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Sample records for choriomeningitis virus-induced inflammation

  1. Fulminant lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus-induced inflammation of the CNS involves a cytokine-chemokine-cytokine-chemokine cascade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jeanette E; Simonsen, Stine; Fenger, Christina;

    2009-01-01

    Intracerebral inoculation of immunocompetent mice with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) normally results in fatal CD8+ T cell mediated meningoencephalitis. However, in CXCL10-deficient mice, the virus-induced CD8+ T cell accumulation in the neural parenchyma is impaired, and only 30...... of the CNS, and astrocytes are the dominant expressors in the neural parenchyma, not microglial cells or recruited bone marrow-derived cell types. These results are consistent with a model suggesting a bidirectional interplay between resident cells of the CNS and the recruited virus-specific T cells...

  2. Fulminant lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus-induced inflammation of the CNS involves a cytokine-chemokine-cytokine-chemokine cascade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jeanette Erbo; Simonsen, Stine; Fenger, Christina;

    2009-01-01

    Intracerebral inoculation of immunocompetent mice with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) normally results in fatal CD8+ T cell mediated meningoencephalitis. However, in CXCL10-deficient mice, the virus-induced CD8+ T cell accumulation in the neural parenchyma is impaired, and only 30......-50% of the mice succumb to the infection. Similar results are obtained in mice deficient in the matching chemokine receptor, CXCR3. Together, these findings point to a key role for CXCL10 in regulating the severity of the LCMV-induced inflammatory process. For this reason, we now address the mechanisms regulating...... the expression of CXCL10 in the CNS of LCMV-infected mice. Using mice deficient in type I IFN receptor, type II IFN receptor, or type II IFN, as well as bone marrow chimeras expressing CXCL10 only in resident cells or only in bone marrow-derived cells, we analyzed the up-stream regulation as well as the cellular...

  3. Mechanisms of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus-induced hemopoietic dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Pisa, P; Bro-Jørgensen, K;

    1986-01-01

    Results of this study showed that lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection causes a marked activation of natural killer (NK) cells not only in the spleen but also in the bone marrow. This activity reached its peak at about day 3 of infection and declined after days 6 to 7. Enhanced NK cell...

  4. Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus-induced immunosuppression: evidence for viral interference with T-cell maturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Bro-Jørgensen, K; Jensen, Birgitte Løkke

    1982-01-01

    Acute lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection is associated with general immunosuppression which develops during the second week of the infection and persists for several weeks. In the present study, the ability of LCMV-infected mice to mount a cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response was...... investigated in a transplantation assay, using LCMV-immunized mice as recipients. By this means it was possible to evaluate the T-cell responsiveness of the acutely infected mice separately. Our results revealed a marked depression of the T-cell function temporally related to immunosuppression in the intact...... that a numerical deficiency of immunocompetent T-cells due to viral interference with T-cell maturation plays an important role in LCMV-induced immunosuppression....

  5. The virus-encoded chemokine vMIP-II inhibits virus-induced Tc1-driven inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindow, Morten; Nansen, Anneline; Bartholdy, Christina;

    2003-01-01

    virus-induced T-cell-mediated inflammation. This was done by use of the well-established model system murine lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection. Mice were infected in the footpad, and the induced CD8(+) T-cell-dependent inflammation was evaluated in mice subjected to treatment with vMIP-II. We...... found that inflammation was markedly inhibited in mice treated during the efferent phase of the antiviral immune response. In vitro studies revealed that vMIP-II inhibited chemokine-induced migration of activated CD8(+) T cells, but not T-cell-target cell contact, granule exocytosis, or cytokine release....... Consistent with these in vitro findings treatment with vMIP-II inhibited the adoptive transfer of a virus-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity response in vivo, but only when antigen-primed donor cells were transferred via the intravenous route and required to migrate actively, not when the cells were...

  6. Autophagy Genes Enhance Murine Gammaherpesvirus 68 Reactivation from Latency by Preventing Virus-Induced Systemic Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sunmin; Buck, Michael D; Desai, Chandni; Zhang, Xin; Loginicheva, Ekaterina; Martinez, Jennifer; Freeman, Michael L; Saitoh, Tatsuya; Akira, Shizuo; Guan, Jun-Lin; He, You-Wen; Blackman, Marcia A; Handley, Scott A; Levine, Beth; Green, Douglas R; Reese, Tiffany A; Artyomov, Maxim N; Virgin, Herbert W

    2016-01-13

    Host genes that regulate systemic inflammation upon chronic viral infection are incompletely understood. Murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) infection is characterized by latency in macrophages, and reactivation is inhibited by interferon-γ (IFN-γ). Using a lysozyme-M-cre (LysMcre) expression system, we show that deletion of autophagy-related (Atg) genes Fip200, beclin 1, Atg14, Atg16l1, Atg7, Atg3, and Atg5, in the myeloid compartment, inhibited MHV68 reactivation in macrophages. Atg5 deficiency did not alter reactivation from B cells, and effects on reactivation from macrophages were not explained by alterations in productive viral replication or the establishment of latency. Rather, chronic MHV68 infection triggered increased systemic inflammation, increased T cell production of IFN-γ, and an IFN-γ-induced transcriptional signature in macrophages from Atg gene-deficient mice. The Atg5-related reactivation defect was partially reversed by neutralization of IFN-γ. Thus Atg genes in myeloid cells dampen virus-induced systemic inflammation, creating an environment that fosters efficient MHV68 reactivation from latency. PMID:26764599

  7. Histone deacetylase inhibitors suppress RSV infection and alleviate virus-induced airway inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Qiuqin; Su, Zhonglan; Song, Shiyu; Χu, Hui; Zhang, Bin; Yi, Long; Tian, Man; Wang, Hongwei

    2016-09-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants and young children. However, the majority of RSV-infected patients only show mild symptoms. Different severities of infection and responses among the RSV-infected population indicate that epigenetic regulation as well as personal genetic background may affect RSV infectivity. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) is an important epigenetic regulator in lung diseases. The present study aimed to explore the possible connection between HDAC expression and RSV-induced lung inflammation. To address this question, RSV-infected airway epithelial cells (BEAS‑2B) were prepared and a mouse model of RSV infection was established, and then treated with various concentrations of HDAC inhibitors (HDACis), namely trichostatin A (TSA) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA). Viral replication and markers of virus-induced airway inflammation or oxidative stress were assessed. The activation of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathways was evaluated by western blot analysis. Our results showed that RSV infection in airway epithelial cells (AECs) significantly decreased histone acetylation levels by altering HDAC2 expression. The treatment of RSV-infected AECs with HDACis significantly restricted RSV replication by upregulating the interferon-α (IFN-α) related signaling pathways. The treatment of RSV-infected AECs with HDACis also significantly inhibited RSV-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine release [interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8] and oxidative stress-related molecule production [malondialdehyde (MDA), and nitrogen monoxide (NO)]. The activation of NF-κB, COX-2, MAPK and Stat3, which orchestrate pro‑inflammatory gene expression and oxidative stress injury, was also significantly inhibited. Our in vivo study using a mouse model of

  8. Tiotropium Attenuates Virus-Induced Pulmonary Inflammation in Cigarette Smoke-Exposed Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Hannes; Duechs, Matthias J; Tilp, Cornelia; Jung, Birgit; Erb, Klaus J

    2016-06-01

    Viral infections trigger exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and tiotropium, a M3 receptor antagonist, reduces exacerbations in patients by unknown mechanisms. In this report, we investigated whether tiotropium has anti-inflammatory effects in mice exposed to cigarette smoke (CS) and infected with influenza virus A/PR/8/34 (H1N1) or respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and compared these effects with those of steroid fluticasone and PDE4-inhibitor roflumilast. Mice were exposed to CS; infected with H1N1 or RSV; and treated with tiotropium, fluticasone, or roflumilast. The amount of cells and cytokine levels in the airways, lung function, and viral load was determined. NCI-H292 cells were infected with H1N1 or RSV and treated with the drugs. In CS/H1N1-exposed mice, tiotropium reduced neutrophil and macrophage numbers and levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in the airways and improved lung function. In contrast, fluticasone increased the loss of body weight; failed to reduce neutrophil or macrophage numbers; increased IL-6, KC, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the lungs; and worsened lung function. Treatment with roflumilast reduced macrophage numbers, IL-6, and KC in the lungs but had no effect on neutrophil numbers or lung function. In CS/RSV-exposed mice, treatment with tiotropium, but not fluticasone or roflumilast, reduced neutrophil numbers and IL-6 and TNF-α levels in the lungs. Viral load of H1N1 and RSV was significantly elevated in CS/virus-exposed mice and NCI-H292 cells after fluticasone treatment, whereas tiotropium and roflumilast had no effect. In conclusion, tiotropium has anti-inflammatory effects on CS/virus-induced inflammation in mice that are superior to the effects of roflumilast and fluticasone. This finding might help to explain the observed reduction of exacerbation rates in COPD patients. PMID:27016458

  9. Suppressors of cytokine signaling 1 and 3 are up-regulated in brain resident cells in response to virus induced inflammation of the CNS via at least two distinctive pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Maria Abildgaard; Fenger, Christina; Christensen, Jeanette Erbo;

    2014-01-01

    Suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins are intracellular proteins that inhibit cytokine signaling in a variety of cell types. A number of viral infections have been associated with SOCS up-regulation; however, not much is known about the mechanisms regulating SOCS expression during viral......-cytolytic and a cytolytic virus induce marked up-regulation of SOCS1 and-3 expression. Notably, the kinetics of the observed up-regulation follows that of activity within pro-inflammatory signalling pathways and, interestingly, type II IFN, which is also a key inducer of inflammatory mediators, seems to be essential...... underlie a virus induced up-regulation of SOCS in the CNS. We found that i.c. infection with either lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) or yellow fever virus (YF) results in gradual up-regulation of SOCS1/3 mRNA expression peaking at day 7 post infection (p.i.). In the LCMV model, SOCS m...

  10. Influenza virus-induced lung inflammation was modulated by cigarette smoke exposure in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Han

    Full Text Available Although smokers have increased susceptibility and severity of seasonal influenza virus infection, there is no report about the risk of 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pdmH1N1 or avian H9N2 (H9N2/G1 virus infection in smokers. In our study, we used mouse model to investigate the effect of cigarette smoke on pdmH1N1 or H9N2 virus infection. Mice were exposed to cigarette smoke for 21 days and then infected with pdmH1N1 or H9N2 virus. Control mice were exposed to air in parallel. We found that cigarette smoke exposure alone significantly upregulated the lung inflammation. Such prior cigarette smoke exposure significantly reduced the disease severity of subsequent pdmH1N1 or H9N2 virus infection. For pdmH1N1 infection, cigarette smoke exposed mice had significantly lower mortality than the control mice, possibly due to the significantly decreased production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Similarly, after H9N2 infection, cigarette smoke exposed mice displayed significantly less weight loss, which might be attributed to lower cytokines and chemokines production, less macrophages, neutrophils, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells infiltration and reduced lung damage compared to the control mice. To further investigate the underlying mechanism, we used nicotine to mimic the effect of cigarette smoke both in vitro and in vivo. Pre-treating the primary human macrophages with nicotine for 72 h significantly decreased their expression of cytokines and chemokines after pdmH1N1 or H9N2 infection. The mice subcutaneously and continuously treated with nicotine displayed significantly less weight loss and lower inflammatory response than the control mice upon pdmH1N1 or H9N2 infection. Moreover, α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor knockout mice had more body weight loss than wild-type mice after cigarette smoke exposure and H9N2 infection. Our study provided the first evidence that the pathogenicity of both pdmH1N1 and H9N2 viruses was alleviated in cigarette smoke exposed

  11. Aqueous extract of the edible Gracilaria tenuistipitata inhibits hepatitis C viral replication via cyclooxygenase-2 suppression and reduces virus-induced inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Jen Chen

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is an important human pathogen leading to hepatocellular carcinoma. Using an in vitro cell-based HCV replicon and JFH-1 infection system, we demonstrated that an aqueous extract of the seaweed Gracilaria tenuistipitata (AEGT concentration-dependently inhibited HCV replication at nontoxic concentrations. AEGT synergistically enhanced interferon-α (IFN-α anti-HCV activity in a combination treatment. We found that AEGT also significantly suppressed virus-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 expression at promoter transactivation and protein levels. Notably, addition of exogenous COX-2 expression in AEGT-treated HCV replicon cells gradually abolished AEGT anti-HCV activity, suggesting that COX-2 down-regulation was responsible for AEGT antiviral effects. Furthermore, we highlighted the inhibitory effect of AEGT in HCV-induced pro-inflammatory gene expression such as the expression of tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, inducible nitrite oxide synthase and COX-2 in a concentration-dependent manner to evaluate the potential therapeutic supplement in the management of patients with chronic HCV infections.

  12. Aqueous extract of the edible Gracilaria tenuistipitata inhibits hepatitis C viral replication via cyclooxygenase-2 suppression and reduces virus-induced inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Jen; Tseng, Chin-Kai; Chang, Fang-Rong; Yang, Jin-Iong; Yeh, Chi-Chen; Chen, Wei-Chun; Wu, Shou-Fang; Chang, Hsueh-Wei; Lee, Jin-Ching

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important human pathogen leading to hepatocellular carcinoma. Using an in vitro cell-based HCV replicon and JFH-1 infection system, we demonstrated that an aqueous extract of the seaweed Gracilaria tenuistipitata (AEGT) concentration-dependently inhibited HCV replication at nontoxic concentrations. AEGT synergistically enhanced interferon-α (IFN-α) anti-HCV activity in a combination treatment. We found that AEGT also significantly suppressed virus-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression at promoter transactivation and protein levels. Notably, addition of exogenous COX-2 expression in AEGT-treated HCV replicon cells gradually abolished AEGT anti-HCV activity, suggesting that COX-2 down-regulation was responsible for AEGT antiviral effects. Furthermore, we highlighted the inhibitory effect of AEGT in HCV-induced pro-inflammatory gene expression such as the expression of tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, inducible nitrite oxide synthase and COX-2 in a concentration-dependent manner to evaluate the potential therapeutic supplement in the management of patients with chronic HCV infections.

  13. The Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus Matrix Protein PPXY Late Domain Drives the Production of Defective Interfering Particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M Ziegler

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Arenaviruses cause severe diseases in humans but establish asymptomatic, lifelong infections in rodent reservoirs. Persistently-infected rodents harbor high levels of defective interfering (DI particles, which are thought to be important for establishing persistence and mitigating virus-induced cytopathic effect. Little is known about what drives the production of DI particles. We show that neither the PPXY late domain encoded within the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV matrix protein nor a functional endosomal sorting complex transport (ESCRT pathway is absolutely required for the generation of standard infectious virus particles. In contrast, DI particle release critically requires the PPXY late domain and is ESCRT-dependent. Additionally, the terminal tyrosine in the PPXY motif is reversibly phosphorylated and our findings indicate that this posttranslational modification may regulate DI particle formation. Thus we have uncovered a new role for the PPXY late domain and a possible mechanism for its regulation.

  14. 9 CFR 113.42 - Detection of lymphocytic choriomeningitis contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Detection of lymphocytic choriomeningitis contamination. 113.42 Section 113.42 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... contamination. The test for detection of lymphocytic choriomeningitis (LCM) virus provided in this section...

  15. Virus-induced exacerbations in asthma and COPD

    OpenAIRE

    DaisukeKurai

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by chronic airway inflammation and/or airflow limitation due to pulmonary emphysema. Chronic bronchitis, pulmonary emphysema, and bronchial asthma may all be associated with airflow limitation; therefore, exacerbation of asthma may be associated with the pathophysiology of COPD. Furthermore, recent studies have suggested that the exacerbation of asthma, namely virus-induced asthma, may be associated with a wide variety of respirato...

  16. Circulating intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) as an early and sensitive marker for virus-induced T cell activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Johansen, J; Marker, O;

    1995-01-01

    The effect of systemic virus infection on the level of circulating ICAM-1 (cICAM-1) in serum, and the role of virus-activated T cells in this context, were studied using the murine lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection as primary model system. A marked virus-induced elevation in cICAM-1...... in serum was revealed, the presence of which coincided with the phase of virus-induced T cell activation. However, high levels of cICAM-1 in serum were observed well before maximal T cell activation could be demonstrated. No increase in cICAM-1 was observed in the serum of infected T cell-deficient nude...... induce shedding of ICAM-1 into the circulation, and this parameter may be used as an early and sensitive marker for immune activation....

  17. Platelets prevent IFN-alpha/beta-induced lethal hemorrhage promoting CTL-dependent clearance of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannacone, Matteo; Sitia, Giovanni; Isogawa, Masanori; Whitmire, Jason K; Marchese, Patrizia; Chisari, Francis V; Ruggeri, Zaverio M; Guidotti, Luca G

    2008-01-15

    We found that mice infected with different isolates of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) develop a mild hemorrhagic anemia, which becomes severe and eventually lethal in animals depleted of platelets or lacking integrin beta3. Lethal hemorrhagic anemia is mediated by virus-induced IFN-alpha/beta that causes platelet dysfunction, mucocutaneous blood loss and suppression of erythropoiesis. In addition to the life-threatening hemorrhagic anemia, platelet-depleted mice fail to mount an efficient cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response and cannot clear LCMV. Transfusion of functional platelets into these animals reduces hemorrhage, prevents death and restores CTL-induced viral clearance in a manner partially dependent on CD40 ligand (CD40L). These results indicate that, upon activation, platelets expressing integrin beta3 and CD40L are required for protecting the host against the induction of an IFN-alpha/beta-dependent lethal hemorrhagic diathesis and for clearing LCMV infection through CTLs.

  18. Virus-induced non-specific signals cause cell cycle progression of primed CD8(+) T cells but do not induce cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørding Andreasen, Susanne; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Marker, O;

    1999-01-01

    with known specificity and priming history in an environment also containing a normal heterogeneous CD8(+) population which served as an intrinsic control. Three parameters of T cell activation were analyzed: cell cycle progression, phenotypic conversion and cytolytic activity. Following injection of the IFN...... that both non-specific and antigen-specific signals contribute to the initial virus-induced proliferation of CD8(+) T cells, but for further proliferation and differentiation to take place, TCR-ligand interaction is required. The implications for maintenance of T cell memory is discussed.......In this report the significance of virus-induced non-specific T cell activation was re-evaluated using transgenic mice in which about half of the CD8(+) T cells expressed a TCR specific for amino acids 33-41 of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus glycoprotein I. This allowed tracing of cells...

  19. Pet Rodents and Fatal Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis in Transplant Patients

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-05-16

    Three organ transplant recipients died from infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), which was traced back to a hamster owned by the daughter of the organ donor. Dr. Brian Amman, a mammalogist with the Special Pathogens Branch at CDC, discusses the dangers LCMV may pose to people with immune disorders, as well as to pregnant women.  Created: 5/16/2007 by CDC, Office of the Director.   Date Released: 5/16/2007.

  20. Congenital viral infections of the brain: lessons learned from lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in the neonatal rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Bonthius

    2007-11-01

    induces delayed-onset neuronal loss after the virus has been cleared, the neonatal rat infected with LCMV may be an excellent model system to study neurodegenerative or psychiatric diseases whose etiologies are hypothesized to be virus-induced, such as autism, schizophrenia, and temporal lobe epilepsy.

  1. [Incidence and features of neuroinfections induced by lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekonenko, E P; Tkachenko, E A; Umanskiĭ, K G; Ivanov, A P; Rezapkin, G V

    1986-01-01

    A follow-up examination of blood sera and cerebrospinal fluid was carried out in 413 patients with various neuroinfections and related diseases. The modern immunological methods were employed: the complement fixation test, the fluorescent antibody test as well as immuno-enzymic and radioimmunoassays. It was established that 8.5% of serous meningitides and 12% of encephalitides were induced by lymphocytic choriomeningitis (LCM) virus. The verified diseases were subjected to a clinical analysis. It is emphasized that the immunological examination of the cerebrospinal fluid in patients with LCM infection contributes to a more detailed study of the pathogenesis of the disease.

  2. Differential Impact of Interferon Regulatory Factor 7 in Initiation of the Type I Interferon Response in the Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus-Infected Central Nervous System versus the Periphery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jeanette Erbo; Fenger, Christina; Issazadeh-Navikas, Shohreh;

    2012-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) regulatory factors (IRFs) are a family of transcription factors involved in regulating type I IFN genes and other genes participating in the early antiviral host response. To better understand the mechanisms involved in virus-induced central nervous system (CNS) inflammation, we...

  3. Virus-Induced Type I Interferon Deteriorates Control of Systemic Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Infection

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    Katja Merches

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Type I interferon (IFN-I predisposes to bacterial superinfections, an important problem during viral infection or treatment with interferon-alpha (IFN-α. IFN-I-induced neutropenia is one reason for the impaired bacterial control; however there is evidence that more frequent bacterial infections during IFN-α-treatment occur independently of neutropenia. Methods: We analyzed in a mouse model, whether Pseudomonas aeruginosa control is influenced by co-infection with the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV. Bacterial titers, numbers of neutrophils and the gene-expression of liver-lysozyme-2 were determined during a 24 hours systemic infection with P. aeruginosa in wild-type and Ifnar-/- mice under the influence of LCMV or poly(I:C. Results: Virus-induced IFN-I impaired the control of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This was associated with neutropenia and loss of lysozyme-2-expression in the liver, which had captured P. aeruginosa. A lower release of IFN-I by poly(I:C-injection also impaired the bacterial control in the liver and reduced the expression of liver-lysozyme-2. Low concentration of IFN-I after infection with a virulent strain of P. aeruginosa alone impaired the bacterial control and reduced lysozyme-2-expression in the liver as well. Conclusion: We found that during systemic infection with P. aeruginosa Kupffer cells quickly controlled the bacteria in cooperation with neutrophils. Upon LCMV-infection this cooperation was disturbed.

  4. Rabies Virus-Induced Membrane Fusion Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Gaudin, Yves

    2000-01-01

    Fusion of rabies virus with membranes is triggered at low pH and is mediated by the viral glycoprotein (G). The rabies virus-induced fusion pathway was studied by investigating the effects of exogenous lipids having various dynamic molecular shapes on the fusion process. Inverted cone-shaped lysophosphatidylcholines (LPCs) blocked fusion at a stage subsequent to fusion peptide insertion into the target membrane. Consistent with the stalk-hypothesis, LPC with shorter alkyl chains inhibited fus...

  5. Cell entry of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus is restricted in myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Masaharu; Urata, Shuzo; Cho, Yoshitake; Ngo, Nhi; de la Torre, Juan C

    2014-06-01

    In mice persistently infected since birth with the prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis viurs, viral antigen and RNA are readily detected in most organs and cell types but remarkably absent in skeletal muscle. Here we report that mouse C2C12 myoblasts that are readily infected by LCMV, become highly refractory to LCMV infection upon their differentiation into myotubes. Myotube's resistance to LCMV was not due to an intracellular restriction of virus replication but rather an impaired cell entry mediated by the LCMV surface glycoprotein. Our findings provide an explanation for the observation that in LCMV carrier mice myotubes, which are constantly exposed to blood-containing virus, remain free of viral antigen and RNA despite myotubes express high levels of the LCMV receptor alpha dystroglycan and do not pose an intracellular blockade to LCMV multiplication.

  6. Virus-induced exacerbations in asthma and COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke eKurai

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is characterized by chronic airway inflammation and/or airflow limitation due to pulmonary emphysema. Chronic bronchitis, pulmonary emphysema, and bronchial asthma may all be associated with airflow limitation; therefore, exacerbation of asthma may be associated with the pathophysiology of COPD. Furthermore, recent studies have suggested that the exacerbation of asthma, namely virus-induced asthma, may be associated with a wide variety of respiratory viruses.COPD and asthma have different underlying pathophysiological processes and thus require individual therapies. Exacerbation of both COPD and asthma, which are basically defined and diagnosed by clinical symptoms, is associated with a rapid decline in lung function and increased mortality. Similar pathogens, including human rhinovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza virus, parainfluenza virus and coronavirus, are also frequently detected during exacerbation of asthma and/or COPD. Immune response to respiratory viral infections, which may be related to the severity of exacerbation in each disease, varies in patients with both COPD and asthma. In this regard, it is crucial to recognize and understand both the similarities and differences of clinical features in patients with COPD and/or asthma associated with respiratory viral infections, especially in the exacerbative stage.In relation to definition, epidemiology, and pathophysiology, this review aims to summarize current knowledge concerning exacerbation of both COPD and asthma by focusing on the clinical significance of associated respiratory virus infections.

  7. 21 CFR 866.3360 - Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus serological reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... cerebral meningitis (inflammation of membranes that envelop the brain) and occasionally a mild pneumonia... meningitis and pneumonia. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from...

  8. Virus-induced congenital malformations in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agerholm, Jørgen S; Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion; Peperkamp, Klaas; Windsor, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosing the cause of bovine congenital malformations (BCMs) is challenging for bovine veterinary practitioners and laboratory diagnosticians as many known as well as a large number of not-yet reported syndromes exist. Foetal infection with certain viruses, including bovine virus diarrhea virus (BVDV), Schmallenberg virus (SBV), blue tongue virus (BTV), Akabane virus (AKAV), or Aino virus (AV), is associated with a range of congenital malformations. It is tempting for veterinary practitioners to diagnose such infections based only on the morphology of the defective offspring. However, diagnosing a virus as a cause of BCMs usually requires laboratory examination and even in such cases, interpretation of findings may be challenging due to lack of experience regarding genetic defects causing similar lesions, even in cases where virus or congenital antibodies are present. Intrauterine infection of the foetus during the susceptible periods of development, i.e. around gestation days 60-180, by BVDV, SBV, BTV, AKAV and AV may cause malformations in the central nervous system, especially in the brain. Brain lesions typically consist of hydranencephaly, porencephaly, hydrocephalus and cerebellar hypoplasia, which in case of SBV, AKAV and AV infections may be associated by malformation of the axial and appendicular skeleton, e.g. arthrogryposis multiplex congenita. Doming of the calvarium is present in some, but not all, cases. None of these lesions are pathognomonic so diagnosing a viral cause based on gross lesions is uncertain. Several genetic defects share morphology with virus induced congenital malformations, so expert advice should be sought when BCMs are encountered. PMID:26399846

  9. Congenital Viral Infections of the Brain: Lessons Learned from Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus in the Neonatal Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Bonthius, Daniel J.; Stanley Perlman

    2007-01-01

    The fetal brain is highly vulnerable to teratogens, including many infectious agents. As a consequence of prenatal infection, many children suffer severe and permanent brain injury and dysfunction. Because most animal models of congenital brain infection do not strongly mirror human disease, the models are highly limited in their abilities to shed light on the pathogenesis of these diseases. The animal model for congenital lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection, however, does not...

  10. Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection of macaques: a model for Lassa fever

    OpenAIRE

    Zapata, Juan C.; Pauza, C. David; Djavani, Mahmoud M.; Rodas, Juan D.; Moshkoff, Dmitry; Bryant, Joseph; Ateh, Eugene; Garcia, Cybele; Lukashevich, Igor S.; Salvato, Maria S.

    2011-01-01

    Arenaviruses such as Lassa fever virus (LASV) and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) are benign in their natural reservoir hosts, and can occasionally cause severe viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) in non-human primates and in human beings. LCMV is considerably more benign for human beings than Lassa virus, however certain strains, like the LCMV-WE strain, can cause severe disease when the virus is delivered as a high-dose inoculum. Here we describe a rhesus macaque model for Lassa fever t...

  11. CXCL10 is the key ligand for CXCR3 on CD8+ effector T cells involved in immune surveillance of the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus-infected central nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jeanette Erbo; de Lemos, Carina; Moos, Torben;

    2006-01-01

    IFN-gamma-inducible protein 10/CXCL10 is a chemokine associated with type 1 T cell responses, regulating the migration of activated T cells through binding to the CXCR3 receptor. Expression of both CXCL10 and CXCR3 are observed during immunopathological diseases of the CNS, and this receptor....../ligand pair is thought to play a central role in regulating T cell-mediated inflammation in this organ site. In this report, we investigated the role of CXCL10 in regulating CD8(+) T cell-mediated inflammation in the virus-infected brain. This was done through analysis of CXCL10-deficient mice infected...... intracerebrally with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, which in normal immunocompetent mice induces a fatal CD8(+) T cell-mediated meningoencephalitis. We found that a normal antiviral CD8(+) T cell response was generated in CXCL10-deficient mice, and that lack of CXCL10 had no influence on the accumulation...

  12. Molecular epidemiology of respiratory viruses in virus-induced asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki eTsukagoshi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory illness (ARI due to various viruses is not only the most common cause of upper respiratory infection in humans but is also a major cause of morbidity and mortality, leading to diseases such as bronchiolitis and pneumonia. Previous studies have shown that respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, human rhinovirus (HRV, human metapneumovirus (HMPV, human parainfluenza virus (HPIV, and human enterovirus (HEV infections may be associated with virus-induced asthma. For example, it has been suggested that HRV infection is detected in the acute exacerbation of asthma and infection is prolonged. Thus it is believed that the main etiological cause of asthma is ARI viruses. Furthermore, the number of asthma patients in most industrial countries has greatly increased, resulting in a morbidity rate of around 10-15% of the population. However, the relationships between viral infections, host immune response, and host factors in the pathophysiology of asthma remain unclear. To gain a better understanding of the epidemiology of virus-induced asthma, it is important to assess both the characteristics of the viruses and the host defense mechanisms. Molecular epidemiology enables us to understand the pathogenesis of microorganisms by identifying specific pathways, molecules, and genes that influence the risk of developing a disease. However, the epidemiology of various respiratory viruses associated with virus-induced asthma is not fully understood. Therefore, in this article, we review molecular epidemiological studies of RSV, HRV, HPIV, and HMPV infection associated with virus-induced asthma.

  13. Hepatitis C Virus-Induced Mitochondrial Dysfunctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birke Bartosch

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis C is characterized by metabolic disorders and a microenvironment in the liver dominated by oxidative stress, inflammation and regeneration processes that lead in the long term to hepatocellular carcinoma. Many lines of evidence suggest that mitochondrial dysfunctions, including modification of metabolic fluxes, generation and elimination of oxidative stress, Ca2+ signaling and apoptosis, play a central role in these processes. However, how these dysfunctions are induced by the virus and whether they play a role in disease progression and neoplastic transformation remains to be determined. Most in vitro studies performed so far have shown that several of the hepatitis C virus (HCV proteins localize to mitochondria, but the consequences of these interactions on mitochondrial functions remain contradictory, probably due to the use of artificial expression and replication systems. In vivo studies are hampered by the fact that innate and adaptive immune responses will overlay mitochondrial dysfunctions induced directly in the hepatocyte by HCV. Thus, the molecular aspects underlying HCV-induced mitochondrial dysfunctions and their roles in viral replication and the associated pathology need yet to be confirmed in the context of productively replicating virus and physiologically relevant in vitro and in vivo model systems.

  14. Hepatitis B virus-induced oncogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers in the world with an annual incidence of more than 500000 in the year 2000. Its incidence is rising in many countries. Recently, it has been estimated that about 53% of HCC cases in the world are related to hepatitis B virus (HBV). The epidemiological association of HBV with HCC is well established. In recent studies,it was revealed that HBsAg carriers have a 25-37times increased risk of developing HCC as compared to non-infected people. At present, HBV-associated carcinogenesis can be seen as a multi-factorial process that includes both direct and indirect mechanisms that might act synergistically. The integration of HBV DNA into the host genome occurs at early steps of clonal tumor expansion. The integration has been shown in a number of cases to affect a variety of cancerrelated genes and to exert insertional mutagenesis. The permanent liver inflammation, induced by the immune response, resulting in a degeneration and regeneration process confers to the accumulation of critical mutations in the host genome. In addition to this, the regulatory proteins HBx and the PreS2 activators that can be encoded by the integrate exert a tumor promoter-like function resulting in positive selection of cells producing a functional regulatory protein. Gene expression profiling and proteomic techniques may help to characterize the molecular mechanisms driving HBV-associated carcinogenesis, and thus potentially identify new strategies in diagnosis and therapy.

  15. Role of an Intact Splenic Microarchitecture in Early Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus Production

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Stefan; Hunziker, Lukas; Enzler, Susanne; Bühler-Jungo, Myriam; Di Santo, James P.; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.; Mueller, C.

    2002-01-01

    An acute infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) is efficiently controlled by the cytotoxic-T-cell (CTL) response of the host, and LCMV titers in the spleen and peripheral solid organs usually fall sharply after day 4 to 6 postinfection. Surprisingly, infection of immunodeficient recombination-activating gene 2-deficient (RAG2−/−) mice with 5 × 102 PFU of LCMV-WE causes about 80-fold-lower LCMV titers in the spleen on day 4 postinfection compared with C57BL/6 control mice. Th...

  16. Vaccination against lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection in MHC class II-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter Johannes; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2011-01-01

    response could be elicited in MHC class II-deficient mice by vaccination with adenovirus encoding lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) glycoprotein tethered to MHC class II-associated invariant chain. Moreover, the response induced conferred significant cytolytic CD8(+) T cell-mediated protection...... against challenge with a high dose of the invasive clone 13 strain of LCMV. In contrast, vaccination with adenovirus encoding unlinked LCMV glycoprotein induced weak virus control in the absence of CD4(+) T cells, and mice may die of increased immunopathology associated with incomplete protection. Acute...

  17. Identification of lymphocytic choriomeningitis mammarenavirus in house mouse (Mus musculus, Rodentia) in French Guiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavergne, Anne; de Thoisy, Benoît; Tirera, Sourakhata; Donato, Damien; Bouchier, Christiane; Catzeflis, François; Lacoste, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Thirty-seven house mice (Mus musculus, Rodentia) caught in different localities in French Guiana were screened to investigate the presence of lymphocytic choriomeningitis mammarenavirus (LCMV). Two animals trapped in an urban area were found positive, hosting a new strain of LCMV, that we tentatively named LCMV "Comou". The complete sequence was determined using a metagenomic approach. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that this strain is related to genetic lineage I composed of strains inducing severe disease in humans. These results emphasize the need for active surveillance in humans as well as in house mouse populations, which is a rather common rodent in French Guianese cities and settlements.

  18. Concanavalin A-induced activation of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus memory lymphocytes into specifically cytotoxic T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marker, O; Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Andersen, G T

    1977-01-01

    When spleen cells, which have been primed to Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis (LCM) virus during a primary infection several months previously, are stimulated in vitro with Con A. highly specific secondary cytotoxic effector cells are generated. The degree of cytotoxicity revealed by such Con A......-stimulated cells is higher than that of non-incubated spleen cells harvested nine days following the primary infection, and the effect is totally inhibited by anti-theta serum plus complement treatment of the effector cells immediately before the cytotoxic test....

  19. Studies on the role of mononuclear phagocytes in resistance to acute lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Volkert, M

    1983-01-01

    The role of mononuclear phagocytes in various phases of the acute lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection was studied. The anti-macrophage agent carrageenan delayed virus clearance. Carrageenan was most effective when given before virus inoculation, suggesting that it interfered...... with early events in the host response to the virus. Correspondingly, carrageenan enhanced early virus multiplication. Pretreatment with carrageenan apparently did not inhibit induction of the T-cell response and had little or no direct effect on T-cell-dependent anti-viral activity. The LCMV-induced natural...

  20. Molecular epidemiology of respiratory viruses in virus-induced asthma

    OpenAIRE

    HiroyukiTsukagoshi; TaiseiIshioka

    2013-01-01

    Acute respiratory illness (ARI) due to various viruses is not only the most common cause of upper respiratory infection in humans but is also a major cause of morbidity and mortality, leading to diseases such as bronchiolitis and pneumonia. Previous studies have shown that respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human rhinovirus (HRV), human metapneumovirus (HMPV), human parainfluenza virus (HPIV), and human enterovirus (HEV) infections may be associated with virus-induced asthma. For example, it ...

  1. Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in employees and mice at multipremises feeder-rodent operation, United States, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knust, Barbara; Ströher, Ute; Edison, Laura; Albariño, César G; Lovejoy, Jodi; Armeanu, Emilian; House, Jennifer; Cory, Denise; Horton, Clayton; Fowler, Kathy L; Austin, Jessica; Poe, John; Humbaugh, Kraig E; Guerrero, Lisa; Campbell, Shelley; Gibbons, Aridth; Reed, Zachary; Cannon, Deborah; Manning, Craig; Petersen, Brett; Metcalf, Douglas; Marsh, Bret; Nichol, Stuart T; Rollin, Pierre E

    2014-02-01

    We investigated the extent of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection in employees and rodents at 3 commercial breeding facilities. Of 97 employees tested, 31 (32%) had IgM and/or IgG to LCMV, and aseptic meningitis was diagnosed in 4 employees. Of 1,820 rodents tested in 1 facility, 382 (21%) mice (Mus musculus) had detectable IgG, and 13 (0.7%) were positive by reverse transcription PCR; LCMV was isolated from 8. Rats (Rattus norvegicus) were not found to be infected. S-segment RNA sequence was similar to strains previously isolated in North America. Contact by wild mice with colony mice was the likely source for LCMV, and shipments of infected mice among facilities spread the infection. The breeding colonies were depopulated to prevent further human infections. Future outbreaks can be prevented with monitoring and management, and employees should be made aware of LCMV risks and prevention. PMID:24447605

  2. Cure of Chronic Viral Infection and Virus-Induced Type 1 Diabetes by Neutralizing Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mette Ejrnaes

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of neutralizing antibodies is one of the most successful methods to interfere with receptor-ligand interactions in vivo. In particular blockade of soluble inflammatory mediators or their corresponding cellular receptors was proven an effective way to regulate inflammation and/or prevent its negative consequences. However, one problem that comes along with an effective neutralization of inflammatory mediators is the general systemic immunomodulatory effect. It is therefore important to design a treatment regimen in a way to strike at the right place and at the right time in order to achieve maximal effects with minimal duration of immunosuppression or hyperactivation. In this review we reflect on two examples of how short time administration of such neutralizing antibodies can block two distinct inflammatory consequences of viral infection. First, we review recent findings that blockade of IL-10/IL-10R interaction can resolve chronic viral infection and second, we reflect on how neutralization of the chemokine CXCL10 can abrogate virus-induced type 1 diabetes.

  3. Virus -induced plankton dynamic and sea spray oragnics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchini, Maria Cristina; O'Dowd, Colin; Danovaro, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    The processes that link phytoplankton biomass and productivity to the organic matter enrichment in sea spray aerosol are far from being understood and modelling predictions remain highly uncertain at the moment. While some studies have asserted that the enrichment of OM in sea spray aerosol is independent on marine productivity, others, on the contrary, have shown significant correlation with phytoplankton biomass and productivity (Chl-a retrieved by satellites). Here we show that viral infection of prokaryotes and phytoplankton, by inducing the release of large quantities of surfaceactive organic matter (cell debris, exudates and other colloidal gel-forming material), in part due to cell lysis and plankton defence reactions, and in part from rapid virus multiplication, triggers the organic matter (OM) enrichment in the sea-spray particles during blooms. We show that virus-induced bloom dynamics may explain the contrasting results present in literature on the link between primary productivity and OM sea spray enrichment.

  4. Virus-induced secondary bacterial infection: a concise review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendaus, Mohamed A; Jomha, Fatima A; Alhammadi, Ahmed H

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory diseases are a very common source of morbidity and mortality among children. Health care providers often face a dilemma when encountering a febrile infant or child with respiratory tract infection. The reason expressed by many clinicians is the trouble to confirm whether the fever is caused by a virus or a bacterium. The aim of this review is to update the current evidence on the virus-induced bacterial infection. We present several clinical as well in vitro studies that support the correlation between virus and secondary bacterial infections. In addition, we discuss the pathophysiology and prevention modes of the virus–bacterium coexistence. A search of the PubMed and MEDLINE databases was carried out for published articles covering bacterial infections associated with respiratory viruses. This review should provide clinicians with a comprehensive idea of the range of bacterial and viral coinfections or secondary infections that could present with viral respiratory illness. PMID:26345407

  5. Attenuation of the cytotoxic T lymphocyte response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in mice subjected to chronic social stress

    OpenAIRE

    Sommershof, Annette; Basler, Michael; Riether, Carsten; Engler, Harald; Gröttrup, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Chronic stress is suspected to increase the susceptibility to infections but experimental evidence from physiological stress models is scarce. We examined the effects of chronic social stress on virus-specific CTL responses in mice after infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). Mice subjected to social stress on six consecutive days prior to infection showed a significant reduction of IFN-γ producing TCD8+ splenocytes and markedly lowered plasma concentrations of IFN-γ. In co...

  6. Influenza virus induces bacterial and nonbacterial otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Kirsty R; Diavatopoulos, Dimitri A; Thornton, Ruth; Pedersen, John; Strugnell, Richard A; Wise, Andrew K; Reading, Patrick C; Wijburg, Odilia L

    2011-12-15

    Otitis media (OM) is one of the most common childhood diseases. OM can arise when a viral infection enables bacteria to disseminate from the nasopharynx to the middle ear. Here, we provide the first infant murine model for disease. Mice coinfected with Streptococcus pneumoniae and influenza virus had high bacterial load in the middle ear, middle ear inflammation, and hearing loss. In contrast, mice colonized with S. pneumoniae alone had significantly less bacteria in the ear, minimal hearing loss, and no inflammation. Of interest, infection with influenza virus alone also caused some middle ear inflammation and hearing loss. Overall, this study provides a clinically relevant and easily accessible animal model to study the pathogenesis and prevention of OM. Moreover, we provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence that influenza virus alone causes middle ear inflammation in infant mice. This inflammation may then play an important role in the development of bacterial OM.

  7. Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection of macaques: a model for Lassa fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Juan C; Pauza, C David; Djavani, Mahmoud M; Rodas, Juan D; Moshkoff, Dmitry; Bryant, Joseph; Ateh, Eugene; Garcia, Cybele; Lukashevich, Igor S; Salvato, Maria S

    2011-11-01

    Arenaviruses such as Lassa fever virus (LASV) and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) are benign in their natural reservoir hosts, and can occasionally cause severe viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) in non-human primates and in human beings. LCMV is considerably more benign for human beings than Lassa virus, however certain strains, like the LCMV-WE strain, can cause severe disease when the virus is delivered as a high-dose inoculum. Here we describe a rhesus macaque model for Lassa fever that employs a virulent strain of LCMV. Since LASV must be studied within Biosafety Level-4 (BSL-4) facilities, the LCMV-infected macaque model has the advantage that it can be used at BSL-3. LCMV-induced disease is rarely as severe as other VHF, but it is similar in cases where vascular leakage leads to lethal systemic failure. The LCMV-infected macaque has been valuable for describing the course of disease with differing viral strains, doses and routes of infection. By monitoring system-wide changes in physiology and gene expression in a controlled experimental setting, it is possible to identify events that are pathognomonic for developing VHF and potential treatment targets. PMID:21820469

  8. Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection of macaques: a model for Lassa fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Juan C.; Pauza, C. David; Djavani, Mahmoud M.; Rodas, Juan D.; Moshkoff, Dmitry; Bryant, Joseph; Ateh, Eugene; Garcia, Cybele; Lukashevich, Igor S.; Salvato, Maria S.

    2011-01-01

    Arenaviruses such as Lassa fever virus (LASV) and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) are benign in their natural reservoir hosts, and can occasionally cause severe viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) in non-human primates and in human beings. LCMV is considerably more benign for human beings than Lassa virus, however certain strains, like the LCMV-WE strain, can cause severe disease when the virus is delivered as a high-dose inoculum. Here we describe a rhesus macaque model for Lassa fever that employs a virulent strain of LCMV. Since LASV must be studied within Biosafety Level-4 (BSL-4) facilities, the LCMV-infected macaque model has the advantage that it can be used at BSL-3. LCMV-induced disease is rarely as severe as other VHF, but it is similar in cases where vascular leakage leads to lethal systemic failure. The LCMV-infected macaque has been valuable for describing the course of disease with differing viral strains, doses and routes of infection. By monitoring system-wide changes in physiology and gene expression in a controlled experimental setting, it is possible to identify events that are pathognomonic for developing VHF and potential treatment targets. PMID:21820469

  9. Virus-induced secondary bacterial infection: a concise review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendaus MA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Mohamed A Hendaus,1 Fatima A Jomha,2 Ahmed H Alhammadi3 1Department of Pediatrics, Academic General Pediatrics Division, Weill-Cornell Medical College, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar; 2School of Pharmacy, Lebanese International University, Khiara, Lebanon; 3Department of Pediatrics, Academic General Pediatrics Division, Weill-Cornell Medical College, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar Abstract: Respiratory diseases are a very common source of morbidity and mortality among children. Health care providers often face a dilemma when encountering a febrile infant or child with respiratory tract infection. The reason expressed by many clinicians is the trouble to confirm whether the fever is caused by a virus or a bacterium. The aim of this review is to update the current evidence on the virus-induced bacterial infection. We present several clinical as well in vitro studies that support the correlation between virus and secondary bacterial infections. In addition, we discuss the pathophysiology and prevention modes of the virus–bacterium coexistence. A search of the PubMed and MEDLINE databases was carried out for published articles covering bacterial infections associated with respiratory viruses. This review should provide clinicians with a comprehensive idea of the range of bacterial and viral coinfections or secondary infections that could present with viral respiratory illness. Keywords: bacteria, infection, risk, virus

  10. Virus-induced Gene Silencing in Eggplant (Solanum melongena)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HaipingLiu; Daqi Fu; Benzhong Zhu; Huaxue Yan; Xiaoying Shen; Jinhua Zuo; Yi Zhu; Yunbo Luo

    2012-01-01

    Eggplant (Solanum melongena) is an economically important vegetable requiring investigation into its various genomic functions.The current limitation in the investigation of genomic function in eggplant is the lack of effective tools available for conducting functional assays.Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) has played a critical role in the functional genetic analyses.In this paper,TRV-mediated VIGS was successfully elicited in eggplant.We first cloned the CDS sequence of PDS (PHYTOENE DESATURASE) in eggplant and then silenced the PDS gene.Photo-bleaching was shown on the newly-developed leaves four weeks after agroinoculation,indicating that VIGS can be used to silence genes in eggplant.To further illustrate the reliability of VIGS in eggplant,we selected Chl H,Su and CLA1 as reporters to elicit VIGS using the high-pressure spray method.Suppression of Chl H and Su led to yellow leaves,while the depletion of CLA1 resulted in albino.In conclusion,four genes,PDS,Chl H,Su (Sulfur),CLA1,were down-regulated significantly by VIGS,indicating that the VIGS system can be successfully applied in eggplant and is a reliable tool for the study of gene function.

  11. Efficient Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Solanum rostratum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lan-Huan; Wang, Rui-Heng; Zhu, Ben-Zhong; Zhu, Hong-Liang; Luo, Yun-Bo; Fu, Da-Qi

    2016-01-01

    Solanum rostratum is a “super weed” that grows fast, is widespread, and produces the toxin solanine, which is harmful to both humans and other animals. To our knowledge, no study has focused on its molecular biology owing to the lack of available transgenic methods and sequence information for S. rostratum. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a powerful tool for the study of gene function in plants; therefore, in the present study, we aimed to establish tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-derived VIGS in S. rostratum. The genes for phytoene desaturase (PDS) and Chlorophyll H subunit (ChlH) of magnesium protoporphyrin chelatase were cloned from S. rostratum and used as reporters of gene silencing. It was shown that high-efficiency VIGS can be achieved in the leaves, flowers, and fruit of S. rostratum. Moreover, based on our comparison of three different types of infection methods, true leaf infection was found to be more efficient than cotyledon and sprout infiltration in long-term VIGS in multiple plant organs. In conclusion, the VIGS technology and tomato genomic sequences can be used in the future to study gene function in S. rostratum. PMID:27258320

  12. Efficient Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Solanum rostratum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan-Huan Meng

    Full Text Available Solanum rostratum is a "super weed" that grows fast, is widespread, and produces the toxin solanine, which is harmful to both humans and other animals. To our knowledge, no study has focused on its molecular biology owing to the lack of available transgenic methods and sequence information for S. rostratum. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS is a powerful tool for the study of gene function in plants; therefore, in the present study, we aimed to establish tobacco rattle virus (TRV-derived VIGS in S. rostratum. The genes for phytoene desaturase (PDS and Chlorophyll H subunit (ChlH of magnesium protoporphyrin chelatase were cloned from S. rostratum and used as reporters of gene silencing. It was shown that high-efficiency VIGS can be achieved in the leaves, flowers, and fruit of S. rostratum. Moreover, based on our comparison of three different types of infection methods, true leaf infection was found to be more efficient than cotyledon and sprout infiltration in long-term VIGS in multiple plant organs. In conclusion, the VIGS technology and tomato genomic sequences can be used in the future to study gene function in S. rostratum.

  13. Efficient Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Solanum rostratum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lan-Huan; Wang, Rui-Heng; Zhu, Ben-Zhong; Zhu, Hong-Liang; Luo, Yun-Bo; Fu, Da-Qi

    2016-01-01

    Solanum rostratum is a "super weed" that grows fast, is widespread, and produces the toxin solanine, which is harmful to both humans and other animals. To our knowledge, no study has focused on its molecular biology owing to the lack of available transgenic methods and sequence information for S. rostratum. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a powerful tool for the study of gene function in plants; therefore, in the present study, we aimed to establish tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-derived VIGS in S. rostratum. The genes for phytoene desaturase (PDS) and Chlorophyll H subunit (ChlH) of magnesium protoporphyrin chelatase were cloned from S. rostratum and used as reporters of gene silencing. It was shown that high-efficiency VIGS can be achieved in the leaves, flowers, and fruit of S. rostratum. Moreover, based on our comparison of three different types of infection methods, true leaf infection was found to be more efficient than cotyledon and sprout infiltration in long-term VIGS in multiple plant organs. In conclusion, the VIGS technology and tomato genomic sequences can be used in the future to study gene function in S. rostratum.

  14. MHC and non-MHC genes regulate elimination of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus and antiviral cytotoxic T lymphocyte and delayed-type hypersensitivity mediating T lymphocyte activity in parallel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Marker, O

    1989-01-01

    The course of systemic infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus was studied in mouse strains differing in the MHC or non-MHC background. Virus clearance rates differed significantly between H-2 identical strains as well as between congenic strains differing in the H-2L subregion, indicat......The course of systemic infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus was studied in mouse strains differing in the MHC or non-MHC background. Virus clearance rates differed significantly between H-2 identical strains as well as between congenic strains differing in the H-2L subregion...

  15. Retroperitoneal inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001255.htm Retroperitoneal inflammation To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Retroperitoneal inflammation is swelling that occurs in the retroperitoneal space. ...

  16. Mice deficient in STAT1 but not STAT2 or IRF9 develop a lethal CD4+ T-cell-mediated disease following infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofer, M.J.; Li, W.; Manders, P.; Terry, R.; Lim, S.L.; King, N.J.; Campbell, I.L.

    2012-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) signaling is crucial for antiviral immunity. While type I IFN signaling is mediated by STAT1, STAT2, and IRF9, type II IFN signaling requires only STAT1. Here, we studied the roles of these signaling factors in the host response to systemic infection with lymphocytic choriomeningiti

  17. Microglia retard dengue virus-induced acute viral encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Chen, Chia-Ling; Lin, Yee-Shin; Chang, Chih-Peng; Tsai, Cheng-Chieh; Cheng, Yi-Lin; Huang, Chao-Ching; Ho, Chien-Jung; Lee, Yi-Chao; Lin, Liang-Tzung; Jhan, Ming-Kai; Lin, Chiou-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Patients with dengue virus (DENV) infection may also present acute viral encephalitis through an unknown mechanism. Here, we report that encephalitic DENV-infected mice exhibited progressive hunchback posture, limbic seizures, limbic weakness, paralysis, and lethality 7 days post-infection. These symptoms were accompanied by CNS inflammation, neurotoxicity, and blood-brain barrier destruction. Microglial cells surrounding the blood vessels and injured hippocampus regions were activated by DENV infection. Pharmacologically depleting microglia unexpectedly increased viral replication, neuropathy, and mortality in DENV-infected mice. In microglia-depleted mice, the DENV infection-mediated expression of antiviral cytokines and the infiltration of CD8-positive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) was abolished. DENV infection prompted the antigen-presenting cell-like differentiation of microglia, which in turn stimulated CTL proliferation and activation. These results suggest that microglial cells play a key role in facilitating antiviral immune responses against DENV infection and acute viral encephalitis. PMID:27279150

  18. Development and application of ELISA for the detection of IgG antibodies to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapošová, K; Lukáčiková, Ľ; Ovečková, I; Pastoreková, S; Rosocha, J; Kuba, D; Beňa, Ľ; Tomášková, J

    2016-06-01

    Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) is a neglected human pathogen, which can cause severe illnesses in humans. The most vulnerable are the human foetus and immunosuppressed individuals. Since there is no commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the diagnosis of anti-LCMV antibodies in human sera, we developed a sandwich ELISA method detecting anti-nucleoprotein IgG antibodies, using a specific monoclonal anti-nucleoprotein antibody and cells persistently infected with LCMV strain MX as antigen. In the present study we show standardization of this ELISA protocol, determination of its clinical specificity and sensitivity and its application on 30 clinical samples from multiorgan donors. Comparison of these results to the indirect immunofluorescence antibody test (IFA) demonstrates that ELISA is more sensitive. The developed ELISA assay provides a fast, simple and efficient tool for the clinical detection of anti-nucleoprotein antibodies in human sera. PMID:27265463

  19. Genetic mapping of the ecotropic virus-inducing locus Akv-2 of the AKR mouse

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    A combination of somatic cell hybridization and standard mendelian breeding techniques was used to map the AKR ecotropic virus inducibility locus Akv-2 to the centromeric end of chromosome 16. This assignment of Akv-2 further emphasizes the endogenous ecotropic retroviruses are inserted at multiple sites in mouse chromosomes.

  20. Foot-and-mouth disease virus-induced RNA polymerase is associated with Golgi apparatus.

    OpenAIRE

    Polatnick, J; Wool, S H

    1985-01-01

    Electrophoretic analysis of the Golgi apparatus isolated by differential centrifugation from radiolabeled cells infected with foot-and-mouth disease virus showed about 10 protein bands. The virus-induced RNA polymerase was identified by immunoprecipitation and electron microscope staining procedures. Pulse-chase experiments indicated that the polymerase passed through the Golgi apparatus in less than 1 h.

  1. CD8+ T Cell Immunodominance in Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus Infection Is Modified in the Presence of Toll-Like Receptor Agonists ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Siddiqui, Sarah; Basta, Sameh

    2011-01-01

    Currently, we have limited understanding of how Toll-like receptor (TLR) engagement by microbial products influences the immune response during a concurrent virus infection. In this study, we established that dual TLR2 plus TLR3 (designated TLR2+3) stimulation alters the immunodominance hierarchies of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) epitopes by reducing NP396-specific CD8+ T cell responses and shifting it to a subdominant position. The shift in immunodominance occurred due to a redu...

  2. Gene-gun DNA vaccination aggravates respiratory syncytial virus-induced pneumonitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholdy, Christina; Olszewska, Wieslawa; Stryhn, Anette;

    2004-01-01

    A CD8+ T-cell memory response to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was generated by using a DNA vaccine construct encoding the dominant Kd-restricted epitope from the viral transcription anti-terminator protein M2 (M2(82-90)), linked covalently to human beta2-microglobulin (beta2m). Cutaneous gene...... elicited with recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the complete RSV M2 protein, but stronger than those induced by a similar DNA construct without the beta2m gene. DNA vaccination led to enhanced pulmonary disease after RSV challenge, with increased weight loss and cell recruitment to the lung. Depletion...... of CD8+ T cells reduced, but did not abolish, enhancement of disease. Mice vaccinated with a construct encoding a class I-restricted lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus epitope and beta2m suffered more severe weight loss after RSV infection than unvaccinated RSV-infected mice, although RSV-specific CD8...

  3. Animal Models of Virus-Induced Neurobehavioral Sequelae: Recent Advances, Methodological Issues, and Future Prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Marco Bortolato; Sean C Godar

    2010-01-01

    Converging lines of clinical and epidemiological evidence suggest that viral infections in early developmental stages may be a causal factor in neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and autism-spectrum disorders. This etiological link, however, remains controversial in view of the lack of consistent and reproducible associations between viruses and mental illness. Animal models of virus-induced neurobehavioral disturbances afford powerful tools to test etiologica...

  4. Influenza Virus Induces Inflammatory Response in Mouse Primary Cortical Neurons with Limited Viral Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gefei Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike stereotypical neurotropic viruses, influenza A viruses have been detected in the brain tissues of human and animal models. To investigate the interaction between neurons and influenza A viruses, mouse cortical neurons were isolated, infected with human H1N1 influenza virus, and then examined for the production of various inflammatory molecules involved in immune response. We found that replication of the influenza virus in neurons was limited, although early viral transcription was not affected. Virus-induced neuron viability decreased at 6 h postinfection (p.i. but increased at 24 h p.i. depending upon the viral strain. Virus-induced apoptosis and cytopathy in primary cortical neurons were not apparent at 24 h p.i. The mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and type I interferons were upregulated at 6 h and 24 h p.i. These results indicate that the influenza virus induces inflammatory response in mouse primary cortical neurons with limited viral replication. The cytokines released in viral infection-induced neuroinflammation might play critical roles in influenza encephalopathy, rather than in viral replication-induced cytopathy.

  5. Influenza Virus Induces Inflammatory Response in Mouse Primary Cortical Neurons with Limited Viral Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhiwu; Gu, Liming; Chen, Yanxia

    2016-01-01

    Unlike stereotypical neurotropic viruses, influenza A viruses have been detected in the brain tissues of human and animal models. To investigate the interaction between neurons and influenza A viruses, mouse cortical neurons were isolated, infected with human H1N1 influenza virus, and then examined for the production of various inflammatory molecules involved in immune response. We found that replication of the influenza virus in neurons was limited, although early viral transcription was not affected. Virus-induced neuron viability decreased at 6 h postinfection (p.i.) but increased at 24 h p.i. depending upon the viral strain. Virus-induced apoptosis and cytopathy in primary cortical neurons were not apparent at 24 h p.i. The mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and type I interferons were upregulated at 6 h and 24 h p.i. These results indicate that the influenza virus induces inflammatory response in mouse primary cortical neurons with limited viral replication. The cytokines released in viral infection-induced neuroinflammation might play critical roles in influenza encephalopathy, rather than in viral replication-induced cytopathy. PMID:27525278

  6. Diesel exposure suppresses natural killer cell function and resolution of eosinophil inflammation: a randmonized controlled trial of exposure in allergic rhinitics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to diesel exhaust (DE) is known to exacerbate allergic inflammation, including virus induced eosinophil activation in laboratory animals. We have previously shown that in human volunteers with allergic rhinitis a short-term exposure to DE prior to infection with the live...

  7. Reduced Tyk2 gene expression in β-cells due to natural mutation determines susceptibility to virus-induced diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Kenichi; Mine, Keiichiro; Inoue, Yoshitaka; Teshima, Miho; Ogawa, Shuichiro; Kai, Yuji; Kurafuji, Toshinobu; Hirakawa, Kanako; Miyakawa, Daiki; Ikeda, Haruka; Inada, Akari; Hara, Manami; Yamada, Hisakata; Akashi, Koichi; Niho, Yoshiyuki; Ina, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Takashi; Yoshikai, Yasunobu; Anzai, Keizo; Yamashita, Teruo; Minagawa, Hiroko; Fujimoto, Shuji; Kurisaki, Hironori; Shimoda, Kazuya; Katsuta, Hitoshi; Nagafuchi, Seiho

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that viruses play an important role in the development of diabetes. Although the diabetogenic encephalomyocarditis strain D virus induces diabetes in restricted lines of inbred mice, the susceptibility genes to virus-induced diabetes have not been identified. We report here that novel Tyrosine kinase 2 (Tyk2) gene mutations are present in virus-induced diabetes-sensitive SJL and SWR mice. Mice carrying the mutant Tyk2 gene on the virus-resistant C57BL/6 background are highly sensitive to virus-induced diabetes. Tyk2 gene expression is strongly reduced in Tyk2-mutant mice, associated with low Tyk2 promoter activity, and leads to decreased expression of interferon-inducible genes, resulting in significantly compromised antiviral response. Tyk2-mutant pancreatic β-cells are unresponsive even to high dose of Type I interferon. Reversal of virus-induced diabetes could be achieved by β-cell-specific Tyk2 gene expression. Thus, reduced Tyk2 gene expression in pancreatic β-cells due to natural mutation is responsible for susceptibility to virus-induced diabetes. PMID:25849081

  8. Lessons from T cell responses to virus induced tumours for cancer eradication in general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melief, C J; Kast, W M

    1992-01-01

    Immunotherapy of virus induced tumours by adoptive transfer of virus specific cytotoxic T cells (CTL) is now feasible in experimental murine systems. These CTL recognize viral peptide sequences of defined length presented in the groove of MHC class I molecules. Effective eradication of large tumour masses requires coadministration of IL-2. In essence, T cell immunity against virus induced tumours does not differ from anti-viral T cell immunity in general. Tumour escape strategies are numerous but, in various instances, can be counteracted by defined measures. Initiation of CTL responses against poorly immunogenic non-virus induced tumours (the majority of human cancer) requires novel strategies to overcome T cell inertia. Rather than waiting to see whether tumour specific CTL (against unknown antigens) can be cultured from TIL, we propose an alternative strategy in which CTL are raised against target molecules of choice, including differentiation antigens of restricted tissue distribution (autoantigens) or mutated/overexpressed oncogene products. The various steps proposed include: (a) identification of target molecules of choice; (b) identification in these target molecules of MHC allele specific peptide motifs involved in peptide binding to MHC molecules; (c) evaluation of actual binding of such peptides to specific MHC class I molecules; (d) in vitro CTL response induction by such peptides, presented either by highly efficient antigen presenting cells (such as processing defective cells, which carry empty MHC class I molecules) loaded with a single peptide or by dendritic cells, both cell types being capable of primary CTL response induction in vitro and (e) adoptive transfer of tumour specific CTL generated in vivo or, more conveniently, vaccination with immunodominant peptides. The latter possibility seems to be feasible because peptide vaccination with a single immunodominant viral peptide can install CTL memory and confer protection against lethal virus

  9. End products of glutamine oxidation in MC-29 virus-induced chicken hepatoma mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuno, T

    1989-10-01

    Products of glutamine metabolism were examined in the MC-29 virus-induced chicken hepatoma mitochondria incubated in vitro. Glutamine oxidation proceeded in the tumor mitochondria exclusively via a pathway involving glutamic-oxalacetic transaminase. Malate stimulated aspartate production from glutamine, while pyruvate exerted suppressive effect on aspartate production with little alanine formation. The mitochondria of this hepatoma are unique in that the metabolic pattern and response to malate and pyruvate are essentially inconsistent with those reported in normal cells as well as those proposed by Moreadith and Lehninger in various tumor cells. PMID:2571353

  10. Morphological studies of Gross virus-induced lymphoblasts by scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichikawa,Hiroyuki

    1977-04-01

    Full Text Available The surface of Gross virus-induced murine lymphoblasts and C-type virus particles budding from these cells were investigated under the scanning electron microscope (SEM. The cells appeared spindle-shaped or roughly-rounded with extensive surface features consisting of microvilli, blebs and ruffled membranes. C-type virus particles were detected on the cell membrane as small spherical particles, distinguishable from the microvilli. Clustered virions were observed in some cases. However, the distribution of virions appeared to be random. The surface of the virion was smooth and had no globular units at high magnification. These morphological observations were confirmed in ultrathin sections.

  11. T-cell-mediated immunity to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in beta2-integrin (CD18)- and ICAM-1 (CD54)-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Marker, O; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    1996-01-01

    The T-cell response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus was studied in mice with deficient expression of beta2-integrins or ICAM-1. In such mice, the generation of virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes was only slightly impaired and bystander activation was as extensive as that observed in wild...... the inflammatory reaction, indicating that under conditions of more limited immune activation both molecules do play a role in formation of the inflammatory exudate. Finally, virus control was found to be somewhat impaired in both mutant strains. In conclusion, our results indicate that although LFA-1-ICAM-1...

  12. Persistence of the irradiated host component in thymocyte populations from bone marrow radiation chimeras infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thymus of chimeras made using T cell-depleted donor bone marrow from Thy1.1+ mice and 950 rad Thy 1.2+ recipients is dominated initially by cells expressing the Thy 1.2+ phenotype of the irradiated host. The thymocyte population recovered at 2 weeks after reconstitution comprises 80% Thy 1.2+ cells (host), the remainder being Thy 1.1+ (donor). This situation is normally reversed within a further week, with the host Ty 1.2+ (donor). This situation is normally reversed within a further week, with the host Thy 1.2+ thymocytes being present at a frequency of less than 5% from Week 4. Infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) at 1 week after reconstitution with bone marrow causes a profound and persistent drop in the total number of thymocytes. The decline is equivalent for all categories of donor-derived thymocytes defined by two-color flow microfluorometric analysis for CD4 and CD8. However, there is a partial compensation by the retention of cells originating from the Thy 1.2+ host, which constitute 30-40% of the total thymocyte pool as late as 8 weeks after administration of bone marrow in the LCMV-infected chimeras. These radiation-resistant precursors give rise to CD4-8-, CD4-8+, CD4+8-, and CD4+8+ thymocytes, with the latter category being present at increased frequency. The potential skewing of the mature T cell repertoire as a consequence of persistent virus infection is discussed

  13. Congenitally acquired persistent lymphocytic choriomeningitis viral infection reduces neuronal progenitor pools in the adult hippocampus and subventricular zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Sun

    Full Text Available Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV can be transmitted through congenital infection, leading to persistent infection of numerous organ systems including the central nervous system (CNS. Adult mice persistently infected with LCMV (LCMV-cgPi mice exhibit learning deficits, such as poor performance in spatial discrimination tests. Given that deficits in spatial learning have been linked to defects in adult neurogenesis, we investigated the impact of congenital LCMV infection on generation of neuroblasts from neural progenitor cells within neurogenic zones of adult mice. In LCMV-cgPi mice, QPCR and immunohistochemistry detected presence of LCMV glycoprotein-coding RNA and nucleoprotein in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and subventricular zone (SVZ, sites of neurogenesis that harbor populations of neuroblasts. Numbers of neuroblasts were reduced in LCMV-cgPi mice, as determined by IHC quantification, and analysis of BrdU incorporation by flow cytometry revealed lower numbers of BrdU-labeled neuroblasts. Additionally, TUNEL assays performed in situ showed increased numbers of apoptotic cells in the two neurogenic regions. Next, neurosphere cultures were infected in vitro with LCMV and differentiated to create a population of cells that consisted of both transit amplifying cells and neuroblasts. Immunocytochemical and TUNEL assays revealed increased numbers of TUNEL-positive cells that express nestin, suggesting that the drop in numbers of neuroblasts was due to a combination of impaired proliferation and apoptosis of progenitor cells. LCMV-cgPi mice exhibited transcriptional up-regulation several cytokines and chemokines, including gamma-interferon inducible chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10. Chronic up-regulation of these chemokines can facilitate a pro-inflammatory niche that may contribute to defects in neurogenesis.

  14. Salicylate prevents virus-induced type 1 diabetes in the BBDR rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaoxing Yang

    Full Text Available Epidemiologic and clinical evidence suggests that virus infection plays an important role in human type 1 diabetes pathogenesis. We used the virus-inducible BioBreeding Diabetes Resistant (BBDR rat to investigate the ability of sodium salicylate, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID, to modulate development of type 1 diabetes. BBDR rats treated with Kilham rat virus (KRV and polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (pIC, a TLR3 agonist develop diabetes at nearly 100% incidence by ~2 weeks. We found distinct temporal profiles of the proinflammatory serum cytokines, IL-1β, IL-6, IFN-γ, IL-12, and haptoglobin (an acute phase protein in KRV+pIC treated rats. Significant elevations of IL-1β and IL-12, coupled with sustained elevations of haptoglobin, were specific to KRV+pIC and not found in rats co-treated with pIC and H1, a non-diabetogenic virus. Salicylate administered concurrently with KRV+pIC inhibited the elevations in IL-1β, IL-6, IFN-γ and haptoglobin almost completely, and reduced IL-12 levels significantly. Salicylate prevented diabetes in a dose-dependent manner, and diabetes-free animals had no evidence of insulitis. Our data support an important role for innate immunity in virus-induced type 1 diabetes pathogenesis. The ability of salicylate to prevent diabetes in this robust animal model demonstrates its potential use to prevent or attenuate human autoimmune diabetes.

  15. Establishment of a highly efficient virus-inducible CRISPR/Cas9 system in insect cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhan-Qi; Chen, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Jun; Hu, Nan; Cao, Ming-Ya; Dong, Fei-Fan; Jiang, Ya-Ming; Chen, Peng; Lu, Cheng; Pan, Min-Hui

    2016-06-01

    Although current antiviral strategies can inhibit baculovirus infection and decrease viral DNA replication to a certain extent, novel tools are required for specific and accurate elimination of baculovirus genomes from infected insects. Using the newly developed clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/associated protein 9 nuclease (CRISPR/Cas9) technology, we disrupted a viral genome in infected insect cells in vitro as a defense against viral infection. We optimized the CRISPR/Cas9 system to edit foreign and viral genome in insect cells. Using Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) as a model, we found that the CRISPR/Cas9 system was capable of cleaving the replication key factor ie-1 in BmNPV thus effectively inhibiting virus proliferation. Furthermore, we constructed a virus-inducible CRISPR/Cas9 editing system, which minimized the probability of off-target effects and was rapidly activated after viral infection. This is the first report describing the application of the CRISPR/Cas9 system in insect antiviral research. Establishment of a highly efficient virus-inducible CRISPR/Cas9 system in insect cells provides insights to produce virus-resistant transgenic strains for future. PMID:26979473

  16. Establishment of a highly efficient virus-inducible CRISPR/Cas9 system in insect cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhan-Qi; Chen, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Jun; Hu, Nan; Cao, Ming-Ya; Dong, Fei-Fan; Jiang, Ya-Ming; Chen, Peng; Lu, Cheng; Pan, Min-Hui

    2016-06-01

    Although current antiviral strategies can inhibit baculovirus infection and decrease viral DNA replication to a certain extent, novel tools are required for specific and accurate elimination of baculovirus genomes from infected insects. Using the newly developed clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/associated protein 9 nuclease (CRISPR/Cas9) technology, we disrupted a viral genome in infected insect cells in vitro as a defense against viral infection. We optimized the CRISPR/Cas9 system to edit foreign and viral genome in insect cells. Using Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) as a model, we found that the CRISPR/Cas9 system was capable of cleaving the replication key factor ie-1 in BmNPV thus effectively inhibiting virus proliferation. Furthermore, we constructed a virus-inducible CRISPR/Cas9 editing system, which minimized the probability of off-target effects and was rapidly activated after viral infection. This is the first report describing the application of the CRISPR/Cas9 system in insect antiviral research. Establishment of a highly efficient virus-inducible CRISPR/Cas9 system in insect cells provides insights to produce virus-resistant transgenic strains for future.

  17. Animal Models of Virus-Induced Neurobehavioral Sequelae: Recent Advances, Methodological Issues, and Future Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Bortolato

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Converging lines of clinical and epidemiological evidence suggest that viral infections in early developmental stages may be a causal factor in neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and autism-spectrum disorders. This etiological link, however, remains controversial in view of the lack of consistent and reproducible associations between viruses and mental illness. Animal models of virus-induced neurobehavioral disturbances afford powerful tools to test etiological hypotheses and explore pathophysiological mechanisms. Prenatal or neonatal inoculations of neurotropic agents (such as herpes-, influenza-, and retroviruses in rodents result in a broad spectrum of long-term alterations reminiscent of psychiatric abnormalities. Nevertheless, the complexity of these sequelae often poses methodological and interpretational challenges and thwarts their characterization. The recent conceptual advancements in psychiatric nosology and behavioral science may help determine new heuristic criteria to enhance the translational value of these models. A particularly critical issue is the identification of intermediate phenotypes, defined as quantifiable factors representing single neurochemical, neuropsychological, or neuroanatomical aspects of a diagnostic category. In this paper, we examine how the employment of these novel concepts may lead to new methodological refinements in the study of virus-induced neurobehavioral sequelae through animal models.

  18. Influenza a virus induces an immediate cytotoxic activity in all major subsets of peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanda Sturlan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A replication defective influenza A vaccine virus (delNS1 virus was developed. Its attenuation is due to potent stimulation of the innate immune system by the virus. Since the innate immune system can also target cancer cells, we reasoned that delNS1 virus induced immune-stimulation should also lead to the induction of innate cytotoxic effects towards cancer cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, isolated CD56+, CD3+, CD14+ and CD19+ subsets and different combinations of the above subsets were stimulated by delNS1, wild type (wt virus or heat inactivated virus and co-cultured with tumor cell lines in the presence or absence of antibodies against the interferon system. Stimulation of PBMCs by the delNS1 virus effectively induced cytotoxicity against different cancer cell lines. Surprisingly, virus induced cytotoxicity was exerted by all major subtypes of PBMCs including CD56+, CD3+, CD14+ and CD19+ cells. Virus induced cytotoxicity in CD3+, CD14+ and CD19+ cells was dependent on virus replication, whereas virus induced cytotoxicity in CD56+ cells was only dependent on the binding of the virus. Virus induced cytotoxicity of isolated cell cultures of CD14+, CD19+ or CD56+ cells could be partially blocked by antibodies against type I and type II (IFN interferon. In contrast, virus induced cytotoxicity in the complete PBMC preparation could not be inhibited by blocking type I or type II IFN, indicating a redundant system of activation in whole blood. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data suggest that apart from their well known specialized functions all main subsets of peripheral blood cells also initially exert a cytotoxic effect upon virus stimulation. This closely links the innate immune system to the adaptive immune response and renders delNS1 virus a potential therapeutic tool for viro-immunotherapy of cancer.

  19. Induction and maintenance of DNA methylation in plant promoter sequences by apple latent spherical virus-induced transcriptional gene silencing

    OpenAIRE

    Tatsuya eKon; Nobuyuki eYoshikawa

    2014-01-01

    Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV) is an efficient virus-induced gene silencing vector in functional genomics analyses of a broad range of plant species. Here, an Agrobacterium-mediated inoculation (agroinoculation) system was developed for the ALSV vector, and virus-induced transcriptional gene silencing (VITGS) is described in plants infected with the ALSV vector. The cDNAs of ALSV RNA1 and RNA2 were inserted between the CaMV 35S promoter and the NOS-T sequences in a binary vector pCAMBIA1...

  20. Inflammation and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Inflammation and Heart Disease Updated:Apr 18,2016 Understand the risks of inflammation. Although it is not proven that inflammation causes ...

  1. Virus-induced gene silencing in Medicago truncatula and Lathyrus odorata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønlund, Mette; Kjær, Gabriela Didina Constantin; Piednoir, Elodie;

    2008-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) has become an important reverse genetics tool for functional genomics. VIGS vectors based on Pea early browning virus (PEBV, genus Tobravirus) and Bean pod mottle virus (genus Comovirus) are available for the legume species Pisum sativum and Glycine max...

  2. Virus-induced gene silencing and transient gene expression in soybean using Bean pod mottle virus infectious clones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a powerful and rapid approach for determining the functions of plant genes. The basis of VIGS is that a viral genome is engineered so that it can carry fragments of plant genes, typically in the 200-300 base pair size range. The recombinant viruses are used to ...

  3. Stability of Barley stripe mosaic virus-induced gene silencing in barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun-Rasmussen, Marianne; Madsen, Christian Toft; Jessing, Stine;

    2007-01-01

    for barley and wheat; however, silencing using this vector is generally transient, with efficient silencing often being confined to the first two or three systemically infected leaves. To investigate this further, part of the barley Phytoene desaturase (PDS) gene was inserted into BSMV and the...... length influenced stability but not efficiency of VIGS. Silencing was transient in most cases; however, the decrease in PDS mRNA levels measured by qRT-PCR began earlier and lasted longer than the photobleaching. Occasionally, silencing persisted and could be transmitted through seed as well as via......Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) can be used as a powerful tool for functional genomics studies in plants. With this approach, it is possible to target most genes and downregulate the messenger (m)RNA in a sequence-specific manner. Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) is an established VIGS vector...

  4. Novel Strategy To Protect against Influenza Virus-Induced Pneumococcal Disease without Interfering with Commensal Colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Christopher J; Marks, Laura R; Hu, John C; Reddinger, Ryan; Mandell, Lorrie; Roche-Hakansson, Hazeline; King-Lyons, Natalie D; Connell, Terry D; Hakansson, Anders P

    2016-06-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae commonly inhabits the nasopharynx as a member of the commensal biofilm. Infection with respiratory viruses, such as influenza A virus, induces commensal S. pneumoniae to disseminate beyond the nasopharynx and to elicit severe infections of the middle ears, lungs, and blood that are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Current preventive strategies, including the polysaccharide conjugate vaccines, aim to eliminate asymptomatic carriage with vaccine-type pneumococci. However, this has resulted in serotype replacement with, so far, less fit pneumococcal strains, which has changed the nasopharyngeal flora, opening the niche for entry of other virulent pathogens (e.g., Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, and potentially Haemophilus influenzae). The long-term effects of these changes are unknown. Here, we present an attractive, alternative preventive approach where we subvert virus-induced pneumococcal disease without interfering with commensal colonization, thus specifically targeting disease-causing organisms. In that regard, pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA), a major surface protein of pneumococci, is a promising vaccine target. Intradermal (i.d.) immunization of mice with recombinant PspA in combination with LT-IIb(T13I), a novel i.d. adjuvant of the type II heat-labile enterotoxin family, elicited strong systemic PspA-specific IgG responses without inducing mucosal anti-PspA IgA responses. This response protected mice from otitis media, pneumonia, and septicemia and averted the cytokine storm associated with septic infection but had no effect on asymptomatic colonization. Our results firmly demonstrated that this immunization strategy against virally induced pneumococcal disease can be conferred without disturbing the desirable preexisting commensal colonization of the nasopharynx. PMID:27001538

  5. Pleiotropic Effects of Levofloxacin, Fluoroquinolone Antibiotics, against Influenza Virus-Induced Lung Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Enoki

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS and nitric oxide (NO are major pathogenic molecules produced during viral lung infections, including influenza. While fluoroquinolones are widely used as antimicrobial agents for treating a variety of bacterial infections, including secondary infections associated with the influenza virus, it has been reported that they also function as anti-oxidants against ROS and as a NO regulator. Therefore, we hypothesized that levofloxacin (LVFX, one of the most frequently used fluoroquinolone derivatives, may attenuate pulmonary injuries associated with influenza virus infections by inhibiting the production of ROS species such as hydroxyl radicals and neutrophil-derived NO that is produced during an influenza viral infection. The therapeutic impact of LVFX was examined in a PR8 (H1N1 influenza virus-induced lung injury mouse model. ESR spin-trapping experiments indicated that LVFX showed scavenging activity against neutrophil-derived hydroxyl radicals. LVFX markedly improved the survival rate of mice that were infected with the influenza virus in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the LVFX treatment resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in the level of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (a marker of oxidative stress and nitrotyrosine (a nitrative marker in the lungs of virus-infected mice, and the nitrite/nitrate ratio (NO metabolites and IFN-γ in BALF. These results indicate that LVFX may be of substantial benefit in the treatment of various acute inflammatory disorders such as influenza virus-induced pneumonia, by inhibiting inflammatory cell responses and suppressing the overproduction of NO in the lungs.

  6. High-dose survival in the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection is accompanied by suppressed DTH but unaffected T-cell cytotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marker, O; Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Volkert, M;

    1985-01-01

    Provided that intracerebral inoculation is applied, an increase in the virus dose from 10(2) to 10(4) LD50 of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) leads to strikingly reduced mortality. To analyse the background for this autointerference, we measured several virologic and immunologic variables...... intracerebral infection with large and small virus doses, and since the LCMV infection in the brain qualitatively and quantitatively was independent of the size of virus inoculum, the explanation for the survival of the high-dose animals is obviously not lack of possibilities for interaction between cytotoxic T...... cells and infected sensitive targets in the central nervous system. On the other hand, high doses of virus caused a clear suppression of the LCMV-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH). In addition, when splenocytes from high-dose animals were transferred either intravenously or locally...

  7. Mouse Models of Multiple Sclerosis: Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis and Theiler’s Virus-Induced Demyelinating Disease

    OpenAIRE

    McCarthy, Derrick P.; Richards, Maureen H.; Miller, Stephen D.

    2012-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and Theiler’s Murine Encephalitis Virus-Induced Demyelinating Disease (TMEV-IDD) are two clinically relevant murine models of multiple sclerosis (MS). Like MS, both are characterized by mononuclear cell infiltration into the CNS and demyelination. EAE is induced by either the administration of myelin protein or peptide in adjuvant or by the adoptive transfer of encephalitogenic T cell blasts into naïve recipients. The relative merits of each of ...

  8. Foxtail Mosaic Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Monocot Plants1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Na; Xie, Ke; Jia, Qi; Zhao, Jinping; Chen, Tianyuan; Li, Huangai; Wei, Xiang; Diao, Xianmin; Hong, Yiguo

    2016-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a powerful technique to study gene function in plants. However, very few VIGS vectors are available for monocot plants. Here we report that Foxtail mosaic virus (FoMV) can be engineered as an effective VIGS system to induce efficient silencing of endogenous genes in monocot plants including barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), wheat (Triticum aestivum) and foxtail millet (Setaria italica). This is evidenced by FoMV-based silencing of phytoene desaturase (PDS) and magnesium chelatase in barley, of PDS and Cloroplastos alterados1 in foxtail millet and wheat, and of an additional gene IspH in foxtail millet. Silencing of these genes resulted in photobleached or chlorosis phenotypes in barley, wheat, and foxtail millet. Furthermore, our FoMV-based gene silencing is the first VIGS system reported for foxtail millet, an important C4 model plant. It may provide an efficient toolbox for high-throughput functional genomics in economically important monocot crops. PMID:27225900

  9. Pseudorabies Virus Induces Viability Changes and Oxidative Stress in Swine Testis Cell-Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Zhan Zhang§1, Ye Chen§1, Hong-Liang Huang§2, Dong-Lei Xu1, Chang-Bao Ren2, Bi-Tao Liu1, Shuo Su1 and Zhao-Xin Tang1, 2*

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we evaluated the association between pseudorabies (PRV virus-induced viability changes and oxidative stress in vitro cultivated swine testis (ST cells. The kinetic of 2, 12, 24, 36 and 48 h during the cell culture with PRV by using a multiplicity of infection (MOI of 1 TCID50 per cell were adopted. The results suggested a complex relation between cell viability and oxidative stress during PRV infection. In the early stages of PRV infection, the cell viability was higher than the control group, and the state of cellular oxidative stress remained relatively stable. After 24 h, the cell viability began to decrease, and the amount of the cellular malondialdehyde in ST cells increased significantly, and the activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase decreased significantly (P<0.05. Meanwhile, the rising concentrations of cellular hydrogen peroxide were detected prior to the changes in cell viability and oxidative stress. In conclusion, the PRV infection of ST cells leads to oxidative stress, and this stress could play a crucial role on the cell viability as the PRV infection time progresses.

  10. Delineation of autoantibody repertoire through differential proteogenomics in hepatitis C virus-induced cryoglobulinemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogishi, Masato; Yotsuyanagi, Hiroshi; Moriya, Kyoji; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies cross-reactive to pathogens and autoantigens are considered pivotal in both infection control and accompanying autoimmunity. However, the pathogenic roles of autoantibodies largely remain elusive without a priori knowledge of disease-specific autoantigens. Here, through a novel quantitative proteogenomics approach, we demonstrated a successful identification of immunoglobulin variable heavy chain (VH) sequences highly enriched in pathological immune complex from clinical specimens obtained from a patient with hepatitis C virus-induced cryoglobulinemia (HCV-CG). Reconstructed single-domain antibodies were reactive to both HCV antigens and potentially liver-derived human proteins. Moreover, over the course of antiviral therapy, a substantial “de-evolution” of a distinct sub-repertoire was discovered, to which proteomically identified cryoprecipitation-prone autoantibodies belonged. This sub-repertoire was characterized by IGHJ6*03-derived, long, hydrophobic complementarity determining region (CDR-H3). This study provides a proof-of-concept of de novo mining of autoantibodies and corresponding autoantigen candidates in a disease-specific context in human, thus facilitating future reverse-translational research for the discovery of novel biomarkers and the development of antigen-specific immunotherapy against various autoantibody-related disorders. PMID:27403724

  11. Development of Virus-Induced Gene Expression and Silencing Vector Derived from Grapevine Algerian Latent Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Ho Park

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Grapevine Algerian latent virus (GALV is a member of the genus Tombusvirus in the Tombusviridae and infects not only woody perennial grapevine plant but also herbaceous Nicotiana benthamiana plant. In this study, we developed GALV-based gene expression and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS vectors in N. benthamiana. The GALV coat protein deletion vector, pGMG, was applied to express the reporter gene, green fluorescence protein (GFP, but the expression of GFP was not detected due to the necrotic cell death on the infiltrated leaves. The p19 silencing suppressor of GALV was engineered to inactivate its expression and GFP was successfully expressed with unrelated silencing suppressor, HC-Pro, from soybean mosaic virus. The pGMG vector was used to knock down magnesium chelatase (ChlH gene in N. benthamaina and the silencing phenotype was clearly observed on systemic leaves. Altogether, the GALV-derived vector is expected to be an attractive tool for useful gene expression and VIGS vectors in grapevine as well as N. benthamiana.

  12. Delineation of autoantibody repertoire through differential proteogenomics in hepatitis C virus-induced cryoglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogishi, Masato; Yotsuyanagi, Hiroshi; Moriya, Kyoji; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies cross-reactive to pathogens and autoantigens are considered pivotal in both infection control and accompanying autoimmunity. However, the pathogenic roles of autoantibodies largely remain elusive without a priori knowledge of disease-specific autoantigens. Here, through a novel quantitative proteogenomics approach, we demonstrated a successful identification of immunoglobulin variable heavy chain (VH) sequences highly enriched in pathological immune complex from clinical specimens obtained from a patient with hepatitis C virus-induced cryoglobulinemia (HCV-CG). Reconstructed single-domain antibodies were reactive to both HCV antigens and potentially liver-derived human proteins. Moreover, over the course of antiviral therapy, a substantial "de-evolution" of a distinct sub-repertoire was discovered, to which proteomically identified cryoprecipitation-prone autoantibodies belonged. This sub-repertoire was characterized by IGHJ6*03-derived, long, hydrophobic complementarity determining region (CDR-H3). This study provides a proof-of-concept of de novo mining of autoantibodies and corresponding autoantigen candidates in a disease-specific context in human, thus facilitating future reverse-translational research for the discovery of novel biomarkers and the development of antigen-specific immunotherapy against various autoantibody-related disorders. PMID:27403724

  13. Virus-induced gene silencing in Catharanthus roseus by biolistic inoculation of tobacco rattle virus vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carqueijeiro, I; Masini, E; Foureau, E; Sepúlveda, L J; Marais, E; Lanoue, A; Besseau, S; Papon, N; Clastre, M; Dugé de Bernonville, T; Glévarec, G; Atehortùa, L; Oudin, A; Courdavault, V

    2015-11-01

    Catharanthus roseus constitutes the unique source of several valuable monoterpenoid indole alkaloids, including the antineoplastics vinblastine and vincristine. These alkaloids result from a complex biosynthetic pathway encompassing between 30 and 50 enzymatic steps whose characterisation is still underway. The most recent identifications of genes from this pathway relied on a tobacco rattle virus-based virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) approach, involving an Agrobacterium-mediated inoculation of plasmids encoding the two genomic components of the virus. As an alternative, we developed a biolistic-mediated approach of inoculation of virus-encoding plasmids that can be easily performed by a simple bombardment of young C. roseus plants. After optimisation of the transformation conditions, we showed that this approach efficiently silenced the phytoene desaturase gene, leading to strong and reproducible photobleaching of leaves. This biolistic transformation was also used to silence a previously characterised gene from the alkaloid biosynthetic pathway, encoding iridoid oxidase. Plant bombardment caused down-regulation of the targeted gene (70%), accompanied by a correlated decreased in MIA biosynthesis (45-90%), similar to results obtained via agro-transformation. Thus, the biolistic-based VIGS approach developed for C. roseus appears suitable for gene function elucidation and can readily be used instead of the Agrobacterium-based approach, e.g. when difficulties arise with agro-inoculations or when Agrobacterium-free procedures are required to avoid plant defence responses. PMID:26284695

  14. A virus-induced gene silencing approach to understanding alkaloid metabolism in Catharanthus roseus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liscombe, David K.; O’Connor, Sarah E.

    2011-01-01

    The anticancer agents vinblastine and vincristine are bisindole alkaloids derived from coupling vindoline and catharanthine, monoterpenoid indole alkaloids produced exclusively by Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) plants. Industrial production of vinblastine and vincristine currently relies on isolation from C. roseus leaves, a process that affords these compounds in 0.0003–0.01% yields. Metabolic engineering efforts to improve alkaloid content or provide alternative sources of the bisindole alkaloids ultimately rely on the isolation and characterization of the genes involved. Several vindoline biosynthetic genes have been isolated, and the cellular and subcellular organization of the corresponding enzymes has been well studied. However, due to the leaf-specific localization of vindoline biosynthesis, and the lack of production of this precursor in cell suspension and hairy root cultures of C. roseus, further elucidation of this pathway demands the development of reverse genetics approaches to assay gene function in planta. The bipartite pTRV vector system is a Tobacco Rattle Virus-based virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) platform that has provided efficient and effective means to assay gene function in diverse plant systems. We have developed a VIGS method to investigate gene function in C. roseus plants using the pTRV vector system. The utility of this approach in understanding gene function in C. roseus leaves is demonstrated by silencing known vindoline biosynthetic genes previously characterized in vitro. PMID:21802100

  15. A Foxtail mosaic virus Vector for Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Yu; Zhang, Chunquan; Kernodle, Bliss M; Hill, John H; Whitham, Steven A

    2016-06-01

    Plant viruses have been widely used as vectors for foreign gene expression and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). A limited number of viruses have been developed into viral vectors for the purposes of gene expression or VIGS in monocotyledonous plants, and among these, the tripartite viruses Brome mosaic virus and Cucumber mosaic virus have been shown to induce VIGS in maize (Zea mays). We describe here a new DNA-based VIGS system derived from Foxtail mosaic virus (FoMV), a monopartite virus that is able to establish systemic infection and silencing of endogenous maize genes homologous to gene fragments inserted into the FoMV genome. To demonstrate VIGS applications of this FoMV vector system, four genes, phytoene desaturase (functions in carotenoid biosynthesis), lesion mimic22 (encodes a key enzyme of the porphyrin pathway), iojap (functions in plastid development), and brown midrib3 (caffeic acid O-methyltransferase), were silenced and characterized in the sweet corn line Golden × Bantam. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the FoMV infectious clone establishes systemic infection in maize inbred lines, sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), and green foxtail (Setaria viridis), indicating the potential wide applications of this viral vector system for functional genomics studies in maize and other monocots. PMID:27208311

  16. Inflammation of the Penis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Penis Medical Dictionary Additional Content Medical News Inflammation of the Penis By Patrick J. Shenot, MD ... Testicular Disorders Introduction to Penile and Testicular Disorders Inflammation of the Penis Phimosis and Paraphimosis Urethral Stricture ...

  17. Inflammation of the Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diagnosis Treatment Medical Dictionary Additional Content Medical News Inflammation of the Orbit (Inflammatory Orbital Pseudotumor) By James ... Introduction to Eye Socket Disorders Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis Inflammation of the Orbit Orbital Cellulitis Preseptal Cellulitis Tumors ...

  18. Idiopathic sclerosing orbital inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.D. Hsuan; D. Selva; A.A. McNab; T.J. Sullivan; P. Saeed; B.A. O'Donnell

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To perform a multicenter review of the clinical features and treatment of 31 patients with idiopathic sclerosing orbital inflammation. Methods: We included all patients with histologically confirmed idiopathic sclerosing orbital inflammation from 5 regional orbital centers. We reviewed th

  19. The Journal of Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Punchard Neville A; Whelan Cliff J; Adcock Ian

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Welcome to the Journal of Inflammation, the first open-access, peer-reviewed, online journal to focus on all aspects of the study of inflammation and inflammatory conditions. While research into inflammation has resulted in great progress in the latter half of the 20th century, the rate of progress is rapidly accelerating. Thus there is a need for a vehicle through which this very diverse research can be made readily available to the scientific community. The Journal of Inflammation,...

  20. Prostaglandins and chronic inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Aoki, Tomohiro; Narumiya, Shuh

    2012-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is the basis of various chronic illnesses including cancer and vascular diseases. However, much has yet to be learned how inflammation becomes chronic. Prostaglandins (PGs) are well established as mediators of acute inflammation, and recent studies in experimental animals have provided evidence that they also function in transition to and maintenance of chronic inflammation. One role PGs play in such processes is amplification of cytokine signaling. As such, PGs can facil...

  1. Latitudinal variation in virus-induced mortality of phytoplankton across the North Atlantic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojica, Kristina D A; Huisman, Jef; Wilhelm, Steven W; Brussaard, Corina P D

    2016-02-01

    Viral lysis of phytoplankton constrains marine primary production, food web dynamics and biogeochemical cycles in the ocean. Yet, little is known about the biogeographical distribution of viral lysis rates across the global ocean. To address this, we investigated phytoplankton group-specific viral lysis rates along a latitudinal gradient within the North Atlantic Ocean. The data show large-scale distribution patterns of different virus groups across the North Atlantic that are associated with the biogeographical distributions of their potential microbial hosts. Average virus-mediated lysis rates of the picocyanobacteria Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus were lower than those of the picoeukaryotic and nanoeukaryotic phytoplankton (that is, 0.14 per day compared with 0.19 and 0.23 per day, respectively). Total phytoplankton mortality (virus plus grazer-mediated) was comparable to the gross growth rate, demonstrating high turnover rates of phytoplankton populations. Virus-induced mortality was an important loss process at low and mid latitudes, whereas phytoplankton mortality was dominated by microzooplankton grazing at higher latitudes (>56°N). This shift from a viral-lysis-dominated to a grazing-dominated phytoplankton community was associated with a decrease in temperature and salinity, and the decrease in viral lysis rates was also associated with increased vertical mixing at higher latitudes. Ocean-climate models predict that surface warming will lead to an expansion of the stratified and oligotrophic regions of the world's oceans. Our findings suggest that these future shifts in the regional climate of the ocean surface layer are likely to increase the contribution of viral lysis to phytoplankton mortality in the higher-latitude waters of the North Atlantic, which may potentially reduce transfer of matter and energy up the food chain and thus affect the capacity of the northern North Atlantic to act as a long-term sink for CO2. PMID:26262815

  2. The influence of virus-induced changes in plants on aphid vectors: insights from luteovirus pathosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosque-Pérez, Nilsa A; Eigenbrode, Sanford D

    2011-08-01

    Plant virus infection can alter the suitability of host plants for their aphid vectors. Most reports indicate that virus-infected plants are superior hosts for vectors compared to virus-free plants with respect to vector growth rates, fecundity and longevity. Some aphid vectors respond preferentially to virus-infected plants compared to virus-free ones, while others avoid infected plants that are inferior hosts. Thus, it appears vectors can exploit changes in host plant quality associated with viral infection. Enhanced vector performance and preference for virus-infected plants might also be advantageous for viruses by promoting their spread and possibly enhancing their fitness. Our research has focused on two of the most important luteoviruses that infect wheat (Barley yellow dwarf virus), or potato (Potato leafroll virus), and their respective aphid vectors, the bird-cherry oat aphid, Rhopalosiphum padi, and the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae. The work has demonstrated that virus infection of host plants enhances the life history of vectors. Additionally, it has shown that virus infection alters the concentration and relative composition of volatile organic compounds in host plants, that apterae of each vector species settle preferentially on virus-infected plants, and that such responses are mediated by volatile organic compounds. The findings also indicate that plants respond heterogeneously to viral infection and as a result different plant parts change in attractiveness to vectors during infection and vector responses to virus-infected plants are dynamic. Such dynamic responses could enhance or reduce the probability of virus acquisition by individual aphids searching among plants. Finally, our work indicates that compared to non-viruliferous aphids, viruliferous ones are less or not responsive to virus-induced host plant volatiles. Changes in vector responsiveness to plants after vectors acquire virus could impact virus epidemiology by influencing virus

  3. Latitudinal variation in virus-induced mortality of phytoplankton across the North Atlantic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojica, Kristina D A; Huisman, Jef; Wilhelm, Steven W; Brussaard, Corina P D

    2016-02-01

    Viral lysis of phytoplankton constrains marine primary production, food web dynamics and biogeochemical cycles in the ocean. Yet, little is known about the biogeographical distribution of viral lysis rates across the global ocean. To address this, we investigated phytoplankton group-specific viral lysis rates along a latitudinal gradient within the North Atlantic Ocean. The data show large-scale distribution patterns of different virus groups across the North Atlantic that are associated with the biogeographical distributions of their potential microbial hosts. Average virus-mediated lysis rates of the picocyanobacteria Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus were lower than those of the picoeukaryotic and nanoeukaryotic phytoplankton (that is, 0.14 per day compared with 0.19 and 0.23 per day, respectively). Total phytoplankton mortality (virus plus grazer-mediated) was comparable to the gross growth rate, demonstrating high turnover rates of phytoplankton populations. Virus-induced mortality was an important loss process at low and mid latitudes, whereas phytoplankton mortality was dominated by microzooplankton grazing at higher latitudes (>56°N). This shift from a viral-lysis-dominated to a grazing-dominated phytoplankton community was associated with a decrease in temperature and salinity, and the decrease in viral lysis rates was also associated with increased vertical mixing at higher latitudes. Ocean-climate models predict that surface warming will lead to an expansion of the stratified and oligotrophic regions of the world's oceans. Our findings suggest that these future shifts in the regional climate of the ocean surface layer are likely to increase the contribution of viral lysis to phytoplankton mortality in the higher-latitude waters of the North Atlantic, which may potentially reduce transfer of matter and energy up the food chain and thus affect the capacity of the northern North Atlantic to act as a long-term sink for CO2.

  4. CLEC5A regulates Japanese encephalitis virus-induced neuroinflammation and lethality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szu-Ting Chen

    Full Text Available CLEC5A/MDL-1, a member of the myeloid C-type lectin family expressed on macrophages and neutrophils, is critical for dengue virus (DV-induced hemorrhagic fever and shock syndrome in Stat1⁻/⁻ mice and ConA-treated wild type mice. However, whether CLEC5A is involved in the pathogenesis of viral encephalitis has not yet been investigated. To investigate the role of CLEC5A to regulate JEV-induced neuroinflammation, antagonistic anti-CLEC5A mAb and CLEC5A-deficient mice were generated. We find that Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV directly interacts with CLEC5A and induces DAP12 phosphorylation in macrophages. In addition, JEV activates macrophages to secrete proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, which are dramatically reduced in JEV-infected Clec5a⁻/⁻ macrophages. Although blockade of CLEC5A cannot inhibit JEV infection of neurons and astrocytes, anti-CLEC5A mAb inhibits JEV-induced proinflammatory cytokine release from microglia and prevents bystander damage to neuronal cells. Moreover, JEV causes blood-brain barrier (BBB disintegrity and lethality in STAT1-deficient (Stat1⁻/⁻ mice, whereas peripheral administration of anti-CLEC5A mAb reduces infiltration of virus-harboring leukocytes into the central nervous system (CNS, restores BBB integrity, attenuates neuroinflammation, and protects mice from JEV-induced lethality. Moreover, all surviving mice develop protective humoral and cellular immunity against JEV infection. These observations demonstrate the critical role of CLEC5A in the pathogenesis of Japanese encephalitis, and identify CLEC5A as a target for the development of new treatments to reduce virus-induced brain damage.

  5. Canine distemper virus induces apoptosis in cervical tumor derived cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajão Daniela S

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Apoptosis can be induced or inhibited by viral proteins, it can form part of the host defense against virus infection, or it can be a mechanism for viral spread to neighboring cells. Canine distemper virus (CDV induces apoptotic cells in lymphoid tissues and in the cerebellum of dogs naturally infected. CDV also produces a cytopathologic effect, leading to apoptosis in Vero cells in tissue culture. We tested canine distemper virus, a member of the Paramyxoviridae family, for the ability to trigger apoptosis in HeLa cells, derived from cervical cancer cells resistant to apoptosis. To study the effect of CDV infection in HeLa cells, we examined apoptotic markers 24 h post infection (pi, by flow cytometry assay for DNA fragmentation, real-time PCR assay for caspase-3 and caspase-8 mRNA expression, and by caspase-3 and -8 immunocytochemistry. Flow cytometry showed that DNA fragmentation was induced in HeLa cells infected by CDV, and immunocytochemistry revealed a significant increase in the levels of the cleaved active form of caspase-3 protein, but did not show any difference in expression of caspase-8, indicating an intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Confirming this observation, expression of caspase-3 mRNA was higher in CDV infected HeLa cells than control cells; however, there was no statistically significant change in caspase-8 mRNA expression profile. Our data suggest that canine distemper virus induced apoptosis in HeLa cells, triggering apoptosis by the intrinsic pathway, with no participation of the initiator caspase -8 from the extrinsic pathway. In conclusion, the cellular stress caused by CDV infection of HeLa cells, leading to apoptosis, can be used as a tool in future research for cervical cancer treatment and control.

  6. Polyoma virus-induced osteosarcomas in inbred strains of mice: host determinants of metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palanivel Velupillai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The mouse polyoma virus induces a broad array of solid tumors in mice of many inbred strains. In most strains tumors grow rapidly but fail to metastasize. An exception has been found in the Czech-II/Ei mouse in which bone tumors metastasize regularly to the lung. These tumors resemble human osteosarcoma in their propensity for pulmonary metastasis. Cell lines established from these metastatic tumors have been compared with ones from non-metastatic osteosarcomas arising in C3H/BiDa mice. Osteopontin, a chemokine implicated in migration and metastasis, is known to be transcriptionally induced by the viral middle T antigen. Czech-II/Ei and C3H/BiDa tumor cells expressed middle T and secreted osteopontin at comparable levels as the major chemoattractant. The tumor cell lines migrated equally well in response to recombinant osteopontin as the sole attractant. An important difference emerged in assays for invasion in which tumor cells from Czech-II/Ei mice were able to invade across an extracellular matrix barrier while those from C3H/BiDa mice were unable to invade. Invasive behavior was linked to elevated levels of the metalloproteinase MMP-2 and of the transcription factor NFAT. Inhibition of either MMP-2 or NFAT inhibited invasion by Czech-II/Ei osteosarcoma cells. The metastatic phenotype is dominant in F1 mice. Osteosarcoma cell lines from F1 mice expressed intermediate levels of MMP-2 and NFAT and were invasive. Osteosarcomas in Czech-II/Ei mice retain functional p53. This virus-host model of metastasis differs from engineered models targeting p53 or pRb and provides a system for investigating the genetic and molecular basis of bone tumor metastasis in the absence of p53 loss.

  7. An efficient virus-induced gene silencing vector for maize functional genomics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Yang, Xinxin; Wang, Nian; Liu, Xuedong; Nelson, Richard S; Li, Weimin; Fan, Zaifeng; Zhou, Tao

    2016-04-01

    Maize is a major crop whose rich genetic diversity provides an advanced resource for genetic research. However, a tool for rapid transient gene function analysis in maize that may be utilized in most maize cultivars has been lacking, resulting in reliance on time-consuming stable transformation and mutation studies to obtain answers. We developed an efficient virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) vector for maize based on a naturally maize-infecting cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) strain, ZMBJ-CMV. An infectious clone of ZMBJ-CMV was constructed, and a vascular puncture inoculation method utilizing Agrobacterium was optimized to improve its utility for CMV infection of maize. ZMBJ-CMV was then modified to function as a VIGS vector. The ZMBJ-CMV vector induced mild to moderate symptoms in many maize lines, making it useful for gene function studies in critically important maize cultivars, such as the sequenced reference inbred line B73. Using this CMV VIGS system, expression of two endogenous genes, ZmPDS and ZmIspH, was found to be decreased by 75% and 78%, respectively, compared with non-silenced tissue. Inserts with lengths of 100-300 bp produced the most complete transcriptional and visual silencing phenotypes. Moreover, genes related to autophagy, ZmATG3 and ZmATG8a, were also silenced, and it was found that they function in leaf starch degradation. These results indicate that our ZMBJ-CMV VIGS vector provides a tool for rapid and efficient gene function studies in maize. PMID:26921244

  8. Molecular characterization of oxysterol binding to the Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 2 (GPR183)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benned-Jensen, Tau; Norn, Christoffer; Laurent, Stephane;

    2012-01-01

    Oxysterols are oxygenated cholesterol derivates that are emerging as a physiologically important group of molecules. Although they regulate a range of cellular processes, only few oxysterol-binding effector proteins have been identified, and the knowledge of their binding mode is limited. Recently......, the family of G protein-coupled seven transmembrane-spanning receptors (7TM receptors) was added to this group. Specifically, the Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 2 (EBI2 or GPR183) was shown to be activated by several oxysterols, most potently by 7α,25-dihydroxycholesterol (7α,25-OHC). Nothing is...

  9. Exercise, Inflammation and Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffrey A Woods; Wilund, Kenneth R.; Martin, Stephen A.; Kistler, Brandon M.

    2011-01-01

    Aging results in chronic low grade inflammation that is associated with increased risk for disease, poor physical functioning and mortality. Strategies that reduce age-related inflammation may improve the quality of life in older adults. Regular exercise is recommended for older people for a variety of reasons including increasing muscle mass and reducing risk for chronic diseases of the heart and metabolic systems. Only recently has exercise been examined in the context of inflammation. This...

  10. The effect of lipopolysaccharide-induced obesity and its chronic inflammation on influenza virus-related pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sun-Young; Sohn, Sung-Hwa; Lee, Sang-Yeon; Park, Hye-Lim; Park, Yong-Wook; Kim, Hun; Nam, Jae-Hwan

    2015-11-01

    Obese individuals show increased susceptibility to infection, low vaccine efficacy, and worse pathophysiology. However, it is unclear how obesity affects these events. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of obesity-triggered chronic inflammation on immune cells after influenza virus infection. Control and lipopolysaccharide mice, in which an osmotic pump continually released Tween saline or lipopolysaccharide, were prepared and 3 weeks later were infected with pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza A virus. In lipopolysaccharide mice, we found a reduction in macrophage activation markers in the steady state, and reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6, in restimulated peritoneal macrophages. Interestingly, lipopolysaccharide-triggered chronic inflammation exacerbated the severity of pathological symptoms in the lungs after challenge with influenza virus. Taken together, the increased severity of virus-induced symptoms in obese individuals with chronic inflammation may be, at least partially, caused by macrophage dysfunction.

  11. Inflammation and coagulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Levi; T. van der Poll

    2010-01-01

    In the pathogenesis of sepsis, inflammation and coagulation play a pivotal role. Increasing evidence points to an extensive cross-talk between these two systems, whereby inflammation leads to activation of coagulation, and coagulation also considerably affects inflammatory activity. Molecular pathwa

  12. Triggers of airway inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerrebijn, K F

    1986-01-01

    Most asthmatics have hyperresponsive airways. This makes them more sensitive than non-asthmatics to bronchoconstricting environmental exposures which, in their turn, may enhance responsiveness. Airway inflammation is considered to be a key determinant of airway hyperresponsiveness: the fact that chronic airway inflammation in cystic fibrosis does not lead to airway hyperresponsiveness of any importance indicates, however, that the role of airway inflammation is complex and incompletely elucidated. The main inducers of airway inflammation are viral infections, antigens, occupational stimuli and pollutants. Although exercise, airway cooling and hyper- or hypotonic aerosols are potent stimuli of bronchoconstriction, it is questionable if airway inflammation is involved in their mode of action. Each of the above-mentioned stimuli is discussed, with emphasis laid on the relation of symptoms to mechanisms. PMID:3533597

  13. Thioredoxin-1 protects against neutrophilic inflammation and emphysema progression in a mouse model of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoya Tanabe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are characterized by acute enhancement of airway neutrophilic inflammation under oxidative stress and can be involved in emphysema progression. However, pharmacotherapy against the neutrophilic inflammation and emphysema progression associated with exacerbation has not been established. Thioredoxin-1 has anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties and it can ameliorate neutrophilic inflammation through anti-chemotactic effects and prevent cigarette smoke (CS-induced emphysema. We aimed to determine whether thioredoxin-1 can suppress neutrophilic inflammation and emphysema progression in a mouse model of COPD exacerbation and if so, to reveal the underlying mechanisms. RESULTS: Mice were exposed to CS and then challenged with polyinosine-polycytidylic acid [poly(I:C], an agonist for virus-induced innate immunity. Airway neutrophilic inflammation, oxidative stress and lung apoptosis were enhanced in smoke-sensitive C57Bl/6, but not in smoke-resistant NZW mice. Exposure to CS and poly(I:C challenge accelerated emphysema progression in C57Bl/6 mice. Thioredoxin-1 suppressed neutrophilic inflammation and emphysema progression. Poly(I:C caused early neutrophilic inflammation through keratinocyte-derived chemokine and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF release in the lung exposed to CS. Late neutrophilic inflammation was caused by persistent GM-CSF release, which thioredoxin-1 ameliorated. Thioredoxin-1 enhanced pulmonary mRNA expression of MAP kinase phosphatase 1 (MKP-1, and the suppressive effects of thioredoxin-1 on prolonged GM-CSF release and late neutrophilic inflammation disappeared by inhibiting MKP-1. CONCLUSION: Using a mouse model of COPD exacerbation, we demonstrated that thioredoxin-1 ameliorated neutrophilic inflammation by suppressing GM-CSF release, which prevented emphysema progression. Our findings deepen understanding of the mechanisms

  14. Estrogens, inflammation and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, April; Feher, Anita; McPhee, Lucy; Jessa, Ailya; Oh, Soojin; Einstein, Gillian

    2016-01-01

    The effects of estrogens are pleiotropic, affecting multiple bodily systems. Changes from the body's natural fluctuating levels of estrogens, through surgical removal of the ovaries, natural menopause, or the administration of exogenous estrogens to menopausal women have been independently linked to an altered immune profile, and changes to cognitive processes. Here, we propose that inflammation may mediate the relationship between low levels of estrogens and cognitive decline. In order to determine what is known about this connection, we review the literature on the cognitive effects of decreased estrogens due to oophorectomy or natural menopause, decreased estrogens' role on inflammation--both peripherally and in the brain--and the relationship between inflammation and cognition. While this review demonstrates that much is unknown about the intersection between estrogens, cognition, inflammation, we propose that there is an important interaction between these literatures.

  15. Orbital inflammation: Corticosteroids first.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagi Glass, Lora R; Freitag, Suzanne K

    2016-01-01

    Orbital inflammation is common, and may affect all ages and both genders. By combining a thorough history and physical examination, targeted ancillary laboratory testing and imaging, a presumptive diagnosis can often be made. Nearly all orbital inflammatory pathology can be empirically treated with corticosteroids, thus obviating the need for histopathologic diagnosis prior to initiation of therapy. In addition, corticosteroids may be effective in treating concurrent systemic disease. Unless orbital inflammation responds atypically or incompletely, patients can be spared biopsy.

  16. Novel avian influenza A (H7N9 virus induces impaired interferon responses in human dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veera Arilahti

    Full Text Available In March 2013 a new avian influenza A(H7N9 virus emerged in China and infected humans with a case fatality rate of over 30%. Like the highly pathogenic H5N1 virus, H7N9 virus is causing severe respiratory distress syndrome in most patients. Based on genetic analysis this avian influenza A virus shows to some extent adaptation to mammalian host. In the present study, we analyzed the activation of innate immune responses by this novel H7N9 influenza A virus and compared these responses to those induced by the avian H5N1 and seasonal H3N2 viruses in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs. We observed that in H7N9 virus-infected cells, interferon (IFN responses were weak although the virus replicated as well as the H5N1 and H3N2 viruses in moDCs. H7N9 virus-induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines remained at a significantly lower level as compared to H5N1 virus-induced "cytokine storm" seen in human moDCs. However, the H7N9 virus was extremely sensitive to the antiviral effects of IFN-α and IFN-β in pretreated cells. Our data indicates that different highly pathogenic avian viruses may show considerable differences in their ability to induce host antiviral responses in human primary cell models such as moDCs. The unexpected appearance of the novel H7N9 virus clearly emphasizes the importance of the global influenza surveillance system. It is, however, equally important to systematically characterize in normal human cells the replication capacity of the new viruses and their ability to induce and respond to natural antiviral substances such as IFNs.

  17. Induction and maintenance of DNA methylation in plant promoter sequences by apple latent spherical virus-induced transcriptional gene silencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya eKon

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV is an efficient virus-induced gene silencing vector in functional genomics analyses of a broad range of plant species. Here, an Agrobacterium-mediated inoculation (agroinoculation system was developed for the ALSV vector, and virus-induced transcriptional gene silencing (VITGS is described in plants infected with the ALSV vector. The cDNAs of ALSV RNA1 and RNA2 were inserted between the CaMV 35S promoter and the NOS-T sequences in a binary vector pCAMBIA1300 to produce pCALSR1 and pCALSR2-XSB or pCALSR2-XSB/MN. When these vector constructs were agroinoculated into Nicotiana benthamiana plants with a construct expressing a viral silencing suppressor, the infection efficiency of the vectors was 100%. A recombinant ALSV vector carrying part of the 35S promoter sequence induced transcriptional gene silencing of the green fluorescent protein gene in a line of N. benthamiana plants, resulting in the disappearance of green fluorescence of infected plants. Bisulfite sequencing showed that cytosine residues at CG and CHG sites of the 35S promoter sequence were highly methylated in the silenced generation 0 plants infected with the ALSV carrying the promoter sequence as well as in progeny. The ALSV-mediated VITGS state was inherited by progeny for multiple generations. In addition, induction of VITGS of an endogenous gene (chalcone synthase-A was demonstrated in petunia plants infected with an ALSV vector carrying the native promoter sequence. These results suggest that ALSV-based vectors can be applied to study DNA methylation in plant genomes, and provide a useful tool for plant breeding via epigenetic modification.

  18. Exacerbation of allergic inflammation in mice exposed to diesel exhaust particles prior to viral infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chason Kelly D

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viral infections and exposure to oxidant air pollutants are two of the most important inducers of asthma exacerbation. Our previous studies have demonstrated that exposure to diesel exhaust increases the susceptibility to influenza virus infections both in epithelial cells in vitro and in mice in vivo. Therefore, we examined whether in the setting of allergic asthma, exposure to oxidant air pollutants enhances the susceptibility to respiratory virus infections, which in turn leads to increased virus-induced exacerbation of asthma. Ovalbumin-sensitized (OVA male C57BL/6 mice were instilled with diesel exhaust particles (DEP or saline and 24 hours later infected with influenza A/PR/8. Animals were sacrificed 24 hours post-infection and analyzed for markers of lung injury, allergic inflammation, and pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Results Exposure to DEP or infection with influenza alone had no significant effects on markers of injury or allergic inflammation. However, OVA-sensitized mice that were exposed to DEP and subsequently infected with influenza showed increased levels of eosinophils in lung lavage and tissue. In addition Th2-type cytokines, such as IL-4 and IL-13, and markers of eosinophil chemotaxis, such as CCL11 and CCR3, were increased in OVA-sensitized mice exposed to DEP prior to infection with influenza. These mice also showed increased levels of IL-1α, but not IL-10, RANTES, and MCP-1 in lung homogenates. Conclusion These data suggest that in the setting of allergic asthma, exposure to diesel exhaust could enhance virus-induced exacerbation of allergic inflammation.

  19. Inflammation and keratoconus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMonnies, Charles W

    2015-02-01

    Keratoconus (KC) has been traditionally classified as a noninflammatory disease. Barring loss of function, the other classic signs of inflammation (heat, redness, swelling, pain) are not usually obvious or even apparent in KC. This clinical perspective examines the evidence and implications of numerous inflammatory processes that have been recognized in the tears of KC patients as well as some inflammation relevant differences found in the KC cornea. The roles of inflammation in corneal trauma attributed to eye rubbing and/or contact lens wear are examined as is the significance of atopy, allergic disease, dry eye disease, degradative enzyme activity, wound healing, reduced anti-inflammatory capacity, and ultraviolet irradiation. It is possible that any comorbidity that is inflammatory in nature may add synergistically to other forms of KC-related inflammation and exacerbate its pathogenetic processes. For example, some features of inflammation in ocular rosacea and associated corneal thinning and distortion could have some possible relevance to KC. An analogy is drawn with osteoarthritis, which also involves significant inflammatory processes but, like KC, does not meet all the classic criteria for an inflammatory disease. Classifying KC as quasi-inflammatory (inflammatory-related) rather than a noninflammatory disease appears to be more appropriate and may help focus attention on the possibility of developing effective anti-inflammatory therapies for its management. PMID:25397925

  20. Clinical significance of connective tissue growth factor in hepatitis B virus-induced hepatic fibrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong-Li Piao; David R Brigstock; Jie Zhu; Man-Li Zhang; Run-Ping Gao

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To determine the utility of connective tissue growth factor (CCN2/CTGF) for assessing hepatic fibrosis in hepatitis B virus (HBV)-induced chronic liver diseases (CLD-B).METHODS:Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure CCN2 in sera from 107 patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and 39 patients with HBVinduced active liver cirrhosis and 30 healthy individuals.Liver samples from 31 patients with CHB,8 patients with HBV-induced liver cirrhosis and 8 HBV carriers with normal liver histology were examined for transforming growth factor β-1 (TGF-β1) or CCN2 mRNA levels by in situ hybridization,and computer image analysis was performed to measure integrated optimal density (IOD) of CCN2 mRNA-positive cells in liver tissues.Histological inflammation grading and fibrosis staging were evaluated by H and E staining and Van Gieson's method.RESULTS:Serum CCN2 concentrations were,respectively,4.0-or 4.9-fold higher in patients with CHB or active liver cirrhosis as compared to healthy individuals (P < 0.01).There was good consistency between the levels of CCN2 in sera and CCN2 mRNA expression in liver tissues (r =0.87,P < 0.01).The levels of CCN2 in sera were increased with the enhancement of histological fibrosis staging in patients with CLD-B (r =0.85,P < 0.01).Serum CCN2 was a reliable marker for the assessment of liver fibrosis,with areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves (AUC) of 0.94 or 0.85 for,respectively,distinguishing normal liver controls from patients with F1 stage liver fibrosis or discriminating between mild and significant fibrosis.CONCLUSION:Detection of serum CCN2 in patients with CLD-B may have clinical significance for assessment of severity of hepatic fibrosis.

  1. Sinonasal inflammation in COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Håkansson, Kåre; Konge, Lars; Thomsen, Sf;

    2013-01-01

    In this review we demonstrate that patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) frequently report sinonasal symptoms. Furthermore, we present evidence that smoking on its own can cause nasal disease, and that in COPD patients, nasal inflammation mimics that of the bronchi. All...... this evidence suggests that COPD related sinonasal disease does exist and that smoking on its own rather than systemic inflammation triggers the condition. However, COPD related sinonasal disease remains to be characterized in terms of symptoms and endoscopic findings. In addition, more studies are needed...

  2. Virus-induced polyclonal T cell activation is followed by apoptosis: partitioning of CD8+ T cells based on alpha 4 integrin expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Röpke, C; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    1996-01-01

    Systemic infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) is accompanied by marked splenomegaly, primarily reflecting the accumulation of CD8(+) T cells with an activated phenotype (e.g. VLA-4hi). Analysis of DNA content using 7-aminoactinomycin-D revealed that as many as 30% of CD8(+) T...... cells are cycling around day 6 post-infection and that virtually all cycling cells express a high level of VLA-4. In accord with the relatively stable CD4+ cell number, only few cycling CD4+ cells were observed. Following virus control, splenic lymphocyte numbers decreased gradually and during...... this period many apoptotic cells were detected in the white pulp using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling. Flow cytometric analysis of DNA content revealed a high frequency of cells with subnormal levels of DNA in the CD8(+)VLA-4hi subset, whereas the frequency...

  3. Janus kinase inhibition lessens inflammation and ameliorates disease in murine models of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Rupali; Guan, Peng; Sprague, Leslee; Verbist, Katherine; Tedrick, Paige; An, Qi Angel; Cheng, Cheng; Kurachi, Makoto; Levine, Ross; Wherry, E John; Canna, Scott W; Behrens, Edward M; Nichols, Kim E

    2016-03-31

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) comprises an emerging spectrum of inherited and noninherited disorders of the immune system characterized by the excessive production of cytokines, including interferon-γ and interleukins 2, 6, and 10 (IL-2, IL-6, and IL-10). The Janus kinases (JAKs) transduce signals initiated following engagement of specific receptors that bind a broad array of cytokines, including those overproduced in HLH. Based on the central role for cytokines in the pathogenesis of HLH, we sought to examine whether the inhibition of JAK function might lessen inflammation in murine models of the disease. Toward this end, we examined the effects of JAK inhibition using a model of primary (inherited) HLH in which perforin-deficient (Prf1(-∕-)) mice are infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and secondary (noninherited) HLH in which C57BL/6 mice receive repeated injections of CpG DNA. In both models, treatment with the JAK1/2 inhibitor ruxolitinib significantly lessened the clinical and laboratory manifestations of HLH, including weight loss, organomegaly, anemia, thrombocytopenia, hypercytokinemia, and tissue inflammation. Importantly, ruxolitinib treatment also significantly improved the survival of LCMV-infectedPrf1(-∕-)mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that in vivo exposure to ruxolitinib inhibited signal transducer and activation of transcription 1-dependent gene expression, limited CD8(+)T-cell expansion, and greatly reduced proinflammatory cytokine production, without effecting degranulation and cytotoxic function. Collectively, these findings highlight the JAKs as novel, druggable targets for mitigating the cytokine-driven hyperinflammation that occurs in HLH. These observations also support the incorporation of JAK inhibitors such as ruxolitinib into future clinical trials for patients with these life-threatening disorders. PMID:26825707

  4. Periostin in Allergic Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Izuhara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Periostin, an extracellular matrix protein belonging to the fasciclin family, has been shown to play a critical role in the process of remodeling during tissue/organ development or repair. Periostin functions as a matricellular protein in cell activation by binding to their receptors on cell surface, thereby exerting its biological activities. After we found that periostin is a downstream molecule of interleukin (IL-4 and IL-13, signature cytokines of type 2 immune responses, we showed that periostin is a component of subepithelial fibrosis in bronchial asthma, the first formal proof that periostin is involved in allergic inflammation. Subsequently, a great deal of evidence has accumulated demonstrating the significance of periostin in allergic inflammation. It is of note that in skin tissues, periostin is critical for amplification and persistence of allergic inflammation by communicating between fibroblasts and keratinocytes. Furthermore, periostin has been applied to development of novel diagnostics or therapeutic agents for allergic diseases. Serum periostin can reflect local production of periostin in inflamed lesions induced by Th2-type immune responses and also can predict the efficacy of Th2 antagonists against bronchial asthma. Blocking the interaction between periostin and its receptor, αv integrin, or down-regulating the periostin expression shows improvement of periostin-induced inflammation in mouse models or in in vitro systems. It is hoped that diagnostics or therapeutic agents targeting periostin will be of practical use in the near future.

  5. Immunsystemet ved kronisk inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtzen, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Innate and adaptive immunity has evolved as a defence against infections and as an important repair mechanism after physical injury. If elimination of microbes and healing is not achieved, or if the immune system is dysregulated, chronic inflammation ensues. Immune cells become engaged in prolonged...

  6. Systemic virus-induced gene silencing allows functional characterization of maize genes during biotrophic interaction with Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linde, Karina; Kastner, Christine; Kumlehn, Jochen; Kahmann, Regine; Doehlemann, Gunther

    2011-01-01

    Infection of maize (Zea mays) plants with the corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis leads to the formation of large tumors on the stem, leaves and inflorescences. In this biotrophic interaction, plant defense responses are actively suppressed by the pathogen, and previous transcriptome analyses of infected maize plants showed massive and stage-specific changes in host gene expression during disease progression. To identify maize genes that are functionally involved in the interaction with U. maydis, we adapted a virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) system based on the brome mosaic virus (BMV) for maize. Conditions were established that allowed successful U. maydis infection of BMV-preinfected maize plants. This set-up enabled quantification of VIGS and its impact on U. maydis infection using a quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR)-based readout. In proof-of-principle experiments, an U. maydis-induced terpene synthase was shown to negatively regulate disease development while a protein involved in cell death inhibition was required for full virulence of U. maydis. The results suggest that this system is a versatile tool for the rapid identification of maize genes that determine compatibility with U. maydis.

  7. Virus-induced gene silencing of pea CHLI and CHLD affects tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, chloroplast development and the primary metabolic network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Tao; Luo, Sha; Araújo, Wagner L; Schlicke, Hagen; Rothbart, Maxi; Yu, Jing; Fan, Tingting; Fernie, Alisdair R; Grimm, Bernhard; Luo, Meizhong

    2013-04-01

    The first committed and highly regulated step of chlorophyll biosynthesis is the insertion of Mg(2+) into protoporphyrin IX, which is catalyzed by Mg chelatase that consists of CHLH, CHLD and CHLI subunits. In this study, CHLI and CHLD genes were suppressed by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS-CHLI and VIGS-CHLD) in pea (Pisum sativum), respectively. VIGS-CHLI and VIGS-CHLD plants both showed yellow leaf phenotypes with the reduced Mg chelatase activity and the inactivated synthesis of 5-aminolevulinic acid. The lower chlorophyll accumulation correlated with undeveloped thylakoid membranes, altered chloroplast nucleoid structure, malformed antenna complexes and compromised photosynthesis capacity in the yellow leaf tissues of the VIGS-CHLI and VIGS-CHLD plants. Non-enzymatic antioxidant contents and the activities of antioxidant enzymes were altered in response to enhanced accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the chlorophyll deficient leaves of VIGS-CHLI and VIGS-CHLD plants. Furthermore, the results of metabolite profiling indicate a tight correlation between primary metabolic pathways and Mg chelatase activity. We also found that CHLD induces a feedback-regulated change of the transcription of photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes. CHLD and CHLI silencing resulted in a rapid reduction of photosynthetic proteins. Taken together, Mg chelatase is not only a key regulator of tetrapyrrole biosynthesis but its activity also correlates with ROS homeostasis, primary interorganellar metabolism and retrograde signaling in plant cells. PMID:23416492

  8. A high throughput barley stripe mosaic virus vector for virus induced gene silencing in monocots and dicots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Yuan

    Full Text Available Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV is a single-stranded RNA virus with three genome components designated alpha, beta, and gamma. BSMV vectors have previously been shown to be efficient virus induced gene silencing (VIGS vehicles in barley and wheat and have provided important information about host genes functioning during pathogenesis as well as various aspects of genes functioning in development. To permit more effective use of BSMV VIGS for functional genomics experiments, we have developed an Agrobacterium delivery system for BSMV and have coupled this with a ligation independent cloning (LIC strategy to mediate efficient cloning of host genes. Infiltrated Nicotiana benthamiana leaves provided excellent sources of virus for secondary BSMV infections and VIGS in cereals. The Agro/LIC BSMV VIGS vectors were able to function in high efficiency down regulation of phytoene desaturase (PDS, magnesium chelatase subunit H (ChlH, and plastid transketolase (TK gene silencing in N. benthamiana and in the monocots, wheat, barley, and the model grass, Brachypodium distachyon. Suppression of an Arabidopsis orthologue cloned from wheat (TaPMR5 also interfered with wheat powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici infections in a manner similar to that of the A. thaliana PMR5 loss-of-function allele. These results imply that the PMR5 gene has maintained similar functions across monocot and dicot families. Our BSMV VIGS system provides substantial advantages in expense, cloning efficiency, ease of manipulation and ability to apply VIGS for high throughput genomics studies.

  9. T-cell effector function and unresponsiveness in the murine lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection. II. Delayed-type hypersensitivity unresponsiveness reflects a defective differentiation from TD precursor to effector cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Marker, O

    1986-01-01

    An increase in the virus dose from 10(2) LD50 (low dose) to 10(4) LD50 (high dose) of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) results in markedly delayed virus clearance, in spite of a potent cytotoxic T-cell (TC) response. However, virus-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactivity...... is markedly depressed in high-dose mice, suggesting an association between DTH and virus clearance. When virus-primed memory cells are transferred, DTH reactivity as well as virus-clearing capacity is restored in high-dose mice, indicating that the virus is not present in a changed or concealed form. The role...... of T-cells mediating DTH (TD cells) in virus clearance was also studied by adoptive transfer to naive recipients. Here the high-dose primed cells did mediate virus clearance, although no DTH reaction was detectable 24-72 h after transfer. However, when footpad swelling was measured 96 h or more after...

  10. 淋巴细胞脉络丛脑膜炎病毒快速核酸检测方法%Establishment of Nucleic Acid Assays for Rapid Detection of Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊炜; 林颖峥; 魏晓锋; 王艳; 张强; 李健; 胡建华; 黄忠荣

    2015-01-01

    In order to survey and conduct epidemiological investigation of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus(LCMV) among wild and experimental rodent animals,RT-PCR assay and Real-time RT-PCR assay were established using TaqMan probe for LCMV with high sensitivity,specificity and stability for rapid detection of LCMV.%为加强口岸对进境野生及实验用啮齿类动物中淋巴细胞脉络丛脑膜炎病毒(LCMV)筛查和流行病学调查,本研究建立了RT-PCR和Real-time RT-PCR快速高通量检测LCMV的方法,证实两种核酸检测方法具有良好的特异性、灵敏性和稳定性,适于快速检测LCMV。

  11. COPD exacerbations, inflammation and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bathoorn, Derk

    2007-01-01

    This thesis describes investigations into the inflammation in COPD, and its treatment. Inflammation in COPD is a central factor in the onset of the disease and its progression. During acute deteriorations of the disease, exacerbations, the inflammation is more severe, and depending on the cause of t

  12. Gut Microbiota and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Molin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Systemic and local inflammation in relation to the resident microbiota of the human gastro-intestinal (GI tract and administration of probiotics are the main themes of the present review. The dominating taxa of the human GI tract and their potential for aggravating or suppressing inflammation are described. The review focuses on human trials with probiotics and does not include in vitro studies and animal experimental models. The applications of probiotics considered are systemic immune-modulation, the metabolic syndrome, liver injury, inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer and radiation-induced enteritis. When the major genomic differences between different types of probiotics are taken into account, it is to be expected that the human body can respond differently to the different species and strains of probiotics. This fact is often neglected in discussions of the outcome of clinical trials with probiotics.

  13. Stress, Inflammation and Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Lavretsky, Helen; Newhouse, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    This editorial provides a summary of the state of research on stress-related changes associated with aging and discuss how factors such as inflammation and sex steroid alterations may interact with psychosocial stress to affect the risk for mood and cognitive disturbance in older individuals. The authors provide an integrated summary of four studies reported in this issue of the journal and views on future direction in stress and aging research and interventions targeting resilience to stress.

  14. Myopia and Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Herbort, Carl P.; Marina Papadia; Piergiorgio Neri

    2011-01-01

    The correlation between myopia and intraocular inflammation has rarely been explored. The aim of this article is to review myopic changes induced by inflammatory diseases and inflammatory diseases related to myopia, followed by a discussion on inflammatory choroidal neovascularization. Clinical cases are used to illustrate these conditions. The review does not include inflammatory conditions caused by surgical interventions employed for treatment of myopia. Uveitic conditions that can induce ...

  15. Coagulation inhibitors in inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmon, C T

    2005-04-01

    Coagulation is triggered by inflammatory mediators in a number of ways. However, to prevent unwanted clot formation, several natural anticoagulant mechanisms exist, such as the antithrombin-heparin mechanism, the tissue factor pathway inhibitor mechanism and the protein C anticoagulant pathway. This review examines the ways in which these pathways are down-regulated by inflammation, thus limiting clot formation and decreasing the natural anti-inflammatory mechanisms that these pathways possess. PMID:15787615

  16. Obesity and metabolic inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Haiyan

    2013-01-01

    Obesity epidemics affect 35.7% of adults and approximately 17% of children in the United States. Obesity has been associated with several health disorders, such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, fatty liver disease, and certain forms of cancer. Medical costs associated with obesity were estimated at $147 billion in 2008. Chronic tissue inflammation, particularly in adipose tissue, has been considered as a key underlying mechanism for the development of obesity-related metabolic syn...

  17. Significant correlation between expression level of HSP gp96 and progression of hepatitis B virus induced diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Dong Zhu; Cheng-Lin Li; Zhen-Wei Lang; George F Gao; Po Tien

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Gp96, also known as Grp94, is a member of heat shock protein (HSP) family and binds repertoires of peptides thereof eliciting peptide-specific T cell immune responses.It predominantly locates inside the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) with some cell surface expression in certain cancerous cells. Previous studies have shown that gp96 expression level was up-regulated in tumor cells, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, relationship between the extent of gp96 expression and disease progression especially HBV-induced chronic infection, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, has not been addressed before. As primary HCC can be induced and progressed from chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and HBV-induced cirrhosis, we designed an immunohistochemical experiment to test the correlation between gp96 expression level and HBV-induced disease progression, from chronic HBV infection, cirrhosis to HCC.METHODS: We chose liver samples from different patients of hepatitis B virus induced diseases, including chronic hepatitis B (77 patients), cirrhosis (27 patients) and primary HCC (30 patients), to test the expression level of gp96 in different affected groups. Formalin-fixed, and paraffinembedded liver tissues taken from these patients were immuno-stained by using an anti-gp96 monoclonal antibody for the expression level of gp96 protein in the sections. In addition, Western blotting of whole cell lysates derived from established human embryonic liver cell lines and several human HCC cell lines (Huh7, HepG2, SSMC-7721) was compared with the expression of gp96.RESULTS: We found that the extent of elevated gp96expression was significantly correlated with the disease progression, and was the highest in HCC patients, lowest in chronic HBV infection and was that of the cirrhosis in the middle.CONCLUSION: Increased expression of gp96 might be used as a diagnostic or prognostic bio-marker for the HBV infection and HBV-induced diseases.

  18. Virus-Induced Chaperone-Enriched (VICE domains function as nuclear protein quality control centers during HSV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine M Livingston

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Virus-Induced Chaperone-Enriched (VICE domains form adjacent to nuclear viral replication compartments (RC during the early stages of HSV-1 infection. Between 2 and 3 hours post infection at a MOI of 10, host protein quality control machinery such as molecular chaperones (e.g. Hsc70, the 20S proteasome and ubiquitin are reorganized from a diffuse nuclear distribution pattern to sequestration in VICE domains. The observation that VICE domains contain putative misfolded proteins suggests that they may be similar to nuclear inclusion bodies that form under conditions in which the protein quality control machinery is overwhelmed by the presence of misfolded proteins. The detection of Hsc70 in VICE domains, but not in nuclear inclusion bodies, indicates that Hsc70 is specifically reorganized by HSV-1 infection. We hypothesize that HSV-1 infection induces the formation of nuclear protein quality control centers to remodel or degrade aberrant nuclear proteins that would otherwise interfere with productive infection. Detection of proteolytic activity in VICE domains suggests that substrates may be degraded by the 20S proteasome in VICE domains. FRAP analysis reveals that GFP-Hsc70 is dynamically associated with VICE domains, suggesting a role for Hsc70 in scanning the infected nucleus for misfolded proteins. During 42 degrees C heat shock, Hsc70 is redistributed from VICE domains into RC perhaps to remodel viral replication and regulatory proteins that have become insoluble in these compartments. The experiments presented in this paper suggest that VICE domains are nuclear protein quality control centers that are modified by HSV-1 to promote productive infection.

  19. Virus-induced gene silencing as a tool for functional analyses in the emerging model plant Aquilegia (columbine, Ranunculaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kramer Elena M

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The lower eudicot genus Aquilegia, commonly known as columbine, is currently the subject of extensive genetic and genomic research aimed at developing this taxon as a new model for the study of ecology and evolution. The ability to perform functional genetic analyses is a critical component of this development process and ultimately has the potential to provide insight into the genetic basis for the evolution of a wide array of traits that differentiate flowering plants. Aquilegia is of particular interest due to both its recent evolutionary history, which involves a rapid adaptive radiation, and its intermediate phylogenetic position between core eudicot (e.g., Arabidopsis and grass (e.g., Oryza model species. Results Here we demonstrate the effective use of a reverse genetic technique, virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS, to study gene function in this emerging model plant. Using Agrobacterium mediated transfer of tobacco rattle virus (TRV based vectors, we induce silencing of PHYTOENE DESATURASE (AqPDS in Aquilegia vulgaris seedlings, and ANTHOCYANIDIN SYNTHASE (AqANS and the B-class floral organ identity gene PISTILLATA in A. vulgaris flowers. For all of these genes, silencing phenotypes are associated with consistent reduction in endogenous transcript levels. In addition, we show that silencing of AqANS has no effect on overall floral morphology and is therefore a suitable marker for the identification of silenced flowers in dual-locus silencing experiments. Conclusion Our results show that TRV-VIGS in Aquilegia vulgaris allows data to be rapidly obtained and can be reproduced with effective survival and silencing rates. Furthermore, this method can successfully be used to evaluate the function of early-acting developmental genes. In the future, data derived from VIGS analyses will be combined with large-scale sequencing and microarray experiments already underway in order to address both recent and ancient evolutionary

  20. Lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus induces systemic lymphocyte activation via TLR7-dependent IFNalpha responses by plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph G Ammann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus (LDV is a natural infectious agent of mice. Like several other viruses, LDV causes widespread and very rapid but transient activation of both B cells and T cells in lymphoid tissues and the blood. The mechanism of this activation has not been fully described and is the focus of the current studies. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A known inducer of early lymphocyte activation is IFNalpha, a cytokine strongly induced by LDV infection. Neutralization of IFNalpha in the plasma from infected mice ablated its ability to activate lymphocytes in vitro. Since the primary source of virus-induced IFNalpha in vivo is often plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC's, we depleted these cells prior to LDV infection and tested for lymphocyte activation. Depletion of pDC's in vivo eradicated both the LDV-induced IFNalpha response and lymphocyte activation. A primary receptor in pDC's for single stranded RNA viruses such as LDV is the toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7 pattern recognition receptor. Infection of TLR7-knockout mice revealed that both the IFNalpha response and lymphocyte activation were dependent on TLR7 signaling in vivo. Interestingly, virus levels in both TLR7 knockout mice and pDC-depleted mice were indistinguishable from controls indicating that LDV is largely resistant to the systemic IFNalpha response. CONCLUSION: Results indicate that LDV-induced activation of lymphocytes is due to recognition of LDV nucleic acid by TLR7 pattern recognition receptors in pDC's that respond with a lymphocyte-inducing IFNalpha response.

  1. Chikungunya virus induces IPS-1-dependent innate immune activation and protein kinase R-independent translational shutoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Laura K; Sali, Tina; Alvarado, David; Gatti, Evelina; Pierre, Philippe; Streblow, Daniel; Defilippis, Victor R

    2011-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an arthritogenic mosquito-transmitted alphavirus that is undergoing reemergence in areas around the Indian Ocean. Despite the current and potential danger posed by this virus, we know surprisingly little about the induction and evasion of CHIKV-associated antiviral immune responses. With this in mind we investigated innate immune reactions to CHIKV in human fibroblasts, a demonstrable in vivo target of virus replication and spread. We show that CHIKV infection leads to activation of the transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and subsequent transcription of IRF3-dependent antiviral genes, including beta interferon (IFN-β). IRF3 activation occurs by way of a virus-induced innate immune signaling pathway that includes the adaptor molecule interferon promoter stimulator 1 (IPS-1). Despite strong transcriptional upregulation of these genes, however, translation of the corresponding proteins is not observed. We further demonstrate that translation of cellular (but not viral) genes is blocked during infection and that although CHIKV is found to trigger inactivation of the translational molecule eukaryotic initiation factor subunit 2α by way of the double-stranded RNA sensor protein kinase R, this response is not required for the block to protein synthesis. Furthermore, overall diminution of cellular RNA synthesis is also observed in the presence of CHIKV and transcription of IRF3-dependent antiviral genes appears specifically blocked late in infection. We hypothesize that the observed absence of IFN-β and antiviral proteins during infection results from an evasion mechanism exhibited by CHIKV that is dependent on widespread shutoff of cellular protein synthesis and a targeted block to late synthesis of antiviral mRNA transcripts.

  2. Development of Agrobacterium-mediated virus-induced gene silencing and performance evaluation of four marker genes in Gossypium barbadense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhuan Pang

    Full Text Available Gossypiumbarbadense is a cultivated cotton species and possesses many desirable traits, including high fiber quality and resistance to pathogens, especially Verticilliumdahliae (a devastating pathogen of Gossypium hirsutum, the main cultivated species. These elite traits are difficult to be introduced into G. hirsutum through classical breeding methods. In addition, genetic transformation of G. barbadense has not been successfully performed. It is therefore important to develop methods for evaluating the function and molecular mechanism of genes in G. barbadense. In this study, we had successfully introduced a virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS system into three cultivars of G. barbadense by inserting marker genes into the tobacco rattle virus (TRV vector. After we optimized the VIGS conditions, including light intensity, photoperiod, seedling age and Agrobacterium strain, 100% of plants agroinfiltrated with the GaPDS silencing vector showed white colored leaves. Three other marker genes, GaCLA1, GaANS and GaANR, were employed to further test this VIGS system in G. barbadense. The transcript levels of the endogenous genes in the silenced plants were reduced by more than 99% compared to control plants; these plants presented phenotypic symptoms 2 weeks after inoculation. We introduced a fusing sequence fragment of GaPDS and GaANR gene silencing vectors into a single plant, which resulted in both photobleaching and brownish coloration. The extent of silencing in plants agroinfiltrated with fusing two-gene-silencing vector was consistent with plants harboring a single gene silencing vector. The development of this VIGS system should promote analysis of gene function in G. barbadense, and help to contribute desirable traits for breeding of G. barbadense and G. hirsutum.

  3. Bioinformatics analysis of the factors controlling type I IFN gene expression in autoimmune disease and virus-induced immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di eFeng

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and Sjögren's syndrome (SS display increased levels of type I IFN-induced genes. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDCs are natural interferon producing cells and considered to be a primary source of IFN-α in these two diseases. Differential expression patterns of type I IFN inducible transcripts can be found in different immune cell subsets and in patients with both active and inactive autoimmune disease. A type I IFN gene signature generally consists of three groups of IFN-induced genes - those regulated in response to virus-induced type I IFN, those regulated by the IFN-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK pathway, and those by the IFN-induced phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI-3K pathway. These three groups of type I IFN-regulated genes control important cellular processes such as apoptosis, survival, adhesion, and chemotaxis, that when dysregulated, contribute to autoimmunity. With the recent generation of large datasets in the public domain from next-generation sequencing and DNA microarray experiments, one can perform detailed analyses of cell type-specific gene signatures as well as identify distinct transcription factors that differentially regulate these gene signatures. We have performed bioinformatics analysis of data in the public domain and experimental data from our lab to gain insight into the regulation of type I IFN gene expression. We have found that the genetic landscape of the IFNA and IFNB genes are occupied by transcription factors, such as insulators CTCF and cohesin, that negatively regulate transcription, as well as IRF5 and IRF7, that positively and distinctly regulate IFNA subtypes. A detailed understanding of the factors controlling type I IFN gene transcription will significantly aid in the identification and development of new therapeutic strategies targeting the IFN pathway in autoimmune disease.

  4. Basophils in inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Christian; Eberle, Joerg U; Voehringer, David

    2016-05-01

    Basophils are functionally closely related to mast cells. Both cell types express the high-affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI) and rapidly release preformed mediator from intracellular stores upon IgE-mediated activation. However, in contrast to mast cells basophils finish their maturation in the bone marrow and have a lifespan of only 2-3 days. Basophil numbers increase in response to IL-3 or TSLP and migrate into tissues to promote type 2 immune responses. Here we review recent advances regarding the pro- and anti-inflammatory functions of basophils in murine models and human allergic inflammation of the skin, lung and intestine. PMID:25959388

  5. Myopia and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl P Herbort

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The correlation between myopia and intraocular inflammation has rarely been explored. The aim of this article is to review myopic changes induced by inflammatory diseases and inflammatory diseases related to myopia, followed by a discussion on inflammatory choroidal neovascularization. Clinical cases are used to illustrate these conditions. The review does not include inflammatory conditions caused by surgical interventions employed for treatment of myopia. Uveitic conditions that can induce a myopic shift include sclero-choroidal inflammation, lens induced myopia due to steroid cataracts, juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA induced myopia, and transient drug induced myopia due to sulfonamides and acetazolamide used for treatment of ocular toxoplasmosis and inflammatory cystoid macular edema, respectively. Most inflammatory conditions related to myopia are conditions involving the choriocapillaris. These include multifocal choroiditis and/or punctate inner choroiditis, multiple evanescent white dot syndrome and acute idiopathic blind spot enlargement. It can be hypothesized that fragility of the choriocapillaris due to particular anatomic changes due to myopia, together with unknown immunogenetic factors predispose myopic eyes to primary inflammatory choriocapillaropathies.

  6. Myopia and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbort, Carl P; Papadia, Marina; Neri, Piergiorgio

    2011-10-01

    The correlation between myopia and intraocular inflammation has rarely been explored. The aim of this article is to review myopic changes induced by inflammatory diseases and inflammatory diseases related to myopia, followed by a discussion on inflammatory choroidal neovascularization. Clinical cases are used to illustrate these conditions. The review does not include inflammatory conditions caused by surgical interventions employed for treatment of myopia. Uveitic conditions that can induce a myopic shift include sclero-choroidal inflammation, lens induced myopia due to steroid cataracts, juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) induced myopia, and transient drug induced myopia due to sulfonamides and acetazolamide used for treatment of ocular toxoplasmosis and inflammatory cystoid macular edema, respectively. Most inflammatory conditions related to myopia are conditions involving the choriocapillaris. These include multifocal choroiditis and/or punctate inner choroiditis, multiple evanescent white dot syndrome and acute idiopathic blind spot enlargement. It can be hypothesized that fragility of the choriocapillaris due to particular anatomic changes due to myopia, together with unknown immunogenetic factors predispose myopic eyes to primary inflammatory choriocapillaropathies. PMID:22454750

  7. Chronic Inflammation in Cancer Development

    OpenAIRE

    Multhoff, Gabriele; Molls, Michael; Radons, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory mediators exert pleiotropic effects in the development of cancer. On the one hand, inflammation favors carcinogenesis, malignant transformation, tumor growth, invasion, and metastatic spread; on the other hand inflammation can stimulate immune effector mechanisms that might limit tumor growth. The link between cancer and inflammation depends on intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. Both pathways result in the activation of transcription factors such as NF-κB, STAT-3, and HIF-...

  8. Identification of novel compounds inhibiting chikungunya virus-induced cell death by high throughput screening of a kinase inhibitor library.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deu John M Cruz

    CHIKV having a novel antiviral activity--inhibition of virus-induced CPE--likely by targeting kinases involved in apoptosis.

  9. Total Hepatitis B Core Antigen Antibody, a Quantitative Non-Invasive Marker of Hepatitis B Virus Induced Liver Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Yuan

    Full Text Available Non invasive immunologic markers of virus-induced liver disease are unmet needs. We tested the clinical significance of quantitative total and IgM-anti-HBc in well characterized chronic-HBsAg-carriers. Sera (212 were obtained from 111 HBsAg-carriers followed-up for 52 months (28-216 during different phases of chronic-HBV-genotype-D-infection: 10 HBeAg-positive, 25 inactive-carriers (HBV-DNA≤2000IU/ml, ALT<30U/L, 66 HBeAg-negative-CHB-patients and 10 with HDV-super-infection. In 35 patients treated with Peg-IFN±nucleos(tide-analogues (NUCs sera were obtained at baseline, end-of-therapy and week-24-off-therapy and in 22 treated with NUCs (for 60 months, 42-134m at baseline and end-of-follow-up. HBsAg and IgM-anti-HBc were measured by Architect-assays (Abbott, USA; total-anti-HBc by double-antigen-sandwich-immune-assay (Wantai, China; HBV-DNA by COBAS-TaqMan (Roche, Germany. Total-anti-HBc were detectable in all sera with lower levels in HBsAg-carriers without CHB (immune-tolerant, inactive and HDV-superinfected, median 3.26, range 2.26-4.49 Log10 IU/ml versus untreated-CHB (median 4.68, range 2.76-5.54 Log10 IU/ml, p<0.0001. IgM-anti-HBc positive using the chronic-hepatitis-cut-off" (0.130-S/CO were positive in 102 of 212 sera (48.1%. Overall total-anti-HBc and IgM-anti-HBc correlated significantly (p<0.001, r=0.417. Total-anti-HBc declined significantly in CHB patients with response to Peg-IFN (p<0.001 and in NUC-treated patients (p<0.001; the lowest levels (median 2.68, range 2.12-3.08 Log10 IU/ml were found in long-term responders who cleared HBsAg subsequently. During spontaneous and therapy-induced fluctuations of CHB (remissions and reactivations total- and IgM-anti-HBc correlated with ALT (p<0.001, r=0.351 and p=0.008, r=0.185 respectively. Total-anti-HBc qualifies as a useful marker of HBV-induced-liver-disease that might help to discriminate major phases of chronic HBV infection and to predict sustained response to antivirals.

  10. [Evaluation of nasal inflammation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Torre Morín, F; Sánchez Machín, I

    2006-01-01

    In the reaction of immediate hypersensibility to alergene is joined to its specific type IgE antibody, also united to the high affinity receptors for IgE (FccI) of the effecters cells fundamentally mastocites and basophiles. The interbreeding of these molecules Fcc to RI, after the union ofpolyvalent antigenes to IgE, active these cells, producing three biologic responses: excitosis of the preformed content of its granules, synthesization of lipidic mediators and citoquine secretion. The inflammation mediators are in last term, substances responsible of the clinic symptomatology. They can be divided generally in preformed mediators (biogene amines and macromolecules of the granules) and of new synthese mediators (lipidic and citoquine mediators). PMID:16749721

  11. SOCS, inflammation and autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiko eYoshimura

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Cytokines play essential roles in innate and adaptive immunity. However, excess cytokines or dysregulation of cytokine signaling can cause a variety of diseases, including allergies, autoimmune diseases, inflammation, and cancer. Most cytokines utilize the so-called Janus kinase-signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK-STAT pathway. This pathway is negatively regulated by various mechanisms including suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS proteins. SOCS proteins bind to JAK or cytokine receptors, thereby suppressing further signaling events. Especially, SOCS1 and SOCS3 are strong inhibitors of JAK, because these two contain kinase inhibitory region (KIR at the N-terminus. Studies using conditional knockout mice have shown that SOCS proteins are key physiological as well as pathological regulators of immune homeostasis. Recent studies have also demonstrated that SOCS1 and SOCS3 are important regulators of helper T cell differentiation and functions.

  12. Leptospira and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. F. Gonçalves-de-Albuquerque

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis is an important zoonosis and has a worldwide impact on public health. This paper will discuss both the role of immunogenic and pathogenic molecules during leptospirosis infection and possible new targets for immunotherapy against leptospira components. Leptospira, possess a wide variety of mechanisms that allow them to evade the host immune system and cause infection. Many molecules contribute to the ability of Leptospira to adhere, invade, and colonize. The recent sequencing of the Leptospira genome has increased our knowledge about this pathogen. Although the virulence factors, molecular targets, mechanisms of inflammation, and signaling pathways triggered by leptospiral antigens have been studied, some questions are still unanswered. Toll-like receptors (TLRs are the primary sensors of invading pathogens. TLRs recognize conserved microbial pattern molecules and activate signaling pathways that are pivotal to innate and adaptive immune responses. Recently, a new molecular target has emerged—the Na/K-ATPase—which may contribute to inflammatory and metabolic alteration in this syndrome. Na/K-ATPase is a target for specific fatty acids of host origin and for bacterial components such as the glycolipoprotein fraction (GLP that may lead to inflammasome activation. We propose that in addition to TLRs, Na/K-ATPase may play a role in the innate response to leptospirosis infection.

  13. Imaging infection and inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    imaging acute infection on the intensive therapy unit or to reduce radiation dose in the monitoring of a child with inflammatory bowel disease who had to suffer the indignity of a colonoscopy or a barium enema. We also look forward to newer techniques, certainly the use of immuno globulins, both pooled human and monoclonal antibodies directed either against leukocytes or a specific pathogen may prove useful. The new molecular medicine is starting to exploit our knowledge of the mechanisms of infection and inflammation. It may be possible to produce artificial peptides to localize at sites of infections and/or inflammation. Simpler techniques such as radio labelled antibiotics may be the answer. At present one such antibiotic, a quinilone labelled with Technetium-99 m (called infecton) in undergoing an international IAEA trial. A more complex approach will be the use of radio labelled drugs wrapped in 'stealth'liposomes to avoid liver uptake but deliver the pharmaceutical to the granulocyte in vivo. All are under development. We must however also deliver the best clinical service we can at present delivering accurate results with the lowest radiation dose and available when the patient needs it. As such Tc-99 m HMPAO labelled leukocytes and Gallium-67 are still probably the methods of choice in most situations thoung this may be tempered by local needs and factors

  14. Apoptosis and inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Haanen

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last few decades it has been recognized that cell death is not the consequence of accidental injury, but is the expression of a cell suicide programme. Kerr et al. (1972 introduced the term apoptosis. This form of cell death is under the influence of hormones, growth factors and cytokines, which depending upon the receptors present on the target cells, may activate a genetically controlled cell elimination process. During apoptosis the cell membrane remains intact and the cell breaks into apoptotic bodies, which are phagocytosed. Apoptosis, in contrast to necrosis, is not harmful to the host and does not induce any inflammatory reaction. The principal event that leads to inflammatory disease is cell damage, induced by chemical/physical injury, anoxia or starvation. Cell damage means leakage of cell contents into the adjacent tissues, resulting in the capillary transmigration of granulocytes to the injured tissue. The accumulation of neutrophils and release of enzymes and oxygen radicals enhances the inflammatory reaction. Until now there has been little research into the factors controlling the accumulation and the tissue load of granulocytes and their histotoxic products in inflammatory processes. Neutrophil apoptosis may represent an important event in the control of intlamtnation. It has been assumed that granulocytes disintegrate to apoptotic bodies before their fragments are removed by local macrophages. Removal of neutrophils from the inflammatory site without release of granule contents is of paramount importance for cessation of inflammation. In conclusion, apoptotic cell death plays an important role in inflammatory processes and in the resolution of inflammatory reactions. The facts known at present should stimulate further research into the role of neutrophil, eosinophil and macrophage apoptosis in inflammatory diseases.

  15. Alveolar inflammation in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, Martina; Worlitzsch, Dieter; Viglio, Simona;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In infected lungs of the cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, opportunistic pathogens and mutated cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR) contribute to chronic airway inflammation that is characterized by neutrophil/macrophage infiltration, cytokine release...

  16. Eosinophilic airway inflammation in COPD

    OpenAIRE

    Saha, Shironjit; Brightling, Christopher E.

    2006-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a common condition and a major cause of mortality. COPD is characterized by irreversible airflow obstruction. The physiological abnormalities observed in COPD are due to a combination of emphysema and obliteration of the small airways in association with airway inflammation. The predominant cells involved in this inflammatory response are CD8+ lymphocytes, neutrophils, and macrophages. Although eosinophilic airway inflammation is usually considered a f...

  17. Endogenous Receptor Agonists: Resolving Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Gerhard Bannenberg; Makoto Arita; Serhan, Charles N.

    2007-01-01

    Controlled resolution or the physiologic resolution of a well-orchestrated inflammatory response at the tissue level is essential to return to homeostasis. A comprehensive understanding of the cellular and molecular events that control the termination of acute inflammation is needed in molecular terms given the widely held view that aberrant inflammation underlies many common diseases. This review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of the role of arachidonic acid and ω-3 polyunsa...

  18. INFLAMMATION AND ACUTE PHASE RESPONSE

    OpenAIRE

    Farah Aziz Khan; Mohd Fareed Khan

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation caused by infection takes place by the cooperative cascade of cytokines and leukocytes. Tumor necrosis factor, interlukin-1, and interlukin-6 play important roles as proinflammatory cytokines to mediate local inflammation and activate other inflammatory cells e.g. neutrophils, monocytes, and macrophages. At least 15 different low molecular weight cytokine are secreted by activated leukocytes and are responsible for triggering acute phase response in the form of fever, leukocytosi...

  19. Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in the Culinary Ginger (Zingiber officinale): An Effective Mechanism for Down-Regulating Gene Expression in Tropical Monocots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tanya Renner; Jennifer Bragga; Heather E. Driscoll; Juliana Cho; Andrew O. Jackson; Chelsea D. Specht

    2009-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) has been shown to be effective for transient knockdown of gene expres-sion in plants to analyze the effects of specific genes in development and stress-related responses. VlGS is well established for studies of model systems and crops within the Solanaceae, Brassicaceae, Leguminaceae, and Poaceae, but only recently has been applied to plants residing outside these families. Here, we have demonstrated that barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) can infect two species within the Zingiberaceae, and that BSMV-VlGS can be applied to specifically down-regulate phytoene desaturase in the culinary ginger Zingiber officinale. These results suggest that extension of BSMV-VIGS to monocots other than cereals has the potential for directed genetic analyses of many important temperate and tropical crop species.

  20. CCR5 and CXCR3 are dispensable for liver infiltration, but CCR5 protects against virus-induced T-cell-mediated hepatic steatosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, P J; Orskov, C; Qvortrup, K;

    2007-01-01

    CCR5 and CXCR3 are important molecules in regulating the migration of activated lymphocytes. Thus, the majority of tissue-infiltrating T cells found in the context of autoimmune conditions and viral infections express CCR5 and CXCR3, and the principal chemokine ligands are expressed within inflamed...... tissues. Accordingly, intervention studies have pointed to nonredundant roles of these receptors in models of allograft rejection, viral infection, and autoimmunity. In spite of this, considerable controversy exists, with many studies failing to support a role for CCR5 or CXCR3 in disease pathogenesis....... One possible explanation is that different chemokine receptors may take over in the absence of any individual receptor, thus rendering individual receptors redundant. We have attempted to address this issue by analyzing CCR5(-/-), CXCR3(-/-), and CCR5/CXCR3(-/-) mice with regard to virus-induced liver...

  1. Diesel exposure suppresses natural killer cell function and resolution of eosinophil inflammation: a randomized controlled trial of exposure in allergic rhinitics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, Erica A; Noah, Terry L; Zhou, Haibo; Chehrazi, Claire; Robinette, Carole; Diaz-Sanchez, David; Müller, Loretta; Jaspers, Ilona

    2016-05-06

    Exposure to diesel exhaust (DE) is known to exacerbate allergic inflammation, including virus-induced eosinophil activation in laboratory animals. We have previously shown that in human volunteers with allergic rhinitis a short-term exposure to DE prior to infection with the live attenuated influenza virus (LAIV) increases markers of allergic inflammation in the nasal mucosa. Specifically, levels of eosinophilic cationic protein (ECP) were significantly enhanced in individuals exposed to DE prior to inoculation with LAIV and this effect was maintained for at least seven days. However, this previous study was limited in its scope of nasal immune endpoints and did not explore potential mechanisms mediating the prolonged exacerbation of allergic inflammation caused by exposure to DE prior to inoculation with LAIV. In this follow-up study, the methods were modified to expand experimental endpoints and explore the potential role of NK cells. The data presented here suggest DE prolongs viral-induced eosinophil activation, which was accompanied by decreased markers of NK cell recruitment and activation. Separate in vitro studies showed that exposure to DE particles decreases the ability of NK cells to kill eosinophils. Taken together, these follow-up studies suggest that DE-induced exacerbation of allergic inflammation in the context of viral infections may be mediated by decreased activity of NK cells and their ability to clear eosinophils.

  2. Role of Resistin in Inflammation and Inflammation-Related Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shanshan Pang; Yingying Le

    2006-01-01

    Resistin is a newly identified adipocyte secreted hormone belonging to a cysteine-rich protein family. It is expressed in white adipose tissues in rodents and has also been found in several other tissues in human. Insulin, glucose,many cytokines and anti-diabetic thiazolidinediones are regulators of resistin gene expression. Resistin was firstly proposed to be involved in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Recently, it was found to be relevant to inflammation and inflammation-related diseases like atherosclerosis and arthritis.

  3. Bioactive Egg Components and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine J. Andersen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is a normal acute response of the immune system to pathogens and tissue injury. However, chronic inflammation is known to play a significant role in the pathophysiology of numerous chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and cancer. Thus, the impact of dietary factors on inflammation may provide key insight into mitigating chronic disease risk. Eggs are recognized as a functional food that contain a variety of bioactive compounds that can influence pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways. Interestingly, the effects of egg consumption on inflammation varies across different populations, including those that are classified as healthy, overweight, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetic. The following review will discuss the pro- and anti-inflammatory properties of egg components, with a focus on egg phospholipids, cholesterol, the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin, and bioactive proteins. The effects of egg consumption of inflammation across human populations will additionally be presented. Together, these findings have implications for population-specific dietary recommendations and chronic disease risk.

  4. Distinct dictation of Japanese encephalitis virus-induced neuroinflammation and lethality via triggering TLR3 and TLR4 signal pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Woo Han

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Japanese encephalitis (JE is major emerging neurologic disease caused by JE virus. To date, the impact of TLR molecules on JE progression has not been addressed. Here, we determined whether each TLR modulates JE, using several TLR-deficient mouse strains (TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, TLR7, TLR9. Surprisingly, among the tested TLR-deficient mice there were contrasting results in TLR3(-/- and TLR4(-/- mice, i.e. TLR3(-/- mice were highly susceptible to JE, whereas TLR4(-/- mice showed enhanced resistance to JE. TLR3 ablation induced severe CNS inflammation characterized by early infiltration of inflammatory CD11b(+Ly-6Chigh monocytes along with profoundly increased viral burden, proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine expression as well as BBB permeability. In contrast, TLR4(-/- mice showed mild CNS inflammation manifested by reduced viral burden, leukocyte infiltration and proinflammatory cytokine expression. Interestingly, TLR4 ablation provided potent in vivo systemic type I IFN innate response, as well as ex vivo type I IFN production associated with strong induction of antiviral PRRs (RIG-I, MDA5, transcription factors (IRF-3, IRF-7, and IFN-dependent (PKR, Oas1, Mx and independent ISGs (ISG49, ISG54, ISG56 by alternative activation of IRF3 and NF-κB in myeloid-derived DCs and macrophages, as compared to TLR3(-/- myeloid-derived cells which were more permissive to viral replication through impaired type I IFN innate response. TLR4 ablation also appeared to mount an enhanced type I IFN innate and humoral, CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cell responses, which were mediated by altered immune cell populations (increased number of plasmacytoid DCs and NK cells, reduced CD11b(+Ly-6C(high monocytes and CD4(+Foxp3(+ Treg number in lymphoid tissue. Thus, potent type I IFN innate and adaptive immune responses in the absence of TLR4 were closely coupled with reduced JE lethality. Collectively, these results suggest that a balanced triggering of TLR signal array by viral components

  5. Points of control in inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Carl

    2002-12-01

    Inflammation is a complex set of interactions among soluble factors and cells that can arise in any tissue in response to traumatic, infectious, post-ischaemic, toxic or autoimmune injury. The process normally leads to recovery from infection and to healing, However, if targeted destruction and assisted repair are not properly phased, inflammation can lead to persistent tissue damage by leukocytes, lymphocytes or collagen. Inflammation may be considered in terms of its checkpoints, where binary or higher-order signals drive each commitment to escalate, go signals trigger stop signals, and molecules responsible for mediating the inflammatory response also suppress it, depending on timing and context. The non-inflammatory state does not arise passively from an absence of inflammatory stimuli; rather, maintenance of health requires the positive actions of specific gene products to suppress reactions to potentially inflammatory stimuli that do not warrant a full response.

  6. Granulomatous inflammation in Acanthamoeba sclerokeratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samrat Chatterjee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This report describes the histopathological findings in a patient with Acanthamoeba sclerokeratitis (ASK. A 58-year-old patient with ASK underwent enucleation and sections of the cornea and sclera were subjected to histopathology and immunohistochemistry with monoclonal mouse antihuman antibodies against T cell CD3 and B cell CD20 antigens. Hematoxylin and Eosin stained sections of the cornea revealed epithelial ulceration, Bowman′s membrane destruction, stromal vascularization, infiltration with lymphocytes, plasma cells, and granulomatous inflammation with multinucleated giant cells (MNGC. The areas of scleritis showed complete disruption of sclera collagen, necrosis and infiltration with neutrophils, macrophages, lymphocytes, and granulomatous inflammation with MNGC. No cyst or trophozoites of Acanthamoeba were seen in the cornea or sclera. Immunophenotyping revealed that the population of lymphocytes was predominantly of T cells. Granulomatous inflammation in ASK is probably responsible for the continuance and progression of the scleritis and management protocols should include immunosuppressive agents alongside amoebicidal drugs.

  7. Parkinson's Disease and Systemic Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Carina C.; Tarelli, Rodolfo

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral inflammation triggers exacerbation in the central brain's ongoing damage in several neurodegenerative diseases. Systemic inflammatory stimulus induce a general response known as sickness behaviour, indicating that a peripheral stimulus can induce the synthesis of cytokines in the brain. In Parkinson's disease (PD), inflammation was mainly associated with microglia activation that can underlie the neurodegeneration of neurons in the substantia nigra (SN). Peripheral inflammation can transform the “primed” microglia into an “active” state, which can trigger stronger responses dealing with neurodegenerative processes. Numerous evidences show that systemic inflammatory processes exacerbate ongoing neurodegeneration in PD patient and animal models. Anti-inflammatory treatment in PD patients exerts a neuroprotective effect. In the present paper, we analyse the effect of peripheral infections in the etiology and progression in PD patients and animal models, suggesting that these peripheral immune challenges can exacerbate the symptoms in the disease. PMID:21403862

  8. Borna disease virus induces acute fatal neurological disorders in neonatal gerbils without virus- and immune-mediated cell destructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borna disease virus (BDV) is a noncytolytic, neurotropic RNA virus that is known to cause neurological disturbances in various animal species. Our previous experiment demonstrated that neonate gerbils develop an acute fatal neurological disease following infection with BDV , Virology 282, 65-76). The study suggested that BDV directly causes functional damage of neuronal cells resulting in the lethal disorder in neonatal gerbils. To extend this finding, we examined whether BDV can induce neurological diseases in the absence of virus- and immune-mediated cell destruction, by using cyclosporine A (CsA)-treated neonatal gerbils. Although CsA completely suppressed specific antibody production and brain inflammation in the infected gerbil brains, the fatal neurological disorder was not inhibited by the treatment. Furthermore, we demonstrated that CsA treatment significantly decreased brain levels of cytokines, except interleukin (IL)-1β, in the infected gerbils. These results suggested that BDV replication, as well as brain cytokines, at least IL-1β, rapidly induces fatal disturbances in gerbil brain. We demonstrate here that BDV exhibits a unique neuropathogenesis in neonatal gerbil that may be pathologically and immunologically different from those in two other established rodent models, rats and mice. With this novel rodent model of virus infection it should be possible not only to examine acute neurological disturbances without severe neuroanatomical and immunopathological alterations but also to analyze molecular and cellular damage by virus replication in the central nervous system

  9. Quantitative Label-Free Phosphoproteomics Reveals Differentially Regulated Protein Phosphorylation Involved in West Nile Virus-Induced Host Inflammatory Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Sun, Jun; Ye, Jing; Ashraf, Usama; Chen, Zheng; Zhu, Bibo; He, Wen; Xu, Qiuping; Wei, Yanming; Chen, Huanchun; Fu, Zhen F; Liu, Rong; Cao, Shengbo

    2015-12-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) can cause neuro-invasive and febrile illness that may be fatal to humans. The production of inflammatory cytokines is key to mediating WNV-induced immunopathology in the central nervous system. Elucidating the host factors utilized by WNV for productive infection would provide valuable insights into the evasion strategies used by this virus. Although attempts have been made to determine these host factors, proteomic data depicting WNV-host protein interactions are limited. We applied liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for label-free, quantitative phosphoproteomics to systematically investigate the global phosphorylation events induced by WNV infection. Quantifiable changes to 1,657 phosphoproteins were found; of these, 626 were significantly upregulated and 227 were downregulated at 12 h postinfection. The phosphoproteomic data were subjected to gene ontology enrichment analysis, which returned the inflammation-related spliceosome, ErbB, mitogen-activated protein kinase, nuclear factor kappa B, and mechanistic target of rapamycin signaling pathways. We used short interfering RNAs to decrease the levels of glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta, bifunctional polynucleotide phosphatase/kinase, and retinoblastoma 1 and found that the activity of nuclear factor kappa B (p65) is significantly decreased in WNV-infected U251 cells, which in turn led to markedly reduced inflammatory cytokine production. Our results provide a better understanding of the host response to WNV infection and highlight multiple targets for the development of antiviral and anti-inflammatory therapies.

  10. Neonatal testicular cell transplantation restores murine spermatogenesis damaged in the course of herpes simplex virus-induced orchitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malolina, Ekaterina A; Kulibin, Andrey Yu; Kushch, Alla A

    2016-04-01

    Genital tract infection and inflammation may affect male fertility, causing germ and Sertoli cell loss. We determined if testicular cell transplantation is effective at repairing testicular injury induced by herpes simplex virus (HSV) orchitis. ROSA26 mice were used as donors and the recipients were C57BL/6 mice after HSV testicular inoculation; some of the recipients were treated with the antiviral drug acyclovir (ACV). ACV reduced the amount of HSV antigen in testes on Day 3 after transplantation and enhanced the efficacy of transplantation at Day 30. In recipient testes, donor Sertoli cells formed new seminiferous tubules; significantly more new tubules were observed in the testes of ACV-treated mice compared with mice not treated with ACV (17.8% vs 3.6%). Over half (50.4%) of new tubules in ACV-treated testes contained germ cells and round spermatids were detected in 14.2% of new tubules compared with 15.9% and 5.3% in testes not treated with ACV, respectively. At Day 150 the seminiferous epithelium was completely recovered in some donor tubules and elongated spermatids were observed inside it. Thus, our findings reveal the effectiveness of the combination of antiviral therapy with neonatal testis-cell transplantation for the restoration of spermatogenesis damaged by viral infection.

  11. Platelets in inflammation and infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenne, Craig N; Kubes, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Although platelets are traditionally recognized for their central role in hemostasis, many lines of research clearly demonstrate these rather ubiquitous blood components are potent immune modulators and effectors. Platelets have been shown to directly recognize, sequester and kill pathogens, to activated and recruit leukocytes to sites of infection and inflammation, and to modulate leukocyte behavior, enhancing their ability to phagocytose and kill pathogens and inducing unique effector functions, such as the production of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs). This multifaceted response to infection and inflammation is due, in part, to the huge array of soluble mediators and cell surface molecules expressed by platelets. From their earliest origins as primordial hemocytes in invertebrates to their current form as megakaryocyte-derived cytoplasts, platelets have evolved to be one of the key regulators of host intravascular immunity and inflammation. In this review, we present the diverse roles platelets play in immunity and inflammation associated with autoimmune diseases and infection. Additionally, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of platelet behavior made possible through the use of advanced imaging techniques that allow us to visualize platelets and their interactions, in real-time, within the intact blood vessels of a living host.

  12. Purinergic Receptors in Ocular Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Guzman-Aranguez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is a complex process that implies the interaction between cells and molecular mediators, which, when not properly “tuned,” can lead to disease. When inflammation affects the eye, it can produce severe disorders affecting the superficial and internal parts of the visual organ. The nucleoside adenosine and nucleotides including adenine mononucleotides like ADP and ATP and dinucleotides such as P1,P4-diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A, and P1,P5-diadenosine pentaphosphate (Ap5A are present in different ocular locations and therefore they may contribute/modulate inflammatory processes. Adenosine receptors, in particular A2A adenosine receptors, present anti-inflammatory action in acute and chronic retinal inflammation. Regarding the A3 receptor, selective agonists like N6-(3-iodobenzyl-5′-N-methylcarboxamidoadenosine (CF101 have been used for the treatment of inflammatory ophthalmic diseases such as dry eye and uveoretinitis. Sideways, diverse stimuli (sensory stimulation, large intraocular pressure increases can produce a release of ATP from ocular sensory innervation or after injury to ocular tissues. Then, ATP will activate purinergic P2 receptors present in sensory nerve endings, the iris, the ciliary body, or other tissues surrounding the anterior chamber of the eye to produce uveitis/endophthalmitis. In summary, adenosine and nucleotides can activate receptors in ocular structures susceptible to suffer from inflammatory processes. This involvement suggests the possible use of purinergic agonists and antagonists as therapeutic targets for ocular inflammation.

  13. Preeclampsia, Hypoxia, Thrombosis, and Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Shamshirsaz, Amir A.; Michael Paidas; Graciela Krikun

    2011-01-01

    Reductions in uteroplacental flow initiate a cascade of molecular effects leading to hypoxia, thrombosis, inflammation, and endothelial cell dysfunction resulting in untoward pregnancy outcomes. In this review, we detail these effects and their relationship to preeclampsia (PE) and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR).

  14. Genetic models for CNS inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T; Wekerle, H; Antel, J

    2001-01-01

    The use of transgenic technology to over-express or prevent expression of genes encoding molecules related to inflammation has allowed direct examination of their role in experimental disease. This article reviews transgenic and knockout models of CNS demyelinating disease, focusing primarily on ...

  15. P-glycoprotein activity in the blood-brain barrier is affected by virus-induced neuroinflammation and antipsychotic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doorduin, Janine; de Vries, Erik F J; Dierckx, Rudi A; Klein, Hans C

    2014-10-01

    A large percentage of schizophrenic patients respond poorly to antipsychotic treatment. This could be explained by inefficient drug transport across the blood-brain barrier due to P-glycoprotein mediated efflux. P-glycoprotein activity and expression in the blood-brain barrier can be affected by inflammation and pharmacotherapy. We therefore investigated the effect of herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) induced neuroinflammation and antipsychotic treatment on P-glycoprotein activity. Rats were inoculated with HSV-1 or PBS (control) on day 0 and treated with saline, clozapine or risperidone from day 0 up until day 4 post-inoculation. Positron emission tomography with the P-glycoprotein substrate [11C]verapamil was used to assess P-glycoprotein activity at day 6 post-inoculation. Disease symptoms in HSV-1 inoculated rats increased over time and were not significantly affected by treatment. The volume of distribution (VT) of [11C]verapamil was significantly lower (10-22%) in HSV-1 inoculated rats than in control rats. In addition, antipsychotic treatment significantly affected the VT of [11C]verapamil in all brain regions, although this effect was drug dependent. In fact, VT of [11C]verapamil was significantly increased (22-39%) in risperidone treated rats in most brain regions when compared to clozapine treated rats and in midbrain when compared to saline treated rats. No interaction between HSV-1 inoculation and antipsychotic treatment on VT of [11C]verapamil was found. In this study we demonstrated that HSV-1 induced neuroinflammation increased and risperidone treatment decreased P-glycoprotein activity. This finding is of importance for the understanding of treatment resistance in schizophrenia, and warrants further investigation of the underlying mechanism and the importance in clinical practice.

  16. Role of hepatitis C virus induced osteopontin in epithelial to mesenchymal transition, migration and invasion of hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jawed Iqbal

    Full Text Available Osteopontin (OPN is a secreted phosphoprotein which has been linked to tumor progression and metastasis in a variety of cancers including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Previous studies have shown that OPN is upregulated during liver injury and inflammation. However, the role of OPN in hepatitis C virus (HCV-induced liver disease pathogenesis is not known. In this study, we determined the induction of OPN, and then investigated the effect of secreted forms of OPN in epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT, migration and invasion of hepatocytes. We show the induction of OPN mRNA and protein expression by HCV-infection. Our results also demonstrate the processing of precursor OPN (75 kDa into 55 kDa, 42 kDa and 36 kDa forms of OPN in HCV-infected cells. Furthermore, we show the binding of secreted OPN to integrin αVβ3 and CD44 at the cell surface, leading to the activation of downstream cellular kinases such as focal adhesion kinase (FAK, Src, and Akt. Importantly, our results show the reduced expression of epithelial marker (E-cadherin and induction of mesenchymal marker (N-cadherin in HCV-infected cells. We also show the migration and invasion of HCV-infected cells using wound healing assay and matrigel coated Boyden chamber. In addition, we demonstrate the activation of above EMT markers, and the critical players involved in OPN-mediated cell signaling cascade using primary human hepatocytes infected with Japanese fulminant hepatitis (JFH-1 HCV. Taken together, these studies suggest a potential role of OPN in inducing chronic liver disease and HCC associated with chronic HCV infection.

  17. Role of hepatitis C virus induced osteopontin in epithelial to mesenchymal transition, migration and invasion of hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Jawed; McRae, Steven; Mai, Thi; Banaudha, Krishna; Sarkar-Dutta, Mehuli; Waris, Gulam

    2014-01-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a secreted phosphoprotein which has been linked to tumor progression and metastasis in a variety of cancers including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Previous studies have shown that OPN is upregulated during liver injury and inflammation. However, the role of OPN in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-induced liver disease pathogenesis is not known. In this study, we determined the induction of OPN, and then investigated the effect of secreted forms of OPN in epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), migration and invasion of hepatocytes. We show the induction of OPN mRNA and protein expression by HCV-infection. Our results also demonstrate the processing of precursor OPN (75 kDa) into 55 kDa, 42 kDa and 36 kDa forms of OPN in HCV-infected cells. Furthermore, we show the binding of secreted OPN to integrin αVβ3 and CD44 at the cell surface, leading to the activation of downstream cellular kinases such as focal adhesion kinase (FAK), Src, and Akt. Importantly, our results show the reduced expression of epithelial marker (E-cadherin) and induction of mesenchymal marker (N-cadherin) in HCV-infected cells. We also show the migration and invasion of HCV-infected cells using wound healing assay and matrigel coated Boyden chamber. In addition, we demonstrate the activation of above EMT markers, and the critical players involved in OPN-mediated cell signaling cascade using primary human hepatocytes infected with Japanese fulminant hepatitis (JFH)-1 HCV. Taken together, these studies suggest a potential role of OPN in inducing chronic liver disease and HCC associated with chronic HCV infection. PMID:24498111

  18. Opposing effects of CXCR3 and CCR5 deficiency on CD8+ T cell-mediated inflammation in the central nervous system of virus-infected mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lemos, Carina; Christensen, Jeanette Erbo; Nansen, Anneline;

    2005-01-01

    T cells play a key role in the control of viral infection in the CNS but may also contribute to immune-mediated cell damage. To study the redundancy of the chemokine receptors CXCR3 and CCR5 in regulating virus-induced CD8+ T cell-mediated inflammation in the brain, CXCR3/CCR5 double-deficient mice...... and therefore protect mice against the otherwise fatal CD8+ T cell-mediated immune attack. Contrary to expectations, the accumulation of mononuclear cells in cerebrospinal fluid was only slightly delayed compared with mice with normal expression of both receptors. Even more surprising, CXCR3/CCR5 double......-deficient mice were more susceptible to intracerebral infection than CXCR3-deficient mice. Analysis of effector T cell generation revealed an accelerated antiviral CD8+ T cell response in CXCR3/CCR5 double-deficient mice. Furthermore, while the accumulation of CD8+ T cells in the neural parenchyma...

  19. Aetiological factors behind adipose tissue inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Scholten, Bernt J; Andresen, Erik N; Sørensen, Thorkild I A;

    2013-01-01

    Despite extensive research into the biological mechanisms behind obesity-related inflammation, knowledge of environmental and genetic factors triggering such mechanisms is limited. In the present narrative review we present potential determinants of adipose tissue inflammation and suggest ways...

  20. Prenatal Inflammation Linked to Autism Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thursday, January 24, 2013 Prenatal inflammation linked to autism risk Maternal inflammation during early pregnancy may be related to an increased risk of autism in children, according to new findings supported by ...

  1. Virus-Induced Gene Silencing Using Tobacco Rattle Virus as a Tool to Study the Interaction between Nicotiana attenuata and Rhizophagus irregularis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Groten

    Full Text Available Most land plants live in a symbiotic association with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF that belong to the phylum Glomeromycota. Although a number of plant genes involved in the plant-AMF interactions have been identified by analyzing mutants, the ability to rapidly manipulate gene expression to study the potential functions of new candidate genes remains unrealized. We analyzed changes in gene expression of wild tobacco roots (Nicotiana attenuata after infection with mycorrhizal fungi (Rhizophagus irregularis by serial analysis of gene expression (SuperSAGE combined with next generation sequencing, and established a virus-induced gene-silencing protocol to study the function of candidate genes in the interaction. From 92,434 SuperSAGE Tag sequences, 32,808 (35% matched with our in-house Nicotiana attenuata transcriptome database and 3,698 (4% matched to Rhizophagus genes. In total, 11,194 Tags showed a significant change in expression (p2-fold change after infection. When comparing the functions of highly up-regulated annotated Tags in this study with those of two previous large-scale gene expression studies, 18 gene functions were found to be up-regulated in all three studies mainly playing roles related to phytohormone metabolism, catabolism and defense. To validate the function of identified candidate genes, we used the technique of virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS to silence the expression of three putative N. attenuata genes: germin-like protein, indole-3-acetic acid-amido synthetase GH3.9 and, as a proof-of-principle, calcium and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK. The silencing of the three plant genes in roots was successful, but only CCaMK silencing had a significant effect on the interaction with R. irregularis. Interestingly, when a highly activated inoculum was used for plant inoculation, the effect of CCaMK silencing on fungal colonization was masked, probably due to trans-complementation. This study demonstrates that

  2. Virus-Induced Gene Silencing Using Tobacco Rattle Virus as a Tool to Study the Interaction between Nicotiana attenuata and Rhizophagus irregularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groten, Karin; Pahari, Nabin T; Xu, Shuqing; Miloradovic van Doorn, Maja; Baldwin, Ian T

    2015-01-01

    Most land plants live in a symbiotic association with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) that belong to the phylum Glomeromycota. Although a number of plant genes involved in the plant-AMF interactions have been identified by analyzing mutants, the ability to rapidly manipulate gene expression to study the potential functions of new candidate genes remains unrealized. We analyzed changes in gene expression of wild tobacco roots (Nicotiana attenuata) after infection with mycorrhizal fungi (Rhizophagus irregularis) by serial analysis of gene expression (SuperSAGE) combined with next generation sequencing, and established a virus-induced gene-silencing protocol to study the function of candidate genes in the interaction. From 92,434 SuperSAGE Tag sequences, 32,808 (35%) matched with our in-house Nicotiana attenuata transcriptome database and 3,698 (4%) matched to Rhizophagus genes. In total, 11,194 Tags showed a significant change in expression (p2-fold change) after infection. When comparing the functions of highly up-regulated annotated Tags in this study with those of two previous large-scale gene expression studies, 18 gene functions were found to be up-regulated in all three studies mainly playing roles related to phytohormone metabolism, catabolism and defense. To validate the function of identified candidate genes, we used the technique of virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) to silence the expression of three putative N. attenuata genes: germin-like protein, indole-3-acetic acid-amido synthetase GH3.9 and, as a proof-of-principle, calcium and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK). The silencing of the three plant genes in roots was successful, but only CCaMK silencing had a significant effect on the interaction with R. irregularis. Interestingly, when a highly activated inoculum was used for plant inoculation, the effect of CCaMK silencing on fungal colonization was masked, probably due to trans-complementation. This study demonstrates that large

  3. Eosinophilic inflammation in allergic asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Souza Possa

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophils are circulating granulocytes involved in pathogenesis of asthma. A cascade of processes directed by Th2 cytokine producing T-cells influence the recruitment of eosinophils into the lungs. Furthermore, multiple elements including interleukin (IL-5, IL-13, chemoattractants such as eotaxin, Clara cells, and CC chemokine receptor (CCR3 are already directly involved in recruiting eosinophils to the lung during allergic inflammation. Once recruited, eosinophils participate in the modulation of immune response, induction of airway hyperresponsiveness and remodeling, characteristic features of asthma. Various types of promising treatments for reducing asthmatic response are related to reduction in eosinophil counts both in human and experimental models of pulmonary allergic inflammation, showing that the recruitment of these cells really plays an important role in the pathophysiology of allergic diseases such asthma.

  4. Obesity, inflammation, and liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Beicheng; Karin, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Obesity has become a universal and major public health problem with increasing prevalence in both adults and children in the 21st century, even in developing countries. Extensive epidemiological studies reveal a strong link between obesity and development and progression of various types of cancers. The connection between obesity and liver cancer is particularly strong and obesity often results in liver diseases such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and the more severe non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). NASH is characterized by fatty liver inflammation and is believed to cause fibrosis and cirrhosis. The latter is a known liver cancer risk factor. In fact due to its much higher prevalence obesity may be a more substantial contributor to overall hepatocellular carcinoma burden than infection with hepatitis viruses. Here we review and discuss recent advances in elucidation of cellular and molecular alterations and signaling pathways associated with obesity and liver inflammation and their contribution to hepatocarcinogenesis.

  5. Eosinophilic inflammation in allergic asthma

    OpenAIRE

    IolandaFátima Lopes CalvoTibério; CarlaMáximoPrado

    2013-01-01

    Eosinophils are circulating granulocytes involved in pathogenesis of asthma. A cascade of processes directed by Th2 cytokine producing T-cells influence the recruitment of eosinophils into the lungs. Furthermore, multiple elements including interleukin (IL)-5, IL-13, chemoattractants such as eotaxin, Clara cells, and CC chemokine receptor (CCR)3 are already directly involved in recruiting eosinophils to the lung during allergic inflammation. Once recruited, eosinophils participate in the modu...

  6. Eosinophilic Inflammation in Allergic Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Possa, Samantha S.; Leick, Edna A; Carla M. Prado; Martins, Mílton A.; Tibério, Iolanda F. L. C.

    2013-01-01

    Eosinophils are circulating granulocytes involved in pathogenesis of asthma. A cascade of processes directed by Th2 cytokine producing T-cells influence the recruitment of eosinophils into the lungs. Furthermore, multiple elements including interleukin (IL)-5, IL-13, chemoattractants such as eotaxin, Clara cells, and CC chemokine receptor (CCR)3 are already directly involved in recruiting eosinophils to the lung during allergic inflammation. Once recruited, eosinophils participate in the modu...

  7. Viral infection, inflammation and schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Kneeland, Rachel E.; Fatemi, S. Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder with genetic and environmental etiologies. Prenatal viral/bacterial infections and inflammation play major roles in the genesis of schizophrenia. In this review, we describe a viral model of schizophrenia tested in mice whereby the offspring of mice prenatally infected with influenza at E7, E9, E16, and E18 show significant gene, protein, and brain structural abnormalities postnatally. Similarly, we describe data on rodents exposed to bact...

  8. Resolution of Inflammation in Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Levy, Bruce D.; Vachier, Isabelle; Serhan, Charles

    2012-01-01

    The resolution of inflammation in healthy airways is an active process with specialized mediators and cellular mechanisms that are enlisted to restore tissue homeostasis. In this article, we will focus on recent discoveries of natural mediators derived from essential fatty acids, including omega-3 fatty acids, that have anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving actions. These specialized pro-resolving mediators serve as agonists at specific receptors. Asthma is a disease of chronic, non-resolving i...

  9. Surfactant and allergic airway inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Carla; Hohlfeld, Jens M

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a complex mixture of unique proteins and lipids that covers the airway lumen. Surfactant prevents alveolar collapse and maintains airway patency by reducing surface tension at the air-liquid interface. Furthermore, it provides a defence against antigen uptake by binding foreign particles and enhancing cellular immune responses. Allergic asthma is associated with chronic airway inflammation and presents with episodes of airway narrowing. The pulmonary inflammation and bronchoconstriction can be triggered by exposure to allergens or pathogens present in the inhaled air. Pulmonary surfactant has the potential to interact with various immune cells which orchestrate allergen- or pathogen-driven episodes of airway inflammation. The complex nature of surfactant allows multiple sites of interaction, but also makes it susceptible to external alterations, which potentially impair its function. This duality of modulating airway physiology and immunology during inflammatory conditions, while at the same time being prone to alterations accompanied by restricted function, has stimulated numerous studies in recent decades, which are reviewed in this article. PMID:23896983

  10. Inflammation in coronary artery diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jian-jun

    2011-01-01

    The concept that atherosclerosis is an inflammation has been increasingly recognized,and subsequently resulted in great interest in revealing the inflammatory nature of the atherosclerotic process.More recently,a large body of evidence has supported the idea that inflammatory mechanisms play a pivotal role throughout all phases of atherogenesis,from endothelial dysfunction and the formation of fatty streaks to plaque destabilization and the acute coronary events due to vulnerable plaque rupture.Indeed,although triggers and pathways of inflammation are probably multiple and vary in different clinical entities of atherosclerotic disorders,an imbalance between anti-inflammatory mechanisms and pro-inflammatory factors will result in an atherosclerotic progression.Vascular endothelial dysfunction and lipoprotein retention into the arterial intima have been reported as the earliest events in atherogenesis with which inflammation is linked.Inflammatory has also been extended to the disorders of coronary microvasculature,and associated with special subsets of coronary artery disease such as silent myocardial ischemia,myocardial ischemia-reperfusion,cardiac syndrome X,variant angina,coronary artery ectasia,coronary calcification and in-stent restenosis.Inflammatory biomarkers,originally studied to better understand the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis,have generated increasing interest among researches and clinicians.The identification of inflammatory biomarkers and cellular/molecular pathways in atherosclerotic disease represent important goals in cardiovascular disease research,in particular with respect of the development of therapeutic strategies to prevent or reverse atherosclerotic diseases.

  11. INFLAMMATION AND ACUTE PHASE RESPONSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah Aziz Khan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation caused by infection takes place by the cooperative cascade of cytokines and leukocytes. Tumor necrosis factor, interlukin-1, and interlukin-6 play important roles as proinflammatory cytokines to mediate local inflammation and activate other inflammatory cells e.g. neutrophils, monocytes, and macrophages. At least 15 different low molecular weight cytokine are secreted by activated leukocytes and are responsible for triggering acute phase response in the form of fever, leukocytosis, increased secretion of adreno corticotropic hormones, and production of acute phase proteins. Acute phase proteins are produced in liver under the influence of cytokines, which through blood stream passes to the site of inflammation and kill the pathogens by opsonization and activating complement pathways. The changes in the concentrations of positive acute-phase proteins and negative acute-phase proteins are due to the changes in their production by liver. Three of the best known acute phase proteins are C-reactive protein, serum anyloid A, and haptoglobin. Some disease states are casually related to acute phase proteins. C-reactive protein mediated compliment activation has a key role in some forms of tissue alteration such as cardiac infarction. Elevated S amyloid A levels are seen in chronic arthritis and tuberculosis. Other acute phase proteins show more moderate rise, usually less than fivefold.

  12. A New Mechanism of Vitamin C Effects on A/FM/1/47(H1N1 Virus-Induced Pneumonia in Restraint-Stressed Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Cai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that vitamin C could protect against influenza infection, but little is known about the mechanisms. This study aimed to investigate the influence and possible mechanisms of vitamin C on pneumonia induced by influenza virus in stressed mice. Results showed that restraint stress significantly increased the mortality and the severity of pneumonia in mice caused by A/FM/1/47(H1N1 virus infection, which was attenuated by oral administration of vitamin C (125 and 250 mg/kg. Moreover, vitamin C administration significantly decreased expression of susceptibility genes, including mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS and interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3, and increased expression of NF-κB. These work in conjunction to induce type I interferons (IFNs and elicit innate antiviral response as key factors in RIG-I-mediated signal transduction pathway. The above effects of vitamin C were further found to relate with inhibition of excess CORT synthesis by regulating steroid hydroxylating enzymes in adrenal gland. In conclusion, the protective effects of vitamin C on influenza virus-caused pneumonia might be related to its inhibition of CORT synthesis, which reduces the susceptibility to influenza viral infection in restraint-stressed mice. These findings provide a new mechanism for the effects of vitamin C on influenza virus-induced pneumonia in restraint-stressed mice.

  13. Tobacco mosaic virus 126-kDa protein increases the susceptibility of Nicotiana tabacum to other viruses and its dosage affects virus-induced gene silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, Phillip A; Palanichelvam, Karuppaiah; Bhat, Sumana; Nelson, Richard S

    2008-12-01

    The Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) 126-kDa protein is a suppressor of RNA silencing previously shown to delay the silencing of transgenes in Nicotiana tabacum and N. benthamiana. Here, we demonstrate that expression of a 126-kDa protein-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion (126-GFP) in N. tabacum increases susceptibility to a broad assortment of viruses, including Alfalfa mosaic virus, Brome mosaic virus, Tobacco rattle virus (TRV), and Potato virus X. Given its ability to enhance TRV infection in tobacco, we tested the effect of 126-GFP expression on TRV-mediated virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) and demonstrate that this protein can enhance silencing phenotypes. To explain these results, we examined the poorly understood effect of suppressor dosage on the VIGS response and demonstrated that enhanced VIGS corresponds to the presence of low levels of suppressor protein. A mutant version of the 126-kDa protein, inhibited in its ability to suppress silencing, had a minimal effect on VIGS, suggesting that the suppressor activity of the 126-kDa protein is indeed responsible for the observed dosage effects. These findings illustrate the sensitivity of host plants to relatively small changes in suppressor dosage and have implications for those interested in enhancing silencing phenotypes in tobacco and other species through VIGS. PMID:18986250

  14. Antibodies to P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 block dendritic cell-mediated enterovirus 71 transmission and prevent virus-induced cells death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiao-Xin; Li, Chuan; Xiong, Si-Dong; Huang, Zhong; Wang, Jian-Hua; Wang, Hai-Bo

    2015-01-01

    P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) has been proved to serve as the functional receptor for enterovirus 71 (EV71). We found the abundant expression of PSGL-1 on monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs). However, we have previously demonstrated that MDDCs did not support efficient replication of EV71. Dendritic cells (DCs) have been described to be subverted by various viruses including EV71 for viral dissemination, we thus explore the potential contribution of PSGL-1 on DC-mediated EV71 transmission. We found that the cell-surface-expressing PSGL-1 on MDDCs mediated EV71 binding, and intriguingly, these loaded-viruses on MDDCs could be transferred to encountered target cells; Prior-treatment with PSGL-1 antibodies or interference with PSGL-1 expression diminished MDDC-mediated EV71 transfer and rescued virus-induced cell death. Our data uncover a novel role of PSGL-1 in DC-mediated EV71 spread, and provide an insight into blocking primary EV71 infection.

  15. Development of tobacco ringspot virus-based vectors for foreign gene expression and virus-induced gene silencing in a variety of plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fumei; Lim, Seungmo; Igori, Davaajargal; Yoo, Ran Hee; Kwon, Suk-Yoon; Moon, Jae Sun

    2016-05-01

    We report here the development of tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV)-based vectors for the transient expression of foreign genes and for the analysis of endogenous gene function in plants using virus-induced gene silencing. The jellyfish green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene was inserted between the TRSV movement protein (MP) and coat protein (CP) regions, resulting in high in-frame expression of the RNA2-encoded viral polyprotein. GFP was released from the polyprotein via an N-terminal homologous MP-CP cleavage site and a C-terminal foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) 2 A catalytic peptide in Nicotiana benthamiana. The VIGS target gene was introduced in the sense and antisense orientations into a SnaBI site, which was created by mutating the sequence following the CP stop codon. VIGS of phytoene desaturase (PDS) in N. benthamiana, Arabidopsis ecotype Col-0, cucurbits and legumes led to obvious photo-bleaching phenotypes. A significant reduction in PDS mRNA levels in silenced plants was confirmed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. PMID:26950504

  16. Virus-induced gene silencing of the RPC5-like subunit of RNA polymerase III caused pleiotropic effects in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemchinov, Lev G; Boutanaev, Alexander M; Postnikova, Olga A

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, RNA polymerase III is highly conserved and transcribes housekeeping genes such as ribosomal 5S rRNA, tRNA and other small RNAs. The RPC5-like subunit is one of the 17 subunits forming RNAPIII and its exact functional roles in the transcription are poorly understood. In this work, we report that virus-induced gene silencing of transcripts encoding a putative RPC5-like subunit of the RNA Polymerase III in a model species Nicotiana benthamiana had pleiotropic effects, including but not limited to severe dwarfing appearance, chlorosis, nearly complete reduction of internodes and abnormal leaf shape. Using transcriptomic analysis, we identified genes and pathways affected by RPC5 silencing and thus presumably related to the cellular roles of the subunit as well as to the downstream cascade of reactions in response to partial loss of RNA Polymerase III function. Our results suggest that silencing of the RPC5L in N. benthamiana disrupted not only functions commonly associated with the core RNA Polymerase III transcripts, but also more diverse cellular processes, including responses to stress. We believe this is the first demonstration that activity of the RPC5 subunit is critical for proper functionality of RNA Polymerase III and normal plant development. PMID:27282827

  17. Characterization of the Rana grylio virus 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and its novel role in suppressing virus-induced cytopathic effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD) isoenzymes play a key role in cellular steroid hormone synthesis. Here, a 3β-HSD gene homolog was cloned from Rana grylio virus (RGV), a member of family Iridoviridae. RGV 3β-HSD gene has 1068 bp, encoding a 355 aa predicted protein. Transcription analyses showed that RGV 3β-HSD gene was transcribed immediate-early during infection from an initiation site 19 nucleotides upstream of the translation start site. Confocal microscopy revealed that the 3β-HSD-EGFP fusion protein was exclusively colocalized with the mitochondria marker (pDsRed2-Mito) in EPC cells. Upon morphological observation and MTT assay, it was revealed that overexpression of RGV 3β-HSD in EPC cells could apparently suppress RGV-induced cytopathic effect (CPE). The present studies indicate that the RGV immediate-early 3β-HSD gene encodes a mitochondria-localized protein, which has a novel role in suppressing virus-induced CPE. All these suggest that RGV 3β-HSD might be a protein involved in host-virus interaction

  18. Aquaporin-mediated long-distance polyphosphate translocation directed towards the host in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis: application of virus-induced gene silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Yusuke; Hijikata, Nowaki; Ohtomo, Ryo; Handa, Yoshihiro; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Saito, Katsuharu; Masuta, Chikara; Ezawa, Tatsuhiro

    2016-09-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi translocate polyphosphate through hyphae over a long distance to deliver to the host. More than three decades ago, suppression of host transpiration was found to decelerate phosphate delivery of the fungal symbiont, leading us to hypothesize that transpiration provides a primary driving force for polyphosphate translocation, probably via creating hyphal water flow in which fungal aquaporin(s) may be involved. The impact of transpiration suppression on polyphosphate translocation through hyphae of Rhizophagus clarus was evaluated. An aquaporin gene expressed in intraradical mycelia was characterized and knocked down by virus-induced gene silencing to investigate the involvement of the gene in polyphosphate translocation. Rhizophagus clarus aquaporin 3 (RcAQP3) that was most highly expressed in intraradical mycelia encodes an aquaglyceroporin responsible for water transport across the plasma membrane. Knockdown of RcAQP3 as well as the suppression of host transpiration decelerated polyphosphate translocation in proportion to the levels of knockdown and suppression, respectively. These results provide the first insight into the mechanism underlying long-distance polyphosphate translocation in mycorrhizal associations at the molecular level, in which host transpiration and the fungal aquaporin play key roles. A hypothetical model of the translocation is proposed for further elucidation of the mechanism. PMID:27136716

  19. Utilizing virus-induced gene silencing for the functional characterization of maize genes during infection with the fungal pathogen Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linde, Karina; Doehlemann, Gunther

    2013-01-01

    While in dicotyledonous plants virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is well established to study plant-pathogen interaction, in monocots only few examples of efficient VIGS have been reported so far. One of the available systems is based on the brome mosaic virus (BMV) which allows gene silencing in different cereals including barley (Hordeum vulgare), wheat (Triticum aestivum), and maize (Zea mays).Infection of maize plants by the corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis leads to the formation of large tumors on stem, leaves, and inflorescences. During this biotrophic interaction, plant defense responses are actively suppressed by the pathogen, and previous transcriptome analyses of infected maize plants showed comprehensive and stage-specific changes in host gene expression during disease progression.To identify maize genes that are functionally involved in the interaction with U. maydis, we adapted a VIGS system based on the Brome mosaic virus (BMV) to maize at conditions that allow successful U. maydis infection of BMV pre-infected maize plants. This setup enables quantification of VIGS and its impact on U. maydis infection using a quantitative real-time PCR (q(RT)-PCR)-based readout.

  20. Virus-induced gene silencing identifies Catharanthus roseus 7-deoxyloganic acid-7-hydroxylase, a step in iridoid and monoterpene indole alkaloid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Vonny; Yu, Fang; Altarejos, Joaquín; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2013-12-01

    Iridoids are a major group of biologically active molecules that are present in thousands of plant species, and one versatile iridoid, secologanin, is a precursor for the assembly of thousands of monoterpenoid indole alkaloids (MIAs) as well as a number of quinoline alkaloids. This study uses bioinformatics to screen large databases of annotated transcripts from various MIA-producing plant species to select candidate genes that may be involved in iridoid biosynthesis. Virus-induced gene silencing of the selected genes combined with metabolite analyses of silenced plants was then used to identify the 7-deoxyloganic acid 7-hydroxylase (CrDL7H) that is involved in the 3rd to last step in secologanin biosynthesis. Silencing of CrDL7H reduced secologanin levels by at least 70%, and increased the levels of 7-deoxyloganic acid to over 4 mg g(-1) fresh leaf weight compared to control plants in which this iridoid is not detected. Functional expression of this CrDL7H in yeast confirmed its biochemical activity, and substrate specificity studies showed its preference for 7-deoxyloganic acid over other closely related substrates. Together, these results suggest that hydroxylation precedes carboxy-O-methylation in the secologanin pathway in Catharanthus roseus. PMID:24103035

  1. Focal brain inflammation and autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theoharides, Theoharis C; Asadi, Shahrzad; Patel, Arti B

    2013-04-09

    Increasing evidence indicates that brain inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric diseases. Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are characterized by social and learning disabilities that affect as many as 1/80 children in the USA. There is still no definitive pathogenesis or reliable biomarkers for ASD, thus significantly curtailing the development of effective therapies. Many children with ASD regress at about age 3 years, often after a specific event such as reaction to vaccination, infection, stress or trauma implying some epigenetic triggers, and may constitute a distinct phenotype. ASD children respond disproportionally to stress and are also affected by food and skin allergies. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is secreted under stress and together with neurotensin (NT) stimulates mast cells and microglia resulting in focal brain inflammation and neurotoxicity. NT is significantly increased in serum of ASD children along with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). NT stimulates mast cell secretion of mtDNA that is misconstrued as an innate pathogen triggering an auto-inflammatory response. The phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene mutation, associated with the higher risk of ASD, which leads to hyper-active mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling that is crucial for cellular homeostasis. CRH, NT and environmental triggers could hyperstimulate the already activated mTOR, as well as stimulate mast cell and microglia activation and proliferation. The natural flavonoid luteolin inhibits mTOR, mast cells and microglia and could have a significant benefit in ASD.

  2. Factor V Leiden and Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Pujol, Silvia; Aras, Omer; Escolar, Gines

    2012-01-01

    Factor V Leiden, is a variant of human factor V (FV), also known as proaccelerin, which leads to a hypercoagulable state. Along these years, factor V Leiden (FVL) has been studied from the pathophysiologic point of view, and research has been focused on finding clinical approaches for the management of the FVL associated to a trombophilic state. Less attention has been paid about the possible role of FVL in inflammatory conditions known to be present in different disorders such as uremia, cirrhosis, liver transplantation, depression as well as sepsis, infection or, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Whether platelet FVL will increase the activation of coagulation and/or in which proportion is able to determine the final outcome in the previously mentioned inflammatory conditions is a subject that remains uncertain. This paper will review the association of FVL with inflammation. Specifically, it will analyze the important role of the endothelium and the contribution of other inflammatory components involved at both the immune and vascular levels. This paper will also try to emphasize the importance of being a FVL carrier in associations to diseases where a chronic inflammation occurs, and how this condition may be determinant in the progression and outcome of a specific clinic situation. PMID:22666576

  3. Obstructive sleep apnea and inflammation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNicholas, Walter T

    2012-02-01

    The pathogenesis of cardiovascular complications in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is not fully understood but is likely multifactorial in origin. Inflammatory processes play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, and circulating levels of several markers of inflammation have been associated with future cardiovascular risk. These include cell adhesion molecules such as intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and selectins, cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 6, chemokines such as interleukin 8, and C-reactive protein. There is also increasing evidence that inflammatory processes play an important role in the cardiovascular pathophysiology of OSAS and many of the inflammatory markers associated with cardiovascular risk have been reported as elevated in patients with OSAS. Furthermore, animal and cell culture studies have demonstrated preferential activation of inflammatory pathways by intermittent hypoxia, which is an integral feature of OSAS. The precise role of inflammation in the development of cardiovascular disease in OSAS requires further study, particularly the relationship with oxidative stress, metabolic dysfunction, and obesity.

  4. Growth hormone, inflammation and aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal M. Masternak

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutant animals characterized by extended longevity provide valuable tools to study the mechanisms of aging. Growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 constitute one of the well-established pathways involved in the regulation of aging and lifespan. Ames and Snell dwarf mice characterized by GH deficiency as well as growth hormone receptor/growth hormone binding protein knockout (GHRKO mice characterized by GH resistance live significantly longer than genetically normal animals. During normal aging of rodents and humans there is increased insulin resistance, disruption of metabolic activities and decline of the function of the immune system. All of these age related processes promote inflammatory activity, causing long term tissue damage and systemic chronic inflammation. However, studies of long living mutants and calorie restricted animals show decreased pro-inflammatory activity with increased levels of anti-inflammatory adipokines such as adiponectin. At the same time, these animals have improved insulin signaling and carbohydrate homeostasis that relate to alterations in the secretory profile of adipose tissue including increased production and release of anti-inflammatory adipokines. This suggests that reduced inflammation promoting healthy metabolism may represent one of the major mechanisms of extended longevity in long-lived mutant mice and likely also in the human.

  5. Metabolic syndrome, inflammation and atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Paoletti

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Rodolfo Paoletti1,2, Chiara Bolego1, Andrea Poli2, Andrea Cignarella1,31Department of Pharmacological Sciences, University of Milan, Italy; 2Nutrition Foundation of Italy (NFI, Milan; 3Department of Pharmacology and Anesthesiology, University of Padova, ItalyAbstract: The inflammatory component of atherogenesis has been increasingly recognized over the last decade. Inflammation participates in all stages of atherosclerosis, not only during initiation and during evolution of lesions, but also with precipitation of acute thrombotic complications. The metabolic syndrome is associated with increased risk for development of both cardiovascular disease and type-2 diabetes in humans. Central obesity and insulin resistance are thought to represent common underlying factors of the syndrome, which features a chronic low-grade inflammatory state. Diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome occurs using defined threshold values for waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting glucose and dyslipidemia. The metabolic syndrome appears to affect a significant proportion of the population. Therapeutic approaches that reduce the levels of proinflammatory biomarkers and address traditional risk factors are particularly important in preventing cardiovascular disease and, potentially, diabetes. The primary management of metabolic syndrome involves healthy lifestyle promotion through moderate calorie restriction, moderate increase in physical activity and change in dietary composition. Treatment of individual components aims to control atherogenic dyslipidemia using fibrates and statins, elevated blood pressure, and hyperglycemia. While no single treatment for the metabolic syndrome as a whole yet exists, emerging therapies offer potential as future therapeutic approaches.Keywords: metabolic syndrome, systemic inflammation, coronary artery disease

  6. Factor V Leiden and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Perez-Pujol

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Factor V Leiden, is a variant of human factor V (FV, also known as proaccelerin, which leads to a hypercoagulable state. Along these years, factor V Leiden (FVL has been studied from the pathophysiologic point of view, and research has been focused on finding clinical approaches for the management of the FVL associated to a trombophilic state. Less attention has been paid about the possible role of FVL in inflammatory conditions known to be present in different disorders such as uremia, cirrhosis, liver transplantation, depression as well as sepsis, infection or, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Whether platelet FVL will increase the activation of coagulation and/or in which proportion is able to determine the final outcome in the previously mentioned inflammatory conditions is a subject that remains uncertain. This paper will review the association of FVL with inflammation. Specifically, it will analyze the important role of the endothelium and the contribution of other inflammatory components involved at both the immune and vascular levels. This paper will also try to emphasize the importance of being a FVL carrier in associations to diseases where a chronic inflammation occurs, and how this condition may be determinant in the progression and outcome of a specific clinic situation.

  7. Growth of transplantable melanoma and leukaemia and prevention of virus-induced leukaemia in long lived radiation chimeras constructed with unmanipulated bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haemopoietic radiation chimeras across the H-2 barrier (BALB/c → C57B1/6; H-2sup(d) → H-2sup(b) chimeras and vice versa) have been studied for their capacity to suppress the growth, or to reject, transplantable B16 melanotic melanoma and radiation leukaemia virus-induced, transplantable leukaemia. Also, radiation leukaemia virus (RadLV) obtained from the thymus of leukaemic C57B1/6 mice was injected i.p. into established chimeras (H-2sup(d) → H-2sup(b)). As expected, long lived, graft versus host disease free allogeneic chimeras constructed with intact bone marrow were unable to reject the tumours both when recipients were BALB/c → C57B1/6 or C57B1/6 → BALB/c chimeras. However, inoculation of a large number of immunocompetent cells from normal BALB/c mice into BALB/c → C57B1/6 chimeras failed to promote a rejection of the tumours. On the contrary, the same amount of syngeneic (BALB/c) immunocompetent cells prevented growth of melanoma when transferred into athymic nude BALB/c mice, while the tumour grew unimpaired in untreated athymic nude BALB/c mice. The same type of H-2sup(d) → H-2sup(b) chimeras displayed complete resistance to inoculation of leukaemogenic H-2sup(b) restricted RadLV while all H-2sup(b) → H-2sup(b), syngeneically reconstituted mice developed disseminated leukaemia. (author)

  8. Central nervous system Toll-like receptor expression in response to Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelination disease in resistant and susceptible mouse strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turrin Nicolas P

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In immunopathological diseases, such as multiple sclerosis (MS, genetic and environmental factors that contribute to the initiation and progression of the disease are often discussed. The Theiler murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelination disease (TMEV-IDD model used to study MS reflects this: genetically susceptible mice infected intra-cerebrally with TMEV develop a chronic demyelination disease. TMEV-IDD can be induced in resistant mouse strains by inducing innate immunity with lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Interestingly, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 is the cognate receptor for LPS and its activation can induces up-regulation of other TLRs, such as TLR7 (the receptor for TMEV and 9, known to be involved in autoimmunity. Up-regulation of TLRs could be involved in precipitating an autoimmune susceptible state. Consequently, we looked at TLR expression in the susceptible (SJL/J and resistant (C57BL/6 strains of mice infected with TMEV. The resistant mice were induced to develop TMEV-IDD by two LPS injections following TMEV infection. Results Both strains were found to up-regulate multiple TLRs (TLR2, 7 and 9 following the TMEV infection. Expression of these TLRs and of viral mRNA was significantly greater in infected SJL/J mice. The susceptible SJL/J mice showed up-regulation of TLR3, 6 and 8, which was not seen in C57BL/6 mice. Conclusion Expression of TLRs by susceptible mice and the up-regulation of the TLRs in resistant mice could participate in priming the mice toward an autoimmune state and develop TMEV-IDD. This could have implications on therapies that target TLRs to prevent the emergence of conditions such as MS in patients at risk for the disease.

  9. Identification of Novel Pepper Genes Involved in Bax- or INF1-Mediated Cell Death Responses by High-Throughput Virus-Induced Gene Silencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Hee Lee

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Hot pepper is one of the economically important crops in Asia. A large number of gene sequences, including expressed sequence tag (EST and genomic sequences are publicly available. However, it is still a daunting task to determine gene function due to difficulties in genetic modification of a pepper plants. Here, we show the application of the virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS repression for the study of 459 pepper ESTs selected as non-host pathogen-induced cell death responsive genes from pepper microarray experiments in Nicotiana benthamiana. Developmental abnormalities in N. benthamiana plants are observed in the 32 (7% pepper ESTs-silenced plants. Aberrant morphological phenotypes largely comprised of three groups: stunted, abnormal leaf, and dead. In addition, by employing the combination of VIGS and Agrobacterium-mediated transient assays, we identified novel pepper ESTs that involved in Bax or INF1-mediated cell death responses. Silencing of seven pepper ESTs homologs suppressed Bax or INF1-induced cell death, five of which suppressed both cell death responses in N. benthamiana. The genes represented by these five ESTs encode putative proteins with functions in endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and lipid signaling. The genes represented by the other two pepper ESTs showing only Bax-mediated cell death inhibition encode a CCCH-type zinc finger protein containing an ankyrin-repeat domain and a probable calcium-binding protein, CML30-like. Taken together, we effectively isolated novel pepper clones that are involved in hypersensitive response (HR-like cell death using VIGS, and identified silenced clones that have different responses to Bax and INF1 exposure, indicating separate signaling pathways for Bax- and INF1-mediated cell death.

  10. Adipose Inflammation, Insulin Resistance, and Cardiovascular Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Arti; Mehta, Nehal; Reilly, Muredach P.

    2008-01-01

    Adiposity-associated inflammation and insulin resistance are strongly implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. This article reviews the mechanisms of adipose inflammation, because these may represent therapeutic targets for insulin resistance and for prevention of metabolic and cardiovascular consequences of obesity. The initial insult in adipose inflammation and insulin resistance, mediated by macrophage recruitment and endogenous ligand ac...

  11. Resolvins and protectins: mediating solutions to inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Kohli, Payal; Levy, Bruce D.

    2009-01-01

    Resolution of inflammation has historically been viewed as a passive process, occurring as a result of the withdrawal of pro-inflammatory signals, including lipid mediators such as leukotrienes and prostaglandins. Thus, most anti-inflammatory drugs have traditionally targeted primarily mediator pathways that are engaged at the onset of inflammation. Only recently has it been established that inflammation resolution is an active process with a distinct set of chemical mediators. Several clinic...

  12. Inflammation, Infection, and Future Cardiovascular Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Cardiovascular Diseases; Coronary Disease; Cerebrovascular Accident; Myocardial Infarction; Venous Thromboembolism; Heart Diseases; Infection; Chlamydia Infections; Cytomegalovirus Infections; Helicobacter Infections; Herpesviridae Infections; Inflammation

  13. Inflammation Promotes Expression of Stemness-Related Properties in HBV-Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Te-Sheng Chang

    Full Text Available The expression of cancer stemness is believed to reduce the efficacy of current therapies against hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Understanding of the stemness-regulating signaling pathways incurred by a specific etiology can facilitate the development of novel targets for individualized therapy against HCC. Niche environments, such as virus-induced inflammation, may play a crucial role. However, the mechanisms linking inflammation and stemness expression in HCC remain unclear. Here we demonstrated the distinct role of inflammatory mediators in expressions of stemness-related properties involving the pluripotent octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT4 in cell migration and drug resistance of hepatitis B virus-related HCC (HBV-HCC. We observed positive immunorecognition for macrophage chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1/CD68 and OCT4/NANOG in HBV-HCC tissues. The inflammation-conditioned medium (inflamed-CM generated by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated U937 human leukemia cells significantly increased the mRNA and protein levels of OCT4/NANOG preferentially in HBV-active (HBV+HBsAg+ HCC cells. The inflamed-CM also increased the side population (SP cell percentage, green fluorescent protein (GFP-positive cell population, and luciferase activity of OCT4 promoter-GFP/luciferase in HBV-active HCC cells. Furthermore, the inflamed-CM upregulated the expressions of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I/IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR and activated IGF-IR/Akt signaling in HBV-HCC. The IGF-IR phosphorylation inhibitor picropodophyllin (PPP suppressed inflamed-CM-induced OCT4 and NANOG levels in HBV+HBsAg+ Hep3B cells. Forced expression of OCT4 significantly increased the secondary sphere formation and cell migration, and reduced susceptibility of HBV-HCC cells to cisplatin, bleomycin, and doxorubicin. Taking together, our results show that niche inflammatory mediators play critical roles in inducing the expression of stemness-related properties involving IGF

  14. A new treatment for neurogenic inflammation caused by EV71 with CR2-targeted complement inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu Shaofu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enterovirus 71 (EV71, one of the most important neurotropic EVs, has caused death and long-term neurological sequelae in hundreds of thousands of young children in the Asia-Pacific region in the past decade. The neurological diseases are attributed to infection by EV71 inducing an extensive peripheral and central nervous system (CNS inflammatory response with abnormal cytokine production and lymphocyte depletion induced by EV71 infection. In the absence of specific antiviral agents or vaccines, an effective immunosuppressive strategy would be valuable to alleviate the severity of the local inflammation induced by EV71 infection. Presentation of the hypothesis The complement system plays a pivotal role in the inflammatory response. Inappropriate or excessive activation of the complement system results in a severe inflammatory reaction or numerous pathological injuries. Previous studies have revealed that EV71 infection can induce complement activation and an inflammatory response of the CNS. CR2-targeted complement inhibition has been proved to be a potential therapeutic strategy for many diseases, such as influenza virus-induced lung tissue injury, postischemic cerebral injury and spinal cord injury. In this paper, a mouse model is proposed to test whether a recombinant fusion protein consisting of CR2 and a region of Crry (CR2-Crry is able to specifically inhibit the local complement activation induced by EV71 infection, and to observe whether this treatment strategy can alleviate or even cure the neurogenic inflammation. Testing the hypothesis CR2-Crry is expressed in CHO cells, and its biological activity is determined by complement inhibition assays. 7-day-old ICR mice are inoculated intracranially with EV71 to duplicate the neurological symptoms. The mice are then divided into two groups, in one of which the mice are treated with CR2-Crry targeted complement inhibitor, and in the other with phosphate-buffered saline. A

  15. Polyphenols, inflammation, and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangney, Christy C; Rasmussen, Heather E

    2013-05-01

    Polyphenols are compounds found in foods such as tea, coffee, cocoa, olive oil, and red wine and have been studied to determine if their intake may modify cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Historically, biologic actions of polyphenols have been attributed to antioxidant activities, but recent evidence suggests that immunomodulatory and vasodilatory properties of polyphenols may also contribute to CVD risk reduction. These properties will be discussed, and recent epidemiological evidence and intervention trials will be reviewed. Further identification of polyphenols in foods and accurate assessment of exposures through measurement of biomarkers (i.e., polyphenol metabolites) could provide the needed impetus to examine the impact of polyphenol-rich foods on CVD intermediate outcomes (especially those signifying chronic inflammation) and hard endpoints among high risk patients. Although we have mechanistic insight into how polyphenols may function in CVD risk reduction, further research is needed before definitive recommendations for consumption can be made.

  16. Lipid Chaperones and Metabolic Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato Furuhashi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, a large body of evidence has emerged demonstrating an integration of metabolic and immune response pathways. It is now clear that obesity and associated disorders such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes are associated with a metabolically driven, low-grade, chronic inflammatory state, referred to as “metaflammation.” Several inflammatory cytokines as well as lipids and metabolic stress pathways can activate metaflammation, which targets metabolically critical organs and tissues including adipocytes and macrophages to adversely affect systemic homeostasis. On the other hand, inside the cell, fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs, a family of lipid chaperones, as well as endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, and reactive oxygen species derived from mitochondria play significant roles in promotion of metabolically triggered inflammation. Here, we discuss the molecular and cellular basis of the roles of FABPs, especially FABP4 and FABP5, in metaflammation and related diseases including obesity, diabetes, and atherosclerosis.

  17. [Intraocular Inflammation: Autoimmune or Infectious?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auw-Hädrich, C; Heinzelmann, S; Coupland, S

    2016-07-01

    Presentation of 3 cases of intraocular inflammation: 1. 47-year old female patient with severe necrotising scleritis and uveitis with underlying granulomatous polyangiitis (formerly known as Wegener granulomatosis, in honour of the German pathologist Friedrich Wegener), known for 10 years. 2. 48-year old male patient with longstanding bilateral uveitis and granulomatous polyangiitis for 2 years. In the histopathological examination of the enucleation specimen, a retrolental tumour turned out to be a granuloma. 3. 57-year old male patient in status post renal transplantation with intraocular cellular infiltration suspicious for lymphoma, which surprisingly proved to be Toxoplasma gondii-associated uveitis. The clinical course and characteristic histological signs and therapeutic options are discussed. PMID:27468098

  18. Microbes, intestinal inflammation and probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammad W; Kale, Amod A; Bere, Praveen; Vajjala, Sriharsha; Gounaris, Elias; Pakanati, Krishna Chaitanya

    2012-02-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is known for causing disturbed homeostatic balance among the intestinal immune compartment, epithelium and microbiota. Owing to the emergence of IBD as a major cause of morbidity and mortality, great efforts have been put into understanding the sequence of intestinal inflammatory events. Intestinal macrophages and dendritic cells act in a synergistic fashion with intestinal epithelial cells and microbiota to initiate the triad that governs the intestinal immune responses (whether inflammatory or regulatory). In this review, we will discuss the interplay of intestinal epithelial cells, bacteria and the innate immune component. Moreover, whether or not genetic intervention of probiotic bacteria is a valid approach for attenuating/mitigating exaggerated inflammation and IBD will also be discussed.

  19. Reparative inflammation takes charge of tissue regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karin, Michael; Clevers, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation underlies many chronic and degenerative diseases, but it also mitigates infections, clears damaged cells and initiates tissue repair. Many of the mechanisms that link inflammation to damage repair and regeneration in mammals are conserved in lower organisms, indicating that it is an evo

  20. Tissue factor in infection and severe inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Levi; T. van der Poll; H. ten Cate

    2006-01-01

    In the pathogenesis of vascular disease, inflammation and coagulation play a pivotal role. Increasing evidence points to an extensive cross-talk between these two systems, whereby inflammation not only leads to activation of coagulation, but coagulation also considerably affects inflammatory activit

  1. The coagulant response in sepsis and inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Levi

    2010-01-01

    Critically ill patients often have systemic activation of both inflammation and coagulation. Increasing evidence points to an extensive cross-talk between these two systems, whereby inflammation not only leads to activation of coagulation, but coagulation also considerably affects inflammatory activ

  2. Neurogenic inflammation in human and rodent skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmelz, M; Petersen, Lars Jelstrup

    2001-01-01

    The combination of vasodilation and protein extravasation following activation of nociceptors has been termed "neurogenic inflammation." In contrast to rodents, no neurogenic protein extravasation can be elicited in healthy human skin. Dermal microdialysis has considerably increased our knowledge...... about neurogenic inflammation in human skin, including the involvement of mast cells....

  3. SOCS and inflammation in chronic renal failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rastmanesh, M.M.

    2008-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in renal patients and a major health concern in western countries per se. Recent studies point to the important role of inflammation as an underlying cause of atherosclerosis. Importantly medicines that suppress inflammation lower the inc

  4. Radiopharmaceuticals for imaging chronic lymphocytic inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malviya, Gaurav; De Vries, Erik F. J.; Dierckx, Rudi A.; Signore, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    In the last few decades, a number of radiopharmaceuticals for imaging inflammation have been proposed that differ in their specificity and mechanism of uptake in inflamed foci as compared to the traditional inflammation imaging agents. Radiolabelled cytokines represent a reliable tool for the precli

  5. Dual role of neutrophils in inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pillay, J.

    2011-01-01

    Systemic inflammation is a hallmark of trauma, sepsis and various severe infectious diseases. Severe systemic inflammation can lead to inflammatory complications. The Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) and Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome (MODS) are seen after trauma and in sepsis and are

  6. Pain related inflammation analysis using infrared images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmik, Mrinal Kanti; Bardhan, Shawli; Das, Kakali; Bhattacharjee, Debotosh; Nath, Satyabrata

    2016-05-01

    Medical Infrared Thermography (MIT) offers a potential non-invasive, non-contact and radiation free imaging modality for assessment of abnormal inflammation having pain in the human body. The assessment of inflammation mainly depends on the emission of heat from the skin surface. Arthritis is a disease of joint damage that generates inflammation in one or more anatomical joints of the body. Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most frequent appearing form of arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most threatening form of them. In this study, the inflammatory analysis has been performed on the infrared images of patients suffering from RA and OA. For the analysis, a dataset of 30 bilateral knee thermograms has been captured from the patient of RA and OA by following a thermogram acquisition standard. The thermograms are pre-processed, and areas of interest are extracted for further processing. The investigation of the spread of inflammation is performed along with the statistical analysis of the pre-processed thermograms. The objectives of the study include: i) Generation of a novel thermogram acquisition standard for inflammatory pain disease ii) Analysis of the spread of the inflammation related to RA and OA using K-means clustering. iii) First and second order statistical analysis of pre-processed thermograms. The conclusion reflects that, in most of the cases, RA oriented inflammation affects bilateral knees whereas inflammation related to OA present in the unilateral knee. Also due to the spread of inflammation in OA, contralateral asymmetries are detected through the statistical analysis.

  7. Treating dyslipidemias: is inflammation the missing link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoutsidakis, Nikolaos; Deftereos, Spyridon; Giannopoulos, Georgios; Panagopoulou, Vasiliki; Manolis, Antonis S; Bouras, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    Low-grade chronic inflammation is now being held as an important process in the development of atherosclerosis, with new links between dyslipidemia and inflammation being constantly found. While most studies aim to discover inflammatory pathways leading from dyslipidemia to atherogenesis, there is evidence that inflammation can also act in reverse, altering lipid metabolism in unfavorable ways, possibly creating a vicious cycle of inflammationdyslipidemia- inflammation. This is highly relevant for the search of novel therapeutic targets. In this review, after a brief account of the inflammatory mechanisms leading from dyslipidemia to atherogenesis, we focus on what is currently known about the ways inflammation can impair lipid metabolism and whether anti-inflammatory therapies could have a role in dyslipidemia management.

  8. Resolution of acute inflammation in the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Bruce D; Serhan, Charles N

    2014-01-01

    Acute inflammation in the lung is essential to health. So too is its resolution. In response to invading microbes, noxious stimuli, or tissue injury, an acute inflammatory response is mounted to protect the host. To limit inflammation and prevent collateral injury of healthy, uninvolved tissue, the lung orchestrates the formation of specialized proresolving mediators, specifically lipoxins, resolvins, protectins, and maresins. These immunoresolvents are agonists for resolution that interact with specific receptors on leukocytes and structural cells to blunt further inflammation and promote catabasis. This process appears to be defective in several common lung diseases that are characterized by excess or chronic inflammation. Here, we review the molecular and cellular effectors of resolution of acute inflammation in the lung. PMID:24313723

  9. Myxoma virus induces type I interferon production in murine plasmacytoid dendritic cells via a TLR9/MyD88-, IRF5/IRF7-, and IFNAR-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Peihong; Cao, Hua; Merghoub, Taha; Avogadri, Francesca; Wang, Weiyi; Parikh, Tanvi; Fang, Chee-Mun; Pitha, Paula M; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Rahman, Masmudur M; McFadden, Grant; Hu, Xiaoyu; Houghton, Alan N; Shuman, Stewart; Deng, Liang

    2011-10-01

    Poxviruses are large DNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Myxoma virus is a rabbit poxvirus that belongs to the Leporipoxvirus genus. It causes a lethal disease called myxomatosis in European rabbits but cannot sustain any detectable infection in nonlagomorphs. Vaccinia virus is a prototypal orthopoxvirus that was used as a vaccine to eradicate smallpox. Myxoma virus is nonpathogenic in mice, whereas systemic infection with vaccinia virus can be lethal even in immunocompetent mice. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are potent type I interferon (IFN)-producing cells that play important roles in antiviral innate immunity. How poxviruses are sensed by pDCs to induce type I IFN production is not well understood. Here we report that infection of primary murine pDCs with myxoma virus, but not with vaccinia virus, induces IFN-α, IFN-β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and interleukin-12p70 (IL-12p70) production. Using pDCs derived from genetic knockout mice, we show that the myxoma virus-induced innate immune response requires the endosomal DNA sensor TLR9 and its adaptor MyD88, transcription factors IRF5 and IRF7, and the type I IFN positive-feedback loop mediated by IFNAR1. It is independent of the cytoplasmic RNA sensing pathway mediated by the mitochondrial adaptor molecule MAVS, the TLR3 adaptor TRIF, or the transcription factor IRF3. Using pharmacological inhibitors, we demonstrate that myxoma virus-induced type I IFN and IL-12p70 production in murine pDCs is also dependent on phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt. Furthermore, our results reveal that the N-terminal Z-DNA/RNA binding domain of vaccinia virulence factor E3, which is missing in the orthologous M029 protein expressed by myxoma virus, plays an inhibitory role in poxvirus sensing and innate cytokine production by murine pDCs. PMID:21835795

  10. Tomato Infection by Whitefly-Transmitted Circulative and Non-Circulative Viruses Induce Contrasting Changes in Plant Volatiles and Vector Behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fereres, Alberto; Peñaflor, Maria Fernanda G V; Favaro, Carla F; Azevedo, Kamila E X; Landi, Carolina H; Maluta, Nathalie K P; Bento, José Mauricio S; Lopes, Joao R S

    2016-01-01

    , this type of virus-induced manipulation of vector behaviour was not observed for the semi persistent crinivirus, ToCV, which is not specifically transmitted by B. tabaci and has a much less intimate virus-vector relationship. PMID:27529271

  11. Tomato Infection by Whitefly-Transmitted Circulative and Non-Circulative Viruses Induce Contrasting Changes in Plant Volatiles and Vector Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fereres, Alberto; Peñaflor, Maria Fernanda G. V.; Favaro, Carla F.; Azevedo, Kamila E. X.; Landi, Carolina H.; Maluta, Nathalie K. P.; Bento, José Mauricio S.; Lopes, Joao R.S.

    2016-01-01

    , this type of virus-induced manipulation of vector behaviour was not observed for the semi persistent crinivirus, ToCV, which is not specifically transmitted by B. tabaci and has a much less intimate virus-vector relationship. PMID:27529271

  12. Virus-induced gene-silencing in wheat spikes and grains and its application in functional analysis of HMW-GS-encoding genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Meng

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV-based vector has been developed and used for gene silencing in barley and wheat seedlings to assess gene functions in pathogen- or insect-resistance, but conditions for gene silencing in spikes and grains have not been evaluated. In this study, we explored the feasibility of using BSMV for gene silencing in wheat spikes or grains. Results Apparent photobleaching on the spikes infected with BSMV:PDS at heading stage was observed after13 days post inoculation (dpi, and persisted until 30dpi, while the spikes inoculated with BSMV:00 remained green during the same period. Grains of BSMV:PDS infected spikes also exhibited photobleaching. Molecular analysis indicated that photobleached spikes or grains resulted from the reduction of endogenous PDS transcript abundances, suggesting that BSMV:PDS was able to induce PDS silencing in wheat spikes and grains. Inoculation onto wheat spikes from heading to flowering stage was optimal for efficient silencing of PDS in wheat spikes. Furthermore, we used the BSMV-based system to reduce the transcript level of 1Bx14, a gene encoding for High-molecular-weight glutenin subunit 1Bx14 (HMW-GS 1Bx14, by 97 % in the grains of the BSMV:1Bx14 infected spikes at 15dpi, compared with that in BSMV:00 infected spikes, and the reduction persisted until at least 25 dpi. The amount of the HMW-GS 1Bx14 was also detectably decreased. The percentage of glutenin macropolymeric proteins in total proteins was significantly reduced in the grains of 1Bx14-silenced plants as compared with that in the grains of BSMV:00 infected control plants, indicating that HMW-GS 1Bx14 is one of major components participating in the formation of glutenin macropolymers in wheat grains. Conclusion This is one of the first reports of successful application of BSMV-based virus-induced-gene-silencing (VIGS for gene knockdown in wheat spikes and grains and its application in functional analysis of

  13. Assessment of in situ adipose tissue inflammation by microdialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkilde, Anne; Andersen, Ove; Henriksen, Jens H;

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation, and specifically adipose tissue (AT) inflammation, is part of the pathophysiology of obesity and HIV-associated lipodystrophy. Local AT protein assessment methods are limited, and AT inflammation studies have therefore primarily examined inflammatory gene expression. We therefore...

  14. Fruit polyphenols, immunity and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Gallego, Javier; García-Mediavilla, M Victoria; Sánchez-Campos, Sonia; Tuñón, María J

    2010-10-01

    Flavonoids are a large class of naturally occurring compounds widely present in fruits, vegetables and beverages derived from plants. These molecules have been reported to possess a wide range of activities in the prevention of common diseases, including CHD, cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, gastrointestinal disorders and others. The effects appear to be related to the various biological/pharmacological activities of flavonoids. A large number of publications suggest immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties of these compounds. However, almost all studies are in vitro studies with limited research on animal models and scarce data from human studies. The majority of in vitro research has been carried out with single flavonoids, generally aglycones, at rather supraphysiological concentrations. Few studies have investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of physiologically attainable flavonoid concentrations in healthy subjects, and more epidemiological studies and prospective randomised trials are still required. This review summarises evidence for the effects of fruit and tea flavonoids and their metabolites in inflammation and immunity. Mechanisms of effect are discussed, including those on enzyme function and regulation of gene and protein expression. Animal work is included, and evidence from epidemiological studies and human intervention trials is reviewed. Biological relevance and functional benefits of the reported effects, such as resistance to infection or exercise performance, are also discussed.

  15. Minireview: adiposity, inflammation, and atherogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Christopher J; Law, Ronald E; Hsueh, Willa A

    2003-06-01

    Adipose tissue is a dynamic endocrine organ that secretes a number of factors that are increasingly recognized to contribute to systemic and vascular inflammation. Several of these factors, collectively referred to as adipokines, have now been shown regulate, directly or indirectly, a number of the processes that contribute to the development of atherosclerosis, including hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, insulin resistance, and vascular remodeling. Several adipokines are preferentially expressed in visceral adipose tissue, and the secretion of proinflammatory adipokines is elevated with increasing adiposity. Not surprisingly, approaches that reduce adipose tissue depots, including surgical fat removal, exercise, and reduced caloric intake, improve proinflammatory adipokine levels and reduce the severity of their resultant pathologies. Systemic adipokine levels can also be favorably altered by treatment with several of the existing drug classes used to treat insulin resistance, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia. Greater understanding of adipokine regulation, however, should result in the design of improved treatment strategies to control disease states associated with increase adiposity, an important outcome in view of the growing worldwide epidemic of obesity. PMID:12746274

  16. Platelets, inflammation and tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurden, Alan T

    2011-05-01

    Blood platelets have long been recognised to bring about primary haemostasis with deficiencies in platelet production and function manifesting in bleeding while upregulated function favourises arterial thrombosis. Yet increasing evidence indicates that platelets fulfil a much wider role in health and disease. First, they store and release a wide range of biologically active substances including the panoply of growth factors, chemokines and cytokines released from a-granules. Membrane budding gives rise to microparticles (MPs), another active participant within the blood stream. Platelets are essential for the innate immune response and combat infection (viruses, bacteria, micro-organisms). They help maintain and modulate inflammation and are a major source of pro-inflammatory molecules (e.g. P-selectin, tissue factor, CD40L, metalloproteinases). As well as promoting coagulation, they are active in fibrinolysis; wound healing, angiogenesis and bone formation as well as in maternal tissue and foetal vascular remodelling. Activated platelets and MPs intervene in the propagation of major diseases. They are major players in atherosclerosis and related diseases, pathologies of the central nervous system (Alzheimers disease, multiple sclerosis), cancer and tumour growth. They participate in other tissue-related acquired pathologies such as skin diseases and allergy, rheumatoid arthritis, liver disease; while, paradoxically, autologous platelet-rich plasma and platelet releasate are being used as an aid to promote tissue repair and cellular growth. The above mentioned roles of platelets are now discussed.

  17. Inflammation in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Laura C; Wort, S John; Perros, Frédéric; Dorfmüller, Peter; Huertas, Alice; Montani, David; Cohen-Kaminsky, Sylvia; Humbert, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by pulmonary vascular remodeling of the precapillary pulmonary arteries, with excessive proliferation of vascular cells. Although the exact pathophysiology remains unknown, there is increasing evidence to suggest an important role for inflammation. Firstly, pathologic specimens from patients with PAH reveal an accumulation of perivascular inflammatory cells, including macrophages, dendritic cells, T and B lymphocytes, and mast cells. Secondly, circulating levels of certain cytokines and chemokines are elevated, and these may correlate with a worse clinical outcome. Thirdly, certain inflammatory conditions such as connective tissue diseases are associated with an increased incidence of PAH. Finally, treatment of the underlying inflammatory condition may alleviate the associated PAH. Underlying pathologic mechanisms are likely to be "multihit" and complex. For instance, the inflammatory response may be regulated by bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2 (BMPR II) status, and, in turn, BMPR II expression can be altered by certain cytokines. Although antiinflammatory therapies have been effective in certain connective-tissue-disease-associated PAH, this approach is untested in idiopathic PAH (iPAH). The potential benefit of antiinflammatory therapies in iPAH is of importance and requires further study. PMID:22215829

  18. Polyunsaturated fatty acids and inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calder Philip C.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid arachidonic acid gives rise to the eicosanoid family of inflammatory mediators (prostaglandins, leukotrienes and related metabolites and through these regulates the activities of inflammatory cells, the production of cytokines and the various balances within the immune system. Fish oil and oily fish are good sources of long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Consumption of these fatty acids decreases the amount of arachidonic acid in cell membranes and so available for eicosanoid production. Thus, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids act as arachidonic acid antagonists. Components of both natural and acquired immunity, including the production of key inflammatory cytokines, can be affected by n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Although some of the effects of n-3 fatty acids may be brought about by modulation of the amount and types of eicosanoids made, it is possible that these fatty acids might elicit some of their effects by eicosanoid-independent mechanisms. Such n-3 fatty acid-induced effects may be of use as a therapy for acute and chronic inflammation, and for disorders that involve an inappropriately-activated immune response.

  19. Fatty acids, endocannabinoids and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkamp, Renger

    2016-08-15

    From their phylogenetic and pharmacological classification it might be inferred that cannabinoid receptors and their endogenous ligands constitute a rather specialised and biologically distinct signalling system. However, the opposite is true and accumulating data underline how much the endocannabinoid system is intertwined with other lipid and non-lipid signalling systems. Endocannabinoids per se have many structural congeners, and these molecules exist in dynamic equilibria with different other lipid-derived mediators, including eicosanoids and prostamides. With multiple crossroads and shared targets, this creates a versatile system involved in fine-tuning different physiological and metabolic processes, including inflammation. A key feature of this 'expanded' endocannabinoid system, or 'endocannabinoidome', is its subtle orchestration based on interactions between a relatively small number of receptors and multiple ligands with different but partly overlapping activities. Following an update on the role of the 'endocannabinoidome' in inflammatory processes, this review continues with possible targets for intervention at the level of receptors or enzymes involved in formation or breakdown of endocannabinoids and their congeners. Although its pleiotropic character poses scientific challenges, the 'expanded' endocannabinoid system offers several opportunities for prevention and therapy of chronic diseases. In this respect, successes are more likely to come from 'multiple-target' than from 'single-target' strategies. PMID:26325095

  20. Cholinergic Regulation of Airway Inflammation and Remodelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Kolahian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine is the predominant parasympathetic neurotransmitter in the airways that regulates bronchoconstriction and mucus secretion. Recent findings suggest that acetylcholine regulates additional functions in the airways, including inflammation and remodelling during inflammatory airway diseases. Moreover, it has become apparent that acetylcholine is synthesized by nonneuronal cells and tissues, including inflammatory cells and structural cells. In this paper, we will discuss the regulatory role of acetylcholine in inflammation and remodelling in which we will focus on the role of the airway smooth muscle cell as a target cell for acetylcholine that modulates inflammation and remodelling during respiratory diseases such as asthma and COPD.

  1. A link between inflammation and metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M. T.; Forst, B.; Cremers, N.;

    2015-01-01

    S100A4 is implicated in metastasis and chronic inflammation, but its function remains uncertain. Here we establish an S100A4-dependent link between inflammation and metastatic tumor progression. We found that the acute-phase response proteins serum amyloid A (SAA) 1 and SAA3 are transcriptional....... Furthermore, coordinate expression of S100A4 and SAA in tumor samples from colorectal carcinoma patients significantly correlated with reduced overall survival. These data show that SAA proteins are effectors for the metastasis-promoting functions of S100A4, and serve as a link between inflammation and tumor...

  2. The dynamics of acute inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rukmini

    The acute inflammatory response is the non-specific and immediate reaction of the body to pathogenic organisms, tissue trauma and unregulated cell growth. An imbalance in this response could lead to a condition commonly known as "shock" or "sepsis". This thesis is an attempt to elucidate the dynamics of acute inflammatory response to infection and contribute to its systemic understanding through mathematical modeling and analysis. The models of immunity discussed use Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs) to model the variation of concentration in time of the various interacting species. Chapter 2 discusses three such models of increasing complexity. Sections 2.1 and 2.2 discuss smaller models that capture the core features of inflammation and offer general predictions concerning the design of the system. Phase-space and bifurcation analyses have been used to examine the behavior at various parameter regimes. Section 2.3 discusses a global physiological model that includes several equations modeling the concentration (or numbers) of cells, cytokines and other mediators. The conclusions drawn from the reduced and detailed models about the qualitative effects of the parameters are very similar and these similarities have also been discussed. In Chapter 3, the specific applications of the biologically detailed model are discussed in greater detail. These include a simulation of anthrax infection and an in silico simulation of a clinical trial. Such simulations are very useful to biologists and could prove to be invaluable tools in drug design. Finally, Chapter 4 discusses the general problem of extinction of populations modeled as continuous variables in ODES is discussed. The average time to extinction and threshold are estimated based on analyzing the equivalent stochastic processes.

  3. Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Organizations (PDF, 270 KB). Alternate Language URL Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease Page Content On ... Nutrition Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is anemia? Anemia is a condition in which a person ...

  4. Inflammation induced loss of skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londhe, Priya; Guttridge, Denis C

    2015-11-01

    Inflammation is an important contributor to the pathology of diseases implicated in skeletal muscle dysfunction. A number of diseases and disorders including inflammatory myopathies and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disorder (COPD) are characterized by chronic inflammation or elevation of the inflammatory mediators. While these disease states exhibit different pathologies, all have in common the loss of skeletal muscle mass and a deregulated skeletal muscle physiology. Pro-inflammatory cytokines are key contributors to chronic inflammation found in many of these diseases. This section of the review focuses on some of the known inflammatory disorders like COPD, Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and inflammatory myopathies that display skeletal muscle atrophy and also provides the reader an overview of the mediators of inflammation, their signaling pathways, and mechanisms of action. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Muscle Bone Interactions".

  5. Cholinergic regulation of airway inflammation and remodelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolahian, Saeed; Gosens, Reinoud

    2012-01-01

    Acetylcholine is the predominant parasympathetic neurotransmitter in the airways that regulates bronchoconstriction and mucus secretion. Recent findings suggest that acetylcholine regulates additional functions in the airways, including inflammation and remodelling during inflammatory airway disease

  6. Regulation of pulmonary inflammation by mesenchymal cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alkhouri, Hatem; Poppinga, Wilfred Jelco; Tania, Navessa Padma; Ammit, Alaina; Schuliga, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary inflammation and tissue remodelling are common elements of chronic respiratory diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), and pulmonary hypertension (PH). In disease, pulmonary mesenchymal cells not only contribute to tissue

  7. Oxidative Stress, Molecular Inflammation and Sarcopenia

    OpenAIRE

    Si-Jin Meng; Long-Jiang Yu

    2010-01-01

    Sarcopenia is the decline of muscle mass and strength with age. Evidence suggests that oxidative stress and molecular inflammation play important roles in age-related muscle atrophy. The two factors may interfere with the balance between protein synthesis and breakdown, cause mitochondrial dysfunction, and induce apoptosis. The purpose of this review is to discuss some of the major signaling pathways that are activated or inactivated during the oxidative stress and molecular inflammation seen...

  8. Dual role of neutrophils in inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Pillay, J.

    2011-01-01

    Systemic inflammation is a hallmark of trauma, sepsis and various severe infectious diseases. Severe systemic inflammation can lead to inflammatory complications. The Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) and Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome (MODS) are seen after trauma and in sepsis and are accompanied by a high mortality and morbitidy. These complications are mediated by a hyperactive immune system. On the other hand, immune suppression is frequently seen following systemic inflamma...

  9. Regulation of Inflammation in Cancer by Eicosanoids

    OpenAIRE

    Greene, Emily R.; Huang, Sui; Serhan, Charles N.; Panigrahy, Dipak

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation in the tumour microenvironment is now recognized as one of the hallmarks of cancer. Endogenously produced lipid autacoids, locally acting small molecule lipid mediators, play a central role in inflammation and tissue homeostasis, and have recently been implicated in cancer. A well-studied group of autacoid mediators that are the products of arachidonic acid metabolism include: the prostaglandins, leukotrienes, lipoxins and cytochrome P450 (CYP) derived bioactive products. These l...

  10. Systemic inflammation impairs respiratory chemoreflexes and plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Huxtable, A. G.; Vinit, S; Windelborn, J.A.; Crader, S.M.; Guenther, C.H.; Watters, J.J.; Mitchell, G.S.

    2011-01-01

    Many lung and central nervous system disorders require robust and appropriate physiological responses to assure adequate breathing. Factors undermining the efficacy of ventilatory control will diminish the ability to compensate for pathology, threatening life itself. Although most of these same disorders are associated with systemic and/or neuroinflammation, and inflammation affects neural function, we are only beginning to understand interactions between inflammation and any aspect of ventil...

  11. Role of Brain Inflammation in Epileptogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Jieun; Koh, Sookyong

    2008-01-01

    Inflammation is known to participate in the mediation of a growing number of acute and chronic neurological disorders. Even so, the involvement of inflammation in the pathogenesis of epilepsy and seizure-induced brain damage has only recently been appreciated. Inflammatory processes, including activation of microglia and astrocytes and production of proinflammatory cytokines and related molecules, have been described in human epilepsy patients as well as in experimental models of epilepsy. Fo...

  12. Mouse models of intestinal inflammation and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, Aya M; Szakmary, Akos; Schiestl, Robert H

    2016-09-01

    Chronic inflammation is strongly associated with approximately one-fifth of all human cancers. Arising from combinations of factors such as environmental exposures, diet, inherited gene polymorphisms, infections, or from dysfunctions of the immune response, chronic inflammation begins as an attempt of the body to remove injurious stimuli; however, over time, this results in continuous tissue destruction and promotion and maintenance of carcinogenesis. Here, we focus on intestinal inflammation and its associated cancers, a group of diseases on the rise and affecting millions of people worldwide. Intestinal inflammation can be widely grouped into inflammatory bowel diseases (ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease) and celiac disease. Long-standing intestinal inflammation is associated with colorectal cancer and small-bowel adenocarcinoma, as well as extraintestinal manifestations, including lymphomas and autoimmune diseases. This article highlights potential mechanisms of pathogenesis in inflammatory bowel diseases and celiac disease, as well as those involved in the progression to associated cancers, most of which have been identified from studies utilizing mouse models of intestinal inflammation. Mouse models of intestinal inflammation can be widely grouped into chemically induced models; genetic models, which make up the bulk of the studied models; adoptive transfer models; and spontaneous models. Studies in these models have lead to the understanding that persistent antigen exposure in the intestinal lumen, in combination with loss of epithelial barrier function, and dysfunction and dysregulation of the innate and adaptive immune responses lead to chronic intestinal inflammation. Transcriptional changes in this environment leading to cell survival, hyperplasia, promotion of angiogenesis, persistent DNA damage, or insufficient repair of DNA damage due to an excess of proinflammatory mediators are then thought to lead to sustained malignant transformation. With

  13. The science of fatty acids and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsche, Kevin L

    2015-05-01

    Inflammation is believed to play a central role in many of the chronic diseases that characterize modern society. In the past decade, our understanding of how dietary fats affect our immune system and subsequently our inflammatory status has grown considerably. There are compelling data showing that high-fat meals promote endotoxin [e.g., lipopolysaccharide (LPS)] translocation into the bloodstream, stimulating innate immune cells and leading to a transient postprandial inflammatory response. The nature of this effect is influenced by the amount and type of fat consumed. The role of various dietary constituents, including fats, on gut microflora and subsequent health outcomes in the host is another exciting and novel area of inquiry. The impact of specific fatty acids on inflammation may be central to how dietary fats affect health. Three key fatty acid-inflammation interactions are briefly described. First, the evidence suggests that saturated fatty acids induce inflammation in part by mimicking the actions of LPS. Second, the often-repeated claim that dietary linoleic acid promotes inflammation was not supported in a recent systematic review of the evidence. Third, an explanation is offered for why omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids are so much less anti-inflammatory in humans than in mice. The article closes with a cautionary tale from the genomic literature that illustrates why extrapolating the results from inflammation studies in mice to humans is problematic. PMID:25979502

  14. Resolution of Inflammation: What Controls Its Onset?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Michelle A.; Sousa, Lirlândia P.; Pinho, Vanessa; Perretti, Mauro; Teixeira, Mauro M.

    2016-01-01

    An effective resolution program may be able to prevent the progression from non-resolving acute inflammation to persistent chronic inflammation. It has now become evident that coordinated resolution programs initiate shortly after inflammatory responses begin. In this context, several mechanisms provide the fine-tuning of inflammation and create a favorable environment for the resolution phase to take place and for homeostasis to return. In this review, we focus on the events required for an effective transition from the proinflammatory phase to the onset and establishment of resolution. We suggest that several mediators that promote the inflammatory phase of inflammation can simultaneously initiate a program for active resolution. Indeed, several events enact a decrease in the local chemokine concentration, a reduction which is essential to inhibit further infiltration of neutrophils into the tissue. Interestingly, although neutrophils are cells that characteristically participate in the active phase of inflammation, they also contribute to the onset of resolution. Further understanding of the molecular mechanisms that initiate resolution may be instrumental to develop pro-resolution strategies to treat complex chronic inflammatory diseases, in humans. The efforts to develop strategies based on resolution of inflammation have shaped a new area of pharmacology referred to as “resolution pharmacology.” PMID:27199985

  15. Resolution of Inflammation: What Controls Its Onset?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Michelle A; Sousa, Lirlândia P; Pinho, Vanessa; Perretti, Mauro; Teixeira, Mauro M

    2016-01-01

    An effective resolution program may be able to prevent the progression from non-resolving acute inflammation to persistent chronic inflammation. It has now become evident that coordinated resolution programs initiate shortly after inflammatory responses begin. In this context, several mechanisms provide the fine-tuning of inflammation and create a favorable environment for the resolution phase to take place and for homeostasis to return. In this review, we focus on the events required for an effective transition from the proinflammatory phase to the onset and establishment of resolution. We suggest that several mediators that promote the inflammatory phase of inflammation can simultaneously initiate a program for active resolution. Indeed, several events enact a decrease in the local chemokine concentration, a reduction which is essential to inhibit further infiltration of neutrophils into the tissue. Interestingly, although neutrophils are cells that characteristically participate in the active phase of inflammation, they also contribute to the onset of resolution. Further understanding of the molecular mechanisms that initiate resolution may be instrumental to develop pro-resolution strategies to treat complex chronic inflammatory diseases, in humans. The efforts to develop strategies based on resolution of inflammation have shaped a new area of pharmacology referred to as "resolution pharmacology."

  16. Stretching Impacts Inflammation Resolution in Connective Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrueta, Lisbeth; Muskaj, Igla; Olenich, Sara; Butler, Taylor; Badger, Gary J; Colas, Romain A; Spite, Matthew; Serhan, Charles N; Langevin, Helene M

    2016-07-01

    Acute inflammation is accompanied from its outset by the release of specialized pro-resolving mediators (SPMs), including resolvins, that orchestrate the resolution of local inflammation. We showed earlier that, in rats with subcutaneous inflammation of the back induced by carrageenan, stretching for 10 min twice daily reduced inflammation and improved pain, 2 weeks after carrageenan injection. In this study, we hypothesized that stretching of connective tissue activates local pro-resolving mechanisms within the tissue in the acute phase of inflammation. In rats injected with carrageenan and randomized to stretch versus no stretch for 48 h, stretching reduced inflammatory lesion thickness and neutrophil count, and increased resolvin (RvD1) concentrations within lesions. Furthermore, subcutaneous resolvin injection mimicked the effect of stretching. In ex vivo experiments, stretching of connective tissue reduced the migration of neutrophils and increased tissue RvD1 concentration. These results demonstrate a direct mechanical impact of stretching on inflammation-regulation mechanisms within connective tissue.

  17. Cerebellar white matter inflammation and demyelination in chronic relapsing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wanscher, B.; Sørensen, P. S.; Juhler, M.;

    1993-01-01

    Experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, demyelination, inflammation, immunology, neuropathology......Experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, demyelination, inflammation, immunology, neuropathology...

  18. The therapeutic value of targeting inflammation in gastrointestinal cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Beicheng; Karin, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation has been implicated in the initiation and progression of gastrointestinal (GI) cancers. Inflammation also plays important roles in subverting immune tolerance, escape from immune surveillance, and conferring resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. Targeting key regulators and mediators of inflammation represents an attractive strategy for GI cancer prevention and treatment. However, the targeting of inflammation in GI cancer is not straight-forward and sometimes inflammation may c...

  19. Microbe- and danger-induced inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broggi, Achille; Granucci, Francesca

    2015-02-01

    The ability of the immune system to give rise to an effective response against pathogens while maintaining tolerance towards self-tissues has always been an object of keen interest for immunologist. Over the years, different theories have been proposed to explain if and how the immune system is able to discriminate between self and non-self, including the Infectious Non-self theory from Charles Janeway and Polly Matzinger's Danger theory. Nowadays we know Janeway's theory is largely true, however the immune system does respond to injured, stressed and necrotic cells releasing danger signals (DAMPs) with a potent inflammatory response. To avoid unwanted prolonged autoimmune reactions, though, danger-induced inflammation should be tightly regulated. In the present review we discuss how prototypic DAMPs are able to induce inflammation and the peculiarity of danger-induced inflammation, as opposed to a complete immune response to fight pathogen invasions.

  20. Neurobiology of inflammation-associated anorexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Gautron

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Compelling data demonstrate that inflammation-associated anorexia directly results from the action of pro-inflammatory factors, primarily cytokines and prostaglandins E2, on the nervous system. For instance, the aforementioned pro-inflammatory factors can stimulate the activity of peripheral sensory neurons, and induce their own de novo synthesis and release into the brain parenchyma and cerebrospinal fluid. Ultimately, it results in the mobilization of a specific neural circuit that shuts down appetite. The present article describes the different cell groups and neurotransmitters involved in inflammation-associated anorexia and examines how they interact with neural systems regulating feeding such as the melanocortin system. A better understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying inflammation-associated anorexia will help to develop appetite stimulants for cancer and AIDS patients.

  1. Unexplained Aspects of Anemia of Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A. Price

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Anemia of inflammation (AI, also known as anemia of chronic inflammation or anemia of chronic disease was described over 50 years ago as anemia in association with clinically overt inflammatory disease, and the findings of low plasma iron, decreased bone marrow sideroblasts and increased reticuloendothelial iron. Pathogenic features underlying AI include a mild shortening of red cell survival, impaired erythropoietin production, blunted responsiveness of the marrow to erythropoietin, and impaired iron metabolism mediated by inflammatory cytokines and the iron regulatory peptide, hepcidin. Despite marked recent advances in understanding AI, gaps remain, including understanding of the pathogenesis of AI associated with “noninflammatory” or mildly inflammatory diseases, the challenge of excluding iron deficiency anemia in the context of concomitant inflammation, and understanding more precisely the contributory role of hepcidin in the development of AI in human inflammatory diseases.

  2. An overview of inflammation: mechanism and consequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Afsar U. AHMED

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation is an essential response provided by the immune systems that ensures the survival during infection and tissue injury.Inflammatory responses are essential for the maintenance of normal tissue homeostasis.The molecular mechanism of inflammation is quite a complicated process which is initiated by the recognition of specific molecular patterns associated with either infection or tissue injury.The entire process of the inflammatory response is mediated by several key regulators involved in the selective expression of proinflammatory molecules.Prolonged inflammations are often associated with severe detrimental side effects on health.Alterations in inflammatory responses due to persistent inducers or genetic variations are on the rise over the last couple of decades,causing a variety of inflammatory diseases and pathophysiological conditions.

  3. Inflammation: maladies, models, mechanisms and molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, A G; Beart, P M

    2016-02-01

    The continued focus of attention on the diversity of mechanisms underpinning inflammation has improved our understanding of the potential to target specific pathways in the inflammatory network to achieve meaningful therapeutic gains. In this themed issue of the British Journal of Pharmacology our scope was deliberately broad, ranging across both acute and chronic disease in various organs. Pro- and anti-inflammatory mechanisms receive attention as does the phenotype of macrophages. Whilst the manifestations of neuro-inflammation are less obvious than those in peripheral tissues, central innate and adaptive immunity in brain and the M1/M2 phenotypes of microglia are topics of special interest. The contributions to the inflammatory milieu of cytokines, chemokines and associated signalling cascades are considered. Overall, the coverage herein advances the basic science underpinning our understanding of inflammation and emphasizes its importance in different pathologies.

  4. Early adversity, neural development, and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Jessica J; Taylor, Shelley E; Bower, Julienne E

    2015-12-01

    Early adversity is a risk factor for poor mental and physical health. Although altered neural development is believed to be one pathway linking early adversity to psychopathology, it has rarely been considered a pathway linking early adversity to poor physical health. However, this is a viable pathway because the central nervous system is known to interact with the immune system via the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and autonomic nervous system (ANS). In support of this pathway, early adversity has been linked to changes in neural development (particularly of the amygdala, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex), HPA axis and ANS dysregulation, and higher levels of inflammation. Inflammation, in turn, can be detrimental to physical health when prolonged. In this review, we present these studies and consider how altered neural development may be a pathway by which early adversity increases inflammation and thus risk for adverse physical health outcomes.

  5. The AT2 Receptor and Inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esquitino, Veronica Valero; Danyel, Leon Alexander; Steckelings, Ulrike M.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter summarizes current knowledge about the role of the angiotensin type 2 (AT2) receptor in inflammation. The first section provides an overview about molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory action of the AT2 receptor. This section is followed by a rev......This chapter summarizes current knowledge about the role of the angiotensin type 2 (AT2) receptor in inflammation. The first section provides an overview about molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory action of the AT2 receptor. This section is followed...... by a review of the existing literature addressing the role of the AT2 receptor in a wide range of disorders, in which acute or chronic inflammation is an essential contributor to the pathology. These disorders comprise cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, renal, and autoimmune diseases.Taken as a whole...

  6. Understanding migraine: Potential role of neurogenic inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Malhotra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenic inflammation, a well-defined pathophysiologial process is characterized by the release of potent vasoactive neuropeptides, predominantly calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP, substance P (SP, and neurokinin A from activated peripheral nociceptive sensory nerve terminals (usually C and A delta-fibers. These peptides lead to a cascade of inflammatory tissue responses including arteriolar vasodilation, plasma protein extravasation, and degranulation of mast cells in their peripheral target tissue. Neurogenic inflammatory processes have long been implicated as a possible mechanism involved in the pathophysiology of various human diseases of the nervous system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal tract, urogenital tract, and skin. The recent development of several innovative experimental migraine models has provided evidence suggestive of the involvement of neuropeptides (SP, neurokinin A, and CGRP in migraine headache. Antidromic stimulation of nociceptive fibers of the trigeminal nerve resulted in a neurogenic inflammatory response with marked increase in plasma protein extravasation from dural blood vessels by the release of various sensory neuropeptides. Several clinically effective abortive antimigraine medications, such as ergots and triptans, have been shown to attenuate the release of neuropeptide and neurogenic plasma protein extravasation. These findings provide support for the validity of using animal models to investigate mechanisms of neurogenic inflammation in migraine. These also further strengthen the notion of migraine being a neuroinflammatory disease. In the clinical context, there is a paucity of knowledge and awareness among physicians regarding the role of neurogenic inflammation in migraine. Improved understanding of the molecular biology, pharmacology, and pathophysiology of neurogenic inflammation may provide the practitioner the context-specific feedback to identify the novel and most effective therapeutic

  7. Topical Application of Fingolimod Perturbs Cutaneous Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wai Y; Dimasi, David P; Pitman, Melissa R; Zhuang, YiZhong; Heddle, Robert; Pitson, Stuart M; Grimbaldeston, Michele A; Bonder, Claudine S

    2016-05-01

    The prevalence of allergies, including rhinitis, eczema, and anaphylaxis, is rising dramatically worldwide. This increase is especially problematic in children who bear the greatest burden of this rising trend. Increasing evidence identifies neutrophils as primary perpetrators of the more severe and difficult to manage forms of inflammation. A newly recognized mechanism by which neutrophils are recruited during the early phase of histamine-induced inflammation involves the sphingosine kinase (SK)/sphingosine-1-phosphate axis. This study examines whether topical application of fingolimod, an established SK/sphingosine-1-phosphate antagonist already in clinical use to treat multiple sclerosis, may be repurposed to treat cutaneous inflammation. Using two mouse models of ear skin inflammation (histamine- and IgE-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis) we topically applied fingolimod prophylactically, as well as after establishment of the inflammatory response, and examined ear swelling, SK activity, vascular permeability, leukocyte recruitment, and production of proinflammatory mediators. The present study reveals that when applied topically, fingolimod attenuates both immediate and late-phase responses to histamine with reduced extravasation of fluid, SK-1 activity, proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine production, and neutrophil influx and prevents ear swelling. Intravital microscopy demonstrates that histamine-induced neutrophil rolling and adhesion to the postcapillary venules in the mouse ears is significantly attenuated even after 24 h. More importantly, these effects are achievable even once inflammation is established. Translation into humans was also accomplished with epicutaneous application of fingolimod resolving histamine-induced and allergen-induced inflammatory reactions in forearm skin. Overall, this study demonstrates, to our knowledge for the first time, that fingolimod may be repurposed to treat cutaneous inflammation. PMID:27001955

  8. Understanding migraine: Potential role of neurogenic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic inflammation, a well-defined pathophysiologial process is characterized by the release of potent vasoactive neuropeptides, predominantly calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP), and neurokinin A from activated peripheral nociceptive sensory nerve terminals (usually C and A delta-fibers). These peptides lead to a cascade of inflammatory tissue responses including arteriolar vasodilation, plasma protein extravasation, and degranulation of mast cells in their peripheral target tissue. Neurogenic inflammatory processes have long been implicated as a possible mechanism involved in the pathophysiology of various human diseases of the nervous system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal tract, urogenital tract, and skin. The recent development of several innovative experimental migraine models has provided evidence suggestive of the involvement of neuropeptides (SP, neurokinin A, and CGRP) in migraine headache. Antidromic stimulation of nociceptive fibers of the trigeminal nerve resulted in a neurogenic inflammatory response with marked increase in plasma protein extravasation from dural blood vessels by the release of various sensory neuropeptides. Several clinically effective abortive antimigraine medications, such as ergots and triptans, have been shown to attenuate the release of neuropeptide and neurogenic plasma protein extravasation. These findings provide support for the validity of using animal models to investigate mechanisms of neurogenic inflammation in migraine. These also further strengthen the notion of migraine being a neuroinflammatory disease. In the clinical context, there is a paucity of knowledge and awareness among physicians regarding the role of neurogenic inflammation in migraine. Improved understanding of the molecular biology, pharmacology, and pathophysiology of neurogenic inflammation may provide the practitioner the context-specific feedback to identify the novel and most effective therapeutic approach to treatment

  9. Oxidative Stress, Molecular Inflammation and Sarcopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Jin Meng

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia is the decline of muscle mass and strength with age. Evidence suggests that oxidative stress and molecular inflammation play important roles in age-related muscle atrophy. The two factors may interfere with the balance between protein synthesis and breakdown, cause mitochondrial dysfunction, and induce apoptosis. The purpose of this review is to discuss some of the major signaling pathways that are activated or inactivated during the oxidative stress and molecular inflammation seen in aged skeletal muscle. Combined interventions that may be required to reverse sarcopenia, such as exercise, caloric restriction, and nutrition, will also be discussed.

  10. Reparative inflammation takes charge of tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karin, Michael; Clevers, Hans

    2016-01-21

    Inflammation underlies many chronic and degenerative diseases, but it also mitigates infections, clears damaged cells and initiates tissue repair. Many of the mechanisms that link inflammation to damage repair and regeneration in mammals are conserved in lower organisms, indicating that it is an evolutionarily important process. Recent insights have shed light on the cellular and molecular processes through which conventional inflammatory cytokines and Wnt factors control mammalian tissue repair and regeneration. This is particularly important for regeneration in the gastrointestinal system, especially for intestine and liver tissues in which aberrant and deregulated repair results in severe pathologies.

  11. Earlobe Inflammation from a Palm Thorn Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Press, Yan; Peleg, Roni

    2016-05-01

    Injury from the thorn of a palm tree is characterized by a prolonged, painful inflammatory reaction. Even when the source of the inflammation is diagnosed, appropriate treatment is usually delayed because family doctors are not familiar with the entity. Penetration of a palm thorn into the earlobe is an unrecognized cause of local inflammation. We describe a case of injury from a palm tree thorn in this uncommon site. We present the technique of transillumination for the identification and removal of the palm thorn. PMID:26903615

  12. Inflammation: a trigger for acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sager, Hendrik B; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the vessel wall and a major cause of death worldwide. One of atherosclerosis' most dreadful complications are acute coronary syndromes that comprise ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, and unstable angina. We now understand that inflammation substantially contributes to the initiation, progression, and destabilization of atherosclerosis. In this review, we will focus on the role of inflammatory leukocytes, which are the cellular protagonists of vascular inflammation, in triggering disease progression and, ultimately, the destabilization that causes acute coronary syndromes. PMID:27273431

  13. Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 699–710. 4 Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease Eating, Diet, and Nutrition People with anemia caused by ... Phone: 202–776–0544 Fax: 202–776–0545 Internet: www. hematology. org Iron Disorders Institute P.O. Box 675 Taylors, SC 29687 ...

  14. Molecular Basis Linking Platelet to Inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马丽萍

    2010-01-01

    @@ Introduction Blood platelets not only play an important role in hemostasis and thrombosis,but increasing evidence show that they participate in the induction of inflammation.Firstly,platelets contain and release cytokines and immune mediators.And platelets are able to modulate and regulate the function of surrounding cells by adhesion molecules or by the release of various factors.

  15. Scintigraphic visualization of inflammation in neurodegenerative disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versijpt, J; Van Laere, K; Dierckx, RA; Dumont, F; De Deyn, PP; Slegers, G; Korf, J

    2003-01-01

    In the past few decades, our understanding of the central nervous system has evolved from one of an immune-privileged site, to one where inflammation is pathognomonic for some of the most prevalent and tragic neurodegenerative diseases. Current research indicates that diseases as diverse as multiple

  16. Mechanisms Linking Inflammation to Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is now widespread around the world. Obesity-associated chronic low-grade inflammation is responsible for the decrease of insulin sensitivity, which makes obesity a major risk factor for insulin resistance and related diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndromes. The state of low-grade inflammation is caused by overnutrition which leads to lipid accumulation in adipocytes. Obesity might increase the expression of some inflammatory cytokines and activate several signaling pathways, both of which are involved in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance by interfering with insulin signaling and action. It has been suggested that specific factors and signaling pathways are often correlated with each other; therefore, both of the fluctuation of cytokines and the status of relevant signaling pathways should be considered during studies analyzing inflammation-related insulin resistance. In this paper, we discuss how these factors and signaling pathways contribute to insulin resistance and the therapeutic promise targeting inflammation in insulin resistance based on the latest experimental studies.

  17. Les mediateurs biochimiques de l'inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Henrotin, Yves; Deby-Dupont, G.; Reginster, Jean-Yves

    2001-01-01

    Inflammatory processes are the physiological response of the organism to different stimuli such as trauma, infections or immunological reactions. The events leading to inflammation are characterized by leukocytes adhesion to the endothelium, diapedesis and migration, cells activation and tissue remodelling. These processes are initiated and regulated by a great variety of inflammatory mediators including cytokines, prostanoids, leukotrienes, neuropeptides, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species...

  18. Copycat innate lymphoid cells dampen gut inflammation.

    OpenAIRE

    Magri, Giuliana; Cerutti, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms whereby the gut mucosa tolerates trillions of commensal bacteria without developing inflammation remain poorly understood. A recent Science article reveals that gut innate lymphoid cells constrain inflammatory T cell responses to commensal bacteria by adopting a strategy usually deployed by thymic epithelial cells to negatively select self-reactive T cells.

  19. Intestinal Hedgehog signaling in tumors and inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.V.J.A. Büller

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis we investigated the role of Hedgehog signaling in tumors and inflammation. By using an inducible Indian Hedgehog (Ihh) knockout mouse we show that Ihh signals via the mesenchyme to the proliferating cells in the crypt to attenuate proliferation. Despite its anti-proliferative role in

  20. Research sheds light on treatment of inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ The latest research breakthrough on the molecular mechanism and treatment of inflammation, contributed by scientists from the Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences (SIBS) under the Chinese Academy of Sciences and their American collaborators, was reported online by Nature Immunology on July 16, 2007.

  1. Aggravation of viral hepatitis by platelet-derived serotonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Philipp A; Contaldo, Claudio; Georgiev, Panco; El-Badry, Ashraf Mohammad; Recher, Mike; Kurrer, Michael; Cervantes-Barragan, Luisa; Ludewig, Burkhard; Calzascia, Thomas; Bolinger, Beatrice; Merkler, Doron; Odermatt, Bernhard; Bader, Michael; Graf, Rolf; Clavien, Pierre-Alain; Hegazy, Ahmed N; Löhning, Max; Harris, Nicola L; Ohashi, Pamela S; Hengartner, Hans; Zinkernagel, Rolf M; Lang, Karl S

    2008-07-01

    More than 500 million people worldwide are persistently infected with hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus. Although both viruses are poorly cytopathic, persistence of either virus carries a risk of chronic liver inflammation, potentially resulting in liver steatosis, liver cirrhosis, end-stage liver failure or hepatocellular carcinoma. Virus-specific T cells are a major determinant of the outcome of hepatitis, as they contribute to the early control of chronic hepatitis viruses, but they also mediate immunopathology during persistent virus infection. We have analyzed the role of platelet-derived vasoactive serotonin during virus-induced CD8(+) T cell-dependent immunopathological hepatitis in mice infected with the noncytopathic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. After virus infection, platelets were recruited to the liver, and their activation correlated with severely reduced sinusoidal microcirculation, delayed virus elimination and increased immunopathological liver cell damage. Lack of platelet-derived serotonin in serotonin-deficient mice normalized hepatic microcirculatory dysfunction, accelerated virus clearance in the liver and reduced CD8(+) T cell-dependent liver cell damage. In keeping with these observations, serotonin treatment of infected mice delayed entry of activated CD8(+) T cells into the liver, delayed virus control and aggravated immunopathological hepatitis. Thus, vasoactive serotonin supports virus persistence in the liver and aggravates virus-induced immunopathology.

  2. Melanin: A scavenger in gingival inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Nilima

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the major direct or indirect targets of ultraviolet exposure of skin is the melanocyte or the melanin -forming cell. Epidermal melanocytes act as a trap for free radicals. Based on the protective role of melanocytes in medical literature, the role of melanin pigmentation in gingiva needs to be elucidated. Periodontal pathogens and their products demonstrate the ability to induce the generation of reactive oxygen species. Hence purpose of this study was to unravel the protective role of melanin (if any against the gingival inflammation. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 subjects; 20 in each group were selected. The selection of subjects regarding gingival pigmentation was based on Dummett′s scoring criteria 0, 3. A complete medical, dental history and an informed consent were obtained from the patients. After evaluation of clinical parameters the GCF was collected using microcapillary pipettes at the selected sites. IL-1β levels were quantitated using ELISA. Results: In non-pigmented healthy and gingivitis groups, there was a positive correlation between plaque index, gingival index and bleeding index versus IL-1β level: indicating an increase in the biochemical mediator of inflammation corresponding to an increase in the clinical parameters of inflammation. Also a positive correlation was found between the gingival index and bleeding index versus the IL-1β levels in the pigmented healthy group. The pigmented gingivitis groups showed a negative correlation between the plaque index, gingival index and bleeding index. Conclusions: The clinical markers of inflammation such as gingival index, bleeding index was of low numerical value in pigmented group than in the non-pigmented group, supposedly due to the protective action of melanin. The negative correlation of clinical markers of inflammation to the IL-1β levels in the pigmented gingivitis group could possibly be attributed to the protective role of melanins.

  3. Role of Smooth Muscle in Intestinal Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M Collins

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The notion that smooth muscle function is altered in inflammation is prompted by clinical observations of altered motility in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. While altered motility may reflect inflammation-induced changes in intrinsic or extrinsic nerves to the gut, changes in gut hormone release and changes in muscle function, recent studies have provided in vitro evidence of altered muscle contractility in muscle resected from patients with ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease. In addition, the observation that smooth muscle cells are more numerous and prominent in the strictured bowel of IBD patients compared with controls suggests that inflammation may alter the growth of intestinal smooth muscle. Thus, inflammation is associated with changes in smooth muscle growth and contractility that, in turn, contribute to important symptoms of IBD including diarrhea (from altered motility and pain (via either altered motility or stricture formation. The involvement of smooth muscle in this context may be as an innocent bystander, where cells and products of the inflammatory process induce alterations in muscle contractility and growth. However, it is likely that intestinal muscle cells play a more active role in the inflammatory process via the elaboration of mediators and trophic factors, including cytokines, and via the production of collagen. The concept of muscle cells as active participants in the intestinal inflammatory process is a new concept that is under intense study. This report summarizes current knowledge as it relates to these two aspects of altered muscle function (growth and contractility in the inflamed intestine, and will focus on mechanisms underlying these changes, based on data obtained from animal models of intestinal inflammation.

  4. Virus-induced dilated cardiomyopathy is characterized by increased levels of fibrotic extracellular matrix proteins and reduced amounts of energy-producing enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishtala, Krishnatej; Phong, Truong Q; Steil, Leif; Sauter, Martina; Salazar, Manuela G; Kandolf, Reinhard; Kroemer, Heyo K; Felix, Stephan B; Völker, Uwe; Klingel, Karin; Hammer, Elke

    2011-11-01

    The most relevant clinical phenotype resulting from chronic enteroviral myocarditis is dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Mice of the susceptible mouse strain A.BY/SnJ mimick well human DCM since they develop as a consequence of persistent infection and chronic inflammation a dilation of the heart ventricle several weeks after coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) infection. Therefore, this model is well suited for the analysis of changes in the heart proteome associated with DCM. Here, we present a proteomic survey of the dilated hearts based on differential fluorescence gel electrophoresis and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric centered methods in comparison to age-matched non-infected hearts. In total, 101 distinct proteins, which belong to categories immunity and defense, cell structure and associated proteins, energy metabolism and protein metabolism/modification differed in their levels in both groups. Levels of proteins involved in fatty acid metabolism and electron transport chain were found to be significantly reduced in infected mice suggesting a decrease in energy production in CVB3-induced DCM. Furthermore, proteins associated with muscle contraction (MLRV, MLRc2, MYH6, MyBPC3), were present in significantly altered amounts in infected mice. A significant increase in the level of extracellular matrix proteins in the dilated hearts indicates cardiac remodeling due to fibrosis.

  5. Gamma Interferon Signaling in Macrophage Lineage Cells Regulates Central Nervous System Inflammation and Chemokine Production ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Adora A.; Tripathi, Pulak K.; Sholl, Allyson; Jordan, Michael B.; Hildeman, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Intracranial (i.c.) infection of mice with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) results in anorexic weight loss, mediated by T cells and gamma interferon (IFN-γ). Here, we assessed the role of CD4+ T cells and IFN-γ on immune cell recruitment and proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine production in the central nervous system (CNS) after i.c. LCMV infection. We found that T-cell-depleted mice had decreased recruitment of hematopoietic cells to the CNS and diminished levels of IFN-γ, CCL2 (MCP...

  6. Endogenous lipid mediators in the resolution of airway inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Haworth, O.; Levy, B D

    2007-01-01

    Acute inflammation in the lung is fundamentally important to host defence, but chronic or excessive inflammation leads to several common respiratory diseases, including asthma and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

  7. DMPD: Regulatory pathways in inflammation. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17967718 Regulatory pathways in inflammation. Mantovani A, Garlanda C, Locati M, Ro....html) (.csml) Show Regulatory pathways in inflammation. PubmedID 17967718 Title Regulatory pathways in infl

  8. Role of TLR2-dependent inflammation in metastatic progression

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sunhwa; Karin, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation is a part of the host defense system, which provides protection against invading pathogens. However, it has become increasingly clear that inflammation can be evoked by endogenous mediators through Toll-like receptors (TLRs) to enhance tumor progression and metastasis. Here, we discuss the roles of TLR-mediated inflammation in tumor progression and the mechanisms through which it accomplishes this pathogenic function.

  9. New insights into pulmonary inflammation in cystic fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, S; Grigg, J

    2006-01-01

    Persistent lower airway infection with inflammation is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis. This review examines the recent advances in the understanding of airway inflammation in cystic fibrosis, and focuses on the evidence that pulmonary inflammation is, under some circumstances, disassociated from infection, and the potential implications for therapeutic intervention.

  10. The Hepatitis C Virus-induced NLRP3 Inflammasome Activates the Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Protein (SREBP) and Regulates Lipid Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, Steven; Iqbal, Jawed; Sarkar-Dutta, Mehuli; Lane, Samantha; Nagaraj, Abhiram; Ali, Naushad; Waris, Gulam

    2016-02-12

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) relies on host lipids and lipid droplets for replication and morphogenesis. The accumulation of lipid droplets in infected hepatocytes manifests as hepatosteatosis, a common pathology observed in chronic hepatitis C patients. One way by which HCV promotes the accumulation of intracellular lipids is through enhancing de novo lipogenesis by activating the sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs). In general, activation of SREBPs occurs during cholesterol depletion. Interestingly, during HCV infection, the activation of SREBPs occurs under normal cholesterol levels, but the underlying mechanisms are still elusive. Our previous study has demonstrated the activation of the inflammasome complex in HCV-infected human hepatoma cells. In this study, we elucidate the potential link between chronic hepatitis C-associated inflammation and alteration of lipid homeostasis in infected cells. Our results reveal that the HCV-activated NLRP3 inflammasome is required for the up-regulation of lipogenic genes such as 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase, fatty acid synthase, and stearoyl-CoA desaturase. Using pharmacological inhibitors and siRNA against the inflammasome components (NLRP3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD, and caspase-1), we further show that the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome plays a critical role in lipid droplet formation. NLRP3 inflammasome activation in HCV-infected cells enables caspase-1-mediated degradation of insulin-induced gene proteins. This subsequently leads to the transport of the SREBP cleavage-activating protein·SREBP complex from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi, followed by proteolytic activation of SREBPs by S1P and S2P in the Golgi. Typically, inflammasome activation leads to viral clearance. Paradoxically, here we demonstrate how HCV exploits the NLRP3 inflammasome to activate SREBPs and host lipid metabolism, leading to liver disease pathogenesis associated with

  11. The Hepatitis C Virus-induced NLRP3 Inflammasome Activates the Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Protein (SREBP) and Regulates Lipid Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, Steven; Iqbal, Jawed; Sarkar-Dutta, Mehuli; Lane, Samantha; Nagaraj, Abhiram; Ali, Naushad; Waris, Gulam

    2016-02-12

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) relies on host lipids and lipid droplets for replication and morphogenesis. The accumulation of lipid droplets in infected hepatocytes manifests as hepatosteatosis, a common pathology observed in chronic hepatitis C patients. One way by which HCV promotes the accumulation of intracellular lipids is through enhancing de novo lipogenesis by activating the sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs). In general, activation of SREBPs occurs during cholesterol depletion. Interestingly, during HCV infection, the activation of SREBPs occurs under normal cholesterol levels, but the underlying mechanisms are still elusive. Our previous study has demonstrated the activation of the inflammasome complex in HCV-infected human hepatoma cells. In this study, we elucidate the potential link between chronic hepatitis C-associated inflammation and alteration of lipid homeostasis in infected cells. Our results reveal that the HCV-activated NLRP3 inflammasome is required for the up-regulation of lipogenic genes such as 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase, fatty acid synthase, and stearoyl-CoA desaturase. Using pharmacological inhibitors and siRNA against the inflammasome components (NLRP3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD, and caspase-1), we further show that the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome plays a critical role in lipid droplet formation. NLRP3 inflammasome activation in HCV-infected cells enables caspase-1-mediated degradation of insulin-induced gene proteins. This subsequently leads to the transport of the SREBP cleavage-activating protein·SREBP complex from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi, followed by proteolytic activation of SREBPs by S1P and S2P in the Golgi. Typically, inflammasome activation leads to viral clearance. Paradoxically, here we demonstrate how HCV exploits the NLRP3 inflammasome to activate SREBPs and host lipid metabolism, leading to liver disease pathogenesis associated with

  12. Cross Talk Pathways Between Coagulation and Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Jonathan H; Conway, Edward M

    2016-04-29

    Anatomic pathology studies performed over 150 years ago revealed that excessive activation of coagulation occurs in the setting of inflammation. However, it has taken over a century since these seminal observations were made to delineate the molecular mechanisms by which these systems interact and the extent to which they participate in the pathogenesis of multiple diseases. There is, in fact, extensive cross talk between coagulation and inflammation, whereby activation of one system may amplify activation of the other, a situation that, if unopposed, may result in tissue damage or even multiorgan failure. Characterizing the common triggers and pathways are key for the strategic design of effective therapeutic interventions. In this review, we highlight some of the key molecular interactions, some of which are already showing promise as therapeutic targets for inflammatory and thrombotic disorders. PMID:27126649

  13. Role of platelets in allergic airway inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idzko, Marco; Pitchford, Simon; Page, Clive

    2015-06-01

    Increasing evidence suggests an important role for platelets and their products (e.g., platelet factor 4, β-thromboglobulin, RANTES, thromboxane, or serotonin) in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. A variety of changes in platelet function have been observed in patients with asthma, such as alterations in platelet secretion, expression of surface molecules, aggregation, and adhesion. Moreover, platelets have been found to actively contribute to most of the characteristic features of asthma, including bronchial hyperresponsiveness, bronchoconstriction, airway inflammation, and airway remodeling. This review brings together the current available data from both experimental and clinical studies that have investigated the role of platelets in allergic airway inflammation and asthma. It is anticipated that a better understanding of the role of platelets in the pathogenesis of asthma might lead to novel promising therapeutic approaches in the treatment of allergic airway diseases. PMID:26051948

  14. TRPA1: A Gatekeeper for Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, Diana M.; Pellegrino, Maurizio; Tsunozaki, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Tissue damage evokes an inflammatory response that promotes the removal of harmful stimuli, tissue repair, and protective behaviors to prevent further damage and encourage healing. However, inflammation may outlive its usefulness and become chronic. Chronic inflammation can lead to a host of diseases, including asthma, itch, rheumatoid arthritis, and colitis. Primary afferent sensory neurons that innervate target organs release inflammatory neuropeptides in the local area of tissue damage to promote vascular leakage, the recruitment of immune cells, and hypersensitivity to mechanical and thermal stimuli. TRPA1 channels are required for neuronal excitation, the release of inflammatory neuropeptides, and subsequent pain hypersensitivity. TRPA1 is also activated by the release of inflammatory agents from nonneuronal cells in the area of tissue injury or disease. This dual function of TRPA1 as a detector and instigator of inflammatory agents makes TRPA1 a gatekeeper of chronic inflammatory disorders of the skin, airways, and gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23020579

  15. Inflammation: therapeutic targets for diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiyin; Zhou, Shiwen

    2014-02-01

    There are still no approved treatments for the prevention or of cure of diabetic neuropathy, and only symptomatic pain therapies of variable efficacy are available. Inflammation is a cardinal pathogenic mechanism of diabetic neuropathy. The relationships between inflammation and the development of diabetic neuropathy involve complex molecular networks and processes. Herein, we review the key inflammatory molecules (inflammatory cytokines, adhesion molecules, chemokines) and pathways (nuclear factor kappa B, JUN N-terminal kinase) implicated in the development and progression of diabetic neuropathy. Advances in the understanding of the roles of these key inflammatory molecules and pathways in diabetic neuropathy will facilitate the discovery of the potential of anti-inflammatory approaches for the inhibition of the development of neuropathy. Specifically, many anti-inflammatory drugs significantly inhibit the development of different aspects of diabetic neuropathy in animal models and clinical trials.

  16. Gaseous mediators in resolution of inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, John L; Ianaro, Angela; Flannigan, Kyle L; Cirino, Giuseppe

    2015-05-01

    There are numerous gaseous substances that can act as signaling molecules, but the best characterized of these are nitric oxide, hydrogen sulfide and carbon monoxide. Each has been shown to play important roles in many physiological and pathophysiological processes. This article is focused on the effects of these gasotransmitters in the context of inflammation. There is considerable overlap in the actions of nitric oxide, hydrogen sulfide and carbon monoxide with respect to inflammation, and these mediators appear to act primarily as anti-inflammatory substances, promoting resolution of inflammatory processes. They also have protective and pro-healing effects in some tissues, such as the gastrointestinal tract and lung. Over the past two decades, significant progress has been made in the development of novel anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective drugs that release of one or more of these gaseous mediators.

  17. Delayed inflammation associated with retained perfluorocarbon liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Pradeep

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 55-year-old woman, with history of cataract surgery 1 year back, presented with features of ocular inflammation for last 3 months. She had no history of any other intraocular surgery. On examination, anterior segment showed frothy material in the inferior angle with moderate anterior chamber reaction (cells+/flare+ and sulcus intraocular lens with large posterior capsule rent. Fundoscopy showed multiple, small to medium-sized transparent bubbles of perfluorocarbon liquid (PFCL with membranes in the vitreous cavity. Ultrasonography confirmed the presence of PFCL in the vitreous cavity. Pars plana vitrectomy with anterior chamber wash was done which led to good visual recovery. To conclude, retained PFCL can cause late onset fibrinous inflammation after a quiescent period but surgical intervention may lead to good visual outcome.

  18. Inflammation, immunity, and vaccines for Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Elios, Mario M; Andersen, Leif P

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects almost half of the population worldwide and represents the major cause of gastroduodenal diseases, such as duodenal and gastric ulcer, gastric adenocarcinoma, autoimmune gastritis, and B-cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue. Helicobacter pylori induces...... the activation of a complex and fascinating cytokine and chemokine network in the gastric mucosa. Different bacterial and environmental factors, other concomitant infections, and host genetics may influence the balance between mucosal tolerance and inflammation in the course of H. pylori infection. An inverse...... association between H. pylori prevalence and the frequencies of asthma and allergies was demonstrated, and the neutrophil activating protein of H. pylori was shown to inhibit the allergic inflammation of bronchial asthma. During the last year, significant progress was made on the road to the first efficient...

  19. Inflammation as an Animal Development Phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Campos Ramos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is a term that has been used throughout history in different contexts; it may represent a simple collection of clinical symptoms for which drugs are developed, a disease mechanism, or even a defense mechanism against microbes validating Pasteur's studies on bacteriology and Darwin's proposed struggle for survival. Thus, an explanation of this term must also consider the scientific questions addressed. In this study, I propose that several of the inflammatory events typically described in immunological, pathological, and pharmacological contexts can also be perceived as mechanisms of animal development. Thus, by recognizing that the generation of an animal form, its conservation, and its regeneration after tissue damage are phenomena of the same nature, inflammation can be addressed through the approach of developmental biology, thereby acquiring a much neglected physiological counterpart.

  20. Understanding migraine: Potential role of neurogenic inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Rakesh Malhotra

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic inflammation, a well-defined pathophysiologial process is characterized by the release of potent vasoactive neuropeptides, predominantly calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP), and neurokinin A from activated peripheral nociceptive sensory nerve terminals (usually C and A delta-fibers). These peptides lead to a cascade of inflammatory tissue responses including arteriolar vasodilation, plasma protein extravasation, and degranulation of mast cells in their peripher...

  1. The role of histamine in neurogenic inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Rosa, A. C.; Fantozzi, R

    2013-01-01

    The term ‘neurogenic inflammation’ has been adopted to describe the local release of inflammatory mediators, such as substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide, from neurons. Once released, these neuropeptides induce the release of histamine from adjacent mast cells. In turn, histamine evokes the release of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide; thus, a bidirectional link between histamine and neuropeptides in neurogenic inflammation is established. The aim of this review is to...

  2. Mediators of Inflammation in Acute Kidney Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Akcay; Quocan Nguyen; Edelstein, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) remains to be an independent risk factor for mortality and morbidity. Inflammation is now believed to play a major role in the pathopathophysiology of AKI. It is hypothesized that in ischemia, sepsis and nephrotoxic models that the initial insult results in morphological and/or functional changes in vascular endothelial cells and/or in tubular epithelium. Then, leukocytes including neutrophils, macrophages, natural killer cells, and lymphocytes infiltrate into the in...

  3. Reactive Oxygen Species, SUMOylation, and Endothelial Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Nhat-Tu Le; Corsetti, James P; Janet L. Dehoff-Sparks; Sparks, Charles E.; Keigi Fujiwara; Jun-ichi Abe

    2012-01-01

    Although the exact mechanism through which NADPH oxidases (Nox’s) generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) is still not completely understood, it is widely considered that ROS accumulation is the cause of oxidative stress in endothelial cells. Increasing pieces of evidence strongly indicate the role for ROS in endothelial inflammation and dysfunction and subsequent development of atherosclerotic plaques, which are causes of various pathological cardiac events. An overview for a causative relati...

  4. Neurobiology of Inflammation-Associated Anorexia

    OpenAIRE

    Gautron, Laurent; Layé, Sophie

    2010-01-01

    Compelling data demonstrate that inflammation-associated anorexia directly results from the action of pro-inflammatory factors, primarily cytokines and prostaglandins E2, on the nervous system. For instance, the aforementioned pro-inflammatory factors can stimulate the activity of peripheral sensory neurons, and induce their own de novo synthesis and release into the brain parenchyma and cerebrospinal fluid. Ultimately, it results in the mobilization of a specific neural circuit that shuts do...

  5. Anticoagulant modulation of inflammation in severe sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Karen S; Sawheny, Eva; Kinasewitz, Gary T

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation and coagulation are so tightly linked that the cytokine storm which accompanies the development of sepsis initiates thrombin activation and the development of an intravascular coagulopathy. This review examines the interaction between the inflammatory and coagulation cascades, as well as the role of endogenous anticoagulants in regulating this interaction and dampening the activity of both pathways. Clinical trials attempting to improve outcomes in patients with severe sepsis by ...

  6. Heme on innate immunity and inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Dutra, Fabianno F.; Bozza, Marcelo T.

    2014-01-01

    Heme is an essential molecule expressed ubiquitously all through our tissues. Heme plays major functions in cellular physiology and metabolism as the prosthetic group of diverse proteins. Once released from cells and from hemeproteins free heme causes oxidative damage and inflammation, thus acting as a prototypic damage-associated molecular pattern. In this context, free heme is a critical component of the pathological process of sterile and infectious hemolytic conditions including malaria, ...

  7. Links between behavioral factors and inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    O’Connor, Mary-Frances; Irwin, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    This review focuses on those biobehavioral factors that show robust associations with markers of inflammation, including discussion of the following variables: diet, smoking, coffee, alcohol, exercise and sleep disruption. Each of these variables has been assessed in large-scale epidemiological studies, and many in clinical and experimental studies as well. Treatment strategies that target biobehavioral factors have the potential to complement and add to the benefit of anti-inflammatory medic...

  8. Neurobiology of inflammation-associated anorexia

    OpenAIRE

    Laurent Gautron; Sophie Laye

    2010-01-01

    Compelling data demonstrate that inflammation-associated anorexia directly results from the action of pro-inflammatory factors, primarily cytokines and prostaglandins E2, on the nervous system. For instance, the aforementioned pro-inflammatory factors can stimulate the activity of peripheral sensory neurons, and induce their own de novo synthesis and release into the brain parenchyma and cerebrospinal fluid. Ultimately, it results in the mobilization of a specific neural circuit that shuts do...

  9. Silibinin attenuates allergic airway inflammation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Silibinin diminishes ovalbumin-induced inflammatory reactions in the mouse lung. ► Silibinin reduces the levels of various cytokines into the lung of allergic mice. ► Silibinin prevents the development of airway hyperresponsiveness in allergic mice. ► Silibinin suppresses NF-κB transcriptional activity. -- Abstract: Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease regulated by coordination of T-helper2 (Th2) type cytokines and inflammatory signal molecules. Silibinin is one of the main flavonoids produced by milk thistle, which is reported to inhibit the inflammatory response by suppressing the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathway. Because NF-κB activation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation, we have investigated the effect of silibinin on a mouse ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma model. Airway hyperresponsiveness, cytokines levels, and eosinophilic infiltration were analyzed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue. Pretreatment of silibinin significantly inhibited airway inflammatory cell recruitment and peribronchiolar inflammation and reduced the production of various cytokines in bronchoalveolar fluid. In addition, silibinin prevented the development of airway hyperresponsiveness and attenuated the OVA challenge-induced NF-κB activation. These findings indicate that silibinin protects against OVA-induced airway inflammation, at least in part via downregulation of NF-κB activity. Our data support the utility of silibinin as a potential medicine for the treatment of asthma.

  10. Silibinin attenuates allergic airway inflammation in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yun Ho [Department of Anatomy, Medical School, Institute for Medical Sciences, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Jeonbuk 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Guang Yu [Department of Radiology, Yanbian University Hospital, YanJi 133002 (China); Guo, Hui Shu [Centralab, The First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116011 (China); Piao, Hong Mei [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Yanbian University Hospital, YanJi 133000 (China); Li, Liang chang; Li, Guang Zhao [Department of Anatomy and Histology and Embryology, Yanbian University School of Basic Medical Sciences, 977 Gongyuan Road, YanJi 133002, Jilin (China); Lin, Zhen Hua [Department of Pathology, Yanbian University School of Basic Medical Sciences, YanJi 133000 (China); Yan, Guang Hai, E-mail: ghyan@ybu.edu.cn [Department of Anatomy and Histology and Embryology, Yanbian University School of Basic Medical Sciences, 977 Gongyuan Road, YanJi 133002, Jilin (China)

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin diminishes ovalbumin-induced inflammatory reactions in the mouse lung. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin reduces the levels of various cytokines into the lung of allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin prevents the development of airway hyperresponsiveness in allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin suppresses NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity. -- Abstract: Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease regulated by coordination of T-helper2 (Th2) type cytokines and inflammatory signal molecules. Silibinin is one of the main flavonoids produced by milk thistle, which is reported to inhibit the inflammatory response by suppressing the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) pathway. Because NF-{kappa}B activation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation, we have investigated the effect of silibinin on a mouse ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma model. Airway hyperresponsiveness, cytokines levels, and eosinophilic infiltration were analyzed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue. Pretreatment of silibinin significantly inhibited airway inflammatory cell recruitment and peribronchiolar inflammation and reduced the production of various cytokines in bronchoalveolar fluid. In addition, silibinin prevented the development of airway hyperresponsiveness and attenuated the OVA challenge-induced NF-{kappa}B activation. These findings indicate that silibinin protects against OVA-induced airway inflammation, at least in part via downregulation of NF-{kappa}B activity. Our data support the utility of silibinin as a potential medicine for the treatment of asthma.

  11. Gut inflammation and microbiome in spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabeerdoss, Jayakanthan; Sandhya, Pulukool; Danda, Debashish

    2016-04-01

    Spondyloarthritis (SpA) is chronic inflammatory disease involving joints and the spine. Bowel inflammation is common in SpA, which may be classified as acute or chronic. Chronic gut inflammation is most common in SpA patients with axial involvement as compared to those presenting with peripheral involvement alone. The pathogenesis of gut inflammation in SpA could be explained by two factors-over-activation of immunological cells and altered gut microbiome. This is exemplified by SpA animal models, namely HLA-B27-expressing transgenic animals and SKG mice models. Immunological mechanisms include homing of activated T cells from gut into synovium, excess pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion by immune cells such as IL-23 and genetic variations in immunological genes. The evidence for role of gut microbiome in SpA is gradually emerging. Recently, metagenomic study of gut microbiome by sequencing of microbial nucleic acids has enabled identification of new microbial taxa and their functions in gut of patients with SpA. In SpA, the gut microbiome could emerge as diagnostic and prognostic marker of disease. Modulation of gut microbiome is slated to have therapeutic potential as well. PMID:26719306

  12. Stress, and Inflammation in Young Soccer Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Baralic

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The physiologic stress induced by physical activity is reflected in immune system perturbations, oxidative stress, muscle injury, and inflammation. We investigated the effect of astaxanthin (Asx supplementation on salivary IgA (sIgA and oxidative stress status in plasma, along with changes in biochemical parameters and total/differential white cell counts. Forty trained male soccer players were randomly assigned to Asx and placebo groups. Asx group was supplemented with 4 mg of Asx. Saliva and blood samples were collected at the baseline and after 90 days of supplementation in preexercise conditions. We observed a rise of sIgA levels at rest after 90 days of Asx supplementation, which was accompanied with a decrease in prooxidant-antioxidant balance. The plasma muscle enzymes levels were reduced significantly by Asx supplementation and by regular training. The increase in neutrophil count and hs-CRP level was found only in placebo group, indicating a significant blunting of the systemic inflammatory response in the subjects taking Asx. This study indicates that Asx supplementation improves sIgA response and attenuates muscle damage, thus preventing inflammation induced by rigorous physical training. Our findings also point that Asx could show significant physiologic modulation in individuals with mucosal immunity impairment or under conditions of increased oxidative stress and inflammation.

  13. Congenital muscular dystrophy with inflammation: Diagnostic considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaumudi Konkay

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Muscle biopsy features of congenital muscular dystrophies (CMD vary from usual dystrophic picture to normal or nonspecific myopathic picture or prominent fibrosis or striking inflammatory infiltrate, which may lead to diagnostic errors. A series of patients of CMD with significant inflammatory infiltrates on muscle biopsy were correlated with laminin α 2 deficiency on immunohistochemistry (IHC. Material and Methods: Cryostat sections of muscle biopsies from the patients diagnosed as CMD on clinical and muscle biopsy features from 1996 to 2014 were reviewed with hematoxylin and eosin(H&E, enzyme and immunohistochemistry (IHC with laminin α 2. Muscle biopsies with inflammatory infiltrate were correlated with laminin α 2 deficiency. Results: There were 65 patients of CMD, with inflammation on muscle biopsy in 16. IHC with laminin α 2 was available in nine patients, of which six showed complete absence along sarcolemma (five presented with floppy infant syndrome and one with delayed motor milestones and three showed discontinuous, and less intense staining. Conclusions: CMD show variable degrees of inflammation on muscle biopsy. A diagnosis of laminin α 2 deficient CMD should be considered in patients of muscular dystrophy with inflammation, in children with hypotonia/delayed motor milestones.

  14. NOX2-dependent regulation of inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singel, Kelly L; Segal, Brahm H

    2016-04-01

    NADPH oxidase (NOX) isoforms together have multiple functions that are important for normal physiology and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a broad range of diseases, including atherosclerosis, cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. The phagocyte NADPH oxidase (NOX2) is critical for antimicrobial host defence. Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an inherited disorder of NOX2 characterized by severe life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections and by excessive inflammation, including Crohn's-like inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). NOX2 defends against microbes through the direct antimicrobial activity of reactive oxidants and through activation of granular proteases and generation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). NETosis involves the breakdown of cell membranes and extracellular release of chromatin and neutrophil granular constituents that target extracellular pathogens. Although the immediate effects of oxidant generation and NETosis are predicted to be injurious, NOX2, in several contexts, limits inflammation and injury by modulation of key signalling pathways that affect neutrophil accumulation and clearance. NOX2 also plays a role in antigen presentation and regulation of adaptive immunity. Specific NOX2-activated pathways such as nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a transcriptional factor that induces antioxidative and cytoprotective responses, may be important therapeutic targets for CGD and, more broadly, diseases associated with excessive inflammation and injury.

  15. The Enteric Nervous System in Intestinal Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith A Sharkey

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Since about the 1950s nerves in the wall of the intestine have been postulated to play a role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Human and animal studies examining the role of nerves in intestinal inflammation are the focus of this review. Consideration is given to two possible ways that nerves are involved in IBD. First, nerves may play a role in the development or maintenance of inflammation through local release of transmitters. Second, once initiated (by whatever means, the processes of inflammation may disrupt the normal pattern of innervation and the interactions of nerves and their target tissues. Many of the functional disturbances observed in IBD are likely due to an alteration in the enteric nervous system either structurally through disruptions of nerve-target relationships or by modifications of neurotransmitters or their receptors. Finally, it appears that the enteric nervous system may be a potential therapeutic target in IBD and that neuroactive drugs acting locally can represent useful agents in the management of this disease.

  16. Progress in Study of Plant Resistance Gene Function Using Virus Induced Gene Silence System%病毒诱导的基因沉默在植物抗病基因功能研究中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓萝; 赵君

    2013-01-01

    Virus induced gene silence(VIGS)is a natural mechanism, which was used by plants to resist the virus invasion. Now, it has been developed into a popular genetic technique to suppress the endogenous gene expression by recombinant viruses which contain the fragment of target genes. As a novel tool to unravel the candidate gene's function, VIGS has many advantages such as unnecessarily knowing the ful -length sequence of the target gene in advance, quick acquisition of phenotype, and unnecessarily obtaining the transgenic plant. Now, it has been widely used in the field of plant gene function studies. In this review, we summarized the research progress in VIGS mechanism, the advantages and limitations of VIGS system and its application to studying the plant resistance gene's function.%  病毒诱导的基因沉默(Virus induced gene silencing, VIGS)是一种植物抵抗病毒侵入的自然机制,现在已被开发成通过插入目的基因片段的重组病毒来抑制植物内源基因表达的遗传技术,主要用于研究目标基因的功能。作为一种新型的基因鉴定和功能研究的技术工具, VIGS 具有无需事先知道目的基因全长序列、快速获取表型、无需获得转基因植株等诸多优点,已越来越广泛地被应用于植物基因功能研究领域。本文从 VIGS 的作用机制、 VIGS 体系的优点及局限性以及 VIGS 在植物抗病机制方面的研究进展等几个方面对病毒诱导的基因沉默进行了综述。

  17. RNF20 Links Histone H2B Ubiquitylation with Inflammation and Inflammation-Associated Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarcic, Ohad; Pateras, Ioannis S.; Cooks, Tomer; Shema, Efrat; Kanterman, Julia; Ashkenazi, Hadas; Boocholez, Hana; Hubert, Ayala; Rotkopf, Ron; Baniyash, Michal; Pikarsky, Eli; Gorgoulis, Vassilis G.; Oren, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    Summary Factors linking inflammation and cancer are of great interest. We now report that the chromatin-targeting E3 ubiquitin ligase RNF20/RNF40, driving histone H2B monoubiquitylation (H2Bub1), modulates inflammation and inflammation-associated cancer in mice and humans. Downregulation of RNF20 and H2Bub1 favors recruitment of p65-containing nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) dimers over repressive p50 homodimers and decreases the heterochromatin mark H3K9me3 on a subset of NF-κB target genes to augment their transcription. Concordantly, RNF20+/− mice are predisposed to acute and chronic colonic inflammation and inflammation-associated colorectal cancer, with excessive myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) that may quench antitumoral T cell activity. Notably, colons of human ulcerative colitis patients, as well as colorectal tumors, reveal downregulation of RNF20/RNF40 and H2Bub1 in both epithelium and stroma, supporting the clinical relevance of our tissue culture and mouse model findings. PMID:26854224

  18. RNF20 Links Histone H2B Ubiquitylation with Inflammation and Inflammation-Associated Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohad Tarcic

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Factors linking inflammation and cancer are of great interest. We now report that the chromatin-targeting E3 ubiquitin ligase RNF20/RNF40, driving histone H2B monoubiquitylation (H2Bub1, modulates inflammation and inflammation-associated cancer in mice and humans. Downregulation of RNF20 and H2Bub1 favors recruitment of p65-containing nuclear factor κB (NF-κB dimers over repressive p50 homodimers and decreases the heterochromatin mark H3K9me3 on a subset of NF-κB target genes to augment their transcription. Concordantly, RNF20+/− mice are predisposed to acute and chronic colonic inflammation and inflammation-associated colorectal cancer, with excessive myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs that may quench antitumoral T cell activity. Notably, colons of human ulcerative colitis patients, as well as colorectal tumors, reveal downregulation of RNF20/RNF40 and H2Bub1 in both epithelium and stroma, supporting the clinical relevance of our tissue culture and mouse model findings.

  19. Epstein-Barr Virus-Induced Gene 3 (EBI3) Blocking Leads to Induce Antitumor Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Response and Suppress Tumor Growth in Colorectal Cancer by Bidirectional Reciprocal-Regulation STAT3 Signaling Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yanfang; Chen, Qianqian; Du, Wenjing; Chen, Can; Li, Feifei; Yang, Jingying; Peng, Jianyu; Kang, Dongping; Lin, Bihua; Chai, Xingxing; Zhou, Keyuan; Zeng, Jincheng

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 3 (EBI3) is a member of the interleukin-12 (IL-12) family structural subunit and can form a heterodimer with IL-27p28 and IL-12p35 subunit to build IL-27 and IL-35, respectively. However, IL-27 stimulates whereas IL-35 inhibits antitumor T cell responses. To date, little is known about the role of EBI3 in tumor microenvironment. In this study, firstly we assessed EBI3, IL-27p28, IL-12p35, gp130, and p-STAT3 expression with clinicopathological parameters of colorectal cancer (CRC) tissues; then we evaluated the antitumor T cell responses and tumor growth with a EBI3 blocking peptide. We found that elevated EBI3 may be associated with IL-12p35, gp130, and p-STAT3 to promote CRC progression. EBI3 blocking peptide promoted antitumor cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response by inducing Granzyme B, IFN-γ production, and p-STAT3 expression and inhibited CRC cell proliferation and tumor growth to associate with suppressing gp130 and p-STAT3 expression. Taken together, these results suggest that EBI3 may mediate a bidirectional reciprocal-regulation STAT3 signaling pathway to assist the tumor escape immune surveillance in CRC. PMID:27247488

  20. Down-regulation of osmotin (PR5) gene by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) leads to susceptibility of resistant Piper colubrinum Link. to the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora capsici Leonian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anu, K; Jessymol, K K; Chidambareswaren, M; Gayathri, G S; Manjula, S

    2015-06-01

    Piper colubrinum Link., a distant relative of Piper nigrum L., is immune to the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora capsici Leonian that causes 'quick wilt' in cultivated black pepper (P. nigrum). The osmotin, PR5 gene homologue, earlier identified from P. colubrinum, showed significant overexpression in response to pathogen and defense signalling molecules. The present study focuses on the functional validation of P. colubrinum osmotin (PcOSM) by virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) using Tobacco Rattle Virus (TRV)-based vector. P. colubrinum plants maintained under controlled growth conditions in a growth chamber were infiltrated with Agrobacterium carrying TRV empty vector (control) and TRV vector carrying PcOSM. Three weeks post infiltration, viral movement was confirmed in newly emerged leaves of infiltrated plants by RT-PCR using TRV RNA1 and TRV RNA2 primers. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR confirmed significant down-regulation of PcOSM gene in TRV-PcOSM infiltrated plant compared with the control plants. The control and silenced plants were challenged with Phytophthora capsici which demonstrated that knock-down of PcOSM in P. colubrinum leads to increased fungal mycelial growth in silenced plants compared to control plants, which was accompanied by decreased accumulation of H2O2 as indicated by 3,3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB) staining. Thus, in this study, we demonstrated that Piper colubrinum osmotin gene is required for resisting P. capsici infection and has possible role in hypersensitive cell death response and oxidative burst signaling during infection. PMID:26155671

  1. The role of adipokines in chronic inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mancuso P

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Peter Mancuso Department of Nutritional Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA Abstract: Adipose tissue has traditionally been defined as connective tissue that stores excess calories in the form of triacylglycerol. However, the physiologic functions attributed to adipose tissue are expanding, and it is now well established that adipose tissue is an endocrine gland. Among the endocrine factors elaborated by adipose tissue are the adipokines; hormones, similar in structure to cytokines, produced by adipose tissue in response to changes in adipocyte triacylglycerol storage and local and systemic inflammation. They inform the host regarding long-term energy storage and have a profound influence on reproductive function, blood pressure regulation, energy homeostasis, the immune response, and many other physiologic processes. The adipokines possess pro- and anti-inflammatory properties and play a critical role in integrating systemic metabolism with immune function. In calorie restriction and starvation, proinflammatory adipokines decline and anti-inflammatory adipokines increase, which informs the host of energy deficits and contributes to the suppression of immune function. In individuals with normal metabolic status, there is a balance of pro- and anti-inflammatory adipokines. This balance shifts to favor proinflammatory mediators as adipose tissue expands during the development of obesity. As a consequence, the proinflammatory status of adipose tissue contributes to a chronic low-grade state of inflammation and metabolic disorders associated with obesity. These disturbances are associated with an increased risk of metabolic disease, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and many other pathological conditions. This review focuses on the impact of energy homeostasis on the adipokines in immune function. Keywords: calorie restriction, obesity, adipose tissue, type 2 diabetes, macrophage, infection, chronic

  2. Probiotics as regulators of inflammation: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Lescheid

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A substantial and increasing body of clinical evidence supports the role of specific strains and mixtures of probiotics in the prevention and treatment of certain diseases. Several general mechanisms of action have been proposed, including supporting repair of hyperpermeable epithelial barriers, interfering with infection by pathogens, and restoring a healthful balance of commensal microbes to affect metabolism. Emerging evidence supports an additional role of probiotics as important modulators of immune system responses, including inflammation, at mucosal surfaces. In particular, by preventing or repairing ‘leaky’ epithelial barriers, probiotics can indirectly affect the inflammatory response by negating the source of pro-inflammatory stimuli associated with low-grade endotoxemia. They also enhance production of short chain fatty acids with anti-inflammatory properties (e.g. butyrate as well as increase synthesis of antimicrobial peptides that influence inflammation resolution pathways in the mucosa. Furthermore, probiotics and some of their secreted metabolic products can act as ligands for innate immune system receptors, directly influencing key pro-inflammatory pathways. They also stimulate the differentiation and activity of important immune cells (e.g., dendritic cells, T cells, and subsequently increase production of important regulatory cytokines, including interleukin-10 (IL-10 and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-. Finally, there are limited but increasing animal studies and clinical trials demonstrating probiotics do affect common biomarkers of inflammation, including C-reactive protein, as well as signs and symptoms of the associated diseases suggesting they can have therapeutic benefit in the treatment of chronic inflammatory disease

  3. Radiolabelled cytokines for imaging chronic inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diagnosis and particularly follow-up of chronic inflammatory disorders could be often difficult in clinical practice. Indeed, traditional radiological techniques reveal only structural tissue alterations and are not able to monitor functional changes occurring in tissues affected by chronic inflammation. The continuous advances in the knowledge of the pathophysiology of chronic disorders, combine with the progress of radiochemistry, led to the development of new specific radiolabelled agents for the imaging of chronic diseases. In this scenario, cytokines, due to their pivotal role in such diseases, represent good candidate as radiopharmaceuticals. (author)

  4. Peroxisomes,oxidative stress,and inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stanley; R; Terlecky; Laura; J; Terlecky; Courtney; R; Giordano

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisomes are intracellular organelles mediating a wide variety of biosynthetic and biodegradative reactions.Included among these are the metabolism of hydrogen peroxide and other reactive species,molecules whose levels help define the oxidative state of cells.Loss of oxidative equilibrium in cells of tissues and organs potentiates inflammatory responses which can ultimately trigger human disease.The goal of this article is to review evidence for connections between peroxisome function,oxidative stress,and inflammation in the context of human health and degenerative disease.Dysregulated points in this nexus are identified and potential remedial approaches are presented.

  5. Does Inflammation Mediate the Association Between Obesity and Insulin Resistance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adabimohazab, Razieh; Garfinkel, Amanda; Milam, Emily C; Frosch, Olivia; Mangone, Alexander; Convit, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    In adult obesity, low-grade systemic inflammation is considered an important step in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance (IR). The association between obesity and inflammation is less well established in adolescents. Here, we ascertain the importance of inflammation in IR among obese adolescents by utilizing either random forest (RF) classification or mediation analysis approaches. The inflammation balance score, composed of eight pro- and anti-inflammatory makers, as well as most of the individual inflammatory markers differed significantly between lean and overweight/obese. In contrast, adiponectin was the only individual marker selected as a predictor of IR by RF, and the balance score only revealed a medium-to-low importance score. Neither adiponectin nor the inflammation balance score was found to mediate the relationship between obesity and IR. These findings do not support the premise that low-grade systemic inflammation is a key for the expression of IR in the human. Prospective longitudinal studies should confirm these findings.

  6. Dietary Modulation of Inflammation-Induced Colorectal Cancer through PPARγ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashlee B. Carter

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Mounting evidence suggests that the risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC is dramatically increased for patients with chronic inflammatory diseases. For instance, patients with Crohn's Disease (CD or Ulcerative Colitis (UC have a 12–20% increased risk for developing CRC. Preventive strategies utilizing nontoxic natural compounds that modulate immune responses could be successful in the suppression of inflammation-driven colorectal cancer in high-risk groups. The increase of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ expression and its transcriptional activity has been identified as a target for anti-inflammatory efforts, and the suppression of inflammation-driven colon cancer. PPARγ down-modulates inflammation and elicits antiproliferative and proapoptotic actions in epithelial cells. All of which may decrease the risk for inflammation-induced CRC. This review will focus on the use of orally active, naturally occurring chemopreventive approaches against inflammation-induced CRC that target PPARγ and therefore down-modulate inflammation.

  7. Modulation of Macrophage Efferocytosis in Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darlynn R Korns

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A critical function of macrophages within the inflammatory milieu is the removal of dying cells by a specialized phagocytic process called efferocytosis (to carry to the grave. Through specific receptor engagement and induction of downstream signaling, efferocytosing macrophages promote resolution of inflammation by i efficiently engulfing dying cells, thus avoiding cellular disruption and release of inflammatory contents, and ii producing anti-inflammatory mediators such as IL-10 and TGF-β that dampen pro-inflammatory responses. Evidence suggests that plasticity in macrophage programming, in response to changing environmental cues, modulates efferocytic capability. Essential to programming for enhanced efferocytosis is activation of the nuclear receptors PPARγ, PPARδ, LXR and possibly RXRα. Additionally, a number of signals in the inflammatory milieu, including those from dying cells themselves, can influence efferocytic efficacy either by acting as immediate inhibitors/enhancers or by altering macrophage programming for longer-term effects. Importantly, sustained inflammatory programming of macrophages can lead to defective apoptotic cell clearance and is associated with development of autoimmunity and other chronic inflammatory disorders. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the multiple factors that modulate macrophage efferocytic ability and highlights emerging therapeutic targets with significant potential for limiting chronic inflammation.

  8. The role of adipokines in chronic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue has traditionally been defined as connective tissue that stores excess calories in the form of triacylglycerol. However, the physiologic functions attributed to adipose tissue are expanding, and it is now well established that adipose tissue is an endocrine gland. Among the endocrine factors elaborated by adipose tissue are the adipokines; hormones, similar in structure to cytokines, produced by adipose tissue in response to changes in adipocyte triacylglycerol storage and local and systemic inflammation. They inform the host regarding long-term energy storage and have a profound influence on reproductive function, blood pressure regulation, energy homeostasis, the immune response, and many other physiologic processes. The adipokines possess pro- and anti-inflammatory properties and play a critical role in integrating systemic metabolism with immune function. In calorie restriction and starvation, proinflammatory adipokines decline and anti-inflammatory adipokines increase, which informs the host of energy deficits and contributes to the suppression of immune function. In individuals with normal metabolic status, there is a balance of pro- and anti-inflammatory adipokines. This balance shifts to favor proinflammatory mediators as adipose tissue expands during the development of obesity. As a consequence, the proinflammatory status of adipose tissue contributes to a chronic low-grade state of inflammation and metabolic disorders associated with obesity. These disturbances are associated with an increased risk of metabolic disease, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and many other pathological conditions. This review focuses on the impact of energy homeostasis on the adipokines in immune function. PMID:27529061

  9. Acupuncture to Reduce HIV-Associated Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Swanson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. HIV infection is associated with systemic inflammation that can increase risk for cardiovascular events. Acupuncture has been shown to have immunomodulatory effects and to improve symptoms in persons with inflammatory conditions. Objective. To test the anti-inflammatory effects of an acupuncture protocol that targets the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway (CAIP, a neural mechanism whose activation has been shown to reduce the release of proinflammatory cytokines, in persons with HIV-associated inflammation. Design, Setting, Participants, and Interventions. Double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial conducted in an outpatient clinic located in a medically underserved urban neighborhood. Twenty-five clinically-stable HIV-infected persons on antiretroviral therapy were randomized to receive once weekly CAIP-based acupuncture or sham acupuncture. Main Outcome Measures. Outcomes included plasma concentrations of high sensitivity C-reactive protein and D-dimer and fasting lipids. Results. Twenty-five participants completed the protocol (treatment group n=12, control group n=13. No adverse events related to the acupuncture protocol were observed. Compared to baseline values, the two groups did not significantly differ in any outcome measures at the end of the acupuncture protocol. Conclusions. CAIP-based acupuncture did not favorably modulate inflammatory or lipid parameters. Additional studies are warranted of CAIP-based protocols of different frequencies/durations.

  10. Curbing Inflammation in the Ischemic Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto B. Evora

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A modern concept considers acute coronary syndrome as an autoinflammatory disorder. From the onset to the healing stage, an endless inflammation has been presented with complex, multiple cross-talk mechanisms at the molecular, cellular, and organ levels. Inflammatory response following acute myocardial infarction has been well documented since the 1940s and 1950s, including increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate, the C-reactive protein analysis, and the determination of serum complement. It is surprising to note, based on a wide literature overview including the following 30 years (decades of 1960, 1970, and 1980, that the inflammatory acute myocardium infarction lost its focus, virtually disappearing from the literature reports. The reversal of this historical process occurs in the 1990s with the explosion of studies involving cytokines. Considering the importance of inflammation in the pathophysiology of ischemic heart disease, the aim of this paper is to present a conceptual overview in order to explore the possibility of curbing this inflammatory process.

  11. Resveratrol, MicroRNAs, Inflammation, and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmerina Tili

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are short noncoding RNAs that regulate the expression of many target genes posttranscriptionally and are thus implicated in a wide array of cellular and developmental processes. The expression of miR-155 or miR-21 is upregulated during the course of the inflammatory response, but these microRNAs are also considered oncogenes due to their upregulation of expression in several types of tumors. Furthermore, it is now well established that inflammation is associated with the induction or the aggravation of nearly 25% of cancers. Therefore, the above microRNAs are thought to link inflammation and cancer. Recently, resveratrol (trans-3,4′,5-trihydroxystilbene, a natural polyphenol with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties, currently at the stage of preclinical studies for human cancer prevention, has been shown to induce the expression of miR-663, a tumor-suppressor and anti-inflammatory microRNA, while downregulating miR-155 and miR-21. In this paper we will discuss how the use of resveratrol in therapeutics may benefit from the preanalyses on the status of expression of miR-155 or miR-21 as well as of TGFβ1. In addition, we will discuss how resveratrol activity might possibly be enhanced by simultaneously manipulating the levels of its key target microRNAs, such as miR-663.

  12. Nutritionally Mediated Oxidative Stress and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Muñoz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many sources of nutritionally mediated oxidative stress that trigger inflammatory cascades along short and long time frames. These events are primarily mediated via NFκB. On the short-term scale postprandial inflammation is characterized by an increase in circulating levels of IL-6 and TNF-α and is mirrored on the long-term by proinflammatory gene expression changes in the adipocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs of obese individuals. Specifically the upregulation of CCL2/MCP-1, CCL3/MIP-1α, CCL4/MIP-1β, CXCL2/MIP-2α, and CXCL3/MIP-2β is noted because these changes have been observed in both adipocytes and PBMC of obese humans. In comparing numerous human intervention studies it is clear that pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory consumption choices mediate gene expression in humans adipocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Arachidonic acid and saturated fatty acids (SFAs both demonstrate an ability to increase pro-inflammatory IL-8 along with numerous other inflammatory factors including IL-6, TNFα, IL-1β, and CXCL1 for arachidonic acid and IGB2 and CTSS for SFA. Antioxidant rich foods including olive oil, fruits, and vegetables all demonstrate an ability to lower levels of IL-6 in PBMCs. Thus, dietary choices play a complex role in the mediation of unavoidable oxidative stress and can serve to exacerbate or dampen the level of inflammation.

  13. Do surface active parenteral formulations cause inflammation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderberg, Lars; Engblom, Johan; Lanbeck, Peter; Wahlgren, Marie

    2015-04-30

    Local irritation and inflammation at the site of administration are a common side effect following administration of parenteral formulations. Biological effects of surface (interfacial) activity in solutions are less well investigated than effects caused by other physico-chemical parameters such as pH and osmolality. The interfacial activity in different systems, including human plasma, typical amphiphilic substances with fundamental biological relevance such as free fatty acids, anesthetic depot formulations and six different antibiotics was measured. The relative interfacial pressure, and/or concentration of active substance, required to obtain 50% of the maximal attainable effect in terms of interfacial pressure were calculated. The aim was to test the hypothesis that these parameters would allow comparison to biological effects reported in in vivo studies on the investigated substances. The highest interfacial activity was found in a triglyceride/plasma system. Among the antibiotic tested, the highest interfacial activities were found in erythromycin and dicloxacillin, which is in accordance with previous clinical findings of a high tendency of infusion phlebitis and cell toxicity. Independently of investigated system, biological effects were minimal below a 15% relative increase of interfacial activity. Above 35-45% the effects were severe. Interfacial activity in parenteral formulations may well cause damages to tissues followed by inflammation. PMID:25708007

  14. Purinergic Receptors in Thrombosis and Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hechler, Béatrice; Gachet, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Under various pathological conditions, including thrombosis and inflammation, extracellular nucleotide levels may increase because of both active release and passive leakage from damaged or dying cells. Once in the extracellular compartment, nucleotides interact with plasma membrane receptors belonging to the P2 purinergic family, which are expressed by virtually all circulating blood cells and in most blood vessels. In this review, we focus on the specific role of the 3 platelet P2 receptors P2Y1, P2Y12, and P2X1 in hemostasis and arterial thrombosis. Beyond platelets, these 3 receptors, along with the P2Y2, P2Y6, and P2X7 receptors, constitute the main P2 receptors mediating the proinflammatory effects of nucleotides, which play important roles in various functions of circulating blood cells and cells of the vessel wall. Each of these P2 receptor subtypes specifically contributes to chronic or acute vascular inflammation and related diseases, such as atherosclerosis, restenosis, endotoxemia, and sepsis. The potential for therapeutic targeting of these P2 receptor subtypes is also discussed.

  15. The role of hypoxia in intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Yatrik M

    2016-12-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory disease of the intestine. IBD is a multifactorial disorder, and IBD-associated genes are critical in innate immune response, inflammatory response, autophagy, and epithelial barrier integrity. Moreover, epithelial oxygen tension plays a critical role in intestinal inflammation and resolution in IBD. The intestines have a dynamic and rapid fluctuation in cellular oxygen tension, which is dysregulated in IBD. Intestinal epithelial cells have a steep oxygen gradient where the tips of the villi are hypoxic and the oxygenation increases at the base of the villi. IBD results in heightened hypoxia throughout the mucosa. Hypoxia signals through a well-conserved family of transcription factors, where hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α and HIF-2α are essential in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. In inflamed mucosa, HIF-1α increases barrier protective genes, elicits protective innate immune responses, and activates an antimicrobial response through the increase in β-defensins. HIF-2α is essential in maintaining an epithelial-elicited inflammatory response and the regenerative and proliferative capacity of the intestine following an acute injury. HIF-1α activation in colitis leads to a protective response, whereas chronic activation of HIF-2α increases the pro-inflammatory response, intestinal injury, and cancer. In this mini-review, we detail the role of HIF-1α and HIF-2α in intestinal inflammation and injury and therapeutic implications of targeting HIF signaling in IBD. PMID:26812949

  16. Inhibition of Inflammation-Associated Olfactory Loss by Etanercept in an Inducible Olfactory Inflammation Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yong Gi; Lane, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of a soluble human tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) receptor blocker (Etanercept) on an inducible olfactory inflammation (IOI) mouse model Study Design An in vivo study using a transgenic mouse model Setting Research laboratory Subjects and Methods To study the impact of chronic inflammation on the olfactory system, a transgenic mouse model of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS)-associated olfactory loss was utilized (IOI mouse), expressing TNF-α in a temporally-controlled fashion specifically within the olfactory epithelium. In one group of mice (n=4), Etanercept was injected intraperitoneally (100 µg/dose, 3 times/week) concurrent with a 2-week period of TNF-α expression. A second group of mice (n=2) underwent induction of TNF-α expression for 8 weeks, with Etanercept treatment administered during the final 2 weeks of inflammation. Olfactory function was assayed by elecro-olfactogram (EOG), and olfactory tissue was processed for histology and immunohistochemical staining. Each group was compared with equal number of control group. Results Compared to non-treated IOI mice, Etanercept -treated IOI mice showed significantly improved EOG responses after 2 weeks (p<0.001). After 8 weeks of induced inflammation, there was massive loss of olfactory epithelium and no EOG response in non-treated IOI mice. However, in Etanercept - treated mice, regeneration of olfactory epithelium was observed. Conclusion Concomitant administration of Etanercept in IOI mice results in interruption of TNF-α-induced olfactory loss and induction of neuroepithelial regeneration. This demonstrates that Etanercept has potential utility as a tool for elucidating the role of TNF-α in other olfactory inflammation models. PMID:26932943

  17. Sex Differences in Depression: Does Inflammation Play a Role?

    OpenAIRE

    Derry, Heather M.; Padin, Avelina C.; Kuo, Jennifer L.; Hughes, Spenser; Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K.

    2015-01-01

    Women become depressed more frequently than men, a consistent pattern across cultures. Inflammation plays a key role in initiating depression among a subset of individuals, and depression also has inflammatory consequences. Notably, women experience higher levels of inflammation and greater autoimmune disease risk compared to men. In the current review, we explore the bidirectional relationship between inflammation and depression and describe how this link may be particularly relevant for wom...

  18. Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in Obesity-Related Glomerulopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Jinhua Tang; Haidong Yan; Shougang Zhuang

    2012-01-01

    Obesity-related glomerulopathy is an increasing cause of end-stage renal disease. Obesity has been considered a state of chronic low-grade systemic inflammation and chronic oxidative stress. Augmented inflammation in adipose and kidney tissues promotes the progression of kidney damage in obesity. Adipose tissue, which is accumulated in obesity, is a key endocrine organ that produces multiple biologically active molecules, including leptin, adiponectin, resistin, that affect inflammation, and ...

  19. Unraveling the Complex Relationship Triad between Lipids, Obesity, and Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Shahida A.; Ashraf Ali; Khan, Sarah A.; Solafa A. Zahran; Ghazi Damanhouri; Esam Azhar; Ishtiaq Qadri

    2014-01-01

    Obesity today stands at the intersection between inflammation and metabolic disorders causing an aberration of immune activity, and resulting in increased risk for diabetes, atherosclerosis, fatty liver, and pulmonary inflammation to name a few. Increases in mortality and morbidity in obesity related inflammation have initiated studies to explore different lipid mediated molecular pathways of attempting resolution that uncover newer therapeutic opportunities of anti-inflammatory components. M...

  20. Rat gingival model for testing drugs influencing inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Shaju P Jacob; Sonia Nath

    2013-01-01

    Preclinical drug testing is an important areain new drug development where animals are used.An ideal animal model for this is one which is simple,reliable and can be extrapolated to humans. Topicaldrugs for inflammation are conventionally tested onthe skin of animals after induction of inflammation.A gingival model would be simple as inflammation canbe induced naturally by the action of plaque. Rats area popular animal model for testing drugs as well as tostudy various diseases of the periodo...

  1. Programmed cell death and its role in inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Yang; Ge-Ning Jiang; Peng Zhang; Jie Fan

    2015-01-01

    Cell death plays an important role in the regulation of inflammation and may be the result of inflammation. The maintenance of tissue homeostasis necessitates both the recognition and removal of invading microbial pathogens as well as the clearance of dying cells. In the past few decades, emerging knowledge on cell death and inflammation has enriched our molecular understanding of the signaling pathways that mediate various programs of cell death and multiple types of inflammatory responses. This review provides an overview of the major types of cell death related to inflammation. Modification of cell death pathways is likely to be a logical therapeutic target for inflammatory diseases.

  2. Muscle regeneration and inflammation in patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauerslev, S; Ørngreen, M C; Hertz, J M;

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether inflammation and regeneration are prominent in mildly affected muscles of patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy type 1A (FSHD1A). Inflammation in muscle has been suggested by MRI studies in patients with FSHD1A.......The aim of this study was to investigate whether inflammation and regeneration are prominent in mildly affected muscles of patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy type 1A (FSHD1A). Inflammation in muscle has been suggested by MRI studies in patients with FSHD1A....

  3. Ovarian cancer, the coagulation pathway, and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xipeng; Wang, Ena; Kavanagh, John J; Freedman, Ralph S

    2005-06-21

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) represents the most frequent cause of death in the United States from a cancer involving the female genital tract. Contributing to the overall poor outcome in EOC patients, are the metastases to the peritoneum and stroma that are common in this cancer. In one study, cDNA microarray analysis was performed on fresh tissue to profile gene expression in patients with EOC. This study showed a number of genes with significantly altered expression in the pelvic peritoneum and stroma, and in the vicinity of EOC implants. These genes included those encoding coagulation factors and regulatory proteins in the coagulation cascade and genes encoding proteins associated with inflammatory responses. In addition to promoting the formation of blood clots, coagulation factors exhibit many other biologic functions as well as tumorigenic functions, the later including tumor cell proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Coagulation pathway proteins involved in tumorigenesis consist of factor II (thrombin), thrombin receptor (protease-activated receptors), factor III (tissue factor), factor VII, factor X and factor I (fibrinogen), and fibrin and factor XIII. In a recent study we conducted, we found that factor XII, factor XI, and several coagulation regulatory proteins, including heparin cofactor-II and epithelial protein C receptor (EPCR), were also upregulated in the peritoneum of EOC. In this review, we summarize evidence in support of a role for these factors in promoting tumor cell progression and the formation of ascites. We also discuss the different roles of coagulation factor pathways in the tumor and peritumoral microenvironments as they relate to angiogenesis, proliferation, invasion, and metastasis. Since inflammatory responses are another characteristic of the peritoneum in EOC, we also discuss the linkage between the coagulation cascade and the cytokines/chemokines involved in inflammation. Interleukin-8, which is considered an

  4. Ovarian cancer, the coagulation pathway, and inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavanagh John J

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC represents the most frequent cause of death in the United States from a cancer involving the female genital tract. Contributing to the overall poor outcome in EOC patients, are the metastases to the peritoneum and stroma that are common in this cancer. In one study, cDNA microarray analysis was performed on fresh tissue to profile gene expression in patients with EOC. This study showed a number of genes with significantly altered expression in the pelvic peritoneum and stroma, and in the vicinity of EOC implants. These genes included those encoding coagulation factors and regulatory proteins in the coagulation cascade and genes encoding proteins associated with inflammatory responses. In addition to promoting the formation of blood clots, coagulation factors exhibit many other biologic functions as well as tumorigenic functions, the later including tumor cell proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Coagulation pathway proteins involved in tumorigenesis consist of factor II (thrombin, thrombin receptor (protease-activated receptors, factor III (tissue factor, factor VII, factor X and factor I (fibrinogen, and fibrin and factor XIII. In a recent study we conducted, we found that factor XII, factor XI, and several coagulation regulatory proteins, including heparin cofactor-II and epithelial protein C receptor (EPCR, were also upregulated in the peritoneum of EOC. In this review, we summarize evidence in support of a role for these factors in promoting tumor cell progression and the formation of ascites. We also discuss the different roles of coagulation factor pathways in the tumor and peritumoral microenvironments as they relate to angiogenesis, proliferation, invasion, and metastasis. . Since inflammatory responses are another characteristic of the peritoneum in EOC, we also discuss the linkage between the coagulation cascade and the cytokines/chemokines involved in inflammation. Interleukin

  5. Inflammation-induced thrombosis: mechanisms, disease associations and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksu, Kenan; Donmez, Ayhan; Keser, Gokhan

    2012-01-01

    Although inflammation-induced thrombosis is a well-known entity, its pathogenesis remains complicated. There are complex interactions between inflammation and hemostasis, involving proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, adhesion molecules, tissue factor expression, platelet and endothelial activation, and microparticles. Inflammation increases procoagulant factors, and also inhibits natural anticoagulant pathways and fibrinolytic activity, causing a thrombotic tendency. Besides, chronic inflammation may cause endothelial damage, resulting in the loss of physiologic anticoagulant, antiaggregant and vasodilatory properties of endothelium. However, inflammation- induced venous thrombosis may develop even in the absence of vessel wall damage. On the other hand, coagulation also augments inflammation, causing a vicious cycle. This is mainly achieved by means of thrombin-induced secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors. Platelets may also trigger inflammation by activating the dendritic cells. There are many systemic inflammatory diseases characterized by thrombotic tendency, including Behçet disease (BD), antineutrophilic cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitides, Takayasu arteritis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, antiphosholipid syndrome, familial Mediterranean fever, thromboangiitis obliterans (TAO) and inflammatory bowel diseases. Inflammation-induced thrombosis may respond to immunosuppressive (IS) treatment, as in the case of BD. However effectiveness of this treatment can not be generalized to all other inflammatory diseases. For instance, IS agents do not have any beneficial role in the management of TAO. Heparin, antiplatelet agents such as aspirin and clopidogrel, colchicine and statins also have some antiinflammatory activity. However, decreased responsiveness to aspirin and clopidogrel treatments may be observed in inflammatory diseases, due to antiplatelet resistance caused by systemic inflammation. In the present

  6. 8-Prenylkaempferol Suppresses Influenza A Virus-Induced RANTES Production in A549 Cells via Blocking PI3K-Mediated Transcriptional Activation of NF-κB and IRF3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Fei Chiou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available 8-Prenylkaempferol (8-PK is a prenylflavonoid isolated from Sophora flavescens, a Chinese herb with antiviral and anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we investigated its effect on regulated activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES secretion by influenza A virus (H1N1-infected A549 alveolar epithelial cells. Cell inoculation with H1N1 evoked a significant induction in RANTES accumulation accompanied with time-related increase in nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB and interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3, but showed no effect on c-Jun phosphorylation. 8-PK could significantly inhibit not only RANTES production but also NF-κB and IRF-3 nuclear translocation. We had proved that both NF-κB and IRF-3 participated in H1N1-induced RANTES production since NF-κB inhibitor pyrrolidinedithio carbamate (PDTC and IRF-3 siRNA attenuated significantly RANTES accumulation. H1N1 inoculation also increased PI3K activity as well as Akt phosphorylation and such responsiveness were attenuated by 8-PK. In the presence of wortmannin, nuclear translocation of NF-κB and IRF3 as well as RANTES production by H1N1 infection were all reversed, demonstrating that PI3K-Akt pathway is essential for NF-κB- and IRF-3-mediated RANTES production in A549 cells. Furthermore, 8-PK but not wortmannin, prevented effectively H1N1-evoked IκB degradation. In conclusion, 8-PK might be an anti-inflammatory agent for suppressing influenza A virus-induced RANTES production acts by blocking PI3K-mediated transcriptional activation of NF-κB and IRF-3 and in part by interfering with IκB degradation which subsequently decreases NF-κB translocation.

  7. Deletion of fucose residues in plant N-glycans by repression of the GDP-mannose 4,6-dehydratase gene using virus-induced gene silencing and RNA interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Kouki; Matsumura, Takeshi

    2011-02-01

    Production of pharmaceutical glycoproteins in plants has many advantages in terms of safety and reduced costs. However, plant-produced glycoproteins have N-glycans with plant-specific sugar residues (core β-1,2-xylose and α-1,3-fucose) and a Lewis a (Le(a) ) epitope, i.e., Galβ(1-3)[Fucα(1-4)]GlcNAc. Because these sugar residues and glycan structures seemed to be immunogenic, several attempts have been made to delete them by repressing their respective glycosyltransferase genes. However, until date, such deletions have not been successful in completely eliminating the fucose residues. In this study, we simultaneously reduced the plant-specific core α-1,3-fucose and α-1,4-fucose residues in the Le(a) epitopes by repressing the Guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP)-D-mannose 4,6-dehydratase (GMD) gene, which is associated with GDP-L-fucose biosynthesis, in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Repression of GMD was achieved using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) and RNA interference (RNAi). The proportion of fucose-free N-glycans found in total soluble protein from GMD gene-repressed plants increased by 80% and 95% following VIGS and RNAi, respectively, compared to wild-type plants. A small amount of putative galactose substitution in N-glycans from the NbGMD gene-repressed plants was observed, similar to what has been previously reported GMD-knockout Arabidopsis mutant. On the other hand, the recombinant mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) with fucose-deleted N-glycans was successfully produced in NbGMD-RNAi transgenic N. benthamiana plants. Thus, repression of the GMD gene is thus very useful for deleting immunogenic total fucose residues and facilitating the production of pharmaceutical glycoproteins in plants.

  8. Encephalopathy of infection and systemic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, G Bryan

    2013-10-01

    This review will discuss several intracranial infections and sepsis-associated encephalopathy. Intracranial infections and inflammation of interest to the neurologist and EEG technicians include viral and autoimmune encephalitides; bacterial, fungal, and other meningitides; cerebritis; and brain abscess and subdural empyema. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy refers to a diffuse brain dysfunction secondary to infection that is principally located outside of the central nervous system. It is much more common than all of the intracranial infections put together, at least for adults in Western society. It probably involves a number of mechanisms that are not mutually exclusive and likely vary from patient to patient. Morbidity and mortality are directly related to the severity of SAE. The earliest features of SAE are delirium and mild EEG slowing; it is crucial to recognize these early features and to search for and treat the underlying infection promptly to reduce mortality and morbidity. PMID:24084178

  9. Maternal Obesity, Inflammation, and Developmental Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie A. Segovia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of obesity, especially in women of child-bearing age, is a global health concern. In addition to increasing the immediate risk of gestational complications, there is accumulating evidence that maternal obesity also has long-term consequences for the offspring. The concept of developmental programming describes the process in which an environmental stimulus, including altered nutrition, during critical periods of development can program alterations in organogenesis, tissue development, and metabolism, predisposing offspring to obesity and metabolic and cardiovascular disorders in later life. Although the mechanisms underpinning programming of metabolic disorders remain poorly defined, it has become increasingly clear that low-grade inflammation is associated with obesity and its comorbidities. This review will discuss maternal metainflammation as a mediator of programming in insulin sensitive tissues in offspring. Use of nutritional anti-inflammatories in pregnancy including omega 3 fatty acids, resveratrol, curcumin, and taurine may provide beneficial intervention strategies to ameliorate maternal obesity-induced programming.

  10. Thyroid Hormones, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Mancini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation and oxidative stress (OS are closely related processes, as well exemplified in obesity and cardiovascular diseases. OS is also related to hormonal derangement in a reciprocal way. Among the various hormonal influences that operate on the antioxidant balance, thyroid hormones play particularly important roles, since both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism have been shown to be associated with OS in animals and humans. In this context, the nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS that typically manifests as reduced conversion of thyroxine (T4 to triiodothyronine (T3 in different acute and chronic systemic conditions is still a debated topic. The pathophysiological mechanisms of this syndrome are reviewed, together with the roles of deiodinases, the enzymes responsible for the conversion of T4 to T3, in both physiological and pathological situations. The presence of OS indexes in NTIS supports the hypothesis that it represents a condition of hypothyroidism at the tissue level and not only an adaptive mechanism to diseases.

  11. Thyroid Hormones, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Antonio; Di Segni, Chantal; Raimondo, Sebastiano; Olivieri, Giulio; Silvestrini, Andrea; Meucci, Elisabetta; Currò, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress (OS) are closely related processes, as well exemplified in obesity and cardiovascular diseases. OS is also related to hormonal derangement in a reciprocal way. Among the various hormonal influences that operate on the antioxidant balance, thyroid hormones play particularly important roles, since both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism have been shown to be associated with OS in animals and humans. In this context, the nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) that typically manifests as reduced conversion of thyroxine (T4) to triiodothyronine (T3) in different acute and chronic systemic conditions is still a debated topic. The pathophysiological mechanisms of this syndrome are reviewed, together with the roles of deiodinases, the enzymes responsible for the conversion of T4 to T3, in both physiological and pathological situations. The presence of OS indexes in NTIS supports the hypothesis that it represents a condition of hypothyroidism at the tissue level and not only an adaptive mechanism to diseases.

  12. Toll-Like Receptors and Myocardial Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Feng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLRs are a member of the innate immune system. TLRs detect invading pathogens through the pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs recognition and play an essential role in the host defense. TLRs can also sense a large number of endogenous molecules with the damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs that are produced under various injurious conditions. Animal studies of the last decade have demonstrated that TLR signaling contributes to the pathogenesis of the critical cardiac conditions, where myocardial inflammation plays a prominent role, such as ischemic myocardial injury, myocarditis, and septic cardiomyopathy. This paper reviews the animal data on (1 TLRs, TLR ligands, and the signal transduction system and (2 the important role of TLR signaling in these critical cardiac conditions.

  13. Neurology of allergic inflammation and rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canning, Brendan J

    2002-05-01

    Afferent nerves, derived from the trigeminal ganglion, and postganglionic autonomic nerves, derived from sympathetic and parasympathetic ganglia expressing many different neurotransmitters, innervate the nose. Reflexes that serve to optimize the air-conditioning function of the nose by altering sinus blood flow, or serve to protect the nasal mucosal surface by mucus secretion, vasodilatation, and sneezing, can be initiated by a variety of stimuli, including allergen, cold air, and chemical irritation. Activation of nasal afferent nerves can also have profound effects on respiration, heart rate, blood pressure, and airway caliber (the diving response). Dysregulation of the nerves in the nose plays an integral role in the pathogenesis of allergic rhinitis. Axon reflexes can precipitate inflammatory responses in the nose, resulting in plasma extravasation and inflammatory cell recruitment, while allergic inflammation can produce neuronal hyper-responsiveness. Targeting the neuronal dysregulation in the nose may be beneficial in treating upper airway disease. PMID:11918862

  14. Obesity, inflammation, and the gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Amanda J; West, Nicholas P; Cripps, Allan W

    2015-03-01

    As the prevalence of obesity and associated disease continues to rise and concerns for the spiralling economic and social costs also escalate, innovative management strategies beyond primary prevention and traditional lifestyle interventions are urgently needed. The biological basis of disease is one avenue for further exploration in this context. Several key inflammatory markers have been consistently associated with both obesity and risk of adverse outcomes in obesity-associated diseases, which suggests that a persistent, low-grade, inflammatory response is a potentially modifiable risk factor. In this Review, we provide evidence supporting perturbation of the intestinal microbiota and changes in intestinal permeability as potential triggers of inflammation in obesity. Further characterisation of the mechanisms underpinning the triggers of such inflammatory responses in overweight and obese individuals could offer unique opportunities for intervention strategies to help ameliorate the risk of obesity-associated disease.

  15. Anticoagulant modulation of inflammation in severe sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Karen S; Sawheny, Eva; Kinasewitz, Gary T

    2015-05-01

    Inflammation and coagulation are so tightly linked that the cytokine storm which accompanies the development of sepsis initiates thrombin activation and the development of an intravascular coagulopathy. This review examines the interaction between the inflammatory and coagulation cascades, as well as the role of endogenous anticoagulants in regulating this interaction and dampening the activity of both pathways. Clinical trials attempting to improve outcomes in patients with severe sepsis by inhibiting thrombin generation with heparin and or endogenous anticoagulants are reviewed. In general, these trials have failed to demonstrate that anticoagulant therapy is associated with improvement in mortality or morbidity. While it is possible that selective patients who are severely ill with a high expected mortality may be shown to benefit from such therapy, at the present time none of these anticoagulants are neither approved nor can they be recommended for the treatment of sepsis. PMID:25938026

  16. Necrotizing granulomatous inflammation of the glans penis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulidou, Michelle; Bunker, Christopher B; Trevisan, Giorgia; Muneer, Asif

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a 73-year-old man who presented with a 10-month history of an ulcerating lesion on the glans penis. Initially this was thought to be an invasive squamous cell carcinoma but a biopsy showed histological features consistent with necrotizing granulomatous inflammation. Extensive serological, immunological and microbiological tests only showed a positive antinuclear and perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies indicating a possible autoimmune aetiology but an underlying systemic cause was not identified. Treatment with oral corticosteroids limited the inflammatory process but due to the gross destruction of the glans penis, he still required a glansectomy and split-skin graft reconstruction from which he recovered well. Although this patient ultimately required surgery for this rare presentation, this case highlights the differential diagnosis of penile ulceration (that transcends neoplasia) and the importance of performing and interpreting penile biopsies before undertaking potentially mutilating definitive surgery. PMID:27558192

  17. The Role of Inflammation in Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert eMüller

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractHigh levels of pro-inflammatory substances such as cytokines have been described in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid of schizophrenia patients. Animal models of schizophrenia show that under certain conditions an immune disturbance during early life, such as an infection-triggered immune activation, might trigger lifelong increased immune reactivity. A large epidemiological study clearly demonstrated that severe infections and autoimmune disorders are risk factors for schizophrenia. Genetic studies have shown a strong signal for schizophrenia on chromosome 6p22.1, in a region related to the human leucocyte antigen (HLA system and other immune functions. Another line of evidence demonstrates that chronic (disstress is associated with immune activation. The vulnerability-stress-inflammation model of schizophrenia includes the contribution of stress on the basis of increased genetic vulnerability for the pathogenesis

  18. PROGRESSION VARIANTS OF CHRONIC SYSTEMIC INFLAMMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Y. Gusev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Fourteen groups of patients have been investigated and divided into 2 classes. The first class included the following cohorts of patients: relatively healthy persons, age 18 to 55 yrs (n = 50; elderly persons 60 yrs old, as well as senior persons (n = 22; persons with chronic adnexitis, women in their 1st trimester of pregnancy (n = 16; climacteric syndrome (n = 16; autoimmune thyroiditis (n = 29. The second class of patients included following cohorts: elderly persons with chronic cardiac insufficiency (CCI II-III stage (n=49; valvular cardiac disease (rheumatism, n = 15; psoriatic arthritis (n = 12; reactive arthritis (n = 17; antiphospholipid syndrome, a sub-group in the 1st trimester of pregnancy (n = 5; systemic lupus erythematosus (n=49; decompensated atherosclerosis of femoral artery (n = 38; end-stage renal disease (n = 42. Plasma cytokines (TNFαα, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, acute-phase C-reactive protein (CRP, cortisol, troponin I, myoglobin, D-dimers, interleukin-2 soluble receptor (IL-2sR, and eosinophil cationic protein (ECP were determined in all the patients, by means of immune chemiluminescent technique (Immulite; Siemens Medical Solutions Diagnostics, USA. The integral indices of systemic inflammatory reaction (SIR have been calculated, i.e., a Reactivity Coefficient (RC and a Reactivity Level (RL. In the patients belonging to Class 1 cohorts, an absence of chronic systemic inflammation features was revealed, despite of some signs of systemic inflammatory response. Meanwhile, a majority of Class 2 patients have shown the signs of chronic systemic inflammation stage I to III.

  19. Adipokines mediate inflammation and insulin resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey E. Pessin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available For many years, adipose tissue was considered as an inert energy storage organ that accumulates and stores triacylglycerols during energy excess and releases fatty acids in times of systemic energy need. However, over the last two decades adipose tissue depots have been established as highly active endocrine and metabolically important organs that modulate energy expenditure and glucose homeostasis. In rodents, brown adipose tissue plays an essential role in non-shivering thermogenesis and in energy dissipation that can serve to protect against diet-induced obesity. White adipose tissue collectively referred too as either subcutaneous or visceral adipose tissue is responsible for the secretion of an array of signaling molecules, termed adipokines. These adipokines function as classic circulating hormones to communicate with other organs including brain, liver, muscle, the immune system and adipose tissue itself. The dysregulation of adipokines has been implicated in obesity, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Recently, inflammatory responses in adipose tissue have been shown as a major mechanism to induce peripheral tissue insulin resistance. Although leptin and adiponectin regulate feeding behavior and energy expenditure, these adipokines are also involved in the regulation of inflammatory responses. Adipose tissue secrete various pro- and anti-inflammatory adipokines to modulate inflammation and insulin resistance. In obese humans and rodent models, the expression of pro-inflammatory adipokines is enhanced to induce insulin resistance. Collectively, these findings have suggested that obesity-induced insulin resistance may result, at least in part, from an imbalance in the expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory adipokines. Thus we will review the recent progress regarding the physiological and molecular functions of adipokines in the obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance with perspectives on future directions.

  20. Acidic Chitinase Limits Allergic Inflammation and Promotes Intestinal Nematode Expulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase) is stereotypically induced during mammalian immune responses to helminths and allergens—yet, its precise role in immunity and inflammation is unclear. Here we show that in the lung, genetic ablation of AMCase failed to diminish type 2 inflammation against helmint...

  1. Microglia and Inflammation: Impact on Developmental Brain Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Li-Jin; Takanohashi, Asako; Bell, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Inflammation during the perinatal period has become a recognized risk factor for developmental brain injuries over the past decade or more. To fully understand the relationship between inflammation and brain development, a comprehensive knowledge about the immune system within the brain is essential. Microglia are resident immune cells within the…

  2. Comorbidity, systemic inflammation and outcomes in the ECLIPSE cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Joy; Edwards, Lisa D; Agustí, Alvar;

    2013-01-01

    Comorbidities, are common in COPD, have been associated with poor outcomes and are thought to relate to systemic inflammation. To investigate comorbidities in relation to systemic inflammation and outcomes we recorded comorbidities in a well characterized cohort (ECLIPSE study) for 2164 clinicall...

  3. Research on airway inflammation: present status in Mainland China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zeng-li

    2005-01-01

    @@ Airway inflammation involving activated eosinophils, mast cells and T lymphocytes is an established feature of asthma and has been the key target to treatment. Airway structural changes that occur in patients with asthma in response to persistent inflammation are termed airway remodeling.

  4. Characterization of inflammation in COPD : clinical and experimental approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vernooy, J.H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is an important feature of COPD. This inflammatory response is not restricted to the local compartment - including airways, lung parenchyma, and pulmonary vasculature - but is also present in the circulation. However, the origin of the systemic inflammation present in COPD patie

  5. Oxidant Stress in Renal Inflammation: Mechanisms and Remedies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishola, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    Our overall hypothesis was that oxidant stress is a central player in renal inflammation; pharmacological reduction of oxidant stress should therefore relieve renal inflammation. We explored pro- and anti-oxidant mechanisms in three experimental renal injury models. OXIDANT-DEPENDENT RENAL INFLAMMAT

  6. The relationship between inflammation and the coagulation system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choi, Goda; Schultz, Marcus J; Levi, Marcel; van der Poll, Tom

    2006-01-01

    Inflammation and coagulation play pivotal roles in host defence. As phylogenetically old responses, there is extensive cross-talk between inflammation and coagulation in enabling an adequate immune response against potentially injurious stimuli. Immune cells are important in the initiation of coagul

  7. Gallium-labelled peptides for imaging of inflammation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roivainen, Anne [University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); University of Turku, Turku Center for Disease Modeling, Turku (Finland); Jalkanen, Sirpa [University of Turku, MediCity Research Laboratory, Turku (Finland); University of Turku, Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Turku (Finland); Nanni, Cristina [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria S.Orsola Malpighi, UO Medicina Nucleare, Bologna (Italy)

    2012-02-15

    Inflammation plays a major role in the development of many diseases. This review article summarizes recent research in the field of in vivo imaging of inflammation. Novel methodologies using PET with {sup 68}Ga peptides targeting, for example, vascular adhesion protein 1 are discussed. (orig.)

  8. Inflammation. Courseware Evaluation for Vocational and Technical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarbrough, Stephen

    This courseware evaluation rates the "Inflammation" program developed by Lane Community College in Eugene, Oregon. (This program--not contained in this document--introduces students to the possible causes, signs, and protective benefits of inflammation.) Part A describes the program in terms of subject area (allied health, nursing), and hardware…

  9. Chemokines and chemokine receptors in inflammation of the nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, D; Han, Yong-Chang; Rani, M R;

    2000-01-01

    This article focuses on the production of chemokines by resident glial cells of the nervous system. We describe studies in two distinct categories of inflammation within the nervous system: immune-mediated inflammation as seen in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) or multiple sclerosis...

  10. Chronic inflammation induces telomere dysfunction and accelerates ageing in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jurk, Diana; Wilson, Caroline; Passos, Joao F.; Oakley, Fiona; Correia-Melo, Clara; Greaves, Laura; Saretzki, Gabriele; Fox, Chris; Lawless, Conor; Anderson, Rhys; Hewitt, Graeme; Pender, Sylvia L. F.; Fullard, Nicola; Nelson, Glyn; Mann, Jelena; van de Sluis, Bart; Mann, Derek A.; von Zglinicki, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is associated with normal and pathological ageing. Here we show that chronic, progressive low-grade inflammation induced by knockout of the nfkb1 subunit of the transcription factor NF-kappa B induces premature ageing in mice. We also show that these mice have reduced regenerati

  11. 9 CFR 311.35 - Muscular inflammation, degeneration, or infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Muscular inflammation, degeneration... PARTS § 311.35 Muscular inflammation, degeneration, or infiltration. (a) If muscular lesions are found... carcass shall be condemned. (b) If muscular lesions are found to be distributed in such a manner or to...

  12. Diabetes and the Brain: Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Muriach

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a common metabolic disorder associated with chronic complications including a state of mild to moderate cognitive impairment, in particular psychomotor slowing and reduced mental flexibility, not attributable to other causes, and shares many symptoms that are best described as accelerated brain ageing. A common theory for aging and for the pathogenesis of this cerebral dysfunctioning in diabetes relates cell death to oxidative stress in strong association to inflammation, and in fact nuclear factor κB (NFκB, a master regulator of inflammation and also a sensor of oxidative stress, has a strategic position at the crossroad between oxidative stress and inflammation. Moreover, metabolic inflammation is, in turn, related to the induction of various intracellular stresses such as mitochondrial oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, and autophagy defect. In parallel, blockade of autophagy can relate to proinflammatory signaling via oxidative stress pathway and NFκB-mediated inflammation.

  13. Treatment of orbital inflammation with rituximab in Wegener's granulomatosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baslund, Bo; Wiencke, Anne Katrine; Rasmussen, Niels;

    2012-01-01

    inflammation. All patients were treated with 1000 mg of rituximab administered twice with an interval of 14 days between the infusions. Six months after therapy, a physical examination and a control computerised tomography (CT) scan was performed. RESULTS: All patients had orbital inflammation demonstrated......OBJECTIVES: To study the efficacy of rituximab therapy for the treatment of orbital inflammation in patients with Wegener's granulomatosis (WG). METHODS: Ten WG patients with orbital inflammation were included in this case-series. None had symptoms suggestive of extra-orbital disease activity...... the size of the orbital mass was unchanged in eight patients. CONCLUSIONS: Rituximab therapy has positive effects on symptoms, visual acuity and/or granuloma size in some WG patients with orbital inflammation. Treatment with rituximab should be considered in WG patients with this serious manifestation...

  14. Synovial tissue hypoxia and inflammation in vivo.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ng, C T

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Hypoxia is a microenvironmental feature in the inflamed joint, which promotes survival advantage for cells. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship of partial oxygen pressure in the synovial tissue (tPO(2)) in patients with inflammatory arthritis with macroscopic\\/microscopic inflammation and local levels of proinflammatory mediators. METHODS: Patients with inflammatory arthritis underwent full clinical assessment and video arthroscopy to quantify macroscopic synovitis and measure synovial tPO(2) under direct visualisation. Cell specific markers (CD3 (T cells), CD68 (macrophages), Ki67 (cell proliferation) and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labelling (cell apoptosis)) were quantified by immunohistology. In vitro migration was assessed in primary and normal synoviocytes (synovial fibroblast cells (SFCs)) using a wound repair scratch assay. Levels of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), interleukin 1beta (IL1beta), interferon gamma (IFNgamma), IL6, macrophage inflammatory protein 3alpha (MIP3alpha) and IL8 were quantified, in matched serum and synovial fluid, by multiplex cytokine assay and ELISA. RESULTS: The tPO(2) was 22.5 (range 3.2-54.1) mm Hg and correlated inversely with macroscopic synovitis (r=-0.421, p=0.02), sublining CD3 cells (-0.611, p<0.01) and sublining CD68 cells (r=-0.615, p<0.001). No relationship with cell proliferation or apoptosis was found. Primary and normal SFCs exposed to 1% and 3% oxygen (reflecting the median tPO(2) in vivo) induced cell migration. This was coupled with significantly higher levels of synovial fluid tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), IL1beta, IFNgamma and MIP3alpha in patients with tPO(2) <20 mm Hg (all p values <0.05). CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to show a direct in vivo correlation between synovial tPO(2), inflammation and cell migration, thus it is proposed that hypoxia is a possible primary driver of inflammatory processes in the arthritic joint.

  15. Adverse effects of smoking on patients with ocular inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galor, Anat; Feuer, William; Kempen, John H; Kaçmaz, R Oktay; Liesegang, Teresa L; Suhler, Eric B; Foster, C Stephen; Jabs, Douglas A; Levy-Clarke, Grace A; Nussenblatt, Robert B; Rosenbaum, James T; Thorne, Jennifer E

    2011-01-01

    Background To evaluate how smoking affects the time to disease quiescence and time to disease recurrence in patients with ocular inflammation. Methods A retrospective cohort study of patients with ocular inflammation who were followed longitudinally and had smoking information available in the Systemic Immunosuppressive Therapy for Eye Diseases Cohort Study database. Results Among 2676 patients with active ocular inflammation, smokers were more likely to have bilateral ocular disease and poorer visual acuity on presentation compared with non-smokers and previous smokers. In a multivariate analysis, there was no statistically significant difference in the time to disease quiescence between groups. However, the median time to recurrence of ocular inflammation was statistically significantly longer for non-smokers (9.4 months) and for previous smokers (10.7 months) than for current smokers (7.8 months) (p=0.02). The RR of ocular inflammation recurrence was higher for smokers than for non-smokers (adjusted HR=1.19, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.37) and tended towards significance in previous smokers (adjusted HR=1.11, 95% CI 0.93 to 1.35). Conclusions Smoking was associated with an increased likelihood of bilateral ocular inflammation and reduced vision upon presentation, and an increased risk of recurrence compared with not smoking. These results suggest that patients with ocular inflammation should be counselled to stop smoking as part of routine management. PMID:20606023

  16. Inflammation Thread Runs across Medical Laboratory Specialities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nydegger, Urs; Lung, Thomas; Risch, Lorenz; Risch, Martin; Medina Escobar, Pedro; Bodmer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We work on the assumption that four major specialities or sectors of medical laboratory assays, comprising clinical chemistry, haematology, immunology, and microbiology, embraced by genome sequencing techniques, are routinely in use. Medical laboratory markers for inflammation serve as model: they are allotted to most fields of medical lab assays including genomics. Incessant coding of assays aligns each of them in the long lists of big data. As exemplified with the complement gene family, containing C2, C3, C8A, C8B, CFH, CFI, and ITGB2, heritability patterns/risk factors associated with diseases with genetic glitch of complement components are unfolding. The C4 component serum levels depend on sufficient vitamin D whilst low vitamin D is inversely related to IgG1, IgA, and C3 linking vitamin sufficiency to innate immunity. Whole genome sequencing of microbial organisms may distinguish virulent from nonvirulent and antibiotic resistant from nonresistant varieties of the same species and thus can be listed in personal big data banks including microbiological pathology; the big data warehouse continues to grow. PMID:27493451

  17. Sleep, immunity and inflammation in gastrointestinal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Tauseef; Choe, James; Awab, Ahmed; Wagener, Theodore L; Orr, William C

    2013-12-28

    Sleep disorders have become a global issue, and discovering their causes and consequences are the focus of many research endeavors. An estimated 70 million Americans suffer from some form of sleep disorder. Certain sleep disorders have been shown to cause neurocognitive impairment such as decreased cognitive ability, slower response times and performance detriments. Recent research suggests that individuals with sleep abnormalities are also at greater risk of serious adverse health, economic consequences, and most importantly increased all-cause mortality. Several research studies support the associations among sleep, immune function and inflammation. Here, we review the current research linking sleep, immune function, and gastrointestinal diseases and discuss the interdependent relationship between sleep and these gastrointestinal disorders. Different physiologic processes including immune system and inflammatory cytokines help regulate the sleep. The inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1 (IL-1), and IL-6 have been shown to be a significant contributor of sleep disturbances. On the other hand, sleep disturbances such as sleep deprivation have been shown to up regulate these inflammatory cytokines. Alterations in these cytokine levels have been demonstrated in certain gastrointestinal diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, gastro-esophageal reflux, liver disorders and colorectal cancer. In turn, abnormal sleep brought on by these diseases is shown to contribute to the severity of these same gastrointestinal diseases. Knowledge of these relationships will allow gastroenterologists a great opportunity to enhance the care of their patients. PMID:24409051

  18. Inflammation Thread Runs across Medical Laboratory Specialities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung, Thomas; Risch, Lorenz; Risch, Martin; Medina Escobar, Pedro; Bodmer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We work on the assumption that four major specialities or sectors of medical laboratory assays, comprising clinical chemistry, haematology, immunology, and microbiology, embraced by genome sequencing techniques, are routinely in use. Medical laboratory markers for inflammation serve as model: they are allotted to most fields of medical lab assays including genomics. Incessant coding of assays aligns each of them in the long lists of big data. As exemplified with the complement gene family, containing C2, C3, C8A, C8B, CFH, CFI, and ITGB2, heritability patterns/risk factors associated with diseases with genetic glitch of complement components are unfolding. The C4 component serum levels depend on sufficient vitamin D whilst low vitamin D is inversely related to IgG1, IgA, and C3 linking vitamin sufficiency to innate immunity. Whole genome sequencing of microbial organisms may distinguish virulent from nonvirulent and antibiotic resistant from nonresistant varieties of the same species and thus can be listed in personal big data banks including microbiological pathology; the big data warehouse continues to grow. PMID:27493451

  19. Psychosocial stress and inflammation in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, N D; Tarr, A J; Sheridan, J F

    2013-03-01

    Stress-induced immune dysregulation results in significant health consequences for immune related disorders including viral infections, chronic autoimmune disease, and tumor growth and metastasis. In this mini-review we discuss the sympathetic, neuroendocrine and immunologic mechanisms by which psychosocial stress can impact cancer biology. Both human and animal studies have shown the sympathetic and neuroendocrine responses to psychosocial stress significantly impacts cancer, in part, through regulation of inflammatory mediators. Psychosocial stressors stimulate neuroendocrine, sympathetic, and immune responses that result in the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis, sympathetic nervous system (SNS), and the subsequent regulation of inflammatory responses by immune cells. Social disruption (SDR) stress, a murine model of psychosocial stress and repeated social defeat, provides a novel and powerful tool to probe the mechanisms leading to stress-induced alterations in inflammation, tumor growth, progression, and metastasis. In this review, we will focus on SDR as an important model of psychosocial stress in understanding neural-immune mechanisms in cancer.

  20. Inflammation and Pharmacological Treatment in Diabetic Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snježana Kaštelan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy (DR, the most common microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus, is estimated to be the leading cause of new blindness in the working population of developed countries. Primary interventions such as intensive glycemic control, strict blood pressure regulation, and lipid-modifying therapy as well as local ocular treatment (laser photocoagulation and pars plana vitrectomy can significantly reduce the risk of retinopathy occurrence and progression. Considering the limitations of current DR treatments development of new therapeutic strategies, it becomes necessary to focus on pharmacological treatment. Currently, there is increasing evidence that inflammatory processes have a considerable role in the pathogenesis of DR with multiple studies showing an association of various systemic as well as local (vitreous and aqueous fluid inflammatory factors and the progression of DR. Since inflammation is identified as a relevant mechanism, significant effort has been directed to the development of new concepts for the prevention and treatment of DR acting on the inflammatory processes and the use of pharmacological agents with anti-inflammatory effect. Inhibiting the inflammatory pathway could be an appealing treatment option for DR in future practices, and as further prospective randomized clinical trials accumulate data, the role and guidelines of anti-inflammatory pharmacologic treatments will become clearer.

  1. Understanding about the classification of pulp inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trijoedani Widodo

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Since most authors use the reversible pulpitis and irreversible pulpitis classification, however, many dentists still do not implement these new classifications. Research was made using a descriptive method by proposing questionnaire to dentists from various dental clinics. The numbers of the dentists participating in this research are 22 dentists. All respondents use the diagnosis sheet during their examinations on patients. Nonetheless, it can't be known what diagnosis card used and most of the dentists are still using the old classification. Concerning responses given towards the new classification: a the new classification had been heard, however, it was not clear (36.3%; b the new classification has never been heard at all (63.6%. Then, responses concerning whether a new development is important to be followed-up or not: a there are those who think that information concerning new development is very important (27.2%; b those who feel that it is important to have new information (68.3%; c those who think that new information is not important (8%. It concluded that information concerning the development of classification of pulp inflammation did not reach the dentists.

  2. Inflammation Thread Runs across Medical Laboratory Specialities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urs Nydegger

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We work on the assumption that four major specialities or sectors of medical laboratory assays, comprising clinical chemistry, haematology, immunology, and microbiology, embraced by genome sequencing techniques, are routinely in use. Medical laboratory markers for inflammation serve as model: they are allotted to most fields of medical lab assays including genomics. Incessant coding of assays aligns each of them in the long lists of big data. As exemplified with the complement gene family, containing C2, C3, C8A, C8B, CFH, CFI, and ITGB2, heritability patterns/risk factors associated with diseases with genetic glitch of complement components are unfolding. The C4 component serum levels depend on sufficient vitamin D whilst low vitamin D is inversely related to IgG1, IgA, and C3 linking vitamin sufficiency to innate immunity. Whole genome sequencing of microbial organisms may distinguish virulent from nonvirulent and antibiotic resistant from nonresistant varieties of the same species and thus can be listed in personal big data banks including microbiological pathology; the big data warehouse continues to grow.

  3. Vascular oxidant stress and inflammation in hyperhomocysteinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papatheodorou, Louisa; Weiss, Norbert

    2007-11-01

    Elevated plasma levels of homocysteine are a metabolic risk factor for atherosclerotic vascular disease, as shown in numerous clinical studies that linked elevated homocysteine levels to de novo and recurrent cardiovascular events. High levels of homocysteine promote oxidant stress in vascular cells and tissue because of the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which have been strongly implicated in the development of atherosclerosis. In particular, ROS have been shown to cause endothelial injury, dysfunction, and activation. Elevated homocysteine stimulates proinflammatory pathways in vascular cells, resulting in leukocyte recruitment to the vessel wall, mediated by the expression of adhesion molecules on endothelial cells and circulating monocytes and neutrophils, in the infiltration of leukocytes into the arterial wall mediated by increased secretion of chemokines, and in the differentiation of monocytes into cholesterol-scavenging macrophages. Furthermore, it stimulates the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells followed by the production of extracellular matrix. Many of these events involve redox-sensitive signaling events, which are promoted by elevated homocysteine, and result in the formation of atherosclerotic lesions. In this article, we review current knowledge about the role of homocysteine on oxidant stress-mediated vascular inflammation during the development of atherosclerosis.

  4. A combined marker of inflammation in individuals with mania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faith Dickerson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Markers of immune activation have been associated with mania but have not been examined in combination. We studied the association between mania and an inflammation score based on four immune markers. METHODS: A total of 57 individuals with mania were assessed at up to three time points: the day of hospital admission, evaluation several days later, and six-month follow-up. Also assessed were 207 non-psychiatric controls and 330 individuals with recent onset psychosis, multi-episode schizophrenia, or bipolar disorder depression. A combined inflammation score was calculated by factor analysis of the levels of class-specific antibodies to the NR peptide of the NMDA receptor; gliadin; Mason-Pfizer monkey virus protein 24; and Toxoplasma gondii. Inflammation scores among groups were compared by multivariate analyses. The inflammation score of the mania group at evaluation was studied as a predictor of re-hospitalization in the follow-up period. RESULTS: The combined inflammation score of the mania group at hospital admission and at evaluation differed significantly from that of the non-psychiatric controls (t=3.95, 4.10, p<.001. The inflammation score was significantly decreased at six month follow-up (F=5.85, p=0.004. There were not any significant differences in the inflammation scores of any of the other psychiatric groups and that of the controls. Within the mania group, an elevated inflammation score at evaluation predicted re-hospitalization (Hazard ratio=7.12, p=.005. CONCLUSIONS: Hospitalization for mania is associated with immune activation. The level of this activation is predictive of subsequent re-hospitalization. Interventions for the modulation of inflammation should be evaluated for the therapy of individuals with mania.

  5. A Combined Marker of Inflammation in Individuals with Mania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Faith; Stallings, Cassie; Origoni, Andrea; Vaughan, Crystal; Katsafanas, Emily; Khushalani, Sunil; Yolken, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Background Markers of immune activation have been associated with mania but have not been examined in combination. We studied the association between mania and an inflammation score based on four immune markers. Methods A total of 57 individuals with mania were assessed at up to three time points: the day of hospital admission, evaluation several days later, and six-month follow-up. Also assessed were 207 non-psychiatric controls and 330 individuals with recent onset psychosis, multi-episode schizophrenia, or bipolar disorder depression. A combined inflammation score was calculated by factor analysis of the levels of class-specific antibodies to the NR peptide of the NMDA receptor; gliadin; Mason-Pfizer monkey virus protein 24; and Toxoplasma gondii. Inflammation scores among groups were compared by multivariate analyses. The inflammation score of the mania group at evaluation was studied as a predictor of re-hospitalization in the follow-up period. Results The combined inflammation score of the mania group at hospital admission and at evaluation differed significantly from that of the non-psychiatric controls (t = 3.95, 4.10, p<.001). The inflammation score was significantly decreased at six month follow-up (F = 5.85, p = 0.004). There were not any significant differences in the inflammation scores of any of the other psychiatric groups and that of the controls. Within the mania group, an elevated inflammation score at evaluation predicted re-hospitalization (Hazard ratio = 7.12, p = .005). Conclusions Hospitalization for mania is associated with immune activation. The level of this activation is predictive of subsequent re-hospitalization. Interventions for the modulation of inflammation should be evaluated for the therapy of individuals with mania. PMID:24019926

  6. A case of relapsing flitting bilateral idiopathic orbital inflammation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Browne, Michelle Ann

    2009-12-01

    Idiopathic orbital inflammation (IOI) is defined as a benign non-infective clinical syndrome characterized by features of non-specific inflammation of the orbit without identifiable local or systemic causes. This can be called orbital myositis if the inflammation is predominantly in the orbital muscles. It is a diagnosis of exclusion based on clinical, radiological, and if necessary, histological findings. The most commons symptoms are swelling, ptosis, proptosis and painful eye movements. To our knowledge, this patient is the first with IOI to demonstrate relapsing flitting bilateral involvement of several individual extra-ocular muscles.

  7. Persistent low-grade inflammation and regular exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrom, Maj-Briit; Feigh, Michael; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund;

    2010-01-01

    Persistent low-grade systemic inflammation is a feature of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD), type 2 diabetes and dementia and evidence exists that inflammation is a causal factor in the development of insulin resistance and atherosclerosis. Regular exercise offers protection...... against all of these diseases and recent evidence suggests that the protective effect of exercise may to some extent be ascribed to an anti-inflammatory effect of regular exercise. Visceral adiposity contributes to systemic inflammation and is independently associated with the occurrence of CVD, type 2...

  8. Antenatal infection/inflammation and postnatal lung maturation and injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikegami Machiko

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chorioamnionitis is frequently associated with preterm deliveries before 30 weeks gestation. Chorioamnionitis correlates both with an increased risk of bronchopulmonary dysplasia and with a decreased risk of respiratory distress syndrome. Both interleukin-1α and endotoxin can induce inflammation in the fetal lungs and lung maturation after preterm birth when given by intra-amniotic injection. Inflammation can also result in an arrest of alveolarization, and this lung developmental abnormality is prominent in the lungs of preterm infants that die of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. The mechanisms by which infection/inflammation can have both beneficial and injurious effects on the preterm lung remain to be characterized.

  9. Virus-Induced Gene Silencing-Based Functional Analyses Revealed the Involvement of Several Putative Trehalose-6-Phosphate Synthase/Phosphatase Genes in Disease Resistance against Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 in Tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huijuan; Hong, Yongbo; Huang, Lei; Liu, Shixia; Tian, Limei; Dai, Yi; Cao, Zhongye; Huang, Lihong; Li, Dayong; Song, Fengming

    2016-01-01

    Trehalose and its metabolism have been demonstrated to play important roles in control of plant growth, development, and stress responses. However, direct genetic evidence supporting the functions of trehalose and its metabolism in defense response against pathogens is lacking. In the present study, genome-wide characterization of putative trehalose-related genes identified 11 SlTPSs for trehalose-6-phosphate synthase, 8 SlTPPs for trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase and one SlTRE1 for trehalase in tomato genome. Nine SlTPSs, 4 SlTPPs, and SlTRE1 were selected for functional analyses to explore their involvement in tomato disease resistance. Some selected SlTPSs, SlTPPs, and SlTRE1 responded with distinct expression induction patterns to Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 as well as to defense signaling hormones (e.g., salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, and a precursor of ethylene). Virus-induced gene silencing-mediated silencing of SlTPS3, SlTPS4, or SlTPS7 led to deregulation of ROS accumulation and attenuated the expression of defense-related genes upon pathogen infection and thus deteriorated the resistance against B. cinerea or Pst DC3000. By contrast, silencing of SlTPS5 or SlTPP2 led to an increased expression of the defense-related genes upon pathogen infection and conferred an increased resistance against Pst DC3000. Silencing of SlTPS3, SlTPS4, SlTPS5, SlTPS7, or SlTPP2 affected trehalose level in tomato plants with or without infection of B. cinerea or Pst DC3000. These results demonstrate that SlTPS3, SlTPS4, SlTPS5, SlTPS7, and SlTPP2 play roles in resistance against B. cinerea and Pst DC3000, implying the importance of trehalose and tis metabolism in regulation of defense response against pathogens in tomato. PMID:27540389

  10. Virus-Induced Gene Silencing-Based Functional Analyses Revealed the Involvement of Several Putative Trehalose-6-Phosphate Synthase/Phosphatase Genes in Disease Resistance against Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 in Tomato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huijuan; Hong, Yongbo; Huang, Lei; Liu, Shixia; Tian, Limei; Dai, Yi; Cao, Zhongye; Huang, Lihong; Li, Dayong; Song, Fengming

    2016-01-01

    Trehalose and its metabolism have been demonstrated to play important roles in control of plant growth, development, and stress responses. However, direct genetic evidence supporting the functions of trehalose and its metabolism in defense response against pathogens is lacking. In the present study, genome-wide characterization of putative trehalose-related genes identified 11 SlTPSs for trehalose-6-phosphate synthase, 8 SlTPPs for trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase and one SlTRE1 for trehalase in tomato genome. Nine SlTPSs, 4 SlTPPs, and SlTRE1 were selected for functional analyses to explore their involvement in tomato disease resistance. Some selected SlTPSs, SlTPPs, and SlTRE1 responded with distinct expression induction patterns to Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 as well as to defense signaling hormones (e.g., salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, and a precursor of ethylene). Virus-induced gene silencing-mediated silencing of SlTPS3, SlTPS4, or SlTPS7 led to deregulation of ROS accumulation and attenuated the expression of defense-related genes upon pathogen infection and thus deteriorated the resistance against B. cinerea or Pst DC3000. By contrast, silencing of SlTPS5 or SlTPP2 led to an increased expression of the defense-related genes upon pathogen infection and conferred an increased resistance against Pst DC3000. Silencing of SlTPS3, SlTPS4, SlTPS5, SlTPS7, or SlTPP2 affected trehalose level in tomato plants with or without infection of B. cinerea or Pst DC3000. These results demonstrate that SlTPS3, SlTPS4, SlTPS5, SlTPS7, and SlTPP2 play roles in resistance against B. cinerea and Pst DC3000, implying the importance of trehalose and tis metabolism in regulation of defense response against pathogens in tomato. PMID:27540389

  11. Virus-Induced Gene Silencing-Based Functional Analyses Revealed the Involvement of Several Putative Trehalose-6-Phosphate Synthase/Phosphatase Genes in Disease Resistance against Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 in Tomato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huijuan; Hong, Yongbo; Huang, Lei; Liu, Shixia; Tian, Limei; Dai, Yi; Cao, Zhongye; Huang, Lihong; Li, Dayong; Song, Fengming

    2016-01-01

    Trehalose and its metabolism have been demonstrated to play important roles in control of plant growth, development, and stress responses. However, direct genetic evidence supporting the functions of trehalose and its metabolism in defense response against pathogens is lacking. In the present study, genome-wide characterization of putative trehalose-related genes identified 11 SlTPSs for trehalose-6-phosphate synthase, 8 SlTPPs for trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase and one SlTRE1 for trehalase in tomato genome. Nine SlTPSs, 4 SlTPPs, and SlTRE1 were selected for functional analyses to explore their involvement in tomato disease resistance. Some selected SlTPSs, SlTPPs, and SlTRE1 responded with distinct expression induction patterns to Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 as well as to defense signaling hormones (e.g., salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, and a precursor of ethylene). Virus-induced gene silencing-mediated silencing of SlTPS3, SlTPS4, or SlTPS7 led to deregulation of ROS accumulation and attenuated the expression of defense-related genes upon pathogen infection and thus deteriorated the resistance against B. cinerea or Pst DC3000. By contrast, silencing of SlTPS5 or SlTPP2 led to an increased expression of the defense-related genes upon pathogen infection and conferred an increased resistance against Pst DC3000. Silencing of SlTPS3, SlTPS4, SlTPS5, SlTPS7, or SlTPP2 affected trehalose level in tomato plants with or without infection of B. cinerea or Pst DC3000. These results demonstrate that SlTPS3, SlTPS4, SlTPS5, SlTPS7, and SlTPP2 play roles in resistance against B. cinerea and Pst DC3000, implying the importance of trehalose and tis metabolism in regulation of defense response against pathogens in tomato.

  12. A Mechanism of Virus-Induced Demyelination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayasri Das Sarma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Myelin forms an insulating sheath surrounding axons in the central and peripheral nervous systems and is essential for rapid propagation of neuronal action potentials. Demyelination is an acquired disorder in which normally formed myelin degenerates, exposing axons to the extracellular environment. The result is dysfunction of normal neuron-to-neuron communication and in many cases, varying degrees of axonal degeneration. Numerous central nervous system demyelinating disorders exist, including multiple sclerosis. Although demyelination is the major manifestation of most of the demyelinating diseases, recent studies have clearly documented concomitant axonal loss to varying degrees resulting in long-term disability. Axonal injury may occur secondary to myelin damage (outside-in model or myelin damage may occur secondary to axonal injury (inside-out model. Viral induced demyelination models, has provided unique imminent into the cellular mechanisms of myelin destruction. They illustrate mechanisms of viral persistence, including latent infections, virus reactivation and viral-induced tissue damage. These studies have also provided excellent paradigms to study the interactions between the immune system and the central nervous system (CNS. In this review we will discuss potential cellular and molecular mechanism of central nervous system axonal loss and demyelination in a viral induced mouse model of multiple sclerosis.

  13. Virus-Induced Behavioural Changes in Insects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, Y.; Oers, van M.M.; Houte, van C.G.J.; Ros, V.I.D.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that host behaviour often changes following infection by a variety of parasites, including viruses. The altered behaviour is either induced by the parasites to enhance parasite survival and transmission, or is a response of the host to avoid spread of infection in the host

  14. Human immunodeficiency virus induced oral candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrier, S Aravind; Sathasivasubramanian, S

    2015-08-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a worldwide health problem, which affects in both developing and developed countries. The oral lesions caused due to this disease can drastically change the life of the patient, in terms of quality. We can also know the progression of the disease and also the important immune status of the patient. Lots of information on HIV is known in the developed countries and very less reports are available in the developing countries. The morbidity of HIV disease is due to its association with opportunistic fungal infection and the most common among them is oral candidiasis. Here, we present a case report on an apparently healthy male patient of 39 years, who had oral candidiasis and was one of the indicators for HIV infection.

  15. Amphotropic murine leukemia viruses induce spongiform encephalomyelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münk, C; Löhler, J; Prassolov, V; Just, U; Stockschläder, M; Stocking, C

    1997-05-27

    Recombinants of amphotropic murine leukemia virus (A-MuLV) have found widespread use in retroviral vector systems due to their ability to efficiently and stably infect cells of several different species, including human. Previous work has shown that replication-competent recombinants containing the amphotropic env gene, encoding the major SU envelope glycoprotein that determines host tropism, induce lymphomas in vivo. We show here that these viruses also induce a spongiform encephalomyelopathy in mice inoculated perinatally. This fatal central nervous system disease is characterized by noninflammatory spongiform lesions of nerve and glial cells and their processes, and is associated with moderate astro- and microgliosis. The first clinical symptoms are ataxia, tremor, and spasticity, progressing to complete tetraparesis and incontinence, and finally death of the animal. Sequences within the amphotropic env gene are necessary for disease induction. Coinfection of A-MuLV recombinants with nonneuropathogenic ecotropic or polytropic MuLV drastically increases the incidence, degree, and distribution of the neurodegenerative disorder. The consequence of these results in view of the use of A-MuLV recombinants in the clinic is discussed.

  16. Nasal hyperreactivity and inflammation in allergic rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Garrelds

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The history of allergic disease goes back to 1819, when Bostock described his own ‘periodical affection of the eyes and chest’, which he called ‘summer catarrh’. Since they thought it was produced by the effluvium of new hay, this condition was also called hay fever. Later, in 1873, Blackley established that pollen played an important role in the causation of hay fever. Nowadays, the definition of allergy is ‘An untoward physiologic event mediated by a variety of different immunologic reactions’. In this review, the term allergy will be restricted to the IgE-dependent reactions. The most important clinical manifestations of IgE-dependent reactions are allergic conjunctivitis, allergic rhinitis, allergic asthma and atopic dermatitis. However, this review will be restricted to allergic rhinitis. The histopathological features of allergic inflammation involve an increase in blood flow and vascular permeability, leading to plasma exudation and the formation of oedema. In addition, a cascade of events occurs which involves a variety of inflammatory cells. These inflammatory cells migrate under the influence of chemotactic agents to the site of injury and induce the process of repair. Several types of inflammatory cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of allergic rhinitis. After specific or nonspecific stimuli, inflammatory mediators are generated from cells normally found in the nose, such as mast cells, antigen-presenting cells and epithelial cells (primary effector cells and from cells recruited into the nose, such as basophils, eosinophils, lymphocytes, platelets and neutrophils (secondary effector cells. This review describes the identification of each of the inflammatory cells and their mediators which play a role in the perennial allergic processes in the nose of rhinitis patients.

  17. Oxidative stress and inflammation in liver carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Olaya

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available

    Inflammation is a common response in the human liver. It is involved in chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, steatosis, ischemiareperfusion damage, hepatocarcinomas and in the development of metastasis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS production is part of the inflammatory processes. It is implicated in many physiological and pathological situations and can induce mutations in key cancer genes. Normally, this process is prevented by DNA repair enzymatic systems that maintain sequence fidelity during DNA replication. However, overproduction of free radicals in chronic inflammatory diseases is thought to saturate the ability of the cell to repair DNA damage prior to replications. Inflammation-induced genetic damage is not unique to the liver, and it might contribute to the development of mutations in several organs. An example is the chronic inflammatory response in ulcerative colitis that ultimately could lead to neoplasia.

    There is compelling evidence to suggest that most known environmental risk factors for HCC development lead to generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Indeed, hepatitis C virus (HCV, alcohol and hepatitis B virus (HBV have all been associated with oxidative stress. Direct production of oxidative stress by HCV core protein has been shown. A link between oxidative stress and liver pathogenesis is also supported by the successful use of antioxidant therapy to treat liver injury caused by chronic HCV infection, although it is not currently used for effective therapy. Ethanol metabolism via the alcohol dehydrogenase pathway and microsomal ethanol oxidizing system contribute substantially to the production of acetaldehyde and generation of ROS. HBx via its association with mitochondria has been shown to induce oxidative stress which in turn leads to activation of a

  18. Airways Disease: Phenotyping Heterogeneity Using Measures of Airway Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddiqui Salman

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease being widely regarded as heterogeneous diseases, a consensus for an accurate system of classification has not been agreed. Recent studies have suggested that the recognition of subphenotypes of airway disease based on the pattern of airway inflammation may be particularly useful in increasing our understanding of the disease. The use of non-invasive markers of airway inflammation has suggested the presence of four distinct phenotypes: eosinophilic, neutrophilic, mixed inflammatory and paucigranulocytic asthma. Recent studies suggest that these subgroups may differ in their etiology, immunopathology and response to treatment. Importantly, novel treatment approaches targeted at specific patterns of airway inflammation are emerging, making an appreciation of subphenotypes particularly relevant. New developments in phenotyping inflammation and other facets of airway disease mean that we are entering an era where careful phenotyping will lead to targeted therapy.

  19. Purinergic Receptors: Key Mediators of HIV-1 infection and inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talia H Swartz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 causes a chronic infection that afflicts more than 38 million individuals worldwide. While the infection can be suppressed with potent anti-retroviral therapies, individuals infected with HIV have elevated levels of inflammation as indicated by increased T cell activation, soluble biomarkers, and associated morbidity and mortality. A single mechanism linking HIV pathogenesis to this inflammation has yet to be identified. Purinergic receptors are known to mediate inflammation and have been shown to be required for HIV-1 infection at the level of HIV-1 membrane fusion. Here we review the literature on the role of purinergic receptors in HIV-1 infection and associated inflammation and describe a role for these receptors as potential therapeutic targets.

  20. Inflammation, thrombosis and atherosclerosis: results of the Glostrup study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maat, M de; Bladbjerg, E-M; Drivsholm, T;

    2003-01-01

    Inflammation and thrombosis are important mechanisms in cardiovascular disease, as illustrated by the consistent association between inflammatory and hemostatic variables and the risk of cardiovascular events in epidemiological studies. However, the relationship between plasma concentrations of i...

  1. Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in Obesity-Related Glomerulopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhua Tang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity-related glomerulopathy is an increasing cause of end-stage renal disease. Obesity has been considered a state of chronic low-grade systemic inflammation and chronic oxidative stress. Augmented inflammation in adipose and kidney tissues promotes the progression of kidney damage in obesity. Adipose tissue, which is accumulated in obesity, is a key endocrine organ that produces multiple biologically active molecules, including leptin, adiponectin, resistin, that affect inflammation, and subsequent deregulation of cell function in renal glomeruli that leads to pathological changes. Oxidative stress is also associated with obesity-related renal diseases and may trigger the initiation or progression of renal damage in obesity. In this paper, we focus on inflammation and oxidative stress in the progression of obesity-related glomerulopathy and possible interventions to prevent kidney injury in obesity.

  2. Inflammation in Achromobacter xylosoxidans infected cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, C. R.; Pressler, T.; Nielsen, K. G.;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Achromobacter xylosoxidans infection may cause conspicuous chronic pulmonary inflammation in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients similar to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc). Evolution in lung function was compared in chronically infected patients. Cytokine...

  3. Relationship between airway pathophysiology and airway inflammation in older asthmatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porsbjerg, Celeste M; Gibson, Peter G; Pretto, Jeffrey J;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Asthma-related morbidity is greater in older compared with younger asthmatics. Airway closure is also greater in older asthmatics, an observation that may be explained by differences in airway inflammation. We hypothesized that in older adult patients with asthma......, neutrophil airway inflammation increases airway closure during bronchoconstriction, while eosinophil airway inflammation increases airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). METHODS: Asthmatic subjects (n = 26), aged ≥55 years (68% female), were studied, and AHR to 4.5% saline challenge was measured by the response......-dose ratio (%fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1 )/mg saline). Airway closure was assessed during bronchoconstriction percent change in forced vital capacity (FVC)/percent change in FEV1 (i.e. Closing Index). Airway inflammation was assessed by induced sputum and exhaled nitric oxide (eNO). RESULTS...

  4. Vasoreactivity, Inflammation and vascular effects of Thiazolidinediones in Insulin resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, Fabrice Marcel Anne Clément

    2006-01-01

    In the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis, based on the respons to injury mechanism, the pathophysiological phenomenons endothelial dysfunction and inflammation are playing a pivitol role. Endothelial dysfunction is characterized by a shift towards reduced vasodilation, a pro-inflammatory state, a

  5. RIP3-dependent necrosis induced inflammation exacerbates atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lingjun; Jin, Wei; Wang, Yuhui; Huang, Huanwei; Li, Jia; Zhang, Cai

    2016-04-29

    Atherothrombotic vascular disease is already the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Atherosclerosis shares features with diseases caused by chronic inflammation. More attention should concentrates on the innate immunity effect atherosclerosis progress. RIP3 (receptor-interacting protein kinase 3) act through the transcription factor named Nr4a3 (Nuclear orphan receptors) to regulate cytokine production. Deletion RIP3 decreases IL-1α production. Injection of anti-IL-1α antibody protects against the progress of atherosclerosis in ApoE -/- mice. RIP3 as a molecular switch in necrosis, controls macrophage necrotic death caused inflammation. Inhibiting necrosis will certainly reduce atherosclerosis through limit inflammation. Necrotic cell death caused systemic inflammation exacerbated cardiovascular disease. Inhibition of necrosis may yield novel therapeutic targets for treatment in years to come.

  6. Anxiety disorders and inflammation in a large adult cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogelzangs, N.; Beekman, A. T. F.; de Jonge, P.; Penninx, Brenda

    2013-01-01

    Although anxiety disorders, like depression, are increasingly being associated with metabolic and cardiovascular burden, in contrast with depression, the role of inflammation in anxiety has sparsely been examined. This large cohort study examines the association between anxiety disorders and anxiety

  7. Effects of Ramadan Fasting on the Regulation of Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safieh Ebrahimi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The month of Ramadan, as a model of intermittent fasting, is a valuable opportunity to investigate the effects of dietary modifications on human metabolism. Fasting improves insulin sensitivity, reduces atherogenic risk, oxidative stress, and inflammation. Inflammation plays a key role in the pathogenesis of different disorders including atherosclerosis, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases. Ramadan fasting can positively modulate cardiovascular risks and improves the metabolic syndrome features through suppression of inflammatory responses. In this review we attempt to present recent studies that addressed the regulatory role(s of this nutritional status on inflammation in patients with inflammatory diseases. These studies suggest that the anti-inflammatory effect of fasting is significant and could be considered as a complementary therapeutic approach in treatment of inflammatory disorders in patients.Keywords: Ramadan fasting, Inflammation, Metabolic syndrome, Cardiovascular diseaseAbstract Abstract Abstract Abstract Abstract Abstract Abstract Abstract Abstract Abstract Abstract Abstract Abstract Abstract Abstract Abstract Abstract Abstract Abstract

  8. Airways Disease: Phenotyping Heterogeneity Using Measures of Airway Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Siddiqui Salman; Brightling Christopher E

    2007-01-01

    Despite asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease being widely regarded as heterogeneous diseases, a consensus for an accurate system of classification has not been agreed. Recent studies have suggested that the recognition of subphenotypes of airway disease based on the pattern of airway inflammation may be particularly useful in increasing our understanding of the disease. The use of non-invasive markers of airway inflammation has suggested the presence of four distinct phenotypes: ...

  9. Resolvins: Natural Agonists for Resolution of Pulmonary Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Uddin, Mohib; Levy, Bruce D.

    2010-01-01

    Inappropriate or excessive pulmonary inflammation can contribute to chronic lung diseases. In health, the resolution of inflammation is an active process that terminates inflammatory responses. The recent identification of endogenous lipid-derived mediators of resolution has provided a window to explore the pathobiology of inflammatory disease and structural templates for the design of novel pro-resolving therapeutics. Resolvins (resolution-phase interaction products) are a family of pro-reso...

  10. Inflammation in the genesis and perpetuation of atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelmann, Mads D M; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup

    2005-01-01

    The prevalence and persistence of atrial fibrillation (AF) and the relative inefficacy of the currently available pharmacotherapy requires development of new treatment strategies. Recent findings have suggested a mechanistic link between inflammatory processes and the development of AF. Epidemiol...... be through anti-inflammatory activity. This article reviews what is known about inflammation in genesis and perpetuation of AF, the putative underlying mechanisms, and possible therapeutic implications for the inhibition of inflammation as an evolving treatment modality for AF....

  11. Systemic inflammation associated with mechanical ventilation among extremely preterm infants

    OpenAIRE

    Bose, Carl L.; Laughon, Matthew M; Allred, Elizabeth N.; O’Shea, T. Michael; Van Marter, Linda J; Ehrenkranz, Richard A.; Raina N Fichorova; Leviton, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Little evidence is available to document that mechanical ventilation is an antecedent of systemic inflammation in preterm humans. We obtained blood on postnatal day 14 from 726 infants born before the 28th week of gestation and measured the concentrations of 25 inflammation-related proteins. We created multivariable models to assess the relationship between duration of ventilation and protein concentrations in the top quartile. Compared to newborns ventilated for fewer than 7 days (N=247), th...

  12. Cellular Mechanisms Underlying Eosinophilic and Neutrophilic Airway Inflammation in Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Girolamo Pelaia; Alessandro Vatrella; Maria Teresa Busceti; Luca Gallelli; Cecilia Calabrese; Rosa Terracciano; Rosario Maselli

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a phenotypically heterogeneous chronic disease of the airways, characterized by either predominant eosinophilic or neutrophilic, or even mixed eosinophilic/neutrophilic inflammatory patterns. Eosinophilic inflammation can be associated with the whole spectrum of asthma severity, ranging from mild-to-moderate to severe uncontrolled disease, whereas neutrophilic inflammation occurs mostly in more severe asthma. Eosinophilic asthma includes either allergic or nonallergic phenotypes un...

  13. Slow resolution of inflammation in severe adult dengue patients

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Lingzhai; Huang, Xiuyan; Hong, Wenxin; Qiu, Shuang; Wang, Jian; Yu, Lei; Zeng, Yaoying; Tan, Xinghua; Zhang, Fuchun

    2016-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of severe dengue has not been fully elucidated. The inflammatory response plays a critical role in the outcome of dengue disease. Methods In this study, we investigated the levels of 17 important inflammation mediators in plasma collected from mild or severe adult dengue patients at different time points to understand the contribution of inflammation to disease severity and to seek experimental evidence to optimize the existing clinical treatment strategies. Patien...

  14. Chemical Mediators and the Resolution of Airway Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Carlo, Troy; Levy, Bruce D.

    2008-01-01

    Asthma pathobiology is remarkable for chronic airway inflammation that fails to spontaneously resolve. No curative therapy is currently available. A growing body of evidence indicates that, in health, inflammation resolution is an active process orchestrated by specific chemical mediators that are elaborated to restore tissue homeostasis. Activated cell membranes release polyunsaturated fatty acids from phospholipids for enzymatic conversion to biologically active mediators with profound regu...

  15. Purinergic Receptors: Key Mediators of HIV-1 Infection and Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Swartz, Talia H.; Dubyak, George R.; Chen, Benjamin K.

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) causes a chronic infection that afflicts more than 30 million individuals worldwide. While the infection can be suppressed with potent antiretroviral therapies, individuals infected with HIV-1 have elevated levels of inflammation as indicated by increased T cell activation, soluble biomarkers, and associated morbidity and mortality. A single mechanism linking HIV-1 pathogenesis to this inflammation has yet to be identified. Purinergic receptors are ...

  16. Melanocortin receptors as novel effectors of macrophage responses in inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Hetal B.; Trinidad eMontero-Melendez; Greco, Karin V.; Mauro ePerretti

    2011-01-01

    Macrophages have crucial functions in initiating the inflammatory reaction in a strict temporal and spatial manner to provide a ‘clear-up’ response required for resolution. Hormonal peptides such as melanocortins modulate macrophage reactivity and attenuate inflammation ranging from skin inflammation to joint disease and reperfusion injury. The melanocortins (e.g. ACTH and αMSH) elicit regulatory properties through activation of a family of GPCRs, the MC receptors; MC1-MC5. Several studies ha...

  17. Melanocortin Receptors as Novel Effectors of Macrophage Responses in Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Hetal B.; Montero-Melendez, Trinidad; Greco, Karin V.; Perretti, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    Macrophages have crucial functions in initiating the inflammatory reaction in a strict temporal and spatial manner to provide a “clear-up” response required for resolution. Hormonal peptides such as melanocortins modulate macrophage reactivity and attenuate inflammation ranging from skin inflammation to joint disease and reperfusion injury. The melanocortins (e.g., adrenocorticotrophin, ACTH and αMSH) elicit regulatory properties through activation of a family of GPCRs, the melanocortin (MC) ...

  18. Divergent neuroendocrine responses to localised and systemic inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Lukewich, Mark K.; Rogers, Richard C.; Lomax, Alan E.

    2014-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) is part of an integrative network that functions to restore homeostasis following injury and infection. The SNS can provide negative feedback control over inflammation through the secretion of catecholamines from postganglionic sympathetic neurons and adrenal chromaffin cells (ACCs). Central autonomic structures receive information regarding the inflammatory status of the body and reflexively modulate SNS activity. However, inflammation and infection can a...

  19. HEMORRHAGIC STROKE AS POST-INTRACEREBRAL HEMORRHAGE INFLAMMATION

    OpenAIRE

    Yabluchanskiy, A.

    2011-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage remains one of the less studied problems in modern neurology. Later publications suggest that inflammatory processes play a significant role in hemorrhagic stroke; however, most of these reports represent fragmentary information on the local and less system levels of inflammation, and do not show the correlation between these levels. In this review the attention is focused on the compensatory, adaptive and restorative nature of the inflammation in the post-intracerebr...

  20. DJ-1 contributes to adipogenesis and obesity-induced inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Jung-Min Kim; Hyun-Jun Jang; Soo Youn Choi; Soo-Ah Park; Il Shin Kim; Yong Ryoul Yang; Yong Hwa Lee; Sung Ho Ryu; Pann-Ghill Suh

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue functions as an endocrine organ, and the development of systemic inflammation in adipose tissue is closely associated with metabolic diseases, such as obesity and insulin resistance. Accordingly, the fine regulation of the inflammatory response caused by obesity has therapeutic potential for the treatment of metabolic syndrome. In this study, we analyzed the role of DJ-1 (PARK7) in adipogenesis and inflammation related to obesity in vitro and in vivo. Many intracellular functio...

  1. Biologic response modifiers to decrease inflammation: Focus on infection risks

    OpenAIRE

    Le Saux, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Biologic response modifiers are a novel class of drugs used by sub-specialists to treat immune-mediated conditions such as juvenile idiopathic arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. Also known as ‘cytokine inhibitors’, they are proteins whose purpose is to block the action of cytokines involved in inflammation. The desired therapeutic effect is to reduce or control inflammation. Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) inhibitors are the prototypes, but newer agents in this class target other cyto...

  2. Even low-grade inflammation impacts on small intestinal function

    OpenAIRE

    Peuhkuri, Katri; Vapaatalo, Heikki; Korpela, Riitta

    2010-01-01

    Independent of the cause and location, inflammation - even when minimal - has clear effects on gastrointestinal morphology and function. These result in altered digestion, absorption and barrier function. There is evidence of reduced villus height and crypt depth, increased permeability, as well as altered sugar and peptide absorption in the small intestine after induction of inflammation in experimental models, which is supported by some clinical data. Identification of inflammatory factors ...

  3. Synthesis and turnover of prothrombin during experimental inflammation in rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Koj, A; Regoeczi, E.; Chindemi, P A; Gauldie, J.

    1984-01-01

    The response of prothrombin to inflammatory reactions was investigated in rats. Inflammation was induced by the administration of either subcutaneous turpentine or intraperitoneal endotoxin, and its effects were studied 24 h and 48 h later. Albumin and alpha 1-acute-phase globulin served as the controls. There were only insignificant changes in plasma prothrombin concentration during inflammation which contrasts sharply with a decrease in circulating albumin by approximately 25% and an increa...

  4. Pulmonary CD103 expression regulates airway inflammation in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernatchez, Emilie; Gold, Matthew J; Langlois, Anick; Lemay, Anne-Marie; Brassard, Julyanne; Flamand, Nicolas; Marsolais, David; McNagny, Kelly M; Blanchet, Marie-Renee

    2015-04-15

    Although CD103(+) cells recently emerged as key regulatory cells in the gut, the role of CD103 ubiquitous expression in the lung and development of allergic airway disease has never been studied. To answer this important question, we evaluated the response of Cd103(-/-) mice in two separate well-described mouse models of asthma (ovalbumin and house dust mite extract). Pulmonary inflammation was assessed by analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage content, histology, and cytokine response. CD103 expression was analyzed on lung dendritic cells and T cell subsets by flow cytometry. Cd103(-/-) mice exposed to antigens developed exacerbated lung inflammation, characterized by increased eosinophilic infiltration, severe tissue inflammation, and altered cytokine response. In wild-type mice exposed to house dust mite, CD103(+) dendritic cells are increased in the lung and an important subset of CD4(+) T cells, CD8(+) T cells, and T regulatory cells express CD103. Importantly, Cd103(-/-) mice presented a deficiency in the resolution phase of inflammation, which supports an important role for this molecule in the control of inflammation severity. These results suggest an important role for CD103 in the control of airway inflammation in asthma. PMID:25681437

  5. The features of skin inflammation induced by lupus serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lena; Xu, Guangqion; Dou, Hui; Deng, Guo-Min

    2016-04-01

    We recently developed a model of lupus serum-induced skin inflammation, which was used to study the pathogenesis of skin injury in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We further characterized the features of lupus serum-induced skin inflammation. This skin inflammation was evident within 3h and lasted for at least two weeks. The skin inflammation was characterized by an influx of monocytic, CD11b+cells and by a scarcity of T and B lymphocytes. Depletion of IgG from the serum abrogated the skin inflammatory response. The skin inflammation was related to lupus patients' skin history but not to SLE disease activity and type of autoantibody. The expression of TNFR1, NF-kB and MCP-1 was increased locally in skin lesions. The TLR9 ligand and lupus serum act synergistically to trigger skin inflammation. These findings suggest that this novel model is valuable for the study of the pathogenesis and therapy of skin injury in SLE.

  6. Effect and treatment of lactobacillus on inflammation around the implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bing; Wu, Feng; Tian, Guobing

    2015-09-01

    Ultrasonic scaling and antibiotic therapy are traditional therapeutic methods for inflammation around the implant but therapeutic effect is not ideal. In view of maintaining flora balance around the implant and implant long-term solid holdup, this experiment observes impact and clinical effect of lactobacillus metabolite on inflammation around the impact to explore a new kind of ecological drug. This drug has little or no side effect, good curative effect and low recurrence rate, which can be applied for broad groups of people. 16 cases with inflammation around the impact were divided into experimental group and control group, 8 cases for each group. Lactobacillus metabolites gargle was offered to experimental group; purified water was offered to control group. Gargle way is 3 times/day, 20 ml/time, 3 min/time and for 7 days. Two groups of cases were clinical and microbiological tested before gargle, 3 days, 7 days and 30 days after gargle. Based on clinical and microbiological test of 8 cases of health implant, we observe sub gingival flora variation trend and clinical effects of infectors with inflammation around implant. Lactobacillus metabolite can improve clinical index of inflammation around the impact including MPLI, GI, MBI and PD. Lactobacillus metabolite has a strong treatment effect on inflammation around the implant and has no side effect.

  7. Resolution of Sterile Inflammation: Role for Vitamin C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassem M. Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Macrophage reprogramming is vital for resolution of acute inflammation. Parenteral vitamin C (VitC attenuates proinflammatory states in murine and human sepsis. However information about the mechanism by which VitC regulates resolution of inflammation is limited. Methods. To examine whether physiological levels of VitC modulate resolution of inflammation, we used transgenic mice lacking L-gulono-γ-lactone oxidase. VitC sufficient/deficient mice were subjected to a thioglycollate-elicited peritonitis model of sterile inflammation. Some VitC deficient mice received daily parenteral VitC (200 mg/kg for 3 or 5 days following thioglycollate infusion. Peritoneal macrophages harvested on day 3 or day 5 were examined for intracellular VitC levels, pro- and anti-inflammatory protein and lipid mediators, mitochondrial function, and response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS. The THP-1 cell line was used to determine the modulatory activities of VitC in activated human macrophages. Results. VitC deficiency significantly delayed resolution of inflammation and generated an exaggerated proinflammatory response to in vitro LPS stimulation. VitC sufficiency and in vivo VitC supplementation restored macrophage phenotype and function in VitC deficient mice. VitC loading of THP-1 macrophages attenuated LPS-induced proinflammatory responses. Conclusion. VitC sufficiency favorably modulates macrophage function. In vivo or in vitro VitC supplementation restores macrophage phenotype and function leading to timely resolution of inflammation.

  8. The role of inflammation in kidney cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vivar Chevez, Antonio Roma; Finke, James; Bukowski, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    MDSC) and positively (TH1 cells, IP-10, and MIG) with tumor progression and survival. Finally, there is a discussion of different inhibitors of inflammation that may be useful in the treatment of RCC.

  9. Inflammation laryngeal changes in common cold children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. P. Selkova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is dedicated to the connection between laryngealinflammatory pathology and influenza/common cold.The purpose is to study the frequency of different form of laryngitis in children with common cold/ influenza, influenced of carried laryngitis within common cold on laryngeal structures and also the effectiveness of preventive measures against acute respiratory infections.Material and methods are the results of the examination (including laryngeal endoscopy and analysis of medical files of 3169 patients and also the data of the annual report of one Moscow semi-clinic.Results. Inflammation laryngeal pathology was revealed in 152 (4,79% cases, in 129 (84,9% – non-obstructive. 91 patient (59,8% belonged to category “frequently and often sick”. The recurrent episodes were seen in patients with both forms of laryngitis. Different laryngeal pathology (laryngitis, vocal nodules was seen after common cold treatment with 43,5% obstructive and 18,63% non-obstructive laryngitis patient as well as dysphonia in 3-14% getting worse with the following common cold episodes. The preventative measures carried among patients with laryngitis allowed to decrease spreading of this pathology notwithstanding the fact of annual growth of common cold in children.Conclusion. Thus taking to account the high circulation of respiratory viruses the absence of specific preventative measures and the especial role of viruses in development all forms of laryngitis it is recommended to include special drugs in preventative techniques of laryngitis prophylactics. Different methods of non-specific prophylactic are effective in decreasing the amount of common cold episodes, decrease the frequency and severity all forms of laryngitis in children and also tend to stabilize/normalize the voice quality in different laryngeal pathology children.

  10. A Feedback Loop between Inflammation and Zn Uptake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Bonaventura

    Full Text Available Zinc (Zn has major effects on the immune system and inflammation is associated with systemic Zn deficiency. The aim of this work was to investigate how inflammation modifies Zn metabolism at the cellular level. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA synoviocytes exposed to cytokines were used as a model of chronic inflammation. Osteoarthritis (OA synoviocytes were used as control.Zn levels were measured in medium and inside cells by Induced Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS, in the presence of minute quantities of stable spike 70Zn isotope and the addition or not of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-17 (IL-17 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α. Gene expression of ZIP-8 importer, ZnT1 exporter and the homeostasis regulators metallothioneins (MTs was evaluated after pre-exposure to cytokines, with or without exogenous Zn addition at increasing concentrations. IL-6 production was used as a marker of inflammation and measured by ELISA.Exposure to IL-17 and TNF-α enhanced expression of the Zn-importer ZIP-8, regardless of the concentration of Zn in the culture medium. In contrast, the expression of the Zn-exporter ZnT1 and of the MTs was primarily dependent on Zn levels. Addition of Zn also increased the production of IL-6, thus further stimulating the inflammatory response.IL-17/TNF-mediated inflammation enhanced the intracellular Zn uptake by synoviocytes, further increasing inflammation. These observations document the existence of a feedback loop between inflammation and Zn uptake. Based on these results, a mathematical model was developed to represent the cytokine-mediated Zn homeostasis alterations.

  11. Systemic LPS administration induces brain inflammation but not dopaminergic neuronal death in the substantia nigra

    OpenAIRE

    Jeong, Hey-Kyeong; Jou, Ilo; Joe, Eun-hye

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that brain inflammation is important in aggravation of brain damage and/or that inflammation causes neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease (PD). Recently, systemic inflammation has also emerged as a risk factor for PD. In the present study, we evaluated how systemic inflammation induced by intravenous (iv) lipopolysaccharides (LPS) injection affected brain inflammation and neuronal damage in the rat. Interestingly, almost all brain inflammatory response...

  12. Radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis of inflammation; Radiopharmaka fuer die Entzuendungsdiagnostik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meller, B.; Baehre, M. [Luebeck Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin

    2007-06-15

    Inflammations represent mediator-induced reactions of the hematopoetic-immunologic cell system resulting from exogenous or endogenous stimuli. On cellular level, an increased expression of inflammatory genes is followed by the release of several mediators. As inflammatory response vascular permeability increases and interstitial oedema develops. Additionally, white blood cells emigrate and several transduction cascades are activated. Radiopharmaceuticals for inflammation scintigraphy should specifically reflect one or several aspects of inflammation pathophysiology on molecular level. A group of elder tracers for this purpose comprised substances that are accumulated due to the permeability of physiological barriers. However, their property to accumulate in all processes with increased vascular permeability results in a comparably low specificity of these methods. In-vitro-labelled granulocytes were the method of choice for scintigraphic imaging of inflammation for years. Investigations with {sup 111}In-labelled granulocytes are still frequently considered as the gold standard to detect inflammation by scintigraphy. The use of antibodies or antibody fragments directed against leucocytes allowed in vivo labelling and substituted more complex techniques of in vitro labelling despite of several disadvantages. Due to the superior imaging quality of positron emission tomography, [{sup 18}F]FDG-labelled leucocytes might result in a renaissance of in vitro methods. In cases of cerebral inflammation, activated microglia was visualised by its increased expression of benzodiazepin receptors. An interesting approach to differentiate between infection and sterile inflammation could be the use of bacterial gyrase inhibitors labelled with radioactive compounds. At present, specificity of this method is still controversially discussed. In search of substances to visualise inflammatory transduction cascades selectively, several chemotactic and chemokinetic cytokines, metabolites

  13. Metabolic Inflammation-Differential Modulation by Dietary Constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Claire L; Kennedy, Elaine B; Roche, Helen M

    2016-01-01

    Obesity arises from a sustained positive energy balance which triggers a pro-inflammatory response, a key contributor to metabolic diseases such as T2D. Recent studies, focused on the emerging area of metabolic-inflammation, highlight that specific metabolites can modulate the functional nature and inflammatory phenotype of immune cells. In obesity, expanding adipose tissue attracts immune cells, creating an inflammatory environment within this fatty acid storage organ. Resident immune cells undergo both a pro-inflammatory and metabolic switch in their function. Inflammatory mediators, such as TNF-α and IL-1β, are induced by saturated fatty acids and disrupt insulin signaling. Conversely, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids do not interrupt metabolism and inflammation to the same extent. AMPK links inflammation, metabolism and T2D, with roles to play in all and is influenced negatively by obesity. Lipid spillover results in hepatic lipotoxicity and steatosis. Also in skeletal muscle, excessive FFA can impede insulin's action and promote inflammation. Ectopic fat can also affect pancreatic β-cell function, thereby contributing to insulin resistance. Therapeutics, lifestyle changes, supplements and dietary manipulation are all possible avenues to combat metabolic inflammation and the subsequent insulin resistant state which will be explored in the current review. PMID:27128935

  14. Unraveling the Complex Relationship Triad between Lipids, Obesity, and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahida A. Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity today stands at the intersection between inflammation and metabolic disorders causing an aberration of immune activity, and resulting in increased risk for diabetes, atherosclerosis, fatty liver, and pulmonary inflammation to name a few. Increases in mortality and morbidity in obesity related inflammation have initiated studies to explore different lipid mediated molecular pathways of attempting resolution that uncover newer therapeutic opportunities of anti-inflammatory components. Majorly the thromboxanes, prostaglandins, leukotrienes, lipoxins, and so forth form the group of lipid mediators influencing inflammation. Of special mention are the omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids that regulate inflammatory mediators of interest in hepatocytes and adipocytes via the cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways. They also exhibit profound effects on eicosanoid production. The inflammatory cyclooxygenase pathway arising from arachidonic acid is a critical step in the progression of inflammatory responses. New oxygenated products of omega-3 metabolism, namely, resolvins and protectins, behave as endogenous mediators exhibiting powerful anti-inflammatory and immune-regulatory actions via the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs and G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs. In this review we attempt to discuss the complex pathways and links between obesity and inflammation particularly in relation to different lipid mediators.

  15. TLR2-independent induction and regulation of chronic intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulard, Olivier; Asquith, Mark J; Powrie, Fiona; Maloy, Kevin J

    2010-02-01

    Interactions between the intestinal microflora and host innate immune receptors play a critical role in intestinal homeostasis. Several studies have shown that TLR2 can modulate inflammatory responses in the gut. TLR2 signals enhance tight junction formation and fortify the epithelial barrier, and may play a crucial role in driving acute inflammatory responses towards intestinal bacterial pathogens. In addition, TLR2 agonists can have direct effects on both Th1 cells and Treg. To define the role of TLR2 in the induction and regulation of chronic intestinal inflammation we examined the effects of TLR2 deletion on several complementary models of inflammatory bowel disease. Our results show that TLR2 signals are not required for the induction of chronic intestinal inflammation by either innate or adaptive immune responses. We further show that TLR2(-/-) mice harbor normal numbers of Foxp3(+) Treg that are able to suppress intestinal inflammation as effectively as their WT counterparts. We also did not find any intrinsic role for TLR2 for pathogenic effector T-cell responses in the gut. Thus, in contrast to their role in acute intestinal inflammation and repair, TLR2 signals may have a limited impact on the induction and regulation of chronic intestinal inflammation. PMID:19950179

  16. Rat gingival model for testing drugs influencing inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaju P Jacob

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Preclinical drug testing is an important areain new drug development where animals are used.An ideal animal model for this is one which is simple,reliable and can be extrapolated to humans. Topicaldrugs for inflammation are conventionally tested onthe skin of animals after induction of inflammation.A gingival model would be simple as inflammation canbe induced naturally by the action of plaque. Rats area popular animal model for testing drugs as well as tostudy various diseases of the periodontium. Periodontaldisease including gingival inflammation develops inrats in relation to indigenous plaque or experimentallyinduced bacterial products. A number of features ofrats ranging from anatomy, histology and response tobacterial insult can be seen mirrored to a great extentin humans. There is a lot similarity in the developmentand resolution of inflammation as well as the gingivalwound healing of rats and humans. This paper tries toexplore the feasibility of using the rat gingival modelfor preclinical testing of drugs acting on or influencinginflammation and concludes by identifying potentialareas of research using this model. The addition of sucha simple and inexpensive model for preclinical testing ofdrugs will be welcomed by the drug developers.

  17. Inflammation and skin cancer: old pals telling new stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensler, Sabine; Mueller, Margareta M

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation and the inflammatory infiltrate essentially contribute to tumor development and progression. For skin cancer, the observation that tumors arise in sites of chronic irritation and inflammation dates back to 1828 and has stimulated a whole field of research. Numerous animal models such as models of UV-induced or chemically induced skin carcinogenesis but also trangenic models support the role of a deregulated inflammation in the development of skin cancer. These models have greatly contributed to our understanding of the multistage process of carcinogenesis and have given important insights in the differences between physiological inflammation in a healing wound and the functional contribution of the deregulated tumor-associated inflammation to skin cancer growth and progression. Data from these models are supported by epidemiological studies that emphasize a connection of inflammatory conditions with the development of melanoma and epithelial skin cancer and give first indications for a beneficial effect of anti-inflammatory treatments in reducing the risk for skin cancer. Consequently, anti-inflammatory drugs might represent a highly interesting approach in the prevention and treatment of skin cancers.

  18. Links between coagulation, inflammation, regeneration, and fibrosis in kidney pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Álvarez, Beatriz; Liapis, Helen; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2016-04-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) involves nephron injury leading to irreversible nephron loss, ie, chronic kidney disease (CKD). Both AKI and CKD are associated with distinct histological patterns of tissue injury, but kidney atrophy in CKD involves tissue remodeling with interstitial inflammation and scarring. No doubt, nephron atrophy, inflammation, fibrosis, and renal dysfunction are associated with each other, but their hierarchical relationships remain speculative. To better understand the pathophysiology, we provide an overview of the fundamental danger response programs that assure host survival upon traumatic injury from as early as the first multicellular organisms, ie, bleeding control by coagulation, infection control by inflammation, epithelial barrier restoration by re-epithelialization, and tissue stabilization by mesenchymal repair. Although these processes assure survival in the majority of the populations, their dysregulation causes kidney disease in a minority. We discuss how, in genetically heterogeneous population, genetic variants shift balances and modulate danger responses toward kidney disease. We further discuss how classic kidney disease entities develop from an insufficient or overshooting activation of these danger response programs. Finally, we discuss molecular pathways linking, for example, inflammation and regeneration or inflammation and fibrosis. Understanding the causative and hierarchical relationships and the molecular links between the danger response programs should help to identify molecular targets to modulate kidney injury and to improve outcomes for kidney disease patients.

  19. The Interplay between Inflammation and Fibrosis in Kidney Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina B. Torres

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Serial surveillance renal allograft biopsies have shown that early subclinical inflammation constitutes a risk factor for the development of interstitial fibrosis. More recently, it has been observed that persistent inflammation is also associated with fibrosis progression and chronic humoral rejection, two histological conditions associated with poor allograft survival. Treatment of subclinical inflammation with steroid boluses prevents progression of fibrosis and preserves renal function in patients treated with a cyclosporine-based regimen. Subclinical inflammation has been reduced after the introduction of tacrolimus based regimens, and it has been shown that immunosuppressive schedules that are effective in preventing acute rejection and subclinical inflammation may prevent the progression of fibrosis and chronic humoral rejection. On the other hand, minimization protocols are associated with progression of fibrosis, and noncompliance with the immunosuppressive regime constitutes a major risk factor for chronic humoral rejection. Thus, adequate immunosuppressive treatment, avoiding minimization strategies and reinforcing educational actions to prevent noncompliance, is at present an effective approach to combat the progression of fibrosis.

  20. Management of Anemia of Inflammation in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Macciò

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Anemia of any degree is recognized as a significant independent contributor to morbidity, mortality, and frailty in elderly patients. Among the broad types of anemia in the elderly a peculiar role seems to be played by the anemia associated with chronic inflammation, which remains the most complex form of anemia to treat. The origin of this nonspecific inflammation in the elderly has not yet been clarified. It seems more plausible that the oxidative stress that accompanies ageing is the real cause of chronic inflammation of the elderly and that the same oxidative stress is actually a major cause of this anemia. The erythropoietic agents have the potential to play a therapeutic role in this patient population. Despite some promising results, rHuEPO does not have a specific indication for the treatment of anemia in the elderly. Moreover, concerns about their side effects have spurred the search for alternatives. Considering the etiopathogenetic mechanisms of anemia of inflammation in the elderly population, an integrated nutritional/dietetic approach with nutraceuticals that can manipulate oxidative stress and related inflammation may prevent the onset of this anemia and its negative impact on patients’ performance and quality of life.

  1. Unique database study linking gingival inflammation and smoking in carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söder, Birgitta; Andersson, Leif C; Meurman, Jukka H; Söder, Per-Östen

    2015-02-01

    We investigated statistical association between gingival inflammation and cancer in a group of patients followed up for 26 years with the hypothesis that gingival inflammation affects carcinogenesis. Altogether, 1676 30- to 40-year-old subjects from Stockholm were clinically examined in 1985. In 2011, we compared the baseline oral examination and follow-up data with cancer diagnoses sourced from the Swedish national hospital register databases. Of 1676 individuals, 89 (55 women, 34 men) had got cancer by the year 2011. Women were found to be at higher risk for cancer than men. Smoking (expressed in pack-years) had been more prevalent in the cancer group than in those with no cancer diagnosis. Gingival index, marker of gingival inflammation, was higher in the cancer group than in subjects with no cancer. There were no significant differences between the groups regarding age, education, dental plaque and calculus index scores, or in the number of missing teeth. In multiple logistic regression analysis with cancer as the dependent variable and several independent variables, pack-years of smoking appeared to be a principal independent predictor with odds ratio (OR) 1.32 while gingival inflammation showed OR 1.29. Hence, our present findings showed that together with smoking, gingival inflammation indeed associated with the incidence of cancer in this cohort. PMID:25533098

  2. Metabolic Inflammation-Differential Modulation by Dietary Constituents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire L. Lyons

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Obesity arises from a sustained positive energy balance which triggers a pro-inflammatory response, a key contributor to metabolic diseases such as T2D. Recent studies, focused on the emerging area of metabolic-inflammation, highlight that specific metabolites can modulate the functional nature and inflammatory phenotype of immune cells. In obesity, expanding adipose tissue attracts immune cells, creating an inflammatory environment within this fatty acid storage organ. Resident immune cells undergo both a pro-inflammatory and metabolic switch in their function. Inflammatory mediators, such as TNF-α and IL-1β, are induced by saturated fatty acids and disrupt insulin signaling. Conversely, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids do not interrupt metabolism and inflammation to the same extent. AMPK links inflammation, metabolism and T2D, with roles to play in all and is influenced negatively by obesity. Lipid spillover results in hepatic lipotoxicity and steatosis. Also in skeletal muscle, excessive FFA can impede insulin’s action and promote inflammation. Ectopic fat can also affect pancreatic β-cell function, thereby contributing to insulin resistance. Therapeutics, lifestyle changes, supplements and dietary manipulation are all possible avenues to combat metabolic inflammation and the subsequent insulin resistant state which will be explored in the current review.

  3. An Association between Corneal Inflammation and Corneal Lymphangiogenesis after Keratoplasty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weihua Li; Wencong Wang; Shiqi Ling

    2014-01-01

    Purpose:To examine the relationship between corneal in-flammation and corneal lymphangiogenesis after keratoplasty. Methods:.Rat corneal lymphangiogenesis was examined by lymphatic vessel endothelial receptor (LYVE-1) immunohis-tochemistry and whole mount immunofluorescence at 1, 3, 7, 10, and 14 days after corneal transplantation. Corneal inflam-mation was evaluated by inflammation index (IF) grading and NF-κB immunohistochemistry at the same time points. The association between lymphatic vessel counting (LVC) and the IF scores was then examined. Results:.LYVE-1 positive lymphatic vessels occurred in the corneal stroma on day 3,.developed throughout days 7 and 10,.and peaked in number at day 14 after keratoplasty. Corneal inflammation was strong on day 3, and then resolved gradually,.but increased again from days 7 to 14 after the transplantation..LVC was strongly and positively correlated with IF after keratoplasty(r=0.41;P<0.05). However, changes in IF scores and LVC were not parallel. Conclusion:.A close,.but not parallel,.relationship was found between corneal lymphangiogenesis and corneal inflammation after corneal transplantation.

  4. Persistent low-grade inflammation and regular exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Åström, Maj-brit; Feigh, Michael; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2010-01-01

    against all of these diseases and recent evidence suggests that the protective effect of exercise may to some extent be ascribed to an anti-inflammatory effect of regular exercise. Visceral adiposity contributes to systemic inflammation and is independently associated with the occurrence of CVD, type 2...... diabetes and dementia. We suggest that the anti-inflammatory effects of exercise may be mediated via a long-term effect of exercise leading to a reduction in visceral fat mass and/or by induction of anti-inflammatory cytokines with each bout of exercise.......Persistent low-grade systemic inflammation is a feature of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD), type 2 diabetes and dementia and evidence exists that inflammation is a causal factor in the development of insulin resistance and atherosclerosis. Regular exercise offers protection...

  5. The value of panoramic radiography in assessing maxillary sinus inflammation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Bong Hae; Jung, Yun Hoa; Nah, Kyung Soo [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    To evaluate the value of panoramic radiography in diagnosing maxillary sinus inflammation. A total of 214 maxillary sinuses from 114 panoramic radiographs were assessed in this study. Two independent experienced oral radiologists evaluated the images in random order for sinus inflammation. Using Cone beam CT images as the gold standard, the sensitivity and specificity of panoramic radiography were calculated, and inter- and intraobserver agreement for panoramic interpretation were obtained. The mean sensitivity and specificity of panoramic radiography were 81.0% and 85.6%, respectively. The weighted kappas for inter- and intraobserver agreement of panoramic radiography were 0.56 and 0.60, respectively. Panoramic radiography is a reasonably accurate method for diagnosing maxillary sinus inflammation and can be used for screening. However, additional examinations should be considered in patients with potentially significant pathology.

  6. Thrombomodulin: A Bifunctional Modulator of Inflammation and Coagulation in Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Okamoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Deregulated interplay between inflammation and coagulation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of sepsis. Therapeutic approaches that simultaneously target both inflammation and coagulation hold great promise for the treatment of sepsis. Thrombomodulin is an endogenous anticoagulant protein that, in cooperation with protein C and thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor, serves to maintain the endothelial microenvironment in an anti-inflammatory and anticoagulant state. A recombinant soluble form of thrombomodulin has been approved to treat patients suffering from disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC and has thus far shown greater therapeutic potential than heparin. A phase II clinical trial is currently underway in the USA to study the efficacy of thrombomodulin for the treatment of sepsis with DIC complications. This paper focuses on the critical roles that thrombomodulin plays at the intersection of inflammation and coagulation and proposes the possible existence of interactions with integrins via protein C. Finally, we provide a rationale for the clinical application of thrombomodulin for alleviating sepsis.

  7. The value of panoramic radiography in assessing maxillary sinus inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the value of panoramic radiography in diagnosing maxillary sinus inflammation. A total of 214 maxillary sinuses from 114 panoramic radiographs were assessed in this study. Two independent experienced oral radiologists evaluated the images in random order for sinus inflammation. Using Cone beam CT images as the gold standard, the sensitivity and specificity of panoramic radiography were calculated, and inter- and intraobserver agreement for panoramic interpretation were obtained. The mean sensitivity and specificity of panoramic radiography were 81.0% and 85.6%, respectively. The weighted kappas for inter- and intraobserver agreement of panoramic radiography were 0.56 and 0.60, respectively. Panoramic radiography is a reasonably accurate method for diagnosing maxillary sinus inflammation and can be used for screening. However, additional examinations should be considered in patients with potentially significant pathology.

  8. Curcumin, Inflammation, and Chronic Diseases: How Are They Linked?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan He

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available It is extensively verified that continued oxidative stress and oxidative damage may lead to chronic inflammation, which in turn can mediate most chronic diseases including cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular, neurological, inflammatory bowel disease and pulmonary diseases. Curcumin, a yellow coloring agent extracted from turmeric, shows strong anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities when used as a remedy for the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases. How oxidative stress activates inflammatory pathways leading to the progression of chronic diseases is the focus of this review. Thus, research to date suggests that chronic inflammation, oxidative stress, and most chronic diseases are closely linked, and the antioxidant properties of curcumin can play a key role in the prevention and treatment of chronic inflammation diseases.

  9. Airway, responsiveness and inflammation in adolescent elite swimmers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lise; Lund, T.K.; Barnes, P.J.;

    2008-01-01

    Background: Whereas increased airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and airway inflammation are well documented in adult elite athletes, it remains uncertain whether the same airway changes are present in adolescents involved in elite sport. Objective: To investigate airway responsiveness and airway...... inflammation in adolescent elite swimmers. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study on adolescent elite swimmers (n = 33) and 2 control groups: unselected adolescents (n = 35) and adolescents with asthma (n = 212). The following tests were performed: questionnaire, exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), spirometry...... years of intense training and competition. This leads us to believe that elite swimmers do not have particularly susceptible airways when they take up competitive swimming when young, but that they develop respiratory symptoms, airway inflammation, and AHR during their swimming careers Udgivelsesdato...

  10. Inflammation and Arterial Hypertension: From Pathophysiological Links to Risk Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietri, Panagiota; Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Tousoulis, Dimitris

    2015-01-01

    Over the last years, ample data have demonstrated the pivotal role of low-grade inflammation in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. It is well established that inflammatory activation, serving either as a substrate, in the chronic phase of atherosclerotic disease, or as a trigger, in the acute phase, increases cardiovascular events. Considering hypertension, the inflammatory process is implicated in its pathophysiology through a bidirectional relationship since arterial hypertension may enhance inflammation and vice versa. Inflammatory biomarkers such as high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, have shown predictive value for both the incidence of hypertension and the clinical outcomes in hypertensive patients. In the present review, data on the association between arterial hypertension and low-grade inflammation will be reported and potential pathophysiological pathways and clinical implications underlying this association will be discussed.

  11. Cellular mechanisms underlying eosinophilic and neutrophilic airway inflammation in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelaia, Girolamo; Vatrella, Alessandro; Busceti, Maria Teresa; Gallelli, Luca; Calabrese, Cecilia; Terracciano, Rosa; Maselli, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a phenotypically heterogeneous chronic disease of the airways, characterized by either predominant eosinophilic or neutrophilic, or even mixed eosinophilic/neutrophilic inflammatory patterns. Eosinophilic inflammation can be associated with the whole spectrum of asthma severity, ranging from mild-to-moderate to severe uncontrolled disease, whereas neutrophilic inflammation occurs mostly in more severe asthma. Eosinophilic asthma includes either allergic or nonallergic phenotypes underlying immune responses mediated by T helper (Th)2 cell-derived cytokines, whilst neutrophilic asthma is mostly dependent on Th17 cell-induced mechanisms. These immune-inflammatory profiles develop as a consequence of a functional impairment of T regulatory (Treg) lymphocytes, which promotes the activation of dendritic cells directing the differentiation of distinct Th cell subsets. The recent advances in the knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying asthmatic inflammation are contributing to the identification of novel therapeutic targets, potentially suitable for the implementation of future improvements in antiasthma pharmacologic treatments. PMID:25878402

  12. Cellular Mechanisms Underlying Eosinophilic and Neutrophilic Airway Inflammation in Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girolamo Pelaia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a phenotypically heterogeneous chronic disease of the airways, characterized by either predominant eosinophilic or neutrophilic, or even mixed eosinophilic/neutrophilic inflammatory patterns. Eosinophilic inflammation can be associated with the whole spectrum of asthma severity, ranging from mild-to-moderate to severe uncontrolled disease, whereas neutrophilic inflammation occurs mostly in more severe asthma. Eosinophilic asthma includes either allergic or nonallergic phenotypes underlying immune responses mediated by T helper (Th2 cell-derived cytokines, whilst neutrophilic asthma is mostly dependent on Th17 cell-induced mechanisms. These immune-inflammatory profiles develop as a consequence of a functional impairment of T regulatory (Treg lymphocytes, which promotes the activation of dendritic cells directing the differentiation of distinct Th cell subsets. The recent advances in the knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying asthmatic inflammation are contributing to the identification of novel therapeutic targets, potentially suitable for the implementation of future improvements in antiasthma pharmacologic treatments.

  13. Inflammation and nerve fiber interaction in endometriotic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Brett D; Bertschi, Dominic; Bersinger, Nick A; Mueller, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Endometriosis is an extremely prevalent estrogen-dependent condition characterized by the growth of ectopic endometrial tissue outside the uterine cavity, and is often presented with severe pain. Although the relationship between lesion and pain remains unclear, nerve fibers found in close proximity to endometriotic lesions may be related to pain. Also, women with endometriosis pain develop central sensitization. Endometriosis creates an inflammatory environment and recent research is beginning to elucidate the role of inflammation in stimulating peripheral nerve sensitization. In this review, we discuss endometriosis-associated inflammation, peripheral nerve fibers, and assess their potential mechanism of interaction. We propose that an interaction between lesions and nerve fibers, mediated by inflammation, may be important in endometriosis-associated pain. PMID:25465987

  14. The Interface between Inflammation and Coagulation in Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Demetz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The intimate connection between coagulation and inflammation in the pathogenesis of vascular disease has moved more and more into focus of clinical research. This paper focuses on the essential components of this interplay in the settings of cardiovascular disease and acute coronary syndrome. Tissue factor, the main initiator of the extrinsic coagulation pathway, plays a central role via causing a proinflammatory response through activation of coagulation factors and thereby initiating coagulation and downstream cellular signalling pathways. Regarding activated clotting factors II, X, and VII, protease-activated receptors provide the molecular link between coagulation and inflammation. Hereby, PAR-1 displays deleterious as well as beneficial properties. Unravelling these interrelations may help developing new strategies to ameliorate the detrimental reciprocal aggravation of inflammation and coagulation.

  15. Nurr1 expression is modified by inflammation in microglia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallier, Scott W.; Graf, Amanda E.; Waidyarante, Gavisha R.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in neonatal care have allowed premature infants to survive at earlier gestational ages, but they are often afflicted with neurological delays or deficits. Maternal inflammation has been identified as a major risk factor for premature birth and once born, infants often require supplemental oxygen for survival. Nurr1 (NR4A2) is an orphan nuclear receptor with no known binding site and is essential for the growth of midbrain dopamine neurons. Others have reported that Nurr1 can act as an anti-inflammatory transcription factor in microglia and astrocytes and respond lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We have previously reported decreased numbers of oligodendrocytes and increased numbers of microglia in the mice exposed to both maternal inflammation and neonatal hyperoxia in the perinatal period. These studies tested the hypothesis that the combined exposures to inflammation and hyperoxia would increase Nurr1 expression in microglia in our mouse model and in an immortalized microglia cell line, BV2 cells. Our data indicate that Nurr1 protein expression is increased at postnatal day 0 and postnatal day 28 in whole-brain homogenates from mice exposed to LPS and hyperoxia. Alternatively, Nurr1 message is decreased at postnatal day 60 in isolated microglia, indicating that the increases in whole-brain homogenates may be due to other cell types. In BV2 cells, Nurr1 message in increased by exposure to hyperoxia, but this increase is attenuated in cells exposed to both LPS and hyperoxia. Although Nurr1 regulation is not straightforward, these data indicate that Nurr1 expression is increased in whole-brain homogenates in response to inflammation, but is decreased in isolated primary microglia and BV2 cells in response to similar inflammation. Our data support the hypothesis that Nurr1 expression may play a significant role in regulating inflammation in the brain and understanding the complex regulation of Nurr1 could lead to new therapeutic strategies. PMID:27532877

  16. Low grade inflammation as measured by levels of YKL-40

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathcke, Camilla Noelle; Raymond, Ilan; Kistorp, Caroline;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low grade inflammation is of pathogenic importance in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes. The inflammation marker YKL-40 correlates with insulin resistance and is highly expressed in atherosclerotic plaques. We aimed to investigate whether YKL-40 could...... factors and markers including lipids, high sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP), N-terminal fragment of pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and urinary albumin/creatinine-ratio (UACR). Median follow-up period was 5.0 (0.17-5.28) years. RESULTS: In subjects without diabetes and CVD at baseline...

  17. Anticopper therapy against cancer and diseases of inflammation and fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, George J

    2005-08-15

    Anticopper drugs that have been developed to treat Wilson's disease, a disease of copper toxicity, include tetrathiomolybdate, zinc, penicillamine, and trientine. Lowering copper levels by a modest amount in non-Wilson's patients with tetrathiomolybdate inhibits angiogenesis, fibrosis and inflammation while avoiding clinical copper deficiency. Through this mechanism tetrathiomolybdate has proven effective in numerous animal models of cancer, retinopathy, fibrosis, and inflammation. Penicillamine has efficacy in rheumatoid arthritis and trientine has efficacy in diabetic neuropathy and diabetic heart disease. If clinical studies support the animal work, anticopper therapy holds promise for therapy of cancer, fibrotic disease and inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  18. Systemic inflammation and multiple organ injury in traumatic hemorrhagic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huaizheng; Xiao, Xuefei; Sun, Chuanzheng; Sun, Dao; Li, Yayong; Yang, Mingshi

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic hemorrhagic shock (HS) is a severe outcome of traumatic injury that accounts for numerous traumatic deaths. In the process of traumatic HS, both hemorrhage and trauma can trigger a complex cascade of posttraumatic events that are related to inflammatory and immune responses, which may lead to multiple organ injury or even death. From a mechanistic perspective, systemic inflammation and organ injury are involved coagulation, the complement system, impaired microcirculation and inflammatory signaling pathways. In this review, we discuss the systemic inflammation and multiple organ injury in post-traumatic HS. PMID:25961533

  19. Role of Hydrogen Sulfide in the Pathology of Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhav Bhatia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is a well-known toxic gas that is synthesized in the human body from the amino acids cystathionine, homocysteine, and cysteine by the action of at least two distinct enzymes: cystathionine-γ-lyase and cystathionine-β-synthase. In the past few years, H2S has emerged as a novel and increasingly important biological mediator. Imbalances in H2S have also been shown to be associated with various disease conditions. However, defining the precise pathophysiology of H2S is proving to be a complex challenge. Recent research in our laboratory has shown H2S as a novel mediator of inflammation and work in several groups worldwide is currently focused on determining the role of H2S in inflammation. H2S has been implicated in different inflammatory conditions, such as acute pancreatitis, sepsis, joint inflammation, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Active research on the role of H2S in inflammation will unravel the pathophysiology of its actions in inflammatory conditions and may help develop novel therapeutic approaches for several, as yet incurable, disease conditions.

  20. Association between peripheral airway function and neutrophilic inflammation in asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farah, Claude S.; Keulers, Laurien A. B.; Hardaker, Kate M.; Peters, Matthew J.; Berend, Norbert; Postma, Dirkje S.; Salome, Cheryl M.; King, Gregory G.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectiveSmall airway dysfunction is associated with asthma severity and control, but its association with airway inflammation is unknown. The aim was to determine the association between sputum inflammatory cells and the site of small airway dysfunction, measured by multiple breath n

  1. Inflammation and Immune Response in COPD: Where Do We Stand?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikoletta Rovina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence indicates that chronic inflammatory and immune responses play key roles in the development and progression of COPD. Recent data provide evidence for a role in the NLRP3 inflammasome in the airway inflammation observed in COPD. Cigarette smoke activates innate immune cells by triggering pattern recognition receptors (PRRs to release “danger signal”. These signals act as ligands to Toll-like receptors (TLRs, triggering the production of cytokines and inducing innate inflammation. In smokers who develop COPD there appears to be a specific pattern of inflammation in the airways and parenchyma as a result of both innate and adaptive immune responses, with the predominance of CD8+ and CD4+ cells, and in the more severe disease, with the presence of lymphoid follicles containing B lymphocytes and T cells. Furthermore, viral and bacterial infections interfere with the chronic inflammation seen in stable COPD and exacerbations via pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs. Finally, autoimmunity is another novel aspect that may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of COPD. This review is un update of the currently discussed roles of inflammatory and immune responses in the pathogenesis of COPD.

  2. Role of GSTM1 in Resistance for Lung Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung inflammation resulting from oxidant/antioxidant imbalance is a common feature of many lung diseases. In particular, the role of enzymes regulated by the NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) transcription factor has recently received increased attention. Among these antioxidant gene...

  3. The effectiveness of dental floss in reducing gingival inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, P; Grossman, E

    1979-03-01

    Unwaxed and waxed dental floss were clinically evaluated for effectiveness in reducing gingival inflammation. Two different scoring methods were employed. Both types of floss, when administered by a dental hygienist, were very effective, but no significant differences between them could be found. Both scoring methods led to the same conclusions, but one was more sensitive and provided more detailed information.

  4. Animal study for airway inflammation triggered by gastroesophageal reflux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAI Yun-gang; WANG Zhong-gao; JI Feng; WU Ji-min; CHEN Xiu; LI Zhen; DONG Shu-kui

    2009-01-01

    Background Gastroesophageal reflux disease with extra-esophageal symptoms, especially those with respiratory istress was attracting more and more attention. The related mechanisms were still in controversy. The purpose of the work was to explore airway inflammation triggered by gastroesophageal reflux.Methods Sixteen Sprague-Dawley rats were used as study group and 9 as control. In the study group, a plastic extender with a trumpet-shaped distal end was inserted into the lower esophagus to dilate the cardia, the pylorus was ligated. One ml of 0.1 mol/L hydrochloric acid was injected into the stomach, While a simple laparotomy was performed for control animals. All animals from two groups were sacrificed 24 hours after operation. Then tracheotomy was carried and the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was collected in all animals. Cells in the fluid were counted and levels of intedeukin (IL)-5, -6, -8 in it were measured.Results Compared with control group, the study group presented a neutrophil pattem of airway inflammation and an elevated concentration of IL-5, -6, -8 with no significant difference regarding eosinophil count.Conclusion The gastroesophageal reflux-triggered airway inflammation is characterized by a neutrophilic airway inflammation which differed from that caused by asthma, and enhanced levels of IL-5, -6 and -8, which are similar to that caused by asthma.

  5. Biomarkers for inflammation and surveillance strategies in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooiweer, E.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation of the colonic mucosa, as observed in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). Endoscopic surveillance aimed at the detection of dysplasia and asymptomatic CRC is therefore recommended in order to mitigate t

  6. Targeting inflammation with autoantigen-specific T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guichelaar, T.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic autoimmune diseases are driven by cells that respond to tissue components of the body. Inflammation in diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes or multiple sclerosis, can be suppressed by drug therapy. However, the broad range of immunosuppressive action of these drugs often does not res

  7. Characterization of brain inflammation during primary amoebic meningoencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes-Sandoval, Isaac; Serrano-Luna, José de Jesús; García-Latorre, Ethel; Tsutsumi, Víctor; Shibayama, Mineko

    2008-09-01

    Naegleria fowleri is a free-living amoeba and the etiologic agent of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Trophozoites reach the brain by penetrating the olfactory epithelium, and invasion of the olfactory bulbs results in an intense inflammatory reaction. The contribution of the inflammatory response to brain damage in experimental PAM has not been delineated. Using both optical and electron microscopy, we analyzed the morphologic changes in the brain parenchyma due to inflammation during experimental PAM. Several N. fowleri trophozoites were observed in the olfactory bulbs 72 h post-inoculation, and the number of amoebae increased rapidly over the next 24 h. Eosinophils and neutrophils surrounding the amoebae were then noted at later times during infection. Electron microscopic examination of the increased numbers of neutrophils and the interactions with trophozoites indicated an active attempt to eliminate the amoebae. The extent of inflammation increased over time, with a predominant neutrophil response indicating important signs of damage and necrosis of the parenchyma. These data suggest a probable role of inflammation in tissue damage. To test the former hypothesis, we used CD38-/- knockout mice with deficiencies in chemotaxis to compare the rate of mortality with the parental strain, C57BL/6J. The results showed that inflammation and mortality were delayed in the knockout mice. Based on these results, we suggest that the host inflammatory response and polymorphonuclear cell lysis contribute to a great extent to the central nervous system tissue damage.

  8. Can Skin Exposure to Sunlight Prevent Liver Inflammation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelley Gorman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Liver inflammation contributes towards the pathology of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. Here we discuss how skin exposure to sunlight may suppress liver inflammation and the severity of NAFLD. Following exposure to sunlight-derived ultraviolet radiation (UVR, the skin releases anti-inflammatory mediators such as vitamin D and nitric oxide. Animal modeling studies suggest that exposure to UVR can prevent the development of NAFLD. Association studies also support a negative link between circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D and NAFLD incidence or severity. Clinical trials are in their infancy and are yet to demonstrate a clear beneficial effect of vitamin D supplementation. There are a number of potentially interdependent mechanisms whereby vitamin D could dampen liver inflammation, by inhibiting hepatocyte apoptosis and liver fibrosis, modulating the gut microbiome and through altered production and transport of bile acids. While there has been a focus on vitamin D, other mediators induced by sun exposure, such as nitric oxide may also play important roles in curtailing liver inflammation.

  9. The 82-plex plasma protein signature that predicts increasing inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tepel, Martin; Beck, Hans C; Tan, Qihua;

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to define the specific plasma protein signature that predicts the increase of the inflammation marker C-reactive protein from index day to next-day using proteome analysis and novel bioinformatics tools. We performed a prospective study of 91 incident kidney...

  10. Effects of sublingual immunotherapy on allergic inflammation: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacoub, Mona-Rita; Colombo, Giselda; Marcucci, Francesco; Caminati, Marco; Sensi, Laura; Di Cara, Giuseppe; Frati, Franco; Incorvaia, Cristoforo

    2012-08-01

    The most common allergic diseases, and especially the respiratory disorders such as rhinitis and asthma, are closely related to the allergic inflammation elicited by the causative allergen. This makes inflammation the main target of anti-allergic therapies. Among the available treatments, allergen specific immunotherapy (AIT) has a patent effect on allergic inflammation, which persists also after its discontinuation, and is the only therapy able to modify the natural history of allergy. The traditional, subcutaneous route of administration was demonstrated to modify the allergen presentation by dendritic cells (DCs) that in turn correct the phenotype of allergen-specific T cells, switching from the Th2-type response, typical of allergic inflammation and characterized by the production of IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, IL-17, and IL-32 cytokines to a Th1-type response. This immune deviation is related to an increased IFN-gamma and IL-2 production as well as to the anergy of Th2 or to tolerance, the latter being related to the generation of allergen-specific T regulatory (Treg) cells, which produce cytokines such as IL-10 and TGF-beta. Anti-inflammatory mechanisms observed during sublingual AIT with high allergen doses proved to be similar to subcutaneous immunotherapy. Data obtained from biopsies clearly indicate that the pathophysiology of the oral mucosa, with particular importance for mucosal DCs, plays a crucial role in inducing tolerance to the administered allergen. PMID:22506880

  11. Genetic influence on inflammation variables in the elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Maat, Moniek P M; Bladbjerg, Else Marie; Hjelmborg, Jacob v. B.;

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inflammation variables (C-reactive protein [CRP], fibrinogen, and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 [sICAM-1]) have been identified as risk factors for cardiovascular disease. It is still not known how much the regulation of inflammatory risk factors is determined by genetic f...

  12. Voriconazole metabolism is influenced by severe inflammation : a prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veringa, Anette; Ter Avest, Mendy; Span, Lambert F R; van den Heuvel, Edwin R; Touw, Daan J; Zijlstra, Jan G; Kosterink, Jos G W; van der Werf, Tjip S; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: During an infection or inflammation, several drug-metabolizing enzymes in the liver are down-regulated, including cytochrome P450 iso-enzymes. Since voriconazole is extensively metabolized by cytochrome P450 iso-enzymes, the metabolism of voriconazole can be influenced during inflammatio

  13. An investigation of the resolution of inflammation (catabasis in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noguera Aina

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD is characterized by an enhanced inflammatory response to smoking that persists despite quitting. The resolution of inflammation (catabasis is a complex and highly regulated process where tissue resident macrophages play a key role since they phagocytose apoptotic cells (efferocytosis, preventing their secondary necrosis and the spill-over of their pro-inflammatory cytoplasmic content, and release pro-resolution and tissue repair molecules, such as TGFβ, VEGF and HGF. Because inflammation does not resolve in COPD, we hypothesized that catabasis may be abnormal in these patients. Methods To explore this hypothesis, we studied lung tissue samples obtained at surgery from 21 COPD patients, 22 smokers with normal spirometry and 13 non-smokers controls. In these samples we used: (1 immunohistochemistry to assess the expression of CD44, CD36, VEGF and TGFβ in lung macrophages; (2 real time PCR to determine HGF, PPARγ, TGFβ, VEGF and MMP-9 gene expression; and, (3 ELISA to quantify lipoxin A4, a lipid mediator of catabasis. Results We found that current and former smokers with COPD showed: (1 more inflammation (higher MMP-9 expression; (2 reduced macrophage surface expression of CD44, a key efferocytosis receptor; and, (3 similar levels of TGFβ, VEGF, HGF, PPARγ, and lipoxin A4 than smokers with normal spirometry, despite the presence of inflammation and disease. Conclusions These results identify several potential abnormalities of catabasis in patients with COPD.

  14. Association of body fat with inflammation in peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mattos, Andresa Marques; Ovidio, Paula Payão; Jordão, Alceu Afonso; da Costa, José Abrão Cardeal; Chiarello, Paula Garcia

    2013-06-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) frequently leads to body weight gain, which appears to be a potential cause of the chronic inflammation frequently present in these patients. The consequences of this inflammation are impaired nutritional status, accelerated atherosclerosis, and increased mortality. To assess the association between inflammation and body fat in female patients treated with PD. Nineteen female patients on PD for at least 6 months with no infectious complications or malignant or acute inflammatory diseases. Nutritional status was determined by measuring weight, height, body mass index (BMI), waist (WC), and mid-arm circumferences (MAC), mid-arm muscle area, and tricipital fold (TCF). Bioelectrical impedance (BIA) was used to determine body composition. Biochemical evaluation included the determination of serum albumin, urea, creatinine, and C-reactive protein (CRP). The glucose absorbed from the dialysis solution was quantitated. According to BMI, two patients were classified as malnourished and ten as overweight/obese. Sixteen individuals had high WC measurements and 12 had excess body fat (BF) as measured by BIA. High CRP levels were observed in 12 patients, who had higher WC, MAC, BMI, TCF, and BF measurements compared to non-inflamed patients. Positive associations were detected between CRP and BMI, MAC, WC, and TCF. Associations between BF and CRP suggest that adiposity may be a potent exacerbating factor of inflammation in this population, especially visceral fat. Thus, obesity may be considered to be one more factor responsible for the early atherosclerosis and high cardiovascular mortality observed in these patients.

  15. Perspectives for Monocyte/Macrophage-Based Diagnostics of Chronic Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Gudima, Alexandru; Moganti, Kondaiah; Gratchev, Alexei; Orekhov, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Low-grade chronic inflammation underlies the development of the most dangerous cardiometabolic disorders including type 2 diabetes and its vascular complications. In contrast to acute inflammation induced by bacteria and viruses, chronic inflammation can be driven by abnormal reaction to endogenous factors, including Th2 cytokines, metabolic factors like advanced glycation end products (AGEs), modified lipoproteins, or hyperglycemia. The key innate immune cells that recognize these factors in blood circulation are monocytes. Inflammatory programming of monocytes which migrate into tissues can, in turn, result into generation of tissue macrophages with pathological functions. Therefore, determination of the molecular and functional phenotype of circulating monocytes is a very promising diagnostic tool for the identification of hidden inflammation, which can precede the development of the pathology. Here we propose a new test system for the identification of inflammatory programming of monocytes: surface biomarkers and ex vivo functional system. We summarize the current knowledge about surface biomarkers for monocyte subsets, including CD16, CCR2, CX3CR1, CD64, stabilin-1 and CD36, and their association with inflammatory human disorders. Furthermore, we present the design of an ex vivo monocyte-based test system with minimal set of parameters as a potential diagnostic tool for the identification of personalized inflammatory responses. PMID:27226789

  16. Role of systemic inflammation in cirrhosis: From pathogenesis to prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirchwolf, Melisa; Ruf, Andrés Eduardo

    2015-08-01

    The natural history of cirrhosis can be divided into an initial stage, known as compensated cirrhosis, and an advanced stage which encompasses both decompensated cirrhosis and acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF). The latter syndrome has been recently described as an acute deterioration of liver function in patients with cirrhosis, which is usually triggered by a precipitating event and results in the failure of one or more organs and high short-term mortality rates. Each stage is characterized by distinctive clinical manifestations and prognoses. One of the key elements involved in cirrhosis physiopathology is systemic inflammation, recently described as one of the components in the cirrhosis-associated immune dysfunction syndrome. This syndrome refers to the combination of immune deficiency and exacerbated inflammation that coexist during the course of cirrhosis and relates to the appearance of clinical complications. Since systemic inflammation is often difficult to assess in cirrhosis patients, new objective, reproducible and readily-available markers are needed in order to optimize prognosis and lengthen survival. Thus, surrogate serum markers and clinical parameters of systemic inflammation have been sought to improve disease follow-up and management, especially in decompensated cirrhosis and ACLF. Leukocyte counts (evaluated as total leukocytes, total eosinophils or neutrophil:lymphocyte ratio) and plasma levels of procalcitonin or C-reactive protein have been proposed as prognostic markers, each with advantages and shortcomings. Research and prospective randomized studies that validate these and other markers are clearly warranted. PMID:26261687

  17. Effects of inflammation and infection on peritoneal transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. van Esch

    2014-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) allows solute and water transport. Adequate PD depends on a good function of the peritoneal membrane. Peritoneal morphological and functional alterations mostly develop with time on PD. Glucose based dialysis solutions, inflammation and infections are conceivable enemies for

  18. Mucociliary clearance, airway inflammation and nasal symptoms in urban motorcyclists

    OpenAIRE

    Brant, Tereza C S; Yoshida, Carolina T; Tomas de S. Carvalho; Nicola, Marina L; Jocimar. A. Martins; Lays M. Braga; Regiani C. de Oliveira; Vilma Leyton; Carmen S. de André; Saldiva, Paulo H. N.; Rubin, Bruce K.; Naomi K. Nakagawa

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: There is evidence that outdoor workers exposed to high levels of air pollution exhibit airway inflammation and increased airway symptoms. We hypothesized that these workers would experience increased airway symptoms and decreased nasal mucociliary clearance associated with their exposure to air pollution. METHODS:...

  19. Cancer and inflammation studies using zebrafish cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, Shuning

    2010-01-01

    As the zebrafish, Danio rerio, has been increasingly used as an animal model for biomedical research, we aimed to establish zebrafish cell line models for inflammation and cancer studies in this thesis. Several zebrafish cell lines were characterized and their genetic and physiological properties we

  20. Management of Inflammation by Natural Polyphenols: A Comprehensive Mechanistic Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Souvik; Mazumder, Somnath; Saha, Shubhra J; Bandyopadhyay, Uday

    2016-05-27

    Inflammation generates a systemic response against injury or infection from bacteria, viruses, and other pathogens. The welfare of host is the primary target of this process. However, uncontrolled or inadequate regulation of the inflammatory response produces detrimental effects leading to the generation of various chronic disorders including atherosclerosis, type-2 diabetes, neurodegenerative disease, cancer and Alzheimer's disease with severe tissue damage. The exact identity of the inflammatory stimuli is still elusive as they function in multiple pathways; therefore targeting a particular pathway does not resolve the problem. Existing therapeutics targeting the inflammatory responses include steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (SAIDs) and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). In spite of their numerous beneficial effects, both SAIDs as well as NSAIDs have their independent, unavoidable side effects, which discourage their prolonged therapeutic applications. Since the management of uncontrolled inflammation is critical for the general wellbeing, therefore an alternative source of multi-targeted non-toxic therapeutic intervention is mandatory. Plant-derived phenols constitute such a group of molecules that can be utilised to manage inflammation. They synergistically modulate several important components involved in multiple signalling pathways that regulate uncontrolled inflammation to exhibit their beneficial health effects. This review discusses the recent advances in structure-function activity of some antiinflammatory polyphenols, their bioavailability enhancement, clinical/ preclinical findings with a view to provide knowledge for developing novel antiinflammatory drugs by following system biology of proinflammatory responses with minimal side effects. PMID:27087243

  1. Sphingolipids: A Potential Molecular Approach to Treat Allergic Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai Y. Sun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergic inflammation is an immune response to foreign antigens, which begins within minutes of exposure to the allergen followed by a late phase leading to chronic inflammation. Prolonged allergic inflammation manifests in diseases such as urticaria and rhino-conjunctivitis, as well as chronic asthma and life-threatening anaphylaxis. The prevalence of allergic diseases is profound with 25% of the worldwide population affected and a rising trend across all ages, gender, and racial groups. The identification and avoidance of allergens can manage this disease, but this is not always possible with triggers being common foods, prevalent air-borne particles and only extremely low levels of allergen exposure required for sensitization. Patients who are sensitive to multiple allergens require prophylactic and symptomatic treatments. Current treatments are often suboptimal and associated with adverse effects, such as the interruption of cognition, sleep cycles, and endocrine homeostasis, all of which affect quality of life and are a financial burden to society. Clearly, a better therapeutic approach for allergic diseases is required. Herein, we review the current knowledge of allergic inflammation and discuss the role of sphingolipids as potential targets to regulate inflammatory development in vivo and in humans. We also discuss the benefits and risks of using sphingolipid inhibitors.

  2. Inflammation and intracranial aneurysms: mechanisms of initiation, growth, and rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter S Amenta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Outcomes following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage remain poor in many patients, despite advances in microsurgical and endovascular management. Consequently, considerable effort has been placed in determining the mechanisms of aneurysm formation, growth, and rupture. Various environmental and genetic factors are implicated as key components in the aneurysm pathogenesis. Currently, sufficient evidence exists to incriminate the inflammatory response as the common pathway leading to aneurysm generation and rupture. Central to this model is the interaction between the vessel wall and inflammatory cells. Dysfunction of the endothelium and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs promotes a chronic pathological inflammatory response that progressively weakens the vessel wall. We review the literature pertaining to the cellular and chemical mechanisms of inflammation that contribute to aneurysm development. Hemodynamic stress and alterations in blood flow are discussed regarding their role in promoting chronic inflammation. Endothelial cell and VSMC dysfunction are examined concerning vascular remodeling. The contribution of inflammatory cytokines, especially tumor necrosis factor-α is illustrated. Inflammatory cell infiltration, particularly macrophage-mediated deterioration of vascular integrity, is reviewed. We discuss the inflammation as a means to determine aneurysms at greatest risk of rupture. Finally, future therapeutic implications of pharmacologic modulation of the inflammation are discussed.

  3. Group 2 innate lymphoid cells in lung inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.W.S. Li (Bobby W.); R.W. Hendriks (Rudi)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractSummary: Although allergic asthma is a heterogeneous disease, allergen-specific T helper 2 (Th2) cells producing the key cytokines involved in type 2 inflammation, interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-5 and IL-13, are thought to play a major role in asthma pathogenesis. This model is challenged by t

  4. Pathobiology of obesity and osteoarthritis: integrating biomechanics and inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita I. Issa

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a significant risk factor for developing osteoarthritis in weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing joints. Although the pathogenesis of obesity-associated osteoarthritis is not completely understood, recent studies indicate that pro-inflammatory metabolic factors contribute to an increase in osteoarthritis risk. Adipose tissue, and in particular infrapatellar fat, is a local source of pro-inflammatory mediators that are increased with obesity and have been shown to increase cartilage degradation in cell and tissue culture models. One adipokine in particular, leptin, may be a critical mediator of obesity-associated osteoarthritis via synergistic actions with other inflammatory cytokines. Biomechanical factors may also increase the risk of osteoarthritis by activating cellular inflammation and promoting oxidative stress. However, some types of biomechanical stimulation, such as physiologic cyclic loading, inhibit inflammation and protect against cartilage degradation. A high percentage of obese individuals with knee osteoarthritis are sedentary, suggesting that a lack of physical activity may increase the susceptibility to inflammation. A more comprehensive approach to understanding how obesity alters daily biomechanical exposures within joint tissues may provide new insight into the protective and damaging effects of biomechanical factors on inflammation in osteoarthritis.

  5. Stimulation of systemic low-grade inflammation by psychosocial stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohleder, Nicolas

    2014-04-01

    Psychosocial stress is an important precursor of disease and reduced quality of life in humans. The biological pathways between stress exposure and pathophysiological processes underlying disease have received substantial scientific attention, although the roles of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and sympathetic nervous system remain insufficiently understood. Recent attention has focused on chronic systemic low-grade inflammation as a promising pathway because elevated inflammation often accompanies chronic psychosocial distress. These alterations of inflammatory activity play a key role in the pathophysiology of diseases that are adversely affected by chronic distress, such as cardiovascular disease. Transient increases in systemic inflammation are observed in response to acute psychosocial stress, with larger responses among individuals reporting adverse psychosocial states or conditions such as depression, lower self-esteem, or lower self-compassion. Recent evidence shows that lower subjective social status and perceived purpose in life are associated with sensitization of inflammatory stress responses to repeated stress exposure. The aims of this selective review article are to summarize current knowledge of the role of acute and chronic psychosocial stress on low-grade inflammation in humans and to discuss potential relationships between inflammatory responses to acute psychosocial stress and long-term development of disease.

  6. Ghrelin receptor regulates adipose tissue inflammation in aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aging is commonly associated with low-grade adipose inflammation, which is closely linked to insulin resistance. Ghrelin is the only circulating orexigenic hormone which is known to increase obesity and insulin resistance. We previously reported that the expression of the ghrelin receptor, growth ho...

  7. Role of G protein-coupled receptors in inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei SUN; Richard DYE

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play important roles in inflammation.Inflammatory cells such as polymorphonuclear leuko-cytes (PMN),monocytes and macrophages express a large number of GPCRs for classic chemoattractants and chemokines.These receptors are critical to the migration of phagocytes and their accumulation at sites of inflammation,where these cells can exacer-bate inflammation but also contribute to its resolution.Besides chemoattractant GPCRs,protease activated receptors (PARs) such as PAR1 are involved in the regulation of vascular endothelial permeability.Prostaglandin receptors play different roles in inflam-matory cell activation,and can mediate both proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory functions.Many GPCRs present in inflammatory cells also mediate transcription factor activation,resulting in the synthesis and secretion of inflammatory factors and,in some cases,molecules that suppress inflammation.An understanding of the signaling paradigms of GPCRs in inflammatory cells is likely to facilitate translational research and development of improved anti-inflammatory therapies.

  8. Distinct macrophage phenotypes in allergic and nonallergic lung inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robbe, Patricia; Draijer, Christina; Rebelo Borg, Thiago; Luinge, Marjan; Timens, Wim; Wouters, Inge M.; Melgert, Barbro N.; Hylkema, Machteld N.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic exposure to farm environments is a risk factor for nonallergic lung disease. In contrast to allergic asthma, in which type 2 helper T cell (Th2) activation is dominant, exposure to farm dust extracts (FDE) induces Th1/Th17 lung inflammation, associated with neutrophil infiltration. Macrophag

  9. Inflammation Aggravates Disease Severity in Marfan Syndrome Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radonic, Teodora; de Witte, Piet; Groenink, Maarten; de Waard, Vivian; Lutter, Rene; van Eijk, Marco; Jansen, Marnix; Timmermans, Janneke; Kempers, Marlies; Scholte, Arthur J.; Hilhorst-Hofstee, Yvonne; van den Berg, Maarten P.; van Tintelen, J. Peter; Pals, Gerard; Baars, Marieke J. H.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a pleiotropic genetic disorder with major features in cardiovascular, ocular and skeletal systems, associated with large clinical variability. Numerous studies reveal an involvement of TGF-beta signaling. However, the contribution of tissue inflammation is not ad

  10. SUSCEPTIBILITY TO POLLUTANT-INDUCED AIRWAY INFLAMMATION IS NEUROGENICALLY MEDIATED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neurogenic inflammation in the airways involves the activation of sensory irritant receptors (capsaicin, VR1) by noxious stimuli and the subsequent release of neuropeptides (e.g., SP, CGRP, NKA) from these fibers. Once released, these peptides initiate and sustain symptoms of ...

  11. [Vascular depression in the elderly. Does inflammation play a role?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viscogliosi, Giovanni; Andreozzi, Paola; Chiriac, Iulia Maria; Ettorre, Evaristo; Vulcano, Achiropita; Servello, Adriana; Marigliano, Benedetta; Marigliano, Vincenzo

    2011-06-01

    Vascular depression in the elderly. Does inflammation play a role?Depression is the most common comorbidity in the elderly, and it is a major determinant of disability. The late-onset depression in highly associated to cardiovascular disease. Depressive symptoms may follow vascular brain damage, especially when mood regulating areas are affected. However depression is strongly associated to vascular disease even when there is no manifest brain damage. Recently great attention has been given to chronic inflammation, both related to depression and vascular disease. Both experimental and clinical evidence shows that a rise in the concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines and glucocorticoids in depressed patients is associated with defect in serotonergic function. Chronic inflammation may underlie many forms of depression associated with vascular disease and metabolic syndrome. The importance of the inflammation hypothesis of depression lies is that psychotropic drugs may have central anti-inflammatory action, and that new generation of central anti-inflammatory drugs may be useful in depression treatment. PMID:21779108

  12. The Significance and Insignificance of Carbon Nanotube-Induced Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S.P. Boyles

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In the present review article immune responses induced by carbon nanotubes (CNTs are addressed. As inhalation is considered to be the primary entry route, and concern has been raised by similar high aspect ratio materials, the main focus lies on immune responses upon pulmonary exposure. Inflammation-related findings from both in vivo studies and in vitro models are reviewed, and the major responsible characteristics, which may drive CNT-induced inflammation in the lung, are discussed. In a second part, responses upon intentional administration of CNTs via subcutaneous and intravenous application are addressed, including their potential benefits and drawbacks for immunotherapy. Finally, the gastrointestinal tract as an alternative exposure route is briefly discussed. While there are many studies identifying numerous other factors involved in CNT-driven toxicity, e.g., cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, and genotoxicity, the focus of this review was kept solely on CNT-induced inflammation. Overall the literature has shown that CNTs are able to induce inflammation, which in some cases was a particularly robust response coinciding with the development of pro-fibrotic conditions. In the majority of cases the greatest inflammatory responses were associated with CNTs of considerable length and a high aspect ratio, accompanied by other factors like dispersion and sample purity.

  13. Inflammation-and stress-related signaling pathways in hepatocarcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hayato Nakagawa; Shin Maeda

    2012-01-01

    It has been established that cancer can be promoted and exacerbated by inflammation.Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer worldwide,and its long-term prognosis remains poor.Although HCC is a complex and heterogeneous tumor with several genomic mutations,it usually develops in the context of chronic liver damage and inflammation,suggesting that understanding the mechanism(s) of inflammation-mediated hepatocarcinogenesis is essential for the treatment and prevention of HCC.Chronic liver damage induces a persistent cycle of necroinflammation and hepatocyte regeneration,resulting in genetic mutations in hepatocytes and expansion of initiated cells,eventually leading to HCC development.Recently,several inflammation-and stress-related signaling pathways have been identified as key players in these processes,which include the nuclear factorκB,signal transducer and activator of transcription,and stress-activated mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways.Although these pathways may suggest potential therapeutic targets,they have a wide range of functions and complex crosstalk occurs among them.This review focuses on recent advances in our understanding of the roles of these signaling pathways in hepatocarcinogenesis.

  14. Emodin ameliorates lipopolysaccharides-induced corneal inflammation in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Ling; Chen; Jing-Jing; Zhang; Xin; Kao; Lu-Wan; Wei; Zhi-Yu; Liu

    2015-01-01

    · AIM: To investigate the effect of emodin on pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharides(LPS)-induced corneal inflammation in rats.· METHODS: Corneal infection was induced by pseudomonas aeruginosa LPS in Wistar rats. The inflammation induced by LPS were examined by slit lamp microscope and cytological checkup of aqueous humor.Corneal tissue structure was observed by hematoxylin and eosin(HE) staining. The activation of nuclear factor kappa B(NF-κB) was determined by Western blot.Messenger ribonucleic acid(m RNA) of tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1(ICAM-1) in LPS-challenged rat corneas were measured with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR).· RESULTS: Typical manifestations of acute corneal inflammation were observed in LPS-induce rat model,and the corneal inflammatory response and structure were improved in rats pretreated with emodin. Treatment with emodin could improve corneal structure, reduce corneal injure by reducing corneal inflammatory response. Emodin could inhibit the decreasing lever of inhibitor of kappa B alpha(IкBα) express, and the m RNA expression of TNF-α and ICAM-1 in corneal tissues was also inhibited by emodin. The differences were statistically significant between groups treated with emodin and those without treatment(P <0.01).·CONCLUSION: Emodin could ameliorate LPS-induced corneal inflammation, which might via inhibiting the activation of NF-κB.

  15. Inflammation, Immunity, and Vaccines for Helicobacter pylori Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walduck, Anna; Andersen, Leif P; Raghavan, Sukanya

    2015-01-01

    During the last year, a variety of studies have been published that increases our understanding of the basic mechanisms of immunity and inflammation in Helicobacter pylori infection and progression to gastric cancer. Innate immune regulation and epithelial cell response were covered by several...

  16. Effects of diesel exhaust on influenza-induced nasal inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Title: Effects of Diesel Exhaust on Influenza-Induced Nasal Inflammation T L Noah, MD1,2, K Horvath, BS3, C Robinette, RN2, 0 Diaz Sanchez, PhD4 and I Jaspers, PhD1,2. 1UNC Dept. of Pediatrics, United States; 2UNC Center for Environmental Medicine, Asthma and Lung Biology, ...

  17. Human endotoxemia as a model of systemic inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, K.S.; Krogh-Madsen, R.; Taudorf, S.;

    2008-01-01

    and physiological significance of the systemic inflammatory response are still not fully understood. The human endotoxin model, an in vivo model of systemic inflammation in which lipopolysaccharide is injected or infused intravenously in healthy volunteers, may be helpful in unravelling these issues. The present...

  18. Biological evaluation of nutraceuticals affecting cartilage metabolism and inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, A.

    2010-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common joint disease and an important cause of physical disability. Clinical symptoms are frequently associated with a significant functional impairment and signs and symptoms of inflammation, including pain, stiffness and loss of mobility. In osteoarthritis the balance be

  19. Diet, inflammation and prediabetes-impact of quality of diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uusitupa, Matti; Schwab, Ursula

    2013-10-01

    Low grade inflammation has been linked to risk of type 2 diabetes and atherosclerotic vascular diseases. Obesity and, in particular, abdominal obesity increase the risk of diabetes and atherosclerotic vascular diseases. One of the mechanisms could be low grade inflammation and vascular endothelial dysfunction. Permanent weight reduction is the first line of treatment both for obese individuals at increased risk of diabetes and for newly onset type 2 diabetes. Weight reduction lowers the level of several inflammatory factors in the body while increasing the level of adiponectin. Besides weight reduction the quality of diet and physical activity also modifies low grade inflammation. Based on the literature survey and our own studies in humans, it is possible to have dietary patterns that reduce inflammatory stress in the body and improves vascular endothelial dysfunction. There is strong evidence to suggest that IL-1 Ra is a very sensitive marker of low grade inflammation in obesity and related phenotypes; however, its level is markedly lowered by weight reduction and by choosing foods that have been shown to reduce inflammatory stress in the body.

  20. Influencing Factors of Self-care Agency in Outpatients with Hepatitis B Virus-induced Cirrhosis%门诊乙型病毒性肝炎肝硬化患者自我护理能力及影响因素研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕云霞; 陈琪尔; 谭坚铃

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the influencing factors of self-care agency in outpatients with hepatitis B virus-induced cirrhosis. Methods Exercise of Self-care Agency Scale (ESCA), Social Support Rating Scale (SSRS) and Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS) were used to investigate 112 outpatients with hepatitis B virus-induced cirrhosis. Results The scores of self-care agency of outpatients were 109.00±14.96. Multi-factor analysis of the total score showed that depression, subjective support, support availability were variables (P<0.05). There was positive relationship among self-care ability, subjective support and support availability while negative relationship between self-care ability and depression. Conclusion The self-care ability of patients with hepatitis B virus-induced cirrhosis was in moderate level. The factors affecting self-care agency of outpatients with hepatitis B virus-induced cirrhosis include depression, subjective support and support availability. The more depressed the patients are, the lower self-care agency they are with while the higher subjective support and support availability, the higher self-care agency.%  目的探讨门诊乙型病毒性肝炎肝硬化患者自我护理能力现状及其影响因素。方法采用自我护理能力实施量表、社会支持评定量表、抑郁自评量表及一般资料问卷对在广州某三级甲等综合医院门诊复查的112例乙型病毒性肝炎肝硬化患者进行调查。结果门诊乙型病毒性肝炎肝硬化患者自我护理能力总分(109.00±14.96)分;自我护理能力总分的多因素分析结果显示:进入回归方程的变量为抑郁、主观支持、支持利用度(P<0.05),其中自我护理能力与主观支持和支持利用度呈正相关,与抑郁呈负相关。结论门诊乙型病毒性肝炎肝硬化患者自我护理能力处于中等水平,其影响因素为抑郁、主观支持、支持利用度。患者的抑郁水平越高,其自我护