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Sample records for christiane taubira relative

  1. CHRISTIANS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Believe it or not,most of the Lisus in the Nujiang Canyon are Christians.At Lumadeng, a district under the jurisdiction of Fugong Couty, nearly all the people go to church on Sunday and in Wednesday and Saturday evenings.According to local officials, there is a church in almost every village.

  2. Report made in the name of the Commission of cultural affairs, familial and social on the law proposition (n.1258) of Misses Christiane Taubira relative to the admission and the indemnification of the victims of the nuclear weapons tests or nuclear accidents; Rapport fait au nom de la commission des affaires culturelles, familiales et sociales sur la proposition de loi (n. 1258) de Mme christiane taubira relative a la reconnaissance et a l'indemnisation des victimes des essais ou accidents nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    The present proposition of law has for object to come up to the expectations of persons having participated to nuclear weapons test made by France between the 13. february 1960 and the 27 january 1996, in Sahara or French polynesia. The consequences on health can not be ignored even after several decades of years. Furthermore, the present proposition of law chooses to extend this measure to the victims of nuclear accidents. The Chernobylsk accident has shown that the French territory did not avoid to a risk inherent to this kind of activity. This project makes a census of the different nuclear tests with incidents, different accidents in France and the different kind of pathologies among the veterans and their progeny. The different steps for the victims to claim are detailed. Other states have adopted laws of compensation for the victims of their populations, civil or military ones. That is why this proposition of law comes today to be adopted. (N.C.)

  3. Evolution and Personal Religious Belief: Christian University Biology-Related Majors' Search for Reconciliation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, Mark W.; Staver, John R.; Scharmann, Lawrence C.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study was to explore Christian biology-related majors' perceptions of conflicts between evolution and their religious beliefs. This naturalistic study utilized a case study design of 15 undergraduate biology-related majors at or recent biology-related graduates from a mid-western Christian university. The broad sources of data…

  4. CHRISTIAN-MUSLIM RELATIONS IN GHANA: A MODEL FOR WORLD DIALOGUE AND PEACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustapha Abdul-Hamid

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The relations between Christians and Muslims has been a shaky one for centuries. Islam and Christianity are locked up in competing truth claims that has often led its adherents to resort to force to drive home the truth of their claims. In all the continents of the world, wars have been fought between the adherents of these traditions, which curiously are both descended from Abraham. Indeed that is why they are called the Abrahamic faiths. The events of September 11 2001in the United States have further deepened the suspicion between adherents of these two faiths. In the West African country of Nigeria, clashes between Christians and Muslims have become a yearly ritual. Conferences are organised all year round in every part of the world in the name of Muslim-Christian dialogue all in an effort to ensure lasting peace between these faiths. These conferences have hardly yielded their desired results. In Ghana however, Christians and Muslims have lived in absolute peace since the introduction of Christianity and Islam in the fifteenth century. This paper explores Christian-Muslim relations in Ghana and specifically examines why Muslims and Christians have lived in peace for centuries now. The paper concludes that it is the “dialogue of life” that will ensure peace between these two faiths rather than conference meetings and half-hearted handshakes. There are great tensions between and within nations. Religion has often exacerbated these conflicts and tensions rather than ameliorate them. Christians and Muslims constitute nearly half of the population of the world. Therefore whether or not the people of these faiths live together in peace and harmony has serious implications for world peace. In most parts of the world, Muslims and Christians have been at each other’s throat. In the West African nation of Nigeria for example, conflict between Christians and Muslims has become a yearly ritual with its attendant loss of lives and property.

  5. Evolution and personal religious belief: Christian biology-related majors' search for reconciliation at a Christian university

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, Mark William

    The goal of this study was to explore how Christian biology-related majors at a Christian university perceive the apparent conflicts between their understanding of evolution and their religious beliefs, and how their faith, as a structural-developmental system for ordering and making meaning of the world, plays a role in the mediating process. This naturalistic study utilized a case study design of 15 participants specified as undergraduate biology-related majors or recent biology-related graduates from a midwestern Christian university who had completed an upper-level course on evolution. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews that investigated participants' faith and their views on creationism and evolution. Fowler's theory of faith development and Parks' model of college students' faith was extensively used. Additional data were collected through an Evolution Attitudes Survey and a position paper on evolution as an assignment in the evolution course. Data analysis revealed patterns that were organized into themes and sub-themes that were the major outcomes of the study. Most participants were raised to believe in creationism, but came to accept evolution through an extended process of evaluating the scientific evidence in support of evolution, negotiating the literalness of Genesis, recognizing evolution as a non-salvation issue, and observing professors as role models of Christians who accept evolution. Participants remained committed to their personal religious beliefs despite apprehension that accompanied the reconciliation process in accepting evolution. Most participants operated from the perspective that science and religion are separate and interacting domains. Faith played an important role in how participants reconciled their understanding of evolution and their personal religious beliefs. Participants who operated in conventional faith dismissed contentious issues or collapsed dichotomies in an effort to avoid ambiguity and perceived

  6. Relations among and between Career Values and Christian Religious Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Mary Miller; Hardin, Susan I.

    2002-01-01

    Empirical research and vocational theory indicate that values are important in career counseling and vocational choice. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of career values to Christian religious values as they might be assessed in career counseling. Results indicate that there was some overlap between religious and…

  7. Reframing Race And Jewish/Christian Relations In The Middle Ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Dorothy

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article evaluates Jewish-Christian difference in the constantly shifting terrain of thirteenth-century medieval England. It reframes this difference in relation to theories of embodiment, feminist materialism, and entanglement theory. To conceptualize how Jews can be marked by race vis-à-vis the body, the article uses the example of Christian Hebraists discussing the Hebrew alphabet and its place in thirteenth-century English bilingual manuscripts.

  8. WE ARE FROM THE SAME ANCESTORS: CHRISTIAN-MUSLIM RELATIONS IN CONTEMPORAY ACEH SINGKIL

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    Muhammad Ansor

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The following Paper discusses the Muslim-Christian relations in Aceh Singkil Regency as well as the process of religious identity formation in the context of the debate over the Islamic Sharia in Aceh. First of all I will present the overview of the socio-political context of the regulations of Islamic jurisprudence in Aceh and the position of non-Muslims in such regulations. Next, I will trace the impact of the regulations on the format of the Muslim-Christian relations. Based on the Goffman theory of dramaturgy, this paper found that Muslim-Christian relations in Singkil were a complex narrative, often opposite between the appearance of the front stageand the backstage. Amid suspicions of the majority of the Aceh Singkil Muslims and the local Government of the existence of Christians, Interfaith communities at the grassroots level are precisely trying to build harmony and co-existence. I conclude that the consciousness about the similarities of ethnic origins has so far contributed effectivelyto suppressing the conflict between the two religions in Aceh Singkil. Keywords: Ethnicity, Muslim-Christian Relations, Aceh Singkil

  9. Discipline as a Source of Public Relations in a Christian School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Brian S.

    2004-01-01

    Christian schools, like all private schools, face the challenge of building and maintaining the confidence of parents and other stakeholders. Their public relations efforts should be rooted in institutional mission and core values, factors that influence parents to elect this educational option. Administrators and others often overlook the fact…

  10. A Historical Perspective in the Christian-Muslim Relations in Nigeria since 1914

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamolekun Taiye

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses Christian- Muslim relations in Nigeria since 1914. In achieving the objective in this paper, Historical approach is adopted. It gives a historical survey of the evolution of Nigeria and the attitude of colonial administration to religious propaganda. The method of conversion adopted by Islam and Christianity in pre-independence is discussed .The independence and republican constitution provision for religious freedom is pointed out. The role of military Government on religious development and interaction is identified. 1978 Nigeria constituent Assembly debate on Sharia court of appeal and 1979 constitution on Religious affairs are discussed. New dimension in Religious propaganda, fanaticism, fundamentalism, and Religious Politics since 1980 is discussed. The 1999 constitution and Sharia law in the civilian dispensation is identified. Religious terrorism as practised by maitasine and Boko Haram sects is discussed. It is discovered that various factors contributed and affected Christian-Muslim relationship in Nigeria. The paper concludes with suggestions and solutions to the problems affecting Christian-Muslim relations.

  11. Christian Self-Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebauer, Jochen E; Sedikides, Constantine; Schrade, Alexandra

    2017-02-16

    People overestimate themselves in domains that are central to their self-concept. Critically, the psychological status of this "self-centrality principle" remains unclear. One view regards the principle as an inextricable part of human nature and, thus, as universal and resistant to normative pressure. A contrasting view regards the principle as liable to pressure (and subsequent modification) from self-effacement norms, thus questioning its universality. Advocates of the latter view point to Christianity's robust self-effacement norms, which they consider particularly effective in curbing self-enhancement, and ascribe Christianity an ego-quieting function. Three sets of studies examined the self-centrality principle among Christians. Studies 1A and 1B (N = 2,118) operationalized self-enhancement as better-than-average perceptions on the domains of commandments of faith (self-centrality: Christians ≫ nonbelievers) and commandments of communion (self-centrality: Christians > nonbelievers). Studies 2A-2H (N = 1,779) operationalized self-enhancement as knowledge overclaiming on the domains of Christianity (self-centrality: Christians ≫ nonbelievers), communion (self-centrality: Christians > nonbelievers), and agency (self-centrality: Christians ≈ nonbelievers). Studies 3A-3J (N = 1,956) operationalized self-enhancement as grandiose narcissism on the domains of communion (self-centrality: Christians > nonbelievers) and agency (self-centrality: Christians ≈ nonbelievers). The results converged across studies, yielding consistent evidence for Christian self-enhancement. Relative to nonbelievers, Christians self-enhanced strongly in domains central to the Christian self-concept. The results also generalized across countries with differing levels of religiosity. Christianity does not quiet the ego. The self-centrality principle is resistant to normative pressure, universal, and rooted in human nature. (PsycINFO Database Record

  12. Protestant Evangelical Christian Fathers and Their Intentional Involvement in the Relational Christian Spiritual Formation of Their Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Steve Richard

    2013-01-01

    This quantitative study explored paternal intentional involvement in the relational spiritual formation of their children. The main research question was to what degree are Protestant Evangelical fathers intentionally involved in the relational spiritual formation of their children? The research was based on two domains: relational spiritual…

  13. Personal Integrative Spirituality, Relational Christian Spirituality, and College Student Identity Development, with a Focus on Gender Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corry, Lisa M.

    2012-01-01

    The question explored in this research from the literature is: Regarding college student identity development, what is known about personal integrative spirituality and relational Christian spirituality, with a particular focus on gender differences? Spirituality is included as an aspect of identity development by theorists Erikson, Marcia,…

  14. Social contexts of exclusionary reactions: study on Muslim and Christian relation in the city of Ambon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahyo Pamungkas

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to answer the question of what social context related to atti- tudes of exclusionary reactions between Muslims and Christians. The data used in this research is resulted from interviews in the city of Ambon. The conceptual framework used to analyze findings of fieldwork is about relation- ship between ethno-religious identification and exclusionary reactions. In addition, actual or symbolic competition in the political, economic, social and cultural behaviour contributes to exclusionary attitudes. Likewise, the collective memory of the conflict led individuals to have prejudices against out-group members. Based on interview data, this study indicates that exclu- sionary reactions present in the city of Ambon in the form of social avoidance between Muslim and Christian students and the support for residential segre- gation. Both of these phenomena related to political and symbolic competi- tion in public institutions such as public universities. Also, social processes of implanting ethno-religious identity in their families have roles in the creation of prejudicial attitudes against out-group members. The collective memory of the conflict also contributes unto the phenomena of social avoidance and support for residential segregation. Studi ini bertujuan untuk menjawab pertanyaan konteks sosial apa yang berkaitan dengan meningkatnya fenomena eksklusivisme sosial antara umat Islam dan Kristen. Data yang digunakan sebagai basis untuk menjawab pertayaan ini tersebut berasal dari sejumlah wawancara di Kota Ambon. Kerangka konsep yang digunakan untuk menganalisis temuan lapangan adalah tentang hubungan identifikasi terhadap identitas kelompok etnik dan agama dengan perilaku mengecualikan kelompok lain. Selain itu, kompetisi aktual maupun simbolik dalam bidang politik, ekonomi, dan sosial budaya ikut memberikan kontribusi pada perilaku mengecualikan kelompok lain. Demikian juga memori kolektif mengenai konflik di masa lalu menjadikan

  15. Christian Theological Attitudes vis-a-vis Islam: The Effect on West-Muslim Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-12-01

    which those attitudes were formed, and that understanding how those attitudes were formed explains Christianity’s “ exclusivist ” attitude and refusal to...New York: Vintage Books, 1997). 194 Chapman, 262. 63 Muslims or otherwise, will fall in defeat at the Lord’s coming.195 Such an exclusivist ...followers need to convert to Christianity or face eternal separation from God. This “ exclusivist ” perspective leaves little room for ecumenism. One

  16. The neoliberal gospel : an examination of global Christian social forces in relation to states, societies, markets, and the production of global neoliberal hegemony

    OpenAIRE

    Murray, Kyle

    2011-01-01

    peer-reviewed This dissertation analyses specific transnational Christian social forces in relation to states, societies, and markets. It is argued here that Pentecostal, charismatic, and fundamentalist Christian institutions and intellectuals constitute a globalised demographic group and transnational social identity that shares a common worldview. This common worldview is anchored by a singular meta-narrative and popular culture, and is expressed through corresponding forms of socio-p...

  17. Some Thoughts on Christianity and Sports

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    There is a need to discuss, starting from some basic Christian truths, to what extent the Christian and athletic ideals are compatible; how sports could help modern men and women to be better Christians, and what kind of difficulties will normally be encountered by the Christian athlete. This essay proposes a few biblical principles and discusses them as they relate to an athlete's experience. Algunos autores de sociología deportiva o de religión se han referido a aspectos del deporte en l...

  18. "What Do These Stones Mean?" Inscriptions on Stone from an Ancient Monastery in Ireland that Address Jewish-Christian Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shillington, V. George

    2013-01-01

    Etched on a stone from a monastery from the Middle Ages at a small village in County Roscommon in Ireland is a combination of Jewish and Christian symbols. The Menorah sits atop a cross. At the base of the cross and at both ends of the crossbar are three small extensions. The image is one of religious integration. Augustine, whose argument for the…

  19. Christianity Facing the Ageing of Global Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Sanecka

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The ageing population is a great challenge for the whole world including churches, Christian communities, Christian families and the so-called “Christian countries”. The respect and support for elderly people is almost a common rule of social life in developed countries regardless of religious views. But in the Christian world this obligation has very strong religious justification – obligation enshrined in the Commandments of Old (the fourth/fifth Commandment and New (the second one of The Greatest Commandments of Love Testaments. Therefore between the Christianity – understood as a set of different communities sharing their beliefs in Jesus Christ – and aging population there are many very different connections including among others: honour and respect, privilege, obligations, giving – receiving relations, duty, charity, solidarity, dependency. They are present both in the teaching and the practice of different Christian communities starting with Churches, through NGOs and Christian societies, ending with Christian families. The paper shows some of these connections. It also tries – based on a case of Poland – to answer the question whether the Christianity is ready to face the aging of global population

  20. Non-religious Christians

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    Abby Day

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Scholars who recently rejected secularisation theses on the grounds that they were insufficiently defined or contextualised now seem to be accepting with unseemly, uncritical haste, the new, in vogue notion of the post-secular. Scholars seem tempted to drop the term ‘post-secular’ into their papers and presentations as if it is a generally accepted and understood term. It is not and nor, as this paper will argue, is it plausible unless applied to a limited and specific range of phenomena. Far from disappearing, religion is often used publicly as a marker of group identity. This is not a return to religion, or a resurgence in spirituality, but a fluctuating form of contextualised religious identity. Christian nominalists may not believe in God or Jesus, at least if belief is understood as ‘faith’. It would be incorrect, however, to dismiss them as ‘unbelievers’, or their nominalist beliefs as not having essential or substantive reality. They believe in many things, usually related to ‘belonging’. By closely examining people’s sense of Christian ‘belonging’, we find other more subtle, interwoven ‘belongings’ related to, for example, history, nation, morality, gender, and ‘culture’.

  1. Christian Leadership Literature Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Connie Chuen Ying

    2007-01-01

    Background: Christian leadership is distinctively different from other major leadership conceptions such as instructional, transactional, and transformational leadership conceptions. With few studies found, the author had to consult the Bible and also non-school Christian literature instead, focusing on Hong Kong principal leadership in Protestant…

  2. The Dhimmi Narrative: A Comparison between the Historical and the Actual in the Context of Christian-Muslim Relations in Modern Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    camels, testify against a Muslim in a criminal legal case, sell alcohol, pork, or carrion to Muslims. In addition, Jews and Christians in some places...case, sell alcohol, pork, or carrion to Muslims. The Pact of Umar prohibited Christians and Jews from marrying Muslim women. In addition, Jews and

  3. Geir Hønneland, Russia and the Arctic: Environment, Identity and Foreign Policy & Leif Christian Jensen, International Relations in the Arctic: Norway and the Struggle for Power in the New North (London/New York: IB Tauris, 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Chuffart

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A review of the books: Geir Hønneland, Russia and the Arctic: Environment, Identity and Foreign Policy (London/New York: IB Tauris, 2016; and Leif Christian Jensen, International Relations in the Arctic: Norway and the Struggle for Power in the New North (London/New York: IB Tauris, 2016

  4. Beyond denial and exclusion: The history of relations between Christians and Muslims in the Cape Colony during the 17th–18th centuries with lessons for a post-colonial theology of religions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaco Beyers

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Learning from the past prepares one for being able to cope with the future. History is made up of strings of relationships. This article follows a historical line from colonialism, through apartheid to post-colonialism in order to illustrate inter-religious relations in South-Africa and how each context determines these relations. Social cohesion is enhanced by a post-colonial theology of religions based on the current context. By describing the relationship between Christians and Muslims during the 17th–18th centuries in the Cape Colony, lessons can be deduced to guide inter-religious relations in a post-colonial era in South Africa. One of the most prominent Muslim leaders during the 17th century in the Cape Colony was Sheik Yusuf al-Makassari. His influence determined the future face of Islam in the Cape Colony and here, during the 18th century, ethics started playing a crucial role in determining the relationship between Christians and Muslims. The ethical guidance of the Imams formed the Muslim communities whilst ethical decline was apparent amongst the Christian colonists during the same period. The place of ethics as determinative of future inter-religious dialogue is emphasised. Denial and exclusion characterised relationships between Christians and Muslims. According to a post-colonial understanding of inter-religious contact the equality and dignity of non-Christian religions are to be acknowledged. In the postcolonial and postapartheid struggle for equality, also of religions, prof Graham Duncan, to whom this article is dedicated, contributed to the process of acknowledging the plurality of the religious reality in South Africa.

  5. Christian Leclere (1962 - 2014)

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    It is with great sadness that we announce the sudden death of our colleague Christian Leclere at the age of 52. He had worked as a courier in the CERN Mail Service since 1988.   Christian was a native of northern France, to which he owed the warm and helpful nature that he never lost. His work, which he thoroughly enjoyed and to which he devoted himself wholeheartedly, suited his personality perfectly, in particular his liking for social interaction and his constant desire to help others. He did, though, have a slight preference for his rounds of the Prévessin site and the underground areas, which he honed to perfection. Paradoxically, Christian was quiet and unassuming, yet always there when anyone needed him. His loss leaves a huge void in the Mail Office team, and he will be greatly missed by all those who knew him. Our thoughts are with his family and friends. His colleagues and friends

  6. Bioethics and Christian theology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griniezakis, Makarios; Symeonides, Nathanael

    2005-01-01

    The authors of this essay suggest that the field of bioethics and Christian theology have a great deal to offer each other. The authors first argue that representatives from both fields must first make sure that they fully and correctly represent their respective position. In other words, scientists, ethicists, and theologians alike must make sure that they present their fields and not use their knowledge merely for personal gain at the stake of misguiding people. Once this is established, the authors then proceed to show the intimate relationship between Christianity and medicine that has existed throughout the ages. It is a call for a continuation of such a relationship that the authors suggest between bioethics and theology. Through an integration of bioethics and Christian theology, both scientists/physicians and theologians are able to gain greater insight into the human person--a focus in both fields.

  7. Evolution and Christian Faith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roughgarden, J. E.

    2006-12-01

    My recent book, Evolution and Christian Faith explores how evolutionary biology can be portrayed from the religious perspective of Christianity. The principal metaphors for evolutionary biology---differential success at breeding and random mutation, probably originate with the dawn of agriculture and clearly occur in the Bible. The central narrative of evolutionary biology can be presented using Biblical passages, providing an account of evolution that is inherently friendly to a Christian perspective. Still, evolutionary biology is far from complete, and problematic areas pertain to species in which the concept of an individual is poorly defined, and to species in which the expression of gender and sexuality depart from Darwin's sexual-selection templates. The present- day controversy in the US about teaching evolution in the schools provides an opportunity to engage the public about science education.

  8. The Christian voice in philosophy

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    Stuart Fowler

    1982-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the Rev. Stuart Fowler outlines a Christian voice in Philosophy and urges the Christian philosopher to investigate his position and his stance with integrity and honesty.

  9. Tocqueville's Christian Citzen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ossewaarde, Marinus

    2005-01-01

    Tocqueville's Christian Citizen Marinus Ossewaarde Introduction Alexis De Tocqueville is well known for his critique of democracy. A French statesman, he was left with the legacy of the French Revolution that had torn his fatherland and had changed the course of human history for good. Tocqueville,

  10. Hans Christian Andersen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jørgen

    2007-01-01

    The Danish author, Hans Christian Andersen, living in the 1800s expressed through his fairy tales and other stories an enthusiasm for the technological breakthroughs in that century with trains, etc. But he also showed great concern for what the natural science did to people by narrowing their mind...

  11. Froebel and Christianity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Wook; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes the educational thought of Friedrich Froebel and his substantial influence on early childhood education. Illuminates the historical influences on Froebel's philosophy, and how his ideas about Christianity affected his ideas on child-centeredness, on the role of play in construction of world knowledge, and on his concept of unity in…

  12. Christian attitude in business

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    J M Vorster

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The beginning of the twenty-first century faces new challenges in the field of business ethics.� Totally new macro-ethical challenges have arisen and they have already inspired constant ethical reflection. Two major developments in the field of economics paved the way for this new interest in business ethics: the total dominance of the market driven economy and economic globalization. This article investigates the ethical challenges posed by this new environment from a Christian ethical perspective. Firstly norms are formulated flowing from the paradigm of Christian attitude as a manifestation of the attitude of Christ. These are love, stewardship, self-denial and obedience to God. These norms are then applied to the following modern-day issues in the field of business ethics: the challenge of globalization, respect for basic human rights, remuneration, the corporation as a moral model, the need for self-evaluation, political responsibility and environmental concern. In conclusion I attempt to define the role of Christians and Christian churches in transforming corporations into moral agents.

  13. Reimagining Christian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulme, E. Eileen; Groom, David E., Jr.; Heltzel, Joseph M.

    2016-01-01

    The challenges facing higher education continue to mount. The shifting of the U.S. ethnic and racial demographics, the proliferation of advanced digital technologies and data, and the move from traditional degrees to continuous learning platforms have created an unstable environment to which Christian higher education must adapt in order to remain…

  14. Christianity and Resilience as Experienced by Caregivers of Dementia Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackey, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the role and relationship of the practice of Christian beliefs and resilience in the context of dementia patient caregivers' lives. The guiding question was "What is the relational nature of the practice of Christian beliefs and resilience in the lived experiences of caregivers of dementia…

  15. Christian lay understandings of preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolin, Bill; Motion, Judy

    2010-11-01

    Focus groups were used to analyse Christian lay public understanding of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), a relatively new biomedical practice. The paper explores how this often controversial genetic technology was contextualised and interpreted through the intersection of religious values and beliefs, secular and cultural knowledges, and lived experience and emotion. For the lay people in our study, PGD often created moral dilemmas that could not necessarily be resolved through Christian beliefs and teaching, but which required the expression of empathy and compassion. The findings emphasise the heterogeneity in individuals' interpretations of scientific issues and reinforce the need to consider public understanding of science and technology in terms of public concerns and meaning.

  16. Christian attitude in business

    OpenAIRE

    J. M. Vorster

    2006-01-01

    The beginning of the twenty-first century faces new challenges in the field of business ethics.� Totally new macro-ethical challenges have arisen and they have already inspired constant ethical reflection. Two major developments in the field of economics paved the way for this new interest in business ethics: the total dominance of the market driven economy and economic globalization. This article investigates the ethical challenges posed by this new environment from a Christian ethical persp...

  17. Religious coping moderates the relation between racism and psychological well-being among Christian Asian American college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Paul Youngbin; Kendall, Dana L; Webb, Marcia

    2015-01-01

    The authors examined the moderating role of positive and negative religious coping in the relation between racism and psychological well-being in a sample of Catholic and Protestant Asian American college students (N = 107). On the basis of prior theorizing on the 2 types of religious coping, combined with some limited empirical evidence, they predicted that positive religious coping would have a buffering effect (Hypothesis 1) on the racism-mental health relation and that negative religious coping would have an exacerbating effect (Hypothesis 2). Participants completed an online survey containing measures corresponding to the study variables. Results indicated that the interaction between positive religious coping and racism was nonsignificant, so Hypothesis 1 was not supported. For Hypothesis 2, the negative religious coping and racism interaction term was statistically significant, but the moderating effect was in an unexpected direction, such that negative religious coping actually protected against the deleterious impact of racism on mental health. The findings suggest that the theorized deleterious influence of negative religious coping may need to be reconsidered in an Asian American setting. The findings have the potential to inform practitioners who work with Asian American college students to better cope with the detrimental consequences of racism.

  18. Spiritual Formation within Christian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Patrick; Harrington, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Christian university has a distinct responsibility to provide an environment devoted to the spiritual formation of students. Spiritual formation is not to be viewed as the only important goal of the university, thereby sacrificing intellectual or relational development, but rather spiritual formation is the aggregate "product" of the…

  19. Analysing Religion and Education in Christian Academies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    This paper asserts that the religious assumptions of Christian academies need to be fully examined in relation to any analysis of their cultural practices, impact or policy implications. It proposes that Bourdieu's concepts of habitus, cultural capital and symbolic power can be broadened out from their traditional use in accounting for social…

  20. Christian Leadership as a trans-disciplinary field of study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Kessler

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this article is on Christian Leadership as a theological and academic field of study, rather than on the praxis of Christian leadership. We define Christian Leadership and note the varying ecclesial, theological and social contexts within which research in the field of Christian Leadership is conducted. We discuss some trends and areas of interest that emerge from within African and European contexts, especially those of South Africa and Germany. In the article, we show how research in Christian Leadership is linked to other disciplines, both theological and non-theological. Finally, we identify key areas of research and methodological issues relevant to the field of Christian Leadership, particularly in relation to the disciplines of Practical Theology and Theological Ethics. We give special credit to Schleiermacher who defined Practical Theology as the �theory of church leadership�.Intradisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary implications: Christian leadership is understood as a trans-disciplinary field of study that draws on both theological and other disciplines (such as Management Sciences, Psychology and Sociology. Christian leadership can be pursued as a distinct discipline or a trans-disciplinary field of study, but it cannot be pursued in isolation.

  1. Food justice and Christian ethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinrich Bedford-Strohm

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article dealt with the moral and political problem of international food justice in which the deep contradiction between the present situation of malnourishment and starvation in large parts of the global population on the one hand and the biblical notion of the preferential option for the poor on the other hand was described. This ecumenically widely accepted notion was clarified in several aspects. How deeply this is rooted in the history of Christian social thought was shown by Martin Luther�s writings on the economy which have remained relatively unknown in the churches and in the scholarly world. The article then presented three models of Christian economic ethic: the technical economic model, the utopian economic model and the public theological economic model. On the basis of the public theological model seven challenges for international food justice were presented. The basis for these challenges is an understanding of globalisation which guarantees just participation for everyone and deals with nature in an ecologically sustainable way. The interests of small farmers are the basis for judging the activities of big agro-corporations. Public theology is the background for an active involvement of the churches as agents of a global civil society to promote international food justice.

  2. The antinomies of Christian Zionism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boer Roland

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Defining Christian Zionism as conservative Christian support for the state of Israel, and an influential political force, especially in the United States, this article outlines four antinomies of such a position. Firstly, although Christian Zionism argues that it is purely theological, that it follows God’s will irrespective of any politics, and although mainstream Zionism is resolutely political, we argue that such a separation is impossible. Indeed, mainstream Zionism cannot avoid being influenced by Christian Zionism’s political agenda. Secondly, despite the efforts by mainstream Zionism to use Christian Zionism in order to influence US foreign policy in the Middle East, mainstream Zionism is playing with fire, since Christian Zionists wish to convert or annihilate all Jews. Thirdly, Christian Zionism is the ultimate version of anti-Semitism, for it wishes to get rid of Arabs (as hindrances to the Zionist project and then dispense with Jews. (Both Arabs and Jews are by definition Semites. Finally, since Christian Zionists are fundamentalist Christians, they must take the Old and New Testaments at their word. However, this position is impossible to hold, and in order to resolve the tension they must resort to the violence of the final conflict, Armageddon.

  3. Christian School Leaders and Spirituality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banke, Susan; Maldonado, Nancy; Lacey, Candace H.

    2012-01-01

    This phenomenological study examined the spiritual experiences of Christian school leaders who are the spiritual leaders of their schools. A purposeful, nominated sample of 12 Christian school leaders was selected. In-depth, open-ended interviews were conducted, audio taped, and then transcribed verbatim. Data analysis was based on Rudestam and…

  4. Ambassadors for the Kingdom of God or for America? Christian Nationalism, the Christian Right, and the Contra War

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Frances Turek

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This essay uses the concept of Christian nationalism to explore the religious dynamics of the Contra war and U.S.–Nicaraguan relations during Ronald Reagan’s presidency. Religious organizations and individuals played crucial roles on both sides in the war in Nicaragua and in the debates in the United States over support for the Contras. Evangelistic work strengthened transnational ties between Christians, but also raised the stakes of the war; supporters of the Sandinistas and Contras alike alleged a victory by their adversary imperiled the future of Christianity in Nicaragua. Christian nationalism thus manifested itself and intertwined in both the United States and Nicaragua. Examining how evangelicals and Catholics in the United States and Nicaragua, as well as the Reagan administration, the Contras, and the Sandinistas, used Christian nationalism to build support for their policy objectives sheds light on both the malleability and the power of identifying faith with the state. Having assessed Christian nationalism as a tool and a locus of conflict in the Contra war, the essay then steps back and considers the larger methodological implications of using Christian nationalism as a category of analysis in U.S. foreign relations history.

  5. The ecclesiastical situation of the first generation Roman Christians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. du Toit

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Forming pan of a trilogy about the first generation Roman Christians, this anicle concentrates on the ecclesiastical aspect. From some scattered and relatively small groups, the numbers of Roman Christians increased markedly in the second half of the first century. According to Romans 16, Jewish Christians played a significant role in the initial period, although Gentile Christians were in the majority. Friction between these groups may have been a problem, but was not Paul's main concern. The Gentile Christians were mainly from a foreign background. Thus the first Christian community had a strongly cosmopolitan character. The plurality of house-churches was mainly due to practical factors, but social differentiation might have played a role. Meetings most probably took place in the ordinary rented apanments of insulae. Romans 16 renders a vivid picture of the leadership activities of Christian women and of Paul's enlightened position in this regard.

  6. What makes Christian bioethics Christian? Bible, story, and communal discernment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhey, Allen

    2005-12-01

    Scripture is somehow normative for any bioethic that would be Christian. There are problems, however, both with Scripture and with those who read Scripture. Methodological reflection is necessary. Scripture must be read humbly and in Christian community. It must be read not as a timeless code but as the story of God and of our lives. That story moves from creation to a new creation. At the center of the Christian story are the stories of Jesus of Nazareth as healer, preacher of good news to the poor, and sufferer. The story shapes character and conduct and enables communal discernment.

  7. Coptic Christian Practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galal, Lise Paulsen

    2012-01-01

    Phrases such as ‘the only difference is one of faith’ construct Copts and Muslims in Egypt as, although different, mainly the same as each other. Similar constructions of sameness are also dominant in historical and current Egyptian narratives on national unity. However, as a result of the privil......Phrases such as ‘the only difference is one of faith’ construct Copts and Muslims in Egypt as, although different, mainly the same as each other. Similar constructions of sameness are also dominant in historical and current Egyptian narratives on national unity. However, as a result...... practices in Egypt take shape under the influence of hegemonic narratives of sameness and difference. Supported by data collected from ethnographic fieldwork carried out in Egypt, the argument is that the Copts, by positioning themselves as Christians in specific locations and situations, are mediating...

  8. A Primary Study on Christian Aesthetic Thoughts of St Augustine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Yiming

    2016-01-01

    St Augustine was a celebrated esthetician in the Middle Ages. He proposed the Christian aesthetic thoughts in his later years. This paper discusses his theory of combining absolute beauty and God. And then it analyzes the social and historical elements of his thoughts. In addition, through analyzing his formalism and his focus on ugliness, it points out that his thoughts are new ideas which not only carry on pagan Greeks but also are closely related to Christian Theology.

  9. The Christianization as the strategy of resistance: the representation of indigenous Christians in the art of the sixteenth century

    OpenAIRE

    José Luis Pérez Flores

    2015-01-01

    In this article I will discuss the importance for indigenous charged under Spanish rule, represent themselves as Christians. I will show that after the conquest was compelling acquire legitimacy as a devout Christian; for this native attended the images codices and monastic mural painting, I will relate the cultural and political contexts with information from written sources and visual sources contained in tlaxcaltecas codices and the convent wall painting.

  10. A Codex of Coptic Christianity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, James S.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the preparation of an edition of the Savery Codex, a fourth century Coptic manuscript which illuminates elements of early Coptic Christianity. Illustrates the value of the text in the study of the Coptic language. (LS)

  11. Old Scandinavian and Christian eschatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Hultgård

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available The eschatological beliefs current in Scandinavia during the Viking and early Medieval periods can be grouped into two main traditions, denoted by the concepts of Ragnarok and Doomsday. The former has its roots in the pre-Christian religion of Scandinavia, the latter was brought to the north in the process of christianization. Although different in origin the two traditions did not, in the age with which we are concerned, necessarily reflect a strict division between adherents of the old faith and Christians. Syncretic versions of the Ragnarok concept were in circulation, one of which was presented by Snorri in his Edda. The common people, although officially christianized, apparently continued to transmit beliefs connected with the Ragnarok tradition. Scholarly research has tended to treat the two traditions separately. In fact they coexisted for centuries, leaving room for confrontation and mutual influences.

  12. "Christian carrying goomies".

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Dr. Passingan Usurup tells critics of his pragmatic approach on condom promotion that he is a Christian carrying condoms for Christ. He is head of the University of Papua New Guinea Medical Center and is credited with developing an AIDS/HIV policy for the Papua New Guinea Defence Force. The condoms were named Goomy and promoted at launching in 1992 in a blue packet under the slogan "The bond that guards." Goomy was chosen as the name because it is pidgin for rubber, chewing gum, and anything associated with rubber. Blue packets were chosen over the calls of most soldiers for a camouflage design because of its universal appeal as the color of the sea and sky and because it was the preference of women in the airlines. Once firmly ensconced in his role at the University, Usurup plans to develop a policy for students and staff and help to conduct AIDS prevention and education activities on campus. He will encourage students to test for HIV rather than highlighting the gloom and doom of infection and disease.

  13. ["Purified empiricism": Johann Christian Reil's (1759-1813) attempts at a foundation of medicine in relation to its tradition, kantianism, and speculative philosophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmann, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Johann Christian Reil's (1759-1813) importance lies in his theoretical approach to medicine. Following Kant in his early work, he attempts to combine medical experience with an underlying conceptual structure. This attempt is directed against both the chaotic empiricism of traditional medicine and speculative theories such as vitalism. The paper starts from his early reflections on the concept of a life force, which he interprets in the way of a non-reductive materialism. In the following, the basic outlines of his Theory of Fever will be shown. The Theory is a systematic attempt at finding a new foundation for diagnosis and therapy on the basis of the concept of fever, which is understood as modification of vital processes. The paper ends with a discussion of his later work, which has remained controversial so far. It shows that the combination of practical empiricism and scientific theory remained rather unstable in this early phase of the development of modern medicine.

  14. Ambivalence in the Christian attitude to war and peace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, Wilhelm

    2007-06-01

    In this paper it will be argued that the basic document of Christianity, the Bible, contains a unique potential for accepting the other and solving conflicts by non-violent means, but that this potential has never been available in pure form. The history of Christianity from the very beginnings in the New Testament period up to the present has been one of great ambiguity, an amalgam of attempts to live out the fundamental values as well as of compromise and open betrayal. This process will be outlined, illustrated and the factors will be pointed at, which in different situations bring to the fore the conflicting elements of Christian tradition. Examples of Christian pacifism, the ethical compromise of the just-war doctrine throughout the centuries will be commented on. The emphasis, however, is on developments in the twentieth century with the great regression of fascism. Finally, the focus is on more recent developments in reflection and action, when Christians begin to transcend the just-war doctrine and struggle to overcome the institution of war responding to the threat posed by weapons of mass destruction. Concrete examples of decisions are discussed and the shadow of a powerful Christian fundamentalism is critically assessed. Nevertheless, it is argued that despite all the failures of historic and contemporary Christianity the basic values of Christian tradition could serve as a motivating force to meet the challenges of a historical situation when violence is dangerously increasing on a global scale. However, these values will only become effective if people relate personally and practically to the ambivalent historical process, critically and responsibly.

  15. Christianity: Queer Pasts, Queer Futures?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Isherwood

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper asks whether Christianity has always been queer, is the very nature of it beyond what one might expect from reality? Does the core of Christianity destabilise the categories by which subsequent Christian leaders have created doctrine, developed ethics and controlled the faithful? Is this queer core located in the very notion of incarnation itself, an event that truly changes all we thought we knew about the nature of materiality? The paper is not attempting to find a queer past in order to justify a queer present and solidify a queer future but rather to suggest that fluidity, rupture and unexpected outcomes should be at the heart of the Christian enterprise. It also follows that if the categories which have been used to exclude are themselves queered then Christianity becomes a far more inclusive way of living. The paper also asks whether the very notion of monotheism itself is a barrier to what may be understood as the fluid volatile core of incarnational religion. What does the queer theologian do with the ONE? 

  16. Christianity in the International law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shavinina-Kalashyan Diana

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates the role of Christianity in the development and establishment of the international law, as well as in the development and humanization of the individual in the society. It separately considers the problems of our time which have arisen under the influence of globalization, and are manifested in the deformation of the person’s humanistic orientation. We describe the interconnection and interdependence of Christianity and the international law with a focus on the category that adequately reflects various aspects of this influence. The levels of influence of Christianity on the development and humanization of the individual, as well as on the international law are defined. The necessity of forming a new doctrine of development and humanization of the individual in the society and, accordingly, the humanization of the international law are grounded.

  17. How Do Fundamental Christians Deal with Depression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinney, Douglas Harvey

    1991-01-01

    Provides explanation of developmental dynamics in experience of fundamental Christians that provoke reactive depression. Describes depressant retardant defenses against depression that have been observed in Christian fundamental subculture. Suggests four counseling strategies for helping fundamentalists. (Author/ABL)

  18. Where sexuality and spirituality meet: An assessment of Christian teaching on sexuality and marriage in relation to the reality of 21st century moral norms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilize E. Tukker

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Christians and the church tend to shy away from talking about sex, premarital sex and sex outside of marriage. God and sex are rarely mentioned in the same sentence, and yet people still have a deep need for spirituality, to experience God in their lives and to seek guidance on sexual matters. It becomes a dilemma when the question is posed: where do sexuality and spirituality meet? One way to answer this question is to attempt to find a link between spirituality and sexuality. In this way, spirituality could gain relevance, and expressing one’s sexuality could find a moral foundation. People are both spiritual and sexual creatures – with the need to express their spirituality and sexuality in a moral, but unashamedly natural way. This article attempts to find alternative solutions for our complex society – on the subject of marriage and sexuality. The intention is not to dismiss the institution of marriage, but rather to renegotiate the terms and structure of marriage in the 21st century.

  19. Hukan Fabian: Japan's First Encounter with Christianity

    OpenAIRE

    YAMAUCHI, Tomosaburô

    2010-01-01

    In order to understand the ethical background of Edo-era Japan, let me present an eccentric thinker named Hukan Fabian (1565-1621) who criticized Christianity from the traditional, syncretistic view of Confucianism, Buddhism, Taoism, and Shintoism. He was called Fabian the apostate, because, having reached the highest position of all Japanese leading Christians in the Catholic Church, he later renounced Christianity and wrote a book attacking Christianity. It is remarkable that there was a th...

  20. Reincarnation belief and the Christian churches

    OpenAIRE

    Waterhouse, Helen; Walter, Tony

    2003-01-01

    Reincarnation has never been part of mainstream Christian theology. This is true in spite of periodic speculations by Christian theologians, and in spite of the fact that reincarnation believers sometimes wrongly impute belief in reincarnation to prominent Christian thinkers. Even so, in 1984 Paul Badham was able to point to statistics which indicated that as many Anglicans believed in reincarnation as believed in heaven and hell. This paper is based on the responses of the many Christians wh...

  1. Challenging Christianity: Leo Tolstoy and Religious Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulin, Dan

    2009-01-01

    The religious thought of Russian novelist Leo Tolstoy is a well documented but often overlooked example of unorthodox Christianity. This paper uses the example of Tolstoy's religious thinking to question the integrity of the current representation of Christianity in UK schools. It also uses Tolstoy's criticism of orthodox Christianity to suggest a…

  2. Entrevista com Christiane Nord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Pfau

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Quando pensamos em tradução e enfocamos em aspectos como "por que traduzir?" "quem será meu leitor?" "como abordar os aspectos das culturas?", certamente nos vem o nome da pesquisadora alemã Christiane Nord. No meio acadêmico dos Estudos da Tradução, dos últimos trinta anos, é provável que seu nome se faça presente como teórica importante nos cursos de tradução, na abordagem prática da formação de tradutores, enriquecendo discussões, formando perfis profissionais. Seu trabalho como teórica, professora e tradutora já trouxe um material bastante rico para pensar sobre os Estudos da Tradução e a Tarefa do Tradutor. Ela traz o funcionalismo alemão como uma teoria de tradução aplicável tanto no exercício profissional do tradutor, como na análise comparativa entre texto-fonte e texto-alvo em uma abordagem comunicativa eficiente e real. Nesta entrevista que Nord gentilmente proporcionou, recebendo-me em sua residência em Heidelberg, conversamos sobre algumas questões que aparecem em discussões com colegas que também usam a teoria funcionalista alemã para suas pesquisas e pensam em tradução enquanto teoria e prática. Nord, como lecionando uma de suas aulas, esclarece dúvidas sobre o uso da teoria na prática, sobre os primeiros passos do aprendiz em tradução até se tornar um profissional e sobre questões reais que circundam o mercado da tradução. Ela também traz algumas estratégias e técnicas que o tradutor pode adotar, dependendo do cliente e do leitor, sugerindo possíveis modos de relacionamento entre eles para que o trabalho seja satisfatório para todas as partes, defendendo o conceito de lealdade de sua teoria. A entrevistada também discute sobre a definição de convenções culturais, fazendo um paralelo ao conceito de normas (Toury, 1995 e pondera sobre seu significado, trazendo diversos exemplos reais como formas de encontrar as convenções de uma cultura. Também conversamos a respeito do

  3. Christian pedagogy, education and teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. van Wyk

    1976-03-01

    Full Text Available The question which confronts one at the outset is: What is the nature and content of that Christian pedagogy, education, teaching and type of school for which Calvinists in South Africa have struggled in the past, and in fact are still struggling for, even today?

  4. Christian Responses to Modern Slavery

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Exhibited at the second Glucksman Memorial Symposium on June 13th 2007 This research project explores the theological and ethical issues around modern slavery and movements to abolish it. Topics include: human trafficking; human rights; racism; theological language and doctrines; Christian ethics, values and social practice.

  5. Orthodox Christian beliefs and homophobia in baccalaureate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlub, S M; Martsolf, D S

    1999-01-01

    Religion is an important factor in attitudes formed about groups, specifically homosexuals. Nursing education does little to inhibit homophobia in students. Sophomore (n = 87) and senior (n = 87) nursing students completed a demographic questionnaire, the Index of Homophobia (IHP), the Christian Orthodoxy Scale, and the Intrinsic Religious Motivation Scale. Half the students had IHP scores indicative of high-grade nonhomophobia. IHP scores and frequency of church attendance were significantly correlated, as were Christian orthodoxy and homophobia scores. Intrinsic religious motivation and homophobia were inversely related. Implications include the need to provide opportunities for students to discuss religion and attitudes toward homosexuals.

  6. A Christian Value? Faculty Diversity at Southern Evangelical Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Marquita; Mamiseishvili, Ketevan

    2016-01-01

    This case study research project examined efforts at three member institutions of the Council for Christian Colleges & Universities (CCCU), all located in the southern United States, to increase faculty diversity. The study also explored how these efforts related to institutional mission and what aspects within the history of evangelicalism…

  7. Teaching Humility in First-Grade Christian School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonker, Julie E.; Wielard, Cassie J.; Vos, Carolyn L.; Tudder, Ashley M.

    2017-01-01

    Four classes of first-grade children at a Christian school took pre- and post-tests measuring humility. Two intervention classes had devotional lessons on humility and two comparison classes did not. For one week, devotional lessons featured humility-related children's literature, cognitively appropriate discussions, writing about humility, and…

  8. The Evolution of Christianity in the Caucasus in the IV–XVIII Centuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr A. Cherkasov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the history of christianity in the Caucasus in the IV–XVIII centuries. The main attention is paid to the complex process of the formation and fate of christianity among the various peoples of the region, the role of Byzantine, Georgian and Russian christian missionaries. Among the sources there are used the pre-revolutionary materials on the history of christianity in the Caucasus, as well as scientific publications. The decision of research tasks is based on the principle of historicism. The problem of the spread of christianity in the Caucasus, while maintaining the pagan beliefs are seen as a consequence of specific socio-historical conditions, in the formation of which the important role was played by external factors, and also the conservative mentality of highlanders. In conclusion, the authors note that every of the caucasian peoples had its story of the spread and adoption of christianity in the Caucasus. On the one hand, the ancient christian Armenia and Georgia, relatively quickly emerging with paganism, on the other, the mountain tribes, who had no public began taking christianity in the reduced forms under the influence of Byzantium, Georgia, Russia with the broad preservation of pagan beliefs. Ultimately, under the influence of the first Crimean khans, and then the Ottoman Empire, these tribes have consistently converted to Islam.

  9. A CHANGE IN “TONE” IN GILSON’S NOTION OF CHRISTIAN PHILOSOPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Fafara

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The author undertakes four points: (a There was no major change in Gilson’s position on Christian philosophy as it was defined and justified in his 1931 Gifford Lectures and later developed in the sixties. (b During the 1960s, Gilson’s Christian philosophy placed more emphasis on its Christian aspect, faith guiding reason. Earlier formulations emphasized philosophy searching within the faith for what can become rational. (c During the 1960s Gilson emphasized faith and the Church as the guardian of Christian philosophy, expressed a relative indifference to the validity of rational proofs for the existence of God, and empathized with those accepting questionable philosophical approaches to understand the faith. (d Gilson’s Christian philosophy fits into the framework of post-modernism. [Trans. into Polish by Pawel Tarasiewicz

  10. Postcolonial Reflection on the Christian Mission: The Case of North Korean Refugees in China and South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Ji Kang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to challenge the dominant narrative of Christian service providers working for North Korean refugees’ welfare, and to articulate the perspectives of non-Christian aid recipients, especially North Korean refugees in China and South Korea. Drawing upon postcolonialism, I will unpack dysfunctions of Christian missions and ministries while relating them to anthropological insights and ethnographic research data. As a Christian scholar, I attempt to invite Christian leaders and field workers to engage in critical reflections on their goals, dispositions, and strategies in relating to the culturally, politically, and economically marginalized. This paper is aimed to offer opportunities for Christian missionaries to critique their colonial models and to reclaim their missions that decolonize both missionaries and the missionized.

  11. Teacher Self-Efficacy in a Classical Christian Environment versus a Traditional Christian Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Emily Rose

    2016-01-01

    Teachers in a classical Christian environment oftentimes are not taught in the classic manner themselves, requiring different training from that in teacher-education programs. This study compared teacher self-efficacy between traditional Christian-education environments and classical Christian-education environments. The purpose of this…

  12. ["I am rather satisfied with this interpretation of my dreams." -- real-life and work-related encounters between psychiatrist Johann Christian August Heinroth and poet Johann Wolfgang von Goethe].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmideler, S; Steinberg, H

    2004-09-01

    Apart from being a major pioneer of modern psychiatry, Johann Christian August Heinroth (1773 - 1843) is foremost famous as the first academic teacher, professor of this subject at Leipzig University. Despite his theoretical concepts being thoroughly investigated by medical historians, the fact that his scientific work also brought him in contact with Weimar poet and scientist Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749 - 1832) has up to now not been acknowledged. This paper analyses for the first time the manifold points of contact between the two geniuses. Starting off with a retrospective on Goethe's relationship towards psychiatry in his day, this paper investigates the mutual interconnections and influences between the two. This is achieved by an analysis of yet unknown primary sources as well as Goethe's literary and scientific works. A main emphasis is also placed on Heinroth's Textbook of Anthropology of 1822 in which the psychiatrist laid out his understanding of 'relational thinking' (gegenständliches Denken), a key concept for both. This theory developed from Heinroth's dealing with Goethe's concept of "anschauung" and was to gain major importance not only for his way of gaining knowledge in general but also for his psychiatric concept. Goethe's influence on Heinroth is particularly revealed in the latter's holistic views on mental illnesses. Heinroth's visit to Goethe on 15 September 1827 can be earmarked as a sign of their mutual esteem.

  13. [The Christian ethic and sexuality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourton, J

    1991-03-01

    The Catholic Church and the Christian faith in general have been accused of a history of sexual repression and denunciation of the dangers of all expressions of sexuality as well as of neglecting sex education within religious education. This work seeks to analyze the apparent conflict between Christian ethics and the experience of modern sexuality, and discusses the response of Christian ethics to the conflict. Beginning at the Renaissance and for the entire modern epoch, a moral system that might be called secularized has confronted that of the Church; it has been more liberal, utilitarian, and hedonistic in sexual matters. In the course of becoming more permissive, human sexuality like so many other aspects of modern culture has lost most of its sacred character. The sexual sphere in modern cultural and moral development is 1 of the aspects in which morals and customs are most distanced from religious influence. Despite the great sexual permissiveness of the mass media and the culture at large, adolescents and youth of today do not appear to have advanced any closer to a general state of happiness. Sexuality today--despite whatever sex education is available--is still enveloped in the same ignorance, feat, complexes, and conflicts as ever. The youth of today should have access to better sex education, they should be liberated from both religious taboos that impede health sexual adjustment and from the sexual permissiveness celebrated in much of the mass media. Teachers and moralists should engage in a dialogue in which the problem of sex education is examined in its complexity in order to identify elements of an improved process that would lead to a true humanization. An ethics that goes beyond the permissiveness of the present is needed, but it should not be based on fear of AIDS, fear of pregnancy, or any other fears or threats. A positive secular ethics moved by natural motivations and a Christian ethics motivated by faith in the love of God should appear

  14. Stigma as 'othering' among Christian theology students in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Breda, Adrian D

    2012-11-01

    HIV is a health and developmental crisis that has profoundly challenged the Christian church in sub-Saharan Africa. Responding to stigma and prejudice against HIV and people living with HIV and AIDS has been a major concern of theologians and Christian leaders. However, Christians themselves and the church as a community are equally prone to stigma and prejudice. The author contends that this stigma is grounded in the dynamic of 'othering', which, among Christians, takes on religious or theological overtones. Drawing on qualitative data from theology students in South Africa, the paper assembles a model of AIDS stigma as othering. The central story or axis of the model is the dynamic of othering, comprising three themes, viz. lack of empathic contact, disconnection, and distancing. There are three main dynamics that appear to contribute to or feed into othering, viz. emotions related to sexuality and HIV, theology of health and judgement, and contextualised knowledge of HIV. Finally, the model presents two primary results of othering, viz. disengagement from HIV through passivity and hopelessness, and prejudice against those living with HIV. The paper endeavours to reveal the possible biblical roots of AIDS stigma. Through this, the deep violence embedded in such stigma is exposed and contrasted with a theology of inclusiveness and engagement.

  15. Comparative Study of Christian Trinity and Indian Trimurty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Farhang Ghahfarokhi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available   Belief to the holy Trinity is the most critical axiom of Christian theology which has been criticized more than the others by the two Abrahamic religions, that is Judaism and Islam. The holy Quran calls it blasphemy and heresy in original Christianity but Christians whom call themselves Unitarian, interpret this Trinity in view of Unity so they believe that this antinomy is a mystery.   When studying other traditions we encounter ternaries which of course the Indian Trimurti: Brahma, Vishnu and Shiva is the most important one. These two ternaries have simibrities and differences this Trimurti has had deep effects on the Indian society in the case that each of these Gods are appreciated and prayed independently in a pantheistic system. In this article, free from inter religion viewpoints we assess the essence of Trinity from the metaphysical viewpoint and it’s relation to Unity. Finally after investigating the meaning of Christian Trinity and Indian Trimurti we go to the comparative study of these two ternaries. 

  16. Christian Social Justice Advocate: Contradiction or Legacy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Cher N.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the relationship between Christian religiosity and the principles of social justice is explored, including the sociopolitical aspects of faith and advocacy. A particular emphasis is placed on the historical legacy and theological relationships between Christianity and social justice. The author concludes with a call for…

  17. Christian Associations in Hollywood Science Fiction Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Rong-qing

    2014-01-01

    Hollywood movies are profoundly influenced by American culture while promoting its mainstream ideologies and core values via the silver screen. The Christian elements embodied in Hollywood science fiction films reflect the importance of Christianity in American culture and distinguish themselves from science fictions made in other countries, therefore serve the studies of Hollywood films and American culture.

  18. Christian Economic Thought in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.P. van Staveren (Irene)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractAbstract. This paper is not about Dutch Christian political economy. Instead, it focuses on some recent writings of Dutch Christian economists. The objective of the paper is to get an idea of how economic thought in the Netherlands – particularly about the market – is influenced by Chri

  19. Christian Economic Thought in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staveren, I.P. van

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to provide an insight into the ethics in the works of Christian economists in The Netherlands. The paper starts with a brief review of some key texts by Dutch Christian economists representing faith-based organizations. The next section presents a summary of (Dutch) Ch

  20. Christianity in Africa: a historical appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samson A Fatokun

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the author challenges the popular public conception that Christianity in Africa is a latecomer introduced only with the advent of colonialism. By tracing the origins of the Christian faith in both North and sub-Saharan Africa (including, North-Central and West Africa, this paper seeks to show that Christianity has been in Africa virtually since its inception and that the continent� s own adherents to this faith played an important role in the formation and advance of Christianity elsewhere. Moreover, Christianity in Africa can be found almost everywhere on the continent and indigenous varieties of the tradition developed which allowed it to become as part of Africa as African traditional religions.

  1. European Christians are at the forefront in accepting evolution: results from an internet-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David P

    2010-01-01

    Beliefs regarding the origins of the universe and life differ substantially between groups of people and are often particularly associated with religious worldviews. It is important to understand factors associated with evolution and creationism beliefs and unacceptance of scientific evidence for evolution. An internet-based survey was conducted to elicit information from people who self-identify as Christians, atheists, agnostics and other belief systems, as well as by geographical location and other demographic variables, on acceptance of evolution or creationism, certainty with which each position is believed, and reasons for rejecting the alternative. It was found that almost 60% of Christians believe in creationism and less than 10% believe in natural evolution. Worldwide, these proportions were relatively consistent across all locations except for in Europe. Among European Christians the majority of Christians believe in a form of evolution. It was found that the vast majority (87%) of Christians are 'absolutely certain' about their beliefs, compared with the minority of atheists and agnostics claiming 'absolute certainty'. Generally, reasons Christians did not accept evolution were based not on evidence but on religious doctrine. In contrast, the most common reason for not accepting the existence of a god by atheists who supported evolution was the lack of evidence. Innovative strategies may be required to communicate evolutionary science effectively to non-European Christians.

  2. A look at Refutations of Christianity in Azarbayjan Region

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    hasan aminifar

    2015-03-01

    Preaching Association of Church, Mission Basel and American Missionaries in Azarbayjan area. - The geographical location of this area which is located in the northwest of Iranian western border has always been the confluence of different religions and culture. From the perspective of religion, because of its closeness to European and Christian countries and due to the arrival of the first missioners at this area, the first Muslim resistance occurred here. - The presence of the prominent figure like Muḥammd Ṣādiq Fakhr al-Islām in the area has had its own influence. He as a new convert to Islam and after leaving Christianity as his previous religion wrote a book in refuting of Christianity and had several debates with Christian priests. Other Muslim scholars who had close relation with him and were familiar with his woks started writing other refuting works. Therefore, it can be said that Muḥammd Ṣādiq Fakhr al-Islām had a great function in stimulating Muslim scholars to do this movement. - The support of the Iranian government at the time for the creation of such works was another reason for the emergence of this movement. For instance, Nāṣir al-DῙn Shāh was the one who gave the title of Fakhr al-Islām (The Pride of Islam to him and he wrote the book "AnῙs al-Islām" with his order. The Iranian city of Tabriz can be counted as a pioneer city in many issues. The publication industry was first introduced in this city which was another cause for the thriving of writing and publishing books against Christianity in this area. - The writing of the book "MῙzān al-Ḥaq" by Carl Funder (1803-1865 the Protestant Missioner and his missionary activities in this area, led to the emergence of a wave of refuting works against Christianity in Azarbayjan and other Islamic countries. Some books were directly aimed at refuting this book. As a result, the scholars of Azarbayjan, were influential in writing against Christianity and the missionary activities and a lot of

  3. Weber-Christian panniculitis and auto-immune disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen-Mersh, T G

    1976-02-01

    A case is described of Weber-Christian panniculitis accompanied by a gammaglobulin disturbance which preceded by five years the diagnosis of an autoimmune hepatitis and pancytopenia. Also associated was the onset of diabetes mellitus, found at necropsy to be related to pancreatic islet amyloid deposition. This case reinforces the view that Weber-Christian panniculitis may be an adipose response to a variety of immunological stimuli.

  4. THE AMERINDIANS IN THE THREADS OF CHRISTIAN AFTERLIFE

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    Glória Kok

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the work of Jesuits on the reorganization of the dead´s world of the Tupi-Guarani Indians, in order to fit it in the christian model of afterlife. In consequence, images and visions related to Heaven, Hell and Purgatory were disseminated and translated in multiple forms by the Indians of Portuguese America during the cathechization´s process.

  5. Christianity in Africa: A Beacon of Hope for Christianity in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Fuseini Wandusim

    2015-01-01

    World Christianity has experienced several changes including its spread and decline across the world. Following what Andrew F. Walls terms as “Serial character of Christian advance,” Christianity has moved from Europe, its previous heartland to other continents like Africa, Asia and Latin America. Today in Europe, in general terms, Christianity can be described in words such as ‘declining’, ‘empty pews’, ‘dying’, ‘few pews filled with only old folks’, etc. Given the seemingly hopeless nature ...

  6. Christian Kelchi "Liivimaa ajaloo" allikad / Janet Laidla

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Laidla, Janet, 1982-

    2007-01-01

    Christian Kelchist. 17. sajandil ei olnud allikatele viitamine üheselt kohustuslikuks kujunenud. Kelchi kroonikas mainitud ja kasutatud teostest ja nende autoritest. Oma allikaid on Kelch pigem refereerinud kui ümber kirjutanud.

  7. Hans Christian Andersen ja Põhjamaade muinasjutud

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    Narva kultuurimajas etendub teater Varius etendus "Jutustan teile oma lugu", mis põhineb Hans Christian Anderseni elulool. Põhjamaade Ministrite Nõukogu esindus Eestis kingib Narva Linnavalitsusele 20 venekeelset Põhjamaade muinasjuttude kogumikku

  8. Generic Structure Potential of Christian Apologetics

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    Onwu Inya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Religious texts have been examined by scholars from different theoretical standpoints. However, a close survey of the literature reveals that little attention has been paid to Christian apologetics from a linguistic perspective. Also, an examination of studies along the lines of Generic Structure Potential (henceforth GSP shows that the genre status of Christian apologetics has not been indicated. This gap provides the motivation for this paper, which investigates the GSP of Christian apologetics. Twenty texts written by various key contemporary apologetic writers were purposively selected for the study. The following generic structure potential catalogue was generated:The paper reveals that the elements of the GSP concertedly work to advance, argue for or defend the Christian belief system. The paper also suggests that the model could be applied to other forms of apologetic instances.

  9. 50th birthday of Christian von Ferber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available On May 15, 2011 Christian von Ferber - member of the Editorial Board of "Condensed Matter Physics" and renowned expert in the fields of soft matter physics and complex systems - celebrated his 50th birthday. The Editorial board of CMP, colleagues and friends warmy congratulate Christian von Ferber and wish him and his family continuing good health and to enjoy many adventures and discoveries in his future scientific travels!

  10. The Christian Support Networks for Immigrants in Palermo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Bassi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on a fieldwork conducted in Sicily, this paper analyses how, when faced with the emergence of immigration, Christian organisations in Palermo become involved with the migration issue, notably thanks to the pioneering commitment of certain clerics. It draws attention to the heterogeneous nature of the Christian sphere, the internal secularisation of the religious organisations working with migrants, and the transformations of the church-related associative sector from a volunteering to professional expertise model. In sum, the capacity for organisational and ideological adaptation of religious organisations has enabled them to retain social control of the territory by becoming inescapable stakeholders in the migration issue. This study also identifies the practices and the know-how of the actors involved in these organisations, and singles out the motives that lead them to engage with these organisations and the meaning they attach to their implication

  11. The Intersection of Gay and Christian Identities on Christian College Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentz, Joel M.; Wessel, Roger D.

    2011-01-01

    Because some Christian colleges prohibit same-sex sexual behaviors, the development of authentic sexual identities on these campuses may be difficult for gay and lesbian students. This article introduces the idea of an identity conflict that may occur between sexual and spiritual identities for gay and lesbian students at Christian colleges and…

  12. Maternal Silences: Motherhood and Voluntary Childlessness in Contemporary Christianity

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    Dawn Llewellyn

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In Christianity, there is an ideology of motherhood that pervades scripture, ritual, and doctrine, yet there is an academic silence that means relatively little space has been given to motherhood and mothering, and even less to voluntary childlessness, from a faith perspective. By drawing on qualitative in-depth interviews with Christian women living in Britain, narrating their experiences of motherhood and voluntary childlessness, I suggest there are also lived maternal silences encountered by women in contemporary Christianity. There is a maternal expectation produced through church teaching, liturgy and culture that constructs women as ‘maternal bodies’ (Gatrell 2008; this silences and marginalises women from articulating their complex relationship with religion, motherhood, and childlessness in ways that challenge their spiritual development. However, this article also introduces the everyday and intentional tactics women employ to disrupt the maternal expectation, and hereby interrupt the maternal silence.

  13. Cell scientist to watch - Christian Behrends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Christian Behrends studied biology at the University of Konstanz in Germany, but did his Diploma thesis externally with Michael Ehrmann in the School of Bioscience at Cardiff University, UK. He then pursued his PhD degree in Franz-Ulrich Hartl's group at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry in Martinsried, Germany. For his postdoctoral work Christian received a Feodor Lynen Research Fellowship from the Alexander von Humboldt Stiftung, with which he moved to the US and joined the laboratory of J. Wade Harper at Harvard Medical School. In 2011, he received an Emmy Noether Research Grant from the German Research Foundation (DFG) and started his own independent group at the Medical School of Goethe University in Frankfurt am Main. He is also a recipient of an ERC starting grant. Research in Christian's lab is focused on the basic mechanisms of autophagy, particularly concentrating on the role of ubiquitin signalling in autophagy, and the crosstalk between autophagy and other vesicular trafficking pathways.

  14. Nietzsche, The Christians And The Jews

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    Alexandru Ștefănescu

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The present text is concerned with depicting an imagery of fundamental opposition between Friedrich Nietzsche on the one hand, and Judeo-Christianity, on the other. Since the vigorous and authentic society of the Ancients is falsely an unwarrantedly substituted by an ever-growing Christian paradigm, Nietzsche’s response will tend to identifying, as well as possibly curing the Judeo-Christian disease on a social and moral level. We therefore investigate his denouncement of a falsely-oriented cultural way of life and thought by addressing the two halves of his philosophical project: morals and religion. Moreover, in the final part of the current paper we will briefly concern ourselves with some political, as well as cultural implications stemming from his radical views.

  15. Emerging Churches in Post-Christian Canada

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    Steven Studebaker

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The traditional mainline and evangelical churches in Canada, as in most western countries, are either in decline or static. Taken as a measure of the future, the prospects for Christianity in Canada, and more broadly the West, are bleak. Post-Christian Canada, however, contains thriving alternative and innovative forms of church, often called ‘emerging’ churches. They take many forms of expression, but share common theological convictions. Based on site research and personal interviews, this article describes the various types and contexts of these churches in Canada. It then highlights three of their central theological characteristics. First, rejecting the ‘culture wars’ social involvement of Christendom churches, they embrace practices and initiatives that transform their local communities. Second, they embrace an incarnational and contextual understanding of Christian life and ministry. Eschewing mega-church franchise models, they endeavor to shape their ministry to the their local communities. Third, they adopt a comprehensive rather than compartmental spirituality.

  16. Christian paroikias and the negation of the polis: biopolitics and the christian pastorate

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    João Roberto Barros II

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of our work is to expose the final topic of Foucault’s argumentation concerning the Christian self-care (epimeleia ton allon, showing that the Christian epimeleia ton allon is closely connected to the government modality of the souls and bodies that Foucault names Christian pastorate. We want to show how Foucault’s refusal in accepting an authentic Christian epimeleia heautou gave place to the inevitable bond between it and the birth of modern biopolitics. Our argumentation aims at showing that it was inevitable, for Foucault, to make such considerations and reach this conclusion putting together, in a causal chain, Christian epimeleia ton allon, pastoral government and modern biopolitics. For such purpose, we will use Agamben’s arguments, exposed mostly in his work El reino y la Gloria, in which he discusses the intercrossing of two paradigms: political theology and political economy. The final topic of our argumentation is that the rejection of the oikos as locus for the practice of epimeleia heautou would inevitably cause the intensification of Christian epimeleia ton allon through the paradigms of oikonomia, resulting that Christianity would not have otherwise contributed to the practice of the self-care, if not by intensifying and re-signifying practices with the objective of operating a true hermeneutic of the desires, once from such hermeneutic it would be possible to go through with the total command of the lives of the individuals.

  17. The formation of Christian theology in Alexandria

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    Willem H. Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Jesus was born in Palestine. He was the main determinant for the foundation of a religious movement or sect later called Christianity. This movement, founded in Palestine after the ascension of Jesus, with Jerusalem as its main centre of worship, was merely a Judaeo-Christian sect. In Jerusalem, the adherents to this movement were not really distinctive from the Jewish religion, as they worshipped the same God, Yahweh, went to the same Temple and/or synagogues and kept the same Jewish Laws. After the destruction of the Temple in 70 CE, many Jews, including the �believers in Christ�s teachings� (the earliest Christians fled Jerusalem for different parts of the Roman Empire such as Transjordan, Syria and Africa. Different �Christianities� developed in the main cities of the Roman Empire � Rome, Antioch and Alexandria. In each of these cities, the believers in Christ�s teachings developed their own religion alongside Judaism. This article argued that it was in Alexandria, a world famous city during the time of the Roman Empire, especially renowned for its academic excellence, that the new religion best found and made its own stand. The Catechetical School, with scholarly heads and writers, such as Clement and Origen, started to develop a theology that set the standard for Christian theology in the Empire.Intradisciplinary�and/or�interdisciplinary implications: The general assumption is that Jerusalem, as the origin of Christianity, was the place where it had its formation. This article proposed that it was actually Alexandria where Christianity was best found and became distinctive from Judaism. However, a lack of original sources on this subject area limited the research.

  18. 从基督教婚姻观的变化看宗教与道德关系%Religion and Morality ——Relation and Change between Religion and Morality under the Discussion about the Change of Christian Marriage Viewpoint

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周湘雁翔

    2011-01-01

    在世界三大宗教中,基督教是对西方社会影响最深远的宗教,同时也是最关注世俗事物的宗教。基督教在圣经中对于婚姻的相关内容有较多且全面的描述。伴随着基督教在社会中地位的变化,以及人权运动以及女权运动的兴起,交错在其中的基督教婚姻观,道德观也在慢慢发生改变。这背后实际是人本主义对宗教的一种呼唤。本文将从基督教的婚姻观的变化来窥视宗教与道德的关系及其变化。%In three world religions,Christianity has the most far-reaching impact on western society,and also mostly concerns on secular affairs.There are a lot comprehensive descriptions about marriage in the Bible.With the Christian change of the position in society,and the rise of Feminist movement and Human rights movement,marriage and moral viewpoints also have changed.It is actually a humanism call on religion under this facture.On the paper,we will discuss the relation and change of morality and religion on the change of Christian marriage.

  19. Marriage and family in the light of the Christian doctrine

    OpenAIRE

    Kоrоliov M. G.

    2010-01-01

    Article is devoted consideration of the Christian doctrine about marriage and family. The author analyzes its features in Orthodox and Catholic Churches. Influence of Christian ideas about marriage and family on a life of a modern society is shown.

  20. TRANSFORMATION REFLEXES OF PRE-CHRISTIAN WORLDVIEW IN KIEVAN RUS LITERATURE

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    Nataliia O. Stratonova

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to review the literature of Kievan Rus' in the light of interaction and mutual influence of Christian and pre-Christian worldviews; to open and show the character of the relations of pre-Christian and Christian religions; to reveal some aspects of these relationships in the literature of Kievan Rus in XI-XIII centuries. Methodology. Among the general scientific approaches in solving the problems that have been used was primarily theological and philosophical. This approach allowed us to explore and objectively analyze the tendency to reflect pre-Christian beliefs in the literature of Kievan Rus. As specially-scientific methods there were used historiosophical (philosophical understanding of historical events and processes, topical (selection and analysis of the basic conceptual directions of transformations, chronological (link historiographical tradition with a concrete historical reality and the philosophical and hermeneutical (theological-philosophical interpretation of monuments. Scientific novelty. The work is theological and philosophical reflection analysis of pre-Christian ideas in literary monuments of Kievan Rus. For the first time takes into account the specifics of medieval imagination and poetry, studied the religious significance of the texts found their reflection in the pre-Christian beliefs and stated on their role in shaping the world Kievan Rus’ scribes, analyzed the specificity of interaction between Christian and pagan notions. Conclusions. In the process, the author comes to the conclusion that by denying the fact of paganism, separating itself along with other Orthodox nations from the "Latins" and "heretics", Rus claimed its identity through the adoption of Christianity. This process has had its impact on the internal development of the mythodogical consciousness of the people, has accelerated the emergence of the epic in his heroic cycles and Kiev, where it was easy, but dosed and

  1. The Functions of Theology to Christian Tradition

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    Ghasem Kakaie

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The term Theology has various definitions and meanings in the Christian tradition. In this article, after discussing these definitions and meanings we have tried to illuminate the extended functions of theology in Christianity and we have also explained the meaning of this term which has been entered to our literature by means of translation from European languages into Persian. In this connection, the history of the term, "theology", is discussed rapidly and then some main branches of theology explained according to its functions. Finally, we have concentrated on some equivalents of "theology" in Persian language.

  2. Christian Leadership as a trans-disciplinary field of study

    OpenAIRE

    Volker Kessler; Louise Kretzschmar

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this article is on Christian Leadership as a theological and academic field of study, rather than on the praxis of Christian leadership. We define Christian Leadership and note the varying ecclesial, theological and social contexts within which research in the field of Christian Leadership is conducted. We discuss some trends and areas of interest that emerge from within African and European contexts, especially those of South Africa and Germany. In the article, we show how resea...

  3. The Extent and Nature of Bullying in a Christian School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazeltine, Brian C.; Hernandez, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Bullying is a problem that has been studied in schools worldwide, but there is little research on bullying within Christian schools, a dearth which may stem from the assumption that Christian schools teach character traits that are inimical to bullying. Yet understanding the extent and nature of bullying in Christian schools may lead to a better…

  4. The Extent and Nature of Bullying in a Christian School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazeltine, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Bullying is a problem that has been studied in schools worldwide, but there is little research on bullying within Christian schools, a dearth which may stem from the assumption that Christian schools teach character traits that are inimical to bullying. Yet understanding the extent and nature of bullying in Christian schools may lead to a better…

  5. Discovering a Theology "for" the Christian Teacher Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Clare

    2008-01-01

    This paper aims to offer a "liveable" theology for the Christian teacher; that is, it seeks to articulate a theology of teaching in contemporary contexts which can serve the spiritual and faith development of Christian teachers in their vocation. A first section gives some brief account of "teaching" in the Christian theological tradition,…

  6. Christian Schooling and Educational Excellence: An Australian Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justins, Charles

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers from an Australian perspective the tensions for Christian schooling in the notion of educational excellence and whether, ultimately, it is possible for a Christian school to promote itself as a centre for educational excellence and remain authentically Christian. The language of excellence is prevalent in Western society, and…

  7. The Value of Christian-Ethos Schooling for Secular Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Globally, many Christian organizations seek to serve communities by providing schooling and education for children and young people who are not necessarily Christian. This article may inform the work of such Christian organizations as it reports findings from a funded research project that investigated three schools in England with a Christian…

  8. Studying religious music at the grassroots level: a look into the discourse practices of Christian metal bands online

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henna Jousmäki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Religious issues are studied in various ways, most prominently by sociologists of religion. This paper suggests that in today’s world of globally intersecting webs of people, places, ideas and action, scholars and readers interested in religion will find themselves benefiting from cross-disciplinary approaches which help them to conceptualize and describe today’s phenomena at different levels. This paper describes how the emerging discipline of the sociology of language and religion may be applied to studying Christian metal bands’ discourse online. Although previous studies give a good idea of the structures, practices and tendencies in and related to Christian metal, little is reported on what happens at the very micro-level of Christian metal – for example, how they represent themselves to their audiences, what they sing about, and what else they say and, importantly, how they say it. To fill this gap, Christian metal bands’ online presence is examined with a particular interest in how the bands utilize online spaces to build up Christian metal identity and culture with the help of textual, discursive, and multimodal resources. This includes a look at the online self-representation of Christian metal bands, a more detailed investigation of the uses of the Bible on bands’ websites, as well as perspectives on an important part of Christian metal; namely the lyrics.

  9. Evangelical Christians and English Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Manka M.; Johnston, Bill

    2007-01-01

    Evangelical Christians are an enduring and growing presence in the field of English language teaching worldwide and in the TESOL organization in particular. Yet to date, hardly any empirical research has been done on this population of teachers or on the links between English teaching, religious beliefs, and missionary work. This article reports…

  10. Toward a Pedagogy Grounded in Christian Spirituality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimabukuro, Gini

    2008-01-01

    Church documents, theology, leadership theory, and sociology come together in this article to present a pedagogy for Catholic schools that is deeply rooted in a personal faith and a contemporary understanding of the person. In order to construct a conceptual model of a pedagogy grounded in Christian spirituality, the meaning of the term "pedagogy"…

  11. Bioethics and Christian theology in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Anjos, Márcio Fabri; Lepargneur, Hubert François

    2008-01-01

    A Christian theology is important to bioethics in Brazil not only because Brazil is a country of strong Christian traditions, but also because of its theological method and because of many practices in their Christian communities. In fact, the interaction within practice and theory is a big point of its methodology. A heritage of a long history of colonialism in South America comes to our times as enormous social inequalities. In such a context, the silent cry of poor people is heard as a question of coherence to the Christian faith and to the neighbor love. Through a constant dialog with human sciences, the method of theology, known as liberation theology, seeks the roots of social inequalities and the alternatives to a movement of spiritual and social liberation. In touch with the modern bioethics, this theology has strongly contributed to understand all the questions of bioethics in the frame of social structures and systems. On the other hand, many actual practices of the Catholic Church in Brazil with popular impact, like its annual Fraternity Campaign, develop social themes and problems that are also big concerns of bioethics. In this article we try to expose some aspects of this dialog, where theology has a well considered contribution to Brazilian bioethics, at the same time his religious discourse is open to interact with a lay discourse.

  12. Christianity and Miao Education in Shimenkan, Guizhou

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuang, Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Shimenkan is a remote and mountainous village in Weining county, Guizhou province, an area traditionally populated by Miao ethnic minority. The arrival of Christian missionaries just over 100 years ago began Shimenkan's transformation from an illiterate school-less place, to a "revered site of Miao education." Today, Shimenkan has…

  13. Christian Andersen, Master of Fairy Tales

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正>Denmark will hold a celebration ceremony on April 2,2005,the date when Christian Andersen was born,The activity will last until December 6,the day when he returned to his hometown-Odense,Many countries will also hold their own special celebrations.

  14. Classroom Advocacy? A Christian Pacifist's Dilemma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Christian professors and professors generally, whether teaching at religiously affiliated or secular institutions, face an age-old question: Can one safely use the classroom to advocate one's personal position with regard to controversial issues or not? Positions examined include that of "value-free" science, "value-full" advocacy, and an…

  15. Emotional Intelligence in Christian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gliebe, Sudi Kate

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the importance of emotional intelligence in Christian higher education. Specifically, it addresses possible implications between emotional intelligence skills and success in the areas of learning, mental health, and career preparation. The paper addresses the following questions: Is there a positive relationship between…

  16. Understanding the Growth of Christian Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, William Lloyd

    The number of independent fundamentalist Protestant schools and students has been increasing rapidly in the last few decades. Research in Kentucky and Wisconsin on administrators and parents in these Christian schools indicates the reasons why such schools are started and why families send their children to them. Administrators start Christian…

  17. Christian Müller - Orgelmaker in Amsterdam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gritter, G.H.

    2014-01-01

    Christian Müller is internationally considered to be one of the most important Northern European organbuilders of the 18th century. The especially impressive organ he built in the years 1735-38 in the Grote of St. Bavokerk in Haarlem has been counted amongst the most famous in the world since its in

  18. GILSON ON THE RATIONALITY OF CHRISTIAN BELIEF

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    CURTIS L. HANCOCK

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The underlying skepticism of ancient Greek culture made it unreceptive of philosophy. It was the Catholic Church that embraced philosophy. Still, Étienne Gilson reminds us in Reason and Revelation in the Middle Ages that some early Christians rejected philosophy. Their rejection was based on fideism: the view that faith alone provides knowledge. Philosophy is unnecessary and dangerous, fideists argue, because (1 anything known by reason can be better known by faith, and (2 reason, on account of the sin of pride, seeks to replace faith. To support this twofold claim, fideists, like Tertullian and Tatian, quote St. Paul. However, a judicious interpretation of St. Paul’s remarks show that he does not object to philosophy per se but to erroneous philosophy. This interpretation is reinforced by St. Paul’s own background in philosophy and by his willingness to engage intellectuals critical of Christianity in the public square. The challenge of fideism brings up the interesting question: what would Jesus himself say about the discipline of philosophy? Could it be that Jesus himself was a philosopher (as George Bush once declared? As the fullness of wisdom and intelligence, Jesus certainly understood philosophy, although not in the conventional sense. But surely, interpreting his life through the lens of fideism is unconvincing. Instead, an appreciation of his innate philosophical skills serves better to understand important elements of his mission. His perfect grasp of how grace perfects nature includes a philosophy of the human person. This philosophy grounded in common-sense analysis of human experience enables Jesus to be a profound moral philosopher. Specifically, he is able to explain the principles of personal actualization. Relying on ordinary experience, where good philosophy must start, he narrates moral lessons—parables—that illumine difficulties regarding moral responsibility and virtue. These parables are accessible but profound

  19. Christian Values in Vilhelm Kyukhelbekker's Early Prose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedoseeva T.V.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines Vilhelm Kyukhelbekker's narrative prose of the first half of the 1820s. For the analysis we have chosen the most significant works of this period — his book of travel notes The Journey and the novel Ado. The study reveals the writer's attitude to Christianity and Christian values in his early period of work. In this research the axiological approach is used, as well as the methods of historical, typological, structural and semiotic study of literary texts. Studying The Journey, we performed a detailed analysis of the author's letters which describe the paintings by the artists of Flemish and Dutch schools, as well as German and Italian painters of the 17th and 18th centuries exhibited in the Dresden gallery. The writer prefers the paintings of biblical subjects to those of naturalistic everyday scenes. He pays special attention to the evangelical themes. He is attracted by Christ the child's divine nature and the heavenly purity, high humility of the Mother of God's image, and the fact that St. Sebastian is portrayed as joyfully suffering for Christ. Historical events of the novel Ado date back to the time of the Baltic peoples' forced Christianization by the Order of the Brothers of the Sword. Baltic peoples are trying to keep the faith of their ancestors and rebel against the cruel governor of the Order. The novel focuses particularly on one knight, Michael, who stood up for the oppressed and like Archangel Michael found himself on the cutting edge of Good and Evil. This character of the novel is connected with the idea of Christian sacrificial love and eternal spiritual life, which was very important for Kyukhelbekker. We concluded that even in his early prose Kyukhelbekker expressed the main spiritual and moral values of Christianity.

  20. When Christianity and homosexuality collide: understanding the potential intrapersonal conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhi, Nasrudin; Geelan, David

    2012-01-01

    Reconciling sexual orientation with religious and spiritual beliefs can be challenging for Christian homosexuals, since many Christian churches teach that homosexual behavior is sinful. A qualitative study of 10 male and 10 female Christian homosexuals was conducted via semistructured interviews. This article seeks to explore the potential conflict between Christianity and homosexuality faced by the respondents. Participants' life stories and experiences varied widely. A few respondents were unaffected by the potential conflict between Christianity and homosexuality, however, the majority were affected. Effects included depression, guilt, anxiety, suicidal ideation, and alienation. Implications of the findings for support personnel are included.

  1. Christian Faith Rush in Rural Areas and Social Work Intervention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Jian-ling; WANG Shu-min

    2012-01-01

    To make the public have rational knowledge of the Christian faith rush in rural areas and guide coordinated development of Christianity with the socialist society, we analyzed reasons and complex influence on rural social development from aspects of society and individual and attraction of Christianity by the Literature Analysis Method. In view of its negative effect, we put forward several countermeasures from the perspective of social work intervention, such as improving farmers’ overall qualities, promoting effective implementation of social security system, and correcting believers’ understanding of Christianity. Finally, we introduced situation of Christian faith in other countries and reference and directive significance to China.

  2. From Christianity to African Religion and back again

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A M Meiring

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available This article passes from Christianity to African Religion and back again, in order to gain new insight on reconciliation. Traditional Christian reconciliation models are valuable but also contextual and limited; thus new models should be sought. African myths of community, acceptance and rebellion offer alternative ways of understanding reconciliation. When evaluated according to the principles of integration and transcendence, these myths meet the criteria of better religion and emphasise Christian notions that are often ignored in tradition Christianity. These new African-inspired insights can be used in Christian liturgy as a number of examples prove.

  3. A Christian mission of glocal culture within riven societies in God’s world

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    C.G. Seerveld

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Globalisation today seems to be an implacable force at work trying to homogenise world cultures into the same format. Huntington’s well-known thesis sees a clash coming between Christian Western civilisation and the rest of the world. This article argues against Huntington that civilised cultures with different identities have comparable structural features. Because contrary cultures are all human constructs with good and bad mixed in, they can, like human relatives, learn from and correct one another rather than demonise others. It is posited that the deepest antagonism disturbing the world is not a Christian West versus the rest, but is largely the struggle between two tyrannical ideologies: a post-Christian capitalistic secularism and a theocratic fundamentalism. A biblical Christian mission of glocal culture formation (global awareness and local action is offered as an alternative vision for our worsening dilemma. This biblically-rooted diaconal way to be redemptively busy in salvaging cultural activity proffers concrete hope. The life work of Bennie van der Walt is cited as an example, and a few illustrations of glocal artistry provide evidence that such a Christian mission can be deed as well as talk.

  4. "Higher" Education: A Perspective from a Christian University Foundation in Contemporary England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, Gerald J.

    2015-01-01

    The relation between Christian education and the secularized public square, based on how state and church relations are typically portrayed, has been described chiefly in terms of conflict. However, in the case of church-founded schools and universities in Britain, the relationship, in practice, is more ambiguous than polarized. Arguably, there is…

  5. Holy Koran\\\\\\'s Pattern in the Cultural Communication of Islam and Christianity

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    Habibollah Arzani

    2016-01-01

    and good deeds. This is not realized unless we can eliminate the roots of dispute such as subordination to non-right and domination of the powerful i.e. the weak accepting the cruelty of the more powerful. We all must accept that there is no Allah except Allah and no other rule except Allah's rule. The Holy prophet of Islam (PBUH invites the People of the Book to believe his revelation and to unite around the word of Allah. This is not an invitation to the just theoretical monotheism but it is an applied monotheism that has social effects such as expansion of justice and rejection of idolatrous. In brief, if we consider the verses related to the Christians, we can conclude the ways the Koran offers in order to communicate with them. What has a vital importance in this communication is the monotheism and refusal of polytheism. The ways to attain this goal are the seven ones which we pointed out in the article 

  6. The politics of being Muslim and being British in the British Christian print media

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    Gabriel Faimau

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available There have been a significant number of published studies in recent years on the British media representation of Muslims. These studies have tended to focus only on the British mainstream media, and to my knowledge, there is no significant research on the discursive construction of British Muslims in alternative media outlets. This paper attempts to fill this gap, focusing on the representations of British Muslims in the British Christian print media. Drawing on empirical data relating to four British Christian print media, Church Times, The Tablet, Evangelicals Now and Evangelical Times, this paper investigates how the questions of being Muslim and being British are dealt with in the British Christian print media, and the extent to which the politics of being Muslim and being British inform us about identity formation and affirmation.

  7. The books of the Bibles in early Christianity

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    Jordan Scheetz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A resurgence in the interest in other early Christian literature has brought the issue of the Christian biblical canon(s to the forefront. Questions in relation to what the literature was, which literature was authoritative, and when did it become authoritative, have all been reopened both on a popular and scholarly level. With this climate, a re-evaluation of primary source information in relation to the various lists was in order. The lists from Origen, Eusebius, the Muratorian Canon, Athanasius, and to a lesser extent Tertullian, were examined. The result was: a nuanced perspective that reflects a three level reading hierarchy that gave precedence to the unquestioned texts, allows for mediated expansion through the questioned texts, and calls for a complete correction of the rejected texts based on the first two levels. Further, although none of the lists are exactly alike, substantial agreement was established between these various lists spanning more than a 150 years. In contrast to Marcion, theological harmony did not appear to be the main consideration in these various lists.

  8. Christianity and globalisation: An alternative ethical response

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    Retief Müller

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This article critically evaluated the role of Christian Ethics in response to globalisation. It showed that ethical critiques of globalisation inevitably fall short when Christianity’s historical contributions to processes of globalisation are neglected or de-emphasised. A Christian Ethics that attempts completely to wash its hands of and disavow globalisation is therefore indicated to be perched on a false premise. In this regard, the author specifically discussed the divergent stances of Max Stackhouse and Rebecca Todd Peters and opted for the former as the more helpful when considered from an interdisciplinary approach. In the final analysis, the author argued that the problem of globalisation might fruitfully be addressed with an ethics that is not averse to bring the various insights of missiology, church history and practical theology to the table, focusing particularly on rituals of reconciliation and forgiveness.

  9. [Christian Bohr and the Seven Little Devils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjedde, Albert

    2004-01-01

    The author explores novel lessons emerging from the oxygen diffusion controversy between Christian Bohr on one side and August and Marie Krogh on the other. THe controversy found its emphatic expression in August and Marie Krogh's "Seven Little Devils", a series of papers published back-to-back in the 1910 volume of Skandinavisches Archiv für Physiologie. The Devils unjustifiably sealed the fate of Christian Bohr's theory of active cellular participation in the transport of oxygen from the lungs to the pulmonary circulation. The author's renewed examination of the original papers of Bohr and the Kroghs reveals that Bohr's concept of active cellular participation in diffusion is entirely compatible with the mechanism of capillary recruitment, for the discovery of which Krogh was later awarded Nobel's Prize, years after Bohr's untimely and unexpected death in 1911.

  10. The Christian physician in the non-Christian institution: objections of conscience and physician value neutrality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peppin, John F

    1997-03-01

    Christian physicians are in danger of losing the right of conscientious objection in situations they deem immoral. The erosion of this right is bolstered by the doctrine of "physician value neutrality" (PVN) which may be an impetus for the push to require physicians to refer for procedures they find immoral. It is only a small step from referral to compelling performance of these same procedures. If no one particular value is more morally correct than any other (a foundational PVN premise) and a physician ought to be value neutral, than conscientious objection to morally objectionable actions becomes a thing of the past. However, the argument for PVN fails. Therefore, Christian physicians should state their values openly, which would allow patients the ability to choose like-minded physicians. Some possible responses to this erosion of conscientious objection include, disengagement from non-Christian institutions, the formation of distinctly Christian medical institutions and political action. However, for the Christian the initial focus should be on a life of holiness which requires each of us to avoid evil.

  11. The French Spring of la Manif pour tous: Conservative Protests against Same-Sex Marriage and Adoption in France

    OpenAIRE

    Morabito, Léa

    2013-01-01

    First lines: On September 14th and 15th 2013, la Manif pour tous, a French protest group fighting against same-sex marriage, organized a summer school near Paris to celebrate a year of mobilization against the Taubira law. This law, named after the French Minister of Justice, Christiane Taubira, passed in April 2013, legalizing same-sex marriage and the adoption of children by same-sex married couples. In August, le Printemps français, another group protesting against the law, had also organi...

  12. Foucault about parrhesia and parrhesia in Christianity

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    Jadranka Brnčić

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the basic Foucault’s thesis about parrhesia is presented. It is then analysed regarding how it is verified when it comes to Christianity, and especially the New Testament. The focus is Jesus's parrhesia as an everyday practice (speech and life harmonised as opposed to hypocrisy. Next, questions regarding the interpretation of parrhesia in theology and in the institutional Church, where parrhesia sometimes is absent in everyday practice as the production of truth, is opened.

  13. Colonial Subjectification: Foucault, Christianity and Governmentality

    OpenAIRE

    Christina Petterson

    2012-01-01

    Foucault’s concept of pastoral power is envisioned as a technique of power developed from the medieval period and carried through into modern political rationalities. As such, it is an old power technique – which originated in Christian institutions – in a new political shape, which he coined governmentality. This article uses Foucault’s genealogy of pastoral power and governmentality to discuss the intersection of domination and technology of self in the Greenlandic colonial context and to b...

  14. Cultural criticism as an imperative for Christians

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    Andries G. van Aarde

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article cultural criticism is approached from an epistemological perspective, in other words from the viewpoint of a theory of knowledge that includes matters such as the nature of knowledge, its sources, criteria, possibilities, and limits. Seen from this perspective, cultural criticism represents a critical position towards those culturally oriented studies, which advocate a positivist schema in epistemology. A cultural-critical disposition in Christian theology is to question whether meaningful life depends on a Christian’s acceptance and conformity to the so-called “orders of creation” as divine imperatives. Since such compliance was biblically legitimated as God’s will and wisdom, cultural criticism seeks for another theological validation that can create space for an “alternative wisdom” within a postmodern paradigm. The article aims at showing that dialectical thinking paved the way for applying critical theory in the humanities, theology and biblical exegesis. In the article different critical theories in firstcontinental (Euro-centric philosophy and Christian theology are discussed. It argues that cultural criticism should be seen as an imperative for Christians because they ought to build their lives on the “cultural wisdom” of Jesus of Nazareth, which pertains to a “cultural-critical” position in his time.

  15. Institutional Types, Organizational Cultures, and Innovation in Christian Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obenchain, Alice M.; Johnson, William C.; Dion, Paul A.

    2004-01-01

    Relative to the many types of higher education institutions, Christian institutions face extreme operating conditions. Specifically, they are highly tuition dependent, face extreme pressure for funding, and struggle to preserve the history, tradition, and distinctive cultures of their organizations (Dockery and Gushee, 1999). At the same time,…

  16. We Live to Create Dissonance: Is It Possible to Be a Christian and Racist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Theron N.

    2009-01-01

    Confronted with the reality of the limited exposure to human diversity among their students at two Christian universities, two African American professors relate their efforts to prepare students to teach in the twenty-first century. This article is a reflective report on the strategies and events that occurred as a result of challenging students'…

  17. Chinese Christians in America: Attachment to God, Stress, and Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Meifen; Ku, Tsun-Yao; Chen, Hwei-Jane; Wade, Nathaniel; Liao, Kelly Yu-Hsin; Guo, Gwo-Jen

    2012-01-01

    This study examined whether attachment to God moderated the relation between perceived stress and well-being (i.e., life satisfaction and positive affect) among 183 Chinese Christian international students and immigrants. Results showed significant main effects of (a) perceived stress on life satisfaction and (b) secure attachment to God and…

  18. Christian community sanctification and leadership

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    Stoian Mihai Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In general, it is necessary for the priest to always carefully control his aspect and behavior in his relations with the believers, always maintaining an attitude of seriousness and dignity that calls for respect, because an act of the priest can not be without effect on the believers.

  19. Renaissance Humanists:Defenders of Medieval Christian worldview

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘玥婷

    2006-01-01

    The Renaissance is a new golden age of intellectual achievement with a sharp contrast with the Middle Ages.Though new secular and scientific values begin to supplant traditional religious belief,there exists the continuity between the Middle Ages and the Renaissance,and humanists bear strong Christian character.They never change their devotion to Christianity and keep making their effort to maintain the primacy of Jesus.Humanists in Renaissance are defenders of medieval Christian view of the world.

  20. A Comparison between the concepts of redemption in Christianity and intercessionin Shia Islam

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    Ahmad Reza Meftah

    2015-03-01

    both of them are considered as act of God and are accomplished by permission of God both of them are based on grace and mercy of God both of them are ordained to save men both of them prerequisite some conditions. The differences between these doctrines include: The doctrine of redemption in Christianity is the main factor for salvation and that is initiative act of God but in the doctrine of intercession, man himself has the main role for salvation and intercession has a complementary role redemption changes human nature, but according to Islam nature of human isn't sinful so that it require sanctification redemption is almost related to Original sin and establishes reconciliation between God and man, but intercession is related to daily sins. Eventually redemption is the essential doctrine in Christianity, but intercession is the secondary doctrine in Shia. Indeed the story of Cross and redemption is the base of Christian theology and other issues are based on it. Consequently if the doctrine of redemption is put under question, the whole Christian theology will be disintegrated. However because there is religious Law in Shia, the concept of intercession has secondary aspect and if there are different views about intercession, it will not make any problem for other theological doctrines in Shia.

  1. Reconstructing Christian Ethics: Exploring Constructivist Practices for Teaching Christian Ethics in the Masters of Divinity Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danaher, William

    2009-01-01

    This article reflects on an effort to incorporate constructivist pedagogies (learner-centered, inquiry-guided, problem-based models of teaching) into an introductory class on Christian Ethics in an M.Div. curriculum. Although some students preferred more traditional pedagogies, the majority found that constructivist pedagogies better accommodated…

  2. Church over Nation: Christian Missionaries and Korean Christians in Colonial Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Matsutani, Motokazu

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines the interrelationships between the foreign Missions and the Korean Church in colonial Korea. In contrast to previous scholarship that assumes a necessary link between the Korean Church and Korean nationalism, this study focuses on the foreign Mission's predominance over the Korean Church as a major obstacle in the Korean Church's adoption of nationalism as part of its Christian vision.

  3. Colonial Subjectification: Foucault, Christianity and Governmentality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Petterson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Foucault’s concept of pastoral power is envisioned as a technique of power developed from the medieval period and carried through into modern political rationalities. As such, it is an old power technique – which originated in Christian institutions – in a new political shape, which he coined governmentality. This article uses Foucault’s genealogy of pastoral power and governmentality to discuss the intersection of domination and technology of self in the Greenlandic colonial context and to bring out the central role of religion in Foucault’s conceptualisation of governmentality.

  4. An integral investigation into the phenomenology and neurophysiology of Christian Trinity meditation

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    Stephen D. Edwards

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This integral investigation explored phenomenological and neurophysiologic, individual and collective dimensions of Christian Trinitarian meditation experiences in a volunteer, convenience sample of 10 practicing Christians, 6 men and 4 women, with a mean age of 48 years and an age range from 21 to 85 years. Participants meditated for a minimum period of 15 minutes, during which neurophysiologic data in the form of electroencephalographic (EEG, electromyographic (EMG, blood volume pulse (BVP and respiratory activity were recorded. A phenomenological analysis indicated that the meditation process generally involved a movement from body to mind to spirit as evident in reports of an increasingly relaxed, contented and focused state of consciousness characterised by Christian Trinitarian imagery, wonder, surrender, peace, bliss, openness and formlessness. The neuropsychological findings indicated significant increases, from baseline to meditation recordings, in the alpha and beta range, accompanied by increasing mean trends in the theta and gamma range, and decreasing mean trends in the delta range, EMG, BVP and respiration. Integrative findings indicated the practical theological value of small doses of Christian Trinity meditation to enhance spiritual life for those forms of waking, thinking, conscious behaviour needed in everyday world involvement and healing. Findings were discussed in relation to further integrative investigations and interventions with practical theological implications.

  5. Highly-Valued Reasons Muslim Caregivers Choose Evangelical Christian Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumbaugh, Andrew E.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated what were the most highly-valued reasons among Muslim caregivers for sending their children to Lebanese evangelical Christian schools. Muslim caregivers (N = 1,403) from four Lebanese evangelical Christian schools responded to determine what were the most highly-valued reasons for sending their children to an evangelical…

  6. Addressing Poverty Issues in Christian Schools: Teachers' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankston, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of Christian education is to incorporate Biblical values in the curriculum, and one essential message in the Bible is to reach out and liberate the poor. Through interviews, writing protocols, a focus group meeting, and document analysis, this narrative study focuses on the question of how do Christian educators create pedagogical…

  7. Elementary Christian School Teachers Utilizing Biblical Concepts in Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Christy E.

    2014-01-01

    This phenomenological study examined biblical concepts utilized by elementary Christian school teachers in classroom management in two Christian schools in Virginia. Items examined included which biblical components were being utilized and how teachers are utilizing them. Determining factors influencing the incorporation of biblical concepts in…

  8. Empowering Teachers: The Influence of Transformational Leadership in Christian Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirika, John Irungu

    2011-01-01

    The object of this study was to investigate transformational leadership in Christian schools. The study investigated the perception of empowerment of K-12 Christian school teachers and its influence on organizational and professional commitment and job satisfaction. It explored correlations between teacher empowerment and selected demographic…

  9. Christian Religious Education Research in the Japanese Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Kazuhiro

    2006-01-01

    Protestant Christianity was brought to Japan during the modernization of that country in the middle of the nineteenth century. Before the Second World War, except for a short time, Christianity in Japan as a Western religion had experienced a difficult course of history because of hostility due to nationalism of the populace and the leaders of the…

  10. Teaching the History of Christianity: Critical Themes and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killen, Patricia O'Connell; Duntley, Madeline; Furey, Constance; Gilpin, W. Clark; Six-Means, Horace E.

    2009-01-01

    At the November 2008 meeting of the American Academy of Religion, the History of Christianity section sponsored a panel around the question: "What are the key challenges, opportunities, and goals in the History of Christianity classroom today and how best should teachers respond to them?" Beginning with brief sketches of institutional context and…

  11. Foundations for an Intercultural Philosophy of Christian Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ospino, Hosffman

    2009-01-01

    This article proposes a number of fundamental principles that seek to establish a solid platform for a philosophy of Christian Education that is culturally responsive and responsible. In this theological-practical reflection the author affirms that the context where most processes of Christian Education take place in the United States today is one…

  12. Spiritual Maturation and Religious Behaviors in Christian University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Ronald D.; Mellberg, Kimberlee

    2008-01-01

    Spiritual maturation processes of internalization and questing were assessed at a Christian university to determine their relationship to year in school and certain religious behaviors. This was a first step toward the development of a new model of Christian higher education that will intentionally facilitate spiritual maturation. A group of 179…

  13. The Implications of Christian Anti-Semitism for Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Patricia

    1995-01-01

    Maintains that the history of anti-Semitism has historical links to Christian theology. Asserts that Christianity provided ample fuel for the secular anti-Semitism preached by Hitler and the Nazi party. Contends that educators can draw important lessons on the value of education and the pedagogy of teaching history. (CFR)

  14. Some contemporary aspects of Hindu-Christian dialogue

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    Alexandru-Corneliu Arion

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with an important aspect of today’s interreligious dialogue, that between Christianity and the second largest religion of Asia, namely Hinduism. The concern is centering around not the ancient or traditional links between these two expressions of the Sacred, but rather of the contemporary ones. But that requires certain knowledge of what has already happened. The dialogue comes from the heart of the people, and is situated in the middle of life. Unfortunately, many present-day dialogues set the stage according to the terms of one of the parties alone. But in spite of misunderstandings and difficulties of the Hindu-Christian dialogue, it has an unavoidable effect: it changes our vision and interpretation of our own religion. The main tenets would be: the future of Hindu-Christian dialogue will largely depend on future mutual interest; Hindu-Christian dialogue may be linked to the future development of Hinduism and Christianity; the future of Hindu-Christian dialogue may be endangered by an institutional misunderstanding of its nature; Hindu-Christian dialogue may have to be placed into a larger “secular” context; Hindu-Christian dialogue is inevitable. It is an imperative and it must exhibit more continuity.

  15. John Nelson Darby: His Contributions to Evangelical Christian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Winston Terrance

    2010-01-01

    The study reported in this article focused on the contributions of John Nelson Derby to biblical hermeneutics and contemporary eschatological thought. Darby continues to exert a great influence on Christianity, particularly conservative evangelical Christianity. This research provides a discussion of Darby's contributions to contemporary…

  16. Sacrifice in Early Christianity : The Social Dimension of a Metaphor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rouwhorst, Gerard; Duyndam, Joachim; Korte, Anne-Marie; Poorthuis, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    In Early Christianity the term 'sacrifice' was understood in a metaphorical way. The key to this metaphorical was to be found in the life and the death of Jesus Christ which which was interpreted as a self-offering and, for its part, constituted the model of the Christian way of life. Although this

  17. Presidential Perspectives of Crisis Preparedness at Christian Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrell, Stacy M.; Heiselt, April K.

    2012-01-01

    Crises, whether human or natural, occur on all college campuses. Extensive research has been conducted on crisis preparedness at four-year, nondenominational institutions. This study examined crisis preparedness at Christian institutions of higher education. The study examined the perspectives of presidents of Christian institutions of higher…

  18. Christian Higher Education in Europe: A Historical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebbington, D. W.

    2011-01-01

    The history of Christian higher education in Europe may be analyzed in terms of seven eras. From their medieval origins in scholasticism and the practical needs of students and rulers, universities passed through Renaissance humanism to a period of decay, yet remained substantially Christian in intent. The Enlightenment exercised a partially…

  19. Christianity and Character Education: Faith in Core Values?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Character education is important within the Christian tradition but tends to be viewed with suspicion by educators who privilege autonomy as the aim of a liberal education. Equally, Christians may have concerns that character education places too great an emphasis upon good works rather than God's grace. This article reasons that character…

  20. Applying Diversity Management Principles to Institutions of Christian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fubara, Edward I.; Gardner, Matthew T.; Wolff, Jordan S.

    2011-01-01

    For a variety of reasons many Christian higher education institutions struggle to embrace issues of diversity. This paper explores some of the challenges facing Christian higher education institutions when it comes to embracing diversity, particularly in the area of employment. It begins with a discussion of basic diversity/diversity management…

  1. The human embryo in the Christian tradition: a reconsideration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D A

    2005-12-01

    Recent claims that the Christian tradition justifies destructive research on human embryos have drawn upon an article by the late Professor Gordon Dunstan which appeared in this journal in 1984. Despite its undoubted influence, this article was flawed and seriously misrepresented the tradition of Christian reflection on the moral status of the human embryo.

  2. Prejudice or Preference? Attitudes of Gay and Lesbian Christians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Elizabeth A.; Gorsuch, Richard L.

    Research on the attitudes of heterosexual churchgoers is extensive. However, very little empirical information is available about the attitudes held by gay and lesbian Christians. In the current study, it was hypothesized that gay and lesbian Christians, unlike their heterosexual peers, would demonstrate desire for and acceptance of social…

  3. Thinking Levels of Questions in Christian Reading Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Heather A.

    2015-01-01

    If Christian schools desire students to achieve higher-level thinking, then the textbooks that teachers use should reflect such thinking. Using Risner's (1987) methodology, raters classified questions from two Christian publishers' fifth grade reading textbooks based on the revised Bloom's taxonomy (Anderson et al., 2001). The questions in the A…

  4. De religione: How Christianity Became a Religion

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    Denisa Červenková

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Following the findings of contemporary theological and religious studies research, the present interdisciplinary study attempts to trace the process of adopting the originally Roman category of “religion” for referring to Christianity. The text notes, in particular, the socio-political role of religio in classical culture and the transformations that the relationship of the society of classical antiquity and the Christian community went through in the first centuries AD, especially the first Christian attempts at communication with the late classical Latin culture and the administrative structures of the Roman Empire. The adaptation of the category is traced back to Tertullian, whose conception appears to have fundamentally influenced later generations of Christians; the second part of the study therefore devotes considerable attention to his works. It is here that justified use of the category of “religion” in connection with the Christian tradition is first encountered, as an expression encompassing the doctrinal and philosophical, as well as ethical and liturgical aspects of Christianity. Analysis of the text of Tertullian’s Apologeticum shows how the apologetic literature of the second century AD conveys the Christian message in an exemplary and highly elaborate form, which serves the dual purpose of providing an adequate definition of the Christian religious identity and preserving it, as well as making it available to recipients of diverse contemporary cultural environments. De religione: Jak se křesťanství stalo náboženstvím Předkládaná interdisciplinární studie se v návaznosti na poznatky současného teologického a religionistického bádání snaží vystopovat proces převzetí původně římské kategorie „náboženství“ pro označení křesťanství. V textu se připomíná zejm. sociopolitická role religio v antické kultuře a proměny, jimiž procházel vztah antické společnosti a k

  5. A non-religious spirituality from a Christian tradition

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    Marià Corbí

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Rapid changes in the ways of survival in human societies, passing quickly from pre-industrial to industrial societies or industrial societies to knowledge societies, characterized by innovation and constant change, require a kind of a non religious spirituality not tied to beliefs. No need to go to Eastern spiritual traditions, Buddhism, Yoga or Advaita Vedanta to show and experience the possibility of a non-religious spirituality; also within the Christian tradition, we find authors that allow non-religious spirituality. We can count on an important notion of Nicholas of Cusa: The "No-Other" as the  absolute dimension of all reality. The Cusano considers that this term is more appropriate to describe that absolute of all reality then the term God. It is also very convenient to live a spirituality that does not divide reality into two poles: the mundane and the divine, the relative and absolute in this world and the next.

  6. Christianity and Militancy in Eastern Indonesia: Revisiting the Maluku Violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumanto Al Qurtuby

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available During the Maluku interreligious violence from 1999 to 2002, both Islam and Christianity contributed to the initiation and intensification of the collective conflict. This article examines the role of religion, especially Christianity, and discusses how Christian identities, teachings, doctrines, symbols, discourses, organizations, and networks became some of the contributing factors in the early phases of the Maluku mayhem. It also examines the complex roles played by Moluccan Christian actors, especially the religious militias, in initiating and intensifying the strife, highlighting how Ambonese militant religious leaders framed the violence, recruited, and mobilized the masses in the combat zone, and how the local ordinary Christian fighters portrayed the violence and transformed their everyday experience in the warfare.

  7. Another look at education from a Christian stewardship perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes L. van der Walt

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite the current postmodern aversion to large-scale philosophies, another look at Christian stewardship education has become necessary. Christian educators need a reminder in the prevailing socio-political conditions in South Africa about the intricacies of their calling and duties towards the upcoming generation. The article commences with a discussion of education in general and then goes on to argue that the ‘thin’, minimalist and universalist language of modern day secular pedagogical theory should be augmented, or preferably replaced, by the ‘thick’, maximalist and particularist language of education theory rooted in the Bible. The article highlights a number of key concepts associated with Christian stewardship education and concludes by observing that, whilst an entire book (once again could have been written on the subject, the discussion of a few key issues with regard to Christian stewardship education can serve as a reminder to Christian educators about their pedagogical responsibilities.

  8. The Role of Christian Education in the Development of Spiritual Stamina in Young Adult Graduates of Christian Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Violet E.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative grounded theory study was to investigate the personal development of spiritual stamina in graduates of Christian high schools who attend secular universities or colleges. Participants are comprised of a theoretical sampling of 16 young adult graduates of one of four Christian schools in Southeastern United States.…

  9. The Origins of Christian Liberal Arts Higher Education in Russia: A Case Study of the Russian-American Christian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titarchuk, Victor N.

    2011-01-01

    This is a case study of the historical development of a private Christian faith-based school of higher education in post-Soviet Russia from its conception in 1990 until 2010. This binational school was founded as Russian-American Christian University (RACU) in 1996. In 2003, business and economics as well as social work undergraduate academic…

  10. Adult Experience; A Key to Christian Discipleship. Putting Immediacy and Emotional Content into a Christian Theology Specifically for Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thede, Gaius Wendt

    The first practical problem of a Christian educator in reaching inadequately committed adults is motivation. Although educational psychology shows very little that goes beyond self-realization or self-actualization as the basic motive of man, the Christian view of man makes it clear that God's own motivation, agape (self-giving love), is also…

  11. Ethical issues in astrobiology: a Christian perspective (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, R. O.

    2009-12-01

    With its focus on the origin, extent, and future of life, Astrobiology raises exciting, multidisciplinary questions for science. At the same time, Astrobiology raises important questions for the humanities. For instance, the prospect of discovering extraterrestrial life - either intelligent or unintelligent - raises questions about humans’ place in the universe and our relationship with nature on planet Earth. Fundamentally, such questions are rooted in our understanding of what it means to be human. From a Christian perspective, the foundational claim about human nature is that all persons bear the "imago dei", the image of God. This concept forms the basis for how humans relate to one another (dignity) and how humans relate to nature (stewardship). For many Christians the "imago dei" also suggests that humans are at the center of the universe. The discovery of extraterrestrial life would be another scientific development - similar to evolution - that essentially de-centers humanity. For some Christian perspectives this de-centering may be problematic, but I will argue that the discovery of extraterrestrial life would actually offer a much needed theological corrective for contemporary Christians’ understanding of the "imago dei". I will make this argument by examining two clusters of ethical issues confronting Astrobiology: 1. What ethical obligations would human explorers owe to extraterrestrial life? Are there ethical obligations to protect extraterrestrial ecosystems from harm or exploitation by human explorers? Do our ethical considerations change, if the extraterrestrial life is a “second genesis;” in other words a form of life completely different and independent from the carbon-based life that we know on Earth? 2. Do we have an ethical obligation to promote life as much as we can? If human explorers discover extraterrestrial life and through examination determine that it is struggling to survive, do we have an ethical obligation to assist that

  12. 激情—Christiane Haase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘丹云

    2009-01-01

    ChriStiane Haase1974年出生于德国柏林,2003年毕业于Bauhaus大学的视觉艺术系。作为一名初露锋芒的年轻艺术家,她的作品曾在德国的许多博物馆和画廊展出,并屡次获奖。2008初,她有幸获得德国艺术交流部的奖学金。作为客座艺术家工作于乐天陶社,从此就和这里结下了缘。最初吸引我的是Christiane去年在工作室完成的作品,

  13. Afrikaner Christianity and the concept of empire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erna Oliver

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Not many Protestant countries in the world have been as influenced by faith as South Africa. Although South Africa was never officially a Christian country, politics, economic development, social life and the culture of the �rainbow nation� was either moulded on, or influenced by, the Calvinistic Christianity that came to the country along with the European merchants. The privileged position of Christianity ended in 1994 when South Africa became a neutral state with guaranteed religious freedom for all. Although more than 80 per cent of the population claim that they are Christians, it seems as if the word is not meant any more as a religion with a value system and moral obligations, but only as a convenient label. The reason behind the contrast between theory and practice must be investigated. One possible reason could be found in the traditional Afrikaans-speaking churches� participation of, and contribution to, the �empire� concept. The responsibility of the individual to practise his or her faith was taken over by the power of the state and church.Bokriste bja Maafrikanere le kgopolo ya mmu�o wo maatlaGa se dinaga t�e nt�i t�a Protestante mo lefaseng t�e di huedit�wego ke tumelo go swana le ka fao naga ya Afrika-Borwa e huedit�wego ke tumelo ka gona. Le ge Afrika-Borwa e sa ka ya ba naga ya Sekriste semmu�o, dipolitiki, tlhabollo ya t�a ekonomi, bophelo bja leago le set�o sa �set�haba sa molalatladi�, se ka ba se bopegile godimo ga, goba se huedit�we ke Bokriste bja Secalvine bjo bo tlilego le bagwebi ba Yuropa. Maemo a go phagama ao a bego a filwe tumelo ya Sekriste a fedile ka ngwaga wa 1994 ge Afrika-Borwa e eba naga ya kemelathoko ya go fa bohle tokologo ya bodumedi. Le ge diphesente t�a go feta 80 t�a set�haba di ipit�a Bakriste, go bonala nke lent�u leo ga le sa �omi�wa go hlalo�a tumelo ye e nago le meetlo le maitshwaro a it�eng a setho, eup�a le no �omi�wa e le seka sa go

  14. Karoo fracking and the Christian faith community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerrit van Tonder

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the challenges for Practical Theology in Africa is to engage with the continent’s concerns and challenges in such a way that the kingdom of God is realised in society and is seen to be relevant to these issues by people who are outside of academia. In our article, which was first presented at the Practical Theology congress in Pretoria in January 2014, the authors seek to demonstrate how this may be accomplished by applying insights to one concern, namely ‘fracking’. The objective is to mobilise the influential Christian faith community in South Africa to begin to exercise prophetic discernment concerning fracking in the Karoo. The fracking debate is a product of the tension between the environmental degradation that its waste products may cause, on the one hand, and, on the other, the greater energy demands of a rapidly increasing world population along with its expectations of an ever-increasing standard of living. Shale gas fracking in the Karoo region of South Africa promises to make vast reserves of oil and gas available to help meet a significant percentage of the country’s energy needs for many years to come, and so thus aid development and contribute to raising the standard of living of many people. Yet the management of the waste products associated with the process is an area of serious environmental concern. The article aims to apprise the South African Christian faith community of the technology and risks involved. Theological guidelines are presented by which fracking’s benefits and dangers can be interrogated so that the community may come to an informed decision as to whether or not to support fracking.

  15. Karoo fracking and the Christian faith community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerrit van Tonder

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the challenges for Practical Theology in Africa is to engage with the continent’s concerns and challenges in such a way that the kingdom of God is realised in society and is seen to be relevant to these issues by people who are outside of academia. In our article, which was first presented at the Practical Theology congress in Pretoria in January 2014, the authors seek to demonstrate how this may be accomplished by applying insights to one concern, namely ‘fracking’. The objective is to mobilise the influential Christian faith community in South Africa to begin to exercise prophetic discernment concerning fracking in the Karoo. The fracking debate is a product of the tension between the environmental degradation that its waste products may cause, on the one hand, and, on the other, the greater energy demands of a rapidly increasing world population along with its expectations of an ever-increasing standard of living. Shale gas fracking in the Karoo region of South Africa promises to make vast reserves of oil and gas available to help meet a significant percentage of the country’s energy needs for many years to come, and so thus aid development and contribute to raising the standard of living of many people. Yet the management of the waste products associated with the process is an area of serious environmental concern. The article aims to apprise the South African Christian faith community of the technology and risks involved. Theological guidelines are presented by which fracking’s benefits and dangers can be interrogated so that the community may come to an informed decision as to whether or not to support fracking.

  16. Koers and the ideal of Christian scholarship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniël F.M. Strauss

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Commemorating the 75-year existence of the journal Koers is connected to the Reformational tradition, from Calvin to Kuyper, Stoker, Dooyeweerd and Vollenhoven – all thinkers who realised that the biblical starting point of life indeed touches the heart, the religious root, of humankind and therefore cannot remain restricted to church life and religion in its narrow sense, but must come to expression in all walks of life. This awareness was a fruit of the Christian worldview and lifeview which currently is confronted by the Big Bang claims and by neo-Darwinism – both movements taking on cultic dimensions with an intolerance towards everyone who does not accept their perspective. Their attitude generated serious reactions on two websites, the impact of which was discussed in this article. Some problems entailed in Darwinism and physicalistic materialism were highlighted, before attention was given to the status of natural laws and normative principles. Particular attention was given to the elimination of God’s law and the way in which modern Humanism explored the two cornerstones of modern nominalism, up to the point where human understanding was elevated to become the a priori formal law-giver of nature. This legacy was continued both by the later developments within the Baden school of neo-Kantian thought and Postmodernism,which is placed within the context of the three succeeding epistemic ideals of the past three centuries. Rationality can only fulfil its true calling when it accounts for the cohering diversity within reality without becoming a victim of any form of reductionism – and by following this guiding star, Koers will continue to strengthen its invaluable contribution to the advancement of Christian scholarship.

  17. 即将谢幕的奢华 Christian Lacroix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zee

    2009-01-01

    <正>当人们还对Christian Lacroix 2009春季巴黎高级定制秀上那一件件斑斓的高级手工礼服记忆犹新时,时尚圈却传来一个坏消息,巴黎时装界"调色大师"克里斯汀·拉克鲁瓦(Christian Lacroix)的同名高级时装品牌Christian Lacroix因抵受不住金融

  18. Keeping the Faith: The Christian Scholar in the Academy in a Postmodern World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlin, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Christian academics continue to face a significant question when engaging in scholarship: Is scholarly pursuit incompatible with Christian thought as seems to be assumed by some academics today, or are academic enquiry and Christian faith mutually supportive? In this paper, a range of responses to this question from within the Christian community…

  19. Development and Validation of a Christian-Based Grief Recovery Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen Der Pan, Peter; Deng, Liang-Yu F.; Tsai, S. L.; Chen, Ho-Yuan J.; Yuan, Sheng-Shiou Jenny

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a Christian-based Grief Recovery Scale (CGRS) which was used to measure Christians recovering from grief after a significant loss. Taiwanese Christian participants were recruited from churches and a comprehensive university in northern Taiwan. They were affected by both the Christian faith and…

  20. The Actors of the Maghribian Diplomacy with the Christian World (12th-15th centuries

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    Valérian, Dominique

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the originalities of the diplomatic practice of the Maghrebian sovereigns with northern Christian States resides in the use of very different types of ambassadors. Whereas the embassies sent to other sovereigns of the world of Islam are all Moslem, eventually Jewish, one finds many Christians as ambassadors sent for missions to Iberian or Italian States. As mercenaries or merchants mostly, they have certainly a good knowledge of the international relations of the time. But they have also a very ambiguous statute within the framework of the Islamo-Christian relations in the Mediterranean. The Maghrebian sovereigns actually use, according to needs for the mission, Christian or Moslem agents, still keeping an effective control on important political decisions.

    Une des originalités de la pratique diplomatique des souverains maghrébins en direction des Etats chrétiens du nord réside dans l’envoi d’ambassadeurs de profils très variés. Alors que les ambassades envoyées à d’autres souverains du monde de l’Islam sont tous musulmans, éventuellement juifs, on trouve de nombreux chrétiens comme ambassadeurs chargés de missions auprès des puissances ibériques ou italiennes. Mercenaires ou marchands le plus souvent, ils ont certes une bonne connaissance des relations internationales de l’époque. Mais ils n’en ont pas moins un statut ambigu dans le cadre des relations islamo-chrétiennes en Méditerranée. Les souverains maghrébins utilisent en réalité, selon les besoins de la mission, des agents chrétiens et musulmans, mais tout en gardant un contrôle efficace sur les décisions prises.

  1. Anglophiles in Balkan Christian states (1862-1920

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    Markovich Slobodan G.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The life stories of five Balkan Anglophiles emerging in the nineteenth century - two Serbs, Vladimir Jovanović (Yovanovich and Čedomilj Mijatović (Chedomille Mijatovich; two Greeks, Ioannes (John Gennadios and Eleutherios Venizelos; and one Bulgarian, Ivan Evstratiev Geshov - reflect, each in its own way, major episodes in relations between Britain and three Balkan Christian states (Serbia, the Hellenic Kingdom and Bulgaria between the 1860s and 1920. Their education, cultural patterns, relations and models inspired by Britain are looked at, showing that they acted as intermediaries between British culture and their own and played a part in the best and worst moments in the history of mutual relations, such as the Serbian-Ottoman crisis of 1862, the Anglo-Hellenic crisis following the Dilessi murders, Bulgarian atrocities and the Eastern Crisis, unification of Bulgaria and the Serbo-Bulgarian War of 1885, the Balkan Wars 1912-13, the National Schism in Greece. Their biographies are therefore essential for understanding Anglo-Balkan relations in the period under study. The roles of two British Balkanophiles (a Bulgarophile, James David Bourchier, and a Hellenophile, Ronald Burrows are looked at as well. In conclusion, a comparison of the Balkan Anglophiles is offered, and their Britain-inspired cultural and institutional legacy to their countries is shown in the form of a table.

  2. Religious Pluralism and Civic Rights in a “Muslim Nation”: An Analysis of Prophet Muhammad’s Covenants with Christians

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    Craig Considine

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the roles that religious pluralism and civic rights played in Prophet Muhammad’s vision of a “Muslim nation”. I demonstrate how Muhammad desired a pluralistic society in which citizenship and equal rights were granted to all people regardless of religious beliefs and practices. The Covenants of the Prophet Muhammad with the Christians of his time are used as a framework for analysis. These documents have received little attention in our time, but their messages are crucial in light of current debates about Muslim-Christian relations. The article campaigns for reviving the egalitarian spirit of the Covenants by refocusing our understanding of the ummah as a site for religious freedom and civil rights. Ultimately, I argue that the Covenants of Prophet Muhammad with the Christians of his time can be used to develop a stronger narrative of democratic partnership between Muslims and Christians in the “Islamic world” and beyond.

  3. Redeeming Emotion-Focused Therapy: A Christian Analysis of Its Worldview, Epistemology, and Emphasis

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    Todd Hardin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available While emotion-focused therapy (EFT offers clinically useful information to Christian practitioners, its underlying worldview, epistemology, and emphasis present challenges for Christian therapists. This article advocates that Christian practitioners can redeem EFT for Christ by evaluating and translating these presuppositions in light of Christian alternatives. In offering these alternatives, the article encourages the creation of a distinctively Christian emotion-focused therapy (CEFT.

  4. Court Culture during the Reign of Christian IV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olden-Jørgensen, Sebastian

    2007-01-01

    Court culture can be defined as a range of cultural forms (festival culture, painting, literature, music, architecture) employed for the enhancement of princely status and the communication of political messages. Christian IV evidently set great store on court culture beginning with his magnificent...... coronation in 1596, reaching a climax with the "great wedding" (of crown prince Christian) in 1634 and at last colapsing during the military and political crisis in the last years of his long reign (1588/96-1648). Danish court culture during the reign of Christian IV decidedly was on an European level......, and during the Thirty Years War he could even profit from the plight of fellow princes in germany and engage top artists like the composer Heinrich Schütz. The court culture of Christian IV was a succes in the sense that during the first part of his reign it underscored his success and status. During...

  5. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Christian County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Christian County, MO. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  6. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Christian County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Christian County, KY. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  7. [Female anthropology, physiology and disease in ancient Christian writers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinzivalli, Emanuela

    2011-01-01

    Ancient Christian sources are rich in reference to the anthropology and physiology of the female. Christianity in the first centuries had multiple positions as concerns the doctrinal thoughts as well as the social practices. Christian anthropological doctrine has been developed along two exegetical lines, hinging on Genesis 1-3: the first views the human being as a whole psycophysical entity and thereby highlights the protological inferiority of the woman; the second, spiritual and Platonic, emphasizes the inner self and thus, in theory, is more equalitarian. Ancient philosophical theories regarding human generation, in particular those ofAristotle and the Stoics, are used, along with medical notions, by Christian theologians to elaborate the dogma of incarnation. However, in certain cases, as with the post partum virginity of Maria, medical theories are totally put aside. The stories recounting the miracles offer the possibility of understanding medical practices offemale conditions and the emotive reactions of the women.

  8. Children and Moods in Hans Christian Andersen's Travel Books

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Bo

    2008-01-01

    A categorization of moods, atmospheres and motifs connected with the children in Hans Christian Andersen’s five travel books (1831-1868). Surprisingly, death and darkness and, on the other side, eroticism and (red) light are the dominant two categories.......A categorization of moods, atmospheres and motifs connected with the children in Hans Christian Andersen’s five travel books (1831-1868). Surprisingly, death and darkness and, on the other side, eroticism and (red) light are the dominant two categories....

  9. Social christianity and the constitution of a new political subject

    OpenAIRE

    Cătălin-Valentin RAIU

    2012-01-01

    The issue of "the political subject" analyzed among others by Michel Foucault and William Connolly is offering to the political scientists a very important tool for their research. In this paper we have tried to find out if the social and political movement called "Social Christianity" from the late nineteenth century had proposed a new political subject for the modernity dominated by the liberalism and socialism. Thus, Social Christianity was not just a middle way between liberalism and soci...

  10. Finding Common Ground Between Earth Scientists and Evangelical Christians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant Ludwig, L.

    2015-12-01

    In recent decades there has been some tension between earth scientists and evangelical Christians in the U.S., and this tension has spilled over into the political arena and policymaking on important issues such as climate change. From my personal and professional experience engaging with both groups, I find there is much common ground for increasing understanding and communicating the societal relevance of earth science. Fruitful discussions can arise from shared values and principles, and common approaches to understanding the world. For example, scientists and Christians are engaged in the pursuit of truth, and they value moral/ethical decision-making based on established principles. Scientists emphasize the benefits of research "for the common good" while Christians emphasize the value of doing "good works". Both groups maintain a longterm perspective: Christians talk about "the eternal" and geologists discuss "deep time". Both groups understand the importance of placing new observations in context of prior understanding: scientists diligently reference "the literature" while Christians quote "chapter and verse". And members of each group engage with each other in "fellowship" or "meetings" to create a sense of community and reinforce shared values. From my perspective, earth scientists can learn to communicate the importance and relevance of science more effectively by engaging with Christians in areas of common ground, rather than by trying to win arguments or debates.

  11. Rethinking Christian Identity: African Reflections from Pauline Writings

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    Togarasei Lovemore

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite its existence for over a century in Africa and statistics putting the Christian populations at average 80 percent mostly in sub-Saharan African countries, Christianity has not managed to provide an alternative identity to ethnicity as issues of identity continue dogging the continent. Many African societies remain divided and at war on the basis of identities, be they racial, tribal, creedal, gender, class, language or other identities. Surprisingly, this state of affairs is also found even within the precincts of the church. Many churches remain divided along racial, ethnic, tribal, and other identities. One does not need to look far and wide to acknowledge this reality. Does Christianity have an identity? Could the writings of Paul address the issues of Christian identity? Or do the writings address this problem at all? These are the questions at the heart of this paper. Making use of Pauline texts such as Galatians 3:28 and scholarly works such as those of Buell and Hodge (2004:237, I discuss Paul’s understanding of Christian identity and its implications for Christian identity in Africa today.

  12. CHRISTIAN SYMBOLISM IN FYODOR DOSTOEVSKY'S NOVEL "THE POSSESSED" ("DEMONS"

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    Sergei Leonidovich Sharakov

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The article raises a question of Christian symbolism in Fyodor Dostoevsky’s novel The Possessed (Demons. The introductory part identifies the purpose of a symbol in Christian poetics through the parallel with ancient symbolism. The author makes a conclusion that the functional role of a symbol in the ancient world and Christian tradition is different. Therefore, the ancient symbol involves a number of interrelated categories, such as fate, intuition or conjecture, inspiration, and predictions. Christian symbolism is based on the idea of redemption and moral innocence. Methodologically, the article is based on a cultural and historical approach, as well as on the comparative academic tradition. The overview of Dostoyevsky’s pre-materials for The Possessed (Demons enables us to suggest the use of Christian symbolism in this novel. Hence, the objective of the study is to investigate a composition of images and symbols in this piece of writing, with a special focus on the image of a chronicler since the storyline of the novel is developed through his perception. We make a supposition that there are several levels of Gospel perception in the artistic vision or consciousness of the chronicler, that form the basis of the symbolical composition of the novel. The article sequentially examines the examples of Christian symbolism, including the connection of ideas, characters and storylines of the novel with the Gospel. Then it gives evidence and reasons for the thesis that the Gospel gives the characters of the novel the grounds for shaping their destiny.

  13. Theology links Christian ministry with God's call.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, L J

    1984-03-01

    Catholic health care ministry originates in and is shaped by the theme of call in the Old and New Testaments. To be specifically Catholic, health professionals and facilities must define their ministries according to the values expressed in this theological tradition. Sponsorship. The opportunity to provide health care enables religious communities to contribute to God's ongoing creation process and to reiterate Christ's call to minister to others. Although health care facility sponsorship thrusts religious communities into the arena of big business, the abandonment of the health care mission could be considered a betrayal of evangelical values. Quality of life. The implicit concern for human dignity that distinguishes Catholic health care facilities should be evident in personalized patient care, just working conditions, and a commitment to healing in the civic community. Stewardship in ethics. The development of business policies and procedures and institutional responses to social change should be carefully considered in light of the Catholic understanding of loving covenant and the Christian way of life. Shared ministry. Health care facilities have played a leading role in implementing the Second Vatican Council's vision of ministry. Sponsoring communities' continued willingness to share responsibilities with laity will be imperative in meeting the health care demands of the future.

  14. Textbook Religion and Lived Religion: A Comparison of the Christian Faith as Expressed in Textbooks and by Young Church Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestøl, Jon Magne

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on perspectives from sociocultural theory, this article investigates how Christian denominations are represented in Norwegian textbooks of religious education and by young believers. The main finding is that textbooks and young adherents present religion in substantially different ways. While textbooks relate religion to global and…

  15. Contributors to Women's Leadership Development in Christian Higher Education: A Model and Emerging Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlvig, Jolyn; Longman, Karen A.

    2014-01-01

    A theory of women's leadership development within the context of Christian higher education is proposed, based on qualitative research involving 16 participants. Motivators to advance into leadership roles were: (a) a sense of relational responsibility; (b) awareness of calling and giftedness for leadership, and (c) a mentoring relationship…

  16. Conceptualizing Human Nature and the Divine: Qualitative Interviews with Christians and Buddhists from a Mixed-Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Lauren Shapiro; Burns, Emily M.; Johnson, Hannah E.; Brown, Betsy R.; Ufholz, Kelsey E.; Riehle, Jennifer L.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the possibility that a link exists between an individual's concept of Divinity and concept of self. Participants were 12 Christians (6 Catholic, 6 Methodist) and 8 Buddhists. They answered open-ended questions about sacredness, after-death experience, and humanity's relation to the natural world. Content analyses focused on…

  17. Faith in Islam and Christianity and its impact on health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mahdi Ahmad farazi

    Full Text Available Of the most central elements of religions and most important issues in theology and the Contemporary study of religion is the category of faith and its greatest impact on various aspects of life. Faith, in Islamic and Christian theology, has common and also distinct aspects. The truth of Faith in Islamic thought was multidimensional and consists of a wide range of Confession of language, intellectual knowledge, heart affirmation and inner experience to the treatment involves external actions. In Christianity, it was faith in confirmation of the revealed proposition that led to a sense of transcendence and meta-proposition and created Interest mode in human And sometimes faith apply to the experience of presence and manifestation of God in life. The position of consensus and association between Islam and Christianity was consists of the doctrine of Belief in God and the prophecy and resurrection. This belief is based on the functionalist view affected on body and psyche (or soul health of the human. The impact of Faith on physical and mental health has been separately approved by the specialists. The impacts of faith and religious teachings on physical health have been investigated through psycho-neuro-physiological way that Faith and Religious teachings produce positive emotions in human. The emotions through autonomous nervous system strengthen the immune system and its optimal performance in a way that the messenger molecule called neuropeptide Y, carry the messages related to thoughts and transport it through the blood circulation, and the mental state directly relate to the body's cells. This is the most important factor in strengthening or weakening the immune system influenced by the thoughts and beliefs. Moreover, Te'osumatic medicine known as the God-body medicine, after the psychosomatic or psycho-body medicine confirms the impact of faith on the health and recovery of individuals. They believe that illness and death of individuals

  18. Faith in Islam and Christianity and its impact on health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Ajdar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Of the most central elements of religions and most important issues in theology and the Contemporary study of religion is the category of faith and its greatest impact on various aspects of life. Faith, in Islamic and Christian theology, has common and also distinct aspects. The truth of Faith in Islamic thought was multidimensional and consists of a wide range of Confession of language, intellectual knowledge, heart affirmation and inner experience to the treatment involves external actions. In Christianity, it was faith in confirmation of the revealed proposition that led to a sense of transcendence and meta-proposition and created Interest mode in human And sometimes faith apply to the experience of presence and manifestation of God in life.   The position of consensus and association between Islam and Christianity was consists of the doctrine of Belief in God and the prophecy and resurrection. This belief is based on the functionalist view affected on body and psyche (or soul health of the human. The impact of Faith on physical and mental health has been separately approved by the specialists. The impacts of faith and religious teachings on physical health have been investigated through psycho-neuro-physiological way that Faith and Religious teachings produce positive emotions in human. The emotions through autonomous nervous system strengthen the immune system and its optimal performance in a way that the messenger molecule called neuropeptide Y, carry the messages related to thoughts and transport it through the blood circulation, and the mental state directly relate to the body's cells. This is the most important factor in strengthening or weakening the immune system influenced by the thoughts and beliefs. Moreover, Te'osumatic medicine known as the God-body medicine, after the psychosomatic or psycho-body medicine confirms the impact of faith on the health and recovery of individuals. They believe that illness and death

  19. On the bodies of women: the common ground between Islam and Christianity in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Charmaine; Ibrahim, Jibrin

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the common ideological ground between Islam and Christianity in Nigeria, in the ways in which gender and sexuality are configured in relation to women's bodies. The latter constitute key sites for the inscription of social norms and practices inherent in particular interpretations of religion. We proceed by examining the interplay between religion and politics in historical context and in specific concrete instances. While the religious right among Muslims and Christians share the view that women's bodies are sexually corrupting and therefore in need of control, this perspective is also found in secular institutions. At the same time Christians and Muslims are strongly opposed to controls on women's bodies that may lead to either religious group being identified as 'the other'. The linkage made between women's bodies and 'public morality' produces diverse forms of gender inequality. The moralising of political economy that these processes entail complicates the terrain on which challenges to the politicisation of religion and its gender politics need to be sustained.

  20. Basics of the ascetical (christian) psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilievski, N

    2015-01-01

    It is obvious that contemporary man is suffering. His sufferings often seem pointless and causeless. Modern science more and more comes to reveal and acknowledge that human sufferings have a psychosomatic basis. In some of the cases, these sufferings are noogenic neuroses. They do not originate from the psychological dimension but from the noological or spiritual one of human existence. The pointlessness of life is the basic cause for the noogenic neurosis and depression from which the humankind suffers. e. Hence, the many escapes from such experienced reality into various addictions. Possible way towards healing is to retrieve one's meaning of life, to strengthen his will to meaning. Religion has always been - and still remains - a powerful and appealing purpose that fulfills the life and being of the believers. This article demonstrates the systematization of the spiritual development of a person presented in a table of the harmony of the ascetic-hesychastic struggle, according which everyone can find his place on the ladder of spiritual development, become aware, and reconciliate the mode of personal struggle according to his spiritual development. The reconciliation of the primary function of the mind with its secondary function - the intellect, is of an essential importance. Contemporary religious psychology do not regard man merely as a biological or a psychological being. The subject matter of research is the human being as a whole, as a spiritual person that is characterized by autonomy, regarding the biological and psychological processes. The importance of understanding the spiritual level of human existence enables holistic approach and experiencing of the human personality as a whole. Furthermore, it offers new perspectives of psychotherapeutic action not only within the range of the classical psychotherapeutic modalities but also within the range of the applied Christian Psychotherapy.

  1. The Christian Marathoner: Athletic References in Paul’s Epistles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias L. Taylor

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available When the Apostle Paul came to Corinth, most likely in the year 50 AD, Corinth had regained its cosmopolitan importance after its destruction by the Romans in 146 BC. Once again it was a prominent and flourishing commerce city.  Its bustling population developed the city and its port to be a vital connecting link between Italy and the eastern provinces of the Roman Empire. After a century of virtual abandonment, Corinth’s Isthmian Games were once again celebrated in the same festive manner as they had been in the past. Since Paul, on his first visit remained in Corinth for eighteen months, as indicated in the book of Acts of the Apostles, he must have been present at the Isthmian Games held in the spring of 51 AD. This experience, as well as those of his own youthful Hellenic and Judaic educational upbringing, gave Paul the opportunity to re-acquaint himself with pagan rituals and use athletic images to spread his evangelical message. Although there is no documented evidence that Paul was an athlete, this qualitative analysis of Alexandrine Greek text, which Paul used to write his epistles, as well as archaeological evidence, points out Paul’s usage of many athletic/sport related references (words in spreading his evangelical message.  In the arena of Christian spiritual contests, Paul was an exceptional Isthmian “athlete”.

  2. May Christians request medically assisted suicide and euthanasia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Etienne de Villiers

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the question: ‘Is it morally acceptable for terminally ill Christians to voluntarily request medically assisted suicide or euthanasia?’ After a brief discussion of relevant changes in the moral landscape over the last century, two influential, but opposite views on the normative basis for the Christian ethical assessment of medically assisted suicide and voluntary euthanasia are critically discussed. The inadequacy of both the view that the biblical message entails an absolute prohibition against these two practices, and the view that Christians have to decide on them on the basis of their own autonomy, is argued. An effort is made to demonstrate that although the biblical message does not entail an absolute prohibition it does have normative ethical implications for deciding on medically assisted suicide and voluntary euthanasia. Certain Christian beliefs encourage terminally ill Christians to live a morally responsible life until their death and cultivate a moral prejudice against taking the life of any human being. This moral prejudice can, however, in exceptional cases be outweighed by moral considerations in favour of medically assisted suicide or voluntary euthanasia.

  3. Forbidden fruit? A longitudinal study of Christianity, sex, and marriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Willy

    2014-01-01

    Does religion still play a role in explorations of romance and sexuality among adolescents and young adults in a secular society such as Norway? Does it influence the type of living arrangements chosen? A population-based sample (n = 2,454) was followed longitudinally from their midteens to their late 20s using survey and register data. Christian involvement in teenage years was associated with subsequent less "precoital" exploration, less masturbation, delayed sexual intercourse, and a smaller number of sex partners. However, there were no associations with prevalence of same-sex experiences. Christians also postponed initiating romantic relationships and chose marriage over cohabitation. Associations were reduced after controlling for confounding factors but remained significant. Some associations (for example, the form of residential union chosen) were present only in the most "active" Christians. In other areas, such as "precoital explorations" and the age at which intercourse is initiated, Christian norms seem to play a role in much broader segments of the population. The findings indicate that Christianity may continue to influence young Norwegians' experiences of sexuality and cohabitation more than has been expected.

  4. Like a Prophet - On Christian Interpretations of a Madonna Video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Häger

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the history of Christianity, its relationship to art has been a complicated one, concerning the use of art in worship as well as the views on "secular" art. This article deals with a current example of the latter. More specifically, the article examines some examples of Christian views on popular music. The best-known reactions to pop and rock music' by Christians are likely to be negative ones, probably because these are usually the most loudly declared. But there is also another aspect to the Christian discourse on popular music. Some Christians try to emphasise what is perceived as a positive message in "secular" rock music. This part of the debate is the main concern in this paper.The examples used deal with one of the most controversial pop artists, Madonna, and one of her most discussed works, the video `Like a Prayer'. Madonna Louise Ciccone, born 1958, has been one of the most successful, most imitated and certainly most talked about popular artists of the past decade. She has — at least to a certain degree quite consciously — stirred up controversy with several of her videos. Raised a Catholic, her use of religious themes and images is one aspect that has caught special attention.

  5. Religious Diversity in the Middle East before Christianity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王浩宇

    2012-01-01

      The Middle East is so religiously diverse that the three major religions, Judaism, Christianity and Islam, are intercon⁃nected and each originated within the Middle East. Islam in its many forms is by far the most heavily represented religion in the region though many branches and sects diversify and segment it. In addition to the widely acknowledged religions, smaller, mi⁃nority religions such as Bahá’í, Druze, Yazidi, Mandean, Gnosticism, Yarsanism, Shabakism, Zoroastrianism are also prevalent throughout the Middle East. This article begins with Mideast civilization and attempts at outlining a religious map of the region. Finally, the study concludes that Hellenistic culture, Jewish religion system and Roman polity all had found their way into spread⁃ing the influence of Christianity before Christianity, the missionary religion established itself in the Middle East.

  6. American Christian Engagement With Mental Health and Mental Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinghorn, Warren A

    2016-01-01

    Although religious belief and practice are relevant to mental health outcomes, many clinicians lack knowledge of particular religious traditions required to make informed judgments about referral to and collaboration with faith-based organizations and clinicians. This Open Forum examines five diverse American Christian approaches to mental health and mental illness-pastoral care and counseling, biblical counseling, integrationism, Christian psychology, and the work of the Institute for the Psychological Sciences--that are relevant for contemporary mental health service delivery. Each of these movements is briefly described and placed in historical, conceptual, and organizational context. Knowledge of the diverse and varied terrain of American Christian engagement with mental health care can inform clinicians' interactions with faith-based providers, clarify opportunities for responsible collaboration, and provide important insight into religious subcultures with faith-based concerns about contemporary psychiatric care.

  7. Christian rock concerts as a meeting between religion and popular culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Häger

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Different forms of artistic expression play a vital role in religious practices of the most diverse traditions. One very important such expression is music. This paper deals with a contemporary form of religious music, Christian rock. Rock or popular music has been used within Christianity as a means for evangelization and worship since the end of the 1960s. The genre of "contemporary Christian music", or Christian rock, stands by definition with one foot in established institutional (in practicality often evangelical Christianity, and the other in the commercial rock musicindustry. The subject of this paper is to study how this intermediate position is manifested and negotiated in Christian rock concerts. Such a performance of Christian rock music is here assumed to be both a rock concert and a religious service. The paper will examine how this duality is expressed in practices at Christian rock concerts.

  8. Christians and Jews in the Twelfth-Century Werewolf Renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyovitz, David I

    2014-10-01

    In the late twelfth century, northern European Jewish mystics engaged in a sustained, unprecedented effort to explore the theological meaning of werewolves. This article seeks to anchor this surprising preoccupation in contemporary European religious culture, arguing that medieval Jews and Christians found werewolves "good to think with" in exploring the spiritual status of the (mutable, unstable) human body. Discourses of monstrosity were used as polemical ammunition in Jewish-Christian debates, but monstrous creatures were simultaneously held to be theologically resonant by both communities-a fact that sheds light upon the broader intellectual and cultural setting in which they were joint participants.

  9. Theory U as a conceptual framework for Christian education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeitler, Ullrich Martin Rudenko

    2014-01-01

    In late modern society, wide-spread secularization and compulsory development challenge religious education. Otto Scharmer’s development theory, Theory U, is assumed to give an answer to how we might work with Christian education. It is argued, that the concepts of letting-go, presencing and lett...... and letting-come are giving an adequate conceptual framework for new professionalism in Christian education. Using Theory U will bring practical theology in line with the new third-generation approach which is conducive of sustainable practice....

  10. Mees, kes väärtustab tundeid / Christian Boltanski ; interv. Peeter Linnap

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Boltanski, Christian, 1944-

    1998-01-01

    P. Linnap Christian Boltanski loomingust ja 5. oktoobrini Helsingi Taidehallis avatud näitusest "Augustiöö". Kureerinud Jan Kaila, Timo Valjakka. Christian Boltanski oma 1990ndate töödest, näitusest Soomes, miks ta nimetab end 20. sajandi lõpu maalikunstnikuks. Valik Christian Boltanski autobiograafilisest küsitlusest "Mida nad minust mäletavad?". Ilmunud ka kogumikus "Silmakirjad". Tartu, 2007, lk. 306-308 pealkirja all "Suremise viisid : intervjuu Christian Boltanskiga"

  11. Christianization of folk customs: An example of Ox'Church

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanović-Barišić Milina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the process of transformation of a pre-Christian custom in Zuce, a village near by Belgrade. The custom is called 'provlaka', held all until the WW II on August 29. This custom was established after the cattle pest in the village. Since WW II, however, this day is celebrated as the village St. patrons/slava day. After the village church has been built and blessed in 2002, the day became also celebrated as one of the church's slava days. Transformation of holidays assumes vanishing of some and appearance of some other segments of the given custom: 1. Until WW II the most important segment of the custom 'provlaka' was extracting wild fire and passage of people and cattle. This custom was maintained with an aim of preventive protection against epidemics. 2. A significant feature of annual celebration of calendar holidays included collective gatherings. On this day people visit relatives from other villages, attend lunch together, and gather at a particular village spot in the afternoon. 3. The beginning of the church building has allowed introduction of religious elements in celebration. In the morning, it is a time usually to attend a liturgy, while what follows represent some inherited customs like reception and eating together with relatives and friends. 4. After the village church has been built and blessed in 2002, the day became also celebrated as one of the church's slava days. This assumes presentation of the village cake maker and cake cutting in the church, accompanied by a local priest.

  12. St. Augustine and the Christian College Composition Classroom: Water into Flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veach, Grace

    2009-01-01

    Today's Christian college students are more engaged in popular youth culture and less reflective than in the past. St. Augustine's On Christian Doctrine, Book IV, gives advice to preachers, but it can easily be adapted to apply to Christian college composition classrooms. The two main sections of the article cover how to teach and what to teach…

  13. Developing Graduate Curricula Faithful to Professional Training and a Christian Worldview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauf-Grounds, Claudia; Edwards, Scott; Macdonald, Don; Quek, Karen Mui-Teng; Sellers, Tina Schermer

    2009-01-01

    Trends in Christian higher education indicate a growing interest in professional training programs that take Christian faith commitments and values seriously. This article explores one professional graduate program with secondary accreditation that attempts to be faithful to a Christian worldview while at the same time honoring the developments…

  14. Christianity, Islam, and Political Culture: Lessons from Sub-Saharan Africa in Comparative Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowd, Robert A.

    Many theorists have argued that western Christianity and Islam affect political culture in different ways, and that western Christianity is more conducive to the rise of a democratic culture than is Islam. This paper argues that the difference between Christianity and Islam in terms of the type of political culture they encourage, is largely…

  15. An Examination of Ideology among Selected K12 Christian School Superintendents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolson, Jimmy L.

    2013-01-01

    This research project focused on explaining the decision making process of K12 Christian school superintendents whose schools belong to the Association of Christian Schools International (ACSI) organization. In spite of their similar religious and philosophical beliefs, ACSI K12 Christian school superintendents differed significantly in…

  16. Analysis on Christian Universities' Indigenization in China%中国基督教大学本土化探析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹广明

    2012-01-01

    As a carrier of modern knowledge and western culture, Christian universities began these indigenization course as soon as they appeared in China. The Christian universities' indigenization were shown in campus culture, teaching and scientific research, teaching staff, university management, service object and so on. The main causes of the Christian universities' indigenization were the rise of Chinese nationalism, the de- mand of Chinese society, the change of Christian church, and the demand of outlay. The Christian universities' indigenization promoted development of Chinese higher education, training of modernization enterprise talent, and culture exchange of China-West. The indigenization manifests a kind of complex, two-side interactive relation between embedding from the outside and breeding from the inside%作为近代知识和西方文化载体的基督教大学在中国出现后就开始了本土化历程。基督教大学在中国的本土化表现在校园文化、教学科研、师资队伍、学校管理、服务对象等方面。中国基督教大学本土化的主要原因是由于中国民族主义的兴起,中国社会的客观需要,基督教教会内部的变化以及办学经费的需要。中国基督教大学本土化促进了中国高等教育的发展,促进了中国近代化人才的培养,促进了中西文化交流。这种本土化体现了外部嵌入和内部培育之间复杂的双向互动关系。

  17. Conflict and compliance: Christianity and the occult in horticultural exporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, C S

    1999-03-01

    The introduction of export horticulture in Meru District, Kenya, brought about disadvantageous effects on female farmers. Their workload increased while their earnings did not. Women reacted by turning to Christianity for support, and resorted to traditional witchcraft to regain control. In this article, Christianity and witchcraft are presented as ways of expressing discontent with the prevailing social norms, and as means to reclaim autonomy and security within their households. Since Kenyan women are entailed to meet the standards of being a good Christian wife, in which women are submissive to their husbands, the church became a means of escaping the confinements of their marriage. In Meru, Christian conversion offers a means of coping with life and an opportunity to interact with other women who share the same experience. Another strategy adopted by women is witchcraft, a traditional relic wherein women give "potions" to their husbands to induce psychosis and eventually death, which would then leave control of the household to the woman. In conclusion, the case presented here demonstrates how failure to recognize cultural dynamics leads to gender inequity and worsens women's well being, as well as men's security.

  18. Stewardship: A Biblical Model for the Formation of Christian Scholars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Julien C. H.; Scales, T. Laine

    2013-01-01

    This article explores theological dimensions of the academic vocation, taking its cue from the research undertaken by the Carnegie Initiative on the Doctorate, which envisions the scholar as a steward of an academic discipline. We contend, however, that the Christian scholar's sense of stewardship extends beyond one's academic…

  19. Virtual Team Leadership: A Case Study in Christian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschy, Mary Jo

    2011-01-01

    This study focused on virtual team leadership in Christian higher education by exploring the viability and acceptability of leadership practices defined by Malhotra, Majchrzak, and Rosen (2007). They identified six leadership practices effective leaders use to overcome the unique challenges associated with virtual teams, including: (a)…

  20. HEALING AND WOMEN HEALERS IN YORUBA RELIGION AND AFRICAN CHRISTIANITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyeronke Olademo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Healing in African indigenous cultures is a corporate matter involving the totality of the person, family and community. Healing presupposes sickness; its practice is therefore interlocked with a people’s conception of sickness and diseases. In Africa, sickness is an attestation to the fact that an individual is out of tune with nature and the supernatural, which is represented by the various deities. The physical signs are therefore a part of the story and not the whole story. Similarly, the Christian conception of disease and healing is intertwined with the individual’s relationship with the supernatural and the physical signs are but part of the story. Diagnosis and prescription for treatment and healing take into cognizance all these facts and this is where the healer comes in. The healer constitutes an integral part of the patient’s healing in Yoruba religion as well as in African Christianity. There are female and male healers in both religions but whereas these specialists are designated as healers/diviners/custodians of tradition in Yoruba religion, in African Christianity, they are known as prophetesses/prophets/deliverance ministers. This paper seeks to evaluate the position of the healer among the Yoruba of Nigeria. A second objective is to analyze contemporary postures on healing activities in Yoruba religion and Christianity and how women feature in these processes.

  1. "Let Freedom Ring!" Black Women's Spirituality Shaping Prophetic Christian Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Yolanda Y.

    2012-01-01

    The author believes that a deep sense of spirituality together with effective Christian education can be a powerful resource for equipping individuals and communities to play an active role in transforming their lives as well as oppressive systems that have impacted their communities. In her discussion of spirituality, womanist ethicist Emilie…

  2. Ethical Becoming: Adult Ethical Development in Christian Congregations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr-Chellman, Davin J.

    2011-01-01

    This is a study of adult ethical development in Christian congregations. Using an empirical hermeneutic phenomenological methodology, this study examined how five pastors understand and encourage ethical development, developing an in-depth analysis and interpretation of their perceptions of the phenomenon of adult ethical development. Two primary…

  3. The Norwegian "Christianity, Religion and Philosophy" Subject "KRL" in Strasbourg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lied, Sidsel

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the judgement and dissent of the European Court of Human Rights in the "Case of Folgero and others v. Norway" regarding the subject "Christianity, Religion and Philosophy (KRL)" in Norwegian state schools. The verdict, reached with dissenting votes of 9-8, states that parents' freedom of ensuring their children an education…

  4. Intervjuu Christian Boltanskiga : suremise viisid / intervjueerinud Peeter Linnap

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Boltanski, Christian, 1944-

    2011-01-01

    Prantsuse kunstnik ja fotograaf oma 1990ndate töödest, 1999. aastal Soomes toimunud näitusest "Augustiöö", mille teemaks oli surm ja maalimisest kui ruumi loomise kunstist ning põhjustest miks ta nimetab end 20. sajandi lõpu maalikunstnikuks. Lisaks valik Christian Boltanski autobiograafilisest küsitlusest "Mida nad minust mäletavad?"

  5. Suremise viisid : intervjuu Christian Boltanskiga / interv. Peeter Linnap

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Boltanski, Christian, 1944-

    2007-01-01

    Prantsuse kunstnik ja fotograaf oma 1990ndate töödest, 1999. aastal Soomes toimunud näitusest "Augustiöö", mille teemaks oli surm ja maalimisest kui ruumi loomise kunstist ning põhjustest miks ta nimetab end 20. sajandi lõpu maalikunstnikuks. Lisaks valik Christian Boltanski autobiograafilisest küsitlusest "Mida nad minust mäletavad?"

  6. Strategies to Foster Emotional Intelligence in Christian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gliebe, Sudi Kate

    2012-01-01

    This article proposes five initiatives to foster emotional intelligence (EI) education throughout institutions of Christian higher education. Goleman (1995) identifies self-awareness, managing emotions, motivation, empathy, and social intelligence as the hallmark skills of emotional intelligence. The importance of mastering these skills and their…

  7. Literary Practice and Imagined Community in Christian Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delamarter, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    Imagined communities are not bound by space or time, they exist in opposition to other communities, and the members perceive themselves as existentially similar. Multiple case studies and interviews revealed that the seven Christian schools in this study functioned as imagined communities, and their literary practices served to establish,…

  8. Hans Christian Ørsted : natuurwetenschapper als estheticus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Millekamp, Jan

    2012-01-01

    The Danish scientist Hans Christian Ørsted (1777-1851) is most famous for his discovery of electromagnetism, a discovery that literally and irreversibly changed our world. In Denmark he is also known as a poet and essayist. Interestingly, his scientific and his aesthetic work are closely interrelate

  9. Education for Discipleship: A Curriculum Orientation for Christian Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, John E.

    2009-01-01

    This article investigates the long-held assumption that Christian educators need their own curriculum orientation. Seminal documents published by Philip Jackson and Harro Van Brummelen in the nineties are analyzed against the background of a brief history of the field of curriculum theory. The author accepts Jackson's conclusion that curriculum…

  10. Christianity and Resistance in the 20th Century

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    How is the Christian supposed to act when his or her government misbehaves? Should one suffer and obey the authority, or should one render resistance; and if so, should it be passive or active; and if active, should it be violent or not?...

  11. Contrasting Policies towards (Mainly) Christian Education in Different Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Keith

    2010-01-01

    During the past 10 to 15 years there has been a renewed interest in the place of religion, religious education and religious schools in different parts of the world. This began in the USA and Europe with the development of private Christian schools. It was later followed by the resurgence of religious schools in the former parts of the Soviet…

  12. Children's Everydaylife at Christianø - an etnographic film

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    , thousands of screeching gulls, seasonal colonies of whistling eiders, and the constant buffeting of the Baltic wind. The film focuses on the everyday lives of children for whom the small island of Christiansø is home. It’s done as a filmed fieldwork, from January to September 2011. Anthropologist...

  13. Ethical issues in radiology: perspectives from the Christian tradition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Linda

    2009-07-01

    The Christian ethical tradition introduces a number of key values into the clinical context. Moreover, although some denominational differences exist, these are essentially differences of emphasis rather than of substance. Among the central values which the Christian tradition promotes are: the dignity of the person, the individual as embodied spirit and the importance of the common good. Within the evolving discourse, social justice considerations have come to the fore as a critical concern within bioethics. In radiology, like most fields of clinical practice, practitioners frequently encounter conflicts and tensions of an ethical nature. Moreover, the manner in which these conflicts are articulated, conceptualised and ultimately resolved will depend, not only on how the scientific data are analysed and interpreted, but also on how different ethical frameworks are invoked in these disputes. The concern in this brief paper is to discuss the Christian ethical tradition as it is expressed in Roman Catholic and 'Protestant' denominations in the western church, considering the values and norms that underlie Christian ethical engagements with applied questions.

  14. On the date of early Christian Basilicas (Central Greece)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantazis, G.; Lambrou, E.

    The exact foundation date of many early Christian churches is still unknown or according to archaeologists estimation it is attributed to a large time interval. According to a new astrogeodetic methology, today it is feasible to assess it. This paper deals with the determination of the orientation, the foundation date and the dedication of Nine Early Christian basilicas, situated in central Greece. According to the suggested methodology, the appropriate geodetic and astrogeodetic measurements were carried out on the site of Each Early Christian basilica in order to: Determine the accurate position on the surface of the earth by the calculation of its coordinates, Draw the accurate digital plan, Define the basic longitudinal axis, Calculate the astronomical azimuth of the basic axis via observations to Polaris (a Ursa Minoris), Create the profile of the perceptible horizon, Determine the apparent transit of the sun for different dates. Combining all the above data for each Early Christian Basilica the total geometric documentation of the monument was made. The detection of its foundation date and its dedication were achieved with adequate precision and reliability. Last, their selectable and systematical astronomical orientations were registered and a data base including all the above data had been created.

  15. Venemaa õllekeiser Christian Ramm-Schmidt / Markku Saksa

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Saksa, Markku

    2004-01-01

    Rahvusvahelise õlletootmisettevõtte Baltic Beverages Holding (BBH) tegevusest Baltikumis, Venemaal, Ukrainas ja Kasahstanis. Venemaa tütarettevõtte juht Christian Ramm-Schmidt kirjeldab Venemaa eraettevõtluse arengut, ärikeskkonda ja -kultuuri ning ettevõtete juhtimise põhimõtteid

  16. The Value of the Individual Child and the Christian Faith.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, John M.

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses the problem of the value of the individual child, particularly the handicapped child who will never be able to compensate society for the resources devoted to caring for and teaching him/her. Attention is first given to secular arguments on human value, then to observations drawn from Christianity. (Author/SJL)

  17. Kierkegaard, Justification and the Integrity of Christian Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Andrew W.

    2015-01-01

    The doctrine of justification is frequently interpreted in a manner that excludes our active involvement in the drama of salvation. This reading has a detrimental effect on Christian education concerned to enable the learner's attentive, reasonable and responsible understanding of the Gospel. Taking its lead from Kierkegaard's account of…

  18. Christian Hip Hop as Pedagogy: A South African Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on interviews with creators of Christian hip hop music in South Africa, this article demonstrates that this genre of popular music and youth culture is utilised as a form of pedagogy to transmit religious beliefs and values to contemporary youth. The pedagogical aspects of hip hop have been recognised in research on the topic, but the…

  19. Integrity and consensus: A Christian perspective on ethical management and education in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Kretzschmar

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article the compliance- and values-based approaches to ethical management are explained and the challenges of the contemporary business and societal contexts in South Africa noted. The need for both moral integrity and character (with respect to perception, intention and virtue and ethical consensus is extensively discussed. The importance of ethical dialogue as a means of reaching moral consensus, and the contribution of public theology (particularly Christian theology are assessed. Finally, vital issues relating to business ethics management and education are outlined and some practical possibilities suggested.

  20. Death, cadavers and post-mortem biomedical research: a point of view from a Christian community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlier, Philippe; Joly, Alain; Champagnat, Julie; Brun, Luc; de la Grandmaison, Geoffroy Lorin; Hervé, Christian

    2013-12-01

    Facing modern developments of medicine and biomedical researches, religious communities are a strong source of ethics principles and orientations. Human dignity does not disappear after life, in a context of biomedical research on cadavers. Moral, political, social and scientific aspects of research on human cadavers (mainly autopsies) have been widely discussed in biomedical publications, whereas the religious ones (which could be predominant for some) have rarely been analyzed and presented. This article will present the results of a survey carried out a French Benedictine Abbey (relative to death, cadaver's status and biomedical research) and subsequent Christian background according to canonic texts and practical cases from anthropological, historical, archeological and biomedical origin.

  1. Images as a Substitute for Words? The Notion of Visual Arts in Early Christian Writings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tine Germ

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the relation between verbal and visual communication in the early Christian era and its influence on the perception of visual arts in the Middle Ages. Taking as its starting point the famous statement by Pope Gregory the Great that “what Scripture is to the educated, images are to the ignorant, who read in them what they cannot read in books,” it traces the issue back to the early church fathers and Christian apologists, who rejected the practice of making images of God and other sacred images. Many of them categorically condemned the visual arts and branded artists as sinners that supported idolatry with works of art. The theological arguments against sacred images concentrate on the idea that it is completely impossible for any human being to imagine what God looks like, let alone make an image of Him. The only possible way to visualize and depict God is through symbolic and allegorical images. This idea, clearly formulated by Origen, marks the position of later church fathers as well, although even by the early fourth century the attitude towards sacred images and the visual arts had become less austere. Eusebius of Caesarea followed Origen in his speculation on sacred images, yet he described the statue of Christ with the woman that had an issue of blood in his native Caesarea without questioning the artist’s intention to render the image of Christ realistically and thus recreate the figure of the historical Jesus. Eusebius and the church fathers of the fifth century realized that the visual arts were very important media and could be applied to the purpose of the Church: images could be useful in spreading Christian teachings, illustrating interpretations of the Scriptures, and rendering them more comprehensible. Biblical exegesis thus found its counterpart in the allegorical and narrative motifs of early Christian art. Although the didactic value of early Christian art prevailed at least in the polemics on art

  2. The exploitation of heroic conventions in the OE poem Andreas: an artistic misconduct or a convincing blend of traditional literary concepts and new Christian ideas?

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    Alenka Divjak

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the function of traditional heroic concepts, typical of the traditional military Germanic society, in the Christian environment of the Old English poem Andreas, whose indebtedness to the traditional heroic poetry has been generally recognised. The paper juxtaposes four examples of traditional heroic ethos from Beowulf, the most detailed example of heroic poetry, and the text to which Andreas is verbally and stylistically very close, with the relevant parallels from Andreas, in order to determine to what extent the traditional images relating to the life of traditional heroic society still retain in Andreas their traditional connotations and to what extent they are imbued with the new Christian meaning.

  3. A view of evolution by a Christian biologist

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    Elizabeth Jordaan

    1984-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper, which originated as an address to a gathering of Dutch Reformed Ministers in Potchefstroom, deals with the response of a Christian to concepts of evolution. The paper looks at the concept of “the beginning”, the origin of life , genetics, mutation and natural selection, the origin of diversity or speciation, man as a biological species, the missing link (in which attention is given to various theories, and finally theories of human evolution. These include the neoteny theory, the savannah theory and the aquatic theory. Following a discussion of the various aspects of these theories, the authors go on to a discussion of the evolution of intelligence and culture, and reach the conclusion that “for a Christian, evolution may help him to understand more about God and his love and his work, and also then to have more security in the belief in God”.

  4. Christian biblical ethics: the application of biblical norms to today

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    Patrick J. Hartin

    1991-03-01

    Full Text Available Christian theologians give many different interpretations to the Scriptures, particularly with regard to their ethical perspectives and their application to the present. An examination and criticism of various approaches adopted at present to the ethical dimension of the Scriptures is undertaken. A distinction is made between the revealed and lasting message of the Scriptitres and the message that is conditioned by culture and hence subject to change. Using the thought of Ricoeur and Hauerwas an approach is presented which attempts to do justice to the twofold polarity of the worid of the Bible and the world of today. In order to preserve a scenario of concreteness, attention is given to one practical example, namely the issue of homosexuality. After investigating the Scriptural approach to this question, an attempt is made to see how this issue can be viewed from a Christian perspective in the context of the present world.

  5. Catechesis and baptism in the early Christian church

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    M. E. Nelson

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available This article which originated as a background study for what Augustine says about his own baptism, presents the facts, as far as they could be ascertained, on practices concerning catechesis and baptism in the early Christian church down to about 400 AD, without going into any doctrinal issues. Public confession of faith and baptism was preceded in the early church by lengthy preparations: catechetical, liturgical and ascetical. Baptism was also followed by mystagogical instruction. All of these are set out concisely, based on a number of primary sources, namely some writings by Augustine, Ambrose and Tertullian, the Traditio Apostolica by Hippolytus and the Didache. A number of secondary sources are also cited. Attention is drawn to the significance of the custom to baptise at Easter this explains why Easter was seen as the climax of the church year in the time of the early Christian church.

  6. Assaying the Belief in Divine Incarnation in Hinduism and Christianity

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    S. Mohammad Rohani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the doctrines shared by Hinduism and Christianity is the doctrine of incarnation and bodily fall of divinity, which on surface sounds to have been understood by both schools in the same terms. Since both schools insist on transcendent unity of God in his essence; for example in Upanishads which is one of the key scriptures of Hinduism it is insisted that the origin of existence is a transcendent, invisible and unfathomable God called Brahman which is the highest the most excellent and beyond description. By the same token, in Christianity God has always been envisaged as a unique and transcendent being. Nevertheless, these two religions believe that transcendent God gets incarnated in some conditions. Thus some have paired these two schools in their belief in incarnation without understanding the nuances.    By more probing into their respective theologies, however, we find out that not only their notions of incarnation differ but there are also fundamental differences in their understandings of God in general and divine transcendent unity and synthesizing it with divine fall and incarnation. In Hinduism God is conceived as an absolute being which manifests itself in three attributes. But in Christianity God is not an absolute and simple essence rather it is envisaged as a compound entity spread through trinity figures who have been interacting since the time immemorial. Moreover, these two schools have two different positions on the necessity and cause of incarnation. Thus one can conclude that the doctrine of incarnation is understood in Hinduism and Christianity in radically different fashions.    In Christianity Jesus represents the only incarnation of divinity as the son of God who is one of triple hypostases building trinity and the belief in whom is the path of human salvation. Thus conceived, God has descended into the body of Christ as the ransom of original sin. Then incarnation in Christianity is founded upon two other

  7. [Patron saints and Christian perception of health and illness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spehar, Milan

    2012-01-01

    As a religion based on the teaching of Jesus Christ, from the outset Christianity has developed a completely different attitude toward health and illness than the Old Testament. Health and illness are now viewed through the eyes of Jesus Christ the redeemer, who accepted each and every man. The history of Christianity has had its episodes of masochistic attitude toward illness, but today it clearly underscores the need to fight it with any means available, but it also teaches to accept what can not be changed. Saints are often patrons against diseases they had to endure. However, this is not their main role. To this day many seem to miss the main point their heritage, but see them as miracle healers. This misperception of miracle needs revising as well as the simplistic interpretation of the healing powers of relics (viewed as a demiurge of sort) and of the private vows and votive offerings.

  8. Looking at human development through the lens of Christian mission

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    Akinyemi O. Alawode

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Approximately one billion people live in extreme poverty, with another two billion people surviving on less than $1 per day. Many of them, living in abject poverty, struggle with ill health, limited access to clean water, hygienic sanitation, poor quality housing, hunger, illiteracy and premature death. However, improving the lives of the poor is a complex undertaking with often little agreement as to how can this be best achieved. The intrinsic goal of development is to advance human dignity, freedom, social equity and self-determination. Moreover, there is no univocal definition of development. In this article my own understanding will be discussed more extensively. My conviction that development, in general in the context of Christian mission, finds its roots in Christian empathy with people in dire need will be stated.

  9. Displaying Diaspora: Chinese Christian Presence in Hungary after 1989

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    Dorottya Nagy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present article draws attention to the significance of the “Christian” component in researching Chinese migrants’ presence in post-1989 Hungary within the framework of Chinese globalization and the globalization of Chinese Christianity. After a brief review of the dynamics of Chinese migration to Hungary and special focus on the formation of Chinese Christian Communities, the article examines how the concept of diaspora and the rhetoric built around it is used by missionaries to create new ways of understanding the world from migrants’ perspective and interpreting migration experiences as empowering and liberating divine arrangements for the well-being of their current residence and beyond. The case of Chinese migration to Hungary shows that the concept of diaspora implies a diverse range of community formation practices and the complexity of negotiating Chineseness, which highlights the need of revisiting the very concept of diaspora as reduced to a homogeneous and ethnically essentialized community.

  10. Hans Christian Ørsted reading nature's mind

    CERN Document Server

    Christensen, Dan Charly

    2013-01-01

    Hans Christian Orsted (1777-1851) is of great importance as a scientist and philosopher far beyond the borders of Denmark and his own time. At the centre of an international network of scholars, he was instrumental in founding the world picture of modern physics. Orsted was the physicist who brought Kant's metaphysics to fruition. In 1820 his discovery of electro-magnetism, a phenomenon that could not possibly exist according to his adversaries, changed the course of research in physics. It inspired Michael Faraday's experiments and discovery of the adverse effect, magneto-electric induction. The two physical phenomena were later described in mathematical equations by J.C. Maxwell. Together these discoveries constitute the prerequisites for the overwhelming development of modern technology. But Orsted was also one of the cultural leaders and organizers of the Danish Golden Age (together with Grundtvig, Kierkegaard, and Hans-Christian Andersen, his protege), and made significant contributions to aesthetics, ph...

  11. Cristianismo e política na Idade Média: relações entre Papado e Império (Christianity and politics in the Middle Ages: the relations between the Papacy and the Empire - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2009v7n15p53

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    José D’Assunção Barros

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available O principal propósito deste artigo é discutir uma das mais importantes questões relativas à interação entre Cristianismo e Política nos vários períodos da Idade Média: a relação entre Império e Igreja. O tema será abordado com base no exame de alguns dos aspectos políticos e imaginários envolvidos nesta relação que, à partida, contrasta dois projetos de cunho universalista que terminam por se opor no contexto político e religioso do período medieval. Entre as questões examinadas, um ponto importante será constituído por uma reflexão sobre as origens da noção de Império a partir do Império Romano e, posteriormente, do Império Carolíngio, assim como suas projeções subseqüentes, inclusive no período que ultrapassa a Idade Média em direção à Modernidade. O relacionamento entre Império e Papado, conforme veremos, foi constituído no período examinado por uma alternância de momentos de aliança e oposição política, mas durante todo o período também pode ser pensado nos termos de um grande confronto, entre os poderes secular e religioso, que envolve as noções de “igreja”, “império” e “reino”.Palavras-chaves: Império, Igreja, Realeza, Papado, Poder Abstract The mainly purpose of this article is to discuss one of the most important questions refereed to the interaction between Christianism and Politics in the various periods of the Middle Ages: the relation between Empire and Ecclesia. The theme will be analyzed on basis of the examination of some political and imaginary aspects involved of this relation that, in first place, contrasts two universal projects that falls in opposition in the political and religious context of the Middle Ages. Among the questions examined, an important point will be constituted by the origins of the notion of Empire since the Roman Empire and, later, the Carolingian Empire, as also their subsequent projections, including in the period that exceeds the Middle

  12. Beyond the limits of codified morality: A Christian military ethic

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This article will explore the question: What are the means by which the ethical Christian military professional is formed? The parameters of this exploration will be set out in the first section, using a conception of ethical subjectivity as being simultaneously constituted through conformity to codes as well as through creative ethical self-formation that goes beyond the limits of those codes.This study assumes a minimum ‘thin’ conception of identity whereby the self-reflective individual is...

  13. Psychiatry and religion: Judeo-Christian theism and Fromm's humanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, D F; Bachelder, R

    1985-03-01

    This paper provides a discussion of the ethical humanism of the late psychoanalyst Eric Fromm as compared to traditional Judeo-Christian theism. Considering their respective views of human nature and possibility, and of the relationship between truth, reason, and revelation, the authors posit that Fromm and traditional theists take radically different positions, making their religious stances fundamentally incompatible. In conclusion, the authors suggest how these differences could have significant implication for pastoral care.

  14. Spirit-guided care: Christian nursing for the whole person.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Lyn S; Walker, Mark S

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare today is challenged to provide care that goes beyond the medical model of meeting physical needs. Despite a strong historical foundation in spiritual whole person care, nurses struggle with holistic caring. We propose that for the Christian nurse, holistic nursing can be described as Spirit-guided care--removing oneself as the moiatiating force and allowing Christ, in the furm of the Holy Spirit, to flow through and guide the nurse in care of patients and families.

  15. The Judaic-Christian origin of nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandeis, Gary H; Oates, Daniel J

    2007-06-01

    Many nursing homes today have a religious heritage. While governmental regulations control how much of the care is delivered, the foundations and goals of many homes predate governmental rules and payment policies. This paper explores the basis of Jewish and Christian thought in providing groundwork for religiously based nursing homes. Although the underlying principles are similar, differences in approach and execution for the formation of these homes exist.

  16. Uniting Christian Students� Association�s pilgrimage to overcome colonial racism: A southern African postcolonial missiological dialogue

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    R.W. (Reggie Nel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available World Christianity has been enriched by Christian student movements such as the Uniting Christian Students� Association (UCSA from South Africa. This article, based on my recent doctoral research, starts with the affirmation of the ambiguous relations of these movements with colonial racism. However, faced with new challenges in a postcolonial context, there are key impulses to be gained by an inter-subjective, but also interdisciplinary dialogue with these movements as they negotiate their calling. By focussing on one movement within the southern African context, UCSA, in particular its formation and development since the demise of apartheid in South Africa, the article aims to present an attempt to understand the missionary praxis of UCSA through a postcolonial missiological matrix. The article draws on the theological disciplines of missiology, systematic theology, church history, contextual theology, as well as the methodologies in non-theologic disciplines like sociology, in particular social movement studies, and history. The findings show, amongst others, a growing complexity in relation to its agency, how it frames its world and also how it used its authoritative sources to discern its calling. The article closes with some key insights and pointers relevant for faith communities in their mission to overcome colonial racism.Intradisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary implications: The teaching and research in missiology and systematic theology in how the challenge of colonial racism is addressed, methodologically.

  17. 'Belonging before believing': Some missiological implications of membership and belonging in a Christian community

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    Mario Weyers

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In the final stages of the modern period the power of hegemonic ideologies is coming to an end as people identify less with grand ideologies and more with subcultures related to technology and social and economic networks of different kinds. The post-Christendom phase has begun and is radically challenging Christendom notions of membership and ministry. We have to assume that in a post-Christendom society, the familiarity with Christian concepts will fade as the decline of Christendom has meant that Christian discourse has been losing its status as a lingua franca. It is therefore important that the church will anticipate longer journeys towards faith and not move on to disciple new converts too quickly. Post-Christendom evangelisation will consequently take longer, start further back and move more slowly. For these reasons the authors propose that the question of standards for membership be reconsidered where churches are planted in postmodern contexts. They propose that the old order of �believing before belonging� be replaced by �belonging before believing�.

  18. Withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment for newborn infants from a Christian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott-Joynt, Michael

    2012-02-01

    The more vulnerable a person, of whatever age, therefore, the more there must be a presumption in favour of life; and care must be offered with particular respect and dignity, and in the best interests of the infant her/himself, not in those of others. The principles, that guide Christians in making ethical healthcare decisions, were derived from two core Christian beliefs: that all human beings, of whatever age, are "made in the image of God"--so human beings have a distinctive dignity and value, and may not be treated as possessions or commodities; and that we are therefore made to live relationally--so communal, as well as individual, perspectives ought to be considered in ethical decision-making. The article then notes and explores three areas in which it may not be in the infant's best interests for life-sustaining treatment to continue or to be initiated, noting the complexity of "quality of life" questions, and the danger of considering others' quality of life over that of the infant. So, to safeguard the vulnerable, the threshold for acceptable "quality of life" needs to be set at a "low" level; and a distinction should be drawn, in considering withdrawing life-sustaining treatment, between medical intervention and "assisted-care" - so that there are very limited circumstances in which life-sustaining treatments ought to be withheld or withdrawn from newborn infants.

  19. Cohabitation and premarital sex amongst Christian youth in South Africa today: a missional reflection

    OpenAIRE

    Thinandavha D. Mashau

    2011-01-01

    This article explored the rising trends of cohabitation and premarital sex amongst Christian and non-Christian youth in South Africa that is becoming more socially acceptable. Moving from a premise of engaging in these practices, which is not biblically justified, to what a missional Christian church can do, this article sought to bring the numbers of those who cohabit and engage in premarital sex down. The thesis of this article was that a missional church should view cohabitation and premar...

  20. Sethian Crowns, Sethian Martyrs? Jewish Apocalypses and Christian Martyrs in a Gnostic Literary Tradition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burns, Dylan Michael

    2014-01-01

    , they are notably absent from the Hellenic philosophical tradition which also informs the apocalypses in Plotinus’ school. The abundance of crown-imagery, however, in contemporary Jewish and Christian apocalypses thus serves as evidence of a Judeo-Christian background for this “Platonizing” Sethian literature, even....... Thirdly, Plotinus’ Christian Gnostic opponents may have seen these crowns differently — as indicative of the glory of martyrdom, reminding us that this early confrontation between Hellenic and Christian Gnostic philosophers followed on the heels of the Decian and Valerianic persecutions....

  1. USE OF DISTANCE EDUCATION BY CHRISTIAN RELIGION TO TRAIN, EDIFY AND EDUCATE ADHERENTS

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    P. SATYANARAYANA

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Distance Education has been growing fast, in a marvelously diverse fashion. The efficiency, effectiveness, validity and utility of distance teaching-learning are on increase. All communities and religious groups are making use of distance learning methodology to upgrade their knowledge, skills and attitudes. Christina educational institutions in all the parts of the world are being benefitted by the Christian distance education programme. Christian websites make up more than 80 percent of the websites of the world’s five major religions. Globalisation is facilitating many Christian pioneers of multiple denominations to adopt distance teaching-learning beyond all frontiers and barriers. Baker’s guide to Christian Distance Education profiles upto 150 Christian degree programmes. Some of the popular programmes are indicated here. Christians who constitute 2.33 percent of Indian population are educationally benefitted by Christian distance education programmes. A major Christian distance education programme is offered by Andhra Christian Theological College. Its four distance courses attract students all over the country. How quality is important in distance teaching and learning is highlighted here.

  2. Spirituality and medical practice: a Christian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igboin, Benson O

    2015-01-01

    Everyday experience shows that there is a commonality between spirituality and medical practice. A text message I received from a friend recently read, "Please pray for me. I've been getting a mysterious headache for some days now. I will be seeing the doctor today." This clearly speaks of a relationship: asking for prayer so as to be relieved of a "mysterious headache", yet going to see a doctor whose job is not to cure mysterious headaches. Even though both areas of human experience have their peculiar and largely unrelated methodologies, this paper argues that any extreme separation of the two is injurious to the teleology of both disciplines in relation to human well-being, which forms the core of spirituality and medicine.

  3. Rastafari: Alternative Religion and Resistance against “White” Christianity

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    Jérémie Koubo Dagnini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Depuis le début du seizième siècle, l’histoire de la Jamaïque a successivement été associée à l’esclavage, l’évangélisation, la colonisation et le néo-colonialisme, ce qui a engendré de nombreuses révolutions, émeutes et autres formes d’agitation sociale. Les Jamaïcains noirs ont toujours vécu dans un état de résistance, une mentalité qui a donné naissance, au début des années 1930, à une religion jamaïcaine appelée rastafari. Le but de cet article n’est pas seulement d’étudier les origines et le symbolisme de rastafari, mais également de définir le mouvement rasta comme une religion née en réponse légitime à l’oppression et l’évangélisation. En d’autres termes, cette étude analyse rastafari comme une version panafricaine et afrocentrique du christianisme « blanc ».  Since the early sixteenth century, the history of Jamaica has been associated successively with slavery, Christian Evangelization, colonialism and neocolonialism, which gave rise to numerous revolutions, riots and various other forms of social unrest. Black Jamaicans have always lived in a constant state of resistance, a mentality that gave birth, in the early thirties, to a Jamaican religion called Rastafari. Besides studying the roots and symbolism of Rastafari, my paper is aimed at defining the Rasta movement as a religion born as a legitimate response to oppression and Christian Evangelization. In other words, my work examines Rastafari as a Pan-African and Afrocentric version of “White” Christianity.

  4. Oral Tradition in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam: Introduction

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    Werner H. Kelber

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The present issue of _Oral Tradition_ stands as a tribute to a conference initiated and convened by professors Werner Kelber and Paula Sanders on the topic of Oral-Scribal Dimensions of Scripture, Piety, and Practice in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, April 12-14, 2008. Sixteen active participants (a keynote speaker, four specialists in each of three world religions, and three respondents met to examine the aesthetic, compositional, memorial, and performative aspects of three faiths (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam in their appropriate media contexts. In many ways, this approach differs from, and indeed challenges, historical scholarship. Beginning with the pre-modern period and reaching into our postmodern world, the strictly philological, textual paradigm has served as the intellectual premise for classical and biblical scholarship, for medieval studies, and for the study of world religions as well. The Rice conference and the papers that emanated from it are designed to provide the philological, textual study of the monotheistic faiths with fresh insights and to suggest significant modifications. The largely Western paradigm of the three monotheistic faiths as quintessential religions of the book is, thereby, called into question in the present issue of _Oral Tradition_. If the flourishing discipline of orality-scribality-memory studies has shown anything conclusively, it is that prior to the invention of print technology the verbal arts were an intricate interplay of oral and scribal verbalization, with manuscripts often serving as mere reference points for recitation and memorization. The papers that follow show that this scenario applies with special relevance to Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

  5. Comparative Framework for Understanding Jewish and Christian Violent Fundamentalism

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    Arie Perliger

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Although most scholars agree that in the last couple of decades, religious fundamentalism has become the dominant ideological feature in the landscape of modern terrorism, many prefer to ignore the fact that this is not a development which is restricted to the Islamic world, and that other religious traditions have also experienced growth in groups which prefer to use violent strategies to promote their sacred visions. The current chapter strives to fill this gap by analyzing the emergence of violent religious groups in two distinct, non-Islamic, religious traditions. At first glance, the Christian Identity and the Religious-Zionist movements have very little in common. However, both movements served as a breeding ground for the emergence of violent fundamentalist groups aspiring to facilitate an apocalyptic/redemption scenario by engaging in illegal violent campaigns. Moreover, in both cases, the role of spiritual leaders was crucial in shaping the radicalization of the groups and their target selection, and the violence had a clear symbolic narrative. In other words, for the members of these violent groups, the violence served a clear role in the mobilization of potential supporters, and the branding and dissemination of the movement's ideology. Finally, while in general, terrorism is perceived as the weapon of the weak, in these two cases it was perpetrated by individuals/groups affiliated to communities belonging to the dominant religious framework in their respective polities (i.e., the Religious-Zionist and Christian Identity movements are perceived by their members as branches of Judaism and Christianity. Hence, by utilizing a comparative framework, the article will not just analyze the violent manifestations that emerged from these two movements, but also try to identify the unique factors that characterize and facilitate the emergence of religious groups within religious communities belonging to the dominant religious tradition in their

  6. CHRISTIAN REMINISCENCES IN THE WORKS BY A. KANTEMIR

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    Glariantova E. V.

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the research of Christian reminiscences in A. D. Kantemir's works. Such works of Kantemir’s psalm poetry as the Symphony of the Book of Psalms, paraphrases Metaphrasis Ps. 36, Metaphrasis Ps. 72, Song I Against the Godless, Song II Hope for God are used for this purpose. Images, motives and certain verses of psalms are presented in many Kantemir's works written in different years beginning with his early Symphony to the late translation of The Existence of God by Fenelon. A. D. Kantemir combined verses from the Book of Psalms with similar motives from antique authors' works.

  7. ¿Estaba Christian Anfinsen en lo cierto?

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez del Pozo, Álvaro

    2010-01-01

    Hace aproximadamente 50 años Christian B. Anfinsen llevaba a cabo una serie de experimentos que resultaron ser contribuciones esenciales para la comprensión del fenómeno del plegamiento de proteínas. Los resultados obtenidos le permitieron proponer lo que ha terminado por conocerse como la Hipótesis de Anfinsen. Durante este tiempo la Biología se ha transformado radicalmente por la revolución que ha supuesto el desarrollo de la Biología Molecular. En el presente artículo se reflexiona sobre l...

  8. Schools and Religious Communities' Contributions to the Religious Formation of Christian Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kock, A.

    2015-01-01

    This article questions the implications of tribal forms of religious socialization for (religious) schools' and communities' contributions to the religious formation of Christian youth. It clarifies that the religious education of a new generation of young Christians requires authorities and communities to connect in a worldwide pedagogical space…

  9. Attitude toward Christianity and paranormal belief among 13- to 16-yr.-old students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Emyr; Francis, Leslie J; Robbins, Mandy

    2006-08-01

    A small but statistically significant positive correlation (r = .17) was found in a sample of 279 13- to 16-yr.-old students in Wales between scores on the Francis Scale of Attitude toward Christianity and on a new Index of Paranormal Belief. These data suggest that there is little common variance between attitude toward Christianity and belief in the paranormal.

  10. The Role of Christian Educational Institutions in Improving Economic Self-Reliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwosu, Constance C.

    2012-01-01

    This article argues that Christian educational institutions in Africa can play a major role in improving economic self-reliance within the continent, if those who establish Christian universities there take time to plan the programs and activities in those institutions. Specifically, it argues that with proper planning of quality education--the…

  11. Becoming a World Christian: Hospitality as a Framework for Engaging Otherness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrington, Aminta

    2017-01-01

    Hospitality is the Christian imperative of welcoming the stranger to our table, which serves as a living metaphor for the salvation God extends to all of us, welcoming us as sinners to his table of abundance. As we transition from the era of missions to the era of world Christianity, a hospitality framework is helpful for the concomitant task of…

  12. Christian Ackermanni töökoda / Tiina-Mall Kreem

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kreem, Tiina-Mall

    2005-01-01

    Puunikerdajast ja skulptorist Christian Ackermannist, kes saabus Tallinna 1670. aastate algul, töötas Elert Thiele töökojas, abiellus E. Thiele lesega ja omandas Thiele töökoja, töötas vaba meistrina. Christian Ackermanni lomingust (kantslid, altariseinad, siseportaalid, ktutsifiksid, epitaafid, vappepitaafid), acermannlikust stiilist. Bilbiograafia lk. 457

  13. Story, Presence, Community: A Servant-Leadership Model for Rocky Bayou Christian School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskins, John Richard

    2014-01-01

    Christian schools ought to revolve around Jesus' teaching, "Whoever would be great among you must be your servant, and whoever would be first among you must be your slave, even as the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many" (Matthew 20:26-28, ESV). However, Christian schools often model…

  14. What Kind of Person Would Do Something Like That? A Christian Ecological Virtue Ethic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouma-Prediger, Steven

    2016-01-01

    In my book "For the Beauty of the Earth: A Christian Vision of Creation Care" (2001, rev edn 2010) I develop a set of ecological virtues from a Christian perspective. Although there are now monographs, e.g. "Character and Environment: A Virtue-Oriented Approach to Environmental Ethics" (2007), and anthologies, e.g.…

  15. The Role of Spirituality in Christian School Leadership: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banke, Susan; Maldonado, Nancy; Lacey, Candace H.; Thompson, Steve

    2005-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the spiritual experiences of Christian school leaders. A purposeful, nominated sample of 12 Christian school leaders was selected. In-depth, open-ended interviews were conducted, audio taped, and then transcribed verbatim. Data analysis was based on Rudestam and Newton (2001) and Creswell's (1998) method of…

  16. Some Theological Reservations Surrounding One Contemporary Christian Approach to Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittle, Sean

    2014-01-01

    This article raises a number of theological reservations about one contemporary Christian approach to teaching and learning. For many years David Smith and Trevor Cooling have played a leading role in demonstrating how Christian beliefs and theological themes might be integrated into classroom practice across the curriculum. But despite the good…

  17. The Issue of the Homosexual Student on the Christian College Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Brandon D.

    A difficult issue for student affairs professionals at Christian colleges is homosexuality. It is important for Christian student affairs professionals to understand the unique issues homosexual students face, develop programming and resources for homosexual students, and determine appropriate institutional responses to infractions of college…

  18. Shifting positions between anthropology, religion and development: the case of Christianity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geest, S.

    2011-01-01

    Anthropologists in Africa used to have an ambivalent relationship with missionary Christianity and international development work. Being active in the same areas but with different intentions reinforced mutual stereotypes and added to the uneasiness. This seems to be changing now. Christianity has p

  19. Doing Justice Today: A Welcoming Embrace for LGBT Students in Christian Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joldersma, Clarence W.

    2016-01-01

    The article argues for welcoming LGBT students in Christian schools. The article develops an idea of justice based on Nicholas Wolterstorff's idea of claim-rights of vulnerable groups that have been wronged, and applies this to the security and recognition of LGBT students in Christian schools. The article presents empirical evidence about the…

  20. Neuroscience, Christian Theology, and a Fuller Understanding of the Human Person

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaman, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The author's specialization as a Christian theologian is in the combined area of morality and spirituality. The focus of his teaching and research has been in the areas of bioethics; the theology of sexuality, marriage, and the family; and Christian spirituality. In his research he came across several authors who advocated some positions different…

  1. "So What If I Pray Like a Girl": Gendered Religious Socialization at a Christian School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsasser, Stacey

    A study sought to explore and define the nature of gendered religious socialization in a non-denominational Christian school, using the lens of submission theology. Many Christian schools today are less rigid in their rules and doctrines than formerly and are no longer separate from the world. This study was conducted in one such school, where a…

  2. Diapers, Dissertations, and Other Holy Things: The Experiences of Mothers Working in Christian Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, M. Elizabeth Lewis; Anderson, Tamara L.; Willingham, Michele M.

    2004-01-01

    Academic institutions present specific challenges to women attempting to balance work and family responsibilities. This type of involvement within the subculture of evangelical Christianity presents its own variations. Interviews with 30 mothers working in Christian academia were analyzed using a post hoc content analysis informed by principles of…

  3. Beyond War Stories: Clifford G. Christians' Influence on the Teaching of Media Ethics, 1976-1984.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Lee Anne

    Clifford Glenn Christians' work in the area of media ethics education from 1976 through 1984 has influenced the way media ethics is taught to many college students today. This time period includes, among his other accomplishments, Christians' work on an extensive survey of how media ethics was taught in the late 1970s, his work on the Hastings…

  4. Beyond Transmissional Pedagogies in Christian Education: One School's Recasting of Values Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, John; Dowson, Martin

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the efforts of one Christian school to counteract secular societal norms and foster Christian values in its students. Anecdotal observations led to an empirical study to ascertain students' thinking about values. In turn, the study results led to the school staff taking specific actions to address the realities discovered in…

  5. The Christian Schools Campaign: What Were Its Long-Term Consequences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Sylvia

    2009-01-01

    This article looks at the long-term consequences of a political campaign that was influential in Britain between 1988 and 1992, the Christian Schools Campaign. The campaign was a response to the need for funding of a group of small independent Christian schools. The article brings up to date the direct outcomes of the campaign in two areas. The…

  6. Is Christian Schooling Really at Loggerheads with the Ideas of Diversity and Tolerance? A Rejoinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etherington, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    This article builds on the foundations and evaluations laid recently by Symes and Gulson in their 2005 article, "Crucifying Education: The rise and rise of new Christian schooling in Australia." It evaluates the warrant of Christian schooling within a liberal democracy and offers a rejoinder for defending the rights of Christian…

  7. Walking the Tightrope: Christian Colleges and Universities in a Time of Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henck, Anita Fitzgerald

    2011-01-01

    Leadership of Christian higher education in the United States is in a period of significant change. Yet, the dual accountability--to higher education accreditation and to faith communities--means that Christian colleges and universities walk a tightrope between these two entities, their expectations, and their values. The challenge for U.S.…

  8. Living out our values: the legacy of Christian academic nursing leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coeling, Harriet V; Chiang-Hanisko, Lenny; Thompson, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Retired academic nursing leaders possess a rich legacy of knowledge. Using a grounded theory approach, knowledge possessed by 14 retired Christian Chairperson/Deans was explored. Two themes representing commitment to living out Christian values; and fortitude, understanding, and spiritual guidance emerged from written responses to open-ended survey questions.

  9. Christian Education in Chile: Is the Seventh-Day Adventist System at Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grajales G., Tevni; Leon V., Vicente H.; Elias, Galiya

    2010-01-01

    Diverse perspectives with respect to Christian Education constitute a potential path for misunderstanding and contradictions; this study considers this situation in the context of a Seventh-day Adventist Christian system with students and parents from different religious perspectives in Chile. The parents/sponsors of the eighth graders were…

  10. Opposition from Christians to Myers-Briggs Personality Typing: An Analysis and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, John B.

    2007-01-01

    Myers-Briggs personality typing is widely used in the Christian church as an aid to individual self-understanding and spiritual formation. However, some Christian leaders have expressed doubt about its validity in understanding human personality and also opposition to its use in nurturing spiritual growth. The aim of the work reported was to…

  11. Measuring the Contribution of Independent Christian Secondary Schools to Students' Religious, Personal, and Social Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Leslie J.; ap Siôn, Tania; Village, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    From the late 1960s independent Christian schools have emerged in England and Wales, initiated either by churches or by parents. Many of these new independent schools are linked through the Christian Schools Trust. The impact that these schools are exerting on their students may be of interest for the churches with which they are associated and of…

  12. Chaos and Christianity: A Response to Butz and a Biblical Alternative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Richard E.; Trusty, Jerry

    1997-01-01

    M.R. Butz's position regarding chaos theory and Christianity is reviewed. The compatibility of biblical theology and the sciences is discussed. Parallels between chaos theory and the philosophical perspective of Soren Kierkegaard are explored. A biblical model is offered for counselors in assisting Christian clients in embracing chaos. (Author/EMK)

  13. Only in Canada: A Study of National Market Potential for Christian Higher Education Canada (CHEC) Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiebert, Al

    2011-01-01

    In July 2007 Ipsos Reid delivered to Christian Higher Education Canada (CHEC) a report entitled "Christian Post-Secondary Education in Canada, Phase 3: Defining the Market". This article is a selective summary of the full 353-page report. It tabulates and analyzes findings from 1,000 phone interviews and 6,689 online surveys from six population…

  14. The Christian Environmental Ethic of the Russian Pomor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Brain

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article revisits Lynn White's famous 1967 article that placed the blame forenvironmental problems in the Western world on the Judeo-Christian belief system, anddiscusses the case of the Pomor, a Russian sub-ethnicity who settled on the shores ofthe White Sea in the twelfth century. Although maintaining their Orthodox faith aftermigrating to the edge of the Slavic cultural zone, the Pomor adopted an entirely newway of life suited to the climate of the far north. Rather than concentrating onagriculture, which proved unreliable at the extreme northern latitude, they turned theirattention to the exploitation of marine resources: fishing, sealing, and whaling.Contending with the harsh elements on a daily basis, the Pomor developed a worldviewcalled "sacral geography," which fused animism with Christian eschatology. Sacralgeography, in addition to providing an interpretive system for the natural world, alsoobligated the Pomor to observe and respect the natural world by limiting their economicstrategies. The result was a unique environmental ethic. In the late nineteenth centuryand early twentieth century, the Pomor environmental ethic came under direct criticismfrom larger social forces-first the local business community and then the Soviet statebecauseof its low productivity. Ultimately, Stalin's aggressive economic and politicalpolicies succeeded in eliminating the Pomor environmental ethic as an effective curb onresource exploitation.

  15. Reconciling LGB and Christian Identities in the Rural South

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandi Woodell

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Drawing on in-depth interviews with rural Christians living in the South who identify as lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB, this study analyzes how they negotiate their religious, geographic, and sexual identities. We find that most interviewees employed two strategies to reconcile their Christian and gay identities: emphasizing a personal connection to an accepting God and finding a local church in their rural community in which they felt accepted. We argue that rural contexts influenced interviewees’ reliance on these strategies and show how individuals can construct multiple interpretations about themselves, which do not always align with existing cultural assumptions. In addition, we argue that gender differences exist with regard to participants’ residential choices and the importance they place on “community”. We find that, in general, women value the privacy and freedom afforded to them in rural areas, a sentiment that is echoed in their religious choices while many of the men value the close knit community they find in their small towns.

  16. The theological-Christian dimension of the human person

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Alves de Oliveira

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to demonstrate that the human person is an ontological greatness that has a divine foundation. The essence of the person is built in the being of God. The concept of the origin of person took place in theological-Christian ground, in the context of the Christological and Trinitarian discussions in the fourth century. In the West, its historical trajectory has a philosophical-theological bias, wavering between substantialism unrelated to rationalism without substantiality. The theological dimension of the person is in its image condition of God and creature called into existence by God, according to Jewish and Christian tradition. Like creature receiving his existence as a gift, the person is oriented toward God. Between God and the person there is an interpersonal relationship, one “tu-a-tu”. Because of their transcendent foundation, the person has an onto-axiological primacy over other creatures. The person holds an absolute value and cannot be manipulated by the state, the market and nor religion. This person is an indefinable and a mystery magnitude, just as God its Creator. The person is a reflection of the mystery of God. All love, respect and veneration rendered to God must also be devoted to his image, the human person.

  17. The Christian family in the secularized context of our society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ştefan Florea

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the problem of the family from the Christian perspective and its role in the postmodern society, but also the most serious problems affecting its functionality. As social form, the family is the environment of existence and training ordained by God for man. It has been instituted since the beginning of the creation of the first people, yet by Christ, by the Holy Mystery of Marriage, has been sanctified the union of love between a man and a woman. As time has gone by, under the impulse of the fundamental freedoms and rights specific of man, recognized especially by the modern society, serious abnormalities have appeared, affecting the integrity of the family, such as: sexual immorality as plague of the matrimonial life, divorce, abortion, the so-called “families” of same-sex people. The contemporary man adheres without due consideration to all these, without taking into account their consequences. Certainly, the Christian Orthodox norms bring along with their application the remedy as well, namely life in Christ, which means full humanization.

  18. Early Christian movements: Jesus movements and the renewal of Israel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Horsley

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the origins and development of the earliest Jesus movements within the context of persistent conflict between the Judean and Galilean peasantry and their Jerusalem and Roman rulers. It explores the prominence of popular prophetic and messianic movements and shows how the earliest movements that formed in response to Jesus’ mission exhibit similar features and patterns. Jesus is not treated as separate from social roles and political-economic relationships. Viewing Jesus against the background of village communities in which people lived, the Gospels are understood as genuine communication with other people in historical social contexts. The article argues that the net effect of these interrelated factors of theologically determined New Testament interpretation is a combination of assumptions and procedures that would be unacceptable in the regular investigation of history. Another version of the essay was published in Horsley, Richard A (ed, A people’s history of Christianity, Volume 1: Christian origins, 23-46. Minneapolis, MN: Fortress.

  19. Coleridge’s Colonial Interest in Abyssinian Christianity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pyeaam Abbasi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Coleridge’s radical and colonial interests can be explored in his 1790 poems as sites of power and resistance. As a product of the complex discursive web of the 18th century, the Orientalist Coleridge could not act out of such historical forces as colonialism that had gone into shaping him and his poetry. Although he attacked European corruption and desired a revolutionary figure such as Mahomet to make a return to Abyssinia as home to true Christianity, Coleridge perpetuated the prejudice of Christianity’s superiority over Islam. Disillusioned by the French Revolution, Coleridge created Mahomet to replace Napoleon to pave the way to Abyssinia where true Christianity began. This study is an attempt to show that Coleridge’s radical interpretation of Mahomet, and desire for the Abyssinian maid and a Pantisocratic setting are all ideologically-shaped discursive practices within the context of 18th century colonialism. With such political elements as colonization in mind, a better historically-engaged understanding of Coleridge can be achieved.

  20. From imago Dei in the Jewish-Christian traditions to human dignity in contemporary Jewish law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barilan, Y Michael

    2009-09-01

    The article surveys and analyzes the roles in Judaism of the value of imago Dei/human dignity, especially in bioethical contexts. Two main topics are discussed. The first is a comparative analysis of imago Dei as an anthropological and ethical concept in Jewish and Western thought (Christianity and secular European values). The Jewish tradition highlights the human body and especially its procreative function and external appearance as central to imago Dei. The second is the role of imago Dei as a moral value relative to others. In rabbinic Judaism, respect for human dignity is not the primary moral maxim; it is secondary to the value of neighborly love and sometimes to other moral laws and values.

  1. Hermetic atomism: Christian Adolph Balduin (1632-1682), Aurum Aurae, and the 1674 phosphor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Vera

    2014-11-01

    The synthesis of phosphors, or light-bearing matter, figured largely among the activities of early scientific societies and within the first scientific journals. They were prestige objects during the formative institutionalisation of experimental natural philosophy. Nevertheless, early phosphors have often appeared within the historiography of chemistry as a throwback to an earlier era. They have been represented as a fundamental epistemic and theoretical divide between a mystical alchemy (exemplified by Christian Adolph Balduin) and modern chemistry (prefigured by progressives such as Robert Boyle). The parallel phosphoric researches of Boyle and Balduin belie this divide. Recovering the theoretical context of Balduin's phosphor can both resituate it in relation to phosphoric research of the 1670s and 1680s, as well as further illuminate the intellectual sources and development of chymical atomism.

  2. Teaching for Transformation: Engaging a Christian Worldview in Teacher Education Courses to Address K-12 Social Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crenshaw, Christina Y.

    2013-01-01

    How faculty at Christian universities encourage teacher candidates to draw on a Christian worldview ultimately influences the ways teacher candidates become effective agents of change in K-12 schools. This study examined the assumption that K-12 Christian teachers cannot remain religiously neutral since one's worldview shapes all aspects of life,…

  3. The Jewish and Christian view on female genital mutilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. El-Damanhoury

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Female genital mutilation (FGM is a practice involving the removal of all or parts of the female external genitalia. It has been documented in 28 African countries and in some countries in Asia and the Middle East, but due to increasing immigration from these countries to the western world, FGM has become a worldwide human rights and health issue. Contrary to the belief that it is a practice carried out by Muslims only, it is also practiced by Christians and a minority group of Ethiopian Jews. However, FGM is neither mentioned in the Torah, nor in the Gospels, and – like in Islam – bodily mutilation is condemned by both religions. In fact, FGM is a mix of mainly cultural and social factors which may put tremendous pressure on the members of the society in question.

  4. The Christian ministry of Primate Stanisław Karnkowski

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    Andrzej Bruździński

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available In the 16th century the Church was faced with a challenge by Martin Luther and his followers. The Church's response to a profound and multi-level crisis at the dawn of the Modern Age, as the impact of the Christian ministry weakened – giving rise to reformation – was the restoration initiated at the Council of Trent. Challenged with the appeal of reformers, the Church in Poland also had to take a closer look at its image and undertake a programme of internal renewal in the spirit of the council restoration. It therefore is worth tracing back the routes which brought the "winds of change" to Poland in the last two decades of the 16th century, when the Polish episcopate was headed by Stanisław Karnowski (1581–1603.

  5. Disability, inclusion and the Christian Church: practice, paradox or promise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapton, J

    1997-10-01

    In Western society, Christian Churches historically have been, and contemporarily are, involved with people perceived with disability. While they may practise biblical ethical imperatives such as care, compassion, mercy, support, welfare and charity, Churches have, paradoxically, only minimally offered cohesive or explicit moral notions for the 'inclusion' of people with disability in communities. Importantly, Churches have paid little attention to the historical construction of 'exclusion'. This paper proposes that matrices of patriarchal theology and patriarchal ethics continue to sustain structural positions of societal exclusion for people with disability because of implicit assumptions and values in the matrices about difference and different bodies. By examining a conjunction between feminism and disability around the issue of embodiment, the paper contends that 'inclusion' needs to be explored through the formation and embracing of matrices of feminist theology and feminist ethics.

  6. Suffering in the mystical traditions of Buddhism and Christianity

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    Jakub Urbaniak

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This article seeks to explore the mystical approaches to suffering characteristic of both Buddhism and Christianity. Through the analysis of the meanings, the two traditions in question ascribe to suffering as a ‘component’ of mystical experience; it challenges the somewhat oversimplified understanding of the dichotomy ’sage-the-robot versus saint-the-sufferer’. Thus it contributes to the ongoing discussion on the theological–spiritual dimensions of the human predicament, as interpreted by various religious traditions. It also illustrates (though only implicitly in what sense – to use the Kantian distinction – the mystical experience offers boundaries (Schranken without imposing limits (Grenzen to interfaith encounter and dialogue.Man [sic] is ready and willing to shoulder any suffering, as soon and as long as he can see a meaning in it. (Frankl 1967:56

  7. Suffering in the mystical traditions of Buddhism and Christianity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Urbaniak

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This article seeks to explore the mystical approaches to suffering characteristic of both Buddhism and Christianity. Through the analysis of the meanings, the two traditions in question ascribe to suffering as a ‘component’ of mystical experience; it challenges the somewhat oversimplified understanding of the dichotomy ’sage-the-robot versus saint-the-sufferer’. Thus it contributes to the ongoing discussion on the theological–spiritual dimensions of the human predicament, as interpreted by various religious traditions. It also illustrates (though only implicitly in what sense – to use the Kantian distinction – the mystical experience offers boundaries (Schranken without imposing limits (Grenzen to interfaith encounter and dialogue. Man [sic] is ready and willing to shoulder any suffering, as soon and as long as he can see a meaning in it. (Frankl 1967:56

  8. Hans Christian Jacobaeus: Inventor of human laparoscopy and thoracoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzinger, Martin; Kwon, S T; Langbein, S; Kamp, S; Häcker, Axel; Alken, Peter

    2006-11-01

    Hans Christian Jacobaeus performed the first clinical laparoscopic surgery in Stockholm. This pioneering procedure was based on the animal experiments of Georg Kelling (1866-1945), a German physician from Dresden, who performed the first laparoscopic intervention in 1901 using a Nitz cystoscope in a dog. In 1910, Jacobaeus published his initial experiences with laparoscopic surgery in the Münchner Medizinischen Wochenschrift under the title "The Possibilities for Performing Cystoscopy in Examinations of Serous Cavities." He used this technique for diagnostic purposes in undefined abdominal complaints and functional impairment. Jacobaeus was the first who pointed out the possibility of injuring organs, especially the intestines, by inserting the trocar. In 1910, Jacobaeus recognized the immense diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities of laparoscopic surgery, as well as its difficulties and limits. He also was the first to realize the need for initial endoscopic training in animals and corpses. He promoted the development of special laparoscopic instruments to optimize and simplify the procedure.

  9. How Christian ethics became medical ethics: the case of Paul Ramsey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauerwas, Stanley

    1995-03-01

    Over the last century Christian ethics has moved from an attempt to Christianize the social order to a quandary over whether being Christian unduly biases how medical ethics is done. This movement can be viewed as the internal development of protestant liberalism to its logical conclusion, and Paul Ramsey can be taken as one of the last great representatives of that tradition. By reducing the Christian message to the 'ethical upshot' of neighbour love, Ramsey did not have the resources to show how Christian practice might make a difference for understanding or forming the practice of medicine. Instead, medicine became the practice that exemplified the moral commitments of Christian civilization, and the goal of the ethicist was to identify the values that were constitutive of medicine. Ramsey thus prepared the way for the Christian ethicist to become a medical ethicist with a difference, and the difference simply involved vague theological presumptions that do no serious intellectual work other than explaining, perhaps, the motivations of the ethicist.

  10. Language games: Christian fundamentalism and the science curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Cheryl J.

    Eighty years after the Scope's Trial, the debate over evolution in the public school curriculum is alive and well. Historically, Christian fundamentalists, the chief opponents of evolution in the public schools, have used the court system to force policymakers, to adopt their ideology regarding evolution in the science curriculum. However, in recent decades their strategy has shifted from the courts to the local level, where they pressure teachers and school boards to include "alternate theories" and the alleged "flaws" and "inconsistencies" of evolution in the science curriculum. The purpose of this content analysis study was to answer the question: How do Christian fundamentalists employ rhetorical strategies to influence the science curriculum? The rhetorical content of several public legal and media documents resulting from a lawsuit filed against the Athens Public Schools by the American Center of Law and Justice were analyzed for the types of rhetorical strategies employed by the participants engaged in the scientific, legal, and public discourse communities. The study employed an analytical schema based on Ludwig Wittgenstein's theory of language games, Lawrence Prelli's theory of discourse communities, and Michael Apple's notion of constitutive and preference rules. Ultimately, this study revealed that adroit use of the constitutive and preference rules of the legal and public discourse communities allowed the school district to reframe the creation-evolution debate, thereby avoiding a public spectacle and ameliorating the power of creationist language to affect change in the science curriculum. In addition, the study reinforced the assertion that speakers enjoy the most persuasive power when they attend to the preference rules of the public discourse community.

  11. Child abandonment as an indicator of Christianization in the Nordic countries

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    Juha Pentikäinen

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Nordic countries, child abandonment seems to have been a commonly accepted social tradition until the acceptance of Christianity. When Christian influences reached the Far North, this old practice was gradually criminalized. When the old practice was criminalized by Christian sanctions and norms, the abandoned, murdered or aborted unbaptized children were experienced supernaturally. Their supranormal manifestations are described in Nordic folk beliefs and narratives concerning dead children; in Old Norse sagas, Swedish and Norwegian provincial and ecclesiastical laws and in Finnish runic poetry, all stemming from the Middle Ages.

  12. [Christian Andreas Cothenius (1708-1789). A pro-memoria on the occasion of the 200th anniversary of his death].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Völker, A

    1990-04-01

    The 200th anniversary of the death of Christian Andreas Cothenius gave occasion to appreciate life and work of this personage of a physician. Cothenius maintained manifold connections to Halle, of which the golden doctorate and the heritage of the pharmaceutic enterprises of his teacher Friedrich Hoffmann were treated in this place. The picture of the local relations was supplemented by the history of the Cothenius medal which is today awarded by the Leopoldina of Halle.

  13. THE SACRAMENT OF THE FIRST CHILD OF GOD: A RENEWED CHRISTIAN ECO-IMAGINARY

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    Charles J. Fensham

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper argues for reimagining of the narratives of Genesis 1-3 in aid of building a Christian imaginary in Christian communities that will establish an anthropology and cosmological vision supportive of global ecology. It argues that the texts of Genesis 1-2 allow for and give support for the idea that creation itself is a child of God and that God gives birth to creation. Moreover, God cherishes creation in the Sabbath as a newborn. Christian anthropology is thus relativised by its humble status as being part of creation, birthed from God, and by the exposure of human arrogance towards creation in their quest for transcending human limitation. Christian communities can discover new eco-affirming imaginaries in doxological and sacramental celebration of creation. doi: 10.7833/111-1-16

  14. The spirits of capitalism and christianity and their impact on the formation of healthcare leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMothe, Ryan

    2013-03-01

    In this article, I portray how the ethos of Christianity, broadly speaking, and the mores of capitalism intersect in the formation of healthcare leaders and the difficult decisions they make in insuring the viability of healthcare institutions. More particularly, I argue that healthcare leaders in Christian healthcare institutions are largely formed by and dependent on a capitalistic ethos in making decisions and less so by a Christian ethos. There are key differences in these two meaning systems, and these differences, in part, reveal an incompatibility between them. This incompatibility does not imply a rejection of capitalism, if that is even possible, but rather a recognition of its effects and limits vis-à-vis the formation of healthcare leaders and their decision-making process. Finally, I offer an approach that deals with the spirits of capitalism and Christianity in forming healthcare leaders and their decision-making.

  15. Talvekuud 18. sajandi lõpu Tallinnas Christian Schlegeli kirjeldustes / Kaja Tiisel

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tiisel, Kaja

    2007-01-01

    Saksa literaadist ja estofiilist Christian Schlegelist ning tema peateosest "Reisen in mehrere Russische Gouvernements in den Jahren 178*, 1801, 1807 und 1815" mis sisaldab rohkesti andmeid eestlaste eluolu ja rahvaluule kohta, sealhulgas kirjeldusi Tallinna linnast ja selle elanikest

  16. Belief and legal philosophy: a conceptual framework for Christian scholarship in undergraduate legal education

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    S. de Freitas

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Legal education in South Africa has arrived at a discursive juncture that demands clarity on what the “purpose” of legal education should be. Debate on the purpose of legal education, more specifically for the Christian law student, becomes especially important in a society dominated by positivism, mate-rialism and pragmatism. With specific reference to the under-graduate Christian law student, this article firstly explains that the purpose of legal education should include the nurturing of the student’s belief – a belief encompassing his/her foun-dational perspective(s on reality. Secondly, in order to achieve the proper nurturing and development of the Christian law student’s belief, the importance of the teaching of legal philo-sophy is explained. In this regard, proposals are postulated pertaining to specific means by which such nurturing and development of the undergraduate Christian law student’s foundational belief can be attained.

  17. Prejudice as moral action in Christian ethical decision-making

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    Stephanus J. Myburgh

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Given the many approaches regarding the use of the Bible, the ethical work in biblical interpretation and the work of being concerned with an ethical issue affecting the Christian as a moral agent cannot be separated from one another. This article deals with that affinity between the approach of the interpreter as moral agent, using the Bible in his or her ethical decision-making and aspects that constitute fundamental starting points for him or her in this ethical decision-making, with regard to the liberation of prejudices as that which makes understanding for moral action possible. It is maintained in the article that prejudices that are conformable to the ways in which responsibility should qualify Christian ethics in general make for responsible use of the Bible in Christian ethical decision-making. Prejudices (pre-understanding that are grounded in an ethics of responsibility allow for the interpreter to adhere to the truth claim of a text, which can only be had from hermeneutical work that promotes prejudices in an intentional and critical way as the link between past text and current interpreter.�--- Abstract translated into Sipedi ---Khuet�o ya dikakanyo t�a mosekaseki e le tiro ya maitshwaro mo go t�eeng diphetho ka maitshwaro a malebaSenaganwaGe re �edit�e ditsela t�a go fapana t�a ka fao Bibele e �omi�wago ka gona, mo�omo wa maitshwaro a maleba tlhathollong le tshekakong ya Bibele le mo�omo wa go tshwenyega ka taba ya maitshwaro a maleba ao a huet�ago Mokriste bjalo ka moemedi wa maitshwaro di ka se aroganywe. Pampiri ye e tlo swaragana le tswalano magareng ga mosekaseki bjalo ka moemedi wa maitshwaro, a diri�a Bibele mo go t�eeng diphetho t�a maitshwaro a maleba le mafapa ao a bopago motheo wa mathomo fao go t�ewago diphetho t�a maitshwaro a maleba, mabapi le tokologo ya maitshwaro a botse e le seo se kgonagat�ago kwe�i�o ya tiro ya maitshwaro. Mo pampiring ye re t�ea gore maitshwaro a

  18. The Christian Nation Debate and the U.S. Supreme Court

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    Mokhtar Ben Barka

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In the 1980s, born-again Christians burst into the political arena with stunning force. The founding of the Moral Majority in 1979 by Southern Baptist preacher Jerry Falwell placed Protestant evangelicals in the center of the American political stage. Together with conservative Catholics, Eastern Orthodox, and members of various political-religious groups, Protestant evangelicals constitute the Religious Right, also known as the New Christian Right. Today, the most important Religious Right ...

  19. Shifting positions between anthropology, religion and development: the case of Christianity

    OpenAIRE

    De Geest, S.

    2011-01-01

    Anthropologists in Africa used to have an ambivalent relationship with missionary Christianity and international development work. Being active in the same areas but with different intentions reinforced mutual stereotypes and added to the uneasiness. This seems to be changing now. Christianity has passed its missionary stage and is now an African religion, interesting to study for anthropologists and ‘applied anthropology’ allows anthropologists to make their discipline more meaningful and re...

  20. The Influence of Greco-Roman and the Judeo-Christian On Western Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷华

    2010-01-01

    western culture itself is a part of world culture. It is made up of many elements, which has gone through changes over the centuries. The more enduring are: the Greco-Roman element, and the Judeo-Christian element. This paper briefly analyzes the origin and foundation of western culture: ancient Greek culture, ancient Roman culture and Christianity which have decisive influence on the shape of western culture. It is expected that this paper helps us better understand western culture.

  1. The view of homosexuality in the Venda culture: a Christian ethical evaluation / Pfananani Thomas Masase

    OpenAIRE

    Masase, Pfananani Thomas

    2009-01-01

    It is a matter of fact that homosexual civil unions are now fully recognized. This study serves to answer one main question: How should the Venda community view homosexuality as seen from a Christian perspective? The new bill on civil unions raises concern in the Venda community due to the fact that it runs against Venda traditions and Christian ethics. In ancient times homosexuality was regarded as an activity or practice, but in the contemporary world it is not only regarded ...

  2. William Apess, Pequot Pastor: A Native American Revisioning of Christian Nationalism in the Early Republic

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    Ethan Goodnight

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pequot Native and Methodist Minister William Apess has received growing recognition among historians as a unique voice for Native Americans—and minorities in general—during the early Republic. This essay began by inquiring into Apess’s relationship with the Christian nationalism of his day. Extensive readings of Apess’s works, scholarship on all aspects of Apess’s life, and analyses of Christian nationalism during the early Republic initially revealed severe conflict. Apess is fiery in his critique of Anglo American society and religion; he questions the integrity of Christians who treat Native Americans with a double standard. Analyzing Apess’s critiques and his proposed solutions in depth, however, shows that his main problem rests with faulty implementation of genuinely good ideals. Apess’s solutions actually rest on revising and enforcing, not destroying, the main components of Christian nationalism. This essay concludes that Apess should be read as advancing his own revised form of Christian nationalism; his plan for the future of America and national unity embraced establishing a more perfect Christian union.

  3. Glocalization and the Marketing of Christianity in Early Modern Southeast Asia

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    Barbara Watson Andaya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The expansion of European commercial interests into Southeast Asia during the early modern period was commonly justified by the biblical injunction to spread Christian teachings, and by the “civilizing” influences it was said to foster. In focusing on areas where Christianity gained a foothold or, in the Philippines and Timor Leste, became the dominant faith, this article invokes the marketing concept of “glocalization”, frequently applied to the sociology of religion. It argues that the historical beginnings of the processes associated with the global/local interface of Christianity are situated in the sixteenth century, when Europe, Asia and the Americas were finally linked through maritime connections. Christian missionizing was undertaken with the assumption that the European-based “brand” of beliefs and practices could be successfully transported to a very different environment. However, the application of these ideas was complicated by the goal of imposing European economic control, by the local resistance thus generated, and by competition with other religions and among Christians themselves. In this often antagonistic environment, the degree to which a global product could be “repackaged” and “glocalized” so that it was appealing to consumers in different cultural environments was always constrained, even among the most sympathetic purveyors. As a result, the glocalization of Christianity set up “power-laden tensions” which both global institutions and dispersed consumers continue to negotiate.

  4. Meeting the buddha on the road – An essay on christian scholarship

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    I.J. Kroeze

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available This essay looks at the christian theory of science from a very specific context. The essay is divided into two parts. In the first part two different (christian theories of science, those of Dooyeweerd and Stoker, will be discussed. In the second part, these theories will be analysed against the background of recent developments in the theories of science and knowledge in the field of law and legal theory. The conclusion from the first part is that christian scholarship (and, conversely, a christian university has nothing to do with the morality of either students or lecturers. It should also be clear that one cannot speak of “the” christian paradigm of science, but that there are various theories and paradigms. In the second part various problems with these two theories are discussed. These include the objectivist stance of both Dooyeweerd and Stoker, Dooyeweerd’s archimedean point of departure and Stoker’s use of socalled scriptural truths. These problems are highlighted by recent developments in legal theory of which christian scholarship must take cognisance.

  5. Science instruction in the context of Christian faith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Brock Cameron

    One of the issues faced in higher education involves the development of scientifically literate undergraduate students (NRC, 1996). Developing science literacy needs to take into account the various aspects of resistance students have toward science because of their personal faith. There is a need to know more about the effective strategies that science faculty in a Christian, faith-based institution use to assist their undergraduate students in dealing with the apparent conflict between science and faith. The purpose of this study was to analyze how these faculty members develop scientifically literate students. Through descriptive qualitative analysis, interview and questionnaire data were analyzed to discover science faculty perceptions of student tension with faith and science and to elicit faculty use of conceptual change teaching strategies. It was discovered that faculty participants perceive that their students experience such a tension. Students generally view the two as conflicting or independent of each other. Also, it was found that the conceptual change strategies were used to some extent by all participants. The data revealed three themes: time, talk, and trust. Conceptual change is accomplished over time through a learning environment rich with instruction and experimentation. These strategies allow for increasing science literacy through self-reflection and conversations. Trust is built through faculty modeling of the process of science and its integration with personal faith. Increasing science literacy in the college population has potential for social change by producing adults capable of making more informed political and ethical decisions.

  6. Overcoming violence - a basic task of Christian churches

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    Wolfgang Huber

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article � based on the second of two keynote lectures at a conference on violence � the view is developed that the task of the church with respect to violence consists mainly in overcoming violence. In the first part of the article dealing with the basic tasks of the church it is argued that the task to overcome violence is close to the essence of the church. The point of departure is taken in Article 7 of the Augsburg Confession, which understands the church as the �communion of saints� and names the pure proclamation of the gospel and the right administration of the sacraments as the two characteristics of the church. The Christian message that the church has to proclaim the gospel entails a preferential option for nonviolence that includes the responsibility to put an end to existing violence. In the second part of the article attention is given to the implications the basic task of the church in overcoming violence holds for the practice of the church. It is argued that the starting point is that the church has to proclaim the gospel of peace and as a community of faith become a community of peace herself. Some of the most important practical consequences the proclamation of the gospel of peace has for the church as a community of action, for her work in education, for her promotion of justice and for her solidarity with those in need, are discussed.

  7. SAINT APOLLONIA: BETWEEN PAGANISM AND CHRISTIANITY IN MEDICINE

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    Gheorghe Gh. BĂLAN

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The history of medicine and dentistry shows that dental medicine is entitled to take upon itself, as representative elements of the field, symbols or spiritual protectors, religious (either Christian or pagan archetypes from different historical periods. These paved the way for the elaboration of a long-lasting set of professional and ethical criteria that ennoble today the dental profession. The present study analyzes some of the symbols of historical-religious nature, stressing their cultural impact and the manner in which such symbols are interpreted in various scientific, medical, theological, artistic contexts and, last but not least, in the general social perception. The professional ethical domain of dentistry makes use of numerous symbols with religious connotation, the more so that this branch of medicine and the various religions have numerous elements in common. Either stylistically, or appearing as products of folk culture, the main symbolistic or legendary references specific to dental culture are the legend of Cadmus and the canonization of Saint Apollonia, the champion of dentists and of those suffering from toothache. Such symbols give to the representatives of this profession a feeling of belonging to a noble medical domain; they also decode and facilitate communication with patients, therefore being outflanked by the idea that awareness on the existence of such religious symbols and on their practical cohesion is especially helpful.

  8. TEMPERATURE MAPPING OF PETRA CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY MAIN CAMPUS SURABAYA

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    JUNIWATI Anik

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Petra Christian University (PCU is a university in Siwalankerto, a suburban area of Surabaya city, East Java-Indonesia. It is well developed at Siwalankerto that has been crowded with surrounding buildings. This research objective is to find the temperature mapping of PCU. The method is used by calculating all the land coverings including the built areas, the pavements, the green areas, mapped by the Screening Tool for Estate Environment Evaluation software-STEVE tool. The field measurement was also conducted. The results then be analyzed, which lands cover that gives more impact to the ambient air temperature. The climate components reviewed are the minimum, the average and the maximum ambient air temperature in degree Celcius. This research found that the lowest ambient air temperature mapped both by field measurement and STEVE-tool is the Zone 5; while the highest ambient air temperature of the STEVE-tool is the Zone 4; but from the field measurement found that the hottest is the Zone 3. This different results give an input for later STEVE-tool improvement.

  9. Vazio e fastio em Faserland, de Christian Kracht

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    Daniel R. Bonomo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Christian Kracht é hoje, se não dos melhores, certamente dos mais comentados autores da ficção de língua alemã. Seu trajeto recua a 1995, ano da publicação de Faserland, o primeiro romance, que aliás distinguiu as balizas daquela que, nessa década, se chamou Popliteratur. Mas, seja a hora zero de uma obra composta de outros bons momentos, seja o ponteiro literário de uma geração, Faserland não é só exemplo pop, tem merecido constantes leituras, sempre novas tiragens, abordagens críticas e assim também a atenção da historiografia literária. No romance são narrados alguns poucos dias da vida narcotizada de um jovem endinheirado e meio sem rumo, do Norte ao Sul da Alemanha, até a Suíça. Nada extraordinário, nenhuma grande peripécia, nenhuma aventura, senão a impressão de um vazio todo presente e o fastio, força do aborrecimento. No texto, investigo que espécie de aborrecimento produz Faserland.

  10. Gender representation in Christian book covers: A case study

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    Stella Viljoen

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we described how gender is represented on two Christian book covers by popular author, John Eldredge, namely Wild at Heart. Discovering the Secret to a Man�s Soul (2001 and Captivating. Unveiling the Mystery of a Woman�s Soul (2005. Through semiotic visual analysis, we explored how the active male�passive female opposition functions on these covers. This opposition is constructed by visually associating the male figure on the cover of Wild at Heart with active outdoor adventurism and the female figure on Captivating with passive situatedness in nature. The titles of the two books also contribute to positioning the male as active and the female as passive. We further investigated how certain myths are created on these covers in support of an active male�passive female opposition and its underlying ideologies. The cover of Wild at Heart creates and also taps into the colonial myth of conquest. The cover of Captivating creates and taps into the myth of the fairytale and visually represents the female figure in a whimsical manner, thus constructing her as a representation of the spiritual or divine. The article questioned the role this information design plays in prescribing the expectations of gendered identity.

  11. Clusters, roots and hierarchies of metaphors in Scripture and the quest for Christian scholarship

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    M.E. Botha

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available This article explores how the confessional thrust of Scriptural and root metaphors relates to the Christian scholar’s quest and how choices for hermeneutical keys to Scripture relate to metaphorical keys chosen as means of access to reality. With respect to Biblical interpretation it is argued that the text of Scripture itself provides the theologian or reader with leads concerning the kind of metaphorical access that functions as its hermeneutical key. I argue that there are clusters or hierarchies of metaphors, central and root metaphors, that regulate the interpretation of Scriptural texts and that a redemptive historical reading of Scripture as a confessional text guides the meaning of such clusters and hierarchies of metaphors. I argue that root metaphors in Scripture set the certitudinal parameters for the metaphors chosen and utilised in the disciplines. Regarding reality I argue that the recognition of the multidimensionality of reality and the plurivocity of meaning and signification on which we rely in both literal and metaphorical language use and reference assumes the existence of non-linguistic and preconceptual bases that guide the recognition of similarities, differences and analogies in reality. They in turn are pointers to a design plan for reality which one could call a God-given order of creation. Metaphorical meaning appeals to and presupposes such an ordered and categorised world to which language and texts refer and which provides limits and boundaries to the multiplicity of deferrals of meaning that intertextual relationships seem to imply. In disciplines concerned metaphorical models play a hermeneutical role in the understanding and interpretation of reality. In these metaphorical models, control beliefs steer, guide and condition the access of the discipline to reality. For Christian scholars the ultimate presuppositions embedded in control beliefs need to comport with the thrust of Scripture and its root metaphors

  12. The philosophic background as starting-point for early Christian doctrine of God’s immanence

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    Ciocan Tudor Cosmin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In philosophy of religion the term of Immanence is mostly applied to GOD in contrast to the divine Transcendence. This relation, as we will see here, it is not far from the truth since one cannot be without the other, however they are not to be put in contrast, but in conjunction. The one-sided insistence on the immanence of God, to the exclusion of His transcendence, leads to Pantheism, just as the one-sided insistence upon His transcendence, to the exclusion of His immanence, leads to Deism. These two can be separated, but the consequences are great for human knowledge and society; it is the two taken together that result in, and are necessary to Theism. But from the least complicated idea that even the name of God is a manifestation of His immanence contrasting with Deus absconditus, whose existence and name cannot be known or thought, theology and religion in general need to regard immanence of God as crucial for the acts of worship. What are the philosophical background for Christian theology to imply the immanence characteristic for God’s existence related to His creation? – This is the main question the present work tries to answer as an overview.

  13. The study of the Christianization of the Nordic countries: some reflections

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    Ragnhild Bjerre Finnestad

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this paper is some problems that appear in the study of the transition from old Norse religion to Christianity, which requires further reflection. The problems may be said to arise from the need for clearer and more pragmatic definitions of analytical categories and, also, for more precise explications of the object of study. One of the most popular concerns of the study has been to ask whether a particular idea or custom or value is "Christian" or "old Norse". Often the question tacitly, but evidently, presupposes that "Christianity" and "old Norse religion" refer to well-defined sets of ideas, customs, and values, fixed within their respective systems. But, in the first place, Christianity did not come as a homogeneous entity to the North, but as differing versions. There are grounds for presuming that "old Norse" religion displayed a heterogeneous picture, as well. Secondly, no living religion is fixed, but is continually changing. Among the most influential factors in this dynamic process are what a religion adopts from other religions, and in this respect Christianity and old Norse religion have influenced each other over a long period of time, a fact which complicates the question of identity.

  14. Ethno-Religiosity in Orthodox Christianity: A Source of Solidarity & Multiculturalism in American Society

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    Chris Durante

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study will analyze the processes of community organization implemented by Eastern Orthodox Christian ethno-religious groups, and Greek Orthodox Christian communities in particular, to establish themselves in American civil society. It will be argued that the symbiotic relationship formed between ethnicity and religion in this tradition, as well as the democratized grassroots mode of community organization that American civil society fosters, contributes to a strong sense of belonging amongst members of the ethno-religious Orthodox Christian congregations. In turn, this sense of belonging has produced a multi-layered mechanism for solidarity-building in these communities. It will then be suggested that in addition to contributing to America’s religious diversity, the preservation of ethno-linguistic heritage by the various Orthodox Christian churches simultaneously contributes to America’s poly-ethnicity and linguistic diversity as well. Last, it will be argued that the continued survival of ethno-religiosity in American Orthodoxy can either lead to further isolation amongst the separate ethnic congregations, or it can alternatively open avenues for the cultivation of a form of Orthodox Christian multiculturalism that supports neither homogeneity nor isolationism.

  15. Teología de la Liberación y Cristianismo Mundial: hacia una recuperación del Cristianismo culturalmente plural (Liberation Theology and World Christianity: towards the recovery of Christianity culturally plural.

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    Jorge Eliécer Castillo Guerra

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available KOINONIA/ASETTMINGA/MUTIRÃO DE REVISTAS DE TEOLOGIA LATINO-AMERICANASTeología de la Liberación y Cristianismo Mundial: hacia una recuperación del Cristianismo culturalmente plural (Liberation Theology and World Christianity: towards the recovery of Christianity culturally plural.

  16. Cultural Trauma and Christian Identity in the Late Medieval Heroic Epic, The Siege of Jerusalem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMarco, Patricia A

    2015-01-01

    This essay examines scenes of violence in the late medieval poem The Siege of Jerusalem in order to reveal the ways in which trauma is used as the grounds upon which Christian/Jewish difference is established. In particular, I argue that this poem serves as an example of a widespread element in Christian chivalric identity, namely the need to manage the repetitive invocation of Christ's crucifixion (ritually repeated through liturgical and poetic invocation) as a means of asserting both the bodily and psychic integrity of the Christian subject in contrast to the violently abjected figure of the Jewish body. The failure of The Siege protagonist, Wespasian, to navigate the cultural trauma of the crucifixion is contrasted to the successful management of trauma by the martial hero, Tancred, in Tasso's epic, Gerusalemme Liberata, illustrating the range of imaginative possibilities for understanding trauma in pre-modern war literature.

  17. Sex reassignment technology: the dilemma of transsexuals in Islam and Christianity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, Mohd Shuhaimi Bin Haji; Haneef, Sayed Sikandar Shah

    2014-04-01

    The birth of people with confused or ambiguous sex makeup as a biological fact since the annals of history has posed the challenge of accommodating them within the binary gender of sociocultural systems. In this process, the role of religion as a defining factor in social engineering has been paramount. Major religions, such as Islam and Christianity, have addressed this issue within the frame of their God-ordained laws by devising a set of moral and legal imperatives specific to the "third gender." Modern developments in medicine and biology, however, have made sex reassignment possible for this category of people, today called transsexuals. The question is: How do Islam and Christianity respond to it. After presenting an analytical view of both Muslim scholars and Christian religious authorities on the legitimacy of sex reassignment for transsexuals, this paper attempts to explore if such a dilemma can be resolved.

  18. Cohabitation and premarital sex amongst Christian youth in South Africa today: A missional reflection

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    Thinandavha D. Mashau

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This article explored the rising trends of cohabitation and premarital sex amongst Christian and non-Christian youth in South Africa that is becoming more socially acceptable. Moving from a premise of engaging in these practices, which is not biblically justified, to what a missional Christian church can do, this article sought to bring the numbers of those who cohabit and engage in premarital sex down. The thesis of this article was that a missional church should view cohabitation and premarital sex as frontiers that need to be crossed to save the lives of our youth by minimising premarital pregnancies and the spread of sexually transmitted diseases (the Human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] and Acquired immune deficiency syndrome [AIDS] pandemic included. This will also go a long way in saving the sinking image of marriage. It is the presupposition of this article that cohabitation and premarital sex are great threats to the institution of marriage.

  19. Good feelings in christianity and buddhism: religious differences in ideal affect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jeanne L; Miao, Felicity F; Seppala, Emma

    2007-03-01

    Affect valuation theory (AVT) predicts cultural variation in the affective states that people ideally want to feel (i.e., "ideal affect"). National and ethnic comparisons support this prediction: For instance, European Americans (EA) value high arousal positive (HAP) states (e.g., excitement) more and low arousal positive (LAP) states (e.g., calm) less than Hong Kong Chinese. In this article, the authors examine whether religions differ in the ideal affective states they endorse. The authors predicted that Christianity values HAP more and LAP less than Buddhism. In Study 1, they compared Christian and Buddhist practitioners' ideal affect. In Studies 2 and 3, they compared the endorsement of HAP and LAP in Christian and Buddhist classical texts (e.g., Gospels, Lotus Sutra) and contemporary self-help books (e.g., Your Best Life Now, Art of Happiness). Findings supported predictions, suggesting that AVT applies to religious and to national and ethnic cultures.

  20. Old Nordic and Christian elements in Saami ideas about the realm of the dead

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    Olof Pettersson

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available The fact that a word or concept has been borrowed from outside does not mean that the original content, the original ideas which the loan word in question expresses, have also been adopted. This is by no means the case when it is a question of abstract words and notions, such as the afterlife. A word, an idea, a custom is taken over but filled with new content; in its new context it acquires a genuinely Saami conceptual load, which has its original domiciliary rights in Saami, north Eurasian culture. The present brief notes on the Nordic and Christian influence on Saami ideas about the realm of the dead proceed from the Saami religion as a whole, examining and explaining it from an external perspective: what connecting-points are there in the "original" mother tradition for the new ideas which have been adopted over the course of time and which have been grafted on to the old? The first and fundamental starting-point for the study of the meeting of the Saami religion with the old Nordic and Christian ones will be the Saami religion itself in its Finno-Ugric and North Euroasiancontext and not the old Norse or Christian beliefs. The question is what has inspired ideas: Are they ideas which have emerged from the Saamis' own religion, or are these ideas the result of old Norse/Christian influence? As far as old Norse influence is concerned, its relevance seems to be limited to the saivo concept. The sources for Saami religion which we possess are not primary sources, which go back to the Lapps themselves; they have been assembled by outsiders. Those who compiled these records were "children of their time" and bound by the conceptual models of the day and by the frames of reference of their religion—Christianity. The Saami realm of death, Jabmeaimo, is Saami in character, with certain Christian elements (purgatory, heaven–hell, heavenly god–devil.

  1. The Essence of Hindu Doctrine and its Influence on Christianity in America and Europe

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    Alexandru-Corneliu Arion

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the topic of the identity of Hindu religion and its impact on Christianity in the West (i.e. in Europe and USA, which is to be seen, especially through Neo-Hindu movements (that occurred mainly during 1950s–1980s. Thus, features and key terms such as: authority of the Veda, Dharma, moksha, samsāra and karma, the paths to liberation, concept of God, Brahman-ātman, avidyā and māyā and AUM are sketchily presented in the first part of the paper. There are obvious differences between both Hindu schools and Christian faith which regards 1. Ultimate concern: For the Hindu, it is escape from the human condition, whereas for the Christian it is freedom from guilt, sin, and the devil; 2. Human nature: For the Christian it is creaturely and sinful; for the Hindu it is divine; 3. Human problem: It is moral sin for the Christian and intellectual ignorance for the Hindu; 4. Resolution: For the Christian it is a divine act at infinite cost to God; for the Hindu it is human effort, sometimes mixed with grace, without cost to the god. In the second part it is presented the debated problem of Gurus and their movements and Neo-Hindu movements sprung at the second half of 20th century, such as Satya Sai Baba, International Society for Krishna Consciousness and meditation for “transcendental consciousness” (TM. In any case, the Indian offspring demonstrate that we have come to an important moment in the history of religions, one in which new religious landscapes continually emerge like the images of a kaleidoscope and where people will have to learn whether it is possible to share the same planet.

  2. The end of early Christian adoptionism? A note on the invention of adoptionism, its sources, and its current demise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, P.B.A.

    2015-01-01

    ‘Adoptionism’ is an early Christian ‘heresy’ often associated with early strands of Jewish Christian tradition. It figures as such in handbooks of church history and New Testament studies alike. This essay investigates the origins of the concept of ‘adoptionism’ in the historiography of early Christ

  3. The Impact of Institutional Culture on Student Activism: A Multi-Case Study in Christian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Brian E.

    2013-01-01

    This study contributes to the description and meaning of student activism within the context of Christian college environments and cultures, and is interpreted through the sociological concept of symbolic interactionism. The purpose of this study is to help fill the void in the literature on student activism at Christian colleges and universities,…

  4. Preparing for God Knows What: The Importance of Gender-Sensitive Mentoring for Female Students on Christian Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangenberg, Katy

    2013-01-01

    Integrating prior research focused on gender climate and expectations in Christian higher education, this article describes mentoring models and strategies sensitive to dual family and career goals frequently expressed by female students. Discussion includes a review of literature relevant to women's mentoring on Christian campuses, exploration of…

  5. "Our Boys": The Christian Brothers and the Formation of Youth in the "New Ireland"1914-1944

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, Daire

    2015-01-01

    This essay investigates the development of the boys' magazine, "Our Boys," and how this became a powerful auxiliary to the Christian Brothers' work in schools. It championed the values that the Christian Brothers had propagated since their foundation in 1802. Often characterised as Celtic and Romantic, it was neither, but aimed at…

  6. A Decade of Christian Democratic Decline: The Dilemmas of the CDU, ÖVP and CDA in the 1990s

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duncan, Fraser

    2006-01-01

    This article explores Christian Democratic electoral decline in the 1990s through an examination of the key problems faced by the CDU, the ÖVP and the CDA. Although the problems of Christian Democracy in this period are identified as arising from exogenous changes, the article goes beyond a mechanis

  7. A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE ON RACIAL AND LINGUISTIC INTEGRATIONIN SOUTH AFRICAN CHRISTIAN CONGREGATIONS

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    Dawid Venter

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This is a study that uses data from a national survey of multicultural and multilingual Christian congregations in South Africa to examine the institutional factors that support the dominance of English in formerly segregated churches without a formal language policy. Data were collected by qualitative methods on the levels and types of linguistic integration (as well as racial and cultural incorporation in each of 60 congregations from nine Christian denominations across South Africa. The patterns found are best explained in terms of the articulation of formal and popular ideologies that contribute to institutional isomorphism across state and civil institutions.

  8. A study of the development of scientific literacy in students of conservative Christian schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Christopher D.

    A collision of concepts often occurs within the science classrooms of Christian schools. Students are faced with the task of accommodating biblical teachings with science theories that are not only incompatible but often directly conflicting. Teachers in the Christian school must choose to what extent and how this conflicting information will be addressed. Students must manage the tension caused by this conflict and then determine their own belief systems. High-stakes achievement testing also plays a role in the curriculum and instruction of science in the Christian school as well as public schools. Science literacy, a lifelong pursuit of understanding of the physical world, can be a victim of instructional strategies aimed at promoting student success on a specific test covering a specific set of facts instead of a comprehensive plan developed for individual-specific growth. This study was designed to gain an understanding of science literacy development of the middle school student in the Christian school. This was accomplished by comparing the individual component scores of the science Indiana Statewide Testing for Educational Progress-Plus achievement test for a 3-year period of 5 Christian schools in Indiana to the overall state averages. Armed with this information, the study, in its second phase, included interviews of the 7th-grade science teachers of the included schools. The goal of the interviews was to provide meaning and substance to the score comparisons. The purpose of the study was to understand how the students in Christian schools compared to the overall population of students in areas of science that may conflict with their Biblical beliefs. Additionally, this study was developed to understand how the science teachers in Christian schools managed the conflict that develops between the Bible and theories of science. Findings from this study showed that students in Christian schools continue to score higher than the overall population of students

  9. F. I. BUSLAEV ABOUT A CHRISTIAN PHASE IN THE HISTORY OF LITERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedoseeva T. V.

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The article attempts to evaluate the concept of the historical development of literature by F. I. Buslaev who is traditionally perceived as the founder of the mythological school in Russian science. The scholar identifies two basic phases of language and literature development, i. e. mythological and Christian ones. Buslaev analyzes complex interactions between pagan and Christian, religious and artistic features at different stages of the development of Russian literature up to Romanticism and Realism, as well as of the novel in the 19th-century art.

  10. G. N. Magliocca on Christian G. Fritz’s American Sovereigns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Christian G. Fritz, American Sovereigns:  The People and America’s Constitutional Tradition Before the Civil War.  New York:  Cambridge University Press, 2008. Christian G. Fritz’s American Sovereigns: The People and America’s Constitutional Tradition Before the Civil War is a useful resource on how the process of constitutional change was tamed during the early Republic.  The American Revolution rested on the principle that the people were sovereign, but Fritz focuses on the subsequent debat...

  11. Sword of Christ. Christian inspirations of Polish socialism before the January Uprising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Kuligowski

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the history of the Christian fraction of Polish socialism against the background of the era, from the very beginning until its end after the January Uprising. On the basis of the texts from the era the understanding of socialism, the principles of the program of Clusters of the Polish People and the anatomy of Fr. Piotr Ściegienny’s conspiracy have been reconstructed. The text reproduces the utopian ideas of social reconstruction by Zenon Świętosławski and Ludwik Królikowski and based on these the text also shows the place of Christian socialism in the Polish socialist thought.

  12. The role of Christian leadership in the workplace in China ----A case study of a medium-sized enterprise in Chinese service industry

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    This article examines religious leadership in workplace. It focuses on the practice of Christian leadership in Chinese business context. It attempts to, firstly, explore why employers adopt Christian leadership and promote Christian values in workplaces, and secondly, investigate employees’ reactions and understanding of the presence of Christian leadership in their organizations. The research is based on a private medium-sized enterprise in Chinese service industry of which the leader adopts...

  13. Histiocytosis versus (Hand-Schuller-Christian disease) - a case report; Histiocitose versus (sindrome de Hand-Schuller-Christian) - relato de caso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carneiro Filho, Jose Olimar; Leite, Marta Santos [Hospital Geral de Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Clinica Radiologica Beroaldo Jurema, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil)]. E-mail: olimar_carneiro@hotmail.com; Andrade Neto, Jose Moacyr [Hospital Universitario Lauro Wanderley, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil). Clinica Medica

    2002-04-01

    The authors report a case of a 4-year-old girl with headache, irritability, othorrea and unilateral exophtalmus. Computed tomography and plain films showed large lytic areas in the vault and base of the skull. No other bones were involved. The diagnosis of histiocytosis X (Hand-Schuller-Christian disease) was confirmed by bone marrow biopsy. This paper presents the cytological and radiological findings of this patient as well as a review of the literature. (author)

  14. THE CHRISTIANITY AVERSION TO NATURE ACCORDING TO FEUERBACH A AVERSÃO DO CRISTIANISMO À NATUREZA EM FEUERBACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Ferreira Chagas

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Feuerbach clearly states that Christian theology relates negatively in face of nature.  Religious disregard or devaluation of nature lead to consequences for the judgement of human nature by theology, for the latter condemns also the natural-sensitive dimension of man’s nature, and, in the face of it, glorifies the spirit. Due to the very fact that nature gives expression to objectivity, necessity, corporality, sensibility, it is the negative, so to speak, a proof for the limits of interiority, religious feelings, that is, a true barricade against illusion of a supernatural existence.  From this Christian view point it should, therefore, be cleared, denied.  Feuerback argues that God (the almighty, the sublime essence that was created by religious folly is only a gostly representation by humankind, a subjective konstruktion by man, lacking all nature’s frontiers and restrictions, and the Christian religion assisting man as a tool by means of which he tries do get rid of nature.
    Feuerbach deixa claro que a teologia cristã se relaciona negativamente ante a natureza. A depreciação ou desvalorização religiosa pela natureza tem consequências para o julgamento da natureza humana por parte da teologia, pois esta condena também a dimensão natural-sensível da natureza do homem e, frente a esta, enaltece o espírito. Precisamente porque a natureza expressa objetividade, necessidade, corporeidade, sensibilidade, é ela o negativo, por assim dizer uma prova dos limites da interioridade, do sentimento religioso, isto é, a barreira concreta que se opõe à ilusão de uma existência sobrenatural. Deste ponto de vista cristão, ela deve, portanto, ser eliminada, negada. Feuerbach argumenta que Deus (o todo supremo, a essência sublime, o qual a fantasia religiosa criou, é apenas uma representação fantasmagórica do gênero humano, uma construção subjetiva do homem, abstraída de todas as

  15. Christian Marclay : « iconoclasme » musical et interrogation sur l’instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Massin

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Le travail de Christian Marclay, artiste multiforme, improvisateur et performer, explore systématiquement un espace au confluent des arts sonores et visuels (vidéo, photos, installations, sculptures. Comment réfléchir sur le son à travers les objets tangibles et les représentations visuelles qui le réifient ? Comment produire – par une pratique musicale de platiniste notamment – de nouveaux sons et de nouveaux rapports à la musique ? Ce double axe d’interrogation rencontre nécessairement la question de l’instrument. Iconoclasme musical dans la double lignée du mouvement punk et de Fluxus ? Ou /et interrogation sur le fonctionnement de l’instrument dans la pratique vive d’une musique à réinventer ? On voudrait suggérer qu’une telle approche esthétique peut nourrir l’approche ontologique de l’instrument et, en paraphrasant Nelson Goodman, poser la question « quand y a-t-il instrument ? ».Christian Marclay : Musical « iconoclasism » and an instrumental interrogative Christian Marclay a polyvalent/multiform artist who improvises and performs. His work systematically explores the artistic space where audio arts and visual arts (video, photos, installations and sculpture merge. How can sound be considered in relation to tangible objects and visual representations that give it some actuality ? How can new sounds and new relationships with music be produced by any musical output for example of a turntablist ? This bilateral enquiry necessarily confronts the topic of the instrument. Is it a musical iconoclasism in the dynamic of both punk and Fluxus ? Or/and a questioning of the way the instrument works while a vivid musical practice has to be reinvented? It is suggested that such an esthetical approach may feed the ontological approach of the instrument and, to paraphrase Nelson Goodman, ask the question “When is something an instrument ?”.

  16. Dogmatic theology and Christian spiritual experience: rethinking the relationship with H. U. von Balthasar

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    Maria Abrão

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In proposing this reflection about the relationship between dogmatic theology and Christian spiritual experience, we want to demonstrate in this article how a great 20th century theologian, Hans Urs von Balthasar, invites the reader to enter into the reading and understanding of the historical and theological reasons that have guided some options and postures assumed, as well as to recognize the impacts caused both in the theology and in the spiritual experience and yet, more widely, in Christianity and its mission. The path chosen for this study starts from one of his works, L’amour seul est digne de foi, and relies, then, in the impressive intellectual patrimony of the author, by researching in the same the transversality of the theme. We will be, in the present work, vigilant to the threat of disruptions, particularly analyze the conception and the possibility of the Christian spiritual experience by inquiring the Old Testament, the New Testament and the Holy Fathers. What is the hope delineated in this dialogue? It will be possible to infer partial conclusions from the route made. Further researches will be essential in order to reach the understanding of everything that is at stake in the search for intelligibility of the Theology and of the Christian experience itself.

  17. A Chrysanthemum in the Garden: A Christian Kindergarten in the Empire of Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Yukiyo

    2015-01-01

    This is a study of the contribution of Christian missionaries to kindergarten education in the Empire of Japan. The study concerns an American Missionary woman, Annie L. Howe (1852-1943) and her kindergarten in Kobe, Japan. Annie L. Howe had a great impact on the history of early childhood education and is still remembered as the "Mother of…

  18. Religion, Sexual Orientation, and School Policy: How the Christian Right Frames Its Arguments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macgillivray, Ian K.

    2008-01-01

    The Christian Right opposes the inclusion of sexual orientation in school policies, charging that the schools are legitimating and promoting homosexuality. The arguments have moved past the trite, "God created Adam and Eve, not Adam and Steve," to claims of violations of parental rights and the First Amendment, often positioning…

  19. Bronzino and a bronze boar. Hans Christian Andersen and Stendhal in nineteenth-century Florence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klerck, A.R. de

    2015-01-01

    Bronzino e il porcellino: Hans Christian Andersen e Stendhal nella Firenze del XIX secolo La storia dell’arte dell’Ottocento non sembra aver avuto particolarmente a cuore gli artisti italiani delle generazioni successive ai grandi maestri rinascimentali, quali Raffaello e Michelangelo. Così, ad ese

  20. Dialogical inquiry as an instrument of the reconciliation of conflict in the hands of Christian leaders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.J. Hugo

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The apartheid system caused deep rifts in South African society, and even following the dawn of democracy, society in South Africa continues to struggle with violence and conflict, ethnic differences, mass action and poverty. Christian leaders have an important part to play in conflict resolution. Conflict management in organisations incorporates negotiation as a means of conflict resolution. A number of approaches to conflict resolution contribute to this approach; these include forcing, avoiding, accommodating, compromising and collaborating. Christian leaders, however, favour reconciliation as a means of resolving conflict. A Christian approach to conflict resolution needs to take cognisance of the existential aspect of conflict. Examples of such approaches are those of Dreyer, who speaks of reconciliation as a dilemma for forgiveness, and Kistner, who explores the way in which the use of narratives rather than reallife stories in the Truth and Reconciliation Commission reduced the severity of trauma. The social construction of trauma in “Mamelodi” by Brigid Hess, which presents a shift from forgiveness to a journey taken along with the perpetrators, and the belief of Desmond Tutu in the healing brought about by the ubuntu philosophy, are evaluated here as being detrimental to reconciliation. Based on the examples cited, an approach to conflict resolution entailing a clear integration of the biblical approach to reconciliation and dialogical inquiry (DI is proposed as an appropriate intervention approach for Christian leaders. The present contribution is offered from within the discipline of Practical Theology, with a focus on Pastoral Counseling.

  1. Spatial Dimensions of Christianity and Education in Western European History, with Legacies for the Present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Colin

    2010-01-01

    This article attempts to illustrate the significance of the geographical dimension of certain connections between Christianity and education in Europe. It does so by initially introducing the nature of the three components of the triangle with special reference to theory. Taking the fundamental geographical issue of scale, the discussion proceeds…

  2. Contextualizing the Tools of a Classical and Christian Homeschooling Mother-Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherfinski, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on the resurgence of classical and Christian education in the United States. This education has been especially popular with evangelical homeschooling mother-teachers. It seeks to cultivate the biblical virtues of truth, goodness, and beauty through contemplating scripture. The curriculum relies on the ancient Trivium tools of…

  3. A Noble Quest: Cultivating Christian Spirituality in Catholic Adolescents and the Usefulness of 12 Pastoral Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales, Arthur David

    2009-01-01

    The essay considers the process of cultivating Christian spirituality in Catholic adolescents. It will integrate and document official Catholic Church teachings on the subject and also unofficial scholarly reflections. The expose briefly defines adolescent spirituality and situates the process of cultivating adolescent spirituality in Catholic…

  4. Faculty Perceptions of Organizational Culture and Collegiality at Protestant Christian Universities in the Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jamie R.

    2013-01-01

    This study focused on faculty perceptions of organizational culture and collegiality at denominationally affiliated Christian colleges and universities in the Pacific Northwest. It was found that while faculty members perceive tension around their experience of organizational culture, the extent of their relationships as cultivated through formal…

  5. Religion and Social Hidden Curriculum--The Educative Influences of Christianity and Islam in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorent-Bedmar, Vincente; Llorent, Vicente J.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we highlight the similarities and differences between Christianity and Islam, on the social functions of women based on the sacred texts of both, references to a hidden social curriculum in the history. Faced with the growing religious pluralism in contemporary societies, we believe that the debate on how the two main religions in…

  6. Comparative Critical Discourse Analysis of Student and Teacher Editions of Secondary Christian American Literature Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agiro, Christa Preston

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the comparative application of critical discourse analysis to student and teacher editions of the two most widely used high school American literature textbooks by Christian publishers, examining them through the lens of critical theory. The study examined all parts of the student and teacher editions, excepting literary…

  7. A Christian educational perspective on the process oriented approach to intrinsic motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mechaéla Scott

    1992-03-01

    Full Text Available Within the classroom context, albeit school or university, intrinsic motivation can effectively be described and changed if a process-oriented approach is employed. The question is posed whether a process-oriented approach to motivation is acceptable to Christian education. To answer this question, intrinsic motivation and the process-oriented approach to motivation are described. A Christian view of self-knowledge and control, which are the main components of a process-oricnted approach to motivation, is subsequently given and the process-oriented approach to motivation is subjected to a Christian evaluation. The conclusions are drawn that this approach can fruitfully be used in Christian education, given that self-knowledge and control arc interpreted within the context of the concept of the student as God’s representative on earth and the fact that God equipped him adequately with cognitive, affective and conative abilities to respond to His call to discover, develop and rule the earth actively.

  8. Multiple Identity Considerations among African American Christian Men Experiencing Same-Sex Attraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarhouse, Mark A.; Nowacki-Butzen, Stephanie; Brooks, D. Fredrica

    2009-01-01

    The authors explored the experiences of African American men who identified as Christian and experienced same-sex attraction. Participants completed an online questionnaire addressing experiences of same-sex attraction; meaning attributed to their attractions; the sharing of their experiences with others; and perceptions regarding the intersection…

  9. Jacques Maritain and Some Christian Suggestions for the Education of Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Wade A.

    2005-01-01

    "What indeed has Athens to do with Jerusalem? What concord is there between the Academy and the Church?" According to third-century Christian apologist Tertullian, not much. From precisely the opposite perspective, the twentieth-century "secular humanist" John Dewey would have echoed Tertullian, although he was as greatly indebted to Christian…

  10. Perceptions of Administrators' Servant Leadership Qualities at a Christian University: A Descriptive Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Michael J.; Swails, Patricia; Mills, Randy

    2015-01-01

    The servant leadership model is often touted as the best model for Administrators to use at Christian schools of higher education. Research indicated, however, that a disconnection between how leaders of an organization perceived the strengths and weaknesses of their leadership skills and how followers perceived those skills can be detrimental to…

  11. Servant Leadership as Defined by K-12 ACSI Christian School Administrators in Arizona, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temperley, Austin J.

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to understand how ACSI certified Christian School leaders in Arizona lead their schools. There are a variety of leadership models available. Servant leadership, being a fairly recent phenomenon has been studied and implemented by numerous organizations and leaders with great organizational success and buy in. One area of…

  12. Faculty Perceptions of Organizational Leadership at Christian Colleges and Universities with Missions of Servant Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Marila Dollahite

    2011-01-01

    This study examined differences in faculty perceptions of organizational leadership at Christian institutions with servant leadership missions. The study evaluated faculty members' perceptions based on the independent variables of employment status (full- or part-time/adjunct), number of years employed at the institution, and attendance at an…

  13. Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorders among Students in Christian Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jacob J.

    2011-01-01

    This article explores current research, diagnosis, and common problems of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) among Christian college and university students. For years, ADHD was believed to dissipate as children mature, but current research contradicts that belief. Proctor (2009) and others detail the continuance of ADHD into…

  14. The Reasons for Prejudices against Women in Christian Culture of Medieval Times

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨心彤

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at further analyzing the critical reasons for prejudices against women during medieval times which roots deeply in Christian culture.Drawing strength from the past makes it easier to address gender discrimination through modern feminism.Thus,human community can evolve into something far better.

  15. Christian Resistance to Gay-Proselytism in a Secular Nigeria: Anathema or Social Heroism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endong Floribert

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The criminalization of homosexuality in Nigeria has partially been inspired and acclaimed by a number of religious schools of thought, including Christian opinion leaders. Such an influence of religion on politics has been seriously questioned. Using observations and literary sources, this paper underlines the unconstitutionality of Christian antigay proselytism at the political sphere of the Nigerian State, anchoring its claim on the constitutional provision stipulating the secular character of Nigeria. It however interprets such a move (the “influential” Christian anti-gay proselytism as an inevitable expression of the religious character of Nigeria’s social and cultural spheres. Furthermore, the paper argues that the Nigerian Federation is “fully secular” only on paper and not in practice. Secularity is partially observed at the political sphere of the State. Religion and populism continue to shape major socio-political schemes (as seen in the criminalization of homosexuality in Nigeria. With such a socio-political influence of religion, legislative projects such as the Same-Sex Marriage (Prohibition Act and political strategies such as the Nigerian Government’s resistance against western gay-proselytism can only be massively celebrated. In line with this, (Christian anti-gay proselytism at the Nigeria’s political sphere is logically viewed less as an anathema, and more as socio-political heroism.

  16. Exploring the Interface between Christian Faith and Education: An Annotated List of Current Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkness, Allan G.

    2013-01-01

    Seventeen academic journals which explore aspects of the interface between the Christian faith and educational concerns, and which are currently available internationally and in English, are listed. Annotations for each journal include publication and editorial details, website access, sponsoring institution, stated focus, educational content…

  17. An appreciation of Christiane Groehen: the correspondence between Charles Darwin and Anton Dohrn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Anton Dohrn was introduced to Darwinism by Ernst Haeckel during his student years at Jena, and became an eager disciple of Charles Darwin's work. He founded the Stazione Zoologica in 1872. Darwin became a patron of Dohrn's Stazione, and the two naturalists corresponded regularly. This article discusses their relationship and the contributions of Christiane Groeben to its elucidation.

  18. On the Importance of Subject Matter in Mathematics Education: A Conversation with Erich Christian Wittmann

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinwunmi, Kathrin; Höveler, Karina; Schnell, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Erich Christian Wittmann is one of the primary founders of mathematics education research as an autonomous field of work and research in Germany. The interview presented here reflects on his role in promoting mathematics education as a design science. The interview addresses the following topics: (1) The importance of subject matter in…

  19. Ecumenical Theology as Cross-Cultural Experience in Christian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, John T.

    2006-01-01

    Ecumenical Theology involves not only the academic study of church-separating issues, but also the ecclesial commitment of each individual Christian. Accordingly, a course on the "History and Theology of the Ecumenical Movement" should utilize the ecumenical experiences of both instructors and students. A variety of pedagogical means can be used…

  20. Altruism and the Flourishing Teacher: Exploring a Christian Theology of Love

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthias, Laurie R.

    2016-01-01

    This article responds to Chris Higgins' (2010) claim that perpetuating the myth of altruism is a factor that leads to teacher burnout, thus making "flourishing teacher" an oxymoron. It does so by exploring various views of the Christian concepts of agape, kenosis, and desire, debunking some persistent definitions that linger in Christian…

  1. Luther's Antisemitism in Historical Context: A Necessary Discussion for Christian Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Martin Luther remains a complex, contradictory figure whose impact on modern Western history cannot be overstated. Among the most controversial aspects of Luther's work is his ambivalent perspective of the Jews. The early Luther viewed the Jews warmly, depicting them as Christianity's historical and religious ancestors. Later, however, he…

  2. Saved at Home: Christian Branding and Faith Nights in the "Church of Baseball"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterworth, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    Baseball has enjoyed its status as the "national pastime" in part because it has been associated with democracy. To the extent that baseball, as an institution of civil religion, fosters pluralism and inclusion, it can indeed be viewed in democratic terms. In recent years, the advent of conservative Christian events called "Faith Nights" threatens…

  3. Alcohol Consumption among Athletes and Non-Athletes in Christian Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, William S.; Allen, Bert; Drinnon, Joy

    2010-01-01

    This research was designed to be a pilot study that examined the differences in heavy episodic drinking and perceptions of drinking between athletes and non-athletes. To the authors' knowledge, this study is the first of alcohol consumption between these groups at Christian-affiliated colleges. A random sample of participants comprised…

  4. Today’s Young Women’s Christian Association of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    THE Young Women’s Christian Association of China, founded in 1890, has experienced many changes through the years. While the China of today has opened her gates and astonished the world with a speedy development and reform, how does the YWCA fit into this quickly changing climate?

  5. A religion of film : experiencing Christianity and videos beyond semiotics in rural Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merz, Johannes Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Three Christian films have become popular in the Commune of Cobly of today’s Republic of Benin, notably the American “Jesus Film” (1979), the American-Ivorian film “La Solution” (1994) and the Beninese video film “Yatin: Lieu de souffrance” (2002). The discussion centres on how people receive and un

  6. A New Mission for Open Dialogue with Non-Christians in Higher Education Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Peter Tze Ming

    2005-01-01

    Will our Christian colleges in Asia serve as possible venues for the cultivation of communication and understandings among people of different cultures? This is the issue addressed in this paper and the author attempts to give a report of the work of Chung Chi College overall, with special reference to her distinctive contribution as a Christian…

  7. North American Christian Study Abroad Programs: Wheaton College and Whitworth University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Lindy

    2015-01-01

    Study abroad programs are in vogue today, especially among Christian colleges and universities. It is, therefore, appropriate to ask tough questions of these programs. Do they help our students become more mature followers of Jesus? Are they respectful of people in the target culture? College and university leaders must focus in particular on how…

  8. Narrating Lives, Narrating Faith: "Organic Hybridity" for Contemporary Christian Religious Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Mai-Anh Le

    2010-01-01

    This article proposes that Christian Religious Education (CRE) today requires the practice of "organic hybridity" in fluid and shifting "diasporic spaces," the prerequisite for which is the recognition that "hybrid subjectivities" is characteristic of our current postmodern, postcolonial, transnational, globalized world. Toward this aim, CRE must…

  9. The Need for Changes in the Nature of Christian Seminary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeynes, William H.

    2012-01-01

    This article examines today's functioning of Christian seminaries. In contemporary America, the overwhelming percentage of seminaries focus on student intellectual development and theological accuracy. The author observes, however, that such an emphasis is a major departure from seminary historical practices in the United States and is contrary to…

  10. The Mirror of Learning: Towards a Theology of Reflection in Christian Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, John

    2011-01-01

    Most programmes of adult Christian learning today expect students to engage in theological reflection. The theoretical underpinning for this is often drawn from secular models of reflective practice, made "theological" by the subject matter for reflection. This article aims to establish an explicitly theological basis for the use of the metaphor…

  11. Perception and Experience of Transformative Learning and Faculty Authenticity among North American Professors of Christian Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hokyung Paul

    2012-01-01

    Through convenient purposeful sampling, 16 professors from North American Professors of Christian Education were recruited for this study. Through consulting key personnel in NAPCE a pool of participants were attained (n = 16). The findings from the research study revealed the elements contributing to the way that participants experienced and…

  12. How Christian Spiritual and Religious Beliefs Help and Hinder Counselors' Empathy toward Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Marie; Borgen, William A.

    2010-01-01

    The critical incident technique was used to examine how counselors' religion and spirituality help and hinder counselor empathy toward clients. Twelve counselors holding Christian beliefs identified 242 helping and 25 hindering incidents that formed 14 helping and 3 hindering categories. Categories reflected counselors relying on a natural…

  13. When God's Word Isn't Good Enough: Exploring Christian Discourses in the College Composition Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Heather E.

    2009-01-01

    This study--a hybrid project that blends empirical research traditions from the social sciences and composition studies--examines how discourses of Christianity and composition operate in college writing classrooms. Conducted at a large, public, Midwestern university, this qualitative study analyzes surveys and interviews of writing instructors…

  14. Invent--Innovate--Implement--Interview with Dr. Christian Schaefer, Senior Vice President Sales, EV Group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Dr. Christian Schaefer, Senior Vice President Sales of EV Group, has 15 years of international management experience in the materials and equipment industry. During his tenure, Schaefer spearheaded the consolidation 9f RHI following the first Asian crisis and guided the company through major mergers and acquisitions,accomplishments that ultimately helped the company increase market share, revenues and profits.

  15. Driven to Achieve: First-Generation Students' Narrated Experience at a Private Christian College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rood, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the narrated experiences around the college choice and persistence of junior and senior first-generation students attending a private Christian college. Using interviews and focus groups, the author identified three key factors that emerged from the data: faculty, faith, and family. Faculty involvement was critical…

  16. The Contribution of Secular Social Theory to Research in Christian Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    This article argues that educators should be aware of the way that Christian beliefs interact with the structure and practices of secular education policies and that established secular social theory can help them to do this. Drawing on an example from empirical research, the author models how concepts associated with Bourdieu's social theory can…

  17. Program Evaluation on the Implementation of a Middle School Concept in Private Christian Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, James Chapman

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the level of implementing a middle school concept in three private Christian schools using Daniel Stufflebeam's CIPP model of program evaluation. The National Middle School Survey was used to measure faculty and administrative perceptions of both the value and actual implementation of middle school…

  18. Is Bible Translation "Imperialist"? Challenging Another Anti-Christian Bias in the Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian, William

    2007-01-01

    A strong anti-Christian bias exists in the modern American university. It has been documented by George Marsden in his 1994 book, "The Soul of the American University," and by a growing number of other scholars. The modern university response to the history of Bible translation movements provides another example of the anti-Christian…

  19. Metaphorical Maps of Improbable Fictions: The Semantic Parables of Christian Morgenstern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Robert Ian

    1995-01-01

    States that Christian Morgenstern made a fundamental point of semantics clear by making any absolute faith in words ridiculous. Describes other pieces of Morgenstern's poetry, and examines its implications in semantic terms. Points out that Morgenstern ridiculed the assumption that what is said must be sensible, as if the world must obey human…

  20. Factors Affecting Christian Parents' School Choice Decision Processes: A Grounded Theory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prichard, Tami G.; Swezey, James A.

    2016-01-01

    This study identifies factors affecting the decision processes for school choice by Christian parents. Grounded theory design incorporated interview transcripts, field notes, and a reflective journal to analyze themes. Comparative analysis, including open, axial, and selective coding, was used to reduce the coded statements to five code families:…

  1. A Distinctive Vision for the Liberal Arts: General Education and the Flourishing of Christian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Cynthia A.

    2016-01-01

    This article argues that a coherent and inspired general education program, infused with a deliberate vision of the liberal arts, is crucial to the flourishing of Christian higher education. This article begins by describing the context and status of general education, emphasizing how this element of the educational program falls short in…

  2. The enduring mission of Moses : Indonesian Muslim and Christian Representation of a Jewish Prophet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doeka, F.Y.A.

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation concentrates discusses the reception and interpretation of Moses among Muslims and Christians in modern Indonesia. The first five chapter are devoted to Muslim interpretations. Much attention is given to the five main Indonesian commentaries on the Qur’ān, namely Zainal Arifin Abba

  3. Challenges of Postmodern Thought in Christian Higher Education Institutions: Implications for Ethical Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darroux, Dean A.

    2013-01-01

    The study investigated the question: What is the process that Christian higher education administrators and faculty members used when understanding the challenges of postmodern thought at the institutions, and what are the challenges for ethical leadership? Utilizing a grounded theory methodology, the researcher sought to develop a theory that…

  4. Christian Librarians and the Ethics of the Library Bill of Rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Kaihoi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This study is the follow up to a pilot study entitled “Christian Librarians and the Library Bill of Rights: a survey of opinions and professional practice” published in the Spring 2014 issue of The Christian Librarian.  Using an online survey, it sought to discover how librarians working in a variety of contexts who self-identified as Christians responded to the ALA’s ethical standards as embodied in the Library Bill of Rights.  The results showed general support for the Library Bill of Rights and its ethics, though a majority of respondents had at least some way in which they adhered to the Library Bill of Rights less than fully, and a significant minority (around 40% had areas in which they differed with its ethics, usually in the form of feeling that certain types of content (e.g., pornography, harmful materials, etc. could or should be limited.  The responses in this survey would seem to support the notion that many Christian librarians do sometimes perceive a need to place the value of defending what they perceive to be true and right above the call to remain professionally impartial about certain kinds of content.

  5. Comparing the Financial Literacy of Public School, Christian School, and Homeschooled Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Tricia

    2016-01-01

    The 2008 recession underscored public concern that financial illiteracy has costs that are not limited to the individual who makes poor financial decisions. Considering that college students with limited financial experience are making legally binding decisions, this study explored the personal finance literacy and behavior of Christian college…

  6. Transformational Christian College and University Presidents: An Examination of Fundraising Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrows, Keith O.

    2016-01-01

    The nature of presidential leadership styles at Christian higher education institutions was examined through the lens of fundraising. There has been a growing understanding that college and university presidents are being called on to play a more significant role in the leadership of their institutions, particularly in light of the fiscal…

  7. [Guides for the National Observance of Children's Sabbaths: Christian, Catholic, and Jewish Guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Children's Defense Fund, Washington, DC.

    These three booklets were designed to help Christian, Catholic, and Jewish congregations and parishes participate in the National Observance of Children's Sabbaths on October 16-18, 1992. During the Children's Sabbath, religious services and programs focus on the needs of children and ways in which the religious community can help meet those…

  8. Enhancing Global Service-Learning with Partnerships as an Engagement Strategy for Christian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bish, Gregory T.; Lommel, John

    2016-01-01

    Global engagement programming across higher education continues to expand as institutional leaders and practitioners strive to meet global citizenship and civic engagement outcomes. This article presents case study research on a global service-learning partnership, the "Christian University" (CU) Wheelchair Project, which has involved…

  9. Global Learning and Development as an Engagement Strategy for Christian Higher Education: A Macro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Allyn; Hawkins, Greg

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to better understand the variety of student and faculty global learning and development programs by member institutions of the Council for Christian Colleges & Universities (CCCU), and what motivated the creation of these types of programs. Although various forms of global engagement programming were examined,…

  10. International Christian Schoolteachers' Traits, Characteristics, and Qualities Valued by Third Culture Kids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linton, Dale B.

    2015-01-01

    In this qualitative grounded theory study, 24 participants, referred to as "third culture kids" (or TCKs), ages 18-30 years, who had previously attended international Christian schools were interviewed to determine the dispositions they valued in their teachers. Incorporating principles of grounded theory, a series of rigorous steps were…

  11. Character Education in Christian Higher Education: A Historical Analysis and Contemporary Challenge (Part I)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeynes, William H.; Robinson, David

    2010-01-01

    In this set of two articles, the authors summarize the history of the practice of character instruction in Christian higher education. They examine character education beginning with the founding of Harvard in 1636 to contemporary times. They note that virtually every historian, theologian, and social scientist acknowledges that character…

  12. Getting It Write: What Christian Institutions of Higher Education Can Learn from "Basic" Writers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Mez, Jack

    2009-01-01

    This article examines how institutions of higher education conflate moral and descriptive terms for good, bad, remedial, and basic writing students. It outlines some of the social and historical developments that have led to exclusionary admissions and curricular requirements, and identifies how Christian institutions are complicit in these…

  13. Character Education in Christian Higher Education: A Historical Analysis and Contemporary Challenge (Part II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, David; Jeynes, William H.

    2010-01-01

    In this pair of two articles, the authors summarize the history of the practice of character instruction in Christian higher education. They examine character education beginning with the founding of Harvard in 1636 to contemporary times. They note that virtually every historian, theologian, and social scientist acknowledges that character…

  14. Dorothy L. Sayers and C. S. Lewis: Christian Postmodernism beyond Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuasa, Kyoko

    2012-01-01

    Modern critics do not consider science fiction and mystery novels to be "serious reading", but Dorothy L. Sayers and C. S. Lewis questioned the boundaries between "popular" and "serious" literature. Both Christian writers critically discuss the spiritual crisis of the modern world in each fiction genre. This paper…

  15. Is Discrimination against Evangelical Christians a Problem in Social Work Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolen, Rebecca M.; Dessel, Adrienne B.

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the literature regarding discrimination by social work practitioners and educators against evangelical Christian social workers. We examine the methodology of articles that compare religiosity and political ideology between social workers and the general population and also of articles that address discrimination against…

  16. Velopharyngeal incompetence in a patient with multifocal eosinophilic granuloma (Hand-Schüller-Christian disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, E R; Garver, K L; Metz, H C; McWilliams, B J; Skolnick, M L; Garrett, W S

    1982-08-01

    The diagnosis and management of velopharyngeal insufficiency in a 16-year-old boy with multifocal eosinophilic granuloma (Hand-Schüller-Christian disease) is described. Medical history, speech and velopharyngeal valving information, and the results of clinical management are presented.

  17. The New Christian Right: Communication, Conflict, and the Politics of Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Michael

    Noting that language and politics both grow out of the underlying processes of social agreement and dispute, this paper analyzes the political language of the New Christian Right (NCR) movement as it is found in the national print media. Various sections of the paper discuss the following: (1) the background of the NCR, the characteristics of the…

  18. Assessing Christian-Faith and Cognitive Development in College Students: CFCDS Instrument Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, Laura S.

    2013-01-01

    What happens when students go to college? An important outcome of college attendance is student cognitive development. Part of that developmental process is learning how to address contrasting values, beliefs, knowledge structures, and worldviews critically. This study addressed the relationship between cognitive and Christian-faith development in…

  19. Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology: Christian N. L. Olivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Christian N. L. Olivers, winner of the Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology, is cited for outstanding research on visual attention and working memory. Olivers uses classic experimental designs in an innovative and sophisticated way to determine underlying mechanisms. He has formulated important theoretical…

  20. CHRISTIAN TRADITIONS IN 20TH—21ST CENTURY RUSSIAN FANTASY WRITING (ARTICLE 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeniy Mikhaylovich Neyolov

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The article looks at the various aspects of appropriating the Christian traditions by Russian fantasy writing. We show that the Christian tradition has most significantly revealed itself in the genre of fantasy writing which is in high demand among early 21st century readers. Both the content and the formal poetics of this tradition have been taken into account here. One of the typical fantasy protagonists is a hero yearning for God, which is a familiar staple of Russian literature. By default fantasy deals with demonolog, thus becoming closely linked to Christian tradition of the struggle against evil. Demon (or devil being a popular character in fantasy writing, the forgotten traditions of Old Russian literature get re-actualized in 20th and early 21st century and the demonological image includes both the demonic and the human. We conclude that contemporary fantasy authors develop their own versions of the Christian tradition, removing the conflict between the “faith” and “invention” typical for fantasy writing.

  1. Determinants of Secondary School Learners Performance in Christian Religious Education in Lelan Sub County, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaranga, Stephen; Simiyu, Patrick Cheben

    2016-01-01

    In Kenya, Christian Religious Education is taught and examined by the Kenya National Examinations Council in the Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education at the end of the four years of Secondary Education cycle. The teaching of this subject in Secondary Schools ensures that learners are offered an opportunity to develop morally and spiritually…

  2. Use of Distance Education by Christian Religion to Train, Edify and Educate Adherents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyanarayana, P.; DK Meduri, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Distance Education has been growing fast, in a marvelously diverse fashion. The efficiency, effectiveness, validity and utility of distance teaching-learning are on increase. All communities and religious groups are making use of distance learning methodology to upgrade their knowledge, skills and attitudes. Christian educational institutions in…

  3. The influence of religiosity on violent behavior of adolescents: a comparison of Christian and Muslim religiosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baier, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Different criminological theories assume that religiosity protects against violent behavior. Up to now, this assumption is tested empirically almost exclusively for the Christian religiosity. The study presented here questions whether such a relationship between religiosity and violent behavior could be found for Muslims, likewise. Using a German-wide representative school survey of 16,545 male students in the ninth grade, who belong either to a Christian or an Islamic denomination, it can be revealed that only for Christians a higher religiosity correlates with a lower rate of violent behavior. This influence of Christian religiosity can be explained by mainly control theory variables. For Muslims, there is no significant correlation between religiosity and violent behavior in a bivariate analysis. A multivariate analysis, however, reveals a suppression effect: Controlling for alcohol consumption, Muslim religiosity increases violent behavior. In addition, high religious Muslims agree more often to norms of masculinity and consume more often media violence, which are risk factors of violent behavior. Accordingly, it can be concluded that religiosity is not a violence-protecting factor in general; instead, a more differentiated view for separate religious groups is necessary.

  4. [The movement to establish a Christian medical school proposed by medical missionary "John C. Berry"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuseda, Tetsuya

    2014-12-01

    John C. Berry (1847-1936) came to Japan in 1872, worked as a medical missionary for the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions (ABCFM . He attempted to influence Japanese medical education toward a more Christian-influenced approach. In early Meiji, the Japanese government adopted the German language and principles for its national medical program. This promoted a tendency towards the adoption of German concepts in Japanese medical education. The director of of Doshisha, Niijima, was concerned about such a tendency, which he considered rather science-oriented or skeptical and atheistic, according to his writings. The tradition of corruption among Japanese doctors also deeply disappointed him. Niijima sought the type of medical institution in which the students would learn Western medicine based on a moral base of Christianity, presumably in Kyoto, to take advantage of the foundation of Doshisha, which had already been built. Missionaries in Japan, especially Berry, supported Niijima's intentions. During his visit to the U.S. he promoted a mission statement in support of Niijima's idea in order to raise funds among Christian communities. This project produced a resolution among the Christian community in Philadelphia to establish an interdenominational foundation for establishing such a medical institution and it encouraged other cities to follow. However, the American Board of Missionaries in Japan disagreed with the idea of its being interdenominational, and then, along with other struggles such as the lack of funding in light of the economic slowdown, and the widespread social rejection of Christianity in Japan, the project fell apart and was suspended.

  5. Analysis on Zeng Guofan's View of Christianity%试析曾国藩的基督教观

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李传斌

    2012-01-01

    As an alien culture,Christianity was spread into modern China under the background of western powers' invasion.So religious culture and politics became two viewpoints from which modern Chinese looked on Christianity.From the viewpoint of religious culture,Zeng Guofan's attitude towards Christianity changed from anti-Christianity for the "protection of Confucianism" to value Christianity's religion status;from the viewpoint of politics,Zeng Guofan adopted Christianity's privilege,limited Christianity's invasion outside the treaty,at last he hoped to revise Christian clause of unequal treaty.Generally speaking,Zen Guofan's attitude toward Christianity had a course of change,had it's rationality and shortcoming.%作为一种异质文化,基督教是在西力东渐的背景下传入近代中国的。因此,宗教文化与政治成为近代中国人看待基督教的两个重要视角。从宗教文化的角度看,曾国藩对基督教的认识经历了一个从"卫道"对抗到正视其宗教地位的过程;从政治的角度看,曾国藩主张承认传教特权、限制基督教约外侵权,最终希望修改传教条约。总体而论,曾国藩的基督教观经历了一个变化的过程,有其合理性的一面,但也存在自身的缺陷。

  6. Pühaduse performatiivsus ja kristlik teater / The Performativity of Sacrality and Christian Theatre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madis Kolk

    2015-06-01

    s prior determinations, which emphasizes first, that sacred theatre induces a change of consciousness in which the subject and the object merge; second, the liminality of the intersubjective environment surrounding the experience of the sacred, in which the verbal and the transcendental unite. When describing the influence of the logocentrism of Christian culture on the experience of sacredness, Yarrow draws on the views of Mark C. Taylor, Rudolf Otto, Mircea Eliade and Georges Bataille. All of these thinkers critique the rationalism attributed to monotheistic religion, which gives an important place to Christ as the mediator of God’s transcendental truth, the logos, and sacred scripture, all of which differ from the numinous experience of the mystic. The art of so-called sacred theatre, where, at least according to tradition, the performative mission, dramaturgy, stage design, and public reception are all part of a unified contemplative whole seems to be missing in Western culture. Indeed, this is what several Western stage experimenters have been looking for, and in their search they have looked eastward. New viewpoints with respect to the perception of a work of art were gained in the „performative turn“ of the end of the 20th century; besides the text, proponents of this new direction became interested in the sensory and bodily processes of creativity and reception. Erika Fischer-Lichte and others have conceptualized these processes on a more general level and reflected upon the aesthetics of performativity; insodoing they have pointed to a dualism in the Western aesthetics of performativity, recognizing that there is a contradiction between the referential, semiotic pole of art and its performative dimension. Although the reasons for this split can be sought in the very origins of Western art as well as that of medieval Christian art, relations between theatre and the church differ according to confession; Yarrow’s definitions do not apply to Christianity as

  7. Feminism and Faith: Exploring Christian Spaces in the Writing of Sara Maitland and Michèle Roberts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arina LUNGU-CIRSTEA

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available En 1983, les féministes britanniques Sara Maitland et Jo Garcia ont publié Walking on the Water (London : Virago, une collection d’essais, de récits, de poèmes et de photos produits par des femmes sur le thème de la spiritualité. Les contributrices ont été en particulier invitées à explorer la relation entre leur identité féministe et leurs croyances religieuses. Le ton de ces contributions varie fortement, allant de l’envie passionnée de concilier les objectifs du féminisme avec le christianisme à un rejet total de l’Eglise comme institution patriarcale suprême. Cet article met en dialogue des récits diamétralement opposés du rapport entre christianisme et féminisme en s’intéressante plus particulièrement à deux des contributrices, Sara Maitland (1950 - et Michèle Roberts (1949 - . Ces deux écrivaines, qui se sont activement impliquées dans les mouvements féministes des années 1970, ont toutes deux lutté pour se réconcilier avec leur héritage chrétien. Néanmoins, alors que Maitland tente essentiellement de revisiter le christianisme en y incorporant les points essentiels d’une idéologie féministe, Roberts sent le besoin impérieux de se défaire de son identité religieuse afin de devenir indépendante ; en effet, dans son autobiographie Paper Houses (2007 elle décrit son éducation catholique comme “autoritaire et misogyne” (16. Cet article explore les façons dont l’identité spirituelle se construit dans le jeu complexe des interactions entre féminisme et foi. Il se propose, dans une perspective comparatiste, d’analyser d’une part le recueil de nouvelles de Sara Maitland intitulé A Book of Spells, et d’autre part, le roman acclamé de Michèle Roberts, Daughters of the House. Dans ces écrits, Maitland et Roberts ont un objectif commun qui est de renégocier la place des femmes dans l’histoire chrétienne dont elles reconnaissent – il est vrai à partir de perspectives diff

  8. Christian theology of life, death and healing in an era of antiretroviraltherapy: reflections on the responses of some Botswana churches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togarasei, Lovemore

    2010-12-01

    This article discusses Christian understandings of life, death and healing in the context of antiretroviral (ARV) therapy. The discussion is a response to the reactions of some Botswana Pentecostal and African Independent Churches to the availability of ARV therapy, as reflected in several media reports of churches discouraging church members' use of ARV drugs. The article argues that this negative attitude to ARVs is a result of the Christian churches' understandings of life, death and healing through traditional Bible-based interpretations. Based on this, some churches view the ability of ARVs to prolong life as challenging God who is the source of life and healing. The article argues that this attitude grows from an initial Christian understanding of HIV and AIDS as a form of God's punishment on humanity for its sins. The article thus argues for the development of 'a Christian theology of ARVs' that sees ARVs as a manifestation and not a contradiction of God's healing powers.

  9. Some Particularities in the Doctrine of the Trinity as Found in the Works of Christian Arabic Authors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Davydenkov

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This articles examines the Trinitarian theology of Christian Arab-speaking medieval theologians. The author explains that there are differences in the way the doctrine of the Trinity is presented by these theologians and by the way it is handled by their Greek and Latin counterparts. He devotes special attention to the question regarding the influence of Islamic philosophy and theology on the Trinitarian theology of these Arabic speaking Christians

  10. Pro-abstinence Discourses and the Definition of the Conservative Christian Identity in the Contemporary United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greslé-Favier, Claire

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This article argues that pro-abstinence discourses play a key role in the definition of the conservative Christian identity in contemporary United States. Using conservative Christian authors coming from various perspectives in the pro-abstinence movements I explain how they, in my view, use abstinence to reinforce and reassert concepts which play a crucial role in the definition of their community's identity.

  11. Another Race between Islam and Christianity: The Case of Flores, Southeast Indonesia, 1900-1920

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Steenbrink

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Islam and Christianity arrived in the south-eastern islands of the Indonesian archipelago in two waves. The first wave started in about 1480 with the arrival of Arab and Indian (Gujerati traders in the spice islands of the Northern Moluccas: particularly in Ternate and Tidore. They arrived through the island of Flores, and probably very quickly moved across to the island of Timor as well, to engage in trade in sandalwood, horses and slaves. In south-east Indonesia, as in most regions of the archipelago, the arrival of Islam occurred somewhat earlier than the coming of the first Christians. At that time, the two main centers of trade in south-east Indonesia, which also became centers for the new religions, were the islands of Solor and Ende.Copyright (c 2014 by SDI. All right reserved.DOI: 10.15408/sdi.v9i1.674

  12. Taking up the cudgels against gay rights? Trends and trajectories in African Christian theologies on homosexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Klinken, Adriaan S; Gunda, Masiiwa Ragies

    2012-01-01

    Against the background of the HIV epidemic and the intense public controversy on homosexuality in African societies, this article investigates the discourses of academic African Christian theologians on homosexuality. Distinguishing some major strands in African theology, that is, inculturation, liberation, women's and reconstruction theology, the article examines how the central concepts of culture, liberation, justice, and human rights function in these discourses. On the basis of a qualitative analysis of a large number of publications, the article shows that stances of African theologians are varying from silence and rejection to acceptance. Although many African theologians have taken up the cudgels against gay rights, some "dissident voices" break the taboo and develop more inclusive concepts of African identity and African Christianity.

  13. Both Islam and Christianity Invite to Tolerance: A Commentary on Dirk Baier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamati, Payman; Naji, Zohrehsadat; Koutlaki, Sofia A; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa

    2015-12-01

    Baier recently published an interesting original article in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence. He compared violent behavior (VB) between Christians and Muslims and concluded that religiosity was not a protecting factor against violence and that Muslim religiosity associated positively with increased VB. We appreciate the author's enormous efforts on researching such an issue of relevance to today's world. However, in our view, the article has methodological weaknesses in terms of participants, instruments, and statistical analyses, which we examine in detail. Therefore, Baier's results should be interpreted more cautiously. Although interpersonal violence may sometimes be observable among Muslims, we do not attribute these to Islam's teachings. In our opinion, both Islam and Christianity invite to tolerance, peace, and friendship. So, the comparison of such differences and the drawing of conclusions that may reflect negatively on specific religious groups need better defined research, taking into consideration other basic variables in different communities.

  14. Stoning for Adultery in Christianity and Islam and its Implementation in Contemporary Muslim Societies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azman bin Mohd Noor

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This paper examines the scriptural bases of stoning for adultery in the two sister religions and its implementation in contemporary Muslim societies. Based upon archival and documentary research, this study found that stoning to death for adultery is prescribed in both the Bible and the Qur’ān. Christians, however, have abandoned this law and it is no longer practiced in any Christian-dominant country. With the expansion of Western imperialism, the same trend seems to be taking place in Muslim societies. There are a few Muslim countries that are trying to implement this law but they face a good deal of criticism from the Western media and other secular organizations, consequently, shying away from implementing this punishment in public.

  15. Christianity and the African traditional religion(s: The postcolonial round of engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David T. Adamo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This article concerned itself with the modern encounter between Christianity and African Indigenous Religion (AIR in Africa. It is essentially a postcolonial approach to what AIR and its essential characteristics is: God and humanity, sacrifices, afterlife and ancestors. The rapid growth of many religions in Africa and the revival of AIR in postcolonial Africa have made inter-religious dialogue an urgent necessity. Unlike the colonial encounter with AIR, which was characterised by hostility and the condemnation of AIR, the postcolonial encounter should be characterised by mutual respect, understanding, tolerance, and some level of freedom, liberation and genuineness. In this way, suspicion will be reduced, because despite the adherents� confession of Christianity, AIR is not about to be extinct.

  16. [Illness in the arts of late antiquity: some aspects of a Christian iconographic programme].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lançon, B

    1996-01-01

    Nowadays concepts of Art are quite different from those of Antiquity. For instance, the healing ex votos which were sculpted in wood and dedicated to Sequana in the IIIrd century were undoubtedly seen as crude works: today, they are considered as expressions of popular arts, just like african statues. If art is defined by an esthetic purpose, and not only pragmatic, we can see no trace of sicks in the arts of Late Antiquity. There are only some examples in christian art, where Jesus' healing miracles are illustrated. Their iconographic representation doesn't dissociate illness from healing. This fact is highly representative of a christian iconographic programme, linking illness to carnal condition and healing to salvation. So, the arts of Late Antiquity teach us almost anything about disease, but very much about the perception of it and its pastoral use.

  17. Ethnic Identities and Christianities between Late Antiquity and Early Medieval Period

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    Walter Pohl

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to re-read Roman-Barbarian ethnicity as a cultural construct not least based on Biblical models viewed and interpreted as founded as well as authoritative instruments of self-definition. The study intends to overturn the traditional historiographical paradigm, according to which ethnicity emerges as a purely “Barbaric” construction in opposition to the Christian-Roman universalism. Starting from such a model, European history was often represented as a conflict between universalistic and nationalistic issues. According to A.’s analysis, the political role of ethnicity in Latin Europe doesn’t emerge, at least partially, as a Barbarian “import”. Far from representing an antithesis to the Universal Church, ethnicity assumes its politic role through Christianity and, more specifically, on the basis of exegesis as well as of re-adaptation of ethnic self-definitions well attested in Biblical texts.

  18. From Hillforts to Saints: Sun Tropoi and Patterns of Christianization in NW Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintela, Marco V. García; García, A. César González; Veiga, Yolanda Seoane

    2015-05-01

    We present three Iron Age landscapes in the province of Ourense (northwest Spain), consisting of a hill fort with an acropolis used for religious purposes, and an "extra-urban" location used for ritual functions. Both locations are associated with the solstices, corroborating the validity of considering them jointly in each case, and the three cases jointly as a model. In the three locations, the oldest Christian saints and festivals we are able to identify re-use the dates of the solstices, and others, marked by Iron Age monuments. These observations open the way for research in several directions: the definition of religious landscapes from the Iron Age; the reason why there is not a 'Roman landscape'; the relationship between the Indo-European legacy and the introduction of Christianity; and the relationship between local calendars and the Celtic, Julian and Gregorian 'cultural' calendars.

  19. Evangelization and Causes of Religion Conversion from Hindu to Christian at Badung District Bali

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    Ni Kadek Surpi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This research focuses on the effort of evangelization and religious conversion factors from Hinduism to Christianity in Badung, Bali. Bali as a unique island and famous all over the world has long been used as a target of missionary. In the early stages, the process of spreading Christianity is very slow. Even, Dutch East Indies government closed the door to evangelization and prohibited its activities in Bali. This study uses a cross field of knowledge and find that there are many causes behind the religion conversion in the area of study. Findings of this research shows that the reason for religious conversion is the social upheavals because of dissatisfaction on system and religion, individual crises, eco- nomic and socio-cultural factors, the influence of mysticism, spiritual thirst and the promise of salvation, family breakdown and urbanization, wedding and birth order in the family, education and professional evangelistic activity and lack understand- ing of Hinduism.

  20. Scripture in the Sky: Jeremias Drexel, Julius Schiller, and the Christianizing of the Constellations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendillo, M.; Shapiro, A.

    2011-06-01

    From the times of early Christians up to the Enlightenment, the twelve ancient signs of the zodiac were challenged as highly inappropriate pagan images. The most concerted efforts to replace those signs with names, mottos, and images taken from Holy Scripture occurred in the early decades of the 17th century. We review the background that led to the proposed use of sacred mottos by Jeremias Drexel, and then of the names and images of the Twelve Apostles by Julius Schiller. The reaction of a leading seventeenth-century astronomer is presented to suggest why such changes were never adopted. Finally, we address issues of conflict and motivation that might have led to efforts to Christianize the Heavens.

  1. Histiocitose x (síndrome de hand-schuller-christian: relato de caso Histiocytosis X (Hand-Schuller-Christian disease: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Olimar Carneiro Filho

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Os autores relatam o caso de uma criança do sexo feminino, quatro anos de idade, que apresentava cefaléia, irritabilidade, otorréia e exoftalmia unilateral. No estudo tomográfico e na radiologia convencional encontraram-se grandes áreas líticas no crânio e na sua base. O restante do esqueleto não evidenciou anormalidades. O diagnóstico de histiocitose X (síndrome de Hand-Schuller-Christian foi confirmado pelo mielograma. Este estudo mostra achados radiológicos e citológicos, além de apresentar uma revisão da literatura sobre o caso.The authors report a case of a 4-year-old girl with headache, irritability, otorrhea, and unilateral exophthalmus. Computed tomography and plain films showed large lytic areas in the vault and base of the skull. No other bones were involved. The diagnosis of histiocytosis X (Hand-Schuller-Christian disease was confirmed by bone marrow biopsy. This paper presents the cytological and radiological findings of this patient as well as a review of the literature.

  2. Changes in the timing of sexual initiation among young Muslim and Christian women in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agha, Sohail

    2009-12-01

    Sexual initiation during adolescence has important demographic and health consequences for a population, yet no systematic analysis of changes in the timing of sexual initiation has been conducted in Nigeria. Two rounds of national surveys conducted in 1990 and 2003 were used to examine changes in the timing of sexual initiation among female adolescents in Nigeria. Multivariate survival analysis using Cox proportional hazards models was used to assess changes in the risk of sexual initiation and to identify the correlates of first sex. Contrary to what has been reported in several Nigerian studies, there was no decline in age at first sex among Christian adolescents. Age at first sex did not change significantly for Christian adolescents, although premarital sex appears to have increased-primarily due to an increase in the age at marriage. Age at first sex did increase among Muslim women. Premarital sex remained low among Muslim women. A number of socioeconomic variables were associated with the timing of sexual initiation. Weekly exposure to the mass media was associated with earlier sexual initiation. The degree to which an environment was liberal or restrictive was a key determinant of the timing of sexual initiation in Nigeria. The findings also illustrate the important role of socioeconomic factors in determining the timing of sexual initiation in Nigeria. As secondary education increases in Northern Nigeria, additional increases in the age at sexual debut are likely among Muslim women. The study raises concerns about the influence of the mass media on the timing of first sex in Nigeria. The evidence of an absence of changes in the timing of sexual initiation among Christian women in more than a decade implies that programs which aim to delay the timing of sexual initiation in Southern Nigeria may have limited success. With age at marriage already high among Christian women, programs that focus on abstinence until marriage may also be pursuing an approach with

  3. Fäcke, Christian (Ed. (2014. Manual of language acquisition. Berlin/Boston: de Gruyter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie A. Bernstein

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This review introduces readers to the Manual of Language Acquisition, edited by Christian Fäcke, and part of the “Manuals of Romance Linguistics” series. The Manual surveys current and central issues in the acquisition of Romance languages and cultures, as well as raises important questions about the relationship between Romance languages and with other languages—Immigrant languages, local dialects, English—across the Romance–speaking world.

  4. Ideas of Orthodox Christianity and Hesychasm in Latvia from 1836 to 1934

    OpenAIRE

    Vuguls, Juris

    2012-01-01

    Annotation Theme of the research - „Ideas of Orthodox Christianity and Hesychasm in Latvia from 1836 to 1934”. This research is analyzing Patristic philosophical and theological ideas in aspect of hesuchia in Latvian Orthodox church tradition in second half of 19. century and beginning of 20. centry, with using ideas of Annales school, M. Focault, hermeneutical, historical approaches, methods of life philosophy and philosophy of dialogue. Researches in Latvia in this field so far have not ...

  5. Christianity, Islam, and Oriṣa Religion: Three Traditions in Comparison and Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    "The Yoruba of southwestern Nigeria are exceptional for the copresence among them of three religious traditions: Islam, Christianity, and the indigenous oriṣa religion. In this comparative study, at once historical and anthropological, Peel explores the intertwined character of the three religions and the dense imbrication of religion in all aspects of Yoruba history up to the present. For over 400 years, the Yoruba have straddled two geocultural spheres: one reaching north over the Sahara to...

  6. READING A COLONIAL BUREAU: THE POLITICS OF CULTURAL INVESTIGATION OF THE NON-CHRISTIAN FILIPINOS

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    Mary Jane B Rodriguez

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Ethnography, as a scientific method of describing people, played a significant role in the policy of integration undertaken by the newly established American colonial government as regards the non-Christian population of the Philippines in the early 1900s. Such an assertion requires an interrogation of the colonial institution, the Bureau of Non-Christian Tribes, which was tasked, among other things, to conduct “special investigation” of the different ethnic groups (“pagans” and “Mohammedans” living in the far-flung areas of the archipelago. This paper underscores the politics of ethnological research of the Bureau, and critiques its methodology using David Prescott Barrows’ guidelines for fieldworkers as a lens through which to examine the conduct of research. It analyzes the implications of the racialized methodology for the colonial policy of the United States towards the Philippines, and attempts to explore how such investigation, with the colonial knowledge that it produced, was translated into the native discourse.In its dual capacity as an agent of science and advocate of change, the Bureau of Non-Christian Tribes stands in history as the precursor of the Philippine government agencies that established a highly contested policy of integration of the so-called “ethnic minorities” into the main body politic. The ‘expert knowledge’ that it produced was deemed instrumental in the material and moral uplift of colonial subjects, particularly the non-Christians. The “scientific expeditions” of the bureau generated data which eventually formed the corpus of knowledge for state legislation concerning the newly colonized peoples. However, the bureau advanced notions of racial typologies derived from the assumption of Western civilization as a standard for cultural evolution. Far from its professed agenda, the bureau also created artificial and heightened ethnic differences among Filipinos that easily translated into

  7. Facing the Inequalities of Development: Some lessons from Judaism and Christianity

    OpenAIRE

    Bernardo Kliksberg

    2003-01-01

    Bernardo Kliksberg looks at the commitment of two major religions - Judaism and Christianity - to development. Why has Judaism been ahead of the pack in pushing for the examination and resolution of the key problems of development? He suggests that the answer lies largely in the Old Testament. He also examines the fundamental precepts of church doctrine on this subject. He proposes a synthetic approach, one that arises from both religions' approach to globalization and development. Developmen...

  8. Cloning humans? Current science, current views, and a perspective from Christianity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, Rudolf B

    2002-01-01

    Therapeutic cloning is urgent and should be vigorously supported. To successfully argue for this position, the distinction between a human embryo and a human nuclear transplant may be helpful. Even if current technical difficulties should be solved, global legislation should prohibit cloning for the purpose of fabricating babies. This position originates from a view on human nature in general and from a Christian perspective in particular.

  9. Integrity and consensus: A Christian perspective on ethical management and education in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    L. Kretzschmar

    2002-01-01

    In this article the compliance- and values-based approaches to ethical management are explained and the challenges of the contemporary business and societal contexts in South Africa noted. The need for both moral integrity and character (with respect to perception, intention and virtue) and ethical consensus is extensively discussed. The importance of ethical dialogue as a means of reaching moral consensus, and the contribution of public theology (particularly Christian theology) are assessed...

  10. THE DISPUTE BETWEEN POLITICAL THEOLOGY AND THE POLITICS OF THEOLOGY IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY ON THE MEANINGS OF THE POSTMODERN GLOBALIZING AND INDIVIDUALISTIC SOCIETY AND THE CHRISTIAN PERSONALIST GLOBALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelian MANOLACHE

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Upon the dawn of postmodernity, in the twenty-first century, we witness the emergence of a new way of thinking and of new forms of culture and life, under the ideology of globalism, whose dominance is given by the practicality and utility related to civilization, and under globality, which is the cultural aspect of globalization, pertaining to the field of culture. The two dimensions of globalization and globality, civilizational and cultural, will (requestion the principle relationship between Christianity and the new postmodern globalizing utopia, requiring to (reconsider the sense and presence of Christianity within the world, and the appropriate sociological figure of the Church, within the new reality of global and globalized humanity, in the postmodern public space. This paper deals with this ideology - globalism and the cultural manifestation of globality, and with the Orthodox answer to the new challenge of individualism and postmodern globalizing (neocollectivism.

  11. A therapeutic community as a relevant and efficient ecclesial model in African Christianity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsobane Manala

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This article sets forth the argument that Christian ministry in Africa must become socially and culturally informed and constructed or else it will not touch the African soul and thus remain superficial. Black African people aspire above everything else to experience fullness of life and wellbeing here and now, as demonstrated by their greetings that are actually an enquiry into each other’s health and an expression of the wish for the other’s good health and wellbeing. The mainline churches that operate in Africa should embrace the scripturally sound Christian healing ministry in obedience to Christ’s commission to preach the gospel and heal the sick, if they are to prosper. Hence, this article discusses the following eight points, namely, (1 good health and healing as Africans’ important aspiration, (2 healing as the work of God and thus of the church, (3 the imperative of serious consideration of and respect for the African worldview, (4 membership decline and mainline churches’ loss of influence, (5 rethinking church in African Christianity, (6 the need for the black African church to adopt a therapeutic or healing community ecclesial model in order to position itself strategically to cater for the holistic needs of African (South African church members and surrounding communities, (7 the rationale of the healing ministry in today’s Reformed Church in Africa and (8 the recommended healing ministry. The article closes with a few concluding statements and advice

  12. The Fluid Mechanics of the Bible: Miracles Explainable by Christian Science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Amy

    2015-11-01

    The Bible is full of accounts clearly in violation of our scientific understanding of fluid mechanics. Examples include the floating axe head, Jesus walking on the water and immediately calming a storm. ``Jesus of Nazareth was the most scientific man that ever trod the globe. He plunged beneath the material surface of things, and found the spiritual cause,'' wrote Mary Baker Eddy (1821-1910), the founder of a now well-established religion known as Christian Science, in her seminal work Science & Health with Key to the Scriptures. She asserted that Jesus' miracles were in accord with the, ``Science of God's unchangeable law.'' She also proclaimed that matter is a derivative of consciousness. Independently with the discovery of quantum mechanics, physicists such as Max Planck and Sir James Jeans began to make similar statements (``The Mental Universe'', Nature, 2005). More recently, Max Tegmark (MIT) theorized that consciousness is a state of matter (New Scientist, April 2014). Using a paradigm shift from matter to consciousness as the primary substance, one can scientifically explain how a mental activity (i.e. prayer) could influence the physical. Since this conference is next door to the original church of Christian Science (Const. 1894), this talk will discuss various fluid-mechanic miracles in the Bible and provide an explanation based on divine metaphysics while providing an overview of scientific Christianity and its unifying influence to the fields of science, theology and medicine.

  13. Speech, time and suffering: Rosenstock-Huessy’s Post-Goethean, Post-Christian sociology

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    Cristaudo Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Five years ago, a new three volume edition of Eugen Rosenstock- Huessy (to translate In the Cross of Reality: A Post-Goethean Sociology appeared in Germany. As with the two prior editions of the work (a one volume version in 1925, and a much revised and expanded two volume version 1956/8 it met with almost no critical response. This is perhaps not surprising - and it barely mentions any other sociologists, its approach is highly idiosyncratic, it is as much anthropology and history as it is sociology. Indeed, the second and third volumes mainly focus on the social formations of antiquity, and the role of Christianity and the messianic revolutions of the last millennium in creating a universal history. In this paper I take the relationship between speech, time and suffering as the key to Rosenstock-Huessy’s argument for why a theoretical grasp of Christianity as a social power is so important for social theory, and why he sees Sociology as a post-Christian form of knowledge. I also make the case for why Rosenstock-Huessy is an interesting and important social theorist.

  14. Patterns of national identity development among the Balkan orthodox Christians during the nineteenth century

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    Markovich Slobodan G.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the development of national identities among Balkan Orthodox Christians from the 1780s to 1914. It points to pre-modern political subsystems in which many Balkan Orthodox peasants lived in the Ottoman Empire at the beginning of the nineteenth century. The Serbian and Greek uprisings/revolutions are analyzed in the context of the intellectual climate of the Enlightenment. Various modes of penetration of the ideas of the Age of Revolution are analyzed as well as the ways in which new concepts influenced proto-national identities of Serbs and Romans/Greeks. The author accepts Hobsbawm’s concept of proto-national identities and identifies their ethno-religious identity as the main element of Balkan Christian Orthodox proto-nations. The role of the Orthodox Church in the formation of ethno-religious proto-national identity and in its development into national identity during the nineteenth century is analyzed in the cases of Serbs, Romans/ Greeks, Vlachs/Romanians and Bulgarians. Three of the four Balkan national movements fully developed their respective national identities through their own ethnic states, and the fourth (Bulgarian developed partially through its ethnic state. All four analyzed identities reached the stage of mass nationalism by the time of the Balkan Wars. By the beginning of the twentieth century, only Macedonian Slavs kept their proto-national ethno-religious identity to a substantial degree. Various analyzed patterns indicate that nascent national identities coexisted with fluid and shifting protonational identities within the same religious background. Occasional supremacy of social over ethnic identities has also been identified. Ethnification of the Orthodox Church, in the period 1831-1872, is viewed as very important for the development of national movements of Balkan Orthodox Christians. A new three-stage model of national identity development among Balkan Orthodox Christians has been proposed. It is

  15. [Tertullianus and Agostinus. Approaches to dreams in ancient Christianity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genovese, Armando

    2009-01-01

    The author analyzes the nature and typologies of dreams in Tertullianus' De anima and, briefly, in the work of Agostinus, two centuries later. What are made dreams of? Are they autonomous productions of psyché or phantasia, or rather messages sent by demons or God, according to dreams' bad or good intimate nature? Is there a relation between time of the night and nature of the dreams? Moreover, is there a relation between seasons and dreams? Does a specific relationship between food, regimen and dreams exist? Which is the soul's faculty able to generate dreams? Is phantasia moved by some other deep and mysterious principle? Which are the connections linking human physiology and dreams?

  16. Pierre Duhem, entropy, and Christian faith

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Helge

    2008-01-01

    of the laws of thermodynamics. He held that it was unjustified to draw cosmological consequences from thermodynamics or any other science, and even more unjustified to draw consequences of a religious nature. I place Duhem's thoughts on "the physics of a believer" in their proper contexts by relating them...... to the late-nineteenth-century discussion concerning the meaning and domain of the law of entropy increase. I also consider Duhem's position with respect to Catholic science and culture in the anticlerical Third Republic....

  17. ‘Do not quench the Spirit!’ The discourse of the Holy Spirit in earliest Christianity

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    Bert Jan Lietaert Peerbolte

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Trinitarian discourse of the 4th and 5th centuries grew out of earlier developments, whilst at the same time reflecting a renewal over against the language of the earliest Christian sources. This article reflects on the way in which early Christianity thought about the Holy Spirit and developed a new discourse on the basis of earlier, Jewish traditions. It situates the development of the idea of the Holy Spirit as God’s presence in past and present within the social history of the developing Christian movement, and shows how this idea was connected to the concept of apostolic succession. Thus, emerging Christianity legitimised itself and its social structures by the theology of the Holy Spirit. Its message was presented as old instead of new, as the Holy Spirit had foretold the Christ event. Its organisation was seen as divinely inspired, because its leaders were thought to be endowed with the Spirit. In this development, the narrative of Luke-Acts has thoroughly influenced the way in which Christianity developed a new discourse to present itself as old.

  18. Christian IV’s tugt- og børnehus. Social institution eller merkantilistisk foretagende?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Agerbo Jensen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The Gaol and Orphanage of Christian IV - Social Institution or Mercantilist Enterprise?In 1605, the Danish King Christian IV founded a gaol after English and Northern European models. The purpose of the gaol  was that the inmates, the vagrants, should be taught textile  making. In contrast to contemporary foreign examples the  Danish gaol was founded by the king himself, just as it was the  crown that both owned the institution and was the purchaser of  its textile products. In 1620, the institution was extended with an orphanage as well as various workshops for textile handicrafts. The gaol and orphanage was closed in 1649.The basic question posed in the present article is: Was the foundation in 1605 and the subsequent operation of the gaol and orphanage of Christian IV in the years until its closure in 1649 a manifestation of mercantilism, the predominant economic theory of the age, or should the institution rather be  seen as a social and preventive measure in the fight against  vagrancy?In order to answer this question, an examination is made of various contemporary sources, including legislatory material, in order to determine the character of the gaol undertaking.It is the conclusion of the present article that the gaol and orphanage was a combination of mercantilist policy and a socially preventive measure. From being at the outset in 1605 a predominantly social institution with a certain element of mercantilism, it developed into a predominantly mercantilist enterprise whose previous social function was toned down and receded into the background.

  19. THE INFLUENCE OF CHRISTIANITY ON GRAECO-ROMAN MEDICINE UP TO THE RENAISSANCE

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    F.P. Retief

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Christianity made its appearance at a time when religion, even magic, played a much more important role in health care than it does today. As Ferngren and Amundsen (1994:2957-2960 point out, this is not necessarily because the ancients were more credulous or superstitious than we are today, but mainly because they realized that so much of life, including ill health, lay beyond their control. Ancient civilizations on the shores of the Mediterranean believed in a multitude of gods or goddesses, magical forces and supernatural powers which affected their health. But at least since the days of Homer there also existed physicians who practised some form of empirical medicine, and during the 5th and 4th centuries BC the Hippocratic doctors established the foundations of rational or scientific medicine as we know it today, where superstition, magic and supernatural factors were not relevant.
    Health care based on the teachings of Christ, as recorded in the New Testament, is primarily of a religious nature (Wassermann 1997:6-12. Although this need not imply conflict with secular medicine, history tells us that antagonism did soon arise, and despite the fact that positive influences are acknowledged, the view that the Christian church eventually retarded the advance of medical science (in Medieval times in particular is a common one (Porter 1997:110-112. However, Nutton (1984:1, Avalos (1999:7-15 and others have warned that much research still needs to be done to verify traditional statements on this issue. In this study we have endeavoured to analyse the intricate interplay between the Christian church and rational medicine (as represented by Graeco-Roman medical concepts during the first 1500 years of Christendom.

  20. Producing High Priests and Princesses: The Father-Daughter Relationship in the Christian Sexual Purity Movement

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    Elizabeth Gish

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article describes and analyzes father-daughter purity balls in the context of the contemporary U.S. American conservative Christian sexual purity movement, with an emphasis on taking the self-understanding of those involved in the movement into account. It shows the ways that the idealization of a hierarchical father-daughter relationship both constructs and reflects sexual purity ideals. The Christian sexual purity teachings frame this father-daughter relationship as an essential part of forming the ideal subject, and as reflective of the right order of the kingdom of God. In the logic of sexual purity, a good man is the strong high-priest leader of the household and the ideal girl is princess-like: white, non-poor, attractive, pure, feminine, delicate, and receptive. She is preparing, under her father’s guidance, for heterosexual marriage. Attention to the father-daughter relationship in the sexual purity movement highlights the ways that sexual purity is primarily about subject formation and the ordering of relationships—in families, in the nation, and in the church—and less about the specifics of when particular sexual acts take place or the public health risks that might come from those acts. This exploration also brings into relief the ways that contemporary conservative Christian sexual purity teachings draw from and build on two prominent aspects of contemporary U.S. American popular culture: the important role of the princess figure, and the buying of goods as indispensable to the formation of the subject.

  1. Recreation and Christian Youth Ministries: The Ottawa Chapter of the Greek Orthodox Youth of America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Karlis

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Ottawa (Canada Chapter of the Greek Orthodox Youth of America (GOYA has existed since the mid 1900s. At that time, GOYA was viewed as an organization pertinent not only for the practice and maintenance of a religious minority (Greek Orthodoxy in mainstream Canada, but also as a social recreational organization for interaction of the limited few Greeks that dwelled in Ottawa. Today, the primary purpose of the Ottawa Chapter of GOYA remains the same and consistent to the original mission as established by the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America (GOAA – that is - a youth ministry based on Liturgia (worship, Koinonia (fellowship, Diakonia (service, and Martyria (witness. Historically, recreation activities in the form of retreats and cultural/religious seminars have traditional been used to address the mission of GOYA and to recruit new members in GOYA. Administrators of GOYA and the HCO have acknowledged recreation as a useful means to not only endorse the mission of GOYA, but to also solicit membership through activities such as cultural dances, basketball tournaments, and ice skating outings. This paper depicts the relationship between recreation and Christian youth ministries for the implementation of the mission of the Ottawa Chapter of GOYA. A model has been constructed to depict the relationship between recreation and Christian youth ministries from an organizational context. This paper concludes with suggestions for administrators of GOYA and other Christian Youth Ministries for the use of recreation to help implement their mission and ministry, as well as suggestions for the potential use of recreation to aid in membership growth.

  2. The "Annie hypothesis": did the death of his daughter cause Darwin to "give up Christianity"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wyhe, John; Pallen, Mark J

    2012-01-01

    This article examines one of the most widely believed episodes in the life of Charles Darwin, that the death of his daughter Annie in 1851 caused the end of Darwin's belief in Christianity, and according to some versions, ended his attendance of church on Sundays. This hypothesis, it is argued, is commonly treated as a straightforward true account of Darwin's life, yet there is little or no supporting evidence. Furthermore, we argue, there is sufficient evidence that Darwin's loss of faith occurred before Annie's death.

  3. APPLICATION OF LINEAR PROGRAMMING FOR DORMITORY DEVELOPMENT PLAN AT PETRA CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY

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    Connie Susilawati

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Dormitory is a very important facility which have to be provided by a university. A survey to Petra Christian University’s students has been conducted to understand the required facilities and their financial ability. Linear programming has been used to calculate number of rooms and area of each facility which could satisfy the constraints and to obtain optimum profit. Number of bedrooms, number of bathrooms, and area of each facility, such as: living room, dining room, common room, cafeteria, book shop, mini market, phone booths, sport facilities, and parking space are recommended. Since the investment is financially feasible, the dormitory could be built in the future.

  4. Cold War Transgressions: Christian Realism, Conservative Socialism, and the Longer 1960s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Thomas Edwards

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This essay examines the convergence of the Protestant left and traditionalist right during the 1950s. Reinhold Niebuhr and the World Council of Churches challenged Cold War liberalism from within. As they did, they anticipated and even applauded the anti-liberalism of early Cold War conservatives. While exploring intellectual precursors of the New Left, this essay forefronts one forgotten byproduct of the political realignments following World War II: The transgressive politics of “conservative socialism.” Furthermore, this work contributes to growing awareness of ecumenical Christian impact within American life.

  5. Cultural Conflicts and Fusion in the Process of Christianity Disseminating in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李培平

    2012-01-01

      This paper focuses on cultural conflicts, mainly conflicts of God oriented and people oriented world view, different view towards human nature-virtue culture and guilt culture, the theology that all are equal before God and hierarchical order tradition, monotheism and polytheism, conflict between the doctrine and the concept of clan, briefly, that between Chinese traditional culture and Christian doctrine in the process of the religion disseminating in China. It also touches upon the beneficial attributes of Chinese culture for the fusion of the two culture patterns

  6. Hans Christian Andersen's spelling and syntax: Allegations of specific dyslexia are unfounded

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kihl, Preben; Gregersen, K.; Sterum, N.

    2000-01-01

    Sources contemporary with Danish author Hans Christian Andersen claimed that he did not master the Danish Language, which modern studies interpret as specific dyslexia. A systematic study of his diaries from age 20 to 70 found a mean spelling error percentage of approximately 1.7 (SD=1%, range 0...... and 15 times lower than the mean percentages in studies of individuals with dyslexia. A structural analysis of Andersen's spelling errors shows that they are mainly phonologically plausible from ages 11 to 70, and that the proportion of phonologically plausible/implausible errors match those of normal...... achievers, but not those of individuals with dyslexia....

  7. Video of Christian Skau and Martin Raussen's interview with the Abel Prize Winner John Milnor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skau, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The television interview with Abel Laureate John Milnor that was broadcasted on Norwegian television in June is now available on the Abel Prize multimedia page. John Milnor received the Abel Prize «for pioneering discoveries in topology, geometry and algebra» to quote the Abel Committee. King...... Harald presented the Abel Prize to John Milnor at the award ceremony in Oslo, Norway on 24 May. Before the interview there is a short presentation of the award ceremony. John Milnor is interviewed by Martin Raussen and Christian Skau. The Abel Prize that carries a cash award of NOK 6 million (about EUR...

  8. The elite sport and Christianity debate: shifting focus from normative values to the conscious disregard for health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee Sinden, Jane

    2013-03-01

    Scholars and theologians continue to debate whether or not God's intended purpose of elite sport violates the creational normativity for elite sport. However, while it is important to be aware of the contradictions between elite sport and Christianity, there is a need for more deep-seated discussions about emotions and health problems in elite sport and why so many Christian athletes continue to train for their sport at the expense of their health. This paper summaries the present debate regarding elite sport and Christianity and then shifts the reader to an exploration of the normalization of emotion, and the consequence of emotional suppression on athletes health. In doing so, the author presents the disregard of health problems as a more concrete measure of how far athletes should push themselves in elite sport. The author makes recommendations for emotion education and suggests directions for future research and practice.

  9. First Foreign-Policy Success of Kievan Commanding Elite in Europe: Byzantine Military Campaign of 860 and Askold's Christianization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor A. Melnichuk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article, using annalistic sources and Byzantine literary monuments of VIII–IX centuries, attempts to conduct historical and political analysis and estimate major successes of Rus under Askol'd’s reign: Rusichi march on Constantinople in 860 and as a result Christianization of prince and his druzhina. The article presents obvious success of Askold and military and political elite of Rus:- Breakthrough of Russia to the European political space and, consequently, access to economic space: extremely important markets of Byzantium and other states.- Launch of the irreversible process of Christianization of the state, which has become one of the key stages of its development and the important step towards equal access of Russia to the European family of nations.- Selection of Eastern (Orthodox version of Christian doctrine.

  10. God as an Attachment Figure : A Case Study of the God Attachment Language and God Concepts of Anxiously Attached Christian Youths in South Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Counted, Victor

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the role of the Christian God as an attachment figure, using the attachment language criteria of a strong and enduring affectionate bond. Respondents were 15 anxiously attached Christian youths, purposefully selected for in-depth interviews to explore their God attachment languag

  11. Christianity in the Graeco-Roman World: Socio-Political, Philosophical, and Religious Interactions up to the Edict of Milan (CE 313)

    OpenAIRE

    van Kooten, G.H.; Bingham, D.J.

    2010-01-01

    George H. van Kooten, “Christianity in the Graeco-Roman World: Socio-Political, Philosophical, and Religious Interactions up to the Edict of Milan (CE 313),” in The Routledge Companion to Early Christian Thought (ed. D. Jeffrey Bingham; London and New York: Routledge, 2010), 3-37.

  12. Christianity in the Graeco-Roman World : Socio-Political, Philosophical, and Religious Interactions up to the Edict of Milan (CE 313)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kooten, G.H.; Bingham, D.J.

    2010-01-01

    George H. van Kooten, “Christianity in the Graeco-Roman World: Socio-Political, Philosophical, and Religious Interactions up to the Edict of Milan (CE 313),” in The Routledge Companion to Early Christian Thought (ed. D. Jeffrey Bingham; London and New York: Routledge, 2010), 3-37.

  13. Why Teach Doctrine? A Response to Dan Moulin's "Challenging Christianity: Leo Tolstoy and Religious Education" in "Journal of Beliefs and Values," Vol. 30, No. 2, August 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Penny; Watson, Brenda

    2010-01-01

    In response to the article by Dan Moulin it is argued that the representation of Christianity in British religious education relies on central beliefs and practices that are widely shared. In contrast to Moulin we consider that the teaching of doctrine is important in order to prevent serious misunderstanding of Christianity. Focussing on a…

  14. Impact of Spiritual Well-Being, Spiritual Perspective, and Religiosity on the Self-Rated Health of Jordanian Arab Christians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musa, Ahmad S; Pevalin, David J; Shahin, Francis I

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore associations of spiritual well-being, spiritual perspective, and religiosity with self-rated health in a convenience sample of 340 adult Jordanian Arab Christians. Data were collected through church and community groups. Results indicated that spiritual well-being and religiosity were positively associated with self-rated health, but in the final regression model only spiritual well-being retained a significant association after controlling for the other spiritual and religious measures. In conclusion, spirituality and religiosity are important to Jordanian Arab Christians' health and well-being, and the implications for nursing practice are explored.

  15. Representations of God in Icons. Immanence and Transcendence in Christian Art

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    Isbasoiu Iulian

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Human desire to be in a more natural relationship with God, his Creator, caused the former to find different means of communication. In addition to the liturgical expression, materialized in prayer, another way of interaction is represented by the icon. The icon and through the icon, Heaven and earth, God and the members of the triumphant Church and the ones of the militant Church meet and communicate. The iconographic representation of God, symbols, events and holy Persons, gave rise to much controversy in history, which triggered a major conflict in the life of the Church, culminating in the eighth century iconoclastic dispute. The Seventh Ecumenical Council solved this dispute and placed the icon in its natural spiritual position. In the present study we will analyze and contrast how people have understood the freedom of representing the image of God the Father in icons, an issue which caused disputes and reactions due to exaggerations in artistic expression and misunderstandings linked to the limits of such representation. This evolution is considered historically in the Christian world, East and West, which shows either an exaggerated tolerance of representation or an extreme conservatism leading to the prohibition of painting an anthropomorphic image of the Father. We will also study the recommendations of in the textbooks of Christian erminia and we will present examples of Romanian iconographic art.

  16. Defense of a fragment: The theological pertinence of the advanced symphony of Christian Duquoc

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    Paulo Sérgio Carrara

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is situated in the area of inter-religious dialogue, one of the great paradigms of actual theology. After Vatican Council II, which treated about the salvation of non Christians and of the members of other religions, theology deepened this theme and appeared several proposals for an inter-religious dialogue. For theologians it imposed the challenge of joining the constructive necessity of Jesus Christ for the salvation of all and the place of other religious traditions in God’s salvation plan. The proposal of the French Catholic theologian, Christian Duquoc, which he called postponed symphony, arouses attention to its singularity in affirming the positive side of the divisions and fragments. His approach is situated within the Catholic Theology that emerged after Vatican II, in which there are several prospects for interreligious dialogue. His theology emphasizes the role of the Holy Spirit in building the possible unity in diversity of fragments. The present article evaluates the theological importance of the French theologian’s proposal in favor of inter-religious dialogue. 

  17. A Christian faith-based recovery theory: understanding God as sponsor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmons, Shirley M

    2012-12-01

    This article reports the development of a substantive theory to explain an evangelical Christian-based process of recovery from addiction. Faith-based, 12-step, mutual aid programs can improve drug abstinence by offering: (a) an intervention option alone and/or in conjunction with secular programs and (b) an opportunity for religious involvement. Although literature on religion, spirituality, and addiction is voluminous, traditional 12-step programs fail to explain the mechanism that underpins the process of Christian-based recovery (CR). This pilot study used grounded theory to explore and describe the essence of recovery of 10 former crack cocaine-addicted persons voluntarily enrolled in a CR program. Data were collected from in-depth interviews during 4 months of 2008. Audiotapes were transcribed verbatim, and the constant comparative method was used to analyze data resulting in the basic social process theory, understanding God as sponsor. The theory was determined through writing theoretical memos that generated key elements that allow persons to recover: acknowledging God-centered crises, communicating with God, and planning for the future. Findings from this preliminary study identifies important factors that can help persons in recovery to sustain sobriety and program administrators to benefit from theory that guides the development of evidence-based addiction interventions.

  18. Core Intuitions About Persons Coexist and Interfere With Acquired Christian Beliefs About God.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlev, Michael; Mermelstein, Spencer; German, Tamsin C

    2016-11-24

    This study tested the hypothesis that in the minds of adult religious adherents, acquired beliefs about the extraordinary characteristics of God coexist with, rather than replace, an initial representation of God formed by co-option of the evolved person concept. In three experiments, Christian religious adherents were asked to evaluate a series of statements for which core intuitions about persons and acquired Christian beliefs about God were consistent (i.e., true according to both [e.g., "God has beliefs that are true"] or false according to both [e.g., "All beliefs God has are false"]) or inconsistent (i.e., true on intuition but false theologically [e.g., "God has beliefs that are false"] or false on intuition but true theologically [e.g., "All beliefs God has are true"]). Participants were less accurate and slower to respond to inconsistent versus consistent statements, suggesting that the core intuitions both coexisted alongside and interfered with the acquired beliefs (Experiments 1 and 2). In Experiment 2 when responding under time pressure participants were disproportionately more likely to make errors on inconsistent versus consistent statements than when responding with no time pressure, suggesting that the resolution of interference requires cognitive resources the functioning of which decreases under cognitive load. In Experiment 3 a plausible alternative interpretation of these findings was ruled out by demonstrating that the response accuracy and time differences on consistent versus inconsistent statements occur for God-a supernatural religious entity-but not for a natural religious entity (a priest).

  19. Social justice and religious participation: a qualitative investigation of Christian perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Nathan R; Rufa, Anne K

    2013-06-01

    This investigation examines how self-identified Christians in the Midwest U.S. understand and work for social justice, with a focus on their process of social justice development and the role of religious congregations in promoting social justice. Using a grounded theory analysis of 15 in-depth interviews, results indicated multiple understandings of social justice such as meeting basic needs, fixing social structures and systems to create equal distributions of resources, promoting human rights and dignity, and as a religious responsibility. Participants also described a process of social justice development facilitated by exposure to injustice, mentors, educating others, and the importance of finding a social justice community. Distinct personal barriers to social justice engagement were identified such as resources and negative emotions, whereas congregational leadership was important for congregational involvement. General frustration with congregations was expressed regarding low social justice engagement; however, participants balanced this frustration with hope for the positive potential of congregations to promote social justice. Together these findings show multifaceted understandings of social justice and a dynamic process of social justice development for these self-identified Christians. Implications for future research and partnership with religious individuals and congregations also are discussed.

  20. Eros in the first century’s Christian theology. Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite

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    Mircea Adrian Marica

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available For among most contemporaries, the concept of Eros seems to have nothing to do with Christianity. Sifting through the psychoanalysis of sexual fantasy, theologically it says nothing. Our study gives reasons showing that for theologians since the dawn of the Christian era, Eros-love plays a fundamental role.. The connotations of this concept, however, are different from those of today, when its sensory meaning is more restricted to sexuality. Greek theologians of the first centuries after Christ, taught the concept of Plato enshrined as a unifying enthusiasm, the attraction of inferior to superior states, as “hungry and thirsty” for something continuously higher, developing, and enriching the connotation. The work of Dionysius ((Pseudo Areopagite, the Idea of Good, leads us step by step up the ascent of the erotically chaste, and is identified with the One-God, who is the very source of love. Consequently, Eros-love originates from God, Eros- love being not only an ascending but firstly a descending love, which calls for a reciprocal communion.

  1. Interactions of Christians and Evangelists of Yazd with Muslims in the Qajar Era

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    Hamidreza Shams Esfandabadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The history of Yazd in Qajar era shows several political-social incidents in different periods which have greatly affected the social, cultural, economic and even physical historical-ancient life of the city. Investigating the interaction between Iranians and the residents from different religions during the aforementioned era is interest of the study. This interaction has experienced some fluctuations including peaceful friendships as well as brutal conflicts. The present research is a scientific-investigative effort to perform a historical, periodical, and at the same time documentary and analytical study on the extent, type and method of interactions of the majority of Yazd residents such as Shia Muslims, with the religious minority living in Yazd or non-local Christians temporary living in Yazd for the purpose of performing preaching and advertising programs in Yazd during the Qajar era. The researchers’ hypothesis is as follow: in the Qajar era there was a mutual communication, conflicts and correspondence between Christian minorities (evangelists and Shia Muslims in Yazd most of which proves a relationship and peaceful co-existence between them. This study applies a comparative-historical methodology as well as examines the academic literature and field studies.

  2. Boundary objects in complementary and alternative medicine: acupuncture vs. Christian Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Kellie

    2015-03-01

    Nearly four in ten American use complementary or alternative medicine (CAM) each year. Even with a large number of patients, CAM practitioners face scrutiny from physicians and biomedical researchers who, in an era of evidence-based medicine, argue there is little evidence to support CAM treatments. Examining how CAM has or has not been integrated into American health care is crucial in understanding the contemporary boundaries of healthcare systems. An analytical tool from science and technology studies, boundary objects, can help scholars of medicine understand which practices become integrated into these systems. Using a comparative analysis based on archival and interview data, this paper examines the use of boundary objects in two alternative medical practices - acupuncture and Christian Science. While boundary objects alone cannot explain what health practices succeed or fail, juxtaposing the use of boundary objects by different CAM groups identifies the work boundary objects do to facilitate integration and the conditions under which they "work." I find that acupuncturists' use of sterile needles as a boundary objects assists in their effective integration into U.S. healthcare because needles are both a symbol of biomedical prowess and a potentially unsafe device requiring regulation. Christian Scientists' use of the placebo effect as a boundary object has not succeeded because they fail to acknowledge the different contextual definitions of the placebo effect in biomedical communities. This comparative analysis highlights how context affects which boundary objects "work" for CAM practices and theorizes why alternative health practices succeed or fail to become integrated into healthcare systems.

  3. Modernity and its Discontents: Western Catholic Pioneers of the Hindu-Christian Dialogue

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    Enrico Beltramini

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a reassessment of the Hindu-Christian dialogue in its relationship with modernity. The focus is on a group of Western Catholic clergymen who relocated to India, specifically during 1940-70, and became involved in the Hindu-Christian dialogue. The article traces the reasons for these Catholics’ relocations to their dissatisfaction with modernity and the predominance of rationality in the West, as well as their aversion to modern scientific thought. It emphasises the dual character of the interfaith dialogue, and the struggles of this group of clergymen to overcome modernity, whereby a modern Weltanschauung was the obstacle along the path to reshaping Catholic theology and establishing a fruitful interfaith dialogue with Hinduism. Although they did not pursue a common agenda and had different goals, these pioneers of interfaith dialogue came to consider such a dialogue with Hinduism as regenerative, as a means of revitalising Western thought, of balancing the modern excesses of a Western civilisation increasingly dominated by technology, and of transcending the rationalised culture of the modern West to achieve higher consciousness.

  4. “This World Is Not My Home”: Richard Mouw and Christian Nationalism

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    Aaron Pattillo-Lunt

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available American evangelicalism has often been punctuated by dual commitments to the United States and to God. Those commitments were strongest within politically conservative evangelicalism. Though representing a solid majority among professing evangelicals, conservatives could not speak for the movement as a whole. Politically progressive evangelicals, beginning in the 1960s, formed a dissenting opinion of the post-World War II revival of Christian nationalism. They dared to challenge American action abroad, noticeably during the Vietnam War. Their critique of Christian nationalism and conservative evangelicals’ close ties to the Republican Party led them to seek refuge in either progressive policies or the Democratic Party. A third, underexplored subgroup of evangelicalism rooted in reformed theology becomes important to consider in this regard. These reformed evangelicals sought to contextualize nationalism in biblical rather than partisan or political terms. This goal is championed well by Richard Mouw, resulting in a nuanced look at evangelical Christians’ difficult dual role as both citizens of the Kingdom of God and the United States.

  5. Did God Break the Sabbath? Astrosociology and Christian Fundamentalism in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdamis, J. D. Eric

    2009-03-01

    The modern era has witnessed many progressive religious traditions liberally accommodating scientific explanations and incorporating them into their interpretation of religious texts. For most religions, and their adherents, a similar acceptance of astrobiology and the search for life elsewhere in the universe can be expected. Not all faith traditions are likely to be so accepting however, and Christian fundamentalism in the United States, animated by biblical literalism, promises to be one particularly potent exception. The outspoken and politically powerful opposition Christian fundamentalists have mounted against some of the cornerstones of modern science, including evolution and the age of the Earth, ominously project another information battleground looming in the future of astrosociology. Specifically, any evidence of a "second genesis" could be seen as threatening to the belief that humans are the center of God's attention and as a validation of the theory of evolution. Consequently, the "alternative science apparatus" of the fundamentalist movement could be expected to argue in favor of one-way panspermia, originating from Earth, whenever and wherever evidence of life beyond Earth is found. To prevent astrobiology from becoming the next hotly contested information battleground between science and religion, more attention should be paid to the particular segments of the faithful in society that are likely to react negatively to any new evidence that astrobiology may produce.

  6. Love, Fear, and Loathing: A Qualitative Examination of Christian Perceptions of Muslims

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    Carolyn F. Pevey

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available For centuries Christians and Muslims have sometimes shown extreme thoughts and feelings about each other, often based on very little factual information. While one large and well-respected survey study (PEW RESEARCH CENTER FOR THE PEOPLE AND THE PRESS, 2002, has researched attitudes in the United States toward Muslims, including a breakdown of attitudes by religion, race, sex and other demographic characteristics, that research may be limited by its quantitative approach to a question that is best answered using qualitative methodology. This study used an innovative qualitative method inspired by market research to investigate Christian feelings about Muslims. We note the undercurrents of fear and curiosity expressed by subjects and although the respondents in this study would have received high knowledge scores in the PEW survey, we found that they actually knew very little about Islam. We give rationale and detailed examples of our method of metaphor elicitation, suggest possible uses for it elsewhere, and close with suggestions for further research. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs090118

  7. Physician-assisted suicide, euthanasia, and Christian bioethics: moral controversy in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Arnd T

    2003-01-01

    Discussions in Germany regarding appropriate end-of-life decision-making have been heavily influenced by the liberalization of access to physician-assisted suicide and voluntary active euthanasia in the Netherlands and Belgium. These discussions disclose conflicting moral views regarding the propriety of physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia, threatening conflicts within not only the medical profession, but also the mainline churches in Germany, whose membership now entertains views regarding end-of-life decision-making at odds with traditional Christian doctrine. On the surface, there appears to be a broad consensus supporting the hospice movement and condemning physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia. The German Supreme Court has held that treatment decisions should, in absence of known patients' wishes, be made in light of commonly shared values, unless these violate the principle of "in dubio pro vita". The Roman Catholic church and the Evangelical Lutheran church in Germany have developed an advance directive for treatment choices at the end of life, while condemning physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia. This stance is in tension with the strong emerging support for physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia, a development that promises to open up foundational disagreements within mainline German Christianity regarding the appropriate approach to intentionally terminating human life.

  8. Christian Herrgen y la institucionalización de la mineralogía en Madrid

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    Parra, Dolores

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the goals of the scientific policy of the governments of the Borbones were that of favors the disciplines subject to be applied for the necessary stimulus of the Spanish economy. Such it was the case of the Mineralogy, science that was developed and imparted in several scientific cultured institutions. One of these centers were the Cabinet of Natural History from Madrid, in which the work of the German specialist Christian Herrgen contributed to the institutionalization of the Spanish Mineralogy.

    Uno de los objetivos de la política científica de los gobiernos borbones fue la de potenciar aquellas disciplinas susceptibles de ser aplicadas en el necesario fomento de la economía española. Tal fue el caso de la Mineralogía, ciencia que fue desarrollada e impartida en varias instituciones científicas ilustradas. Uno de estos centros fue el Gabinete de Historia Natural de Madrid, en el que la labor del especialista alemán Christian Herrgen contribuyó a la institucionalización de la mineralogía española.

  9. Untying the knots of thinking: Wittgenstein and the role of philosophy in Christian faith

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    Aleksandar S. Santrac

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with Ludwig Wittgenstein’s philosophy and how it can be properly applied in Christian theology. It provides useful tools for methodology in Christian thinking. According to Wittgenstein, philosophy deals primarily with critical examination, clarification and evaluation of the language we use. Wittgenstein’s ideas − including the concept of mystery beyond linguistic forms, the idea of language game and its possible evolution, the impossibility of the ultimate truth and the concrete application of language − have the potential to play a very significant methodological role in every form of theological doctrinal expression.Wittgenstein en die rol van die filosofie in die Christelike geloof. Hierdie artikel handel oor Ludwig Wittgenstein se filosofie en hoe dit behoorlik toegepas kan word in die Christelike teologie. Dit bied nuttige gereedskap vir metodologie in Christelike denke. Volgens Wittgenstein, handel filosofie hoofsaaklik oor die kritiese ondersoek, verduideliking en evaluering van die taal wat ons gebruik. Wittgenstein se idees − insluitend die konsep van misterie buite taalkundige vorms, die idee van taalspel en die moontlike evolusie, die onmoontlikheid van die uiteindelike waarheid en die konkrete toepassing van taal − het die potensiaal om ’n baie belangrike metodologiese rol te speel in elke vorm teologiese leerstellige uitdrukking.

  10. CHALLENGES IN ASSESSING CHARACTER EDUCATION IN ELT: IMPLICATIONS FROM A CASE STUDY IN A CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY

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    Joseph Ernest Mambu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article I examine some challenges of assessing character education in the context of Teaching English as a Foreign Language in Indonesia (TEFLIN. Major sources of character education in Indonesia (e.g., Kurikulum 2013 seem to be religious values. However, there are two salient problems. First, in religiously inspired character education, there are concerns about religious values imposition. Second, it is oftentimes vague what types of, and how, character education can be evaluated in English language teaching and learning settings. In the context of an EFL teacher education program in a Christian university that I studied, one Christian student showed her religious dogmatism in classroom interactions or elsewhere in which peers having different religious views were present. Students’ communicative competence in expressing religious values can be assessed by examining their growing self-reflexivity (which problematizes dogmatism, among others, in their discourse. Character education assessment rubrics are developed from the cases reported here, in light of: (1 the Indonesian government’s guidelines for assessing character education; (2 critical ELT; and (3 Celce-Murcia’s (2007 model of communicative competence.

  11. Bronzino and a Bronze Boar. Hans Christian Andersen and Stendhal in Nineteenth-Century Florence

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    Bram de Klerck

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bronzino e il porcellino: Hans Christian Andersen e Stendhal nella Firenze del XIX secoloLa storia dell’arte dell’Ottocento non sembra aver avuto particolarmente a cuore gli artisti italiani delle generazioni successive ai grandi maestri rinascimentali, quali Raffaello e Michelangelo. Così, ad esempio, lo stile delle opere del pittore fiorentino Agnolo Bronzino (1503-1572 veniva giudicato con termini alquanto ostici come ‘vuoto’, ‘offensivo’, o come il risultato di ‘pedanteria anatomica’. Autori con meno preoccupazioni determinate dalla storia dell'arte lasciano tuttavia intravedere di aver apprezzato altre caratteristiche di questi artisti. Almeno gli scritti di un poeta ed un romanziere, ambedue grandi amatori dell’Italia e di firenze, rivelano una valutazione sorprendentemente diversa di un’importante opera del pittore, la sua Discesa di Cristo al Limbo del 1552. Si tratta di Hans Christian Andersen e di Stendhal. Questo contributo alla ricezione dello stile ‘manierista’ del quadro sulla Discesa al Limbo del Bronzino prende in esame sia la critica d’arte del XIX secolo che il modo con cui l’opera è stata trattata dall’immaginazione letteraria, così come risulta dal racconto di Andersen intitolato Il porcellino di bronzo e dal resoconto originale delle esperienze di Stendhal a Firenze, considerate poi come i sintomi della ‘sindrome’ che porta il suo nome.

  12. The church and the secular: The effect of the post-secular on Christianity

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    Jaco Beyers

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Paradigms determine relationships. During the Enlightenment period Emile Durkheim proposed a relationship between the sacred and the profane. Religion, which is concerned with the sacred, was defined in terms of being different from the profane. The profane came to denote the secular. The organic character of religion caused some scholars to predict the end of the church at the hand of modernisation and rationalisation. Some scholars instead envisaged a new form and function of the church. Some scholars anticipated the growth of Christianity. Reality shows that Christianity has not died out but seems to be growing. The new era we are currently in (identified as the postmodern has been described as the post-secular age where a process of re-sacralisation takes place. How will the post-secular influence the church? What will the relationship between the church and the secular be like under a new paradigm? This article suggests that within a postmodern paradigm, the post-secular will emphasise the place of the individual in the church. Fragmentation of society will also be the result of the post-secular. Religiosity in future will have to contend with fundamentalism and civil religion.

  13. Contributions from Christian ethics and Buddhist philosophy to the management of compassion fatigue in nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pembroke, Neil

    2016-03-01

    The aim in the article is to demonstrate how insights from Christian ethics and Buddhist philosophy can make contributions to the management of compassion fatigue. There are already helpful resources available that provide principles, tips, and practical guidelines for self-care. The approach here is centered on attitudinal, ethical, and philosophical issues. From the Christian tradition, the ethical principle of "equal regard" is employed. Equal regard is the notion that agape (disinterested, universal love) requires of a people that they love others neither more nor less than they love themselves. When the ethical principle that a nurse operates out of in her everyday life is self-sacrifice, self-care is much less likely to be set as a personal priority. From the Buddhist tradition, the principle of compassion with equanimity is engaged. The Buddhist ideal is opening oneself to the pain of the other while maintaining calmness or stillness of mind. It is contended that inculcation of this skill means that a nurse can be exposed to suffering without running down their store of compassion.

  14. Christian Kerez

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    1962年出生于委内瑞拉马拉开波,并在1988年于瑞士苏黎世联邦技术研究所接受教育,获得建筑硕士学位。从1991年至1993年在Rudolf Fontana工作室,担任建筑设计师。经过大量被发表的作品和建筑摄影作品,1993年他在苏黎世开办了自己的建筑工作室。

  15. Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Einstein, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Time magazine's ""Man of the Century"", Albert Einstein is the founder of modern physics and his theory of relativity is the most important scientific idea of the modern era. In this short book, Einstein explains, using the minimum of mathematical terms, the basic ideas and principles of the theory that has shaped the world we live in today. Unsurpassed by any subsequent books on relativity, this remains the most popular and useful exposition of Einstein's immense contribution to human knowledge.With a new foreword by Derek Raine.

  16. Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Brewster, Hilary D

    2009-01-01

    The theory of relativity has become a cornerstone of modern physics. Over the course of time it has been scrutinized in a multitude of experiments and has always been verified with high accuracy. The correctness of this theory can no longer be called into question. Right after its discovery by Albert Einstein in 1905, special relativity was only gradually accepted because it made numerous predictions contradicting common sense, fervently castigated by Einstein, and also defied experiment for too long a time. It was only with the advent of particle or high energy physics that matter could be ac

  17. Christian Values and Noble Ideas of Rank and their Consequences on Symbolic Acts

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    Gerd ALTHOFF

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In the Middle Ages a Christian system of values met the values of a noble warrior society. Although these two systems had completely different conceptions of norms, they adapted from each other certain values and symbolic forms to express these values.The development of this adaptation is depicted by treating the Christian values misericordia, humilitas and clementia. In which way did the noble warrior society take up these values and how did these norms possibly change?Misericordia, for example, became an essential part of noble behaviour, but the fundamental idea of Christian misericordia was changed. Helping the poor was often motivated by the nobles’ will to prove his mercy, not by personal compassion.Although the value of humilitas implied a sharp contrast to the values of honor and rank, one can find forms of expression, which revealed a noble’s or ruler’s humility. With his humble behaviour one proved one’s qualification and legitimacy. Humility was expressed with symbolic forms of expression like walking barefoot and in penitential clothes or making footfalls. Similarly, these forms were used in inner-secular communication to acknowledge the existing order of rank.The ritual of deditio combines the values humilitas and clementia. The author describes this ritual as a pre-arranged stage-play, in which the one’s humility granted the other’s clemency. These ‘stage-plays’ had only little in common with the original Christian virtues, but this way several elements of the Christian virtue system influenced the noble behaviour pattern.En la edad media el sistema de valores cristiano confluye con el de una sociedad noble guerrera. Aunque ambos sistemas tuvieron dos concepciones de normas completamente diferentes, sin embargo, cada uno de ellos adapto ciertos valores y sus expresiones simbólicas del otro.El desarrollo de esta adaptación es descrito a través de los valores cristianos de misericordia, humilitas y clementia

  18. Mutazilite Ghazi Abduljabbar and Contemporary Christian Philosophers of Religion on the Possibility of Miracle

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    Abbas Dehghaninezhad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of western thinkers have declared miracle a self-contradicting and inconsistent notion. Christian theologians have made some efforts to reject this claim and demonstrate the consistency of miracle but it seems they have not succeeded to accomplish much in this regard and failed to substantiate the conceptual coherence of miracle.       We seek to show that the definition Ghazi Abduljabbar offers of miracle tackles this difficulty. In our view this issue indicates the upper hand of Moslem theologians in defining miracles as compared to their Christian counterparts. Problem Stated Swinburne articulates the difficulty as follows: "The first is that evidence that a particular event E occurred and that it is a violation of a supposed law of nature L really only tends to show, not that a law of nature has been violated, but that we have misstated the law of nature. the real law of nature is not really L but some other law L  which allows the occurrence of E… This view amounts to the view that it is logically impossible that there be a violation of a law of nature" (Swinburne, The concept of miracle, p. 19.       To tackle this objection, contemporary western thinkers have sought to demonstrate the consistency of miracle as a concept. Among others, the ideas of L. J. Mackie and Richard Swinburne in this regard are more renowned and hereby we turn to them. Makie's Solution Mackie defines a miracle to be a super natural intervention into the natural world: '... we can give a coherent definition of a miracle. As a supernatural intrusion into the normally closed system that works in accordance with those law. Mackie then defines a miracle to be a super natural intervention into the natural world: '... we can give a coherent definition of a miracle as a supernatural intrusion into the normally closed system that works in Accordance with those laws… (Mackie, p: 21 tem that works in This does not mean the law is false; it only means the

  19. Unpacking religious affiliation: Exploring associations between Christian children's religious cultural context, God image, and self-esteem across development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Erin I; Crosby, Robert G

    2017-03-01

    In developmental research, religiousness is typically measured with omnibus affiliation or attendance variables that underspecify how the religious cultural contexts and experiences that affiliation represents influence developmental outcomes. This study explores associations between five aspects of a religious cultural context (family religiosity, religious schooling, church-based relationships with peers and adults, and view of God) in 844 seven- to 12-year-old Christian children to examine how they differentially predict self-esteem. Results of a structural equation model (SEM) analysis indicated that God image and peer church relationships directly predicted self-esteem, whereas God image mediated the influence of adult church relationships and family religious practices on self-esteem. A multiple group SEM analysis met the criterion for weak, but not strong, evidence that self-esteem is more related to younger children's adult church relationships but older children's peer church relationships. God image tended to be more related to younger children's family religious practices but older children's adult church relationships. Implications for developmental researchers and practitioners are discussed. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Religious affiliation is an omnibus variable representing multiple contexts of development. Self-esteem is an important outcome variable with different influences across development. Religious affiliation is associated with increased self-esteem. What does this study add? Children's experience in the contexts of religious affiliation influences development differently. It is not just affiliation, but specific religious contexts that influence children's self-esteem. The role of religious contexts in shaping children's self-esteem shifts across development.

  20. The leadership challenges of Paul's collection for the saints in Jerusalem: Part I: Overcoming the obstacles on the side of the Gentile Christian donors

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    Christoph W. Stenschke

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In addition to many other activities, the Apostle Paul was involved in a large-scale fund raising project. Following a charge he once had received in Jerusalem to remember the poor (Gl 2:10, Paul tried to convince the predominantly Gentile Christian churches which he had founded to contribute to a collection for the impoverished Jewish Christians of Jerusalem. For the potential donors it was far from obvious that they should be involved in benefaction for people far away and unable to reciprocate to their would-be �patrons�, to name but one obstacle. Whilst Paul is best known as theologian, missionary and pastor, his collection project also indicates his determination and skills as an early Christian leader. In this quest, Paul combined a broad salvation historical perspective, skilful persuasion and rhetoric, the notions of honour and shame, exemplary transparency and other aspects. This article describes what obstacles Paul had to overcome on the side of the Gentile Christian donors, how he did so and how he proceeded in preparing and organising the actual collection, the transport of the funds to Jerusalem and its presentation in Jerusalem. In closing, the article suggests applications for today�s Christian leaders.Intradisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary implications: The article indicates that already in early Christianity Christian leadership involved the use of several skills and was controversial. Far from being able to simply demand a certain course of action, early Christian leaders such as Paul had to convince others to lead by their own example and had to be involved themselves in what they demanded of others. This challenges some contemporary notions of Christian leadership. Following the portrayal of Paul�s leadership as it emerges from his collection project will lead to more effective Christian leadership.