Here, we review recent progress in characterization of such chromatin domains and delineation of mechanisms of their formation in animal cells. PMID:27259200

  9. Chromatin proteins and modifications as drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helin, Kristian; Dhanak, Dashyant

    2013-01-01

    A plethora of groundbreaking studies have demonstrated the importance of chromatin-associated proteins and post-translational modifications of histones, proteins and DNA (so-called epigenetic modifications) for transcriptional control and normal development. Disruption of epigenetic control...

  10. Chromatin Dynamics During DNA Replication and Uncharacterized Replication Factors determined by Nascent Chromatin Capture (NCC) Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabert, Constance; Bukowski-Wills, Jimi-Carlo; Lee, Sung-Bau; Kustatscher, Georg; Nakamura, Kyosuke; de Lima Alves, Flavia; Menard, Patrice; Mejlvang, Jakob; Rappsilber, Juri; Groth, Anja

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY To maintain genome function and stability, DNA sequence and its organization into chromatin must be duplicated during cell division. Understanding how entire chromosomes are copied remains a major challenge. Here, we use Nascent Chromatin Capture (NCC) to profile chromatin proteome dynamics during replication in human cells. NCC relies on biotin-dUTP labelling of replicating DNA, affinity-purification and quantitative proteomics. Comparing nascent chromatin with mature post-replicative chromatin, we provide association dynamics for 3995 proteins. The replication machinery and 485 chromatin factors like CAF-1, DNMT1, SUV39h1 are enriched in nascent chromatin, whereas 170 factors including histone H1, DNMT3, MBD1-3 and PRC1 show delayed association. This correlates with H4K5K12diAc removal and H3K9me1 accumulation, while H3K27me3 and H3K9me3 remain unchanged. Finally, we combine NCC enrichment with experimentally derived chromatin probabilities to predict a function in nascent chromatin for 93 uncharacterized proteins and identify FAM111A as a replication factor required for PCNA loading. Together, this provides an extensive resource to understand genome and epigenome maintenance. PMID:24561620

  11. The Chromatin Fiber: Multiscale Problems and Approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Ozer, Gungor; Luque, Antoni; Schlick, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    The structure of chromatin, affected by many factors from DNA linker lengths to posttranslational modifications, is crucial to the regulation of eukaryotic cells. Combined experimental and computational methods have led to new insights into its structural and dynamical features, from interactions due to the flexible core histone tails of the nucleosomes to the physical mechanism driving the formation of chromosomal domains. Here we present a perspective of recent advances in chromatin modelin...

  12. Etiology and Evaluation of Sperm Chromatin Anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marziyeh Tavalaee

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence suggests that human sperm chromatin anomalies adversely affect reproductive outcomesand infertile men possess substantially amount of sperm with chromatin anomalies than fertilemen.Routine semen analysis evaluates parameters such as sperm motility and morphology, but doesnot examine the nuclear DNA integrity of spermatozoa. It has been suggested that altered nuclearchromatin structure or damaged DNA in spermatozoa could modify the special cellular functionsof human spermatozoa, and thereby affect the fertility potential. Intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection(ICSI bypass the barriers to fertilization for such a sperm, then the effect of chromatin anomalies onthe development remains a concern. Therefore, it is essential to develop and use accurate diagnostictests, which may provide better prognostic capabilities than the standard sperm assessments. Thisreview discusses our current understanding of the structure and organization of sperm DNA,the different procedures for assessment of sperm chromatin anomalies including comet assay,Chromomycin A3 (CMA3, sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA, acridine orange test (AOT,terminal TdT-mediated dUTP-nick-end labelling (TUNEL assay, aniline blue and sperm chromatindispersion (SCD test and the impact of chromatin anomalies on reproductive outcome.

  13. Extension of the preceding birth technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, A

    1994-01-01

    The Brass-inspired Preceding Birth Technique (PBT), is an indirect estimation technique with low costs of administration. PBT involves asking women at a time close to delivery about the survival of the preceding births. The proportion dead is close to the probability of dying between the birth and the second birthday or an index of early childhood mortality (II or Q). Brass and Macrae have determined that II is an estimate of mortality between birth and an age lower than the birth interval or around 4/5 of the birth interval. Hospital and clinic data are likely to include a concentration of women with lower risks of disease because of higher educational levels and socioeconomic status. A simulation of PBT data from the World Fertility Survey for Mexico and Peru found that the proportions of previously dead children were 0.156 in Peru and 0.092 in Mexican home deliveries. Maternity clinic proportions were 0.088 in Peru and 0.066 in Mexico. Use of clinic and hospital data collection underestimated mortality by 32% in Peru and 15% in Mexico. Another alternative was proposed: interviewing women at some other time than delivery. If the interview was during a child/infant intervention after delivery, the subsample would still be subject to a bias, but this problem could be overcome by computing the weighted average of the actual probability of the older child being dead and the conditional probability of the younger child being dead or both younger and older children being dead. Correction factors could be applied using the general standard of the logit life table system of Brass. Calculation of a simple average of the ages of the younger children could provide enough information to help decide which tables to use. Five surveys were selected for testing the factors of dependence between probabilities of death of successive siblings: Bangladesh, Lesotho, Kenya, Ghana, and Guyana. Higher mortality was related to lower dependency factors between the probabilities of death

  14. Dengue Preceding Diabetic Ketoacidosis Dear Editor;

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA is an important hyperglycemic complication of diabetes mellitus. Infection is confirmed as an important underlying etiology of DKA. Here, the author presents an interesting case of dengue preceding DKA. The case is a 61-year-old female presenting to the physician with the complaint of high fever without relief by self-prescription of acetaminophen. She had an underlying disease, diabetes mellitus (DM. Her body temperature was 39.4 degrees Celsius and her complete blood count showed an important finding: thrombocytopenia (platelet count = 85.000. The serological test was done and the diagnosis of dengue hemorrhagic fever was finally confirmed. This case was treated by standard fluid replacement therapy (normal saline regimen. On day 3, the patient developed new symptoms, frequent urination (more than 3 times in an hour, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting and rapid breathing. Complete blood count was done but platelet count was within normal limit at this time. However, the urinalysis showed many positive findings, sugar 4+ and ketone 3+. Her additional blood chemistry results showed a blood glucose level of 454 mg/dL and positive serum ketone. The patient was finally diagnosed to have DKA and endocrinologists were consulted for the management. Of interest, this is a simple case of DKA but the interesting issue is the underlying condition leading to DKA in this patient. Although there are many reports confirming that infection can induce DKA, this is the first reported case of dengue preceding DKA. Indeed, there is a previous report from Thailand on a female patient presented to the physician with concurrent DKA and dengue infection (1. However, DM had not previously been diagnosed in the present case. The dengue infection is common in the tropical world and DM is also the important emerging health problem in this area. Some reports note that DM can be an aggravating factor in the development of dengue shock (2,3. There is

  15. Maintenance of Xist Imprinting Depends on Chromatin Condensation State and Rnf12 Dosage in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Atsushi; Mitani, Atsushi; Miyashita, Toshiyuki; Sado, Takashi; Umezawa, Akihiro; Akutsu, Hidenori

    2016-01-01

    In female mammals, activation of Xist (X-inactive specific transcript) is essential for establishment of X chromosome inactivation. During early embryonic development in mice, paternal Xist is preferentially expressed whereas maternal Xist (Xm-Xist) is silenced. Unlike autosomal imprinted genes, Xist imprinting for Xm-Xist silencing was erased in cloned or parthenogenetic but not fertilized embryos. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the variable nature of Xm-Xist imprinting is poorly understood. Here, we revealed that Xm-Xist silencing depends on chromatin condensation states at the Xist/Tsix genomic region and on Rnf12 expression levels. In early preimplantation, chromatin decondensation via H3K9me3 loss and histone acetylation gain caused Xm-Xist derepression irrespective of embryo type. Although the presence of the paternal genome during pronuclear formation impeded Xm-Xist derepression, Xm-Xist was robustly derepressed when the maternal genome was decondensed before fertilization. Once Xm-Xist was derepressed by chromatin alterations, the derepression was stably maintained and rescued XmXpΔ lethality, indicating that loss of Xm-Xist imprinting was irreversible. In late preimplantation, Oct4 served as a chromatin opener to create transcriptional permissive states at Xm-Xist/Tsix genomic loci. In parthenogenetic embryos, Rnf12 overdose caused Xm-Xist derepression via Xm-Tsix repression; physiological Rnf12 levels were essential for Xm-Xist silencing maintenance in fertilized embryos. Thus, chromatin condensation and fine-tuning of Rnf12 dosage were crucial for Xist imprint maintenance by silencing Xm-Xist. PMID:27788132

  16. New mitotic regulators released from chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki eYokoyama

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Faithful action of the mitotic spindle segregates duplicated chromosomes into daughter cells. Perturbations of this process result in chromosome mis-segregation, leading to chromosomal instability and cancer development. Chromosomes are not simply passengers segregated by spindle microtubules but rather play a major active role in spindle assembly. The GTP bound form of the Ran GTPase (RanGTP, produced around chromosomes, locally activates spindle assembly factors. Recent studies have uncovered that chromosomes organize mitosis beyond spindle formation. They distinctly regulate other mitotic events, such as spindle maintenance in anaphase, which is essential for chromosome segregation. Furthermore, the direct function of chromosomes is not only to produce RanGTP but, in addition, to release key mitotic regulators from chromatin. Chromatin-remodeling factors and nuclear pore complex proteins, which have established functions on chromatin in interphase, dissociate from mitotic chromatin and function in spindle assembly or maintenance. Thus, chromosomes actively organize their own segregation using chromatin-releasing mitotic regulators as well as RanGTP.

  17. Chromatin associations in Arabidopsis interphase nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veit eSchubert

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The arrangement of chromatin within interphase nuclei seems to be caused by topological constraints and related to gene expression depending on tissue and developmental stage. In yeast and animals it was found that homologous and heterologous chromatin association are required to realize faithful expression and DNA repair. To test whether such associations are present in plants we analysed Arabidopsis thaliana interphase nuclei by FISH using probes from different chromosomes. We found that chromatin fibre movement and variable associations, although in general relatively seldom, may occur between euchromatin segments along chromosomes, sometimes even over large distances. The combination of euchromatin segments bearing high or low co-expressing genes did not reveal different association frequencies probably due to adjacent genes of deviating expression patterns.Based on previous data and on FISH analyses presented here, we conclude that the global interphase chromatin organization in A. thaliana is relatively stable, due to the location of its ten centromeres at the nuclear periphery and of the telomeres mainly at the centrally localized nucleolus. Nevertheless, chromatin movement enables a flexible spatial genome arrangement in plant nuclei.

  18. Neutron-scattering studies of chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is clear that a knowledge of the basic molecular structure of chromatin is a prerequisite for any progress toward an understanding of chromosome organization. With a two-component system, protein and nucleic acid, neutrons have a particularly powerful application to studies of the spatial arrangements of these components because of the ability, by contrast matching with H2O-D2O mixtures, to obtain neutron-scattering data on the individual components. With this approach it has been shown that the neutron diffraction of chromatin is consistent with a ''beads on a string'' model in which the bead consists of a protein core with DNA coiled on the outside. However, because chromatin is a gel and gives limited structural data, confirmation of such a model requires extension of the neutron studies by deuteration of specific chromatin components and the isolation of chromatin subunits. Although these studies are not complete, the neutron results so far obtained support the subunit model described above

  19. Chromatin ring formation at plant centromeres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veit eSchubert

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We observed the formation of chromatin ring structures at centromeres of somatic rye and Arabidopsis chromosomes. To test whether this behavior is present also in other plant species and tissues we analyzed Arabidopsis, rye, wheat, Aegilops and barley centromeres during cell divisions and in interphase nuclei by immunostaining and FISH. Furthermore, structured illumination microscopy (super-resolution was applied to investigate the ultrastructure of centromere chromatin beyond the classical refraction limit of light. It became obvious, that a ring formation at centromeres may appear during mitosis, meiosis and in interphase nuclei in all species analyzed. However, varying centromere structures, as ring formations or globular organized chromatin fibers, were identified in different tissues of one and the same species. In addition, we found that a chromatin ring formation may also be caused by subtelomeric repeats in barley. Thus, we conclude that the formation of chromatin rings may appear in different plant species and tissues, but that it is not specific for centromere function. Based on our findings we established a model describing the ultrastructure of plant centromeres and discuss it in comparison to previous models proposed for animals and plants.

  20. Respiratory infections precede adult-onset asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aino Rantala

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Respiratory infections in early life are associated with an increased risk of developing asthma but there is little evidence on the role of infections for onset of asthma in adults. The objective of this study was to assess the relation of the occurrence of respiratory infections in the past 12 months to adult-onset asthma in a population-based incident case-control study of adults 21-63 years of age. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We recruited all new clinically diagnosed cases of asthma (n = 521 during a 2.5-year study period and randomly selected controls (n = 932 in a geographically defined area in South Finland. Information on respiratory infections was collected by a self-administered questionnaire. The diagnosis of asthma was based on symptoms and reversible airflow obstruction in lung function measurements. The risk of asthma onset was strongly increased in subjects who had experienced in the preceding 12 months lower respiratory tract infections (including acute bronchitis and pneumonia with an adjusted odds ratio (OR 7.18 (95% confidence interval [CI] 5.16-9.99, or upper respiratory tract infections (including common cold, sinusitis, tonsillitis, and otitis media with an adjusted OR 2.26 (95% CI 1.72-2.97. Individuals with personal atopy and/or parental atopy were more susceptible to the effects of respiratory infections on asthma onset than non-atopic persons. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides new evidence that recently experienced respiratory infections are a strong determinant for adult-onset asthma. Reducing such infections might prevent onset of asthma in adulthood, especially in individuals with atopy or hereditary propensity to it.

  1. Nucleosome dynamics during chromatin remodeling in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Srinivas; Henikoff, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Precise positioning of nucleosomes around regulatory sites is achieved by the action of chromatin remodelers, which use the energy of ATP to slide, evict or change the composition of nucleosomes. Chromatin remodelers act to bind nucleosomes, disrupt histone-DNA interactions and translocate the DNA around the histone core to reposition nucleosomes. Hence, remodeling is expected to involve nucleosomal intermediates with a structural organization that is distinct from intact nucleosomes. We describe the identification of a partially unwrapped nucleosome structure using methods that map histone-DNA contacts genome-wide. This alternative nucleosome structure is likely formed as an intermediate or by-product during nucleosome remodeling by the RSC complex. Identification of the loss of histone-DNA contacts during chromatin remodeling by RSC in vivo has implications for the regulation of transcriptional initiation. PMID:26933790

  2. Functions of the Proteasome on Chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Tyler S.; Tansey, William P.

    2014-01-01

    The proteasome is a large self-compartmentalized protease complex that recognizes, unfolds, and destroys ubiquitylated substrates. Proteasome activities are required for a host of cellular functions, and it has become clear in recent years that one set of critical actions of the proteasome occur on chromatin. In this review, we discuss some of the ways in which proteasomes directly regulate the structure and function of chromatin and chromatin regulatory proteins, and how this influences gene transcription. We discuss lingering controversies in the field, the relative importance of proteolytic versus non-proteolytic proteasome activities in this process, and highlight areas that require further investigation. Our intention is to show that proteasomes are involved in major steps controlling the expression of the genetic information, that proteasomes use both proteolytic mechanisms and ATP-dependent protein remodeling to accomplish this task, and that much is yet to be learned about the full spectrum of ways that proteasomes influence the genome. PMID:25422899

  3. Functions of the Proteasome on Chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler S. McCann

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The proteasome is a large self-compartmentalized protease complex that recognizes, unfolds, and destroys ubiquitylated substrates. Proteasome activities are required for a host of cellular functions, and it has become clear in recent years that one set of critical actions of the proteasome occur on chromatin. In this review, we discuss some of the ways in which proteasomes directly regulate the structure and function of chromatin and chromatin regulatory proteins, and how this influences gene transcription. We discuss lingering controversies in the field, the relative importance of proteolytic versus non-proteolytic proteasome activities in this process, and highlight areas that require further investigation. Our intention is to show that proteasomes are involved in major steps controlling the expression of the genetic information, that proteasomes use both proteolytic mechanisms and ATP-dependent protein remodeling to accomplish this task, and that much is yet to be learned about the full spectrum of ways that proteasomes influence the genome.

  4. CHD chromatin remodelers and the transcription cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawska, Magdalena; Brehm, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    It is well established that ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers modulate DNA access of transcription factors and RNA polymerases by "opening" or "closing" chromatin structure. However, this view is far too simplistic. Recent findings have demonstrated that these enzymes not only set the stage for the transcription machinery to act but are actively involved at every step of the transcription process. As a consequence, they affect initiation, elongation, termination and RNA processing. In this review we will use the CHD family as a paradigm to illustrate the progress that has been made in revealing these new concepts.

  5. Exome sequencing identifies frequent inactivating mutations in BAP1, ARID1A and PBRM1 in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selaru, Florin M; Streppel, Mirte M; Lucas, Donald J; Niknafs, Noushin; Guthrie, Violeta Beleva; Maitra, Anirban; Argani, Pedram; Offerhaus, G Johan A; Roa, Juan Carlos; Roberts, Lewis R; Gores, Gregory J; Popescu, Irinel; Alexandrescu, Sorin T; Dima, Simona; Fassan, Matteo; Simbolo, Michele; Mafficini, Andrea; Capelli, Paola; Lawlor, Rita T; Ruzzenente, Andrea; Guglielmi, Alfredo; Tortora, Giampaolo; de Braud, Filippo; Scarpa, Aldo; Jarnagin, William; Klimstra, David; Karchin, Rachel; Velculescu, Victor E; Hruban, Ralph H; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Wood, Laura D

    2014-01-01

    Through exomic sequencing of 32 intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas, we discovered frequent inactivating mutations in multiple chromatin-remodeling genes (including BAP1, ARID1A and PBRM1), and mutation in one of these genes occurred in almost half of the carcinomas sequenced. We also identified frequent mutations at previously reported hotspots in the IDH1 and IDH2 genes encoding metabolic enzymes in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas. In contrast, TP53 was the most frequently altered gene in a series of nine gallbladder carcinomas. These discoveries highlight the key role of dysregulated chromatin remodeling in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas. PMID:24185509

  6. Genetic Inactivation of ATRX Leads to a Decrease in the Amount of Telomeric Cohesin and Level of Telomere Transcription in Human Glioma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Rita; Demattei, Marie-Véronique; Episkopou, Harikleia; Augé-Gouillou, Corinne; Decottignies, Anabelle; Grandin, Nathalie; Charbonneau, Michel

    2015-08-01

    Mutations in ATRX (alpha thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked), a chromatin-remodeling protein, are associated with the telomerase-independent ALT (alternative lengthening of telomeres) pathway of telomere maintenance in several types of cancer, including human gliomas. In telomerase-positive glioma cells, we found by immunofluorescence that ATRX localized not far from the chromosome ends but not exactly at the telomere termini. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments confirmed a subtelomeric localization for ATRX, yet short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated genetic inactivation of ATRX failed to trigger the ALT pathway. Cohesin has been recently shown to be part of telomeric chromatin. Here, using ChIP, we showed that genetic inactivation of ATRX provoked diminution in the amount of cohesin in subtelomeric regions of telomerase-positive glioma cells. Inactivation of ATRX also led to diminution in the amount of TERRAs, noncoding RNAs resulting from transcription of telomeric DNA, as well as to a decrease in RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) levels at the telomeres. Our data suggest that ATRX might establish functional interactions with cohesin on telomeric chromatin in order to control TERRA levels and that one or the other or both of these events might be relevant to the triggering of the ALT pathway in cancer cells that exhibit genetic inactivation of ATRX. PMID:26055325

  7. Local Nucleosome Dynamics Facilitate Chromatin Accessibility in Living Mammalian Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saera Hihara

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Genome information, which is three-dimensionally organized within cells as chromatin, is searched and read by various proteins for diverse cell functions. Although how the protein factors find their targets remains unclear, the dynamic and flexible nature of chromatin is likely crucial. Using a combined approach of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, single-nucleosome imaging, and Monte Carlo computer simulations, we demonstrate local chromatin dynamics in living mammalian cells. We show that similar to interphase chromatin, dense mitotic chromosomes also have considerable chromatin accessibility. For both interphase and mitotic chromatin, we observed local fluctuation of individual nucleosomes (∼50 nm movement/30 ms, which is caused by confined Brownian motion. Inhibition of these local dynamics by crosslinking impaired accessibility in the dense chromatin regions. Our findings show that local nucleosome dynamics drive chromatin accessibility. We propose that this local nucleosome fluctuation is the basis for scanning genome information.

  8. CTCF Binding Polarity Determines Chromatin Looping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, Elzo; Vos, Erica S M; Holwerda, Sjoerd J B; Valdes-Quezada, Christian; Verstegen, Marjon J A M; Teunissen, Hans; Splinter, Erik; Wijchers, Patrick J; Krijger, Peter H L; de Laat, Wouter

    2015-01-01

    CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) is an architectural protein involved in the three-dimensional (3D) organization of chromatin. In this study, we assayed the 3D genomic contact profiles of a large number of CTCF binding sites with high-resolution 4C-seq. As recently reported, our data also suggest that ch

  9. Unraveling the mechanisms of chromatin fibril packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilov, Alexey A; Shevelyov, Yuri Y; Ulianov, Sergey V; Khrameeva, Ekaterina E; Kos, Pavel; Chertovich, Alexander; Razin, Sergey V

    2016-05-01

    Recent data indicate that eukaryotic chromosomes are organized into Topologically Associating Domains (TADs); however, the mechanisms underlying TAD formation remain obscure. Based on the results of Hi-C analysis performed on 4 Drosophila melanogaster cell lines, we have proposed that specific properties of nucleosomes in active and repressed chromatin play a key role in the formation of TADs. Our computer simulations showed that the ability of "inactive" nucleosomes to stick to each other and the lack of such ability in "active" nucleosomes is sufficient for spatial segregation of these types of chromatin, which is revealed in the Hi-C analysis as TAD/inter-TAD partitioning. However, some Drosophila and mammalian TADs contain both active and inactive chromatin, a fact that does not fit this model. Herein, we present additional arguments for the model by postulating that transcriptionally active chromatin is extruded on the surface of a TAD, and discuss the possible impact of this organization on the enhancer-promoter communication and on the segregation of TADs. PMID:27249516

  10. Chromatin and epigenetics in all their states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bey, Till; Jamge, Suraj; Klemme, Sonja; Komar, Dorota Natalia; Gall, Le Sabine; Mikulski, Pawel; Schmidt, Martin; Zicola, Johan; Berr, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    In January 2016, the first Epigenetic and Chromatin Regulation of Plant Traits conference was held in Strasbourg, France. An all-star lineup of speakers, a packed audience of 130 participants from over 20 countries, and a friendly scientific atmosphere contributed to make this conference a meetin

  11. Single Chromatin Fibre Assembly Using Optical Tweezers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennink, M.L.; Pope, L.H.; Leuba, S.H.; Grooth, de B.G.; Greve, J.

    2001-01-01

    Here we observe the formation of a single chromatin fibre using optical tweezers. A single -DNA molecule was suspended between two micron-sized beads, one held by a micropipette and the other in an optical trap. The constrained DNA molecule was incubated with Xenopus laevis egg extract in order to r

  12. Research Discovers Frequent Mutations of Chromatin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    With the support of National Natural Science Foundation of China, BGI, the largest genomics organization in the world, and Peking University Shenzhen Hospital, published online in Nature Geneticsics that the study on frequent mutations of chromatin remodeling genes in transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of thebladder on August 8th, 2011. Their study provides a valuable genetic basis for future studies on TCC,

  13. Epigenetic chromatin silencing: bistability and front propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedighi, Mohammad; Sengupta, Anirvan M.

    2007-12-01

    The role of post-translational modification of histones in eukaryotic gene regulation is well recognized. Epigenetic silencing of genes via heritable chromatin modifications plays a major role in cell fate specification in higher organisms. We formulate a coarse-grained model of chromatin silencing in yeast and study the conditions under which the system becomes bistable, allowing for different epigenetic states. We also study the dynamics of the boundary between the two locally stable states of chromatin: silenced and unsilenced. The model could be of use in guiding the discussion on chromatin silencing in general. In the context of silencing in budding yeast, it helps us understand the phenotype of various mutants, some of which may be non-trivial to see without the help of a mathematical model. One such example is a mutation that reduces the rate of background acetylation of particular histone side chains that competes with the deacetylation by Sir2p. The resulting negative feedback due to a Sir protein depletion effect gives rise to interesting counter-intuitive consequences. Our mathematical analysis brings forth the different dynamical behaviors possible within the same molecular model and guides the formulation of more refined hypotheses that could be addressed experimentally.

  14. Impact of chromatin structure on PR signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Lars; Hager, Gordon L

    2012-01-01

    but also to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), as these receptors share many similarities regarding interaction with, and remodeling of, chromatin. Both receptors can bind nucleosomal DNA and have accordingly been described as pioneering factors. However recent genomic approaches (ChIP-seq and DHS-seq) show...

  15. Histone variants: key players of chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biterge, Burcu; Schneider, Robert

    2014-06-01

    Histones are fundamental structural components of chromatin. Eukaryotic DNA is wound around an octamer of the core histones H2A, H2B, H3, and H4. Binding of linker histone H1 promotes higher order chromatin organization. In addition to their structural role, histones impact chromatin function and dynamics by, e.g., post-translational histone modifications or the presence of specific histone variants. Histone variants exhibit differential expression timings (DNA replication-independent) and mRNA characteristics compared to canonical histones. Replacement of canonical histones with histone variants can affect nucleosome stability and help to create functionally distinct chromatin domains. In line with this, several histone variants have been implicated in the regulation of cellular processes such as DNA repair and transcriptional activity. In this review, we focus on recent progress in the study of core histone variants H2A.X, H2A.Z, macroH2A, H3.3, and CENP-A, as well as linker histone H1 variants, their functions and their links to development and disease.

  16. The great repression: chromatin and cryptic transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Bianca P; Fischer, Tamás

    2013-01-01

    The eukaryotic chromatin structure is essential in correctly defining transcription units. Impairing this structure can activate cryptic promoters, and lead to the accumulation of aberrant RNA transcripts. Here we discuss critical pathways that are responsible for the repression of cryptic transcription and the maintenance of genome integrity.

  17. The Chromatin Scaffold Protein SAFB1 Renders Chromatin Permissive for DNA Damage Signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altmeyer, Matthias; Toledo Lazaro, Luis Ignacio; Gudjonsson, Thorkell;

    2013-01-01

    Although the general relevance of chromatin modifications for genotoxic stress signaling, cell-cycle checkpoint activation, and DNA repair is well established, how these modifications reach initial thresholds in order to trigger robust responses remains largely unexplored. Here, we identify...... the chromatin-associated scaffold attachment factor SAFB1 as a component of the DNA damage response and show that SAFB1 cooperates with histone acetylation to allow for efficient γH2AX spreading and genotoxic stress signaling. SAFB1 undergoes a highly dynamic exchange at damaged chromatin in a poly......(ADP-ribose)-polymerase 1- and poly(ADP-ribose)-dependent manner and is required for unperturbed cell-cycle checkpoint activation and guarding cells against replicative stress. Altogether, our data reveal that transient recruitment of an architectural chromatin component is required in order to overcome physiological...

  18. Chromatin Dynamics of the mouse β-globin locus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P.C. van de Corput (Mariëtte); E. de Boer (Ernie); T.A. Knoch (Tobias); W.A. van Cappellen (Gert); M. Lesnussa (Michael); H.J.F.M.M. Eussen (Bert)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractLately it has become more clear that (subtle) changes in 3D organization of chromatin can either trigger transcription or silence genes or gene clusters. It has also been postulated that due to changes in chromatin structure, a change in chromatin accessibility of transcription factors

  19. The many faces of plant chromatin: Meeting summary of the 4th European workshop on plant chromatin 2015, Uppsala, Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozgová, Iva; Köhler, Claudia; Gaudin, Valérie; Hennig, Lars

    2015-01-01

    In June 2015, the fourth European Workshop on Plant Chromatin took place in Uppsala, Sweden, bringing together 80 researchers studying various aspects of plant chromatin and epigenetics. The intricate relationships between plant chromatin dynamics and gene expression change, chromatin organization within the plant cell nucleus, and the impact of chromatin structure on plant development were discussed. Among the main highlights of the meeting were an ever-growing list of newly identified players in chromatin structure establishment and the development of novel tools and approaches to foster our understanding of chromatin-mediated gene regulation, taking into account the context of the plant cell nucleus and its architecture. In this report, we summarize some of the main advances and prospects of plant chromatin research presented at this meeting. PMID:26646904

  20. Chromatin remodelling complex RSC promotes base excision repair in chromatin of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaja, Wioletta; Mao, Peng; Smerdon, Michael J

    2014-04-01

    The base excision repair (BER) pathway is a conserved DNA repair system required to maintain genomic integrity and prevent mutagenesis in all eukaryotic cells. Nevertheless, how BER operates in vivo (i.e. in the context of chromatin) is poorly understood. We have investigated the role of an essential ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling (ACR) complex RSC (Remodels the Structure of Chromatin) in BER of intact yeast cells. We show that depletion of STH1, the ATPase subunit of RSC, causes enhanced sensitivity to the DNA alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and results in a substantial inhibition of BER, at the GAL1 locus and in the genome overall. Consistent with this observation, the DNA in chromatin is less accessible to micrococcal nuclease digestion in the absence of RSC. Quantitative PCR results indicate that repair deficiency in STH1 depleted cells is not due to changes in the expression of BER genes. Collectively, our data indicates the RSC complex promotes efficient BER in chromatin. These results provide, for the first time, a link between ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling and BER in living cells.

  1. Chromatin-associated degradation is defined by UBXN-3/FAF1 to safeguard DNA replication fork progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, André; Pirson, Paul A; Pilger, Domenic; Halder, Swagata; Achuthankutty, Divya; Kashkar, Hamid; Ramadan, Kristijan; Hoppe, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    The coordinated activity of DNA replication factors is a highly dynamic process that involves ubiquitin-dependent regulation. In this context, the ubiquitin-directed ATPase CDC-48/p97 recently emerged as a key regulator of chromatin-associated degradation in several of the DNA metabolic pathways that assure genome integrity. However, the spatiotemporal control of distinct CDC-48/p97 substrates in the chromatin environment remained unclear. Here, we report that progression of the DNA replication fork is coordinated by UBXN-3/FAF1. UBXN-3/FAF1 binds to the licensing factor CDT-1 and additional ubiquitylated proteins, thus promoting CDC-48/p97-dependent turnover and disassembly of DNA replication factor complexes. Consequently, inactivation of UBXN-3/FAF1 stabilizes CDT-1 and CDC-45/GINS on chromatin, causing severe defects in replication fork dynamics accompanied by pronounced replication stress and eventually resulting in genome instability. Our work identifies a critical substrate selection module of CDC-48/p97 required for chromatin-associated protein degradation in both Caenorhabditis elegans and humans, which is relevant to oncogenesis and aging. PMID:26842564

  2. The landscape of accessible chromatin in mammalian preimplantation embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jingyi; Huang, Bo; Chen, He; Yin, Qiangzong; Liu, Yang; Xiang, Yunlong; Zhang, Bingjie; Liu, Bofeng; Wang, Qiujun; Xia, Weikun; Li, Wenzhi; Li, Yuanyuan; Ma, Jing; Peng, Xu; Zheng, Hui; Ming, Jia; Zhang, Wenhao; Zhang, Jing; Tian, Geng; Xu, Feng; Chang, Zai; Na, Jie; Yang, Xuerui; Xie, Wei

    2016-06-30

    In mammals, extensive chromatin reorganization is essential for reprogramming terminally committed gametes to a totipotent state during preimplantation development. However, the global chromatin landscape and its dynamics in this period remain unexplored. Here we report a genome-wide map of accessible chromatin in mouse preimplantation embryos using an improved assay for transposase-accessible chromatin with high throughput sequencing (ATAC-seq) approach with CRISPR/Cas9-assisted mitochondrial DNA depletion. We show that despite extensive parental asymmetry in DNA methylomes, the chromatin accessibility between the parental genomes is globally comparable after major zygotic genome activation (ZGA). Accessible chromatin in early embryos is widely shaped by transposable elements and overlaps extensively with putative cis-regulatory sequences. Unexpectedly, accessible chromatin is also found near the transcription end sites of active genes. By integrating the maps of cis-regulatory elements and single-cell transcriptomes, we construct the regulatory network of early development, which helps to identify the key modulators for lineage specification. Finally, we find that the activities of cis-regulatory elements and their associated open chromatin diminished before major ZGA. Surprisingly, we observed many loci showing non-canonical, large open chromatin domains over the entire transcribed units in minor ZGA, supporting the presence of an unusually permissive chromatin state. Together, these data reveal a unique spatiotemporal chromatin configuration that accompanies early mammalian development. PMID:27309802

  3. Restricted Dynamic Programming Heuristic for Precedence Constrained Bottleneck Generalized TSP

    OpenAIRE

    Salii, Y.

    2015-01-01

    We develop a restricted dynamical programming heuristic for a complicated traveling salesman problem: a) cities are grouped into clusters, resp. Generalized TSP; b) precedence constraints are imposed on the order of visiting the clusters, resp. Precedence Constrained TSP; c) the costs of moving to the next cluster and doing the required job inside one are aggregated in a minimax manner, resp. Bottleneck TSP; d) all the costs may depend on the sequence of previously visited clusters, resp. Seq...

  4. Replicating chromatin: a tale of histones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Anja

    2009-01-01

    Chromatin serves structural and functional roles crucial for genome stability and correct gene expression. This organization must be reproduced on daughter strands during replication to maintain proper overlay of epigenetic fabric onto genetic sequence. Nucleosomes constitute the structural...... reassembly on nascent DNA strands. The aim of this review is to discuss how histones - new and old - are handled at the replication fork, highlighting new mechanistic insights and revisiting old paradigms....

  5. Keystone Symposia on Epigenomics and Chromatin Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravnskjær, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Keystone Symposia kicked off the start of 2012 with two joint meetings on Epigenomics and Chromatin Dynamics and a star-studded list of speakers. Held in Keystone, CO, January 17-22, and organized by Steven Jacobsen and Steven Henikoff and by Bradley Cairns and Geneviève Almouzni, respectively, t......, there was plenty happening in these sessions that it did not seem to matter that the ski-slope conditions were not ideal....

  6. Identification of alternative topological domains in chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Filippova, Darya; Patro, Rob; Duggal, Geet; Kingsford, Carl

    2014-01-01

    Chromosome conformation capture experiments have led to the discovery of dense, contiguous, megabase-sized topological domains that are similar across cell types and conserved across species. These domains are strongly correlated with a number of chromatin markers and have since been included in a number of analyses. However, functionally-relevant domains may exist at multiple length scales. We introduce a new and efficient algorithm that is able to capture persistent domains across various r...

  7. Multiscale Identification of Topological Domains in Chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Filippova, Darya; Patro, Rob; Duggal, Geet; Kingsford, Carl

    2013-01-01

    Recent chromosome conformation capture experiments have led to the discovery of dense, contiguous, megabase-sized topological domains that are similar across cell types and conserved across species. These domains are strongly correlated with a number of chromatin markers and have since been included in a number of analyses. However, functionally-relevant domains may exist at multiple length scales. We introduce a new and efficient algorithm that is able to capture persistent domains across va...

  8. Chromatin regulation in drug addiction and depression

    OpenAIRE

    Renthal, William; Nestler, Eric J.

    2009-01-01

    Alterations in gene expression are implicated in the pathogenesis of several neuropsychiatrie disorders, including drug addiction and depression, increasing evidence indicates that changes in gene expression in neurons, in the context of animal models of addiction and depression, are mediated in part by epigenetic mechanisms that alter chromatin structure on specific gene promoters. This review discusses recent findings from behavioral, molecular, and bioinformatic approaches that are being u...

  9. Titration and hysteresis in epigenetic chromatin silencing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epigenetic mechanisms of silencing via heritable chromatin modifications play a major role in gene regulation and cell fate specification. We consider a model of epigenetic chromatin silencing in budding yeast and study the bifurcation diagram and characterize the bistable and the monostable regimes. The main focus of this paper is to examine how the perturbations altering the activity of histone modifying enzymes affect the epigenetic states. We analyze the implications of having the total number of silencing proteins, given by the sum of proteins bound to the nucleosomes and the ones available in the ambient, to be constant. This constraint couples different regions of chromatin through the shared reservoir of ambient silencing proteins. We show that the response of the system to perturbations depends dramatically on the titration effect caused by the above constraint. In particular, for a certain range of overall abundance of silencing proteins, the hysteresis loop changes qualitatively with certain jump replaced by continuous merger of different states. In addition, we find a nonmonotonic dependence of gene expression on the rate of histone deacetylation activity of Sir2. We discuss how these qualitative predictions of our model could be compared with experimental studies of the yeast system under anti-silencing drugs. (paper)

  10. A SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodelling Protein Controls Cytokinin Production through the Regulation of Chromatin Architecture

    KAUST Repository

    Jégu, Teddy

    2015-10-12

    Chromatin architecture determines transcriptional accessibility to DNA and consequently gene expression levels in response to developmental and environmental stimuli. Recently, chromatin remodelers such as SWI/SNF complexes have been recognized as key regulators of chromatin architecture. To gain insight into the function of these complexes during root development, we have analyzed Arabidopsis knock-down lines for one sub-unit of SWI/SNF complexes: BAF60. Here, we show that BAF60 is a positive regulator of root development and cell cycle progression in the root meristem via its ability to down-regulate cytokinin production. By opposing both the deposition of active histone marks and the formation of a chromatin regulatory loop, BAF60 negatively regulates two crucial target genes for cytokinin biosynthesis (IPT3 and IPT7) and one cell cycle inhibitor (KRP7). Our results demonstrate that SWI/SNF complexes containing BAF60 are key factors governing the equilibrium between formation and dissociation of a chromatin loop controlling phytohormone production and cell cycle progression.

  11. Spectroscopic study of fast-neutron-irradiated chromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radu, L. [V. Babes National Inst., Dept. of Molecular Genetics, Bucharest (Romania)]. E-mail: serbanradu@pcnet.ro; Gazdaru, D. [Bucharest Univ., Dept. of Biophysics, Physics Faculty, Bucharest (Romania); Constantinescu, B. [H. Hulubei National Inst., Dept. of Cyclotron, Bucharest (Romania)

    2004-02-01

    The effects produced by fast neutrons (0-100 Gy) on chromatin structure were analyzed by (i) [{sup 1}H]-NMR spectroscopy, (ii) time resolved spectroscopy, and (iii) fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Two types of chromatin were tested: (i) a chromatin from a normal tissue (liver of Wistar rats) and (ii) a chromatin from a tumoral tissue (Guerin limphotrope epithelioma, a rat solid tumor). The fast-neutron action on chromatin determines greater values of the [{sup 1}H]-NMR transverse relaxation time, indicating a more injured structure. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements show that the relative contribution of the excited state lifetime of bound ethidium bromide to chromatin DNA diminishes with increasing irradiation doses. This reflects the damage that occurs in DNA structure: production of single- and double-strand breaks due to sugar and base modifications. By the FRET method, the distance between dansyl chloride and acridine orange coupled at chromatin was determined. This distance increases upon fast-neutron action. The radiosensitivity of the tumor tissue chromatin seems higher than that of the normal tissue chromatin, probably because of its higher (loose) euchromatin/(compact) heterochromatin ratio. As the values of the physical parameters analyzed are specific for a determined dose, the establishment of these parameters may constitute a criterion for the microdosimetry of chromatin radiolesions produced by fast neutrons. (author)

  12. The chromatin remodeler SPLAYED regulates specific stress signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin W Walley

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Organisms are continuously exposed to a myriad of environmental stresses. Central to an organism's survival is the ability to mount a robust transcriptional response to the imposed stress. An emerging mechanism of transcriptional control involves dynamic changes in chromatin structure. Alterations in chromatin structure are brought about by a number of different mechanisms, including chromatin modifications, which covalently modify histone proteins; incorporation of histone variants; and chromatin remodeling, which utilizes ATP hydrolysis to alter histone-DNA contacts. While considerable insight into the mechanisms of chromatin remodeling has been gained, the biological role of chromatin remodeling complexes beyond their function as regulators of cellular differentiation and development has remained poorly understood. Here, we provide genetic, biochemical, and biological evidence for the critical role of chromatin remodeling in mediating plant defense against specific biotic stresses. We found that the Arabidopsis SWI/SNF class chromatin remodeling ATPase SPLAYED (SYD is required for the expression of selected genes downstream of the jasmonate (JA and ethylene (ET signaling pathways. SYD is also directly recruited to the promoters of several of these genes. Furthermore, we show that SYD is required for resistance against the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea but not the biotrophic pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. These findings demonstrate not only that chromatin remodeling is required for selective pathogen resistance, but also that chromatin remodelers such as SYD can regulate specific pathways within biotic stress signaling networks.

  13. Depletion of the chromatin looping proteins CTCF and cohesin causes chromatin compaction: insight into chromatin folding by polymer modelling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariliis Tark-Dame

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Folding of the chromosomal fibre in interphase nuclei is an important element in the regulation of gene expression. For instance, physical contacts between promoters and enhancers are a key element in cell-type-specific transcription. We know remarkably little about the principles that control chromosome folding. Here we explore the view that intrachromosomal interactions, forming a complex pattern of loops, are a key element in chromosome folding. CTCF and cohesin are two abundant looping proteins of interphase chromosomes of higher eukaryotes. To investigate the role of looping in large-scale (supra Mb folding of human chromosomes, we knocked down the gene that codes for CTCF and the one coding for Rad21, an essential subunit of cohesin. We measured the effect on chromosome folding using systematic 3D fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH. Results show that chromatin becomes more compact after reducing the concentration of these two looping proteins. The molecular basis for this counter-intuitive behaviour is explored by polymer modelling usingy the Dynamic Loop model (Bohn M, Heermann DW (2010 Diffusion-driven looping provides a consistent framework for chromatin organization. PLoS ONE 5: e12218.. We show that compaction can be explained by selectively decreasing the number of short-range loops, leaving long-range looping unchanged. In support of this model prediction it has recently been shown by others that CTCF and cohesin indeed are responsible primarily for short-range looping. Our results suggest that the local and the overall changes in of chromosome structure are controlled by a delicate balance between short-range and long-range loops, allowing easy switching between, for instance, open and more compact chromatin states.

  14. Impact of Pdx1-associated chromatin modifiers on islet β-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaeth, J M; Walker, E M; Stein, R

    2016-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus arises from insufficient insulin secretion from pancreatic islet β-cells. In type 2 diabetes (T2D), β-cell dysfunction is associated with inactivation and/or loss of transcription factor (TF) activity, including Pdx1. Notably, this particular TF is viewed as a master regulator of pancreas development and islet β-cell formation, identity and function. TFs, like Pdx1, recruit coregulators to transduce activating and/or repressing signals to the general transcriptional machinery for controlling gene expression, including modifiers of DNA, histones and nucleosome architecture. These coregulators impart a secondary layer of control that can be exploited to modulate TF activity. In this review, we describe Pdx1-recruited coregulators that impact chromatin structure, consequently influencing normal β-cell function and likely Pdx1 activity in pathophysiological settings. PMID:27615141

  15. Prevalence of X-chromatin in Jordanian women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was conducted to evaluate the distribution of X-chromatin among Jordanian women at different age groups. Results will be compared with other studies for possible racial and environmental effects on X-chromatin distribution. Blood samples were drawn from all women subjected to this study by finger prick and stained with Wright's stain. X-chromatin positive polymorphonuclear cells were counted and corrected for percentage. Samples were taken during the late 2002 and early 2003 from healthy women attending routine checkup in health centers in Northern Jordan. The number of X-chromatin was highest in the 50 and above years age group. The number of X-chromatin was 14-18% in other age groups. These results were in accordance with other studies. It seems that racial and environmental factors are ineffective on distribution of X-chromatin in Jordanian women. These data could be used as as reference for further studies. (author)

  16. Inverstigation of chromatin folding patterns by atomic force microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGYi; OUYANGZhenqian; 等

    1999-01-01

    The chromatin folding patterns in air and liquid were studied by atomic force microscopy(AFM),A gentle water-air interface method was adopted to spread chromatin from interphase nucleus of chicken erythrocyte.The chromatin was absorbed on APS-mica surface and studied with AFM,Beads-on a-string were observed and many higher-order structrues such as superbeads with dimensions 40-60nm in diameter and 4-7nm in height were found to string together to make chromation fibers.When sample spreading and absorbing time were shortened.higher-order chromatin fibers with 60-120nm in width were observed in air as well as under water environment.These chromatin structures may reflect chromatin folding patterns in the living cells.

  17. Long Noncoding RNAs, Chromatin, and Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P. Caley

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The way in which the genome of a multicellular organism can orchestrate the differentiation of trillions of cells and many organs, all from a single fertilized egg, is the subject of intense study. Different cell types can be defined by the networks of genes they express. This differential expression is regulated at the epigenetic level by chromatin modifications, such as DNA and histone methylation, which interact with structural and enzymatic proteins, resulting in the activation or silencing of any given gene. While detailed mechanisms are emerging on the role of different chromatin modifications and how these functions are effected at the molecular level, it is still unclear how their deposition across the epigenomic landscape is regulated in different cells. A raft of recent evidence is accumulating that implicates long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs in these processes. Most genomes studied to date undergo widespread transcription, the majority of which is not translated into proteins. In this review, we will describe recent work suggesting that lncRNAs are more than transcriptional "noise", but instead play a functional role by acting as tethers and guides to bind proteins responsible for modifying chromatin and mediating their deposition at specific genomic locations. We suggest that lncRNAs are at the heart of developmental regulation, determining the epigenetic status and transcriptional network in any given cell type, and that they provide a means to integrate external differentiation cues with dynamic nuclear responses through the regulation of a metastable epigenome. Better characterization of the lncRNA-protein "interactome" may eventually lead to a new molecular toolkit, allowing researchers and clinicians to modulate the genome at the epigenetic level to treat conditions such as cancer.

  18. INACTIVATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYSTS WITH OZONE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozone inactivation rates for Cryptosporidium parvum (C. parvum) oocysts were determined with an in-vitro excystation method based on excysted sporozoite counts. Results were consistent with published animal infectivity data for the same C. parvum strain. The inactivation kinetics...

  19. Chromatin remodeling regulated by steroid and nuclear receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    Coactivators and corepressors regulate transcription by controlling interactions between sequence-specific transcription factors,the basal transcriptional machinery and the chromatin environment,This review consider the access of nuclear and steroid receptors to chromatin,their use of corepressors and coactivators to modify chromatin structure and the implications for transcriptional control.The assembly of specific nucleoprotein architectures and targeted histone modification emerge as central controlling elements for gene expression.

  20. Combinatorial epigenetic patterns as quantitative predictors of chromatin biology

    OpenAIRE

    Cieślik, Marcin; Bekiranov, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Background Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) is the most widely used method for characterizing the epigenetic states of chromatin on a genomic scale. With the recent availability of large genome-wide data sets, often comprising several epigenetic marks, novel approaches are required to explore functionally relevant interactions between histone modifications. Computational discovery of "chromatin states" defined by such combinatorial interactions enabled desc...

  1. Hydrogen peroxide mediates higher order chromatin degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, H; Konat, G W

    2003-01-01

    Although a large body of evidence supports a causative link between oxidative stress and neurodegeneration, the mechanisms are still elusive. We have recently demonstrated that hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), the major mediator of oxidative stress triggers higher order chromatin degradation (HOCD), i.e. excision of chromatin loops at the matrix attachment regions (MARs). The present study was designed to determine the specificity of H(2)O(2) in respect to HOCD induction. Rat glioma C6 cells were exposed to H(2)O(2) and other oxidants, and the fragmentation of genomic DNA was assessed by field inversion gel electrophoresis (FIGE). S1 digestion before FIGE was used to detect single strand fragmentation. The exposure of C6 cells to H(2)O(2) induced a rapid and extensive HOCD. Thus, within 30 min, total chromatin was single strandedly digested into 50 kb fragments. Evident HOCD was elicited by H(2)O(2) at concentrations as low as 5 micro M. HOCD was mostly reversible during 4-8h following the removal of H(2)O(2) from the medium indicating an efficient relegation of the chromatin fragments. No HOCD was induced by H(2)O(2) in isolated nuclei indicating that HOCD-endonuclease is activated indirectly by cytoplasmic signal pathways triggered by H(2)O(2). The exposure of cells to a synthetic peroxide, i.e. tert-butyrylhydroperoxide (tBH) also induced HOCD, but to a lesser extent than H(2)O(2). Contrary to the peroxides, the exposure of cells to equitoxic concentration of hypochlorite and spermine NONOate, a nitric oxide generator, failed to induce rapid HOCD. These results indicate that rapid HOCD is not a result of oxidative stress per se, but is rather triggered by signaling cascades initiated specifically by H(2)O(2). Furthermore, the rapid and extensive HOCD was observed in several rat and human cell lines challenged with H(2)O(2), indicating that the process is not restricted to glial cells, but rather represents a general response of cells to H(2)O(2). PMID:12421592

  2. Genome-wide Association of Yorkie with Chromatin and Chromatin-Remodeling Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyangyee Oh

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The Hippo pathway regulates growth through the transcriptional coactivator Yorkie, but how Yorkie promotes transcription remains poorly understood. We address this by characterizing Yorkie’s association with chromatin and by identifying nuclear partners that effect transcriptional activation. Coimmunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry identify GAGA factor (GAF, the Brahma complex, and the Mediator complex as Yorkie-associated nuclear protein complexes. All three are required for Yorkie’s transcriptional activation of downstream genes, and GAF and the Brahma complex subunit Moira interact directly with Yorkie. Genome-wide chromatin-binding experiments identify thousands of Yorkie sites, most of which are associated with elevated transcription, based on genome-wide analysis of messenger RNA and histone H3K4Me3 modification. Chromatin binding also supports extensive functional overlap between Yorkie and GAF. Our studies suggest a widespread role for Yorkie as a regulator of transcription and identify recruitment of the chromatin-modifying GAF protein and BRM complex as a molecular mechanism for transcriptional activation by Yorkie.

  3. Isolation of In Vivo SUMOylated Chromatin-Bound Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bawa-Khalfe, Tasneem

    2016-01-01

    SUMO posttranslational modification directs gene transcription and epigenetic programming to support normal cell function. The dynamic nature of SUMO-modification makes it difficult to identify endogenous protein substrates. Isolation of chromatin-bound SUMO targets is exceptionally challenging, as conventional immunoprecipitation assays are inefficient at concentrating this protein population. This chapter describes a protocol that effectively precipitates chromatin-associated fractions of SUMOylated heterochromatin protein 1α in cultured cells. Techniques to enrich endogenous SUMO substrates at the chromatin are also demonstrated and discussed. This approach could be adapted to evaluate chromatin-bound SUMO targets in additional in vivo systems. PMID:27631808

  4. Interaction of sulfur mustard with rat liver salt fractionated chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Mahvash; Nateghi, M; Rabbani, A

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the interaction of an alkylating agent, sulfur mustard (SM) with rat liver active (S1 and S2) and inactive (P2) chromatin was investigated employing UV/vis spectroscopy and gel electrophoreses. The results show that SM affects the chromatin structure in a dose-dependent manner. The binding of SM to fractions is different. At lower concentrations (<500 microM), SM seems to unfold the structure and at higher concentrations, it induces aggregation and condensation of chromatin possibly via forming cross-links between the chromatin components. The extent of condensation in S2 is higher when compared to the P2 fraction.

  5. Fission yeast Scm3 mediates stable assembly of Cnp1/CENP-A into centromeric chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jessica S; Hayashi, Takeshi; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro; Russell, Paul

    2009-02-13

    Mis16 and Mis18 are subunits of a protein complex required for incorporation of the histone H3 variant CenH3 (Cnp1/CENP-A) into centromeric chromatin in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and mammals. How the Mis16-Mis18 complex performs this function is unknown. Here, we report that the Mis16-Mis18 complex is required for centromere localization of Scm3(Sp), a Cnp1-binding protein related to Saccharomyces cerevisiae Scm3. Scm3(Sp) is required for centromeric localization of Cnp1, while Scm3(Sp) localizes at centromeres independently of Cnp1. Like the Mis16-Mis18 complex but unlike Cnp1, Scm3(Sp) dissociates from centromeres during mitosis. Inactivation of Scm3(Sp) or Mis18 increases centromere localization of histones H3 and H2A/H2B, which are largely absent from centromeres in wild-type cells. Whereas S. cerevisiae Scm3 is proposed to replace histone H2A/H2B in centromeric nucleosomes, the dynamic behavior of S. pombe Scm3 suggests that it acts as a Cnp1 assembly/maintenance factor that directly mediates the stable deposition of Cnp1 into centromeric chromatin. PMID:19217403

  6. Fission Yeast Scm3 Mediates Stable Assembly of Cnp1 (CENP-A) into Centromeric Chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jessica S.; Hayashi, Takeshi; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro; Russell, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Summary Mis16 and Mis18 are subunits of a protein complex required for incorporation of the histone H3 variant CenH3 (Cnp1/CENP-A) into centromeric chromatin in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and mammals. How the Mis16-Mis18 complex performs this function is unknown. Here we report that the Mis16-Mis18 complex is required for centromere localization of Scm3Sp, a Cnp1-binding protein related to Saccharomyces cerevisiae Scm3. Scm3Sp is required for centromeric localization of Cnp1, whilst Scm3Sp localizes at centromeres independently of Cnp1. Like the Mis16-Mis18 complex but unlike Cnp1, Scm3Sp dissociates from centromeres during mitosis. Inactivation of Scm3Sp or Mis18 increases centromere localization of histones H3 and H2A/H2B, which are largely absent from centromeres in wild type cells. Whereas S. cerevisiae Scm3 is proposed to replace histone H2A/H2B in centromeric nucleosomes, the dynamic behavior of S. pombe Scm3 suggests that it acts as a Cnp1 assembly/maintenance factor that directly mediates the stable deposition of Cnp1 into centromeric chromatin. PMID:19217403

  7. Effective Chemical Inactivation of Ebola Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddock, Elaine; Feldmann, Friederike

    2016-01-01

    Reliable inactivation of specimens before removal from high-level biocontainment is crucial for safe operation. To evaluate efficacy of methods of chemical inactivation, we compared in vitro and in vivo approaches using Ebola virus as a surrogate pathogen. Consequently, we have established parameters and protocols leading to reliable and effective inactivation. PMID:27070504

  8. Organization of higher-level chromatin structures (chromomere, chromonema and chromatin block) examined using visible light-induced chromatin photo-stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheval, E V; Prusov, A N; Kireev, I I; Fais, D; Polyakov, V Yu

    2002-01-01

    The method of chromatin photo-stabilization by the action of visible light in the presence of ethidium bromide was used for investigation of higher-level chromatin structures in isolated nuclei. As a model we used rat hepatocyte nuclei isolated in buffers which stabilized or destabilized nuclear matrix. Several higher-level chromatin structures were visualized: 100nm globules-chromomeres, chains of chromomeres-chromonemata, aggregates of chromomeres-blocks of condensed chromatin. All these structures were completely destroyed by 2M NaCl extraction independent of the matrix state, and DNA was extruded from the residual nuclei (nuclear matrices) into a halo. These results show that nuclear matrix proteins do not play the main role in the maintenance of higher-level chromatin structures. Preliminary irradiation led to the reduction of the halo width in the dose-dependent manner. In regions of condensed chromatin of irradiated nucleoids there were discrete complexes consisting of DNA fibers radiating from an electron-dense core and resembling the decondensed chromomeres or the rosette-like structures. As shown by the analysis of proteins bound to irradiated nuclei upon high-salt extraction, irradiation presumably stabilized the non-histone proteins. These results suggest that in interphase nuclei loop domains are folded into discrete higher-level chromatin complexes (chromomeres). These complexes are possibly maintained by putative non-histone proteins, which are extracted with high-salt buffers from non-irradiated nuclei. PMID:12127937

  9. A chromatin insulator driving three-dimensional Polycomb response element (PRE) contacts and Polycomb association with the chromatin fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comet, Itys; Schuettengruber, Bernd; Sexton, Tom;

    2011-01-01

    to insulate genes from regulatory elements or to take part in long-distance interactions. Using a high-resolution chromatin conformation capture (H3C) method, we show that the Drosophila gypsy insulator behaves as a conformational chromatin border that is able to prohibit contacts between a Polycomb response...... element (PRE) and a distal promoter. On the other hand, two spaced gypsy elements form a chromatin loop that is able to bring an upstream PRE in contact with a downstream gene to mediate its repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) profiles of the Polycomb protein and its associated H3K27me3...

  10. Impact of preceding crop on alfalfa competitiveness with weeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organic producers would like to include no-till practices in their farming systems. We are seeking to develop a continuous no-till system for organic farming, based on a complex rotation that includes a 3-year sequence of alfalfa. In this study, we evaluated impact of preceding crop on weed infest...

  11. Counselor Interventions Preceding Client Laughter in Brief Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Dana R.; Hill, Clara E.

    1992-01-01

    Examined whether 6 categories of counselor humor and 4 categories of risk interventions preceded client laughter in 236 events from 8 cases of brief psychotherapy. Found most client laughter was mild and moderate, with only eight instances of strong laughter. Humorous interventions led to more client laughter than did interventions that encouraged…

  12. Deactivation of the Parahippocampal Gyrus Preceding Auditory Hallucinations in Schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diederen, Kelly M. J.; Neggers, Sebastiaan F. W.; Daalman, Kirstin; Blom, Jan Dirk; Goekoop, Rutger; Kahn, Rene S.; Sommer, Iris E. C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Activation in a network of language-related regions has been reported during auditory verbal hallucinations. It remains unclear, however, how this activation is triggered. Identifying brain regions that show significant signal changes preceding auditory hallucinations might reveal the ori

  13. Lessons from Anaplasma phagocytophilum: Chromatin Remodeling by Bacterial Effectors

    OpenAIRE

    Rennoll-Bankert, Kristen E.; Dumler, J. Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens can alter global host gene expression via histone modifications and chromatin remodeling in order to subvert host responses, including those involved with innate immunity, allowing for bacterial survival. Shigella flexneri, Listeria monocytogenes, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Anaplasma phagocytophilum express effector proteins that modify host histones and chromatin structure. A. phagocytophilum modulates granulocyte respiratory burst in part by dampening transcription of se...

  14. Analysis of chromatin integrity and DNA damage of buffalo spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, K Gh M; El-Sokary, A A E; Abdel-Ghaffar, A E; Abou El-Roos, M E A; Ahmed, Y F

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine chromatin integrity and DNA damage by DNA electrophoresis and comet assays of buffalo fresh and frozen semen. Semen samples were collected from four buffalo bulls and evaluated after freezing for semen motility, viability, sperm abnormalities, chromatin integrity and DNA damage. A significant variation was found in semen parameters after thawing. Highly significant differences (Partificial insemination. PMID:27175169

  15. Rapid genome-scale mapping of chromatin accessibility in tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Lars; Bandle, Russell; John, Sam;

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The challenge in extracting genome-wide chromatin features from limiting clinical samples poses a significant hurdle in identification of regulatory marks that impact the physiological or pathological state. Current methods that identify nuclease accessible chromatin are reliant on la...

  16. A Broad Set of Chromatin Factors Influences Splicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allemand, Eric; Myers, Michael P.; Garcia-Bernardo, Jose; Harel-Bellan, Annick; Krainer, Adrian R.; Muchardt, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Several studies propose an influence of chromatin on pre-mRNA splicing, but it is still unclear how widespread and how direct this phenomenon is. We find here that when assembled in vivo, the U2 snRNP co-purifies with a subset of chromatin-proteins, including histones and remodeling complexes like SWI/SNF. Yet, an unbiased RNAi screen revealed that the outcome of splicing is influenced by a much larger variety of chromatin factors not all associating with the spliceosome. The availability of this broad range of chromatin factors impacting splicing further unveiled their very context specific effect, resulting in either inclusion or skipping, depending on the exon under scrutiny. Finally, a direct assessment of the impact of chromatin on splicing using an in vitro co-transcriptional splicing assay with pre-mRNAs transcribed from a nucleosomal template, demonstrated that chromatin impacts nascent pre-mRNP in their competence for splicing. Altogether, our data show that numerous chromatin factors associated or not with the spliceosome can affect the outcome of splicing, possibly as a function of the local chromatin environment that by default interferes with the efficiency of splicing. PMID:27662573

  17. Chromatin Regulators as a Guide for Cancer Treatment Choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurard-Levin, Zachary A; Wilson, Laurence O W; Pancaldi, Vera; Postel-Vinay, Sophie; Sousa, Fabricio G; Reyes, Cecile; Marangoni, Elisabetta; Gentien, David; Valencia, Alfonso; Pommier, Yves; Cottu, Paul; Almouzni, Geneviève

    2016-07-01

    The limited capacity to predict a patient's response to distinct chemotherapeutic agents is a major hurdle in cancer management. The efficiency of a large fraction of current cancer therapeutics (radio- and chemotherapies) is influenced by chromatin structure. Reciprocally, alterations in chromatin organization may affect resistance mechanisms. Here, we explore how the misexpression of chromatin regulators-factors involved in the establishment and maintenance of functional chromatin domains-can inform about the extent of docetaxel response. We exploit Affymetrix and NanoString gene expression data for a set of chromatin regulators generated from breast cancer patient-derived xenograft models and patient samples treated with docetaxel. Random Forest classification reveals specific panels of chromatin regulators, including key components of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeler, which readily distinguish docetaxel high-responders and poor-responders. Further exploration of SWI/SNF components in the comprehensive NCI-60 dataset reveals that the expression inversely correlates with docetaxel sensitivity. Finally, we show that loss of the SWI/SNF subunit BRG1 (SMARCA4) in a model cell line leads to enhanced docetaxel sensitivity. Altogether, our findings point toward chromatin regulators as biomarkers for drug response as well as therapeutic targets to sensitize patients toward docetaxel and combat drug resistance. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(7); 1768-77. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27196757

  18. Chromatin architecture and gene expression in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willenbrock, Hanni; Ussery, David

    2004-01-01

    Two recent genome-scale analyses underscore the importance of DNA topology and chromatin structure in regulating transcription in Escherichia coli.......Two recent genome-scale analyses underscore the importance of DNA topology and chromatin structure in regulating transcription in Escherichia coli....

  19. Hydrazine vapor inactivates Bacillus spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Wayne W.; Engler, Diane L.; Beaudet, Robert A.

    2016-05-01

    NASA policy restricts the total number of bacterial spores that can remain on a spacecraft traveling to any planetary body which might harbor life or have evidence of past life. Hydrazine, N2H4, is commonly used as a propellant on spacecraft. Hydrazine as a liquid is known to inactivate bacterial spores. We have now verified that hydrazine vapor also inactivates bacterial spores. After Bacillus atrophaeus ATCC 9372 spores deposited on stainless steel coupons were exposed to saturated hydrazine vapor in closed containers, the spores were recovered from the coupons, serially diluted, pour plated and the surviving bacterial colonies were counted. The exposure times required to reduce the spore population by a factor of ten, known as the D-value, were 4.70 ± 0.50 h at 25 °C and 2.85 ± 0.13 h at 35 °C. These inactivation rates are short enough to ensure that the bioburden of the surfaces and volumes would be negligible after prolonged exposure to hydrazine vapor. Thus, all the propellant tubing and internal tank surfaces exposed to hydrazine vapor do not contribute to the total spore count.

  20. HAMLET interacts with histones and chromatin in tumor cell nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düringer, Caroline; Hamiche, Ali; Gustafsson, Lotta; Kimura, Hiroshi; Svanborg, Catharina

    2003-10-24

    HAMLET is a folding variant of human alpha-lactalbumin in an active complex with oleic acid. HAMLET selectively enters tumor cells, accumulates in their nuclei and induces apoptosis-like cell death. This study examined the interactions of HAMLET with nuclear constituents and identified histones as targets. HAMLET was found to bind histone H3 strongly and to lesser extent histones H4 and H2B. The specificity of these interactions was confirmed using BIAcore technology and chromatin assembly assays. In vivo in tumor cells, HAMLET co-localized with histones and perturbed the chromatin structure; HAMLET was found associated with chromatin in an insoluble nuclear fraction resistant to salt extraction. In vitro, HAMLET bound strongly to histones and impaired their deposition on DNA. We conclude that HAMLET interacts with histones and chromatin in tumor cell nuclei and propose that this interaction locks the cells into the death pathway by irreversibly disrupting chromatin organization.

  1. Genome maintenance in the context of 4D chromatin condensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Sonia; Yang, Fan; Shen, Wen H

    2016-08-01

    The eukaryotic genome is packaged in the three-dimensional nuclear space by forming loops, domains, and compartments in a hierarchical manner. However, when duplicated genomes prepare for segregation, mitotic cells eliminate topologically associating domains and abandon the compartmentalized structure. Alongside chromatin architecture reorganization during the transition from interphase to mitosis, cells halt most DNA-templated processes such as transcription and repair. The intrinsically condensed chromatin serves as a sophisticated signaling module subjected to selective relaxation for programmed genomic activities. To understand the elaborate genome-epigenome interplay during cell cycle progression, the steady three-dimensional genome requires a time scale to form a dynamic four-dimensional and a more comprehensive portrait. In this review, we will dissect the functions of critical chromatin architectural components in constructing and maintaining an orderly packaged chromatin environment. We will also highlight the importance of the spatially and temporally conscious orchestration of chromatin remodeling to ensure high-fidelity genetic transmission. PMID:27098512

  2. The AID-induced DNA damage response in chromatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daniel, Jeremy A; Nussenzweig, André

    2013-01-01

    Chemical modifications to the DNA and histone protein components of chromatin can modulate gene expression and genome stability. Understanding the physiological impact of changes in chromatin structure remains an important question in biology. As one example, in order to generate antibody diversity...... with somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination, chromatin must be made accessible for activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID)-mediated deamination of cytosines in DNA. These lesions are recognized and removed by various DNA repair pathways but, if not handled properly, can lead to formation...... of oncogenic chromosomal translocations. In this review, we focus the discussion on how chromatin-modifying activities and -binding proteins contribute to the native chromatin environment in which AID-induced DNA damage is targeted and repaired. Outstanding questions remain regarding the direct roles...

  3. Data on the kinetics of in vitro assembled chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Völker-Albert, Moritz Carl; Pusch, Miriam Caroline; Schmidt, Andreas; Imhof, Axel

    2016-09-01

    Here, we use LC-MS/MS and SWATH-MS to describe the kinetics of in vitro assembled chromatin supported by an embryo extract prepared from preblastoderm Drosophila melanogaster embryos (DREX). This system allows easy manipulation of distinct aspects of chromatin assembly such as post-translational histone modifications, the levels of histone chaperones and the concentration of distinct DNA binding factors. In total, 480 proteins have been quantified as chromatin enriched factors and their binding kinetics have been monitored in the time course of 15 min, 1 h and 4 h of chromatin assembly. The data accompanying the manuscript on this approach, Völker-Albert et al., 2016 "A quantitative proteomic analysis of in vitro assembled chromatin" [1], has been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium (http://www.proteomexchange.org) via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier submission number PRIDE: PXD002537 and PRIDE: PXD003445. PMID:27331114

  4. On the mechanochemical machinery underlying chromatin remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusufaly, Tahir I.

    This dissertation discuss two recent efforts, via a unique combination of structural bioinformatics and density functional theory, to unravel some of the details concerning how molecular machinery within the eukaryotic cell nucleus controls chromatin architecture. The first, a study of the 5-methylation of cytosine in 5'-CG-3' : 5'-CG-3' base-pair steps, reveals that the methyl groups roughen the local elastic energy landscape of the DNA. This enhances the probability of the canonical B-DNA structure transitioning into the undertwisted A-like and overtwisted C-like forms seen in nucleosomes, or looped segments of DNA bound to histones. The second part focuses on the formation of salt bridges between arginine residues in histones and phosphate groups on the DNA backbone. The arginine residues are ob- served to apply a tunable mechanical load to the backbone, enabling precision-controlled activation of DNA deformations.

  5. Chromatin structure near transcriptionally active genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypersensitive domains are the most prominent features of transcriptionally active chromatin. In the case of the β/sup A/-globin gene, it seems likely that two or more protein factors are capable of binding to the DNA so tightly that the nucleosome is prevented from binding. We have shown that nucleosomes, once bound in the assembly process in vitro, cannot be displaced. The interaction of the 5S gene transcription factor TFIIIA with its target DNA also is blocked by histones, and it has been suggested that the activation of the gene must occur during replication, before histones are reassembled on the DNA. We suppose that a similar mechanism may govern the binding of the hypersensitivity factors. It should be noted that nucleosomes are excluded not only from the sites to which the factors bind, but also from the regions between the two domains and at either side. 12 refs., 6 figs

  6. Nascent chromatin capture proteomics determines chromatin dynamics during DNA replication and identifies unknown fork components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alabert, Constance; Bukowski-Wills, Jimi-Carlo; Lee, Sung-Po;

    2014-01-01

    such as CAF-1, DNMT1 and SUV39h1 are enriched in nascent chromatin, whereas 170 factors including histone H1, DNMT3, MBD1-3 and PRC1 show delayed association. This correlates with H4K5K12diAc removal and H3K9me1 accumulation, whereas H3K27me3 and H3K9me3 remain unchanged. Finally, we combine NCC enrichment...

  7. Escape from X inactivation varies in mouse tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel B Berletch

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available X chromosome inactivation (XCI silences most genes on one X chromosome in female mammals, but some genes escape XCI. To identify escape genes in vivo and to explore molecular mechanisms that regulate this process we analyzed the allele-specific expression and chromatin structure of X-linked genes in mouse tissues and cells with skewed XCI and distinguishable alleles based on single nucleotide polymorphisms. Using a binomial model to assess allelic expression, we demonstrate a continuum between complete silencing and expression from the inactive X (Xi. The validity of the RNA-seq approach was verified using RT-PCR with species-specific primers or Sanger sequencing. Both common escape genes and genes with significant differences in XCI status between tissues were identified. Such genes may be candidates for tissue-specific sex differences. Overall, few genes (3-7% escape XCI in any of the mouse tissues examined, suggesting stringent silencing and escape controls. In contrast, an in vitro system represented by the embryonic-kidney-derived Patski cell line showed a higher density of escape genes (21%, representing both kidney-specific escape genes and cell-line specific escape genes. Allele-specific RNA polymerase II occupancy and DNase I hypersensitivity at the promoter of genes on the Xi correlated well with levels of escape, consistent with an open chromatin structure at escape genes. Allele-specific CTCF binding on the Xi clustered at escape genes and was denser in brain compared to the Patski cell line, possibly contributing to a more compartmentalized structure of the Xi and fewer escape genes in brain compared to the cell line where larger domains of escape were observed.

  8. Three-Dimensional, Live-Cell Imaging of Chromatin Dynamics in Plant Nuclei Using Chromatin Tagging Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirakawa, Takeshi; Matsunaga, Sachihiro

    2016-01-01

    In plants, chromatin dynamics spatiotemporally change in response to various environmental stimuli. However, little is known about chromatin dynamics in the nuclei of plants. Here, we introduce a three-dimensional, live-cell imaging method that can monitor chromatin dynamics in nuclei via a chromatin tagging system that can visualize specific genomic loci in living plant cells. The chromatin tagging system is based on a bacterial operator/repressor system in which the repressor is fused to fluorescent proteins. A recent refinement of promoters for the system solved the problem of gene silencing and abnormal pairing frequencies between operators. Using this system, we can detect the spatiotemporal dynamics of two homologous loci as two fluorescent signals within a nucleus and monitor the distance between homologous loci. These live-cell imaging methods will provide new insights into genome organization, development processes, and subnuclear responses to environmental stimuli in plants. PMID:27557696

  9. Cardiac sympathetic denervation preceding motor signs in Parkinson disease

    OpenAIRE

    Goldstein, David S.; Sharabi, Yehonatan; Karp, Barbara I.; Bentho, Oladi; Saleem, Ahmed; Pacak, Karel; Eisenhofer, Graeme

    2007-01-01

    There is substantial interest in identifying biomarkers to detect early Parkinson disease (PD). Cardiac noradrenergic denervation and attenuated baroreflex-cardiovagal function occur in de novo PD, but whether these abnormalities can precede PD has been unknown. Here we report the case of a patient who had profoundly decreased left ventricular myocardial 6-[18F]fluorodopamine-derived radioactivity and low baroreflex-cardiovagal gain, 4 years before the onset of symptoms and signs of PD. The r...

  10. Explicit Precedence Constraints in Safety-Critical Java

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puffitsch, Wolfgang; Noulard, Eric; Pagetti, Claire

    2013-01-01

    Safety-critical Java (SCJ) aims at making the amenities of Java available for the development of safety-critical applications. The multi-rate synchronous language Prelude facilitates the specification of the communication and timing requirements of complex real-time systems. This paper combines...... to provide explicit support for precedence constraints. We present the considerations behind the design of this extension and discuss our experiences with a first prototype implementation based on the SCJ implementation of the Java Optimized Processor....

  11. Radiation protection: precedents, principles and practices - a regulatory viewpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation protection in its broadest sense is a multidisciplinary human function exemplifying in all meaningful respects the innate ability of dedicated persons to apply with both general and specialized expertise knowledge derived from a great many scientific and technical fields. The aim of this address is to outline from a regulatory viewpoint the precedents, principles and practices of radiation protection, a very essential human function

  12. Design of a Secure RFID Authentication Scheme Preceding Market Transactions

    OpenAIRE

    Chin-Ling Chen

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, as RFID reader equipment is ever more widely deployed in handled devices, the importance of security problems among RFID reader, tags and server have obviously gained increased attention. However, there are still many security issues preceding transactions; these issues are well worth discussing. In this paper, we propose a novel authentication scheme, conforming EPC C1G2 standards, at a low implementation cost for market application. In order to achieve mutual authentication...

  13. Endogenous lipoid pneumonia preceding diagnosis of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoon, James W; Hernandez, Michelle L; Roehrs, Phillip A; Noah, Terry L; Leigh, Margaret W; Byerley, Julie S

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is an under-reported and under-diagnosed condition, with a high percentage of cases found on autopsy or late stage disease. The etiology of PAP includes genetic, primary (anti-granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor antibodies) and secondary (oncologic, rheumatologic, infectious, chemical and immunologic) causes. Here, we present the first reported pediatric case of endogenous lipoid pneumonia and non-specific interstitial pneumonitis preceding the development of PAP. PMID:25103284

  14. Parallel machine scheduling with precedence constraints and setup times

    CERN Document Server

    Gacias, Bernat; López, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents different methods for solving parallel machine scheduling problems with precedence constraints and setup times between the jobs. Limited discrepancy search methods mixed with local search principles, dominance conditions and specific lower bounds are proposed. The proposed methods are evaluated on a set of randomly generated instances and compared with previous results from the literature and those obtained with an efficient commercial solver. We conclude that our propositions are quite competitive and our results even outperform other approaches in most cases.

  15. Maladaptation of event-related EEG responses preceding performance errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Eichele

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent EEG and fMRI evidence suggests that behavioral errors are foreshadowed by systematic changes in brain activity preceding the outcome by seconds. In order to further characterize this type of error precursor activity, we investigated single-trial event-related EEG activity from 70 participants performing a modified Eriksen flanker task, in particular focusing on the trial-by-trial dynamics of a fronto-central independent component that previously has been associated with error and feedback processing. The stimulus-locked peaks in the N2 and P3 latency range in the event-related averages showed expected compatibility and error-related modulations. In addition, a small pre-stimulus negative slow wave was present at erroneous trials. Significant error-preceding activity was found in local stimulus sequences with decreased conflict in the form of less negativity at the N2 latency (310–350 ms accumulating across five trials before error; concomitantly response times were speeding across trials. These results illustrate that error-preceding activity in event-related EEG is associated with the performance monitoring system and we conclude that the dynamics of performance monitoring contribute to the generation of error-prone states in addition to the more remote and indirect effects in ongoing activity such as posterior alpha power in EEG and default mode drifts in fMRI.

  16. Experimental Evidence for a Cochlear Source of the Precedence Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bianchi, Federica; Verhulst, Sarah; Dau, Torsten

    2013-01-01

    The precedence effect (PE) refers to the dominance of directional information carried by a direct sound (lead) over the spatial information contained in its multiple reflections (lags) in sound localization. Although the processes underlying the PE have been largely investigated, the extent to wh...... range from 1 to 4 ms, as indicated by the suppression of the lag-CEOAE, was the source of the reduction in the lag-ABRs and a possible peripheral contributor to the PE for click stimuli.......The precedence effect (PE) refers to the dominance of directional information carried by a direct sound (lead) over the spatial information contained in its multiple reflections (lags) in sound localization. Although the processes underlying the PE have been largely investigated, the extent....... The psychoacoustical experiments, comprising a fusion task, an interaural time difference detection task and a lateralization task, demonstrated a time range from 1 to 4.6–5 ms, in which the PE operated (precedence window). Click-evoked otoacoustic emissions (CEOAEs) were recorded in both ears to investigate the lead–lag...

  17. Chromatin remodeling occurs independent of transcription factor binding during 5-azacytidine reactivation of the human HPRT gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hornstra, L.K.; Litt, M.D.; Yang, T.P. [Univ. of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    A novel system of differential gene expression in mammals is established during normal female embryogenesis by X chromosome inactivation. Studies of 5-aza-2{prime}-deoxycytidine (5aCdr)-induced reactivation of genes on the inactive human X chromosome strongly implicate DNA methylation in maintaining the transcriptional repression of discrete loci on the inactive X. During the process of 5aCdr-induced reactivation of the human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene on the inactive X chromosome, changes in nuclease sensitivity of chromatin in the 5{prime} region of the HPRT gene and HPRT mRNA levels have been analyzed from 0-72 hrs. after 5aCdr exposure. Increased nuclease sensitivity is first detectable at 6 hrs. and reaches a maximum at 24 hrs. after initial exposure to 5aCdr, while the appearance of HPRT mRNA levels is first detectable by RT-PCR at 24 hrs. and reaches a maximum of 48 hrs. after 5aCdr exposure. Thus, the change in chromatin structure of the 5{prime} region as a result of 5aCdr treatment appears to occur prior to active transcription of the gene. However, it is unclear if the remodeling of chromatin requires the binding of transcription factors to the 5{prime} region, or if the binding of transcription factors is only required for transcription of the HPRT gene. We now have assayed the binding of transcription factors to the 5{prime} region of the HPRT gene on the inactive X chromosome during 5aCdr reactivation. We find that the change in chromatin structure as a result of 5aCdr treatment occurs independent of transcription factor binding, and that the binding of factors is correlated with active transcription of the gene rather than remodeling of chromatin structure. These data suggest that the differential binding of transcriptional activators (and differential expression of the HPRT gene) to the active and inactive HPRT genes is modulated by the accessibility of their binding sites due to chromatin structure.

  18. Characteristics of thymine dimer excision from xeroderma pigmentosum chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated thymine dimer excision from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) chromatin in the cell-free reconstruction system. The normal-cell extract performed specific dimer excision from native chromatin and DNA isolated from 100 J/m2-irradiated cells. Such an excision in vitro was rapid and required high concentrations of extract. The extracts of XP group A, C and G cells were unable to excise from their own native-chromatin, but capable of excising from chromatin deprived of loosely bound nonhistone proteins with 0.35 M NaCl, as were from purified DNA. Thus, group A, C and G cells are most likely to be defective in the specific XP factors facilitating the excising activity under multicomponent regulation at the chromatin level. Further, either of group A, C and G extracts successfully complemented the native chromatin of the alternative groups. Uniquely, the XP group D extract excised dimers from native chromatin in the normal fashion under the condition. These results suggest that XP group A, C, D and G cells examined may not be defective in the dimer specific endonuclease and exonuclease per se. 19 references, 3 figures, 2 tables

  19. PREDICTION OF CHROMATIN STATES USING DNA SEQUENCE PROPERTIES

    KAUST Repository

    Bahabri, Rihab R.

    2013-06-01

    Activities of DNA are to a great extent controlled epigenetically through the internal struc- ture of chromatin. This structure is dynamic and is influenced by different modifications of histone proteins. Various combinations of epigenetic modification of histones pinpoint to different functional regions of the DNA determining the so-called chromatin states. How- ever, the characterization of chromatin states by the DNA sequence properties remains largely unknown. In this study we aim to explore whether DNA sequence patterns in the human genome can characterize different chromatin states. Using DNA sequence motifs we built binary classifiers for each chromatic state to eval- uate whether a given genomic sequence is a good candidate for belonging to a particular chromatin state. Of four classification algorithms (C4.5, Naive Bayes, Random Forest, and SVM) used for this purpose, the decision tree based classifiers (C4.5 and Random Forest) yielded best results among those we evaluated. Our results suggest that in general these models lack sufficient predictive power, although for four chromatin states (insulators, het- erochromatin, and two types of copy number variation) we found that presence of certain motifs in DNA sequences does imply an increased probability that such a sequence is one of these chromatin states.

  20. Anti-chromatin antibodies in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Gerloni

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the prevalence and clinical significance of anti-chromatin antibodies (Abs in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA. Methods: IgG anti-chromatin Abs were detected by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, in sera of 94 children with JRA (10 children with systemic, 38 with polyarticular and 46 with oligoarticular disease onset. As control group, 33 age- and-sex-matched healthy children (HC were also examined. Results: Abs to chromatin were detected in 24/94 (25,5% of children suffering from JRA. Particularly, the higher prevalence of anti-chromatin Abs has been found in children with oligoarticular (30,4% and polyarticular (23,7% onset JRA. In these groups Abs titers were significantly higher compared to systemic JRA and HC (p=0.003. Anti-chromatin Abs were observed more frequently in patients with oligoarticular disease and chronic uveitis (21,7%. Furthermore, higher levels of anti-chromatin Abs has been found in all the patients treated with anti-TNFα therapy (p<0.0001. Conclusions: our results confirm previous data about the prevalence of anti-chromatin Abs in JRA. These Abs were significantly higher in the group of patients with oligoarticular onset with past or present hystory of ocular involvement and in the group with polyarticular JRA treated with biologic therapy. A long-term follow-up study could be useful to evaluate the potential utility of these autoantibodies.

  1. Fractal Characterization of Chromatin Decompaction in Live Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ji; Stypula-Cyrus, Yolanda; Blaha, Catherine S; Roy, Hemant K; Backman, Vadim

    2015-12-01

    Chromatin organization has a fundamental impact on the whole spectrum of genomic functions. Quantitative characterization of the chromatin structure, particularly at submicron length scales where chromatin fractal globules are formed, is critical to understanding this structure-function relationship. Such analysis is currently challenging due to the diffraction-limited resolution of conventional light microscopy. We herein present an optical approach termed inverse spectroscopic optical coherence tomography to characterize the mass density fractality of chromatin, and we apply the technique to observe chromatin decompaction in live cells. The technique makes it possible for the first time, to our knowledge, to sense intracellular morphology with length-scale sensitivity from ∼30 to 450 nm, thus primarily probing the higher-order chromatin structure, without resolving the actual structures. We used chromatin decompaction due to inhibition of histone deacytelases and measured the subsequent changes in the fractal dimension of the intracellular structure. The results were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and confocal fluorescence microscopy.

  2. Chromatinization of the KSHV Genome During the KSHV Life Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timsy Uppal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV belongs to the gamma herpesvirus family and is the causative agent of various lymphoproliferative diseases in humans. KSHV, like other herpesviruses, establishes life-long latent infection with the expression of a limited number of viral genes. Expression of these genes is tightly regulated by both the viral and cellular factors. Recent advancements in identifying the expression profiles of viral transcripts, using tilling arrays and next generation sequencing have identified additional coding and non-coding transcripts in the KSHV genome. Determining the functions of these transcripts will provide a better understanding of the mechanisms utilized by KSHV in altering cellular pathways involved in promoting cell growth and tumorigenesis. Replication of the viral genome is critical in maintaining the existing copies of the viral episomes during both latent and lytic phases of the viral life cycle. The replication of the viral episome is facilitated by viral components responsible for recruiting chromatin modifying enzymes and replication factors for altering the chromatin complexity and replication initiation functions, respectively. Importantly, chromatin modification of the viral genome plays a crucial role in determining whether the viral genome will persist as latent episome or undergo lytic reactivation. Additionally, chromatinization of the incoming virion DNA, which lacks chromatin structure, in the target cells during primary infection, helps in establishing latent infection. Here, we discuss the recent advancements on our understating of KSHV genome chromatinization and the consequences of chromatin modifications on viral life cycle.

  3. Chromatinization of the KSHV Genome During the KSHV Life Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uppal, Timsy [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Nevada, 1664 N Virginia Street, MS 320, Reno, NV 89557 (United States); Jha, Hem C. [Department of Microbiology and the Tumor Virology Program of the Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, 201E Johnson Pavilion, 3610 Hamilton Walk, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Verma, Subhash C. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Nevada, 1664 N Virginia Street, MS 320, Reno, NV 89557 (United States); Robertson, Erle S., E-mail: erle@mail.med.upenn.edu [Department of Microbiology and the Tumor Virology Program of the Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, 201E Johnson Pavilion, 3610 Hamilton Walk, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2015-01-14

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) belongs to the gamma herpesvirus family and is the causative agent of various lymphoproliferative diseases in humans. KSHV, like other herpesviruses, establishes life-long latent infection with the expression of a limited number of viral genes. Expression of these genes is tightly regulated by both the viral and cellular factors. Recent advancements in identifying the expression profiles of viral transcripts, using tilling arrays and next generation sequencing have identified additional coding and non-coding transcripts in the KSHV genome. Determining the functions of these transcripts will provide a better understanding of the mechanisms utilized by KSHV in altering cellular pathways involved in promoting cell growth and tumorigenesis. Replication of the viral genome is critical in maintaining the existing copies of the viral episomes during both latent and lytic phases of the viral life cycle. The replication of the viral episome is facilitated by viral components responsible for recruiting chromatin modifying enzymes and replication factors for altering the chromatin complexity and replication initiation functions, respectively. Importantly, chromatin modification of the viral genome plays a crucial role in determining whether the viral genome will persist as latent episome or undergo lytic reactivation. Additionally, chromatinization of the incoming virion DNA, which lacks chromatin structure, in the target cells during primary infection, helps in establishing latent infection. Here, we discuss the recent advancements on our understating of KSHV genome chromatinization and the consequences of chromatin modifications on viral life cycle.

  4. Chromatinization of the KSHV Genome During the KSHV Life Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) belongs to the gamma herpesvirus family and is the causative agent of various lymphoproliferative diseases in humans. KSHV, like other herpesviruses, establishes life-long latent infection with the expression of a limited number of viral genes. Expression of these genes is tightly regulated by both the viral and cellular factors. Recent advancements in identifying the expression profiles of viral transcripts, using tilling arrays and next generation sequencing have identified additional coding and non-coding transcripts in the KSHV genome. Determining the functions of these transcripts will provide a better understanding of the mechanisms utilized by KSHV in altering cellular pathways involved in promoting cell growth and tumorigenesis. Replication of the viral genome is critical in maintaining the existing copies of the viral episomes during both latent and lytic phases of the viral life cycle. The replication of the viral episome is facilitated by viral components responsible for recruiting chromatin modifying enzymes and replication factors for altering the chromatin complexity and replication initiation functions, respectively. Importantly, chromatin modification of the viral genome plays a crucial role in determining whether the viral genome will persist as latent episome or undergo lytic reactivation. Additionally, chromatinization of the incoming virion DNA, which lacks chromatin structure, in the target cells during primary infection, helps in establishing latent infection. Here, we discuss the recent advancements on our understating of KSHV genome chromatinization and the consequences of chromatin modifications on viral life cycle

  5. Tracking the mechanical dynamics of human embryonic stem cell chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinde Elizabeth

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A plastic chromatin structure has emerged as fundamental to the self-renewal and pluripotent capacity of embryonic stem (ES cells. Direct measurement of chromatin dynamics in vivo is, however, challenging as high spatiotemporal resolution is required. Here, we present a new tracking-based method which can detect high frequency chromatin movement and quantify the mechanical dynamics of chromatin in live cells. Results We use this method to study how the mechanical properties of chromatin movement in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs are modulated spatiotemporally during differentiation into cardiomyocytes (CM. Notably, we find that pluripotency is associated with a highly discrete, energy-dependent frequency of chromatin movement that we refer to as a ‘breathing’ state. We find that this ‘breathing’ state is strictly dependent on the metabolic state of the cell and is progressively silenced during differentiation. Conclusions We thus propose that the measured chromatin high frequency movements in hESCs may represent a hallmark of pluripotency and serve as a mechanism to maintain the genome in a transcriptionally accessible state. This is a result that could not have been observed without the high spatial and temporal resolution provided by this novel tracking method.

  6. Nucleosome positioning and composition modulate in silico chromatin flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauvelin, N; Lo, P; Kulaeva, O I; Nizovtseva, E V; Diaz-Montes, J; Zola, J; Parashar, M; Studitsky, V M; Olson, W K

    2015-02-18

    The dynamic organization of chromatin plays an essential role in the regulation of gene expression and in other fundamental cellular processes. The underlying physical basis of these activities lies in the sequential positioning, chemical composition, and intermolecular interactions of the nucleosomes-the familiar assemblies of ∼150 DNA base pairs and eight histone proteins-found on chromatin fibers. Here we introduce a mesoscale model of short nucleosomal arrays and a computational framework that make it possible to incorporate detailed structural features of DNA and histones in simulations of short chromatin constructs. We explore the effects of nucleosome positioning and the presence or absence of cationic N-terminal histone tails on the 'local' inter-nucleosomal interactions and the global deformations of the simulated chains. The correspondence between the predicted and observed effects of nucleosome composition and numbers on the long-range communication between the ends of designed nucleosome arrays lends credence to the model and to the molecular insights gleaned from the simulated structures. We also extract effective nucleosome-nucleosome potentials from the simulations and implement the potentials in a larger-scale computational treatment of regularly repeating chromatin fibers. Our results reveal a remarkable effect of nucleosome spacing on chromatin flexibility, with small changes in DNA linker length significantly altering the interactions of nucleosomes and the dimensions of the fiber as a whole. In addition, we find that these changes in nucleosome positioning influence the statistical properties of long chromatin constructs. That is, simulated chromatin fibers with the same number of nucleosomes exhibit polymeric behaviors ranging from Gaussian to worm-like, depending upon nucleosome spacing. These findings suggest that the physical and mechanical properties of chromatin can span a wide range of behaviors, depending on nucleosome positioning, and

  7. Interaction and conformational changes of chromatin with divalent ions.

    OpenAIRE

    Borochov, N; Ausio, J; Eisenberg, H

    1984-01-01

    We have investigated the interaction of divalent ions with chromatin towards a closer understanding of the role of metal ions in the cell nucleus. The first row transition metal ion chlorides MnCl2, CoCl2, NiCl2 and CuCl2 lead to precipitation of chicken erythrocyte chromatin at a significantly lower concentration than the alkali earth metal chlorides MgCl2, CaCl2 and BaCl2. A similar distinction can be made for the compaction of chromatin to the "30 nm" solenoid higher order structure which ...

  8. SUMO-2 Orchestrates Chromatin Modifiers in Response to DNA Damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriks, Ivo A; Treffers, Louise W; Verlaan-de Vries, Matty;

    2015-01-01

    dynamically SUMOylated interaction networks of chromatin modifiers, transcription factors, DNA repair factors, and nuclear body components. SUMOylated chromatin modifiers include JARID1B/KDM5B, JARID1C/KDM5C, p300, CBP, PARP1, SetDB1, and MBD1. Whereas SUMOylated JARID1B was ubiquitylated by the SUMO......-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF4 and degraded by the proteasome in response to DNA damage, JARID1C was SUMOylated and recruited to the chromatin to demethylate histone H3K4....

  9. Sperm chromatin structure and male fertility: biological and clinical aspects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. Erenpreiss; M. Spano; J. Erenpreisa; M. Bungum; A. Giwercman

    2006-01-01

    Aim: Sperm chromatin/DNA integrity is essential for the accurate transmission of paternal genetic information, and normal sperm chromatin structure is important for sperm fertilizing ability. The routine examination of semen, which includes sperm concentration, motility and morphology, does not identify defects in sperm chromatin structure. The origin of sperm DNA damage and a variety of methods for its assessment are described. Evaluation of sperm DNA damage appears to be a useful tool for assessing male fertility potential both in vivo and in vitro. The possible impact of sperm DNA defects on the offspring is also discussed.

  10. Fumarate hydratase inactivation in renal tumors: HIF1α, NRF2, and "cryptic targets" of transcription factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aikseng Ooi; Kyle A.Furge

    2012-01-01

    Biallelic inactivation of fumarate hydratase (FH) causes type 2 papillary renal cell carcinoma (PRCC2),uterine fibroids,and cutaneous leimyomas,a condition known as hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC).The most direct effect of FH inactivation is intracellular fumarate accumulation.A majority of studies on FH inactivation over the past decade have focused on the theory that intracellular fumarate stabilizes hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1A) through competitive inhibition of HIF prolyl hydroxylases.Recently,a competing theory that intracellular fumarate activates nuclear factor (erythroidderived 2)-like 2 (NRF2) through post-translational modification of its negative regulator.Kelch-like ECH- associated protein 1 (KEAP1) has emerged from a computational modeling study and mouse model studies.This review dissects the origin of these two governing theories and highlights the presence of chromatin-structure-regulated targets of transcription factors,which we refer to as "cryptic targets" of transcription factors.One such cryptic target is heme oxygenase Ⅰ (HMOX1),the expression of which is known to be modulated by the gene product of SWI/SNF-related,matrix-associated,actin-dependent regulator of chromatin,subfamily a,member 4 (SMARCA4,also known as BRG1).

  11. Lamin C and chromatin organization in Drosophila

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B. V. Gurudatta; L. S. Shashidhara; Veena K. Parnaik

    2010-04-01

    Drosophila lamin C (LamC) is a developmentally regulated component of the nuclear lamina. The lamC gene is situated in the fifth intron of the essential gene tout velu (ttv). We carried out genetic analysis of lamC during development. Phenotypic analyses of RNAi-mediated downregulation of lamC expression as well as targeted misexpression of lamin C suggest a role for lamC in cell survival. Of particular interest in the context of laminopathies is the caspase-dependent apoptosis induced by the overexpression of lamin C. Interestingly, misexpression of lamin C in the central nervous system, where it is not normally expressed, did not affect organization of the nuclear lamina. lamC mutant alleles suppressed position effect variegation normally displayed at near-centromeric and telomeric regions. Further, both downregulation and misexpression of lamin C affected the distribution of heterochromatin protein 1. Our results suggest that Drosophila lamC has a tissue-specific role during development and is required for chromatin organization.

  12. Control of chromatin structure by long noncoding RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhmdorfer, Gudrun; Wierzbicki, Andrzej T.

    2015-01-01

    Long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) is a pivotal factor regulating various aspects of genome activity. Genome regulation via DNA methylation and posttranslational histone modifications is a well-documented function of lncRNA in plants, fungi, and animals. Here, we summarize evidence showing that lncRNA also controls chromatin structure including nucleosome positioning and chromosome looping. We focus on data from plant experimental systems, discussed in the context of other eukaryotes. We explain the mechanisms of lncRNA-controlled chromatin remodeling and the implications of the functional interplay between noncoding transcription and several different chromatin remodelers. We propose that the unique properties of RNA make it suitable for controlling chromatin modifications and structure. PMID:26410408

  13. R-loop: an emerging regulator of chromatin dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qais Al-Hadid; Yanzhong Yang

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic structure of chromatin,which exists in two conformational states:heterochromatin and euchromatin,alters the accessibility of the DNA to regulatory factors during transcription,replication,recombination,and DNA damage repair.Chemical modifications of histones and DNA,as well as adenosine triphospahate-dependent nucleosome remodeling,have been the major focus of research on chromatin dynamics over the past two decades.However,recent studies using a DNA-RNA hybrid-specific antibody and next-generation seque,ncing approaches have revealed that the formation of R-loops,one of the most common non-canonical DNA structures,is an emerging regulator of chromatin states.This review focuses on recent insights into the interplay between R-loop formation and the epigenetic modifications of chromatin in normal and disease states.

  14. In vitro binding of nitracrine to DNA in chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmańska, D; Szmigiero, L; Gniazdowski, M

    1989-01-01

    In the presence of sulfhydryl compounds nitracrine, an anticancer drug, binds covalently to DNA. The accessibility of DNA in chromatin both to nitracrine and to 8-methoxypsoralen, which was used as a reference compound in this study, when assayed in NaCl concentrations from 0 to 2 M show similar characteristics. The initial decrease reaches a minimum at 0.15 M NaCl above which dissociation of non-histone proteins and histones at higher ionic strengths is demonstrated by an increase in accessible sites. The relative accessibility of DNA in chromatin to nitracrine is, however, lower than that found for 8-methoxypsoralen. Partial dissociation of chromatin with 0.7 M NaCl increases the accessibility of DNA in chromatin when assayed in the absence of NaCl but has no apparent influence when estimated at ionic strength close to physiological conditions. PMID:2742691

  15. Polymer Physics of the Large-Scale Structure of Chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Simona; Chiariello, Andrea Maria; Annunziatella, Carlo; Esposito, Andrea; Nicodemi, Mario

    2016-01-01

    We summarize the picture emerging from recently proposed models of polymer physics describing the general features of chromatin large scale spatial architecture, as revealed by microscopy and Hi-C experiments. PMID:27659986

  16. Probing Chromatin-modifying Enzymes with Chemical Tools

    KAUST Repository

    Fischle, Wolfgang

    2016-02-04

    Chromatin is the universal template of genetic information in all eukaryotic organisms. Chemical modifications of the DNA-packaging histone proteins and the DNA bases are crucial signaling events in directing the use and readout of eukaryotic genomes. The enzymes that install and remove these chromatin modifications as well as the proteins that bind these marks govern information that goes beyond the sequence of DNA. Therefore, these so-called epigenetic regulators are intensively studied and represent promising drug targets in modern medicine. We summarize and discuss recent advances in the field of chemical biology that have provided chromatin research with sophisticated tools for investigating the composition, activity, and target sites of chromatin modifying enzymes and reader proteins.

  17. HACking the centromere chromatin code: insights from human artificial chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Jan H; Martins, Nuno M C; Larionov, Vladimir; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Earnshaw, William C

    2012-07-01

    The centromere is a specialized chromosomal region that serves as the assembly site of the kinetochore. At the centromere, CENP-A nucleosomes form part of a chromatin landscape termed centrochromatin. This chromatin environment conveys epigenetic marks regulating kinetochore formation. Recent work sheds light on the intricate relationship between centrochromatin state, the CENP-A assembly pathway and the maintenance of centromere function. Here, we review the emerging picture of how chromatin affects mammalian kinetochore formation. We place particular emphasis on data obtained from Human Artificial Chromosome (HAC) biology and the targeted engineering of centrochromatin using synthetic HACs. We discuss implications of these findings, which indicate that a delicate balance of histone modifications and chromatin state dictates both de novo centromere formation and the maintenance of centromere identity in dividing cell populations.

  18. Insights into Chromatin Structure and Dynamics in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Rosa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The packaging of chromatin into the nucleus of a eukaryotic cell requires an extraordinary degree of compaction and physical organization. In recent years, it has been shown that this organization is dynamically orchestrated to regulate responses to exogenous stimuli as well as to guide complex cell-type-specific developmental programs. Gene expression is regulated by the compartmentalization of functional domains within the nucleus, by distinct nucleosome compositions accomplished via differential modifications on the histone tails and through the replacement of core histones by histone variants. In this review, we focus on these aspects of chromatin organization and discuss novel approaches such as live cell imaging and photobleaching as important tools likely to give significant insights into our understanding of the very dynamic nature of chromatin and chromatin regulatory processes. We highlight the contribution plant studies have made in this area showing the potential advantages of plants as models in understanding this fundamental aspect of biology.

  19. Does seminal fluid viscosity influence sperm chromatin integrity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalkrishnan, K; Padwal, V; Balaiah, D

    2000-01-01

    A retrospective study was undertaken to investigate whether viscosity alters sperm chromatin integrity. Semen samples were obtained from 269 men attending the infertility clinic. The viscosity was measured quantitatively by needle and syringe method and the viscosity ratio was calculated against distilled water. The chromatin integrity was evaluated by in vitro decondensation test using 1% SDS and 6 mM EDTA. According to the viscosity ratios the samples were divided into 2 groups: I, normal (ratio 9, n = 30) viscosity. Chromatin integrity was significantly lower in the group with higher viscosity. Significant decrease in sperm count and motility were seen in group II as compared to group I. Thus, hyperviscosity of seminal fluid alters the sperm chromatin integrity. PMID:11028927

  20. Shelterin Protects Chromosome Ends by Compacting Telomeric Chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandaria, Jigar N; Qin, Peiwu; Berk, Veysel; Chu, Steven; Yildiz, Ahmet

    2016-02-11

    Telomeres, repetitive DNA sequences at chromosome ends, are shielded against the DNA damage response (DDR) by the shelterin complex. To understand how shelterin protects telomere ends, we investigated the structural organization of telomeric chromatin in human cells using super-resolution microscopy. We found that telomeres form compact globular structures through a complex network of interactions between shelterin subunits and telomeric DNA, but not by DNA methylation, histone deacetylation, or histone trimethylation at telomeres and subtelomeric regions. Mutations that abrogate shelterin assembly or removal of individual subunits from telomeres cause up to a 10-fold increase in telomere volume. Decompacted telomeres accumulate DDR signals and become more accessible to telomere-associated proteins. Recompaction of telomeric chromatin using an orthogonal method displaces DDR signals from telomeres. These results reveal the chromatin remodeling activity of shelterin and demonstrate that shelterin-mediated compaction of telomeric chromatin provides robust protection of chromosome ends against the DDR machinery. PMID:26871633

  1. Neutron scattering studies on chromatin higher-order structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graziano, V.; Gerchman, S.E.; Schneider, D.K.; Ramakrishnan, V. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    We have been engaged in studies of the structure and condensation of chromatin into the 30nm filament using small-angle neutron scattering. We have also used deuterated histone H1 to determine its location in the chromatin 30nm filament. Our studies indicate that chromatin condenses with increasing ionic strength to a limiting structure that has a mass per unit length of 6-7 nucleosomes/11 nm. They also show that the linker histone H1/H5 is located in the interior of the chromatin filament, in a position compatible with its binding to the inner face of the nucleosome. Analysis of the mass per unit length as a function of H5 stoichiometry suggests that 5-7 contiguous nucleosomes need to have H5 bound before a stable higher order structure can exist.

  2. FACT facilitates chromatin transcription by RNA polymerases I and III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birch, Joanna L; Tan, Bertrand C-M; Panov, Kostya I;

    2009-01-01

    Efficient transcription elongation from a chromatin template requires RNA polymerases (Pols) to negotiate nucleosomes. Our biochemical analyses demonstrate that RNA Pol I can transcribe through nucleosome templates and that this requires structural rearrangement of the nucleosomal core particle....... The subunits of the histone chaperone FACT (facilitates chromatin transcription), SSRP1 and Spt16, co-purify and co-immunoprecipitate with mammalian Pol I complexes. In cells, SSRP1 is detectable at the rRNA gene repeats. Crucially, siRNA-mediated repression of FACT subunit expression in cells results...... in a significant reduction in 47S pre-rRNA levels, whereas synthesis of the first 40 nt of the rRNA is not affected, implying that FACT is important for Pol I transcription elongation through chromatin. FACT also associates with RNA Pol III complexes, is present at the chromatin of genes transcribed by Pol III...

  3. APOE polymorphisms influence longitudinal lipid trends preceding intracerebral hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuah, Chia-Ling; Raffeld, Miriam R.; Ayres, Alison M.; Gurol, M. Edip; Viswanathan, Anand; Greenberg, Steven M.; Biffi, Alessandro; Rosand, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We sought to determine whether APOE genotype influences a previously observed decline in serum total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels preceding primary intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), as a potential demonstration of nonamyloid mechanisms of APOE in ICH risk. Methods: We performed a single-center retrospective longitudinal analysis using patients with known APOE genotype drawn from an ongoing cohort study of ICH. Serum lipid measurements for TC, triglycerides (TGs), LDL, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) collected within 2 years before and after index ICH were extracted from electronic medical records. Piecewise linear mixed-effects models were used to compare APOE allele–specific effects on temporal serum lipid trends in ICH. Demographics, medical history, medications, and health maintenance data were included as fixed effects. Inter- and intraindividual variations in lipid levels were modeled as random effects. Results: A total of 124 ICH cases were analyzed. APOE ε4 carriers had greater rates of decline in serum TC and LDL within 6 months preceding ICH (TC: −7.30 mg/dL/mo, p = 0.0035; LDL: −8.44 mg/dL/mo, p = 0.0001). Conversely, serum TC and LDL levels in APOE ε2 carriers were unchanged within the same time period. APOE genotype had no associations with serum HDL or TG trends. Conclusions: APOE allele status predicts serum TC and LDL changes preceding acute ICH. Our results have implications for ongoing efforts in dissecting the role of dyslipidemia in cerebrovascular disease risk. APOE genotype–specific influence on lipid trends provides a clue for one mechanism by which APOE may influence risk of ICH. Further characterization of the metabolic roles of APOE is needed to improve the understanding of APOE biology in cerebrovascular disease risk. PMID:27433544

  4. Vitiligo disease triggers: psychological stressors preceding the onset of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, Jonathan I; Silverberg, Nanette B

    2015-05-01

    Vitiligo is the loss of skin pigmentation caused by autoimmune destruction of melanocytes. Little is known about the impact of psychological stressors preceding vitiligo onset on symptoms associated with vitiligo and the extent of disease. We performed a questionnaire-based study of 1541 adults with vitiligo to evaluate the impact of psychological stressors in this patient population. Psychological stressors should be considered as potential disease triggers in vitiligo patients, and screening of vitiligo patients for psychological stressors and associated symptoms should be included in routine assessment.

  5. USING PRECEDENTS FOR REDUCTION OF DECISION TREE BY GRAPH SEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Bessmertny

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the problem of mutual payment organization between business entities by means of clearing that is solved by search of graph paths. To reduce the decision tree complexity a method of precedents is proposed that consists in saving the intermediate solution during the moving along decision tree. An algorithm and example are presented demonstrating solution complexity coming close to a linear one. The tests carried out in civil aviation settlement system demonstrate approximately 30 percent shortage of real money transfer. The proposed algorithm is planned to be implemented also in other clearing organizations of the Russian Federation.

  6. Design of a Secure RFID Authentication Scheme Preceding Market Transactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Ling Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, as RFID reader equipment is ever more widely deployed in handled devices, the importance of security problems among RFID reader, tags and server have obviously gained increased attention. However, there are still many security issues preceding transactions; these issues are well worth discussing. In this paper, we propose a novel authentication scheme, conforming EPC C1G2 standards, at a low implementation cost for market application. In order to achieve mutual authentication, the proposed scheme integrates fingerprint biometrics, related cryptology and a hash function mechanism to ensure the security of the transmitted messages. The proposed scheme also can resist known attacks.

  7. Chromatin structure modulates DNA repair by photolyase in vivo.

    OpenAIRE

    Suter, B.; Livingstone-Zatchej, M; Thoma, F

    1997-01-01

    Yeast and many other organisms use nucleotide excision repair (NER) and photolyase in the presence of light (photoreactivation) to repair cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), a major class of DNA lesions generated by UV light. To study the role of photoreactivation at the chromatin level in vivo, we used yeast strains which contained minichromosomes (YRpTRURAP, YRpCS1) with well-characterized chromatin structures. The strains were either proficient (RAD1) or deficient (rad1 delta) in NER. In...

  8. Higher order chromatin structure: bridging physics and biology

    OpenAIRE

    Fudenberg, Geoffrey; Mirny, Leonid A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in microscopy and genomic techniques have provided new insight into spatial chromatin organization inside of the nucleus. In particular, chromosome conformation capture data has highlighted the relevance of polymer physics for high-order chromatin organization. In this context, we review basic polymer states, discuss how an appropriate polymer model can be determined from experimental data, and examine the success and limitations of various polymer models of high-order interph...

  9. Ectopically tethered CP190 induces large-scale chromatin decondensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahanger, Sajad H.; Günther, Katharina; Weth, Oliver; Bartkuhn, Marek; Bhonde, Ramesh R.; Shouche, Yogesh S.; Renkawitz, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Insulator mediated alteration in higher-order chromatin and/or nucleosome organization is an important aspect of epigenetic gene regulation. Recent studies have suggested a key role for CP190 in such processes. In this study, we analysed the effects of ectopically tethered insulator factors on chromatin structure and found that CP190 induces large-scale decondensation when targeted to a condensed lacO array in mammalian and Drosophila cells. In contrast, dCTCF alone, is unable to cause such a decondensation, however, when CP190 is present, dCTCF recruits it to the lacO array and mediates chromatin unfolding. The CP190 induced opening of chromatin may not be correlated with transcriptional activation, as binding of CP190 does not enhance luciferase activity in reporter assays. We propose that CP190 may mediate histone modification and chromatin remodelling activity to induce an open chromatin state by its direct recruitment or targeting by a DNA binding factor such as dCTCF.

  10. Minor groove binder distamycin remodels chromatin but inhibits transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parijat Majumder

    Full Text Available The condensed structure of chromatin limits access of cellular machinery towards template DNA. This in turn represses essential processes like transcription, replication, repair and recombination. The repression is alleviated by a variety of energy dependent processes, collectively known as "chromatin remodeling". In a eukaryotic cell, a fine balance between condensed and de-condensed states of chromatin helps to maintain an optimum level of gene expression. DNA binding small molecules have the potential to perturb such equilibrium. We present herein the study of an oligopeptide antibiotic distamycin, which binds to the minor groove of B-DNA. Chromatin mobility assays and circular dichroism spectroscopy have been employed to study the effect of distamycin on chromatosomes, isolated from the liver of Sprague-Dawley rats. Our results show that distamycin is capable of remodeling both chromatosomes and reconstituted nucleosomes, and the remodeling takes place in an ATP-independent manner. Binding of distamycin to the linker and nucleosomal DNA culminates in eviction of the linker histone and the formation of a population of off-centered nucleosomes. This hints at a possible corkscrew type motion of the DNA with respect to the histone octamer. Our results indicate that distamycin in spite of remodeling chromatin, inhibits transcription from both DNA and chromatin templates. Therefore, the DNA that is made accessible due to remodeling is either structurally incompetent for transcription, or bound distamycin poses a roadblock for the transcription machinery to advance.

  11. X chromosome inactivation: Activation of Silencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.H. Jonkers (Iris)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractX chromosome inactivation is a process that ensures equal expression of the X chromosomes between males, which have one X and one Y chromosome, and females, which have two X chromosomes, in mammals. Females initiate inactivation of one of their two X chromosomes early during embryogenesi

  12. ATP-Dependent Chromatin Remodeling Factors and Their Roles in Affecting Nucleosome Fiber Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Lusser

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors of the SNF2 family are key components of the cellular machineries that shape and regulate chromatin structure and function. Members of this group of proteins have broad and heterogeneous functions ranging from controlling gene activity, facilitating DNA damage repair, promoting homologous recombination to maintaining genomic stability. Several chromatin remodeling factors are critical components of nucleosome assembly processes, and recent reports have identified specific functions of distinct chromatin remodeling factors in the assembly of variant histones into chromatin. In this review we will discuss the specific roles of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors in determining nucleosome composition and, thus, chromatin fiber properties.

  13. Expectations from preceding prosody influence segmentation in online sentence processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Meredith; Salverda, Anne Pier; Dilley, Laura C; Tanenhaus, Michael K

    2011-12-01

    Previous work examining prosodic cues in online spoken-word recognition has focused primarily on local cues to word identity. However, recent studies have suggested that utterance-level prosodic patterns can also influence the interpretation of subsequent sequences of lexically ambiguous syllables (Dilley, Mattys, & Vinke, Journal of Memory and Language, 63:274-294, 2010; Dilley & McAuley, Journal of Memory and Language, 59:294-311, 2008). To test the hypothesis that these distal prosody effects are based on expectations about the organization of upcoming material, we conducted a visual-world experiment. We examined fixations to competing alternatives such as pan and panda upon hearing the target word panda in utterances in which the acoustic properties of the preceding sentence material had been manipulated. The proportions of fixations to the monosyllabic competitor were higher beginning 200 ms after target word onset when the preceding prosody supported a prosodic constituent boundary following pan-, rather than following panda. These findings support the hypothesis that expectations based on perceived prosodic patterns in the distal context influence lexical segmentation and word recognition.

  14. Arterial stiffening precedes systolic hypertension in diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbrod, Robert M; Shiang, Tina; Al Sayah, Leona; Fry, Jessica L; Bajpai, Saumendra; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A; Lob, Heinrich E; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Mitchell, Gary; Cohen, Richard A; Seta, Francesca

    2013-12-01

    Stiffening of conduit arteries is a risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity. Aortic wall stiffening increases pulsatile hemodynamic forces that are detrimental to the microcirculation in highly perfused organs, such as the heart, brain, and kidney. Arterial stiffness is associated with hypertension but presumed to be due to an adaptive response to increased hemodynamic load. In contrast, a recent clinical study found that stiffness precedes and may contribute to the development of hypertension although the mechanisms underlying hypertension are unknown. Here, we report that in a diet-induced model of obesity, arterial stiffness, measured in vivo, develops within 1 month of the initiation of the diet and precedes the development of hypertension by 5 months. Diet-induced obese mice recapitulate the metabolic syndrome and are characterized by inflammation in visceral fat and aorta. Normalization of the metabolic state by weight loss resulted in return of arterial stiffness and blood pressure to normal. Our findings support the hypothesis that arterial stiffness is a cause rather than a consequence of hypertension.

  15. Effect of preceding speech on nonspeech sound perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Joseph D.; Holt, Lori L.

    2002-05-01

    Data from Japanese quail suggest that the effect of preceding liquids (/l/ or /r/) on response to subsequent stops (/g/ or /d/) arises from general auditory processes sensitive to the spectral structure of sound [A. J. Lotto, K. R. Kluender, and L. L. Holt, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 102, 1134-1140 (1997)]. If spectral content is key, appropriate nonspeech sounds should influence perception of speech sounds and vice versa. The former effect has been demonstrated [A. J. Lotto and K. R. Kluender, Percept. Psychophys. 60, 602-619 (1998)]. The current experiment investigated the influence of speech on the perception of nonspeech sounds. Nonspeech stimuli were 80-ms chirps modeled after the F2 and F3 transitions in /ga/ and /da/. F3 onset was increased in equal steps from 1800 Hz (/ga/ analog) to 2700 Hz (/da/ analog) to create a ten-member series. During AX discrimination trials, listeners heard chirps that were three steps apart on the series. Each chirp was preceded by a synthesized /al/ or /ar/. Results showed context effects predicted from differences in spectral content between the syllables and chirps. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that spectral contrast influences context effects in speech perception. [Work supported by ONR, NOHR, and CNBC.

  16. Photodynamic Inactivation of Mammalian Viruses and Bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Costa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic inactivation (PDI has been used to inactivate microorganisms through the use of photosensitizers. The inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages by photosensitization has been applied with success since the first decades of the last century. Due to the fact that mammalian viruses are known to pose a threat to public health and that bacteriophages are frequently used as models of mammalian viruses, it is important to know and understand the mechanisms and photodynamic procedures involved in their photoinactivation. The aim of this review is to (i summarize the main approaches developed until now for the photodynamic inactivation of bacteriophages and mammalian viruses and, (ii discuss and compare the present state of the art of mammalian viruses PDI with phage photoinactivation, with special focus on the most relevant mechanisms, molecular targets and factors affecting the viral inactivation process.

  17. Photodynamic inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Liliana; Faustino, Maria Amparo F; Neves, Maria Graça P M S; Cunha, Angela; Almeida, Adelaide

    2012-07-01

    Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) has been used to inactivate microorganisms through the use of photosensitizers. The inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages by photosensitization has been applied with success since the first decades of the last century. Due to the fact that mammalian viruses are known to pose a threat to public health and that bacteriophages are frequently used as models of mammalian viruses, it is important to know and understand the mechanisms and photodynamic procedures involved in their photoinactivation. The aim of this review is to (i) summarize the main approaches developed until now for the photodynamic inactivation of bacteriophages and mammalian viruses and, (ii) discuss and compare the present state of the art of mammalian viruses PDI with phage photoinactivation, with special focus on the most relevant mechanisms, molecular targets and factors affecting the viral inactivation process.

  18. Interphase Chromosome Conformation and Chromatin-Chromatin Interactions in Human Epithelial Cells Cultured Under Different Gravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Hada, Megumi; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Microgravity has been shown to alter global gene expression patterns and protein levels both in cultured cells and animal models. It has been suggested that the packaging of chromatin fibers in the interphase nucleus is closely related to genome function, and the changes in transcriptional activity are tightly correlated with changes in chromatin folding. This study explores the changes of chromatin conformation and chromatin-chromatin interactions in the simulated microgravity environment, and investigates their correlation to the expression of genes located at different regions of the chromosome. To investigate the folding of chromatin in interphase under various culture conditions, human epithelial cells, fibroblasts, and lymphocytes were fixed in the G1 phase. Interphase chromosomes were hybridized with a multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) probe for chromosome 3 which distinguishes six regions of the chromosome as separate colors. After images were captured with a laser scanning confocal microscope, the 3-dimensional structure of interphase chromosome 3 was reconstructed at multi-mega base pair scale. In order to determine the effects of microgravity on chromosome conformation and orientation, measures such as distance between homologous pairs, relative orientation of chromosome arms about a shared midpoint, and orientation of arms within individual chromosomes were all considered as potentially impacted by simulated microgravity conditions. The studies revealed non-random folding of chromatin in interphase, and suggested an association of interphase chromatin folding with radiation-induced chromosome aberration hotspots. Interestingly, the distributions of genes with expression changes over chromosome 3 in cells cultured under microgravity environment are apparently clustered on specific loci and chromosomes. This data provides important insights into how mammalian cells respond to microgravity at molecular level.

  19. p53 inactivation upregulates p73 expression through E2F-1 mediated transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaitali Tophkhane

    Full Text Available While p73 overexpression has been associated with increased apoptosis in cancer tissues, p73 overexpressing tumors appear to be of high grade malignancy. Why this putative tumor suppressor is overexpressed in cancer cells and what the function of overexpressed p73 is in breast cancers are critical questions to be addressed. By investigating the effect of p53 inactivation on p73 expression, we found that both protein and mRNA levels of TAp73 were increased in MCF-7/p53siRNA cells, MCF-7/p53mt135 cells and HCT-116/p53-/- cells, as compared to wild type control, suggesting that p53 inactivation by various forms upregulates p73. We showed that p53 knockdown induced p73 was mainly regulated at the transcriptional level. However, although p53 has a putative binding site in the TAp73 promoter, deletion of this binding site did not affect p53 knockdown mediated activation of TAp73 promoter. Chromatin immuno-precipitation (ChIP data demonstrated that loss of p53 results in enhanced occupancy of E2F-1 in the TAp73 promoter. The responsive sequence of p53 inactivation mediated p73 upregulation was mapped to the proximal promoter region of the TAp73 gene. To test the role of E2F-1 in p53 inactivation mediated regulation of p73 transcription, we found that p53 knockdown enhanced E2F-1 dependent p73 transcription, and mutations in E2F-1 binding sites in the TAp73 promoter abrogated p53 knockdown mediated activation of TAp73 promoter. Moreover, we demonstrated that p21 is a mediator of p53-E2F crosstalk in the regulation of p73 transcription. We concluded that p53 knockdown/inactivation may upregulate TAp73 expression through E2F-1 mediated transcriptional regulation. p53 inactivation mediated upregulation of p73 suggests an intrinsic rescuing mechanism in response to p53 mutation/inactivation. These findings support further analysis of the correlation between p53 status and p73 expression and its prognostic/predictive significance in human cancers.

  20. Changes in autonomic activity preceding onset of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaka, M.; Saitoh, H.; Sasabe, N.; Atarashi, H.; Katoh, T.; Hayakawa, H.; Cohen, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    Background: The triggering role of the autonomic nervous system in the initiation of ventricular tachycardia has not been established. To investigate the relationship between changes in autonomic activity and the occurrence of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia (NSVT) we examined heart rate variability (HRV) during the 2-hour period preceding spontaneous episodes of NSVT. Twenty-four subjects were identified retrospectively as having had one episode of NSVT during 24-hour Holter ECC recording. Methods: We measured the mean interval between normal heats (meanRR), the standard deviation of the intervals between beats (SD), the percentage of counts of sequential intervals between normal beats with a change of >50 ms (%RR50), the logarithms of low- and high-frequency spectral components (lnLF, lnHF) of HRV for sequential 10-minute segments preceding NSVT. The correlation dimension (CDim) of HRV was calculated similarly for sequential 20-minute segments. We assessed the significance of the time-course change of each marker over the 120-minute period prior to NSVT onset. Results: MeanRR (P < 0.05), lnLF (P < 0.0001), lnHF (P < 0.0001), the natural logarithm of the ratio of LF to HF (ln[LF/HF]; P < 0.05), and CDim (P < 0.05) showed significant time-course changes during that period, while SD and %RR50 did not. MeanRR, lnLF, lnHF, and CDim all decreased prior to the onset of NSVT, whereas ln(LF/HF) increased. We divided the subjects into two groups: one consisting of 12 patients with coronary artery disease; and the second group of 12 patients without known coronary artery disease. Both groups showed significant changes (P < 0.05) of CDim, lnLF, and lnHF preceding the episodes of NSVT. Conclusions: Changes in the pattern of HRV prior to the onset of episodes of NSVT suggest that changes in autonomic activity may commonly play a role in the triggering of spontaneous episodes of NSVT in susceptible patients. The measured changes suggest a reduction in parasympathetic

  1. Structural Fluctuations of the Chromatin Fiber within Topologically Associating Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiana, Guido; Amitai, Assaf; Pollex, Tim; Piolot, Tristan; Holcman, David; Heard, Edith; Giorgetti, Luca

    2016-03-29

    Experiments based on chromosome conformation capture have shown that mammalian genomes are partitioned into topologically associating domains (TADs), within which the chromatin fiber preferentially interacts. TADs may provide three-dimensional scaffolds allowing genes to contact their appropriate distal regulatory DNA sequences (e.g., enhancers) and thus to be properly regulated. Understanding the cell-to-cell and temporal variability of the chromatin fiber within TADs, and what determines them, is thus of great importance to better understand transcriptional regulation. We recently described an equilibrium polymer model that can accurately predict cell-to-cell variation of chromosome conformation within single TADs, from chromosome conformation capture-based data. Here we further analyze the conformational and energetic properties of our model. We show that the chromatin fiber within TADs can easily fluctuate between several conformational states, which are hierarchically organized and are not separated by important free energy barriers, and that this is facilitated by the fact that the chromatin fiber within TADs is close to the onset of the coil-globule transition. We further show that in this dynamic state the properties of the chromatin fiber, and its contact probabilities in particular, are determined in a nontrivial manner not only by site-specific interactions between strongly interacting loci along the fiber, but also by nonlocal correlations between pairs of contacts. Finally, we use live-cell experiments to measure the dynamics of the chromatin fiber in mouse embryonic stem cells, in combination with dynamical simulations, and predict that conformational changes within one TAD are likely to occur on timescales that are much shorter than the duration of one cell cycle. This suggests that genes and their regulatory elements may come together and disassociate several times during a cell cycle. These results have important implications for transcriptional

  2. Chromatin perturbations during the DNA damage response in higher eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkenist, Christopher J; Kastan, Michael B

    2015-12-01

    The DNA damage response is a widely used term that encompasses all signaling initiated at DNA lesions and damaged replication forks as it extends to orchestrate DNA repair, cell cycle checkpoints, cell death and senescence. ATM, an apical DNA damage signaling kinase, is virtually instantaneously activated following the introduction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) complex, which has a catalytic role in DNA repair, and the KAT5 (Tip60) acetyltransferase are required for maximal ATM kinase activation in cells exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation. The sensing of DNA lesions occurs within a highly complex and heterogeneous chromatin environment. Chromatin decondensation and histone eviction at DSBs may be permissive for KAT5 binding to H3K9me3 and H3K36me3, ATM kinase acetylation and activation. Furthermore, chromatin perturbation may be a prerequisite for most DNA repair. Nucleosome disassembly during DNA repair was first reported in the 1970s by Smerdon and colleagues when nucleosome rearrangement was noted during the process of nucleotide excision repair of UV-induced DNA damage in human cells. Recently, the multi-functional protein nucleolin was identified as the relevant histone chaperone required for partial nucleosome disruption at DBSs, the recruitment of repair enzymes and for DNA repair. Notably, ATM kinase is activated by chromatin perturbations induced by a variety of treatments that do not directly cause DSBs, including treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors. Central to the mechanisms that activate ATR, the second apical DNA damage signaling kinase, outside of a stalled and collapsed replication fork in S-phase, is chromatin decondensation and histone eviction associated with DNA end resection at DSBs. Thus, a stress that is common to both ATM and ATR kinase activation is chromatin perturbations, and we argue that chromatin perturbations are both sufficient and required for induction of the DNA damage response

  3. Revisiting Precede-Proceed: A Leading Model for Ecological and Ethical Health Promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Christine M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Precede-Proceed model has provided moral and practical guidance for the fields of health education and health promotion since Lawrence Green first developed Precede in 1974 and Green and Kreuter added Proceed in 1991. Precede-Proceed today remains the most comprehensive and one of the most used approaches to promoting health.…

  4. The physics of charge separation preceding lightning strokes in thunderclouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrala, Ali

    1987-01-01

    The physics of charge separation preceding lightning strokes in thunderclouds is presented by three types of arguments: An explanation is given for the aggregation of electrical charges of like sign overcoming Coulomb repulsion by attraction due to exchange interaction. The latter is well known in quantum mechanics from the theories of the nuclear bond and the covalent bond. A classical electrostatic model of charge balls of segregated positive and negative charges in the thundercloud is presented. These charge balls can only be maintained in temporarily stable locations by a containing vortex. Because they will be of different sizes and masses, they will stabilize at different altitudes when drag forces are included with the given electrostatic force. The question of how the charges become concentrated again after lightning discharges is approached by means of the collisional Boltzmann transport equation to explain quasi-periodic recharging. It is shown that solutions cannot be separable in both position and time if they are to represent aggregation.

  5. High Body Mass Index in Adolescent Girls Precedes Psoriasis Hospitalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bryld, L.E.; Sørensen, T.I.A.; Andersen, Klaus Kaae;

    2010-01-01

    Psoriasis is associated with being overweight, but the temporal relationship is not known. This historical cohort study tested whether severe psoriasis resulting in hospitalization in adulthood was preceded by excess increase in age-adjusted body mass index, a known risk factor in childhood...... identified as having psoriasis, with at least one hospital admission. Multivariate analysis demonstrated an association between excess increase in body mass index and psoriasis in females only. Being overweight in adolescence was the main factor behind this observation. The female group showed a significant...... association between psoriasis and body mass index at ages 12 (p=0.028) and 13 years (p=0.010). This was not the case for males or for body mass index measured at ages 11 years and below....

  6. Heart rate dynamics preceding hemorrhage in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Travis J; Clark, Matthew T; Lake, Douglas E; Moorman, J Randall; Calland, J Forrest

    2015-01-01

    Occult hemorrhage in surgical/trauma intensive care unit (STICU) patients is common and may lead to circulatory collapse. Continuous electrocardiography (ECG) monitoring may allow for early identification and treatment, and could improve outcomes. We studied 4,259 consecutive admissions to the STICU at the University of Virginia Health System. We collected ECG waveform data captured by bedside monitors and calculated linear and non-linear measures of the RR interbeat intervals. We tested the hypothesis that a transfusion requirement of 3 or more PRBC transfusions in a 24 hour period is preceded by dynamical changes in these heart rate measures and performed logistic regression modeling. We identified 308 hemorrhage events. A multivariate model including heart rate, standard deviation of the RR intervals, detrended fluctuation analysis, and local dynamics density had a C-statistic of 0.62. Earlier detection of hemorrhage might improve outcomes by allowing earlier resuscitation in STICU patients. PMID:26342251

  7. The dynamics of individual nucleosomes controls the chromatin condensation pathway: direct AFM visualization of variant chromatin

    CERN Document Server

    Montel, Fabien; Castelnovo, Martin; Bednar, Jan; Dimitrov, Stefan; Angelov, Dimitar; Faivre-Moskalenko, Cendrine

    2009-01-01

    Chromatin organization and dynamics is studied in this work at scales ranging from single nucleosome to nucleosomal array by using a unique combination of biochemical assays, single molecule imaging technique and numerical modeling. We demonstrate that a subtle modification in the nucleosome structure induced by the histone variant H2A.Bbd drastically modifies the higher order organization of the nucleosomal arrays. Importantly, as directly visualized by AFM, conventional H2A nucleosomal arrays exhibit specific local organization, in contrast to H2A.Bbd arrays, which show ?beads on a string? structure. The combination of systematic image analysis and theoretical modeling allows a quantitative description relating the observed gross structural changes of the arrays to their local organization. Our results strongly suggest that higher-order organization of H1-free nucleosomal arrays is mainly determined by the fluctuation properties of individual nucleosomes. Moreover, numerical simulations suggest the existenc...

  8. CDC28 phosphorylates Cac1p and regulates the association of chromatin assembly factor I with chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Daniel C B; Kakusho, Naoko; You, Zhiying; Gharib, Marlene; Wyse, Brandon; Drury, Erin; Weinreich, Michael; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Masai, Hisao; Yankulov, Krassimir

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin Assembly Factor I (CAF-I) plays a key role in the replication-coupled assembly of nucleosomes. It is expected that its function is linked to the regulation of the cell cycle, but little detail is available. Current models suggest that CAF-I is recruited to replication forks and to chromatin via an interaction between its Cac1p subunit and the replication sliding clamp, PCNA, and that this interaction is stimulated by the kinase CDC7. Here we show that another kinase, CDC28, phosphorylates Cac1p on serines 94 and 515 in early S phase and regulates its association with chromatin, but not its association with PCNA. Mutations in the Cac1p-phosphorylation sites of CDC28 but not of CDC7 substantially reduce the in vivo phosphorylation of Cac1p. However, mutations in the putative CDC7 target sites on Cac1p reduce its stability. The association of CAF-I with chromatin is impaired in a cdc28-1 mutant and to a lesser extent in a cdc7-1 mutant. In addition, mutations in the Cac1p-phosphorylation sites by both CDC28 and CDC7 reduce gene silencing at the telomeres. We propose that this phosphorylation represents a regulatory step in the recruitment of CAF-I to chromatin in early S phase that is distinct from the association of CAF-I with PCNA. Hence, we implicate CDC28 in the regulation of chromatin reassembly during DNA replication. These findings provide novel mechanistic insights on the links between cell-cycle regulation, DNA replication and chromatin reassembly.

  9. CDC28 phosphorylates Cac1p and regulates the association of chromatin assembly factor i with chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Daniel CB; Kakusho, Naoko; You, Zhiying; Gharib, Marlene; Wyse, Brandon; Drury, Erin; Weinreich, Michael; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Masai, Hisao; Yankulov, Krassimir

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin Assembly Factor I (CAF-I) plays a key role in the replication-coupled assembly of nucleosomes. It is expected that its function is linked to the regulation of the cell cycle, but little detail is available. Current models suggest that CAF-I is recruited to replication forks and to chromatin via an interaction between its Cac1p subunit and the replication sliding clamp, PCNA, and that this interaction is stimulated by the kinase CDC7. Here we show that another kinase, CDC28, phosphorylates Cac1p on serines 94 and 515 in early S phase and regulates its association with chromatin, but not its association with PCNA. Mutations in the Cac1p-phosphorylation sites of CDC28 but not of CDC7 substantially reduce the in vivo phosphorylation of Cac1p. However, mutations in the putative CDC7 target sites on Cac1p reduce its stability. The association of CAF-I with chromatin is impaired in a cdc28–1 mutant and to a lesser extent in a cdc7–1 mutant. In addition, mutations in the Cac1p-phosphorylation sites by both CDC28 and CDC7 reduce gene silencing at the telomeres. We propose that this phosphorylation represents a regulatory step in the recruitment of CAF-I to chromatin in early S phase that is distinct from the association of CAF-I with PCNA. Hence, we implicate CDC28 in the regulation of chromatin reassembly during DNA replication. These findings provide novel mechanistic insights on the links between cell-cycle regulation, DNA replication and chromatin reassembly. PMID:25602519

  10. CDC28 phosphorylates Cac1p and regulates the association of chromatin assembly factor I with chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Daniel C B; Kakusho, Naoko; You, Zhiying; Gharib, Marlene; Wyse, Brandon; Drury, Erin; Weinreich, Michael; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Masai, Hisao; Yankulov, Krassimir

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin Assembly Factor I (CAF-I) plays a key role in the replication-coupled assembly of nucleosomes. It is expected that its function is linked to the regulation of the cell cycle, but little detail is available. Current models suggest that CAF-I is recruited to replication forks and to chromatin via an interaction between its Cac1p subunit and the replication sliding clamp, PCNA, and that this interaction is stimulated by the kinase CDC7. Here we show that another kinase, CDC28, phosphorylates Cac1p on serines 94 and 515 in early S phase and regulates its association with chromatin, but not its association with PCNA. Mutations in the Cac1p-phosphorylation sites of CDC28 but not of CDC7 substantially reduce the in vivo phosphorylation of Cac1p. However, mutations in the putative CDC7 target sites on Cac1p reduce its stability. The association of CAF-I with chromatin is impaired in a cdc28-1 mutant and to a lesser extent in a cdc7-1 mutant. In addition, mutations in the Cac1p-phosphorylation sites by both CDC28 and CDC7 reduce gene silencing at the telomeres. We propose that this phosphorylation represents a regulatory step in the recruitment of CAF-I to chromatin in early S phase that is distinct from the association of CAF-I with PCNA. Hence, we implicate CDC28 in the regulation of chromatin reassembly during DNA replication. These findings provide novel mechanistic insights on the links between cell-cycle regulation, DNA replication and chromatin reassembly. PMID:25602519

  11. Circadian rhythms and memory formation: regulation by chromatin remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahar, Saurabh; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetic changes, such as DNA methylation or histone modification, can remodel the chromatin and regulate gene expression. Remodeling of chromatin provides an efficient mechanism of transducing signals, such as light or nutrient availability, to regulate gene expression. CLOCK:BMAL1 mediated activation of clock-controlled genes (CCGs) is coupled to circadian changes in histone modification at their promoters. Several chromatin modifiers, such as the deacetylases SIRT1 and HDAC3 or methyltransferase MLL1, have been shown to be recruited to the promoters of the CCGs in a circadian manner. Interestingly, the central element of the core clock machinery, the transcription factor CLOCK, also possesses histone acetyltransferase activity. Rhythmic expression of the CCGs is abolished in the absence of these chromatin modifiers. Recent research has demonstrated that chromatin remodeling is at the cross-roads of circadian rhythms and regulation of metabolism and aging. It would be of interest to identify if similar pathways exist in the epigenetic regulation of memory formation. PMID:22470318

  12. Circadian Rhythms and Memory Formation: Regulation by Chromatin Remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh eSahar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic changes, such as DNA methylation or histone modification, can remodel the chromatin and regulate gene expression. Remodeling of chromatin provides an efficient mechanism of transducing signals, such as light or nutrient availability, to regulate gene expression. CLOCK:BMAL1 mediated activation of clock-controlled genes (CCGs is coupled to circadian changes in histone modification at their promoters. Several chromatin modifiers, such as the deacetylases SIRT1 and HDAC3 or methyltransferase MLL1, have been shown to be recruited to the promoters of the CCGs in a circadian manner. Interestingly, the central element of the core clock machinery, the transcription factor CLOCK, also possesses histone acetyltransferase activity. Rhythmic expression of the CCGs is abolished in the absence of these chromatin modifiers. Recent research has demonstrated that chromatin remodeling is at the cross-roads of circadian rhythms and regulation of metabolism and aging. It would be of interest to identify if similar pathways exist in the epigenetic regulation of memory formation.

  13. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib induces an inhibitory chromatin environment at a distal enhancer of the estrogen receptor-α gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ginny L Powers

    Full Text Available Expression of the estrogen receptor-α (ERα gene, ESR1, is a clinical biomarker used to predict therapeutic outcome of breast cancer. Hence, there is significant interest in understanding the mechanisms regulating ESR1 gene expression. Proteasome activity is increased in cancer and we previously showed that proteasome inhibition leads to loss of ESR1 gene expression in breast cancer cells. Expression of ESR1 mRNA in breast cancer cells is controlled predominantly through a proximal promoter within ∼400 base pair (bp of the transcription start site (TSS. Here, we show that loss of ESR1 gene expression induced by the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib is associated with inactivation of a distal enhancer located 150 kilobases (kb from the TSS. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays reveal several bortezomib-induced changes at the distal site including decreased occupancy of three critical transcription factors, GATA3, FOXA1, and AP2γ. Bortezomib treatment also resulted in decreased histone H3 and H4 acetylation and decreased occupancy of histone acetyltransferase, p300. These data suggest a mechanism to explain proteasome inhibitor-induced loss of ESR1 mRNA expression that highlights the importance of the chromatin environment at the -150 kb distal enhancer in regulation of basal expression of ESR1 in breast cancer cells.

  14. hSNF5/INI1 inactivation is mainly associated with homozygous deletions and mitotic recombinations in rhabdoid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau-Merck, M F; Versteege, I; Legrand, I; Couturier, J; Mairal, A; Delattre, O; Aurias, A

    1999-07-01

    The chromatin-remodeling hSNF5/INI1 gene has recently been shown to act as a tumor suppressor gene in rhabdoid tumors (RTs). In an attempt to further characterize the main chromosomal mechanisms involved in hSNF5/INI1 inactivation in RTs, we report here the molecular cytogenetic data obtained in 12 cell lines harboring hSNF5/INI1 mutations and/or deletions in relation to the molecular genetic analysis using polymorphic markers extended to both extremities of chromosome 22q. On the whole, mitotic recombination occurring in the proximal part of chromosome 22q, as demonstrated in five cases, and nondisjunction/duplication, highly suspected in two cases (processes leading respectively to partial or complete isodisomy), appear to be major mechanisms associated with hSNF5/INI1 inactivation. Such isodisomy accompanies each of the RTs exhibiting two cytogenetically normal chromosomes 22. This results in homozygosity for the mutation at the hSNF5/INI1 locus. An alternate mechanism accounting for hSNF5/INI1 inactivation observed in these tumors is homozygous deletion in the rhabdoid consensus region. This was observed in each of the four tumors carrying a chromosome 22q abnormality and, in particular, in the three tumors with chromosomal translocations. Only one case of our series illustrates the mutation/deletion classical model proposed for the double-hit inactivation of a tumor suppressor gene. PMID:10397258

  15. Deciphering Noncoding RNA and Chromatin Interactions: Multiplex Chromatin Interaction Analysis by Paired-End Tag Sequencing (mChIA-PET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Jocelyn; Fullwood, Melissa J

    2017-01-01

    Genomic DNA is dynamically associated with protein factors and folded to form chromatin fibers. The 3-dimensional (3D) configuration of the chromatin will enable the distal genetic elements to come into close proximity, allowing transcriptional regulation. Noncoding RNA can mediate the 3D structure of chromatin. Chromatin Interaction Analysis by Paired-End Tag Sequencing (ChIA-PET) is a valuable and powerful technique in molecular biology which allows the study of unbiased, genome-wide de novo chromatin interactions with paired-end tags. Here, we describe the standard version of ChIA-PET and a Multiplex ChIA-PET version. PMID:27662871

  16. Ribosome Inactivating Proteins from Rosaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenjing Shang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs are widespread among higher plants of different taxonomic orders. In this study, we report on the RIP sequences found in the genome/transcriptome of several important Rosaceae species, including many economically important edible fruits such as apple, pear, peach, apricot, and strawberry. All RIP domains from Rosaceae share high sequence similarity with conserved residues in the catalytic site and the carbohydrate binding sites. The genomes of Malus domestica and Pyrus communis contain both type 1 and type 2 RIP sequences, whereas for Prunus mume, Prunus persica, Pyrus bretschneideri, and Pyrus communis a complex set of type 1 RIP sequences was retrieved. Heterologous expression and purification of the type 1 as well as the type 2 RIP from apple allowed to characterize the biological activity of the proteins. Both RIPs from Malus domestica can inhibit protein synthesis. Furthermore, molecular modelling suggests that RIPs from Rosaceae possess three-dimensional structures that are highly similar to the model proteins and can bind to RIP substrates. Screening of the recombinant type 2 RIP from apple on a glycan array revealed that this type 2 RIP interacts with terminal sialic acid residues. Our data suggest that the RIPs from Rosaceae are biologically active proteins.

  17. Ribosome Inactivating Proteins from Rosaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Chenjing; Rougé, Pierre; Van Damme, Els J M

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are widespread among higher plants of different taxonomic orders. In this study, we report on the RIP sequences found in the genome/transcriptome of several important Rosaceae species, including many economically important edible fruits such as apple, pear, peach, apricot, and strawberry. All RIP domains from Rosaceae share high sequence similarity with conserved residues in the catalytic site and the carbohydrate binding sites. The genomes of Malus domestica and Pyrus communis contain both type 1 and type 2 RIP sequences, whereas for Prunus mume, Prunus persica, Pyrus bretschneideri, and Pyrus communis a complex set of type 1 RIP sequences was retrieved. Heterologous expression and purification of the type 1 as well as the type 2 RIP from apple allowed to characterize the biological activity of the proteins. Both RIPs from Malus domestica can inhibit protein synthesis. Furthermore, molecular modelling suggests that RIPs from Rosaceae possess three-dimensional structures that are highly similar to the model proteins and can bind to RIP substrates. Screening of the recombinant type 2 RIP from apple on a glycan array revealed that this type 2 RIP interacts with terminal sialic acid residues. Our data suggest that the RIPs from Rosaceae are biologically active proteins.

  18. Population Dynamics of Viral Inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Krista; Li, Dong; Behrens, Manja; Streletzky, Kiril; Olsson, Ulf; Evilevitch, Alex

    We have investigated the population dynamics of viral inactivation in vitrousing time-resolved cryo electron microscopy combined with light and X-ray scattering techniques. Using bacteriophage λ as a model system for pressurized double-stranded DNA viruses, we found that virions incubated with their cell receptor eject their genome in a stochastic triggering process. The triggering of DNA ejection occurs in a non synchronized manner after the receptor addition, resulting in an exponential decay of the number of genome-filled viruses with time. We have explored the characteristic time constant of this triggering process at different temperatures, salt conditions, and packaged genome lengths. Furthermore, using the temperature dependence we determined an activation energy for DNA ejections. The dependences of the time constant and activation energy on internal DNA pressure, affected by salt conditions and encapsidated genome length, suggest that the triggering process is directly dependent on the conformational state of the encapsidated DNA. The results of this work provide insight into how the in vivo kinetics of the spread of viral infection are influenced by intra- and extra cellular environmental conditions. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1252522.

  19. Spatial organization of chromatin domains and compartments in single chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Siyuan; Su, Jun-Han; Beliveau, Brian J; Bintu, Bogdan; Moffitt, Jeffrey R; Wu, Chao-ting; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-08-01

    The spatial organization of chromatin critically affects genome function. Recent chromosome-conformation-capture studies have revealed topologically associating domains (TADs) as a conserved feature of chromatin organization, but how TADs are spatially organized in individual chromosomes remains unknown. Here, we developed an imaging method for mapping the spatial positions of numerous genomic regions along individual chromosomes and traced the positions of TADs in human interphase autosomes and X chromosomes. We observed that chromosome folding deviates from the ideal fractal-globule model at large length scales and that TADs are largely organized into two compartments spatially arranged in a polarized manner in individual chromosomes. Active and inactive X chromosomes adopt different folding and compartmentalization configurations. These results suggest that the spatial organization of chromatin domains can change in response to regulation. PMID:27445307

  20. Structural plasticity of single chromatin fibers revealed by torsional manipulation

    CERN Document Server

    Bancaud, Aurelien; Barbi, Maria; Wagner, Gaudeline; Allemand, Jean-Francois; Mozziconacci, Julien; Lavelle, Christophe; Croquette, Vincent; Victor, Jean-Marc; Prunell, Ariel; Viovy, Jean-Louis

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic tweezers are used to study the mechanical response under torsion of single nucleosome arrays reconstituted on tandem repeats of 5S positioning sequences. Regular arrays are extremely resilient and can reversibly accommodate a large amount of supercoiling without much change in length. This behavior is quantitatively described by a molecular model of the chromatin 3-D architecture. In this model, we assume the existence of a dynamic equilibrium between three conformations of the nucleosome, which are determined by the crossing status of the entry/exit DNAs (positive, null or negative). Torsional strain, in displacing that equilibrium, extensively reorganizes the fiber architecture. The model explains a number of long-standing topological questions regarding DNA in chromatin, and may provide the ground to better understand the dynamic binding of most chromatin-associated proteins.

  1. H4K44 Acetylation Facilitates Chromatin Accessibility during Meiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jialei Hu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Meiotic recombination hotspots are associated with histone post-translational modifications and open chromatin. However, it remains unclear how histone modifications and chromatin structure regulate meiotic recombination. Here, we identify acetylation of histone H4 at Lys44 (H4K44ac occurring on the nucleosomal lateral surface. We show that H4K44 is acetylated at pre-meiosis and meiosis and displays genome-wide enrichment at recombination hotspots in meiosis. Acetylation at H4K44 is required for normal meiotic recombination, normal levels of double-strand breaks (DSBs during meiosis, and optimal sporulation. Non-modifiable H4K44R results in increased nucleosomal occupancy around DSB hotspots. Our results indicate that H4K44ac functions to facilitate chromatin accessibility favorable for normal DSB formation and meiotic recombination.

  2. Oxidative stress signaling to chromatin in health and disease

    KAUST Repository

    Kreuz, Sarah

    2016-06-20

    Oxidative stress has a significant impact on the development and progression of common human pathologies, including cancer, diabetes, hypertension and neurodegenerative diseases. Increasing evidence suggests that oxidative stress globally influences chromatin structure, DNA methylation, enzymatic and non-enzymatic post-translational modifications of histones and DNA-binding proteins. The effects of oxidative stress on these chromatin alterations mediate a number of cellular changes, including modulation of gene expression, cell death, cell survival and mutagenesis, which are disease-driving mechanisms in human pathologies. Targeting oxidative stress-dependent pathways is thus a promising strategy for the prevention and treatment of these diseases. We summarize recent research developments connecting oxidative stress and chromatin regulation.

  3. Human pescadillo induces large-scale chromatin unfolding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hao; FANG Yan; HUANG Cuifen; YANG Xiao; YE Qinong

    2005-01-01

    The human pescadillo gene encodes a protein with a BRCT domain. Pescadillo plays an important role in DNA synthesis, cell proliferation and transformation. Since BRCT domains have been shown to induce chromatin large-scale unfolding, we tested the role of Pescadillo in regulation of large-scale chromatin unfolding. To this end, we isolated the coding region of Pescadillo from human mammary MCF10A cells. Compared with the reported sequence, the isolated Pescadillo contains in-frame deletion from amino acid 580 to 582. Targeting the Pescadillo to an amplified, lac operator-containing chromosome region in the mammalian genome results in large-scale chromatin decondensation. This unfolding activity maps to the BRCT domain of Pescadillo. These data provide a new clue to understanding the vital role of Pescadillo.

  4. Sliding and peeling of histone during chromatin remodelling

    CERN Document Server

    Garai, Ashok; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2011-01-01

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes (CRE) are bio-molecular motors in eukaryotic cells. These are driven by a chemical fuel, namely, adenosine triphosphate (ATP). CREs actively participate in many cellular processes that require accessibility of specific stretches of DNA which are packaged as chromatin. The basic unit of chromatin is a nucleosome where 146 bp $\\sim$ 50 nm of a double stranded DNA (dsDNA) is wrapped around a spool formed by histone proteins. We investigate the mechanism of peeling of the histone spool, and its complete detachment, from the dsDNA by a CRE. Our two-state model of a CRE captures effectively two distinct chemical (or conformational) states in the mechano-chemical cycle of each ATP-dependent CRE. We calculate the mean times for histone detachment. Our predictions on the ATP-dependence of the measurable quantities can be tested by carrying out {\\it in-vitro} experiments.

  5. Absence of canonical active chromatin marks in developmentally regulated genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Romero, Marina; Corominas, Montserrat; Guigó, Roderic

    2015-01-01

    The interplay of active and repressive histone modifications is assumed to play a key role in the regulation of gene expression. In contrast to this generally accepted view, we show that transcription of genes temporally regulated during fly and worm development occurs in the absence of canonically active histone modifications. Conversely, strong chromatin marking is related to transcriptional and post-transcriptional stability, an association that we also observe in mammals. Our results support a model in which chromatin marking is associated to stable production of RNA, while unmarked chromatin would permit rapid gene activation and de-activation during development. In this case, regulation by transcription factors would play a comparatively more important regulatory role. PMID:26280901

  6. TALE proteins bind to both active and inactive chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, James N F; Kupinski, Adam P; Kirkham, Christopher M; Tuma, Roman; Boyes, Joan

    2014-02-15

    TALE (transcription activator-like effector) proteins can be tailored to bind to any DNA sequence of choice and thus are of immense utility for genome editing and the specific delivery of transcription activators. However, to perform these functions, they need to occupy their sites in chromatin. In the present study, we have systematically assessed TALE binding to chromatin substrates and find that in vitro TALEs bind to their target site on nucleosomes at the more accessible entry/exit sites, but not at the nucleosome dyad. We show further that in vivo TALEs bind to transcriptionally repressed chromatin and that transcription increases binding by only 2-fold. These data therefore imply that TALEs are likely to bind to their target in vivo even at inactive loci.

  7. Rapid genome-scale mapping of chromatin accessibility in tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The challenge in extracting genome-wide chromatin features from limiting clinical samples poses a significant hurdle in identification of regulatory marks that impact the physiological or pathological state. Current methods that identify nuclease accessible chromatin are reliant on large amounts of purified nuclei as starting material. This complicates analysis of trace clinical tissue samples that are often stored frozen. We have developed an alternative nuclease based procedure to bypass nuclear preparation to interrogate nuclease accessible regions in frozen tissue samples. Results Here we introduce a novel technique that specifically identifies Tissue Accessible Chromatin (TACh). The TACh method uses pulverized frozen tissue as starting material and employs one of the two robust endonucleases, Benzonase or Cyansase, which are fully active under a range of stringent conditions such as high levels of detergent and DTT. As a proof of principle we applied TACh to frozen mouse liver tissue. Combined with massive parallel sequencing TACh identifies accessible regions that are associated with euchromatic features and accessibility at transcriptional start sites correlates positively with levels of gene transcription. Accessible chromatin identified by TACh overlaps to a large extend with accessible chromatin identified by DNase I using nuclei purified from freshly isolated liver tissue as starting material. The similarities are most pronounced at highly accessible regions, whereas identification of less accessible regions tends to be more divergence between nucleases. Interestingly, we show that some of the differences between DNase I and Benzonase relate to their intrinsic sequence biases and accordingly accessibility of CpG islands is probed more efficiently using TACh. Conclusion The TACh methodology identifies accessible chromatin derived from frozen tissue samples. We propose that this simple, robust approach can be applied across a broad range of

  8. Rapid genome-scale mapping of chromatin accessibility in tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grøntved Lars

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The challenge in extracting genome-wide chromatin features from limiting clinical samples poses a significant hurdle in identification of regulatory marks that impact the physiological or pathological state. Current methods that identify nuclease accessible chromatin are reliant on large amounts of purified nuclei as starting material. This complicates analysis of trace clinical tissue samples that are often stored frozen. We have developed an alternative nuclease based procedure to bypass nuclear preparation to interrogate nuclease accessible regions in frozen tissue samples. Results Here we introduce a novel technique that specifically identifies Tissue Accessible Chromatin (TACh. The TACh method uses pulverized frozen tissue as starting material and employs one of the two robust endonucleases, Benzonase or Cyansase, which are fully active under a range of stringent conditions such as high levels of detergent and DTT. As a proof of principle we applied TACh to frozen mouse liver tissue. Combined with massive parallel sequencing TACh identifies accessible regions that are associated with euchromatic features and accessibility at transcriptional start sites correlates positively with levels of gene transcription. Accessible chromatin identified by TACh overlaps to a large extend with accessible chromatin identified by DNase I using nuclei purified from freshly isolated liver tissue as starting material. The similarities are most pronounced at highly accessible regions, whereas identification of less accessible regions tends to be more divergence between nucleases. Interestingly, we show that some of the differences between DNase I and Benzonase relate to their intrinsic sequence biases and accordingly accessibility of CpG islands is probed more efficiently using TACh. Conclusion The TACh methodology identifies accessible chromatin derived from frozen tissue samples. We propose that this simple, robust approach can be applied

  9. Dicer is associated with ribosomal DNA chromatin in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasse Sinkkonen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: RNA silencing is a common term for pathways utilizing small RNAs as sequence-specific guides to repress gene expression. Components of the RNA silencing machinery are involved in different aspects of chromatin function in numerous organisms. However, association of RNA silencing with chromatin in mammalian cells remains unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Immunostaining of mitotic chromosomes with antibodies visualizing either endogenous or ectopically expressed Dicer in mammalian cells revealed association of the protein with ribosomal DNA (rDNA repeats. Chromatin immunoprecipitations and bisulfite sequencing experiments indicated that Dicer is associated with transcribed regions of both active and silenced genes in rDNA arrays of interphase chromosomes. Metabolic labeling of the mouse embryonic stem (ES cells lacking Dicer did not reveal apparent defect in rRNA biogenesis though pre-rRNA synthesis in these cells was decreased, likely as a consequence of their slower growth caused by the loss of miRNAs. We analyzed in detail chromatin structure of rDNA but did not find any epigenetic changes at rDNA loci in Dicer(-/- ES cells. Instead, we found that rDNA methylation is rather low in primary tissues, contrasting with rDNA methylation patterns in transformed cell lines. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We found that Dicer, a key component of RNA silencing pathways, can be detected in association with rDNA chromatin in mammalian cells. The role of this particular localization of Dicer is not readily apparent since the enzyme is associated with rDNA genes regardless of their transcriptional activity. However, localization of Dicer to the transcribed region suggests that transcription may contribute to the Dicer deposition at rDNA chromatin. We hypothesize that Dicer functions in maintaining integrity of rDNA arrays.

  10. Single-epitope recognition imaging of native chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Hongda

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Direct visualization of chromatin has the potential to provide important insights into epigenetic processes. In particular, atomic force microscopy (AFM can visualize single nucleosomes under physiological ionic conditions. However, AFM has mostly been applied to chromatin that has been reconstituted in vitro, and its potential as a tool for the dissection of native nucleosomes has not been explored. Recently we applied AFM to native Drosophila chromatin containing the centromere-specific histone 3 (CenH3, showing that it is greatly enriched in smaller particles. Taken together with biochemical analyses of CenH3 nucleosomes, we propose that centromeric nucleosomes are hemisomes, with one turn of DNA wrapped around a particle consisting of one molecule each of centromere-specific CenH3, H4, H2A and H2B. Results Here we apply a recognition mode of AFM imaging to directly identify CenH3 within histone core particles released from native centromeric chromatin. More than 90% of these particles were found to be tetrameric in height. The specificity of recognition was confirmed by blocking with a CenH3 peptide, and the strength of the interaction was quantified by force measurements. These results imply that the particles imaged by AFM are indeed mature CenH3-containing hemisomes. Conclusion Efficient and highly specific recognition of CenH3 in histone core particles isolated from native centromeric chromatin demonstrates that tetramers are the predominant form of centromeric nucleosomes in mature tetramers. Our findings provide proof of principle that this approach can yield insights into chromatin biology using direct and rapid detection of native nucleosomes in physiological salt concentrations.

  11. Microbial Inactivation by Ultrasound Assisted Supercritical Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedito, Jose; Ortuño, Carmen; Castillo-Zamudio, Rosa Isela; Mulet, Antonio

    A method combining supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) and high power ultrasound (HPU) has been developed and tested for microbial/enzyme inactivation purposes, at different process conditions for both liquid and solid matrices. In culture media, using only SC-CO2, the inactivation rate of E. coli and S. cerevisiae increased with pressure and temperature; and the total inactivation (7-8 log-cycles) was attained after 25 and 140 min of SC-CO2 (350 bar, 36 °C) treatment, respectively. Using SC-CO2+HPU, the time for the total inactivation of both microorganisms was reduced to only 1-2 min, at any condition selected. The SC-CO2+HPU inactivation of both microorganisms was slower in juices (avg. 4.9 min) than in culture media (avg. 1.5 min). In solid samples (chicken, turkey ham and dry-cured pork cured ham) treated with SC-CO2 and SC-CO2+HPU, the inactivation rate of E. coli increased with temperature. The application of HPU to the SC-CO2 treatments accelerated the inactivation rate of E. coli and that effect was more pronounced in treatments with isotonic solution surrounding the solid food samples. The application of HPU enhanced the SC-CO2 inactivation mechanisms of microorganisms, generating a vigorous agitation that facilitated the CO2 solubilization and the mass transfer process. The cavitation generated by HPU could damage the cell walls accelerating the extraction of vital constituents and the microbial death. Thus, using the combined technique, reasonable industrial processing times and mild process conditions could be used which could result into a cost reduction and lead to the minimization in the food nutritional and organoleptic changes.

  12. Physical inactivation and stabilization of sludges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High temperature conditioning of sludge is a stabilization process that insures sterilization. Both thermal pasteurization and irradiation are inactivation processes. Viruses and parasites are inactivated at 70-800C. Total bacterial destruction requires higher temperatures and/or detention time. Radio sensitivity of pathogens and pertinent treatment parameters are examined. If sludge is to be land disposed, disinfection requires irradiation doses ranging 500 Krad; if cattle feeding is considered, the required dose is 1 Mrad

  13. Proteolytic inactivation of cytokines by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Parmely, M; Gale, A; Clabaugh, M.; Horvat, R; Zhou, W W

    1990-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa alkaline protease and elastase are thought to contribute to bacterial invasiveness, tissue damage, and immune suppression in animals and patients infected with the bacterium. This study examined the ability of the two proteases to inactivate a number of cytokines that mediate immune and inflammatory responses. Human recombinant gamma interferon (rIFN-gamma) and human recombinant tumor necrosis factor alpha were inactivated by both proteases. Murine rIFN-gamma was relati...

  14. Lithospheric Convergence Preceded Extension in the Pannonian-Carpathian System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houseman, Gregory; Stuart, Graham; Dando, Ben; Hetenyi, Gyorgy; Lorinczi, Piroska; Hegedus, Endre; Brueckl, Ewald

    2010-05-01

    The continuing collision of the Adriatic block with European continental lithosphere has its clearest expression now in the Alpine collision zone. Recent tomographic images of the upper mantle beneath the eastern Alps and western Pannonian Basin support the interpretation that in the Early Miocene the collision zone extended further east: a steeply dipping seismically fast structure stretches downward beneath the Eastern Alps reaching to the base of the transition zone, consistent with the long history of convergence in this region. This high velocity structure also extends eastward beneath the extensional Pannonian Basin. The high velocity anomaly beneath the Basin is strongly developed in transition zone depths (410 to 660 km) but the anomaly weakens upward. High velocities beneath the center of the extensional basin are unexpected because there is substantive evidence that the onset of extension in the Pannonian domain at around 17 Ma produced rapid extension of the lithosphere and replacement of the lower part of the lithosphere by hot asthenosphere. These deeper structures, however, must be explained by the long history of convergence that preceded the extension of the basin. Further evidence of a history of sustained convergence in the present Pannonian region is found in the depression of the 660 km seismic discontinuity beneath the Alps (Lombardi et al., EPSL, 2009) and also beneath the Pannonian Basin (Hetenyi et al., GRL, 2009). The 660 km discontinuity in both places is depressed by as much as 40 km, whereas the 410 km discontinuity is at approximately nominal depths. Evidently in both regions relatively dense material derived from the mid-Miocene collision sits stagnant on top of the 660 km discontinuity, where further descent is obstructed by the negative Clapeyron slope of the spinel-to-perovskite phase transition and/or the high viscosity of the lower mantle. The rapid extension of the Intra-Carpathian Basins in the Mid-Miocene (between about 17 and

  15. Cerebral potentials preceding unilateral and simultaneous bilateral finger movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristeva, R; Keller, E; Deecke, L; Kornhuber, H H

    1979-08-01

    Cerebral potentials preceding voluntary bilateral simultaneous finger movements were investigated in 19 right-handed young adult subjects, and were compared with unilateral right-sided finger m n the same experiment. With bilateral movements, the Bereitschaftspotential (BP) was not symmetrical or larger over the dominant hemisphere, but surprisingly, it was larger over the minor hemisphere. The BP averaged -3.66 microV (S.D. 1.96) over the left precentral region and -4.82 microV (S.D. 3.73) over the right precentral region in this condition. The difference was significant at 2P less than 0.01. This difference was pronounced in precentral leads but very small and almost missing in parietal leads. The pre-motion positivity (PMP) was well developed and even larger with bilateral than with unilateral (right-sides) movements. At the vertex it averaged +1.33 microV (S.D.4.16) with bilateral movements and only +0.15 microV (S.D. 1.42) with right-sided unilateral movements (2P less than 0.05). With bilateral movements the PMP could be observed in any record, but with unilateral movements it was missing at the left precentral lead, in accordance with previous publications (Deecke et al. 1969, 1976). The motor potential (MP), measured in a bipolar record from left and right precentral leads, was larger with unilateral (-1.25 microV, S.D. 1.33) than with bilateral movements (-0.36 microV, S.D. 0.92). Onset time differences of the BP preceding unilateral and bilateral movements were very small. However, there was a tendency towards earlier onset with unilateral than with bilateral movements (1031 msec, S.D. 358, as compared with 951 msec, S.D. 305). The averaged EMG revealed differences in movement onset. Muscular contraction tended to be earlier in the right than in the left m. flexor indicis in our right-handed subjects, on the average by 16 msec (S.D. 15). With unilateral right-sided movements, the left m. flexor indicis was not silent but showed an abortive mirror activity

  16. Chromatin Repressive Complexes in Stem Cells, Development, and Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugesen, Anne; Helin, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    of the polycomb repressive complexes, PRC1 and PRC2, and the HDAC1- and HDAC2-containing complexes, NuRD, Sin3, and CoREST, in stem cells, development, and cancer, as well as the ongoing efforts to develop therapies targeting these complexes in human cancer. Furthermore, we discuss the role of repressive......The chromatin environment is essential for the correct specification and preservation of cell identity through modulation and maintenance of transcription patterns. Many chromatin regulators are required for development, stem cell maintenance, and differentiation. Here, we review the roles...... complexes in modulating thresholds for gene activation and their importance for specification and maintenance of cell fate....

  17. The human chromosome. Electron microscopic observations on chromatin fiber organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelo, J G; Moore, D E

    1969-04-01

    Human lymphocytes were grown in short-term tissue culture and were arrested in metaphase with Colcemid. Their chromosomes were prepared by the Langmuir trough-critical point drying technique and were examined under the electron microscope. In addition, some chromosomes were digested with trypsin, Pronase, or DNase. The chromosomes consist entirely of tightly packed, 240 +/- 50-A chromatin fibers. Trypsin and Pronase treatments induce relaxation of fiber packing and reveal certain underlying fiber arrangements. Furthermore, trypsin treatment demonstrates that the chromatin fiber has a 25-50 A trypsin-resistant core surrounded by a trypsin-sensitive sheath. DNase digestion suggests that this core contains DNA.

  18. Chromatin versus pathogens: the function of epigenetics in plant immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo eDing

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available To defend against pathogens, plants have developed a sophisticated innate immunity that includes effector recognition, signal transduction, and rapid defense responses. Recent evidence has demonstrated that plants utilize the epigenetic control of gene expression to fine-tune their defense when challenged by pathogens. In this review, we highlight the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms of histone modifications (i.e., methylation, acetylation, and ubiquitination and chromatin remodeling that contribute to plant immunity against pathogens. Functions of key histone-modifying and chromatin remodeling enzymes are discussed.

  19. Retention of the Native Epigenome in Purified Mammalian Chromatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas H Ehrensberger

    Full Text Available A protocol is presented for the isolation of native mammalian chromatin as fibers of 25-250 nucleosomes under conditions that preserve the natural epigenetic signature. The material is composed almost exclusively of histones and DNA and conforms to the structure expected by electron microscopy. All sequences probed for were retained, indicating that the material is representative of the majority of the genome. DNA methylation marks and histone marks resembled the patterns observed in vivo. Importantly, nucleosome positions also remained largely unchanged, except on CpG islands, where nucleosomes were found to be unstable. The technical challenges of reconstituting biochemical reactions with native mammalian chromatin are discussed.

  20. Genomic and chromatin signals underlying transcription start-site selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valen, Eivind; Sandelin, Albin Gustav

    2011-01-01

    ; the field is now faced with the daunting challenge of translating these descriptive maps into quantitative and predictive models describing the underlying biology. We review here the genomic and chromatin features that underlie TSS selection and usage, focusing on the differences between the major classes....... In recent years substantial progress has been made towards this goal, spurred by the possibility of applying genome-wide, sequencing-based analysis. We now have a large collection of high-resolution datasets identifying locations of TSSs, protein-DNA interactions, and chromatin features over whole genomes...

  1. Chromatin structure and evolution in the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunlop Malcolm G

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolutionary rates are not constant across the human genome but genes in close proximity have been shown to experience similar levels of divergence and selection. The higher-order organisation of chromosomes has often been invoked to explain such phenomena but previously there has been insufficient data on chromosome structure to investigate this rigorously. Using the results of a recent genome-wide analysis of open and closed human chromatin structures we have investigated the global association between divergence, selection and chromatin structure for the first time. Results In this study we have shown that, paradoxically, synonymous site divergence (dS at non-CpG sites is highest in regions of open chromatin, primarily as a result of an increased number of transitions, while the rates of other traditional measures of mutation (intergenic, intronic and ancient repeat divergence as well as SNP density are highest in closed regions of the genome. Analysis of human-chimpanzee divergence across intron-exon boundaries indicates that although genes in relatively open chromatin generally display little selection at their synonymous sites, those in closed regions show markedly lower divergence at their fourfold degenerate sites than in neighbouring introns and intergenic regions. Exclusion of known Exonic Splice Enhancer hexamers has little affect on the divergence observed at fourfold degenerate sites across chromatin categories; however, we show that closed chromatin is enriched with certain classes of ncRNA genes whose RNA secondary structure may be particularly important. Conclusion We conclude that, overall, non-CpG mutation rates are lowest in open regions of the genome and that regions of the genome with a closed chromatin structure have the highest background mutation rate. This might reflect lower rates of DNA damage or enhanced DNA repair processes in regions of open chromatin. Our results also indicate that dS is a poor

  2. The importance of topoisomerases for chromatin regulated genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredsøe, Jacob Christian; Pedersen, Jakob Madsen; Rødgaard, Morten Terpager;

    2013-01-01

    DNA topoisomerases are enzymes, which function to relieve torsional stress in the DNA helix by introducing transient breaks into the DNA molecule. By use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and microarray technology we have previously shown that topoisomerases are required for the activation of chromatin...... topoisomerases for optimal activation, but in contrast to the PHO5 gene, topoisomerases are not required for chromatin remodeling of the GAL1/10 promoter region, indicating a different role of the enzymes. We are currently performing a detailed investigation of the GAL genes to elucidate the precise role...

  3. Promoter Methylation Precedes Chromosomal Alterations in Colorectal Cancer Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Derks

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Colorectal cancers are characterized by genetic and epigenetic alterations. This study aimed to explore the timing of promoter methylation and relationship with mutations and chromosomal alterations in colorectal carcinogenesis. Methods: In a series of 47 nonprogressed adenomas, 41 progressed adenomas (malignant polyps, 38 colorectal carcinomas and 18 paired normal tissues, we evaluated promoter methylation status of hMLH1, O6MGMT, APC, p14ARF, p16INK4A, RASSF1A, GATA-4, GATA-5, and CHFR using methylation-specific PCR. Mutation status of TP53, APC and KRAS were studied by p53 immunohistochemistry and sequencing of the APC and KRAS mutation cluster regions. Chromosomal alterations were evaluated by comparative genomic hybridization. Results: Our data demonstrate that nonprogressed adenomas, progressed adenomas and carcinomas show similar frequencies of promoter methylation for the majority of the genes. Normal tissues showed significantly lower frequencies of promoter methylation of APC, p16INK4A, GATA-4, and GATA-5 (P-values: 0.02, 0.02, 1.1×10−5 and 0.008 respectively. P53 immunopositivity and chromosomal abnormalities occur predominantly in carcinomas (P values: 1.1×10−5 and 4.1×10−10. Conclusions: Since promoter methylation was already present in nonprogressed adenomas without chromosomal alterations, we conclude that promoter methylation can be regarded as an early event preceding TP53 mutation and chromosomal abnormalities in colorectal cancer development.

  4. Activities preceding a decline in the paratuberculosis test prevalence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Toft, Nils

    A voluntary control programme on Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) was initiated in Denmark in 2006 and has since 2007 included 25-28% of the dairy herds and 35-40% of the dairy cows. The programme was complemented with activities aimed to reduce the MAP infection prevalence. A ch...... for a “continuous” flow of diagnostic test information four times annually in each herd. This information can be used for detection and management of infectious animals and for prevalence monitoring........ A challenge in evaluation of activities in a national programme it is essentially a sample size of one without a control group. Therefore, the apparent effect of activities on programme level can only be descriptive. Our objective was to describe the decline in the test-prevalence along with the activities...... preceding this decline. The cohort of herds enrolled in 2006-2007 had an average estimated within-herd test-prevalence of 10% at start. By January 2014 this had declined to 2%. The test-prevalence in the cohort of herds enrolled in 2008-2010 started at approximately 6% and by January 2014 was reduced...

  5. Axonal Dysfunction Precedes Motor Neuronal Death in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuta Iwai

    Full Text Available Wide-spread fasciculations are a characteristic feature in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, suggesting motor axonal hyperexcitability. Previous excitability studies have shown increased nodal persistent sodium conductances and decreased potassium currents in motor axons of ALS patients, both of the changes inducing hyperexcitability. Altered axonal excitability potentially contributes to motor neuron death in ALS, but the relationship of the extent of motor neuronal death and abnormal excitability has not been fully elucidated. We performed multiple nerve excitability measurements in the median nerve at the wrist of 140 ALS patients and analyzed the relationship of compound muscle action potential (CMAP amplitude (index of motor neuronal loss and excitability indices, such as strength-duration time constant, threshold electrotonus, recovery cycle and current-threshold relationships. Compared to age-matched normal controls (n = 44, ALS patients (n = 140 had longer strength-duration time constant (SDTC: a measure of nodal persistent sodium current; p 5mV. Regression analyses showed that SDTC (R = -0.22 and depolarizing threshold electrotonus (R = -0.22 increased with CMAP decline. These findings suggest that motor nerve hyperexcitability occurs in the early stage of the disease, and precedes motor neuronal loss in ALS. Modulation of altered ion channel function could be a treatment option for ALS.

  6. Axonal Dysfunction Precedes Motor Neuronal Death in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Yuta; Shibuya, Kazumoto; Misawa, Sonoko; Sekiguchi, Yukari; Watanabe, Keisuke; Amino, Hiroshi; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Wide-spread fasciculations are a characteristic feature in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), suggesting motor axonal hyperexcitability. Previous excitability studies have shown increased nodal persistent sodium conductances and decreased potassium currents in motor axons of ALS patients, both of the changes inducing hyperexcitability. Altered axonal excitability potentially contributes to motor neuron death in ALS, but the relationship of the extent of motor neuronal death and abnormal excitability has not been fully elucidated. We performed multiple nerve excitability measurements in the median nerve at the wrist of 140 ALS patients and analyzed the relationship of compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitude (index of motor neuronal loss) and excitability indices, such as strength-duration time constant, threshold electrotonus, recovery cycle and current-threshold relationships. Compared to age-matched normal controls (n = 44), ALS patients (n = 140) had longer strength-duration time constant (SDTC: a measure of nodal persistent sodium current; p CMAP (> 5mV). Regression analyses showed that SDTC (R = -0.22) and depolarizing threshold electrotonus (R = -0.22) increased with CMAP decline. These findings suggest that motor nerve hyperexcitability occurs in the early stage of the disease, and precedes motor neuronal loss in ALS. Modulation of altered ion channel function could be a treatment option for ALS. PMID:27383069

  7. CDC28 phosphorylates Cac1p and regulates the association of chromatin assembly factor i with chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffery, Daniel CB; Kakusho, Naoko; You, Zhiying; Gharib, Marlene; Wyse, Brandon; Drury, Erin; Weinreich, Michael; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Masai, Hisao; Yankulov, Krassimir

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin Assembly Factor I (CAF-I) plays a key role in the replication-coupled assembly of nucleosomes. It is expected that its function is linked to the regulation of the cell cycle, but little detail is available. Current models suggest that CAF-I is recruited to replication forks and to chromatin via an interaction between its Cac1p subunit and the replication sliding clamp, PCNA, and that this interaction is stimulated by the kinase CDC7. Here we show that another kinase, ...

  8. Mechanism-based inactivation of dopamine beta-hydroxylase by p-cresol and related alkylphenols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism-based inhibition of dopamine beta-hydroxylase by p-cresol (4-methylphenol) and other simple structural analogues of dopamine, which lack a basic side-chain nitrogen, is reported. p-Cresol binds DBH by a mechanism that is kinetically indistinguishable from normal dopamine substrate binding. Under conditions (pH 6.6) of random oxygen and phenethylamine substrate addition p-cresol adds randomly, whereas at pH 4.5 or in the presence of fumarate activator addition of p-cresol precedes oxygen binding as is observed with phenethylamine substrate. p-Cresol is shown to be a rapid (kinact = 2.0 min-1, pH 5.0) mechanism-based inactivator of DBH. This inactivation exhibits pseudo-first-order kinetics, is irreversible, is prevented by tyramine substrate or competitive inhibitor, and is dependent upon oxygen and ascorbic acid cosubstrates. Inhibition occurs with partial covalent incorporation of p-cresol into DBH. A plot of -log kinact vs. pH shows maximal inactivation occurs at pH 5.0 with dependence upon enzymatic groups with apparent pK values of 4.51 +/- 0.06 and 5.12 +/- 0.06. p-Cresol and related alkylphenols, unlike other mechanism-based inhibitors of DBH, lack a latent electrophile. These inhibitors are postulated to covalently modify DBH by a direct insertion of an aberrant substrate-derived benzylic radical into an active site residue

  9. The chromatin remodelers RSC and ISW1 display functional and chromatin-based promoter antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnell, Timothy J; Schlichter, Alisha; Wilson, Boris G; Cairns, Bradley R

    2015-01-01

    ISWI family chromatin remodelers typically organize nucleosome arrays, while SWI/SNF family remodelers (RSC) typically disorganize and eject nucleosomes, implying an antagonism that is largely unexplored in vivo. Here, we describe two independent genetic screens for rsc suppressors that yielded mutations in the promoter-focused ISW1a complex or mutations in the 'basic patch' of histone H4 (an epitope that regulates ISWI activity), strongly supporting RSC-ISW1a antagonism in vivo. RSC and ISW1a largely co-localize, and genomic nucleosome studies using rsc isw1 mutant combinations revealed opposing functions: promoters classified with a nucleosome-deficient region (NDR) gain nucleosome occupancy in rsc mutants, but this gain is attenuated in rsc isw1 double mutants. Furthermore, promoters lacking NDRs have the highest occupancy of both remodelers, consistent with regulation by nucleosome occupancy, and decreased transcription in rsc mutants. Taken together, we provide the first genetic and genomic evidence for RSC-ISW1a antagonism and reveal different mechanisms at two different promoter architectures.

  10. ATP independent and ATP dependent chromatin remodeling in wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unraveling the biochemistry of chromatin dynamics during DNA replication, repair, recombination as well as transcription is the current challenge in biology. The nucleosomes containing histone octamer are the crucial elements responsible for winding and unwinding eukaryotic DNA. During DNA centric events, these nucleosomes translocate along the DNA with concomitant covalent modifications of histones. We explored these mechanisms in wheat seedlings after irradiation with survivable dose of 60Co-γ radiations. The histones isolated from irradiated seedlings showed that global acetylation of H3 decreased and H4 increased in dose depend manner till 100 grays. Time course of individual modifications showed that for H3K4 and H3K9 acetylation decreased, whereas H3S10, phosphorylation increased. There were fluctuations in acetylation of H4K5, H4K12 and H4K16, whereas H4K8 showed hyperacetylation. We found ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling activity as trans-transfer of the nucleosomes from wheat native donor chromatin on a labeled nucleosome positioning sequence and cis-transfer of the mononucleosomes in vitro. However, there was no significant change in this activity in extracts obtained from irradiated wheat seedlings. This is the first report on, demonstration of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling activity and site specific H3 and H4 modifications in response to exposure to ionizing radiation in case of plants. (author)

  11. Chromatin Structure in Cell Differentiation, Aging and Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Kheradmand Kia (Sima)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractChromatin is the structure that the eukaryotic genome is packaged into, allowing over a metre of DNA to fit into the small volume of the nucleus. It is composed of DNA and proteins, most of which are histones. This DNA-protein complex is the template for a number of essential cell proces

  12. Chromatin remodelers in the DNA double strand break response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeenk, Godelieve

    2012-01-01

    During my PhD project, I studied the role of several chromatin remodelers in the DNA double strand break (DSB) response. We discovered that both CHD4 and SMARCA5 are required for ubiquitin signaling through the E3 ubiquitin ligases RNF8 and RNF168, which is a central signaling event in the response

  13. Generation of bivalent chromatin domains during cell fate decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Gobbi Marco

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In self-renewing, pluripotent cells, bivalent chromatin modification is thought to silence (H3K27me3 lineage control genes while 'poising' (H3K4me3 them for subsequent activation during differentiation, implying an important role for epigenetic modification in directing cell fate decisions. However, rather than representing an equivalently balanced epigenetic mark, the patterns and levels of histone modifications at bivalent genes can vary widely and the criteria for identifying this chromatin signature are poorly defined. Results Here, we initially show how chromatin status alters during lineage commitment and differentiation at a single well characterised bivalent locus. In addition we have determined how chromatin modifications at this locus change with gene expression in both ensemble and single cell analyses. We also show, on a global scale, how mRNA expression may be reflected in the ratio of H3K4me3/H3K27me3. Conclusions While truly 'poised' bivalently modified genes may exist, the original hypothesis that all bivalent genes are epigenetically premarked for subsequent expression might be oversimplistic. In fact, from the data presented in the present work, it is equally possible that many genes that appear to be bivalent in pluripotent and multipotent cells may simply be stochastically expressed at low levels in the process of multilineage priming. Although both situations could be considered to be forms of 'poising', the underlying mechanisms and the associated implications are clearly different.

  14. Regulation of chromatin structure by poly(ADP-ribosylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha eBeneke

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of DNA with proteins in the context of chromatin has to be tightly regulated to achieve so different tasks as packaging, transcription, replication and repair. The very rapid and transient post-translational modification of proteins by poly(ADP-ribose has been shown to take part in all four. Originally identified as immediate cellular answer to a variety of genotoxic stresses, already early data indicated the ability of this highly charged nucleic acid-like polymer to modulate nucleosome structure, the basic unit of chromatin. At the same time the enzyme responsible for synthesizing poly(ADP-ribose, the zinc-finger protein poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP1, was shown to control transcription initiation as basic factor TFIIC within the RNA-polymerase II machinery. Later research focused more on PARP-mediated regulation of DNA repair and cell death, but in the last few years, transcription as well as chromatin modulation has re-appeared on the scene. This review will discuss the impact of PARP1 on transcription and transcription factors, its implication in chromatin remodeling for DNA repair and probably also replication, and its role in controlling epigenetic events such as DNA methylation and the functionality of the insulator protein CCCTC-binding factor.

  15. Is chromatin remodeling required to build sister-chromatid cohesion?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riedel, Christian G; Gregan, Juraj; Gruber, Stephan; Nasmyth, Kim

    2004-01-01

    Chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis depends on the linkage of sister DNA molecules after replication. These links, known as sister-chromatid cohesion, are provided by a multi-subunit complex called cohesin. Recent papers suggest that chromatin-remodeling complexes also have a role in t

  16. Functional Insights into Chromatin Remodelling from Studies on CHARGE Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basson, M. Albert; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny

    2015-01-01

    CHARGE syndrome is a rare genetic syndrome characterised by a unique combination of multiple organ anomalies. Dominant loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 7 (CHD7), which is an ATP-dependent chromatin remodeller, have been identified as the cause

  17. Trichostatin A induced histone acetylation causes decondensation of interphase chromatin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); M. Wachsmuth (Malte); M. Frank-Stöhr (Monika); M. Stöhr (Michael); C.P. Bacher (Christian); K. Rippe (Karsten)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe effect of trichostatin A (TSA)-induced histone acetylation on the interphase chromatin structure was visualized in vivo with a HeLa cell line stably expressing histone H2A, which was fused to enhanced yellow fluorescent protein. The globally increased histone acetylation caused a rev

  18. Control of the Transition to Flowering by Chromatin Modifications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuehui He

    2009-01-01

    The timing of floral transition is critical to reproductive success in angiosperms and is genetically controlled by a network of flowering genes.In Arabidopsis,expression of certain flowering genes is regulated by various chromatin modifications,among which are two central regulators of flowering,namely FLOWERING LOCUS C(FLC) and FLOWERING LOCUS T(FT).Recent studies have revealed that a number of chromatin-modifying components are involved in activation or repression of FLC expression.Activation of FLC expression is associated with various 'active' chromatin modifications including acetylation of core histone tails,histone H3 lysine-4 (H3K4) methylation,H2B monoubiquitination,H3 lysine-36 (H3K36) di- and tri-methylation and deposition of the histone variant H2A.Z,whereas various 'repressive' histone modifications are associated with FLC repression,including histone deacetylation,H3K4 demethylation,histone H3 lysine-9(H3Kg) and H3 lysine-27 (H3K27) methylation,and histone arginine methylation.In addition,recent studies have revealed that Polycomb group gene-mediated transcriptional-silencing mechanism not only represses FLC expression,but also directly represses FT expression.Regulation of FLC expression provides a paradigm for control of the expression of other developmental genes in plants through chromatin mechanisms.

  19. Perfluorooctanesulfonate Mediates Renal Tubular Cell Apoptosis through PPARgamma Inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Li Wen

    Full Text Available Perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs are ubiquitously distributed in the environments including stainless pan-coating, raincoat, fire extinguisher, and semiconductor products. The PPAR family has been shown to contribute to the toxic effects of PFCs in thymus, immune and excretory systems. Herein, we demonstrated that perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS caused cell apoptosis through increasing ratio of Bcl-xS/xL, cytosolic cytochrome C, and caspase 3 activation in renal tubular cells (RTCs. In addition, PFOS increased transcription of inflammatory cytokines (i.e., TNFα, ICAM1, and MCP1 by NFκB activation. Conversely, PFOS reduced the mRNA levels of antioxidative enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase, as a result of reduced PPARγ transactivational activity by using reporter and chromatin immuoprecipitation (ChIP assays. PFOS reduced the protein interaction between PPARγ and PPARγ coactivator-1 alpha (PGC1α by PPARγ deacetylation through Sirt1 upregulation, of which the binding of PPARγ and PGC1α to a peroxisome proliferator response element (PPRE in the promoter regions of these antioxidative enzymes was alleviated in the ChIP assay. Furthermore, Sirt1 also deacetylated p53 and then increased the binding of p53 to Bax, resulting in increased cytosolic cytochrome C. The effect of PPARγ inactivation by PFOS was validated using the PPARγ antagonist GW9662, whereas the adverse effects of PFOS were prevented by PPARγ overexpression and activators, rosiglitozone and L-carnitine, in RTCs. The in vitro finding of protective effect of L-carnitine was substantiated in vivo using Balb/c mice model subjected to PFOS challenge. Altogether, we provide in vivo and in vitro evidence for the protective mechanism of L-carnitine in eliminating PFOS-mediated renal injury, at least partially, through PPARγ activation.

  20. The epigenetic regulation of cell cycle and chromatin dynamic by sirtuins

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Redondo, Paloma

    2014-01-01

    Tesi realitzada a l'Institut d'Investigació Biomèdica de Bellvitge (IDIBELL) The chromatin consists of a hierarchical and dynamical structure that is modulated during the different cell cycle stages in order to maintain genome integrity and preserve the genetic information coded in the DNA. The dynamic structure of the chromatin depends on the coordination of the different chromatin remodeling processes: histone modifications, chromatin remodeling enzymes/complexes, DNA methylation and chr...

  1. Transcriptional repression of the yeast CHA1 gene requires the chromatin-remodeling complex RSC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreira, José Manuel Alfonso; Holmberg, S

    1999-01-01

    In eukaryotes, DNA is packaged into chromatin, a compact structure that must be disrupted when genes are transcribed by RNA polymerase II. For transcription to take place, chromatin is remodeled via nucleosome disruption or displacement, a fundamental transcriptional regulatory mechanism in eukar......In eukaryotes, DNA is packaged into chromatin, a compact structure that must be disrupted when genes are transcribed by RNA polymerase II. For transcription to take place, chromatin is remodeled via nucleosome disruption or displacement, a fundamental transcriptional regulatory mechanism...

  2. Citrullination regulates pluripotency and histone H1 binding to chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christophorou, Maria A.; Castelo-Branco, Gonçalo; Halley-Stott, Richard P.; Oliveira, Clara Slade; Loos, Remco; Radzisheuskaya, Aliaksandra; Mowen, Kerri A.; Bertone, Paul; Silva, José C. R.; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena; Nielsen, Michael L.; Gurdon, John B.; Kouzarides, Tony

    2014-03-01

    Citrullination is the post-translational conversion of an arginine residue within a protein to the non-coded amino acid citrulline. This modification leads to the loss of a positive charge and reduction in hydrogen-bonding ability. It is carried out by a small family of tissue-specific vertebrate enzymes called peptidylarginine deiminases (PADIs) and is associated with the development of diverse pathological states such as autoimmunity, cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, prion diseases and thrombosis. Nevertheless, the physiological functions of citrullination remain ill-defined, although citrullination of core histones has been linked to transcriptional regulation and the DNA damage response. PADI4 (also called PAD4 or PADV), the only PADI with a nuclear localization signal, was previously shown to act in myeloid cells where it mediates profound chromatin decondensation during the innate immune response to infection. Here we show that the expression and enzymatic activity of Padi4 are also induced under conditions of ground-state pluripotency and during reprogramming in mouse. Padi4 is part of the pluripotency transcriptional network, binding to regulatory elements of key stem-cell genes and activating their expression. Its inhibition lowers the percentage of pluripotent cells in the early mouse embryo and significantly reduces reprogramming efficiency. Using an unbiased proteomic approach we identify linker histone H1 variants, which are involved in the generation of compact chromatin, as novel PADI4 substrates. Citrullination of a single arginine residue within the DNA-binding site of H1 results in its displacement from chromatin and global chromatin decondensation. Together, these results uncover a role for citrullination in the regulation of pluripotency and provide new mechanistic insights into how citrullination regulates chromatin compaction.

  3. Dynamic chromatin: the regulatory domain organization of eukaryotic gene loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifer, C; Hecht, A; Saueressig, H; Winter, D M; Sippel, A E

    1991-10-01

    It is hypothesized that nuclear DNA is organized in topologically constrained loop domains defining basic units of higher order chromatin structure. Our studies are performed in order to investigate the functional relevance of this structural subdivision of eukaryotic chromatin for the control of gene expression. We used the chicken lysozyme gene locus as a model to examine the relation between chromatin structure and gene function. Several structural features of the lysozyme locus are known: the extension of the region of general DNAasel sensitivity of the active gene, the location of DNA-sequences with high affinity for the nuclear matrix in vitro, and the position of DNAasel hypersensitive chromatin sites (DHSs). The pattern of DHSs changes depending on the transcriptional status of the gene. Functional studies demonstrated that DHSs mark the position of cis-acting regulatory elements. Additionally, we discovered a novel cis-activity of the border regions of the DNAasel sensitive domain (A-elements). By eliminating the position effect on gene expression usually observed when genes are randomly integrated into the genome after transfection, A-elements possibly serve as punctuation marks for a regulatory chromatin domain. Experiments using transgenic mice confirmed that the complete structurally defined lysozyme gene domain behaves as an independent regulatory unit, expressing the gene in a tissue specific and position independent manner. These expression features were lost in transgenic mice carrying a construct, in which the A-elements as well as an upstream enhancer region were deleted, indicating the lack of a locus activation function on this construct. Experiments are designed in order to uncover possible hierarchical relationships between the different cis-acting regulatory elements for stepwise gene activation during cell differentiation. We are aiming at the definition of the basic structural and functional requirements for position independent and high

  4. Reconciling findings of emotion-induced memory enhancement and impairment of preceding items

    OpenAIRE

    Knight, Marisa; Mather, Mara

    2009-01-01

    A large body of work reveals that people remember emotionally arousing information better than neutral information. However, previous research reveals contradictory effects of emotional events on memory for neutral events that precede or follow them: in some studies emotionally arousing items impair memory for immediately preceding or following items and in others arousing items enhance memory for preceding items. By demonstrating both emotion-induced enhancement and impairment, Experiments 1...

  5. Effects of aluminum and other cations on the structure of brain and liver chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, P R; LeBlanc, J; Sikorska, M

    1989-05-01

    The reactivity of aluminum and several other divalent and trivalent metallic cations toward chromatin from rat brain and liver has been investigated. Two criteria are used to determine the relative reactivity of these cations toward chromatin. The first involves the ability of the ions to compact the chromatin fibers to the point where chromatin precipitates. The second criterion measures the ability of cations to interfere with the accessibility of exogenous structural probes (nucleases) to chromatin. Of the divalent cations tested, nickel, cobalt, zinc, cadmium, and mercury were the most reactive toward chromatin, on the basis of their ability to induce precipitation of chromatin in the micromolar concentration range. The divalent cations magnesium, calcium, copper, strontium, and barium were much less effective, although all cations precipitate chromatin if their concentration is increased. Of the trivalent cations tested, aluminum, indium, and gallium were very effective precipitants, whereas iron and scandium were without effect at the concentrations tested. Of all the cations tested, aluminum was the most reactive. Aluminum's ability to alter the structure of chromatin was investigated further by testing its ability to interfere with nuclease accessibility. This test confirmed that aluminum does induce considerable changes in chromatin structure at micromolar concentrations. Furthermore, chromatin from cortical areas of the brain was much more sensitive to aluminum than chromatin from liver. These results are discussed in light of the known toxicity of these cations, with particular emphasis on the possible role of aluminum in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:2752000

  6. The Emerging Roles of ATP-Dependent Chromatin Remodeling Enzymes in Nucleotide Excision Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wioletta Czaja

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available DNA repair in eukaryotic cells takes place in the context of chromatin, where DNA, including damaged DNA, is tightly packed into nucleosomes and higher order chromatin structures. Chromatin intrinsically restricts accessibility of DNA repair proteins to the damaged DNA and impacts upon the overall rate of DNA repair. Chromatin is highly responsive to DNA damage and undergoes specific remodeling to facilitate DNA repair. How damaged DNA is accessed, repaired and restored to the original chromatin state, and how chromatin remodeling coordinates these processes in vivo, remains largely unknown. ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers (ACRs are the master regulators of chromatin structure and dynamics. Conserved from yeast to humans, ACRs utilize the energy of ATP to reorganize packing of chromatin and control DNA accessibility by sliding, ejecting or restructuring nucleosomes. Several studies have demonstrated that ATP-dependent remodeling activity of ACRs plays important roles in coordination of spatio-temporal steps of different DNA repair pathways in chromatin. This review focuses on the role of ACRs in regulation of various aspects of nucleotide excision repair (NER in the context of chromatin. We discuss current understanding of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling by various subfamilies of remodelers and regulation of the NER pathway in vivo.

  7. Retroviruses hijack chromatin loops to drive oncogene expression and highlight the chromatin architecture around proto-oncogenic loci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jillian M Pattison

    Full Text Available The majority of the genome consists of intergenic and non-coding DNA sequences shown to play a major role in different gene regulatory networks. However, the specific potency of these distal elements as well as how these regions exert function across large genomic distances remains unclear. To address these unresolved issues, we closely examined the chromatin architecture around proto-oncogenic loci in the mouse and human genomes to demonstrate a functional role for chromatin looping in distal gene regulation. Using cell culture models, we show that tumorigenic retroviral integration sites within the mouse genome occur near existing large chromatin loops and that this chromatin architecture is maintained within the human genome as well. Significantly, as mutagenesis screens are not feasible in humans, we demonstrate a way to leverage existing screens in mice to identify disease relevant human enhancers and expose novel disease mechanisms. For instance, we characterize the epigenetic landscape upstream of the human Cyclin D1 locus to find multiple distal interactions that contribute to the complex cis-regulation of this cell cycle gene. Furthermore, we characterize a novel distal interaction upstream of the Cyclin D1 gene which provides mechanistic evidence for the abundant overexpression of Cyclin D1 occurring in multiple myeloma cells harboring a pathogenic translocation event. Through use of mapped retroviral integrations and translocation breakpoints, our studies highlight the importance of chromatin looping in oncogene expression, elucidate the epigenetic mechanisms crucial for distal cis-regulation, and in one particular instance, explain how a translocation event drives tumorigenesis through upregulation of a proto-oncogene.

  8. Retroviruses Hijack Chromatin Loops to Drive Oncogene Expression and Highlight the Chromatin Architecture around Proto-Oncogenic Loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattison, Jillian M.; Wright, Jason B.; Cole, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of the genome consists of intergenic and non-coding DNA sequences shown to play a major role in different gene regulatory networks. However, the specific potency of these distal elements as well as how these regions exert function across large genomic distances remains unclear. To address these unresolved issues, we closely examined the chromatin architecture around proto-oncogenic loci in the mouse and human genomes to demonstrate a functional role for chromatin looping in distal gene regulation. Using cell culture models, we show that tumorigenic retroviral integration sites within the mouse genome occur near existing large chromatin loops and that this chromatin architecture is maintained within the human genome as well. Significantly, as mutagenesis screens are not feasible in humans, we demonstrate a way to leverage existing screens in mice to identify disease relevant human enhancers and expose novel disease mechanisms. For instance, we characterize the epigenetic landscape upstream of the human Cyclin D1 locus to find multiple distal interactions that contribute to the complex cis-regulation of this cell cycle gene. Furthermore, we characterize a novel distal interaction upstream of the Cyclin D1 gene which provides mechanistic evidence for the abundant overexpression of Cyclin D1 occurring in multiple myeloma cells harboring a pathogenic translocation event. Through use of mapped retroviral integrations and translocation breakpoints, our studies highlight the importance of chromatin looping in oncogene expression, elucidate the epigenetic mechanisms crucial for distal cis-regulation, and in one particular instance, explain how a translocation event drives tumorigenesis through upregulation of a proto-oncogene. PMID:25799187

  9. Chromatin analyses of Zymoseptoria tritici: Methods for chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyer, Jessica L; Möller, Mareike; Schotanus, Klaas; Connolly, Lanelle R; Galazka, Jonathan M; Freitag, Michael; Stukenbrock, Eva H

    2015-06-01

    The presence or absence of specific transcription factors, chromatin remodeling machineries, chromatin modification enzymes, post-translational histone modifications and histone variants all play crucial roles in the regulation of pathogenicity genes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) provides an important tool to study genome-wide protein-DNA interactions to help understand gene regulation in the context of native chromatin. ChIP-seq is a convenient in vivo technique to identify, map and characterize occupancy of specific DNA fragments with proteins against which specific antibodies exist or which can be epitope-tagged in vivo. We optimized existing ChIP protocols for use in the wheat pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici and closely related sister species. Here, we provide a detailed method, underscoring which aspects of the technique are organism-specific. Library preparation for Illumina sequencing is described, as this is currently the most widely used ChIP-seq method. One approach for the analysis and visualization of representative sequence is described; improved tools for these analyses are constantly being developed. Using ChIP-seq with antibodies against H3K4me2, which is considered a mark for euchromatin or H3K9me3 and H3K27me3, which are considered marks for heterochromatin, the overall distribution of euchromatin and heterochromatin in the genome of Z. tritici can be determined. Our ChIP-seq protocol was also successfully applied to Z. tritici strains with high levels of melanization or aberrant colony morphology, and to different species of the genus (Z. ardabiliae and Z. pseudotritici), suggesting that our technique is robust. The methods described here provide a powerful framework to study new aspects of chromatin biology and gene regulation in this prominent wheat pathogen.

  10. Reiter's disease: Circinate balanitis as alone preceding presentation - Successfully treated with pimecrolimus 1% cream

    OpenAIRE

    Sumir Kumar; Bharat Bhushan Mahajan; Ravinder Singh Ahluwalia; Amarbir Singh Boparai

    2015-01-01

    Circinate balanitis, although a common manifestation of reactive arthritis, is usually an associated finding present along with the triad of arthritis, conjunctivitis, and urethritis. It is rarely seen as the only preceding manifestation of reactive arthritis. We hereby report a case of circinate balanitis as alone preceding presentation of reactive arthritis that was successfully treated with topical pimecrolimus 1% cream.

  11. Reiter′s disease: Circinate balanitis as alone preceding presentation - Successfully treated with pimecrolimus 1% cream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumir Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Circinate balanitis, although a common manifestation of reactive arthritis, is usually an associated finding present along with the triad of arthritis, conjunctivitis, and urethritis. It is rarely seen as the only preceding manifestation of reactive arthritis. We hereby report a case of circinate balanitis as alone preceding presentation of reactive arthritis that was successfully treated with topical pimecrolimus 1% cream.

  12. Reiter's disease: Circinate balanitis as alone preceding presentation - Successfully treated with pimecrolimus 1% cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sumir; Mahajan, Bharat Bhushan; Ahluwalia, Ravinder Singh; Boparai, Amarbir Singh

    2015-01-01

    Circinate balanitis, although a common manifestation of reactive arthritis, is usually an associated finding present along with the triad of arthritis, conjunctivitis, and urethritis. It is rarely seen as the only preceding manifestation of reactive arthritis. We hereby report a case of circinate balanitis as alone preceding presentation of reactive arthritis that was successfully treated with topical pimecrolimus 1% cream. PMID:26392659

  13. Proteomics and the genetics of sperm chromatin condensation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rafael Oliva; Judit Castillo

    2011-01-01

    Spermatogenesis involves extremely marked cellular, genetic and chromatin changes resulting in the generation of the highly specialized sperm cell. Proteomics allows the identification of the proteins that compose the spermatogenic cells and the study of their function. The recent developments in mass spectrometry (MS) have markedly increased the throughput to identify and to study the sperm proteins. Catalogs of thousands of testis and spermatozoan proteins in human and different model species are becoming available, setting up the basis for subsequent research, diagnostic applications and possibly the future development of specific treatments. The present review intends to summarize the key genetic and chromatin changes at the different stages of spermatogenesis and in the mature sperm cell and to comment on the presently available proteomic studies.

  14. Synaptic, transcriptional, and chromatin genes disrupted in autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rubeis, Silvia; He, Xin; Goldberg, Arthur P.; Poultney, Christopher S.; Samocha, Kaitlin; Cicek, A Ercument; Kou, Yan; Liu, Li; Fromer, Menachem; Walker, Susan; Singh, Tarjinder; Klei, Lambertus; Kosmicki, Jack; Fu, Shih-Chen; Aleksic, Branko; Biscaldi, Monica; Bolton, Patrick F.; Brownfeld, Jessica M.; Cai, Jinlu; Campbell, Nicholas J.; Carracedo, Angel; Chahrour, Maria H.; Chiocchetti, Andreas G.; Coon, Hilary; Crawford, Emily L.; Crooks, Lucy; Curran, Sarah R.; Dawson, Geraldine; Duketis, Eftichia; Fernandez, Bridget A.; Gallagher, Louise; Geller, Evan; Guter, Stephen J.; Hill, R. Sean; Ionita-Laza, Iuliana; Gonzalez, Patricia Jimenez; Kilpinen, Helena; Klauck, Sabine M.; Kolevzon, Alexander; Lee, Irene; Lei, Jing; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Ma'ayan, Avi; Marshall, Christian R.; McInnes, Alison L.; Neale, Benjamin; Owen, Michael J.; Ozaki, Norio; Parellada, Mara; Parr, Jeremy R.; Purcell, Shaun; Puura, Kaija; Rajagopalan, Deepthi; Rehnström, Karola; Reichenberg, Abraham; Sabo, Aniko; Sachse, Michael; Sanders, Stephan J.; Schafer, Chad; Schulte-Rüther, Martin; Skuse, David; Stevens, Christine; Szatmari, Peter; Tammimies, Kristiina; Valladares, Otto; Voran, Annette; Wang, Li-San; Weiss, Lauren A.; Willsey, A. Jeremy; Yu, Timothy W.; Yuen, Ryan K.C.; Cook, Edwin H.; Freitag, Christine M.; Gill, Michael; Hultman, Christina M.; Lehner, Thomas; Palotie, Aarno; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Sklar, Pamela; State, Matthew W.; Sutcliffe, James S.; Walsh, Christopher A.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Zwick, Michael E.; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Cutler, David J.; Roeder, Kathryn; Devlin, Bernie; Daly, Mark J.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The genetic architecture of autism spectrum disorder involves the interplay of common and rare variation and their impact on hundreds of genes. Using exome sequencing, analysis of rare coding variation in 3,871 autism cases and 9,937 ancestry-matched or parental controls implicates 22 autosomal genes at a false discovery rate (FDR) < 0.05, and a set of 107 autosomal genes strongly enriched for those likely to affect risk (FDR < 0.30). These 107 genes, which show unusual evolutionary constraint against mutations, incur de novo loss-of-function mutations in over 5% of autistic subjects. Many of the genes implicated encode proteins for synaptic, transcriptional, and chromatin remodeling pathways. These include voltage-gated ion channels regulating propagation of action potentials, pacemaking, and excitability-transcription coupling, as well as histone-modifying enzymes and chromatin remodelers, prominently histone post-translational modifications involving lysine methylation/demethylation. PMID:25363760

  15. Cellular Fractionation and Isolation of Chromatin-Associated RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Thomas; Ørom, Ulf Andersson

    2017-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the synthesis, processing, and functions of RNA molecules are confined to distinct subcellular compartments. Biochemical fractionation of cells prior to RNA isolation thus enables the analysis of distinct steps in the lifetime of individual RNA molecules that would be masked in bulk RNA preparations from whole cells. Here, we describe a simple two-step differential centrifugation protocol for the isolation of cytoplasmic, nucleoplasmic, and chromatin-associated RNA that can be used in downstream applications such as qPCR or deep sequencing. We discuss various aspects of this fractionation protocol, which can be readily applied to many mammalian cell types. For the study of long noncoding RNAs and enhancer RNAs in regulation of transcription especially the preparation of chromatin-associated RNA can contribute significantly to further developments.

  16. Cellular Fractionation and Isolation of Chromatin-Associated RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Thomas; Ørom, Ulf Andersson

    2017-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the synthesis, processing, and functions of RNA molecules are confined to distinct subcellular compartments. Biochemical fractionation of cells prior to RNA isolation thus enables the analysis of distinct steps in the lifetime of individual RNA molecules that would be masked in bulk RNA preparations from whole cells. Here, we describe a simple two-step differential centrifugation protocol for the isolation of cytoplasmic, nucleoplasmic, and chromatin-associated RNA that can be used in downstream applications such as qPCR or deep sequencing. We discuss various aspects of this fractionation protocol, which can be readily applied to many mammalian cell types. For the study of long noncoding RNAs and enhancer RNAs in regulation of transcription especially the preparation of chromatin-associated RNA can contribute significantly to further developments. PMID:27662865

  17. Changes in chromatin state in donors subjected to physical stress

    OpenAIRE

    Shckorbatov, Yuriy; Samokhvalov, Valeriy; Bevziuk, Dariya; Kovaliov, Maxim

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to evaluate changes in chromatin of human buccal epithelium under the influence of stressing factor - dosed physical activity. Investigations were performed in a group of students (13 men) of age 19-23. Cells were stained on a slide by a 2% orcein solution in 45% acetic acid during 1 h. The following physiological indexes were determined: arterial blood pressure, pulse frequency, and frequency of breathing. The physical stress produced by the dosed physical...

  18. Effect of saffron on rat sperm chromatin integrity

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Mardani; Ahmad Vaez; Shahnaz Razavi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Currently, relation between reactive oxygen species (ROS) ROS concentration and semen quality was indicated. Saffron has traditionally been not only considered as a food additive but also as a medicinal herb, which has a good antioxidant properties. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the protection potency of saffron and vitamin E on sperm chromatin integrity. Materials and Methods: Thirty adult male Wistar rats divided equally into saffron (100 mg/kg), vitamin E (10...

  19. Light scattering measurements supporting helical structures for chromatin in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, A M; Cotter, R I; Pardon, J F

    1978-05-01

    Laser light scattering measurements have been made on a series of polynucleosomes containing from 50 to 150 nucleosomes. Radii of gyration have been determined as a function of polynucleosome length for different ionic strength solutions. The results suggest that at low ionic strength the chromatin adopts a loosely helical structure rather than a random coil. The helix becomes more regular on increasing the ionic strength, the dimension resembling those proposed by Finch and Klug for their solenoid model. PMID:662693

  20. Quality of histone modification antibodies undermines chromatin biology research

    OpenAIRE

    Goran Kungulovski; Albert Jeltsch

    2015-01-01

    Histone post-translational modification (PTM) antibodies are essential research reagents in chromatin biology. However, they suffer from variable properties and insufficient documentation of quality. Antibody manufacturers and vendors should provide detailed lot-specific documentation of quality, rendering further quality checks by end-customers unnecessary. A shift from polyclonal antibodies towards sustainable reagents like monoclonal or recombinant antibodies or histone binding domains wou...

  1. Spermine-induced aggregation of DNA, nucleosome, and chromatin.

    OpenAIRE

    Raspaud, E.; Chaperon, I; Leforestier, A; Livolant, F

    1999-01-01

    We have analyzed the conditions of aggregation or precipitation of DNA in four different states: double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), mononucleosome core particles (NCP), and H1-depleted chromatin fragments (ChF) in the presence of the multivalent cation spermine (4+). In an intermediate regime of DNA concentration, these conditions are identical for the four states. This result demonstrates that the mechanism involved is general from flexible chains to rigid rods and qua...

  2. A NIMA homologue promotes chromatin condensation in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krien, M J; Bugg, S J; Palatsides, M; Asouline, G; Morimyo, M; O'Connell, M J

    1998-04-01

    Entry into mitosis requires p34(cdc2), which activates downstream mitotic events through phosphorylation of key target proteins. In Aspergillus nidulans, the NIMA protein kinase has been identified as a potential downstream target and plays a role in regulating chromatin condensation at mitosis. nimA- mutants arrest in a state that physically resembles interphase even though p34(cdc2) is fully active. Despite evidence for the existence of NIMA-like activities in a variety of cell types, the only bona fide NIMA homologue that has been identified is the nim-1 gene of Neurospora crassa. We report here the isolation of a fission yeast NIMA homologue, and have designated this gene fin1 and the 83 kDa predicted protein p83(fin1). Overexpression of fin1 promotes premature chromatin condensation from any point in the cell cycle independently of p34(cdc2) function. Like NIMA, p83(fin1) levels fluctuate through the cell cycle, peaking in mitosis and levels are greatly elevated by removal of C-terminal PEST sequences. Deletion of fin1 results in viable but elongated cells, indicative of a cell cycle delay. Genetic analysis has placed this delay in G2 but, unlike in nimA mutants of Aspergillus, p34(cdc2) activation appears to be delayed. Interaction of fin1 mutants with other strains defective in chromatin organisation also support the hypothesis of p83(fin1) playing a role in this process at the onset of mitosis. These data indicate that NIMA-related kinases may be a general feature of the cell cycle and chromatin organisation at mitosis.

  3. Inactivation of Microbial Contaminants in Fresh Produce

    Science.gov (United States)

    With the microbial safety of fresh produce of increasing concern, conventional sanitizing treatments need to be supplemented with effective new interventions to inactivate human pathogens. The Produce Safety research project at the US Dept. Agriculture’s Eastern Regional Research Center develops and...

  4. Inactivation of prion infectivity by ionizing rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inactivation of prion deposits on medical devices or prion contamination in pharmaceutical raw materials is considered as impossible by using gamma irradiation. Early, the guideline WHO/CDS/CSR/APH/2000 has described irradiation as an ineffective process. But, in 2003, S. Miekka et al. noted radiation inactivation of prions in a particular application to purify human albumin, shown by the physical denaturation of the infectious protein (PrP). The aim of our study was to determine the inactivation of prions with a scrapie model (strain C506M3) by irradiating standardised preparations. Results: Gamma irradiation was partially effective, showing a 4-5 log reduction on exposure to 50 kGy. A characteristic effect-dose curve was not observed (25, 50 and 100 kGy), only an increase in the incubation period of the murine disease (229 days with 25 kGy to 290 days with 100 kGy) compared with 170 days without irradiation. Since the inactivation was not a total one, the observed effect is significant. It is proposed that further work be undertaken with the model to investigate the application of gamma radiation known levels of prion contamination

  5. Inactivation of prion infectivity by ionizing rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gominet, M. [Ionisos, ZI les Chatinieres, F01120 Dagneux (France); Vadrot, C.; Austruy, G. [Paris V University, Central Pharmacy of Hospitals, 4 avenue de l' Observatoire, F-75006, Paris (France); Darbord, J.C. [Paris V University, Central Pharmacy of Hospitals, 4 avenue de l' Observatoire, F-75006, Paris (France)], E-mail: darbord@pharmacie.univ-paris5.fr

    2007-11-15

    Inactivation of prion deposits on medical devices or prion contamination in pharmaceutical raw materials is considered as impossible by using gamma irradiation. Early, the guideline WHO/CDS/CSR/APH/2000 has described irradiation as an ineffective process. But, in 2003, S. Miekka et al. noted radiation inactivation of prions in a particular application to purify human albumin, shown by the physical denaturation of the infectious protein (PrP). The aim of our study was to determine the inactivation of prions with a scrapie model (strain C506M3) by irradiating standardised preparations. Results: Gamma irradiation was partially effective, showing a 4-5 log reduction on exposure to 50 kGy. A characteristic effect-dose curve was not observed (25, 50 and 100 kGy), only an increase in the incubation period of the murine disease (229 days with 25 kGy to 290 days with 100 kGy) compared with 170 days without irradiation. Since the inactivation was not a total one, the observed effect is significant. It is proposed that further work be undertaken with the model to investigate the application of gamma radiation known levels of prion contamination.

  6. Inactivation of prion infectivity by ionizing rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gominet, M.; Vadrot, C.; Austruy, G.; Darbord, J. C.

    2007-11-01

    Inactivation of prion deposits on medical devices or prion contamination in pharmaceutical raw materials is considered as impossible by using gamma irradiation. Early, the guideline WHO/CDS/CSR/APH/2000 has described irradiation as an ineffective process. But, in 2003, S. Miekka et al. noted radiation inactivation of prions in a particular application to purify human albumin, shown by the physical denaturation of the infectious protein (PrP). The aim of our study was to determine the inactivation of prions with a scrapie model (strain C506M3) by irradiating standardised preparations. Results: Gamma irradiation was partially effective, showing a 4-5 log reduction on exposure to 50 kGy. A characteristic effect-dose curve was not observed (25, 50 and 100 kGy), only an increase in the incubation period of the murine disease (229 days with 25 kGy to 290 days with 100 kGy) compared with 170 days without irradiation. Since the inactivation was not a total one, the observed effect is significant. It is proposed that further work be undertaken with the model to investigate the application of gamma radiation known levels of prion contamination.

  7. Inactivation of Bacillus atrophaeus by OH radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Ryo; Yonetamari, Kenta; Tokumitsu, Yusuke; Yonemori, Seiya; Yasuda, Hachiro; Mizuno, Akira

    2016-08-01

    The inactivation of Bacillus atrophaeus by OH radicals is measured. This study aims to evaluate the bactericidal effects of OH radicals produced by atmospheric-pressure nonthermal plasma widely used for plasma medicine; however, in this study, OH radicals are produced by vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photolysis of water vapor instead of plasma to allow the production of OH radicals with almost no other reactive species. A 172 nm VUV light from a Xe2 excimer lamp irradiates a He–H2O mixture flowing in a quartz tube to photodissociate H2O to produce OH, H, O, HO2, H2O2, and O3. The produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) flow out of the quartz tube nozzle to the bacteria on an agar plate and cause inactivation. The inactivation by OH radicals among the six ROS is observed by properly setting the experimental conditions with the help of simulations calculating the ROS densities. A 30 s treatment with approximately 0.1 ppm OH radicals causes visible inactivation.

  8. Temperature Tolerance and Inactivation of Chikungunya Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan-Jang S; Hsu, Wei-Wen; Higgs, Stephen; Vanlandingham, Dana L

    2015-11-01

    In late 2013, chikungunya virus (CHIKV) was introduced to the New World and large outbreaks occurred in the Caribbean islands causing over a million suspected and over 20,000 laboratory-confirmed cases. Serological analysis is an essential component for the diagnosis of CHIKV infection together with virus isolation and detection of viral nucleic acid. Demonstrating virus neutralizing by serum antibodies in a plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) is the gold standard of all serological diagnostic assays. Prior to the testing, heat inactivation of serum at 56°C for 30 min is required for the inactivation of complement activity and adventitious viruses. The presence of adventitious contaminating viruses may interfere with the results by leading to a higher number of plaques on the monolayers and subsequent false-negative results. This procedure is widely accepted for the inactivation of flaviviruses and alphaviruses. In this study, the thermostability of CHIKV was evaluated. Heat inactivation at 56°C for 30 min was demonstrated to be insufficient for the complete removal of infectious CHIKV virions present in the samples. This thermotolerance of CHIKV could compromise the accuracy of serum tests, and therefore longer treatment for greater than 120 min is recommended.

  9. Pulsed electric field inactivation in a microreactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fox, M.B.

    2006-01-01

    Pulsed electric fields (PEF) is a novel, non-thermal pasteurization method which uses short, high electric field pulses to inactivate microorganisms. The advantage of a pasteurization method like PEF compared to regular heat pasteurization is that the taste, flavour, texture and nutritional value ar

  10. High Pressure Inactivation of HAV within Mussels

    Science.gov (United States)

    The potential of hepatitis A virus (HAV) to be inactivated within Mediterranean mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) and blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) by high pressure processing was evaluated. HAV was bioaccumulated within mussels to approximately 6-log10 PFU by exposure of mussels to HAV-contamina...

  11. Inactivation of human interferon by body fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesario, T. C.; Mandell, A.; Tilles, J. G.

    1973-01-01

    Description of the effects of human feces, bile, saliva, serum, and cerebrospinal fluid on interferon activity. It is shown that crude interferon is inactivated by at least 50% more than with the control medium used, when incubated for 4 hr in vitro in the presence of serum, saliva, or cerebrospinal liquid, and by close to 100% when incubated with stool extract or bile.

  12. Repression and activation by multiprotein complexes that alter chromatin structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, R E; Bunker, C A; Imbalzano, A N

    1996-04-15

    Recent studies have provided strong evidence that macromolecular complexes are used in the cell to remodel chromatin structure during activation and to create an inaccessible structure during repression, Although there is not yet any rigorous demonstration that modification of chromatin structure plays a direct, causal role in either activation or repression, there is sufficient smoke to indicate the presence of a blazing inferno nearby. It is clear that complexes that remodel chromatin are tractable in vitro; hopefully this will allow the establishment of systems that provide a direct analysis of the role that remodeling might play in activation. These studies indicate that establishment of functional systems to corroborate the elegant genetic studies on repression might also be tractable. As the mechanistic effects of these complexes are sorted out, it will become important to understand how the complexes are regulated. In many of the instances discussed above, the genes whose products make up these complexes were identified in genetic screens for effects on developmental processes. This implies a regulation of the activity of these complexes in response to developmental cues and further implies that the work to fully understand these complexes will occupy a generation of scientists.

  13. High sperm chromatin stability in semen with high viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, G F; Sánchez, A

    1994-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the effects of high semen viscosity on sperm chromatin stability. Semen samples obtained from men with normal and high viscosity were studied. Sperm chromatin stability was tested by exposure to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) only and SDS together with a zinc-chelating agent, disodium ethylene diamine tetraacetate (SDS+EDTA). After SDS incubation, stable sperm was 61.36 +/- 3.0 and 54.71 +/- 3.42% for normal and high semen viscosity, respectively (P:NS), and after SDS+EDTA, it was further reduced to 12.48 +/- 0.99% in semen samples with normal consistency and in a less magnitude in semen samples with high viscosity (25.6 +/- 5.2). Comparing values obtained in SDS+EDTA, a high sperm stability was observed in samples with hyperviscosity (p hyperviscosity is associated with a high sperm chromatin stability in situations when a zinc-chelating agent is present. PMID:8122934

  14. Histone chaperones link histone nuclear import and chromatin assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keck, Kristin M; Pemberton, Lucy F

    2013-01-01

    Histone chaperones are proteins that shield histones from nonspecific interactions until they are assembled into chromatin. After their synthesis in the cytoplasm, histones are bound by different histone chaperones, subjected to a series of posttranslational modifications and imported into the nucleus. These evolutionarily conserved modifications, including acetylation and methylation, can occur in the cytoplasm, but their role in regulating import is not well understood. As part of histone import complexes, histone chaperones may serve to protect the histones during transport, or they may be using histones to promote their own nuclear localization. In addition, there is evidence that histone chaperones can play an active role in the import of histones. Histone chaperones have also been shown to regulate the localization of important chromatin modifying enzymes. This review is focused on the role histone chaperones play in the early biogenesis of histones, the distinct cytoplasmic subcomplexes in which histone chaperones have been found in both yeast and mammalian cells and the importins/karyopherins and nuclear localization signals that mediate the nuclear import of histones. We also address the role that histone chaperone localization plays in human disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Histone chaperones and chromatin assembly.

  15. The shades of gray of the chromatin fiber: recent literature provides new insights into the structure of chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausió, Juan

    2015-01-01

    The chromatin fiber consists of a string of nucleosomes connected by linker DNA regions. The hierarchy of folding of this fiber within the cell has long been controversial, and the existence of an originally described 30 nm fiber has been debated and reviewed extensively. This review contextualizes two recent papers on this topic that suggest the 30 nm fiber to be an over-simplification. The idealized model from the first study provides good insight into the constraints and histone participation in the maintenance of the fiber structure. The second paper provides a theoretical description of a more realistic view of the highly heterogeneous and dynamic chromatin organization in the in vivo setting. It is now time to abandon the highly regular "one start" solenoidal 30 nm structure and replace it with a more realistic highly dynamic, polymorphic fiber.

  16. Inactivation of Escherichia coli phage by pulsed electric field treatment and analysis of inactivation mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanino, Takanori; Yoshida, Tomoki; Sakai, Kazuki; Ohshima, Takayuki

    2013-03-01

    Inactivation of bacteriophage by pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment, one of the effective procedures for bacteria nonthermal inactivation, was studied. Model phage particles Escherichia coli bacteriophages M13mp18 and λ phage, were successfully inactivated by PEF treatment. The survival ratios of both bacteriophages decreased depending on the PEF treatment time when applied peak voltage was 5 or 7 kV, and the survival ratios after 12 min PEF treatment were 10-4 - 10-5. Electrophoresis analyses of biological molecules of inactivated λ phage detected no degradation of total protein and genomic DNA. These results suggested that the factor of phage inactivation by PEF treatment was not based on the degradation of protein or DNA, but on the destruction of phage particle structure. Sensitivity of E. coli phage to PEF treatment was compared with that of E. coli cell. Phage and MV1184 cell were treated with same condition PEF at 5 kV, respectively. After 12 min treatment, the survival ration of λ phage and MV1184 were 4.0 × 10-5 and 1.7 × 10-3, respectively. The survival ratio of phage was lower than that of MV1184. E. coli cell is more tolerant to inactivation with PEF treatment than coli phage.

  17. The protein encoded by the proto-oncogene DEK changes the topology of chromatin and reduces the efficiency of DNA replication in a chromatin-specific manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexiadis, V; Waldmann, T; Andersen, Jens S.;

    2000-01-01

    The structure of chromatin regulates the genetic activity of the underlying DNA sequence. We report here that the protein encoded by the proto-oncogene DEK, which is involved in acute myelogenous leukemia, induces alterations of the superhelical density of DNA in chromatin. The change in topology...

  18. Effects of Bacterial Inactivation Methods on Downstream Proteomic Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Andy; Merkley, Eric D.; Clowers, Brian H.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Kreuzer, Helen W.

    2015-05-01

    Inactivation of pathogenic microbial samples is often necessary for the protection of researchers and to comply with local and federal regulations. By its nature, biological inactivation causes changes to microbial samples, potentially affecting observed experimental results. While inactivation induced damage to materials such as DNA has been evaluated, the effect of various inactivation strategies on proteomic data, to our knowledge, has not been discussed. To this end, we inactivated samples of Yersinia pestis and Escherichia coli by autoclave, ethanol, or irradiation treatment to determine how inactivation changes liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry data quality as well as apparent protein content of cells. Proteomic datasets obtained from aliquots of samples inactivated by different methods were highly similar, with Pearson correlation coefficients ranging from 0.822 to 0.985 and 0.816 to 0.985 for E. coli and Y. pestis, respectively, suggesting that inactivation had only slight impacts on the set of proteins identified. In addition, spectral quality metrics such as distributions of various database search algorithm scores remained constant across inactivation methods, indicating that inactivation does not appreciably degrade spectral quality. Though overall changes resulting from inactivation were small, there were detectable trends. For example, one-sided Fischer exact tests determined that periplasmic proteins decrease in observed abundance after sample inactivation by autoclaving (α = 1.71x10-2 for E. coli, α = 4.97x10-4 for Y. pestis) and irradiation (α = 9.43x10-7 for E. coli, α = 1.21x10-5 for Y. pestis) when compared to controls that were not inactivated. Based on our data, if sample inactivation is necessary, we recommend inactivation with ethanol treatment with secondary preference given to irradiation.

  19. RNA is an integral component of chromatin that contributes to its structural organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Rodríguez-Campos

    Full Text Available Chromatin structure is influenced by multiples factors, such as pH, temperature, nature and concentration of counterions, post-translational modifications of histones and binding of structural non-histone proteins. RNA is also known to contribute to the regulation of chromatin structure as chromatin-induced gene silencing was shown to depend on the RNAi machinery in S. pombe, plants and Drosophila. Moreover, both in Drosophila and mammals, dosage compensation requires the contribution of specific non-coding RNAs. However, whether RNA itself plays a direct structural role in chromatin is not known. Here, we report results that indicate a general structural role for RNA in eukaryotic chromatin. RNA is found associated to purified chromatin prepared from chicken liver, or cultured Drosophila S2 cells, and treatment with RNase A alters the structural properties of chromatin. Our results indicate that chromatin-associated RNAs, which account for 2%-5% of total chromatin-associated nucleic acids, are polyA(- and show a size similar to that of the DNA contained in the corresponding chromatin fragments. Chromatin-associated RNA(s are not likely to correspond to nascent transcripts as they are also found bound to chromatin when cells are treated with alpha-amanitin. After treatment with RNase A, chromatin fragments of molecular weight >3.000 bp of DNA showed reduced sedimentation through sucrose gradients and increased sensitivity to micrococcal nuclease digestion. This structural transition, which is observed both at euchromatic and heterochromatic regions, proceeds without loss of histone H1 or any significant change in core-histone composition and integrity.

  20. Influence of a preceding auditory stimulus on evoked potential of the succeeding stimulus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Mingshi; LIU Zhongguo; ZHU Qiang; LIU Jin; WANG Liqun; LIU Haiying

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the influence of the preceding auditory stimulus on the auditory-evoked potential (AEP) of the succeeding stimuli, when the human subjects were presented with a pair of auditory stimuli. We found that the evoked potential of the succeeding stimulus was inhibited completely by the preceding stimulus, as the inter-stimulus interval (ISI) was shorter than 150 ms. This influence was dependent on the ISI of two stimuli, the shorter the ISI the stronger the influence would be. The inhibitory influence of the preceding stimulus might be caused by the neural refractory effect.

  1. Inactivation and reactivation of B. megatherium phage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NORTHROP, J H

    1955-11-20

    Preparation of Reversibly Inactivated (R.I.) Phage.- If B. megatherium phage (of any type, or in any stage of purification) is suspended in dilute salt solutions at pH 5-6, it is completely inactivated; i.e., it does not form plaques, or give rise to more phage when mixed with a sensitive organism (Northrop, 1954). The inactivation occurs when the phage is added to the dilute salt solution. If a suspension of the inactive phage in pH 7 peptone is titrated to pH 5 and allowed to stand, the activity gradually returns. The inactivation is therefore reversible. Properties of R.I. Phage.- The R.I. phage is adsorbed by sensitive cells at about the same rate as the active phage. It kills the cells, but no active phage is produced. The R.I. phage therefore has the properties of phage "ghosts" (Herriott, 1951) or of colicines (Gratia, 1925), or phage inactivated by ultraviolet light (Luria, 1947). The R.I. phage is sedimented in the centrifuge at the same rate as active phage. It is therefore about the same size as the active phage. The R.I. phage is most stable in pH 7, 5 per cent peptone, and may be kept in this solution for weeks at 0 degrees C. The rate of digestion of R.I. phage by trypsin, chymotrypsin, or desoxyribonuclease is about the same as that of active phage (Northrop, 1955 a). Effect of Various Substances on the Formation of R.I. Phage.- There is an equilibrium between R.I. phage and active phage. The R.I. form is the stable one in dilute salt solution, pH 5 to 6.5 and at low temperature (6.5, in dilute salt solution, the R.I. phage changes to the active form. The cycle, active right harpoon over left harpoon inactive phage, may be repeated many times at 0 degrees C. by changing the pH of the solution back and forth between pH 7 and pH 6. Irreversible inactivation is caused by distilled water, some heavy metals, concentrated urea or quanidine solutions, and by l-arginine. Reversible inactivation is prevented by all salts tested (except those causing

  2. Does the oxidation of methionine residue precede the inactivation of the trypsin inhibitor (LUTI in germinating seeds of common flax (Linum usitatissimum?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Lorenc-Kubis

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Antitrypsin activity in germinating common seeds of flax (Linum usitatissimum was investigated. At the early stage of germination an increase in antitrypsin activity was observed, followed by its decrease during the development of the seedlings. From 6-day-old seedlings a trypsin inhibitor (gerLUTI was purified. The purification procedure involved fractionation of proteins from seedling homogenate with alcohol and successive chromatography on CM-Sephadex C-25 on immobilised methylchymotrypsin in the presence of 5 M NaCl, and finally on a C18 column in RP-HPLC. The gerLUTI migrated in SDS PAGE as a single band, but in mass spectroscopy analysis it exhibited the presence of at least three forms with molecular masses of 7654 ± 3 Da, 7668/7670 ± 3 Da, and 7687 ± 3 Da. The preparation of LUTI isolated from resting seeds contained only one form, with a molecular mass of 7655 ± 3 Da. LUTI and gerLUTI differed also in methionine contents. LUTI contained two methionine residues, whereas in gerLUTI only a trace of methionine was detected. The obtained results might suggest that during flax seeds germination the inhibitor molecules undergo selective modification, e.g. oxidation at methionine residues, before being degraded by proteolytic enzymes.

  3. Temporal profiling of the chromatin proteome reveals system-wide responses to replication inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khoudoli, Guennadi A; Gillespie, Peter J; Stewart, Graeme;

    2008-01-01

    Although the replication, expression, and maintenance of DNA are well-studied processes, the way that they are coordinated is poorly understood. Here, we report an analysis of the changing association of proteins with chromatin (the chromatin proteome) during progression through interphase...... of the cell cycle. Sperm nuclei were incubated in Xenopus egg extracts, and chromatin-associated proteins were analyzed by mass spectrometry at different times. Approximately 75% of the proteins varied in abundance on chromatin by more than 15%, suggesting that the chromatin proteome is highly dynamic....... Proteins were then assigned to one of 12 different clusters on the basis of their pattern of chromatin association. Each cluster contained functional groups of proteins involved in different nuclear processes related to progression through interphase. We also blocked DNA replication by inhibiting either...

  4. Contribution of Topological Domains and Loop Formation to 3D Chromatin Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuthy Ea

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent investigations on 3D chromatin folding revealed that the eukaryote genomes are both highly compartmentalized and extremely dynamic. This review presents the most recent advances in topological domains’ organization of the eukaryote genomes and discusses the relationship to chromatin loop formation. CTCF protein appears as a central factor of these two organization levels having either a strong insulating role at TAD borders, or a weaker architectural role in chromatin loop formation. TAD borders directly impact on chromatin dynamics by restricting contacts within specific genomic portions thus confining chromatin loop formation within TADs. We discuss how sub-TAD chromatin dynamics, constrained into a recently described statistical helix conformation, can produce functional interactions by contact stabilization.

  5. Female meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in chicken.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Schoenmakers

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available During meiotic prophase in male mammals, the heterologous X and Y chromosomes remain largely unsynapsed, and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI leads to formation of the transcriptionally silenced XY body. In birds, the heterogametic sex is female, carrying Z and W chromosomes (ZW, whereas males have the homogametic ZZ constitution. During chicken oogenesis, the heterologous ZW pair reaches a state of complete heterologous synapsis, and this might enable maintenance of transcription of Z- and W chromosomal genes during meiotic prophase. Herein, we show that the ZW pair is transiently silenced, from early pachytene to early diplotene using immunocytochemistry and gene expression analyses. We propose that ZW inactivation is most likely achieved via spreading of heterochromatin from the W on the Z chromosome. Also, persistent meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs may contribute to silencing of Z. Surprisingly, gammaH2AX, a marker of DSBs, and also the earliest histone modification that is associated with XY body formation in mammalian and marsupial spermatocytes, does not cover the ZW during the synapsed stage. However, when the ZW pair starts to desynapse, a second wave of gammaH2AX accumulates on the unsynapsed regions of Z, which also show a reappearance of the DSB repair protein RAD51. This indicates that repair of meiotic DSBs on the heterologous part of Z is postponed until late pachytene/diplotene, possibly to avoid recombination with regions on the heterologously synapsed W chromosome. Two days after entering diplotene, the Z looses gammaH2AX and shows reactivation. This is the first report of meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in a species with female heterogamety, providing evidence that this mechanism is not specific to spermatogenesis. It also indicates the presence of an evolutionary force that drives meiotic sex chromosome inactivation independent of the final achievement of synapsis.

  6. Inactivation of Anandamide Signaling: A Continuing Debate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wael E. Houssen

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Since the first endocannabinoid anandamide was identified in 1992, extensive research has been conducted to characterize the elements of the tightly controlled endocannabinoid signaling system. While it was established that the activity of endocannabinoids are terminated by a two-step process that includes cellular uptake and degradation, there is still a continuing debate about the mechanistic role of these processes in inactivating anandamide signals.

  7. Pulsed electric field inactivation in a microreactor

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, M.B.

    2006-01-01

    Pulsed electric fields (PEF) is a novel, non-thermal pasteurization method which uses short, high electric field pulses to inactivate microorganisms. The advantage of a pasteurization method like PEF compared to regular heat pasteurization is that the taste, flavour, texture and nutritional value are much less affected. At the moment, the PEF process faces several challenges, to which microtechnology could be an aid. The small electrode distance in microtechnological reactors enables the use ...

  8. Photodynamic inactivation of antibiotic-resistant pathogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays methicillin-resistant strain Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the most widespread multiresistant bacteria. Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) of microorganisms by photosensitizers (PS) may be an effective and alternative therapeutic option against antibiotic resistant bacteria. The effectiveness of new PS cationic porphyrin Zn-TBut4PyP was tested on two strains of S. aureus (MRSA and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus). It is shown that Zn-TBut4PyP has high photodynamic activity against both strains

  9. Rapid inactivation of SARS-like coronaviruses.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapil, Sanjay (Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS); Oberst, R. D. (Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS); Bieker, Jill Marie; Tucker, Mark David; Souza, Caroline Ann; Williams, Cecelia Victoria

    2004-03-01

    Chemical disinfection and inactivation of viruses is largely understudied, but is very important especially in the case of highly infectious viruses. The purpose of this LDRD was to determine the efficacy of the Sandia National Laboratories developed decontamination formulations against Bovine Coronavirus (BCV) as a surrogate for the coronavirus that causes Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in humans. The outbreak of SARS in late 2002 resulted from a highly infectious virus that was able to survive and remain infectious for extended periods. For this study, preliminary testing with Escherichia coli MS-2 (MS-2) and Escherichia coli T4 (T4) bacteriophages was conducted to develop virucidal methodology for verifying the inactivation after treatment with the test formulations following AOAC germicidal methodologies. After the determination of various experimental parameters (i.e. exposure, concentration) of the formulations, final testing was conducted on BCV. All experiments were conducted with various organic challenges (horse serum, bovine feces, compost) for results that more accurately represent field use condition. The MS-2 and T4 were slightly more resistant than BCV and required a 2 minute exposure while BCV was completely inactivated after a 1 minute exposure. These results were also consistent for the testing conducted in the presence of the various organic challenges indicating that the test formulations are highly effective for real world application.

  10. Analysis of Myc-induced histone modifications on target chromatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Martinato

    Full Text Available The c-myc proto-oncogene is induced by mitogens and is a central regulator of cell growth and differentiation. The c-myc product, Myc, is a transcription factor that binds a multitude of genomic sites, estimated to be over 10-15% of all promoter regions. Target promoters generally pre-exist in an active or poised chromatin state that is further modified by Myc, contributing to fine transcriptional regulation (activation or repression of the afferent gene. Among other mechanisms, Myc recruits histone acetyl-transferases to target chromatin and locally promotes hyper-acetylation of multiple lysines on histones H3 and H4, although the identity and combination of the modified lysines is unknown. Whether Myc dynamically regulates other histone modifications (or marks at its binding sites also remains to be addressed. Here, we used quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation (qChIP to profile a total of 24 lysine-acetylation and -methylation marks modulated by Myc at target promoters in a human B-cell line with a regulatable c-myc transgene. Myc binding promoted acetylation of multiple lysines, primarily of H3K9, H3K14, H3K18, H4K5 and H4K12, but significantly also of H4K8, H4K91 and H2AK5. Dimethylation of H3K79 was also selectively induced at target promoters. A majority of target promoters showed co-induction of multiple marks - in various combinations - correlating with recruitment of the two HATs tested (Tip60 and HBO1, incorporation of the histone variant H2A.Z and transcriptional activation. Based on this and previous findings, we surmise that Myc recruits the Tip60/p400 complex to achieve a coordinated histone acetylation/exchange reaction at activated promoters. Our data are also consistent with the additive and redundant role of multiple acetylation events in transcriptional activation.

  11. A unique chromatin signature uncovers early developmental enhancers in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rada-Iglesias, Alvaro; Bajpai, Ruchi; Swigut, Tomek; Brugmann, Samantha A; Flynn, Ryan A; Wysocka, Joanna

    2011-02-10

    Cell-fate transitions involve the integration of genomic information encoded by regulatory elements, such as enhancers, with the cellular environment. However, identification of genomic sequences that control human embryonic development represents a formidable challenge. Here we show that in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), unique chromatin signatures identify two distinct classes of genomic elements, both of which are marked by the presence of chromatin regulators p300 and BRG1, monomethylation of histone H3 at lysine 4 (H3K4me1), and low nucleosomal density. In addition, elements of the first class are distinguished by the acetylation of histone H3 at lysine 27 (H3K27ac), overlap with previously characterized hESC enhancers, and are located proximally to genes expressed in hESCs and the epiblast. In contrast, elements of the second class, which we term 'poised enhancers', are distinguished by the absence of H3K27ac, enrichment of histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3), and are linked to genes inactive in hESCs and instead are involved in orchestrating early steps in embryogenesis, such as gastrulation, mesoderm formation and neurulation. Consistent with the poised identity, during differentiation of hESCs to neuroepithelium, a neuroectoderm-specific subset of poised enhancers acquires a chromatin signature associated with active enhancers. When assayed in zebrafish embryos, poised enhancers are able to direct cell-type and stage-specific expression characteristic of their proximal developmental gene, even in the absence of sequence conservation in the fish genome. Our data demonstrate that early developmental enhancers are epigenetically pre-marked in hESCs and indicate an unappreciated role of H3K27me3 at distal regulatory elements. Moreover, the wealth of new regulatory sequences identified here provides an invaluable resource for studies and isolation of transient, rare cell populations representing early stages of human embryogenesis.

  12. Direct Measurement of Local Chromatin Fluidity Using Optical Trap Modulation Force Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Roopa, T.; Shivashankar, G. V.

    2006-01-01

    Chromatin assembly is condensed by histone tail-tail interactions and other nuclear proteins into a highly compact structure. Using an optical trap modulation force spectroscopy, we probe the effect of tail interactions on local chromatin fluidity. Chromatin fibers, purified from mammalian cells, are tethered between a microscope coverslip and a glass micropipette. Mechanical unzipping of tail interactions, using the micropipette, lead to the enhancement of local fluidity. This is measured us...

  13. Biochemical and structural characterization of Cren7, a novel chromatin protein conserved among Crenarchaea

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Li; Feng, Yingang; Zhang, Zhenfeng; Yao, Hongwei; Luo, Yuanming; Wang, Jinfeng; Huang, Li

    2007-01-01

    Archaea contain a variety of chromatin proteins consistent with the evolution of different genome packaging mechanisms. Among the two main kingdoms in the Archaea, Euryarchaeota synthesize histone homologs, whereas Crenarchaeota have not been shown to possess a chromatin protein conserved at the kingdom level. We report the identification of Cren7, a novel family of chromatin proteins highly conserved in the Crenarchaeota. A small, basic, methylated and abundant protein, Cren7 displays a high...

  14. Study on Resistance of Human Sperm Chromatin to Heparin Decondensation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    褚劲松; 李建国; 薛同一; 王一飞

    1995-01-01

    Resistance of human sperm chromatin to heparin deeondensatinn was investigated by image analysis. The level of DNA deeondensation was determined by measuring the α, [red fluorescence/(red + green) fluoreseence] of sperm. The optimal experimental conditions were incubating sperms with 1000 IU/ml of heparin at 37℃ for 13 minutes and analysing the sperms with excitation F488, red fluoreseenee F630, green fluoreseence F530. The result showed that 72.93±14.73 percent of 20 fertile human sperms resist heparin deeondensa tion.

  15. Evaluation of sperm chromatin structure in boar semen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banaszewska Dorota

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was an attempt to evaluate sperm chromatin structure in the semen of insemination boars. Preparations of semen were stained with acridine orange, aniline blue, and chromomycin A3. Abnormal protamination occurred more frequently in young individuals whose sexual development was not yet complete, but may also be an individual trait. This possibility is important to factor into the decision regarding further exploitation of insemination boars. Thus a precise assessment of abnormalities in the protamination process would seem to be expedient as a tool supplementing morphological and molecular evaluation of semen. Disruptions in nucleoprotein structure can be treated as indicators of the biological value of sperm cells.

  16. Hydrodynamic evidence in support of spacer regions in chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, K S; Shaw, B R

    1977-08-12

    Quasi-elastic light scattering and sedimentation velocity methods were used to study the hydrodynamic properties of purified dimer subunits obtained from partial digestion of chicken erythrocyte chromatin with staphylococcal nuclease. The experimental value of 1.87 +/- 0.08 X 10(-7) gram per second for the friction factor of these dimer subunits in low ionic strength buffer cannot be reasonably interpreted in terms of a contiguous sphere model. Analysis by means of an equivalent dimer method suggests that the spacer region accounts for a maximum of 19 percent of the friction properties of the dimer.

  17. Effects of nuclear isolation on psoralen affinity for chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have tested the effects of nuclear isolation on intercalation of TMP (a psoralen) at specific sequences and in total DNA of cultured human cells. DNA in nuclei photobound about 20% more TMP than in cells and about 10% as much as purified DNA. In contrast, a transcribed ras gene and a randomly selected polymorphic sequence each bound about 20% more TMP than total DNA in cells. However, in nuclei, as in purified DNA, both sequences were just as sensitive as total DNA. Apparently, chromatin in cells exists within diverse TMP-binding environments and some of this diversity was lost upon nuclear isolation

  18. Nucleosome conformational flexibility in experiments with single chromatin fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivolob A. V.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies on the chromatin nucleosome organization play an ever increasing role in our comprehension of mechanisms of the gene activity regulation. This minireview describes the results on the nucleosome conformational flexibility, which were obtained using magnetic tweezers to apply torsion to oligonucleosome fibers reconstituted on single DNA molecules. Such an approach revealed a new structural form of the nucleosome, the reversome, in which DNA is wrapped in a right-handed superhelix around a distorted histone octamer. Molecular mechanisms of the nucleosome structural flexibility and its biological relevance are discussed.

  19. The Effect of Preceding Biopsy on Complete Endoscopic Resection in Rectal Carcinoid Tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sang Pyo; Sung, In-Kyung; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Lee, Sun-Young; Park, Hyung Seok; Shim, Chan Sup

    2014-01-01

    Biopsy of rectal carcinoid tumor is commonly taken before endoscopic resection. However the preceding biopsy can inhibit complete resection by causing blurred tumor border and fibrosis of the tissue. The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of preceding biopsy on complete endoscopic resection in rectal carcinoid tumor. It was also determined if rectal carcinoid tumors can be macroscopically distinguished by endoscopy. We reviewed retrospectively the records of patients with re...

  20. Effects of Different Preceding Crops on Soil Micro-ecological Environment and Yield of Cucumber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Shouwei; LIU Shuqin; PAN Kai; WANG Lili; WU Fengzhi

    2011-01-01

    Pepper, celery, eggplant and tomato were used as preceding crops to study their effects on the yield, soil microorganism quantity and soil enzyme activities of cucumber. Results showed that four preceding crops all increased soil microorganism quantity in cucumber, but decreased population of Fusarium oxysporum. The effect of pepper was more significant than that of the others Populations of soil bacteria, fungi and actinomyces of pepper treatment were significantly higher than those of the other treatments, except that the populations of fungi had no significant difference with celery and eggplant treatments on 50 days after transplanting, while that of Fusarium oxysporum was fewer than that of the other treatments. The soil microorganism quantity in celery and eggplant treatment was more significant than tomato, but lower population of Fusarium oxysporum. Four preceding crops all increased sol enzyme activities, lnvertase and urease activities of pepper treatment were significantly higher than those of the other treatments, catalase activities of pepper, celery and eggplant treatments were significantly higher than those of tomato and the control treatments All preceding crops remarkably increased cucumber yield, with pepper as the highest. Comparing with the control, cucumber yields of pepper, celery and eggplant treatments increased by 24.9%, 13.6% and 11.9%, respectively. Results suggested that four preceding crops all improved soil microbial ecology and increased cucumber yield. The pepper was the most suitable preceding crop, then followed by celery and eggplant. Tomato had the similar effect as the control.

  1. Analysis of histone posttranslational modifications from nucleolus-associated chromatin by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillinger, Stefan; Garea, Ana Villar; Deutzmann, Rainer; Németh, Attila

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin is unevenly distributed within the eukaryote nucleus and it contributes to the formation of morphologically and functionally distinct substructures, called chromatin domains and nuclear bodies. Here we describe an approach to assess specific chromatin features, the histone posttranslational modifications (PTMs), of the largest nuclear sub-compartment, the nucleolus. In this chapter, methods for the isolation of nucleolus-associated chromatin from native or formaldehyde-fixed cells and the effect of experimental procedures on the outcome of mass spectrometry analysis of histone PTMs are compared.

  2. MRN1 implicates chromatin remodeling complexes and architectural factors in mRNA maturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Düring, Louis; Thorsen, Michael; Petersen, Darima;

    2012-01-01

    A functional relationship between chromatin structure and mRNA processing events has been suggested, however, so far only a few involved factors have been characterized. Here we show that rsc nhp6¿¿ mutants, deficient for the function of the chromatin remodeling factor RSC and the chromatin....... Genetic interactions are observed between 2 µm-MRN1 and the splicing deficient mutants snt309¿, prp3, prp4, and prp22, and additional genetic analyses link MRN1, SNT309, NHP6A/B, SWI/SNF, and RSC supporting the notion of a role of chromatin structure in mRNA processing....

  3. Restoring chromatin after replication: How new and old histone marks come together

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jasencakova, Zusana; Groth, Anja

    2010-01-01

    replication and chromatin assembly processes in time and space. Dynamic recycling and de novo deposition of histones are fundamental for chromatin restoration. Histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) are thought to have a causal role in establishing distinct chromatin structures. Here we discuss PTMs...... present on new and parental histones and how they influence genome stability and restoration of epigenetically defined domains. Newly deposited histones must change their signature in the process of chromatin restoration, this may occur in a step-wise fashion involving replication-coupled processes...... and information from recycled parental histones....

  4. Identification of potential nuclear reprogramming and differentiation factors by a novel selection method for cloning chromatin-binding proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiuWang; AihuaZheng; LingYi; ChongrenXu; MingxiaoDing; HongkuiDeng

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear reprogramming is critical for animal cloning and stem cell creation through nuclear transfer, which requires extensive remodeling of chromosomal architecture involving dramatic changes in chromatin-binding proteins. To understand the mechanism of nuclear reprogramming, it is critical to identify chromatin-binding factors specify the reprogramming process. In this report, we have developed a high-throughput selection method, based on T7 phage display and chromatin immunoprecipitation, to isolate chromatin-binding factors expressed in mouse embryonic stem cells using primary mouse embryonic fibroblast chromatin. Seven chromatin-binding proteins have been isolated by this method. We have also isolated several chromatin-binding proteins involved in hepatocyte differentiation. Our method provides a powerful tool to rapidly and selectively identify chromatin-binding proteins. The method can be used to study epigenetic modification of chromatin during nuclear reprogramming, cell differentiation, and transdifferentiation.

  5. Genomic alterations in DNA repair and chromatin remodeling genes in estrogen receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer patients with exceptional responses to capecitabine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyzed the genomic and phosphoproteomic profiles of breast cancer tissue obtained from six patients with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive, HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer who had highly durable (≥5 years) and, in some cases, ongoing clinical responses with capecitabine. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples from patients’ primary (n = 4) or metastatic (n = 2) breast cancers were utilized for targeted next-generation sequencing and reversed phase protein microarray. Two patients received capecitabine monotherapy. Four patients received capecitabine in combination with paclitaxel; three of these continued single-agent capecitabine after stopping paclitaxel. Capecitabine was discontinued for progressive disease after a mean of 66 months in four patients (range 54–86 months), and two patients remain on therapy, having received capecitabine for >91 months and >122 months, respectively. Three patients’ cancers (50%) had likely functional alterations in DNA repair and chromatin remodeling genes, while three other patients’ cancers had variants of unknown significance in these pathways. Mutations in PIK3CA, amplifications of FGFR1 or ZNF703, or phosphorylation of HER family receptors and their downstream proteins did not preclude exceptional responses to capecitabine. None of the patients’ tumors harbored TP53 or PTEN mutations. Four of the patients had breast cancer tissue available for PTEN immunohistochemistry, and all four patients’ cancers were positive for PTEN. These surprising findings in a group of phenotypically similar patients with ER-positive, endocrine therapy-pretreated, HER2-negative metastases, are supported by preclinical data showing that sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil is enhanced by deficiencies in chromatin remodeling and homologous recombination genes. Our findings suggest that mutations that inactivate homologous recombination and/or chromatin remodeling genes within ER-positive, HER2-negative breast cancers may

  6. Chromatin factors affecting DNA repair in mammalian cell nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are investigating chromatin factors that participate in the incision step of DNA repair in eukaryotic cells. Localization of repair activity within nuclei, the stability and extractability of activity, the specificity for recognizing damage in chromatin or purified DNA as substrates are of interest in this investigation of human cells, CHO cells, and their radiation sensitive mutants. We have developed procedures that provide nuclei in which their DNA behaves as a collection of circular molecules. The integrity of the DNA in human nuclei can be maintained during incubation in appropriate buffers for as long as 60 minutes. When cells or nuclei are exposed to uv light prior to incubation, incisions presumably associated with DNA repair can be demonstrated. Incision activity is stable to prior extraction of nuclei with 0.6 M NaCl, which removes many nonhistone proteins. Our studies are consistent with an hypothesis that factors responsible for initiating DNA repair are localized in the nuclear matrix. 18 references, 3 figures

  7. Chromatin Assembly at Kinetochores Is Uncoupled from DNA Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelby, Richard D.; Monier, Karine; Sullivan, Kevin F.

    2000-01-01

    The specification of metazoan centromeres does not depend strictly on centromeric DNA sequences, but also requires epigenetic factors. The mechanistic basis for establishing a centromeric “state” on the DNA remains unclear. In this work, we have directly examined replication timing of the prekinetochore domain of human chromosomes. Kinetochores were labeled by expression of epitope-tagged CENP-A, which stably marks prekinetochore domains in human cells. By immunoprecipitating CENP-A mononucleosomes from synchronized cells pulsed with [3H]thymidine we demonstrate that CENP-A–associated DNA is replicated in mid-to-late S phase. Cytological analysis of DNA replication further demonstrated that centromeres replicate asynchronously in parallel with numerous other genomic regions. In contrast, quantitative Western blot analysis demonstrates that CENP-A protein synthesis occurs later, in G2. Quantitative fluorescence microscopy and transient transfection in the presence of aphidicolin, an inhibitor of DNA replication, show that CENP-A can assemble into centromeres in the absence of DNA replication. Thus, unlike most genomic chromatin, histone synthesis and assembly are uncoupled from DNA replication at the kinetochore. Uncoupling DNA replication from CENP-A synthesis suggests that regulated chromatin assembly or remodeling could play a role in epigenetic centromere propagation. PMID:11086012

  8. Synaptic, transcriptional and chromatin genes disrupted in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rubeis, Silvia; He, Xin; Goldberg, Arthur P; Poultney, Christopher S; Samocha, Kaitlin; Cicek, A Erucment; Kou, Yan; Liu, Li; Fromer, Menachem; Walker, Susan; Singh, Tarinder; Klei, Lambertus; Kosmicki, Jack; Shih-Chen, Fu; Aleksic, Branko; Biscaldi, Monica; Bolton, Patrick F; Brownfeld, Jessica M; Cai, Jinlu; Campbell, Nicholas G; Carracedo, Angel; Chahrour, Maria H; Chiocchetti, Andreas G; Coon, Hilary; Crawford, Emily L; Curran, Sarah R; Dawson, Geraldine; Duketis, Eftichia; Fernandez, Bridget A; Gallagher, Louise; Geller, Evan; Guter, Stephen J; Hill, R Sean; Ionita-Laza, Juliana; Jimenz Gonzalez, Patricia; Kilpinen, Helena; Klauck, Sabine M; Kolevzon, Alexander; Lee, Irene; Lei, Irene; Lei, Jing; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Ma'ayan, Avi; Marshall, Christian R; McInnes, Alison L; Neale, Benjamin; Owen, Michael J; Ozaki, Noriio; Parellada, Mara; Parr, Jeremy R; Purcell, Shaun; Puura, Kaija; Rajagopalan, Deepthi; Rehnström, Karola; Reichenberg, Abraham; Sabo, Aniko; Sachse, Michael; Sanders, Stephan J; Schafer, Chad; Schulte-Rüther, Martin; Skuse, David; Stevens, Christine; Szatmari, Peter; Tammimies, Kristiina; Valladares, Otto; Voran, Annette; Li-San, Wang; Weiss, Lauren A; Willsey, A Jeremy; Yu, Timothy W; Yuen, Ryan K C; Cook, Edwin H; Freitag, Christine M; Gill, Michael; Hultman, Christina M; Lehner, Thomas; Palotie, Aaarno; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Sklar, Pamela; State, Matthew W; Sutcliffe, James S; Walsh, Christiopher A; Scherer, Stephen W; Zwick, Michael E; Barett, Jeffrey C; Cutler, David J; Roeder, Kathryn; Devlin, Bernie; Daly, Mark J; Buxbaum, Joseph D

    2014-11-13

    The genetic architecture of autism spectrum disorder involves the interplay of common and rare variants and their impact on hundreds of genes. Using exome sequencing, here we show that analysis of rare coding variation in 3,871 autism cases and 9,937 ancestry-matched or parental controls implicates 22 autosomal genes at a false discovery rate (FDR) < 0.05, plus a set of 107 autosomal genes strongly enriched for those likely to affect risk (FDR < 0.30). These 107 genes, which show unusual evolutionary constraint against mutations, incur de novo loss-of-function mutations in over 5% of autistic subjects. Many of the genes implicated encode proteins for synaptic formation, transcriptional regulation and chromatin-remodelling pathways. These include voltage-gated ion channels regulating the propagation of action potentials, pacemaking and excitability-transcription coupling, as well as histone-modifying enzymes and chromatin remodellers-most prominently those that mediate post-translational lysine methylation/demethylation modifications of histones.

  9. Synaptic, transcriptional and chromatin genes disrupted in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rubeis, Silvia; He, Xin; Goldberg, Arthur P; Poultney, Christopher S; Samocha, Kaitlin; Cicek, A Erucment; Kou, Yan; Liu, Li; Fromer, Menachem; Walker, Susan; Singh, Tarinder; Klei, Lambertus; Kosmicki, Jack; Shih-Chen, Fu; Aleksic, Branko; Biscaldi, Monica; Bolton, Patrick F; Brownfeld, Jessica M; Cai, Jinlu; Campbell, Nicholas G; Carracedo, Angel; Chahrour, Maria H; Chiocchetti, Andreas G; Coon, Hilary; Crawford, Emily L; Curran, Sarah R; Dawson, Geraldine; Duketis, Eftichia; Fernandez, Bridget A; Gallagher, Louise; Geller, Evan; Guter, Stephen J; Hill, R Sean; Ionita-Laza, Juliana; Jimenz Gonzalez, Patricia; Kilpinen, Helena; Klauck, Sabine M; Kolevzon, Alexander; Lee, Irene; Lei, Irene; Lei, Jing; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Ma'ayan, Avi; Marshall, Christian R; McInnes, Alison L; Neale, Benjamin; Owen, Michael J; Ozaki, Noriio; Parellada, Mara; Parr, Jeremy R; Purcell, Shaun; Puura, Kaija; Rajagopalan, Deepthi; Rehnström, Karola; Reichenberg, Abraham; Sabo, Aniko; Sachse, Michael; Sanders, Stephan J; Schafer, Chad; Schulte-Rüther, Martin; Skuse, David; Stevens, Christine; Szatmari, Peter; Tammimies, Kristiina; Valladares, Otto; Voran, Annette; Li-San, Wang; Weiss, Lauren A; Willsey, A Jeremy; Yu, Timothy W; Yuen, Ryan K C; Cook, Edwin H; Freitag, Christine M; Gill, Michael; Hultman, Christina M; Lehner, Thomas; Palotie, Aaarno; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Sklar, Pamela; State, Matthew W; Sutcliffe, James S; Walsh, Christiopher A; Scherer, Stephen W; Zwick, Michael E; Barett, Jeffrey C; Cutler, David J; Roeder, Kathryn; Devlin, Bernie; Daly, Mark J; Buxbaum, Joseph D

    2014-11-13

    The genetic architecture of autism spectrum disorder involves the interplay of common and rare variants and their impact on hundreds of genes. Using exome sequencing, here we show that analysis of rare coding variation in 3,871 autism cases and 9,937 ancestry-matched or parental controls implicates 22 autosomal genes at a false discovery rate (FDR) < 0.05, plus a set of 107 autosomal genes strongly enriched for those likely to affect risk (FDR < 0.30). These 107 genes, which show unusual evolutionary constraint against mutations, incur de novo loss-of-function mutations in over 5% of autistic subjects. Many of the genes implicated encode proteins for synaptic formation, transcriptional regulation and chromatin-remodelling pathways. These include voltage-gated ion channels regulating the propagation of action potentials, pacemaking and excitability-transcription coupling, as well as histone-modifying enzymes and chromatin remodellers-most prominently those that mediate post-translational lysine methylation/demethylation modifications of histones. PMID:25363760

  10. Differential affinity of mammalian histone H1 somatic subtypes for DNA and chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mora Xavier

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histone H1 is involved in the formation and maintenance of chromatin higher order structure. H1 has multiple isoforms; the subtypes differ in timing of expression, extent of phosphorylation and turnover rate. In vertebrates, the amino acid substitution rates differ among subtypes by almost one order of magnitude, suggesting that each subtype might have acquired a unique function. We have devised a competitive assay to estimate the relative binding affinities of histone H1 mammalian somatic subtypes H1a-e and H1° for long chromatin fragments (30–35 nucleosomes in physiological salt (0.14 M NaCl at constant stoichiometry. Results The H1 complement of native chromatin was perturbed by adding an additional amount of one of the subtypes. A certain amount of SAR (scaffold-associated region DNA was present in the mixture to avoid precipitation of chromatin by excess H1. SAR DNA also provided a set of reference relative affinities, which were needed to estimate the relative affinities of the subtypes for chromatin from the distribution of the subtypes between the SAR and the chromatin. The amounts of chromatin, SAR and additional H1 were adjusted so as to keep the stoichiometry of perturbed chromatin similar to that of native chromatin. H1 molecules freely exchanged between the chromatin and SAR binding sites. In conditions of free exchange, H1a was the subtype of lowest affinity, H1b and H1c had intermediate affinities and H1d, H1e and H1° the highest affinities. Subtype affinities for chromatin differed by up to 19-fold. The relative affinities of the subtypes for chromatin were equivalent to those estimated for a SAR DNA fragment and a pUC19 fragment of similar length. Avian H5 had an affinity ~12-fold higher than H1e for both DNA and chromatin. Conclusion H1 subtypes freely exchange in vitro between chromatin binding sites in physiological salt (0.14 M NaCl. The large differences in relative affinity of the H1 subtypes for

  11. Molecular and Physiological Effects of Mycobacterial oxyR Inactivation

    OpenAIRE

    Pagán-Ramos, Eileen; Master, Sharon S.; Pritchett, Christopher L.; Reimschuessel, Renate; Trucksis, Michele; Timmins, Graham S.; Deretic, Vojo

    2006-01-01

    The majority of slow-growing mycobacteria have a functional oxyR, the central regulator of the bacterial oxidative stress response. In contrast, this gene has been inactivated during the evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Here we inactivated the oxyR gene in Mycobacterium marinum, an organism used to model M. tuberculosis pathogenesis. Inactivation of oxyR abrogated induction of ahpC, a gene encoding alkylhydroperoxide reductase, normally activated upon peroxide challenge. The absence o...

  12. MILT DILUTION EFFECTIVENESS ON PIKEPERCH (SANDER LUCIOPERCA) SPERM DNA INACTIVATION

    OpenAIRE

    B. KORBULY; A. GROZEA; ADA CEAN; I. BĂNĂŢEAN - DUNEA; N. PĂCALĂ; A. VĂLEAN

    2013-01-01

    Percid fishes, including pikeperch (Sander lucioperca) have recently become the subject of intense research. In order to obtain gynogenetic all female pikeperch populations, normal pikeperch eggs are fertilized with inactivated sperm. Because pikeperch semen has a high viscosity, milt has to be diluted in an immobilizing solution before DNA inactivation. The aim of this study was to assess milt diluting solutions effectiveness in order to inactivate sperm DNA with UV irradiation, to produce m...

  13. X Inactivation and Progenitor Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben Agrelo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, silencing of one of the two X chromosomes is necessary to achieve dosage compensation. The 17 kb non-coding RNA called Xist triggers X inactivation. Gene silencing by Xist can only be achieved in certain contexts such as in cells of the early embryo and in certain hematopoietic progenitors where silencing factors are present. Moreover, these epigenetic contexts are maintained in cancer progenitors in which SATB1 has been identified as a factor related to Xist-mediated chromosome silencing.

  14. Inactivation of Effector Caspases through Nondegradative Polyubiquitylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditzel, Mark; Broemer, Meike; Tenev, Tencho;

    2008-01-01

    Ubiquitin-mediated inactivation of caspases has long been postulated to contribute to the regulation of apoptosis. However, detailed mechanisms and functional consequences of caspase ubiquitylation have not been demonstrated. Here we show that the Drosophila Inhibitor of Apoptosis 1, DIAP1, blocks...... reduces the caspase's proteolytic velocity. Disruption of drICE ubiquitylation, either by mutation of DIAP1's E3 activity or drICE's ubiquitin-acceptor lysines, abrogates DIAP1's ability to neutralize drICE and suppress apoptosis in vivo. We also show that DIAP1 rests in an "inactive" conformation that...

  15. Radiation Inactivation of Viruses in Infected Products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The effects of gamma radiation on foot-and-mouth disease virus in vitro and in situ have been studied. The data so far obtained show that a dose of 2 Mrad is required to inactivate virus in infected animal carcasses. But the dose may adversely affect the organoleptic quality of the meat. Experiments in vitro and in situ are necessary to study the effects of ionizing radiation on other viruses, such as rinderpest, swine fever and African swine fever-viruses, associated with animal products. Radiation may offer a possible means of eliminating the virus titre in many animal products and solve consequent quarantine problems. (author)

  16. Chromatin and epigenetics in all their states: Meeting report of the first conference on Epigenetic and Chromatin Regulation of Plant Traits - January 14 - 15, 2016 - Strasbourg, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bey, Till; Jamge, Suraj; Klemme, Sonja; Komar, Dorota Natalia; Le Gall, Sabine; Mikulski, Pawel; Schmidt, Martin; Zicola, Johan; Berr, Alexandre

    2016-08-01

    In January 2016, the first Epigenetic and Chromatin Regulation of Plant Traits conference was held in Strasbourg, France. An all-star lineup of speakers, a packed audience of 130 participants from over 20 countries, and a friendly scientific atmosphere contributed to make this conference a meeting to remember. In this article we summarize some of the new insights into chromatin, epigenetics, and epigenomics research and highlight nascent ideas and emerging concepts in this exciting area of research. PMID:27184433

  17. No evidence of conpopulation sperm precedence between allopatric populations of house mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renée C Firman

    Full Text Available Investigations into the evolution of reproductive barriers have traditionally focused on closely related species, and the prevalence of conspecific sperm precedence. The effectiveness of conspecific sperm precedence at limiting gene exchange between species suggests that gametic isolation is an important component of reproductive isolation. However, there is a paucity of tests for evidence of sperm precedence during the earlier stages of divergence, for example among isolated populations. Here, we sourced individuals from two allopatric populations of house mice (Mus domesticus and performed competitive in vitro fertilisation assays to test for conpopulation sperm precedence specifically at the gametic level. We found that ova population origin did not influence the outcome of the sperm competitions, and thus provide no evidence of conpopulation or heteropopulation sperm precedence. Instead, we found that males from a population that had evolved under a high level of postcopulatory sexual selection consistently outcompeted males from a population that had evolved under a relatively lower level of postcopulatory sexual selection. We standardised the number of motile sperm of each competitor across the replicate assays. Our data therefore show that competitive fertilizing success was directly attributable to differences in sperm fertilizing competence.

  18. Inactivation of virus in solution by cold atmospheric pressure plasma: identification of chemical inactivation pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboubakr, Hamada A.; Gangal, Urvashi; Youssef, Mohammed M.; Goyal, Sagar M.; Bruggeman, Peter J.

    2016-05-01

    Cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAP) inactivates bacteria and virus through in situ production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS). While the bactericidal and virucidal efficiency of plasmas is well established, there is limited knowledge about the chemistry leading to the pathogen inactivation. This article describes a chemical analysis of the CAP reactive chemistry involved in the inactivation of feline calicivirus. We used a remote radio frequency CAP produced in varying gas mixtures leading to different plasma-induced chemistries. A study of the effects of selected scavengers complemented with positive control measurements of relevant RONS reveal two distinctive pathways based on singlet oxygen and peroxynitrous acid. The first mechanism is favored in the presence of oxygen and the second in the presence of air when a significant pH reduction is induced in the solution by the plasma. Additionally, smaller effects of the H2O2, O3 and \\text{NO}2- produced were also found. Identification of singlet oxygen-mediated 2-imidazolone/2-oxo-His (His  +14 Da)—an oxidative modification of His 262 comprising the capsid protein of feline calicivirus links the plasma induced singlet oxygen chemistry to viral inactivation.

  19. Modeling the pressure inactivation dynamics of Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamamoto K.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli, as a model microorganism, was treated in phosphate-buffered saline under high hydrostatic pressure between 100 and 300 MPa, and the inactivation dynamics was investigated from the viewpoint of predictive microbiology. Inactivation data were curve fitted by typical predictive models: logistic, Gompertz and Weibull functions. Weibull function described the inactivation curve the best. Two parameters of Weibull function were calculated for each holding pressure and their dependence on holding pressure was obtained by interpolation. With the interpolated parameters, inactivation curves were simulated and compared with the experimental data sets.

  20. A Testis-Specific Chaperone and the Chromatin Remodeler ISWI Mediate Repackaging of the Paternal Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile M. Doyen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available During spermatogenesis, the paternal genome is repackaged into a non-nucleosomal, highly compacted chromatin structure. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that Drosophila sperm chromatin proteins are characterized by a motif related to the high-mobility group (HMG box, which we termed male-specific transcript (MST-HMG box. MST77F is a MST-HMG-box protein that forms an essential component of sperm chromatin. The deposition of MST77F onto the paternal genome requires the chaperone function of tNAP, a testis-specific NAP protein. MST77F, in turn, enables the stable incorporation of MST35Ba and MST35Bb into sperm chromatin. Following MST-HMG-box protein deposition, the ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler ISWI mediates the appropriate organization of sperm chromatin. Conversely, at fertilization, maternal ISWI targets the paternal genome and drives its repackaging into de-condensed nucleosomal chromatin. Failure of this transition in ISWI mutant embryos is followed by mitotic defects, aneuploidy, and haploid embryonic divisions. Thus, ISWI enables bi-directional transitions between two fundamentally different forms of chromatin.

  1. Phytochrome B and histone deacetylase 6 control light-induced chromatin compaction in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Tessadori

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Natural genetic variation in Arabidopsis thaliana exists for many traits and often reflects acclimation to local environments. Studying natural variation has proven valuable in the characterization of phenotypic traits and, in particular, in identifying genetic factors controlling these traits. It has been previously shown that chromatin compaction changes during development and biotic stress. To gain more insight into the genetic control of chromatin compaction, we investigated the nuclear phenotype of 21 selected Arabidopsis accessions from different geographic origins and habitats. We show natural variation in chromatin compaction and demonstrate a positive correlation with latitude of geographic origin. The level of compaction appeared to be dependent on light intensity. A novel approach, combining Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL mapping and microscopic examination, pointed at PHYTOCHROME-B (PHYB and HISTONE DEACETYLASE-6 (HDA6 as positive regulators of light-controlled chromatin compaction. Indeed, mutant analyses demonstrate that both factors affect global chromatin organization. HDA6, in addition, strongly promotes the light-mediated compaction of the Nucleolar Organizing Regions (NORs. The accession Cape Verde Islands-0 (Cvi-0, which shows sequence polymorphism in the PHYB gene and in the HDA6 promotor, resembles the hda6 mutant in having reduced chromatin compaction and decreased methylation levels of DNA and histone H3K9 at the NORs. We provide evidence that chromatin organization is controlled by light intensity. We propose that chromatin plasticity is associated with acclimation of Arabidopsis to its environment. The polymorphic alleles such as PHYB and HDA6 control this process.

  2. Chd1 remodelers maintain open chromatin and regulate the epigenetics of differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Jenna [Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Center for Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet (Sweden); Ekwall, Karl, E-mail: karl.ekwall@ki.se [Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Center for Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet (Sweden); School of Life Sciences, University College Sodertorn, NOVUM, Huddinge (Sweden)

    2010-05-01

    Eukaryotic DNA is packaged around octamers of histone proteins into nucleosomes, the basic unit of chromatin. In addition to enabling meters of DNA to fit within the confines of a nucleus, the structure of chromatin has functional implications for cell identity. Covalent chemical modifications to the DNA and to histones, histone variants, ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, small noncoding RNAs and the level of chromatin compaction all contribute to chromosomal structure and to the activity or silencing of genes. These chromatin-level alterations are defined as epigenetic when they are heritable from mother to daughter cell. The great diversity of epigenomes that can arise from a single genome permits a single, totipotent cell to generate the hundreds of distinct cell types found in humans. Two recent studies in mouse and in fly have highlighted the importance of Chd1 chromatin remodelers for maintaining an open, active chromatin state. Based on evidence from fission yeast as a model system, we speculate that Chd1 remodelers are involved in the disassembly of nucleosomes at promoter regions, thus promoting active transcription and open chromatin. It is likely that these nucleosomes are specifically marked for disassembly by the histone variant H2A.Z.

  3. The condensed chromatin fiber: an allosteric chemo-mechanical machine for signal transduction and genome processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesne, Annick; Bécavin, Christophe; Victor, Jean–Marc

    2012-02-01

    Allostery is a key concept of molecular biology which refers to the control of an enzyme activity by an effector molecule binding the enzyme at another site rather than the active site (allos = other in Greek). We revisit here allostery in the context of chromatin and argue that allosteric principles underlie and explain the functional architecture required for spacetime coordination of gene expression at all scales from DNA to the whole chromosome. We further suggest that this functional architecture is provided by the chromatin fiber itself. The structural, mechanical and topological features of the chromatin fiber endow chromosomes with a tunable signal transduction from specific (or nonspecific) effectors to specific (or nonspecific) active sites. Mechanical constraints can travel along the fiber all the better since the fiber is more compact and regular, which speaks in favor of the actual existence of the (so-called 30 nm) chromatin fiber. Chromatin fiber allostery reconciles both the physical and biochemical approaches of chromatin. We illustrate this view with two supporting specific examples. Moreover, from a methodological point of view, we suggest that the notion of chromatin fiber allostery is particularly relevant for systemic approaches. Finally we discuss the evolutionary power of allostery in the context of chromatin and its relation to modularity.

  4. Assembly of Two Transgenes in an Artificial Chromatin Domain Gives Highly Coordinated Expression in Tobacco

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mlynárová, Ludmila; Loonen, Annelies; Mietkiewska, Elzbieta; Jansen, Ritsert C.; Nap, Jan-Peter

    2002-01-01

    The chromatin loop model predicts that genes within the same chromatin domain exhibit coordinated regulation. We here present the first direct experimental support for this model in plants. Two reporter genes, the E. coli β-glucuronidase gene and the firefly luciferase gene, driven by different prom

  5. Relationship between chromatin structure and sensitivity to molecularly targeted auger electron radiation therapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terry, S.Y.A.; Vallis, K.A.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: The open structure of euchromatin renders it susceptible to DNA damage by ionizing radiation (IR) compared with compact heterochromatin. The effect of chromatin configuration on the efficacy of Auger electron radiotherapy was investigated. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Chromatin structure was alte

  6. Prediction of highly expressed genes in microbes based on chromatin accessibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willenbrock, Hanni; Ussery, David

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is well known that gene expression is dependent on chromatin structure in eukaryotes and it is likely that chromatin can play a role in bacterial gene expression as well. Here, we use a nucleosomal position preference measure of anisotropic DNA flexibility to predict highly expressed...

  7. Requirements for chromatin reassembly during transcriptional downregulation of a heat shock gene in S. cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mette Moesgaard; Christensen, Marianne Skovgaard; Bonven, Bjarne Juul;

    2008-01-01

    , but not Asf1p, reassociation of H3 with DNA is compromised. However, despite a lasting open chromatin structure, transcription ceases normally in the spt6 mutant. Thus, transcriptional downregulation can be uncoupled from histone redepositioning and ongoing transcription is not required to prevent chromatin...

  8. The condensed chromatin fiber: an allosteric chemo-mechanical machine for signal transduction and genome processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allostery is a key concept of molecular biology which refers to the control of an enzyme activity by an effector molecule binding the enzyme at another site rather than the active site (allos = other in Greek). We revisit here allostery in the context of chromatin and argue that allosteric principles underlie and explain the functional architecture required for spacetime coordination of gene expression at all scales from DNA to the whole chromosome. We further suggest that this functional architecture is provided by the chromatin fiber itself. The structural, mechanical and topological features of the chromatin fiber endow chromosomes with a tunable signal transduction from specific (or nonspecific) effectors to specific (or nonspecific) active sites. Mechanical constraints can travel along the fiber all the better since the fiber is more compact and regular, which speaks in favor of the actual existence of the (so-called 30 nm) chromatin fiber. Chromatin fiber allostery reconciles both the physical and biochemical approaches of chromatin. We illustrate this view with two supporting specific examples. Moreover, from a methodological point of view, we suggest that the notion of chromatin fiber allostery is particularly relevant for systemic approaches. Finally we discuss the evolutionary power of allostery in the context of chromatin and its relation to modularity. (perspective)

  9. Herpes simplex virus 1 induces egress channels through marginalized host chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myllys, Markko; Ruokolainen, Visa; Aho, Vesa; Smith, Elizabeth A; Hakanen, Satu; Peri, Piritta; Salvetti, Anna; Timonen, Jussi; Hukkanen, Veijo; Larabell, Carolyn A; Vihinen-Ranta, Maija

    2016-01-01

    Lytic infection with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) induces profound modification of the cell nucleus including formation of a viral replication compartment and chromatin marginalization into the nuclear periphery. We used three-dimensional soft X-ray tomography, combined with cryogenic fluorescence, confocal and electron microscopy, to analyse the transformation of peripheral chromatin during HSV-1 infection. Our data showed an increased presence of low-density gaps in the marginalized chromatin at late infection. Advanced data analysis indicated the formation of virus-nucleocapsid-sized (or wider) channels extending through the compacted chromatin of the host. Importantly, confocal and electron microscopy analysis showed that these gaps frequently contained viral nucleocapsids. These results demonstrated that HSV-1 infection induces the formation of channels penetrating the compacted layer of cellular chromatin and allowing for the passage of progeny viruses to the nuclear envelope, their site of nuclear egress. PMID:27349677

  10. High-Frequency Promoter Firing Links THO Complex Function to Heavy Chromatin Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouaikel, John; Causse, Sébastien Z; Rougemaille, Mathieu;

    2013-01-01

    The THO complex is involved in transcription, genome stability, and messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) formation, but its precise molecular function remains enigmatic. Under heat shock conditions, THO mutants accumulate large protein-DNA complexes that alter the chromatin density of target genes...... (heavy chromatin), defining a specific biochemical facet of THO function and a powerful tool of analysis. Here, we show that heavy chromatin distribution is dictated by gene boundaries and that the gene promoter is necessary and sufficient to convey THO sensitivity in these conditions. Single......-molecule fluorescence insitu hybridization measurements show that heavy chromatin formation correlates with an unusually high firing pace of the promoter with more than 20 transcription events per minute. Heavy chromatin formation closely follows the modulation of promoter firing and strongly correlates with polymerase...

  11. Assembly of telomeric chromatin to create ALTernative endings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Roderick J; Almouzni, Genevieve

    2014-11-01

    Circumvention of the telomere length-dependent mechanisms that control the upper boundaries of cellular proliferation is necessary for the unlimited growth of cancer. Most cancer cells achieve cellular immortality by up-regulating the expression of telomerase to extend and maintain their telomere length. However, a small but significant number of cancers do so via the exchange of telomeric DNA between chromosomes in a pathway termed alternative lengthening of telomeres, or ALT. Although it remains to be clarified why a cell chooses the ALT pathway and how ALT is initiated, recently identified mutations in factors that shape the chromatin and epigenetic landscape of ALT telomeres are shedding light on these mechanisms. In this review, we examine these recent findings and integrate them into the current models of the ALT mechanism. PMID:25172551

  12. Quantitative Immunofluorescence Analysis of Nucleolus-Associated Chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillinger, Stefan; Németh, Attila

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear distribution of eu- and heterochromatin is nonrandom, heterogeneous, and dynamic, which is mirrored by specific spatiotemporal arrangements of histone posttranslational modifications (PTMs). Here we describe a semiautomated method for the analysis of histone PTM localization patterns within the mammalian nucleus using confocal laser scanning microscope images of fixed, immunofluorescence stained cells as data source. The ImageJ-based process includes the segmentation of the nucleus, furthermore measurements of total fluorescence intensities, the heterogeneity of the staining, and the frequency of the brightest pixels in the region of interest (ROI). In the presented image analysis pipeline, the perinucleolar chromatin is selected as primary ROI, and the nuclear periphery as secondary ROI. PMID:27576710

  13. Modulation of the Chromatin Phosphoproteome by the Haspin Protein Kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maiolica, Alessio; de Medina-Redondo, Maria; Schoof, Erwin;

    2014-01-01

    Recent discoveries have highlighted the importance of Haspin kinase activity for the correct positioning of the kinase Aurora B at the centromere. Haspin phosphorylates Thr3 of the histone H3 (H3), which provides a signal for Aurora B to localize to the centromere of mitotic chromosomes. To date...... protein- protein interaction network. We determined the Haspin consensus motif and the co-crystal structure of the kinase with the histone H3 tail. The structure revealed a unique bent substrate binding mode positioning the histone H3 residues Arg2 and Lys4 adjacent to the Haspin phosphorylated threonine......, histone H3 is the only confirmed Haspin substrate. We used a combination of biochemical, pharmacological, and mass spectrometric approaches to study the consequences of Haspin inhibition in mitotic cells. We quantified 3964 phosphorylation sites on chromatin- associated proteins and identified a Haspin...

  14. Impact of sperm DNA chromatin in the clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannou, Dimitrios; Miller, David; Griffin, Darren K; Tempest, Helen G

    2016-02-01

    The paternal contribution to fertilization and embryogenesis is frequently overlooked as the spermatozoon is often considered to be a silent vessel whose only function is to safely deliver the paternal genome to the maternal oocyte. In this article, we hope to demonstrate that this perception is far from the truth. Typically, infertile men have been unable to conceive naturally (or through regular IVF), and therefore, a perturbation of the genetic integrity of sperm heads in infertile males has been under-considered. The advent of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) however has led to very successful treatment of male factor infertility and subsequent widespread use in IVF clinics worldwide. Until recently, little concern has been raised about the genetic quality of sperm in ICSI patients or the impact genetic aberrations could have on fertility and embryogenesis. This review highlights the importance of chromatin packaging in the sperm nucleus as essential for the establishment and maintenance of a viable pregnancy. PMID:26678492

  15. Interaction of maize chromatin-associated HMG proteins with mononucleosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lichota, J.; Grasser, Klaus D.

    2003-01-01

    maize HMGA and five different HMGB proteins with mononucleosomes (containing approx. 165 bp of DNA) purified from micrococcal nuclease-digested maize chromatin. The HMGB proteins interacted with the nucleosomes independent of the presence of the linker histone H1, while the binding of HMGA...... in the presence of H1 differed from that observed in the absence of H1. HMGA and the HMGB proteins bound H1-containing nucleosome particles with similar affinity. The plant HMG proteins could also bind nucleosomes that were briefly treated with trypsin (removing the N-terminal domains of the core histones......), suggesting that the histone N-termini are dispensable for HMG protein binding. In the presence of untreated nucleosomes and trypsinised nucleosomes, HMGB1 could be chemically crosslinked with a core histone, which indicates that the trypsin-resistant part of the histones within the nucleosome is the main...

  16. Chromatin Remodeling in Stem Cell Maintenance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Xu; Wen-Hui Shen

    2009-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells are able to both self-renew and generate undifferentiated cells for the formation of new tissues and organs.In higher plants,stem cells found in the shoot apical meristem (SAM) and the root apical meristem (RAM) are origins of organogenesis occurring post-embryonically.It is important to understand how the regulation of stem cell fate is coordinated to enable the meristem to constantly generate different types of lateral organs.Much knowledge has accumulated on specific transcription factors controlling SAM and RAM activity.Here,we review recent evidences for a role of chromatin remodeling in the maintenance of stable expression states of transcription factor genes and the control of stem cell activity in Arabidopsis.

  17. Formation of mammalian erythrocytes: chromatin condensation and enucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Peng; Murata-Hori, Maki; Lodish, Harvey F

    2011-07-01

    In all vertebrates, the cell nucleus becomes highly condensed and transcriptionally inactive during the final stages of red cell biogenesis. Enucleation, the process by which the nucleus is extruded by budding off from the erythroblast, is unique to mammals. Enucleation has critical physiological and evolutionary significance in that it allows an elevation of hemoglobin levels in the blood and also gives red cells their flexible biconcave shape. Recent experiments reveal that enucleation involves multiple molecular and cellular pathways that include histone deacetylation, actin polymerization, cytokinesis, cell-matrix interactions, specific microRNAs and vesicle trafficking; many evolutionarily conserved proteins and genes have been recruited to participate in this uniquely mammalian process. In this review, we discuss recent advances in mammalian erythroblast chromatin condensation and enucleation, and conclude with our perspectives on future studies.

  18. Chromatin Dynamics in Vivo: A Game of Musical Chairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniël P. Melters

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Histones are a major component of chromatin, the nucleoprotein complex fundamental to regulating transcription, facilitating cell division, and maintaining genome integrity in almost all eukaryotes. In addition to canonical, replication-dependent histones, replication-independent histone variants exist in most eukaryotes. In recent years, steady progress has been made in understanding how histone variants assemble, their involvement in development, mitosis, transcription, and genome repair. In this review, we will focus on the localization of the major histone variants H3.3, CENP-A, H2A.Z, and macroH2A, as well as how these variants have evolved, their structural differences, and their functional significance in vivo.

  19. Protection against Japanese encephalitis by inactivated vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoke, C H; Nisalak, A; Sangawhipa, N; Jatanasen, S; Laorakapongse, T; Innis, B L; Kotchasenee, S; Gingrich, J B; Latendresse, J; Fukai, K

    1988-09-01

    Encephalitis caused by Japanese encephalitis virus occurs in annual epidemics throughout Asia, making it the principal cause of epidemic viral encephalitis in the world. No currently available vaccine has demonstrated efficacy in preventing this disease in a controlled trial. We performed a placebo-controlled, blinded, randomized trial in a northern Thai province, with two doses of monovalent (Nakayama strain) or bivalent (Nakayama plus Beijing strains) inactivated, purified Japanese encephalitis vaccine made from whole virus derived from mouse brain. We examined the effect of these vaccines on the incidence and severity of Japanese encephalitis and dengue hemorrhagic fever, a disease caused by a closely related flavivirus. Between November 1984 and March 1985, 65,224 children received two doses of monovalent Japanese encephalitis vaccine (n = 21,628), bivalent Japanese encephalitis vaccine (n = 22,080), or tetanus toxoid placebo (n = 21,516), with only minor side effects. The cumulative attack rate for encephalitis due to Japanese encephalitis virus was 51 per 100,000 in the placebo group and 5 per 100,000 in each vaccine group. The efficacy in both vaccine groups combined was 91 percent (95 percent confidence interval, 70 to 97 percent). Attack rates for dengue hemorrhagic fever declined, but not significantly. The severity of cases of dengue was also reduced. We conclude that two doses of inactivated Japanese encephalitis vaccine, either monovalent or bivalent, protect against encephalitis due to Japanese encephalitis virus and may have a limited beneficial effect on the severity of dengue hemorrhagic fever.

  20. Pulvinar inactivation disrupts selection of movement plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, Melanie; Turchi, Janita; Smith, Katy; Mishkin, Mortimer; Leopold, David A

    2010-06-23

    The coordinated movement of the eyes and hands under visual guidance is an essential part of goal-directed behavior. Several cortical areas known to be involved in this process exchange projections with the dorsal aspect of the thalamic pulvinar nucleus, suggesting that this structure may play a central role in visuomotor behavior. Here, we used reversible inactivation to investigate the role of the dorsal pulvinar in the selection and execution of visually guided manual and saccadic eye movements in macaque monkeys. We found that unilateral pulvinar inactivation resulted in a spatial neglect syndrome accompanied by visuomotor deficits including optic ataxia during visually guided limb movements. Monkeys were severely disrupted in their visually guided behavior regarding space contralateral to the side of the injection in several domains, including the following: (1) target selection in both manual and oculomotor tasks, (2) limb usage in a manual retrieval task, and (3) spontaneous visual exploration. In addition, saccades into the ipsilesional field had abnormally short latencies and tended to overshoot their mark. None of the deficits could be explained by a visual field defect or primary motor deficit. These findings highlight the importance of the dorsal aspect of the pulvinar nucleus as a critical hub for spatial attention and selection of visually guided actions. PMID:20573910

  1. Ribosome Inactivating Proteins from Plants Inhibiting Viruses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Inderdeep Kaur; R C Gupta; Munish Puri

    2011-01-01

    Many plants contain ribosome inactivating proteins (RIPs) with N-glycosidase activity,which depurinate large ribosomal RNA and arrest protein synthesis.RIPs so far tested inhibit replication of mRNA as well as DNA viruses and these proteins,isolated from plants,are found to be effective against a broad range of viruses such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV),hepatitis B virus (HBV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV).Most of the research work related to RIPs has been focused on antiviral activity against HIV; however,the exact mechanism of antiviral activity is still not clear.The mechanism of antiviral activity was thought to follow inactivation of the host cell ribosome,leading to inhibition of viral protein translation and host cell death.Enzymatic activity of RIPs is not hmited to depurination of the large rRNA,in addition they can depurinate viral DNA as well as RNA.Recently,Phase Ⅰ/Ⅱ clinical trials have demonstrated the potential use of RIPs for treating patients with HIV disease.The aim of this review is to focus on various RIPs from plants associated with anti-HIV activity.

  2. A lattice traffic model with consideration of preceding mixture traffic information

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zhi-Peng; Liu Fu-Qiang; Sun Jian

    2011-01-01

    In this paper,the lattice model is presented,incorporating not only site information about preceding cars but also relative currents in front.We derive the stability condition of the extended model by considering a small perturbation around the homogeneous flow solution and find that the improvement in the stability of traffic flow is obtained by taking into account preceding mixture traffic information.Direct simulations also confirm that the traffic jam can be suppressed efficiently by considering the relative currents ahead,just like incorporating site information in front.Moreover,from the nonlinear analysis of the extended models,the preceding mixture traffic information dependence of the propagating kink solutions for traffic jams is obtained by deriving the modified KdV equation near the critical point using the reductive perturbation method.

  3. DUTY OF GROUNDS IN THE NEW CIVIL PROCEDURE CODE AND THE BINDING PRECEDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Cortez Mendes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The new Brazilian Civil Procedure Code instituted a model of binding precedents, to approach the legal system of common law countries. The legislator was already seeking the transformation of the STF and t he STJ of superior courts in supreme courts, with the transition from the exercises of the judgment control function in this case for assurance uniformity of interpretation of the law. So assumes special importance the duty of grounds, which is disciplined in article 489, allowing the management of binding system, with appropriate formation and application of the precedents. The article attempts therefore shed light on concepts inherent in the work with binding precedents, especially on those instilled in law by new Brazilian Civil Procedure Code, which are the ratio decidendi , the distinguishing and the overruling.

  4. Parallel Machine Scheduling Models with Fuzzy Parameters and Precedence Constraints: A Credibility Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Fu-jun; WU Qi-zong

    2007-01-01

    A method for modeling the parallel machine scheduling problems with fuzzy parameters and precedence constraints based on credibility measure is provided.For the given n jobs to be processed on m machines, it is assumed that the processing times and the due dates are nonnegative fuzzy numbers and all the weights are positive, crisp numbers.Based on credibility measure, three parallel machine scheduling problems and a goal-programming model are formulated.Feasible schedules are evaluated not only by their objective values but also by the credibility degree of satisfaction with their precedence constraints.The genetic algorithm is utilized to find the best solutions in a short period of time.An illustrative numerical example is also given.Simulation results show that the proposed models are effective, which can deal with the parallel machine scheduling problems with fuzzy parameters and precedence constraints based on credibility measure.

  5. Snake-like chromatin in conjunctival cells of a population aged 30-60 years from Copenhagen City

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Kirsten Birgitte

    1998-01-01

    ophthalmology, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, Sjögrens Syndrome, epidemiology, imprint biopsy, snake-like chromatin......ophthalmology, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, Sjögrens Syndrome, epidemiology, imprint biopsy, snake-like chromatin...

  6. C/EBP maintains chromatin accessibility in liver and facilitates glucocorticoid receptor recruitment to steroid response elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Lars; John, Sam; Baek, Songjoon;

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms regulating transcription factor interaction with chromatin in intact mammalian tissues are poorly understood. Exploiting an adrenalectomized mouse model with depleted endogenous glucocorticoids, we monitor changes of the chromatin landscape in intact liver tissue following glucocortico...

  7. Genomic aberrations frequently alter chromatin regulatory genes in chordoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Zehir, Ahmet; Nafa, Khedoudja; Zhou, Nengyi; Berger, Michael F; Casanova, Jacklyn; Sadowska, Justyna; Lu, Chao; Allis, C David; Gounder, Mrinal; Chandhanayingyong, Chandhanarat; Ladanyi, Marc; Boland, Patrick J; Hameed, Meera

    2016-07-01

    Chordoma is a rare primary bone neoplasm that is resistant to standard chemotherapies. Despite aggressive surgical management, local recurrence and metastasis is not uncommon. To identify the specific genetic aberrations that play key roles in chordoma pathogenesis, we utilized a genome-wide high-resolution SNP-array and next generation sequencing (NGS)-based molecular profiling platform to study 24 patient samples with typical histopathologic features of chordoma. Matching normal tissues were available for 16 samples. SNP-array analysis revealed nonrandom copy number losses across the genome, frequently involving 3, 9p, 1p, 14, 10, and 13. In contrast, copy number gain is uncommon in chordomas. Two minimum deleted regions were observed on 3p within a ∼8 Mb segment at 3p21.1-p21.31, which overlaps SETD2, BAP1 and PBRM1. The minimum deleted region on 9p was mapped to CDKN2A locus at 9p21.3, and homozygous deletion of CDKN2A was detected in 5/22 chordomas (∼23%). NGS-based molecular profiling demonstrated an extremely low level of mutation rate in chordomas, with an average of 0.5 mutations per sample for the 16 cases with matched normal. When the mutated genes were grouped based on molecular functions, many of the mutation events (∼40%) were found in chromatin regulatory genes. The combined copy number and mutation profiling revealed that SETD2 is the single gene affected most frequently in chordomas, either by deletion or by mutations. Our study demonstrated that chordoma belongs to the C-class (copy number changes) tumors whose oncogenic signature is non-random multiple copy number losses across the genome and genomic aberrations frequently alter chromatin regulatory genes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Genomic aberrations frequently alter chromatin regulatory genes in chordoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Zehir, Ahmet; Nafa, Khedoudja; Zhou, Nengyi; Berger, Michael F; Casanova, Jacklyn; Sadowska, Justyna; Lu, Chao; Allis, C David; Gounder, Mrinal; Chandhanayingyong, Chandhanarat; Ladanyi, Marc; Boland, Patrick J; Hameed, Meera

    2016-07-01

    Chordoma is a rare primary bone neoplasm that is resistant to standard chemotherapies. Despite aggressive surgical management, local recurrence and metastasis is not uncommon. To identify the specific genetic aberrations that play key roles in chordoma pathogenesis, we utilized a genome-wide high-resolution SNP-array and next generation sequencing (NGS)-based molecular profiling platform to study 24 patient samples with typical histopathologic features of chordoma. Matching normal tissues were available for 16 samples. SNP-array analysis revealed nonrandom copy number losses across the genome, frequently involving 3, 9p, 1p, 14, 10, and 13. In contrast, copy number gain is uncommon in chordomas. Two minimum deleted regions were observed on 3p within a ∼8 Mb segment at 3p21.1-p21.31, which overlaps SETD2, BAP1 and PBRM1. The minimum deleted region on 9p was mapped to CDKN2A locus at 9p21.3, and homozygous deletion of CDKN2A was detected in 5/22 chordomas (∼23%). NGS-based molecular profiling demonstrated an extremely low level of mutation rate in chordomas, with an average of 0.5 mutations per sample for the 16 cases with matched normal. When the mutated genes were grouped based on molecular functions, many of the mutation events (∼40%) were found in chromatin regulatory genes. The combined copy number and mutation profiling revealed that SETD2 is the single gene affected most frequently in chordomas, either by deletion or by mutations. Our study demonstrated that chordoma belongs to the C-class (copy number changes) tumors whose oncogenic signature is non-random multiple copy number losses across the genome and genomic aberrations frequently alter chromatin regulatory genes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27072194

  9. Genomic Aberrations Frequently Alter Chromatin Regulatory Genes in Chordoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Zehir, Ahmet; Nafa, Khedoudja; Zhou, Nengyi; Berger, Michael F.; Casanova, Jacklyn; Sadowska, Justyna; Lu, Chao; Allis, C. David; Gounder, Mrinal; Chandhanayingyong, Chandhanarat; Ladanyi, Marc; Boland, Patrick J; Hameed, Meera

    2016-01-01

    Chordoma is a rare primary bone neoplasm that is resistant to standard chemotherapies. Despite aggressive surgical management, local recurrence and metastasis is not uncommon. To identify the specific genetic aberrations that play key roles in chordoma pathogenesis, we utilized a genome-wide high-resolution SNP-array and next generation sequencing (NGS)-based molecular profiling platform to study 24 patient samples with typical histopathologic features of chordoma. Matching normal tissues were available for 16 samples. SNP-array analysis revealed nonrandom copy number losses across the genome, frequently involving 3, 9p, 1p, 14, 10, and 13. In contrast, copy number gain is uncommon in chordomas. Two minimum deleted regions were observed on 3p within a ~8 Mb segment at 3p21.1–p21.31, which overlaps SETD2, BAP1 and PBRM1. The minimum deleted region on 9p was mapped to CDKN2A locus at 9p21.3, and homozygous deletion of CDKN2A was detected in 5/22 chordomas (~23%). NGS-based molecular profiling demonstrated an extremely low level of mutation rate in chordomas, with an average of 0.5 mutations per sample for the 16 cases with matched normal. When the mutated genes were grouped based on molecular functions, many of the mutation events (~40%) were found in chromatin regulatory genes. The combined copy number and mutation profiling revealed that SETD2 is the single gene affected most frequently in chordomas, either by deletion or by mutations. Our study demonstrated that chordoma belongs to the C-class (copy number changes) tumors whose oncogenic signature is non-random multiple copy number losses across the genome and genomic aberrations frequently alter chromatin regulatory genes. PMID:27072194

  10. SMARCA4 inactivation defines a group of undifferentiated thoracic malignancies transcriptionally related to BAF-deficient sarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Loarer, Francois; Watson, Sarah; Pierron, Gaelle; de Montpreville, Vincent Thomas; Ballet, Stelly; Firmin, Nelly; Auguste, Aurelie; Pissaloux, Daniel; Boyault, Sandrine; Paindavoine, Sandrine; Dechelotte, Pierre Joseph; Besse, Benjamin; Vignaud, Jean Michel; Brevet, Marie; Fadel, Elie; Richer, Wilfrid; Treilleux, Isabelle; Masliah-Planchon, Julien; Devouassoux-Shisheboran, Mojgan; Zalcman, Gerard; Allory, Yves; Bourdeaut, Franck; Thivolet-Bejui, Francoise; Ranchere-Vince, Dominique; Girard, Nicolas; Lantuejoul, Sylvie; Galateau-Sallé, Francoise; Coindre, Jean Michel; Leary, Alexandra; Delattre, Olivier; Blay, Jean Yves; Tirode, Franck

    2015-10-01

    While investigating cohorts of unclassified sarcomas by RNA sequencing, we identified 19 cases with inactivation of SMARCA4, which encodes an ATPase subunit of BAF chromatin-remodeling complexes. Clinically, the cases were all strikingly similar, presenting as compressive mediastino-pulmonary masses in 30- to 35-year-old adults with a median survival time of 7 months. To help define the nosological relationships of these tumors, we compared their transcriptomic profiles with those of SMARCA4-mutated small-cell carcinomas of the ovary, hypercalcemic type (SCCOHTs), SMARCB1-inactivated malignant rhabdoid tumors (MRTs) and lung carcinomas (of which 10% display SMARCA4 mutations). Gene profiling analyses demonstrated that these tumors were distinct from lung carcinomas but related to MRTs and SCCOHTs. Transcriptome analyses, further validated by immunohistochemistry, highlighted strong expression of SOX2, a marker that supports the differential diagnosis of these tumors from SMARCA4-deficient lung carcinomas. The prospective recruitment of cases confirmed this new category of 'SMARCA4-deficient thoracic sarcomas' as readily recognizable in clinical practice, providing opportunities to tailor their therapeutic management. PMID:26343384

  11. Formation of the postmitotic nuclear envelope from extended ER cisternae precedes nuclear pore assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Ladinsky, Mark S.; Lu, Lei; Kirchhausen, Tomas Leopold

    2011-01-01

    During mitosis, the nuclear envelope merges with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and nuclear pore complexes are disassembled. In a current model for reassembly after mitosis, the nuclear envelope forms by a reshaping of ER tubules. For the assembly of pores, two major models have been proposed. In the insertion model, nuclear pore complexes are embedded in the nuclear envelope after their formation. In the prepore model, nucleoporins assemble on the chromatin as an intermediate nuclear pore c...

  12. Use of oral antihypertensive medication preceding blood pressure elevation in hospitalized patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macedo Cristiano Ricardo Bastos de

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the frequency of oral antihypertensive medication preceding the increase in blood pressure in patients in a university hospital, the drug of choice, and the maintained use of antihypertensive medication. METHODS: Data from January to June 1997 from the University Hospital Professor Edgard Santos Pharmacy concerning the prescriptions of all inpatients were used. Variables included in the analysis were: antihypertensive medication prescription preceding increase in blood pressure, type of antihypertensive medication, gender, clinical or surgical wards, and the presence of maintained antihypertensive medication. RESULTS: The hospital admitted 2,532 patients, 1,468 in surgical wards and 818 in medical wards. Antihypertensive medication prescription preceding pressure increase was observed in 578 patients (22.8%. Nifedipine was used in 553 (95.7% and captopril in 25 (4.3%. In 50.7% of patients, prescription of antihypertensive medication was not associated with maintained antihypertensive medication. Prescription of antihypertensive drugs preceding elevation of blood pressure was significantly (p<0.001 more frequent on the surgical floor (27.5%; 405/1468 than on the medical floor (14.3%; 117/818. The frequency of prescription of antihypertensive drugs preceding elevation of blood pressure without maintained antihypertensive drugs and the ratio between the number of prescriptions of nifedipine and captopril were greater in surgical wards. CONCLUSION: The use of antihypertensive medication, preceding elevation of blood pressure (22.8% observed in admitted patients is not supported by scientific evidence. The high frequency of this practice may be even greater in nonuniversity hospitals.

  13. Distributed probing of chromatin structure in vivo reveals pervasive chromatin accessibility for expressed and non-expressed genes during tissue differentiation in C. elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sha Ky

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tissue differentiation is accompanied by genome-wide changes in the underlying chromatin structure and dynamics, or epigenome. By controlling when, where, and what regulatory factors have access to the underlying genomic DNA, the epigenome influences the cell's transcriptome and ultimately its function. Existing genomic methods for analyzing cell-type-specific changes in chromatin generally involve two elements: (i a source for purified cells (or nuclei of distinct types, and (ii a specific treatment that partitions or degrades chromatin by activity or structural features. For many cell types of great interest, such assays are limited by our inability to isolate the relevant cell populations in an organism or complex tissue containing an intertwined mixture of other cells. This limitation has confined available knowledge of chromatin dynamics to a narrow range of biological systems (cell types that can be sorted/separated/dissected in large numbers and tissue culture models or to amalgamations of diverse cell types (tissue chunks, whole organisms. Results Transgene-driven expression of DNA/chromatin modifying enzymes provides one opportunity to query chromatin structures in expression-defined cell subsets. In this work we combine in vivo expression of a bacterial DNA adenine methyltransferase (DAM with high throughput sequencing to sample tissue-specific chromatin accessibility on a genome-wide scale. We have applied the method (DALEC: Direct Asymmetric Ligation End Capture towards mapping a cell-type-specific view of genome accessibility as a function of differentiated state. Taking advantage of C. elegans strains expressing the DAM enzyme in diverse tissues (body wall muscle, gut, and hypodermis, our efforts yield a genome-wide dataset measuring chromatin accessibility at each of 538,000 DAM target sites in the C. elegans (diploid genome. Conclusions Validating the DALEC mapping results, we observe a strong association

  14. Phosphorylation of the PDH complex precedes HIF-1-mediated effects and PDK1 upregulation during the first hours of hypoxic treatment in HCC cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zimmer AD

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Andreas David Zimmer, Geoffroy Walbrecq, Ines Kozar, Iris Behrmann, Claude Haan Life Sciences Research Unit, University of Luxembourg, Belvaux, Luxembourg Abstract: The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC is an important gatekeeper enzyme connecting glycolysis to the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS. Thereby, it has a strong impact on the glycolytic flux as well as the metabolic phenotype of a cell. PDC activity is regulated via reversible phosphorylation of three serine residues on the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH E1α subunit. Phosphorylation of any of these residues by the PDH kinases (PDKs leads to a strong decrease in PDC activity. Under hypoxia, the inactivation of the PDC has been described to be dependent on the hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1-induced PDK1 protein upregulation. In this study, we show in two hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines (HepG2 and JHH-4 that, during the adaptation to hypoxia, PDH is already phosphorylated at time points preceding HIF-1-mediated transcriptional events and PDK1 protein upregulation. Using siRNAs and small molecule inhibitor approaches, we show that this inactivation of PDC is independent of HIF-1α expression but that the PDKs need to be expressed and active. Furthermore, we show that reactive oxygen species might be important for the induction of this PDH phosphorylation since it correlates with the appearance of an altered redox state in the mitochondria and is also inducible by H2O2 treatment under normoxic conditions. Overall, these results show that neither HIF-1 expression nor PDK1 upregulation is necessary for the phosphorylation of PDH during the first hours of the adaptation to hypoxia. Keywords: pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, hypoxia metabolism, glycolytic switch, radical oxygen species

  15. Precedent in the Sui Generis Legal Order: A Mine Run Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadl, Urska; Hink, Sigrid

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we use case-to-case citation networks to explore the force of precedent in EU law. We introduce a novel methodology to analyse the extent to which references to past decisions act as reasons for decisions in subsequent cases and illustrate the approach on the European citizenship...... case-law citation network. We conclude that the cohesive pull of precedent in EU citizenship case-law is too weak to generate a coherent judicial doctrine, thereby confirming qualitative research on the subject. However, the incursions into competences of the Member States in areas, found only...

  16. A novel car following model considering average speed of preceding vehicles group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dihua; Kang, Yirong; Yang, Shuhong

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, a new car following model is presented by considering the average speed effect of preceding vehicles group in cyber-physical systems (CPS) environment. The effect of this new consideration upon the stability of traffic flow is examined through linear stability analysis. A modified Korteweg-de Vries (mKdV) equation was derived via nonlinear analysis to describe the propagating behavior of traffic density wave near the critical point. Good agreement between the simulation and the analytical results shows that average speed of preceding vehicles group leads to the stabilization of traffic systems, and thus can efficiently suppress the emergence of traffic jamming.

  17. Aplastic anaemia preceding acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in an adult with isolated deletion of chromosome 9q.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, Kevin

    2008-12-01

    Aplastic anaemia (AA) can precede acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in 2% of children but this is rarely reported to occur in adults. A 21-year-old male presented with bone marrow failure and bone marrow biopsy showed a profoundly hypocellular marrow. He recovered spontaneously but represented 2 months later when he was diagnosed with pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Chromosomal examination revealed 46,XY,del(9)(q13q34). To the best of our knowledge this is the first case to be reported of aplasia preceding ALL with 9q minus as the sole chromosomal abnormality.

  18. Cybridization in Nicotiana tabacum L. using double inactivation of parental protoplasts and post-fusion selection based on nuclear-encoded and chloroplast-encoded marker genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matibiri, E A; Mantell, S H

    1994-09-01

    An effective selection system preceded by double inactivation of parental protoplasts was used to transfer Nicotiana suaveolens Leh. cytoplasmic male sterility into a commercial tobacco (N. tabacum L.) breeding line. Mesophyll protoplasts from transformed plants of N. tabacum cultivar WZ2-3-1-1 possessing a neomycin phosphotransferase II gene were used as the nuclear donors, while those isolated from N. suaveolens plants carrying a chloroplast mutation for resistance to spectinomycin, induced using nitrosomethyl urea, were the cytoplasm donors in somatic cybridizations. Prior to fusion, nuclear donor protoplasts were inactivated with iodoacetamide or rhodamine 6G, while those of the cytoplasm donor were inactivated by X-irradiation. The resultant microcalli were cultured on a shoot regeneration medium containing both kanamycin and spectinomycin to select cybrids. Only regenerants that had typical characteristics of the N. tabacum cultivar were selected for transfer to the glasshouse. Four putative cytoplasmic male-sterile (CMS) plants, out of a total of 44 regenerated plants transferred to the glasshouse, were obtained. Intraspecific somatic transfers of the CMS trait between N. tabacum cultivars with distinctlydifferent morphologies using single inactivation and nonselective shoot regeneration medium were demonstrated. The implications of the results for practical tobacco breeding as a means of circumventing lengthy backcrossing procedures are discussed. PMID:24186256

  19. Plasticity of Fission Yeast CENP-A Chromatin Driven by Relative Levels of Histone H3 and H4

    OpenAIRE

    Castillo, Araceli G.; Mellone, Barbara G; Partridge, Janet F; William Richardson; Hamilton, Georgina L.; Allshire, Robin C.; Pidoux, Alison L.

    2007-01-01

    The histone H3 variant CENP-A assembles into chromatin exclusively at centromeres. The process of CENP-A chromatin assembly is epigenetically regulated. Fission yeast centromeres are composed of a central kinetochore domain on which CENP-A chromatin is assembled, and this is flanked by heterochromatin. Marker genes are silenced when placed within kinetochore or heterochromatin domains. It is not known if fission yeast CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin is confined to specific sequences or whether histone...

  20. Snake-like chromatin in conjunctival cells of normal elderly persons and of patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome and other connective tissue diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Kirsten Birgitte

    1995-01-01

    Ophthalmology, snake-like chromatin, cytoplasm ratio, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, nucleus, goblet cell......Ophthalmology, snake-like chromatin, cytoplasm ratio, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, nucleus, goblet cell...

  1. Phosphorylation-mediated EZH2 inactivation promotes drug resistance in multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Jiro; Koyama, Daisuke; Wada, Taeko; Izumi, Tohru; Hofgaard, Peter O; Bogen, Bjarne; Furukawa, Yusuke

    2015-12-01

    Alterations in chromatin modifications, such as histone methylation, have been suggested as mediating chemotherapy resistance in several cancer types; therefore, elucidation of the epigenetic mechanisms that underlie drug resistance may greatly contribute to the advancement of cancer therapies. In the present study, we identified histone H3-lysine 27 (H3K27) as a critical residue for epigenetic modification in multiple myeloma. We determined that abrogation of drug-induced H3K27 hypermethylation is associated with cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR), which is the most important form of drug resistance, using a coculture system to evaluate stroma cell adhesion-dependent alterations in multiple myeloma cells. Cell adhesion counteracted anticancer drug-induced hypermethylation of H3K27 via inactivating phosphorylation of the transcription regulator EZH2 at serine 21, leading to the sustained expression of antiapoptotic genes, including IGF1, B cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (BCL2), and hypoxia inducible factor 1, α subunit (HIF1A). Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of the IGF-1R/PI3K/AKT pathway reversed CAM-DR by promoting EZH2 dephosphorylation and H3K27 hypermethylation both in vitro and in refractory murine myeloma models. Together, our findings identify and characterize an epigenetic mechanism that underlies CAM-DR and suggest that kinase inhibitors to counteract EZH2 phosphorylation should be included in combination chemotherapy to increase therapeutic index. PMID:26517694

  2. Mechanisms of Escherichia coli inactivation by several disinfectants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Min; Kim, Jaeeun; Kim, Jee Yeon; Yoon, Jeyong; Kim, Jae-Hong

    2010-06-01

    The objective of this study was to elucidate dominant mechanisms of inactivation, i.e. surface attack versus intracellular attack, during application of common water disinfectants such as ozone, chlorine dioxide, free chlorine and UV irradiation. Escherichia coli was used as a representative microorganism. During cell inactivation, protein release, lipid peroxidation, cell permeability change, damage in intracellular enzyme and morphological change were comparatively examined. For the same level of cell inactivation by chemical disinfectants, cell surface damage was more pronounced with strong oxidant such as ozone while damage in inner cell components was more apparent with weaker oxidant such as free chlorine. Chlorine dioxide showed the inactivation mechanism between these two disinfectants. The results suggest that the mechanism of cell inactivation is primarily related to the reactivity of chemical disinfectant. In contrast to chemical disinfectants, cell inactivation by UV occurred without any changes measurable with the methods employed. Understanding the differences in inactivation mechanisms presented herein is critical to identify rate-limiting steps involved in the inactivation process as well as to develop more effective disinfection strategies.

  3. Mechanism of Inactivation in Voltage-Gated Na(+) Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawali, V S; Todt, H

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSCs) initiate action potentials thereby giving rise to rapid transmission of electrical signals along cell membranes and between cells. Depolarization of the cell membrane causes VGSCs to open but also gives rise to a nonconducting state termed inactivation. Inactivation of VGSCs serves a critical physiologic function as it determines the extent of excitability of neurons and of muscle cells. Depending on the time course of development and removal of inactivation both "fast-" and "slow"-inactivated states have been described. Evidence from mutagenesis studies suggests that fast inactivation is produced by a block of the internal vestibule by a tethered inactivation particle that has been mapped to the internal linker between domains III and IV. The motion of this linker may be regulated by parts of the internal C-terminus. The molecular mechanism of slow inactivation is less clear. However, aside from a high number of mutagenesis studies, the recent availability of 3D structures of crystallized prokaryotic VGSCs offers insights into the molecular motions associated with slow inactivation. One possible scenario is that slow movements of the voltage sensors are transmitted to the external vestibule giving rise to a conformational change of this region. This molecular rearrangement is transmitted to the S6 segments giving rise to collapse of the internal vestibule. PMID:27586291

  4. Mutual inactivation of Notch receptors and ligands facilitates developmental patterning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sprinzak

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Developmental patterning requires juxtacrine signaling in order to tightly coordinate the fates of neighboring cells. Recent work has shown that Notch and Delta, the canonical metazoan juxtacrine signaling receptor and ligand, mutually inactivate each other in the same cell. This cis-interaction generates mutually exclusive sending and receiving states in individual cells. It generally remains unclear, however, how this mutual inactivation and the resulting switching behavior can impact developmental patterning circuits. Here we address this question using mathematical modeling in the context of two canonical pattern formation processes: boundary formation and lateral inhibition. For boundary formation, in a model motivated by Drosophila wing vein patterning, we find that mutual inactivation allows sharp boundary formation across a broader range of parameters than models lacking mutual inactivation. This model with mutual inactivation also exhibits robustness to correlated gene expression perturbations. For lateral inhibition, we find that mutual inactivation speeds up patterning dynamics, relieves the need for cooperative regulatory interactions, and expands the range of parameter values that permit pattern formation, compared to canonical models. Furthermore, mutual inactivation enables a simple lateral inhibition circuit architecture which requires only a single downstream regulatory step. Both model systems show how mutual inactivation can facilitate robust fine-grained patterning processes that would be difficult to implement without it, by encoding a difference-promoting feedback within the signaling system itself. Together, these results provide a framework for analysis of more complex Notch-dependent developmental systems.

  5. Inactivation of cathespin B/sub 1/ by diazomethyl ketones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leary, R.; Shaw, E.

    1977-12-07

    Benzyloxycarbonyl-phenylalanyl diazomethyl ketone and benzyloxy-carbonyl-phenylalanyl-phenylalanyl diazomethyl ketone, which have been shown to inactivate the thiol protease papain by a mechanism different from that of substrate chloromethyl ketone derivatives, have now been examined as inhibitors of cathepsin B/sub 1/ of beef spleen. The dipeptide derivative irreversibly inactivates this protease rapidly, apparently by affinity labeling.

  6. Chlorophyll mediated photodynamic inactivation of blue laser on Streptococcus mutans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astuti, Suryani Dyah; Zaidan, A.; Setiawati, Ernie Maduratna; Suhariningsih

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic inactivation is an inactivation method in microbial pathogens that utilize light and photosensitizer. This study was conducted to investigate photodynamic inactivation effects of low intensity laser exposure with various dose energy on Streptococcus mutans bacteria. The photodynamic inactivation was achieved with the addition of chlorophyll as photosensitizers. To determine the survival percentage of Streptococcus mutans bacteria after laser exposure, the total plate count method was used. For this study, the wavelength of the laser is 405 nm and variables of energy doses are 1.44, 2.87, 4.31, 5.74, 7.18, and 8.61 in J/cm2. The results show that exposure to laser with energy dose of 7.18 J/cm2 has the best photodynamic inactivation with a decrease of 78% in Streptococcus

  7. Inactivation of Chikungunya virus by 1,5 iodonapthyl azide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Anuj

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is an arthropod borne alphavirus of the family Togaviridae. CHIKV is a reemerging virus for which there is no safe prophylactic vaccine. A live attenuated strain of CHIKV, CHIK181/25, was previously demonstrated to be highly immunogenic in humans, however, it showed residual virulence causing transient arthralgia. Findings In this study, we demonstrate the complete inactivation of CHIKV181/25 by 1,5 iodonapthyl azide (INA. No cytopathic effect and virus replication was observed in cells infected with the INA-inactivated CHIKV. However, a reduction in the INA-inactivated CHIK virus-antibody binding capacity was observed by western blot analysis. Conclusion INA completely inactivated CHIKV and can further be explored for developing an inactivated-CHIKV vaccine.

  8. [Inactivation of T4 phage in water environment using proteinase].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Wen-zhou; Yang, Qing-xiang; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Min; Zhu, Chun-fang

    2004-09-01

    The inactivation effectiveness of proteinase to viruses was investigated by using T4 phage as a model virus. The results showed that the inactivation effectiveness of proteinase to T4 phage was obvious. In the optimum conditions and 67.5 u/mL concentration, the inactivation rate of proteinase K to T4 phage in sterilized water and in sewage achieved 99.4% and 49.4% respectively in an hour, and achieved >99.9% and 81.1% in three hours. The inactivation rate of the industrial proteinase 1398 to T4 phage in sterilized water achieved 74.4% in an hour. The effects of pH and temperature on the inactivation effectiveness was not evident.

  9. Pathogen Inactivation of red cells: challenges and opportunities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephen J. Wagner

    2006-01-01

    @@ Introduction Virus inactivation methods for blood have been explored as a means to further reduce the risk from tested agents and to decrease the risk of emerging or variant agents for whom no deferral or effective screening methods are available. Although inactivation methods promise to reduce transfusion-related infectious disease risk, these methods are not perfect. Most techniques for pathogen reduction will not kill bacterial spores, or inactivate bacterial endotoxin, prion protein, or certain non-enveloped viruses whose tightly packed capsid proteins prevent access of the virucidal agent to its nucleic acid target. In addition,various inactivation methods have been known to decrease blood cell yield, affect blood cell recovery or survival, and may pose risk to recipients or blood center workers. My presentation today will review two methods for pathogen inactivation of red cells.

  10. Organophosphorous pesticide exposure alters sperm chromatin structure in Mexican agricultural workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our objective was to evaluate alterations in sperm chromatin structure in men occupationally exposed to a mixture of organophosphorus pesticides (OP) because these alterations have been proposed to compromise male fertility and offspring development. Chromatin susceptibility to in situ acid-induced denaturation structure was assessed by the sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). Urinary levels of alkylphosphates (DAP) were used to assess exposure. Diethylthiophosphate (DETP) was the most frequent OP metabolite found in urine samples indicating that compounds derived from thiophosphoric acid were mainly used. Chromatin structure was altered in most samples. About 75% of semen samples were classified as having poor fertility potential (>30% of Percentage of DNA Fragmentation Index [DFI%]), whereas individuals without OP occupational exposure showed average DFI% values of 9.9%. Most parameters of conventional semen analysis were within normality except for the presence of immature cells (IGC) in which 82% of the samples were above reference values. There were significant direct associations between urinary DETP concentrations and mean DFI and SD-DFI but marginally (P = 0.079) with DFI%, after adjustment for potential confounders, including IGC. This suggests that OP exposure alters sperm chromatin condensation, which could be reflected in an increased number of cells with greater susceptibility to DNA denaturation. This study showed that human sperm chromatin is a sensitive target to OP exposure and may contribute to adverse reproductive outcomes. Further studies on the relevance of protein phosphorylation as a possible mechanism by which OP alter sperm chromatin are required

  11. SIRT6 recruits SNF2H to DNA break sites, preventing genomic instability through chromatin remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toiber, Debra; Erdel, Fabian; Bouazoune, Karim; Silberman, Dafne M; Zhong, Lei; Mulligan, Peter; Sebastian, Carlos; Cosentino, Claudia; Martinez-Pastor, Barbara; Giacosa, Sofia; D'Urso, Agustina; Näär, Anders M; Kingston, Robert; Rippe, Karsten; Mostoslavsky, Raul

    2013-08-22

    DNA damage is linked to multiple human diseases, such as cancer, neurodegeneration, and aging. Little is known about the role of chromatin accessibility in DNA repair. Here, we find that the deacetylase sirtuin 6 (SIRT6) is one of the earliest factors recruited to double-strand breaks (DSBs). SIRT6 recruits the chromatin remodeler SNF2H to DSBs and focally deacetylates histone H3K56. Lack of SIRT6 and SNF2H impairs chromatin remodeling, increasing sensitivity to genotoxic damage and recruitment of downstream factors such as 53BP1 and breast cancer 1 (BRCA1). Remarkably, SIRT6-deficient mice exhibit lower levels of chromatin-associated SNF2H in specific tissues, a phenotype accompanied by DNA damage. We demonstrate that SIRT6 is critical for recruitment of a chromatin remodeler as an early step in the DNA damage response, indicating that proper unfolding of chromatin plays a rate-limiting role. We present a unique crosstalk between a histone modifier and a chromatin remodeler, regulating a coordinated response to prevent DNA damage.

  12. Chromatin Targeting of de Novo DNA Methyltransferases by the PWWP Domain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-ZiGe; Min-TiePu; HumairaGowher; Hai-PingWu; Jian-PingDing; AlbertJeltsch; Guo-LiangXu

    2005-01-01

    DNA methylation patterns of mammalian genomes are generated in gametogenesis and early embryonic development. Two de novo DNA methyltransferases, Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b, are responsible for the process. Both en-zymes contain a long N-terminal regulatory region linked to a conserved C-terminal domain responsible forthe catalytic activity. Although a PWWP domain in the N-terminal region has been shown to bind DNA in vitro, it is unclear how the DNA methyltransferases access their substrate in chromatin in vivo. We show here that the two proteins are associated with chromatin including mitotic chromosomes in mammalian cells, and the PWWP domain is essential for the chromatin targeting of the enzymes. The functional significance of PWWPmediated chromatin targeting is suggested by the fact that a missense mutation in this domain of human DNMT3B causes immunodeficiency, centromeric heterochromatin instability, facial anomalies (ICF) syndrome, which is characterized by loss of methylation insatellite DNA, pericentromeric instability, and immunodeficiency. We demonstrate that the mutant protein completely loses its chromatin targeting capacity. Our data establish the PWWP domain as a novel chromatin/chromosome-targeting module and suggest that the PWWP-mediated chromatin association is essential for the function of the de novo methyltransferases during development.

  13. Non coding RNA: sequence-specific guide for chromatin modification and DNA damage signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia eFrancia

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin conformation shapes the environment in which our genome is transcribed into RNA. Transcription is a source of DNA damage, thus it often occurs concomitantly to DNA damage signaling. Growing amounts of evidence suggest that different types of RNAs can, independently from their protein-coding properties, directly affect chromatin conformation, transcription and splicing, as well as promote the activation of the DNA damage response (DDR and DNA repair. Therefore, transcription paradoxically functions to both threaten and safeguard genome integrity. On the other hand, DNA damage signaling is known to modulate chromatin to suppress transcription of the surrounding genetic unit. It is thus intriguing to understand how transcription can modulate DDR signaling while, in turn, DDR signaling represses transcription of chromatin around the DNA lesion. An unexpected player in this field is the RNA interference (RNAi machinery, which play roles in transcription, splicing and chromatin modulation in several organisms. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs and several protein factors involved in the RNAi pathway are well known master regulators of chromatin while only recent reports suggest that ncRNAs are involved in DDR signaling and homology-mediated DNA repair. Here, we discuss the experimental evidence supporting the idea that ncRNAs act at the genomic loci from which they are transcribed to modulate chromatin, DDR signaling and DNA repair.

  14. Interaction of the Arabidopsis UV-B-Specific Signaling Component UVR8 with Chromatin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Catherine Cloix; Gareth I.Jenkins

    2008-01-01

    Arabidopsis UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 (UVR8) is a UV-B-specific signaling component that regulates expression of a range of genes concerned with UV protection. Here, we investigate the interaction of UVR8 with chromatin. Using antibodies specific to UVR8 in chromatin immunoprecipitation (CHIP) assays with wild-type plants, we show that native UVR8 binds to chromatin in vivo. Similar experiments using an anti-GFP antibody with plants expressing a GFP-UVR8 fusion show that UVR8 associates with a relatively small region of chromatin containing the HY5 gene. UVR8 interacts with chromatin containing the promoter regions of other genes, but not with all the genes it regulates. UV-B is not required for the interaction of UVR8 with chromatin because association with several gene loci is observed in the absence of UV-B. Pulldown assays demonstrate that UVR8 associates with histones in vivo and competition experiments indicate that the interaction is preferentially with histone H2B. ChIP experiments using antibodies that recognize specific histone modifications indicate that the UV-B-stimulated transcription of some genes may be correlated with histone modification. In particular, the ELIP1 promoter showed a significant enrichment of diacetyl histone H3 (K9/K14) following UV-B exposure.These findings increase understanding of the interaction of the key UV-B-specific regulator UVR8 with chromatin.

  15. Sense and antisense transcription are associated with distinct chromatin architectures across genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Struan C; Haenni, Simon; Howe, Françoise S; Fischl, Harry; Chocian, Karolina; Nair, Anitha; Mellor, Jane

    2015-09-18

    Genes from yeast to mammals are frequently subject to non-coding transcription of their antisense strand; however the genome-wide role for antisense transcription remains elusive. As transcription influences chromatin structure, we took a genome-wide approach to assess which chromatin features are associated with nascent antisense transcription, and contrast these with features associated with nascent sense transcription. We describe a distinct chromatin architecture at the promoter and gene body specifically associated with antisense transcription, marked by reduced H2B ubiquitination, H3K36 and H3K79 trimethylation and increased levels of H3 acetylation, chromatin remodelling enzymes, histone chaperones and histone turnover. The difference in sense transcription between genes with high or low levels of antisense transcription is slight; thus the antisense transcription-associated chromatin state is not simply analogous to a repressed state. Using mutants in which the level of antisense transcription is reduced at GAL1, or altered genome-wide, we show that non-coding transcription is associated with high H3 acetylation and H3 levels across the gene, while reducing H3K36me3. Set1 is required for these antisense transcription-associated chromatin changes in the gene body. We propose that nascent antisense and sense transcription have fundamentally distinct relationships with chromatin, and that both should be considered canonical features of eukaryotic genes.

  16. Non-Coding RNA: Sequence-Specific Guide for Chromatin Modification and DNA Damage Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin conformation shapes the environment in which our genome is transcribed into RNA. Transcription is a source of DNA damage, thus it often occurs concomitantly to DNA damage signaling. Growing amounts of evidence suggest that different types of RNAs can, independently from their protein-coding properties, directly affect chromatin conformation, transcription and splicing, as well as promote the activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) and DNA repair. Therefore, transcription paradoxically functions to both threaten and safeguard genome integrity. On the other hand, DNA damage signaling is known to modulate chromatin to suppress transcription of the surrounding genetic unit. It is thus intriguing to understand how transcription can modulate DDR signaling while, in turn, DDR signaling represses transcription of chromatin around the DNA lesion. An unexpected player in this field is the RNA interference (RNAi) machinery, which play roles in transcription, splicing and chromatin modulation in several organisms. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) and several protein factors involved in the RNAi pathway are well known master regulators of chromatin while only recent reports show their involvement in DDR. Here, we discuss the experimental evidence supporting the idea that ncRNAs act at the genomic loci from which they are transcribed to modulate chromatin, DDR signaling and DNA repair.

  17. Evaluation of event-related desynchronization (ERD) preceding and following voluntary self-paced movement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfurtscheller, G.; Aranibar, A.

    1979-01-01

    A method of accurate storage and on-line preprocessing of an EEG signal, preceding and following a trigger signal, elicited by button pressing, is described. The method was used to study the changes occurring in the power of the rhythmic activity within the alpha band in central areas, during volunt

  18. 5 CFR 870.801 - Order of precedence and payment of benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... specific person or persons to receive life insurance benefits upon the death of an insured individual... the individual(s) entitled to receive Basic life insurance benefits under the statutory order of... SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES' GROUP LIFE INSURANCE PROGRAM Order of Precedence...

  19. Renal vascular dysfunction precedes the development of renal damage in the hypertensive Fawn-Hooded rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ochodnicky, Peter; Henning, Robert H.; Buikema, Hendrik J.; de Zeeuw, Dick; Provoost, Abraham P.; van Dokkum, Richard P. E.

    2010-01-01

    Ochodnicky P, Henning RH, Buikema HJ, de Zeeuw D, Provoost AP, van Dokkum RP. Renal vascular dysfunction precedes the development of renal damage in the hypertensive Fawn-Hooded rat. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 298: F625-F633, 2010. First published December 9, 2009; doi:10.1152/ajprenal.00289.2009.-I

  20. Local inhibition of GABA affects precedence effect in the inferior colliculus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanjun Wang; Ningyu Wang; Dan Wang; Jun Jia; Jinfeng Liu; Yan Xie; Xiaohui Wen; Xiaoting Li

    2014-01-01

    The precedence effect is a prerequisite for faithful sound localization in a complex auditory envi-ronment, and is a physiological phenomenon in which the auditory system selectively suppresses the directional information from echoes. Here we investigated how neurons in the inferior col-liculus respond to the paired sounds that produce precedence-effect illusions, and whether their ifring behavior can be modulated through inhibition with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). We recorded extracellularly from 36 neurons in rat inferior colliculus under three conditions:no injection, injection with saline, and injection with gamma-aminobutyric acid. The paired sounds that produced precedence effects were two identical 4-ms noise bursts, which were deliv-ered contralaterally or ipsilaterally to the recording site. The normalized neural responses were measured as a function of different inter-stimulus delays and half-maximal interstimulus delays were acquired. Neuronal responses to the lagging sounds were weak when the inter-stimulus delay was short, but increased gradually as the delay was lengthened. Saline injection produced no changes in neural responses, but after local gamma-aminobutyric acid application, responses to the lagging stimulus were suppressed. Application of gamma-aminobutyric acid affected the normalized response to lagging sounds, independently of whether they or the paired sounds were contralateral or ipsilateral to the recording site. These observations suggest that local inhibition by gamma-aminobutyric acid in the rat inferior colliculus shapes the neural responses to lagging sounds, and modulates the precedence effect.

  1. Applying PRECEDE-PROCEED to Develop an Intuitive Eating Nondieting Approach to Weight Management Pilot Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Renee E.; Horacek, Tanya

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To describe the use of a consolidated version of the PRECEDE-PROCEED participatory program planning model to collaboratively design an intuitive eating program with Fort Drum military spouses tailored to their readiness to reject the dieting mentality and make healthful lifestyle modifications. Design: A consolidated version of…

  2. Using the PRECEDE Model for Causal Analysis of Bulimic Tendencies among Elite Women Swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, RoseAnn; Taub, Diane E.

    1993-01-01

    Describes a study of weight control techniques and bulimic tendencies among elite female participants in an Olympic Swimming Selection Meet. Results showed concern with thinness, body dissatisfaction, and unhealthy eating, dieting, and weight loss patterns among participants. Discusses the explanatory power of the PRECEDE model. (SM)

  3. Ancient Uses of Meteoritic Metals as Precedent for Modern In-Situ Asteroid Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardon, Austin A.; Fawcett, Brett; Krispin, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Given the strain on earth's supply of metal and the meteoritic content of meteorites, a prudent course would be to pursue in-situ asteroid mining of meteors for metal. There is a precedent for this going back to ancient Egypt; humans have always used the meteoritic content of meteorites to fashion everything from weapons to cosmetics.

  4. Solving a large-scale precedence constrained scheduling problem with elastic jobs using tabu search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, C.R.; Rasmussen, R.V.; Andersen, Kim Allan

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a solution method for minimizing makespan of a practical large-scale scheduling problem with elastic jobs. The jobs are processed on three servers and restricted by precedence constraints, time windows and capacity limitations. We derive a new method for approximating the server...

  5. Building ensemble representations: How the shape of preceding distractor distributions affects visual search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetverikov, Andrey; Campana, Gianluca; Kristjánsson, Árni

    2016-08-01

    Perception allows us to extract information about regularities in the environment. Observers can quickly determine summary statistics of a group of objects and detect outliers. The existing body of research has, however, not revealed how such ensemble representations develop over time. Moreover, the correspondence between the physical distribution of features in the external world and their potential internal representation as a probability density function (PDF) by the visual system is still unknown. Here, for the first time we demonstrate that such internal PDFs are built during visual search and show how they can be assessed with repetition and role-reversal effects. Using singleton search for an oddly oriented target line among differently oriented distractors (a priming of pop-out paradigm), we test how different properties of previously observed distractor distributions (mean, variability, and shape) influence search times. Our results indicate that observers learn properties of distractor distributions over and above mean and variance; in fact, response times also depend on the shape of the preceding distractor distribution. Response times decrease as a function of target distance from the mean of preceding Gaussian distractor distributions, and the decrease is steeper when preceding distributions have small standard deviations. When preceding distributions are uniform, however, this decrease in response times can be described by a two-piece function corresponding to the uniform distribution PDF. Moreover, following skewed distributions response times function is skewed in accordance with the skew in distributions. Indeed, internal PDFs seem to be specifically tuned to the observed feature distribution. PMID:27232163

  6. Metabolic and Signaling Alterations in Dystrophin-Deficient Hearts Precede Overt Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cytoskeletal protein dystrophin has been implicated in hereditary and acquired forms of cardiomyopathy. However, much remains to be learned about the role of dystrophin in the heart. We hypothesized that the dystrophin-deficient heart displays early alterations in energy metabolism that precede ...

  7. From Function to Context to Form: Precedents and Focus Shifts in the Form Creation Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Restrepo-Giraldo, John Dairo

    2005-01-01

    In design, the form creation process involves imagining, seeing and drawing. Translating the vague and imprecise initial ideas into sketches requires significant ability, and in this process, images of existing products (precedents) are a welcomed aid. Searching for them, however, is difficult, b...

  8. 29 CFR 548.306 - Average earnings for year or quarter year preceding the current quarter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Average earnings for year or quarter year preceding the... PAY Interpretations Authorized Basic Rates § 548.306 Average earnings for year or quarter year... hour for each workweek equal to the average hourly remuneration of the employee for employment...

  9. Esterase resistant to inactivation by heavy metals

    KAUST Repository

    El, Dorry Hamza

    2014-09-25

    EstATII is an esterase that a halotolerant, thermophilic and resistant to a spectrum of heavy metals including toxic concentration of metals. It was isolated from the lowest convective layer of the Atlantis II Red Sea brine pool. The Atlantis II brine pool is an extreme environment that possesses multiple harsh conditions such as; high temperature, salinity, pH and high concentration of metals, including toxic heavy metals. A fosmid metagenomic library using DNA isolated from the lowest convective layer this pool was used to identify EstATII. Polynucleotides encoding EstATII and similar esterases are disclosed and can be used to make EstATII. EstATII or compositions or apparatuses that contain it may be used in various processes employing lipases/esterases especially when these processes are performed under harsh conditions that inactivate other kinds of lipases or esterases.

  10. Regulation of Brassinosteroid Biosynthesis and Inactivation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baolin Zhao; Jia Li

    2012-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are a group of naturally-occurring steroidal phytohormones playing fundamental roles during normal plant growth and development.Using a combination of experimental approaches,including analytical chemistry,genetics,and biochemistry,the major BR biosynthetic pathway has been largely elucidated.The least-understood knowledge in the BR research field is probably the molecular mechanisms controlling the bioactive levels of BRs in response to various developmental and environmental cues.In this review,we focus our discussion on a recently-proposed,8-step predominant BR biosynthetic pathway,several newly-identified transcription factors regulating the expression of key enzymes that catalyze BR biosynthesis,and up-to-date information about the mechanisms that plants use to inactivate unnecessary BRs.

  11. UV inactivation of pathogenic and indicator microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, J.C.; Ossoff, S.F.; Lobe, D.C.; Dorfman, M.H.; Dumais, C.M.; Qualls, R.G.; Johnson, J.D.

    1985-06-01

    Survival was measured as a function of the dose of germicidal UV light for the bacteria Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi, Shigella sonnei, Streptococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus subtilis spores, the enteric viruses poliovirus type 1 and simian rotavirus SA11, the cysts of the protozoan Acanthamoeba castellanii, as well as for total coliforms and standard plate count microorganisms from secondary effluent. The doses of UV light necessary for a 99.9% inactivation of the cultured vegetative bacteria, total coliforms, and standard plate count microorganisms were comparable. However, the viruses, the bacterial spores, and the amoebic cysts required about 3 to 4 times, 9 times, and 15 times, respectively, the dose required for E. coli. These ratios covered a narrower relative dose range than that previously reported for chlorine disinfection of E. coli, viruses, spores, and cysts.

  12. Inactivation of microbes using ultrasound: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piyasena, P; Mohareb, E; McKellar, R C

    2003-11-01

    Alternative methods for pasteurization and sterilization are gaining importance, due to increased consumer demand for new methods of food processing that have a reduced impact on nutritional content and overall food quality. Ultrasound processing or sonication is one of the alternative technologies that has shown promise in the food industry. Sonication alone is not very effective in killing bacteria in food; however, the use of ultrasound coupled with pressure and/or heat is promising. Thermosonic (heat plus sonication), manosonic (pressure plus sonication), and manothermosonic (heat and pressure plus sonication) treatments are likely the best methods to inactivate microbes, as they are more energy-efficient and effective in killing microorganisms. Ultrasonic processing is still in its infancy and requires a great deal of future research in order to develop the technology on an industrial scale, and to more fully elucidate the effect of ultrasound on the properties of foods.

  13. Ion channels to inactivate neurons in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J L Hodge

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Ion channels are the determinants of excitability; therefore, manipulation of their levels and properties provides an opportunity for the investigator to modulate neuronal and circuit function. There are a number of ways to suppress electrical activity in Drosophila neurons, for instance, over-expression of potassium channels (i.e. Shaker Kv1, Shaw Kv3, Kir2.1 and DORK that are open at resting membrane potential. This will result in increased potassium efflux and membrane hyperpolarisation setting resting membrane potential below the threshold required to fire action potentials. Alternatively over-expression of other channels, pumps or co-transporters that result in a hyperpolarised membrane potential will also prevent firing. Lastly, neurons can be inactivated by, disrupting or reducing the level of functional voltage-gated sodium (Nav1 paralytic or calcium (Cav2 cacophony channels that mediate the depolarisation phase of action potentials. Similarly, strategies involving the opposite channel manipulation should allow net depolarisation and hyperexcitation in a given neuron. These changes in ion channel expression can be brought about by the versatile transgenic (i.e. Gal4/UAS based systems available in Drosophila allowing fine temporal and spatial control of (channel transgene expression. These systems are making it possible to electrically inactivate (or hyperexcite any neuron or neural circuit in the fly brain, and much like an exquisite lesion experiment, potentially elucidate whatever interesting behaviour or phenotype each network mediates. These techniques are now being used in Drosophila to reprogram electrical activity of well-defined circuits and bring about robust and easily quantifiable changes in behaviour, allowing different models and hypotheses to be rapidly tested.

  14. High-resolution mapping reveals links of HP1 with active and inactive chromatin components.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elzo de Wit

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1 is commonly seen as a key factor of repressive heterochromatin, even though a few genes are known to require HP1-chromatin for their expression. To obtain insight into the targeting of HP1 and its interplay with other chromatin components, we have mapped HP1-binding sites on Chromosomes 2 and 4 in Drosophila Kc cells using high-density oligonucleotide arrays and the DNA adenine methyltransferase identification (DamID technique. The resulting high-resolution maps show that HP1 forms large domains in pericentric regions, but is targeted to single genes on chromosome arms. Intriguingly, HP1 shows a striking preference for exon-dense genes on chromosome arms. Furthermore, HP1 binds along entire transcription units, except for 5' regions. Comparison with expression data shows that most of these genes are actively transcribed. HP1 target genes are also marked by the histone variant H3.3 and dimethylated histone 3 lysine 4 (H3K4me2, which are both typical of active chromatin. Interestingly, H3.3 deposition, which is usually observed along entire transcription units, is limited to the 5' ends of HP1-bound genes. Thus, H3.3 and HP1 are mutually exclusive marks on active chromatin. Additionally, we observed that HP1-chromatin and Polycomb-chromatin are nonoverlapping, but often closely juxtaposed, suggesting an interplay between both types of chromatin. These results demonstrate that HP1-chromatin is transcriptionally active and has extensive links with several other chromatin components.

  15. Kinetic modelling of enzyme inactivation Kinetics of heat inactivation of the extracellular proteinase from Pseudomonas fluorescens 22F.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schokker, E.P.

    1997-01-01

    The kinetics of heat inactivation of the extracellular proteinase from Pseudomonas fluorescens 22F was studied. It was established, by making use of kinetic modelling, that heat inactivation in the temperature range 35 - 70 °C was most likely caused by intermolecular autoproteolysis, where unfolded

  16. Structural hierarchy of chromatin in chicken erythrocyte nuclei based on small-angle neutron scattering: Fractal nature of the large-scale chromatin organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chromatin organization in chicken erythrocyte nuclei was studied by small-angle neutron scattering in the scattering-vector range from 1.5 x 10-1 to 10-4 A-1 with the use of the contrast-variation technique. This scattering-vector range corresponds to linear dimensions from 4 nm to 6 μm and covers the whole hierarchy of chromatin structures, from the nucleosomal structure to the entire nucleus. The results of the present study allowed the following conclusions to be drawn: (1) both the chromatin-protein structure and the structure of the nucleic acid component in chicken erythrocyte nuclei have mass-fractal properties, (2) the structure of the protein component of chromatin exhibits a fractal behavior on scales extending over two orders of magnitude, from the nucleosomal size to the size of an entire nucleus, and (3) the structure of the nucleic acid component of chromatin in chicken erythrocyte nuclei is likewise of a fractal nature and has two levels of organization or two phases with the crossover point at about 300-400 nm

  17. To spread or not to spread - chromatin modifications in response to DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altmeyer, M.; Lukas, J.

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin modifications in response to DNA damage are vital for genome integrity. Multiple proteins and pathways required to generate specialized chromatin domains around DNA lesions have been identified and the increasing amount of information calls for unifying concepts that would allow us...... to grasp the ever-increasing complexity. This review aims at contributing to this trend by focusing on feed-forward and feedback mechanisms, which in mammalian cells determine the extent of chromatin modifications after DNA damage. We highlight the emerging notion that the nodal points of these highly...

  18. Effective chromosome pairing requires chromatin remodeling at the onset of meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colas, Isabelle; Shaw, Peter; Prieto, Pilar; Wanous, Michael; Spielmeyer, Wolfgang; Mago, Rohit; Moore, Graham

    2008-01-01

    During meiosis, homologous chromosomes (homologues) recognize each other and then intimately associate. Studies exploiting species with large chromosomes reveal that chromatin is remodeled at the onset of meiosis before this intimate association. However, little is known about the effect the remodeling has on pairing. We show here in wheat that chromatin remodeling of homologues can only occur if they are identical or nearly identical. Moreover, a failure to undergo remodeling results in reduced pairing between the homologues. Thus, chromatin remodeling at the onset of meiosis enables the chromosomes to become competent to pair and recombine efficiently. PMID:18417451

  19. Genome-Wide Chromatin Immunoprecipitation in Candida albicans and Other Yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, Matthew B.; Kongsomboonvech, Pisiwat; Madrigal, Maria; Hernday, Aaron D.; Nobile, Clarissa J.

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments are critical to investigating the interactions between DNA and a wide range of nuclear proteins within a cell or biological sample. In this chapter we outline an optimized protocol for genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation that has been used successfully for several distinct morphological forms of numerous yeast species, and include an optimized method for amplification of chromatin immunoprecipitated DNA samples and hybridization to a high-density oligonucleotide tiling microarray. We also provide detailed suggestions on how to analyze the complex data obtained from these experiments. PMID:26483022

  20. Nucleosomal organization of chromatin in sperm nuclei of the bivalve mollusc Aulacomya ater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, C; Ruiz, S

    1991-03-13

    The sperm nuclei of Aulacomya ater, family Mitylidae, contain three proteins (X, Aa5 and Aa6) which are specific to this cell type coexisting with a set of five somatic-type histones. Information about the chromatin structure resulting from this kind of association is scarce. Therefore, we have probed the structure of this sperm chromatin through digestion with micrococcal nuclease in combination with salt fractionation. The data obtained have allowed us to propose a nucleosomal arrangement for this chromatin. However, two types of nucleosomes would be present in agreement with their protein components. PMID:1861676

  1. Data on force-dependent structural changes of chromatin fibers measured with magnetic tweezers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan-Tso Chien

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The compaction of chromatin fibers regulates the accessibility of embedded DNA, highly associated with transcriptional activities [1]. Single molecule force spectroscopy has revealed the great details of the structural changes of chromatin fibers in the presence of external exerted force [2–7]. However, most of the studies focus on a specific force regime [2,3,8,9]. The data here show force-extension (FE traces of chromatin fibers as measured with magnetic tweezers, covering the force regime from 0 pN to 27 pN. Those traces provide information for further studies at varied force regimes.

  2. Tagging of MADS domain proteins for chromatin immunoprecipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Zuijlen Lisette GC

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most transcription factors fulfill their role in complexes and regulate their target genes upon binding to DNA motifs located in upstream regions or introns. To date, knowledge about transcription factor target genes and their corresponding transcription factor binding sites are still very limited. Two related methods that allow in vivo identification of transcription factor binding sites are chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP and chromatin affinity purification (ChAP. For ChAP, the protein of interest is tagged with a peptide or protein, which can be used for affinity purification of the protein-DNA complex and hence, the identification of the target gene. Results Here, we present the results of experiments aiming at the development of a generic tagging approach for the Arabidopsis MADS domain proteins AGAMOUS, SEPALLATA3, and FRUITFULL. For this, Arabidopsis wild type plants were transformed with constructs containing a MADS-box gene fused to either a double Strep-tag® II-FLAG-tag, a triple HA-tag, or an eGFP-tag, all under the control of the constitutive double 35S Cauliflower Mosaic Virus (CaMV promoter. Strikingly, in all cases, the number of transformants with loss-of-function phenotypes was much larger than those with an overexpression phenotype. Using endogenous promoters in stead of the 35S CaMV resulted in a dramatic reduction in the frequency of loss-of-function phenotypes. Furthermore, pleiotropic defects occasionally caused by an overexpression strategy can be overcome by using the native promoter of the gene. Finally, a ChAP result is presented using GFP antibody on plants carrying a genomic fragment of a MADS-box gene fused to GFP. Conclusion This study revealed that MADS-box proteins are very sensitive to fusions with small peptide tags and GFP tags. Furthermore, for the expression of chimeric versions of MADS-box genes it is favorable to use the entire genomic region in frame to the tag of choice

  3. Circulating chromatin-anti-chromatin antibody complexes bind with high affinity to dermo-epidermal structures in murine and human lupus nephritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fismen, S; Hedberg, A; Fenton, K A;

    2009-01-01

    Murine and human lupus nephritis are characterized by glomerular deposits of electron-dense structures (EDS). Dominant components of EDS are chromatin fragments and IgG antibodies. Whether glomerular EDS predispose for similar deposits in skin is unknown. We analysed (i) whether dermo...... (NZBxNZW)F1 and MRL-lpr/lpr mice and from five patients with lupus nephritis were analysed by immunofluorescence, immune electron microscopy (IEM) and co-localization TUNEL IEM. Affinity of chromatin fragments for membrane structures was determined by surface plasmon resonance. Results demonstrated (i...... were present in capillary lumina in glomeruli and skin of all nephritic individuals. Thus, chromatin-IgG complexes accounting for lupus nephritis seem to reach skin through circulation, but other undetermined factors are required for these complexes to deposit within skin membranes....

  4. Inactivation of Lassa, Marburg, and Ebola viruses by gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, L.H.; McCormick, J.B.; Johnson, K.M.

    1982-10-01

    Because of the cumbersome conditions experienced in a maximum containment laboratory, methods for inactivating highly pathogenic viruses were investigated. The infectivity of Lassa, Marburg, and Ebola viruses was inactivated without altering the immunological activity after radiation with /sup 60/CO gamma rays. At 4 degrees C, Lassa virus was the most difficult to inactivate with a rate of 5.3 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad of /sup 60/CO radiation, as compared with 6.8 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad for Ebola virus and 8.4 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad for Marburg virus. Experimental inactivation curves, as well as curves giving the total radiation needed to inactivate a given concentration of any of the three viruses, are presented. The authors found this method of inactivation to be superior to UV light or beta-propiolactone inactivation and now routinely use it for preparation of material for protein-chemistry studies or for preparation of immunological reagents.

  5. Inactivation of Lassa, Marburg, and Ebola viruses by gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, L.H.; McCormick, J.B.; Johnson, K.M.

    1982-10-01

    Because of the cumbersome conditions experienced in a maximum containment laboratory, methods for inactivating highly pathogenic viruses were investigated. The infectivity of Lassa, Marburg, and Ebola viruses was inactivated without altering the immunological activity after radiation with /sup 60/Co gamma rays. At 4 degrees C, Lassa virus was the most difficult to inactivate with a rate of 5.3 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad of /sup 60/Co radiation, as compared with 6.8 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad for Ebola virus and 8.4 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad for Marburg virus. Experimental inactivation curves, as well as curves giving the total radiation needed to inactivate a given concentration of any of the three viruses, are presented. We found this method of inactivation to be superior to UV light or beta-propiolactone inactivation and now routinely use it for preparation of material for protein-chemistry studies or for preparation of immunological reagents.

  6. Application of gaseous ozone for inactivation of Bacillus subtilis spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydogan, Ahmet; Gurol, Mirat D

    2006-02-01

    The effectiveness of gaseous ozone (O3) as a disinfectant was tested on Bacillus subtilis spores, which share the same physiological characteristics as Bacillus anthracis spores that cause the anthrax disease. Spores dried on surfaces of different carrier material were exposed to O3 gas in the range of 500-5000 ppm and at relative humidity (RH) of 70-95%. Gaseous O3 was found to be very effective against the B. subtilis spores, and at O3 concentrations as low as 3 mg/L (1500 ppm), approximately 3-log inactivation was obtained within 4 hr of exposure. The inactivation curves consisted of a short lag phase followed by an exponential decrease in the number of surviving spores. Prehydration of the bacterial spores has eliminated the initial lag phase. The inactivation rate increased with increasing O3 concentration but not >3 mg/L. The inactivation rate also increased with increase in RH. Different survival curves were obtained for various surfaces used to carry spores. Inactivation rates of spores on glass, a vinyl floor tile, and office paper were nearly the same. Whereas cut pile carpet and hardwood flooring surfaces resulted in much lower inactivation rates, another type of carpet (loop pile) showed significant enhancement in the inactivation of the spores. PMID:16568801

  7. Epigenetic inactivation and aberrant transcription of CSMD1 in squamous cell carcinoma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scholnick Steven B

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The p23.2 region of human chromosome 8 is frequently deleted in several types of epithelial cancer and those deletions appear to be associated with poor prognosis. Cub and Sushi Multiple Domains 1 (CSMD1 was positionally cloned as a candidate for the 8p23 suppressor but point mutations in this gene are rare relative to the frequency of allelic loss. In an effort to identify alternative mechanisms of inactivation, we have characterized CSMD1 expression and epigenetic modifications in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines. Results Only one of the 20 cell lines examined appears to express a structurally normal CSMD1 transcript. The rest express transcripts which either lack internal exons, terminate abnormally or initiate at cryptic promoters. None of these truncated transcripts is predicted to encode a functional CSMD1 protein. Cell lines that express little or no CSMD1 RNA exhibit DNA methylation of a specific region of the CpG island surrounding CSMD1's first exon. Conclusion Correlating methylation patterns and expression suggests that it is modification of the genomic DNA preceding the first exon that is associated with gene silencing and that methylation of CpG dinucleotides further 3' does not contribute to inactivation of the gene. Taken together, the cell line data suggest that epigenetic silencing and aberrant splicing rather than point mutations may be contributing to the reduction in CSMD1 expression in squamous cancers. These mechanisms can now serve as a focus for further analysis of primary squamous cancers.

  8. Chromatin and Cell Wall Staining of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, Iain M

    2016-01-01

    Fission yeasts grow by tip extension, maintaining a constant width until they reach a critical size threshold and divide. Division by medial fission-which gives these yeast their name-generates a new end that arises from the site of cytokinesis. The old end, which was produced during the previous cell cycle, initiates progression of the new cell cycle, and in G2, the new end is activated in a process termed new-end takeoff (NETO). In this protocol, the fluorescent stains calcofluor and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) are used to give a rapid and informative assessment of morphogenesis and cell-cycle progression in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe Calcofluor reveals the timing of NETO because it stains the birth scars that are generated at new ends by cytokinesis less efficiently than the rest of the cell wall. Intense calcofluor staining of the septum and measurement of cell length are also widely used to identify dividing cells and to gauge the timing of mitotic commitment. Staining nuclei with DAPI identifies mono- and binucleated cells and complements the calcofluor staining procedure to evaluate the stages of the cell cycle and identify mitotic errors. Equally simple DAPI staining procedures reveal chromatin structure in higher resolution, facilitating more accurate staging of mitotic progression and characterization of mitotic errors. PMID:27250942

  9. Cracking the chromatin code: Precise rule of nucleosome positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifonov, Edward N.

    2011-03-01

    Various aspects of packaging DNA in eukaryotic cells are outlined in physical rather than biological terms. The informational and physical nature of packaging instructions encoded in DNA sequences is discussed with the emphasis on signal processing difficulties - very low signal-to-noise ratio and high degeneracy of the nucleosome positioning signal. As the author has been contributing to the field from its very onset in 1980, the review is mostly focused at the works of the author and his colleagues. The leading concept of the overview is the role of deformational properties of DNA in the nucleosome positioning. The target of the studies is to derive the DNA bendability matrix describing where along the DNA various dinucleotide elements should be positioned, to facilitate its bending in the nucleosome. Three different approaches are described leading to derivation of the DNA deformability sequence pattern, which is a simplified linear presentation of the bendability matrix. All three approaches converge to the same unique sequence motif CGRAAATTTYCG or, in binary form, YRRRRRYYYYYR, both representing the chromatin code.

  10. HJURP is involved in the expansion of centromeric chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perpelescu, Marinela; Hori, Tetsuya; Toyoda, Atsushi; Misu, Sadahiko; Monma, Norikazu; Ikeo, Kazuho; Obuse, Chikashi; Fujiyama, Asao; Fukagawa, Tatsuo

    2015-08-01

    The CENP-A-specific chaperone HJURP mediates CENP-A deposition at centromeres. The N-terminal region of HJURP is responsible for binding to soluble CENP-A. However, it is unclear whether other regions of HJURP have additional functions for centromere formation and maintenance. In this study, we generated chicken DT40 knockout cell lines and gene replacement constructs for HJURP to assess the additional functions of HJURP in vivo. Our analysis revealed that the middle region of HJURP associates with the Mis18 complex protein M18BP1/KNL2 and that the HJURP-M18BP1 association is required for HJURP function. In addition, on the basis of the analysis of artificial centromeres induced by ectopic HJURP localization, we demonstrate that HJURP exhibits a centromere expansion activity that is separable from its CENP-A-binding activity. We also observed centromere expansion surrounding natural centromeres after HJURP overexpression. We propose that this centromere expansion activity reflects the functional properties of HJURP, which uses this activity to contribute to the plastic establishment of a centromeric chromatin structure. PMID:26063729

  11. Relocalization of human chromatin remodeling cofactor TIP48 in mitosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TIP48 is a highly conserved eukaryotic AAA+ protein which is an essential cofactor for several complexes involved in chromatin acetylation and remodeling, transcriptional and developmental regulation and nucleolar organization and trafficking. We show that TIP48 abundance in HeLa cells did not change during the cell cycle, nor did its distribution in various biochemical fractions. However, we observed distinct changes in the subcellular localization of TIP48 during M phase using immunofluorescence microscopy. Our studies demonstrate that in interphase cells TIP48 was found mainly in the nucleus and exhibited a distinct localization in the nuclear periphery. As the cells entered mitosis, TIP48 was excluded from the condensing chromosomes but showed association with the mitotic apparatus. During anaphase, some TIP48 was detected in the centrosome colocalizing with tubulin but the strongest staining appeared in the mitotic equator associated with the midzone central spindle. Accumulation of TIP48 in the midzone and the midbody was observed in late telophase and cytokinesis. This redeployment of TIP48 during anaphase and cytokinesis was independent of microtubule assembly. The relocation of endogenous TIP48 to the midzone/midbody under physiological conditions suggests a novel and distinct function for TIP48 in mitosis and possible involvement in the exit of mitosis

  12. First Exon Length Controls Active Chromatin Signatures and Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole I. Bieberstein

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Here, we explore the role of splicing in transcription, employing both genome-wide analysis of human ChIP-seq data and experimental manipulation of exon-intron organization in transgenic cell lines. We show that the activating histone modifications H3K4me3 and H3K9ac map specifically to first exon-intron boundaries. This is surprising, because these marks help recruit general transcription factors (GTFs to promoters. In genes with long first exons, promoter-proximal levels of H3K4me3 and H3K9ac are greatly reduced; consequently, GTFs and RNA polymerase II are low at transcription start sites (TSSs and exhibit a second, promoter-distal peak from which transcription also initiates. In contrast, short first exons lead to increased H3K4me3 and H3K9ac at promoters, higher expression levels, accuracy in TSS usage, and a lower frequency of antisense transcription. Therefore, first exon length is predictive for gene activity. Finally, splicing inhibition and intron deletion reduce H3K4me3 levels and transcriptional output. Thus, gene architecture and splicing determines transcription quantity and quality as well as chromatin signatures.

  13. Dual Chromatin and Cytoskeletal Remodeling by SETD2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, In Young; Powell, Reid T; Tripathi, Durga Nand; Dere, Ruhee; Ho, Thai H; Blasius, T Lynne; Chiang, Yun-Chen; Davis, Ian J; Fahey, Catherine C; Hacker, Kathryn E; Verhey, Kristen J; Bedford, Mark T; Jonasch, Eric; Rathmell, W Kimryn; Walker, Cheryl Lyn

    2016-08-11

    Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of tubulin specify microtubules for specialized cellular functions and comprise what is termed a "tubulin code." PTMs of histones comprise an analogous "histone code," although the "readers, writers, and erasers" of the cytoskeleton and epigenome have heretofore been distinct. We show that methylation is a PTM of dynamic microtubules and that the histone methyltransferase SET-domain-containing 2 (SETD2), which is responsible for H3 lysine 36 trimethylation (H3K36me3) of histones, also methylates α-tubulin at lysine 40, the same lysine that is marked by acetylation on microtubules. Methylation of microtubules occurs during mitosis and cytokinesis and can be ablated by SETD2 deletion, which causes mitotic spindle and cytokinesis defects, micronuclei, and polyploidy. These data now identify SETD2 as a dual-function methyltransferase for both chromatin and the cytoskeleton and show a requirement for methylation in maintenance of genomic stability and the integrity of both the tubulin and histone codes. PMID:27518565

  14. Chromatin remodeling and stem cell theory of relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerny, Jan; Quesenberry, Peter J

    2004-10-01

    The field of stem cell biology is currently being redefined. Stem cell (hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic) differentiation has been considered hierarchical in nature, but recent data suggest that there is no progenitor/stem cell hierarchy, but rather a reversible continuum. The stem cell (hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic) phenotype, the total differentiation capacity (hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic), gene expression as well as other stem cell functional characteristics (homing, receptor and adhesion molecule expression) vary throughout a cell-cycle transit widely. This seems to be dependent on shifting chromatin and gene expression with cell-cycle transit. The published data on DNA methylation, histone acetylation, and also RNAi, the major regulators of gene expression, conjoins very well and provides an explanation for the major issues of stem cell biology. Those features of stem cells mentioned above can be rather difficult to apprehend when a classical hierarchy biology view is applied, but they become clear and easier to understand once they are correlated with the underlining epigenetic changes. We are entering a new era of stem cell biology the era of "chromatinomics." We are one step closer to the practical use of cellular therapy for degenerative diseases.

  15. An animal model of disengagement: Temporary inactivation of the superior colliculus impairs attention disengagement in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araujo, Mariana Ferreira Pereira; Matsumoto, Jumpei; Ono, Taketoshi; Nishijo, Hisao

    2015-10-15

    The orienting attention network is responsible for prioritizing sensory input through overt or covert shifts of attention among targets. The ability to disengage attention is essential for the proper functioning of this network. In addition to its importance for proper orienting, deficits in disengagement have been recently implicated in autism disorders. Despite its importance, the neural mechanisms underlying disengagement processing are still poorly understood. In this study, the involvement of the superior colliculus (SC) in disengagement was investigated in unrestrained rats that had been trained in a two-alternative light-guided spatial choice task. At each trial, the rats had to choose one of two paths, leading either to a large or a small reward, based on 1 (single-cue) or 2 (double-cue) lights. The task consisted of serial trials with single- and/or double-cue lights, and rats could acquire a large reward if the rats chose infrequent lights when infrequent cue lights were presented after preceding frequent cue lights. Experiment 1 included trials with either single- or double-cue lights, and infrequent trials with double-cue lights required both attentional disengagement and shift of attention from preceding frequent single-cue lights, while experiment 2 included only trials with single-cue lights requiring shifts of attention but not attentional disengagement. The results indicated that temporary inactivation of the SC by muscimol injections selectively impaired performance on trials requiring disengagement. No impairment was observed on the other trials, in which attention disengagement was not required. The results provide the first evidence that the SC is necessary for attentional disengagement. PMID:26196954

  16. Transient isolated brainstem symptoms preceding posterior circulation stroke: a population-based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Nicola LM; Simoni, Michela; Rothwell, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Transient isolated brainstem symptoms (eg, isolated vertigo, dysarthria, diplopia) are not consistently classified as transient ischaemic attacks (TIAs) and data for prognosis are limited. If some of these transient neurological attacks (TNAs) are due to vertebrobasilar ischaemia, then they should be common during the days and weeks preceding posterior circulation strokes. We aimed to assess the frequency of TNAs before vertebrobasilar ischaemic stroke. Methods We studied all potential ischaemic events during the 90 days preceding an ischaemic stroke in patients ascertained within a prospective, population-based incidence study in Oxfordshire, UK (Oxford Vascular Study; 2002–2010) and compared rates of TNA preceding vertebrobasilar stroke versus carotid stroke. We classified the brainstem symptoms isolated vertigo, vertigo with non-focal symptoms, isolated double vision, transient generalised weakness, and binocular visual disturbance as TNAs in the vertebrobasilar territory; atypical amaurosis fugax and limb-shaking as TNAs in the carotid territory; and isolated slurred speech, migraine variants, transient confusion, and hemisensory tingling symptoms as TNAs in uncertain territory. Findings Of the 1141 patients with ischaemic stroke, vascular territory was categorisable in 1034 (91%) cases, with 275 vertebrobasilar strokes and 759 carotid strokes. Isolated brainstem TNAs were more frequent before a vertebrobasilar stroke (45 of 275 events) than before a carotid stroke (10 of 759; OR 14·7, 95% CI 7·3–29·5, p<0·0001), particularly during the preceding 2 days (22 of 252 before a vertebrobasilar stroke vs two of 751 before a carotid stroke, OR 35·8, 8·4–153·5, p<0·0001). Of all 59 TNAs preceding (median 4 days, IQR 1–30) vertebrobasilar stroke, only five (8%) fulfilled the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) criteria for TIA. The other 54 cases were isolated vertigo (n=23), non-NINDS binocular visual

  17. Global precedence, spatial frequency channels, and the statistics of natural images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, H C; Nozawa, G; Kitterle, F

    1996-01-01

    A great deal of evidence suggests that early in processing, retinal images are filtered by parallel, spatial frequency selective channels. We attempt to incorporate this view of early vision with the principle of global precedence, which holds that Gestalt-like processes sensitive to global image configurations tend to dominate local feature processing in human pattern perception. Global precedence is inferred from the pattern of reaction times observed when visual patterns contain multiple cues at different levels of spatial scale. Specifically, it is frequently observed that global processing times are largely unaffected by conflicting local cues, but local processing times are substantially lengthened by conflicting global cues. The asymmetry of these effects suggests the dominant role of global configurations. Since global spatial information is effectively represented by low spatial frequencies, global precedence potentially implies a low frequency dominance. The thesis is that low spatial frequencies tend to be available before information carried by higher frequency bands, producing a coarse-to-fine temporal order in visual spatial perception. It is suggested that a variety of factors contribute to the "prior entry" of low frequency information, including the high contrast gain of the magnocellular pathway, the amplitude spectra typical of natural images, and inhibitory interactions between the parallel frequency-tuned channels. Evidence suggesting a close relationship between global precedence and spatial frequency channels is provided by observations that the essential features of the global precedence effect are obtained using patterns consisting of low and high frequency sinusoids. The hypothesis that these asymmetric interference effects are due to interactions between parallel spatial channels is supported by an analysis of reaction times (RTs), which shows that RTs to redundant low and high frequency cues produce less facilitation than predictions

  18. Shedding Light on Large-Scale Chromatin Reorganization in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Martijn van Zanten; Federico Tessadori; Anton J.M. Peeters; Paul Fransz

    2012-01-01

    Plants need to respond quickly and appropriately to various types of light signals from the environment to optimize growth and development.The immediate response to shading,reduced photon flux (low light),and changes in spectral quality involves changes in gene regulation.In the case of more persistent shade,the plant shows a dramatic change in the organization of chromatin.Both plant responses are controlled via photoreceptor signaling proteins.Recently,several studies have revealed similar features of chromatin reorganization in response to various abiotic and biotic signals,while others have unveiled intricate molecular networks of light signaling towards gene regulation.This opinion paper briefly describes the chromatin (de)compaction response from a light-signaling perspective to provide a link between chromatin and the molecular network of photoreceptors and E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes.

  19. Protocol: fine-tuning of a Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP protocol in tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iusem Norberto D

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Searching thoroughly for plant cis-elements corresponding to transcription factors is worthwhile to reveal novel gene activation cascades. At the same time, a great deal of research is currently focused on epigenetic events in plants. A widely used method serving both purposes is chromatin immunoprecipitation, which was developed for Arabidopsis and other plants but is not yet operational for tomato (Solanum lycopersicum, a model plant species for a group of economically important crops. Results We developed a chromatin immunoprecipitation protocol suitable for tomato by adjusting the parameters to optimise in vivo crosslinking, purification of nuclei, chromatin extraction, DNA shearing and precipitate analysis using real-time PCR. Results were obtained with two different antibodies, five control loci and two normalisation criteria. Conclusion Here we provide a chromatin immunoprecipitation procedure for tomato leaves that could be combined with high-throughput sequencing to generate a detailed map of epigenetic modifications or genome-wide nucleosome positioning data.

  20. Discovery and Characterization of Chromatin States for Systematic Annotation of the Human Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Jason; Kellis, Manolis

    A plethora of epigenetic modifications have been described in the human genome and shown to play diverse roles in gene regulation, cellular differentiation and the onset of disease. Although individual modifications have been linked to the activity levels of various genetic functional elements, their combinatorial patterns are still unresolved and their potential for systematic de novo genome annotation remains untapped. Here, we use a multivariate Hidden Markov Model to reveal chromatin states in human T cells, based on recurrent and spatially coherent combinations of chromatin marks.We define 51 distinct chromatin states, including promoter-associated, transcription-associated, active intergenic, largescale repressed and repeat-associated states. Each chromatin state shows specific enrichments in functional annotations, sequence motifs and specific experimentally observed characteristics, suggesting distinct biological roles. This approach provides a complementary functional annotation of the human genome that reveals the genome-wide locations of diverse classes of epigenetic function.

  1. Identification of noncoding transcripts from within CENP-A chromatin at fission yeast centromeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun Shik; Strålfors, Annelie; Castillo, Araceli G; Durand-Dubief, Mickaël; Ekwall, Karl; Allshire, Robin C

    2011-07-01

    The histone H3 variant CENP-A is the most favored candidate for an epigenetic mark that specifies the centromere. In fission yeast, adjacent heterochromatin can direct CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin establishment, but the underlying features governing where CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin assembles are unknown. We show that, in addition to centromeric regions, a low level of CENP-A(Cnp1) associates with gene promoters where histone H3 is depleted by the activity of the Hrp1(Chd1) chromatin-remodeling factor. Moreover, we demonstrate that noncoding RNAs are transcribed by RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) from CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin at centromeres. These analyses reveal a similarity between centromeres and a subset of RNAPII genes and suggest a role for remodeling at RNAPII promoters within centromeres that influences the replacement of histone H3 with CENP-A(Cnp1). PMID:21531710

  2. Physiological and Pathological Aging Affects Chromatin Dynamics, Structure and Function at the Nuclear Edge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Jérôme D; Magdinier, Frédérique

    2016-01-01

    Lamins are intermediate filaments that form a complex meshwork at the inner nuclear membrane. Mammalian cells express two types of Lamins, Lamins A/C and Lamins B, encoded by three different genes, LMNA, LMNB1, and LMNB2. Mutations in the LMNA gene are associated with a group of phenotypically diverse diseases referred to as laminopathies. Lamins interact with a large number of binding partners including proteins of the nuclear envelope but also chromatin-associated factors. Lamins not only constitute a scaffold for nuclear shape, rigidity and resistance to stress but also contribute to the organization of chromatin and chromosomal domains. We will discuss here the impact of A-type Lamins loss on alterations of chromatin organization and formation of chromatin domains and how disorganization of the lamina contributes to the patho-physiology of premature aging syndromes. PMID:27602048

  3. The RSC and INO80 chromatin-remodeling complexes in DNA double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Anna L; Downs, Jessica A

    2012-01-01

    In eukaryotes, DNA is packaged into chromatin and is therefore relatively inaccessible to DNA repair enzymes. In order to perform efficient DNA repair, ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling enzymes are required to alter the chromatin structure near the site of damage to facilitate processing and allow access to repair enzymes. Two of the best-studied remodeling complexes involved in repair are RSC (Remodels the Structure of Chromatin) and INO80 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which are both conserved in higher eukaryotes. RSC is very rapidly recruited to breaks and mobilizes nucleosomes to promote phosphorylation of H2A S129 and resection. INO80 enrichment at a break occurs later and is dependent on phospho-S129 H2A. INO80 activity at the break site also facilitates resection. Consequently, both homologous recombination and nonhomologous end-joining are defective in rsc mutants, while subsets of these repair pathways are affected in ino80 mutants.

  4. Till disassembly do us part: a happy marriage of nuclear envelope and chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Yuichi

    2008-02-01

    A characteristic feature of eukaryotic cells is the presence of nuclear envelope (NE) which separates genomic DNA from cytoplasm. NE is composed of inner nuclear membrane (INM), which interacts with chromatin, and outer nuclear membrane, which is connected to endoplasmic reticulum. Nuclear pore complexes are inserted into NE to form transport channels between nucleus and cytoplasm. In metazoan cells, an intermediate filament-based meshwork called as nuclear lamina exists between INM and chromatin. Sophisticated collaboration of these molecular machineries is necessary for the structure and functions of NE. Recent research advances have revealed that NE dynamically communicates with chromatin and cytoskeleton to control multiple nuclear functions. In this mini review, I briefly summarize the basic concepts and current topics of functional relationships between NE and chromatin.

  5. Active remodeling of chromatin and implications for in-vivo folding

    CERN Document Server

    Ramakrishnan, N; Kuttippurathu, Lakshmi; Kumar, P B Sunil; Rao, Madan

    2015-01-01

    Recent high resolution experiments have provided a quantitative description of the statistical properties of interphase chromatin at large scales. These findings have stimulated a search for generic physical interactions that give rise to such specific statistical conformations. Here, we show that an active chromatin model of in-vivo folding, based on the interplay between polymer elasticity, confinement, topological constraints and active stresses arising from the (un)binding of ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling proteins gives rise to steady state conformations consistent with these experiments. Our results lead us to conjecture that the chromatin conformation resulting from this active folding optimizes information storage by co-locating gene loci which share transcription resources.

  6. Absence of canonical marks of active chromatin in developmentally regulated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Lluch, Sílvia; Blanco, Enrique; Tilgner, Hagen; Curado, Joao; Ruiz-Romero, Marina; Corominas, Montserrat; Guigó, Roderic

    2015-10-01

    The interplay of active and repressive histone modifications is assumed to have a key role in the regulation of gene expression. In contrast to this generally accepted view, we show that the transcription of genes temporally regulated during fly and worm development occurs in the absence of canonically active histone modifications. Conversely, strong chromatin marking is related to transcriptional and post-transcriptional stability, an association that we also observe in mammals. Our results support a model in which chromatin marking is associated with the stable production of RNA, whereas unmarked chromatin would permit rapid gene activation and deactivation during development. In the latter case, regulation by transcription factors would have a comparatively more important regulatory role than chromatin marks.

  7. Micro- and nanoscale devices for the investigation of epigenetics and chromatin dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Carlos A.; Craighead, Harold G.

    2013-10-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the blueprint on which life is based and transmitted, but the way in which chromatin -- a dynamic complex of nucleic acids and proteins -- is packaged and behaves in the cellular nucleus has only begun to be investigated. Epigenetic modifications sit 'on top of' the genome and affect how DNA is compacted into chromatin and transcribed into ribonucleic acid (RNA). The packaging and modifications around the genome have been shown to exert significant influence on cellular behaviour and, in turn, human development and disease. However, conventional techniques for studying epigenetic or conformational modifications of chromosomes have inherent limitations and, therefore, new methods based on micro- and nanoscale devices have been sought. Here, we review the development of these devices and explore their use in the study of DNA modifications, chromatin modifications and higher-order chromatin structures.

  8. Mechanisms of inactivation of poliovirus by chlorine dioxide and iodine.

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez, M E; O'Brien, R T

    1982-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide and iodine inactivated poliovirus more efficiently at pH 10.0 than at pH 6.0. Sedimentation analyses of viruses inactivated by chlorine dioxide and iodine at pH 10.9 showed that viral RNA separated from the capsids, resulting in the conversion of virions from 156S structures to 80S particles. The RNAs release from both chlorine dioxide- and iodine-inactivated viruses cosedimented with intact 35S viral RNA. Both chlorine dioxide and iodine reacted with the capsid proteins of p...

  9. MILT DILUTION EFFECTIVENESS ON PIKEPERCH (SANDER LUCIOPERCA SPERM DNA INACTIVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. KORBULY

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Percid fishes, including pikeperch (Sander lucioperca have recently become the subject of intense research. In order to obtain gynogenetic all female pikeperch populations, normal pikeperch eggs are fertilized with inactivated sperm. Because pikeperch semen has a high viscosity, milt has to be diluted in an immobilizing solution before DNA inactivation. The aim of this study was to assess milt diluting solutions effectiveness in order to inactivate sperm DNA with UV irradiation, to produce meiotic gynogenetic pikeperch (Sander lucioperca. We assessed sperm motility after dilution in 5 different immobilizing solutions. Best results were obtained using Ringer’s solution as pikeperch sperm diluent.

  10. Inactivation of human and simian rotaviruses by ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughn, J.M.; Chen, Y.S.; Lindburg, K.; Morales, D.

    1987-09-01

    The inactivation of simian rotavirus Sa-11 and human rotavirus type 2 (Wa) by ozone was compared at 4/sup 0/C by using single-particle virus stocks. Although the human strain was clearly more sensitive, both virus types were rapidly inactivated by ozone concentrations of 0.25 mg/liter or greater at all pH levels tested. Comparison of the virucidal activity of ozone with that of chlorine in identical experiments indicated little significant difference in rotavirus-inactivating efficiencies when the disinfectants were used at concentrations of 0.25 mg/liter or greater.

  11. Sequential chromatin immunoprecipitation protocol for global analysis through massive parallel sequencing (reChIP-seq)

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Marco Antonio Mendoza-Parra, Shankaranarayanan Pattabhiraman & Hinrich Gronemeyer ### Abstract Chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with massive parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq) is increasingly used to study protein-chromatin interactions or local epigenetic modifications at genome-wide scale. ChIP-seq can be performed directly with several ng of immunoprecipitated DNA, which is generally obtained from a several million cells, depending on the quality of the antibody. ChI...

  12. Active chromatin and transcription play a key role in chromosome partitioning into topologically associating domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulianov, Sergey V; Khrameeva, Ekaterina E; Gavrilov, Alexey A; Flyamer, Ilya M; Kos, Pavel; Mikhaleva, Elena A; Penin, Aleksey A; Logacheva, Maria D; Imakaev, Maxim V; Chertovich, Alexander; Gelfand, Mikhail S; Shevelyov, Yuri Y; Razin, Sergey V

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances enabled by the Hi-C technique have unraveled many principles of chromosomal folding that were subsequently linked to disease and gene regulation. In particular, Hi-C revealed that chromosomes of animals are organized into topologically associating domains (TADs), evolutionary conserved compact chromatin domains that influence gene expression. Mechanisms that underlie partitioning of the genome into TADs remain poorly understood. To explore principles of TAD folding in Drosophila melanogaster, we performed Hi-C and poly(A)(+) RNA-seq in four cell lines of various origins (S2, Kc167, DmBG3-c2, and OSC). Contrary to previous studies, we find that regions between TADs (i.e., the inter-TADs and TAD boundaries) in Drosophila are only weakly enriched with the insulator protein dCTCF, while another insulator protein Su(Hw) is preferentially present within TADs. However, Drosophila inter-TADs harbor active chromatin and constitutively transcribed (housekeeping) genes. Accordingly, we find that binding of insulator proteins dCTCF and Su(Hw) predicts TAD boundaries much worse than active chromatin marks do. Interestingly, inter-TADs correspond to decompacted inter-bands of polytene chromosomes, whereas TADs mostly correspond to densely packed bands. Collectively, our results suggest that TADs are condensed chromatin domains depleted in active chromatin marks, separated by regions of active chromatin. We propose the mechanism of TAD self-assembly based on the ability of nucleosomes from inactive chromatin to aggregate, and lack of this ability in acetylated nucleosomal arrays. Finally, we test this hypothesis by polymer simulations and find that TAD partitioning may be explained by different modes of inter-nucleosomal interactions for active and inactive chromatin. PMID:26518482

  13. An in vitro reconstitution system for the assessment of chromatin protein fluidity during Xenopus development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Ryuta; Inui, Masafumi; Hayashi, Yohei; Sedohara, Ayako [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Okabayashi, Koji [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); ICORP Organ Regeneration Project, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Ohnuma, Kiyoshi, E-mail: kohnuma@vos.nagaokaut.ac.jp [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Murata, Masayuki [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Asashima, Makoto, E-mail: asashi@bio.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); ICORP Organ Regeneration Project, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Organ Development Research Laboratory, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba Central 4, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8562 (Japan)

    2010-09-17

    Research highlights: {yields} An in vitro reconstitution system was established with isolated nuclei and cytoplasm. {yields} Chromatin fluidities were measured in the system using FRAP. {yields} Chromatin fluidities were higher in the cytoplasm of earlier-stage embryos. {yields} Chromatin fluidities were higher in the earlier-stage nuclei with egg-extract. {yields} Chromatin fluidity may decrease during embryonic development. -- Abstract: Chromatin fluidity, which is one of the indicators of higher-order structures in chromatin, is associated with cell differentiation. However, little is known about the relationships between chromatin fluidity and cell differentiation status in embryonic development. We established an in vitro reconstitution system that uses isolated nuclei and cytoplasmic extracts of Xenopus embryos and a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching assay to measure the fluidities of heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) and histone H1 during development. The HP1 and H1 fluidities of nuclei isolated from the tailbuds of early tadpole stage (stage 32) embryos in the cytoplasmic extracts of eggs and of late blastula stage (stage 9) embryos were higher than those in the cytoplasmic extracts of mid-neurula stage (stage 15) embryos. The HP1 fluidities of nuclei isolated from animal cap cells of early gastrula stage (stage 10) embryos and from the neural plates of neural stage (stage 20) embryos were higher than those isolated from the tailbuds of stage 32 embryos in egg extracts, whereas the HP1 fluidities of these nuclei were the same in the cytoplasmic extracts of stage 15 embryos. These results suggest that chromatin fluidity is dependent upon both cytoplasmic and nuclear factors and decreases during development.

  14. An in vitro reconstitution system for the assessment of chromatin protein fluidity during Xenopus development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → An in vitro reconstitution system was established with isolated nuclei and cytoplasm. → Chromatin fluidities were measured in the system using FRAP. → Chromatin fluidities were higher in the cytoplasm of earlier-stage embryos. → Chromatin fluidities were higher in the earlier-stage nuclei with egg-extract. → Chromatin fluidity may decrease during embryonic development. -- Abstract: Chromatin fluidity, which is one of the indicators of higher-order structures in chromatin, is associated with cell differentiation. However, little is known about the relationships between chromatin fluidity and cell differentiation status in embryonic development. We established an in vitro reconstitution system that uses isolated nuclei and cytoplasmic extracts of Xenopus embryos and a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching assay to measure the fluidities of heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) and histone H1 during development. The HP1 and H1 fluidities of nuclei isolated from the tailbuds of early tadpole stage (stage 32) embryos in the cytoplasmic extracts of eggs and of late blastula stage (stage 9) embryos were higher than those in the cytoplasmic extracts of mid-neurula stage (stage 15) embryos. The HP1 fluidities of nuclei isolated from animal cap cells of early gastrula stage (stage 10) embryos and from the neural plates of neural stage (stage 20) embryos were higher than those isolated from the tailbuds of stage 32 embryos in egg extracts, whereas the HP1 fluidities of these nuclei were the same in the cytoplasmic extracts of stage 15 embryos. These results suggest that chromatin fluidity is dependent upon both cytoplasmic and nuclear factors and decreases during development.

  15. Chromatin remodeling of human subtelomeres and TERRA promoters upon cellular senescence: commonalities and differences between chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijssen, Peter E; Tobi, Elmar W; Balog, Judit; Schouten, Suzanne G; Kremer, Dennis; El Bouazzaoui, Fatiha; Henneman, Peter; Putter, Hein; Eline Slagboom, P; Heijmans, Bastiaan T; van der Maarel, Silvère M

    2013-05-01

    Subtelomeres are patchworks of evolutionary conserved sequence blocks and harbor the transcriptional start sites for telomere repeat containing RNAs (TERRA). Recent studies suggest that the interplay between telomeres and subtelomeric chromatin is required for maintaining telomere function. To further characterize chromatin remodeling of subtelomeres in relation to telomere shortening and cellular senescence, we systematically quantified histone modifications and DNA methylation at the subtelomeres of chromosomes 7q and 11q in primary human WI-38 fibroblasts. Upon senescence, both subtelomeres were characterized by a decrease in markers of constitutive heterochromatin, suggesting relative chromatin relaxation. However, we did not find increased levels of markers of euchromatin or derepression of the 7q VIPR2 gene. The repressed state of the subtelomeres was maintained upon senescence, which could be attributed to a rise in levels of facultative heterochromatin markers at both subtelomeres. While senescence-induced subtelomeric chromatin remodeling was similar for both chromosomes, chromatin remodeling at TERRA promoters displayed chromosome-specific patterns. At the 7q TERRA promoter, chromatin structure was co-regulated with the more proximal subtelomere. In contrast, the 11q TERRA promoter, which was previously shown to be bound by CCCTC-binding factor CTCF, displayed lower levels of markers of constitutive heterochromatin that did not change upon senescence, whereas levels of markers of facultative heterochromatin decreased upon senescence. In line with the chromatin state data, transcription of 11q TERRA but not 7q TERRA was detected. Our study provides a detailed description of human subtelomeric chromatin dynamics and shows distinct regulation of the TERRA promoters of 7q and 11q upon cellular senescence.

  16. Protocol: methodology for chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    OpenAIRE

    Strenkert Daniela; Schmollinger Stefan; Schroda Michael

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We report on a detailed chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) protocol for the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The protocol is suitable for the analysis of nucleosome occupancy, histone modifications and transcription factor binding sites at the level of mononucleosomes for targeted and genome-wide studies. We describe the optimization of conditions for crosslinking, chromatin fragmentation and antibody titer determination and provide recommendations and an example f...

  17. Chromatin Adaptor Brd4 Modulates E2 Transcription Activity and Protein Stability*

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, A-Young; Chiang, Cheng-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Brd4 is a chromatin adaptor containing tandem bromodomains binding to acetylated histone H3 and H4. Although Brd4 has been implicated in the transcriptional control of papillomavirus-encoded E2 protein, it is unclear how Brd4 regulates E2 function and whether the involvement of Brd4 in transactivation and transrepression is common to different types of E2 proteins. Using DNase I footprinting performed with in vitro reconstituted human papillomavirus (HPV) chromatin and...

  18. Effect of Seminal Vesicles and Dithiotritol (Dtt on Stability of Sperm Chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MH Nasr-Esfahani

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Different studies have shown that there is no relation between sperm chromatin stability and fertilization rate in both IVF and ICSI patients. However, the relation between SDS tests, as a detergent, along with DTT as reducer of disulphide bridges has not been studied so far in ICSI patients. Since different concentrations of DTT can induce different degrees of sperm chromatin decondensation, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different concentrations of DTT on sperm chromatin decondensation in IVF and ICSI cases. Methods: During this study, 85 patients were divided into two groups according to their treatment procedure (IVF or ICSI.Semen samples of each patient was evaluated for sperm chromatin tests including SDS, SDS+EDTA & SDS+DTT for assessment of free thiole groups level (-SH, amount of non covalent bond between Zn and thioles(-SH Zn SH- and levels of disulfide bond (-S-S- in sperm chromatin, respectively. In this study, seminal fructose concentration, corrected seminal fructose level and true corrected fructose level as indicators of seminal vesicle function on sperm chromatin stability were assessed. Results: No correlation was observed between any of the above tests and rate of fertilization, both in IVF and ICSI cases. However, in IVF patients, a significant correlation was observed between SDS, SDS+DTT test and seminal fructose level, while in ICSI patients, only a significant correlation was observed between SDS+DTT and corrected or true fructose concentration. Conclusion: Since no correlation was observed between sperm chromatin test and fertilization rate, it is suggested that the chromatin status of these samples are adequate for fertilization to take place and extent of disulphide bridges has no effect on fertilization rate. However, the amount of disulphide bound present in sperms of ICSI and IVF patients are different, and this difference is related to seminal vesicle performance in these patients.

  19. Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres is characterized by reduced compaction of telomeric chromatin.

    OpenAIRE

    Episkopou, Charikleia; Draskovic, Irena; Van Beneden, Amandine; Tilman, Gaëlle; Mattiussi, Marina; Gobin, Matthieu; Arnoult, Nausica; Londoño-Vallejo, Arturo; Decottignies, Anabelle

    2014-01-01

    International audience Proper telomeric chromatin configuration is thought to be essential for telomere homeostasis and stability. Previous studies in mouse suggested that loss of heterochromatin marks at telomeres might favor onset of Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres (ALT) pathway, by promoting homologous recombination. However, analysis of chromatin status at human ALT telomeres has never been reported. Here, using isogenic human cell lines and cellular hybrids, which rely either on ...

  20. Structure of chromatin, protein transitions, and post-translational histone modifications in several sperm models

    OpenAIRE

    Kurtz, Katryn Lucille

    2008-01-01

    [eng] The study of chromatin structure in several simple sperm models of increasing complexity was performed. Species demonstrating different types of sperm nuclear protein transitions and structural changes in spermatic chromatin during spermiogenesis were selected as models for comparison: "H" (non-histone proteins are removed), "H->P" (protamine displaces histones), and "H->Pp->P" (precursor protamine displaces histones, and subsequently is converted into the mature protamine). This study ...

  1. CTCF-cohesin complex: architect of chromatin structure regulates V(D)J rearrangement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ann J Feeney; Jiyoti Verma-Gaur

    2012-01-01

    The CTCF/cohesin complex regulates higher order chromatin structure by creating long-range chromatin loops and by insulating neighboring genes from each other.The lymphocyte antigen receptor loci have large numbers of CTCF/cohesin binding sites,and recent studies demonstrate that the CTCF/cohesin complex plays several important roles in regulating the process of V(D)J recombination at these megabase-sized receptor loci.

  2. A synthetic lethality-based strategy to treat cancers harboring a genetic deficiency in the chromatin remodeling factor BRG1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oike, Takahiro; Ogiwara, Hideaki; Tominaga, Yuichi; Ito, Kentaro; Ando, Osamu; Tsuta, Koji; Mizukami, Tatsuji; Shimada, Yoko; Isomura, Hisanori; Komachi, Mayumi; Furuta, Koh; Watanabe, Shun-Ichi; Nakano, Takashi; Yokota, Jun; Kohno, Takashi

    2013-09-01

    The occurrence of inactivating mutations in SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling genes in common cancers has attracted a great deal of interest. However, mechanistic strategies to target tumor cells carrying such mutations are yet to be developed. This study proposes a synthetic-lethality therapy for treating cancers deficient in the SWI/SNF catalytic (ATPase) subunit, BRG1/SMARCA4. The strategy relies upon inhibition of BRM/SMARCA2, another catalytic SWI/SNF subunit with a BRG1-related activity. Immunohistochemical analysis of a cohort of non-small-cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC) indicated that 15.5% (16 of 103) of the cohort, corresponding to preferentially undifferentiated tumors, was deficient in BRG1 expression. All BRG1-deficient cases were negative for alterations in known therapeutic target genes, for example, EGFR and DDR2 gene mutations, ALK gene fusions, or FGFR1 gene amplifications. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated silencing of BRM suppressed the growth of BRG1-deficient cancer cells relative to BRG1-proficient cancer cells, inducing senescence via activation of p21/CDKN1A. This growth suppression was reversed by transduction of wild-type but not ATPase-deficient BRG1. In support of these in vitro results, a conditional RNAi study conducted in vivo revealed that BRM depletion suppressed the growth of BRG1-deficient tumor xenografts. Our results offer a rationale to develop BRM-ATPase inhibitors as a strategy to treat BRG1/SMARCA4-deficient cancers, including NSCLCs that lack mutations in presently known therapeutic target genes. PMID:23872584

  3. Nuclear Fractionation Reveals Thousands of Chromatin-Tethered Noncoding RNAs Adjacent to Active Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S. Werner

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A number of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs have been reported to regulate transcription via recruitment of chromatin modifiers or bridging distal enhancer elements to gene promoters. However, the generality of these modes of regulation and the mechanisms of chromatin attachment for thousands of unstudied human lncRNAs remain unclear. To address these questions, we performed stringent nuclear fractionation coupled to RNA sequencing. We provide genome-wide identification of human chromatin-associated lncRNAs and demonstrate tethering of RNA to chromatin by RNAPII is a pervasive mechanism of attachment. We also uncovered thousands of chromatin-enriched RNAs (cheRNAs that share molecular properties with known lncRNAs. Although distinct from eRNAs derived from active prototypical enhancers, the production of cheRNAs is strongly correlated with the expression of neighboring protein-coding genes. This work provides an updated framework for nuclear RNA organization that includes a large chromatin-associated transcript population correlated with active genes and may prove useful in de novo enhancer annotation.

  4. Residual chromatin breaks as biodosimetry for cell killing by carbon ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, M.; Kase, Y.; Nakano, T.; Kanai, T.; Ando, K.

    1998-11-01

    We have studied the relationship between cell killing and the induction of residual chromatin breaks on various human cell lines and primary cultured cells obtained by biopsy from patients irradiated with either X-rays or heavy-ion beams to identify potential bio-marker of radiosensitivity for radiation-induced cell killing. The carbon-ion beams were accelerated with the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC). Six primary cultures obtained by biopsy from 6 patients with carcinoma of the cervix were irradiated with two different mono-LET beams (LET = 13 keV/μm, 76 keV/μm) and 200kV X rays. Residual chromatin breaks were measured by counting the number of non-rejoining chromatin fragments detected by the premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique after a 24 hour post-irradiation incubation period. The induction rate of residual chromatin breaks per cell per Gy was the highest for 76 keV/μm beams on all of the cells. Our results indicated that cell which was more sensitive to the cell killing was similarly more susceptible to induction of residual chromatin breaks. Furthermore there is a good correlation between these two end points in various cell lines and primary cultured cells. This suggests that the detection of residual chromatin breaks by the PCC technique may be useful as a predictive assay of tumor response to cancer radiotherapy.

  5. Advance chromatin extraction improves capture performance of protein A affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nian, Rui; Zhang, Wei; Tan, Lihan; Lee, Jeremy; Bi, Xeuzhi; Yang, Yuansheng; Gan, Hui Theng; Gagnon, Pete

    2016-01-29

    Practical effects of advance chromatin removal on performance of protein A affinity chromatography were evaluated using a caprylic acid-allantoin-based extraction method. Lacking this treatment, the practice of increasing loading residence time to increase capacity was shown to increase host protein contamination of the eluted IgG. Advance chromatin extraction suspended that compromise. Protein A ligand leakage from columns loaded with chromatin-extracted harvest was half the level observed on protein A columns loaded with non-extracted harvest. Columns loaded with chromatin-extracted harvest were cleaned more effectively by 50-100mM NaOH than columns loaded with non-extracted harvest that were cleaned with 250-500mM NaOH. Two protein A media with IgG capacities in excess of 50g/L were loaded with chromatin-extracted harvest, washed with 2.0M NaCl before elution, and the eluted IgG fraction titrated to pH 5.5 before microfiltration. Host protein contamination in the filtrate was reduced to <1ppm, DNA to <1ppb, protein A leakage to 0.5ppm, and aggregates to 1.0%. Caprylic acid and allantoin were both reduced below 5ppm. Step recovery of IgG was 99.4%. Addition of a single polishing step reduced residual protein A beneath the level of detection and aggregates to <0.1%. Overall process recovery including chromatin extraction was 90%. PMID:26774119

  6. Visualization of chromatin folding patterns in chicken erythrocytes by atomic force microscopy (AFM)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIANRUOLAN; ZHENGXIALIU; 等

    1997-01-01

    The organization of the higher order structure of chromatin in chicken erythrocytes has been examined with tapping-mode scanning force microscopy under conditions close to their native envirinment.Reproducible highresolution AFM images of chromatin compaction at several levels can be demonstrated.An extended beads-on-astring (width of - 15-20nm,height of - 2-3nm for each individual nucleosome) can be consistently observed.Furthermore,superbeade (width of - 40nm,height of - 7nm) are demonstrated.Visualization of the solenoid conformation at the level of 30nm chromatin fiber is attained either by using AFM or by using electron microscopy.In addition,tightly coiled chromatin fibers (- 50-60nm and - 90-110nm) can be revealed.Our data suggest that the chromatin in the interphase nucleus of chicken erythrocyte represents a high-order conformation and AFM provides useful high-resolution structural information concerning the folding pattern of interphase chromatin fibers.

  7. ISWI regulates higher-order chromatin structure and histone H1 assembly in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide F V Corona

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Imitation SWI (ISWI and other ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling factors play key roles in transcription and other processes by altering the structure and positioning of nucleosomes. Recent studies have also implicated ISWI in the regulation of higher-order chromatin structure, but its role in this process remains poorly understood. To clarify the role of ISWI in vivo, we examined defects in chromosome structure and gene expression resulting from the loss of Iswi function in Drosophila. Consistent with a broad role in transcriptional regulation, the expression of a large number of genes is altered in Iswi mutant larvae. The expression of a dominant-negative form of ISWI leads to dramatic alterations in higher-order chromatin structure, including the apparent decondensation of both mitotic and polytene chromosomes. The loss of ISWI function does not cause obvious defects in nucleosome assembly, but results in a significant reduction in the level of histone H1 associated with chromatin in vivo. These findings suggest that ISWI plays a global role in chromatin compaction in vivo by promoting the association of the linker histone H1 with chromatin.

  8. Host-viral effects of chromatin assembly factor 1 interaction with HCMV IE2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sung-Bau Lee; Li-Jung Juan; Chung-Fan Lee; Derick S-C Ou; Kalpana Dulal; Liang-Hao Chang; Chen-Han Ma; Chien-Fu Huang; Hua Zhu; Young-Sun Lin

    2011-01-01

    Chromatin assembly factor 1 (CAF1) consisting of p150, p60 and p48 is known to assemble histones onto newly synthesized DNA and thus maintain the chromatin structure. Here, we show that CAF1 expression was induced in human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-infected cells, concomitantly with global chromatin decondensation. This apparent conflict was thought to result, in part, from CAF1 mislocalization to compartments of HCMV DNA synthesis through binding of its largest subunit p150 to viral immediate-early protein 2 (IE2). p150 interaction with p60 and IE2 facilitated HCMV DNA synthesis. The IE2Q548R mutation, previously reported to result in impaired HCMV growth with unknown mechanism, disrupted IE2/p150 and IE2/histones association in our study. Moreover, IE2 interaction with histones partly depends on p150, and the HCMV-induced chromatin decondensation was reduced in cells ectopically expressing the p150 mutant defective in IE2 binding. These results not only indicate that CAF1 was hijacked by IE2 to facilitate the replication of the HCMV genome, suggesting chromatin assembly plays an important role in herpesviral DNA synthesis, but also provide a model of the virus-induced chromatin instability through CAF1.

  9. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation-dependent Transient Chromatin Decondensation and Histone Displacement following Laser Microirradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickfaden, Hilmar; McDonald, Darin; Kruhlak, Michael J; Haince, Jean-Francois; Th'ng, John P H; Rouleau, Michele; Ishibashi, Toytaka; Corry, Gareth N; Ausio, Juan; Underhill, D Alan; Poirier, Guy G; Hendzel, Michael J

    2016-01-22

    Chromatin undergoes a rapid ATP-dependent, ATM and H2AX-independent decondensation when DNA damage is introduced by laser microirradiation. Although the detailed mechanism of this decondensation remains to be determined, the kinetics of decondensation are similar to the kinetics of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. We used laser microirradiation to introduce DNA strand breaks into living cells expressing a photoactivatable GFP-tagged histone H2B. We find that poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation mediated primarily by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) is responsible for the rapid decondensation of chromatin at sites of DNA damage. This decondensation of chromatin correlates temporally with the displacement of histones, which is sensitive to PARP inhibition and is transient in nature. Contrary to the predictions of the histone shuttle hypothesis, we did not find that histone H1 accumulated on poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) in vivo. Rather, histone H1, and to a lessor extent, histones H2A and H2B were rapidly depleted from the sites of PAR accumulation. However, histone H1 returns to chromatin and the chromatin recondenses. Thus, the PARP-dependent relaxation of chromatin closely correlates with histone displacement.

  10. Hemodynamic deterioration precedes onset of ventricular tachyarrhythmia after Heartmate II implantation

    OpenAIRE

    Yaksh, Ameeta; Kik, Charles; Knops, Paul; Zwiers, Korinne; van Ettinger, Maarten J. B.; Manintveld, Olivier C.; de Wijs, Marcel C. J.; Kemp, Peter; Bogers, Ad J.J.C.; de Groot, Natasja M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Early postoperative ventricular tachyarrhythmia (PoVT) after left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation are common and associated with higher mortality-rates. At present, there is no data on initiation of these PoVT and the role of alterations in cardiac hemodynamics. Case Presentation A LVAD was implanted in a patient with end-stage heart failure due to a ischemic cardiomyopathy. Alterations in cardiac rhythm and hemodynamics preceding PoVT-episodes during the first five p...

  11. A Decrease in Temperature and Humidity Precedes Human Rhinovirus Infections in a Cold Climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikäheimo, Tiina M; Jaakkola, Kari; Jokelainen, Jari; Saukkoriipi, Annika; Roivainen, Merja; Juvonen, Raija; Vainio, Olli; Jaakkola, Jouni J K

    2016-01-01

    Both temperature and humidity may independently or jointly contribute to the risk of human rhinovirus (HRV) infections, either through altered survival and spread of viruses in the environment or due to changes in host susceptibility. This study examined the relationship between short-term variations in temperature and humidity and the risk of HRV infections in a subarctic climate. We conducted a case-crossover study among conscripts (n = 892) seeking medical attention due to respiratory symptoms during their military training and identified 147 HRV cases by real-time PCR. An average temperature, a decline in daily ambient temperature and absolute humidity (AH) during the three preceding days of the onset (hazard period) and two reference periods (a week prior and after the onset) were obtained. The average daily temperature preceding HRV infections was -9.9 ± 4.9 °C and the average AH was 2.2 ± 0.9 g/m³. An average (odds ratios (OR) 1.07 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.00-1.15)) and maximal (OR 1.08 (1.01-1.17)) change in temperature increased the risk of HRV infections by 8% per 1 °C decrease. An average (OR 1.20 (CI 1.03-1.40)) and maximal decrease (OR 1.13 (CI 0.96-1.34)) in AH increased the risk of HRV infection by 13% and 20% per 0.5 g/m³ decrease. A higher average temperature during the three preceding days was positively associated with HRV infections (OR 1.07 (CI 1.00-1.15)). A decrease rather than low temperature and humidity per se during the preceding few days increases the risk of HRV infections in a cold climate. The information is applicable to populations residing in cold climates for appropriate personal protection and prevention of adverse health effects. PMID:27598190

  12. TestAnt: an ant colony system approach to sequential testing under precedence constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Çatay, Bülent; Catay, Bulent; Özlük, Özgür; Ozluk, Ozgur; Ünlüyurt, Tonguç; Unluyurt, Tonguc

    2011-01-01

    We consider the problem of minimum cost sequential testing (diagnosis) of a series (or parallel) system under precedence constraints. We model the problem as a nonlinear integer program. We develop and implement an ant colony algorithm for the problem. We demonstrate the performance of this algorithm for special type of instances for which the optimal solutions can be found in polynomial time. In addition, we compare the performance of the ant colony algorithm with a branch and bound algorith...

  13. An ant colony algorithm for the sequential testing problem under precedence constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Çatay, Bülent; Catay, Bulent; Özlük, Özgür; Ozluk, Ozgur; Ünlüyurt, Tonguç; Unluyurt, Tonguc

    2008-01-01

    We consider the problem of minimum cost sequential testing of a series (parallel) system under precedence constraints that can be modeled as a nonlinear integer program. We develop and implement an ant colony algorithm for the problem. We demonstrate the performance of this algorithm for special type of instances for which the optimal solutions can be found in polynomial time. In addition, we compare the performance of the algorithm with a special branch and bound algo...

  14. An assessment of the provision of HIV education among dental hygienists :application of the PRECEDE model

    OpenAIRE

    Johnston, Paula W.

    1993-01-01

    Health professionals have important roles to play in educating their clients about HIV prevention. However, research suggests that health professionals, including dental professionals, more often than not fail to provide any HIV education to their clients. This study employed Green and Kreuter's PRECEDE model to assess those factors that influence the provision of HIV education by dental hygienists in Virginia. A 22 item closed-ended questionnaire which addressed pr...

  15. A Legal Analysis of the Precedents of Medical Disputes in the Cosmetic Surgery Field

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Bo Young; Kim, Min Ji; Kang, So Ra; Hong, Seung Eun

    2016-01-01

    Background Disputes regarding medical malpractice occur between practitioners and patients. As patients have become increasingly aware regarding medical care, an increase in the unexpected side effects of procedures has been observed, thereby leading to an increase in disputes regarding medical malpractice. In this study, we reviewed trends in precedents involving cosmetic surgery-related medical disputes, with the goal of helping to prevent unnecessary disputes in the future. Methods We cond...

  16. Relationship Type and Sexual Precedence: Their Associations With Characteristics of Sexual Assault Perpetrators and Incidents

    OpenAIRE

    Wegner, Rhiana; Pierce, Jennifer; Abbey, Antonia

    2014-01-01

    Although most sexual assaults are committed by men who know their victims, few researchers have considered how characteristics of perpetrators and incidents differ depending on the victim–perpetrator relationship. This study addresses this gap with a community sample of 204 men who reported committing a sexually aggressive act in an audio computer-assisted self-interview. 2 (Relationship Type: Committed vs. Casual) × 2 (Sexual Precedence: Yes vs. No) ANOVAs revealed significant main effects o...

  17. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) consistently precedes multiple myeloma: a prospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Landgren, Ola; Kyle, Robert A.; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Katzmann, Jerry A.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Hayes, Richard B.; Dispenzieri, Angela; Kumar, Shaji; Clark, Raynell J.; Baris, Dalsu; Hoover, Robert; Rajkumar, S. Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is a premalignant plasma-cell proliferative disorder associated with a life-long risk of progression to multiple myeloma (MM). It is not known whether MM is always preceded by a premalignant asymptomatic MGUS stage. Among 77 469 healthy adults enrolled in the nationwide population-based prospective Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial, we identified 71 subjects who developed MM during the course of the ...

  18. Organizational precedents for ownership and management of decentralized renewable-energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meunier, R.; Silversmith, J.A.

    1981-03-01

    Three existing organizational types that meet the decentralization criteria of local consumer ownership and control - cooperatives, Rural Electric Cooperatives, and municipal utilities - are examined. These three organizational precedents are analyzed in terms of their histories, structures, legal powers, sources of capital, and social and political aspects. Examples of related experiments with renewable energy technologies are given, and inferences are drawn regarding the organizations' suitability as vehicles for future implementation of decentralized renewable energy systems.

  19. Do preceding questions influence the reporting of childbearing intentions in social surveys?

    OpenAIRE

    Mathews, Paul; Sear, Rebecca; Coast, Ernestina; Iacovou, Maria

    2012-01-01

    For demographers fertility intentions are a long standing source of both interest and scepticism. Scepticism has been expressed because fertility intentions regularly fail to precisely predict fertility and because they are liable to change across the life course. Here we demonstrate an additional consideration: simply changing the questions that precede fertility intentions questions can have a significant influence on responses. We illustrate this risk using a series of randomised experimen...

  20. Photothermal inactivation of bacteria on plasmonic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Greggy M.; Ibañez de Santi Ferrara, Felipe; Zhao, Fusheng; Rodrigues, Debora F.; Shih, Wei-Chuan

    2016-03-01

    Hospital-acquired bacterial infections are frequently associated with the pathogenic biofilms on surfaces of devices and instruments used in medical procedures. The utilization of thermal plasmonic agents is an innovative approach for sterilizing hospital equipment and for in vivo therapeutic treatment of bacterial infection. A photothermal inactivation technique via array of nanoporous gold disks (NPGDs) has been developed by irradiating near infrared (NIR) light onto deposited bacterial cells (Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Exiguobacterium AT1B) on the surface of metal nanostructure. The physical and photothermal properties of the NPGD substrate were investigated using topographical scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermographic infrared imaging. Bacterial viability studies on NPGD substrates irradiated with and without NIR light were evaluated using a fluorescence-based two-component stain assay. The results show that the heat generated from the NPGD substrate promotes high cell death counts (~100%) at short exposure durations (<25 s) even for thermally-resistant bacterial strains. The photothermal effects on NPGD substrate can lead to point-of-care applications.

  1. Cold plasma inactivation of chronic wound bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Nasir, N; Lee, B K; Yap, S S; Thong, K L; Yap, S L

    2016-09-01

    Cold plasma is partly ionized non-thermal plasma generated at atmospheric pressure. It has been recognized as an alternative approach in medicine for sterilization of wounds, promotion of wound healing, topical treatment of skin diseases with microbial involvement and treatment of cancer. Cold plasma used in wound therapy inhibits microbes in chronic wound due to its antiseptic effects, while promoting healing by stimulation of cell proliferation and migration of wound relating skin cells. In this study, two types of plasma systems are employed to generate cold plasma: a parallel plate dielectric barrier discharge and a capillary-guided corona discharge. Parameters such as applied voltage, discharge frequency, treatment time and the flow of the carrier gas influence the cold plasma chemistry and therefore change the composition and concentration of plasma species that react with the target sample. Chronic wound that fails to heal often infected by multidrug resistant organisms makes them recalcitrant to healing. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) are two common bacteria in infected and clinically non-infected wounds. The efficacies of the cold plasma generated by the two designs on the inactivation of three different isolates of MRSA and four isolates of P. aeruginosa are reported here.

  2. Cold plasma inactivation of chronic wound bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Nasir, N; Lee, B K; Yap, S S; Thong, K L; Yap, S L

    2016-09-01

    Cold plasma is partly ionized non-thermal plasma generated at atmospheric pressure. It has been recognized as an alternative approach in medicine for sterilization of wounds, promotion of wound healing, topical treatment of skin diseases with microbial involvement and treatment of cancer. Cold plasma used in wound therapy inhibits microbes in chronic wound due to its antiseptic effects, while promoting healing by stimulation of cell proliferation and migration of wound relating skin cells. In this study, two types of plasma systems are employed to generate cold plasma: a parallel plate dielectric barrier discharge and a capillary-guided corona discharge. Parameters such as applied voltage, discharge frequency, treatment time and the flow of the carrier gas influence the cold plasma chemistry and therefore change the composition and concentration of plasma species that react with the target sample. Chronic wound that fails to heal often infected by multidrug resistant organisms makes them recalcitrant to healing. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) are two common bacteria in infected and clinically non-infected wounds. The efficacies of the cold plasma generated by the two designs on the inactivation of three different isolates of MRSA and four isolates of P. aeruginosa are reported here. PMID:27046340

  3. Inactivation of RNA viruses by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four kinds of RNA viruses, Bluetongue virus (BT), Bovine Virus Diarrhea-Mucosal Disease virus (BVD·MD), Bovine Respiratory Syncytial virus (RS), Vesicular Stmatitis virus (VS), were subjected to various doses of gamma irradiation to determine the lethal doses. The D10 values, which are the dose necessary to decimally reduce infectivity, ranged from 1.5 to 3.4 kGy under frozen condition at dry-ice temperature, and they increased to 2.6 to 5.0 kGy under frozen condition at dry-ice temperature. Serum neutralzing antibody titer of Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis (IBR) was not adversely changed by the exposure to 36 kGy of gamma-rays under frozen condition. Analysis of electrophoresis patterns of the bovine serum also reveales that the serum proteins were not remarkably affected, even when exposed to 36 kGy of gamma radiation under frozen condition. The results suggested that gamma irradiation under frozen condition is an effective means for inactivating both DNA and RNA viruses without adversely affecting serum proteins and neutralizing antibody titer. (author)

  4. Conjugated Polymers/DNA Hybrid Materials for Protein Inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Likun; Zhang, Jiangyan; Xu, Huiming; Geng, Hao; Cheng, Yongqiang

    2016-09-01

    Chromophore-assisted light inactivation (CALI) is a powerful tool for analyzing protein functions due to the high degree of spatial and temporal resolution. In this work, we demonstrate a CALI approach based on conjugated polymers (CPs)/DNA hybrid material for protein inactivation. The target protein is conjugated with single-stranded DNA in advance. Single-stranded DNA can form CPs/DNA hybrid material with cationic CPs via electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. Through the formation of CPs/DNA hybrid material, the target protein that is conjugated with DNA is brought into close proximity to CPs. Under irradiation, CPs harvest light and generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), resulting in the inactivation of the adjacent target protein. This approach can efficiently inactivate any target protein which is conjugated with DNA and has good specificity and universality, providing a new strategy for studies of protein function and adjustment of protein activity.

  5. CHLORINE INACTIVATION OF CATEGORY "A" BIO-TERRORISM AGENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This poster presents information on the inactivation of select bioterrorist agents. Information will be presented on chlorine disinfection of vegetative cells of Brucella suis, Brucella melitensis, Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei, Francisella tularensis and endos...

  6. Prediction of transposable element derived enhancers using chromatin modification profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahsan Huda

    Full Text Available Experimentally characterized enhancer regions have previously been shown to display specific patterns of enrichment for several different histone modifications. We modelled these enhancer chromatin profiles in the human genome and used them to guide the search for novel enhancers derived from transposable element (TE sequences. To do this, a computational approach was taken to analyze the genome-wide histone modification landscape characterized by the ENCODE project in two human hematopoietic cell types, GM12878 and K562. We predicted the locations of 2,107 and 1,448 TE-derived enhancers in the GM12878 and K562 cell lines respectively. A vast majority of these putative enhancers are unique to each cell line; only 3.5% of the TE-derived enhancers are shared between the two. We evaluated the functional effect of TE-derived enhancers by associating them with the cell-type specific expression of nearby genes, and found that the number of TE-derived enhancers is strongly positively correlated with the expression of nearby genes in each cell line. Furthermore, genes that are differentially expressed between the two cell lines also possess a divergent number of TE-derived enhancers in their vicinity. As such, genes that are up-regulated in the GM12878 cell line and down-regulated in K562 have significantly more TE-derived enhancers in their vicinity in the GM12878 cell line and vice versa. These data indicate that human TE-derived sequences are likely to be involved in regulating cell-type specific gene expression on a broad scale and suggest that the enhancer activity of TE-derived sequences is mediated by epigenetic regulatory mechanisms.

  7. Independent chromatin binding of ARGONAUTE4 and SPT5L/KTF1 mediates transcriptional gene silencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Jordan Rowley

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic genomes contain significant amounts of transposons and repetitive DNA elements, which, if transcribed, can be detrimental to the organism. Expression of these elements is suppressed by establishment of repressive chromatin modifications. In Arabidopsis thaliana, they are silenced by the siRNA-mediated transcriptional gene silencing pathway where long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs produced by RNA Polymerase V (Pol V guide ARGONAUTE4 (AGO4 to chromatin and attract enzymes that establish repressive chromatin modifications. It is unknown how chromatin modifying enzymes are recruited to chromatin. We show through chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP that SPT5L/KTF1, a silencing factor and a homolog of SPT5 elongation factors, binds chromatin at loci subject to transcriptional silencing. Chromatin binding of SPT5L/KTF1 occurs downstream of RNA Polymerase V, but independently from the presence of 24-nt siRNA. We also show that SPT5L/KTF1 and AGO4 are recruited to chromatin in parallel and independently of each other. As shown using methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes, binding of both AGO4 and SPT5L/KTF1 is required for DNA methylation and repressive histone modifications of several loci. We propose that the coordinate binding of SPT5L and AGO4 creates a platform for direct or indirect recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes.

  8. Resistance of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) Prions to Inactivation

    OpenAIRE

    Kurt Giles; Glidden, David V.; Robyn Beckwith; Rose Seoanes; David Peretz; Stephen J DeArmond; Prusiner, Stanley B.

    2008-01-01

    Distinct prion strains often exhibit different incubation periods and patterns of neuropathological lesions. Strain characteristics are generally retained upon intraspecies transmission, but may change on transmission to another species. We investigated the inactivation of two related prions strains: BSE prions from cattle and mouse-passaged BSE prions, termed 301V. Inactivation was manipulated by exposure to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), variations in pH, and different temperatures. Infectiv...

  9. Identification of an archaeal mercury regulon by chromatin immunoprecipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudrappa, Deepak; Yao, Andrew I; White, Derrick; Pavlik, Benjamin J; Singh, Raghuveer; Facciotti, Marc T; Blum, Paul

    2015-12-01

    Mercury is a heavy metal and toxic to all forms of life. Metal exposure can invoke a response to improve survival. In archaea, several components of a mercury response system have been identified, but it is not known whether metal transport is a member of this system. To identify such missing components, a peptide-tagged MerR transcription factor was used to localize enriched chromosome regions by chromosome immunoprecipitation combined with DNA sequence analysis. Such regions could serve as secondary regulatory binding sites to control the expression of additional genes associated with mercury detoxification. Among the 31 highly enriched loci, a subset of five was pursued as potential candidates based on their current annotations. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis of these regions with and without mercury treatment in WT and mutant strains lacking merR indicated significant regulatory responses under these conditions. Of these, a Family 5 extracellular solute-binding protein and the MarR transcription factor shown previously to control responses to oxidation were most strongly affected. Inactivation of the solute-binding protein by gene disruption increased the resistance of mutant cells to mercury challenge. Inductively coupled plasma-MS analysis of the mutant cell line following metal challenge indicated there was less intracellular mercury compared with the isogenic WT strain. Together, these regulated genes comprise new members of the archaeal MerR regulon and reveal a cascade of transcriptional control not previously demonstrated in this model organism.

  10. Thermal Inactivation of Feline Calicivirus in Pet Food Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, J; Patel, M; Knight, A I; Corley, D; Gibson, G; Schaaf, J; Moulin, J; Zuber, S

    2015-12-01

    Extrusion is the most common manufacturing process used to produce heat-treated dry dog and cat food (pet food) for domestic use and international trade. Due to reoccurring outbreaks of notifiable terrestrial animal diseases and their impact on international trade, experiments were undertaken to demonstrate the effectiveness of heat-treated extruded pet food on virus inactivation. The impact of extrusion processing in a pet food matrix on virus inactivation has not been previously reported and very few inactivation studies have examined the thermal inactivation of viruses in complex food matrices. The feline calicivirus vaccine strain FCV F-9 was used as a surrogate model RNA virus pathogen. Small-scale heat inactivation experiments using animal-derived pet food raw materials showed that a > 4 log10 reduction (log10 R) in infectivity occurred at 70 °C prior to reaching the minimum extrusion manufacturing operating temperature of 100 °C. As anticipated, small-scale pressure studies at extrusion pressure (1.6 MPa) showed no apparent effect on FCV F-9 inactivation. Additionally, FCV F-9 was shown not to survive the acidic conditions used to produce pet food palatants of animal origin that are typically used as a coating after the extrusion process. PMID:26208948

  11. Thermal Inactivation of Feline Calicivirus in Pet Food Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, J; Patel, M; Knight, A I; Corley, D; Gibson, G; Schaaf, J; Moulin, J; Zuber, S

    2015-12-01

    Extrusion is the most common manufacturing process used to produce heat-treated dry dog and cat food (pet food) for domestic use and international trade. Due to reoccurring outbreaks of notifiable terrestrial animal diseases and their impact on international trade, experiments were undertaken to demonstrate the effectiveness of heat-treated extruded pet food on virus inactivation. The impact of extrusion processing in a pet food matrix on virus inactivation has not been previously reported and very few inactivation studies have examined the thermal inactivation of viruses in complex food matrices. The feline calicivirus vaccine strain FCV F-9 was used as a surrogate model RNA virus pathogen. Small-scale heat inactivation experiments using animal-derived pet food raw materials showed that a > 4 log10 reduction (log10 R) in infectivity occurred at 70 °C prior to reaching the minimum extrusion manufacturing operating temperature of 100 °C. As anticipated, small-scale pressure studies at extrusion pressure (1.6 MPa) showed no apparent effect on FCV F-9 inactivation. Additionally, FCV F-9 was shown not to survive the acidic conditions used to produce pet food palatants of animal origin that are typically used as a coating after the extrusion process.

  12. Kinetics of inactivation of indicator pathogens during thermophilic anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popat, Sudeep C; Yates, Marylynn V; Deshusses, Marc A

    2010-12-01

    Thermophilic anaerobic sludge digestion is a promising process to divert waste to beneficial use, but an important question is the required temperature and holding time to achieve a given degree of pathogen inactivation. In this study, the kinetics of inactivation of Ascaris suum and vaccine strain poliovirus type 1 (PVS-1), selected as indicators for helminth ova and enteric viruses respectively, were determined during anaerobic digestion at temperatures ranging from 51 to 56 °C. Inactivation of both indicator organisms was fast with greater than two log reductions achieved within 2 h for A. suum and three log reductions for PVS-1, suggesting that the current U.S. regulations are largely conservative. The first-order inactivation rate constants k followed Arrhenius relationship with activation energies of 105 and 39 KJ mol(-1) for A. suum and PVS-1, respectively indicating that A. suum was more sensitive to temperature. Although inactivation was fast, the presence of compounds in the sludge that are known to be protective of pathogen inactivation was observed, suggesting that composition-dependent time-temperature relationships are necessary. PMID:20692678

  13. Viral inactivation in hemotherapy: systematic review on inactivators with action on nucleic acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Marial Sobral

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review on the photoinactivators used in hemotherapy, with action on viral genomes. The SciELO, Science Direct, PubMed and Lilacs databases were searched for articles. The inclusion criterion was that these should be articles on inactivators with action on genetic material that had been published between 2000 and 2010. The key words used in identifying such articles were "hemovigilance", "viral inactivation", "photodynamics", "chemoprevention" and "transfusion safety". Twenty-four articles on viral photoinactivation were found with the main photoinactivators covered being: methylene blue, amotosalen HCl, S-303 frangible anchor linker effector (FRALE, riboflavin and inactin. The results showed that methylene blue has currently been studied least, because it diminishes coagulation factors and fibrinogen. Riboflavin has been studied most because it is a photoinactivator of endogenous origin and has few collateral effects. Amotosalen HCl is effective for platelets and is also used on plasma, but may cause changes both to plasma and to platelets, although these are not significant for hemostasis. S-303 FRALE may lead to neoantigens in erythrocytes and is less indicated for red-cell treatment; in such cases, PEN 110 is recommended. Thus, none of the methods for pathogen reduction is effective for all classes of agents and for all blood components, but despite the high cost, these photoinactivators may diminish the risk of blood-transmitted diseases.

  14. Systematic dissection of roles for chromatin regulators in a yeast stress response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assaf Weiner

    Full Text Available Packaging of eukaryotic genomes into chromatin has wide-ranging effects on gene transcription. Curiously, it is commonly observed that deletion of a global chromatin regulator affects expression of only a limited subset of genes bound to or modified by the regulator in question. However, in many single-gene studies it has become clear that chromatin regulators often do not affect steady-state transcription, but instead are required for normal transcriptional reprogramming by environmental cues. We therefore have systematically investigated the effects of 83 histone mutants, and 119 gene deletion mutants, on induction/repression dynamics of 170 transcripts in response to diamide stress in yeast. Importantly, we find that chromatin regulators play far more pronounced roles during gene induction/repression than they do in steady-state expression. Furthermore, by jointly analyzing the substrates (histone mutants and enzymes (chromatin modifier deletions we identify specific interactions between histone modifications and their regulators. Combining these functional results with genome-wide mapping of several histone marks in the same time course, we systematically investigated the correspondence between histone modification occurrence and function. We followed up on one pathway, finding that Set1-dependent H3K4 methylation primarily acts as a gene repressor during multiple stresses, specifically at genes involved in ribosome biosynthesis. Set1-dependent repression of ribosomal genes occurs via distinct pathways for ribosomal protein genes and ribosomal biogenesis genes, which can be separated based on genetic requirements for repression and based on chromatin changes during gene repression. Together, our dynamic studies provide a rich resource for investigating chromatin regulation, and identify a significant role for the "activating" mark H3K4me3 in gene repression.

  15. FGF signalling regulates chromatin organisation during neural differentiation via mechanisms that can be uncoupled from transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishal S Patel

    Full Text Available Changes in higher order chromatin organisation have been linked to transcriptional regulation; however, little is known about how such organisation alters during embryonic development or how it is regulated by extrinsic signals. Here we analyse changes in chromatin organisation as neural differentiation progresses, exploiting the clear spatial separation of the temporal events of differentiation along the elongating body axis of the mouse embryo. Combining fluorescence in situ hybridisation with super-resolution structured illumination microscopy, we show that chromatin around key differentiation gene loci Pax6 and Irx3 undergoes both decompaction and displacement towards the nuclear centre coincident with transcriptional onset. Conversely, down-regulation of Fgf8 as neural differentiation commences correlates with a more peripheral nuclear position of this locus. During normal neural differentiation, fibroblast growth factor (FGF signalling is repressed by retinoic acid, and this vitamin A derivative is further required for transcription of neural genes. We show here that exposure to retinoic acid or inhibition of FGF signalling promotes precocious decompaction and central nuclear positioning of differentiation gene loci. Using the Raldh2 mutant as a model for retinoid deficiency, we further find that such changes in higher order chromatin organisation are dependent on retinoid signalling. In this retinoid deficient condition, FGF signalling persists ectopically in the elongating body, and importantly, we find that inhibiting FGF receptor (FGFR signalling in Raldh2-/- embryos does not rescue differentiation gene transcription, but does elicit both chromatin decompaction and nuclear position change. These findings demonstrate that regulation of higher order chromatin organisation during differentiation in the embryo can be uncoupled from the machinery that promotes transcription and, for the first time, identify FGF as an extrinsic signal that

  16. Chromatin boundary elements organize genomic architecture and developmental gene regulation in Drosophila Hox clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhibo; Li, Mo; Roy, Sharmila; Liu, Kevin J; Romine, Matthew L; Lane, Derrick C; Patel, Sapna K; Cai, Haini N

    2016-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) organization of the eukaryotic genome is critical for its proper function. Evidence suggests that extensive chromatin loops form the building blocks of the genomic architecture, separating genes and gene clusters into distinct functional domains. These loops are anchored in part by a special type of DNA elements called chromatin boundary elements (CBEs). CBEs were originally found to insulate neighboring genes by blocking influences of transcriptional enhancers or the spread of silent chromatin. However, recent results show that chromatin loops can also play a positive role in gene regulation by looping out intervening DNA and “delivering” remote enhancers to gene promoters. In addition, studies from human and model organisms indicate that the configuration of chromatin loops, many of which are tethered by CBEs, is dynamically regulated during cell differentiation. In particular, a recent work by Li et al has shown that the SF1 boundary, located in the Drosophila Hox cluster, regulates local genes by tethering different subsets of chromatin loops: One subset enclose a neighboring gene ftz, limiting its access by the surrounding Scr enhancers and restrict the spread of repressive histones during early embryogenesis; and the other loops subdivide the Scr regulatory region into independent domains of enhancer accessibility. The enhancer-blocking activity of these CBE elements varies greatly in strength and tissue distribution. Further, tandem pairing of SF1 and SF2 facilitate the bypass of distal enhancers in transgenic flies, providing a mechanism for endogenous enhancers to circumvent genomic interruptions resulting from chromosomal rearrangement. This study demonstrates how a network of chromatin boundaries, centrally organized by SF1, can remodel the 3D genome to facilitate gene regulation during development.

  17. Chromatin boundary elements organize genomic architecture and developmental gene regulation in Drosophila Hox clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhibo; Li, Mo; Roy, Sharmila; Liu, Kevin J; Romine, Matthew L; Lane, Derrick C; Patel, Sapna K; Cai, Haini N

    2016-08-26

    The three-dimensional (3D) organization of the eukaryotic genome is critical for its proper function. Evidence suggests that extensive chromatin loops form the building blocks of the genomic architecture, separating genes and gene clusters into distinct functional domains. These loops are anchored in part by a special type of DNA elements called chromatin boundary elements (CBEs). CBEs were originally found to insulate neighboring genes by blocking influences of transcriptional enhancers or the spread of silent chromatin. However, recent results show that chromatin loops can also play a positive role in gene regulation by looping out intervening DNA and "delivering" remote enhancers to gene promoters. In addition, studies from human and model organisms indicate that the configuration of chromatin loops, many of which are tethered by CBEs, is dynamically regulated during cell differentiation. In particular, a recent work by Li et al has shown that the SF1 boundary, located in the Drosophila Hox cluster, regulates local genes by tethering different subsets of chromatin loops: One subset enclose a neighboring gene ftz, limiting its access by the surrounding Scr enhancers and restrict the spread of repressive histones during early embryogenesis; and the other loops subdivide the Scr regulatory region into independent domains of enhancer accessibility. The enhancer-blocking activity of these CBE elements varies greatly in strength and tissue distribution. Further, tandem pairing of SF1 and SF2 facilitate the bypass of distal enhancers in transgenic flies, providing a mechanism for endogenous enhancers to circumvent genomic interruptions resulting from chromosomal rearrangement. This study demonstrates how a network of chromatin boundaries, centrally organized by SF1, can remodel the 3D genome to facilitate gene regulation during development. PMID:27621770

  18. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling facilitates nucleotide excision repair of UV-induced DNA lesions in synthetic dinucleosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Ura, Kiyoe; Araki, Marito; Saeki, Hideaki; Masutani, Chikahide; Ito, Takashi; Iwai, Shigenori; Mizukoshi, Toshimi; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Hanaoka, Fumio

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between chromatin dynamics and nucleotide excision repair (NER), we have examined the effect of chromatin structure on the formation of two major classes of UV-induced DNA lesions in reconstituted dinucleosomes. Furthermore, we have developed a model chromatin-NER system consisting of purified human NER factors and dinucleosome substrates that contain pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone photoproducts (6-4PPs) either at the center of the nucleosome or in the linker DNA....

  19. Photo inactivation of virus particles in microfluidic capillary systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yudan; Crump, Colin M; Mackley, Malcolm M; Li Puma, Gianluca; Reis, Nuno M

    2016-07-01

    It has long been established that UVC light is a very effective method for inactivating pathogens in a fluid, yet the application of UVC irradiation to modern biotechnological processes is limited by the intrinsic short penetration distance of UVC light in optically dense protein solutions. This experimental and numerical study establishes that irradiating a fluid flowing continuously in a microfluidic capillary system, in which the diameter of the capillary is tuned to the depth of penetration of UVC light, uniquely treats the whole volume of the fluid to UVC light, resulting in fast and effective inactivation of pathogens, with particular focus to virus particles. This was demonstrated by inactivating human herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1, a large enveloped virus) on a dense 10% fetal calf serum solution in a range of fluoropolymer capillary systems, including a 0.75 mm and 1.50 mm internal diameter capillaries and a high-throughput MicroCapillary Film with mean hydraulic diameter of 206 μm. Up to 99.96% of HSV-1 virus particles were effectively inactivated with a mean exposure time of up to 10 s, with undetectable collateral damage to solution proteins. The kinetics of virus inactivation matched well the results from a new mathematical model that considers the parabolic flow profile in the capillaries, and showed the methodology is fully predictable and scalable and avoids both the side effect of UVC light to proteins and the dilution of the fluid in current tubular UVC inactivation systems. This is expected to speed up the industrial adoption of non-invasive UVC virus inactivation in clinical biotechnology and biomanufacturing of therapeutic molecules. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1481-1492. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26694540

  20. Factors preceding CRM readiness in small- and medium-sized tourism enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Vallabh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Customer relationship management (CRM is important to organisations striving for competitive advantage through building relationships with their customers.Research purpose: This study identified the factors preceding CRM and assessed selected South African small- and medium-sized tourism enterprises’ (SMTEs readiness for CRM.Motivation: CRM is likely to enhance SMTEs’ competitiveness. However, successful adoption and implementation of CRM is unlikely unless the organisation is ready for it.Research design, approach and method: A quantitative research approach and survey questionnaire yielded primary data from 332 respondent organisations selected by systematic sampling. Exploratory factor analysis was used to identify the latent factors preceding CRM readiness. Organisational CRM readiness was assessed based on CRM maturity in terms of data collection, use and sharing throughout the organisation.Main findings: Respondent-organisations performed well on the four factors preceding CRM readiness − business strategy, customer strategy, touch points and competencies, skills and technology and also on data collections and use, but not on data sharing.Practical/Managerial implications: CRM practice is believed to assist organisations in tailoring products and services to customers’ needs, providing customer satisfaction, enhancing customer retention and ultimately improving the organisation’s competitiveness and profitability. CRM might fail if SMTEs do not have CRM-enabling conditions in place and a CRM readiness audit should therefore be performed.Contribution: The study contributes to a largely under-researched area concerning CRM in SMTEs by providing an improved understanding of the factors that will enable SMTEs to engage in CRM activities.