WorldWideScience

Sample records for chorioamnionitis inhibits alveolar

  1. Modern Management of Clinical Chorioamnionitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Westover

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical chorioamnionitis continues to contribute to fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality. Significant advances have been made in the last 20 years in understanding the pathophysiologic processes leading to chorioamnionitis. This review addresses the history, incidence, pathophysiology, host defenses, risk factors, diagnosis, and maternal and neonatal management of clinically evident chorioamnionitis. After a detailed review of the physiologic processes leading to clinical chorioamnionitis and sepsis, we present a modern management scheme designed to optimize perinatal outcome for both mother and fetus.

  2. Inhibition of immunological function mediated DNA damage of alveolar macrophages caused by cigarette smoke in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Takahiro; Hirono, Yuriko; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Hutei, Yoshimi; Miyagawa, Mayuko; Sakaguchi, Ikuyo; Pinkerton, Kent E; Takeuchi, Minoru

    2009-12-01

    Exposure to cigarette smoke impairs the pulmonary immune system, including alveolar macrophage function, although the mechanisms by which this occurs are not fully elucidated. This study investigates the effect of cigarette smoke exposure on the antigen-presenting activity of alveolar macrophages, which is required for antigen-specific response to T cells. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to cigarette smoke for 10 days using a Hamburg II smoking machine, and alveolar macrophages were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage. The antigen-presenting activity of alveolar macrophages was significantly inhibited in mice exposed to cigarette smoke compared with mice not exposed to cigarette smoke. Major histocompatibility complex class II cell surface molecule-positive cells, B7-1 molecule-positive cells, and interleukin-1beta messenger RNA gene expression in alveolar macrophages were significantly decreased in mice exposed to cigarette smoke compared with mice not exposed to cigarette smoke. In contrast, DNA damage and generation of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide in alveolar macrophages were significantly increased by cigarette smoke exposure. These results suggest that inhibition of the antigen-presenting activity of alveolar macrophages may result from decreased expression of major histocompatibility complex class II and B7-1 molecules and interleukin-1beta messenger RNA gene expression following cigarette smoke exposure. Furthermore, inhibition of antigen presentation in alveolar macrophage may result from DNA damage induced by excessive amounts of reactive oxygen species being generated by alveolar macrophages following cigarette smoke exposure. These findings suggest that cigarette smoke impairs the immunological function of alveolar macrophages and, as a result, increases the risk for pulmonary infection. PMID:19922407

  3. Selective inhibition of intra-alveolar p55 TNF receptor attenuates ventilator-induced lung injury

    OpenAIRE

    Bertok, Szabolcs; Wilson, Michael R.; Morley, Peter J.; de Wildt, Ruud; Bayliffe, Andrew; Takata, Masao

    2011-01-01

    Background Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) is upregulated in the alveolar space early in the course of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Studies in genetically modified mice indicate that the two TNF receptors play opposing roles during injurious high-stretch mechanical ventilation, with p55 promoting but p75 preventing pulmonary oedema. Aim To investigate the effects of selective inhibition of intra-alveolar p55 TNF receptor on pulmonary oedema and inflammation during ventilator-induced lu...

  4. Effects of phosphodiesterase 4 inhibition on alveolarization and hyperoxia toxicity in newborn rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Méhats

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prolonged neonatal exposure to hyperoxia is associated with high mortality, leukocyte influx in airspaces, and impaired alveolarization. Inhibitors of type 4 phosphodiesterases are potent anti-inflammatory drugs now proposed for lung disorders. The current study was undertaken to determine the effects of the prototypal phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor rolipram on alveolar development and on hyperoxia-induced lung injury. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: Rat pups were placed under hyperoxia (FiO2>95% or room air from birth, and received rolipram or its diluent daily until sacrifice. Mortality rate, weight gain and parameters of lung morphometry were recorded on day 10. Differential cell count and cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage and cytokine mRNA levels in whole lung were recorded on day 6. Rolipram diminished weight gain either under air or hyperoxia. Hyperoxia induced huge mortality rate reaching 70% at day 10, which was prevented by rolipram. Leukocyte influx in bronchoalveolar lavage under hyperoxia was significantly diminished by rolipram. Hyperoxia increased transcript and protein levels of IL-6, MCP1, and osteopontin; rolipram inhibited the increase of these proteins. Alveolarization was impaired by hyperoxia and was not restored by rolipram. Under room air, rolipram-treated pups had significant decrease of Radial Alveolar Count. CONCLUSIONS: Although inhibition of phosphodiesterases 4 prevented mortality and lung inflammation induced by hyperoxia, it had no effect on alveolarization impairment, which might be accounted for by the aggressiveness of the model. The less complex structure of immature lungs of rolipram-treated pups as compared with diluent-treated pups under room air may be explained by the profound effect of PDE4 inhibition on weight gain that interfered with normal alveolarization.

  5. Hidden Danger for the Fetus: Chorioamnionitis

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa Berber

    2013-01-01

    Despite all the advances in medicine, chorioamnionitis are still an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Intrauterine infections are the most important cause of chorioamnionitis. Antenatal infections may lead to serious problems such as preterm birth and loss of the fetus in the early period and in the long term mental retardation, cerebral palsy, retinopathy of prematurity, bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Early treatment of the etiology is still the most effective treatment in terms of re...

  6. Pulmonary surfactant and its components inhibit secretion of phosphatidylcholine from cultured rat alveolar type II cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulmonary surfactant is synthesized and secreted by alveolar type II cells. Radioactive phosphatidylcholine has been used as a marker for surfactant secretion. The authors report findings that suggest that surfactant inhibits secretion of 3H-labeled phosphatidylcholine by cultured rat type II cells. The lipid components and the surfactant protein group of M/sub r/ 26,000-36,000 (SP 26-36) inhibit secretion to different extents. Surfactant lipids do not completely inhibit release; in concentrations of 100 μg/ml, lipids inhibit stimulated secretion by 40%. SP 26-36 inhibits release with an EC50 of 0.1 μg/ml. At concentrations of 1.0 μg/ml, SP 26-36 inhibits basal secretion and reduces to basal levels secretion stimulated by terbutaline, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, and the ionophore A23187. The inhibitory effect of SP 26-36 can be blocked by washing type II cells after adding SP 26-36, by heating the proteins to 1000C for 10 min, by adding antiserum specific to SP 26-36, or by incubating cells in the presence of 0.2 mM EGTA. SP 26-36 isolated from canine and human sources also inhibits phosphatidylcholine release from rat type II cells. Neither type I collagen nor serum apolipoprotein A-1 inhibits secretion. These findings are compatible with the hypothesis that surfactant secretion is under feedback regulatory control

  7. Cigarette Smoke Extract Inhibits the Proliferation of Alveolar Epithelial Cells and Augments the Expression of P21WAF1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zongxian JIAO; Qilin AO; Xiaona GE; Mi XIONG

    2008-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is intimately related with the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, and alveolar epithelium is a major target for the exposure of cigarette smoke ex- tract. In order to investigate the effect of cigarette smoke extract on the proliferation of alveolar epithelial cell type Ⅱand its relationship with P21WAF1, the alveolar epithelial type Ⅱ cell line (A549) cells were chosen as surrogate cells to represent alveolar epithelial type Ⅱ cells. MTT assay was used to detect cell viability after interfered with different concentrations of cigarette smoke ex-tract. It was observed cigarette smoke extract inhibited the growth of A549 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The morphological changes, involving the condensation and margination of nuclear chromatin, even karyorrhexis, were observed by both Hoechst staining and electronic mi-croscopy. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated the increased cell percentages in G1 and subG1phases after the cells were incubated with cigarette smoke extract. The expression of p21WAF1 protein and mRNA was also significantly increased as detected by the methods of Western blot or reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction respectively. In conclusion, cigarette smoke extract inhibits the proliferation of alveolar epithelial cell type Ⅱ and blocks them in G1/S phase. The intracellular accumulation of P21WAF1 may be one of the mechanisms which contribute to cigarette smoke ex-tract-induced inhibition of cell proliferation.

  8. Selective IL-1α exposure to the fetal gut, lung, and chorioamnion/skin causes intestinal inflammatory and developmental changes in fetal sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforou, Maria; Kemp, Matthew W; van Gorp, Rick H; Saito, Masatoshi; Newnham, John P; Reynaert, Niki L; Janssen, Leon E W; Jobe, Alan H; Kallapur, Suhas G; Kramer, Boris W; Wolfs, Tim G A M

    2016-01-01

    Chorioamnionitis, caused by intra-amniotic exposure to bacteria and their toxic components, is associated with fetal gut inflammation and mucosal injury. In a translational ovine model, we have shown that these adverse intestinal outcomes to chorioamnionitis were the combined result of local gut and pulmonary-driven systemic immune responses. Chorioamnionitis-induced gut inflammation and injury was largely prevented by inhibiting interleukin-1 (IL-1) signaling. Therefore, we investigated whether local (gut-derived) IL-1α signaling or systemic IL-1α-driven immune responses (lung or chorioamnion/skin-derived) were sufficient for intestinal inflammation and mucosal injury in the course of chorioamnionitis. Fetal surgery was performed in sheep to isolate the lung, gastrointestinal tract, and chorioamnion/skin, and IL-1α or saline was given into the trachea, stomach, or amniotic cavity 1 or 6 days before preterm delivery. Selective IL-1α exposure to the lung, gut, or chorioamnion/skin increased the CD3+ cell numbers in the fetal gut. Direct IL-1α exposure to the gut impaired intestinal zonula occludens protein-1 expression, induced villus atrophy, changed the expression pattern of intestinal fatty acid-binding protein along the villus, and increased the CD68, IL-1, and TNF-α mRNA levels in the fetal ileum. With lung or chorioamnion/skin exposure to IL-1α, intestinal inflammation was associated with increased numbers of blood leukocytes without induction of intestinal injury or immaturity. We concluded that local IL-1α signaling was required for intestinal inflammation, disturbed gut maturation, and mucosal injury in the context of chorioamnionitis. PMID:26501868

  9. Inhibition of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis by nordihydroguaiaretic acid. The role of alveolar macrophage activation and mediator production.

    OpenAIRE

    Phan, S. H.; Kunkel, S L

    1986-01-01

    The role of alveolar macrophage activation and release of mediators remains unclear. In this study, this role is examined with respect to the effects of relatively selective inhibitors of arachidonate metabolism on the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. CBA/J mice were administered bleomycin (0.037 units) endotracheally to induce pulmonary fibrosis. Daily intraperitoneal injections of a lipoxygenase inhibitor, nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) inhibited pulmonary fibrosis in a dose-dependent ...

  10. The Consequences of Chorioamnionitis: Preterm Birth and Effects on Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Galinsky

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Preterm birth is a major cause of perinatal mortality and long-term morbidity. Chorioamnionitis is a common cause of preterm birth. Clinical chorioamnionitis, characterised by maternal fever, leukocytosis, tachycardia, uterine tenderness, and preterm rupture of membranes, is less common than subclinical/histologic chorioamnionitis, which is asymptomatic and defined by inflammation of the chorion, amnion, and placenta. Chorioamnionitis is often associated with a fetal inflammatory response. The fetal inflammatory response syndrome (FIRS is defined by increased systemic inflammatory cytokine concentrations, funisitis, and fetal vasculitis. Clinical and epidemiological studies have demonstrated that FIRS leads to poor cardiorespiratory, neurological, and renal outcomes. These observations are further supported by experimental studies that have improved our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for these outcomes. This paper outlines clinical and experimental studies that have improved our current understanding of the mechanisms responsible for chorioamnionitis-induced preterm birth and explores the cellular and physiological mechanisms underlying poor cardiorespiratory, neural, retinal, and renal outcomes observed in preterm infants exposed to chorioamnionitis.

  11. Transforming Growth Factor β1 Inhibits Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator-dependent cAMP-stimulated Alveolar Epithelial Fluid Transport via a Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase-dependent Mechanism*

    OpenAIRE

    Roux, Jérémie; Carles, Michel; Koh, Hidefumi; Goolaerts, Arnaud; Ganter, Michael T.; Chesebro, Brian B; Howard, Marybeth; Houseman, Benjamin T.; Finkbeiner, Walter; Shokat, Kevan M.; Paquet, Agnès C.; Matthay, Michael A; Pittet, Jean-François

    2009-01-01

    Exogenous or endogenous β2-adrenergic receptor agonists enhance alveolar epithelial fluid transport via a cAMP-dependent mechanism that protects the lungs from alveolar flooding in acute lung injury. However, impaired alveolar fluid clearance is present in most of the patients with acute lung injury and is associated with increased mortality, although the mechanisms responsible for this inhibition of the alveolar epithelial fluid transport are not completely understood. Here, we found that tr...

  12. Knockdown of flotillin-2 inhibits lung surfactant secretion by alveolar type Ⅱ cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Narendranath Reddy Chintagari; Deming Gou; Lin Liu

    2008-01-01

    @@ Dear Editor, Lung surfactant is stored in lamellar bodies and exocytosed following fusion of the lamellar bodies with the plasma membrane of alveolar type Ⅱ (AT2) cells [1].A number of proteins have been shown to be involved in surfactant secretion including SNAREs,NSF,α-SNAP and annexin A2 [2,3].Lipid rafts enriched in SNAREs are crucial for surfactant secretion [4].

  13. Inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-α reduces alveolar septal cell apoptosis in passive smoking rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Cheng; CAI Shan; CHEN Ping; CHEN Jian-bo; WU Jie; WU Shang-jie; ZHOU Rui

    2008-01-01

    Background Recent studies have revealed that lung cell apoptosis plays an important role in pathogenesis of cigarette-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).Tumor necrosis factor alpha(TNF-α)is one of the most important cytokines which are involved in COPD.This study aimed at investigating the jnfluence of its inhibitor,recombinant human necrosis factor-alpha receptor Ⅱ:IgG Fc fusion protein(rhTNFR:Fc)on alveolar septal cell apoptosis in passive smoking rats.Methods Forty-eight rats were randomly divided into a normal control group,a passive smoking group,an rhTNFR:Fc intervention group and a sham intervention group.The passive smoking rats were treated by exposure to cigarette smoking daily for 80 days.Afcer smoking for one month the rhTNFR:Fc Intervention group was treated with rhTNFR:Fc by subcutaneous injection,the sham intervention group injected subcutaneousIv with a neutral preparation(normal saline 0.1 ml,manicol 0.8 ml,cane sugar 0.2 mg,Tris 0.024 mg as a control.Lung function was determined and the levels of TNF-α in serum and broncho-alveolar lavage fluid(BALF)were measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbnent assay (ELISA).Lung tissue sections stained by hematoxylin and eosin(HE)were observed for study of morphological alternations.Mean linear intercept(MLI)and mean alveolar numbers(MAN)were measured and the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling(TUNEL)method was carried out to determine the percentage of positive cells and distribution of apoptotic cells.Results Increased MLI and decreased MAN were found in the passive smoking group compared with both the normal control group and the rhTNFR:Fc intervention group(P<0.05).Forced expiratory volume in 0.3 second(FEV0.3)/forced vital capacity(FVC)and peak expiratory flow(PEF)were lower in the passive smoking group than that in the normal control group(P<0.05).Compared with the sham intervention group,FEV0.3/FVC and PEF increased in the rhTNFR:Fc intervention

  14. [Premature rupture of membranes and chorioamnionitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez Garcia, R

    1988-01-01

    Despite advances in perinatal medicine in the past decade, the diagnosis and treatment of premature rupture of membranes remain controversial. Premature rupture occurs in 2.7-7.0% of pregnancies and most cases occur spontaneously without apparent cause. The disparity in reported rates of premature rupture is due to differences in the definition and diagnostic criteria for premature rupture and lack of comparability in the populations studied. Mexico's National Institute of Perinatology has adopted the definition of the American COllege of Gynecology and Obstetrics which views premature rupture as that occurring before regular uterine contractions that produce cervical dilation. 8.8% of its patients have premature rupture according to this definition. 20% of cases occur before the 36th week of pregnancy. Treatment of rupture occurring before 37 weeks must balance the threat of amniotic infection with the dangers of premature birth. Infections appear more common in low income patient populations. Chorioamnionitis is a serious complication of pregnancy and is the main argument against conservative treatment of premature rupture. The rate of maternal infection is directly related to the time elapsing between rupture of the membranes and birth. The rate increases after the 1st 24 hours and is at least 10 times higher after 72 hours. But recent studies suggest that there is no considerable increase in infection if vaginal explorations are avoided and careful techniques are used in treating the patient. Those who advise conservative treatment believe that prenatal outcomes are better because respiratory disease syndrome due to prematurity is avoided. Conservative management requires a white cell count at least every 24 hours and measurement of pulse, maternal temperature, and fetal heart rate ideally every 4 hours. Perinatal mortality rates due to premature rupture of membranes range from 2.5-50%. The principal causes are respiratory disease syndrome, infection, asphyxia

  15. Chorioamnionitis Alters the Response to Surfactant in Preterm Infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Been, Jasper V.; Rours, Ingrid G.; Kornelisse, Rene F.; Jonkers, Femke; de Krijger, Ronald R.; Zimmermann, Luc J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To study the association between antenatal exposure to chorioamnionitis and the neonatal response to surfactant. Study design Prospective observational cohort of 301 preterm infants of gestational age Results Compared with HC- infants, HC + F+ infants had significantly greater FiO(2) requi

  16. Treatment Utility of Postpartum Antibiotics in Chorioamnionitis Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, Anthony L; Mehra, Suwan; Gross, Gil; Colvin, Ryan; Harper, Lorie M; Tuuli, Methodius G

    2016-07-01

    Objective To determine if postpartum antibiotics are necessary for patients with chorioamnionitis after a cesarean delivery (CD). Study Design Multicenter randomized controlled trial. Laboring patients with singleton gestations and chorioamnionitis who underwent CD were eligible. Patients were treated with ampicillin and gentamicin per standard protocol, then given clindamycin prior to skin incision. Patients were randomized to either postpartum antibiotic prophylaxis or no treatment following delivery. The primary outcome was the rate of endometritis. Assuming a 30% risk of endometritis in patients with chorioamnionitis who undergo CD, 119 patients per arm would be required to detect a 50% decrease in endometritis. Results The trial was stopped for futility following a planned interim analysis after 80 patients were randomized. There was no difference in the rate of the primary outcome between the two groups (9.8 vs. 7.7%, relative risk [RR]: 1.27; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.30, 5.31). A meta-analysis comparing post-CD antibiotics versus no treatment did not find a statistically significant difference between the groups (16.7 vs. 12.0%, pooled RR: 1.43; 95% CI: 0.72, 2.84). Conclusion Additional postpartum antibiotics do not decrease the rate of endometritis in patients with chorioamnionitis who undergo CD. The current preoperative antibiotic regimen including clindamycin should remain the standard of care in these patients. PMID:26890440

  17. Glucocorticoid-Augmented Efferocytosis Inhibits Pulmonary Pneumococcal Clearance in Mice by Reducing Alveolar Macrophage Bactericidal Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolberg, Valerie R; McCubbrey, Alexandra L; Freeman, Christine M; Brown, Jeanette P; Crudgington, Sean W; Taitano, Sophina H; Saxton, Bridget L; Mancuso, Peter; Curtis, Jeffrey L

    2015-07-01

    Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) increase community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) incidence in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by unknown mechanisms. Apoptosis is increased in the lungs of COPD patients. Uptake of apoptotic cells (ACs) ("efferocytosis") by alveolar macrophages (AMøs) reduces their ability to combat microbes, including Streptococcus pneumoniae, the most common cause of CAP in COPD patients. Having shown that ICS significantly increase AMø efferocytosis, we hypothesized that this process, termed glucocorticoid-augmented efferocytosis, might explain the association of CAP with ICS therapy in COPD. To test this hypothesis, we studied the effects of fluticasone, AC, or both on AMøs of C57BL/6 mice in vitro and in an established model of pneumococcal pneumonia. Fluticasone plus AC significantly reduced TLR4-stimulated AMø IL-12 production, relative to either treatment alone, and decreased TNF-α, CCL3, CCL5, and keratinocyte-derived chemoattractant/CXCL1, relative to AC. Mice treated with fluticasone plus AC before infection with viable pneumococci developed significantly more lung CFUs at 48 h. However, none of the pretreatments altered inflammatory cell recruitment to the lungs at 48 h postinfection, and fluticasone plus AC less markedly reduced in vitro mediator production to heat-killed pneumococci. Fluticasone plus AC significantly reduced in vitro AMø killing of pneumococci, relative to other conditions, in part by delaying phagolysosome acidification without affecting production of reactive oxygen or nitrogen species. These results support glucocorticoid-augmented efferocytosis as a potential explanation for the epidemiological association of ICS therapy of COPD patients with increased risk for CAP, and establish murine experimental models to dissect underlying molecular mechanisms. PMID:25987742

  18. IL-8 inhibits cAMP-stimulated alveolar epithelial fluid transport via a GRK2/PI3K-dependent mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Jérémie; McNicholas, Carmel M.; Carles, Michel; Goolaerts, Arnaud; Houseman, Benjamin T.; Dickinson, Dale A.; Iles, Karen E.; Ware, Lorraine B.; Matthay, Michael A.; Pittet, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    Patients with acute lung injury (ALI) who retain maximal alveolar fluid clearance (AFC) have better clinical outcomes. Experimental and small clinical studies have shown that β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) agonists enhance AFC via a cAMP-dependent mechanism. However, two multicenter phase 3 clinical trials failed to show that β2AR agonists provide a survival advantage in patients with ALI. We hypothesized that IL-8, an important mediator of ALI, directly antagonizes the alveolar epithelial response to β2AR agonists. Short-circuit current and whole-cell patch-clamping experiments revealed that IL-8 or its rat analog CINC-1 decreases by 50% β2AR agonist-stimulated vectorial Cl− and net fluid transport across rat and human alveolar epithelial type II cells via a reduction in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator activity and biosynthesis. This reduction was mediated by heterologous β2AR desensitization and down-regulation (50%) via the G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2)/PI3K signaling pathway. Inhibition of CINC-1 restored β2AR agonist-stimulated AFC in an experimental model of ALI in rats. Finally, consistent with the experimental results, high pulmonary edema fluid levels of IL-8 (>4000 pg/ml) were associated with impaired AFC in patients with ALI. These results demonstrate a novel role for IL-8 in inhibiting β2AR agonist-stimulated alveolar epithelial fluid transport via GRK2/PI3K-dependent mechanisms.—Roux, J., McNicholas, C. M., Carles, M., Goolaerts, A., Houseman, B. T., Dickinson, D. A., Iles, K. E., Ware, L. B., Matthay, M. A., Pittet, J.-F. IL-8 inhibits cAMP-stimulated alveolar epithelial fluid transport via a GRK2/PI3K-dependent mechanism. PMID:23221335

  19. Acute chorioamnionitis and funisitis: definition, pathologic features, and clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chong Jai; Romero, Roberto; Chaemsaithong, Piya; Chaiyasit, Noppadol; Yoon, Bo Hyun; Kim, Yeon Mee

    2015-10-01

    Acute inflammatory lesions of the placenta consist of diffuse infiltration of neutrophils at different sites in the organ. These lesions include acute chorioamnionitis, funisitis, and chorionic vasculitis and represent a host response (maternal or fetal) to a chemotactic gradient in the amniotic cavity. While acute chorioamnionitis is evidence of a maternal host response, funisitis and chorionic vasculitis represent fetal inflammatory responses. Intraamniotic infection generally has been considered to be the cause of acute chorioamnionitis and funisitis; however, recent evidence indicates that "sterile" intraamniotic inflammation, which occurs in the absence of demonstrable microorganisms induced by "danger signals," is frequently associated with these lesions. In the context of intraamniotic infection, chemokines (such as interleukin-8 and granulocyte chemotactic protein) establish a gradient that favors the migration of neutrophils from the maternal or fetal circulation into the chorioamniotic membranes or umbilical cord, respectively. Danger signals that are released during the course of cellular stress or cell death can also induce the release of neutrophil chemokines. The prevalence of chorioamnionitis is a function of gestational age at birth, and present in 3-5% of term placentas and in 94% of placentas delivered at 21-24 weeks of gestation. The frequency is higher in patients with spontaneous labor, preterm labor, clinical chorioamnionitis (preterm or term), or ruptured membranes. Funisitis and chorionic vasculitis are the hallmarks of the fetal inflammatory response syndrome, a condition characterized by an elevation in the fetal plasma concentration of interleukin-6, and associated with the impending onset of preterm labor, a higher rate of neonatal morbidity (after adjustment for gestational age), and multiorgan fetal involvement. This syndrome is the counterpart of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome in adults: a risk factor for short- and long

  20. IL-1 Mediates Pulmonary and Systemic Inflammatory Responses to Chorioamnionitis Induced by Lipopolysaccharide

    OpenAIRE

    Suhas G Kallapur; Nitsos, Ilias; Moss, Timothy J. M.; Graeme R Polglase; Pillow, J. Jane; Cheah, Fook-Choe; Boris W Kramer; Newnham, John P; Ikegami, Machiko; Alan H Jobe

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: Chorioamnionitis frequently associates with preterm delivery and increased amniotic fluid IL-1, and causes fetal lung and systemic inflammation. However, chorioamnionitis is also associated with a paradoxical reduction in the incidence of surfactant deficiency–related respiratory distress syndrome in preterm infants.

  1. Chorioamnionitis caused by Serratia marcescens in a non-immunocompromised host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, S; Kojima, H; Yoshida, C; Suzukawa, K; Mukai, H Y; Hasegawa, Y; Hitomi, S; Nagasawa, T

    2003-11-01

    A 26 year old pregnant woman with antithrombin III deficiency developed recurrent septicaemia with Serratia marcescens. In spite of the administration of antibiotics, high grade fever persisted. She subsequently manifested lower abdominal pain, and spontaneous abortion occurred. After the abortion, she became completely afebrile. The amnion was turbid, and microscopic examination of the placenta showed haemorrhage and massive infiltration of neutrophils, suggestive of infectious chorioamnionitis. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis showed that isolates from the blood, urine, and vaginal discharge were genetically identical. Intravenous pyelography revealed that she had a bilateral completed double ureter. It was thought that a urinary tract anomaly caused infection with S marcescens, and the pathogen spread to the chorioamnion via the bloodstream. This is the first report of chorioamnionitis caused by S marcescens in a non-immunocompromised host. In addition, these findings indicate that the chorioamnion can serve as a site for persistent infection in normal pregnancies. PMID:14600137

  2. Endotoxin induced chorioamnionitis prevents intestinal development during gestation in fetal sheep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim G A M Wolfs

    Full Text Available Chorioamnionitis is the most significant source of prenatal inflammation and preterm delivery. Prematurity and prenatal inflammation are associated with compromised postnatal developmental outcomes, of the intestinal immune defence, gut barrier function and the vascular system. We developed a sheep model to study how the antenatal development of the gut was affected by gestation and/or by endotoxin induced chorioamnionitis.Chorioamnionitis was induced at different gestational ages (GA. Animals were sacrificed at low GA after 2d or 14d exposure to chorioamnionitis. Long term effects of 30d exposure to chorioamnionitis were studied in near term animals after induction of chorioamnionitis. The cellular distribution of tight junction protein ZO-1 was shown to be underdeveloped at low GA whereas endotoxin induced chorioamnionitis prevented the maturation of tight junctions during later gestation. Endotoxin induced chorioamnionitis did not induce an early (2d inflammatory response in the gut in preterm animals. However, 14d after endotoxin administration preterm animals had increased numbers of T-lymphocytes, myeloperoxidase-positive cells and gammadelta T-cells which lasted till 30d after induction of chorioamnionitis in then near term animals. At early GA, low intestinal TLR-4 and MD-2 mRNA levels were detected which were further down regulated during endotoxin-induced chorioamnionitis. Predisposition to organ injury by ischemia was assessed by the vascular function of third-generation mesenteric arteries. Endotoxin-exposed animals of low GA had increased contractile response to the thromboxane A2 mimetic U46619 and reduced endothelium-dependent relaxation in responses to acetylcholine. The administration of a nitric oxide (NO donor completely restored endothelial dysfunction suggesting reduced NO bioavailability which was not due to low expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase.Our results indicate that the distribution of the tight

  3. ADRB3 adrenergic receptor is a key regulator of human myometrial apoptosis and inflammation during chorioamnionitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Lirussi, Fréderic; Rakotoniaina, Zo; Madani, Siham; Goirand, Françoise; Breuiller-Fouché, Michelle; Leroy, Marie-Josèphe; Sagot, Paul; Morrison, John; Dumas, Monique; Bardou, Marc

    2008-01-01

    The pathophysiology underlying preterm labor triggered by inflammatory conditions such as chorioamnionitis remains largely unclear. It has already been suggested that beta-3 adrenergic (ADRB3) agonists might be of interest in the pharmacological management of preterm labor. Although there is evidence implicating ADRB receptors in the control of inflammation, there are minimal data relating specifically to ADRB3. To explore the cellular consequences of chorioamnionitis and detect apoptosis, we...

  4. Adenovirus Vectors Block Human Immunodeficiency Virus–1 Replication in Human Alveolar Macrophages by Inhibition of the Long Terminal Repeat

    OpenAIRE

    Kaner, Robert J.; Santiago, Francisco; Rahaghi, Franck; Michaels, Elizabeth; Moore, John P.; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2009-01-01

    Heterologous viruses may transactivate or suppress human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–1 replication. An adenovirus type 5 gene transfer vector (Ad5) HIV-1 vaccine was recently evaluated in a clinical trial, without efficacy. In this context, it is relevant to ask what effect Ad vectors have on HIV-1 replication, particularly in cells that are part of the innate immune system. Infection of HIV-1–infected human alveolar macrophages (AMs) obtained from HIV-1+ individuals with an Ad vector contai...

  5. Ovine fetal thymus response to lipopolysaccharide-induced chorioamnionitis and antenatal corticosteroids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke Kuypers

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: Chorioamnionitis is associated with preterm delivery and involution of the fetal thymus. Women at risk of preterm delivery receive antenatal corticosteroids which accelerate fetal lung maturation and improve neonatal outcome. However, the effects of antenatal corticosteroids on the fetal thymus in the settings of chorioamnionitis are largely unknown. We hypothesized that intra-amniotic exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS causes involution of the fetal thymus resulting in persistent effects on thymic structure and cell populations. We also hypothesized that antenatal corticosteroids may modulate the effects of LPS on thymic development. METHODS: Time-mated ewes with singleton fetuses received an intra-amniotic injection of LPS 7 or 14 days before preterm delivery at 120 days gestational age (term = 150 days. LPS and corticosteroid treatment groups received intra-amniotic LPS either preceding or following maternal intra-muscular betamethasone. Gestation matched controls received intra-amniotic and maternal intra-muscular saline. The fetal intra-thoracic thymus was evaluated. RESULTS: Intra-amniotic LPS decreased the cortico-medullary (C/M ratio of the thymus and increased Toll-like receptor (TLR 4 mRNA and CD3 expression indicating involution and activation of the fetal thymus. Increased TLR4 and CD3 expression persisted for 14 days but Foxp3 expression decreased suggesting a change in regulatory T-cells. Sonic hedgehog and bone morphogenetic protein 4 mRNA, which are negative regulators of T-cell development, decreased in response to intra-amniotic LPS. Betamethasone treatment before LPS exposure attenuated some of the LPS-induced thymic responses but increased cleaved caspase-3 expression and decreased the C/M ratio. Betamethasone treatment after LPS exposure did not prevent the LPS-induced thymic changes. CONCLUSION: Intra-amniotic exposure to LPS activated the fetal thymus which was accompanied by structural changes. Treatment

  6. A clinical prediction rule for histological chorioamnionitis in preterm newborns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasper V Been

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Histological chorioamnionitis (HC is an intrauterine inflammatory process highly associated with preterm birth and adverse neonatal outcome. HC is often clinically silent and diagnosed postnatally by placental histology. Earlier identification could facilitate treatment individualisation to improve outcome in preterm newborns. AIM: Develop a clinical prediction rule at birth for HC and HC with fetal involvement (HCF in preterm newborns. METHODS: Clinical data and placental pathology were obtained from singleton preterm newborns (gestational age ≤ 32.0 weeks born at Erasmus UMC Rotterdam from 2001 to 2003 (derivation cohort; n = 216 or Máxima MC Veldhoven from 2009 to 2010 (validation cohort; n = 206. HC and HCF prediction rules were developed with preference for high sensitivity using clinical variables available at birth. RESULTS: HC and HCF were present in 39% and 24% in the derivation cohort and in 44% and 22% in the validation cohort, respectively. HC was predicted with 87% accuracy, yielding an area under ROC curve of 0.95 (95%CI = 0.92-0.98, a positive predictive value of 80% (95%CI = 74-84%, and a negative predictive value of 93% (95%CI = 88-96%. Corresponding figures for HCF were: accuracy 83%, area under ROC curve 0.92 (95%CI = 0.88-0.96, positive predictive value 59% (95%CI = 52-62%, and negative predictive value 97% (95%CI = 93-99%. External validation expectedly resulted in some loss of test performance, preferentially affecting positive predictive rather than negative predictive values. CONCLUSION: Using a clinical prediction rule composed of clinical variables available at birth, HC and HCF could be predicted with good test characteristics in preterm newborns. Further studies should evaluate the clinical value of these rules to guide early treatment individualisation.

  7. Calcitonin gene-related peptide inhibits interleukin-1β-induced interleukin-8 secretion in human type Ⅱ alveolar epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-jing LI; Teng-ke WANG; Xian WANG

    2006-01-01

    Aim: Our previous data have shown that type Ⅱ alveolar epithelial (AEII) cells express neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and that pro-inflammatory factor interleukinl-β(IL-1β) induces CGRP secretion in the A549 human AEII cell line. In the present study, we investigated the effect of endogenous and exogenous CGRP on IL-1β-induced chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8) secretion. Methods: We used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and RT-PCR to detect IL-8 protein and mRNA levels, respectively. siRNA and the stably transfected cell line were used to knock down and overexpress the CGRP gene, respectively, and chemiluminescence assay was used to detect reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. Results: CGRP-1 receptor antagonist hCGRP8-37 (0.1-1 nmol·L-1) greatly amplified IL-1β-induced IL-8 production. The inhibition of CGRP expression by siRNA significantly increased IL-8 secretion upon IL-1β stimulation. However, cell clones stably transfected with CGRP showed significantly inhibited mRNA and protein levels of IL-8 induced by IL-1β. Conclusion: These data imply that AEII cell-derived CGRP suppress EL-1β-induced IL-8 secretion in an autocrine/paracrine mode. Further investigation showed that CGRP attenuated IL-1β-aroused ROS formation, which is an early indication of pro-inflammatory factor signaling.

  8. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alveolar proteinosis; Pulmonary alveolar phospholipoproteinosis ... In some cases, the cause of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is unknown. In others, it occurs with lung infection or an immune problem. It also can occur with cancers of the blood system, ...

  9. Anionic Pulmonary Surfactant Phospholipids Inhibit Inflammatory Responses from Alveolar Macrophages and U937 Cells by Binding the Lipopolysaccharide-interacting Proteins CD14 and MD-2*♦

    OpenAIRE

    Kuronuma, Koji; Mitsuzawa, Hiroaki; Takeda, Katsuyuki; Nishitani, Chiaki; Chan, Edward D.; Kuroki, Yoshio; Nakamura, Mari; Voelker, Dennis R.

    2009-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), derived from Gram-negative bacteria, is a major cause of acute lung injury and respiratory distress syndrome. Pulmonary surfactant is secreted as a complex mixture of lipids and proteins onto the alveolar surface of the lung. Surfactant phospholipids are essential in reducing surface tension at the air-liquid interface and preventing alveolar collapse at the end of the respiratory cycle. In the present study, we determined that palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol a...

  10. Chorioamnionitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus with intact membranes in a term pregnancy: A case of maternal and fetal septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorano, Sumire; Goto, Maki; Matsuoka, Sakiko; Tohyama, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Hiroko; Nakamura, Sumie; Fukami, Tatsuya; Matsuoka, Ryoei; Tsujioka, Hiroshi; Eguchi, Fuyuki

    2016-04-01

    Chorioamnionitis is usually caused by migration of cervicovaginal flora through the cervical canal in women with ruptured membranes. Common causative pathogens are genital mycoplasmas, anaerobes, enteric gram-negative bacilli, and group B streptococcus. There have been only seven previous reports of chorioamnionitis due to Staphylococcus aureus and their clinical courses are characterized by rapid disease progression and poor prognosis. This case report describes a case of acute chorioamnionitis due to S. aureus, which was successfully managed with immediate cesarean section and postoperative intensive care. A 22-year-old woman presented at 39 weeks' gestation with a fever and acute lower abdominal pain. Fetal heart monitoring showed fetal distress. Immediate cesarean delivery was performed under general anesthesia. A male infant weighing 2450 g was born. He had Apgar scores of 3 and 7 at 1 and 5 min, respectively. He was immediately intubated and admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit. Maternal blood culture, vaginal culture, neonatal nares, and blood and gastric fluid culture all showed methicillin-sensitive S. aureus. Histopathology of the placenta demonstrated focal acute funisitis and acute chorioamnionitis. Interestingly, most of the patients in the previous reports developed chorioamnionitis due to S. aureus despite the presence of intact membranes, as in our case. Bacterial spread in the absence of membrane rupture and the presence of bacteremia suggests hematogenous, rather than ascending, etiology of S. aureus chorioamnionitis. PMID:26705749

  11. Histological Chorioamnionitis Is Increased at Extremes of Gestation in Stillbirth: A Population-Based Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrienne Gordon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the incidence of histological chorioamnionitis and a fetal response in stillbirths in New South Wales (NSW, and to examine any relationship of fetal response to spontaneous onset of labour and to unexplained antepartum death. Study Design. Population-based cohort study. Setting. New South Wales Australia. Population. All births between 2002 and 2004 with stillbirths reviewed and classified by the state perinatal mortality review committee. Methods. Record linkage of the Midwives Data Collection and the Perinatal Death Database including placental histopathology and standardised cause of death classification. Results. 952 stillbirths were included. The incidence of histopathological chorioamnionitis was 22.6%, with a bimodal distribution. A fetal inflammatory response was present in 10.1% and significantly correlated with spontaneous onset of labour. The absence of a fetal inflammatory response was strongly associated with unexplained antepartum death. Conclusions. The increased incidence of histological chorioamnionitis at extremes of gestation is confirmed in the largest dataset to date using population data. This has important implications for late gestation stillbirth as the percentage of unexplained stillbirths increases near term.

  12. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    OpenAIRE

    Crestani, B; Epaud, R.; Aubier, M.; M-C. Dombret; Taille, C.; M-P. Debray; Danel, C.; R. Borie

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare pulmonary disease characterised by alveolar accumulation of surfactant. It may result from mutations in surfactant proteins or granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) receptor genes, it may be secondary to toxic inhalation or haematological disorders, or it may be auto-immune, with anti-GM-CSF antibodies blocking activation of alveolar macrophages. Auto-immune alveolar proteinosis is the most frequent form of PAP, representing 9...

  13. Pulmonary Surfactant Surface Tension Influences Alveolar Capillary Shape and Oxygenation

    OpenAIRE

    Ikegami, Machiko; Weaver, Timothy E.; Grant, Shawn N.; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.

    2009-01-01

    Alveolar capillaries are located in close proximity to the alveolar epithelium and beneath the surfactant film. We hypothesized that the shape of alveolar capillaries and accompanying oxygenation are influenced by surfactant surface tension in the alveolus. To prove our hypothesis, surfactant surface tension was regulated by conditional expression of surfactant protein (SP)-B in Sftpb−/− mice, thereby inhibiting surface tension–lowering properties of surfactant in vivo within 24 hours after d...

  14. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Sandeep M; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Jordan P Reynolds; Krowka, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a disease of alveolar accumulation of phospholipoproteinaceous material that results in gas exchange impairment leading to dyspnea and alveolar infiltrates. There are three forms of PAP: congenital, acquired and idiopathic; of which the latter two are predominant in the adult population. Previous case studies have found that the acquired form can be secondary to various autoimmune, infectious, malignant and environmental etiologies. Recent advances in t...

  15. Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Sandeep M; Hiroshi Sekiguchi; Jordan P Reynolds; Krowka, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a disease of alveolar accumulation of phospholipoproteinaceous material that results in gas exchange impairment leading to dyspnea and alveolar infiltrates. There are three forms of PAP: congenital, acquired and idiopathic; of which the latter two are predominant in the adult population. Previous case studies have found that the acquired form can be secondary to various autoimmune, infectious, malignant and environmental etiologies. Recent advances in t...

  16. Primary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    OpenAIRE

    Šarac Sanja; Milić Rade; Zolotarevski Lidija; Aćimović Slobodan; Tomić Ilija; Plavec Goran

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is an uncommon disease characterized by the accumulation of surfactant proteins and phospholipids within the alveolar spaces. Acquired disease can be idiopathic (primary) and secondary. The prevalence of acquired pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is about 0.37 per 100,000 persons. Common symptoms are dyspnea and cough. Chest X-ray shows bilateral perihilar infiltrates. Open-lung biopsy is the gold standard for the diagnosis. Treatment includes w...

  17. Extensive pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis

    OpenAIRE

    Rittayamai, Nuttapol; Muangman, Nisa; Ruangchira-Urai, Ruchira

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis is a rare pulmonary disorder that is caused by abnormal sodium-dependent phosphate co-transporter from the mutation of SLC34A2 gene, leading to accumulation of microliths in the alveoli. We report the extensive pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis in an elderly woman who presented with progressive dyspnea for 2 months. Chest radiograph revealed diffuse pulmonary calcification. Tissue histopathology from open lung biopsy demonstrated widespread intra-alveolar lam...

  18. Copeptin concentration in cord blood in infants with early-onset sepsis, chorioamnionitis and perinatal asphyxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aebi Christoph

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vasopressin is one of the most important physiological stress and shock hormones. Copeptin, a stable vasopressin precursor, is a promising sepsis marker in adults. In contrast, its involvement in neonatal diseases remains unknown. The aim of this study was to establish copeptin concentrations in neonates of different stress states such as sepsis, chorioamnionitis and asphyxia. Methods Copeptin cord blood concentration was determined using the BRAHMS kryptor assay. Neonates with early-onset sepsis (EOS, n = 30, chorioamnionitis (n = 33 and asphyxia (n = 25 were compared to a control group of preterm and term (n = 155 neonates. Results Median copeptin concentration in cord blood was 36 pmol/l ranging from undetectable to 5498 pmol/l (IQR 7 - 419. Copeptin cord blood concentrations were non-normally distributed and increased with gestational age (p Conclusions Copeptin concentrations were strongly related to factors associated with perinatal stress such as birth acidosis, asphyxia and vaginal delivery. In contrast, copeptin appears to be unsuitable for the diagnosis of EOS.

  19. Presence of IgE cells in human placenta is independent of malaria infection or chorioamnionitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindsjö, E; Hulthén Varli, I; Ofori, M F;

    2006-01-01

    We have shown previously that numerous IgE(+) macrophage-like cells are present in the villous stroma of full term placenta and that there was no difference in the amount of IgE(+) cells between allergic and non-allergic mothers. The presence of such an abundant number of IgE(+) cells in the plac......We have shown previously that numerous IgE(+) macrophage-like cells are present in the villous stroma of full term placenta and that there was no difference in the amount of IgE(+) cells between allergic and non-allergic mothers. The presence of such an abundant number of IgE(+) cells...... in the placenta in allergic as well as non-allergic women suggests that the IgE is of some importance for a successful pregnancy outcome. Here we have investigated the IgE-pattern in 59 placentas from second and third trimesters from Sweden with different degrees of chorioamnionitis and 27 full term placentas......-infected placentas, nor between different degrees of chorioamnionitis. The IgE score in the placenta did not correlate with the levels of IgE in maternal serum or plasma. However, the IgE score was significantly higher in second- compared to third-trimester placentas (P = 0.03). This might reflect a maturation time...

  20. Effect of acetaminophen on fetal acid-base balance in chorioamnionitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshon, B; Moise, K J; Wasserstrum, N

    1989-12-01

    The effect of antipyretic treatment with acetaminophen on fetal status was examined in eight laboring women febrile with chorioamnionitis. After a fetal heart rate tracing and scalp blood gas level were obtained near maximum maternal fever, a 650-mg acetaminophen suppository was administered. If the temperature remained greater than 101 degrees F, the dose was repeated in one to two hours. The fetal heart rate tracing was analyzed again after the mother's fever was reduced by acetaminophen. All patients delivered within four hours of the first dose. Umbilical artery blood gases were obtained at delivery. Significant improvements in the bicarbonate concentration and base deficit were noted at the time of delivery as compared to the scalp gas at the height of the maternal fever. The fetal heart rate tracings at the height of the maternal fever, characterized by tachycardia, poor variability and late decelerations, changed to a normal heart rate pattern without decelerations when the mother's fever was reduced. Hence, in the laboring gravida with chorioamnionitis, reducing maternal fever with acetaminophen improves fetal status and thereby may reduce the probability of cesarean section for fetal distress. PMID:2621737

  1. Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis

    OpenAIRE

    Gayathri Devi, H.J.; K N Mohan Rao; Prathima, K. M.; Das, Jayanth K.

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis is a rare disease of unknown cause. We report a case in a young boy who presented with history of failure to thrive and chest X-ray finding suggestive of miliary mottling. Open lung biopsy revealed pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis.

  2. Congenital Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis

    OpenAIRE

    Saber Hammami; Khaled Harrathi; Khaled Lajmi; Samir Hadded; Chebil Ben Meriem; Mohamed Néji Guédiche

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare syndrome characterized by pulmonary surfactant accumulation within the alveolar spaces. It occurs with a reported prevalence of 0.1 per 100,000 individuals. Two clinically different pediatric types have been defined as congenital PAP which is fatal and a late-onset PAP which is similar to the adult form and less severe. The clinical course of PAP is variable, ranging from spontaneous remission to respiratory failure. Whole-lung lavage is the curr...

  3. Acute histologic chorioamnionitis is a risk factor for adverse neonatal outcome in late preterm birth after preterm premature rupture of membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Mi Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to determine whether acute histologic chorioamnionitis is associated with adverse neonatal outcomes in late preterm infants who were born after preterm PROM. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The relationship between the presence of acute histologic chorioamnionitis and adverse neonatal outcome was examined in patients with preterm PROM who delivered singleton preterm newborns between 34 weeks and 36 6/7 weeks of gestation. Nonparametric statistics were used for data analysis. The frequency of acute histologic chorioamnionitis was 24% in patients with preterm PROM who delivered preterm newborns between 34 weeks and 36 6/7 weeks of gestation. Newborns born to mothers with histologic chorioamnionitis had significantly higher rates of adverse neonatal outcome (74% vs 51%; p<0.005 than those without histologic chorioamnionitis. This relationship remained significant after adjustment for gestational age at preterm PROM, gestational age at delivery, and exposure to antenatal corticosteroids. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The presence of acute histologic chorioamnionitis is associated with adverse neonatal outcome in late preterm infants born to mothers with preterm PROM.

  4. Ureaplasma parvum undergoes selection in utero resulting in genetically diverse isolates colonizing the chorioamnion of fetal sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, Samantha J; Nitsos, Ilias; Polglase, Graeme R; Newnham, John P; Jobe, Alan H; Knox, Christine L

    2014-02-01

    Ureaplasmas are the microorganisms most frequently isolated from the amniotic fluid of pregnant women and can cause chronic intrauterine infections. These tiny bacteria are thought to undergo rapid evolution and exhibit a hypermutatable phenotype; however, little is known about how ureaplasmas respond to selective pressures in utero. Using an ovine model of chronic intraamniotic infection, we investigated if exposure of ureaplasmas to subinhibitory concentrations of erythromycin could induce phenotypic or genetic indicators of macrolide resistance. At 55 days gestation, 12 pregnant ewes received an intraamniotic injection of a nonclonal, clinical Ureaplasma parvum strain followed by (i) erythromycin treatment (intramuscularly, 30 mg/kg/day, n = 6) or (ii) saline (intramuscularly, n = 6) at 100 days gestation. Fetuses were then delivered surgically at 125 days gestation. Despite injecting the same inoculum into all the ewes, significant differences between amniotic fluid and chorioamnion ureaplasmas were detected following chronic intraamniotic infection. Numerous polymorphisms were observed in domain V of the 23S rRNA gene of ureaplasmas isolated from the chorioamnion (but not the amniotic fluid), resulting in a mosaiclike sequence. Chorioamnion isolates also harbored the macrolide resistance genes erm(B) and msr(D) and were associated with variable roxithromycin minimum inhibitory concentrations. Remarkably, this variability occurred independently of exposure of ureaplasmas to erythromycin, suggesting that low-level erythromycin exposure does not induce ureaplasmal macrolide resistance in utero. Rather, the significant differences observed between amniotic fluid and chorioamnion ureaplasmas suggest that different anatomical sites may select for ureaplasma subtypes within nonclonal, clinical strains. This may have implications for the treatment of intrauterine ureaplasma infections.

  5. Systemic interleukin-2 administration improves lung function and modulates chorioamnionitis-induced pulmonary inflammation in the ovine fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Monique G M; Ophelders, Daan R M G; Nikiforou, Maria; Jellema, Reint K; Butz, Anke; Delhaas, Tammo; Kramer, Boris W; Wolfs, Tim G A M

    2016-01-01

    Chorioamnionitis, an inflammatory reaction of the fetal membranes to microbes, is an important cause of preterm birth and associated with inflammation-driven lung injury. However, inflammation in utero overcomes immaturity of the premature lung by inducing surfactant lipids and lung gas volume. Previously, we found that lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced chorioamnionitis resulted in pulmonary inflammation with increased effector T cells and decreased regulatory T cell (Treg) numbers. Because Tregs are crucial for immune regulation, we assessed the effects of interleukin (IL)-2-driven selective Treg expansion on the fetal lung in an ovine chorioamnionitis model. Instrumented fetuses received systemic prophylactic IL-2 treatment [118 days gestational age (dGA)] with or without subsequent exposure to intra-amniotic LPS (122 dGA). Following delivery at 129 dGA (term 147 dGA), pulmonary and systemic inflammation, morphological changes, lung gas volume, and phospholipid concentration were assessed. IL-2 pretreatment increased the FoxP3(+)/CD3(+) ratio, which was associated with reduced CD3-positive cells in the fetal lungs of LPS-exposed animals. Prophylactic IL-2 treatment did not prevent pulmonary accumulation of myeloperoxidase- and PU.1-positive cells or elevation of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid IL-8 and systemic IL-6 concentrations in LPS-exposed animals. Unexpectedly, IL-2 treatment improved fetal lung function of control lambs as indicated by increased disaturated phospholipids and improved lung gas volume. In conclusion, systemic IL-2 treatment in utero preferentially expanded Tregs and improved lung gas volume and disaturated phospholipids. These beneficial effects on lung function were maintained despite the moderate immunomodulatory effects of prophylactic IL-2 in the course of chorioamnionitis. PMID:26519206

  6. Stimulation of neoplastic mouse lung cell proliferation by alveolar macrophage-derived, insulin-like growth factor-1 can be blocked by inhibiting MEK and PI3K activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malkinson Alvin M

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Worldwide, lung cancer kills more people than breast, colon and prostate cancer combined. Alterations in macrophage number and function during lung tumorigenesis suggest that these immune effector cells stimulate lung cancer growth. Evidence from cancer models in other tissues suggests that cancer cells actively recruit growth factor-producing macrophages through a reciprocal signaling pathway. While the levels of lung macrophages increase during tumor progression in mouse models of lung cancer, and high pulmonary macrophage content correlates with a poor prognosis in human non-small cell lung cancer, the specific role of alveolar macrophages in lung tumorigenesis is not clear. Methods After culturing either an immortalized lung macrophage cell line or primary murine alveolar macrophages from naïve and lung-tumor bearing mice with primary tumor isolates and immortalized cell lines, the effects on epithelial proliferation and cellular kinase activation were determined. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 was quantified by ELISA, and macrophage conditioned media IGF-1 levels manipulated by IL-4 treatment, immuno-depletion and siRNA transfection. Results Primary macrophages from both naïve and lung-tumor bearing mice stimulated epithelial cell proliferation. The lungs of tumor-bearing mice contained 3.5-times more IGF-1 than naïve littermates, and media conditioned by freshly isolated tumor-educated macrophages contained more IGF-1 than media conditioned by naïve macrophages; IL-4 stimulated IGF-1 production by both macrophage subsets. The ability of macrophage conditioned media to stimulate neoplastic proliferation correlated with media IGF-1 levels, and recombinant IGF-1 alone was sufficient to induce epithelial proliferation in all cell lines evaluated. Macrophage-conditioned media and IGF-1 stimulated lung tumor cell growth in an additive manner, while EGF had no effect. Macrophage-derived factors increased p-Erk1/2, p

  7. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Crestani

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP is a rare pulmonary disease characterised by alveolar accumulation of surfactant. It may result from mutations in surfactant proteins or granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF receptor genes, it may be secondary to toxic inhalation or haematological disorders, or it may be auto-immune, with anti-GM-CSF antibodies blocking activation of alveolar macrophages. Auto-immune alveolar proteinosis is the most frequent form of PAP, representing 90% of cases. Although not specific, high-resolution computed tomography shows a characteristic “crazy paving” pattern. In most cases, bronchoalveolar lavage findings establish the diagnosis. Whole lung lavage is the most effective therapy, especially for auto-immune disease. Novel therapies targeting alveolar macrophages (recombinant GM-CSF therapy or anti-GM-CSF antibodies (rituximab and plasmapheresis are being investigated. Our knowledge of the pathophysiology of PAP has improved in the past 20 yrs, but therapy for PAP still needs improvement.

  8. Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep M Patel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP is a disease of alveolar accumulation of phospholipoproteinaceous material that results in gas exchange impairment leading to dyspnea and alveolar infiltrates. There are three forms of PAP: congenital, acquired and idiopathic; of which the latter two are predominant in the adult population. Previous case studies have found that the acquired form can be secondary to various autoimmune, infectious, malignant and environmental etiologies. Recent advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of PAP demonstrate that the idiopathic form is due to antigranulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor antibodies. Therapeutic targets that replace granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor or remove these antibodies are being actively developed. The current standard of care is to perform whole lung lavage on these patients to clear the alveolar space to help improve respiratory physiology. A case of PAP is reported, followed by a literature review on the diagnosis and management of this rare condition with the aim of increasing awareness among physicians when treating patients who present with alveolar infiltrates.

  9. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage (DAH) it is a clinical syndrome that generally manifests with hemoptysis, anemia and infiltrated in the thorax x-ray. From the anatomical point of view, the DAH is defined as the presence of blood in the distal alveolar spaces without it can identify any endobronchial abnormality. The radiological presentation of the DAH is characterized by the presence of having infiltrated of alveolar occupation in the Rx of thorax of prevalence perihiliar and bilateral that goes converging to configure an image of complete consolidation of the air space, the apexes and the periphery of the lungs are generally respected. These infiltrated are solved in one to two weeks, but with the repeated episodes of having bled it can develop interstitial fibrosis

  10. Congenital Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saber Hammami

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP is a rare syndrome characterized by pulmonary surfactant accumulation within the alveolar spaces. It occurs with a reported prevalence of 0.1 per 100,000 individuals. Two clinically different pediatric types have been defined as congenital PAP which is fatal and a late-onset PAP which is similar to the adult form and less severe. The clinical course of PAP is variable, ranging from spontaneous remission to respiratory failure. Whole-lung lavage is the current standard treatment for PAP patients. We report a new congenital case of PAP.

  11. Primary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šarac Sanja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is an uncommon disease characterized by the accumulation of surfactant proteins and phospholipids within the alveolar spaces. Acquired disease can be idiopathic (primary and secondary. The prevalence of acquired pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is about 0.37 per 100,000 persons. Common symptoms are dyspnea and cough. Chest X-ray shows bilateral perihilar infiltrates. Open-lung biopsy is the gold standard for the diagnosis. Treatment includes whole-lung lavage, application of granulocyte-macrophage colonystimulating factor and lung transplantation. Case report. We reported a 51 year-old man with primary form of the disease. It was the second case of this extremely rare disease in the past 30 years in our clinic. The symptoms were longlasting dry cough, fever and physical deterioration. Chest Xray revealed bilateral pulmonary infiltrates; computed tomography showed patchy ground-glass opacification with interlobular thickening. The diagnosis was established by open lung biopsy. Additional tests were performed to exclude secondary form of the disease. Conclusion. We presented a rare clinical entity with typical clinical features and clinical and radiological course of the disease, in order to improve differential diagnostic approach to patients with bilateral lung infiltrations. In patients with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis timely diagnosis and adequate treatment can improve a prognosis.

  12. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Adrian Kwok Wai; Takano, Angela; Hsu, Ann Ling; Low, Su Ying

    2014-01-01

    We report a 68-year-old female who presented with chronic cough and progressive dyspnoea. Computed tomography of the thorax and subsequent bronchoscopy confirmed the diagnosis of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP), which was treated with whole lung lavage. This case is reported in view of the low incidence of PAP.

  13. Protective effect of Ac-SDKP on alveolar epithelial cells through inhibition of EMT via TGF-β1/ROCK1 pathway in silicosis in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Haijing; Xu, Hong; Zhang, Xianghong; Sun, Yue; Wang, Ruimin; Brann, Darrell; Yang, Fang

    2016-03-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a critical stage during the development of silicosis fibrosis. In the current study, we hypothesized that the anti-fibrotic tetrapeptide, N-acetyl-seryl-aspartyl-lysyl-proline (Ac-SDKP) may exert its anti-fibrotic effects via activation of the TGF-β1/ROCK1 pathway, leading to inhibition of EMT. To address this hypothesis, we first examined the effect of Ac-SDKP upon EMT using an in vivo rat silicosis model, as well as in an in vitro model of TGF-β1-induced EMT. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to examine colocalization of surfactant protein A (SP-A), fibroblast specific protein-1 (FSP-1) and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in vivo. Western blot analysis was used to examine for changes in the protein levels of E-cadherin (E-cad) and SP-A (epithelial cell markers), vimentin (mesenchymal cell marker), α-SMA (active myofibroblast marker), and collagen I and III in both in vivo and in vitro experiments. Secondly, we utilized Western blot analysis and confocal laser scanning microscopy to examine the protein expression of TGF-β1 and ROCK1 in in vivo and in vitro studies. The results revealed that Ac-SDKP treatment prevented increases in the expression of mesenchymal markers as well as TGF-β1, ROCK1, collagen I and III. Furthermore, Ac-SDKP treatment prevented decreases in the expression of epithelial cell markers in both in vivo and in vitro experiments. Based on the results, we conclude that Ac-SDKP inhibits the transition of epithelial cell-myofibroblast in silicosis via activation of the TGF-β1/ROCK1 signaling pathway, which may serve as a novel mechanism by which it exerts its anti-fibrosis properties.

  14. Protective effect of Ac-SDKP on alveolar epithelial cells through inhibition of EMT via TGF-β1/ROCK1 pathway in silicosis in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Haijing; Xu, Hong; Zhang, Xianghong; Sun, Yue; Wang, Ruimin; Brann, Darrell; Yang, Fang

    2016-03-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a critical stage during the development of silicosis fibrosis. In the current study, we hypothesized that the anti-fibrotic tetrapeptide, N-acetyl-seryl-aspartyl-lysyl-proline (Ac-SDKP) may exert its anti-fibrotic effects via activation of the TGF-β1/ROCK1 pathway, leading to inhibition of EMT. To address this hypothesis, we first examined the effect of Ac-SDKP upon EMT using an in vivo rat silicosis model, as well as in an in vitro model of TGF-β1-induced EMT. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to examine colocalization of surfactant protein A (SP-A), fibroblast specific protein-1 (FSP-1) and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in vivo. Western blot analysis was used to examine for changes in the protein levels of E-cadherin (E-cad) and SP-A (epithelial cell markers), vimentin (mesenchymal cell marker), α-SMA (active myofibroblast marker), and collagen I and III in both in vivo and in vitro experiments. Secondly, we utilized Western blot analysis and confocal laser scanning microscopy to examine the protein expression of TGF-β1 and ROCK1 in in vivo and in vitro studies. The results revealed that Ac-SDKP treatment prevented increases in the expression of mesenchymal markers as well as TGF-β1, ROCK1, collagen I and III. Furthermore, Ac-SDKP treatment prevented decreases in the expression of epithelial cell markers in both in vivo and in vitro experiments. Based on the results, we conclude that Ac-SDKP inhibits the transition of epithelial cell-myofibroblast in silicosis via activation of the TGF-β1/ROCK1 signaling pathway, which may serve as a novel mechanism by which it exerts its anti-fibrosis properties. PMID:26785300

  15. Amniotic fluid sludge as a marker of intra-amniotic infection and histological chorioamnionitis in cervical insufficiency: a report of four cases and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paules, Cristina; Moreno, Esther; Gonzales, Ariel; Fabre, Ernesto; González de Agüero, Rafael; Oros, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Amniotic fluid sludge (AFS) is defined as the presence of particulate matter in the amniotic fluid in close proximity to the cervix. Although its prevalence is known to correlate with the risk of preterm delivery, initial reports describe a strong association between AFS and microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity (MIAC) and histological chorioamnionitis. However, AFS is also present in uncomplicated pregnancies, and its prevalence appears to increase with gestational age. Recent evidence debates the usefulness of AFS as a marker of early preterm delivery risk. We present four cases with AFS diagnosed by transvaginal ultrasound at admission for cervical insufficiency between 20 and 24 weeks of gestation, with confirmed lower genital tract and intra-amniotic infections by amniocentesis and histological chorioamnionitis and funisitis. Our findings reinforce the presence of AFS as a useful marker of MIAC, chorioamnionitis and funisitis that increase the likelihood of preterm delivery at an extreme gestational age.

  16. Temporal Trends in Chorioamnionitis by Maternal Race/Ethnicity and Gestational Age (1995–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Fassett

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To characterize trends in chorioamnionitis (CAM by maternal race/ethnicity and gestational age. Study Design. We examined trends in CAM from 1995–2010 among singleton births in all Kaiser Permanente Southern California hospitals (. Data were extracted from Perinatal Service System and clinical utilization records. Gestational age- and race/ethnicity-specific biannual diagnosis rates were estimated using the Poisson regression after adjusting for potential confounding factors. Results. Overall diagnosis rates of CAM increased from 2.7% in 1995-1996 to 6.0% in 2009-2010 with a relative increase of 126% (95% confidence intervals [CI] 113%–149%. From 1995-1996 to 2009-2010, CAM increased among the Whites (1.8% to 4.3%, -value for trend <.001, Blacks (2.2% to 3.7%, -value for trend <.001, Hispanics (2.4% to 5.8%, -value for trend <.001, and Asian/Pacific Islanders (3.6% to 9.0%, -value for trend <.001. The adjusted relative percentage change in CAM from 1995-1996 to 2009-2010 was for Whites [preterm 21% (9%–78%, term 138% (108%–173%], for Blacks [preterm 24% (−9%–81%, term 62% (30%–101%], for Hispanics [preterm 31% (3%–66%, term 135% (114%–159%], and for Asian/Pacific Islanders [preterm 44% (9%–127%, term 145% (109%–188%]. Conclusion. The findings suggest that CAM diagnosis rate has increased for all race/ethnic groups. This increase is primarily due to increased diagnosis at term gestation.

  17. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the original description of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) as bilaterally symmetric, confluent, perihilar infiltrates, no large series evaluating the relative frequency of radiographic findings has been published. The authors reviewed 53 histologically proved cases and found a predominantly confluent pattern in 77.4%; of these, 61% had a nodular component. A predominantly nodular pattern was seen in 22.6% often with some coalescence or reticular shadows. Distribution was perhilar 56.6%, diffuse in 26.4%, basilar in 26.4%, and asymmetric in 35.8%. The classic pattern was seen in 18.9%. The authors conclude that the spectrum of patterns in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is wider than generally appreciated

  18. The alveolar macrophage.

    OpenAIRE

    Bowden, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    The pulmonary macrophagic system is critical to the defense of the lung, keeping the alveoli clean and sterile and responding on demand with an adaptive outpouring of new cells into the air sacs. Under basal conditions alveolar macrophages, in common with other mononuclear phagocytes, are derived from the bone marrow. A population of macrophage precursors within the pulmonary interstitium provides a reserve pool capable of proliferation and delivery of phagocytes in response to unusually heav...

  19. Alveolar Development and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffrey A Whitsett; Weaver, Timothy E.

    2015-01-01

    Gas exchange after birth is entirely dependent on the remarkable architecture of the alveolus, its formation and function being mediated by the interactions of numerous cell types whose precise positions and activities are controlled by a diversity of signaling and transcriptional networks. In the later stages of gestation, alveolar epithelial cells lining the peripheral lung saccules produce increasing amounts of surfactant lipids and proteins that are secreted into the airspaces at birth. T...

  20. Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) is a rare disease characterized by the diffuse and bilateral presence of calcium phosphate microlite in the alveolar spaces. The progression of this potentially lethal disease is show and most of the patients remain asymptomatic during years or decades, resulting in a show deterioration of the pulmonary function. The typical finding of the sand storm in the chest X-ray is characteristic of this entity. Mutations in the SLC34A2 gene that does the coding for the type II co-transporter of sodium phosphate were identified as responsible for this disease. Of the almost 600 cases, only 6 have been reported in Colombia. We are presenting a case of pulmonary alveolar microlite in a 27 year old man, with progressive respiratory distress whose diagnosis was made by the X-ray findings and confirmed by trans bronchial biopsy. In the 2 years follow-up, shows evolution towards deterioration of his respiratory function making him a candidate for lung transplantation.

  1. Alveolar development and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Weaver, Timothy E

    2015-07-01

    Gas exchange after birth is entirely dependent on the remarkable architecture of the alveolus, its formation and function being mediated by the interactions of numerous cell types whose precise positions and activities are controlled by a diversity of signaling and transcriptional networks. In the later stages of gestation, alveolar epithelial cells lining the peripheral lung saccules produce increasing amounts of surfactant lipids and proteins that are secreted into the airspaces at birth. The lack of lung maturation and the associated lack of pulmonary surfactant in preterm infants causes respiratory distress syndrome, a common cause of morbidity and mortality associated with premature birth. At the time of birth, surfactant homeostasis begins to be established by balanced processes involved in surfactant production, storage, secretion, recycling, and catabolism. Insights from physiology and engineering made in the 20th century enabled survival of newborn infants requiring mechanical ventilation for the first time. Thereafter, advances in biochemistry, biophysics, and molecular biology led to an understanding of the pulmonary surfactant system that made possible exogenous surfactant replacement for the treatment of preterm infants. Identification of surfactant proteins, cloning of the genes encoding them, and elucidation of their roles in the regulation of surfactant synthesis, structure, and function have provided increasing understanding of alveolar homeostasis in health and disease. This Perspective seeks to consider developmental aspects of the pulmonary surfactant system and its importance in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic lung diseases related to alveolar homeostasis. PMID:25932959

  2. Alveolar development and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Weaver, Timothy E

    2015-07-01

    Gas exchange after birth is entirely dependent on the remarkable architecture of the alveolus, its formation and function being mediated by the interactions of numerous cell types whose precise positions and activities are controlled by a diversity of signaling and transcriptional networks. In the later stages of gestation, alveolar epithelial cells lining the peripheral lung saccules produce increasing amounts of surfactant lipids and proteins that are secreted into the airspaces at birth. The lack of lung maturation and the associated lack of pulmonary surfactant in preterm infants causes respiratory distress syndrome, a common cause of morbidity and mortality associated with premature birth. At the time of birth, surfactant homeostasis begins to be established by balanced processes involved in surfactant production, storage, secretion, recycling, and catabolism. Insights from physiology and engineering made in the 20th century enabled survival of newborn infants requiring mechanical ventilation for the first time. Thereafter, advances in biochemistry, biophysics, and molecular biology led to an understanding of the pulmonary surfactant system that made possible exogenous surfactant replacement for the treatment of preterm infants. Identification of surfactant proteins, cloning of the genes encoding them, and elucidation of their roles in the regulation of surfactant synthesis, structure, and function have provided increasing understanding of alveolar homeostasis in health and disease. This Perspective seeks to consider developmental aspects of the pulmonary surfactant system and its importance in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic lung diseases related to alveolar homeostasis.

  3. Theoretical basis of alveolar sampling.

    OpenAIRE

    Kelman, G R

    1982-01-01

    The conditions under which the partial pressure of a solvent in the alveolar gas is likely to provide a valid index of its partial pressure in the mixed venous blood, and thus of whole-body exposure, is explored on a theoretical basis. Under steady-state conditions, providing the solvent's blood/gas partition coefficient exceeds 10, its mixed venous and alveolar pressures will agree within 10% and become virtually identical during the prolonged expiration necessary to obtain an alveolar sampl...

  4. Amenaza de parto prematuro: Rotura prematura de membranas. Corioamnionitis Preterm labour: Premature rupture of membranes. Chorioamnionitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ochoa

    2009-01-01

    patients. They include antecedents of preterm labour, signs and symptoms, cervical alteration, etc. Premature rupture of membranes and chorioamnionitis involve the risk of preterm labour if they occur in early gestational ages.

  5. Legionella pneumophila infection induces programmed cell death, caspase activation, and release of high-mobility group box 1 protein in A549 alveolar epithelial cells: inhibition by methyl prednisolone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koide Michio

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Legionella pneumophila pneumonia often exacerbates acute lung injury (ALI and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. Apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells is considered to play an important role in the pathogenesis of ALI and ARDS. In this study, we investigated the precise mechanism by which A549 alveolar epithelial cells induced by L. pneumophila undergo apoptosis. We also studied the effect of methyl prednisolone on apoptosis in these cells. Methods Nuclear deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA fragmentation and caspase activation in L. pneumophila-infected A549 alveolar epithelial cells were assessed using the terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase-mediated triphosphate (dUTP-biotin nick end labeling method (TUNEL method and colorimetric caspase activity assays. The virulent L. pneumophila strain AA100jm and the avirulent dotO mutant were used and compared in this study. In addition, we investigated whether methyl prednisolone has any influence on nuclear DNA fragmentation and caspase activation in A549 alveolar epithelial cells infected with L. pneumophila. Results The virulent strain of L. pneumophila grew within A549 alveolar epithelial cells and induced subsequent cell death in a dose-dependent manner. The avirulent strain dotO mutant showed no such effect. The virulent strains of L. pneumophila induced DNA fragmentation (shown by TUNEL staining and activation of caspases 3, 8, 9, and 1 in A549 cells, while the avirulent strain did not. High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 protein was released from A549 cells infected with virulent Legionella. Methyl prednisolone (53.4 μM did not influence the intracellular growth of L. pneumophila within alveolar epithelial cells, but affected DNA fragmentation and caspase activation of infected A549 cells. Conclusion Infection of A549 alveolar epithelial cells with L. pneumophila caused programmed cell death, activation of various caspases, and release of HMGB1. The dot/icm system, a

  6. CT in alveolar proteinosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nine patients with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) were scanned with CT. Results were not specific for PAP but may be help0ful in the differential diagnosis is visualization of pulmonary vessels is maintained and air bronchograms are scarce in diseased areas. CT is better than conventional radiography in identifying infectious complications and evaluating disease extent and may help in deciding whether or not therapeutic lavage is indicated. CT has also identified an interstitial component of PAP that correlates histologically with an inflammatory cell infiltrate. The cellular infiltrate may play a role in the development of the interstitial fibrosis seen in some cases of PAP

  7. Genetics Home Reference: pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description ...

  8. The relationship between meconium-stained amniotic fluid and chorioamnionitis%羊水粪染与绒毛膜羊膜炎关系探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜玉琴; 刘群香; 蔡丹青

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨Ⅱ~Ⅲ度羊水粪染与绒毛膜羊膜炎的关系及对围生儿的影响.方法:对2010年2~8月囚羊水Ⅱ~Ⅲ度粪染行胎盘病理检查的236例临床资料进行回顾性分析.结果:在236例Ⅱ~Ⅲ度羊水粪染病例中,胎盘病理检查有组织学绒毛膜羊膜炎病例多于无组织学绒毛膜羊膜炎病例,重度绒毛膜羊膜炎新生儿窒息发病率较尤急性绒毛膜羊膜炎和轻、中度急性绒毛膜羊膜炎病例高(P<0.05),有组织学绒毛膜羊膜炎与无组织学绒毛膜羊膜炎的胎盘病理表现基本相同(P>0.05).结论:Ⅱ~Ⅲ度羊水粪染与绒毛膜羊膜炎密切相关;绒毛膜羊膜炎引起绒毛及血管病变是导致羊水粪染、胎儿窘迫、新生儿窒息原因之一.在临床工作中对羊水Ⅱ~Ⅲ度粪染病例应常规行胎盘病理检查,有利于诊断及指导孕产妇和新生儿的治疗.%Objective: To study on the relationship between meconium - stained amniotic fluid of Ⅱ ~ Ⅲ degree and chorioamnionitis and the effect of meconium - stained amniotic fluid on perinatal children.Methods: 236 patients who were done placental pathology because of Ⅱ - Ⅲ degree meconium- stained amniotic fluid from February, 2010 to August, 2010 in our hospital were retrospectively analyzed.Results: In 236 cases of Ⅱ - Ⅲ degree meconium - stained amniotic fluid, the patients with histologically chorioamnionitis were more than the patients without histologically chorioamnionitis (64.41% ) by placental pathology, the incidence of neonatal asphyxia with severe chorioamnionitis was higher than those without acute chorioamnionitis and mild acute chorioamnionitis ( P < 0.05 ).The placental pathology was same between histologic chorioamnionitis and no histological chorioamnionitis (P > 0.05 ).Conclusion: Ⅱ - Ⅲ degree meconium - stained amniotic fluid is closely related with the chorioamnionitis; Chorioamnionitis caused by vascular disease is one of the

  9. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadice Selimoğlu Şen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a rare disease characterized by the accumulation of lipoproteinosis material within the alveoli. A 36 age male patient applied to our hospital with dyspnea that began 5 months ago. Bilateral diffuse infiltration on postero-anterior chest graphy was seen. Arterial blood gas measurements (ABG was: pH:7.44, pCO2: 36 mmHg, pO2: 49 mmHg, SaO2: 85%, HCO3: 24 mmol/L. High resolution computed tomography (HRCT reported as bilateral diffuse ground glass areas and interlobuler septal thickening on this areas. Asido resistant bacillus was negative in sputum at three times and was also negative in post bronchoscopic sputum and bronchoalveoler lavage material. Wedge resection was made by video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery. Histopathology report of biopsy material revealed “Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP”. Massive lung lavage under general anesthesia was planned for patient. Clinical improvement was seen in patient beginning from admission and ABG measurements entered the recovery trend in follow-up. Partial pressure of oxygen was increased to 65 mmHg and patient was followed without lung lavage. Control chest radiography and HRCT showed significant radiological improvement. After three months, radiological lesions had completely regressed at control HRCT. As a result, in patients with symptoms and radiologically bilateral diffuse infiltration physicians should consider PAP as a rare disease in the differential diagnosis.

  10. The severity of chorioamnionitis in pregnant sheep is associated with in vivo variation of the surface-exposed multiple-banded antigen/gene of Ureaplasma parvum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Christine L; Dando, Samantha J; Nitsos, Ilias; Kallapur, Suhas G; Jobe, Alan H; Payton, Diane; Moss, Timothy J M; Newnham, John P

    2010-09-01

    Ureaplasma species are the bacteria most frequently isolated from human amniotic fluid in asymptomatic pregnancies and placental infections. Ureaplasma parvum serovars 3 and 6 are the most prevalent serovars isolated from men and women. We hypothesized that the effects on the fetus and chorioamnion of chronic ureaplasma infection in amniotic fluid are dependent on the serovar, dose, and variation of the ureaplasma multiple-banded antigen (MBA) and mba gene. We injected high- or low-dose U. parvum serovar 3, serovar 6, or vehicle intra-amniotically into pregnant ewes at 55 days of gestation (term = 150 days) and examined the chorioamnion, amniotic fluid, and fetal lung tissue of animals delivered by cesarean section at 125 days of gestation. Variation of the multiple banded antigen/mba generated by serovar 3 and serovar 6 ureaplasmas in vivo were compared by PCR assay and Western blot. Ureaplasma inoculums demonstrated only one (serovar 3) or two (serovar 6) MBA variants in vitro, but numerous antigenic variants were generated in vivo: serovar 6 passage 1 amniotic fluid cultures contained more MBA size variants than serovar 3 (P = 0.005), and ureaplasma titers were inversely related to the number of variants (P = 0.025). The severity of chorioamnionitis varied between animals. Low numbers of mba size variants (five or fewer) within amniotic fluid were associated with severe inflammation, whereas the chorioamnion from animals with nine or more mba variants showed little or no inflammation. These differences in chorioamnion inflammation may explain why not all women with in utero Ureaplasma spp. experience adverse pregnancy outcomes.

  11. The Severity of Chorioamnionitis in Pregnant Sheep Is Associated with In Vivo Variation of the Surface-Exposed Multiple-Banded Antigen/Gene of Ureaplasma parvum1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Christine L.; Dando, Samantha J.; Nitsos, Ilias; Kallapur, Suhas G.; Jobe, Alan H.; Payton, Diane; Moss, Timothy J.M.; Newnham, John P.

    2010-01-01

    Ureaplasma species are the bacteria most frequently isolated from human amniotic fluid in asymptomatic pregnancies and placental infections. Ureaplasma parvum serovars 3 and 6 are the most prevalent serovars isolated from men and women. We hypothesized that the effects on the fetus and chorioamnion of chronic ureaplasma infection in amniotic fluid are dependent on the serovar, dose, and variation of the ureaplasma multiple-banded antigen (MBA) and mba gene. We injected high- or low-dose U. parvum serovar 3, serovar 6, or vehicle intra-amniotically into pregnant ewes at 55 days of gestation (term = 150 days) and examined the chorioamnion, amniotic fluid, and fetal lung tissue of animals delivered by cesarean section at 125 days of gestation. Variation of the multiple banded antigen/mba generated by serovar 3 and serovar 6 ureaplasmas in vivo were compared by PCR assay and Western blot. Ureaplasma inoculums demonstrated only one (serovar 3) or two (serovar 6) MBA variants in vitro, but numerous antigenic variants were generated in vivo: serovar 6 passage 1 amniotic fluid cultures contained more MBA size variants than serovar 3 (P = 0.005), and ureaplasma titers were inversely related to the number of variants (P = 0.025). The severity of chorioamnionitis varied between animals. Low numbers of mba size variants (five or fewer) within amniotic fluid were associated with severe inflammation, whereas the chorioamnion from animals with nine or more mba variants showed little or no inflammation. These differences in chorioamnion inflammation may explain why not all women with in utero Ureaplasma spp. experience adverse pregnancy outcomes. PMID:20519696

  12. Condilomatosis genital y embarazo asociada a corioamnionitis y parto prematuro Genital condylomatosis and pregnancy associated with chorioamnionitis and premature delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Martínez Montero

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Los condilomas genitales están producidos por el virus del papiloma humano. En muchas ocasiones se asocian a otras infecciones genitales (hongos, tricomonas y vaginosis. El embarazo favorece la aparición de condilomas en la región anogenital. A propósito de un caso de condilomatosis genital asociada a corioamnionitis y que desencadenó un parto prematuro realizamos una revisión de la literatura.Genital condylomas are produced by the human papilloma virus. On many occasions they are associated with other genital infections (fungi, trichomonas and vaginosis. Pregnancy favours the appearance of condylomas in the anogenital region. On the occasion of a case of genital condylomatosis associated with chorioamnionitis that resulted in a premature delivery, we carry out a review the literature.

  13. PPARs in Alveolar Macrophage Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica R. Smith

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available PPARs, most notably PPAR-γ, play a crucial role in regulating the activation of alveolar macrophages, which in turn occupy a pivotal place in the immune response to pathogens and particulates drawn in with inspired air. In this review, we describe the dual role of the alveolar macrophage as both a first-line defender through its phagocytotic activity and a regulator of the immune response. Depending on its state of activation, the alveolar macrophage may either enhance or suppress different aspects of immune function in the lung. We then review the role of PPAR-γ and its ligands in deactivating alveolar macrophages—thus limiting the inflammatory response that, if unchecked, could threaten the essential respiratory function of the alveolus—while upregulating the cell's phagocytotic activity. Finally, we examine the role that inadequate or inappropriate PPAR-γ responses play in specific lung diseases.

  14. Abses Alveolar Akut Pada Anak

    OpenAIRE

    Delfitri, Meri

    2008-01-01

    Abses alveolar akut adalah suatu kumpulan nanah yang terlokalisasi dalam tulang alveolar sekitar apeks gigi setelah kematian pulpa yang merupakan kelanjutan proses infeksi yang mulai di pulpa dan berkembang ke jaringan periapikal. Perluasan infeksi dari pulpa non vital dapat melalui foramen apikal menuju jaringan periapikal yang mengakibatkan inflamasi akut, bila disertai dengan meningkatnya virulensi bakteri streptokokus alfa, disertai staffilokokus dan sejumlah anaerob lainnya serta r...

  15. Micronuclei in human alveolar macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostini, F; Bonatti, S; Oddera, S; De Flora, S

    1992-01-01

    Occurrence of micronuclei was monitored in pulmonary alveolar macrophages collected from 31 individuals undergoing diagnostic bronchoalveolar lavage. The overall frequency of micronucleated cells was 3.88 +/- 1.84/1000, without any significant difference attributable to sex, age, pathology, occupation, or smoking habits. The lack of influence of cigarette smoke on this clastogenicity index presumably reflects the very low rate of mitoses of macrophages in the alveolar lumen. PMID:1579732

  16. Mechanisms of Leukocyte Accumulation and Activation in Chorioamnionitis: Interleukin 1β and Tumor Necrosis Factor α Enhance Colony Stimulating Factor 2 Expression in Term Decidua

    OpenAIRE

    Arcuri, Felice; Toti, Paolo; Buchwalder, Lynn; Casciaro, Alessandra; Cintorino, Marcella; Schatz, Frederick; Rybalov, Basya; Lockwood, Charles J.

    2009-01-01

    Chorioamnionitis is a major cause of prematurity as well as perinatal morbidity and mortality. The present study observed a marked increase in immunohistochemical staining for Colony Stimulating Factor 2 (CSF2; also known as granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor), a potent neutrophil and macrophage chemoattractant and activator, in the decidua of patients with CAM compared with controls (n = 8; P = .001). To examine the regulation of this CSF2, cultured decidual cells primed with e...

  17. Impact of chorioamnionitis on exhaled nitric oxide and endotracheal aspirate levels of nitrites-nitrates and interleukin-8 in mechanically ventilated preterm neonates

    OpenAIRE

    Figueras-Aloy, Josep; Salvia-Roiges, M.Dolors; Rodríguez-Miguélez, J.Manuel; Miracle-Echegoyen, Xavier; Botet-Mussons, Francisco; Marín-Soria, J.Luís; Carbonell-Estrany, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: To assess the influence of maternal chorioamnionitis on early exhaled nitric oxide (NO) and levels of nitrites-nitrates and interleukin (IL) IL-8 in endotracheal aspirate fluid in mechanically ventilated preterm neonates. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Patient-Subject Selection: Between September 2007 and August 2009, 54 mechanically ventilated preterm neonates were included. Patients were divided into two groups according to the presence or absenc...

  18. Sessile alveolar macrophages communicate with alveolar epithelium to modulate immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphalen, Kristin; Gusarova, Galina A.; Islam, Mohammad N.; Subramanian, Manikandan; Cohen, Taylor S.; Prince, Alice S.; Bhattacharya, Jahar

    2014-02-01

    The tissue-resident macrophages of barrier organs constitute the first line of defence against pathogens at the systemic interface with the ambient environment. In the lung, resident alveolar macrophages (AMs) provide a sentinel function against inhaled pathogens. Bacterial constituents ligate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) on AMs, causing AMs to secrete proinflammatory cytokines that activate alveolar epithelial receptors, leading to recruitment of neutrophils that engulf pathogens. Because the AM-induced response could itself cause tissue injury, it is unclear how AMs modulate the response to prevent injury. Here, using real-time alveolar imaging in situ, we show that a subset of AMs attached to the alveolar wall form connexin 43 (Cx43)-containing gap junction channels with the epithelium. During lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation, the AMs remained sessile and attached to the alveoli, and they established intercommunication through synchronized Ca2+ waves, using the epithelium as the conducting pathway. The intercommunication was immunosuppressive, involving Ca2+-dependent activation of Akt, because AM-specific knockout of Cx43 enhanced alveolar neutrophil recruitment and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage. A picture emerges of a novel immunomodulatory process in which a subset of alveolus-attached AMs intercommunicates immunosuppressive signals to reduce endotoxin-induced lung inflammation.

  19. IL-1α mediated chorioamnionitis induces depletion of FoxP3+ cells and ileal inflammation in the ovine fetal gut.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim G A M Wolfs

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endotoxin induced chorioamnionitis increases IL-1 and provokes an inflammatory response in the fetal ileum that interferes with intestinal maturation. In the present study, we tested in an ovine chorioamnionitis model whether IL-1 is a major cytokine driving the inflammatory response in the fetal ileum. METHOD: Sheep bearing singleton fetuses received a single intraamniotic injection of recombinant ovine IL-1α at 7, 3 or 1 d before caesarian delivery at 125 days gestational age (term = 150 days. RESULTS: 3 and 7 d after IL-1α administration, intestinal mRNA levels for IL-4, IL-10, IFN-γ and TNF-α were strongly elevated. Numbers of CD3+ and CD4+ T-lymphocytes and myeloidperoxidase+ cells were increased whereas FoxP3+ T-cells were detected at low frequency. This increased proinflammatory state was associated with ileal mucosal barrier loss as demonstrated by decreased levels of the intestinal fatty acid binding protein and disruption of the tight junctional protein ZO-1. CONCLUSION: Intraamniotic IL-1α causes an acute detrimental inflammatory response in the ileum, suggesting that induction of IL-1 is a critical element in the pathophysiological effects of endotoxin induced chorioamnionitis. A disturbed balance between T-effector and FoxP3+ cells may contribute to this process.

  20. Displasia alveolar congénita Congenital alveolar dysplasia

    OpenAIRE

    D.P. Sánchez Hernández; M.M. Suárez Galvis; M.T. García Vélez; A. Uribe Molina

    2012-01-01

    La displasia alveolar congénita es una patología congénita poco frecuente caracterizada por disminución de las unidades alveolares y anormalidades del desarrollo de la vasculatura pulmonar. Esta entidad produce hipertensión pulmonar severa e hipoxemia persistente con una evolución mortal en la mayoría de los casos. Afecta generalmente a recién nacidos a término, con un test de Apgar normal, que posteriormente desarrollan dificultad respiratoria, habitualmente en el primer día de vida. La enfe...

  1. VEGF and endothelium-derived retinoic acid regulate lung vascular and alveolar development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Eun Jun; Lorizio, Walter; Seedorf, Gregory; Abman, Steven H; Vu, Thiennu H

    2016-02-15

    Prevention or treatment of lung diseases caused by the failure to form, or destruction of, existing alveoli, as observed in infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia and adults with emphysema, requires understanding of the molecular mechanisms of alveolar development. In addition to its critical role in gas exchange, the pulmonary circulation also contributes to alveolar morphogenesis and maintenance by the production of paracrine factors, termed "angiocrines," that impact the development of surrounding tissue. To identify lung angiocrines that contribute to alveolar formation, we disrupted pulmonary vascular development by conditional inactivation of the Vegf-A gene during alveologenesis. This resulted in decreased pulmonary capillary and alveolar development and altered lung elastin and retinoic acid (RA) expression. We determined that RA is produced by pulmonary endothelial cells and regulates pulmonary angiogenesis and elastin synthesis by induction of VEGF-A and fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-18, respectively. Inhibition of RA synthesis in newborn mice decreased FGF-18 and elastin expression and impaired alveolarization. Treatment with RA and vitamin A partially reversed the impaired vascular and alveolar development induced by VEGF inhibition. Thus we identified RA as a lung angiocrine that regulates alveolarization through autocrine regulation of endothelial development and paracrine regulation of elastin synthesis via induction of FGF-18 in mesenchymal cells. PMID:26566904

  2. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis in a cat

    OpenAIRE

    Szatmári, Viktor; Teske, Erik; Peter G. J. Nikkels; Griese, Matthias; de Jong, Pim A.; Grinwis, Guy; Theegarten, Dirk; Veraa, Stefanie; van Steenbeek, Frank G.; Drent, Marjolein; Bonella, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is an extremely rare lung disease in animals and humans. It is characterized by the deposition of a large amount of phospholipoproteinaceous material in the alveoli. There are several possible etiologies, both congenital and acquired. Alveolar macrophages play an important role in the clearance of surfactant. This is the first report of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis in the feline species. CASE PRESENTATION: Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis was diagnos...

  3. Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis with calcified pleural plaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malhotra Balbir

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM is a rare disease. Herein we report a case of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis who was suspected to have the disease on chest X-ray and was confirmed on high resolution CT and transbronchial lung biopsy. These investigations showed characteristic features of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis with diffuse interstitial pulmonary fibrosis.

  4. Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis with calcified pleural plaques

    OpenAIRE

    Malhotra Balbir; Sabharwal Raghu; Singh Mandeep; Singh Amarjeet

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) is a rare disease. Herein we report a case of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis who was suspected to have the disease on chest X-ray and was confirmed on high resolution CT and transbronchial lung biopsy. These investigations showed characteristic features of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis with diffuse interstitial pulmonary fibrosis.

  5. Endothelial-monocyte activating polypeptide II disrupts alveolar epithelial type II to type I cell transdifferentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Distal alveolar morphogenesis is marked by differentiation of alveolar type (AT-II to AT-I cells that give rise to the primary site of gas exchange, the alveolar/vascular interface. Endothelial-Monocyte Activating Polypeptide (EMAP II, an endogenous protein with anti-angiogenic properties, profoundly disrupts distal lung neovascularization and alveolar formation during lung morphogenesis, and is robustly expressed in the dysplastic alveolar regions of infants with Bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Determination as to whether EMAP II has a direct or indirect affect on ATII→ATI trans-differentiation has not been explored. Method In a controlled nonvascular environment, an in vitro model of ATII→ATI cell trans-differentiation was utilized to demonstrate the contribution that one vascular mediator has on distal epithelial cell differentiation. Results Here, we show that EMAP II significantly blocked ATII→ATI cell transdifferentiation by increasing cellular apoptosis and inhibiting expression of ATI markers. Moreover, EMAP II-treated ATII cells displayed myofibroblast characteristics, including elevated cellular proliferation, increased actin cytoskeleton stress fibers and Rho-GTPase activity, and increased nuclear:cytoplasmic volume. However, EMAP II-treated cells did not express the myofibroblast markers desmin or αSMA. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that EMAP II interferes with ATII → ATI transdifferentiation resulting in a proliferating non-myofibroblast cell. These data identify the transdifferentiating alveolar cell as a possible target for EMAP II's induction of alveolar dysplasia.

  6. Alveolar hypoventilation treated with medroxyprogesterone.

    OpenAIRE

    Milerad, J; Lagercrantz, H.; Löfgren, O

    1985-01-01

    Two children aged 1 and 20 months developed alveolar hypoventilation syndrome. They suffered severe apnoeic episodes and periodically required assisted ventilation. Their ventilatory response to carbon dioxide was lower than that of normal children and the transcutaneous oxygen tension during sleep was well below the normal range. Treatment with medroxyprogesterone acetate resulted in an improved response to carbon dioxide, and assisted ventilation was no longer needed. Oxygen and carbon diox...

  7. [Alveolar sarcoma. Report of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devisme, L; Mensier, E; Bisiau, S; Bloget, F; Gosselin, B

    1996-01-01

    Alveolar soft part sarcoma occurs mostly in the deep soft tissues. An unusual case of primary pulmonary alveolar soft part sarcoma is reported. A 39-year-old woman presented with thoracic pain revealing the tumor. The left lower lobe was surgically resected. The microscopic features of this tumor, including characteristic alveolar pattern and the PAS-positive crystals were typical of alveolar soft part sarcoma. Immunohistochemically, granular cytoplasmic reactivities were observed with antibodies against vimentin, myoglobin, methionine-enkephalin, S100 protein and neuron-specific-enolase. Electron microscopic study demonstrated numerous crystallized structures in the tumor cell cytoplasm. This is the third case of pulmonary alveolar soft part sarcoma, one arising from the pulmonary vein. The histogenesis of alveolar soft part sarcoma is still debated. Our case does not allow distinction between myogenic or neural origin of this tumor.

  8. Alveolar septal pulmonary amyloidosis: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary pulmonary amyloidosis is a rare diesase, and is classified as either tracheobronchial or parenchymal; the latter is also divided into nodular and diffuse alveolar septal forms. The alveolar septal form is extremely rare and usually produces reticular and nodular opacities. We describe a case of alveolar septal pulmonary amyloidosis manifested as multiple small nodules on chest radiograph and disseminated micronodules mainly in centrilobular and subpleural location without reticular opacities, on HRCT

  9. The role of probiotic on alveolar bone resorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desi Sandra Sari

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Probiotics are microbes derived from the group of lactic acid bacteria that work to maintain the health of hosts. Probiotics can also be used to improve oral health. Periodontal disease is usually marked with gingival inflammation and alveolar bone resorption. Gram negative anaerobic bacteria that play important role in human periodontal disease are Porphyromonas gingivalis. (P. gingivalis. P. gingivalis is a virulent bacteria in vivo or in vitro, and mostly found in subgingival plaque of periodontitis patients. Purpose: This study is aimed to know the role of probiotics to inhibit the resorption of alveolar bone induced with P. gingivalis. Methods: This study used male wistar rats divided into 4 groups. Group I was control group (without treatment; group II was induced with P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 for 5 days; group III was induced with P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 and also injected with probiotics (Lactobacillus casei ATCC 4224 for 5 days simultaneously; and group IV was induced with P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 for 5 days and also injected by probiotics (Lactobacillus casei ATCC 4224 in the next 5 days. After that, the samples were decapitated, taken their alveolar bone, and then were examined by immunohistochemistry to observe osteoclast activity in alveolar bone resorption by using tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP expression. All data were then analyzed statistically. Results: It is known that there were significant differences of TRAP expression among all those treatment groups (p < 0.05. Conclusion: It then can be concluded that probiotics can decrease osteoclast activity in periodontal tissue of wistar rats, so it can inhibit alveolar bone resorption.Latar belakang: Probiotik adalah mikroba dari golongan bakteri asam laktat yang bekerja mempertahankan kesehatan host dan probiotik dapat digunakan untuk meningkatkan kesehatan rongga mulut. Penyakit periodontal ditandai dengan adanya keradangan pada gingiva dan resobsi tulang

  10. [Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis: Report of one case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández F, Cristina; Salinas F, Mauricio; de Grazia K, José Andrés; Díaz P, Juan Carlos

    2014-05-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis is an extremely rare disease characterized by intra-alveolar accumulation of calcified spherical particles (called microliths), due to a mutation of the gene encoding a membrane transport protein of the alveolar surface. Most patients are asymptomatic at diagnosis. The course of the disease is slowly progressive, with development of pulmonary fibrosis and respiratory failure. The "sandstorm" pattern is the characteristic finding of this disease. We report a 39-year-old female presenting with progressive dyspnea. A chest X ray showed ground-glass opacities and a high resolution CT scan showed numerous calcified lung micronodules. A surgical lung biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis. PMID:25427025

  11. Effect of two models of intrauterine growth restriction on alveolarization in rat lungs: morphometric and gene expression analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Zana-Taieb

    Full Text Available Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR in preterm infants increases the risk of bronchopulmonary dysplasia, characterized by arrested alveolarization. We evaluated the impact of two different rat models (nitric oxide synthase inhibition or protein deprivation of IUGR on alveolarization, before, during, and at the end of this postnatal process. We studied IUGR rat pups of dams fed either a low protein (LPD or a normal diet throughout gestation and pups of dams treated by continuous infusion of Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME or its diluent on the last four days of gestation. Morphometric parameters, alveolar surface (Svap, mean linear intercept (MLI and radial alveolar count (RAC and transcriptomic analysis were determined with special focus on genes involved in alveolarization. IUGR pups regained normal weight at day 21 in the two treated groups. In the LPD group, Svap, MLI and RAC were not different from those of controls at day 4, but were significantly decreased at day 21, indicating alveolarization arrest. In the L-NAME group, Svap and RAC were significantly decreased and MLI was increased at day 4 with complete correction at day 21. In the L-NAME model, several factors involved in alveolarization, VEGF, VEGF-R1 and -R2, MMP14, MMP16, FGFR3 and 4, FGF18 and 7, were significantly decreased at day 4 and/or day 10, while the various factors studied were not modified in the LPD group. These results demonstrate that only maternal protein deprivation leads to sustained impairment of alveolarization in rat pups, whereas L-NAME impairs lung development before alveolarization. Known growth factors involved in lung development do not seem to be involved in LPD-induced alveolarization disorders, raising the question of a possible programming of altered alveolarization.

  12. Computed tomographic imaging of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a rare disease of uncertain etiology. The computed tomographic image is characterized by geographically sharply delineated alveolar infiltrates, faint, ground-glass-like parenchymal turbidity, with well bordered interstitial structures and recesses in the subpleural space. (orig.)

  13. CT quantification of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis is a rare, familial disease with massive symmetrical intra-alveolar calcium deposition. Conventional CT findings and CT measurements with a dual energy technique were carried out in a 26-year-old patient suffering from this disease. The importance of the findings in the differential diagnosis and for estimating the progression and prognosis of the disease is discussed. (orig.)

  14. High CO2 levels impair alveolar epithelial function independently of pH.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Briva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In patients with acute respiratory failure, gas exchange is impaired due to the accumulation of fluid in the lung airspaces. This life-threatening syndrome is treated with mechanical ventilation, which is adjusted to maintain gas exchange, but can be associated with the accumulation of carbon dioxide in the lung. Carbon dioxide (CO2 is a by-product of cellular energy utilization and its elimination is affected via alveolar epithelial cells. Signaling pathways sensitive to changes in CO2 levels were described in plants and neuronal mammalian cells. However, it has not been fully elucidated whether non-neuronal cells sense and respond to CO2. The Na,K-ATPase consumes approximately 40% of the cellular metabolism to maintain cell homeostasis. Our study examines the effects of increased pCO2 on the epithelial Na,K-ATPase a major contributor to alveolar fluid reabsorption which is a marker of alveolar epithelial function. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that short-term increases in pCO2 impaired alveolar fluid reabsorption in rats. Also, we provide evidence that non-excitable, alveolar epithelial cells sense and respond to high levels of CO2, independently of extracellular and intracellular pH, by inhibiting Na,K-ATPase function, via activation of PKCzeta which phosphorylates the Na,K-ATPase, causing it to endocytose from the plasma membrane into intracellular pools. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that alveolar epithelial cells, through which CO2 is eliminated in mammals, are highly sensitive to hypercapnia. Elevated CO2 levels impair alveolar epithelial function, independently of pH, which is relevant in patients with lung diseases and altered alveolar gas exchange.

  15. Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two asymptomatic Turkish sibs are presented, a 4-year-old boy and his 7-year-old sister, with pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) confirmed by transbronchial lung biopsy and bronchoalveolar lavage. Chest radiographs and high resolution CT demonstrated wide-spread intra-alveolar calcifications in both lungs. The lesions were sharply defined and less than 1 mm in diameter. CT documented a high concentration of microliths along the bronchovascular bundles, the intralobular fissue and the (sub)pleural lung parenchyma. The combination of bronchoalveolar lavage and roentgenographic appearance in high resolution CT are characteristic and pathognomonic, and can confirm the diagnosis. The more severe changes in the elder sib and the radiographic controls suggest that the pulmonary disease may be progressive in our patients. The described family of consanguineous, unaffected parents with two affected and one healthy child confirmed the autosomal recessive inheritance of PAM (McKusick 265100). In addition, the affected girl had autosomal recessive Waardenburg-anophthalmia syndrome (McKusick 206920), raising the question of whether this is a chance occurrence or possibly a contiguous gene syndrome. (orig.)

  16. Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, H. [Center of Diagnostic Radiology, Frankfurt Univ. (Germany); Loercher, U. [Center of Diagnostic Radiology, Frankfurt Univ. (Germany); Kitz, R. [Center of Pediatrics, Frankfurt Univ. (Germany); Zielen, S. [Center of Pediatrics, Frankfurt Univ. (Germany); Ahrens, P. [Center of Pediatrics, Frankfurt Univ. (Germany); Koenig, R. [Inst. of Human Genetics, Frankfurt Univ. (Germany)

    1996-01-01

    Two asymptomatic Turkish sibs are presented, a 4-year-old boy and his 7-year-old sister, with pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) confirmed by transbronchial lung biopsy and bronchoalveolar lavage. Chest radiographs and high resolution CT demonstrated wide-spread intra-alveolar calcifications in both lungs. The lesions were sharply defined and less than 1 mm in diameter. CT documented a high concentration of microliths along the bronchovascular bundles, the intralobular fissue and the (sub)pleural lung parenchyma. The combination of bronchoalveolar lavage and roentgenographic appearance in high resolution CT are characteristic and pathognomonic, and can confirm the diagnosis. The more severe changes in the elder sib and the radiographic controls suggest that the pulmonary disease may be progressive in our patients. The described family of consanguineous, unaffected parents with two affected and one healthy child confirmed the autosomal recessive inheritance of PAM (McKusick 265100). In addition, the affected girl had autosomal recessive Waardenburg-anophthalmia syndrome (McKusick 206920), raising the question of whether this is a chance occurrence or possibly a contiguous gene syndrome. (orig.)

  17. Recent advances in alveolar biology: evolution and function of alveolar proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgeig, Sandra; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Veldhuizen, Edwin J A; Casals, Cristina; Clark, Howard W; Haczku, Angela; Knudsen, Lars; Possmayer, Fred

    2010-08-31

    This review is focused on the evolution and function of alveolar proteins. The lung faces physical and environmental challenges, due to changing pressures/volumes and foreign pathogens, respectively. The pulmonary surfactant system is integral in protecting the lung from these challenges via two groups of surfactant proteins - the small molecular weight hydrophobic SPs, SP-B and -C, that regulate interfacial adsorption of the lipids, and the large hydrophilic SPs, SP-A and -D, which are surfactant collectins capable of inhibiting foreign pathogens. Further aiding pulmonary host defence are non-surfactant collectins and antimicrobial peptides that are expressed across the biological kingdoms. Linking to the first symposium session, which emphasised molecular structure and biophysical function of surfactant lipids and proteins, this review begins with a discussion of the role of temperature and hydrostatic pressure in shaping the evolution of SP-C in mammals. Transitioning to the role of the alveolus in innate host defence we discuss the structure, function and regulation of antimicrobial peptides, the defensins and cathelicidins. We describe the recent discovery of novel avian collectins and provide evidence for their role in preventing influenza infection. This is followed by discussions of the roles of SP-A and SP-D in mediating host defence at the alveolar surface and in mediating inflammation and the allergic response of the airways. Finally we discuss the use of animal models of lung disease including knockouts to develop an understanding of the role of these proteins in initiating and/or perpetuating disease with the aim of developing new therapeutic strategies. PMID:20433956

  18. A case of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis is reported. A 33-year-old male visited our clinic because of cough and sore throat. The chest X-ray showed granular micronodulation diffusely disseminated throughout the lung fields. On the eighth day since admission, cough and sore throat disappeared. Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis was confirmed by transbronchial lung biopsy. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed, and the differential cell count of the BAL fluid showed 74.3 % eosinophilia. Furthermore, 67Ga-citrate scintigraphy revealed diffuse uptake throughout the lung fields. Whether these findings are common in pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis or not is considered to be an unanswered problem. (author)

  19. Integrity of the alveolar-capillary barrier and alveolar surfactant system in smokers.

    OpenAIRE

    Schmekel, B; Bos, J.A.; A. R. Khan; Wohlfart, B; Lachmann, B.; Wollmer, P.

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The permeability of the alveolar-capillary barrier to technetium-99m labelled diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (99mTc DTPA) is known to be greatly increased in smokers, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Abnormal permeability of the alveolar epithelium as well as impaired surfactant function has been suggested. The purpose of this study was to examine transudation of urea and albumin into the alveoli and alveolar surfactant function in smokers and non-smokers and to...

  20. The role of the alveolar macrophage in jaagsiekte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increase of alveolar macrophages in jaagsiekte sheep lungs is not caused by excessive surfactant production but is due to a chemotactic factor secreted by the tumour cells. Both growth inhibitory and growth stimulatory factors were detected in vitro in medium from cultures of lung lavage cells exposed to jaagsiekte tumour cell supernatant. The macrophage component of the lavage cells was found to produce a growth stimulatory factor that was replaced by a growth inhibitory factor following exposure to jaagsiekte tumour cell supernatant. Whether these factors stimulated or inhibited DNA synthesis depended to some extent on whether the indicators cells were transformed or not. Alveolar macrophages infected with lentivirus were found to be chemotactically inhibited as well as having a reduced leukocine production potential. Peripheral blood monocytes isolated from sheep suffering with acute jaagsiekte were depressed with regard to their DNA synthesis potential. 3H-thymidine incorporation assay was used to determine if there was any difference in the division potential of blood monocytes isolated from JS-sheep compared to normal sheep

  1. Alveolar hydatid cyst: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behiye Zarif-Zakerian

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Alveolar hydatid cyst is a parasitic disease due to invasion of the Echinococcus multilocularis larva into the different tissues. The main host of this tape worms is Canidae family, especially foxes and jackals. Human beings are usually infected through eating contaminated vegetables and water with parasite eggs. In this article, one case of alveolar hydatid cyst has been reported in a 35 year-old woman

  2. Rare Lung Diseases II: Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis

    OpenAIRE

    Juvet, Stephen C; David Hwang; Waddell, Thomas K; Downey, Gregory P.

    2008-01-01

    The present article is the second in a series on rare lung diseases. It focuses on pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP), a disorder in which lipoproteinaceous material accumulates in the alveolar space. PAP was first described in 1958, and for many years the nature of the material accumulating in the lungs was unknown. Major insights into PAP have been made in the past decade, and these have led to the notion that PAP is an autoimmume disorder in which autoantibodies interfere with signalling...

  3. The Molecular Basis of Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis

    OpenAIRE

    Carey, Brenna; Trapnell, Bruce C.

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) comprises a heterogenous group of diseases characterized by abnormal surfactant accumulation resulting in respiratory insufficiency, and defects in alveolar macrophage- and neutrophil-mediated host defense. Basic, clinical and translational research over the past two decades have raised PAP from obscurity, identifying the molecular pathogenesis in over 90% of cases as a spectrum of diseases involving the disruption of GM-CSF signaling. Autoimmune PAP repre...

  4. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: diagnostic and therapeutic challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Campo Ilaria; Kadija Zamir; Mariani Francesca; Paracchini Elena; Rodi Giuseppe; Mojoli Francesco; Braschi Antonio; Luisetti Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis (PAP) is a rare syndrome characterized by pulmonary surfactant accumulation within the alveolar spaces. It occurs with a reported prevalence of 0.1 per 100,000 individuals and in distinct clinical forms: autoimmune (previously referred to as the idiopathic form, represents the vast majority of PAP cases, and is associated with Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) auto-antibodies; GMAbs), secondary (is a consequence of underlying dis...

  5. A case report of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    OpenAIRE

    McDermott, Helen; Aitchison, Frances; Nathani, Nazim; Bhatnager, Anjali

    2009-01-01

    This is a case of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis that presented in an inner city hospital in Birmingham, UK. The patient was a previously well 42-year-old man, who went on to experience unusual cerebral complications of the disease. The presentation, imaging findings and diagnostic histology findings are described. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a rare but important diagnosis. Characteristic high-resolution CT findings include diffuse ground glass density with superimposed interlobular sep...

  6. Toward Therapeutic Pulmonary Alveolar Regeneration in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Massaro, Donald; Massaro, Gloria DeCarlo

    2006-01-01

    In humans, age results in loss of pulmonary alveoli; menopause accelerates loss of diffusing capacity, an index of alveolar surface area; and disease (e.g., chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) results in loss of alveoli. Thus, an important goal for investigators is to generate knowledge that allows induction of pulmonary alveolar regeneration in humans. Our enthusiasm for this goal and our assessment of its feasibility are based on work in several laboratories over the last decade that has...

  7. Lung Transplant Recipient with Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis

    OpenAIRE

    Tokman, Sofya; Hahn, M. Frances; Abdelrazek, Hesham; Panchabhai, Tanmay S.; Patel, Vipul J.; Walia, Rajat; Omar, Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a progressive lung disease characterized by accumulated surfactant-like lipoproteinaceous material in the alveoli and distal bronchioles. This accumulation is the result of impaired clearance by alveolar macrophages. PAP has been described in 11 solid organ transplant recipients, 9 of whom were treated with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors. We report a case of a lung transplant recipient treated with prednisone, mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), and ...

  8. Remodeling of alveolar septa after murine pneumonectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ysasi, Alexandra B; Wagner, Willi L; Bennett, Robert D; Ackermann, Maximilian; Valenzuela, Cristian D; Belle, Janeil; Tsuda, Akira; Konerding, Moritz A; Mentzer, Steven J

    2015-06-15

    In most mammals, removing one lung (pneumonectomy) results in the compensatory growth of the remaining lung. In mice, stereological observations have demonstrated an increase in the number of mature alveoli; however, anatomic evidence of the early phases of alveolar growth has remained elusive. To identify changes in the lung microstructure associated with neoalveolarization, we used tissue histology, electron microscopy, and synchrotron imaging to examine the configuration of the alveolar duct after murine pneumonectomy. Systematic histological examination of the cardiac lobe demonstrated no change in the relative frequency of dihedral angle components (Ends, Bends, and Junctions) (P > 0.05), but a significant decrease in the length of a subset of septal ends ("E"). Septal retraction, observed in 20-30% of the alveolar ducts, was maximal on day 3 after pneumonectomy (P alveolar duct diameter ratio (Dout:Din) was significantly lower 3 days after pneumonectomy compared to all controls except for the detergent-treated lung (P surface tension within the alveolar duct, resulting in a new equilibrium at a higher total energy and lower surface area. The spatial and temporal association of these microstructural changes with postpneumonectomy lung growth suggests that these changes represent an early phase of alveolar duct remodeling. PMID:26078396

  9. Particulate concentrations in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEuen, D.D.; Abraham, J.L. (Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla (USA))

    1978-12-01

    Quantitative birefringent particle counts per 10 high-power fields in lung tissue were correlated with age, sex, and occupational exposure in 37 cases of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Counts were significantly higher in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis cases in both regions of alveolar proteinosis (47 {plus minus} 11) and perivascular and peribronchiolar areas (dust retention areas) (275 {plus minus} 65) than in 13 controls (5 {plus minus} 3 and 79 {plus minus} 23, respectively). Of a total of 8619 particles, 4817 were less than 1 micron, and 3771 were 1 to 10 microns in diameter. Fifty-nine percent were round, 19% fibrous, and 22% irregular. When analyzed individually, 20 of 37 cases (78%) had alveolar particle counts significantly higher than controls, and 10 of 26 cases had dust-retention area counts greater than controls (P less than 0.050). Known or possible occupational exposure was ascertained in 13 cases. In the remaining 24 cases insufficient occupational information was available. The mean age of the pulmonary alveolar proteinosis patients was 33 {plus minus} 4 years, and of the controls, 40 {plus minus} 7 years, and there was a male-to-female ratio of approximately 3:1. We propose that many cases of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis will ultimately be shown to be associated with environmental exposures to fine dusts or fumes.

  10. Chloride-dependent secretion of alveolar wall liquid determined by optical-sectioning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindert, Jens; Perlman, Carrie E; Parthasarathi, Kaushik; Bhattacharya, Jahar

    2007-06-01

    The liquid layer lining the pulmonary alveolar wall critically determines the lung's immune defense against inhaled pathogens, because it provides a liquid milieu in the air-filled alveolus for dispersal of immune cells and defensive surfactant proteins. However, mechanisms underlying formation of the liquid are unknown. We achieved visualization of the alveolar wall liquid (AWL) in situ in mouse lungs by means of optical-sectioning microscopy. Continuous liquid secretion was present in alveoli of wild-type (WT) mice under baseline conditions. This secretion was blocked by inhibitors of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR). The secretion was absent in Cftr(-/-) mice, and it was blocked when chloride was depleted from the perfusate of WT mice, providing the first evidence that CFTR-dependent chloride secretion causes AWL formation. Injected microparticles demonstrated flow of the AWL. The flow was blocked by CFTR inhibition and was absent in Cftr(-/-) mice. We conclude that CFTR-dependent liquid secretion is present in alveoli of the adult mouse. Defective alveolar secretion might impair alveolar immune defense and promote alveolar disease. PMID:17290033

  11. Functional expression of nicotine influx transporter in A549 human alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tega, Yuma; Yuzurihara, Chihiro; Kubo, Yoshiyuki; Akanuma, Shin-ichi; Ehrhardt, Carsten; Hosoya, Ken-ichi

    2016-02-01

    Nicotine is a potent addictive alkaloid, and is rapidly absorbed through the alveoli of the lung. However, the transport mechanism of nicotine at the human alveolar epithelial barrier has not been investigated in great detail. In the present study, the transport mechanism of nicotine across alveolar epithelium was investigated in vitro using A549 cells, a human adenocarcinoma-derived cell line with an alveolar epithelial cell like phenotype. Nicotine uptake by A549 cells exhibited time-, temperature-, and concentration-dependence with a Km of 50.4 μM. These results suggest that a carrier-mediated transport process is involved in nicotine transport in human alveolar epithelial cells. Nicotine uptake by A549 cells was insensitive to change in extracellular pH. Moreover, nicotine uptake by A549 cells could be inhibited by organic cations such as verapamil and pyrilamine, but not typical substrates of organic cation transporters and β2-agonist. These results suggest that a novel, not yet molecularly identified, organic cation transporter plays a role in nicotine transport which is unlikely to interact with β2-agonist transport. This nicotine influx transporter in human alveolar epithelium might have implications for the rapid absorption of nicotine into the systemic circulation. PMID:26830082

  12. Myricetin Prevents Alveolar Bone Loss in an Experimental Ovariectomized Mouse Model of Periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jialiang; Wu, Chuanlong; Tian, Bo; Zhou, Xiao; Ma, Nian; Qian, Yufen

    2016-03-22

    Periodontitis is a common chronic inflammatory disease, which leads to alveolar bone resorption. Healthy and functional alveolar bone, which can support the teeth and enable their movement, is very important for orthodontic treatment. Myricetin inhibited osteoclastogenesis by suppressing the expression of some genes, signaling pathways, and cytokines. This study aimed to investigate the effects of myricetin on alveolar bone loss in an ovariectomized (OVX) mouse model of periodontitis as well as in vitro osteoclast formation and bone resorption. Twenty-four healthy eight-week-old C57BL/J6 female mice were assigned randomly to four groups: phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) control (sham) OVX + ligature + PBS (vehicle), and OVX + ligature + low or high (2 or 5 mg∙kg(-1)∙day(-1), respectively) doses of myricetin. Myricetin or PBS was injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) every other day for 30 days. The maxillae were collected and subjected to further examination, including micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining; a resorption pit assay was also performed in vitro to evaluate the effects of myricetin on receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis. Myricetin, at both high and low doses, prevented alveolar bone resorption and increased alveolar crest height in the mouse model and inhibited osteoclast formation and bone resorption in vitro. However, myricetin was more effective at high dose than at low dose. Our study demonstrated that myricetin had a positive effect on alveolar bone resorption in an OVX mouse model of periodontitis and, therefore, may be a potential agent for the treatment of periodontitis and osteoporosis.

  13. Perawatan Ortodontik Gigi Anterior Berjejal dengan Tulang Alveolar yang Tipis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miesje K. Purwanegara

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Anterior teeth movement in orthodontic treatment is limited to labiolingual direction by very thin alveolar bone. An uncontrolled anterior tooth movement to labiolingual direction can cause alveolar bone perforation at its root segment. This case report is to remind us that alveolar bone thickness limits orthodontc tooth movement. A case of crowded anterior teeth with thin alveolar bone in malocclusion I is reported. This case is treated using adgewise orthodontic appliance. Protraction of anterior teeth is anticipated due to thin alveolar bone on the anterior surface. The conclusion is although the alveolar bone surrounding the crowded anterior teeth is thin, by controlling the movement the teeth reposition is allowed.

  14. 孕鼠羊膜囊内注射脂多糖诱导组织学绒毛膜羊膜炎对早产大鼠胎肺成熟与发育的影响%Effects of histologic chorioamnionitis induced by lipopolysaccharide intra-amniotic injection on fetal lung maturation and development in preterm fetal rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白冰; 罗欣; 杨中玫; 丁明霞; 漆洪波; 陈敦金

    2014-01-01

    .34,2.23±0.53,1.49±0.51 and 0.14±0.06,F=28.327; SP-C mRNA:1.20±0.39,2.00±0.20,1.04±0.37 and 0.12±0.16,F=39.546; KGF mRNA:0.97±0.19,2.18±0.61,0.93±0.09 and 0.21±0.11,F=37.544; all P<0.01).All mRNA expressions in LPS2 group were higher than those in the control group and those in LPS10 group was lower (all P<0.05).(4) The expression of KGF protein in LPS2 group was significantly higher than that in other groups (0.60±0.20 vs 0.28±0.12,0.37±0.22,0.24±0.12,F=17.280,all P<0.01).(5) Alveolarization was significantly inhibited in LPS8 group on postnatal day 3,and less maturity of pulmonary tissue was observed.Conclusions Various doses of LPS intra-amniotic injection in rats could induce HCA,fetal lung inflammation and umbilical vasculitis with different degrees.Histological inflammation would be worse with increasing LPS dosage.Moderate inflammation could promote lung maturation without inducing bronchopulmonary dysplasia,and KGF may play a role in this process.

  15. Lateralization Technique and Inferior Alveolar Nerve Transposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Castro Pimentel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone resorption of the posterior mandible can result in diminished bone edge and, therefore, the installation of implants in these regions becomes a challenge, especially in the presence of the mandibular canal and its contents, the inferior alveolar nerve. Several treatment alternatives are suggested: the use of short implants, guided bone regeneration, appositional bone grafting, distraction osteogenesis, inclined implants tangential to the mandibular canal, and the lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve. The aim was to elucidate the success rate of implants in the lateralization technique and in inferior alveolar nerve transposition and to determine the most effective sensory test. We conclude that the success rate is linked to the possibility of installing implants with long bicortical anchor which favors primary stability and biomechanics.

  16. Lateralization Technique and Inferior Alveolar Nerve Transposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanches, Marco Antonio; Ramalho, Gabriel Cardoso; Manzi, Marcello Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Bone resorption of the posterior mandible can result in diminished bone edge and, therefore, the installation of implants in these regions becomes a challenge, especially in the presence of the mandibular canal and its contents, the inferior alveolar nerve. Several treatment alternatives are suggested: the use of short implants, guided bone regeneration, appositional bone grafting, distraction osteogenesis, inclined implants tangential to the mandibular canal, and the lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve. The aim was to elucidate the success rate of implants in the lateralization technique and in inferior alveolar nerve transposition and to determine the most effective sensory test. We conclude that the success rate is linked to the possibility of installing implants with long bicortical anchor which favors primary stability and biomechanics. PMID:27433360

  17. Whole lung lavage for pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayaraman S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 26-year-old male presented with complaints of dry cough of six months and progressive breathlessness of three months duration. He was coughing out milky white sputum for two months and had lost 12 kg weight in two months. He had an evening rise in temperature of one month duration. Clinically, the patient was in respiratory distress and the respiratory system examination revealed bilateral velcro crackles. High resolution computed tomography chest showed bilateral diffuse reticulonodular opacities and "Crazy Paving" pattern suggestive of alveolar proteinosis. Broncho alveolar lavage showed eosinophilic granular material, which was periodic acid-Schiff positive. Open lung biopsy was done to confirm the diagnosis and the histopathologic examination revealed eosinophilic secretions with granular appearance suggestive of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Subsequently, patient underwent bilateral sequential whole lung lavage under general anesthesia. Patient showed marked clinical and radiological improvement after sequential whole lung lavage.

  18. Impairment of Alveolar Macrophage Transcription in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Ping; Rosas, Ivan O.; MacDonald, Sandra D.; Wu, Hai-Ping; Billings, Eric M; Gochuico, Bernadette R.

    2007-01-01

    Rationale: Alveolar macrophages are inflammatory cells that may contribute to the pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), which is characterized by excessive alveolar aggregation of cells and extracellular matrix proteins.

  19. Tobacco smoke and the pulmonary alveolar macrophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drath, D B; Davies, P; Karnovsky, M L; Huber, G L

    1979-01-01

    Our results indicate that tobacco smoke exposure to varying duration causes morphological, biochemical and functional alterations in pulmonary alveolar macrophages. The results of these changes is a population of alveolar macrophages made up of larger cells, with a reduced nucleus-cytoplasmic ratio, which are heavily loaded with heterolysosomes containing lipid. Though their fractional complement of mitochondria remains the same, an increase in the inner mitochondrial membrane surface area may be related to an enhanced oxidative metabolism. The cell is biochemically activated particularly following chronic exposure and is functionally impaired with respect to phagocytosis. PMID:232822

  20. Alveolar proteinosis: case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Alveolar proteinosis is a rare disease. Its etiology, pathology, and manifestations are becoming increasingly more apparent. Few cases have been reported, which highlights the importance of reporting this case and reviewing current literature. New therapeutic options are being introduced with adequate outcomes thereby making it possible to manage patients who were previously unresponsive to conventional treatment. 25% of cases resolve spontaneously, while most patients require conventional treatment with total lung lavage that often does not improve prognosis. The case reported in this article was associated to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and diabetes. Primary alveolar proteinosis can have a direct relationship to these concomitant conditions.

  1. Lung Transplant Recipient with Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofya Tokman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP is a progressive lung disease characterized by accumulated surfactant-like lipoproteinaceous material in the alveoli and distal bronchioles. This accumulation is the result of impaired clearance by alveolar macrophages. PAP has been described in 11 solid organ transplant recipients, 9 of whom were treated with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors. We report a case of a lung transplant recipient treated with prednisone, mycophenolate mofetil (MMF, and tacrolimus who ultimately developed PAP, which worsened when MMF was replaced with everolimus.

  2. Lung Transplant Recipient with Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokman, Sofya; Hahn, M Frances; Abdelrazek, Hesham; Panchabhai, Tanmay S; Patel, Vipul J; Walia, Rajat; Omar, Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a progressive lung disease characterized by accumulated surfactant-like lipoproteinaceous material in the alveoli and distal bronchioles. This accumulation is the result of impaired clearance by alveolar macrophages. PAP has been described in 11 solid organ transplant recipients, 9 of whom were treated with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors. We report a case of a lung transplant recipient treated with prednisone, mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), and tacrolimus who ultimately developed PAP, which worsened when MMF was replaced with everolimus. PMID:27213073

  3. Cultured alveolar epithelial cells from septic rats mimic in vivo septic lung.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor S Cohen

    Full Text Available Sepsis results in the formation of pulmonary edema by increasing in epithelial permeability. Therefore we hypothesized that alveolar epithelial cells isolated from septic animals develop tight junctions with different protein composition and reduced barrier function relative to alveolar epithelial cells from healthy animals. Male rats (200-300 g were sacrificed 24 hours after cecal ligation and double puncture (2CLP or sham surgery. Alveolar epithelial cells were isolated and plated on fibronectin-coated flexible membranes or permeable, non-flexible transwell substrates. After a 5 day culture period, cells were either lysed for western analysis of tight junction protein expressin (claudin 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, and 18, occludin, ZO-1, and JAM-A and MAPk (JNK, ERK, an p38 signaling activation, or barrier function was examined by measuring transepithelial resistance (TER or the flux of two molecular tracers (5 and 20 A. Inhibitors of JNK (SP600125, 20 microM and ERK (U0126, 10 microM were used to determine the role of these pathways in sepsis induced epithelial barrier dysfunction. Expression of claudin 4, claudin 18, and occludin was significantly lower, and activation of JNK and ERK signaling pathways was significantly increased in 2CLP monolayers, relative to sham monolayers. Transepithelial resistance of the 2CLP monolayers was reduced significantly compared to sham (769 and 1234 ohm-cm(2, respectively, however no significant difference in the flux of either tracer was observed. Inhibition of ERK, not JNK, significantly increased TER and expression of claudin 4 in 2CLP monolayers, and prevented significant differences in claudin 18 expression between 2CLP and sham monolayers. We conclude that alveolar epithelial cells isolated from septic animals form confluent monolayers with impaired barrier function compared to healthy monolayers, and inhibition of ERK signaling partially reverses differences between these monolayers. This model provides a unique

  4. Decreased leukotriene B4 synthesis in smokers' alveolar macrophages in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Laviolette, M.; Coulombe, R; Picard, S.; Braquet, P; Borgeat, P

    1986-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that alveolar macrophages (AM) are able to release leukotrienes (LTs). Since cigarette smoking inhibits the cyclooxygenase pathway of arachidonic acid metabolism in the AM, we evaluated the LT production by AM from smokers and nonsmokers. AM were obtained from 35 volunteers, 16 nonsmokers, and 19 smokers. The cells were incubated under various conditions including stimulation with 30 microM arachidonic acid, 2 microM ionophore A23187, or both. Each experiment was per...

  5. Defect of alveolar regeneration in pulmonary emphysema: Role of lung fibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Plantier, Laurent; Boczkowski, Jorge; Crestani, Bruno

    2007-01-01

    Pulmonary emphysema is characterized by the irreversible loss of pulmonary alveoli. Despite recent advances in the understanding this disease, its treatment remains palliative. In this review, we will successively review the data suggesting (1) that alveolar regeneration systems are functional in the mammalian lung and have the potential to regrow lost alveoli, (2) that cigarette smoke, the main etiologic factor of emphysema, inhibits those systems under experimental conditions, and (3) that ...

  6. Selective alveolar corticotomy to intrude overerupted molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Dauro Douglas; de Oliveira, Bruno Franco; de Araújo Brito, Helio Henrique; de Souza, Margareth Maria Gomes; Medeiros, Paulo José

    2008-06-01

    Orthodontic intrusion of overerupted molars in adults is challenging for most clinicians. Efficient intrusion can be achieved by combining selective alveolar corticotomies with a modified full-coverage maxillary splint to reduce surgical risks, treatment time, and costs for both orthodontists and patients. PMID:18538256

  7. Iatrogenic injury to the inferior alveolar nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillerup, Søren

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective, non-randomised, descriptive study is to characterise the neurosensory deficit and associated neurogenic discomfort in 52 patients with iatrogenic injury to the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN). All patients were examined and followed up according to a protocol...

  8. Rituximab therapy in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis improves alveolar macrophage lipid homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Malur Anagha; Kavuru Mani S; Marshall Irene; Barna Barbara P; Huizar Isham; Karnekar Reema; Thomassen Mary

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Rationale Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis (PAP) patients exhibit an acquired deficiency of biologically active granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) attributable to GM-CSF specific autoantibodies. PAP alveolar macrophages are foamy, lipid-filled cells with impaired surfactant clearance and markedly reduced expression of the transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) and the PPARγ-regulated ATP binding cassette (ABC) lipid transpor...

  9. Loss of p120 catenin aggravates alveolar edema of ventilation induced lung injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Chen-yang; DAI Guo-feng; SUN Yu; WANG Yue-lan

    2013-01-01

    Background p120 catenin (p120ctn) is an adheren junction protein that regulates barrier function,but its role has not been explored in alveolar edema induced by ventilation.We measured stretch-induced cell gap formation in MLE 12 cells due to the loss of p120.We hypothesized that alveolar permeability was increased by high lung inflation associated with alveolar epithelia cell tight junctions being destroyed,which resulted from the loss of p120.Methods Cultured MLE12 cells were subjected to being stretched or un-stretched (control) and some cells were pretreated with pp2 (c-src inhibitor).After the end of stretching for 0,1,2,and 4 hours,the cells were lysed,and p120 expression and c-src activation was determined by Western blotting analysis.In vivo,SD rats were taken to different tidal volumes (Vt 7 ml/kg or 40 ml/kg,PEEP=0,respiratory rate 30-40 betas/min) for 0,1,2,and 4 hour and some were pretreated with pp2,and alveolar edema was calculated.Rerults It was found that p120 expression was reduced and c-src activation increased in a time-dependent and strain-dependent manner due to cyclic-stretch of the alveolar epithelial cells.These changes could be reversed by inhibition of c-src.We obtained similar changes in rats when they were subjected to large tidal volumes and the alveolar edema increased more than in rats in the low Vt group.Pretreated the rats with inhibition of c-src had less pulmonary edema induced by the high tidal volume ventilation.Conclusions Cyclic stretch MLE 12 cells induced the loss of p120 and may be the same reason by high tidal volume ventilation in rats can aggravate alveolar edema.Maintenance of p120 expression may be a novel therapeutic strategy for the prevention and treatment of ventilation induced lung injury (VILI).

  10. Activation of Type II Cells into Regenerative Stem Cell Antigen-1+ Cells during Alveolar Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Varsha Suresh; Zhang, Wei; Rehman, Jalees; Malik, Asrar B.

    2015-01-01

    The alveolar epithelium is composed of two cell types: type I cells comprise 95% of the gas exchange surface area, whereas type II cells secrete surfactant, while retaining the ability to convert into type I cells to induce alveolar repair. Using lineage-tracing analyses in the mouse model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa–induced lung injury, we identified a population of stem cell antigen (Sca)-1–expressing type II cells with progenitor cell properties that mediate alveolar repair. These cells were shown to be distinct from previously reported Sca-1–expressing bronchioalveolar stem cells. Microarray and Wnt reporter studies showed that surfactant protein (Sp)-C+Sca-1+ cells expressed Wnt signaling pathway genes, and inhibiting Wnt/β-catenin signaling prevented the regenerative function of Sp-C+Sca-1+ cells in vitro. Thus, P. aeruginosa–mediated lung injury induces the generation of a Sca-1+ subset of type II cells. The progenitor phenotype of the Sp-C+Sca-1+ cells that mediates alveolar epithelial repair might involve Wnt signaling. PMID:25474582

  11. Effect of odanacatib on root resorption and alveolar bone metabolism during orthodontic tooth movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, X X; Chu, J P; Zou, Y Z; Ru, N; Cui, S X; Bai, Y X

    2015-12-22

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of local administration of odanacatib (ODN) on orthodontic root resorption and the status of alveolar bone metabolism in rat molars. All specimens were scanned using microcomputed tomography and then the raw images were reconstructed. The total volume of the root resorption craters of the 60 g-NS (normal saline) group was higher than in the 60 g-ODN group and the control group. In the 60 g-NS group, the bone volume fraction values of alveolar bone were significantly decreased compared with the other 2 groups. There were no significant differences in the bone volume fraction values of the tibiae among the 3 groups. The results of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive (TRAP+) numbers showed that there was no difference between the 60 g-NS group and the 60 g-ODN group. The expression of cathepsin K was decreased significantly in the 60 g-ODN group. These results indicate that ODN reduces orthodontics-induced external root resorption and increases alveolar bone metabolism. This may be because ODN inhibits the activity of odontoclasts, but maintains the quantity of odontoclasts and enhances bone formation. ODN promotes local alveolar bone metabolism, but does not affect systemic bone metabolism.

  12. Effect of odanacatib on root resorption and alveolar bone metabolism during orthodontic tooth movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, X X; Chu, J P; Zou, Y Z; Ru, N; Cui, S X; Bai, Y X

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of local administration of odanacatib (ODN) on orthodontic root resorption and the status of alveolar bone metabolism in rat molars. All specimens were scanned using microcomputed tomography and then the raw images were reconstructed. The total volume of the root resorption craters of the 60 g-NS (normal saline) group was higher than in the 60 g-ODN group and the control group. In the 60 g-NS group, the bone volume fraction values of alveolar bone were significantly decreased compared with the other 2 groups. There were no significant differences in the bone volume fraction values of the tibiae among the 3 groups. The results of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive (TRAP+) numbers showed that there was no difference between the 60 g-NS group and the 60 g-ODN group. The expression of cathepsin K was decreased significantly in the 60 g-ODN group. These results indicate that ODN reduces orthodontics-induced external root resorption and increases alveolar bone metabolism. This may be because ODN inhibits the activity of odontoclasts, but maintains the quantity of odontoclasts and enhances bone formation. ODN promotes local alveolar bone metabolism, but does not affect systemic bone metabolism. PMID:26782444

  13. Secondary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis in hematologic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaulagain, Chakra P; Pilichowska, Monika; Brinckerhoff, Laurence; Tabba, Maher; Erban, John K

    2014-12-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP), characterized by deposition of intra-alveolar PAS positive protein and lipid rich material, is a rare cause of progressive respiratory failure first described by Rosen et al. in 1958. The intra-alveolar lipoproteinaceous material was subsequently proven to have been derived from pulmonary surfactant in 1980 by Singh et al. Levinson et al. also reported in 1958 the case of 19-year-old female with panmyelosis afflicted with a diffuse pulmonary disease characterized by filling of the alveoli with amorphous material described as "intra-alveolar coagulum". This is probably the first reported case of PAP in relation to hematologic malignancy. Much progress has been made on PAP first described by Rosen which is currently classified as idiopathic or primary or autoimmune PAP. Idiopathic PAP occurs as a result of auto-antibodies directed against granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) impeding the surfactant clearing function of alveolar macrophages leading to progressive respiratory failure. Whole lung lavage and GM-CSF therapy has improved outcomes in patients with idiopathic PAP. Despite major advancement in the management of hematologic malignancy and its complications, little is known about the type of PAP first described by Levinson and now known as secondary PAP; a term also used when PAP occurs due to other causes such as occupational dusts. In this article we review and analyze the limited literature available in secondary PAP due to hematologic malignancies and present a case of PAP associated with chronic lymphocytic leukemia successfully treated with bendamustine and rituximab. PMID:25300566

  14. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory bone resorption, and protects against alveolar bone loss in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominari, Tsukasa; Matsumoto, Chiho; Watanabe, Kenta; Hirata, Michiko; Grundler, Florian M W; Miyaura, Chisato; Inada, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a major polyphenol in green tea, possesses antioxidant properties and regulates various cell functions. Here, we examined the function of EGCG in inflammatory bone resorption. In calvarial organ cultures, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced bone resorption was clearly suppressed by EGCG. In osteoblasts, EGCG suppressed the LPS-induced expression of COX-2 and mPGES-1 mRNAs, as well as prostaglandin E2 production, and also suppressed RANKL expression, which is essential for osteoclast differentiation. LPS-induced bone resorption of mandibular alveolar bones was attenuated by EGCG in vitro, and the loss of mouse alveolar bone mass was inhibited by the catechin in vivo.

  15. The Value of the Soluable Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 Levelsin Matermal Serum for Determination of Occult Chorioamnionitis in Premature Rupture of Membranes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹丽; 张会军; 祝建芳; 朱剑文

    2004-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic value of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (sICAM-1)with that of c-reactive protein (CRP) for detecting chorioamnionitis (CAM) in serum of women with premature rupture of membranes (PROM), 55 pregnant women with PROM, including 18pregnant women with preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM) and 20 normal pregnant women at term (TPROM) were studied. Maternal serum were measured by Sandwish enzymelinked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA) for sICAM. CAM was histologically confirmed after delivery. The results revealed that (1) maternal serum levels of sICAM-1 and CRP were significantly higher in women with PROM than those without it; (2) maternal serum levels of sICAM-1 and CRP were significantly higher in women with CAM than those without it; (3) serum levels of sICAM-1 in PPROM women were similar to those in TPROM women, whereas serum levels of CRP in PPROM women were significantly higher than those in TPROM women; (4) the sensitivity,specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, Kappa index and area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of maternal serum sICAM-1 (cutoff 104.7 ng/ml) and CRP (cutoff 1.03 mg/dl) for diagnosing CAM were 100 %, 91.2 %, 87.5 %, 100 %, 0.20, 0.995and 81.0 %, 73.5 %, 65.4 %, 86.2 %, 0.13, 0. 811, respectively; (5) among the mild histological CAM group, severe histological CAM group and clinical CAM group, the difference in maternal serum levels of sICAM-1 were significantly (P<0. 001), with the order of concentration from high level to low level corresponding to the severity of CAM. It is concluded that maternal serum level of ICAM-1 is superior to that of CRP as biomarker for diagnosing intraamniotic infection in pregnant women with PROM.

  16. Bis-enoxacin blocks rat alveolar bone resorption from experimental periodontitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes F Rivera

    Full Text Available Periodontal diseases are multifactorial, caused by polymicrobial subgingival pathogens, including Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia. Chronic periodontal infection results in inflammation, destruction of connective tissues, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone resorption, and ultimately tooth loss. Enoxacin and a bisphosphonate derivative of enoxacin (bis-enoxacin inhibit osteoclast formation and bone resorption and also contain antibiotic properties. Our study proposes that enoxacin and/or bis-enoxacin may be useful in reducing alveolar bone resorption and possibly bacterial colonization. Rats were infected with 10(9 cells of polymicrobial inoculum consisting of P. gingivalis, T. denticola, and T. forsythia, as an oral lavage every other week for twelve weeks. Daily subcutaneous injections of enoxacin (5 mg/kg/day, bis-enoxacin (5, 25 mg/kg/day, alendronate (1, 10 mg/kg/day, or doxycycline (5 mg/day were administered after 6 weeks of polymicrobial infection. Periodontal disease parameters, including bacterial colonization/infection, immune response, inflammation, alveolar bone resorption, and systemic spread, were assessed post-euthanasia. All three periodontal pathogens colonized the rat oral cavity during polymicrobial infection. Polymicrobial infection induced an increase in total alveolar bone resorption, intrabony defects, and gingival inflammation. Treatment with bis-enoxacin significantly decreased alveolar bone resorption more effectively than either alendronate or doxycycline. Histologic examination revealed that treatment with bis-enoxacin and enoxacin reduced gingival inflammation and decreased apical migration of junctional epithelium. These data support the hypothesis that bis-enoxacin and enoxacin may be useful for the treatment of periodontal disease.

  17. An Optimised Human Cell Culture Model for Alveolar Epithelial Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Nigel P.; Suresh, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Robust and reproducible in vitro models are required for investigating the pathways involved in fluid homeostasis in the human alveolar epithelium. We performed functional and phenotypic characterisation of ion transport in the human pulmonary epithelial cell lines NCI-H441 and A549 to determine their similarity to primary human alveolar type II cells. NCI-H441 cells exhibited high expression of junctional proteins ZO-1, and E-cadherin, seal-forming claudin-3, -4, -5 and Na+-K+-ATPase while A549 cells exhibited high expression of pore-forming claudin-2. Consistent with this phenotype NCI-H441, but not A549, cells formed a functional barrier with active ion transport characterised by higher electrical resistance (529 ± 178 Ω cm2 vs 28 ± 4 Ω cm2), lower paracellular permeability ((176 ± 42) ×10−8 cm/s vs (738 ± 190) ×10−8 cm/s) and higher transepithelial potential difference (11.9 ± 4 mV vs 0 mV). Phenotypic and functional properties of NCI-H441 cells were tuned by varying cell seeding density and supplement concentrations. The cells formed a polarised monolayer typical of in vivo epithelium at seeding densities of 100,000 cells per 12-well insert while higher densities resulted in multiple cell layers. Dexamethasone and insulin-transferrin-selenium supplements were required for the development of high levels of electrical resistance, potential difference and expression of claudin-3 and Na+-K+-ATPase. Treatment of NCI-H441 cells with inhibitors and agonists of sodium and chloride channels indicated sodium absorption through ENaC under baseline and forskolin-stimulated conditions. Chloride transport was not sensitive to inhibitors of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) under either condition. Channels inhibited by 5-nitro-1-(3-phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB) contributed to chloride secretion following forskolin stimulation, but not at baseline. These data precisely define experimental conditions for the application of NCI

  18. Rare Lung Diseases II: Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen C Juvet

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present article is the second in a series on rare lung diseases. It focuses on pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP, a disorder in which lipoproteinaceous material accumulates in the alveolar space. PAP was first described in 1958, and for many years the nature of the material accumulating in the lungs was unknown. Major insights into PAP have been made in the past decade, and these have led to the notion that PAP is an autoimmume disorder in which autoantibodies interfere with signalling through the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor, leading to macrophage and neutrophil dysfunction. This has spurred new therapeutic approaches to this disorder. The discussion of PAP will begin with a case report, then will highlight the classification of PAP and review recent insights into the pathogenesis of PAP. The approach to therapy and the prognosis of PAP will also be discussed.

  19. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and aluminum dust exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.R.; Churg, A.M.; Hutcheon, M.; Lom, S.

    1984-08-01

    A 44-yr-old male presented shortness of breath, diffuse X-ray infiltrates, and physiologic evidence of a restrictive lung disease. Biopsy revealed pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. The patient had worked for the previous 6 yr as an aluminum rail grinder in a very dusty environment. Analysis of his lung tissue revealed greater than 300 X 10(6) particles of aluminum/g dry lung; all of the particles appeared as spheres of less than 1 mu diameter. We believe that this case represents an example of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis induced by inhalation of aluminum particles; this finding confirms animal studies which suggest that proteinosis can be produced by very large doses of many types of finely divided mineral dust.

  20. Treatment of Adult Primary Alveolar Proteinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Portal, José Antonio

    2015-07-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare disease characterized by the accumulation of surfactant-like lipoproteinaceous material in the distal air spaces and terminal bronchi, which may lead to impaired gas exchange. This accumulation of surfactant is due to decreased clearance by the alveolar macrophages. Its primary, most common form, is currently considered an autoimmune disease. Better knowledge of the causes of PAP have led to the emergence of alternatives to whole lung lavage, although this is still considered the treatment of choice. Most studies are case series, often with limited patient numbers, so the level of evidence is low. Since the severity of presentation and clinical course are variable, not all patients will require treatment. Due to the low level of evidence, some objective criteria based on expert opinion have been arbitrarily proposed in an attempt to define in which patients it is best to initiate treatment. PMID:25896950

  1. Silver Nanoparticles in Alveolar Bone Surgery Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Sivolella

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Silver (Ag ions have well-known antimicrobial properties and have been applied as nanostrategies in many medical and surgical fields, including dentistry. The use of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs may be an option for reducing bacterial adhesion to dental implant surfaces and preventing biofilm formation, containing the risk of peri-implant infections. Modifying the structure or surface of bone grafts and membranes with Ag NPs may also prevent the risk of contamination and infection that are common when alveolar bone augmentation techniques are used. On the other hand, Ag NPs have revealed some toxic effects on cells in vitro and in vivo in animal studies. In this setting, the aim of the present paper is to summarize the principle behind Ag NP-based devices and their clinical applications in alveolar bone and dental implant surgery.

  2. Bilateral stony lung: pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Subhash; Mohan, Anant; Guleria, Randeep; Das, Prasenjit; Sarkar, Chitra

    2009-01-01

    A 40-year-old male paddy field worker was referred for exertional shortness of breath and non-productive cough for 4 years. He had been treated for pulmonary tuberculosis twice. Chest radiograph showed extensive bilateral nodular opacities ("sandstorm-like") in the middle and lower lobe. Pulmonary function tests revealed a restrictive ventilatory defect. High resolution CT showed widespread nodular infiltration with "crazy paving" appearance and interrupted black pleura sign. This was confirmed as pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) by trans-bronchial lung biopsy, which showed normal respiratory lining epithelium with dilated alveolar spaces containing many calcific bodies, some of which showed concentric calcification. The possibilities of silicosis (due to exposure to husk) and tuberculosis, both of which can mimic PAM clinically and radiologically, made this case a diagnostic challenge. PMID:21686505

  3. Bmp2 and Bmp4 accelerate alveolar bone development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Mingming; Zhao, Yibing; Zhang, Fangming; Huang, Xiaofeng

    2015-06-01

    Alveolar bone remodeling is a continuous process that takes place during development and in response to various physiological and pathological stimuli. However, detailed knowledge regarding the underlying mechanisms involved in alveolar bone development is still lacking. This study aims at improving our understanding of alveolar bone formation and the role of bone morphogenetic proteins (Bmps) in this process. Mice at embryonic (E) day 13.5 to postnatal (PN) day 15.5 were selected to observe the process of alveolar bone development. Alveolar bone development was found to be morphologically observable at E14.5. Molar teeth isolated from mice at PN7.5 were pretreated with Bmp2, Bmp4, Noggin, or BSA, and grafted subcutaneously into mice. The subcutaneously implanted tooth germs formed alveolar bone indicating the role of the dental follicle in alveolar bone development. Alveolar bone formation was increased after pretreatment with Bmp2 and Bmp4, but not with Noggin. Gene expression levels in dental follicle cells from murine molars were also determined by real-time RT-PCR. The expression levels of Runx2, Bsp, and Ocn were significantly higher in dental follicle cells cultured with Bmp2 or Bmp4, and significantly lower in those cultured with Noggin when compared with that of the BSA controls. Our results suggest that the dental follicle participates in alveolar bone formation and Bmp2/4 appears to accelerate alveolar bone development.

  4. Alveolar ridge augmentation by osteoinduction in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, E M; Bang, G; Haanaes, H R

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate bone substitutes for alveolar ridge augmentation by osteoinduction. Allogenic, demineralized, and lyophilized dentin and bone was tested for osteoinductive properties in order to establish an experimental model for further studies. Implantations were...... performed subperiosteally on the premaxilla and heterotopically in the abdominal muscles of rats. Light microscopic evaluations revealed that all allogenic, demineralized, and lyophilized dentin and bone implants induced new bone formation. No inflammatory or foreign body reactions were observed....

  5. Phagocytic properties of lung alveolar wall cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaka,Akisuke

    1974-04-01

    Full Text Available For the purpose to define the mechanism of heavy metal intoxication by inhalation, morphologic observations were made on rat lungs after nasal instillation of iron colloid particles of positive and negative electric charges. Histochemical observation was also made on the liver and spleen of these animals. The instilled iron colloid particles reach the alveolar cavity easily, as can be seen in the tissue sections stained by Prussian blue reaction. Alveolar macrophages do take up them avidly both of positive and negative charges, though much less the positive particles than negative ones. In contrast, the alveolar epithelial cells take up solely positive particles by phagocytosis but not negative ones. Electron microscope observation revealed that the positive particles are ingested by Type I epithelial cells by pinocytosis and by Type II cells by phagocytosis as well. Then the iron colloid particles are transferred into the basement membrane by exocytosis. Travelling through the basement membrane they are again taken up by capillary endothelial cells by phagocytosis. Some particles were found in the intercellular clefts of capillary endothelial cells but not any iron colloid particles in the intercellular spaces of epithelial cells and in the capillary lumen. However, the liver and spleen tissues of the animals given iron colloid showed a strong positive iron reaction. On the basis of these observations, the mechanism of acute intoxication by inhaling heavy metal dusts like lead fume is discussed from the view point of selective uptake of alveolar epithelial and capillary endothelial cells for the particles of the positive electric cha'rge.

  6. In situ methods for assessing alveolar mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, You; Perlman, Carrie E

    2012-02-01

    Lung mechanics are an important determinant of physiological and pathophysiological lung function. Recent light microscopy studies of the intact lung have furthered the understanding of lung mechanics but used methodologies that may have introduced artifacts. To address this concern, we employed a short working distance water immersion objective to capture confocal images of a fluorescently labeled alveolar field on the costal surface of the isolated, perfused rat lung. Surface tension held a saline drop between the objective tip and the lung surface, such that the lung surface was unconstrained. For comparison, we also imaged with O-ring and coverslip; with O-ring, coverslip, and vacuum pressure; and without perfusion. Under each condition, we ventilated the lung and imaged the same region at the endpoints of ventilation. We found use of a coverslip caused a minimal enlargement of the alveolar field; additional use of vacuum pressure caused no further dimensional change; and absence of perfusion did not affect alveolar field dimension. Inflation-induced expansion was unaltered by methodology. In response to inflation, percent expansion was the same as recorded by all four alternative methods. PMID:22074721

  7. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: time to shift?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papiris, Spyros A; Tsirigotis, Panagiotis; Kolilekas, Likurgos; Papadaki, Georgia; Papaioannou, Andriana I; Triantafillidou, Christina; Papaporfyriou, Anastasia; Karakatsani, Anna; Kagouridis, Konstantinos; Griese, Matthias; Manali, Effrosyni D

    2015-06-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is categorized into hereditary, secondary and autoimmune PAP (aPAP) types. The common pathogenesis is the ability of the alveolar macrophages to catabolize phagocytized surfactant is affected. Hereditary PAP is caused by mutations involving the GM-CSF signaling, particularly in genes for the GM-CSF receptor and sometimes by GATA2 mutations. Secondary PAP occurs in hematologic malignancies, other hematologic disorders, miscellaneous malignancies, fume and dust inhalation, drugs, autoimmune disorders and immunodeficiencies. aPAP is related to the production of GM-CSF autoantibodies. PAP is characterized morphologically by the inappropriate and progressive 'occupation' of the alveolar spaces by an excessive amount of unprocessed surfactant, limiting gas exchange and gradually exhausting the respiratory reserve. Myeloid cells' immunity deteriorates, increasing the risk of infections. Treatment of PAP is based on its etiology. In aPAP, recent therapeutic advances might shift the treatment option from the whole lung lavage procedure under general anesthesia to the inhalation of GM-CSF 'as needed'. PMID:25864717

  8. Claudins and alveolar epithelial barrier function in the lung

    OpenAIRE

    Frank, James A.

    2012-01-01

    The alveolar epithelium of the lung constitutes a unique interface with the outside environment. This thin barrier must maintain a surface for gas transfer while being continuously exposed to potentially hazardous environmental stimuli. Small differences in alveolar epithelial barrier properties could therefore have a large impact on disease susceptibility or outcome. Moreover, recent work has focused attention on the alveolar epithelium as central to several lung diseases, including acute lu...

  9. Alveolar epithelial type II cell: defender of the alveolus revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Fehrenbach Heinz

    2001-01-01

    Abstract In 1977, Mason and Williams developed the concept of the alveolar epithelial type II (AE2) cell as a defender of the alveolus. It is well known that AE2 cells synthesise, secrete, and recycle all components of the surfactant that regulates alveolar surface tension in mammalian lungs. AE2 cells influence extracellular surfactant transformation by regulating, for example, pH and [Ca2+] of the hypophase. AE2 cells play various roles in alveolar fluid balance, coagulation/fibrinolysis, a...

  10. Alveolar pressure during high-frequency jet ventilation

    OpenAIRE

    Vught, Adrianus; Versprille, Adrian; Jansen, Jos

    1990-01-01

    textabstractWe studied the influence of ventilatory frequency (1-5 Hz), tidal volume, lung volume and body position on the end-expiratory alveolar-to-tracheal pressure difference during high-frequency jet ventilation (HFJV) in Yorkshire piglets. The animals were anesthetized and paralysed. Alveolar pressure was estimated with the clamp off method, which was performed by a computer controlled ventilator and which had been extensively tested on its feasibility. The alveolar-to-tracheal pressure...

  11. Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis in Children: A case series

    OpenAIRE

    seyyed Ahmad Tabatabaei; abdollah karimi; Sedigheh Rafiee Tabatabaei; B Radpay; Farzaneh Jadali

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis(PAP) is a rare disease of unknown etiology, characterized by the accumulation of proteinoceous material in the alveoli that is rich in lipid and is positive on periodic acid-Schiff(PAS) stain. PAP is rare in children. Two forms are encountered in pediatric practice: congenital alveolar proteinosis (CAP) and a later–onset form that is generally less severe. Broncho-alveolar lavage is the key to diagnosis. Therapeutic lung lavages are the only effective treatment ...

  12. Isolation and Culture of Human Alveolar Type II Pneumocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witherden, I R; Tetley, T D

    2001-01-01

    Alveolar type II pneumocytes (alveolar type II cells; TII cells) play an important role in the homeostasis of the alveolar unit. They are the progenitor cells to the type I pneumocyte and are therefore responsible for regeneration of alveolar epithelium following alveolar epithelial cell damage. The type I cell covers over 90% of the alveolar surface, reflecting its capacity to stretch into a flattened cell with very little depth (approx. 0.1 µm), but with a large surface area, to facilitate gas exchange. Nevertheless, the type II cell outnumbers type I cells, estimated to be by 2:1 in rodents. Most of the type II cell lies buried in the interstitium of the alveolus, with only the apical tip of the cell reaching into the airspace, through which another crucial function, provision of alveolar surfactant, occurs. Surfactant synthesis and secretion is a unique feature of type II cells; surfactant consists of a high proportion of phospholipids (approx. 90%) and a small proportion of protein (approx. 10%), which contains surfactant apoprotein (SP), of which four have so far been described, SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, and SP-D (1,2). Surfactant is highly surface active and is essential to prevent alveolar collapse. In addition, surfactant has many other roles, including pulmonary host defense. Compromised surfactant synthesis and function are believed to be a feature of numerous disease states (1,2), including infant respiratory distress syndrome, adult respiratory distress syndrome, alveolar proteinosis, and microbial infection. PMID:21336897

  13. Characteristic aspects of alveolar proteinosis diagnosis Aspectos característicos do diagnóstico da proteinose alveolar

    OpenAIRE

    Thiago Prudente Bártholo; José Gustavo Pugliese; Luiz Carlos Aguiar Vaz; Cláudia Henrique da Costa; Rogério Rufino

    2012-01-01

    Alveolar proteinosis is an uncommon pulmonary disease characterized by an accumulation of surfactant in terminal airway and alveoli, thereby impairing gas exchange and engendering respiratory insufficiency in some cases. Three clinically and etiologically distinct forms of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis are recognized: congenital, secondary and idiopathic, the latter corresponding to 90% of the cases. In this case report we present a young male patient that was diagnosed with alveolar protein...

  14. Mesenchymal stem cells alleviate experimental asthma by inducing polarization of alveolar macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaolian; Xie, Shuanshuan; Lu, Kun; Wang, Changhui

    2015-04-01

    The reparative and immunoregulatory properties of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have made them attractive candidates for cellular therapy. However, the underlying mechanism of the effects of transplanted MSCs on allergic asthma remains elusive. Here, we show that administration of MSCs isolated from human bone marrow provoked a pronounced polarization in alveolar macrophages to M2 subtypes, rather than induced an increase in the total macrophage number, and efficiently inhibited hallmark features of asthma, including airway hyperresponsiveness and eosinophilic accumulation. Moreover, transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signaling pathway appeared to mediate the effects of MSCs on macrophage polarization and subsequently the inhibition of hallmark features of asthma. Inhibition of TGF-β signaling was sufficient to inhibit the macrophage polarization in response to MSCs and consequently reserved the inhibitory effects of macrophage polarization on hallmark features of asthma. Collectively, our data demonstrate that human MSCs have immunosuppressive activity on asthma, which is mediated by TGF-β-signaling-dependent alveolar macrophage polarization. PMID:24958014

  15. Segment distraction to reduce a wide alveolar cleft before alveolar bone grafting.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binger, T.; Katsaros, C.; Rucker, M.; Spitzer, W.J.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate a method for reduction of wide alveolar clefts prior to bone grafting. This method aims to facilitate bone grafting and achieve adequate soft tissue coverage of the graft with attached gingiva. CASE REPORT: Treatment of a patient with bilateral cleft lip and palate with a s

  16. Nostril Base Augmentation Effect of Alveolar Bone Graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woojin Lee

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The aims of alveolar bone grafting are closure of the fistula, stabilization ofthe maxillary arch, support for the roots of the teeth adjacent to the cleft on each side.We observed nostril base augmentation in patients with alveolar clefts after alveolar bonegrafting. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the nostril base augmentation effect ofsecondary alveolar bone grafting in patients with unilateral alveolar cleft.Methods Records of 15 children with alveolar clefts who underwent secondary alveolar bonegrafting with autogenous iliac cancellous bone between March of 2011 and May of 2012 werereviewed. Preoperative and postoperative worm’s-eye view photographs and reconstructedthree-dimensional computed tomography (CT scans were used for photogrammetry. Thedepression of the nostril base and thickness of the philtrum on the cleft side were measuredin comparison to the normal side. The depression of the cleft side pyriform aperture wasmeasured in comparison to the normal side on reconstructed three-dimensional CT.Results Significant changes were seen in the nostril base (P=0.005, the philtrum length(P=0.013, and the angle (P=0.006. The CT measurements showed significant changes in thepyriform aperture (P<0.001 and the angle (P<0.001.Conclusions An alveolar bone graft not only fills the gap in the alveolar process but alsoaugments the nostril base after surgery. In this study, only an alveolar bone graft was performedto prevent bias from other procedures. Nostril base augmentation can be achieved byperforming alveolar bone grafts in children, in whom invasive methods are not advised.

  17. An estimation of mechanical stress on alveolar walls during repetitive alveolar reopening and closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zheng-Long; Song, Yuan-Lin; Hu, Zhao-Yan; Zhang, Su; Chen, Ya-Zhu

    2015-08-01

    Alveolar overdistension and mechanical stresses generated by repetitive opening and closing of small airways and alveoli have been widely recognized as two primary mechanistic factors that may contribute to the development of ventilator-induced lung injury. A long-duration exposure of alveolar epithelial cells to even small, shear stresses could lead to the changes in cytoskeleton and the production of inflammatory mediators. In this paper, we have made an attempt to estimate in situ the magnitudes of mechanical stresses exerted on the alveolar walls during repetitive alveolar reopening by using a tape-peeling model of McEwan and Taylor (35). To this end, we first speculate the possible ranges of capillary number (Ca) ≡ μU/γ (a dimensionless combination of surface tension γ, fluid viscosity μ, and alveolar opening velocity U) during in vivo alveolar opening. Subsequent calculations show that increasing respiratory rate or inflation rate serves to increase the values of mechanical stresses. For a normal lung, the predicted maximum shear stresses are surface tension or viscosity, the maximum shear stress will notably increase, even at a slow respiratory rate. Similarly, the increased pressure gradients in the case of elevated surface or viscosity may lead to a pressure drop >300 dyn/cm(2) across a cell, possibly inducing epithelial hydraulic cracks. In addition, we have conceived of a geometrical model of alveolar opening to make a prediction of the positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) required to splint open a collapsed alveolus, which as shown by our results, covers a wide range of pressures, from several centimeters to dozens of centimeters of water, strongly depending on the underlying pulmonary conditions. The establishment of adequate regional ventilation-to-perfusion ratios may prevent recruited alveoli from reabsorption atelectasis and accordingly, reduce the required levels of PEEP. The present study and several recent animal experiments likewise

  18. Particle-induced indentation of the alveolar epithelium caused by surface tension forces

    OpenAIRE

    Mijailovich, S. M.; Kojic, M.; Tsuda, A.

    2010-01-01

    Physical contact between an inhaled particle and alveolar epithelium at the moment of particle deposition must have substantial effects on subsequent cellular functions of neighboring cells, such as alveolar type-I, type-II pneumocytes, alveolar macrophage, as well as afferent sensory nerve cells, extending their dendrites toward the alveolar septal surface. The forces driving this physical insult are born at the surface of the alveolar air-liquid layer. The role of alveolar surfactant submer...

  19. Proteinase-activated receptor 4 stimulation-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in alveolar epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araki Hiromasa

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs; PAR1–4 that can be activated by serine proteinases such as thrombin and neutrophil catepsin G are known to contribute to the pathogenesis of various pulmonary diseases including fibrosis. Among these PARs, especially PAR4, a newly identified subtype, is highly expressed in the lung. Here, we examined whether PAR4 stimulation plays a role in the formation of fibrotic response in the lung, through alveolar epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT which contributes to the increase in myofibroblast population. Methods EMT was assessed by measuring the changes in each specific cell markers, E-cadherin for epithelial cell, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA for myofibroblast, using primary cultured mouse alveolar epithelial cells and human lung carcinoma-derived alveolar epithelial cell line (A549 cells. Results Stimulation of PAR with thrombin (1 U/ml or a synthetic PAR4 agonist peptide (AYPGKF-NH2, 100 μM for 72 h induced morphological changes from cobblestone-like structure to elongated shape in primary cultured alveolar epithelial cells and A549 cells. In immunocytochemical analyses of these cells, such PAR4 stimulation decreased E-cadherin-like immunoreactivity and increased α-SMA-like immunoreactivity, as observed with a typical EMT-inducer, tumor growth factor-β (TGF-β. Western blot analyses of PAR4-stimulated A549 cells also showed similar changes in expression of these EMT-related marker proteins. Such PAR4-mediated changes were attenuated by inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR kinase and Src. PAR4-mediated morphological changes in primary cultured alveolar epithelial cells were reduced in the presence of these inhibitors. PAR4 stimulation increased tyrosine phosphorylated EGFR or tyrosine phosphorylated Src level in A549 cells, and the former response being inhibited by Src inhibitor. Conclusion PAR4 stimulation of alveolar epithelial cells induced epithelial

  20. Perawatan Pulpa Gigi Sulung Disertai Abses Dento Alveolar

    OpenAIRE

    Nasution, Nurasiah Adita

    2008-01-01

    Abses dento alveolar adalah kumputan pus yang berada pada tulang alveolar sekitar apeks gigi akibat kematian pulpa. Matinya pulpa dapat disebabkan bakteri, trauma, iritasi mekanis, termis maupun kimiawi. Pengaruh bakteri merupakan penyebab kerusakan jaringan pulpa yang terbesar. Perluasan infeksi ke dalam jaringan periapikal dapat melalui foramen apikalke jaringan periodontal sehingga terjadi inflarnasi. Bila virulensi bakteri meningkat disertai rendahnya pertahanan tubuh penderita dapat ...

  1. Alveolar pressure during high-frequency jet ventilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. van Vught (Adrianus); A. Versprille (Adrian); J.R.C. Jansen (Jos)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractWe studied the influence of ventilatory frequency (1-5 Hz), tidal volume, lung volume and body position on the end-expiratory alveolar-to-tracheal pressure difference during high-frequency jet ventilation (HFJV) in Yorkshire piglets. The animals were anesthetized and paralysed. Alveolar

  2. Post-neonatal drop in alveolar SP-A expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stray-Pedersen, Arne; Vege, Ashild; Stray-Pedersen, Asbjorg;

    2008-01-01

    was developed enabling semi-quantitative estimation of staining intensity and distribution. RESULTS: SP-A was detected in the terminal bronchioles and alveolar spaces of fetuses >35 weeks gestation. The intra-alveolar SP-A expression increased in the perinatal period followed by a marked drop in infants aged...

  3. Anaesthetic management of bilateral alveolar proteinosis for bronchopulmonary lavage.

    OpenAIRE

    Dixit R; Chaudhari L; Mahashur A

    1998-01-01

    The most hazardous manifestation of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is progressive hypoxia for which bronchopulmonary lavage (BPL) is the single most effective treatment. Unfortunately this procedure under general anesthesia itself increases the risk of hypoxia due to the need for one lung ventilation. It was therefore considered interesting to report the successful anaesthetic management of a patient with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis for Bronchopulmonary lavage.

  4. Tongue-Palate Contact of Perceptually Acceptable Alveolar Stops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Alice; Gibbon, Fiona E.; O'Donovan, Cliona

    2013-01-01

    Increased tongue-palate contact for perceptually acceptable alveolar stops has been observed in children with speech sound disorders (SSD). This is a retrospective study that further investigated this issue by using quantitative measures to compare the target alveolar stops /t/, /d/ and /n/ produced in words by nine children with SSD (20 tokens of…

  5. FXYD1 negatively regulates Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity in lung alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wujak, Łukasz A; Blume, Anna; Baloğlu, Emel; Wygrecka, Małgorzata; Wygowski, Jegor; Herold, Susanne; Mayer, Konstantin; Vadász, István; Besuch, Petra; Mairbäurl, Heimo; Seeger, Werner; Morty, Rory E

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is clinical syndrome characterized by decreased lung fluid reabsorption, causing alveolar edema. Defective alveolar ion transport undertaken in part by the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase underlies this compromised fluid balance, although the molecular mechanisms at play are not understood. We describe here increased expression of FXYD1, FXYD3 and FXYD5, three regulatory subunits of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, in the lungs of ARDS patients. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, a pathogenic mediator of ARDS, drove increased FXYD1 expression in A549 human lung alveolar epithelial cells, suggesting that pathogenic TGF-β signaling altered Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity in affected lungs. Lentivirus-mediated delivery of FXYD1 and FXYD3 allowed for overexpression of both regulatory subunits in polarized H441 cell monolayers on an air/liquid interface. FXYD1 but not FXYD3 overexpression inhibited amphotericin B-sensitive equivalent short-circuit current in Ussing chamber studies. Thus, we speculate that FXYD1 overexpression in ARDS patient lungs may limit Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity, and contribute to edema persistence. PMID:26410457

  6. Different pathways of degradation of SP-A and saturated phosphatidylcholine by alveolar macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baritussio, A; Alberti, A; Armanini, D; Meloni, F; Bruttomesso, D

    2000-07-01

    Alveolar macrophages degrade surfactant protein (SP) A and saturated phosphatidycholine [dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC)]. To clarify this process, using rabbit alveolar macrophages, we analyzed the effect of drugs known to affect phagocytosis, pinocytosis, clathrin-mediated uptake, caveolae, the cytoskeleton, lysosomal pH, protein kinase C, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) on the degradation of SP-A and DPPC. We found the following: 1) SP-A binds to the plasma membrane, is rapidly internalized, and then moves toward degradative compartments. Uptake could be clathrin mediated, whereas phagocytosis, pinocytosis, or the use of caveolae are less likely. An intact cytoskeleton and an acidic milieu are necessary for the degradation of SP-A. 2) Stimulation of protein kinase C increases the degradation of SP-A. 3) PI3K influences the degradation of SP-A by regulating both the speed of internalization and subsequent intracellular steps, but its inhibition does not prevent SP-A from reaching the lysosomal compartment. 4) The degradation of DPPC is unaffected by most of the treatments able to influence the degradation of SP-A. Thus it appears that DPPC is degraded by alveolar macrophages through mechanisms very different from those utilized for the degradation of SP-A. PMID:10893207

  7. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: diagnostic and therapeutic challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campo Ilaria

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis (PAP is a rare syndrome characterized by pulmonary surfactant accumulation within the alveolar spaces. It occurs with a reported prevalence of 0.1 per 100,000 individuals and in distinct clinical forms: autoimmune (previously referred to as the idiopathic form, represents the vast majority of PAP cases, and is associated with Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF auto-antibodies; GMAbs, secondary (is a consequence of underlying disorders, congenital (caused by mutations in the genes encoding for the GM-CSF receptor, and PAP-like syndromes (disorders associated with surfactant gene mutations. The clinical course of PAP is variable, ranging from spontaneous remission to respiratory failure. Whole lung lavage (WLL is the current standard treatment for PAP patients and although it is effective in the majority of cases, disease persistence is not an unusual outcome, even if disease is well controlled by WLL. In this paper we review the therapeutic strategies which have been proposed for the treatment of PAP patients and the progress which has been made in the understanding of the disease pathogenesis.

  8. Effects of different doses of dexmedetomidine on minimum alveolar concentration of sevoflurane required to inhibit the body movement evoked by skin incision%不同剂量右美托咪啶对七氟醚抑制切皮诱发患者体动反应肺泡气最低有效浓度的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庞国勋; 高冬艳; 张煜东; 马银玲

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of different doses of dexmedetomidine on the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of sevoflurane required to inhibit the body movement evoked by skin incision.Methods ASA Ⅰ or Ⅱ patients of both sexes,aged 18-64 yr,with body mass index of 21-27 kg/m2,undegoing elective lower abdominal surgery under general anesthesia,were randomly divided into 4 groups:control group (group C) and different doses of dexmedetomidine groups (groups D1,D2 and D3 ).Dexmedetomidine 0.2,0.4 and 0.6 μg/kg in 15 ml of normal saline was infused over 30 min before induction of anesthesia in groups D1,D2 and D3 respectively.While 15 ml of normal saline was given instead in group C.Anesthesia was induced with inhalation of 8% sevoflurane.The patients were mechanically ventilated after tracheal intubation.Anesthesia was maintained with inhalation of sevoflurane.The initial end-tidal concentration of sevoflurane was set at 3.0%,3.0%,2.5%,2.0% in groups C,D1,D2 and D3 respectively.The ratio between the two successive concentrations was 0.9.Skin incision was made after 15 min of equilibratiton.At least 7 independent crossover pairs were observed in each group.The MAC of sevoflurane was the mean of the end-tidal concentration of sevoflurane of each crossover pair,and 95 % confidence interval (CI) was calculated.Results In groups C,D1,D2 and D3,18,20,20 and 22 patients were enrolled respectively.The MAC (95 % CI) of sevoflurane was 2.5 % (2.3 %-2.8 % ),1.5 % ( 1.3 %-1.7%),1.3% (1.0%-1.6%) and 1.1% (0.7%-1.5%) in groupsC,D1,D2 and D3 respectively.The MAC of sevoflurane was significantly lower in groups D1,D2,D3 than in group C,and in groups D2 and D3 than in group D1 ( P < 0.05).There was no significant difference in the MAC of sevoflurane between groups D2 and D3 ( P >0.05).Conclusion Dexmedetomidine 0.2,0.4,0.6 μg/kg can significantly decrease the MAC of sevoflurane required to inhibit the body movement evoked by

  9. Treatment to pulmonary alveolar proteinosis with total bronchoalveolar lavage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a rare disease with variable course and characterized by the accumulation of surfactant in the alveoli. By the treatment it was used the alveolar lavage with good results. We present the experience accumulated in the Las Americas clinic of Medellin city with the treatment of three patients with diagnosis of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis by alveolar lavage. We realized seven lavages, two of them bilateral and sequential. We didn't 't have important complications and in all cases we got good clinical and physiological results. Two patients had relapsed six and seven months after the first lavage and they needed a second lavage. We conclude that the pulmonary lavage is a secure and effective procedure in the treatment of the pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and the modality of bilateral sequential lavage is a good alternative and less expensive

  10. Contemporary Approaches in the Repair of Alveolar Clefts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ufuk Tatli

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Cleft lip and palate is one of the most common craniofacial anomalies. The repair of the alveolar clefts is an important part of the treatment for patients with cleft lip and palate. The treatment concepts of alveolar bone grafting are still controversial. The corresponding controversial issues are; timing of alveolar bone grafting, graft materials, and timing of the orthodontic expansion. In the present article, aforementioned controversial issues and contemporary treatment modalities of the maxillary alveolar clefts were reviewed in the light of current literature. In conclusion, the most suitable time for alveolar bone grafting is mixed dentition period. Grafting procedure may be performed in the early or late phases of this period depending on some clinical features. Adjunct orthodontic expansion procedures should be performed before and/or after grafting depending on the patient's current features. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2014; 23(4.000: 563-574

  11. Autoantibody-Mediated Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis in Rasgrp1-Deficient Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretti, Andrew; Fortwendel, Jarrod R; Gebb, Sarah A; Barrington, Robert A

    2016-07-15

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare lung syndrome caused by the accumulation of surfactants in the alveoli. The most prevalent clinical form of PAP is autoimmune PAP (aPAP) whereby IgG autoantibodies neutralize GM-CSF. GM-CSF is a pleiotropic cytokine that promotes the differentiation, survival, and activation of alveolar macrophages, the cells responsible for surfactant degradation. IgG-mediated neutralization of GM-CSF thereby inhibits alveolar macrophage homeostasis and function, leading to surfactant accumulation and innate immunodeficiency. Importantly, there are no rodent models for this disease; therefore, underlying immune mechanisms regulating GM-CSF-specific IgG in aPAP are not well understood. In this article, we identify that autoimmune-prone Rasgrp1-deficient mice develop aPAP: 1) Rasgrp1-deficient mice exhibit reduced pulmonary compliance and lung histopathology characteristic of PAP; 2) alveolar macrophages from Rasgrp1-deficient mice are enlarged and exhibit reduced surfactant degradation; 3) the concentration of GM-CSF-specific IgG is elevated in both serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from Rasgrp1-deficient mice; 4) GM-CSF-specific IgG is capable of neutralizing GM-CSF bioactivity; and 5) Rasgrp1-deficient mice also lacking CD275/ICOSL, a molecule necessary for conventional T cell-dependent Ab production, have reduced GM-CSF-specific autoantibody and do not develop PAP. Collectively, these studies reveal that Rasgrp1-deficient mice, to our knowledge, represent the first rodent model for aPAP. PMID:27279372

  12. The localization of catalase in the pulmonary alveolar macrophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, P; Drath, D B; Engel, E E; Huber, G L

    1979-02-01

    A combined biochemical and cytochemical study of catalase was performed on alveolar macrophages lavaged from the lungs of adult male rats. Biochemically, catalase activity was present in both a high-speed granule fraction and in the supernatant. The granule-associated activity exhibited latency. Two methods of cell breakage, sonication and homogenization, yielded similar levels and distributions of catalase activity. Catalase activity in whole cells was identified cytochemically by the alkaline diaminobenzidine method and was localized within membrane-lined cytoplasmic granules similar in size to microperoxisomes and associated with cisternae of smooth endoplasmic reticulum. Localization of the reaction product was inhibited by 0.04 M aminotriazole, by cyanide, and by boiling prior to incubation. The cytochemical reaction continued in the absence of exogenous peroxide, but could be prevented by addition of catalase or pyruvate to the peroxide-free medium. Enzyme activity was also localized within a portion of the membrane-bound granules present in the cell fractions used for the biochemical assays. PMID:431040

  13. Rituximab therapy in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis improves alveolar macrophage lipid homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malur Anagha

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rationale Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis (PAP patients exhibit an acquired deficiency of biologically active granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF attributable to GM-CSF specific autoantibodies. PAP alveolar macrophages are foamy, lipid-filled cells with impaired surfactant clearance and markedly reduced expression of the transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ and the PPARγ-regulated ATP binding cassette (ABC lipid transporter, ABCG1. An open label proof of concept Phase II clinical trial was conducted in PAP patients using rituximab, a chimeric murine-human monoclonal antibody directed against B lymphocyte specific antigen CD20. Rituximab treatment decreased anti-GM-CSF antibody levels in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid, and 7/9 patients completing the trial demonstrated clinical improvement as measured by arterial blood oxygenation. Objectives This study sought to determine whether rituximab therapy would restore lipid metabolism in PAP alveolar macrophages. Methods BAL samples were collected from patients pre- and 6-months post-rituximab infusion for evaluation of mRNA and lipid changes. Results Mean PPARγ and ABCG1 mRNA expression increased 2.8 and 5.3-fold respectively (p ≤ 0.05 after treatment. Lysosomal phospholipase A2 (LPLA2 (a key enzyme in surfactant degradation mRNA expression was severely deficient in PAP patients pre-treatment but increased 2.8-fold post-treatment. In supplemental animal studies, LPLA2 deficiency was verified in GM-CSF KO mice but was not present in macrophage-specific PPARγ KO mice compared to wild-type controls. Oil Red O intensity of PAP alveolar macrophages decreased after treatment, indicating reduced intracellular lipid while extracellular free cholesterol increased in BAL fluid. Furthermore, total protein and Surfactant protein A were significantly decreased in the BAL fluid post therapy. Conclusions Reduction in GM

  14. Nitric oxide prevents alveolar senescence and emphysema in a mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda E Boe

    Full Text Available Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME treatment induces arteriosclerosis and vascular senescence. Here, we report that the systemic inhibition of nitric oxide (NO production by L-NAME causes pulmonary emphysema. L-NAME-treated lungs exhibited both the structural (alveolar tissue destruction and functional (increased compliance and reduced elastance characteristics of emphysema development. Furthermore, we found that L-NAME-induced emphysema could be attenuated through both genetic deficiency and pharmacological inhibition of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1. Because PAI-1 is an important contributor to the development of senescence both in vitro and in vivo, we investigated whether L-NAME-induced senescence led to the observed emphysematous changes. We found that L-NAME treatment was associated with molecular and cellular evidence of premature senescence in mice, and that PAI-1 inhibition attenuated these increases. These findings indicate that NO serves to protect and defend lung tissue from physiological aging.

  15. Quantitation and renewal of alveolar and bronchiolar cell populations of rat lungs. Changes during some pathological processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The various cells of alveolar and bronchiolar tissues of rat lungs were studied qualitatively and quantitatively. In physiological conditions, the renewal rate of the cell populations is low and the frequency of the various cell types is constant. This stability, especially at the level of the alveolar tissue, was also found during the latency period and the development of radiation-induced lung cancers. A particular cellular population was demonstrated: marginated leukocyte pool at the level of the pulmonary circulation. This pool was different both qualitatively and quantitatively from the leukocytes of the systemic circulation and, in physiological conditions, behaved as a cellular reservoir of monocytes chiefly re-distributed according to the body needs. In pathological conditions, its fast migration contributed to the defence of the alveolar medium. A quantitative study of the renewal of alveolar macrophages showed that under 1 p. cent of the marginated leukocyte pool is used daily to keep up this population. This fraction undergoes a maturation stage by cellular division within the endoalveolar medium. In some pathological conditions, this division can be completely inhibited

  16. Recent advances in alveolar biology: Evolution and function of alveolar proteins☆

    OpenAIRE

    Orgeig, Sandra; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Edwin J A Veldhuizen; Casals, Cristina; Clark, Howard W.; Haczku, Angela; Knudsen, Lars; Possmayer, Fred

    2010-01-01

    This review is focused on the evolution and function of alveolar proteins. The lung faces physical and environmental challenges, due to changing pressures/volumes and foreign pathogens, respectively. The pulmonary surfactant system is integral in protecting the lung from these challenges via two groups of surfactant proteins – the small molecular weight hydrophobic SPs, SP-B and -C, that regulate interfacial adsorption of the lipids, and the large hydrophilic SPs, SP-A and -D, which are surfa...

  17. Hemorragia alveolar associada a nefrite lúpica Alveolar hemorrhage associated with lupus nephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Henrique de Oliveira Braga Teixeira

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Hemorragia alveolar, como causa de insuficiência respiratória, é pouco freqüente, com diversas etiologias possíveis. Entre elas, o lúpus eritematoso sistêmico, que se apresenta geralmente como síndrome pulmão-rim, possui alta morbimortalidade. Acredita-se que a patogênese da microangiopatia, tanto renal como pulmonar, esteja associada ao depósito de imunocomplexos, que ativariam as vias de apoptose celular. Relatam-se dois casos de pacientes com nefrite lúpica que evoluíram com hemorragia alveolar associada à insuficiência respiratória necessitando de ventilação mecânica com evoluções totalmente distintas frente às terapias farmacológicas. O achado de anticorpos antimembrana basal em um dos casos evidencia a multiplicidade de mecanismos fisiopatológicos possivelmente envolvidos, que poderiam justificar as respostas heterogêneas frente aos tratamentos disponíveis.Alveolar hemorrhage leading to respiratory failure is uncommon. Various etiologies have been reported, including systemic lupus erythematosus, which generally presents as pulmonary-renal syndrome. It is believed that the pathogenesis of microangiopathy is related to deposits of immune complexes that lead to activation of cellular apoptosis. The authors report two cases of alveolar hemorrhage and respiratory failure, both requiring mechanical ventilation. The two cases had opposite outcomes after pharmacological therapy. The presence of anti-glomerular basement membrane antibodies in one of the cases demonstrates the multiplicity of physiopathological mechanisms that may be involved. This multiplicity of mechanisms provides a possible explanation for the heterogeneous responses to the available treatments.

  18. CT diagnosis of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To study the CT findings and evaluate the value of CT in the diagnosis of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM). Methods: The CT findings of 9 cases of PAM proved by lung biopsy or clinical diagnosis were retrospectively analysed. Results: On conventional CT, pulmonary window revealed widespread intraalveolar calcifications of both lungs concentrating in the subpleural parenchyma of the middle and lower lobes. The CT value of microliths ranged from 200 to 400 HU, usually combined with pulmonary emphysema and interstitial fibrosis; Mediastinal window showed linear calcifications along pleura or scattered punctate calcifications in the concentrated area of microliths looking like flame or white line in the medial border. On HRCT, pulmonary window revealed diffuse ground-glass appearance, nodules of different sizes, more microliths along the bronchovesicular bundles and thickening of lobule septa. Conclusion: CT, especially HRCT, can better demonstrate pathological features and stage of PAM, playing an important role in diagnosis and differential diagnosis

  19. Computed tomographic appearances of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated longitudinal changes in chest CT images in six cases (5 males and one female, age: 35-57 yr) of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis treated with bronchopulmonary lavage. Chest CT images on admission showed a mixed pattern of air-space consolidation and reticular or reticulonodular shadows in most cases and showed a peripheral clear zone in all cases. These shadows gradually diminished after bronchopulmonary lavage. Some cases revealed early improvement in the hilar zone while others had equal improvement in all lung lesions. In one case, consolidation was changed into reticular shadows by treatment. Previous reports have indicated that 'interstitial shadows which disappeared with lavage' reflect edematous thickening of interlobular septa. However, our longitudinal evaluation suggests that interstitial shadows on CT images may reflect not only real interstitial infiltration but also inhomogeneous distribution of intralobular deposits. (author)

  20. Computed tomographic appearances of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takiguchi, Yasuo; Uchiyama, Takashi; Nagao, Keiichi; Kuriyama, Takayuki (Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine); Fujita, Akira; Hashizume, Ikko

    1994-03-01

    We evaluated longitudinal changes in chest CT images in six cases (5 males and one female, age: 35-57 yr) of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis treated with bronchopulmonary lavage. Chest CT images on admission showed a mixed pattern of air-space consolidation and reticular or reticulonodular shadows in most cases and showed a peripheral clear zone in all cases. These shadows gradually diminished after bronchopulmonary lavage. Some cases revealed early improvement in the hilar zone while others had equal improvement in all lung lesions. In one case, consolidation was changed into reticular shadows by treatment. Previous reports have indicated that 'interstitial shadows which disappeared with lavage' reflect edematous thickening of interlobular septa. However, our longitudinal evaluation suggests that interstitial shadows on CT images may reflect not only real interstitial infiltration but also inhomogeneous distribution of intralobular deposits. (author).

  1. Epidemiology of human alveolar echinococcosis in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Philip S

    2006-01-01

    Globally human alveolar echinococcosis (AE) is a rare zoonotic helminthic disease confined to the Northern Hemisphere as sporadic infections in rural populations, principally in some areas of North America, west-central Europe, the Near East, Siberia, Central Asia, Japan and China. In China the first human cases were reported from western regions in the 1960s, but most hospital records remain fragmented and inadequate. From the mid-1990s mass screening surveys using portable ultrasound scanners recorded higher prevalences (up to 6% by county) than in any other areas of the world with some village rates as high as 15%. Risk factors identified for AE cases included ethnicity, sex, age and occupation. The role of the dog in transmission of Echinococcus multilocularis to humans now appears to be significant and may be one of the most important risk factor, in combination with landscape/land-use features conducive to maintaining wildlife host populations. PMID:16338167

  2. Imaging features of alveolar soft part sarcoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Teng Jin; Ping Zhang Co-first author; Xiaoming Li

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to analyze the imaging features of alveolar soft part sarcoma (ASPS). Methods The imaging features of 11 cases with ASPS were retrospectively analyzed. Results ASPS mainly exhibited an isointense or slightly high signal intensity on T1-weighted imaging (T1WI), and a mixed high signal on T2-weighted imaging (T2WI). ASPS was partial, with rich tortuous flow voids, or “line-like” low signal septa. The essence of the mass was heterogeneous enhancement. The 1H-MRS showed a slight choline peak at 3.2 ppm. Conclusion The wel-circumscribed mass and blood voids, combined with “line-like” low signals play a significant role in diagnosis. The choline peak and the other signs may be auxiliary diagnoses.

  3. [Distraction osteogenesis of deficient alveolar bone prior to dental rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilo, D; Emodi, O; Aizenbud, D; Rachmiel, A

    2015-07-01

    Implant supported rehabilitation has become very common in treatment plans nowadays, yet many patients lack the vertical and horizontal bone dimensions required for endosseous implant insertion. Distraction osteogenesis is a technique in which bone is generated by progressive elongation of two bone fragments following an osteotomy or corticotomy. Distraction osteogenesis of the alveolar ridge as a treatment modality in implant dentistry is a very useful technique that allows for adequate bone formation suitable for implant insertion. Alveolar distraction can be unidirectional, bidirectional, multidirectional or horizontal. Alveolar distraction osteogenesis can be performed by using intraosseous distraction devices, intraosseous distraction implants or by extraosseous devices which are the most prevalent today. Distraction osteogenesis has many advantages such as gradual lengthening of the bone with no need for an autogenous bone graft and lack of the associated donor site morbidity as well as distraction of the surrounding soft tissue together with the transported bone. One of the major challenges when using alveolar distraction osteogenesis is controlling the vector of distraction, this problem should be further addressed in future researches. We describe different methods for alveolar distraction osteogenesis, including the surgical procedure, latency period, lengthening and consolidation period. We also discuss the advantages, disadvantages and complications of the method. In this manuscript a case of mandibular alveolar deficiency following mandibular fracture and loss of teeth and the alveolar bone is presented. This patient was treated by alveolar distraction osteogenesis with excellent results. This patient was later rehabilitated . using endosseous implants as demonstrated by radiographs. Alveolar distraction osteogenesis provides a method to regain both hard tissue and soft tissue without additional grafting and is an efficient modality in cases of medium

  4. Upper Alveolar Ridge in Edentulous Patients and Caldwell Luc Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Ashok Murthy, V.; Mahendra Kumar, R.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to understand the upper alveolar ridge changes and its impact on Caldwell Luc surgery, in a patient papulation from a Medical College Hospital. We undertook a study to measure the thickness of upper alveolar ridge in edentulous and edentulous patients, to know the difference between the two and its effects on Caldwell Luc surgery. The finding of the study led us to conclude that the upper alveolar ridge is quite thin in edentulous patients and requires care while scra...

  5. Crazy paving radiography finding in asymptomatic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young Rak; Chang, You-Jin; Kim, Si Wook; Choe, Kang Hyeon; Lee, Ki Man; An, Jin-Young

    2015-06-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a rare disorder characterized by alveolar accumulation of surfactant phospholipids and protein components. The symptoms and prognosis are extremely variable. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and/or transbronchial lung biopsy are useful for diagnosis; surgical lung biopsy is often unnecessary but useful in the focal involvement. We report a case of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis in a 50-year-old woman, confirmed by a video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery biopsy from the initial focal involvement, with normal bronchoalveolar lavage and transbronchial lung biopsy findings. PMID:25182335

  6. Depletion of resident alveolar macrophages does not prevent Fas-mediated lung injury in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Bem, R. A.; Farnand, A. W.; Wong, V; Koski, A; Rosenfeld, M. E.; Van Rooijen, N.; C. W. Frevert; Martin, T R; Matute-Bello, G.

    2008-01-01

    Activation of the Fas/Fas ligand (FasL) system in the lungs results in a form of injury characterized by alveolar epithelial apoptosis and neutrophilic inflammation. Studies in vitro show that Fas activation induces apoptosis in alveolar epithelial cells and cytokine production in alveolar macrophages. The main goal of this study was to determine the contribution of alveolar macrophages to Fas-induced lung inflammation in mice, by depleting alveolar macrophages using clodronate-containing lip...

  7. CFTR is required for maximal transepithelial liquid transport in pig alveolar epithelia

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xiaopeng; Comellas, Alejandro P.; Karp, Philip H.; Ernst, Sarah E.; Moninger, Thomas O.; Gansemer, Nicholas D.; Taft, Peter J.; Pezzulo, Alejandro A; Michael V Rector; Rossen, Nathan; Stoltz, David A.; McCray, Paul B.; Welsh, Michael J.; Zabner, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    A balance between alveolar liquid absorption and secretion is critical for maintaining optimal alveolar subphase liquid height and facilitating gas exchange in the alveolar space. However, the role of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator protein (CFTR) in this homeostatic process has remained elusive. Using a newly developed porcine model of cystic fibrosis, in which CFTR is absent, we investigated ion transport properties and alveolar liquid transport in isolated type II alveolar epitheli...

  8. Autoimmune pulmonary alveolar proteinosis co-existing with breast cancer: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Sawai, Toyomitsu; Umeyama, Yasuhiro; Yoshioka, Sumako; Matsuo, Nobuko; Suyama, Naofumi; Kohno, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a rare pulmonary disease characterized by excessive alveolar accumulation of surfactant due to defective alveolar clearance by macrophages. There are only a few published case reports of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis occurring in association with solid cancers. To the best of our knowledge, there are no previously reported cases of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis associated with breast cancer. Case presentation A 48-year-old Asian woman, a nonsmo...

  9. The role of synthetic biomaterials in resorptive alveolar bone regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaličanin Biljana M.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The alveolar bone tissue resorption defect has a significant role in dentistry. Because of the bone tissue deficit developed by alveolar resorption, the use of synthetic material CP/PLGA (calcium-phosphate/polylactide-co-gliycolide composite was introduced. Investigations were performed on rats with artificially produced resorption of the mandibular bone. The results show that the best effect on alveolar bone were attained by using nano-composite implants. The effect of the nanocomposite was ascertained by determining the calcium and phosphate content, as a basis of the hydroxyapatite structure. The results show that synthetic CP/PLGA nanocomposite alleviate the rehabilitation of weakened alveolar bone. Due to its osteoconductive effect, CP/PLGA can be the material of choice for bone substitution in the future.

  10. Alveolar proteinosis lung lavage using partial cardiopulmonary bypass.

    OpenAIRE

    Freedman, A P; Pelias, A; Johnston, R F; Goel, I P; Hakki, H I; Oslick, T; Shinnick, J P

    1981-01-01

    An adult case of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis presented with an arterial oxygen tension of 27 mmHg (3.6 kPa) while breathing air. Dangerous hypoxaemia during lung lavage was avoided by using partial cardiopulmonary bypass.

  11. Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis: A Rare Cause of Respiratory Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir, Zeeshan; Khosa, Muhammad Zeeshan; Qazi, Muhammad Yaqoob

    2015-07-01

    Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis (PAP) is a rare syndrome in the paediatric age group and characterized by intra-alveolar accumulation of proteinaceous phospholipid-laden material called surfactant. The diagnosis is made by High Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) chest which shows characteristic crazy paving appearance and diagnosis confirmed by Bronchoalveolar Lavage (BAL). We report two cases. First was a 9-month old infant who presented with respiratory distress and peripheral cyanosis since birth. He was diagnosed on High Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) chest as a case of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and broncho-alveolar lavage confirmed his diagnosis. Second case was a 10-year old female child who had a history of repeated chest infections for 5 years and now presented with cough and respiratory distress for 45 days. She was also diagnosed on HRCT chest but unfortunately she died before bronchoalveolar lavage. PMID:26208564

  12. Alveolar proteinosis in Behçet's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetikkurt Cuneyt

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A 51-year-old man with Behçet's disease complained of fever, dry cough and dyspnea during exertion. Chest CT showed ground glass opacities with interstitial septal thickening in both lungs. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL revealed amorphous and lipoproteinaceous material that was periodic acid-Schiff (PAS stain positive. Transbronchial biopsy specimen demonstrated PAS positive alveolar eosinophilic material consistent with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Serum anti-granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF antibody was negative. Recent studies have reported anti-GMCSF not present in the the serum of patients with secondary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP but they have not reported so in patients with idiopathic PAP. We report a case of alveolar proteinosis in the setting of Behçet's disease with spontaneous remission.

  13. Alveolar lymphangioma in infants: report of two cases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    FitzGerald, Kirsten

    2009-06-01

    The alveolar lymphangioma is a benign but relatively rare condition found only in the oral cavities of black infants. Dentists practising in Ireland may be unaware of this condition due to its racial specificity. This paper presents two case reports of multiple alveolar lymphangiomas found in black infants in a children\\'s hospital in Ireland. The epidemiology, aetiology, clinical presentation, histology, and management options are discussed. The photographs should aid the practitioner in recognising these lesions.

  14. Dynamics of surfactant release in alveolar type II cells

    OpenAIRE

    Haller, Thomas; Ortmayr, Jörg; Friedrich, Franz; Völkl, Harald; Dietl, Paul

    1998-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant, secreted via exocytosis of lamellar bodies (LB) by alveolar type II (AT II) cells, maintains low alveolar surface tension and is therefore essential for normal lung function. Here we describe real-time monitoring of exocytotic activity in these cells by visualizing and quantifying LB fusion with the plasma membrane (PM). Two approaches were used. First, fluorescence of LysoTracker Green DND-26 (LTG) in LB disappeared when the dye was released after exocytosis. Second, ph...

  15. Identification of a cell membrane protein that binds alveolar surfactant.

    OpenAIRE

    Strayer, D. S.

    1991-01-01

    Alveolar surfactants are complex mixtures of proteins and phospholipids produced by type II alveolar cells and responsible for lowering pulmonary surface tension. The process by which surfactant is produced and exported and by which its production by pulmonary cells is regulated are not well understood. This study was designed to identify a cellular receptor for surfactant constituents. To do so, monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies directed against antibodies to porcine and rabbit surfactant...

  16. Is alveolar cleft reconstruction still controversial? (Review of literature)

    OpenAIRE

    Seifeldin, Sameh A.

    2015-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate (CL/P) is a frequent congenital malformation that manifests in several varieties including unilateral or bilateral and complete or incomplete. Alveolar cleft reconstruction remains controversial with regard to timing, graft materials, surgical techniques, and methods of evaluation. Many studies have been conducted addressing these points to develop an acceptable universal protocol for managing CL/P. The primary goal of alveolar cleft reconstruction in CL/P patients is to ...

  17. Familial occurrence of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis in 3-siblings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) is a rare disease of unknown etiology characterized by intra-alveolar calcium deposits. More than 500 cases were reported in the literature. The disorder affects people at every age beginning from the early childhood. It occurs probably as a result of autosomal recessive transmission. Familial occurrence is often found with family history of the disease being present in up to 50% of the reported cases. We report PAM in 3 siblings. (author)

  18. Alveolar lymphangioma in infants: report of two cases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    FitzGerald, Kirsten

    2012-02-01

    The alveolar lymphangioma is a benign but relatively rare condition found only in the oral cavities of black infants. Dentists practising in Ireland may be unaware of this condition due to its racial specificity. This paper presents two case reports of multiple alveolar lymphangiomas found in black infants in a children\\'s hospital in Ireland. The epidemiology, aetiology, clinical presentation, histology, and management options are discussed. The photographs should aid the practitioner in recognising these lesions.

  19. Alveolar proteinosis in Behçet's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tetikkurt Cuneyt; Tetikkurt Seza; Ozdemir Imran; Zuhur Cigdem; Bayar Nihal

    2010-01-01

    Abstract A 51-year-old man with Behçet's disease complained of fever, dry cough and dyspnea during exertion. Chest CT showed ground glass opacities with interstitial septal thickening in both lungs. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) revealed amorphous and lipoproteinaceous material that was periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) stain positive. Transbronchial biopsy specimen demonstrated PAS positive alveolar eosinophilic material consistent with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Serum anti-granulocyte-macropha...

  20. Anaesthetic management of bilateral alveolar proteinosis for bronchopulmonary lavage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dixit R

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The most hazardous manifestation of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is progressive hypoxia for which bronchopulmonary lavage (BPL is the single most effective treatment. Unfortunately this procedure under general anesthesia itself increases the risk of hypoxia due to the need for one lung ventilation. It was therefore considered interesting to report the successful anaesthetic management of a patient with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis for Bronchopulmonary lavage.

  1. Alveolar proteinosis and nocardiosis: a patient treated by bronchopulmonary lavage.

    OpenAIRE

    Pascual, J.; Gómez Aguinaga, M. A.; Vidal, R; Maudes, A.; Sureda, A.; Gómez Mampaso, E.; Fogué, L.

    1989-01-01

    Alveolar proteinosis is a relatively rare disease of unclear pathogenesis associated with opportunistic-infections. Although nocardiosis is the most frequent one, only 22 cases have been reported previously and are reviewed here. We present a patient with alveolar proteinosis with nocardiosis treated as an emergency with bilateral bronchopulmonary lavage and antibiotics. No previous cases of this association have been successfully managed in this way.

  2. Alveolar ridge augmentation by osteoinductive materials in goats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, E M; Haanaes, H R; Roervik, M;

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether alveolar ridge augmentation could be induced in goats. In 12 male goats allogenic, demineralized, and lyophilized dentin or bone was implanted subperiosteally on the buccal sides of the natural edentulous regions of the alveolar process of...... of the mandible. Light microscopic evaluation revealed fibrous encapsulation, a few multinuclear giant cells, little inflammatory reaction, and no osteoinduction. It was concluded that no osteoinduction took place in goats....

  3. Spontaneous monokine release by alveolar macrophages in chronic sarcoidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Strausz, J; Männel, Daniela N.; S. Pfeifer; A. Borkowski; Ferlinz, R.; Müller-Quernheim, J.

    1991-01-01

    In pulmonary sarcoidosis an activation of alveolar T lymphocytes and alveolar macrophages (AM) has been demonstrated. There is evidence that in contrast to acute disease a heightened T-cell response cannot be observed in the chronic phase of sarcoidosis. The role of AM in the inflammatory process of chronic sarcoidosis is not yet intensively evaluated. To address this question we measured the release of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) by AM of 39 patients with...

  4. Horizontal alveolar bone loss: A periodontal orphan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayakumar A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Attempts to successfully regenerate lost alveolar bone have always been a clinician′s dream. Angular defects, at least, have a fairer chance, but the same cannot be said about horizontal bone loss. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of horizontal alveolar bone loss and vertical bone defects in periodontal patients; and later, to correlate it with the treatment modalities available in the literature for horizontal and vertical bone defects. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in two parts. Part I was the radiographic evaluation of 150 orthopantomographs (OPGs (of patients diagnosed with chronic periodontitis and seeking periodontal care, which were digitized and read using the AutoCAD 2006 software. All the periodontitis-affected teeth were categorized as teeth with vertical defects (if the defect angle was ≤45° and defect depth was ≥3 mm or as having horizontal bone loss. Part II of the study comprised search of the literature on treatment modalities for horizontal and vertical bone loss in four selected periodontal journals. Results: Out of the 150 OPGs studied, 54 (36% OPGs showed one or more vertical defects. Totally, 3,371 teeth were studied, out of which horizontal bone loss was found in 3,107 (92.2% teeth, and vertical defects were found only in 264 (7.8% of the teeth, which was statistically significant (P<.001. Search of the selected journals revealed 477 papers have addressed the treatment modalities for vertical and horizontal types of bone loss specifically. Out of the 477 papers, 461 (96.3% have addressed vertical bone loss, and 18 (3.7% have addressed treatment options for horizontal bone loss. Two papers have addressed both types of bone loss and are included in both categories. Conclusion: Horizontal bone loss is more prevalent than vertical bone loss but has been sidelined by researchers as very few papers have been published on the subject of regenerative treatment

  5. Experimental radiation pneumonitis: changes in physiology of the alveolar surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mice received 2400 rads in two fractions to the thorax; 4 months later at a time when deaths began, mechanical and biochemical properties of the lungs were studied and compared to those of littermate controls. The principal mechanical change was a large increase in the elastance of the alveolar surface element and abnormal surface tension properties of the AF. Alveolar fluid phospholipid content and saturation were only minimally changed; however the alveolar fluid contained a large excess of protein, possible of circulatory origin. The latter may explain the fall in compliance of the alveolar surface and hence of the lung in radiation pneumoritis. A small increase in elastance of the lung tissue element was also found; this correlated with a decrease in lung volume and a small increase in lung hydroxyproline content. These changes may signify the early development of radiation fibrosis. Other features of this model are the frequent occurrence of pleural effusions and the presence of increased numbers of alveolar macrophages in the alveolar lavage

  6. Inhibitory effects of French pine bark extract, Pycnogenol®, on alveolar bone resorption and on the osteoclast differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Hideki; Watanabe, Kiyoko; Toyama, Toshizo; Takahashi, Shun-suke; Sugiyama, Shuta; Lee, Masaichi-Chang-il; Hamada, Nobushiro

    2015-02-01

    Pycnogenol(®) (PYC) is a standardized bark extract from French maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Aiton). We examined the inhibitory effects of PYC on alveolar bone resorption, which is a characteristic feature of periodontitis, induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) and osteoclast differentiation. In rat periodontitis model, rats were divided into four groups: group A served as the non-infected control, group B was infected orally with P. gingivalis ATCC 33277, group C was administered PYC in the diet (0.025%: w/w), and group D was infected with P. gingivalis and administered PYC. Administration of PYC along with P. gingivalis infection significantly reduced alveolar bone resorption. Treatment of P. gingivalis with 1 µg/ml PYC reduced the number of viable bacterial cells. Addition of PYC to epithelial cells inhibited adhesion and invasion by P. gingivalis. The effect of PYC on osteoclast formation was confirmed by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. PYC treatment significantly inhibited osteoclast formation. Addition of PYC (1-100 µg/ml) to purified osteoclasts culture induced cell apoptosis. These results suggest that PYC may prevent alveolar bone resorption through its antibacterial activity against P. gingivalis and by suppressing osteoclastogenesis. Therefore, PYC may be useful as a therapeutic and preventative agent for bone diseases such as periodontitis.

  7. Inhibitory effects of French pine bark extract, Pycnogenol®, on alveolar bone resorption and on the osteoclast differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Hideki; Watanabe, Kiyoko; Toyama, Toshizo; Takahashi, Shun-suke; Sugiyama, Shuta; Lee, Masaichi-Chang-il; Hamada, Nobushiro

    2015-02-01

    Pycnogenol(®) (PYC) is a standardized bark extract from French maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Aiton). We examined the inhibitory effects of PYC on alveolar bone resorption, which is a characteristic feature of periodontitis, induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) and osteoclast differentiation. In rat periodontitis model, rats were divided into four groups: group A served as the non-infected control, group B was infected orally with P. gingivalis ATCC 33277, group C was administered PYC in the diet (0.025%: w/w), and group D was infected with P. gingivalis and administered PYC. Administration of PYC along with P. gingivalis infection significantly reduced alveolar bone resorption. Treatment of P. gingivalis with 1 µg/ml PYC reduced the number of viable bacterial cells. Addition of PYC to epithelial cells inhibited adhesion and invasion by P. gingivalis. The effect of PYC on osteoclast formation was confirmed by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. PYC treatment significantly inhibited osteoclast formation. Addition of PYC (1-100 µg/ml) to purified osteoclasts culture induced cell apoptosis. These results suggest that PYC may prevent alveolar bone resorption through its antibacterial activity against P. gingivalis and by suppressing osteoclastogenesis. Therefore, PYC may be useful as a therapeutic and preventative agent for bone diseases such as periodontitis. PMID:25336411

  8. Bayesian inference of the lung alveolar spatial model for the identification of alveolar mechanics associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christley, Scott; Emr, Bryanna; Ghosh, Auyon; Satalin, Josh; Gatto, Louis; Vodovotz, Yoram; Nieman, Gary F.; An, Gary

    2013-06-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is acute lung failure secondary to severe systemic inflammation, resulting in a derangement of alveolar mechanics (i.e. the dynamic change in alveolar size and shape during tidal ventilation), leading to alveolar instability that can cause further damage to the pulmonary parenchyma. Mechanical ventilation is a mainstay in the treatment of ARDS, but may induce mechano-physical stresses on unstable alveoli, which can paradoxically propagate the cellular and molecular processes exacerbating ARDS pathology. This phenomenon is called ventilator induced lung injury (VILI), and plays a significant role in morbidity and mortality associated with ARDS. In order to identify optimal ventilation strategies to limit VILI and treat ARDS, it is necessary to understand the complex interplay between biological and physical mechanisms of VILI, first at the alveolar level, and then in aggregate at the whole-lung level. Since there is no current consensus about the underlying dynamics of alveolar mechanics, as an initial step we investigate the ventilatory dynamics of an alveolar sac (AS) with the lung alveolar spatial model (LASM), a 3D spatial biomechanical representation of the AS and its interaction with airflow pressure and the surface tension effects of pulmonary surfactant. We use the LASM to identify the mechanical ramifications of alveolar dynamics associated with ARDS. Using graphical processing unit parallel algorithms, we perform Bayesian inference on the model parameters using experimental data from rat lung under control and Tween-induced ARDS conditions. Our results provide two plausible models that recapitulate two fundamental hypotheses about volume change at the alveolar level: (1) increase in alveolar size through isotropic volume change, or (2) minimal change in AS radius with primary expansion of the mouth of the AS, with the implication that the majority of change in lung volume during the respiratory cycle occurs in the

  9. Bayesian inference of the lung alveolar spatial model for the identification of alveolar mechanics associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is acute lung failure secondary to severe systemic inflammation, resulting in a derangement of alveolar mechanics (i.e. the dynamic change in alveolar size and shape during tidal ventilation), leading to alveolar instability that can cause further damage to the pulmonary parenchyma. Mechanical ventilation is a mainstay in the treatment of ARDS, but may induce mechano-physical stresses on unstable alveoli, which can paradoxically propagate the cellular and molecular processes exacerbating ARDS pathology. This phenomenon is called ventilator induced lung injury (VILI), and plays a significant role in morbidity and mortality associated with ARDS. In order to identify optimal ventilation strategies to limit VILI and treat ARDS, it is necessary to understand the complex interplay between biological and physical mechanisms of VILI, first at the alveolar level, and then in aggregate at the whole-lung level. Since there is no current consensus about the underlying dynamics of alveolar mechanics, as an initial step we investigate the ventilatory dynamics of an alveolar sac (AS) with the lung alveolar spatial model (LASM), a 3D spatial biomechanical representation of the AS and its interaction with airflow pressure and the surface tension effects of pulmonary surfactant. We use the LASM to identify the mechanical ramifications of alveolar dynamics associated with ARDS. Using graphical processing unit parallel algorithms, we perform Bayesian inference on the model parameters using experimental data from rat lung under control and Tween-induced ARDS conditions. Our results provide two plausible models that recapitulate two fundamental hypotheses about volume change at the alveolar level: (1) increase in alveolar size through isotropic volume change, or (2) minimal change in AS radius with primary expansion of the mouth of the AS, with the implication that the majority of change in lung volume during the respiratory cycle occurs in the

  10. Cardiovascular risk in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manali, Effrosyni D; Papadaki, Georgia; Konstantonis, Dimitrios; Tsangaris, Iraklis; Papaioannou, Andriana I; Kolilekas, Likurgos; Schams, Andrea; Kagouridis, Konstantinos; Karakatsani, Anna; Orfanos, Stylianos; Griese, Matthias; Papiris, Spyros A

    2016-02-01

    We hypothesized that cardiovascular events and/or indices of cardiac dysfunction may be increased in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP). Systemic and pulmonary arterial hypertension, arrhythmias, pulmonary embolism, stroke and ischemic heart attack were reported. Patients underwent serum anti-GM-CSF antibodies, disease severity score (DSS), Doppler transthoracic echocardiograph, glucose, thyroid hormones, lipids, troponin and pro-Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) examination. Thirteen patients (8 female) were studied, median age of 47. Pro-BNP inversely related to DLCO% and TLC%; troponin directly related to DSS, age, P(A-a)O2, left atrium-, left ventricle-end-diastole diameter and BMI. On multiple regression analysis DSS was the only parameter significantly and strongly related with troponin (R(2) = 0.776, p = 0.007). No cardiovascular event was reported during follow-up. In PAP cardiovascular risk indices relate to lung disease severity. Therefore, PAP patients could be at increased risk for cardiovascular events. Quantitation of its magnitude and potential links to lungs' physiologic derangement will be addressed in future studies. PMID:26558331

  11. Inhaled unfractionated heparin improves abnormalities of alveolar coagulation, fibrinolysis and inflammation in endotoxemia-induced lung injury rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zong-yu; WU Sheng-nan; ZHU Zhao-zhong; YANG Ba-xian; ZHU Xi

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome presents with not only local inflammation,but also pulmonary coagulopathy which is characterized by an alveolar procoagulant response,anticoagulant inhibition,fibrinolytic supression and fibrin deposition.We thus had hypothesized that if aerosolized unfractionated heparin was inhaled into alveolar spaces,it could block the procoagulant tendency,lessen depletion of coagulation factors,and even influence the inflammatory response.We also assessed the effects of different administration regimens of heparin.Methods Male Wistar rats were given inhaled heparin starting 30 minutes before (prophylactic heparin) or 2 hours after (therapeutic heparin) intravenous lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was administered at 6-hour intervals; control groups received inhaled normal saline with or without being exposed to LPS.Thrombin-antithrombin complexes,activated protein C,tissue type and urokinase type plasminogen activators (t-PNu-PA),plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAl-1),tumor necrosis factor-α,interleukin-6 in bronchoalveolar lavage,and lung tissue myeloperoxidase activity,and histology score were measured at three time-points.PAI-1/(t-PA + u-PA) was calculated based on the before-mentioned parameters.Statistical analysis was made using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with post hoc test or Student's t test in the case of heterogeneity of variance.Results An alveolar procoagulant reaction,depressed fibrinolysis,and inflammatory response occurred in endotoxemia-induced lung injury.Local prophylactic application of heparin attenuated coagulation and early inflammation,promoted fibrinolysis,and reduced the histology score.Therapeutic application of heparin had similar,but weaker effects.Conclusions Intrapulmonary application of unfractionated heparin by inhalation might inhibit alveolar procoagulant reaction and the early inflammatory response,promote flbrinolysis,and alleviate pulmonary pathology in endotoxemia

  12. Effects of smoking on edentulous alveolar ridge mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Dubravka

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Tobacco use is an important risk factor for advanced histopathological findings on edentulous alveolar ridge mucosa. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of smoking on histopathological findings on edentulous alveolar ridge mucosa. Material and methods The experimental group consisted of 48 patients (29 smokers and 19 nonsmokers. The mean age of smokers was 42.6 and of nonsmokers 48.7 years. The anamnesis included the following data: age, sex, diseases and toxic habits-cigarette smoking. Biopsy samples were taken from the edentulous alveolar ridge mucosa without gross signs of symptoms. Results The mean number of cigarettes smoked per day was 11.5±7. The results of χ² test proved that there were no statistically significant differences (p>0.05 in histopathological findings on the alveolar ridge mucosa. The mean duration of smoking was 12.7± 5 years. Hyperkeratosis was established in 76.92% of smokers who smoked longer than 15 years. The mean-age at which smokers began smoking was 27.3±8 years and there were no statistically significant differences in histopathological findings on the alveolar ridge mucosa correlated with the beginning of smoking. Conclusion On the basis of our research we conclude that smokers who have been smoking for 15 years are at risk for developing histopathological changes of the alveolar ridge mucosa, but there were no statistically significant differences in histopathological findings on the alveolar ridge mucosa correlated with the number of cigarettes per day and the beginning of smoking. .

  13. Partial pulmonary embolization disrupts alveolarization in fetal sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooper Stuart B

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although bronchopulmonary dysplasia is closely associated with an arrest of alveolar development and pulmonary capillary dysplasia, it is unknown whether these two features are causally related. To investigate the relationship between pulmonary capillaries and alveolar formation, we partially embolized the pulmonary capillary bed. Methods Partial pulmonary embolization (PPE was induced in chronically catheterized fetal sheep by injection of microspheres into the left pulmonary artery for 1 day (1d PPE; 115d gestational age; GA or 5 days (5d PPE; 110-115d GA. Control fetuses received vehicle injections. Lung morphology, secondary septal crests, elastin, collagen, myofibroblast, PECAM1 and HIF1α abundance and localization were determined histologically. VEGF-A, Flk-1, PDGF-A and PDGF-Rα mRNA levels were measured using real-time PCR. Results At 130d GA (term ~147d, in embolized regions of the lung the percentage of lung occupied by tissue was increased from 29 ± 1% in controls to 35 ± 1% in 1d PPE and 44 ± 1% in 5d PPE fetuses (p VEGF and Flk-1, although a small increase in PDGF-Rα expression at 116d GA, from 1.00 ± 0.12 in control fetuses to 1.61 ± 0.18 in 5d PPE fetuses may account for impaired differentiation of alveolar myofibroblasts and alveolar development. Conclusions PPE impairs alveolarization without adverse systemic effects and is a novel model for investigating the role of pulmonary capillaries and alveolar myofibroblasts in alveolar formation.

  14. Proteinose alveolar pulmonar: série de quatro casos Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: four cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Carlos Thompson

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Apresentar a evolução de quatro casos de proteinose alveolar pulmonar atendidos na Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade Estadual de Londrina, enfocando a importância da lavagem pulmonar total como tratamento de escolha. MÉTODOS: Trata-se de um estudo retrospectivo de quatro pacientes, sendo três do gênero feminino, com idades de 22 a 34 anos, e histórias semelhantes de dispnéia progressiva e tosse seca. O diagnóstico final foi realizado por biópsia pulmonar a céu aberto. A lavagem pulmonar total foi realizada em três pacientes em centro cirúrgico, com anestesia geral e sonda de duplo lúme. RESULTADOS: Um paciente apresentou regressão espontânea da proteinose alveolar pulmonar, não sendo necessária a lavagem pulmonar. Nos outros três casos, o número de lavagens variou: uma única lavagem unilateral com remissão completa do quadro bilateralmente, três lavagens sem melhora significativa e quatro procedimentos intercalados com períodos de melhora. CONCLUSÃO: Constatamos em nossa casuística que a lavagem pulmonar se mostrou eficiente, apesar de alguns pacientes apresentarem certa resistência ao procedimento, enquanto que outros podem ter remissão completa da doença.OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to present the evolution of four patients presenting pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and treated at the State University of Londrina School of Medicine. We focus on the importance of whole-lung lavage as the treatment of choice. METHODS: A retrospective study of four patients, three females and one male, 22 to 34 years old, presenting similar histories of progressive dyspnea and dry cough. The final diagnosis was established through open-lung biopsy. Three of the patients underwent whole-lung lavage in the Department of Surgery. The procedures were performed under general anesthesia and using a double-lumen endotracheal tube. RESULTS: One patient presented spontaneous regression of the pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

  15. Hydrogen sulfide donor regulates alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis in rats with acute lung injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wen-li; LIU Zhi-wei; LI Tian-shui; WANG Cong; ZHAO Bin

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute lung injury (ALl) is a common syndrome associated with high morbidity and mortality in emergency medicine.Cell apoptosis plays a key role in the pathogenesis of ALl.Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) plays a protective role during acute lung injury.We designed this study to examine the role of H2S in the lung alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis in rats with ALl.Methods Sixty-nine male Sprague Dawley rats were used.ALl was induced by intra-tail vein injection of oleic acid (OA).NaHS solution was injected intraperitonally 30 minutes before OA injection as the NaHS pretreatment group.Single sodium hydrosulfide pretreatment group and control group were designed.Index of quantitative assessment (IQA),wet/dry weight (W/D) ratio and the percentage of polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were determined.H2S level in lung tissue was measured by a sensitive sulphur electrode.Apoptosis was evaluated by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining and Fas protein was measured by immunohistochemical staining.Results The level of endogenous H2S in lung tissue decreased with the development of ALl induced by OA injection.Apoptosis and Fas protein in alveolar epithelial cells increased in the ALl of rats but NaHS lessened apoptosis and Fas protein expression in alveolar epithelial cells of rats with ALl.Conclusion Endogenous H2S protects rats from oleic acid-induced ALl,probably by inhibiting cell apoptosis.

  16. Chronic Alcohol Ingestion in Rats Alters Lung Metabolism, Promotes Lipid Accumulation, and Impairs Alveolar Macrophage Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Freddy; Shah, Dilip; Duong, Michelle; Stafstrom, William; Hoek, Jan B.; Kallen, Caleb B.; Lang, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic alcoholism impairs pulmonary immune homeostasis and predisposes to inflammatory lung diseases, including infectious pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Although alcoholism has been shown to alter hepatic metabolism, leading to lipid accumulation, hepatitis, and, eventually, cirrhosis, the effects of alcohol on pulmonary metabolism remain largely unknown. Because both the lung and the liver actively engage in lipid synthesis, we hypothesized that chronic alcoholism would impair pulmonary metabolic homeostasis in ways similar to its effects in the liver. We reasoned that perturbations in lipid metabolism might contribute to the impaired pulmonary immunity observed in people who chronically consume alcohol. We studied the metabolic consequences of chronic alcohol consumption in rat lungs in vivo and in alveolar epithelial type II cells and alveolar macrophages (AMs) in vitro. We found that chronic alcohol ingestion significantly alters lung metabolic homeostasis, inhibiting AMP-activated protein kinase, increasing lipid synthesis, and suppressing the expression of genes essential to metabolizing fatty acids (FAs). Furthermore, we show that these metabolic alterations promoted a lung phenotype that is reminiscent of alcoholic fatty liver and is characterized by marked accumulation of triglycerides and free FAs within distal airspaces, AMs, and, to a lesser extent, alveolar epithelial type II cells. We provide evidence that the metabolic alterations in alcohol-exposed rats are mechanistically linked to immune impairments in the alcoholic lung: the elevations in FAs alter AM phenotypes and suppress both phagocytic functions and agonist-induced inflammatory responses. In summary, our work demonstrates that chronic alcohol ingestion impairs lung metabolic homeostasis and promotes pulmonary immune dysfunction. These findings suggest that therapies aimed at reversing alcohol-related metabolic alterations might be effective for preventing and

  17. Degradation of pulmonary surfactant disaturated phosphatidylcholines by alveolar macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments were performed to determine whether rat pulmonary surfactant disaturated phosphatidylcholines (DSPC) are degraded by alveolar macrophages in vitro. When [3H]choline-labeled surfactant materials are incubated with unlabeled alveolar macrophages, approximately 40% of the labeled DSPC is broken down in 6 h. There is just a slight decrease in the specific activity of DSPC, which suggests that most products of degradation are not reincorporated into DSPC, at least during the 6-h incubation period. There is a time- and temperature-dependent association of surfactant DSPC with alveolar macrophages, and some of the cell-associated materials are released from the cell fragments after sonication. Association of surfactant with the cells precedes degradation. The breakdown of surfactant DSPC by intact alveolar macrophages lags behind that produced by sonicated cell preparations with disrupted cell membranes. These data and other information suggest that the surfactant materials are internalized by the cells, before the breakdown. The products of degradation probably include free choline and fatty acids, most of which appear in the extracellular fluid. The breakdown processes do not seem to depend on the physical form of the surfactant or on the presence of surfactant apoproteins. Incubation of the cells alone also results in disappearance of intracellular DSPC, some of which may be surfactant phospholipid taken up by the cells in vivo. These results indicate that alveolar macrophages can degrade surfactant DSPC and suggest that these cells may be involved in catabolism of pulmonary surfactant materials

  18. The effect of exogenous surfactant on alveolar interdependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salito, Caterina; Aliverti, Andrea; Mazzuca, Enrico; Rivolta, Ilaria; Miserocchi, Giuseppe

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the nature of alveolar mechanical interdependence, we purposefully disturbed the equilibrium condition by administering exogenous surfactant in physiological non-surfactant deprived conditions. Changes in alveolar morphology induced by intra-tracheal delivery of CUROSURF were evaluated after opening a pleural window allowing in-vivo microscopic imaging of sub-pleural alveoli in 6 male anesthetized, tracheotomized and mechanically ventilated rabbits. Surfactant instillation increased the surface area of alveoli smaller than 20,000 μm(2) up to ∼ 50% at 15 min after instillation, reflecting a lowering of surface tension due to local surfactant enrichment. Conversely, for alveoli greater than 20,000 μm(2), surface area decreased by ∼ 5%. Opposite changes in alveolar surface are interpreted as reflecting a new inter-alveolar mechanical equilibrium modified by local surfactant distribution and by a decrease in lung distending pressure. We propose that smaller alveoli, representing the majority of alveolar population, might mostly contribute to improve the oxygenation index following surfactant replacement therapy in case of surfactant deficiency. PMID:25600053

  19. Is alveolar cleft reconstruction still controversial? (Review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameh A. Seifeldin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cleft lip and palate (CL/P is a frequent congenital malformation that manifests in several varieties including unilateral or bilateral and complete or incomplete. Alveolar cleft reconstruction remains controversial with regard to timing, graft materials, surgical techniques, and methods of evaluation. Many studies have been conducted addressing these points to develop an acceptable universal protocol for managing CL/P. The primary goal of alveolar cleft reconstruction in CL/P patients is to provide a bony bridge at the cleft site that allows maxillary arch continuity, oronasal fistula repair, eruption of the permanent dentition into the newly formed bone, enhances nasal symmetry through providing alar base support, orthodontic movement and placement of osseointegrated implants when indicated. Other goals include improving speech, improvement of periodontal conditions, establishing better oral hygiene, and limiting growth disturbances. In order to rehabilitate oral function in CL/P patients alveolar bone grafting is necessary. Secondary bone grafting is the most widely accepted method for treating alveolar clefts. Autogenous bone graft is the primary source for reconstructing alveolar cleft defects and is currently the preferred grafting material.

  20. The effect of tobacco smoke on the metabolism and function of rat alveolar macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drath, D B; Harper, A; Gharibian, J; Karnovsky, M L; Huber, G L

    1978-04-01

    Alveolar macrophages harvested by bronchopulmonary lavage from rats exposed to tobacco smoke for 30 days ("smokers") showed alterations in oxidative metabolism, lactate production and phagocytosis of inert starch particles when compared with control macrophages. Phagocytosis of viable Staphylococcus aureus was unaffected by tobacco smoke. Glucose oxidation measured by conversion of glucose-1-14C to 14CO2 moderately affected while oxidation of glucose-6-14C to 14CO2 was not. Smokers routinely yielded fewer cells than controls, though these cells contained approximately 17% more protein than did controls. Opsonization of particles was not necessary for macrophages from either smoker or control animals to manifest a respiratory burst and increased superoxide and hydrogen peroxide release during phagocytosis. The glycolytic inhibitors, sodium fluoride and iodoacetamide, while effectively blocking glycolysis, did not inhibit phagocytosis by macrophages from either group. The results reported clearly distinguish alveolar macrophages from other phagocytic cells (peritoneal macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes) and suggest a state of non-specific activation caused by exposure to tobacco smoke. PMID:205549

  1. Role of cytoskeleton in cytokine production from lung alveolar epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Cytokines are involved in both host defense and inflammatory lung injury. Recent work from our laboratory and others has demonstrated that in addition to classical immune cells, lung alveolar epithelial cells (or pneumocytes) can also produce cytokines in response to various stimuli. This new knowledge has advanced our view of the host defense system in the lung. The regulatory mechanisms of cytokine production have been studied in great detail at various cellular and molecular levels, but the mechanisms of intracellular cytokine transport are largely unknown. Our recent studies suggest that the cytoskeleton could play an important role in mediating intracellular cytokine trafficking. This could be an important regulatory step for cytokine production. For example, lipopolyssacharide (LPS) induced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) from rat pneumocytes, which was further enhanced by a microfilament-disrupting agent. LPS also induced macrophage inflammatory protein-2(MIP-2), a chemokine for neutrophil recruitment and activation, from rat pneumocytes. This effect was enhanced by microtubule-disrupting agents. We speculate that both microfilaments and microtubules are involved in regulating cytokine transportation in pneumocytes through different mechanisms. Further investigation in on going in my laboratory. From a clinical perspective, if we understand the mechanisms regulating cytokine production and release from lung alveolar epithelial cells, we may be able to enhance or inhibit release of crucial cytokines depending on the clinical situation.

  2. Effect of β3-adrenergic agonists on alveolar fluid clearance in hypoxic rat lungs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Nai-jing; LI Wei; HE Ping; GU Xiu; LI Sheng-qi

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent research suggests that β_2-adrenergic agonists increase alveolar fluid clearance (AFC) under physiologic and pathologic conditions. It is unknown whether β_3-adrenergic agonists also increase AFC under pathologic conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of β_3 -adrenergic agonists on AFC following hypoxic lung injury and the mechanisms involved.Methods Hypoxic rats were exposed to 10% oxygen. BRL-37344 (β_3-adrenergic agonist) or CGP-12177 (selective β_3-adrenergic agonist) alone or combined with β receptor antagonists, sodium channel blockers, or Na~+/K~+-ATPase blockers were perfused into the alveolar space of rats exposed to 10% oxygen for 48 hours. Total lung water content (TLW) and AFC were measured.Results AFC did not change for the first 24 hours but then decreased after 48-hour exposure to 10% oxygen. The perfusion of BRL-37344 or CGP-12177 significantly increased AFC in normal and hypoxic rats. The AFC-stimulating effect of CGP-12177 was lowered with amiloride (a Na~+ channel blocker) and ouabain (a Na~+/K~+-ATPase inhibitor) by 37% and 49%, respectively. Colchicine significantly inhibited the effect of CGP-12177.Conclusions These findings suggest that (β3-adrenergic agonists can increase AFC during hypoxic lung injury in rats and accelerate the amelioration of pulmonary edema.

  3. Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma involving the mandibular ramus and its surrounding tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Suk Ja; Kang, Byung Cheol [Chonnam National University College of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-06-15

    Rhabdomyosarcoma, when it occurs in the head and neck, is primarily found in children. Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma is rarely seen in the oral lesion, comparing to the embryonal and the pleomorphic variants. This is a report of a case of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma in the mandible in a ten-year old girl who complained of a non-painful swelling on the right cheek. The right lower 1st molar was mobile. Her radiographs revealed an extensive radiolucency with somewhat irregular border on the right mandibular ramus. The right mandibular 1st and 2nd molars lost their lamina dura and were floating. CT images revealed smooth-outlined soft tissue mass occupying the pterygomandibular space, the infratemporal space, and the masseteric muscle with thinning and perforation of the right mandibular angle and ramus. Histopathological and immunohistochemical findings established the final diagnosis of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma.

  4. Traumatic neuroma of the inferior alveolar nerve: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arribas-García, Ignacio; Alcalá-Galiano, Andrea; Gutiérrez, Ramón; Montalvo-Moreno, Juan José

    2008-03-01

    Traumatic neuromas are rare entities which characteristically arise subsequently to surgery and are usually accompanied by pain, typically neuralgic. We present an unusual case of an intraosseous traumatic neuroma of the inferior alveolar nerve following tooth extraction. A 56-year-old man consulted for paresthesias and hyperesthesia in the left mandibular region following extraction of the left mandibular third molar (#38). The panoramic radiograph revealed a radiolucent lesion in the inferior alveolar nerve canal, and CT demonstrated the existence of a mass within the canal, producing widening of the same. Nerve-sparing excisional biopsy was performed. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry were consistent with traumatic neuroma of the left inferior alveolar nerve. After 3 years of follow-up, the patient is asymptomatic and there are no signs of recurrence.

  5. Acute pulmonary alveolar proteinosis due to exposure to cotton dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thind Gurcharan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Secondary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP is rare but may occur in association with malignancy, certain infections, and exposure to inorganic or organic dust and some toxic fumes. This case report describes the second recorded case of PAP due to exposure to cotton dust. A 24-year-old man developed PAP after working as a spinner for eight years without respiratory protection. He was admitted as an emergency patient with very severe dyspnea for four months and cough for several years. Chest X-ray showed bilateral diffuse alveolar consolidation. He died 16 days later, and a diagnosis of acute pulmonary alveolar proteinosis was made at autopsy. The histopathology demonstrated alveoli and respiratory bronchioles filled with characteristic periodic acid Schiff-positive material, which also revealed birefringent bodies of cotton dust under polarized light. Secondary PAP can be fatal and present with acute respiratory failure. The occupational history and characteristic pathology can alert clinicians to the diagnosis.

  6. Rare combination of congenital heart disease and pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yuki; Miyamoto, Takashi; Yoshitake, Shuichi; Naito, Yuji; Kobayashi, Tomio

    2015-10-01

    Here, we describe a case of total anomalous pulmonary venous return with coarctation of the aorta that was diagnosed as pulmonary alveolar proteinosis at autopsy in a male infant. Surgical repair was performed at 1 day of age, but the infant died on postoperative day 51 due to respiratory insufficiency without any evidence of pulmonary venous obstruction. He had been unexpectedly diagnosed with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and pulmonary hypoplasia on autopsy. Congenital pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a serious condition with a high mortality rate, which should be considered in the differential diagnosis in patients with a clinical picture of pulmonary venous obstruction, because most patients are unable to survive without proper treatment. In this report, we address specific issues that should be discussed in such cases based on our recent experience. PMID:26310609

  7. Variant Inferior Alveolar Nerves and Implications for Local Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Kevin T; Brokaw, Everett J; Bell, Andrea; Joy, Anita

    2016-01-01

    A sound knowledge of anatomical variations that could be encountered during surgical procedures is helpful in avoiding surgical complications. The current article details anomalous morphology of inferior alveolar nerves encountered during routine dissection of the craniofacial region in the Gross Anatomy laboratory. We also report variations of the lingual nerves, associated with the inferior alveolar nerves. The variations were documented and a thorough review of literature was carried out. We focus on the variations themselves, and the clinical implications that these variations present. Thorough understanding of variant anatomy of the lingual and inferior alveolar nerves may determine the success of procedural anesthesia, the etiology of pathologic processes, and the avoidance of surgical misadventure. PMID:27269666

  8. Alveolar recruitment in pulmonary contusion: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, Lívia Maria Vitório; Lopes, Lucianne Cristina da Silva; Cipriano, Graziella França Bernardelli; Vendrame, Letícia Sandre; Andrade Junior, Ary

    2009-03-01

    Treatment of pulmonary contusion when adequately established is very simple in most cases. Pathophysiological changes occur as a result of the effects produced by loss of chest wall integrity, accumulation of fluid in the pleural cavity, obstruction of the airways and lung dysfunction. The alveolar recruitment maneuver is the reopening of collapsed lung areas by increasing inspiratory pressure in the airway. The primary objective of this case report was to evaluate the effectiveness of the alveolar recruitment maneuver in a patient with pulmonary contusion. A 33 year old male patient, with a clinical condition of bilateral chest trauma and traumatic brain injury, evolved with reduction of the level of consciousness, acute respiratory failure, hypovolemic shock and hemoptysis. The patient underwent thoracentesis, bilateral thoracic drainage and was also submitted to invasive mechanical ventilation. After 48 hours of invasive mechanical ventilation, in accordance with protective strategy an alveolar recruitment maneuver mode, pressure-controlled ventilation, pressure controlled 10 cmH2O, respiratory rate 10 rpm, inspiratory time 3.0, positive end-expiratory pressure 30 cmH2O and FI0(2) 100%, for two minutes. After the alveolar recruitment maneuver, the patient presented clinical pulmonary improvement, but there was a variation of 185 to 322 of Pa0(2)/FiO2 (arterial partial pressure of oxygen/ fraction of inspired oxygen). He was discharged from the intensive care unit 22 days after admission. The alveolar recruitment maneuver in this patient showed significant results in the treatment of pulmonary contusion, improving blood oxygenation, preventing alveolar collapse and reversing atelectasis. PMID:25303136

  9. Alveolar macrophage kinetics and function after interruption of canine marrow function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the kinetics and function of alveolar macrophages after interruption of marrow function, we performed serial bronchoalveolar lavages in dogs. The studies were performed before and after 9.0 to 9.5 Grey total body irradiation and marrow infusion. Monocytes had disappeared from the bloodstream by Day 7 after the irradiation. Alveolar macrophages were significantly decreased at Day 21. At Days 14 and 21 myeloperoxidase-positive alveolar macrophages were also significantly decreased. Beyond Day 30 the number of circulating monocytes, myeloperoxidase-positive and total alveolar macrophages had returned. Sex chromatin stains of alveolar macrophages obtained from a male dog that received female marrow indicated that the repopulating macrophages were of marrow origin. In vitro studies of alveolar macrophage migration and phagocytosis demonstrated increased activities beyond Day 30. These studies suggest that in this model the alveolar macrophage is dependent on the bone marrow for support and that the alveolar macrophage depletion may impair lung defense mechanisms

  10. Reconstruction of alveolar defects in patients with cleft lip and palate - 111 consecutive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    Reconstruction of alveolar defects in patients with cleft lip and palate - 111 consecutive patients......Reconstruction of alveolar defects in patients with cleft lip and palate - 111 consecutive patients...

  11. Use of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to Recapitulate Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis Pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Takuji; Mayhew, Christopher; Sallese, Anthony; Chalk, Claudia; Carey, Brenna C.; Malik, Punam; Wood, Robert E.; Trapnell, Bruce C.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: In patients with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) syndrome, disruption of granulocyte/macrophage colony–stimulating factor (GM-CSF) signaling is associated with pathogenic surfactant accumulation from impaired clearance in alveolar macrophages.

  12. Human Vγ9Vδ2-T cells efficiently kill influenza virus-infected lung alveolar epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Xiang, Zheng; Feng, Ting; Li, Jinrong; Liu, Yinping; Fan, Yingying; Lu, Qiao; Yin, Zhongwei; Yu, Meixing; Shen, Chongyang; Tu, Wenwei

    2013-01-01

    γδ-T cells play an indispensable role in host defense against different viruses, including influenza A virus. However, whether these cells have cytotoxic activity against influenza virus-infected lung alveolar epithelial cells and subsequently contribute to virus clearance remains unknown. Using influenza virus-infected A549 cells, human lung alveolar epithelial cells, we investigated the cytotoxic activity of aminobisphosphonate pamidronate (PAM)-expanded human Vγ9Vδ2-T cells and their underlying mechanisms. We found that PAM could selectively activate and expand human Vγ9Vδ2-T cells. PAM-expanded human Vγ9Vδ2-T cells efficiently killed influenza virus-infected lung alveolar epithelial cells and inhibited virus replication. The cytotoxic activity of PAM-expanded Vγ9Vδ2-T cells was dependent on cell-to-cell contact and required NKG2D activation. Perforin–granzyme B, tumor-necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and Fas–Fas ligand (FasL) pathways were involved in their cytotoxicity. Our study suggests that targeting γδ-T cells by PAM can potentially offer an alternative option for the treatment of influenza virus. PMID:23353835

  13. Effect of P2X7 receptor knockout on AQP-5 expression of type I alveolar epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Ebeling

    Full Text Available P2X7 receptors, ATP-gated cation channels, are specifically expressed in alveolar epithelial cells. The pathophysiological function of this lung cell type, except a recently reported putative involvement in surfactant secretion, is unknown. In addition, P2X7 receptor-deficient mice show reduced inflammation and lung fibrosis after exposure with bleomycin. To elucidate the role of the P2X7 receptor in alveolar epithelial type I cells we characterized the pulmonary phenotype of P2X7 receptor knockout mice by using immunohistochemistry, western blot analysis and real-time RT PCR. No pathomorphological signs of fibrosis were found. Results revealed, however, a remarkable loss of aquaporin-5 protein and mRNA in young knockout animals. Additional in vitro experiments with bleomycin treated precision cut lung slices showed a greater sensitivity of the P2X7 receptor knockout mice in terms of aquaporin-5 reduction as wild type animals. Finally, P2X7 receptor function was examined by using the alveolar epithelial cell lines E10 and MLE-12 for stimulation experiments with bleomycin. The in vitro activation of P2X7 receptor was connected with an increase of aquaporin-5, whereas the inhibition of the receptor with oxidized ATP resulted in down regulation of aquaporin-5. The early loss of aquaporin-5 which can be found in different pulmonary fibrosis models does not implicate a specific pathogenetic role during fibrogenesis.

  14. Differential Regulation of Gene Expression of Alveolar Epithelial Cell Markers in Human Lung Adenocarcinoma-Derived A549 Clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Kondo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy appears to be promising for restoring damaged or irreparable lung tissue. However, establishing a simple and reproducible protocol for preparing lung progenitor populations is difficult because the molecular basis for alveolar epithelial cell differentiation is not fully understood. We investigated an in vitro system to analyze the regulatory mechanisms of alveolus-specific gene expression using a human alveolar epithelial type II (ATII cell line, A549. After cloning A549 subpopulations, each clone was classified into five groups according to cell morphology and marker gene expression. Two clones (B7 and H12 were further analyzed. Under serum-free culture conditions, surfactant protein C (SPC, an ATII marker, was upregulated in both H12 and B7. Aquaporin 5 (AQP5, an ATI marker, was upregulated in H12 and significantly induced in B7. When the RAS/MAPK pathway was inhibited, SPC and thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1 expression levels were enhanced. After treatment with dexamethasone (DEX, 8-bromoadenosine 3′5′-cyclic monophosphate (8-Br-cAMP, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX, and keratinocyte growth factor (KGF, surfactant protein B and TTF-1 expression levels were enhanced. We found that A549-derived clones have plasticity in gene expression of alveolar epithelial differentiation markers and could be useful in studying ATII maintenance and differentiation.

  15. Micromolar sodium fluoride mediates anti-osteoclastogenesis in Porphyromonas gingivalis-induced alveolar bone loss

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ujjal K Bhawal; Nobushiro Hamada; Ikuo Nasu; Hirohisa Arakawa; Koh Shibutani; Hye-Jin Lee; Kazumune Arikawa; Michiharu Shimosaka; Masatoshi Suzuki; Toshizo Toyama; Takenori Sato; Ryota Kawamata; Chieko Taguchi

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclasts are bone-specific multinucleated cells generated by the differentiation of monocyte/macrophage lineage precursors. Regulation of osteoclast differentiation is considered an effective therapeutic approach to the treatment of bone-lytic diseases. Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease characterized by extensive bone resorption. In this study, we investigated the effects of sodium fluoride (NaF) on osteoclastogenesis induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis, an important colonizer of the oral cavity that has been implicated in periodontitis. NaF strongly inhibited the P. gingivalis-induced alveolar bone loss. That effect was accompanied by decreased levels of cathepsin K, interleukin (IL)-1b, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9), and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, which were up-regulated during P. gingivalis-induced osteoclastogenesis. Consistent with the in vivo anti-osteoclastogenic effect, NaF inhibited osteoclast formation caused by the differentiation factor RANKL (receptor activator of nuclear factor kB ligand) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). The RANKL-stimulated induction of the transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) c1 was also abrogated by NaF. Taken together, our data demonstrate that NaF inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis by reducing the induction of NFATc1, ultimately leading to the suppressed expression of cathepsin K and MMP9. The in vivo effect of NaF on the inhibition of P. gingivalis-induced osteoclastogenesis strengthens the potential usefulness of NaF for treating periodontal diseases.

  16. Alveolar epithelial permeability in bronchial asthma in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate alveolar epithelial permeability (kep) in children with bronchial asthma, 99mTc-DTPA (diethylene triamine penta acetate) aerosol lung inhalation scintigraphies were performed. There was no correlation between the kep value and the severity of asthma. On the other hand, out of 10 cases which had no aerosol deposition defect in the lung field, 4 showed high kep values on the whole lung field and 7 had high kep value areas, particularly apparent in the upper lung field. These results suggest that even when the central airway lesions are mild, severe damage exists in the alveolar region of the peripheral airway. (author)

  17. Secondary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis associated with myelodysplastic syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Li-xin; ZHAO Tie-mei; WANG Qiao-yun; CHEN Liang-an; LI Ai-min; WANG Dian-jun; QI Fei; LIU You-ning

    2007-01-01

    @@ Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is an uncommon disease first reported by Rosen et al 1 in 1958, and characterized by the accumulation of surfactant proteins and phospholipids within the alveolar spaces. Acquired PAP is divided into two forms based on clinical features:idiopathic PAP and secondary PAP. Secondary PAP is reported to be associated with haematological malignancies, Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia and inhalation of silica or titanium, and the most frequent underlying disease of secondary PAP is haematological malignancy. The exact incidence of PAP in haematological malignancies is still obscure, since there have been only sporadic reports of secondary PAP. 2, 3

  18. Repopulation of denuded tracheal grafts with alveolar type II cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Repopulation of denuded heterotopic tracheal grafts with populations of specific epithelial cell types is one approach to study the differentiation potential of various cell types. This technique has been adopted to delineate the differentiation pathways of alveolar type II cells isolated from rat lungs. Under the conditions of this experiment, the reestablished epithelial lining was alveolar-like, however, ultrastructural analysis of the cells showed them to be like Clara cells. These preliminary results suggest that the secretary cells of the lung parenchyma and terminal airways may share a common ancestry. (author)

  19. Low Levels of IGF-1 Contribute to Alveolar Macrophage Dysfunction in Cystic Fibrosis1

    OpenAIRE

    Bessich, Jamie L.; Nymon, Amanda B.; Moulton, Lisa A; Dorman, Dana; Ashare, Alix

    2013-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages are major contributors to lung innate immunity. Although alveolar macrophages from CFTR−/− mice have impaired function, no study has investigated primary alveolar macrophages in adults with cystic fibrosis (CF). CF patients have low levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), and our prior studies demonstrate a relationship between IGF-1 and macrophage function. We hypothesize that reduced IGF-1 in CF leads to impaired alveolar macrophage function and chronic infectio...

  20. Unsuspected pulmonary alveolar proteinosis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Niazi Masooma; DeLaCruz Angel E; Tejwani Dimple; Diaz-Fuentes Gilda

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Diffuse lung infiltrates are a common finding in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and causes range from infectious processes to malignancies or interstitial lung diseases. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a rare pulmonary disorder rarely reported in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus. Secondary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is associated with conditions involving functional impairment or reduced numbers of alveolar macrophages. It can b...

  1. Serial bronchoscopic lung lavage in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis under local anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, K Rennis; Vadakkan, D Thomas; Krishnakumar, E V; Anas, A Muhammed

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare disease, characterized by alveolar accumulation of surfactant composed of proteins and lipids due to defective surfactant clearance by alveolar macrophages. Mainstay of treatment is whole lung lavage, which requires general anesthesia. Herein, we report a case of primary PAP, successfully treated with serial bronchoscopic lung lavages under local anesthesia. PMID:25814803

  2. Serial bronchoscopic lung lavage in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis under local anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    K Rennis Davis; D Thomas Vadakkan; Krishnakumar, E. V.; A Muhammed Anas

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare disease, characterized by alveolar accumulation of surfactant composed of proteins and lipids due to defective surfactant clearance by alveolar macrophages. Mainstay of treatment is whole lung lavage, which requires general anesthesia. Herein, we report a case of primary PAP, successfully treated with serial bronchoscopic lung lavages under local anesthesia.

  3. Serial bronchoscopic lung lavage in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis under local anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Rennis Davis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP is a rare disease, characterized by alveolar accumulation of surfactant composed of proteins and lipids due to defective surfactant clearance by alveolar macrophages. Mainstay of treatment is whole lung lavage, which requires general anesthesia. Herein, we report a case of primary PAP, successfully treated with serial bronchoscopic lung lavages under local anesthesia.

  4. Study on alveolar macrophage injure caused by uranium dust and its protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dog's alveolar microphage (AM) obtained by lavage was cultured in vitro. The effects of uranium dust, quartz dust on peroxidation of AM and the effects of magnoliavinin C and VE on bio-membrane was observed. In addition the anti-oxidation effect of VE on the whole body was observed by means of experimental silicosis caused by single dust exposure to trachea. The results demonstrate that two kinds of dust all can induce membrane lipid peroxidation, magnoliavinin C and VE have marked anti-oxidation effect. The administration of VE in vivo demonstrates that VE has effect of inhibiting membrane unsaturated fatty acid peroxidation induced by these two kinds of dust in the ears stage of dust exposure and blocking the chain reaction of free radical so as to retard the pathological developing for silicosis. However it's effect is less than the combining effect of VE and phosphohydroxypipe quinoline. (6 tabs., 12 figs.)

  5. Syntaxin 7 and VAMP-7 are Soluble N-Ethylmaleimide–sensitive Factor Attachment Protein Receptors Required for Late Endosome–Lysosome and Homotypic Lysosome Fusion in Alveolar Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, Diane McVey; Pevsner, Jonathan; Scullion, Matthew A.; Vaughn, Michael; Kaplan, Jerry

    2000-01-01

    Endocytosis in alveolar macrophages can be reversibly inhibited, permitting the isolation of endocytic vesicles at defined stages of maturation. Using an in vitro fusion assay, we determined that each isolated endosome population was capable of homotypic fusion. All vesicle populations were also capable of heterotypic fusion in a temporally specific manner; early endosomes, isolated 4 min after internalization, could fuse with endosomes isolated 8 min after internalization but not with 12-min...

  6. Hyperoxia increases the elastic modulus of alveolar epithelial cells through Rho kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Kristina R; Roan, Esra; Ghosh, Manik C; Parthasarathi, Kaushik; Waters, Christopher M

    2014-02-01

    Patients with acute lung injury are administered high concentrations of oxygen during mechanical ventilation, and while both hyperoxia and mechanical ventilation are necessary, each can independently cause additional injury. However, the precise mechanisms that lead to injury are not well understood. We hypothesized that alveolar epithelial cells may be more susceptible to injury caused by mechanical ventilation because hyperoxia causes cells to be stiffer due to increased filamentous actin (f-actin) formation via the GTPase RhoA and its effecter Rho kinase (ROCK). We examined cytoskeletal structures in cultured murine lung alveolar epithelial cells (MLE-12) under normoxic and hyperoxic (48 h) conditions. We also measured cell elasticity (E) using an atomic force microscope in the indenter mode. Hyperoxia caused increased f-actin stress fibers and bundle formation, an increase in g- and f-actin, an increase in nuclear area and a decrease in nuclear height, and cells became stiffer (higher E). Treatment with an inhibitor (Y-27632) of ROCK significantly decreased E and prevented the cytoskeletal changes, while it did not influence the nuclear height and area. Pre-exposure of cells to hyperoxia promoted detachment when cells were subsequently stretched cyclically, but the ROCK inhibitor prevented this effect. Hyperoxia caused thickening of vinculin focal adhesion plaques, and inhibition of ROCK reduced the formation of distinct focal adhesion plaques. Phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase was significantly reduced by both hyperoxia and treatment with Y-27632. Hyperoxia caused increased cell stiffness and promoted cell detachment during stretch. These effects were ameliorated by inhibition of ROCK.

  7. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis in an indium-processing worker

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Yong-long; CAI Hou-rong; WANG Yi-hua; MENG Fan-qing; ZHANG De-ping

    2010-01-01

    @@ With the increasing number of workers engaged in liquid-crystal displays (LCD) manufacturer, lung diseases related to this occupational exposure are attracting more attention.Herein we report a case of interstitial lung disease in a LCD processing worker, which was pathologically confirmed as pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP).

  8. Alveolar ridge augmentation in rats by Bio-Oss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, E M; Bang, G; Haanaes, H R

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine if Bio-Oss initiated osteoinduction or osteoconduction when implanted into rats. Sintered and unsintered granules of the anorganic bovine bone Bio-Oss was implanted subperiosteally for alveolar ridge augmentation purposes and heterotopically in the abdominal...

  9. Alveolar pulmonary proteinosis: case report and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the case of a young women with primary alveolar proteinosis, with a short period of symptoms that are uncommon for this disease, without risk factors for this entity, the clinical evolution of the patient and some complications with the treatment. We review the literature for this entity.

  10. Abnormal gallium scintigraphy in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A patient with medulloblastoma of the cerebellum developed dyspnea and hypoxemia. Pulmonary function tests showed decreased lung volume and diffusing capacity, while the chest radiographs initially showed only mild interstitial infiltrates. Repeated gallium scans showed diffuse lung uptake and diagnosis of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis was made by open lung biopsy

  11. CT scan patterns of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. To study computed tomographic (CT) findings in children with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) more extensively. Objective. To describe the CT features at the time of diagnosis and after therapeutic broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL). Materials and methods. We retrospectively reviewed the CT scans of five children (aged 3 months to 4 years) examined because of incidental bronchitis (n = 1), disease in a sibling (n = 1) and relapsing fever, cough and dyspnoea (n = 3). Each patient had an initial CT scan. Two asymptomatic cases were not treated but were followed up by plain chest films. The other three had BAL and follow-up CT. Results. Initial CT in all cases showed a diffuse reticulomicronodular pattern associated in three cases with posterior bilateral alveolar infiltrates. CT in the two asymptomatic patients remained unchanged or slightly improved without BAL. After BAL, a variable decrease of lung infiltrates was observed. Conclusions. Correlation between the extent of alveolar consolidation and severity of disease was found. Anatomical and pathological considerations allow us to consider that the classical reticulomicronodular pattern is not due to an interstitial infiltration but to alveoli filled with the abnormal material characteristic of PAP. (orig.)

  12. Alveolar echinococcosis localized in the liver, lung and brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seyit Mehmet Kayacan; Kutigin Turkmen; Fatih Yakar; Kerim Guier; Sezai Vatansever; Suleyman Temiz; Bora Uslu; Dilek Kayacan; Vakur Akkaya; Osman Erk; Büent Saka; Aytac Karadag

    2008-01-01

    @@ Echinococcosis is a parasitic disease caused by the larval forms of echinococci. It has two main forms as the unilocular cystic form that is more commonly seen and caused by E. granulosus and the alveolar form that is rarely seen and caused by E.

  13. Alveolar soft-part sarcoma presenting with multiple intracranial metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujit Kumar G

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available A 28-year-old man presented with history of raised intracranial pressure and one episode of generalized tonic clonic seizures. Computed Tomogram revealed multiple contrast enhancing intracranial lesions. Biopsy of one of the lesions was reported as metastatic alveolar soft part sarcoma. He was advised whole brain radiotherapy.

  14. Studying the Role of Alveolar Macrophages in Breast Cancer Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadrevu, Surya Kumari; Sharma, Sharad; Chintala, Navin; Patel, Jalpa; Karbowniczek, Magdalena; Markiewski, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the application of the syngeneic model of breast cancer (4T1) to the studies on a role of pulmonary alveolar macrophages in cancer metastasis. The 4T1 cells expressing GFP in combination with imaging and confocal microscopy are used to monitor tumor growth, track metastasizing tumor cells, and quantify the metastatic burden. These approaches are supplemented by digital histopathology that allows the automated and unbiased quantification of metastases. In this method the routinely prepared histological lung sections, which are stained with hematoxylin and eosin, are scanned and converted to the digital slides that are then analyzed by the self-trained pattern recognition software. In addition, we describe the flow cytometry approaches with the use of multiple cell surface markers to identify alveolar macrophages in the lungs. To determine impact of alveolar macrophages on metastases and antitumor immunity these cells are depleted with the clodronate-containing liposomes administrated intranasally to tumor-bearing mice. This approach leads to the specific and efficient depletion of this cell population as confirmed by flow cytometry. Tumor volumes and lung metastases are evaluated in mice depleted of alveolar macrophages, to determine the role of these cells in the metastatic progression of breast cancer. PMID:27403530

  15. Alveolar macrophages in rabbits exposed to nickel dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camner, P.; Johansson, A.; Lundborg, M.

    1978-07-01

    Two groups of four rabbits each were exposed to 0.5 and 2.0 mg/m/sup 3/ of metallic nickel dust respectively, for 4 weeks (5 days/week, 6 hours/day). About half of the particle masses penetrated a Casella preseparator. After exposure the lungs were extracted and lavaged. Compared to four control rabbits significant effects were seen in both exposed groups with regard to lung weight and density as well as phagocytic activity, size distribution, and ultrastructure of the alveolar macrophages (numerous slender microvilli and long protrusions from the cell surface and laminated structures similar to those seen in alveolar type II cells). The effects on the macrophages were probably not caused directly by nickel. The lung washing from the exposed rabbits contained an amorphous substance rich in phospholipids and laminated structures. Apart from the ultrastructural changes the effects seemed to be dose related. The results of exposure to metallic nickel dust have at least some features in common with ''alveolar lipoproteinosis,'' described in rats exposed to silica dust, and with ''pulmonary alveolar proteinosis,'' described in man.

  16. Abnormal gallium scintigraphy in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, S.D.; White, D.A.; Stover-Pepe, D.E.; Caravelli, J.F.; Van Uitert, C.; Benua, R.S.

    1987-04-01

    A patient with medulloblastoma of the cerebellum developed dyspnea and hypoxemia. Pulmonary function tests showed decreased lung volume and diffusing capacity, while the chest radiographs initially showed only mild interstitial infiltrates. Repeated gallium scans showed diffuse lung uptake and diagnosis of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis was made by open lung biopsy.

  17. Anti-GM-CSF antibodies in paediatric pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    OpenAIRE

    Latzin, P; Tredano, M.; Wust, Y; J. de Blic; Nicolai, T; Bewig, B; Stanzel, F.; Kohler, D.; Bahuau, M.; Griese, M

    2005-01-01

    Background: Auto-antibodies against granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) may be central to the pathogenesis of adult sporadic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP). The role of anti-GM-CSF auto-antibodies in paediatric forms of PAP is as yet unclear.

  18. CT scan patterns of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albafouille, V.; Sayegh, N.; Coudenhove, S. de; Mamou-Mani, T.; Hassine, A.; Brunelle, F. [Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, Paris (France). Dept. of Paediatric Radiology; Scheinmann, P.; Blic, J. de [Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, Paris (France). Dept. of Pneumology; Jaubert, F. [Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, Paris (France). Dept. of Pathology

    1999-03-01

    Background. To study computed tomographic (CT) findings in children with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) more extensively. Objective. To describe the CT features at the time of diagnosis and after therapeutic broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL). Materials and methods. We retrospectively reviewed the CT scans of five children (aged 3 months to 4 years) examined because of incidental bronchitis (n = 1), disease in a sibling (n = 1) and relapsing fever, cough and dyspnoea (n = 3). Each patient had an initial CT scan. Two asymptomatic cases were not treated but were followed up by plain chest films. The other three had BAL and follow-up CT. Results. Initial CT in all cases showed a diffuse reticulomicronodular pattern associated in three cases with posterior bilateral alveolar infiltrates. CT in the two asymptomatic patients remained unchanged or slightly improved without BAL. After BAL, a variable decrease of lung infiltrates was observed. Conclusions. Correlation between the extent of alveolar consolidation and severity of disease was found. Anatomical and pathological considerations allow us to consider that the classical reticulomicronodular pattern is not due to an interstitial infiltration but to alveoli filled with the abnormal material characteristic of PAP. (orig.) With 3 figs., 1 tab., 16 refs.

  19. Bronchoalveolar lavage with trypsin in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Nagasaka, Y.; Takahashi, M; Ueshima, H; Tohda, Y.; Nakajima, S.

    1996-01-01

    Two cases of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis were treated with bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) via a fibreoptic bronchoscope. Additional clinical improvement was seen when trypsin was added to the lavage fluid. Analysis of effluents in the BAL fluid showed marked reduction of protein constituents with clinical improvement after treatment with trypsin in the lavage. BAL with trypsin was well tolerated.

  20. Alveolar occupation infiltrations, eosinophilia in peripheral blood and bronchoalveolar lavage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case of a patient of 25 years old is shown with the antecedent of no potable water consumption who entered for having pulmonary symptoms. Fever, presence of alveolar occupation infiltrations and eosinophilia in peripheral blood a treatment with antiparasitary started with a significant improvement of the symptoms, infiltrations and eosinophilia. it is considered eosinophilic pneumonia diagnostic by parasitary infection (Loeffler's syndrome)

  1. Alveolar occupation infiltrations, eosinophilia in peripheral blood and bronchoalveolar lavage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case of a patient of 25 years old is shown with the antecedent of no potable water consumption who entered for having pulmonary symptoms, fever, presence of alveolar occupation infiltrations and eosinophilia in peripheral blood treatment with antiparasitary started with a significant improvement of the symptoms, infiltrations and eosinophilia. It is considered eosinophilic pneumonia diagnostic by parasitary infection (Loefffers Syndrome)

  2. Biomimetics of fetal alveolar flow phenomena using microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenbaum-Katan, Janna; Fishler, Rami; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Sznitman, Josué

    2015-01-01

    At the onset of life in utero, the respiratory system begins as a liquid-filled tubular organ and undergoes significant morphological changes during fetal development towards establishing a respiratory organ optimized for gas exchange. As airspace morphology evolves, respiratory alveolar flows have been hypothesized to exhibit evolving flow patterns. In the present study, we have investigated flow topologies during increasing phases of embryonic life within an anatomically inspired microfluidic device, reproducing real-scale features of fetal airways representative of three distinct phases of in utero gestation. Micro-particle image velocimetry measurements, supported by computational fluid dynamics simulations, reveal distinct respiratory alveolar flow patterns throughout different stages of fetal life. While attached, streamlined flows characterize the shallow structures of premature alveoli indicative of the onset of saccular stage, separated recirculating vortex flows become the signature of developed and extruded alveoli characteristic of the advanced stages of fetal development. To further mimic physiological aspects of the cellular environment of developing airways, our biomimetic devices integrate an alveolar epithelium using the A549 cell line, recreating a confluent monolayer that produces pulmonary surfactant. Overall, our in vitro biomimetic fetal airways model delivers a robust and reliable platform combining key features of alveolar morphology, flow patterns, and physiological aspects of fetal lungs developing in utero. PMID:25759753

  3. Increased alveolar soluble annexin V promotes lung inflammation and fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Susan; Shi, Wei; Xu, Wei; Frey, Mark R; Moats, Rex; Pardo, Annie; Selman, Moises; Warburton, David

    2015-11-01

    The causes underlying the self-perpetuating nature of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), a progressive and usually lethal disease, remain unknown. We hypothesised that alveolar soluble annexin V contributes to lung fibrosis, based on the observation that human IPF bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) containing high annexin V levels promoted fibroblast involvement in alveolar epithelial wound healing that was reduced when annexin V was depleted from the BALF. Conditioned medium from annexin V-treated alveolar epithelial type 2 cells (AEC2), but not annexin V per se, induced proliferation of human fibroblasts and contained pro-fibrotic, IPF-associated proteins, as well as pro-inflammatory cytokines that were found to correlate tightly (r>0.95) with annexin V levels in human BALF. ErbB2 receptor tyrosine kinase in AECs was activated by annexin V, and blockade reduced the fibrotic potential of annexin V-treated AEC-conditioned medium. In vivo, aerosol delivery of annexin V to mouse lung induced inflammation, fibrosis and increased hydroxyproline, with activation of Wnt, transforming growth factor-β, mitogen-activated protein kinase and nuclear factor-κB signalling pathways, as seen in IPF. Chronically increased alveolar annexin V levels, as reflected in increased IPF BALF levels, may contribute to the progression of IPF by inducing the release of pro-fibrotic mediators. PMID:26160872

  4. N-acetyl-L-cysteine inhibits adenoviral E1A-involved transactivation of nuclear factor-κB in rat alveolar epithelial cells%腺病毒E1A蛋白对核因子-κB活化的影响及N-乙酰半胱氨酸的干预作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈娟; 李冰; 冉丕鑫

    2010-01-01

    Objective The relationship between latent adenvorius infection and airway inflammation had not been well documented.The aim of this study was to illustrate the roles of adenovirus E1 A protein on the transactivation of NF-κ inflammatory stimuli and the effect of N-Acetylcysteine (NAC)upon the transactivation of NF-κB and AP-1 in cells stably expressing E1 A protein.Methods Rat alveolar epithelial cells stably expressing adenoviral E1 A or control plasmid were developed.For isolation of nuclear extracts,5×10~5 cells were plated and grown overnight in 60 mm dishes.Experiments were repeated 3 times.The cell model of stably expressing adenoviral E1 A was stimulated by LPS or TNF-aκ and treated with NAC,a precursor for cysteine.The NF-κB and AP-1 transcriptional activity were measured by LUC report system.The expression of NF-κB and AP-1 were measured by Western blot.Differences between groups were assessed for significance by Student't test,and multiple comparisons were made by one-way ANOVA.Results The luciferage activity drived by NF-κB element wag(9 698±98)RLU in untreated E1 A-positive clones and(101 195±234),and(170 385 4±443)RLU in LPS and TNF-α-stimulated cells,which were significantly higher than that of the control group 2 077±107,67 846±332,95 743-1-211 respectively.The luciferage activity drived by AP-1 element wag 9 034±78 RLU in untreated E1 A-positive clones and 26 343 4±398 and 31 731 4±332 RLU in LPS and TNF-α-stimulated cells.which were significantly higher than that of the control group 2 845±93,10 772±432,11 005±556 respectively.The densitometry of the NF-κB expression in E1 A-positive clones were 79.3±4.6 and 80.3±3.8 respectively without treatment and were 81.8 4±3.9-89.9±1.6 and 94.1 4-1.9 to 99.8±1.6 respectively under LPS or TNF-α stimulation,which were significantly higher than that of the control group(68.3±3.8,69.4±4.3 respectively)without stimulation and 70.1 4±2.8 to 80.8±3.6.73.4±4.9 to 83.2 4±6

  5. Alveolar bone measurement precision for phosphor-plate images

    Science.gov (United States)

    HILDEBOLT, CHARLES F.; COUTURE, REX; GARCIA, NATHALIA M.; DIXON, DEBRA; SHANNON, WILLIAM DOUGLAS; LANGENWALTER, ERIC; CIVITELLI, ROBERTO

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To demonstrate methods for determining measurement precision and to determine the precision of alveolar-bone measurements made with a vacuum-coupled, positioning device and phosphor-plate images. Study design Subjects were rigidly attached to the x-ray tube by means of a vacuum coupling device and custom, cross-arch, bite plates. Original and repeat radiographs (taken within minutes of each other) were obtained of the mandibular posterior teeth of 51 subjects, and cementoenamel-junction-alveolar-crest (CEJ-AC) distances were measured on both sets of images. In addition, x-ray-transmission (radiodensity) and alveolar-crest-height differences were determined by subtracting one image from the other. Image subtractions and measurements were performed twice. Based on duplicate measurements, the root-mean-square standard deviation (precision) and least-significant change (LSC) were calculated. LSC is the magnitude of change in a measurement needed to indicate that a true biological change has occurred. Results The LSCs were 4% for x-ray transmission, 0.49 mm for CEJ-AC distance, and 0.06 mm for crest-height 0.06 mm. Conclusion The LSCs for our CEJ-AC and x-ray transmission measurements are similar to what has been reported. The LSC for alveolar-crest height (determined with image subtraction) was less than 0.1 mm. Compared with findings from previous studies, this represents a highly precise measurement of alveolar crest height. The methods demonstrated for calculating LSC can be used by investigators to determine how large changes in radiographic measurements need to be before the changes can be considered (with 95% confidence) true biological changes and not noise (that is, equipment/observer error). PMID:19716499

  6. Secondary Alveolar Bone Grafting and Iliac Cancellous Bone Harvesting for Patients With Alveolar Cleft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Weiyi; Wu, Chenzhou; Yang, Zheng; Duan, Zexi; Su, Zhifei; Wang, Peiqi; Zheng, Qian; Li, Chunjie

    2016-06-01

    To assess the efficacy of present interventions optimizing the result of secondary alveolar bone grafting (SABG) and the interventions alleviating the donor site morbidity after iliac cancellous bone harvesting. Researches were identified by searching the electronic database of MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Chinese BioMedical Literature Database, and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure. In addition, relevant journals and references of the included studies were searched manually. The Oxford 2011 Levels of Evidence were applied to assess the methodological quality of selected studies, and the best evidence synthesis system was applied afterward to measure the strength of evidence. As a result, 42 studies were considered eligible and included, among which 4 were of high quality while 38 were of low quality. Thirty lines of evidences were acquired after the synthesis, among which 13 were rated as moderate while 17 were rated as insufficient. As for the interventions optimizing the result of SABG, moderate evidence confirmed the efficacy of preoperative orthodontic treatment, the superiority of performing SABG before the eruption of canine, and the accuracy of cone beam computed tomography in preoperative estimation of the cleft volume. As for the interventions alleviating the morbidity of iliac cancellous bone harvesting, moderate evidence confirmed the treatment benefit of the interventions below: minimally invasive technique, including trephine and Shepard osteotomy; preemptive analgesia, including continuous bupivacaine infusion or transversus abdominis plane block. As for the rest interventions, only insufficient evidence was found. PMID:27244214

  7. Characteristic aspects of alveolar proteinosis diagnosis Aspectos característicos do diagnóstico da proteinose alveolar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Prudente Bártholo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Alveolar proteinosis is an uncommon pulmonary disease characterized by an accumulation of surfactant in terminal airway and alveoli, thereby impairing gas exchange and engendering respiratory insufficiency in some cases. Three clinically and etiologically distinct forms of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis are recognized: congenital, secondary and idiopathic, the latter corresponding to 90% of the cases. In this case report we present a young male patient that was diagnosed with alveolar proteinosis. Computed tomography of the thorax, bronchoscopy and transbronchial biopsy were performed. The histopathologic aspect was characteristic. The patient was discharged in good health conditions and remains asymptomatic to date.Proteinose alveolar é uma doença pulmonar incomum caracterizada pelo acúmulo de surfactante nas vias aéreas terminais e nos alvéolos, alterando a troca gasosa e, em alguns casos, promovendo insuficiência respiratória. Três formas clínicas e etiologicamente distintas de proteinose alveolar são reconhecidas: congênitas, secundárias e idiopáticas (mais de 90% dos casos são de etiologia idiopática. Neste relato, apresentamos um homem jovem que foi diagnosticado com proteinose pulmonar. Tomografia computadorizada de tórax, broncoscopia e biópsia transbrônquica foram realizadas. O aspecto histopatológico foi característico. O paciente teve alta, com boas condições de saúde, e encontra-se assintomático nos dias de hoje.

  8. Pulmonary alveolar epithelial uptake of S-nitrosothiols is regulated by L-type amino acid transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granillo, Olivia M; Brahmajothi, Mulugu V; Li, Sheng; Whorton, A Richard; Mason, S Nicholas; McMahon, Timothy J; Auten, Richard L

    2008-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) effects are often mediated via S-nitrosothiol (SNO) formation; SNO uptake has recently been shown to be mediated in some cell types via system L-type amino acid transporters (LAT-1, 2). Inhaled NO therapy may exert some biological effects via SNO formation. We therefore sought to determine if pulmonary epithelial SNO uptake depended on LAT or peptide transporter 2 (PEPT2). Both LAT-1 and PEPT2 proteins were detected by immunoblot and immunocytochemistry in L2 cells and rat lung. We tested SNO uptake through the transporters by exposing rat alveolar epithelial cells (L2 and type II) to RSNOs: S-nitrosoglutathione, S-nitrosocysteinylglycine (SNO-Cys-Gly), S-nitrosocysteine (CSNO), and to NO donor diethylamine NONOate (DEA-NONOate). SNO was detected in cell lysates by ozone chemiluminescence. NO uptake was detected by fluorescence in alveolar epithelial cells loaded with 4-amino-5-methylamino-2',7'-difluorofluorescein (DAF-FM) diacetate cultured in submersion and exposed to RSNOs and DEA NONOate. Addition of L-Cys but not D-Cys to RSNOs or DEA NONOate increased SNO and DAF-FM signal that was inhibited by coincubation with LAT competitors. Incubation of cells with PEPT2 substrate SNO-Cys-Gly showed no increase in SNO or DAF-FM signal unless incubated with L-Cys. This was unaffected by PEPT2 inhibition. We conclude that RSNOs (thionitrites, S-nitrosothiols) and NO enter alveolar epithelial cells predominantly by S-nitrosation of L-Cys, which is then imported through LAT.

  9. Modulation pf pulmonary surfactant secretion from alveolar type II cells by cytoplasmic free calcium ([Ca2+]/sub i/)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ca2+ is regulator of a variety of cellular functions including exocytosis. TPA and terbutaline have been shown to stimulate surfactant secretion from alveolar type II cells. The authors examined changes in [Ca2+]/sub i/ and surfactant secretion by secretagogues in primary culture of alveolar type II cells. Cells were isolated from adult rats and were cultured for 24 h with 3H-choline to label phosphatidylcholine. Percent secretion was determined by counting the lipids of cells and medium; cytotoxicity was excluded by measuring lactate dehydrogenase as cells and medium. [Ca2+]/sub i/ was determined by measuring quin2 fluroescence of cells cultured on a glass coverslip. Ionomycin increased secretion as well as [Ca2+] in dose dependent manner at the concentration from 25 to 400 nM. Ionomycin (50 nM) increased terbutaline-induced secretion in a synergistic manner but only increased TPA-induced secretion in an additive manner. Terbutaline mobilized [Ca2+]/sub i/ from intracellular stores and increased [Ca2+]/sub i/ by 20% from a basal level of 140 nM. TPA itself did not change [Ca2+]/sub i/ but inhibited the effect of terbutaline on [Ca2+]/sub i/. Loading of quin2 in the absence of extracellular calcium lowered [Ca2+]/sub i/ from 143 nM to 31 nM. Lowering [Ca2+]/sub i/ inhibited TPA- or terbutaline-induced secretion by 22% and 40% respectively. These results indicate that [Ca2+]/sub i/ effects cAMp-induced secretion more than protein kinase C-mediated secretion in alveolar type II cells

  10. Modulation pf pulmonary surfactant secretion from alveolar type II cells by cytoplasmic free calcium ((Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sano, K.; Voelker, D.R.; Mason, R.J.

    1986-05-01

    Ca/sup 2 +/ is regulator of a variety of cellular functions including exocytosis. TPA and terbutaline have been shown to stimulate surfactant secretion from alveolar type II cells. The authors examined changes in (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/ and surfactant secretion by secretagogues in primary culture of alveolar type II cells. Cells were isolated from adult rats and were cultured for 24 h with /sup 3/H-choline to label phosphatidylcholine. Percent secretion was determined by counting the lipids of cells and medium; cytotoxicity was excluded by measuring lactate dehydrogenase as cells and medium. (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/ was determined by measuring quin2 fluroescence of cells cultured on a glass coverslip. Ionomycin increased secretion as well as (Ca/sup 2 +/) in dose dependent manner at the concentration from 25 to 400 nM. Ionomycin (50 nM) increased terbutaline-induced secretion in a synergistic manner but only increased TPA-induced secretion in an additive manner. Terbutaline mobilized (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/ from intracellular stores and increased (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/ by 20% from a basal level of 140 nM. TPA itself did not change (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/ but inhibited the effect of terbutaline on (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/. Loading of quin2 in the absence of extracellular calcium lowered (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/ from 143 nM to 31 nM. Lowering (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/ inhibited TPA- or terbutaline-induced secretion by 22% and 40% respectively. These results indicate that (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/ effects cAMp-induced secretion more than protein kinase C-mediated secretion in alveolar type II cells.

  11. Preterm labor and preterm premature rupture of membranes have a different pattern in the involved compartments of acute histologoic chorioamnionitis and/or funisitis: Patho-physiologic implication related to different clinical manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan-Wook; Park, Joong Shin; Moon, Kyung Chul; Jun, Jong Kwan; Yoon, Bo Hyun

    2016-06-01

    It is unknown whether histo-topographic findings about the involved compartments (i.e., choriodecidua, amnion, chorionic-plate) of acute-histologic chorioamnionitis (acute-HCA) and/or funisitis according to the presence or absence of intra-amniotic inflammation (IAI) and/or fetal inflammatory response syndrome (FIRS) are different between preterm labor and intact membranes (PTL) and preterm premature rupture of membranes (preterm-PROM). The involved compartments of acute-HCA and/or funisitis were examined in 161 singleton preterm-births (preterm-PROM (n = 73). The study-population was divided into IAI(-)/FIRS(-), IAI(+)/FIRS(-), and IAI(+)/FIRS(+) groups according to the presence or absence of IAI (amniotic-fluid MMP-8 ≥ 23 ng/ml) and/or FIRS (umbilical-cord plasma CRP ≥ 200 ng/ml). Histological inflammation was not detected in any-compartment except choriodecidua in IAI(-)/FIRS(-) group with PTL while inflammation appeared in all-compartment0s (choriodeciduitis-46.2 %; amnionitis-23.1 %; funisitis-30.8 %; chorionic-plate inflammation-7.7 %) in IAI(-)/FIRS(-) group with preterm-PROM. IAI(+)/FIRS(-) group had a significantly higher frequency of inflammation in each-compartment than IAI(-)/FIRS(-) group in PTL (each-for P preterm-PROM (each-for P > 0.1). However, IAI(+)/FIRS(+) group had a significantly higher rate of inflammation in each compartment than IAI(+)/FIRS(-) group in both PTL and preterm-PROM (each-for P preterm-PROM had a different pattern in the involved compartments of acute-HCA and/or funisitis in the IAI(-)/FIRS(--) group and in the change of involved compartments from IAI(-)/FIRS(-) to IAI(+)/FIRS(-).

  12. Mechanisms of pulmonary fibrosis. Spontaneous release of the alveolar macrophage-derived growth factor in the interstitial lung disorders.

    OpenAIRE

    Bitterman, P B; Adelberg, S; Crystal, R G

    1983-01-01

    Interstitial lung disorders are characterized both by a chronic inflammation of the lower respiratory tract that includes increased numbers of activated alveolar macrophages and by increased numbers of fibroblasts within the alveolar wall. Since alveolar macrophages from normal individuals can be activated to release a growth factor for lung fibroblasts (alveolar macrophage-derived growth factor [AMDGF]), we hypothesized that the activated alveolar macrophages within the lower respiratory tra...

  13. Anti-inflammatory and Anti-resorptive Effects of Atorvastatin on Alveolar Bone Loss in Wistar Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goes, Paula; Lima, Neiberg Alcântara; Rodrigues, José Ariévilo Gurgel; Benevides, Norma Maria Barros; Brito, Gerly Anne Castro; Lima, Vilma

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and anti-resorptive effect of atorvastatin (ATV) in an experimental alveolar bone loss (ABL) model. Wistar rats were subjected to ligature placement around the maxillary second molar for 11 days. The animals received 0.9% saline (2 mL/kg) or ATV (0.3, 3 or 27 mg/kg) daily by gavage. ABL was evaluated by resorption area and histopathological analysis. Serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BALP) activity was also evaluated. Leukogram was performed at 0 h, 6th h, 2nd, 7th and 11th days. Kidney and liver conditions and the body mass variation were analyzed. ATV (3 and 27 mg/kg) inhibited ABL by 39% and 56%, respectively. Histopathological analysis showed that ATV 27 mg/kg prevented ABL and cemental resorption, and inflammatory cell infiltration induced by ligature. ATV (27 mg/kg) prevented serum BALP levels reduction. ATV (27 mg/kg) prevented leukocytosis and did not affect either kidney or liver function nor body mass weight. ATV showed a protecting effect in the ligature-induced periodontitis, without affecting system parameters, by inhibition of inflammatory process and by its anabolic activity on the alveolar bone. PMID:27224558

  14. Enolase 1 (ENO1 and protein disulfide-isomerase associated 3 (PDIA3 regulate Wnt/β-catenin-driven trans-differentiation of murine alveolar epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Mutze

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The alveolar epithelium represents a major site of tissue destruction during lung injury. It consists of alveolar epithelial type I (ATI and type II (ATII cells. ATII cells are capable of self-renewal and exert progenitor function for ATI cells upon alveolar epithelial injury. Cell differentiation pathways enabling this plasticity and allowing for proper repair, however, are poorly understood. Here, we applied proteomics, expression analysis and functional studies in primary murine ATII cells to identify proteins and molecular mechanisms involved in alveolar epithelial plasticity. Mass spectrometry of cultured ATII cells revealed a reduction of carbonyl reductase 2 (CBR2 and an increase in enolase 1 (ENO1 and protein disulfide-isomerase associated 3 (PDIA3 protein expression during ATII-to-ATI cell trans-differentiation. This was accompanied by increased Wnt/β-catenin signaling, as analyzed by qRT-PCR and immunoblotting. Notably, ENO1 and PDIA3, along with T1α (podoplanin; an ATI cell marker, exhibited decreased protein expression upon pharmacological and molecular Wnt/β-catenin inhibition in cultured ATII cells, whereas CBR2 levels were stabilized. Moreover, we analyzed primary ATII cells from mice with bleomycin-induced lung injury, a model exhibiting activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling in vivo. We observed reduced CBR2 significantly correlating with surfactant protein C (SFTPC, whereas ENO1 and PDIA3 along with T1α were increased in injured ATII cells. Finally, siRNA-mediated knockdown of ENO1, as well as PDIA3, in primary ATII cells led to reduced T1α expression, indicating diminished cell trans-differentiation. Our data thus identified proteins involved in ATII-to-ATI cell trans-differentiation and suggest a Wnt/β-catenin-driven functional role of ENO1 and PDIA3 in alveolar epithelial cell plasticity in lung injury and repair.

  15. TGF-β1 induces human alveolar epithelial to mesenchymal cell transition (EMT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamimura Takashi

    2005-06-01

    expression was also evidenced. TGF-β1-induced EMT occurred through phosphorylation of Smad2 and was inhibited by Smad2 gene silencing; MEK inhibitors failed to attenuate either EMT-associated Smad2 phosphorylation or the observed phenotypic changes. Conclusion Our study shows that TGF-β1 induces A549 alveolar epithelial cells to undergo EMT via Smad2 activation. Our data support the concept of EMT in lung epithelial cells, and suggest the need for further studies to investigate the phenomenon.

  16. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage resulting from Pauci-immune pulmonary capillaritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia Salarini Monteiro

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available A 27 year-old female patient, cocaine user, presenting hemoptysis and progressive dyspnea with onset 48 hours prior to hospital admission, without any other signs or symptoms. Serum tests for infectious diseases, collagen disorders and vasculitis were negative. Urinalysis was normal. Computed tomography of the chest showed diffuse alveolar infiltrate, affecting mainly the lower left lobe. A thoracoscopic lung biopsy was performed to clarify the diagnosis. The histopathological findings showed capillaritis and diffuse intra-alveolar hemorrhage. Treated with steroid and cyclophosphamide pulse therapy, a good clinical and radiographical response was obtained. The recently described pauci-immune pulmonary capillaritis is characterized by the presence of isolated pulmonary capillaritis and negative serum testing for auto-immune diseases.

  17. Alveolar damage in AIDS-related Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benfield, T L; Prentø, P; Junge, Jette;

    1997-01-01

    biopsy specimens to compare pathologic features of P carinii pneumonia and other HIV-related lung diseases. DESIGN AND PATIENTS: Thirty-seven consecutive HIV-infected patients undergoing a diagnostic bronchoscopy. RESULTS: P carinii pneumonia was characterized by an increase in inflammation, edema......, exudate, fibrosts, type II pneumocyte proliferation, and cellular infiltration of the alveolar wall when compared with other lung diseases (all p type I pneumocyte. Erosion of type I pneumocytes was observed in 13 of 15 patients...... with P carinii pneumonia, whereas none without P carinii pneumonia had this finding (p type II pneumocyte was not observed. CONCLUSION: Inflammation, interstitial fibrosis, and alveolar epithelial erosion are characteristic features of P carinii pneumonia. The changes may form...

  18. Alveolar bone loss in osteoporosis: a loaded and cellular affair?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonasson, Grethe; Rythén, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Maxillary and mandibular bone mirror skeletal bone conditions. Bone remodeling happens at endosteal surfaces where the osteoclasts and osteoblasts are situated. More surfaces means more cells and remodeling. The bone turnover rate in the mandibular alveolar process is probably the fastest in the body; thus, the first signs of osteoporosis may be revealed here. Hormones, osteoporosis, and aging influence the alveolar process and the skeletal bones similarly, but differences in loading between loaded, half-loaded, and unloaded bones are important to consider. Bone mass is redistributed from one location to another where strength is needed. A sparse trabeculation in the mandibular premolar region (large intertrabecular spaces and thin trabeculae) is a reliable sign of osteopenia and a high skeletal fracture risk. Having dense trabeculation (small intertrabecular spaces and well-mineralized trabeculae) is generally advantageous to the individual because of the low fracture risk, but may imply some problems for the clinician.

  19. Rare Presentation of Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis Causing Acute Respiratory Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan R. Kroll

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP is a rare condition characterized by dysfunctional alveolar macrophages, which ineffectively clear surfactant and typically cause mild hypoxemia. Characteristic Computed Tomography findings are septal reticulations superimposed on ground-glass opacities in a crazy paving pattern, with a clear juxtaposition between affected and unaffected parenchyma. While traditionally PAP was diagnosed via biopsy, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL is usually sufficient; the fluid appears milky, and on microscopic examination there are foamy macrophages with eosinophilic granules and extracellular hyaline material that is Periodic Acid-Schiff positive. Standard therapy is whole lung lavage (WLL, although novel treatments are under development. The case presented is a 55-year-old woman with six months of progressive dyspnea, who developed hypoxemic respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation; she had typical findings of PAP on imaging and BAL. WLL was ultimately successful in restoring adequate oxygenation. Respiratory failure of this magnitude is a rare finding in PAP.

  20. Cytokinetic study of alveolar macrophage renewal in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pools of alveolar macrophages and monocytes were measured by combining morphometry and the extraction of cells by lavage. The turnover rate of macrophages was evaluated by measuring the clearance rate of 59Fe2O3 previously administered by aerosols. The labeling index and S phase duration of cells in alveoli and lung capillaries were determined by autoradiography after 3H-labeled thymidine and 5-125Iododeoxyuridine incorporation. The disappearance rate was determined after specific incorporation of 125Iododeoxyuridine in deoxyribonuclease (DNA) of alveolar macrophages. Steady-state parameters are presented. Under healthy conditions there are almost no macrophages in the interstitium space. Lung capillaries must be considered as a maturation compartment for macrophages before the last dividing stage in the alveoli. This is consistent with the large enrichment of monocytes in the lung and the ability of some of these monocytes to divide inside the capillaries

  1. Alveolar bone loss in osteoporosis: a loaded and cellular affair?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonasson, Grethe; Rythén, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Maxillary and mandibular bone mirror skeletal bone conditions. Bone remodeling happens at endosteal surfaces where the osteoclasts and osteoblasts are situated. More surfaces means more cells and remodeling. The bone turnover rate in the mandibular alveolar process is probably the fastest in the body; thus, the first signs of osteoporosis may be revealed here. Hormones, osteoporosis, and aging influence the alveolar process and the skeletal bones similarly, but differences in loading between loaded, half-loaded, and unloaded bones are important to consider. Bone mass is redistributed from one location to another where strength is needed. A sparse trabeculation in the mandibular premolar region (large intertrabecular spaces and thin trabeculae) is a reliable sign of osteopenia and a high skeletal fracture risk. Having dense trabeculation (small intertrabecular spaces and well-mineralized trabeculae) is generally advantageous to the individual because of the low fracture risk, but may imply some problems for the clinician. PMID:27471408

  2. Alveolar macrophages regulate neutrophil recruitment in endotoxin-induced lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyes Livia

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alveolar macrophages play an important role during the development of acute inflammatory lung injury. In the present study, in vivo alveolar macrophage depletion was performed by intratracheal application of dichloromethylene diphosphonate-liposomes in order to study the role of these effector cells in the early endotoxin-induced lung injury. Methods Lipopolysaccharide was applied intratracheally and the inflammatory reaction was assessed 4 hours later. Neutrophil accumulation and expression of inflammatory mediators were determined. To further analyze in vivo observations, in vitro experiments with alveolar epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages were performed. Results A 320% increase of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was observed in macrophage-depleted compared to macrophage-competent lipopolysaccharide-animals. This neutrophil recruitment was also confirmed in the interstitial space. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was significantly increased in the absence of alveolar macrophages. This phenomenon was underlined by in vitro experiments with alveolar epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages. Neutralizing monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in the airways diminished neutrophil accumulation. Conclusion These data suggest that alveolar macorphages play an important role in early endotoxin-induced lung injury. They prevent neutrophil influx by controlling monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 production through alveolar epithelial cells. Alveolar macrophages might therefore possess robust anti-inflammatory effects.

  3. An automatic early stage alveolar-bone-resorption evaluation method on digital dental panoramic radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Muramatsu, Chisako; Hara, Takeshi; Suzuki, Hiroki; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    Periodontal disease is a kind of typical dental diseases, which affects many adults. The presence of alveolar bone resorption, which can be observed from dental panoramic radiographs, is one of the most important signs of the progression of periodontal disease. Automatically evaluating alveolar-bone resorption is of important clinic meaning in dental radiology. The purpose of this study was to propose a novel system for automated alveolar-bone-resorption evaluation from digital dental panoramic radiographs for the first time. The proposed system enables visualization and quantitative evaluation of alveolar bone resorption degree surrounding the teeth. It has the following procedures: (1) pre-processing for a test image; (2) detection of tooth root apices with Gabor filter and curve fitting for the root apex line; (3) detection of features related with alveolar bone by using image phase congruency map and template matching and curving fitting for the alveolar line; (4) detection of occlusion line with selected Gabor filter; (5) finally, evaluation of the quantitative alveolar-bone-resorption degree in the area surrounding teeth by simply computing the average ratio of the height of the alveolar bone and the height of the teeth. The proposed scheme was applied to 30 patient cases of digital panoramic radiographs, with alveolar bone resorption of different stages. Our initial trial on these test cases indicates that the quantitative evaluation results are correlated with the alveolar-boneresorption degree, although the performance still needs further improvement. Therefore it has potential clinical practicability.

  4. Injury of the Inferior Alveolar Nerve during Implant Placement: a Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gintaras Juodzbalys

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of present article was to review aetiological factors, mechanism, clinical symptoms, and diagnostic methods as well as to create treatment guidelines for the management of inferior alveolar nerve injury during dental implant placement.Material and Methods: Literature was selected through a search of PubMed, Embase and Cochrane electronic databases. The keywords used for search were inferior alveolar nerve injury, inferior alveolar nerve injuries, inferior alveolar nerve injury implant, inferior alveolar nerve damage, inferior alveolar nerve paresthesia and inferior alveolar nerve repair. The search was restricted to English language articles, published from 1972 to November 2010. Additionally, a manual search in the major anatomy, dental implant, periodontal and oral surgery journals and books were performed. The publications there selected by including clinical, human anatomy and physiology studies.Results: In total 136 literature sources were obtained and reviewed. Aetiological factors of inferior alveolar nerve injury, risk factors, mechanism, clinical sensory nerve examination methods, clinical symptoms and treatment were discussed. Guidelines were created to illustrate the methods used to prevent and manage inferior alveolar nerve injury before or after dental implant placement.Conclusions: The damage of inferior alveolar nerve during the dental implant placement can be a serious complication. Clinician should recognise and exclude aetiological factors leading to nerve injury. Proper presurgery planning, timely diagnosis and treatment are the key to avoid nerve sensory disturbances management.

  5. Oxidative Stress, Cell Death, and Other Damage to Alveolar Epithelial Cells Induced by Cigarette Smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagai A

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor in the development of various lung diseases, including pulmonary emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, and lung cancer. The mechanisms of these diseases include alterations in alveolar epithelial cells, which are essential in the maintenance of normal alveolar architecture and function. Following cigarette smoking, alterations in alveolar epithelial cells induce an increase in epithelial permeability, a decrease in surfactant production, the inappropriate production of inflammatory cytokines and growth factors, and an increased risk of lung cancer. However, the most deleterious effect of cigarette smoke on alveolar epithelial cells is cell death, i.e., either apoptosis or necrosis depending on the magnitude of cigarette smoke exposure. Cell death induced by cigarette smoke exposure can largely be accounted for by an enhancement in oxidative stress. In fact, cigarette smoke contains and generates many reactive oxygen species that damage alveolar epithelial cells. Whether apoptosis and/or necrosis in alveolar epithelial cells is enhanced in healthy cigarette smokers is presently unclear. However, recent evidence indicates that the apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells and alveolar endothelial cells is involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema, an important cigarette smoke-induced lung disease characterized by the loss of alveolar structures. This review will discuss oxidative stress, cell death, and other damage to alveolar epithelial cells induced by cigarette smoke.

  6. Secondary Alveolar Bone Grafting (CLEFTSiS) 2007-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Michael; Rae, Jennifer; Paterson, Paul; Gilgrass, Toby; Devlin, Mark; McIntyre, Grant

    2016-03-01

    Objective To determine whether alveolar bone graft outcomes for unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate patients have continued to improve since the reorganization of cleft services in Scotland in 2000. Design Retrospective analysis of postoperative anterior occlusal radiographs. Patients and Participants Eighty-one of 106 patients who were eligible for alveolar bone grafting between 2007 and 2010 had suitable postoperative radiographs available. Interventions Twenty-seven percent of the patients (n = 22) had presurgical orthodontic intervention. All patients underwent alveolar bone grafting with bone harvested from the iliac crest. Main Outcome Measures The Kindelan bone-fill index was used to evaluate success. Weighted kappa statistics were used to assess intra- and interobserver reproducibility. A comparison was made with results from 2000 to 2004 to assess any improvement. Chi-square tests (or Fisher exact test) were used to determine whether outcomes differed depending on the laterality of the cleft, use of presurgical expansion, or age at bone grafting. Results Interobserver scoring agreement was good (weighted kappa = .383). Intraobserver reproducibility was greater (weighted kappas of .835 and .620). Success was achieved in 99% of bone grafts, compared with 76% in the period from 2000 to 2004 (P < .001). There was no statistically significant relationship between the laterality of the cleft (P = 1.000), use of presurgical expansion (P = 1.000), or age at time of bone grafting and outcome (P = .259). Conclusion Scottish secondary alveolar bone graft outcomes improved during 2007 to 2010 in comparison to the 2000 to 2004 results. PMID:26914161

  7. Alveolar bone loss: mechanisms, potential therapeutic targets, and interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intini, G; Katsuragi, Y; Kirkwood, K L; Yang, S

    2014-05-01

    This article reviews recent research into mechanisms underlying bone resorption and highlights avenues of investigation that may generate new therapies to combat alveolar bone loss in periodontitis. Several proteins, signaling pathways, stem cells, and dietary supplements are discussed as they relate to periodontal bone loss and regeneration. RGS12 is a crucial protein that mediates osteoclastogenesis and bone destruction, and a potential therapeutic target. RGS12 likely regulates osteoclast differentiation through regulating calcium influx to control the calcium oscillation-NFATc1 pathway. A working model for RGS10 and RGS12 in the regulation of Ca(2+) oscillations during osteoclast differentiation is proposed. Initiation of inflammation depends on host cell-microbe interactions, including the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Oral p38 inhibitors reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced bone destruction in a rat periodontitis model but showed unsatisfactory safety profiles. The p38 substrate MK2 is a more specific therapeutic target with potentially superior tolerability. Furthermore, MKP-1 shows anti-inflammatory activity, reducing inflammatory cytokine biosynthesis and bone resorption. Multipotent skeletal stem cell (SSC) populations exist within the bone marrow and periosteum of long bones. These bone-marrow-derived SSCs and periosteum-derived SSCs have shown therapeutic potential in several applications, including bone and periodontal regeneration. The existence of craniofacial bone-specific SSCs is suggested based on existing studies. The effects of calcium, vitamin D, and soy isoflavone supplementation on alveolar and skeletal bone loss in post-menopausal women were investigated. Supplementation resulted in stabilization of forearm bone mass density and a reduced rate of alveolar bone loss over 1 yr, compared with placebo. Periodontal attachment levels were also well-maintained and alveolar bone loss suppressed during 24 wk of

  8. Coronectomy - A viable alternative to prevent inferior alveolar nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Sagtani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Coronectomy is a relatively new method to prevent the risk of Inferior Alveolar Nerve (IAN injury during removal of lower third molars with limited scientific literature among Nepalese patients. Thus, a study was designed to evaluate coronectomy regarding its use, outcomes and complications.Materials and Methods: A descriptive study was conducted from December 2012 to December 2013 among patients attending Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, College of Dental Sciences, BP Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal for removal of mandibular third molars. After reviewing the radiograph for proximity of third molar to the IAN, coronectomy was advised. A written informed consent was obtained from the patients and coronectomy was performed. Patients were recalled after one week. The outcome measures in the follow-up visit were primary healing, pain, infection, dry socket, root exposure and IAN injury. The prevalence of IAN proximity of lower third molars and incidence of complications were calculated.Results: A total 300 mandibular third molars were extracted in 278 patients during the study period. Out of 300 impacted mandibular third molar, 41 (13.7% showed close proximity to inferior alveolar nerve . The incidence of complications and failed procedure was 7.4% among the patients who underwent coronectomy. During the follow up visit, persistent pain and root exposure was reported while other complications like inferior alveolar nerve injury, dry socket and infection was not experienced by the study patients.Conclusion: With a success rate of 92.6% among the 41 patients, coronectomy is a viable alternative to conventional total extraction for mandibular third molars who have a higher risk for damage to the inferior alveolar nerve.JCMS Nepal. 2015;11(3:1-5.

  9. Myelinated axon counts of human inferior alveolar nerves.

    OpenAIRE

    Heasman, P A; Beynon, A D

    1987-01-01

    A quantitative, postmortem study of 36 human inferior alveolar nerves is described. The total myelinated fibre count (TMFC) of nerves was not related to sex or age of the subjects but significant positive correlations were found between TMFC and subject body weight in both dentate (r = 0.616) and edentulous (r = 0.676) groups. The TMFC was significantly lower in nerves from edentulous subjects than in nerves from dentate subjects.

  10. Alveolar bone loss: mechanisms, potential therapeutic targets, and interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intini, G; Katsuragi, Y; Kirkwood, K L; Yang, S

    2014-05-01

    This article reviews recent research into mechanisms underlying bone resorption and highlights avenues of investigation that may generate new therapies to combat alveolar bone loss in periodontitis. Several proteins, signaling pathways, stem cells, and dietary supplements are discussed as they relate to periodontal bone loss and regeneration. RGS12 is a crucial protein that mediates osteoclastogenesis and bone destruction, and a potential therapeutic target. RGS12 likely regulates osteoclast differentiation through regulating calcium influx to control the calcium oscillation-NFATc1 pathway. A working model for RGS10 and RGS12 in the regulation of Ca(2+) oscillations during osteoclast differentiation is proposed. Initiation of inflammation depends on host cell-microbe interactions, including the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Oral p38 inhibitors reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced bone destruction in a rat periodontitis model but showed unsatisfactory safety profiles. The p38 substrate MK2 is a more specific therapeutic target with potentially superior tolerability. Furthermore, MKP-1 shows anti-inflammatory activity, reducing inflammatory cytokine biosynthesis and bone resorption. Multipotent skeletal stem cell (SSC) populations exist within the bone marrow and periosteum of long bones. These bone-marrow-derived SSCs and periosteum-derived SSCs have shown therapeutic potential in several applications, including bone and periodontal regeneration. The existence of craniofacial bone-specific SSCs is suggested based on existing studies. The effects of calcium, vitamin D, and soy isoflavone supplementation on alveolar and skeletal bone loss in post-menopausal women were investigated. Supplementation resulted in stabilization of forearm bone mass density and a reduced rate of alveolar bone loss over 1 yr, compared with placebo. Periodontal attachment levels were also well-maintained and alveolar bone loss suppressed during 24 wk of

  11. Virulent Coxiella burnetii Pathotypes Productively Infect Primary Human Alveolar Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Graham, Joseph G.; MacDonald, Laura J.; Hussain, S. Kauser; Sharma, Uma M.; Kurten, Richard C.; Voth, Daniel E.

    2013-01-01

    The intracellular bacterial pathogen Coxiella burnetii is a category B select agent that causes human Q fever. In vivo, C. burnetii targets alveolar macrophages wherein the pathogen replicates in a lysosome-like parasitophorous vacuole (PV). In vitro, C. burnetii infects a variety of cultured cell lines that have collectively been used to model the pathogen’s infectious cycle. However, differences in the cellular response to infection have been observed, and virulent C. burnetii isolate infec...

  12. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis in children: a case series

    OpenAIRE

    Seyyed Ahmad Tabatabaei; Abdollah Karimi; Sedigheh Rafiee Tabatabaei; Badiozzaman Radpay; Farzaneh Jadali; Farideh Shiva; Mana Hadipour Jahromy

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, (PAP) is a rare disease of unknown etiology, characterized by accumulation of intraalveolar proteinaceous material which is rich in lipid and positive on periodic acid-Schiff stain. Two clinically different pediatric types have been defined as congenital PAP which is fulminant and fatal, and a late-onset PAP which is similar to the adult form and less severe. Eight children with late-onset PAP were hospitalized from 1998 to 2005 in Mofid Children Hospital. Char...

  13. Accumulation of surfactant protein D in human pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Crouch, E; Persson, A.; Chang, D.

    1993-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a collagenous calcium-dependent carbohydrate-binding protein that is structurally related to the serum mannose-binding proteins and pulmonary surfactant protein A. SP-D was initially characterized as a biosynthetic product of freshly isolated rat type II cells and first purified in chemical amounts from bronchoalveolar lavage of rats with silica-induced alveolar lipoproteinosis. The present studies describe the characterization of human SP-D isolated from therap...

  14. Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis in Workers at an Indium Processing Facility

    OpenAIRE

    Cummings, Kristin J.; Donat, Walter E.; Ettensohn, David B; Roggli, Victor L; Ingram, Peter; Kreiss, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    Two cases of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, including one death, occurred in workers at a facility producing indium-tin oxide (ITO), a compound used in recent years to make flat panel displays. Both workers were exposed to airborne ITO dust and had indium in lung tissue specimens. One worker was tested for autoantibodies to granulocytemacrophage–colonystimulating factor (GM-CSF) and found to have an elevated level. These cases suggest that inhalational exposure to ITO causes pulmonary alveol...

  15. Nocardial brain abscess in a patient with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    OpenAIRE

    Shirani, Kiana; Poulsen, Asger Nyborg; Hakamifard, Atousa

    2015-01-01

    Brain abscesses caused by Nocardia are rare but have a very high mortality and specific requirements of antibiotic treatment. Nocardial brain abscesses are mainly found in patients with predisposing conditions such as pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP), a disease associated with chronic exposure to silica dust. We present a case of multiple nocardial brain abscesses in a man with PAP probably due to long-term occupational exposure to silica dust. Conclusively, in patients presenting brain a...

  16. Alveolar proteinosis: diagnosis and treatment over a 10-year period.

    OpenAIRE

    du Bois, R M; McAllister, W A; Branthwaite, M A

    1983-01-01

    Ten years' experience of using bronchoalveolar lavage in the treatment of 10 patients with alveolar proteinosis is reported. The diagnosis was often missed. The interval between onset of symptoms and diagnosis varied from six weeks to six years (median 2 years), so that the start of treatment was often delayed. Some patients experienced severe progressive disability before they had treatment. Whole-lung lavage proved to be a safe, repeatable procedure which provided symptomatic, physiological...

  17. Endogenous lipoid pneumonia preceding diagnosis of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoon, James W; Hernandez, Michelle L; Roehrs, Phillip A; Noah, Terry L; Leigh, Margaret W; Byerley, Julie S

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is an under-reported and under-diagnosed condition, with a high percentage of cases found on autopsy or late stage disease. The etiology of PAP includes genetic, primary (anti-granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor antibodies) and secondary (oncologic, rheumatologic, infectious, chemical and immunologic) causes. Here, we present the first reported pediatric case of endogenous lipoid pneumonia and non-specific interstitial pneumonitis preceding the development of PAP. PMID:25103284

  18. Acute pulmonary alveolar proteinosis due to exposure to cotton dust

    OpenAIRE

    Thind Gurcharan

    2009-01-01

    Secondary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is rare but may occur in association with malignancy, certain infections, and exposure to inorganic or organic dust and some toxic fumes. This case report describes the second recorded case of PAP due to exposure to cotton dust. A 24-year-old man developed PAP after working as a spinner for eight years without respiratory protection. He was admitted as an emergency patient with very severe dyspnea for four months and cough for several years. Ches...

  19. Cell mechanics of alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) and macrophages (AMs).

    OpenAIRE

    Féréol, Sophie; Fodil, Redouane; Pelle, Gabriel; Louis, Bruno; Isabey, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Cell mechanics provides an integrated view of many biological phenomena which are intimately related to cell structure and function. Because breathing constitutes a sustained motion synonymous with life, pulmonary cells are normally designed to support permanent cyclic stretch without breaking, while receiving mechanical cues from their environment. The authors study the mechanical responses of alveolar cells, namely epithelial cells and macrophages, exposed to well-controlled mechanical stre...

  20. Biomimetics of fetal alveolar flow phenomena using microfluidics

    OpenAIRE

    Tenenbaum-Katan, Janna; Fishler, Rami; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Sznitman, Josué

    2015-01-01

    At the onset of life in utero, the respiratory system begins as a liquid-filled tubular organ and undergoes significant morphological changes during fetal development towards establishing a respiratory organ optimized for gas exchange. As airspace morphology evolves, respiratory alveolar flows have been hypothesized to exhibit evolving flow patterns. In the present study, we have investigated flow topologies during increasing phases of embryonic life within an anatomically inspired microfluid...

  1. Alveolar Surfactant Homeostasis and the Pathogenesis of Pulmonary Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Wert, Susan E.; Weaver, Timothy E.

    2010-01-01

    The alveolar region of the lung creates an extensive epithelial surface that mediates the transfer of oxygen and carbon dioxide required for respiration after birth. Maintenance of pulmonary function depends on the function of type II epithelial cells that synthesize and secrete pulmonary surfactant lipids and proteins, reducing the collapsing forces created at the air-liquid interface in the alveoli. Genetic and acquired disorders associated with the surfactant system cause both acute and ch...

  2. Alveolar Ridge Augmentation with Titanium Mesh. A Retrospective Clinical Study

    OpenAIRE

    Poli, Pier P; Beretta, Mario; Cicciù, Marco; Maiorana, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    An adequate amount of bone all around the implant surface is essential in order to obtain long-term success of implant restoration. Several techniques have been described to augment alveolar bone volume in critical clinical situations, including guided bone regeneration, based on the use of barrier membranes to prevent ingrowth of the epithelial and gingival connective tissue cells. To achieve this goal, the use of barriers made of titanium micromesh has been advocated. A total of 13 patients...

  3. Male Sex is Associated with a Reduced Alveolar Epithelial Sodium Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltofen, Till; Haase, Melanie; Thome, Ulrich H.; Laube, Mandy

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is the most frequent pulmonary complication in preterm infants. RDS incidence differs between genders, which has been called the male disadvantage. Besides maturation of the surfactant system, Na+ transport driven alveolar fluid clearance is crucial for the prevention of RDS. Na+ transport is mediated by the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) and the Na,K-ATPase, therefore potential differences in their expression or activity possibly contribute to the gender imbalance observed in RDS. Fetal distal lung epithelial (FDLE) cells of rat fetuses were separated by sex and analyzed regarding expression and activity of the Na+ transporters. Ussing chamber experiments showed a higher baseline short-circuit current (ISC) and amiloride-sensitive ΔISC in FDLE cells of female origin. In addition, maximal amiloride-sensitive ΔISC and maximal ouabain-sensitive ΔISC of female cells were higher when measured in the presence of a permeabilized basolateral or apical membrane, respectively. The number of FDLE cells per fetus recoverable during cell isolation was also significantly higher in females. In addition, lung wet-to-dry weight ratio was lower in fetal and newborn female pups. Female derived FDLE cells had higher mRNA levels of the ENaC- and Na,K-ATPase subunits. Furthermore, estrogen (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) mRNA levels were higher in female cells, which might render female cells more responsive, while concentrations of placenta-derived sex steroids do not differ between both genders during fetal life. Inhibition of ER-β abolished the sex differences in Na+ transport and female cells were more responsive to estradiol stimulation. In conclusion, a higher alveolar Na+ transport, possibly attributable to a higher expression of hormone receptors in female FDLE cells, provides an explanation for the well known sex-related difference in RDS occurrence and outcome. PMID:26291531

  4. Male Sex is Associated with a Reduced Alveolar Epithelial Sodium Transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Till Kaltofen

    Full Text Available Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS is the most frequent pulmonary complication in preterm infants. RDS incidence differs between genders, which has been called the male disadvantage. Besides maturation of the surfactant system, Na+ transport driven alveolar fluid clearance is crucial for the prevention of RDS. Na+ transport is mediated by the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC and the Na,K-ATPase, therefore potential differences in their expression or activity possibly contribute to the gender imbalance observed in RDS. Fetal distal lung epithelial (FDLE cells of rat fetuses were separated by sex and analyzed regarding expression and activity of the Na+ transporters. Ussing chamber experiments showed a higher baseline short-circuit current (ISC and amiloride-sensitive ΔISC in FDLE cells of female origin. In addition, maximal amiloride-sensitive ΔISC and maximal ouabain-sensitive ΔISC of female cells were higher when measured in the presence of a permeabilized basolateral or apical membrane, respectively. The number of FDLE cells per fetus recoverable during cell isolation was also significantly higher in females. In addition, lung wet-to-dry weight ratio was lower in fetal and newborn female pups. Female derived FDLE cells had higher mRNA levels of the ENaC- and Na,K-ATPase subunits. Furthermore, estrogen (ER and progesterone receptor (PR mRNA levels were higher in female cells, which might render female cells more responsive, while concentrations of placenta-derived sex steroids do not differ between both genders during fetal life. Inhibition of ER-β abolished the sex differences in Na+ transport and female cells were more responsive to estradiol stimulation. In conclusion, a higher alveolar Na+ transport, possibly attributable to a higher expression of hormone receptors in female FDLE cells, provides an explanation for the well known sex-related difference in RDS occurrence and outcome.

  5. Alveolar echinococcosis of the liver. Findings of magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayasaka, Kazumasa; Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Okuhata, Yoshitaka; Yoshinobu, Takashi; Takemoto, Akiko; Himi, Kazuhisa; Mutoh, Haruomi [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine; Shuke, Noriyuki; Aburano, Tamio

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the findings of MR imaging obtained in patients with Echinococcus multilocularis involving the liver. For 10 patients with alveolar echinococcosis of the liver, the MR findings were compared with the histopathologic findings after biopsy or surgery. Conventional T1-weighted spin echo, T2-weighted spin echo and T1-weighted spin echo after Gd-DTPA were employed. The signal from the lesions of alveolar liver echinococcosis on T1-weighted images was hypointense in 16 of 23 lesions (69.6%), hyperintense in 4 (17.4%), and isointense in 3 (13.0%). The signal from the lesions on T2-weighted images was hyperintense in 20 lesions (87.0%), hypointense in 2 (8.7%), and isointense in one (4.3%). On using Gd-DTPA, 7 of 21 lesions (33.3%) were observed with rim enhancement, and 14 lesions (66.7%) were non-enhanced. We describe our clinical experience together with the various findings of MR imaging as observed in the patients with alveolar echinococcosis of the liver. MR imaging excels in visualizing a low-intensity rim and small cystic foci, with liquefaction necrotic foci displaying a variety of signal intensities. After Gd-DTPA administration, the surrounding inflammatory granulomatous foci could be more clearly visualized. (author).

  6. Effects of elastase and cigarette smoke on alveolar epithelial permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine whether instilled porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) increases alveolar epithelial permeability, the authors measured alveolar epithelium permeability X surface area (PS) for [14C]sucrose and 125I-bovine serum albumin in isolated perfused lungs from hamsters previously exposed to PPE and/or cigarette smoke. Saline (0.5 ml) with 0, 5, or 20 units PPE was instilled intratracheally in anesthetized hamsters. Those exposed to smoke for 4-6 wk received 0 or 5 units; PS was measured 3 h later. Nonsmokers received 0, 5, or 20 units; PS was measured 3 h, 24 h, or 5 days later. Control PS values were (cm3/s X 10(-4), +/- SE) 0.84 +/- 0.11 for sucrose and 0.030 +/- 0.006 for BSA. Three and 24 h following 20 units PPE, (PS)sucrose was twice the control valve. (PS)BSA was four times control at 3 h but not significantly increased at 24 h. Five days after PPE both were back to control levels. Five units PPE or smoke exposure alone caused no PS changes. Smoke exposure and 5 units PPE caused (PS)sucrose to increase markedly (1.85 +/- 0.32); (PS)BSA was not significantly increased (0.076 +/- 0.026). Thus, instilled PPE causes reversible increases in alveolar epithelial PS; cigarette smoking potentiates this effect

  7. Quality assessment of systematic reviews on alveolar socket preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraschini, V; Barboza, E Dos S P

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this overview was to evaluate and compare the quality of systematic reviews, with or without meta-analysis, that have evaluated studies on techniques or biomaterials used for the preservation of alveolar sockets post tooth extraction in humans. An electronic search was conducted without date restrictions using the Medline/PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science databases up to April 2015. Eligibility criteria included systematic reviews, with or without meta-analysis, focused on the preservation of post-extraction alveolar sockets in humans. Two independent authors assessed the quality of the included reviews using AMSTAR and the checklist proposed by Glenny et al. in 2003. After the selection process, 12 systematic reviews were included. None of these reviews obtained the maximum score using the quality assessment tools implemented, and the results of the analyses were highly variable. A significant statistical correlation was observed between the scores of the two checklists. A wide structural and methodological variability was observed between the systematic reviews published on the preservation of alveolar sockets post tooth extraction. None of the reviews evaluated obtained the maximum score using the two quality assessment tools implemented. PMID:27061478

  8. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage in isolated pulmonary capillaritis: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medenica Milić

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pulmonary capillaritis is a small-diameter vessel vasculitis of the lung, which may occur in isolation as in isolated pauci-immune capillaritis, usually associated with the systemic vasculitis but it could be also related to collagen vascular diseases and in lung transplant rejection. Pulmonary capillaritis leads to diffuse alveolar hemorrhage. The clinical presentation includes symptoms like dyspnea, cough, pleuritic chest pain, fever and hemoptysis. Case Outline. A 48 year-old female patient, smoker, presented with progressive dyspnea. Serum tests for infectious diseases, collagen disorders and vasculitis were negative. Radiography and computed tomography of the chest showed diffuse alveolar infiltrates. Cytology of bronchoalveolar lavage showed presence of siderophages. A thoracoscopic lung biopsy was performed to clarify the diagnosis. The histopathological findings showed capillaritis and diffuse intraalveolar hemorrhage. Patient was treated with steroids, and good clinical and minimal radiographic response was obtained. Recently described pauci-immune pulmonary capillaritis has been characterized as p-ANCA (antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies negative isolated pulmonary capillaritis. Conclusion. Isolated pauci-immune pulmonary capillaritis is a rare disease. First clinical manifestations of the isolated pulmonary capillaritis were the symptoms of progressive dyspnea, radiographic and functional signs of the interstitial fibrosis. At the same time, the signs of extrapulmonary diseases were not found. Presence of siderophages in bronchoalveolar lavage indicated alveolar hemorrhage. Histopathological tests of the sample of the lung pointed to pulmonary capillaritis and intraalveolar hemorrhage. Prolonged treatment with corticosteroids was necessary.

  9. Primary alveolar soft-part sarcoma of stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagihashi, S; Yagihashi, N; Hase, Y; Nagai, K; Alguacil-Garcia, A

    1991-04-01

    A case of primary gastric alveolar soft-part sarcoma is presented. The tumor was found in the gastric remnant of a 67-year-old male who had undergone partial gastrectomy due to hemorrhagic gastric ulcer 13 years before. It was located mostly in the submucosa arising from the muscularis propria. The large eosinophilic cells showed the characteristic alveolar compartmentalization and contained intracytoplasmic periodic acid-Schiff-positive granules and typical crystals. Numerous electron-opaque secretory granules in the tumor cell cytoplasm, in addition to crystals of 9 nm periodicity, were confirmed at the ultrastructural levels. Immunostaining failed to detect muscle-related antigens. In contrast, methionine-enkephalin and neuropeptide Y appeared positive in the tumor cells. Interstitial spindle cells showed an occasional positivity to S-100. This is the first case of such a tumor occurring in the gastrointestinal tract, and the findings suggest that gastric alveolar soft-part sarcomas may have a different origin from those arising in the skeleton.

  10. Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis in Children: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    seyyed Ahmad Tabatabaei

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis(PAP is a rare disease of unknown etiology, characterized by the accumulation of proteinoceous material in the alveoli that is rich in lipid and is positive on periodic acid-Schiff(PAS stain. PAP is rare in children. Two forms are encountered in pediatric practice: congenital alveolar proteinosis (CAP and a later–onset form that is generally less severe. Broncho-alveolar lavage is the key to diagnosis. Therapeutic lung lavages are the only effective treatment for severe cases. Other therapeutic trials have been proposed such as: lung transplantation, adminstration of GM- CSF and gene-therapy. This case series presents six cases of PAP which were diagnosed by open lung biopsy in Mofid children hospital in Tehran capital city over a three-year period (2003–2006 and one in 1998. The aim of the present study was to provide detailed data on the characteristics of these patients and the methods of diagnosis and treatment.

  11. Alveolar epithelial type II cell: defender of the alveolus revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fehrenbach Heinz

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In 1977, Mason and Williams developed the concept of the alveolar epithelial type II (AE2 cell as a defender of the alveolus. It is well known that AE2 cells synthesise, secrete, and recycle all components of the surfactant that regulates alveolar surface tension in mammalian lungs. AE2 cells influence extracellular surfactant transformation by regulating, for example, pH and [Ca2+] of the hypophase. AE2 cells play various roles in alveolar fluid balance, coagulation/fibrinolysis, and host defence. AE2 cells proliferate, differentiate into AE1 cells, and remove apoptotic AE2 cells by phagocytosis, thus contributing to epithelial repair. AE2 cells may act as immunoregulatory cells. AE2 cells interact with resident and mobile cells, either directly by membrane contact or indirectly via cytokines/growth factors and their receptors, thus representing an integrative unit within the alveolus. Although most data support the concept, the controversy about the character of hyperplastic AE2 cells, reported to synthesise profibrotic factors, proscribes drawing a definite conclusion today.

  12. Construction of p66Shc gene interfering lentivirus vectors and its effects on alveolar epithelial cells apoptosis induced by hyperoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chan; Dong, Wen-Bin; Zhao, Shuai; Li, Qing-Ping; Kang, Lan; Lei, Xiao-Ping; Guo, Lin; Zhai, Xue-Song

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to observe the inhibitive effects of p66Shc gene interfering lentivirus vectors on the expression of p66Shc, and to explore its effects on alveolar epithelial cells apoptosis induced by hyperoxia. Methods The gene sequences were cloned into the pLenR-GPH-shRNA lentiviral vector, which was selected by Genebank searches. The pLenR-GPH-shRNA and lentiviral vector packaging plasmid mix were cotransfected into 293T cells to package lentiviral particles. Culture virus supernatant was harvested, and then the virus titer was determined by serial dilution assay. A549 cells were transduced with the constructed lentiviral vectors, and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot were used to evaluate p66Shc expression. This study is divided into a control group, a hyperoxia group, an A549-p66ShcshRNA hyperoxia group, and a negative lentivirus group. Cell apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry after 24 hours; the expression of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) and caspase-9 were detected by immunohistochemistry assay. The production of reactive oxygen species and cellular mitochondria membrane potential (ΔΨm) were determined by fluorescence microscopy. Results We successfully established the p66Shc gene interfering lentivirus vectors, A549-p66ShcshRNA. The A549-p66ShcshRNA was transfected into alveolar epithelial cells, and the inhibitive effects on the expression of p66Shc were observed. Both RT-PCR and Western blot demonstrated downregulation of p66Shc expression in A549 cells. In the A549-p66ShcshRNA hyperoxia group, we found dampened oxidative stress. A549-p66ShcshRNA can cause p66Shc gene silencing, reduce mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation, reduce membrane potential decrease, reduce the apoptosis of A549 cells, and reduce alveolar epithelial cell injury, while the lentiviral empty vector group had no such changes. Conclusion p66Shc gene interfering lentivirus vector can affect the

  13. Elemental analysis of lung tissue particles and intracellular iron content of alveolar macrophages in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohkubo Takeru

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP is a rare disease occurred by idiopathic (autoimmune or secondary to particle inhalation. The in-air microparticle induced X-ray emission (in-air micro-PIXE system performs elemental analysis of materials by irradiation with a proton microbeam, and allows visualization of the spatial distribution and quantitation of various elements with very low background noise. The aim of this study was to assess the secondary PAP due to inhalation of harmful particles by employing in-air micro-PIXE analysis for particles and intracellular iron in parafin-embedded lung tissue specimens obtained from a PAP patient comparing with normal lung tissue from a non-PAP patient. The iron inside alveolar macrophages was stained with Berlin blue, and its distribution was compared with that on micro-PIXE images. Results The elements composing particles and their locations in the PAP specimens could be identified by in-air micro-PIXE analysis, with magnesium (Mg, aluminum (Al, silicon (Si, phosphorus (P, sulfur (S, scandium (Sc, potassium (K, calcium (Ca, titanium (Ti, chromium (Cr, copper (Cu, manganase (Mn, iron (Fe, and zinc (Zn being detected. Si was the major component of the particles. Serial sections stained by Berlin blue revealed accumulation of sideromacrophages that had phagocytosed the particles. The intracellular iron content of alveolar macrophage from the surfactant-rich area in PAP was higher than normal lung tissue in control lung by both in-air micro-PIXE analysis and Berlin blue staining. Conclusion The present study demonstrated the efficacy of in-air micro-PIXE for analyzing the distribution and composition of lung particles. The intracellular iron content of single cells was determined by simultaneous two-dimensional and elemental analysis of paraffin-embedded lung tissue sections. The results suggest that secondary PAP is associated with exposure to inhaled particles and accumulation of iron in

  14. Elemental analysis of lung tissue particles and intracellular iron content of alveolar macrophages in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ohkubo Takeru; Yokoyama Akihito; Koka Masashi; Satoh Takahiro; Yanagitani Noriko; Dobashi Kunio; Matsuzaki Shinichi; Shimizu Yasuo; Ishii Yasuyuki; Kamiya Tomihiro; Mori Masatomo

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare disease occurred by idiopathic (autoimmune) or secondary to particle inhalation. The in-air microparticle induced X-ray emission (in-air micro-PIXE) system performs elemental analysis of materials by irradiation with a proton microbeam, and allows visualization of the spatial distribution and quantitation of various elements with very low background noise. The aim of this study was to assess the secondary PAP due to inhalation...

  15. IFITM1 increases osteogenesis through Runx2 in human alveolar-derived bone marrow stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Beom-Su; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Kim, Jin Seong; You, Yong-Ouk; Zadeh, Homa; Shin, Hong-In; Lee, Seung-Jin; Park, Yoon-Jeong; Takata, Takashi; Pi, Sung-Hee; Lee, Jun; You, Hyung-Keun

    2012-09-01

    The exact molecular mechanisms governing the differentiation of bone marrow stromal stem/progenitor cells (BMSCs) into osteoblasts remain largely unknown. In this study, a highly expressed protein that had a high degree of homology with interferon-induced transmembrane protein 1 (IFITM1) was identified using differentially expressed gene (DEG) screening. We sought to determine whether IFITM1 influenced osteoblast differentiation. During differentiation, IFITM1 expression gradually increased from 5 to 10days and subsequently decreased at 15 days in culture. Analysis of IFITM1 protein expression in several cell lines as well as in situ studies on human tissues revealed its selective expression in bone cells and human bone. Proliferation of human alveolar-derived bone marrow stromal cells (hAD-BMSCs) was significantly inhibited by IFITM1 knockdown by using short hairpin RNA, as were bone specific markers such as alkaline phosphatase, collagen type I α 1, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin, and osterix were decreased. Calcium accumulation also decreased following IFITM1 knockdown. Moreover, IFITM1 knockdown in hAD-BMSCs was associated with inhibition of Runx2 mRNA and protein expression. Collectively, the present data provide evidence for the role of IFITM1 in osteoblast differentiation. The exact mechanisms of IFITM1's involvement in osteoblast differentiation are still under investigation.

  16. Treatment of sharp mandibular alveolar process with hybrid prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukaedi Sukaedi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Losing posterior teeth for a long time would occasionally lead to the sharpening of alveolar process. The removable partial denture usually have problems when used during mastication, because of the pressure on the mucosa under the alveolar ridge. Purpose: The purpose of this case report was to manage patients with sharp mandibular alveolar process by wearing hybrid prosthesis with extra coronal precision attachment retention and soft liner on the surface base beneath the removable partial denture. Case: A 76 years old woman visited the Prosthodontic Clinic Faculty of Dentistry Airlangga University. The patient had a long span bridge on the upper jaw and a free end acrylic removable partial denture on the lower jaw. She was having problems with mastication. The patient did not wear her lower denture because of the discomfort with it during mastication. Hence, she would like to replace it with a new removable partial denture. Case management: The patient was treated by wearing a hybrid prosthesis with extra coronal precision attachment on the lower jaw. Soft liner was applied on the surface of the removable partial denture. Hybrid prosthesis is a complex denture consisting of removable partial denture and fixed bridge. Conclusion: It concluded that after restoration, the patient had no problems with sharp alveolar process with her new denture, and she was able to masticate well.Latar belakang: Kehilangan geligi posterior dapat menimbulkan processus alveolaris tajam. Gigi tiruan sebagian lepasan mempunyai masalah selama pengunyahan karena adanya tekanan di mukosa di bawah alveolar ridge. Tujuan: Tujuan laporan kasus ini adalah untuk menjelaskan cara menangani pasien yang mempunyai prosesus alveolaris yang tajam di rahang bawah dengan dibuatkan protesis hybrid dengan daya tahan extra coronal precision attachment dan soft liner di permukaan bawah basis gigi tiruan sebagian lepasan. Kasus: Pasien wanita berumur 76 tahun datang di klinik

  17. The use of digital periapical radiographs to study the prevalence of alveolar domes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xambre, Pedro Augusto Oliveira Santos; Valerio, Claudia Scigliano; e Alves Cardoso, Claudia Assunção; Custódio, Antônio Luís Neto

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In the present study, we coined the term 'alveolar dome' and aimed to demonstrate the prevalence of alveolar domes through digital periapical radiographs. Materials and Methods This study examined 800 digital periapical radiographs in regard to the presence of alveolar domes. The periapical radiographs were acquired by a digital system using a photostimulable phosphor (PSP) plate. The χ2 test, with a significance level of 5%, was used to compare the prevalence of alveolar domes in the maxillary posterior teeth and, considering the same teeth, to verify the difference in the prevalence of dome-shaped phenomena between the roots. Results The prevalence of alveolar domes present in the first pre-molars was statistically lower as compared to the other maxillary posterior teeth (pauxiliary information necessary to identify alveolar domes, thus improving diagnosis, planning, and treatment. PMID:27672614

  18. Alveolar bone grafting in the treatment of midline alveolar cleft and diastema in incomplete median cleft lip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, H-T; Chen, C-H; Bergeron, L; Ko, E W-C; Chen, P K T; Chen, Y-R

    2008-10-01

    Median cleft lip is a rare congenital anomaly. The wide diastema with mesial tipping observed in these patients has been largely overlooked. A midline submucosal alveolar cleft prevents adequate treatment. The purpose of this article is to describe an alveolar bone grafting (ABG) technique used in the combined surgical-orthodontic approach to diastema treatment in patients presenting with incomplete median cleft lip. Patients treated for incomplete median cleft lip and diastema were identified in the clinic registry from 1981 to 2007. Six patients were identified; 4 underwent ABG before permanent maxillary incisor eruption, the other 2 were seen later when they were 11 years old. All 6 ABGs were successful. The incisors erupted through the graft or were successfully moved into it with lasting results. Follow-up ranged from 8 to 21 years. The existence of a midline submucosal alveolar cleft and subsequent diastema should be recognized and addressed in all patients who present with incomplete median cleft lip repair. This includes taking maxillary occlusal view X-rays before the age of 5 years to detect the cleft, and proceed to ABG if necessary, generally before permanent maxillary incisor eruption. PMID:18771899

  19. A Case of Alveolar Echinococcosis Presenting as Cerebral and Spinal Intradural Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atalan, Guneri; Sivrioglu, Ali Kemal; Sönmez, Güner; Celik, Mahir; Simsek, Berksan

    2016-06-01

    Alveolar echinococcosis is a chronic and serious, even lethal, parasitic infection caused by the helminth Echinococcus multilocularis. The involvement of Central Nervous System is reported to be 1-3% in literature. Brain involvement is considered a sign of the terminal phase of alveolar echinococcosis. We here in reported a 67-year-old female who had liver alveolar hydatid disease with brain and spinal intradural metastases. PMID:27551181

  20. Targeted Injury of Type II Alveolar Epithelial Cells Induces Pulmonary Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Sisson, Thomas H.; Mendez, Michael; Choi, Karen; Subbotina, Natalya; Courey, Anthony; Cunningham, Andrew; Dave, Aditi; Engelhardt, John F.; Liu, Xiaoming; White, Eric S.; Thannickal, Victor J.; Bethany B Moore; Christensen, Paul J; Simon, Richard H

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: Ineffective repair of a damaged alveolar epithelium has been postulated to cause pulmonary fibrosis. In support of this theory, epithelial cell abnormalities, including hyperplasia, apoptosis, and persistent denudation of the alveolar basement membrane, are found in the lungs of humans with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and in animal models of fibrotic lung disease. Furthermore, mutations in genes that affect regenerative capacity or that cause injury/apoptosis of type II alveolar ...

  1. The potential of microfluidic lung epithelial wounding: towards in vivo-like alveolar microinjuries

    OpenAIRE

    Felder, Marcel; Stucki, Andreas; Stucki, Janick; Geiser, Thomas; Guenat, Olivier Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) remains a major clinical challenge to date. Repeated alveolar epithelial microinjuries are considered as the starting point and the key event in both the development and the progression of IPF. Various pro-fibrotic agents have been identified and shown to cause alveolar damage. In IPF, however, no leading cause of alveolar epithelial microinjuries can be identified and the exact etiology remains elusive. New results from epidemiologic studies suggest a caus...

  2. Oxidative Stress, Cell Death, and Other Damage to Alveolar Epithelial Cells Induced by Cigarette Smoke

    OpenAIRE

    Aoshiba K; Nagai A

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor in the development of various lung diseases, including pulmonary emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, and lung cancer. The mechanisms of these diseases include alterations in alveolar epithelial cells, which are essential in the maintenance of normal alveolar architecture and function. Following cigarette smoking, alterations in alveolar epithelial cells induce an increase in epithelial permeability, a decrease in surfactant production, the inapprop...

  3. Simultaneous occurrence of pulmonary interstitial fibrosis and alveolar cell carcinoma in one family.

    OpenAIRE

    Beaumont, F; Jansen, H. M.; Elema, J D; ten Kate, L P; Sluiter, H J

    1981-01-01

    The coexistence of interstitial pulmonary fibrosis and alveolar cell carcinoma is well known. The familial occurrence of a combination of these two entities, however, is very rare. We present a family of which five members had diffuse interstitial pulmonary fibrosis. Three of them had in addition alveolar cell carcinoma. In a sixth family member, evidence of alveolar cell carcinoma was present without proven interstitial fibrosis. An autosomal dominant trait is suggested as the mode of inheri...

  4. KL-6, a Human MUC1 Mucin, as a prognostic marker for diffuse alveolar hemorrhage syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Kida, Yoshiko

    2014-01-01

    Background: Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage syndrome is a life threatening condition with diverse etiologies. Sensitive prognostic markers for diffuse alveolar hemorrhage have not been well investigated. Serum KL-6 is a biomarker for various interstitial lung disease associated with disease activity and prognosis. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the clinical utility of serum KL-6 level as a prognostic marker for diffuse alveolar hemorrhage. Methods: We retrospectively colle...

  5. KL-6, a Human MUC1 Mucin, as a prognostic marker for diffuse alveolar hemorrhage syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Kida Yoshiko; Ohshimo Shinichiro; Ota Kohei; Tamura Tomoko; Otani Tadatsugu; Une Kazunobu; Sadamori Takuma; Iwasaki Yasumasa; Bonella Francesco; Hattori Noboru; Hirohashi Nobuyuki; Guzman Josune; Costabel Ulrich; Kohno Nobuoki; Tanigawa Koichi

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage syndrome is a life threatening condition with diverse etiologies. Sensitive prognostic markers for diffuse alveolar hemorrhage have not been well investigated. Serum KL-6 is a biomarker for various interstitial lung disease associated with disease activity and prognosis. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the clinical utility of serum KL-6 level as a prognostic marker for diffuse alveolar hemorrhage. Methods We retrospectively coll...

  6. Injury of the Inferior Alveolar Nerve during Implant Placement: a Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Gintaras Juodzbalys; Hom-Lay Wang; Gintautas Sabalys

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The purpose of present article was to review aetiological factors, mechanism, clinical symptoms, and diagnostic methods as well as to create treatment guidelines for the management of inferior alveolar nerve injury during dental implant placement. Material and Methods Literature was selected through a search of PubMed, Embase and Cochrane electronic databases. The keywords used for search were inferior alveolar nerve injury, inferior alveolar nerve injuries, inferior alveo...

  7. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Alveolar Destruction in Emphysema: An Evolutionary Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Tuder, Rubin M.; Yoshida, Toshinori; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata; Petrache, Irina

    2006-01-01

    Emphysema consists of a unique pattern of alveolar destruction, resulting in marked airspace enlargement with reduction of alveolar capillary exchange area. Classical concepts of the pathogenesis of emphysema have relied on the paradigm set by the inflammation and protease/antiprotease imbalance. We propose herein that cigarette smoke constitutes an environmental hazard that causes alveolar destruction by the interaction of apoptosis, oxidative stress, and protease/antiprotease imbalance. We ...

  8. A pure population of lung alveolar epithelial type II cells derived from human embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Dachun; Haviland, David L.; Burns, Alan R.; Zsigmond, Eva; Wetsel, Rick A.

    2007-01-01

    Alveolar epithelial type II (ATII) cells are small, cuboidal cells that constitute ≈60% of the pulmonary alveolar epithelium. These cells are crucial for repair of the injured alveolus by differentiating into alveolar epithelial type I cells. ATII cells derived from human ES (hES) cells are a promising source of cells that could be used therapeutically to treat distal lung diseases. We have developed a reliable transfection and culture procedure, which facilitates, via genetic selection, the ...

  9. Dexmedetomidine Attenuates Bilirubin-Induced Lung Alveolar Epithelial Cell Death In Vitro and In Vivo*

    OpenAIRE

    Cui, Jian; Zhao, Hailin; Yi, Bin; Zeng, Jing; Lu, Kaizhi; Ma, Daqing

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate bilirubin-induced lung alveolar epithelial cell injury together with the protection afforded by dexmedetomidine. Design: Prospective, randomized, controlled study. Setting: Research laboratory. Subjects: Sprague Dawley rats. Interventions: Alveolar epithelial A549 cell lines were cultured and received bilirubin (from 0 to 160 μM) to explore the protective pathway of dexmedetomidine on bilirubin-induced alveolar epithelial cell injury assessed by immunochemistry and f...

  10. Rapid elevation of sodium transport through insulin is mediated by AKT in alveolar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mattes, Charlott; Laube, Mandy; Thome, Ulrich H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Alveolar fluid clearance is driven by vectorial Na+ transport and promotes postnatal lung adaptation. The effect of insulin on alveolar epithelial Na+ transport was studied in isolated alveolar cells from 18–19‐day gestational age rat fetuses. Equivalent short‐circuit currents (I SC) were measured in Ussing chambers and different kinase inhibitors were used to determine the pathway of insulin stimulation. In Western Blot measurements the activation of mediators stimulated by insulin ...

  11. Rapid elevation of sodium transport through insulin is mediated by AKT in alveolar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mattes, Charlott; Thome, Ulrich H.

    2014-01-01

    Alveolar fluid clearance is driven by vectorial Na+ transport and promotes postnatal lung adaptation. The effect of insulin on alveolar epithelial Na+ transport was studied in isolated alveolar cells from 18–19-day gestational age rat fetuses. Equivalent short-circuit currents (ISC) were measured in Ussing chambers and different kinase inhibitors were used to determine the pathway of insulin stimulation. In Western Blot measurements the activation of mediators stimulated by ...

  12. Alveolar recruitment maneuver in refractory hypoxemia and lobar atelectasis after cardiac surgery: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Herbst-Rodrigues Marcus; Carvalho Vitor; Abrahao Ludhmila; Nozawa Emilia; Feltrim Maria Ignez; Gomes-Galas Filomena Regina

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective This case report describes an unusual presentation of right upper lobe atelectasis associated with refractory hypoxemia to conventional alveolar recruitment maneuvers in a patient soon after coronary artery bypass grafting surgery. Method Case-report. Results The alveolar recruitment with PEEP = 40cmH2O improved the patient’s atelectasis and hypoxemia. Conclusion In the present report, the unusual alveolar recruitment maneuver with PEEP 40cmH2O showed to be safe and efficie...

  13. Pulmonary Alveolar Microlithiasis - Clinico-Radiological dissociation - A case report with Radiological review

    OpenAIRE

    Khaladkar, Sanjay Mhalasakant; Kondapavuluri, Sushen Kumar; Kamal, Anubhav; Kalra, Raghav; Kuber, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) is a rare chronic lung disease characterized by deposition of intra alveolar calcium and phosphate in bilateral lung parenchyma with predominance in lower and mid zones. Etiology and pathogenesis is not fully understood. However, mutation in SLC34A2 gene that encodes a sodium phosphate co-transporter in alveolar type-II cells resulting in formation and accumulation of microliths rich in calcium phosphate due to impaired clearance is considered the cause...

  14. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, a primary immunodeficiency of impaired GM-CSF stimulation of macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Trapnell, Bruce C.; Carey, Brenna C.; Uchida, Kanji; Suzuki, Takuji

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare syndrome characterized by accumulation of pulmonary surfactant, respiratory insufficiency, and increased infections. It occurs in various clinical settings that disrupt surfactant catabolism in alveolar macrophages, including a relatively more common autoimmune disease caused by GM-CSF autoantibodies and a rare congenital disease caused by CSF2RA mutations. Recent results demonstrate that GM-CSF is critical for alveolar macrophage terminal differ...

  15. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and superinfection with pulmonary tuberculosis in a case

    OpenAIRE

    Tekgül, Serpil; Bilaceroglu, Semra; Ozkaya, Sevket; Coskun, Ayse; Komurcuoglu, Berna; Cirak, Ali Kadri

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare and diffuse lung process, characterized by the presence of alveolar spaces filled with amorphous eosinophilic material. Impaired macrophage function and impaired host defence due to abnormalities of surfactant proteins may favor the growth of microorganisms. The association of alveolar proteinosis with mycobacterial infections is rarely reported. The PAP and superinfection with pulmonary tuberculosis is defined by radiologic and histopathologic i...

  16. Therapeutic Whole-Lung Lavage for Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis: A Procedural Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmalak, Basem B; Khanna, Ashish K; Culver, Daniel A; Popovich, Marc J

    2015-07-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a disease caused by increased accumulation and impaired clearance of surfactant by alveolar macrophages. This narrative review summarizes the role of therapeutic whole-lung lavage in the management of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. We describe the preprocedural evaluation, indications, and anesthetic considerations, along with step-by step technical aspects of the procedure, postoperative recovery, potential complications, and long-term outcomes. PMID:26165897

  17. Alveolar Dynamics during Respiration: Are the Pores of Kohn a Pathway to Recruitment?

    OpenAIRE

    Namati, Eman; Thiesse, Jacqueline; de Ryk, Jessica; McLennan, Geoffrey

    2007-01-01

    The change in alveolar size and number during the full breathing cycle in mammals remains unanswered, yet these descriptors are fundamental for understanding alveolar-based diseases and for improving ventilator management. Genetic and environmental mouse models are used increasingly to evaluate the evolution of disease in the peripheral lung; however, little is known regarding alveolar structure and function in the fresh, intact lung. Therefore, we have developed an optical confocal process t...

  18. Biophysical determinants of alveolar epithelial plasma membrane wounding associated with mechanical ventilation

    OpenAIRE

    Hussein, Omar; Walters, Bruce; Stroetz, Randolph; Valencia, Paul; McCall, Deborah; Hubmayr, Rolf D.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation may cause harm by straining lungs at a time they are particularly prone to injury from deforming stress. The objective of this study was to define the relative contributions of alveolar overdistension and cyclic recruitment and “collapse” of unstable lung units to membrane wounding of alveolar epithelial cells. We measured the interactive effects of tidal volume (VT), transpulmonary pressure (PTP), and of airspace liquid on the number of alveolar epithelial cells with p...

  19. Early release of surfactant following lung irradiation of alveolar type II cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At 1 hour, 24 hours, and 1 week following irradiation, studies utilizing LAF 1/J mouse lung showed increase of disaturated alveolar phosphatidylcholine (PC) by radiolabelling and alveolar lavage, thus indicating PC as a nearly immediate post-irradiation biomarker. A corresponding decrease of PC in lung tissue following alveolar lavage correlated with an early decrease of lamellar bodies in type II pneumocytes after irrdiation

  20. Perawatan Ortodonti pada Kasus Mutilasi dengan Resorpsi Tulang Alveolar dan Resesi Gingiva (Laporan Kasus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Retno Widayati

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the mutilated case in adults, generally malocclusion is often accompanied by less support of periodontal tissues, such as alveolar bone resorption and gingival recession. The treatment of orthodontic is to arrange the teeth into good position and good occlusion, but is widely known to increase the alveolar bone resorption. In handling such case, orthodontist needs to look at factors which do not increase existing alveolar bone resorption and gingival recession. In this case report, it will be reported orthodontic treatment on mutilated case which are accompanied by alveolar bone resorption and gingival recession on a patient of 45 years and 4 months of age.

  1. Self-renewal of pulmonary alveolar macrophages: evidence from radiation chimera studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced chimeric mice were used to study the origin of pulmonary alveolar macrophages. Unlike in other studies, these radiation chimeras were prepared by using a special fractionated irradiation regimen to minimize the killing of alveolar macrophage colony-forming cells, putative local stem cells. For this study CBA mice with or without T6 chromosome marker were used. Under this experimental condition, the majority of alveolar macrophages in mitosis are of host origin even after 45 weeks. These data suggest that alveolar macrophages are a self-renewing population under normal steady-state conditions

  2. Syntaxin 7 and VAMP-7 are soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors required for late endosome-lysosome and homotypic lysosome fusion in alveolar macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, D M; Pevsner, J; Scullion, M A; Vaughn, M; Kaplan, J

    2000-07-01

    Endocytosis in alveolar macrophages can be reversibly inhibited, permitting the isolation of endocytic vesicles at defined stages of maturation. Using an in vitro fusion assay, we determined that each isolated endosome population was capable of homotypic fusion. All vesicle populations were also capable of heterotypic fusion in a temporally specific manner; early endosomes, isolated 4 min after internalization, could fuse with endosomes isolated 8 min after internalization but not with 12-min endosomes or lysosomes. Lysosomes fuse with 12-min endosomes but not with earlier endosomes. Using homogenous populations of endosomes, we have identified Syntaxin 7 as a soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) required for late endosome-lysosome and homotypic lysosome fusion in vitro. A bacterially expressed human Syntaxin 7 lacking the transmembrane domain inhibited homotypic late endosome and lysosome fusion as well as heterotypic late endosome-lysosome fusion. Affinity-purified antibodies directed against Syntaxin 7 also inhibited lysosome fusion in vitro but had no affect on homotypic early endosome fusion. Previous work suggested that human VAMP-7 (vesicle-associated membrane protein-7) was a SNARE required for late endosome-lysosome fusion. A bacterially expressed human VAMP-7 lacking the transmembrane domain inhibited both late endosome-lysosome fusion and homotypic lysosome fusion in vitro. These studies indicate that: 1) fusion along the endocytic pathway is a highly regulated process, and 2) two SNARE molecules, Syntaxin 7 and human VAMP-7, are involved in fusion of vesicles in the late endocytic pathway in alveolar macrophages.

  3. Autophagy protects type II alveolar epithelial cells from Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Xu-Guang [Center for Clinical Laboratory Medicine of PLA, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Department of Laboratory Medicine, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Ji, Tian-Xing [Department of Laboratory Medicine, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Xia, Yong, E-mail: gysyxy@gmail.com [Center for Clinical Laboratory Medicine of PLA, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Ma, Yue-Yun, E-mail: cmbmayy@fmmu.edu.cn [Center for Clinical Laboratory Medicine of PLA, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China)

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► We investigated the protective effect of autophagy pathway against MTB infection. ► MTB-infected A549 cells had higher LDH release. ► Inhibition of autophagy signaling significantly enhanced the MTB-induced necrosis. ► Autophagy prevents apoptosis and promotes cell survival in infected cells. -- Abstract: This study was designed to investigate the protective effect of the autophagy signaling pathway against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in type II alveolar epithelial cells. An in vitro M. tuberculosis system was established using human A549 cells. Infection-induced changes in the expression of the autophagic marker LC3 were assessed by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blotting. Morphological changes in autophagosomes were detected by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The function of the autophagy signaling pathway during infection was assessed by measuring the level of cell death and the amount of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) released in the presence or absence of the inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA). In addition, effects on LDH release were assessed after the siRNA-mediated knockdown of the essential autophagosomal structural membrane protein Atg5. LC3 mRNA expression was significantly reduced in M.tuberculosis-infected A549 cells (16888.76 ± 1576.34 vs. uninfected: 12744.29 ± 1089.37; P < 0.05). TEM revealed M.tuberculosis bacilli-containing compartments that were surrounded by double membranes characteristic of the autophagic process. M.tuberculosis-infected A549 cells released more LDH (1.45 ± 0.12 vs. uninfected: 0.45 ± 0.04; P < 0.05). The inhibition of autophagy signaling significantly enhanced M.tuberculosis-induced necrosis (3-MA: 75 ± 5% vs. untreated: 15 ± 1%; P < 0.05) and LDH release (3-MA: 2.50 ± 0.24 vs. untreated: 0.45 ± 0.04; Atg5 knockdown: 3.19 ± 0.29 vs. untreated: 1.28 ± 0.11; P < 0.05). Our results indicate that autophagy signaling pathway prevents apoptosis in type II alveolar epithelial cells

  4. Autophagy protects type II alveolar epithelial cells from Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We investigated the protective effect of autophagy pathway against MTB infection. ► MTB-infected A549 cells had higher LDH release. ► Inhibition of autophagy signaling significantly enhanced the MTB-induced necrosis. ► Autophagy prevents apoptosis and promotes cell survival in infected cells. -- Abstract: This study was designed to investigate the protective effect of the autophagy signaling pathway against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in type II alveolar epithelial cells. An in vitro M. tuberculosis system was established using human A549 cells. Infection-induced changes in the expression of the autophagic marker LC3 were assessed by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blotting. Morphological changes in autophagosomes were detected by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The function of the autophagy signaling pathway during infection was assessed by measuring the level of cell death and the amount of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) released in the presence or absence of the inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA). In addition, effects on LDH release were assessed after the siRNA-mediated knockdown of the essential autophagosomal structural membrane protein Atg5. LC3 mRNA expression was significantly reduced in M.tuberculosis-infected A549 cells (16888.76 ± 1576.34 vs. uninfected: 12744.29 ± 1089.37; P < 0.05). TEM revealed M.tuberculosis bacilli-containing compartments that were surrounded by double membranes characteristic of the autophagic process. M.tuberculosis-infected A549 cells released more LDH (1.45 ± 0.12 vs. uninfected: 0.45 ± 0.04; P < 0.05). The inhibition of autophagy signaling significantly enhanced M.tuberculosis-induced necrosis (3-MA: 75 ± 5% vs. untreated: 15 ± 1%; P < 0.05) and LDH release (3-MA: 2.50 ± 0.24 vs. untreated: 0.45 ± 0.04; Atg5 knockdown: 3.19 ± 0.29 vs. untreated: 1.28 ± 0.11; P < 0.05). Our results indicate that autophagy signaling pathway prevents apoptosis in type II alveolar epithelial cells

  5. Enhanced rifampicin delivery to alveolar macrophages by solid lipid nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuan Junlan [West China School of Pharmacy, Sichuan University, Key Laboratory of Drug Targeting and Drug Delivery System, Ministry of Education (China); Li Yanzhen [Tianjin Institute of Pharmaceutical Research, State Key Laboratory of Drug Delivery Technology and Pharmacokinetics (China); Yang Likai; Sun Xun [West China School of Pharmacy, Sichuan University, Key Laboratory of Drug Targeting and Drug Delivery System, Ministry of Education (China); Zhang Qiang [Peking University, State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences (China); Gong Tao, E-mail: gongtaoy@126.com; Zhang Zhirong, E-mail: zrzzl@vip.sina.com [West China School of Pharmacy, Sichuan University, Key Laboratory of Drug Targeting and Drug Delivery System, Ministry of Education (China)

    2013-05-15

    The present study aimed at developing a drug delivery system targeting the densest site of tuberculosis infection, the alveolar macrophages (AMs). Rifampicin (RFP)-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (RFP-SLNs) with an average size of 829.6 {+-} 16.1 nm were prepared by a modified lipid film hydration method. The cytotoxicity of RFP-SLNs to AMs and alveolar epithelial type II cells (AECs) was examined using MTT assays. The viability of AMs and AECs was above 80 % after treatment with RFP-SLNs, which showed low toxicity to both AMs and AECs. Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy was employed to observe the interaction between RFP-SLNs and both AMs and AECs. After incubating the cells with RFP-SLNs for 2 h, the fluorescent intensity in AMs was more and remained longer (from 0.5 to 12 h) when compared with that in AECs (from 0.5 to 8 h). In vitro uptake characteristics of RFP-SLNs in AMs and AECs were also investigated by detection of intracellular RFP by High performance liquid chromatography. Results showed that RFP-SLNs delivered markedly higher RFP into AMs (691.7 ng/mg in cultured AMs, 662.6 ng/mg in primary AMs) than that into AECs (319.2 ng/mg in cultured AECs, 287.2 ng/mg in primary AECs). Subsequently, in vivo delivery efficiency and the selectivity of RFP-SLNs were further verified in Sprague-Dawley rats. Under pulmonary administration of RFP-SLNs, the amount of RFP in AMs was significantly higher than that in AECs at each time point. Our results demonstrated that solid lipid nanoparticles are a promising strategy for the delivery of rifampicin to alveolar macrophages selectively.

  6. Alveolar hemorrhage and kidney disease: characteristics and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatma, Lilia Ben; El Ati, Zohra; Lamia, Rais; Aich, Dorra Ben; Madiha, Krid; Wided, Smaoui; Maiz, Hedi Ben; Beji, Somaya; Karim, Zouaghi; Moussa, Fatma Ben

    2013-07-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis and Goodpasture's glomerular basement membrane disease are the most common causes of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage, a life-threatening disease. Systemic lupus erythematosus and the antiphospholipid syndrome are also causes of alveolar hemorrhage. We retrospectively reviewed 15 cases of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) associated with renal diseases. Diagnosis of DAH was based on the presence of bloody bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. There were three men and 12 women, with a mean age of 50.5 years (extremes: 24-74 years). Proteinuria and hematuria were observed, respectively, in 15 and 14 cases. Six patients revealed arterial hypertension. Crescentic glomerulonephritis was diagnosed with kidney biopsies in ten cases. The etiology of renal disease was microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) in seven cases, Wegener disease in four cases, systemic lupus erythematous in one case, cryoglobulinemia in one case, myeloma in one case and propyl-thiouracil-induced MPA in one case. Hemoptysis occurred in 14 cases. The mean serum level of hemoglobin was 7.1 g/dL (5.1-10 g/dL). The mean serum creatinine concentration was 7.07 mg/dL (2.4-13.7 mg/dL). Gas exchange was severely compromised, with an oxygenation index <80 mmHg in 14 patients and <60 mmHg in seven patients. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed in 11 cases, and had positive findings for hemorrhage in all. Methylprednisolone pulses and cyclophosphamide were used in 14 patients. Plasmapheresis was performed in three cases. One patient received cycles of Dexamethasome-Melphalan. Three patients died as a result of DAH. The mortality rate in our study was 20%. PMID:23816724

  7. Alveolar hemorrhage and kidney disease: Characteristics and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilia Ben Fatma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis and Goodpasture′s glomerular basement membrane disease are the most common causes of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage, a life-threatening disease. Systemic lupus erythematosus and the antiphospholipid syndrome are also causes of alveolar hemorrhage. We retrospectively reviewed 15 cases of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH associated with renal diseases. Diagnosis of DAH was based on the presence of bloody bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. There were three men and 12 women, with a mean age of 50.5 years (extremes: 24-74 years. Proteinuria and hematuria were observed, respectively, in 15 and 14 cases. Six patients revealed arterial hypertension. Crescentic glomerulonephritis was diagnosed with kidney biopsies in ten cases. The etiology of renal disease was microscopic polyangiitis (MPA in seven cases, Wegener disease in four cases, systemic lupus erythematous in one case, cryoglobulinemia in one case, myeloma in one case and propyl-thiouracil-induced MPA in one case. Hemoptysis occurred in 14 cases. The mean serum level of hemoglobin was 7.1 g/dL (5.1-10 g/dL. The mean serum creatinine concentration was 7.07 mg/dL (2.4-13.7 mg/dL. Gas exchange was severely compromised, with an oxygenation index <80 mmHg in 14 patients and <60 mmHg in seven patients. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed in 11 cases, and had positive findings for hemorrhage in all. Methylprednisolone pulses and cyclophosphamide were used in 14 patients. Plasmapheresis was performed in three cases. One patient received cycles of Dexamethasome-Melphalan. Three patients died as a result of DAH. The mortality rate in our study was 20%.

  8. Albuterol Improves Alveolar-Capillary Membrane Conductance in Healthy Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Natalie E.; Baker, Sarah E.; Olson, Thomas P.; Lalande, Sophie; Johnson, Bruce D.; Snyder, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Beta-2 adrenergic receptors (β2ARs) are located throughout the body including airway and alveolar cells. The β2ARs regulate lung fluid clearance through a variety of mechanisms including ion transport on alveolar cells and relaxation of the pulmonary lymphatics. We examined the effect of an inhaled β2-agonist (albuterol) on alveolar-capillary membrane conductance (DM) and pulmonary capillary blood volume (VC) in healthy humans. METHODS We assessed the diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide (DLCO) and nitric oxide (DLNO) at baseline, 30 minutes, and 60 minutes following nebulized albuterol (2.5 mg, diluted in 3 mL normal saline) in 45 healthy subjects. Seventeen subjects repeated these measures following nebulized normal saline (age = 27 ± 9 years, height = 165 ± 21 cm, weight = 68 ± 12 kg, BMI = 26 ± 9 kg/m2). Cardiac output (Q), heart rate, systemic vascular resistance (SVR), blood pressure, oxygen saturation, forced expiratory volume at one-second (FEV1), and forced expiratory flow at 50% of forced vital capacity (FEF50) were assessed at baseline, 30 minutes, and 60 minutes following the administration of albuterol or saline. RESULTS Albuterol resulted in a decrease in SVR, and an increase in Q, FEV1, and FEF50 compared to saline controls. Albuterol also resulted in a decrease in VC at 60 minutes post albuterol. Both albuterol and normal saline resulted in no change in DLCO or DM when assessed alone, but a significant increase was observed in DM when accounting for changes in VC. CONCLUSION These data suggest that nebulized albuterol improves pulmonary function in healthy humans, while nebulization of both albuterol and saline results in an increase in DM/VC.

  9. Plasma cell gingivitis with severe alveolar bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vivek; Tripathi, Amitandra Kumar; Saimbi, Charanjit Singh; Sinha, Jolly

    2015-01-16

    Plasma cell gingivitis is a rare benign condition of the gingiva characterised by sharply demarcated erythaematous and oedematous gingiva often extending up to the muco gingival junction. It is considered a hypersensitive reaction. It presents clinically as a diffuse, erythaematous and papillary lesion of the gingiva, which frequently bleeds, with minimal trauma. This paper presents a case of a 42-year-old man who was diagnosed with plasma cell gingivitis, based on the presence of plasma cells in histological sections, and severe alveolar bone loss at the affected site, which was managed by surgical intervention.

  10. Does Orthodontic Treatment Affect the Alveolar Bone Density?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jian-Hong; Huang, Heng-Li; Liu, Chien-Feng; Wu, Jay; Li, Yu-Fen; Tsai, Ming-Tzu; Hsu, Jui-Ting

    2016-03-01

    Few studies involving human participants have been conducted to investigate the effect of orthodontic treatment on alveolar bone density around the teeth. Our previous study revealed that patients who received 6 months of active orthodontic treatment exhibited an ∼24% decrease in alveolar bone density around the teeth. However, after an extensive retention period following orthodontic treatment, whether the bone density around the teeth can recover to its original state from before the treatment remains unclear, thus warranting further investigation.The purpose of this study was to assess the bone density changes around the teeth before, during, and after orthodontic treatment.Dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used to measure the changes in bone density around 6 teeth in the anterior maxilla (maxilla central incisors, lateral incisors, and canines) of 8 patients before and after orthodontic treatment. Each patient underwent 3 dental CBCT scans: before treatment (T0); at the end of 7 months of active orthodontic treatment (T1); after several months (20-22 months) of retention (T2). The Friedman test was applied to evaluate the changes in the alveolar bone density around the teeth according to the 3 dental CBCT scans.From T0 to T1, a significant reduction in bone density was observed around the teeth (23.36 ± 10.33%); by contrast, a significant increase was observed from T1 to T2 (31.81 ± 23.80%). From the perspective of the overall orthodontic treatment, comparing the T0 and T2 scans revealed that the bone density around the teeth was relatively constant (a reduction of only 0.75 ± 19.85%). The results of the statistical test also confirmed that the difference in bone density between T0 and T2 was nonsignificant.During orthodontic tooth movement, the alveolar bone density around the teeth was reduced. However, after a period of bone recovery, the reduced bone density recovered to its previous state from before the orthodontic treatment

  11. Case report 501: Alveolar soft parts sarcoma with pulmonary metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alveolar soft part sarcoma (ASPS) is a rare, soft tissue malignancy, usually presenting in young adults. We report a patient with ASPS in the thigh, evaluated with plain films, computed tomography, and a radionuclide scan. The findings in this patient and those in which CT findings have been reported in the literature, show a similar appearance which we believe is highly suggestive of this unusual tumor. The combination of a soft tissue lesion, that on CT appears highly vascular, with features suggestive of an arteriovenous malformation, in association with multiple pulmonary nodules and a bone scan with features suggestive of infection should lead to a consideration of this rare entity. (orig./GDG)

  12. Bruxism elicited by inferior alveolar nerve injury: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Marcello; Coiana, Carlo; Secci, Simona

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this case report is to describe the history of a patient who received an injury to the right inferior alveolar nerve after placement of a dental implant, with bruxism noted afterward. The symptoms were managed by the use of an occlusal appliance worn at night and occasionally during the day, associated with increased awareness of parafunction during the day to reduce muscle pain and fatigue. Paresthesia of the teeth, gingiva, and lower lip persisted but were reduced during appliance use. PMID:22254232

  13. A 3-step therapeutic strategy for severe alveolar proteinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noirez, Leslie; Koutsokera, Angela; Pantet, Olivier; Duss, François-Régis; Eggimann, Philippe; Tozzi, Piergiorgio; Gonzalez, Michel; Coronado, Marcos; Nicod, Laurent P; Lovis, Alban

    2015-04-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is characterized by accumulation of lipoproteinaceous material in the terminal airways. Whole lung lavage (WLL) remains the gold standard treatment but may be particularly challenging in cases of severe hypoxemia. We present a 3-step strategy that was used in a patient with PAP-associated refractory hypoxemia and that combined venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (vvECMO), double-lumen orotracheal intubation, and bilateral multisegmental sequential lavage (MSL). The procedure was well tolerated and permitted weaning from the ventilator. PMID:25841841

  14. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis in children: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Ahmad Tabatabaei

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, (PAP is a rare disease of unknown etiology, characterized by accumulation of intraalveolar proteinaceous material which is rich in lipid and positive on periodic acid-Schiff stain. Two clinically different pediatric types have been defined as congenital PAP which is fulminant and fatal, and a late-onset PAP which is similar to the adult form and less severe. Eight children with late-onset PAP were hospitalized from 1998 to 2005 in Mofid Children Hospital. Characteristics of these patients and the methods of diagnosis and treatment are presented in this case series.

  15. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: another autoimmune disease associated with sarcoidosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerner, Eda Burcu; Costabel, Ulrich; Wessendorf, Thomas Ernst; Theegarten, Dirk; Hetzel, Martin; Drent, Marjolein; Bonella, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare lung disease characterized by the accumulation of surfactant phospholipids and lipoproteins within the alveoli.  Here we report on a female patient who was diagnosed with autoimmune PAP and successfully treated with whole lung lavage (WLL). 15 months after PAP diagnosis the patient developed marked fatigue. Additional tests revealed the diagnosis of sarcoidosis. We can only speculate that PAP and sarcoidosis in our patient are linked to each other based on the fact that other autoimmune disorders have also been associated with sarcoidosis. PMID:27055841

  16. Novel antioxidative nanotherapeutics in a rat periodontitis model: Reactive oxygen species scavenging by redox injectable gel suppresses alveolar bone resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saita, Makiko; Kaneko, Junya; Sato, Takenori; Takahashi, Shun-suke; Wada-Takahashi, Satoko; Kawamata, Ryota; Sakurai, Takashi; Lee, Masaichi-Chang-il; Hamada, Nobushiro; Kimoto, Katsuhiko; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    The excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been implicated in a variety of disorders, but to date, ROS scavengers have not been widely used for local treatment of inflammation, because they are rapidly eliminated from the inflamed site. We have designed a novel redox injectable gel (RIG) that is formed at 37 °C after disintegration of nano-assembled flower micelles allowing nitroxide radicals to act locally as specific ROS scavengers for the treatment of periodontitis. In the present study, we have confirmed retention of the RIG in the periodontal region, along with its antioxidant-related anti-inflammatory effects, and we have subsequently evaluated the inhibitory effect of the RIG against Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis)-induced alveolar bone loss attributed to ROS. Alveolar bone loss was estimated by morphometry, gingival blood flow was measured using laser Doppler flowmetry, and osteoclast differentiation was evaluated by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. The results show that the RIG can inhibit P. gingivalis-induced bone loss by antioxidant-related anti-inflammatory actions, and this suggests that the RIG is a promising novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of P. gingivalis-induced periodontitis.

  17. Postoperative morbidity after reconstruction of alveolar bone defects with chin bone transplants in cleft patients - 111 consecutive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kristian; Nørholt, Sven Erik; Knudsen, Johan;

    Postoperative morbidity after reconstruction of alveolar bone defects with chin bone transplants in cleft patients - 111 consecutive patients......Postoperative morbidity after reconstruction of alveolar bone defects with chin bone transplants in cleft patients - 111 consecutive patients...

  18. An Unusual Radiologic Manifestation of Pulmonary Tuberculosis with Bilateral Multiple Lung Nodules and Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulmonary tuberculosis presenting as bilateral multiple lung nodules or diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is very rare. Here, we report a case of pulmonary tuberculosis presenting as bilateral multiple lung nodules and diffuse alveolar hemorrhage mimicking granulomatous vasculitis, such as Wegener's granulomatosis.

  19. Is there a relation between local bone quality as assessed on panoramic radiographs and alveolar bone level?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nackaerts, Olivia; Gijbels, Frieda; Sanna, Anna-Maria; Jacobs, Reinhilde

    2008-03-01

    The aim was to explore the relation between radiographic bone quality on panoramic radiographs and relative alveolar bone level. Digital panoramic radiographs of 94 female patients were analysed (mean age, 44.5; range, 35-74). Radiographic density of the alveolar bone in the premolar region was determined using Agfa Musica software. Alveolar bone level and bone quality index (BQI) were also assessed. Relationships between bone density and BQI on one hand and the relative loss of alveolar bone level on the other were assessed. Mandibular bone density and loss of alveolar bone level were weakly but significantly negatively correlated for the lower premolar area (r = -.27). The BQI did not show a statistically significant relation to alveolar bone level. Radiographic mandibular bone density on panoramic radiographs shows a weak but significant relation to alveolar bone level, with more periodontal breakdown for less dense alveolar bone. PMID:17690924

  20. Is there a relation between local bone quality as assessed on panoramic radiographs and alveolar bone level?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nackaerts, Olivia; Gijbels, Frieda; Sanna, Anna-Maria; Jacobs, Reinhilde

    2008-03-01

    The aim was to explore the relation between radiographic bone quality on panoramic radiographs and relative alveolar bone level. Digital panoramic radiographs of 94 female patients were analysed (mean age, 44.5; range, 35-74). Radiographic density of the alveolar bone in the premolar region was determined using Agfa Musica software. Alveolar bone level and bone quality index (BQI) were also assessed. Relationships between bone density and BQI on one hand and the relative loss of alveolar bone level on the other were assessed. Mandibular bone density and loss of alveolar bone level were weakly but significantly negatively correlated for the lower premolar area (r = -.27). The BQI did not show a statistically significant relation to alveolar bone level. Radiographic mandibular bone density on panoramic radiographs shows a weak but significant relation to alveolar bone level, with more periodontal breakdown for less dense alveolar bone.

  1. Alterations in the alveolar epithelium after injury leading to pulmonary fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kasper, M; Haroske, G.

    1996-01-01

    This review discusses current knowledge of the involvement of the alveolar epithelium in tissue remodelling during fibrogenesis. The purpose of the present paper is to give an overview, including the authors' own results, of knowledge of ultrastructural alterations, proliferation kinetics and phenotypic changes of pneumocytes in experimental and clinical pathology of pulmonary fibrosis. After lung injury, the alveolar epithelial cells show ultrastructural alter...

  2. Secondary bone grafting for alveolar cleft in children with cleft lip or cleft lip and palate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Guo; C. Li; Q. Zhang; G. Wu; S.A. Deacon; J. Chen; H. Hu; S. Zou; Q. Ye

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Secondary alveolar bone grafting has been widely used to reconstruct alveolar cleft. However, there is still some controversy. OBJECTIVES: To compare the effectiveness and safety of different secondary bone grafting methods. SEARCH STRATEGY: The final electronic and handsearches were car

  3. Morbidity of chin bone transplants used for reconstructing alveolar defects in cleft patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booij, A; Raghoebar, GM; Jansma, J; Kalk, WWI; Vissink, A

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the objective and subjective morbidity of symphyseal chin bone harvesting used for reconstruction of alveolar defects in young cleft patients. Design: All patients who had undergone chin bone harvesting for alveolar cleft reconstruction in the period

  4. An "S-shaped" relationship between smoking duration and alveolar bone loss : generating a hypothesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuller, A A; Holst, D

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A number of epidemiological studies have shown that smoking is a risk factor for periodontal disease. Little is known about the relationship between smoking duration and alveolar bone loss. The purpose of this research was to describe the prevalence of alveolar bone loss according to smo

  5. Genesis of amorphous calcium carbonate containing alveolar plates in the ciliate Coleps hirtus (Ciliophora, Prostomatea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemloh, Marie-Louise; Marin, Frédéric; Herbst, Frédéric; Plasseraud, Laurent; Schweikert, Michael; Baier, Johannes; Bill, Joachim; Brümmer, Franz

    2013-02-01

    In the protist world, the ciliate Coleps hirtus (phylum Ciliophora, class Prostomatea) synthesizes a peculiar biomineralized test made of alveolar plates, structures located within alveolar vesicles at the cell cortex. Alveolar plates are arranged by overlapping like an armor and they are thought to protect and/or stiffen the cell. Although their morphology is species-specific and of complex architecture, so far almost nothing is known about their genesis, their structure and their elemental and mineral composition. We investigated the genesis of new alveolar plates after cell division and examined cells and isolated alveolar plates by electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, FTIR and X-ray diffraction. Our investigations revealed an organic mesh-like structure that guides the formation of new alveolar plates like a template and the role of vesicles transporting inorganic material. We further demonstrated that the inorganic part of the alveolar plates is composed out of amorphous calcium carbonate. For stabilization of the amorphous phase, the alveolar vesicles, the organic fraction and the element phosphorus may play a role.

  6. Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis with the absence of technetium-99m MDP uptake of lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors report a patient with alveolar microlithiasis who was treated for miliary tuberculosis eight years earlier and whose Tc-99m MDP scan revealed absent lung uptake. Diagnosis was established by bronchoalveolar lavage. Both the roentgenogram and computed tomography of the chest confirmed alveolar microlithiasis

  7. Changes in alveolar bone support induced by the Herbst appliance: a tomographic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo Schwartz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: This study evaluated alveolar bone loss around mandibular incisors, induced by the Herbst appliance. Methods: The sample consisted of 23 patients (11 men, 12 women; mean age of 15.76 ± 1.75 years, Class II, Division 1 malocclusion, treated with the Herbst appliance. CBCT scans were obtained before treatment (T0 and after Herbst treatment (T1. Vertical alveolar bone level and alveolar bone thickness of mandibular incisors were assessed. Buccal (B, lingual (L and total (T bone thicknesses were assessed at crestal (1, midroot (2 and apical (3 levels of mandibular incisors. Student's t-test and Wilcoxon t-test were used to compare dependent samples in parametric and nonparametric cases, respectively. Pearson's and Spearman's rank correlation analyses were performed to determine the relationship of changes in alveolar bone thickness. Results were considered at a significance level of 5%. Results: Mandibular incisors showed no statistical significance for vertical alveolar bone level. Alveolar bone thickness of mandibular incisors significantly reduced after treatment at B1, B2, B3, T1 and significantly increased at L2. The magnitude of the statistically significant changes was less than 0.2 mm. The changes in alveolar bone thickness showed no statistical significance with incisor inclination degree. Conclusions: CBCT scans showed an association between the Herbst appliance and alveolar bone loss on the buccal surface of mandibular incisors; however, without clinical significance.

  8. The use of digital periapical radiographs to study the prevalence of alveolar domes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xambre, Pedro Augusto Oliveira Santos; Valerio, Claudia Scigliano; e Alves Cardoso, Claudia Assunção; Custódio, Antônio Luís Neto

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In the present study, we coined the term 'alveolar dome' and aimed to demonstrate the prevalence of alveolar domes through digital periapical radiographs. Materials and Methods This study examined 800 digital periapical radiographs in regard to the presence of alveolar domes. The periapical radiographs were acquired by a digital system using a photostimulable phosphor (PSP) plate. The χ2 test, with a significance level of 5%, was used to compare the prevalence of alveolar domes in the maxillary posterior teeth and, considering the same teeth, to verify the difference in the prevalence of dome-shaped phenomena between the roots. Results The prevalence of alveolar domes present in the first pre-molars was statistically lower as compared to the other maxillary posterior teeth (pfirst and second molars. Considering the maxillary first and second molars, it was observed that the palatal root presented a lower prevalence of alveolar domes when compared to the distobuccal and mesiobuccal roots (pfirst and second molars presented a greater prevalence of alveolar domes, especially in the buccal roots, followed by the third molars and second pre-molars. Although the periapical radiograph is a two-dimensional method, it can provide dentists with the auxiliary information necessary to identify alveolar domes, thus improving diagnosis, planning, and treatment.

  9. Role of alveolar macrophage lysosomes in metal detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, J P; Zhang, L; Galle, P; Ansoborlo, E; Hengé-Napoli, M H; Donnadieu-Claraz, M

    1997-02-15

    The intracellular behaviour of different toxic mineral elements inhaled as soluble aerosols or as insoluble particles was studied in the rat by electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and electron microdiffraction. This study showed that, after inhalation, aerosols of soluble elements like cerous chloride, chromic chloride, uranyl nitrate, and aluminium chloride, are concentrated in the lysosomes of alveolar macrophages and are precipitated in the lysosomes in the form of insoluble phosphate, probably due to the activity of acid phosphatase (intralysosomial enzyme). Also, after inhalation of crystalline particles that are insoluble or poorly soluble in water such as the illites (phyllosilicates), ceric oxides (opaline), and industrial uranium oxides (U3O8), the small crystals are captured by the alveolar macrophage lysosomes and transformed over time into an amorphous form. This structural transformation is associated with changes in the chemical nature of particles inhaled in the oxide form. Microanalysis of amorphous deposits observed after inhalation of uranium or ceric oxides has shown that they contain high concentrations of phosphorus associated with the initial elements cerium and uranium. These different processes tend to limit the diffusion of these toxic elements within the organism, whether they are inhaled in soluble form or not. PMID:9140931

  10. Primary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: computed tomography features at diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berteloot, Laureline; Emond-Gonsard, Sophie; Mamou-Mani, Tania; Lambot, Karen; Grevent, David [Hopital Necker Enfants-Malades, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Paris (France); Taam, Rola Abou; Le Bourgeois, Muriel [Hopital Necker Enfants-Malades, Department of Pediatric Pneumology and Allergology, Paris (France); Elie, Caroline [Hopital Necker Enfants-Malades, Department of Biostatistics, Paris (France); Paris Descartes University, Paris (France); Delacourt, Christophe; Blic, Jacques de [Hopital Necker Enfants-Malades, Department of Pediatric Pneumology and Allergology, Paris (France); Paris Descartes University, Paris (France); Brunelle, Francis [Hopital Necker Enfants-Malades, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Paris (France); Paris Descartes University, Paris (France)

    2014-07-15

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is characterized by an abnormal accumulation of periodic acid-schiff-positive lipoproteinaceous material in the alveoli. Early diagnosis allows setting up of therapeutic lung lavages, which reduces the need for oxygen supplementation and weight gain. To provide a description of radiological features by CT at the onset of primary PAP in children. The clinical and radiological data of 24 patients, including 16 boys and 8 girls (median age: 12 months), diagnosed with a primary form of PAP between April 1992 and May 2012 in a tertiary referral hospital, were retrospectively reviewed. CT images were examined for the presence of alveolar and interstitial elementary lesions. Correlation between clinical and radiological findings was assessed. The types of elementary lesions detected were: ground-glass opacities (n = 24), intralobular lines (n = 24), thickened interlobular septa (n = 22), thickened fissures (n = 21), airspace consolidation (n = 16), hyperinflation (n = 16), cystic lesions (n = 2) and micronodules (n = 1). A crazy-paving pattern was found in 92% of cases. Consolidation and hyperinflation were especially detected in younger children (median age, 8 months, P < 0.01). A density dependent gradient was found. The distribution of the lesions was symmetrical. There was no correlation between radiological and clinical data of severity of the disease. CT findings are suggestive of diagnosis of PAP in immunocompetent children with chronic respiratory failure. (orig.)

  11. Microtomography of the human tooth-alveolar bone complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalstra, Michel; Cattaneo, Paolo M.; Beckmann, Felix; Sakima, Maurício T.; Lemor, Carsten; Laursen, Morten G.; Melsen, Birte

    2006-08-01

    In this study the structure of the adult human dentoalveolar process is examined using conventional and synchrotron radiation-based microtomography (SRμCT). Mandibular and maxillary segments containing two to five adjacent teeth were harvested at autopsy from 49 adult donors. These segments were embedded in blocks of methylmetacrylate and scanned using a conventional table-top μCT-scanner at a pixel size and slice thickness of 35 μm. A few segments were also scanned at a synchrotron facility at an initial pixel size of 16.4 μm, which was binned by a factor 2 to result in an effective voxel size of almost 32.8 μm. The three-dimensional reconstructions revealed how intricately the teeth are supported by the alveolar bone. Furthermore, this support is highly inhomogeneous with respect to the buccal, mesial, lingual and distal quadrants. Reflecting their various degrees of mineralization, tissues like bone, dentine, enamel and cementum, could well be identified, especially in the scans made with SRμCT. Despite comparable voxel sizes, the reconstructed data-sets obtained with conventional μCT were less detailed and somewhat fuzzy in appearance compared to the data-sets of SRμCT. However, for quantification of macroscopical features like the thickness of the alveolar wall or the presence of dehiscences/fenestrations this seemed sufficient.

  12. Bronchiolo-alveolar cell carcinoma: A review of 11 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eleven patients with proved Bronchiolo-alveolar cell carcinoma were found in the chest department of the national menical center from 1975 to 1981. The clinical od Bronchiolo-alveolar cell carcinoma is recently increased as primary lung carcinoma. The results were as follow. 1. The ratio of male and female was 5 : 6, and an incidence of 4.4% among total primary lung cancer patients. The highest incidence (3 of cases) was seen in the sixth decade, and the remaining cases were evenly distributed in the third, fourth, and fifth decades of life. Among them youngest was 29 years old and the oldest was 66 years old. 2. Clinical and radiological initial diagnosis prior to the final diagnosis were as follows; pulmonary tuberculosis; 7 cases, pneumonia; 1 case, bronchiectasis; 1 case, and lung cancer; 2 cases. 3. Radiological examination of chest presented several pictures; most commonly, homogenous or patchy infiltration; 6 cases, nodular or mass like densities; 2 cases, disseminated nodular or military patterns; 2 cases, and reticular pattern; 1 case. 4. Bronchogram revealed no contributable findings except one case of complete tappering obstruction of the segmental bronchus. Therefore we arrive at the conclusion that early diagnosis will result in increased resectability and improved survival so aggressive diagnostic work-up for suspicious pulmonary infiltrate is necessary

  13. Primary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: computed tomography features at diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is characterized by an abnormal accumulation of periodic acid-schiff-positive lipoproteinaceous material in the alveoli. Early diagnosis allows setting up of therapeutic lung lavages, which reduces the need for oxygen supplementation and weight gain. To provide a description of radiological features by CT at the onset of primary PAP in children. The clinical and radiological data of 24 patients, including 16 boys and 8 girls (median age: 12 months), diagnosed with a primary form of PAP between April 1992 and May 2012 in a tertiary referral hospital, were retrospectively reviewed. CT images were examined for the presence of alveolar and interstitial elementary lesions. Correlation between clinical and radiological findings was assessed. The types of elementary lesions detected were: ground-glass opacities (n = 24), intralobular lines (n = 24), thickened interlobular septa (n = 22), thickened fissures (n = 21), airspace consolidation (n = 16), hyperinflation (n = 16), cystic lesions (n = 2) and micronodules (n = 1). A crazy-paving pattern was found in 92% of cases. Consolidation and hyperinflation were especially detected in younger children (median age, 8 months, P < 0.01). A density dependent gradient was found. The distribution of the lesions was symmetrical. There was no correlation between radiological and clinical data of severity of the disease. CT findings are suggestive of diagnosis of PAP in immunocompetent children with chronic respiratory failure. (orig.)

  14. Peptide secreted by human alveolar macrophages releases neutrophil granule contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A monoclonal antibody was developed against an 8000-kDa enzyme-releasing peptide (ERP) released from human alveolar macrophages. ERP was isolated on an immunoaffinity column containing the antibody bound to staphylococcal protein A-Sepharose, and by autoradiography. Release of ERP from the macrophages is not changed by plastic adherence, phagocytosis, calcium ionophore, or phorbol esters. The peptide was not antigenically similar to interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor, or interleukin lα or 1β. The release of constituents from azurophilic and specific granules was the main identified biologic function of ERP. ERP was a more effective secretagogue in the untreated neutrophils and f-met-leu-phe was more effective in the cytochalasin B-treated neutrophils. Absorption of ERP from macrophage-conditioned medium removed a small amount of the chemotactic activity; however, the immunopurified peptide was not chemotactic or chemokinetic for neutrophils, and at high concentrations, it suppressed base line chemokinesis. Treatment of washed macrophages with trypsin released active ERP of approximately the same m.w. of spontaneously secreted ERP. These studies showed that human alveolar macrophages release a peptide which is a secretagogue for human neutrophils under conditions which may be encountered in the lungs during certain disease states. Proteolytic enzymes which are free in the lungs may release the peptide and lead to the secretion of neutrophil enzymes

  15. A 55 years old man with pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeen R Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM is a very rare diffuse chronic lung disease characterized by deposition of small spherules of calcium phosphate within the alveolar cavity. The disease is usually seen from birth up to 40 years of age and is usually diagnosed incidentally during radiography of the chest for other reasons. Most of patients are asymptomatic or having very mild symptoms and the majority of patients either have normal or restrictive pulmonary function test. Clinically, the course of the disease is different; it remains static in few patients or it may progress to pulmonary fibrosis, respiratory failure and cor pulmonale in others. In this case report, we present a 55-year-old man who presented with moderate shortness of breath which has progressed from mild symptoms with in the previous years. His chest high-resolution CT scan showed diffusely scattered, ill-defined little shadowy micronodules which involve the left lung; lingula and left lower lobe in particular. A lung biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of PAM. He was followed up for 1 year with treatment by steroid and alendronate, and no progression was noticed in fact improvement in pulmonary function test noticed. This is the first case report of PAM in Kurdistan.

  16. Alveolar Bone Housing- A Modified Wilkodontics Approach- A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Eshan; Sanjay, Kothamachu; Bhongade, M L; Shrivastav, Sunita

    2016-08-01

    Accelerated orthodontic treatment is the need of the hour in current scenario as the conventional orthodontics is time taking. Corticotomy assisted orthodontics have been used for years to reduce the treatment duration by reducing the resistance provided by alveolar bone housing. This case report describes the orthodontic treatment combined with the modification in conventional wilkodontic technique in a patient to accelerate tooth movement and shorten the treatment time with an anterior open bite and flared and spaced upper and lower incisors. Firstly plaque control was achieved with supra and subgingival scaling. A modified approach using periodontal access flap followed by vertical bone cuts in the cortical bone from the crest of the alveolar bone margin to 2mm-3mm below the apices of all the anterior teeth extending from upper left canine to upper right canine were performed. These vertical cuts were joined by horizontal cuts apically and flap repositioned. An MBT 0.018 inch appliance was bonded. Orthodontic therapy proceeded with frequent activation of the appliances to retract the incisors every two weeks. The total treatment time was four and half months with active period of two months and no adverse effects were observed at the end of active treatment. The modified decortication technique reduced the treatment time to a considerable extent. The interdental spacing closed and optimum overjet and overbite was achieved. PMID:27656577

  17. Alveolar hemorrhage in systemic lupus erythematosus: a cohort review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, C; Mendonça, T; Farinha, F; Correia, J; Marinho, A; Almeida, I; Vasconcelos, C

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a rare but potentially catastrophic manifestation with a high mortality. Among rheumatologic diseases, it occurs most frequently in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and systemic vasculitis. Despite new diagnostic tools and therapies, it remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The aim of this work was to characterize the SLE patients with an episode of alveolar hemorrhage followed in our Clinical Immunology Unit (CIU). A retrospective chart review was carried out for all patients with SLE followed in CIU between 1984 and the end of 2013. We reviewed the following data: demographic characteristics, clinical and laboratory data, radiologic investigations, histologic studies, treatment, and outcome. We identified 10 episodes of DAH, corresponding to seven patients, all female. These represent 1.6% of SLE patients followed in our Unit. The age at DAH attack was 42.75 ± 18.9 years. The average time between diagnosis of SLE and the onset of DAH was 7.1 years. Three patients had the diagnosis of SLE and the DAH attack at the same time. Disease activity according to SLEDAI was high, ranging from 15 to 41. All patients were treated with methylprednisolone, 37.5% cyclophosphamide and 28.6% plasmapheresis. The overall mortality rate was 28.6%.

  18. Alveolar Subphase pH in the Lungs of Anesthetized Rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, D. W.; Goerke, J.; Clements, J. A.

    1981-11-01

    We measured the pH of the alveolar subphase fluid by puncturing the most superficial alveoli of the exposed lungs of anesthetized rabbits with H+-selective and nonselective KCl microelectrodes. In these experiments, we bathed the lung surface with paraffin oil or buffered Ringer's solutions that had a CO2 tension of 40 Torr (1 Torr = 133.3 Pa) and found an alveolar pH of 6.92± 0.01 (mean ± SEM). When the pH of the surface buffer was below 6.7 or above 7.5, alveolar pH varied with surface buffer pH. With the nonselective electrode, we did not find a significant electrical potential difference between the alveolar fluid and the pleural surface. These results are consistent with active transport of H+ (or HCO3-) across alveolar epithelium.

  19. A contemporary perspective on techniques for the clinical assessment of alveolar bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hausmann, E. (State Univ. of New York, Buffalo (USA))

    1990-03-01

    Radiographic techniques, traditional ones as well as newer ones under development, for clinically assessing alveolar bone are critically assessed. Traditional intraoral radiography is reexamined, in particular with regard to the accuracy with which the alveolar crest is seen. Evidence is presented for a more accurate representation of the alveolar crest on bitewings rather than periapical films. Application in periodontics of newer radiographic techniques, subtraction radiography, and single and dual photon aborptiometry presently under clinical development are discussed in regard to their potential and limitations. Similarly, radiopharmaceuticals to evaluate the metabolic status of alveolar bone are discussed as well as the potential for using analyses of gingival crevice fluid as a window for assessment of alveolar crest metabolism. 46 references.

  20. Imaging of the three-dimensional alveolar structure and the alveolar mechanics of a ventilated and perfused isolated rabbit lung with Fourier domain optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, Alexander; Wendel, Martina; Knels, Lilla; Koch, T.; Koch, Edmund

    2006-01-01

    In this feasibility study, Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FDOCT) is used for visualizing the 3-D structure of fixated lung parenchyma and to capture real-time cross sectional images of the subpleural alveolar mechanics in a ventilated and perfused isolated rabbit lung. The compact and modular setup of the FDOCT system allows us to image the first 500 µm of subpleural lung parenchyma with a 3-D resolution of 16×16×8 µm (in air). During mechanical ventilation, real-time cross sectional FDOCT images visualize the inflation and deflation of alveoli and alveolar sacks (acini) in successive images of end-inspiratory and end-expiratory phase. The FDOCT imaging shows the relation of local alveolar mechanics to the setting of tidal volume (VT), peak airway pressure, and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). Application of PEEP leads to persistent recruitment of alveoli and acini in the end-expiratory phase, compared to ventilation without PEEP where alveolar collapse and reinflation are observed. The imaging of alveolar mechanics by FDOCT will help to determine the amount of mechanical stress put on the alveolar walls during tidal ventilation, which is a key factor in understanding the development of ventilator induced lung injury (VILI).

  1. Clinical study of the alveolar bone height for the dental implant using preoperative computed tomographic examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CT examination is useful for preoperative dental implant, and many studies of concerning clinical studies using CT images have been reported. However, there are few reports comparing alveolar bone heights among age groups of many cases. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical studies of preoperative CT examinations for alveolar bone heights and patient ages at our department of radiology using 64 multi-detector row CT. The subjects consisted of 5174 regions in 1312 (425 males and 887 females, mean age 55.5 yrs, 16-86 yrs) cases of preoperative CT examinations, between April 2006 and December 2007. CT machine used was the Aquilion TM64 (Toshiba Medical Systems, Japan), and the workstation used was the ZIOSTATION (ZIOSOFT, Japan). All of CT examinations were performed the position of implant placement and disease examined from CT findings. Alveolar bone heights for dental implants were examined from the CT images. For the maxilla, the alveolar bone height was the distance from the alveolar crest to the base of the nasal cavity, or the base of the maxillary sinus. For the mandible, the alveolar bone height is the distance from the alveolar crest and the upper wall of the mandibular canal, or the distance between the alveolar crest and inferior border of mandible. The numbers of the implant position were 955 site for the first molar of the mandible (the average alveolar bone height is 13.9 mm), 652 site for the second molar of the mandible (12.8 mm), and 567 site for the first molar of the maxilla (6.8 mm). In conclusion, the position where implant were to placed the most was the first molar of the mandible, and it's alveolar bone height got lower with age for women. It is over 60% of the maxillary molar area were lower 8 mm, so some kind of osteogenetic treatment was required in many cases, and hence we reassured the importance of CT. (author)

  2. Viral respiratory infection increases alveolar macrophage cytoplasmic motility in rats: role of NO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, T; Sekizawa, K; Yamaya, M; Okinaga, S; Satoh, M; Sasaki, H

    1995-03-01

    Ingested ferrimagnetic (Fe3O4) particles were used to estimate noninvasively the motion of organelles in alveolar macrophages (AM) in intact rats during viral respiratory infection by parainfluenza type 1 (Sendai) virus. Four days after instillation of Fe3O4 particles (3 mg/kg) into the lung, remnant field strength (RFS) was measured at the body surface immediately after magnetization of Fe3O4 particles by an externally applied magnetic field. RFS decreases with time, due to particle rotation (relaxation) which is related to cytoplasmic motility of AM. Viral infection increased the relaxation rate (lambda o per min), and increases in lambda o reached a maximum 3 days after nasal inoculation (day 3). Viral infection (day 3)-induced increases in lambda o were dose dependently inhibited by either the L-arginine analogue N-nitro-L-arginine or by methylene blue, an inhibitor of guanylate cyclase activity. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid obtained from infected rats contained significantly higher levels of nitrite than that from control rats (P < 0.01). In in vitro experiments, AM from infected rats showed significantly higher lambda o, nitrite production, and intracellular guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate levels than those from control rats (P < 0.01). Sodium nitroprusside, known to release nitric oxide concentration dependently, increased lambda o of AM from noninfected rats in vitro. These results suggest that nitric oxide plays an important role in AM cytoplasmic motility during viral respiratory infection. PMID:7900821

  3. Proinflammatory Responses of Heme in Alveolar Macrophages: Repercussion in Lung Hemorrhagic Episodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael L. Simões

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical and experimental observations have supported the notion that free heme released during hemorrhagic and hemolytic episodes may have a major role in lung inflammation. With alveolar macrophages (AM being the main line of defense in lung environments, the influence of free heme on AM activity and function was investigated. We observed that heme in a concentration range found during hemolytic episodes (3–30 μM elicits AM to present a proinflammatory profile, stimulating reactive oxygen species (ROS and nitric oxide (NO generation and inducing IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-10 secretion. ROS production is NADPH oxidase-dependent, being inhibited by DPI and apocynin, and involves p47 subunit phosphorylation. Furthermore, heme induces NF-κB nuclear translocation, iNOS, and also HO-1 expression. Moreover, AM stimulated with free heme show enhanced phagocytic and bactericidal activities. Taken together, the data support a dual role for heme in the inflammatory response associated with lung hemorrhage, acting as a proinflammatory molecule that can either act as both an adjuvant of the innate immunity and as an amplifier of the inflammatory response, leading tissue injury. The understanding of heme effects on pulmonary inflammatory processes can lead to the development of new strategies to ameliorate tissue damage associated with hemorrhagic episodes.

  4. Modulation of human alveolar macrophage properties by ozone exposure in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, S.; Madden, M.C.; Newman, S.L.; Devlin, R.B.; Koren, H.S.

    1991-01-01

    The study investigated changes in human alveolar macrophage (HAM) function after exposure in vitro to ozone (O3)(0.1-1.0 ppm for 2-4 hr). The functions studied reflect concern that O3 is detrimental to host defense mechanisms in the bronchoalveolar spaces. Exposure of HAM to O3 caused a concentration-dependent increase in release of prostaglandin E2(PGE2), an important modulator of inflammation, phagocytosis, and oxidative burst. Although phagocytosis of particulate immune complexes was decreased by O3, the authors found no change in the quantity of Fc receptors and complement receptors on the HAM surface. Superoxide (O2) production in response to phorbol ester was reduced after exposure of HAM to O3 while the basal O2 release in response to plastic adherence was not affected. Growth inhibition of the opportunistic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans by HAM was not affected by O3 exposure. The production of inflammatory mediators and immune modulators such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin 1, and interleukin 6 were not induced by exposure to O3. However, compared to controls, O3-exposed HAM produced significantly lower levels of these cytokines when simulated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS).

  5. Retention of inhaled plutonium oxide. Elimination procedures by pulmonary lavage and effect of the alveolar macrophage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large fraction of the plutonium particles, reaching the deeper lung are retained in the alveolar macrophages during several months. Cell function changes were measured in vivo and in vitro. Stimulation of macrophage mobility and phagocytosis or natural clearance processes were uneffective on PuO2 excretion. In vivo pulmonary lavage was the only effective therapy. The procedures of in toto pulmonary lavage in order to obtain the highest number of macrophages are described. A study of the physiological and histological consequences showed no long-term pathology, lesions observed during 48 h after lavage were restored quickly. A single lavage eliminated 12-25% only of the lung burden. A procedure of ten repeated lavages (1 per week) eliminated 60-90% of the lung burden. The action of lavage seemed twofold: direct elimination in the rinsing liquid and faster pulmonary clearance with low lymph node overload. Survivals in treated animals kept for long-term observations were compatible with the lung burdens remaining after treatment. Demontration of an inhibiting effect on pulmonary fibrosis should indicate a larger utilization

  6. Peroxidatic activity distinct from myeloperoxidase in human monocytes cultured in vitro and in alveolar macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton-Gorius, J; Vildé, J L; Guichard, J; Vainchenker, W; Basset, F

    1982-01-01

    Human monocytes develop a peroxidatic activity (PA) in rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) after adherence or after culture in semi-solid medium. This enzyme activity disappears after three days of culture in the majority of macrophages derived from adult monocytes but persists for one week in macrophages derived from neonatal monocytes. The PA is due to an enzyme distinct from myeloperoxidase (MPO), since monocytes from a patient with MPO deficiency develop the same PA as that of normal monocytes after adherence. By its localization and other characteristics, PA of adherent monocytes resembles that of rodent macrophages. We therefore investigated whether human alveolar macrophages exhibit PA, using a sensitive cytochemical method which prevents inhibition by aldehyde in adherent monocytes. In various pathological cases, four types of macrophages could be identified: the majority were peroxidase-negative, a small percentage was of exudate type exhibiting a PA in granules as blood monocytes, while few macrophages were intermediate, possessing only PA in RER i.e. of type resident and a smaller proportion had PA in RER and in granules i.e. exudate-resident macrophages. These findings demonstrate that human macrophages and adherent monocytes may exhibit PA in RER as has been reported for rodent macrophages. The true nature and function of the enzyme responsible for this PA, which is distinct from MPO, remains unknown, but some arguments seem to suggest its role in prostaglandin synthesis. PMID:6283838

  7. Neuronal TRPV1 activation regulates alveolar bone resorption by suppressing osteoclastogenesis via CGRP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Naoki; Matsuda, Yumi; Sato, Keisuke; de Jong, Petrus R; Bertin, Samuel; Tabeta, Koichi; Yamazaki, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel is abundantly expressed in peripheral sensory neurons where it acts as an important polymodal cellular sensor for heat, acidic pH, capsaicin, and other noxious stimuli. The oral cavity is densely innervated by afferent sensory neurons and is a highly specialized organ that protects against infections as well as physical, chemical, and thermal stresses in its capacity as the first part of the digestive system. While the function of TRPV1 in sensory neurons has been intensively studied in other organs, its physiological role in periodontal tissues is unclear. In this study we found that Trpv1(-/-) mice developed severe bone loss in an experimental model of periodontitis. Chemical ablation of TRPV1-expressing sensory neurons recapitulated the phenotype of Trpv1(-/-) mice, suggesting a functional link between neuronal TRPV1 signaling and periodontal bone loss. TRPV1 activation in gingival nerves induced production of the neuropeptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and CGRP treatment inhibited osteoclastogenesis in vitro. Oral administration of the TRPV1 agonist, capsaicin, suppressed ligature-induced bone loss in mice with fewer tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive cells in alveolar bone. These results suggest that neuronal TRPV1 signaling in periodontal tissue is crucial for the regulation of osteoclastogenesis via the neuropeptide CGRP. PMID:27388773

  8. Vitamin E alters alveolar type II cell phospholipid synthesis in oxygen and air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newborn rats were injected with vitamin E or placebo daily until 6 days after birth. The effect of vitamin E pretreatment on in vitro surfactant phospholipid synthesis was examined in isolated type II cells exposed to oxygen or air form 24 h in vitro. Type II cells were also isolated from untreated 6-day-old rats and cultured for 24 h in oxygen or air with control medium or vitamin E supplemented medium. These cells were used to examine the effect of vitamin E exposure in vitro on type II cell phospholipid synthesis and ultrastructure. Phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis was reduced in cells cultured in oxygen as compared with air. This decrease was not prevented by in vivo pretreatment or in vitro supplementation with vitamin E. Vitamin E pretreatment increased the ratio of disaturated PC to total PC and increased phosphatidylglycerol synthesis. The volume density of lamellar bodies in type II cells was increased in cells maintained in oxygen. Vitamin E did not affect the volume density of lamellar bodies. We conclude that in vitro hyperoxia inhibits alveolar type II cell phosphatidylcholine synthesis without decreasing lamellar body volume density and that supplemental vitamin E does not prevent hyperoxia-induced decrease in phosphatidylcholine synthesis

  9. Pneumocystis carinii major surface glycoprotein induces interleukin-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 release from a human alveolar epithelial cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benfield, T L; Lundgren, Bettina; Shelhamer, J H;

    1999-01-01

    (IL-8) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) from an alveolar epithelial cell line (A549). RESULTS: Incubation of A549 cells with MSG in concentrations from 0.4 to 10 microg mL-1 for 24 h caused dose-dependent increases in IL-8 release (3.4-fold above control, P ..., suggesting that MSG stimulates A549 cells in part through carbohydrate moieties. Dexamethasone significantly inhibited MSG-induced IL-8 release in concentrations of 10-6-10-8 mol L-1 compared with control experiments (P

  10. Spironolactone attenuates bleomycin-induced pulmonary injury partially via modulating mononuclear phagocyte phenotype switching in circulating and alveolar compartments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Jie Ji

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent experimental studies provide evidence indicating that manipulation of the mononuclear phagocyte phenotype could be a feasible approach to alter the severity and persistence of pulmonary injury and fibrosis. Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR has been reported as a target to regulate macrophage polarization. The present work was designed to investigate the therapeutic potential of MR antagonism in bleomycin-induced acute lung injury and fibrosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We first demonstrated the expression of MR in magnetic bead-purified Ly6G-/CD11b+ circulating monocytes and in alveolar macrophages harvested in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF from C57BL/6 mice. Then, a pharmacological intervention study using spironolactone (20 mg/kg/day by oral gavage revealed that MR antagonism led to decreased inflammatory cell infiltration, cytokine production (downregulated monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, transforming growth factor β1, and interleukin-1β at mRNA and protein levels and collagen deposition (decreased lung total hydroxyproline content and collagen positive area by Masson' trichrome staining in bleomycin treated (2.5 mg/kg, via oropharyngeal instillation male C57BL/6 mice. Moreover, serial flow cytometry analysis in blood, BALF and enzymatically digested lung tissue, revealed that spironolactone could partially inhibit bleomycin-induced circulating Ly6C(hi monocyte expansion, and reduce alternative activation (F4/80+CD11c+CD206+ of mononuclear phagocyte in alveoli, whereas the phenotype of interstitial macrophage (F4/80+CD11c- remained unaffected by spironolactone during investigation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present work provides the experimental evidence that spironolactone could attenuate bleomycin-induced acute pulmonary injury and fibrosis, partially via inhibition of MR-mediated circulating monocyte and alveolar macrophage phenotype switching.

  11. Hormonal regulation of alveolarization: structure-function correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godinez Marye H

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dexamethasone (Dex limits and all-trans-retinoic acid (RA promotes alveolarization. While structural changes resulting from such hormonal exposures are known, their functional consequences are unclear. Methods Neonatal rats were treated with Dex and/or RA during the first two weeks of life or were given RA after previous exposure to Dex. Morphology was assessed by light microscopy and radial alveolar counts. Function was evaluated by plethysmography at d13, pressure volume curves at d30, and exercise swim testing and arterial blood gases at both d15 and d30. Results Dex-treated animals had simplified lung architecture without secondary septation. Animals given RA alone had smaller, more numerous alveoli. Concomitant treatment with Dex + RA prevented the Dex-induced changes in septation. While the results of exposure to Dex + RA were sustained, the effects of RA alone were reversed two weeks after treatment was stopped. At d13, Dex-treated animals had increased lung volume, respiratory rate, tidal volume, and minute ventilation. On d15, both RA- and Dex-treated animals had hypercarbia and low arterial pH. By d30, the RA-treated animals resolved this respiratory acidosis, but Dex-treated animals continued to demonstrate blood gas and lung volume abnormalities. Concomitant RA treatment improved respiratory acidosis, but failed to normalize Dex-induced changes in pulmonary function and lung volumes. No differences in exercise tolerance were noted at either d15 or d30. RA treatment after the period of alveolarization also corrected the effects of earlier Dex exposure, but the structural changes due to RA alone were again lost two weeks after treatment. Conclusion We conclude that both RA- and corticosteroid-treatments are associated with respiratory acidosis at d15. While RA alone-induced changes in structure andrespiratory function are reversed, Dex-treated animals continue to demonstrate increased respiratory rate, minute

  12. The vitronectin RGD motif regulates TGF-β-induced alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheaton, Amanda K; Velikoff, Miranda; Agarwal, Manisha; Loo, Tiffany T; Horowitz, Jeffrey C; Sisson, Thomas H; Kim, Kevin K

    2016-06-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is a critical driver of acute lung injury and fibrosis. Injury leads to activation of TGF-β, which regulates changes in the cellular and matrix makeup of the lung during the repair and fibrosis phase. TGF-β can also initiate alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) apoptosis. Injury leads to destruction of the laminin-rich basement membrane, which is replaced by a provisional matrix composed of arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) motif-containing plasma matrix proteins, including vitronectin and fibronectin. To determine the role of specific matrix proteins on TGF-β-induced apoptosis, we studied primary AECs cultured on different matrix conditions and utilized mice with deletion of vitronectin (Vtn(-/-)) or mice in which the vitronectin RGD motif is mutated to nonintegrin-binding arginine-glycine-glutamate (RGE) (Vtn(RGE/RGE)). We found that AECs cultured on fibronectin and vitronectin or in wild-type mouse serum are resistant to TGF-β-induced apoptosis. In contrast, AECs cultured on laminin or in serum from Vtn(-/-) or Vtn(RGE/RGE) mice undergo robust TGF-β-induced apoptosis. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) sensitizes AECs to greater apoptosis by disrupting AEC engagement to vitronectin. Inhibition of integrin-associated signaling proteins augments AEC apoptosis. Mice with transgenic deletion of PAI-1 have less apoptosis after bleomycin, but deletion of vitronectin or disruption of the vitronectin RGD motif reverses this protection, suggesting that the proapoptotic function of PAI-1 is mediated through vitronectin inhibition. Collectively, these data suggest that integrin-matrix signaling is an important regulator of TGF-β-mediated AEC apoptosis and that PAI-1 functions as a natural regulator of this interaction. PMID:27106291

  13. Effects of ozone on phospholipid synthesis by alveolar type II cells isolated from adult rat lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isolated alveolar type II cells were exposed to ozone by gas diffusion through the thin Teflon bottom of culture dishes. After exposure, type II cells were further incubated in the presence of labeled substrates to assess the capacity to synthesize surfactant lipids. The incorporation of [Me-14C]choline into both total and disaturated phosphatidylcholines in inhibited to 50% of the control values under conditions that result in a diffusion of 0.4 microgram O3/18 cm2-dish per 2.5 h. The incorporation rates of [1-14C]palmitate, [1-14C]acetate, D[U-14C]glucose, and [1,3-3H]glycerol into phosphatidylcholines are also lower after ozone exposure. Moreover, the synthesis of phosphatidylglycerols and phosphatidylethanolamines from these substrates is also inhibited by exposure of type II cells to ozone. These incorporation studies indicate that the effect of ozone is early in the biosynthetic pathway, probably at the step catalyzed by the enzyme glycerolphosphate acyltransferase. Determination of the activity of this enzyme after the ozone exposure shows that it is decreased, whereas the activity of lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase is increased. The activity of choline phosphotransferase also appears to be decreased after exposure of type II cells to ozone, although this enzyme was less susceptible than glycerolphosphate acyltransferase. Studies with the sulfhydryl reagent 5,5'-dithiobis (2-nitrobenzoic acid) indicate a positive correlation between the effect of this compound on enzyme activities in sonicated type II cells and the sensitivity of these enzymes in intact cells to ozone. This suggests that the effect of ozone on the synthesis of surfactant lipids is at least partially exerted via oxidation of the sulfhydryl groups of glycerolphosphate acyltransferase

  14. Nrf2 regulates PU.1 expression and activity in the alveolar macrophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staitieh, Bashar S; Fan, Xian; Neveu, Wendy; Guidot, David M

    2015-05-15

    Alveolar macrophage (AM) immune function depends on the activation of the transcription factor PU.1 by granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor. We have determined that chronic alcohol ingestion dampens PU.1 signaling via an unknown zinc-dependent mechanism; specifically, although PU.1 is not known to be a zinc-dependent transcription factor, zinc treatment reversed alcohol-mediated dampening of PU.1 signaling. Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), a zinc-dependent basic leucine zipper protein essential for antioxidant defenses, is also impaired by chronic alcohol ingestion and enhanced by zinc treatment. We hypothesized that the response of PU.1 to zinc treatment may result from the action of Nrf2 on PU.1. We first performed Nrf2/PU.1 protein coimmunoprecipitation on a rat AM cell line (NR8383) and found no evidence of protein-protein interactions. We then found evidence of increased Nrf2 binding to the PU.1 promoter region by chromatin immunoprecipitation. We next activated Nrf2 using either sulforaphane or an overexpression vector and inhibited Nrf2 with silencing RNA to determine whether Nrf2 could actively regulate PU.1. Nrf2 activation increased protein expression of both factors as well as gene expression of their respective downstream effectors, NAD(P)H dehydrogenase[quinone] 1 (NQO1) and cluster of differentiation antigen-14 (CD14). In contrast, Nrf2 silencing decreased the expression of both proteins, as well as gene expression of their effectors. Activating and inhibiting Nrf2 in primary rat AMs resulted in similar effects. Taken together, these findings suggest that Nrf2 regulates the expression and activity of PU.1 and that antioxidant response and immune activation are coordinately regulated within the AM.

  15. Alveolar stability under different combinations of positive end-expiratory pressure and tidal volume: alveolar microscopy in isolated injured rat lungs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hui; Claudius A. Stahl; Knut Moeller; Matthias Schneider; Steven Ganzert; ZHAO Zhan-qi; TONG Xiao-wen; Josef Guttmann

    2010-01-01

    Background High positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and low tidal volume (VT) ventilation is thought to be a protective ventilation strategy. It is hypothesized that the stabilization of collapsible aiveoli during expiration contributes to lung protection. However, this hypothesis came from analysis of indirect indices like the analysis of the pressure-volume curve of the lung. The purpose of this study was to investigate isolated healthy and injured rat lungs by means of alveolar microscopy, in which combination of PEEP and VI- is beneficial with respect to alveolar stability (I-E%).Methods Alveolar stability was investigated in isolated, non-perfused mechanically ventilated rat lungs. Injured lungs were compared with normal lungs. For both groups three PEEP settings (5, 10, 20 cmH_2O) were combined with three VT settings (6, 10, 15 ml/kg) resulting in nine PEEP-VT combinations per group. Analysis was performed by alveolar microscopy.Results In normal lungs alveolar stability persisted in all PEEP-VT combinations (I-E% (3.2±11.0)%). There was no significant difference using different settings (P >0.01). In contrast, alveoli in injured lungs were extremely instable at PEEP levels of 5 cmH_2O (mean I-E% 100%) and 10 cmH_2O (mean I-E% (30.7±16.8)%); only at a PEEP of 20 cmH_2O were alveoli stabilized (mean I-E% of (0.2±9.3)%).Conclusions In isolated healthy lungs alveolar stability is almost unaffected by different settings of PEEP and VT. In solated injured lungs only a high PEEP level of 20 cmH_2O resulted in stabilized alveoli whereas lower PEEP levels are associated with alveolar instability.

  16. Particle-induced indentation of the alveolar epithelium caused by surface tension forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijailovich, S M; Kojic, M; Tsuda, A

    2010-10-01

    Physical contact between an inhaled particle and alveolar epithelium at the moment of particle deposition must have substantial effects on subsequent cellular functions of neighboring cells, such as alveolar type-I, type-II pneumocytes, alveolar macrophage, as well as afferent sensory nerve cells, extending their dendrites toward the alveolar septal surface. The forces driving this physical insult are born at the surface of the alveolar air-liquid layer. The role of alveolar surfactant submerging a hydrophilic particle has been suggested by Gehr and Schürch's group (e.g., Respir Physiol 80: 17-32, 1990). In this paper, we extended their studies by developing a further comprehensive and mechanistic analysis. The analysis reveals that the mechanics operating in the particle-tissue interaction phenomena can be explained on the basis of a balance between surface tension force and tissue resistance force; the former tend to move a particle toward alveolar epithelial cell surface, the latter to resist the cell deformation. As a result, the submerged particle deforms the tissue and makes a noticeable indentation, which creates unphysiological stress and strain fields in tissue around the particle. This particle-induced microdeformation could likely trigger adverse mechanotransduction and mechanosensing pathways, as well as potentially enhancing particle uptake by the cells. PMID:20634359

  17. Identification of molecular markers related to human alveolar bone cells and pathway analysis in diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, X; Ren, Q H; Bai, L; Feng, Q

    2015-10-28

    Alveolar bone osteoblasts are widely used in dental and related research. They are easily affected by systemic diseases such as diabetes. However, the mechanism of diabetes-induced alveolar bone absorption remains unclear. This study systematically explored the changes in human alveolar bone cell-related gene expression and biological pathways, which may facilitate the investigation of its mechanism. Alveolar bone osteoblasts isolated from 5 male diabetics and 5 male healthy adults were cultured. Total RNA was extracted from these cells and subjected to gene microarray analysis. Differentially expressed genes were screened, and a gene interaction network was constructed. An enrichment pathway analysis was simultaneously performed on differentially expressed genes to identify the biological pathways associated with changes in the alveolar bone cells of diabetic humans. In total, we identified 147 mRNAs that were differentially expressed in diabetic alveolar bone cells (than in the normal cells; 91 upregulated and 36 downregulated mRNAs). The constructed co-expression network showed 3 pairs of significantly-expressed genes. High-enrichment pathway analysis identified 8 pathways that were affected by changes in gene expression; three of the significant pathways were related to metabolism (inositol phosphate metabolism, propanoate metabolism, and pyruvate metabolism). Here, we identified a few potential genes and biological pathways for the diagnosis and treatment of alveolar bone cells in diabetic patients.

  18. Hepatic alveolar echinococcosis: correlative US and CT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Didier, D.; Weiler, S.; Rohmer, P.; Lasseque, A.; Deschamps, J.P.; Vuitton, D.; Miguet, J.P.; Weill, F.

    1985-01-01

    A total of 24 cases of hepatic alveolar echinococcosis (HAE) due to Echinococcus multilocularis was assessed by US and CT. The diagnosis was confirmed in all cases by immunologic and histologic study. Both US and CT patterns of HAE showed changes of liver morphology in both contour and size. Abnormal areas of parenchyma were nodular or in fields, irregular, heterogeneous, and basically echogenic. Clustered microcalcifications were encountered within the abnormal parenchymal fields in 50% of cases, and necrotized zones occurred in 40% of cases. Dilatation of intrahepatic bile ducts was commonly seen, especially on US; hilar involvement was frequent. Follow-up by both techniques can display increases of primary lesions, occurrence of new foci, and local or regional extensions. Precise evaluations of the lesions arising from correlative use of US and CT permits adequate therapeutic management.

  19. [Implant positioned buccally of the alveolar process; a complication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abas, I; Meijer, G J

    2016-02-01

    Because of a blue discolouration of her mucosa a 58-year-old patient visited her new dentist. Her medical history revealed that several months before an implant in the region of dental element 22 had been installed. When palpating the alveolar region, a painless hard swelling was felt. As a malposition of the implant was suspected, it was decided to have a cone beam computed tomography-scan made. The sagittal scan revealed that apically the implant in the region of dental element 22 was not embedded in the jawbone. Following the placement of an implant, it is always necessary to verify that the implant procedure has been carried out successfully; palpating the implant bed is always required. PMID:26878714

  20. Hereditary gingivo-alveolar hyperplasia: a report of two siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasetyono, Theddeus O H; Ekaputri, Krista

    2015-02-01

    Gingival hyperplasia is characterized by fibrotic gingival overgrowth. The lesion may bury all the crown of the teeth and lead to impairment in masticatory functions and aesthetic disfigurement. This inherited disease is considered rare. We presented two cases of gingival hyperplasia in two siblings: an 11-year-old girl and an 8-year-old boy, whose mother had also suffered from the disease. The two siblings presented with generalized gingival overgrowth involving the maxillary and mandibular arches and covering almost all of the teeth. We performed surgery to reduce the excessive gingivo-alveolar tissue and disclosed most of the teeth. The patients showed functional and aesthetic improvement. The last follow-up through a phone call, which was conducted 12 months after the surgery, revealed no recurrent hyperplasia.

  1. Sequential gas delivery provides precise control of alveolar gas exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Joseph A; Iscoe, Steve; Duffin, James

    2016-05-01

    Of the factors determining blood gases, only alveolar ventilation (V˙A) is amenable to manipulation. However, current physiology text books neither describe how breath-by-breath V˙A can be measured, nor how it can be precisely controlled in spontaneously breathing subjects. And such control must be effected independent of minute ventilation (V˙E) and the pattern of breathing. Control of V˙A requires the deliberate partition of inhaled gas between the alveoli and the anatomical deadspace. This distribution is accomplished by sequential gas delivery (SGD): each breath consists of a chosen volume of 'fresh' gas followed by previously exhaled gas. Control of V˙A through SGD is a simple, inexpensive, yet powerful tool with many applications. Here we describe how to implement SGD, how it precisely controls V˙A, and consequently how it controls arterial blood gases. PMID:26840836

  2. A case of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis with Cor Pulmonale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen; Gu, Tao

    2012-03-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) is a rare disease characterized by the formation and deposition of microliths within the alveoli and a paucity of symptoms in contrast to the imaging findings. It has familial tendency and is thought to be an autosomal recessive disorder with the mutation in the SLC34A2 gene. We describe a case of PAM with Cor Pulmonale. Ultrasonic cardiogram showed pulmonary hypertension (82 mmHg). Chest radiography revealed diffuse, bilateral sandstorm-like micronodules with greater density in the lower lung fields. HRCT scans demonstrated diffuse ground-grass opacities, thickening and calcification of interlobular septa and confluent calcified nodules. A diagnosis of PAM was suggested and confirmed by transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB). PMID:23256064

  3. Effect of Phenylephrine on Alveolar Fluid Clearance in Ventilator-induced Lung Injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nai-jing Li; Xiu Gu; Wei Li; Yan Li; Sheng-qi Li; Ping He

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of phenylephrine (an α-adrenergic agonist) on alveolar fluid clearance (AFC) in ventilator-induced lung injury and the possible mechanism involved. Methods A total of 170 male Wistar rats were randomly allocated into 17 groups (n=10) using ran-dom number tables. Short-term (40 minutes) mechanical ventilation with high tidal volume (HVT) was per-formed to induce lung injury,impair active Na+ transport and lung liquid clearance in the rats. Unventilated rats served as controls. To demonstrate the effect of phenylephrine on AFC,phenylephrine at different con-centrations (1×10-5,1×10-6,1×10-7,1×10-8,and 1×10-9 mol/L) was injected into the alveolar space of the HVT ventilated rats. To identify the influence of adrenergic antagonists,Na+ channel,and microtubular sys-tem on the effect of phenylephrine,phenylephrine at 1×10-5 mol/L combined with prazosin (an α1-adrener-gic antagonist,1×10-4 mol/L),yohimbine (an α2-adrenergic antagonist,1×10-4 mol/L),atenolol (a β1-adrenergic antagonist,1×10-5 mol/L),ICI-118551 (an β2-adrenergic antagonist,1×10-5 mol/L),amiloride (a Na+ channel blocker,5×10-4 mol/L),ouabain (a Na+/K+-ATPase blocker,5×10-4 mol/L),colchicine (a mi-crotubular disrupting agent,0.25 mg/100 g body weight),or β-lumicolchicine (an isomer of colchicine,0.25 mg/100 g body weight) were perfused into the alveolar space of the rats ventilated with HVT for 40 minutes. AFC and total lung water content were measured. Results Basal AFC in control rats was (17.47±2.56)%/hour,which decreased to (9.64± 1.32)%/hour in HVT ventilated rats (P=0.003). The perfusion of phenylephrine at 1×10-8,1×10-7,1×10-6,and 1×10-5 mol/L significantly increased the AFC in HVT ventilated rats (all P<0.05). This effect of phenylephrine on AFC was suppressed by prazosin,atenolol,and ICI-118551 in HVT ventilated rats by 53%,31%,and 37%,respectively (all P<0.05). The AFC-stimulating effect of phenylephrine was lowered by 33% and 42% with

  4. Substrate stiffness regulates extracellular matrix deposition by alveolar epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L Eisenberg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Jessica L Eisenberg1,2, Asmahan Safi3, Xiaoding Wei3, Horacio D Espinosa3, GR Scott Budinger2, Desire Takawira1, Susan B Hopkinson1, Jonathan CR Jones1,21Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, 2Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA; 3Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USAAim: The aim of the study was to address whether a stiff substrate, a model for pulmonary fibrosis, is responsible for inducing changes in the phenotype of alveolar epithelial cells (AEC in the lung, including their deposition and organization of extracellular matrix (ECM proteins.Methods: Freshly isolated lung AEC from male Sprague Dawley rats were seeded onto polyacrylamide gel substrates of varying stiffness and analyzed for expression and organization of adhesion, cytoskeletal, differentiation, and ECM components by Western immunoblotting and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy.Results: We observed that substrate stiffness influences cell morphology and the organization of focal adhesions and the actin cytoskeleton. Surprisingly, however, we found that substrate stiffness has no influence on the differentiation of type II into type I AEC, nor does increased substrate stiffness lead to an epithelial–mesenchymal transition. In contrast, our data indicate that substrate stiffness regulates the expression of the α3 laminin subunit by AEC and the organization of both fibronectin and laminin in their ECM.Conclusions: An increase in substrate stiffness leads to enhanced laminin and fibronectin assembly into fibrils, which likely contributes to the disease phenotype in the fibrotic lung.Keywords: alveolar epithelial cells, fibrosis, extracellular matrix, substrate stiffness

  5. Alveolar ridge augmentation with titanium mesh. A retrospective clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, Pier P; Beretta, Mario; Cicciù, Marco; Maiorana, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    An adequate amount of bone all around the implant surface is essential in order to obtain long-term success of implant restoration. Several techniques have been described to augment alveolar bone volume in critical clinical situations, including guided bone regeneration, based on the use of barrier membranes to prevent ingrowth of the epithelial and gingival connective tissue cells. To achieve this goal, the use of barriers made of titanium micromesh has been advocated. A total of 13 patients were selected for alveolar ridge reconstruction treatment prior to implant placement. Each patient underwent a tridimensional bone augmentation by means of a Ti-mesh filled with intraoral autogenous bone mixed with deproteinized anorganic bovine bone in a 1:1 ratio. Implants were placed after a healing period of 6 months. Panoramic x-rays were performed after each surgical procedure and during the follow-up recalls. Software was used to measure the mesial and the distal peri-implant bone loss around each implant. The mean peri-implant bone loss was 1.743 mm on the mesial side and 1.913 mm on the distal side, from the top of the implant head to the first visible bone-implant contact, at a mean follow-up of 88 months. The use of Ti-mesh allows the regeneration of sufficient bone volume for ideal implant placement. The clinical advantages related to this technique include the possibility of correcting severe vertical atrophies associated with considerable reductions in width and the lack of major complications if soft-tissue dehiscence and mesh exposures do occur. PMID:25317209

  6. Effect of Amygdalin on the Proliferation of Hyperoxia-exposed Type Ⅱ Alveolar Epithelial Cells Isolated from Premature Rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祝华平; 常立文; 李文斌; 刘汉楚

    2004-01-01

    Summary: The pathogenesis of hyperoxia lung injury and the mechanism of amygdalin on type 2 alveolar epithelial cells (AEC2) isolated from premature rat lungs in vitro were investigated. AEC2 were obtained by primary culture from 20-days fetal rat lung and hyperoxia-exposed cell model was established. Cell proliferating viability was examined by MTT assay after treatment of amygdalin at various concentrations. DNA content and the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) protein expression of AEC2 were measured by using flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry respectively after 24 h of hyperoxia exposure or amygdalin treatment. The results showed that hyperoxia inhibited the proliferation and decreased PCNA protein expression in AEC2 of premature rat in vitro. Amygdalin at the concentration range of 50-200 μmol/L stimulated the proliferation of AEC2 in a dose-dependent manner, however, 400 μmol/L amygdalin inhibited the proliferation of AEC2. Amygdalin at the concentration of 200 μmol/L played its best role in facilitating proliferation of AEC2s in vitro and could partially ameliorated the changes of proliferation in hyperoxia exposed AEC2 of premature rat. It has been suggested that hyperoxia inhibited the proliferation of AEC2s of premature rat, which may contribute to hyperoxia lung injury. Amygdalin may play partial protective role in hyperoxia-induced lung injury.

  7. Alveolar subphase pH in the lungs of anesthetized rabbits.

    OpenAIRE

    Nielson, D W; Goerke, J; Clements, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    We measured the pH of the alveolar subphase fluid by puncturing the most superficial alveoli of the exposed lungs of anesthetized rabbits with H+-selective and nonselective KCl microelectrodes. In these experiments, we bathed the lung surface with paraffin oil or buffered Ringer's solutions that had a CO2 tension of 40 Torr (1 Torr = 133.3 Pa) and found an alveolar pH of 6.92 +/- 0.01 (mean +/- sEM). When the pH of the surface buffer was below 6.7 or above 7.5, alveolar pH varied with surface...

  8. Alveolar recruitment maneuver in refractory hypoxemia and lobar atelectasis after cardiac surgery: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbst-Rodrigues Marcus

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective This case report describes an unusual presentation of right upper lobe atelectasis associated with refractory hypoxemia to conventional alveolar recruitment maneuvers in a patient soon after coronary artery bypass grafting surgery. Method Case-report. Results The alveolar recruitment with PEEP = 40cmH2O improved the patient’s atelectasis and hypoxemia. Conclusion In the present report, the unusual alveolar recruitment maneuver with PEEP 40cmH2O showed to be safe and efficient to reverse refractory hypoxemia and uncommon atelectasis in a patient after cardiac surgery.

  9. CARCINOMA BRONQUÍOLO-ALVEOLAR: ASPECTOS NA TOMOGRAFIA COMPUTADORIZADA DE ALTA RESOLUÇÃO

    OpenAIRE

    Moreira Luiza Beatriz Melo; Marchiori Edson; Melo Alessandro Severo Alves de; Magnago Marcelo; Muniz Maria Angélica Soares; Irion Klaus

    2002-01-01

    O carcinoma bronquíolo-alveolar é um tipo de carcinoma broncogênico de crescimento insidioso, que surge nas paredes das vias aéreas distais e se dissemina utilizando o septo alveolar como um estroma, preservando a arquitetura pulmonar. Neste trabalho foram analisadas as tomografias computadorizadas de alta resolução de 17 pacientes com carcinoma bronquíolo-alveolar. Ao contrário do relatado na literatura, foram observados predomínio no sexo masculino (71%) e maior freqüência da associação das...

  10. Tracking X-ray microscopy for alveolar dynamics in live intact mice

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Soeun; Kwon, Namseop; Weon, Byung Mook; Kim, Jinkyung; Rhee, Chin Kook; Choi, Han Sung; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Yamamoto, Masaki; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Je, Jung Ho

    2013-01-01

    Here we report a tracking X-ray microscopy (TrXM) as a novel methodology by using upper right lung apices alveoli in live intact mice. By enabling tracking of individual alveolar movements during respiration, TrXM identifies alveolar dynamics: individual alveoli in the upper lung apices show a small size increment as 4.9 ± 0.4% (mean ± s.e.m.) during respiration while their shapes look almost invariant. TrXM analysis in alveolar dynamics would be significant for better understanding of alveol...

  11. Alveolar system of Paramecium. I. Trapping polycationic dye as a result of membrane impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyroba, E

    1981-01-01

    The function of Paramecium alveolar system underlying the cell membrane has been studied. Permeability and structure of cell membrane, alveolar membranes and alveoli following alpha-amylase, beta-amylase, phospholipase C and hyaluronidase treatment has been examined. It is demonstrated that droplets of polycationic dye, ruthenium red, have been trapped within the alveoli whereas the dye was also bound by the outer and inner alveolar membrane. This suggest the presence of anionic sites capable to bind cationic compounds within the alveoli. It may be concluded that the alveolar system in Paramecium is functioning as a barrier protecting the cell against the chemicals added from the outside when the cell membrane separating the cytoplasm from the medium is impaired.

  12. Alveolar Echinococcosis Infection in a Monkey (Ateles Geoffroyi In Mashhad, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Kazemi Mehrjerdi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Alveolar echinococcosis (AE, which is caused by ingestion of eggs of the fox tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis, is the most potentially lethal parasitic infection because of its tendency to invade and proliferate in the liver and the difficulty in treatment. This article describes a case of alveolar echinococcosis found in Ateles geoffroyi in Mashhad, Iran. The cysts were characterized as an alveolar structure, composed of numerous small vesicles in liver, abdominal cavity, retroperitoneum and lungs. A characteristic feature of these vesicles was its exogenous tumor-like proliferation. These cysts were filled with numerous protoscoleces suggesting a potential role of this monkey in cycle of transmission. Up to now, this is probably the first report of alveolar echinococcosis in A. geoffroyi in the world.

  13. Multimodality imaging in diagnosis and management of alveolar echinococcosis: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulakçı, Mesut; Kartal, Merve Gülbiz; Yılmaz, Sabri; Yılmaz, Erdem; Yılmaz, Ravza; Şahin, Dilek; Aşık, Murat; Erol, Oğuz Bülent

    2016-01-01

    Alveolar echinococcosis is a parasitic disease limited to the northern hemisphere. The disease occurs primarily in the liver and shows a profile mimicking slow-growing malignant tumors. Echinococcus multilocularis infection is fatal if left untreated. It can cause several complications by infiltrating the vascular structures, biliary tracts, and the hilum of the liver. As it can invade the adjacent organs or can spread to distant organs, alveolar echinococcosis can easily be confused with malignancies. We provide a brief review of epidemiologic and pathophysiologic profile of alveolar echinococcosis and clinical features of the disease. This article focuses primarily on the imaging features of alveolar echinococcosis on ultrasonogra-phy, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and positron emission tomography-computed tomography. We also reviewed the role of radiology in diagnosis, management, and follow-up of the disease. PMID:27082120

  14. Tracheal compression delays alveolar collapse during deep diving in marine mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostrom, Brian L; Fahlman, Andreas; Jones, David R

    2008-05-31

    Marine mammals have very compliant alveoli and stiff upper airways; an adaptation that allows air to move from the alveoli into the upper airways, during breath-hold diving. Alveolar collapse is thought occur between 30 and 100 m and studies that have attempted to estimate gas exchange at depth have used the simplifying assumption that gas exchange ceases abruptly at the alveolar collapse depth. Here we develop a mathematical model that uses compliance values for the alveoli and upper airspaces, estimated from the literature, to predict volumes of the respiratory system at depth. Any compressibility of the upper airways decreases the volume to contain alveolar air yielding lung collapse pressures 2x that calculated assuming an incompressible upper airway. A simple relationship with alveolar volume was used to predict relative pulmonary shunt at depth. The results from our model agree with empirical data on gas absorption at depth as well as the degree of tracheal compression in forced and free diving mammals.

  15. Unsuspected pulmonary alveolar proteinosis in a patient with a slow resolving pneumonia: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Main, Stephanie; Somani, Vikas; Molyneux, Angus; Bhattacharya, Milan; Randhawa, Rabinder; Kavidasan, Ajikumar

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis (PAP) is a rare condition with an incidence of one in two million and is classified as primary or secondary. This is the first reported case presenting as a slow resolving pneumonia.

  16. Iron homeostatis and oxidative stress in idiopathic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: a case-control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Lung injury caused by both inhaled dusts and infectious agents depends on increased availability of iron and metal-catalyzed oxidative stress. Because inhaled particles, such as silica, and certain infections can cause secondary pulmonary alveolar proteinosi...

  17. A case of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis treated with whole lung lavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koplin-Baucum, Stephanie; Hurst, Susan

    2005-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is rarely seen and, thus, many critical care nurses may not be familiar with the disease. This article provides information about the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and a case study of a patient with this disease. PMID:15912060

  18. Alveolar macrophages regulate neutrophil recruitment in endotoxin-induced lung injury

    OpenAIRE

    Beck-Schimmer, B; Schwendener, R.; Pasch, T; Reyes, L.; Booy, C; Schimmer, R C

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Alveolar macrophages play an important role during the development of acute inflammatory lung injury. In the present study, in vivo alveolar macrophage depletion was performed by intratracheal application of dichloromethylene diphosphonate-liposomes in order to study the role of these effector cells in the early endotoxin-induced lung injury. METHODS: Lipopolysaccharide was applied intratracheally and the inflammatory reaction was assessed 4 hours later. Neutrophil accumulation an...

  19. Alveolar macrophages regulate neutrophil recruitment in endotoxin-induced lung injury

    OpenAIRE

    Reyes Livia; Pasch Thomas; Schwendener Reto; Beck-Schimmer Beatrice; Booy Christa; Schimmer Ralph C

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Alveolar macrophages play an important role during the development of acute inflammatory lung injury. In the present study, in vivo alveolar macrophage depletion was performed by intratracheal application of dichloromethylene diphosphonate-liposomes in order to study the role of these effector cells in the early endotoxin-induced lung injury. Methods Lipopolysaccharide was applied intratracheally and the inflammatory reaction was assessed 4 hours later. Neutrophil accumula...

  20. Detection of Alveolar Fibrocytes in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis and Systemic Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Borie, Raphael; Quesnel, Christophe; Phin, Sophie; Debray, Marie-Pierre; Marchal-Somme, Joelle; Tiev, Kiet; Bonay, Marcel; Fabre, Aurélie; Soler, Paul; Dehoux, Monique; Crestani, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Background Fibrocytes are circulating precursors for fibroblasts. Blood fibrocytes are increased in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). The aim of this study was to determine whether alveolar fibrocytes are detected in broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL), to identify their prognostic value, and their potential association with culture of fibroblasts from BAL. Methods We quantified fibrocytes in BAL from 26 patients with IPF, 9 patients with Systemic Sclerosis(SSc)-interstitial lung d...

  1. Alveolar Type II cell transplantation restores pulmonary surfactant protein levels in lung fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Guillamat-Prats, Raquel; Gay-Jordi, Gemma; Xaubet, Antoni; Peinado, Victor; Serrano-Mollar, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Background Alveolar Type II cell transplantation has been proposed as a cell therapy for the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Its long-term benefits include repair of lung fibrosis, but its success partly depends on the restoration of lung homeostasis. Our aim was to evaluate surfactant protein restoration after alveolar Type II cell transplantation in an experimental model of bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis in rats. Methods Lung fibrosis was induced by intratracheal instillation o...

  2. Targeting of the pulmonary capillary vascular niche promotes lung alveolar repair and ameliorates fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Zhongwei; Lis, Raphael; Ginsberg, Michael; Chavez, Deebly; Shido, Koji; Rabbany, Sina Y.; Fong, Guo-Hua; Sakmar, Thomas P.; Rafii, Shahin; Ding, Bi-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Although the lung can undergo self-repair after injury, fibrosis in chronically injured or diseased lungs can occur at the expense of regeneration. Here we study how a hematopoietic-vascular niche regulates alveolar repair and lung fibrosis. Using intratracheal injection of bleomycin or hydrochloric acid in mice, we show that repetitive lung injury activates pulmonary capillary endothelial cells (PCECs) and perivascular macrophages, impeding alveolar repair and promoting fibrosis. Whereas the...

  3. Activation of Alveolar Macrophages via the Alternative Pathway in Herpesvirus-Induced Lung Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Mora, Ana L.; Torres-González, Edilson; Rojas, Mauricio; Corredor, Claudia; Ritzenthaler, Jeffrey; Xu, Jianguo; Roman, Jesse; Brigham, Kenneth; Stecenko, Arlene

    2006-01-01

    The etiology of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is unknown. Because viral pathogenesis of IPF has been suggested, we have established a murine model of progressive pulmonary fibrosis by infecting IFN-γR–deficient mice (IFN-γR−/−) with the murine γ-herpesvirus 68. Because alveolar macrophages in humans with IPF have been implicated in driving the profibrotic response, we studied their role in our model. Chronic herpesvirus infection of the lung was associated with recruitment of alveolar m...

  4. Status Periodontal dan Kehilangan Tulang Alveolar pada Restorasi Proksimal yang Overhang

    OpenAIRE

    Devy Firena Garna; Amaliya

    2012-01-01

    A healthy periodontal tissue dependent on placing a proper restoration especially proximal restoration whereas to place an overhang restoration could be a risk factor for gingivitis and alveolar bone loss. The aim of the study was to find out relation prevalence periodontal status and alveolar bone loss on proximal restorations. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on patients who visited Tarogong Dental Unit Public Health Centre, Garut Regency between March and November 2010 and...

  5. The Effects of Synthetic Cannabinoids on Alveolar-Arterial Oxygen Gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egemen Kucuk

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Synthetic cannabinoids are chemicals that produce several marijuana-like effects in humans. Aim of this study is to investigate the effects of synthetic cannabinoids on to alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient. Material and Method: A total of 112 patients, who admitted directly to emergency clinic with synthetic cannabinoid usage, were determined between February 2014 and August 2014. Blood gases of 41 patients were determined as arterial blood gases on room air, and included in to study. Patients were evaluated according to age, sex, decade, partial pressure of arterial oxygen, partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide, pH, bicarbonate, metabolic status, age consistent expected alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient and calculated alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient. Results: Synthetic cannabinoid using was higher in males, mean age of patients was 23.32±6.14 years. Number of patients in the third decade were significantly higher than the other decades. The calculated alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient value of patients was significantly higher than age consistent expected alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient value. Respiratory acidosis, was significantly higher than the other types of the metabolic disorders. The best cutoff point for calculated alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient was 12.70, with sensitivity of 90% and specifity of 85%. Area under curve was 0.70 for calculated alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient. Discussion: The value of alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient has been increased due to synthetic cannabinoid usage. This can be used as a supportive parameter in the diagnosis of synthetic cannabinoid usage.

  6. Serum KL-6 is a predictor of outcome in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    OpenAIRE

    Bonella, Francesco; Ohshimo, Shinichiro; Miaotian, Cai; Griese, Matthias; Guzman y Rotaeche, Josune; Costabel, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare disorder characterised by abundant alveolar accumulation of surfactant lipoproteins. Serum levels of KL-6, high molecular weight human MUC1 mucin, are increased in the majority of patients with PAP. The prognostic significance of KL-6 in PAP is still unknown. Aim of the study was to evaluate whether serum KL-6 levels correlate with the outcome of the disease. Patients and methods: From 2006 to 2012, we prospectively studied 33 patient...

  7. Jamming dynamics of stretch-induced surfactant release by alveolar type II cells

    OpenAIRE

    Majumdar, Arnab; Arold, Stephen P.; Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Suki, Béla

    2011-01-01

    Secretion of pulmonary surfactant by alveolar epithelial type II cells is vital for the reduction of interfacial surface tension, thus preventing lung collapse. To study secretion dynamics, rat alveolar epithelial type II cells were cultured on elastic membranes and cyclically stretched. The amounts of phosphatidylcholine, the primary lipid component of surfactant, inside and outside the cells, were measured using radiolabeled choline. During and immediately after stretch, cells secreted less...

  8. Inferior Alveolar Nerve Injuries Following Implant Placement - Importance of Early Diagnosis and Treatment: a Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Ilana Shavit; Gintaras Juodzbalys

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The purpose of this article is to systematically review diagnostic procedures and risk factors associated with inferior alveolar nerve injury following implant placement, to identify the time interval between inferior alveolar nerve injury and its diagnosis after surgical dental implant placement and compare between outcomes of early and delayed diagnosis and treatment given based on case series recorded throughout a period of 10 years. Material and Methods We performed li...

  9. A novel in vivo platform for studying alveolar bone regeneration in rat

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Joong-Hyun; Moon, Ho-Jin; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Jo, Jong-Min; Yang, Sung Hee; Naskar, Deboki; Kundu, Subhas C.; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Kim, Hae-Won

    2013-01-01

    Alveolar bone regeneration is a significant challenge in dental implantation. Novel biomaterials and tissue-engineered constructs are under extensive development and awaiting in vivo animal tests to find clinical endpoint. Here, we establish a novel in vivo model, modifying gingivoperiosteoplasty in rat for the alveolar bone regeneration. Rat premaxillary bone defects were filled with silk scaffold or remained empty during the implantation period (up to 6 weeks), and harvested samples were an...

  10. Hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis complicated with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage: a case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Gnerre

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Urticarial vasculitis is a small-vessel vasculitis characterized clinically by urticaria and microscopically by leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome is a rare subtype of urticarial vasculitis with organ involvement and persistent, acquired hypocomplementemia. Pulmonary involvement, usually seen as diffuse alveolar damage, is an uncommon complication and a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Here we present a rare case of hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome complicated by diffuse alveolar damage and describe the beneficial effect of cyclophosphamide-dexamethasone.

  11. Ontogenesis of the alveolar walls of the tooth germ according to orthopantomography

    OpenAIRE

    Okushko M.R.; Suetenkov D.E.; Chependyuk Т.А.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to identify changes of the configuration and size of the walls of the alveolar stages of ontogenesis. Materials and Methods. Orthopantomograms studied 196 children aged 5 to 12 years. We used visual and morphometric methods. Results. The data on the three diameters of the dental alveoli (proximal, middle and distal) has been presented, under which subsequently the main stages of age transformation have been highlighted. Conclusion. Transformation of the alveolar walls radiologicall...

  12. Problems of diagnosis and a clinical course of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have defined 3 stages of development of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis proceeding from the literature data and their own data on 4 patients. Each stage was characterized in detail with due account of clinical manifestations, in results of laboratory, X-ray, functional and radionuclide investigations. Diagnosis of the disease is a problem requiring biopsy. Bronchoalveolar lavage was shown to be the most effective method of therapy of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

  13. Functional and metabolic properties of alveolar macrophages in response to the gas phase of tobacco smoke.

    OpenAIRE

    Drath, D B; Shorey, J M; Huber, G L

    1981-01-01

    The effect of whole tobacco smoke and the gas phase of tobacco smoke on the metabolism and phagocytic ability of alveolar macrophages was monitored over a 30-day exposure period. It was demonstrated that both the gas phase and whole tobacco smoke induced a weight loss in exposed rats. Alveolar macrophage oxygen consumption was markedly increased by both exposure regimens. Superoxide generation was not affected by whole tobacco smoke exposure but was increased in response to the filtered gas p...

  14. Two cases of extrapulmonary onset granulomatosis with polyangiitis which caused diffuse alveolar haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halide Kaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA is a rare form of vasculitis. Multidisciplinary therapeutic approach and early diagnosis assume vital importance in management of patients with diffuse alveolar haemorrhage caused by GPA, which is a rare complication. The purpose of this study was to present the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges experienced by clinicians in management of two severe cases of GPA with insidious extrapulmonary manifestations which rapidly progressed into acute kidney injury, alveolar haemorrhage and acute respiratory failure.

  15. The Effects of Alcohol Abuse on Pulmonary Alveolar-Capillary Barrier Function in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Burnham, Ellen L.; Halkar, Raghuveer; Burks, Marsha; Moss, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Aims: Alcohol abuse is associated with the development of the acute respiratory distress syndrome, a disorder characterized by abnormal alveolar-capillary permeability. We hypothesized that individuals with a history of alcohol abuse would have clinical evidence of abnormal alveolar-capillary permeability even in the absence of symptoms. This could contribute to their propensity for the development of this disorder. Methods: Thirty-three subjects with a history of alcohol abuse, but no other ...

  16. Alveolar recruitment maneuver and perioperative ventilatory support in obese patients undergoing abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgiarini Júnior, Luiz Alberto; Rezende, Juliana Castilhos; Forgiarini, Soraia Genebra Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    The development of abdominal surgery represents an alternative therapy for the morbidly obese; however, patients undergoing this surgical procedure often experience postoperative pulmonary complications. The use of alveolar recruitment maneuvers and/or perioperative ventilatory strategies is a possible alternative to reduce these complications, focusing on the reduction of postoperative pulmonary complications. In this review, the benefits of perioperative ventilatory strategies and the implementation of alveolar recruitment maneuvers in obese patients undergoing abdominal surgery are described. PMID:24553513

  17. Activated alveolar macrophages in subclinical pulmonary inflammation in collagen vascular diseases.

    OpenAIRE

    Wallaert, B; Bart, F.; Aerts, C.; Ouaissi, A.; Hatron, P Y; Tonnel, A. B.; C. Voisin

    1988-01-01

    A study was initiated to determine whether alveolar macrophages from patients with collagen vascular diseases but free of pulmonary symptoms were spontaneously activated and whether they released various mediators related to the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. Alveolar macrophages obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage from 32 patients with proved collagen vascular disease but no evidence of lung disease were compared with those from 10 patients with collagen vascular disease with interstitia...

  18. Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma originating between the fourth and fifth metatarsal--case report and literature review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bolger, J C

    2010-09-01

    We report a case of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma arising between the fourth and fifth metatarsal. A 13-year-old boy presented to outpatients with a history of pain and swelling in the lateral aspect of his left forefoot. Plain radiographs and MRI showed a soft tissue mass displacing the fourth metatarsal. Percutaneous biopsy revealed an alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. Staging scans showed advanced metastatic disease. The patient was treated with chemotherapy. This highly malignant lesion remains challenging to diagnose, and difficult to treat successfully.

  19. A case of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage associated with hyaluronic acid dermal fillers

    OpenAIRE

    Basora, Jose F.; Fernandez, Ricardo; Gonzalez, Modesto; Adorno, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Male, 25 Final Diagnosis: Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage Symptoms: Cough dry • short of breath Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: — Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Hyaluronic acid is a substance that is naturally present in the human body, especially in joints and eyes. Hyaluronic acid injectable gels have been available for the general market since 2003 as cosmetic dermal fillers and skin boosters. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is an acute event that threatens ...

  20. Whole Lung Lavage of Nine Children with Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis: Experience in a Tertiary Lung Center

    OpenAIRE

    Badiozaman Radpay; Tahereh Parsa; Shideh Dabir; Mohammadreza Boloursaz; Ahmadreza Arbab; Seyyedahmad Tabatabaei

    2013-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare disease in children, characterized by intra-alveolar accumulation of large amounts of surfactant proteins, which severely reduce gas exchange. Whole lung lavage (WLL) is the preferred technique for the treatment of severe PAP.Case Presentation: This report presents nine pediatric cases with advanced PAP who underwent WLL under general anesthesia during a 9 year period. One patient was treated with multiple unilateral WLL without emplo...

  1. Computed tomographic imaging of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis; Computertomographisches Bild der pulmonalen Alveolarproteinose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitton, M.B. [Klinik mit Poliklinik fuer Radiologie, Univ. Mainz (Germany); Schweden, F. [Klinik mit Poliklinik fuer Radiologie, Univ. Mainz (Germany); Wilhelm, K. [Medizinische Klinik 3, Abt. Pneumologie, Univ. Mainz (Germany); Wengler-Becker, U. [Inst. fuer Pathologie, Univ. Mainz (Germany); Thelen, M. [Klinik mit Poliklinik fuer Radiologie, Univ. Mainz (Germany)

    1995-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a rare disease of uncertain etiology. The computed tomographic image is characterized by geographically sharply delineated alveolar infiltrates, faint, ground-glass-like parenchymal turbidity, with well bordered interstitial structures and recesses in the subpleural space. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die pulmonale Alveolarproteinose ist eine seltene Erkrankung unklarer Aetiologie. Das computertomographische Bild ist durch geographisch scharf demarkierte alveolaere Infiltrate, flaue milchglasartige Parenchymtruebungen mit gut abgrenzbaren interstitiellen Strukturen und Aussparung des Subpleuralraumes charakterisiert. (orig.)

  2. Whole lung lavage in alveolar proteinosis: manual clapping versus mechanical chest percussion

    OpenAIRE

    Ars, Catherine; Delguste, Pierre; M’Bazoa, Marie-Paule Biettlot Catherine; Rennotte, Marie-Therese; Weynand, Birgit; Pilette, Charles; Rodenstein, Daniel O

    2009-01-01

    Alveolar proteinosis is an uncommon lung disease presenting in primary or secondary forms, characterised by surfactant derived proteinous material accumulation within the lungs. The most effective treatment remains whole lung lavage under general anaesthesia. We have recently performed whole lung lavage in a 46-year-old patient with alveolar proteinosis who presented with severe dyspnoea and hypoxia. During the left lung lavage, outwards flow was enhanced at random either by manual clapping o...

  3. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: diagnosis using routinely processed smears of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid.

    OpenAIRE

    Mikami, T.; Yamamoto, Y; Yokoyama, M.; Okayasu, I

    1997-01-01

    AIMS: For the diagnosis of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis from bronchoalveolar lavage specimens it is normally necessary to make an ultrastructural examination. However, this is thought to be impractical for bronchoalveolar lavage specimens that have been routinely fixed in ethanol. In the present study, bronchoalveolar lavage cytology smears on slide glasses were examined directly ultrastructurally to make a diagnosis of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. METHODS: Bronchoalveolar lavage smears ...

  4. Long-term follow-up and treatment of congenital alveolar proteinosis

    OpenAIRE

    Griese, Matthias; Ripper, Jan; Sibbersen, Anke; Lohse, Pia; Lohse, Peter; Brasch, Frank; Schams, Andrea; Pamir, Asli; Schaub, Bianca; Muensterer, Oliver J; Schoen, Carola; Gloeckner-Pagel, Judith; Nicolai, Thomas; Reiter, Karl; Hector, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Background: Clinical presentation, diagnosis, management and outcome of molecularly defined congenital pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) due to mutations in the GM-CSF receptor are not well known. Case presentation: A 2 1/2 years old girl was diagnosed as having alveolar proteinosis. Whole lung lavages were performed with a new catheter balloon technique, feasible in small sized airways. Because of some interstitial inflammation in the lung biopsy and to further improve the condition, empi...

  5. A case of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis treated with whole lung lavage

    OpenAIRE

    Bansal, Avdhesh; Sikri, Vikas

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis represents a rare syndrome characterized by the accumulation of proteinaceous phospholipid-laden material in the alveoli. This leads to impaired gas exchange and arterial hypoxemia of varying degrees. The diagnosis is confirmed by lung biopsy. Sequential whole-lung lavage (WLL) first described in 1963 is the standard of care. We report a case of a male diagnosed of having pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) on transbroncial lung biopsy (TBLB). He was treated wi...

  6. Long-term follow-up and treatment of congenital alveolar proteinosis

    OpenAIRE

    Griese, Matthias; Ripper, Jan; Sibbersen, Anke; Lohse, Pia; Lohse, Peter; Brasch, Frank; Schams, Andrea; Pamir, Asli; Schaub, Bianca; Muensterer, Oliver J; Schön, Carola; Glöckner-Pagel, Judith; Nicolai, Thomas; Reiter, Karl; Hector, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Background Clinical presentation, diagnosis, management and outcome of molecularly defined congenital pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) due to mutations in the GM-CSF receptor are not well known. Case presentation A 2 1/2 years old girl was diagnosed as having alveolar proteinosis. Whole lung lavages were performed with a new catheter balloon technique, feasible in small sized airways. Because of some interstitial inflammation in the lung biopsy and to further improve the condition, empiri...

  7. Neutralization and clearance of GM-CSF by autoantibodies in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    OpenAIRE

    Piccoli, Luca; Campo, Ilaria; Fregni, Chiara Silacci; Rodriguez, Blanca Maria Fernandez; Minola, Andrea; Sallusto, Federica; Luisetti, Maurizio; Corti, Davide; Lanzavecchia, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a severe autoimmune disease caused by autoantibodies that neutralize GM-CSF resulting in impaired function of alveolar macrophages. In this study, we characterize 21 GM-CSF autoantibodies from PAP patients and find that somatic mutations critically determine their specificity for the self-antigen. Individual antibodies only partially neutralize GM-CSF activity using an in vitro bioassay, depending on the experimental conditions, while, when injected in ...

  8. Long-term follow-up and treatment of congenital alveolar proteinosis

    OpenAIRE

    Muensterer Oliver J; Schaub Bianca; Pamir Asli; Schams Andrea; Brasch Frank; Lohse Peter; Lohse Pia; Sibbersen Anke; Ripper Jan; Griese Matthias; Schön Carola; Glöckner-Pagel Judith; Nicolai Thomas; Reiter Karl; Hector Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Clinical presentation, diagnosis, management and outcome of molecularly defined congenital pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) due to mutations in the GM-CSF receptor are not well known. Case presentation A 2 1/2 years old girl was diagnosed as having alveolar proteinosis. Whole lung lavages were performed with a new catheter balloon technique, feasible in small sized airways. Because of some interstitial inflammation in the lung biopsy and to further improve the conditio...

  9. Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis and tuberculosis in a diabetic patient: a rare or a seldom diagnosed association

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira-Silva J.L.; Marinho M.M.M.A.; Veloso T.V.B.; Coelho Filho J.C.

    2002-01-01

    A case of Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis (PAP), in association with tuberculosis, is described in a 35-year-old diabetic patient. Lung biopsy showed an intra-alveolar accumulation of PAS-positive material, and multifocal granulomas compatible with tuberculosis. The bronchoalveolar culture was positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PAP results from an imbalance of the mechanisms that regulate the homeostasis of the surfactant, where specific proteins are involved, especially SP-A and SP-D, t...

  10. Whole lung lavage for pulmonary alveolar proteinosis after surgery for spontaneous pneumothorax

    OpenAIRE

    Stoica, R; MACRI, A.; Cordoş, I; Bolca, C

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a relatively rare lung disorder, probably under diagnosed, characterized by the accumulation of lipoproteinaceosus material in the lung alveoli. The primary (acquired or idiopathic) form occurs in more than 90% of all cases. Whole lung lavage is considered the golden standard of treatment. In this report, we describe a rare case of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis with severe and incapacitating respiratory, in which whole lung lavage followe...

  11. Alveolar proteinosis in extremis: a critical case treated with whole lung lavage without extracorporeal membrane oxygenation

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Wen-Liang; Chen, Yu; Zhong, Nan-Shan; Su, Zhu-Quan; Zhong, Chang-Hao; Li, Shi-Yue

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a rare idiopathic lung disease characterized by the accumulation of lipoproteinaceous material within the alveoli, which impairs gas transfer and decreases the ventilation/perfusion ratio, and can lead to respiratory failure. Whole lung lavage is the most effective therapy for pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, but may not be tolerated by patients with severe respiratory failure. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support is advocated for such patients to ensur...

  12. Application of linear integration in the morphometric study of mild and severe pulmonary alveolar injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulombe, P A; Côté, M G

    1988-02-01

    In this study we applied linear integration morphometry to characterize the pulmonary alveolar reaction to toxic injury and to study possible relationships between the major tissue and cell compartments of alveolar tissue, normal and injured. Acute alveolar injury of mild and severe intensity was induced in Swiss-Webster mice by the ip administration of the chemicals diquat (4 mg/kg) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT; 400 mg/kg). Animals were sacrificed at Days 1 and 2 after diquat treatment and at Days 1, 3, and 5 after BHT treatment. Sampling and analysis of alveolar tissue were conducted at both levels of light and electron microscopy. Thickness distributions of arithmetic and reciprocal intercepts, as well as the arithmetic (tau) and harmonic (tau h) mean thicknesses, were established for the following alveolar compartments: septum, alveolo-capillary barrier (ACB), type I and total epithelia, capillary endothelium, and interstitium. A relative measure of the pulmonary diffusion capacity and the capillary load of alveolar septa were also determined. The parameters calculated from these thickness distributions, such as their slopes, percentages of thin intercepts, and tau/tau h ratios, proved very sensitive and useful in the detection and characterization of morphological alterations in the type I epithelial and capillary endothelial cells following either mild or severe alveolar injury. The epithelial, endothelial, and interstitial layers of pulmonary septa were all characterized by their own pattern of structural changes, so that it proved impossible to relate them in a simple way to the tissue reaction, which can be easily studied at the light microscopic level. Linear integration morphometry thus proved very useful as a morphometric approach to the study of pulmonary alveolar injury and repair. PMID:3335253

  13. A simple method for the differential characterization of alveoli and alveolar ducts in injured lungs

    OpenAIRE

    E.M. Negri; Omar, E.D.; Mori, S.S.; Rodrigues, N.R.D.; Barbas, C.S.V.; P.H.N. Saldiva; Dolhnikoff, M.

    2005-01-01

    Rationale and hypothesis: Previous studies evaluating the histoarchitecture of distal airspaces have been shown to be limited by the difficulty in adequately differentiating alveoli and alveolar ducts. This limitation has been specially noticed in studies addressing lung recruitment and in situations of diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), where generic nominations for distal airspaces had to be created, such as “peripheral airspaces” (PAS) and “large-volume gas-exch...

  14. Injurious mechanical ventilation in the normal lung causes a progressive pathologic change in dynamic alveolar mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Pavone, Lucio A; Albert, Scott; Carney, David; Gatto, Louis A; Halter, Jeffrey M; Nieman, Gary F.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Acute respiratory distress syndrome causes a heterogeneous lung injury, and without protective mechanical ventilation a secondary ventilator-induced lung injury can occur. To ventilate noncompliant lung regions, high inflation pressures are required to 'pop open' the injured alveoli. The temporal impact, however, of these elevated pressures on normal alveolar mechanics (that is, the dynamic change in alveolar size and shape during ventilation) is unknown. In the present study we ...

  15. Fractal analysis of alveolarization in hyperoxia-induced rat models of bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porzionato, Andrea; Guidolin, Diego; Macchi, Veronica; Sarasin, Gloria; Grisafi, Davide; Tortorella, Cinzia; Dedja, Arben; Zaramella, Patrizia; De Caro, Raffaele

    2016-04-01

    No papers are available about potentiality of fractal analysis in quantitative assessment of alveolarization in bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Thus, we here performed a comparative analysis between fractal [fractal dimension (D) and lacunarity] and stereological [mean linear intercept (Lm), total volume of alveolar air spaces, total number of alveoli, mean alveolar volume, total volume and surface area of alveolar septa, and mean alveolar septal thickness] parameters in experimental hyperoxia-induced models of BPD. At birth, rats were distributed between the following groups: 1) rats raised in ambient air for 2 wk; 2) rats exposed to 60% oxygen for 2 wk; 3) rats raised in normoxia for 6 wk; and 4) rats exposed to 60% hyperoxia for 2 wk and to room air for further 4 wk. Normoxic 6-wk rats showed increased D and decreased lacunarity with respect to normoxic 2-wk rats, together with changes in all stereological parameters except for mean alveolar volume. Hyperoxia-exposed 2-wk rats showed significant changes only in total number of alveoli, mean alveolar volume, and lacunarity with respect to equal-in-age normoxic rats. In the comparison between 6-wk rats, the hyperoxia-exposed group showed decreased D and increased lacunarity, together with changes in all stereological parameters except for septal thickness. Analysis of receiver operating characteristic curves showed a comparable discriminatory power of D, lacunarity, and total number of alveoli; Lm and mean alveolar volume were less discriminative. D and lacunarity did not show significant changes when different segmentation thresholds were applied, suggesting that the fractal approach may be fit to automatic image analysis. PMID:26851258

  16. Spontaneous Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis in Captive "Moustached Tamarins" (Saguinus mystax) (Primates: Callitrichidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Michaud, Carmen R.; Ragland, Dan R.; Shea, Katherine I.; Zerfas, Patricia M; Kastenmayer, Robin J; St. Claire, Marisa C.; Elkins, William R; Gozalo, Alfonso S

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare human disease characterized by accumulation of surfactant in alveoli without generating an inflammatory response. Lung lesions resembling PAP were observed in seven adult tamarins (five males and two females). Gross lesions were characterized by areas of discoloration, slight bulging over the lung parenchyma, and occasional consolidation. Histological examination of tamarin lung samples revealed intra-alveolar accumulation of an amorphous, amphop...

  17. Chloride-Dependent Secretion of Alveolar Wall Liquid Determined by Optical-Sectioning Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Lindert, Jens; Perlman, Carrie E.; Parthasarathi, Kaushik; Bhattacharya, Jahar

    2007-01-01

    The liquid layer lining the pulmonary alveolar wall critically determines the lung's immune defense against inhaled pathogens, because it provides a liquid milieu in the air-filled alveolus for dispersal of immune cells and defensive surfactant proteins. However, mechanisms underlying formation of the liquid are unknown. We achieved visualization of the alveolar wall liquid (AWL) in situ in mouse lungs by means of optical-sectioning microscopy. Continuous liquid secretion was present in alveo...

  18. Type I Alveolar Epithelial Cells Mount Innate Immune Responses during Pneumococcal Pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Kazuko; Ferrari, Joseph D.; Cao, Yuxia; Ramirez, Maria I.; Jones, Matthew R.; Quinton, Lee J.; Mizgerd, Joseph P.

    2012-01-01

    Pneumonia results from bacteria in the alveoli. The alveolar epithelium consists of type II cells, which secrete surfactant and associated proteins, and type I cells, which constitute 95% of the surface area and met anatomic and structural needs. Other than constitutively expressed surfactant proteins, it is unknown whether alveolar epithelial cells have distinct roles in innate immunity. Since innate immunity gene induction depends on NF-κB RelA (also known as p65) during pneumonia, we gener...

  19. Sandstorm Appearance of Pulmonary Alveolar Microlithiasis Incidentally Detected in a Young, Asymptomatic Male

    OpenAIRE

    Ch'ng, Li Shyan; Bux, Shaik Ismail; Liam, Chong Kin; Rahman, Nazarina Abdul; Ho, Choon Yan

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) is a rare chronic disease with paucity of symptoms in contrast to the imaging findings. We present a case of a 24-year-old Malay man having an incidental abnormal pre-employment chest radiograph of dense micronodular opacities giving the classical "sandstorm" appearance. High-resolution computed tomography of the lungs showed microcalcifications with subpleural cystic changes. Open lung biopsy showed calcospherites within the alveolar spaces. The radiol...

  20. Sandstorm appearance of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis incidentally detected in a young, asymptomatic male.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ch'ng, Li Shyan; Bux, Shaik Ismail; Liam, Chong Kin; Rahman, Nazarina Abdul; Ho, Choon Yan

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) is a rare chronic disease with paucity of symptoms in contrast to the imaging findings. We present a case of a 24-year-old Malay man having an incidental abnormal pre-employment chest radiograph of dense micronodular opacities giving the classical "sandstorm" appearance. High-resolution computed tomography of the lungs showed microcalcifications with subpleural cystic changes. Open lung biopsy showed calcospherites within the alveolar spaces. The radiological and histopathological findings were characteristic of PAM. PMID:24043987

  1. Alveolar liquid pressure measured by micropuncture in isolated lungs of mature and immature fetal rabbits.

    OpenAIRE

    Raj, J U

    1987-01-01

    Increased alveolar surface tension due to surfactant deficiency is thought to result in a negative pressure surrounding pulmonary capillaries and to promote fluid filtration. To test this hypothesis, alveolar liquid pressure (Pliquid) was measured by micropuncture in isolated lungs of mature and immature fetal rabbits (with and without surfactant replacement) at different air inflation pressures (Pairway). Lung maturity was assessed by air pressure-volume (P-V) curves. Pliquid was correlated ...

  2. Alveolar process fractures in the permanent dentition. Part 2. The risk of healing complications in teeth involved in an alveolar process fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Eva; Gerds, Thomas; Andreasen, Jens Ove

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the risk of pulp canal obliteration (PCO), pulp necrosis (PN), repair-related resorption (RRR), infection-related resorption (IRR), ankylosis-related resorption (ARR), marginal bone loss (MBL), and tooth loss (TL) for teeth involved in an alveolar process fracture and to identify.......3-3.5), P = 0.003), and age >30 years (HR: 2.3 (95% CI: 1.1-4.6), P = 0.02). The type of splint (rigid or flexible), the duration of splinting (more or less than 4 weeks), and the administration of antibiotics did not affect the risk of PN. CONCLUSION: Teeth involved in alveolar process fractures appear...

  3. Effect of breathing pattern on gas mixing in a model with asymmetrical alveolar ducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowes, C L; Richardson, J D; Cumming, G; Horsfield, K

    1985-01-01

    A model of the pulmonary airways was used to study three single-breath indices of gas mixing, dead space (VD), slope of the alveolar plateau, and alveolar mixing inefficiency (AMI). In the model, discrete elements of airway volume were represented by nodes. Using a finite difference technique the differential equation for simultaneous convection and diffusion was solved for the nodal network. Conducting airways and respiratory bronchioles were modeled symmetrically, but alveolar ducts asymmetrically, permitting interaction between convection and diffusion. VD, alveolar slope, and AMI increased with increasing flow. Similar trends were seen with inspired volume, although slope decreased at high inspired volumes with constant flow. VD was affected most by inspiratory flow and AMI and alveolar slope by expiratory time. VD fell approximately exponentially with time of breath holding. Eight different breathing patterns were compared. They had a small effect on alveolar slope and AMI and a greater effect on VD. The model shows how series and parallel inhomogeneity occur together and interact in asymmetrical systems: the old argument as to which is the more important should be abandoned. PMID:3968008

  4. Association of alveolar recruitment maneuvers and prone position in acute respiratory disease syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Daniela Caetano; Rocha, Eduardo; Ribeiro, Tatiane Flores

    2009-06-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome is the clinical presentation of acute lung injury characterized by diffuse alveolar damage and development of non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema due to increased pulmonary alveolar-capillary membrane permeability. Alveolar recruitment maneuvers and prone position can be used in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome. The objective of this review of literature was to identify possible benefits, indications, complications and care of the associated recruitment maneuvers and prone position for treatment of the acute respiratory distress syndrome. This national and international scientific literature review was developed according to the established criteria for searching the databases MedLine, LILACS, SciElo, PubMed, Cochrane, from 1994 to 2008 in Portuguese and English, with the key words: acute respiratory distress syndrome, alveolar recruitment maneuver and prone position. Despite advances in the understanding of acute respiratory distress syndrome pathophysiology, mortality is still expressive. Alveolar recruitment maneuvers and prone position significantly contribute to treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome patient aiming to improve oxygenation and minimizing complications of refractory hypoxemia and reduction of pulmonary compliance. However,as there are few studies in literature associating alveolar recruitment maneuvers and prone position for treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome, additional research and evidences of clinical application are required. PMID:25303351

  5. Silicoproteinosis and primary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: high-resolution computed tomography criteria for differential diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a rare disease of unknown etiology, in which the main histologic finding is the presence of alveolar filling with proteinaceous material, causing restrictive lung function hypoxaemia and several radiological abnormalities. In this manuscript we reviewed the (HRCT) findings in 13 patients with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. The study included six patients with primary disease and seven with alveolar proteinosis secondary to silicosis in sandblasters. The aim of this work was to establish HRCT distinguishing features between these conditions, since the histological findings can be identical. The most common HRCT feature of primary alveolar proteinosis was patchy ground-glass attenuation associated with smooth interlobular septal thickening, resulting in a crazy paving pattern. There was no preferential regional lung distribution of this condition, HRCT manifestations of silicoproteinosis included areas of consolidation and foci of increased attenuation consistent with calcification, hilar lymph nodes enlargement and node calcification. We concluded that in the majority of patients the presence of foci of high attenuation in the parenchyma and lymph nodes allows a prompt distinction between silicoproteinosis and primary alveolar proteinosis. (author)

  6. Rehabilitation of masticatory function improves the alveolar bone architecture of the mandible in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavropoulos, Anestis; Odman, Anna; Ammann, Patrick; Kiliaridis, Stavros

    2010-09-01

    Masticatory functional changes have been shown to influence the quantity and quality of the alveolar bone during growth. This study was designed to investigate the effect of masticatory function rehabilitation on the morphology and the trabecular architecture of the mandibular alveolar bone after cessation of growth. Forty-four Sprague-Dawley male rats received soft diet in order to develop masticatory muscle hypofunction. After 21 weeks, after cessation of growth, the animals were divided into two groups: the first group continued receiving soft diet for six more weeks (hypofunction group), while the second group changed to ordinary (hard) diet with the aim to restore a normal masticatory function (rehabilitation group). A third group of 16 male rats (normal group) received ordinary (hard) diet during the whole experimental period and served as control. Micro-tomographic histomorphometry was used to evaluate the architecture of the mandibular alveolar bone (e.g. bone volume fraction, trabecular thickness, trabecular separation, etc.) at the end of the experiment (27 weeks). The height and width of the alveolar process were measured as well. The alveolar process trabecular bone volume fraction (BV/TV) was lower for the animals of the hypofunctional group as compared to those of the normal (pTV was lower in comparison to the normal group (pled to a significant improvement of alveolar bone architecture in adult rats, although the negative effects of hypofunction were not totally reversed during the period under study. PMID:20601301

  7. Porphyromonas gingivalis GroEL induces osteoclastogenesis of periodontal ligament cells and enhances alveolar bone resorption in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Yen Lin

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis is a major periodontal pathogen that contains a variety of virulence factors. The antibody titer to P. gingivalis GroEL, a homologue of HSP60, is significantly higher in periodontitis patients than in healthy control subjects, suggesting that P. gingivalis GroEL is a potential stimulator of periodontal disease. However, the specific role of GroEL in periodontal disease remains unclear. Here, we investigated the effect of P. gingivalis GroEL on human periodontal ligament (PDL cells in vitro, as well as its effect on alveolar bone resorption in rats in vivo. First, we found that stimulation of PDL cells with recombinant GroEL increased the secretion of the bone resorption-associated cytokines interleukin (IL-6 and IL-8, potentially via NF-κB activation. Furthermore, GroEL could effectively stimulate PDL cell migration, possibly through activation of integrin α1 and α2 mRNA expression as well as cytoskeletal reorganization. Additionally, GroEL may be involved in osteoclastogenesis via receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligand (RANKL activation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP mRNA inhibition in PDL cells. Finally, we inoculated GroEL into rat gingiva, and the results of microcomputed tomography (micro-CT and histomorphometric assays indicated that the administration of GroEL significantly increased inflammation and bone loss. In conclusion, P. gingivalis GroEL may act as a potent virulence factor, contributing to osteoclastogenesis of PDL cells and resulting in periodontal disease with alveolar bone resorption.

  8. Cadmium exposure down-regulates 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase expression in rat lung and alveolar epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current study tested the hypothesis that the pulmonary carcinogenic potential of cadmium (Cd) is related to its ability to inhibit the expression (mRNA and protein) and activity of 8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase (OGG1), a base excision repair (BER) enzyme that functions to preferentially excise pre-mutagenic 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) from DNA. We demonstrate that a single Cd aerosol exposure of adult male Lewis rats causes time- and dose-dependent down-regulation in the pulmonary levels of rOGG1 mRNA and OGG1 protein, quantified by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays and western analyses, respectively. Immunohistochemical studies confirmed that Cd inhalation reduces the relative amount of OGG1 in lungs of exposed animals without altering its over-all distribution within the lung, which appears to be more prominent within the alveolar epithelium. In agreement with our in vivo studies, we show that OGG1 expression is also attenuated in alveolar epithelial cell cultures exposed to CdCl2 either acutely or by repeated passaging in Cd-containing medium. The effects caused by Cd were observed in cells that show no loss in viability, as assessed by colony forming ability, the MTT assay, and propidium iodide membrane permeability studies. Nuclear extracts prepared from Cd-treated cells also exhibit a reduction in the ability to nick a synthetic oligonucleotide containing 8-oxoG. We conclude from these studies that Cd causes suppression of OGG1 in the lung and that this mechanism may, in part, play a role in the Cd carcinogenic process

  9. CX3CL1(+ Microparticles Mediate the Chemoattraction of Alveolar Macrophages toward Apoptotic Acute Promyelocytic Leukemic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Hui Tsai

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: During the resolution phase of inflammation, release of “find-me” signals by apoptotic cells is crucial in the chemoattraction of macrophages toward apoptotic cells for subsequent phagocytosis, in which microparticles derived from apoptotic cells (apo-MPs are involved. A recent study reports that CX3CL1 is released from apoptotic cells to stimulate macrophages chemotaxis. In this study, we investigated the role of CX3CL1 in the apo-MPs in the cell-cell interaction between alveolar macrophage NR8383 cells and apoptotic all-trans retinoic acid-treated NB4 (ATRA-NB4 cells. Methods/Results: Apoptotic ATRA-NB4 cells and their conditioning medium (CM enhanced the chemoattraction of NR8383 cells as well as their phagocytosis activity in engulfing apoptotic ATRA-NB4 cells. The levels of CX3CL1(+ apo-MPs and CX3CL1 were rapidly elevated in the CM of ATRA-NB4 cell culture after induction of apoptosis. Both exogenous CX3CL1 and apo-MPs enhanced the transmigration of NR8383 cells toward apoptotic ATRA-NB4 cells. This pro-transmigratory activity was able to be partially inhibited either by blocking the CX3CR1 (CX3CL1 receptor of NR8383 cells with its specific antibody or by blocking the surface CX3CL1 of apo-MPs with its specific antibody before incubating these apo-MPs with NR8383 cells. Conclusion: CX3CL1(+ apo-MPs released by apoptotic cells mediate the chemotactic transmigration of alveolar macrophages.

  10. Modulation of the effects of alveolar macrophages on lung fibroblast collagen production rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) may function as effector cells that can either stimulate or inhibit lung fibroblast collagen production. However, conditions that determine the predominant effect of AM on fibroblasts are not well understood. To delineate factors that modulate the effects of AM on lung fibroblasts, we studied the interaction of AM products and fibroblasts in vitro. The AM were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage of hamsters with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Conditioned medium (CM) from the AM cultures was incubated in varying amounts with lung fibroblast (IMR-90) cultures. After metabolic labeling with [3H]proline, fibroblast collagen production based on procollagen-specific radioactivity was determined. Macrophage CM in concentrations greater than 5% suppressed collagen production, an event attributed to the macrophage-derived suppressive factor that we have previously characterized. Macrophages were also determined to produce PGE2 in culture. Authentic PGE2 at concentrations found in CM was found to suppress fibroblast collagen production, indicating that AM-derived PGE2 contributes to the suppressive activity in CM. To examine possible stimulatory factors in CM, the fibroblasts were preincubated with indomethacin. This approach was based on our previous observation that AM-derived suppressive factor increases endogenous fibroblast PGE2 and that its activity can be blocked by indomethacin. Macrophage CM in a concentration of 20% did not suppress the collagen production of indomethacin-treated fibroblasts. However, CM concentrations of 5 and 10% increased collagen production (173 and 143% of control values, respectively), indicating the presence of stimulatory factor(s) in macrophage-conditioned medium

  11. Modulation of human alveolar macrophage properties by ozone exposure in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, S.; Madden, M.C.; Newman, S.L.; Devlin, R.B.; Koren, H.S. (ABB Environmental Services, Inc., Chapel Hill, NC (United States))

    1991-09-15

    The authors have investigated changes in human alveolar macrophage (HAM) function after exposure in vitro to ozone (O3). The functions studied reflect concern that O3 is detrimental to host defense mechanisms in the bronchoalveolar spaces. Exposure of HAM to O3 caused a concentration-dependent increase in release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), an important modulator of inflammation, phagocytosis, and oxidative burst. Although phagocytosis of particulate immune complexes was decreased by O3, we found no change in the quantity of Fc receptors and complement receptors on the HAM surface. Superoxide (O2-) production in response to phorbol ester was reduced after exposure of HAM to O3 while the basal O2- release in response to plastic adherence was not affected. Growth inhibition of the opportunistic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans by HAM was not affected by O3 exposure. The production of inflammatory mediators and immune modulators such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin 1, and interleukin 6 were not induced by exposure to O3. However, compared to controls, O3- exposed HAM produced significantly lower levels of these cytokines when stimulated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Two-dimensional gel electrophoretic analysis of proteins made by HAM following in vitro exposure to O3 identified 11 proteins whose rate of synthesis was significantly altered. Thus, these studies show that exposure to O3 alters the functional competence of HAM. While there is a minimal effect on protein expression or synthesis, the responses of HAM to particulate immune complexes, to bacterial LPS, and to PMA are impaired. The release of arachidonic acid and PGE2 suggest that the effect of O3 is primarily targeted to the HAM cell membrane. These changes may ultimately result in increased susceptibility to inhaled infectious agents in the O3-exposed individual.

  12. Toxicity of Lunar and Martian Dust Simulants to Alveolar Macrophages Isolated from Human Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latch, Judith N.; Hamilton, Raymond F., Jr.; Holian, Andrij; James, John T.

    2007-01-01

    NASA is planning to build a habitat on the Moon and use the Moon as a stepping stone to Mars. JSC-1, an Arizona volcanic ash that has mineral properties similar to lunar soil, is used to produce lunar environments for instrument and equipment testing. NASA is concerned about potential health risks to workers exposed to these fine dusts in test facilities. The potential toxicity of JSC-1 and a Martian soil simulant (JSC-Mars-1, a Hawaiian volcanic ash) was evaluated using human alveolar macrophages (HAM) isolated from volunteers; titanium dioxide and quartz were used as reference dusts. This investigation is a prerequisite to studies of actual lunar dust. HAM were treated in vitro with these test dusts for 24 h; assays of cell viability and apoptosis showed that JSC-1 and TiO2 were comparable, and more toxic than saline control, but less toxic than quartz. HAM treated with JSC-1 or JSC-Mars 1 showed a dose-dependent increase in cytotoxicity. To elucidate the mechanism by which these dusts induce apoptosis, we investigated the involvement of the scavenger receptor (SR). Pretreatment of cells with polyinosinic acid, an SR blocker, significantly inhibited both apoptosis and necrosis. These results suggest HAM cytotoxicity may be initiated by interaction of the dust particles with SR. Besides being cytotoxic, silica is known to induce shifting of HAM phenotypes to an immune active status. The immunomodulatory effect of the simulants was investigated. Treatment of HAM with either simulant caused preferential damage to the suppressor macrophage subpopulation, leading to a net increase in the ratio of activator (RFD1+) to suppressor (RFD1+7+) macrophages, a result similar to treatment with silica. It is recommended that appropriate precautions be used to minimize exposure to these fine dusts in large-scale engineering applications.

  13. Pulmonary surfactant preserves viability of alveolar type II cells exposed to polymyxin B in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Stichtenoth

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Exogenous surfactant derived from animal lungs is applied for treatment of surfactant deficiency. By means of its rapid spreading properties, it could transport pharmaceutical agents to the terminal air spaces. The antimicrobial peptide Polymyxin B (PxB is used as a topical antibiotic for inhalation therapy. Whereas it has been shown that PxB mixed with surfactant is not inhibiting surface activity while antimicrobiotic activity is preserved, little is known concerning the effects on synthesis of endogenous surfactant in alveolar type II cells (ATIIC. OBJECTIVE: To investigate ATIIC viability and surfactant-exocytosis depending on PxB and/or surfactant exposure. METHODS: ATIIC were isolated from rat lungs as previously described and were cultivated for 48 h. After incubation for a period of 1-5 h with either PxB (0.05 or 0.1 mg/ml, modified porcine surfactant (5 or 10 mg/ml or mixtures of both, viability and exocytosis (spontanously and after stimulation were determined by fluorescence staining of intracellular surfactant. RESULTS: PxB 0.1 mg/ml, but not porcine surfactant or porcine surfactant plus PxB reduces ATIIC-viability. Only PxB alone, but not in combination with porcine surfactant, rapidly reduces fluorescence in ATIIC at maximum within 3 h, indicating stimulation of exocytosis. Subsequent ionomycin-stimulation does not further increase exocytosis of PxB incubated ATIIC. In presence of surfactant, stimulating effects of PxB and ionomycin on exocytosis are reduced. CONCLUSION: PxB alone shows negative effects on ATIIC, which are counterbalanced in mixtures with surfactant. So far, our studies found no results discouraging the concept of a combined treatment with PxB and surfactant mixtures.

  14. Alveolar osseous defect in rat for cell therapy: preliminary report Defeito ósseo alveolar em ratos para terapia celular: estudo preliminar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassio Eduardo Raposo-Amaral

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To study were to reproduce an alveolar bone defect model in Wistar rats to be used for testing the efficacy of stem cell therapies. Additionally, we also aimed to determine the osteogenesis process of this osseous defect in the 1 month period post-surgery. METHODS: The animals were randomly divided into two groups of 7 animals each. A gingivobuccal incision was made, and a bone defect of 28 mm² of area was performed in the alveolar region. Animals were killed at 2 weeks after surgery (n=7 and 4 weeks after surgery (n=7. RESULTS: The average area of the alveolar defect at time point of 2 weeks was 22.27 ± 1.31 mm² and the average area of alveolar defect at time point of 4 weeks was 9.03 ± 1.17 mm². The average amount of bone formation at time point of 2 weeks was 5.73 ± 1.31 mm² and the average amount of bone formation at time point of 4 weeks was 19 ± 1.17 mm². Statistically significant differences between the amount of bone formation at 2 weeks and 4 weeks after surgery were seen (p=0.003. CONCLUSION: The highest rate of ossification occurred mostly from 2 to 4 weeks after surgery. This observation suggests that 4 weeks after the bone defect creation should be a satisfactory timing to assess the potential of bone inductive stem cells to accelerate bone regeneration in Wistar rats.OBJETIVO: Reproduzir um novo modelo de defeito ósseo alveolar em ratos Wistar que será utilizado para terapia genética e estudos com células tronco. Adicionalmente, outro objetivo do presente estudo foi determinar o pico de regeneração óssea do defeito criado na região alveolar do modelo experimental. MÉTODOS: Os animais foram aleatoriamente divididos em dois grupos de sete animais. Através de uma incisão gengivobucal foi criado um defeito ósseo medindo 28 mm² de área na região alveolar dos ratos. Os ratos foram sacrificados após duas semanas (n=7 e quatro semanas (n=7 da cirurgia. RESULTADOS: A área média do defeito alveolar ap

  15. Syntaxin 7 and VAMP-7 are Soluble N-Ethylmaleimide–sensitive Factor Attachment Protein Receptors Required for Late Endosome–Lysosome and Homotypic Lysosome Fusion in Alveolar Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Diane McVey; Pevsner, Jonathan; Scullion, Matthew A.; Vaughn, Michael; Kaplan, Jerry

    2000-01-01

    Endocytosis in alveolar macrophages can be reversibly inhibited, permitting the isolation of endocytic vesicles at defined stages of maturation. Using an in vitro fusion assay, we determined that each isolated endosome population was capable of homotypic fusion. All vesicle populations were also capable of heterotypic fusion in a temporally specific manner; early endosomes, isolated 4 min after internalization, could fuse with endosomes isolated 8 min after internalization but not with 12-min endosomes or lysosomes. Lysosomes fuse with 12-min endosomes but not with earlier endosomes. Using homogenous populations of endosomes, we have identified Syntaxin 7 as a soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) required for late endosome–lysosome and homotypic lysosome fusion in vitro. A bacterially expressed human Syntaxin 7 lacking the transmembrane domain inhibited homotypic late endosome and lysosome fusion as well as heterotypic late endosome–lysosome fusion. Affinity-purified antibodies directed against Syntaxin 7 also inhibited lysosome fusion in vitro but had no affect on homotypic early endosome fusion. Previous work suggested that human VAMP-7 (vesicle-associated membrane protein-7) was a SNARE required for late endosome–lysosome fusion. A bacterially expressed human VAMP-7 lacking the transmembrane domain inhibited both late endosome–lysosome fusion and homotypic lysosome fusion in vitro. These studies indicate that: 1) fusion along the endocytic pathway is a highly regulated process, and 2) two SNARE molecules, Syntaxin 7 and human VAMP-7, are involved in fusion of vesicles in the late endocytic pathway in alveolar macrophages. PMID:10888671

  16. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: Quantitative CT and pulmonary functional correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guan, Yubao, E-mail: yubaoguan@163.com [Department of Radiology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical College, Guangzhou 510120 (China); State Key Laboratory of Respiratory Disease, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Zeng, Qingsi [Department of Radiology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical College, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Yang, Haihong; Zheng, Jinping; Li, Shiyue; Gao, Yi [State Key Laboratory of Respiratory Disease, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Deng, Yu [Department of Radiology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical College, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Mei, Jiang [State Key Laboratory of Respiratory Disease, Guangzhou 510120 (China); He, Jianxing, E-mail: jianxing63@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Respiratory Disease, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Zhong, Nanshan, E-mail: nanshan@vip.163.com [State Key Laboratory of Respiratory Disease, Guangzhou 510120 (China)

    2012-09-15

    Objective: We assessed the relationship between quantitative computer tomography (qCT) and the pulmonary function test (PFT) or blood gas analysis in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) patients, as well as the utility of these analyses to monitor responses to whole lung lavage (WLL) therapy. Methods: Thirty-eight PAP patients simultaneously received a CT scan and PFT. Fifteen of these patients, undergoing sequential WLL for a total of 20 lavages, also underwent chest CT scans and blood gas analysis before and after WLL, and 14 of 15 patients underwent simultaneous PFT analysis. Differences between the qCT and PFT results were analyzed by canonical correlation. Results: PAP patients with low predicted values for FVC, FEV1, D{sub LCO} and D{sub LCO}/VA indicated small airspace volume and mean lung inflation, low airspace volume/total lung volume ratio and high mean lung density. Correlation and regression analysis revealed a strong correlation between D{sub LCO} and PaO{sub 2} values with CT results. The qCT results indicated that WLL significantly decreased lung weights and mean lung densities, and improved the total airspace volume/total lung volume ratios and mean lung inflations. Conclusion: Quantitative CT may be a sensitive tool for measuring the response of PAP patients to medical interventions such as WLL.

  17. Human alveolar epithelial type II cells in primary culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Pu; Wu, Songling; Li, Jianchun; Fu, Wei; He, Weiqun; Liu, Xiaoqing; Slutsky, Arthur S; Zhang, Haibo; Li, Yimin

    2015-02-01

    Alveolar epithelial type II (AEII) cells are a key structure and defender in the lung but also are the targets in many lung diseases, including acute respiratory distress syndrome, ventilator-induced lung injury, and pulmonary fibrosis. We sought to establish an optimized method for high yielding and long maintenance of characteristics of primary human AEII cells to facilitate the investigation of the mechanisms of lung diseases at the cellular and molecular levels. Adult human peripheral normal lung tissues of oncologic patients undergoing lung resection were collected. The AEII cells were isolated and identified by the expression of pro-surfactant protein (SP)C, epithelial sodium channel (αENaC) and cytokeratin (CK)-8, the lamellar bodies specific for AEII cells, and confirmed by the histology using electron microscopy. The phenotype of AEII cells was characterized by the expression of surfactant proteins (SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, SP-D), CK-8, KL-6, αENaC, and aquaporin (AQP)-3, which was maintained over 20 days. The biological activity of the primary human AEII cells producing SP-C, cytokines, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 was vigorous in response to stimulation with tumor necrosis factor-α. We have modified previous methods and optimized a method for isolation of high purity and long maintenance of the human AEII cell phenotype in primary culture. This method provides an important tool for studies aiming at elucidating the molecular mechanisms of lung diseases exclusively in AEII cells. PMID:25677546

  18. Gaining Surgical Access for Repositioning the Inferior Alveolar Neurovascular Bundle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saif Yousif Abdullah Al-Siweedi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed at determining anatomical landmarks that can be used to gain access to the inferior alveolar neurovascular (IAN bundle. Scanned CBCT (i-CAT machine data of sixty patients and reconstructions performed using the SimPlant dental implant software were reviewed. Outcome variables were the linear distances of the mandibular canal to the inferior border and the buccal cortex of the mandible, measured immediately at the mental foramen (D1 and at 10, 20, 30, and 40 mm (D2–D5 distal to it. Predictor variables were age, ethnicity, and gender of subjects. Apicobasal assessment of the canal reveals that it is curving downward towards the inferior mandibular border until 20 mm (D3 distal to the mental foramen where it then curves upwards, making an elliptic-arc curve. The mandibular canal also forms a buccolingually oriented elliptic arc in relation to the buccal cortex. Variations due to age, ethnicity, and gender were evident and this study provides an accurate anatomic zone for gaining surgical access to the IAN bundle. The findings indicate that the buccal cortex-IAN distance was greatest at D3. Therefore, sites between D2 and D5 can be used as favorable landmarks to access the IAN bundle with the least complications to the patient.

  19. Surgical treatment of painful lesions of the inferior alveolar nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biglioli, Federico; Allevi, Fabiana; Lozza, Alessandro

    2015-10-01

    Nerve-related complications are being reported with increasing frequency following oral and dental surgery, and typically involve the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN). We assess herein the etiology of neuropathic pain related to IAN injuries, and describe the various surgical treatment techniques available. Between 2007 and 2013, 19 patients were referred to the Maxillofacial Surgery Department of San Paolo Hospital (Milan, Italy) with pain in the area supplied by the IAN, which developed following endodontic treatment, oral surgery and maxillofacial surgery. All patients underwent IAN surgery by several different microsurgical procedures. Most of the patients affected by pain before surgery experienced complete or partial amelioration of symptoms. All patients receiving sural nerve grafts were pain-free 12 months after surgery. In five patients the operation was unsuccessful. In 78.94% of cases, a significant increase in nerve function was observed. Pain following IAN surgical damage may be addressed by microsurgery; nerve substitution with a sural nerve interpositional graft appears to represent the most efficacious procedure. Scar releasing, nerve decompression and nerve substitution using vein grafts are less effective. Removal of endodontic material extravasated into the mandibular canal is mandatory and effective in patients experiencing severe pain. Surgery should be performed within 12 months postoperatively, ideally during the first few weeks after symptoms onset. PMID:26315275

  20. Effect of Preoperative Pain on Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Vivek; Singla, Mamta; Subbiya, Arunajatesan; Vivekanandhan, Paramasivam; Sharma, Vikram; Sharma, Ritu; Prakash, Venkatachalam; Geethapriya, Nagarajan

    2015-01-01

    The present study tested the hypothesis that the amount and severity of preoperative pain will affect the anesthetic efficacy of inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. One-hundred seventy-seven adult volunteer subjects, actively experiencing pain in a mandibular molar, participated in this prospective double-blind study carried out at 2 different centers. The patients were classified into 3 groups on the basis of severity of preoperative pain: mild, 1-54 mm on the Heft-Parker visual analog scale (HP VAS); moderate, 55-114 mm; and severe, greater than 114 mm. After IANB with 1.8 mL of 2% lidocaine, endodontic access preparation was initiated. Pain during treatment was recorded using the HP VAS. The primary outcome measure was the ability to undertake pulp access and canal instrumentation with no or mild pain. The success rates were statistically analyzed by multiple logistic regression test. There was a significant difference between the mild and severe preoperative pain group (P = .03). There was a positive correlation between the values of preoperative and intraoperative pain (r = .2 and .4 at 2 centers). The amount of preoperative pain can affect the anesthetic success rates of IANB in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. PMID:26650491

  1. The dystrophic hamster: an animal model of alveolar hypoventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenker, E H; Burbach, J A

    1991-11-01

    The BIO 14.6 dystrophic hamster (DH) is a genetically determined animal model of alveolar hypoventilation (AH) that exhibits a ventilatory control pattern of compensation and then decompensation similar to that in progressive forms of muscular dystrophy and nonprogressive congenital myopathies in humans. Possible causes of AH in the DH include respiratory muscle weakness, ventilation-to-perfusion inequalities, and an inadequate drive to breathe. Histochemical and contractile abnormalities of the diaphragm, reduced lung surface area available for gas exchange, abnormal pulmonary microvascular reactivity to hypoxia, altered levels of neurochemicals, and abnormal cellular regulation of calcium are among the specific factors that may contribute to the development of AH. The potential role of hypothyroidism in the development of AH is reviewed because many hypothyroid patients exhibit AH and other ventilatory dysfunctions, hypothyroidism is present in human patients and animals with muscular dystrophy, and thyroid status is known to influence lung architecture, myocyte function, and neural activity. Additional studies linking neurohormonal signals, transcellular signal processing, and control of ventilation in the DH may help us understand the etiology of AH in human disease. PMID:1684789

  2. Substrate stiffness regulates extracellular matrix deposition by alveolar epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Jessica L; Safi, Asmahan; Wei, Xiaoding; Espinosa, Horacio D; Budinger, GR Scott; Takawira, Desire; Hopkinson, Susan B; Jones, Jonathan CR

    2012-01-01

    Aim The aim of the study was to address whether a stiff substrate, a model for pulmonary fibrosis, is responsible for inducing changes in the phenotype of alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) in the lung, including their deposition and organization of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Methods Freshly isolated lung AEC from male Sprague Dawley rats were seeded onto polyacrylamide gel substrates of varying stiffness and analyzed for expression and organization of adhesion, cytoskeletal, differentiation, and ECM components by Western immunoblotting and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. Results We observed that substrate stiffness influences cell morphology and the organization of focal adhesions and the actin cytoskeleton. Surprisingly, however, we found that substrate stiffness has no influence on the differentiation of type II into type I AEC, nor does increased substrate stiffness lead to an epithelial–mesenchymal transition. In contrast, our data indicate that substrate stiffness regulates the expression of the α3 laminin subunit by AEC and the organization of both fibronectin and laminin in their ECM. Conclusions An increase in substrate stiffness leads to enhanced laminin and fibronectin assembly into fibrils, which likely contributes to the disease phenotype in the fibrotic lung. PMID:23204878

  3. HES6 enhances the motility of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absract: HES6, a member of the hairy-enhancer-of-split family of transcription factors, plays multiple roles in myogenesis. It is a direct target of the myogenic transcription factor MyoD and has been shown to regulate the formation of the myotome in development, myoblast cell cycle exit and the organization of the actin cytoskeleton during terminal differentiation. Here we investigate the expression and function of HES6 in rhabdomyosarcoma, a soft tissue tumor which expresses myogenic genes but fails to differentiate into muscle. We show that HES6 is expressed at high levels in the subset of alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas expressing PAX/FOXO1 fusion genes (ARMSp). Knockdown of HES6 mRNA in the ARMSp cell line RH30 reduces proliferation and cell motility. This phenotype is rescued by expression of mouse Hes6 which is insensitive to HES6 siRNA. Furthermore, expression microarray analysis indicates that the HES6 knockdown is associated with a decrease in the levels of Transgelin, (TAGLN), a regulator of the actin cytoskeleton. Knockdown of TAGLN decreases cell motility, whilst TAGLN overexpression rescues the motility defect resulting from HES6 knockdown. These findings indicate HES6 contributes to the pathogenesis of ARMSp by enhancing both proliferation and cell motility.

  4. Alveolar distraction osteogenesis – Crestal widening by distraction osteogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvi Laster

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Following tooth extraction, resorption of the residual ridges occurs in both the vertical and the horizontal directions. Most of this resorption occurs within the first 6 months after tooth extraction. To correc tthis vertical/ horizontal/ dual situation, several surgical approaches have been proposed: autogenous bone grafts, guided bone regeneration, and alveolar distraction osteogenesis (ADO. In recent years, ADO has gained an ongoing popularity ,especially in view of its numerous advantages, mostimportant among them being the shortening of treatment periods and earlier dental implant placement. In cases in which there is sufficient vertical height but not enough bucco-ligual width to accommodate an implant, crestal width has to be built. Crestal widening by distraction osteogenesis is the preferred technique in suchcases. In this study a new type of crest widener, the"Laster" Crest Widening Distractor, is presented, reporting two cases where crest widening by distraction was chosen as the preferred treatment plan. Finally the main advantages and disadvantages of the new crest widening distractor are discussed, helping thus the clinician to make up his mind about this new promising device and surgical technique.

  5. [Atelectasis in general anesthesia and alveolar recruitment strategies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, G; Cruz, P

    2008-10-01

    Atelectasis occurs in most patients during general anesthesia and is the main cause of hypoxemia. The objective of this review is to examine the causes and diagnosis of atelectasis and the different strategies for reducing or preventing this complication and improving oxygenation. Pulmonary atelectasis is mainly caused by 3 factors: compression, gas absorption, and lack of surfactant. Compression and gas absorption are, however, the 2 most commonly implicated factors. Lung collapse is accentuated if pure oxygen is inhaled during induction or if the patient is morbidly obese. Laparoscopic, thoracic, and upper abdominal interventions also carry risk of lung collapse. Various techniques may be used to prevent atelectasis or to reopen collapsed lung tissue. These include using positive end-expiratory pressure or a high tidal volume-thus providing a higher airway pressure (vital capacity maneuver)-or both in combination. Alveolar recruitment strategies have been tried in bariatric surgery, single-lung ventilation, laparoscopy, and adult respiratory distress syndrome. Their application has reduced or prevented atelectasis, thereby reducing postoperative pulmonary complications. PMID:18982787

  6. Evidence for particle transport between alveolar macrophages in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, J.M.; Nikula, K.J.; Guilmette, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    Recent studies at this Institute have focused on determining the role of alveolar macrophages (AMs) in the transport of particles within and form the lung. For those studies, AMs previously labeled using the nuclear stain Hoechst 33342 and polychromatic Fluoresbrite microspheres (1 {mu}m diameter, Polysciences, Inc., Warrington, PA) were instilled into lungs of recipient F344 rats. The fate of the donor particles and the doubly labeled AMs within recipient lungs was followed for 32 d. Within 2-4 d after instillation, the polychromatic microspheres were found in both donor and resident AMs, suggesting that particle transfer occurred between the donor and resident AMs. However, this may also have been an artifact resulting from phagocytosis of the microspheres form dead donor cells or from the fading or degradation of Hoechst 33342 within the donor cells leading to their misidentification as resident AMs. The results support the earlier findings that microspheres in donor AMs can be transferred to resident AMs within 2 d after instillation.

  7. A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF BILATERAL ALVEOLAR BONE GRAFTING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the treatment results of bilateral alveolar bone grafting (BABG) in patients with bilateral complete clefts of lip and palate.Methods. A retrospective study was performed in 66 bilateral complete cleft lip and palate patients who received the procedure of BABG, among them 15 were primary BABG and 51 were secondary BABG. The patients were further divided into three groups according to age and eruption stage of the canine at the time of surgery. The result of BABG was evaluated on the radiographs. Results. (1)The overall success rate of BABG was 75.0%, with 83.3% and 72.5% for primary and secondary BABG respectively; (2)The marginal bone level was found to be significantly higher in the youngest age group than in the other groups both for primary and secondary BABG; (3)For both primary and secondary BABG, Group C (patients' age more than 16 years) had the least optimal success rate, with 66.7% and 65.4% respectively. Conclusion. Simultaneous primary palate repair and BABG is safe and feasible procedure for treating unoperated bilateral complete cleft lip and cleft palate patients. For both primary and secondary BABG, significantly better results can be achieved if the operation is performed before eruption of the canine.

  8. A plasmapheresis protocol for refractory pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Bryan; Albores, Jeffrey; Wang, Tisha; Neville, Thanh H

    2015-04-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare lung disease characterized by the accumulation of proteinaceous material within the lungs. While typically managed with whole lung lavage (WLL), more recent PAP therapies aimed at reducing granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor autoantibodies (anti-GM-CSF) have reduced symptoms and improved lung function. We present a patient with PAP refractory to WLL, exogenous GM-CSF and rituximab who underwent a novel plasmapheresis protocol as a therapeutic trial. While previously reported regimens have utilized plasmapheresis sessions distributed over months, our patient underwent five consecutive days of plasmapheresis, followed by rituximab. Anti-GM-CSF levels decreased from 24.8 to 2.7 mcg/mL post-plasmapheresis. This reduction of autoantibody correlated with reduction in WLL frequency, increase in diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide, and subjective improvement in dyspnea. Our case suggests that five consecutive days of plasmapharesis results in increased clearance of anti-GM-CSF and may be potentially efficacious in cases of refractory PAP. PMID:25557091

  9. Clinical significance of serum lipids in idiopathic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Cun S

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well known that pulmonary alveolar proteinosis(PAP is characterised by accumulation of surfactant lipids and proteins within airspaces. However, few previous data describe the serum lipid levels associated with PAP. Materials and methods We retrospectively reviewed 25 patients with idiopathic PAP(iPAP. The serum lipid levels of patients with idiopathic PAP were compared with those of the healthy volunteers. In patients and healthy subjects, the LDL-C/HDL-C ratios were 2.94 ± 1.21 and 1.60 ± 0.70, respectively (p p A-aO2 (r = -0.685, p = 0.003, and r = 0.688, p = 0.003, respectively. The values of LDL-C/HDL-C ratios also correlated with PaO2 levels and PA-aO2 levels (r = -0.698, p = 0.003, and r = 0.653, p = 0.006, respectively. 11 and 13 patients experienced respectively a decline in TC and LDL-C levels following whole lung lavage(WLL, the median decline was 0.71 mmol/L(p p Conclusions the serum lipid levels, especially the levels of LDL-C and LDL-C/HDL-C, may reflect the severity of the disease in PAP patients, and predict the therapeutic effect of WLL.

  10. Trace elements in human alveolar macrophages studied by PIXE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, G.; Roelandts, I.; Corhay, J. L.; Radermecker, M.; Delavignette, J. P.

    1990-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the metal content of alveolar macrophages by PIXE from 94 subjects divided into two groups as follows: group (1) — subjects with non-occupational exposure to industrial dust: 30 healthy volunteers (controls), 16 patients suffering from lung cancer; group (2) — 48 healthy steel workers from the Liège area (blast-furnace [ n=29] and coke oven [ n=19]). We hope to define more precisely the influence of carcinoma, smoking habit, pathology and occupational exposure in the steel industry on the macrophage metal content. This study has shown: (a) an Fe and Sr increase and a Br decrease in the macrophages of smokers (especially in heavy smokers): (b) a significant Fe, Ti, Br and Cu increase and a trend to Pb, Cr, As and Sr increase in macrophages of healthy steel workers (especially blast-furnace workers) in comparison with non-exposed controls; (c) a significant Fe, Br, Cu and Zn increase and a trend to Pb, As and Ni increase in macrophages of non-exposed patients with lung cancer by comparison with non-exposed controls. The mechanism of metal change could be explained by professional exposure and endogenous changes (protein synthesis, inflammation, bronchial bleeding, …)

  11. Alveolar Ridge Preservation Using Xenogeneic Collagen Matrix and Bone Allograft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas O. Parashis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Alveolar ridge preservation (ARP has been shown to prevent postextraction bone loss. The aim of this report is to highlight the clinical, radiographic, and histological outcomes following use of a bilayer xenogeneic collagen matrix (XCM in combination with freeze-dried bone allograft (FDBA for ARP. Nine patients were treated after extraction of 18 teeth. Following minimal flap elevation and atraumatic extraction, sockets were filled with FDBA. The XCM was adapted to cover the defect and 2-3 mm of adjacent bone and flaps were repositioned. Healing was uneventful in all cases, the XCM remained in place, and any matrix exposure was devoid of further complications. Exposed matrix portions were slowly vascularized and replaced by mature keratinized tissue within 2-3 months. Radiographic and clinical assessment indicated adequate volume of bone for implant placement, with all planned implants placed in acceptable positions. When fixed partial dentures were placed, restorations fulfilled aesthetic demands without requiring further augmentation procedures. Histological and immunohistochemical analysis from 9 sites (4 patients indicated normal mucosa with complete incorporation of the matrix and absence of inflammatory response. The XCM + FDBA combination resulted in minimal complications and desirable soft and hard tissue therapeutic outcomes, suggesting the feasibility of this approach for ARP.

  12. Impaired lipid metabolism in idiopathic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Wenbing

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well known that lipids abnormally accumulate in the alveoli during idiopathic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP. It is unclear, however, whether lipids also abnormally accumulate in serum. This study investigated the serum lipid panels in idiopathic PAP patients and explored the relationships between serum levels and the severity of idiopathic PAP. Methods and Results Clinical data including the level of serum lipids were evaluated in 33 non-diabetic idiopathic PAP patients and 157 healthy volunteers. Serum levels of triglyceride were higher in PAP patients than in healthy subjects (median: 192.00 mg/dl (P25: 104.36, P75: 219.00 vs 119.56 mg/dl (P25: 78.81, P75: 193.03, P vs 51.34 ± 12.06 mg/dl, P 2 (r = -0.403, P P Conclusions PAP associates with high triglyceride and low HDL levels in the serum, and these lipids provide potential intervention strategy for treatment.

  13. Uptake of palmitic acid by rabbit alveolar type II cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alveolar type II cells require a source of palmitic acid for synthesis of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), a major constituent of pulmonary surfactant. Previous studies indicated that maximal rates of DPPC synthesis are achieved only if exogenous palmitate is available to the type II cell. Little is known of the mechanisms by which fatty acids enter type II cells. To determine if uptake is mediated by a membrane carrier system, as described in other cell types, we examined the kinetics of palmitate uptake. Using freshly isolated rabbit type II cells, we demonstrated that radiolabeled palmitate uptake was maximal and linear for 45 s; after 1 min the apparent rate of uptake declined. The initial uptake phase was taken as a measure of cellular fatty acid influx because intracellular radiolabeled palmitate remained 80% nonesterified at this time but was 55% esterified by 2 min. Cellular influx of palmitate showed saturation kinetics with increasing concentration of nonalbumin bound palmitate. Michaelis constant was 52.6 nM, and maximum velocity was 152 pmol.10(6) cells-1.min-1. The hypothesis that saturable cellular influx of palmitate is likely linked to the previously identified membrane fatty acid binding protein (MFABP) was supported by Western-blot analysis of rat lung tissue with an antibody to MFABP that demonstrated the presence of this carrier protein in lung tissue. These data suggest that palmitate uptake by type II cells is saturable and may be mediated by a membrane-associated carrier as described in other cell types

  14. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: Quantitative CT and pulmonary functional correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: We assessed the relationship between quantitative computer tomography (qCT) and the pulmonary function test (PFT) or blood gas analysis in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) patients, as well as the utility of these analyses to monitor responses to whole lung lavage (WLL) therapy. Methods: Thirty-eight PAP patients simultaneously received a CT scan and PFT. Fifteen of these patients, undergoing sequential WLL for a total of 20 lavages, also underwent chest CT scans and blood gas analysis before and after WLL, and 14 of 15 patients underwent simultaneous PFT analysis. Differences between the qCT and PFT results were analyzed by canonical correlation. Results: PAP patients with low predicted values for FVC, FEV1, DLCO and DLCO/VA indicated small airspace volume and mean lung inflation, low airspace volume/total lung volume ratio and high mean lung density. Correlation and regression analysis revealed a strong correlation between DLCO and PaO2 values with CT results. The qCT results indicated that WLL significantly decreased lung weights and mean lung densities, and improved the total airspace volume/total lung volume ratios and mean lung inflations. Conclusion: Quantitative CT may be a sensitive tool for measuring the response of PAP patients to medical interventions such as WLL

  15. Determinants of alveolar ridge preservation differ by anatomic location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblebicioglu, Binnaz; Salas, Mabel; Ort, Yirae; Johnson, Ashley; Yildiz, Vedat O.; Kim, Do-Gyoon; Agarwal, Sudha; Tatakis, Dimitris N.

    2016-01-01

    Aim To investigate and compare outcomes following alveolar ridge preservation (ARP) in posterior maxilla and mandible. Methods Twenty-four patients (54 ± 3 years) with single posterior tooth extraction were included. ARP was performed with freeze-dried bone allograft and collagen membrane. Clinical parameters were recorded at extraction and re-entry. Harvested bone cores were analysed by microcomputed tomography (micro-CT), histomorphometry and immunohistochemistry. Results In both jaws, ARP prevented ridge height loss, but ridge width was significantly reduced by approximately 2.5 mm. Healing time, initial clinical attachment loss and amount of keratinized tissue at extraction site were identified as determinants of ridge height outcome. Buccal plate thickness and tooth root length were identified as determinants of ridge width outcome. In addition, initial ridge width was positively correlated with ridge width loss. Micro-CT revealed greater mineralization per unit volume in new bone compared with existing bone in mandible (p < 0.001). Distributions of residual graft, new cellular bone and immature tissue were similar in both jaws. Conclusion Within the limitations of this study, the results indicate that in different anatomic locations different factors may determine ARP outcomes. Further studies are needed to better understand determinants of ARP outcomes. PMID:23432761

  16. Aggregation of macrophages and fibroblasts is inhibited by a monoclonal antibody to the hyaluronate receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, S.J.; Underhill, C.B. (Georgetown Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC (USA)); Tarone, G. (Univ. of Turin (Italy))

    1988-10-01

    To examine the role of the hyaluronate receptor in cell to cell adhesion, the authors have employed the K-3 monoclonal antibody (MAb) which specifically binds to the hyaluronate receptor and blocks its ability to interact with hyaluronate. In the first set of experiments, they investigated the spontaneous aggregation of SV-3T3 cells, which involves two distinct mechanisms, one of which is dependent upon the presence of divalent cation and the other is independent. The divalent cation-independent aggregation was found to be completely inhibited by both intact and Fab fragments of the K-3 MAb. In contrast, the K-3 MAb had no effect on the divalent cation-dependent aggregation of cells. In a second set of experiments, we examined alveolar macrophages. The presence of hyaluronate receptors on alveolar macrophages was demonstrated by the fact that detergent extracts of these cells could bind ({sup 3})hyaluronate, and this binding was blocked by the K-3 MAb. Immunoblot analysis of alveolar macrophages showed that the hyaluronate receptor had a M{sub r} of 99,500, which is considerably larger than the 85,000 M{sub r} for that on BHK cells. When hyaluronate was added to suspensions of alveolar macrophages, the cells were induced to aggregate. This effect was inhibited by the K-3 MAb, suggesting that the hyaluronate-induced aggregation was mediated by the receptor.

  17. Anaesthesia for serial whole-lung lavage in a patient with severe pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Webb Stephen T; Evans Adrian JR; Varley A James; Klein Andrew A

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a rare condition that requires treatment by whole-lung lavage. We report a case of severe pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and discuss a safe and effective strategy for the anaesthetic management of patients undergoing this complex procedure. Case presentation A 34-year-old Caucasian man was diagnosed with severe pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. He developed severe respiratory failure and subsequently underwent serial whole-lung lavage. Our...

  18. In-Vivo Effect of Andrographolide on Alveolar Bone Resorption Induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis and Its Relation with Antioxidant Enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Rami Al Batran; Fouad H. Al-Bayaty; Mazen M.Jamil Al-Obaidi

    2013-01-01

    Alveolar bone resorption is one of the most important facts in denture construction. Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) causes alveolar bone resorption, and morphologic measurements are the most frequent methods to identify bone resorption in periodontal studies. This study has aimed at evaluating the effect of Andrographolide (AND) on alveolar bone resorption in rats induced by Pg. 24 healthy male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into four groups as follows: normal control group and ...

  19. Effect of positive end-expiratory pressure and tidal volume on lung injury induced by alveolar instability

    OpenAIRE

    Halter, Jeffrey M; Steinberg, Jay M; Gatto, Louis A; DiRocco, Joseph D; Pavone, Lucio A; Schiller, Henry J.; Albert, Scott; Lee, Hsi-Ming; Carney, David; Nieman, Gary F.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction One potential mechanism of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) is due to shear stresses associated with alveolar instability (recruitment/derecruitment). It has been postulated that the optimal combination of tidal volume (Vt) and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) stabilizes alveoli, thus diminishing recruitment/derecruitment and reducing VILI. In this study we directly visualized the effect of Vt and PEEP on alveolar mechanics and correlated alveolar stability with lung ...

  20. Effects of oestrogen deficiency on the alveolar bone of rats with experimental periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin-Chen; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Xi; Zhai, Zan-Jing; Liu, Xu-Qiang; Zheng, Xin-Yi; Zhang, Jun; Qin, An; Lu, Er-Yi

    2015-09-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease characterized by loss of connective tissue and alveolar bone, and osteoporosis is a common disease characterized by a systemic impairment of bone mass and microarchitecture. To date, the association between periodontitis and osteoporosis has remained to be fully elucidated. In the present study, an experimental rat model of periodontitis was used to explore the effects of oestrogen deficiency‑induced osteoporosis on the maxillary alveolar bone. Forty‑four female, six‑month‑old Sprague‑Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups: Control, ligature, ovariectomized (OVX), and OVX + ligature. One month after ovariectomy, rats in the ligature and OVX + ligature groups received ligatures on their first and second maxillary molars for 1 month. Fluorescent labelling was performed prior to sacrificing the animals. At the end of the experiment, the maxillae and serum were collected and subjected to micro‑computed tomography analysis, confocal laser‑scanning microscopic observation, Van Gieson's fuchsin staining, tartrate‑resistant acid phosphatase staining and ELISA. Ligatures slightly reduced the alveolar bone mineral density (BMD) and bone formation rate, but significantly reduced alveolar crest height (ACH). Ovariectomy reduced the alveolar BMD, impaired the trabecular structure, reduced the bone formation rate and increased the serum levels of bone resorption markers. Animals in the OVX + ligature group exhibited a lower alveolar BMD, a poorer trabecular structure, a reduced ACH, a lower bone formation rate and higher serum levels of bone resorption markers compared with those in the control group. The results of the present study showed that ovariectomy enhanced alveolar bone loss and reduced the ACH of rats with experimental periodontitis. Thus, post‑menopausal osteoporosis may influence the progression of periodontitis.