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Sample records for chorda tympani fibers

  1. Shrinkage of ipsilateral taste buds and hyperplasia of contralateral taste buds following chorda tympani nerve transection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi-Ke; Yang, Juan-Mei; Huang, Yi-Bo; Ren, Dong-Dong; Chi, Fang-Lu

    2015-06-01

    The morphological changes that occur in the taste buds after denervation are not well understood in rats, especially in the contralateral tongue epithelium. In this study, we investigated the time course of morphological changes in the taste buds following unilateral nerve transection. The role of the trigeminal component of the lingual nerve in maintaining the structural integrity of the taste buds was also examined. Twenty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: control, unilateral chorda tympani nerve transection and unilateral chorda tympani nerve transection + lingual nerve transection. Rats were allowed up to 42 days of recovery before being euthanized. The taste buds were visualized using a cytokeratin 8 antibody. Taste bud counts, volumes and taste receptor cell numbers were quantified and compared among groups. No significant difference was detected between the chorda tympani nerve transection and chorda tympani nerve transection + lingual nerve transection groups. Taste bud counts, volumes and taste receptor cell numbers on the ipsilateral side all decreased significantly compared with control. On the contralateral side, the number of taste buds remained unchanged over time, but they were larger, and taste receptor cells were more numerous postoperatively. There was no evidence for a role of the trigeminal branch of the lingual nerve in maintaining the structural integrity of the anterior taste buds.

  2. Shrinkage of ipsilateral taste buds and hyperplasia of contralateral taste buds following chorda tympani nerve transection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-ke Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The morphological changes that occur in the taste buds after denervation are not well understood in rats, especially in the contralateral tongue epithelium. In this study, we investigated the time course of morphological changes in the taste buds following unilateral nerve transection. The role of the trigeminal component of the lingual nerve in maintaining the structural integrity of the taste buds was also examined. Twenty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: control, unilateral chorda tympani nerve transection and unilateral chorda tympani nerve transection + lingual nerve transection. Rats were allowed up to 42 days of recovery before being euthanized. The taste buds were visualized using a cytokeratin 8 antibody. Taste bud counts, volumes and taste receptor cell numbers were quantified and compared among groups. No significant difference was detected between the chorda tympani nerve transection and chorda tympani nerve transection + lingual nerve transection groups. Taste bud counts, volumes and taste receptor cell numbers on the ipsilateral side all decreased significantly compared with control. On the contralateral side, the number of taste buds remained unchanged over time, but they were larger, and taste receptor cells were more numerous postoperatively. There was no evidence for a role of the trigeminal branch of the lingual nerve in maintaining the structural integrity of the anterior taste buds.

  3. BDNF is required for taste axon regeneration following unilateral chorda tympani nerve section.

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    Meng, Lingbin; Huang, Tao; Sun, Chengsan; Hill, David L; Krimm, Robin

    2017-07-01

    Taste nerves readily regenerate to reinnervate denervated taste buds; however, factors required for regeneration have not yet been identified. When the chorda tympani nerve is sectioned, expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) remains high in the geniculate ganglion and lingual epithelium, despite the loss of taste buds. These observations suggest that BDNF is present in the taste system after nerve section and may support taste nerve regeneration. To test this hypothesis, we inducibly deleted Bdnf during adulthood in mice. Shortly after Bdnf gene recombination, the chorda tympani nerve was unilaterally sectioned causing a loss of both taste buds and neurons, irrespective of BDNF levels. Eight weeks after nerve section, however, regeneration was differentially affected by Bdnf deletion. In control mice, there was regeneration of the chorda tympani nerve and taste buds reappeared with innervation. In contrast, few taste buds were reinnervated in mice lacking normal Bdnf expression such that taste bud number remained low. In all genotypes, taste buds that were reinnervated were normal-sized, but non-innervated taste buds remained small and atrophic. On the side of the tongue contralateral to the nerve section, taste buds for some genotypes became larger and all taste buds remained innervated. Our findings suggest that BDNF is required for nerve regeneration following gustatory nerve section. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of Chorda Tympani Nerve Transection on Salt Taste Perception in Mice

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    Ishiwatari, Yutaka; Theodorides, Maria L.; Bachmanov, Alexander A.

    2011-01-01

    Effects of gustatory nerve transection on salt taste have been studied extensively in rats and hamsters but have not been well explored in the mouse. We examined the effects of chorda tympani (CT) nerve transection on NaCl taste preferences and thresholds in outbred CD-1 mice using a high-throughput phenotyping method developed in our laboratory. To measure taste thresholds, mice were conditioned by oral self-administration of LiCl or NaCl and then presented with NaCl concentration series in 2-bottle preference tests. LiCl-conditioned and control NaCl-exposed mice were given bilateral transections of the CT nerve (LiCl-CTX, NaCl-CTX) or were left intact as controls (LiCl-CNT, NaCl-CNT). After recovery from surgery, mice received a concentration series of NaCl (0–300 mM) in 48-h 2-bottle tests. CT transection increased NaCl taste thresholds in LiCl-conditioned mice and eliminated avoidance of concentrated NaCl in control NaCl-exposed mice. This demonstrates that in mice, the CT nerve is important for detection and recognition of NaCl taste and is necessary for the normal avoidance of high concentrations of NaCl. The results of this experiment also show that the method of high-throughput phenotyping of salt taste thresholds is suitable for detecting changes in the taste periphery in mouse genetic studies. PMID:21743094

  5. Light and electron microscopic observation of regenerated fungiform taste buds in patients with recovered taste function after severing chorda tympani nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Takehisa; Ito, Tetsufumi; Narita, Norihiko; Yamada, Takechiyo; Manabe, Yasuhiro

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the mean number of regenerated fungiform taste buds per papilla and perform light and electron microscopic observation of taste buds in patients with recovered taste function after severing the chorda tympani nerve during middle ear surgery. We performed a biopsy on the fungiform papillae (FP) in the midlateral region of the dorsal surface of the tongue from 5 control volunteers (33 total FP) and from 7 and 5 patients with and without taste recovery (34 and 29 FP, respectively) 3 years 6 months to 18 years after surgery. The specimens were observed by light and transmission electron microscopy. The taste function was evaluated by electrogustometry. The mean number of taste buds in the FP of patients with completely recovered taste function was significantly smaller (1.9 +/- 1.4 per papilla; p taste buds. Nerve fibers and nerve terminals were also found in the taste buds. It was clarified that taste buds containing taste cells and nerve endings do regenerate in the FP of patients with recovered taste function.

  6. Degeneration process of fungiform taste buds after severing the human chorda tympani nerve--observation by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Takehisa; Ito, Tetsufumi; Ito, Yumi; Kato, Yuji; Manabe, Yasuhiro; Narita, Norihiko

    2015-03-01

    To elucidate the degeneration process of fungiform taste buds after severing the chorda tympani nerve (CTN) by confocal laser scanning microscopy in vivo. Prospective study. University hospital. Seven consecutive patients whose CTN was severed during tympanoplasty for middle ear cholesteatoma. Diagnostic. Preoperative and postoperative gustatory functions were assessed by electrogustometry (EGM). An average of 10 fungiform papillae (FP) in the midlateral region of the tongue were periodically observed, and the number of taste buds was counted using a confocal laser microscope. Among them, 2 to 3 reference FPs were selected based on the typical form of the FP or characteristic arrangements of taste pores. Observation was performed before surgery, 1 or 2 days after surgery, 2 or 3 times a week until 2 weeks after surgery, once a week between 2 and 4 weeks, and every 2 to 4 weeks thereafter until all taste buds had disappeared. EGM thresholds showed no response within 1 month after surgery in all patients. The initial change in the degeneration process was the disappearance of taste pores. The surface of taste buds became covered with epithelium. Finally, taste buds themselves atrofied and disappeared. The time course of degeneration differed depending upon individuals, each FP, and each taste bud. By employing the generalized linear mixed model under the Poisson distribution, it was calculated that all taste buds would disappear at around 50 days after surgery. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was useful for clarifying the degeneration process of fungiform taste buds.

  7. Observation of regenerated fungiform taste buds after severing the chorda tympani nerve using confocal laser scanning microscopy in vivo.

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    Saito, Takehisa; Ito, Tetsufumi; Kato, Yuji; Yamada, Takechiyo; Manabe, Yasuhiro; Narita, Norihiko

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate whether regenerated fungiform taste buds after severing the chorda tympani nerve can be detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy in vivo. Retrospective study. University hospital. Six patients with a normal gustatory function (Group 1), 9 patients with taste function recovery after severing the CTN (Group 2), and 5 patients without taste function recovery (Group 3) were included. In Groups 2 and 3, canal wall up (closed) tympanoplasty or canal wall down with canal reconstruction tympanoplasty was performed in all patients. Diagnostic. The severed nerves were readapted or approximated on the temporalis muscle fascia used to reconstruct the eardrum during surgery. Preoperative and postoperative gustatory functions were assessed using electrogustometry. Twelve to 260 months after severing the CTN, the surface of the midlateral region of the tongue was observed with a confocal laser microscope. EGM thresholds showed no response 1 month after surgery in all patients of Groups 2 and 3. In Group 2, EGM thresholds showed recovery 1 to 2 years after surgery and before confocal microscopy (-1.3 ± 6.5 dB). There was a significant difference between Group 1 (-5.7 ± 2.0 dB; p taste buds were observed in each FP, and 55 (79.7%) of 69 FP contained at least 1 taste bud. The mean number of taste bud per papilla was 3.7 ± 3.6. In patients with a recovered taste function (Group 2), 0 to 8 taste buds were observed in each FP. In this group, 54 (56.2%) of 94 FP contained at least 1 taste bud. The mean number of taste bud per papilla was 2.0 ± 2.2 (p taste bud was observed. Regenerated fungiform taste bud could be observed in vivo using confocal laser scanning microscopy, indicating that regenerated taste bud can be detected without biopsy.

  8. Long-term Follow-up Results of Regeneration Process of Fungiform Taste Buds After Severing the Chorda Tympani Nerve During Middle Ear Surgery.

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    Saito, Takehisa; Ito, Tetsufumi; Ito, Yumi; Manabe, Yasuhiro

    2016-05-01

    To elucidate the regeneration process of fungiform taste buds after severing the chorda tympani nerve (CTN) by confocal laser scanning microscopy in vivo. In 7 consecutive patients whose CTN was severed during tympanoplasty, an average of 10 fungiform papillae in the midlateral region of the tongue were periodically observed, and the number of taste buds was counted until 12 to 24 months after surgery. Gustatory function was assessed by EGM. EGM thresholds showed no response within 1 month after surgery in any patient. All taste buds had disappeared until 13 to 71 days after surgery. Regenerated taste buds were first detected 5 to 8 months after surgery in 5 of the 7 patients. EGM thresholds recovered to their preoperative values in 2 patients. In these 2 patients, the number of regenerated taste buds gradually increased in combination with a recovered taste function. However, a time lag existed between taste bud regeneration and taste function recovery. EGM thresholds did not recover in the other 3 patients with regenerated taste buds, suggesting that these taste buds were immature without gustatory function. The long-term regeneration process of fungiform taste buds could be clarified using confocal laser scanning microscopy. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Comparison of the responses of the chorda tympani and glossopharyngeal nerves to taste stimuli in C57BL/6J mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellekant Göran

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent progress in discernment of molecular pathways of taste transduction underscores the need for comprehensive phenotypic information for the understanding of the influence of genetic factors in taste. To obtain information that can be used as a base line for assessment of effects of genetic manipulations in mice taste, we have recorded the whole-nerve integrated responses to a wide array of taste stimuli in the chorda tympani (CT and glossopharyngeal (NG nerves, the two major taste nerves from the tongue. Results In C57BL/6J mice the responses in the two nerves were not the same. In general sweeteners gave larger responses in the CT than in the NG, while responses to bitter taste in the NG were larger. Thus the CT responses to cyanosuosan, fructose, NC00174, D-phenylalanline and sucrose at all concentrations were significantly larger than in the NG, whereas for acesulfame-K, L-proline, saccharin and SC45647 the differences were not significant. Among bitter compounds amiloride, atropine, cycloheximide, denatonium benzoate, L-phenylalanine, 6-n-propyl-2-thiouracil (PROP and tetraethyl ammonium chloride (TEA gave larger responses in the NG, while the responses to brucine, chloroquine, quinacrine, quinine hydrochloride (QHCl, sparteine and strychnine, known to be very bitter to humans, were not significantly larger in the NG than in the CT. Conclusion These data provide a comprehensive survey and comparison of the taste sensitivity of the normal C57BL/6J mouse against which the effects of manipulations of its gustatory system can be better assessed.

  10. Nucleus of the solitary tract in the C57BL/6J mouse: Subnuclear parcellation, chorda tympani nerve projections, and brainstem connections.

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    Ganchrow, Donald; Ganchrow, Judith R; Cicchini, Vanessa; Bartel, Dianna L; Kaufman, Daniel; Girard, David; Whitehead, Mark C

    2014-05-01

    The nucleus of the solitary tract (NST) processes gustatory and related somatosensory information rostrally and general viscerosensory information caudally. To compare its connections with those of other rodents, this study in the C57BL/6J mouse provides a subnuclear cytoarchitectonic parcellation (Nissl stain) of the NST into rostral, intermediate, and caudal divisions. Subnuclei are further characterized by NADPH staining and P2X2 immunoreactivity (IR). Cholera toxin subunit B (CTb) labeling revealed those NST subnuclei receiving chorda tympani nerve (CT) afferents, those connecting with the parabrachial nucleus (PBN) and reticular formation (RF), and those interconnecting NST subnuclei. CT terminals are densest in the rostral central (RC) and medial (M) subnuclei; less dense in the rostral lateral (RL) subnucleus; and sparse in the ventral (V), ventral lateral (VL), and central lateral (CL) subnuclei. CTb injection into the PBN retrogradely labels cells in the aforementioned subnuclei; RC and M providing the largest source of PBN projection neurons. Pontine efferent axons terminate mainly in V and rostral medial (RM) subnuclei. CTb injection into the medullary RF labels cells and axonal endings predominantly in V at rostral and intermediate NST levels. Small CTb injections within the NST label extensive projections from the rostral division to caudal subnuclei. Projections from the caudal division primarily interconnect subnuclei confined to the caudal division of the NST; they also connect with the area postrema. P2X2 -IR identifies probable vagal nerve terminals in the central (Ce) subnucleus in the intermediate/caudal NST. Ce also shows intense NADPH staining and does not project to the PBN. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Fungiform Taste Bud Degeneration in C57BL/6J Mice Following Chorda-Lingual Nerve Transection

    OpenAIRE

    Guagliardo, Nick A.; Hill, David L.

    2007-01-01

    Taste buds are dependent on innervation for normal morphology and function. Fungiform taste bud degeneration after chorda tympani nerve injury has been well documented in rats, hamsters, and gerbils. The current study examines fungiform taste bud distribution and structure in adult C57BL/6J mice from both intact taste systems and after unilateral chorda-lingual nerve transection. Fungiform taste buds were visualized and measured with the aid of cytokeratin 8. In control mice, taste buds were ...

  12. Scala tympani measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walby, A P

    1985-01-01

    The length and cross-sectional height of the scala tympani are relevant to the design of cochlear implants. The lengths and heights of the scalae tympani in ten pairs of serially sectioned temporal bones were measured by an adaptation of the serial section method of cochlear reconstruction. The study found the middle segments of individual pairs of scalae tympani to be very similar in height, but each pair varied slightly from other pairs. The height decreased overall from the base to the apex, but there was a small expansion at the junction of the basal and middle turns where the interscalar septum originated. The theoretical relationships of different diameter electrodes to the organ of Corti were plotted for one cochlea. The size of the electrode and the path it followed were shown in theory to alter considerably its position in relation to the organ of Corti.

  13. Scala tympani cochleostomy survey: a follow-up study.

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    Iseli, Claire; Adunka, Oliver F; Buchman, Craig A

    2014-08-01

    To reassess cochleostomy techniques among North American cochlear implant surgeons after a 6-year period of widespread education and research on the topic. Prospective cohort study. A multiple-choice survey of cochlear implant techniques was distributed to surgeons attending the William House Cochlear Implant Study Group in 2006 and 2012. This survey contained questions regarding routine surgical access and cochleostomy techniques. Responses were anonymous, and >50% were repeat respondents. Statistical analysis sought changes in technique in the past 6 years. Comparisons between 2006 and 2012 responses revealed no significant changes in the proportion of surgeons identifying the facial nerve or chorda tympani. By contrast, respondents in 2012 were more likely to drill off the round window niche overhang (P < .001), use a round window insertion (P < .001), or make a smaller cochleostomy (P = .003). In two images of a transfacial recess approach, there was a significant increase in the proportion choosing an inferior or anterior cochleostomy site over a superior location (image 1, 76% in 2006 to 92% in 2012, P = .003; image 3, 78% to 90%, respectively, P = .044). This repeat survey documents a change in practice among cochlear implant surgeons. Specifically, scala tympani access techniques now appear to be more consistent with known anatomical relationships in the round window region. These findings may have resulted from the concerted education and research efforts over the past 6 years. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  14. Shrinkage of ipsilateral taste buds and hyperplasia of contralateral taste buds following chorda tympani nerve transection

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yi-ke; Yang, Juan-mei; Huang, Yi-bo; Ren, Dong-dong; Chi, Fang-lu

    2015-01-01

    The morphological changes that occur in the taste buds after denervation are not well understood in rats, especially in the contralateral tongue epithelium. In this study, we investigated the time course of morphological changes in the taste buds following unilateral nerve transection. The role of the trigeminal component of the lingual nerve in maintaining the structural integrity of the taste buds was also examined. Twenty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: co...

  15. Spiral ganglion cell site of excitation I: comparison of scala tympani and intrameatal electrode responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartee, Lianne A; Miller, Charles A; van den Honert, Chris

    2006-05-01

    To determine the site of excitation on the spiral ganglion cell in response to electrical stimulation similar to that from a cochlear implant, single-fiber responses to electrical stimuli delivered by an electrode positioned in the scala tympani were compared to responses from stimuli delivered by an electrode placed in the internal auditory meatus. The response to intrameatal stimulation provided a control set of data with a known excitation site, the central axon of the spiral ganglion cell. For both intrameatal and scala tympani stimuli, the responses to single-pulse, summation, and refractory stimulus protocols were recorded. The data demonstrated that summation pulses, as opposed to single pulses, are likely to give the most insightful measures for determination of the site of excitation. Single-fiber summation data for both scala tympani and intrameatally stimulated fibers were analyzed with a clustering algorithm. Combining cluster analysis and additional numerical modeling data, it was hypothesized that the scala tympani responses corresponded to central excitation, peripheral excitation adjacent to the cell body, and peripheral excitation at a site distant from the cell body. Fibers stimulated by an intrameatal electrode demonstrated the greatest range of jitter measurements indicating that greater fiber independence may be achieved with intrameatal stimulation.

  16. Fungiform taste bud degeneration in C57BL/6J mice following chorda-lingual nerve transection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guagliardo, Nick A; Hill, David L

    2007-09-10

    Taste buds are dependent on innervation for normal morphology and function. Fungiform taste bud degeneration after chorda tympani nerve injury has been well documented in rats, hamsters, and gerbils. The current study examines fungiform taste bud distribution and structure in adult C57BL/6J mice from both intact taste systems and after unilateral chorda-lingual nerve transection. Fungiform taste buds were visualized and measured with the aid of cytokeratin 8. In control mice, taste buds were smaller and more abundant on the anterior tip (taste buds were smaller and fewer on the side of the tongue ipsilateral to the transection and continued to decrease in both size and number until 15 days posttransection. Degenerating fungiform taste buds were smaller due to a loss of taste bud cells rather than changes in taste bud morphology. While almost all taste buds disappeared in more posterior fungiform papillae by 15 days posttransection, the anterior tip of the tongue retained nearly half of its taste buds compared to intact mice. Surviving taste buds could not be explained by an apparent innervation from the remaining intact nerves. Contralateral effects of nerve transection were also observed; taste buds were larger due to an increase in the number of taste bud cells. These data are the first to characterize adult mouse fungiform taste buds and subsequent degeneration after unilateral nerve transection. They provide the basis for more mechanistic studies in which genetically engineered mice can be used. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Fluid-Structure Interaction Analysis of Ruptured Mitral Chordae Tendineae.

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    Toma, Milan; Bloodworth, Charles H; Pierce, Eric L; Einstein, Daniel R; Cochran, Richard P; Yoganathan, Ajit P; Kunzelman, Karyn S

    2017-03-01

    The chordal structure is a part of mitral valve geometry that has been commonly neglected or simplified in computational modeling due to its complexity. However, these simplifications cannot be used when investigating the roles of individual chordae tendineae in mitral valve closure. For the first time, advancements in imaging, computational techniques, and hardware technology make it possible to create models of the mitral valve without simplifications to its complex geometry, and to quickly run validated computer simulations that more realistically capture its function. Such simulations can then be used for a detailed analysis of chordae-related diseases. In this work, a comprehensive model of a subject-specific mitral valve with detailed chordal structure is used to analyze the distinct role played by individual chordae in closure of the mitral valve leaflets. Mitral closure was simulated for 51 possible chordal rupture points. Resultant regurgitant orifice area and strain change in the chordae at the papillary muscle tips were then calculated to examine the role of each ruptured chorda in the mitral valve closure. For certain subclassifications of chordae, regurgitant orifice area was found to trend positively with ruptured chordal diameter, and strain changes correlated negatively with regurgitant orifice area. Further advancements in clinical imaging modalities, coupled with the next generation of computational techniques will enable more physiologically realistic simulations.

  18. [Impedance between modiolus and different walls of scala tympani].

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    Du, Qiang; Wang, Zhengmin

    2008-10-01

    To compare the impedance between the modiolus and the inner wall of scala tympani with that between the modiolus and the outer wall of scala tympani. The impedances between the modiolus and the inner wall of scala tympani and the impedance between the modiolus and the outer wall of scala tympani were measured, calculated and compared under different stimulating rates 0.1, 1.0, 10.0 kHz. The impedance between the modiolus and the inner wall of scala tympani is less than that between the modiolus and the outer wall of scala tympani (P < 0.05). To effectively stimulate the residual neurons in the spiral ganglion, the electrodes should be kept close to the inner wall of scale tympani.

  19. Morphological and mechanical properties of the posterior leaflet chordae tendineae in the mitral valve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lodder, J.; Verkerke, Gijsbertus Jacob; Delemarre, B.J.M.; Dodou, D.

    2016-01-01

    A number of studies have investigated the morphological and mechanical properties of the chordae tendineae of the mitral valve, providing comparisons between basal, marginal, and strut chordae and between chordae at the anterior and posterior leaflets. This study contributes to the literature by

  20. Morphological and mechanical properties of the posterior leaflet chordae tendineae in the mitral valve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lodder, Joost; Verkerke, Gijsbertus J.; Delemarre, Ben J. M.; Dodou, Dimitra

    A number of studies have investigated the morphological and mechanical properties of the chordae tendineae of the mitral valve, providing comparisons between basal, marginal, and strut chordae and between chordae at the anterior and posterior leaflets. This study contributes to the literature by

  1. Scala tympani cochleostomy II: topography and histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adunka, Oliver F; Radeloff, Andreas; Gstoettner, Wolfgang K; Pillsbury, Harold C; Buchman, Craig A

    2007-12-01

    To assess intracochlear trauma using two different round window-related cochleostomy techniques in human temporal bones. Twenty-eight human temporal bones were included in this study. In 21 specimens, cochleostomies were initiated inferior to the round window (RW) annulus. In seven bones, cochleostomies were drilled anterior-inferior to the RW annulus. Limited cochlear implant electrode insertions were performed in 19 bones. In each specimen, promontory anatomy and cochleostomy drilling were photographically documented. Basal cochlear damage was assessed histologically and electrode insertion properties were documented in implanted bones. All implanted specimens showed clear scala tympani electrode placements regardless of cochleostomy technique. All 21 inferior cochleostomies were atraumatic. Anterior-inferior cochleostomies resulted in various degrees of intracochlear trauma in all seven bones. For atraumatic opening of the scala tympani using a cochleostomy approach, initiation of drilling should proceed from inferior to the round window annulus, with gradual progression toward the undersurface of the lumen. While cochleostomies initiated anterior-inferior to the round window annulus resulted in scala tympani opening, many of these bones displayed varying degrees of intracochlear trauma that may result in hearing loss. When intracochlear drilling is avoided, the anterior bony margin of the cochleostomy remains a significant intracochlear impediment to in-line electrode insertion.

  2. The consequences of neural degeneration regarding optimal cochlear implant position in scala tympani: a model approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briaire, Jeroen J; Frijns, Johan H M

    2006-04-01

    Cochlear implant research endeavors to optimize the spatial selectivity, threshold and dynamic range with the objective of improving the speech perception performance of the implant user. One of the ways to achieve some of these goals is by electrode design. New cochlear implant electrode designs strive to bring the electrode contacts into close proximity to the nerve fibers in the modiolus: this is done by placing the contacts on the medial side of the array and positioning the implant against the medial wall of scala tympani. The question remains whether this is the optimal position for a cochlea with intact neural fibers and, if so, whether it is also true for a cochlea with degenerated neural fibers. In this study a computational model of the implanted human cochlea is used to investigate the optimal position of the array with respect to threshold, dynamic range and spatial selectivity for a cochlea with intact nerve fibers and for degenerated nerve fibers. In addition, the model is used to evaluate the predictive value of eCAP measurements for obtaining peri-operative information on the neural status. The model predicts improved threshold, dynamic range and spatial selectivity for the peri-modiolar position at the basal end of the cochlea, with minimal influence of neural degeneration. At the apical end of the array (1.5 cochlear turns), the dynamic range and the spatial selectivity are limited due to the occurrence of cross-turn stimulation, with the exception of the condition without neural degeneration and with the electrode array along the lateral wall of scala tympani. The eCAP simulations indicate that a large P(0) peak occurs before the N(1)P(1) complex when the fibers are not degenerated. The absence of this peak might be used as an indicator for neural degeneration.

  3. Dimensions of the scala tympani in the human and cat with reference to cochlear implants.

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    Hatsushika, S; Shepherd, R K; Tong, Y C; Clark, G M; Funasaka, S

    1990-11-01

    The width, height, and cross-sectional area of the scala tympani in both the human and cat were measured to provide dimensional information relevant to the design of scala tympani electrode arrays. Both the height and width of the human scala tympani decreased rapidly within the first 1.5 mm from the round window. Thereafter, they exhibit a gradual reduction in their dimension with increasing distance from the round window. The cross-sectional area of the human scala tympani reflects the changes observed in both the height and width. In contrast, the cat scala tympani exhibits a rapid decrease in its dimensions over the first 6 to 8 mm from the round window. However, beyond this point the cat scala tympani also exhibits a more gradual decrease in its dimensions. Finally, the width of the scala tympani, in both human and cat, is consistently greater than the height.

  4. A transparent model of the human scala tympani cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebscher, S J; Talbot, N; Bruszewski, W; Heilmann, M; Brasell, J; Merzenich, M M

    1996-01-01

    A dimensionally accurate clear model of the human scala tympani has been produced to evaluate the insertion and position of clinically applied intracochlear electrodes for electrical stimulation. Replicates of the human scala tympani were made from low melting point metal alloy (LMA) and from polymethylmeth-acrylate (PMMA) resin. The LMA metal casts were embedded in blocks of epoxy and in clear silicone rubber. After removal of the metal alloy, a cavity was produced that accurately models the human scala tympani. Investment casting molds were made from the PMMA scala tympani casts to enable production of multiple LMA casts from which identical models were fabricated. Total dimensional distortion of the LMA casting process was less than 1% in length and 2% in diameter. The models have been successfully integrated into the design process for the iterative development of advanced intracochlear electrode arrays at UCSF. These fabrication techniques are applicable to a wide range of biomedical design problems that require modelling of visually obscured cavities.

  5. Scala tympani cochleostomy I: results of a survey.

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    Adunka, Oliver F; Buchman, Craig A

    2007-12-01

    To assess current surgical techniques for scala tympani cochlear implantation among North American surgeons. A survey was distributed to all cochlear implant surgeons participating in the 2006 William House Cochlear Implant Study Group in Toronto, Canada. Participants were asked to anonymously identify their routine surgical practices. Images of trans-facial recess approaches to the round window and cochlear promontory were used in a multiple-choice fashion to assess the surgeon's typical exposure and cochleostomy location. Returned questionnaires were electronically processed and evaluated. Fifty-five (75%) of 73 returned surveys had adequate data validity and availability. Landmark identification and preferred cochleostomy locations varied greatly. About 20% of surgeons selected cochleostomy locations superior to the round window membrane. Cochleostomy size and location appeared to be influenced by surgical experience and whether or not the round window overhang was drilled off. This survey clearly documents marked variations in surgical techniques for scala tympani cochlear implantation. Future studies should more clearly define the surgical anatomy of this region for appropriate placement of a scala tympani cochleostomy. These findings may ultimately have an impact on hearing and neural preservation cochlear implant surgeries.

  6. Off-pump transapical implantation of artificial neo-chordae to correct mitral regurgitation: the TACT Trial (Transapical Artificial Chordae Tendinae) proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeburger, Joerg; Rinaldi, Mauro; Nielsen, Sten Lyager; Salizzoni, Stefano; Lange, Ruediger; Schoenburg, Markus; Alfieri, Ottavio; Borger, Michael Andrew; Mohr, Friedrich Wilhelm; Aidietis, Audrius

    2014-03-11

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the safety and performance of the NeoChord DS1000 system (NeoChord, Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota). There is an increasing interest in transcatheter mitral valve (MV) treatment. The NeoChord DS 1000 system enables off-pump beating heart transapical MV repair with implantation of artificial neo-chordae. Patients with severe mitral regurgitation (MR) due to isolated posterior prolapse were included in this TACT (Transapical Artificial Chordae Tendinae) trial. All patients were scheduled for off-pump transapical implantation of neo-chordae. Thirty patients at 7 centers were enrolled. Major adverse events included 1 death due to post-cardiotomy syndrome and concomitant sepsis and 1 minor stroke with the patient fully recovered at the 30-day follow-up visit. Additional patients experienced procedural major adverse events related to a reoperation or conversion to standard of care. Acute procedural success (placement of at least 1 neo-chord and reduction of MR from 3+ or 4+ to ≤2+) was achieved in 26 patients (86.7%). In 4 patients neo-chordae were not placed for technical and/or patient-specific reasons. These patients underwent intraoperative (3 patients) or post-operative (1 patient) standard MV repair. At 30 days, 17 patients maintained an MR grade ≤2+. Four patients who developed recurrent MR were successfully treated with open MV repair during 30-day follow-up. Results improved with experience: durable reduction in MR to ≤2+ at 30 days was achieved in 5 (33.3%) of the first 15 patients and 12 (85.7%) of the last 14 patients. Off-pump transapical implantation of artificial chordae to correct MR is technically safe and feasible; however, it yields further potential for improvement of efficacy and durability. (Safety and Performance Study of the NeoChord Device [TACT]; NCT01777815). Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Echocardiographic appearance of a hydatid cyst of the papillary muscle and chordae tendineae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabijanić, Damir; Bulat, Cristijan; Letica, Dalibor; Nenadić, Denis; Pešutić-Pisac, Valdi; Carević, Vedran

    2011-09-01

    A 24-year-old woman with a history of hydatid disease of the lung and brain, which was treated surgically and medically with albendazole, was admitted because of syncope. Echocardiography demonstrated a mass in the anterolateral papillary muscle and chordae tendineae. Despite negative serologic tests for Echinococcus granulosus, cytology and histology of the surgically removed mass confirmed hydatid disease. The patient was discharged and treated further with albendazole and praziquantel. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Cochlear pathology following reimplantation of a multichannel scala tympani electrode array in the macaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, R K; Clark, G M; Xu, S A; Pyman, B C

    1995-03-01

    The histopathologic consequence of removing and reimplanting intracochlear electrode arrays on residual auditory nerve fibers is an important issue when evaluating the safety of cochlear prostheses. The authors have examined this issue by implanting multichannel intracochlear electrodes in macaque monkeys. Macaques were selected because of the similarity of the surgical technique used to insert electrodes into the cochlea compared to that in humans, in particular the ability to insert the arrays into the upper basal turn. Five macaques were bilaterally implanted with the Melbourne/Cochlear banded electrode array. Following a minimum implant period of 5 months, the electrode array on one side of each animal was removed and another immediately implanted. The animals were sacrificed a minimum of 5 months following the reinsertion procedure, and the cochleas prepared for histopathologic analysis. Long-term implantation of the electrode resulted in a relatively mild tissue response within the cochlea. Results also showed that inner and outer hair cell survival, although significantly reduced adjacent to the array, was normal in 8 of the 10 cochleas apicalward. Moreover, the electrode reinsertion procedure did not appear to adversely affect this apical hair cell population. Significant new bone formation was frequently observed in both control and reimplanted cochleas close to the electrode fenestration site and was associated with trauma to the endosteum and/or the introduction of bone chips into the cochlea at the time of surgery. Electrode insertion trauma, involving the osseous spiral lamina or basilar membrane, was more commonly observed in reimplanted cochleas. This damage was usually restricted to the lower basal turn and resulted in a more extensive ganglion cell loss. Finally, in a number of cochleas part of the electrode array was located within the scala media or scala vestibuli. These electrodes did not appear to evoke a more extensive tissue response or

  9. Round window electrode insertion potentiates retention in the scala tympani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Stephen E J; Holland, N Julian; Agger, Andreas; Leong, Annabelle C; Varghese, Re Ajay; Jiang, Dan; Fitzgerald O'Connor, Alec

    2012-09-01

    The round window membrane (RWM)-intentioned approach is superior to the traditional bony cochleostomy (BC) approach in obtaining electrode placement within the scala tympani (ST). Cochlear implant outcome is influenced by several factors, including optimal placement and retention of the electrode array within the ST. The present study aimed to assess whether the RWM route is superior to a traditional BC for placement and retention of the electrode array in the ST. This was a prospective consecutive non-randomized comparison study. All patients were implanted with the Advanced Bionics 1J electrode array. The RWM approach (n = 32) was compared with a traditional BC group (n = 33). The outcome measure was the electrode position as judged within the scalar chambers at four points along the basal turn using postoperative computed tomography (CT). When the mean position scores were compared, the RWM-intentioned group had significantly more electrodes directed towards the ST compartment than the BC group (p scala vestibuli.

  10. Scala vestibuli insertion in cochlear implantation: a valuable alternative for cases with obstructed scala tympani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, J; Weber, A; Pfennigdorff, T; von Ilberg, C

    2000-01-01

    Insertion of a sufficient number of electrodes is important for a successful use of cochlear implants. We investigated the results of scala vestibuli insertion for cochlear implantation in cases of obstructed scala tympani. In a series of 200 cochlear implantations, scala vestibuli insertion was successfully performed in 4 cases with obstruction of the scala tympani. Etiologies included a temporal bone fracture, severe otosclerosis and malformations of the cochlea. The maximum insertion depth obtained via the scala vestibuli was 30 mm. Postoperative results were comparable to patients in whom conventional scala tympani insertion was performed. No adverse effects related to the site of insertion were observed. Scala vestibuli insertion offers a valuable alternative in cases of obstructed scala tympani that can be employed for a variety of etiologies. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel

  11. [Applied anatomy of scala tympani inlet related to cochlear implantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Tuanming; Guo, Menghe; Zhang, Hongzheng; Shu, Fan; Xie, Nanping

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the related parameters of the temporal bone structure for determining the position of implanting electrode into the scala tympani in cochlear implantation surgery through the facial recess and epitympanum approach. In a surgical simulation experiment, 20 human temporal bones were studied and measured to determine the related parameters of the temporal bone structure. The distance 5.91∓0.29 mm between the short process of the incus and the round window niche, 2.11∓0.18 mm between the stapes and the round window niche, 6.70∓0.19 mm between the facial nerve in the perpendicular paragraph and the round window niche, 2.22∓0.21 mm from the pyramidal eminence to the round window, and 2.16∓0.14 mm between the stapes and the round window. The minimal distance between the implanting electrode and the vestibular window was 2.12∓0.19 mm. The distance between the cochleariform process and the round window niche was 3.79∓0.17 mm. The position of the cochlear electrode array insertion into the second cochlear turn was 2.25∓0.13 mm under the stapes. The location of the cochlear electrode array insertion into the second cochlear turn was 2.28∓0.20 mm inferior to the pyramidal eminence. These parameters provide a reference value to determine the different positions of cochlear electrode array insertion into the scale tympani in different patients.

  12. A multichannel scala tympani electrode array incorporating a drug delivery system for chronic intracochlear infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Robert K; Xu, Jin

    2002-10-01

    We have developed a novel scala tympani electrode array suitable for use in experimental animals. A unique feature of this array is its ability to chronically deliver pharmacological agents to the scala tympani. The design of the electrode array is described in detail. Experimental studies performed in guinea pigs confirm that this array can successfully deliver various drugs to the cochlea while chronically stimulating the auditory nerve.

  13. Finding of alien brown macroalgae Chorda tomentosa Lyngb. in the Ukrainian Black Sea coast

    OpenAIRE

    Minicheva, Galina

    2015-01-01

    AbstractBrown algae Chorda tomentosa Lyngb. 1819, representative of order Laminariales Mig. 1909, was found in the north-western part of the Black Sea (Ukraine, Odessa Bay, Cape Bolshoi Fontan) in spring 2015. This is a new invasive species in the Black Sea ecosystem and the only representative of brown laminarian algae. Ecological activity of this species is 82.2±4.3 m2·kg-1, that corresponds to the nutrient level of the area where it was found.

  14. Left atrial myxoma, ruptured chordae tendinae causing mitral regurgitation and coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhupesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitral regurgitation is uncommon with left atrial myxoma. The echocardiographic assessment of presence of mitral regurgitation and its severity are impaired by the presence of left atrial myxoma. We describe an uncommon association of left atrial myxoma with coronary artery disease and mitral regurgitation. MR was reported as mild on pre-operative transthoracic echocardiography but found to be severe due to ruptured chordae tendinae during intra-operative transesophageal echocardiography, which lead to change in the surgical plan to mitral valve replacement in addition to excision of myxoma.

  15. Durability of Hearing Preservation after Cochlear Implantation with Conventional-Length Electrodes and Scala Tympani Insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Alex D; Hunter, Jacob B; Carlson, Matthew L; Rivas, Alejandro; Bennett, Marc L; Gifford, Rene H; Noble, Jack H; Haynes, David S; Labadie, Robert F; Wanna, George B

    2016-05-01

    To analyze factors that influence hearing preservation over time in cochlear implant recipients with conventional-length electrode arrays located entirely within the scala tympani. Case series with planned chart review. Single tertiary academic referral center. A retrospective review was performed to analyze a subgroup of cochlear implant recipients with residual acoustic hearing. Patients were included in the study only if their electrode arrays remained fully in the scala tympani after insertion and serviceable acoustic hearing (≤80 dB at 250 Hz) was preserved. Electrode array location was verified through a validated radiographic assessment tool. Patients with scala tympani. In this group, the style of electrode array may influence residual hearing preservation over time. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  16. Parametric model of the scala tympani for haptic-rendered cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Catherine; Naghdy, Fazel

    2005-01-01

    A parametric model of the human scala tympani has been designed for use in a haptic-rendered computer simulation of cochlear implant surgery. It will be the first surgical simulator of this kind. A geometric model of the Scala Tympani has been derived from measured data for this purpose. The model is compared with two existing descriptions of the cochlear spiral. A first approximation of the basilar membrane is also produced. The structures are imported into a force-rendering software application for system development.

  17. Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... meals instead of white rice. Add beans (kidney, black, navy, and pinto) to rice dishes for even more fiber. Spice up salads with berries and almonds, chickpeas, cooked artichokes, and beans (kidney, black, navy, or pinto). Use whole-grain (corn or ...

  18. Traumatic Tricuspid Insufficiency with Chordae Tendinae Rupture: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-Jing Lin

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available With the increase in the number of automobile accidents, traumatic tricuspid insufficiency, a rare complication of non-penetrating blunt chest injury, has become an important problem. This kind of injury has been found more frequently during the last decade, partly because of better diagnostic procedures and a better understanding of the pathology. Here, we report a 22-year-old male patient who suffered chest trauma from an automobile accident. Echocardiography demonstrated tricuspid chordae tendinae rupture with remarkable tricuspid regurgitation. We discuss this case in comparison with the previous literature. This case reminds us that physicians in the emergency department should be aware of this potential complication following non-penetrating chest trauma.

  19. Gentamicin concentration gradients in scala tympani perilymph following systemic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Hartmut; Salt, Alec N; Schumacher, Ulrike; Plontke, Stefan K

    2013-01-01

    It has been shown in prior studies that round window membrane (RWM) application of gentamicin produced a robust basal-apical concentration gradient in the perilymph of scala tympani (ST) with peak concentrations in the basal turn of ST. These gradients potentially contribute to the clinical efficacy and safety of intratympanic gentamicin applications for the treatment of Ménière's disease. The present study aimed to establish the distribution of gentamicin along ST perilymph after systemic applications. Gentamicin sulfate was applied intravenously in the amounts of 100, 300 and 600 mg/kg body weight (BW) over a period of 3 h or as a 300 mg/kg BW subcutaneous bolus injection. At 3 and 5 h after the start of the application perilymph of ST was aspirated from the cochlea apex of the right and left cochlea, respectively, and 10 sequential 1-µl perilymph samples from the apex of each cochlea were quantitatively analyzed using a fluorescence polarization immunoassay. In contrast to local RWM delivery, systemic application of gentamicin resulted in the highest perilymph levels in the apex of the cochlea with decreasing concentrations towards the basal regions of ST. The absolute gentamicin concentrations increased with the amount of drug applied and time before sampling. While it is likely that the basal-apical gradient measured after local drug applications to the round window niche is the result of the direct uptake of drugs into the perilymph of the ST, distribution by diffusion and a very low perilymph flow towards the cochlear apex, computer simulations suggested that the apical-basal gradient observed with these systemic applications can be explained by higher entry rates of gentamicin in the apex compared to the basal turns of the cochlea. It is also possible that gentamicin enters perilymph indirectly from the blood via the endolymph. In this case the faster kinetics in apical turns could be due to the smaller cross-sectional area of ST relative to endolymph in

  20. Differential physiologic effects of perfusion of scala tympani versus scala vestibuli in the ischemic cochlea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, T; Rokugo, M; Takasaka, T; Thalmann, R

    1993-07-01

    The effectiveness of perilymphatic perfusion with oxygenated artificial media upon the endocochlear potential (EP) was measured during systemic ischemia in the guinea pig. Differences in the effects of perfusion of the two perilymphatic scalae were determined. Perfusion of scala vestibuli with oxygenated artificial perilymph at a high flow rate resulted in complete recovery of the EP to the pre-ischemic level, whereas perfusion of scala tympani with the same medium was unable to effect complete recovery. The recovery obtained by perfusion of scala tympani was about half that obtained of scala vestibuli. The pO2 in scala media was measured during perfusion by means of oxygen-sensitive microelectrodes. perfusion of scala vestibuli led to an approximately two-fold higher pO2 in scala media than perfusion of scala tympani. During perfusion, the pO2 in scala media varied dependent upon depth of electrode insertion, with a gradient decreasing toward the stria vascularis, a direction opposite to that seen under normal metabolic conditions. These findings suggest that, in the ischemic cochlea, oxygen enters scala media more easily from scala vestibuli across Reissner's membrane than from scala tympani via the basilar membrane/organ of Corti complex.

  1. Mesothelial cell proliferation in the scala tympani: a reaction to the rupture of the round window membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sone, M

    1998-10-01

    The inner layer of the round window membrane is composed of mesothelial cells and this mesothelial cell layer extends to the scala tympani. This study describes the histopathologic findings of temporal bone analysis from a patient with bilateral perilymphatic fistula of the round window membrane. The left ear showed proliferation of mesothelial cells in the scala tympani of the basal turn adjoining the round window membrane. This cell proliferation is thought to be a reaction to the rupture of the round window membrane.

  2. Changes in immunostaining of inner ears after antigen challenge into the scala tympani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichimiya, I; Kurono, Y; Hirano, T; Mogi, G

    1998-04-01

    To study the mechanisms of immune responses and immune injuries in inner ears, labyrinthitis was induced by inoculation of keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) into the scala tympani of systemically sensitized guinea pigs. Inner ears were then immunostained for KLH, immunoglobulin G (IgG), albumin, connexin26 (Cx26), and sodium-potassium adenosine triphosphate (Na,K-ATPase). Inflammatory cells containing KLH were observed in the scala tympani and in the collecting venule of the spiral modiolar vein (SMV). Spiral ligament, spiral limbus, and blood vessels including the SMV were diffusely positive for IgG and albumin. Immunoreactivity for Cx26 and Na,K-ATPase was decreased compared with the normal ears in the fibrocytes of the spiral ligament. These results suggest that inflammatory cells and blood constituents could extravasate into the cochlea from blood vessels and that fibrocyte damage in the spiral ligament could cause cochlear dysfunction.

  3. Visualization of spiral ganglion neurites within the scala tympani with a cochlear implant in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikar, Jennifer A; Batts, Shelley A; Pfingst, Bryan E; Raphael, Yehoash

    2009-05-15

    Current cochlear histology methods do not allow in situ processing of cochlear implants. The metal components of the implant preclude standard embedding and mid-modiolar sectioning, and whole mounts do not have the spatial resolution needed to view the implant within the scala tympani. One focus of recent auditory research is the regeneration of structures within the cochlea, particularly the ganglion cells and their processes, and there are multiple potential benefits to cochlear implant users from this work. To facilitate experimental investigations of auditory nerve regeneration performed in conjunction with cochlear implantation, it is critical to visualize the cochlear tissue and the implant together to determine if the nerve has made contact with the implant. This paper presents a novel histological technique that enables simultaneous visualization of the in situ cochlear implant and neurofilament-labeled nerve processes within the scala tympani, and the spatial relationship between them.

  4. DNA Repair Gene Polymorphism and the Risk of Mitral Chordae Tendineae Rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysel Kalayci Yigin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymorphisms in Lys939Gln XPC gene may diminish DNA repair capacity, eventually increasing the risk of carcinogenesis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the significance of polymorphism Lys939Gln in XPC gene in patients with mitral chordae tendinea rupture (MCTR. Twenty-one patients with MCTR and thirty-seven age and sex matched controls were enrolled in the study. Genotyping of XPC gene Lys939Gln polymorphism was carried out using polymerase chain reaction- (PCR- restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP. The frequencies of the heterozygote genotype (Lys/Gln-AC and homozygote genotype (Gln/Gln-CC were significantly different in MCTR as compared to control group, respectively (52.4% versus 43.2%, p=0.049; 38.15% versus 16.2%, p=0.018. Homozygote variant (Gln/Gln genotype was significantly associated with increased risk of MCTR (OR = 2.059; 95% CI: 1.097–3.863; p=0.018. Heterozygote variant (Lys/Gln genotype was also highly significantly associated with increased risk of MCTR (OR = 1.489; 95% CI: 1.041–2.129; p=0.049. The variant allele C was found to be significantly associated with MCTR (OR = 1.481; 95% CI: 1.101–1.992; p=0.011. This study has demonstrated the association of XPC gene Lys939Gln polymorphism with MCTR, which is significantly associated with increased risk of MCTR.

  5. In vitro modifications of the scala tympani environment and the cochlear implant array surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontorinis, Georgios; Scheper, Verena; Wissel, Kirsten; Stöver, Timo; Lenarz, Thomas; Paasche, Gerrit

    2012-09-01

    To investigate the influence of alterations of the scala tympani environment and modifications of the surface of cochlear implant electrode arrays on insertion forces in vitro. Research experimental study. Fibroblasts producing neurotrophic factors were cultivated on the surface of Nucleus 24 Contour Advance electrodes. Forces were recorded by an Instron 5542 Force Measurement System as three modified arrays were inserted into an artificial scala tympani model filled with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). The recorded forces were compared to control groups including three unmodified electrodes inserted into a model filled with PBS (unmodified environment) or Healon (current practice). Fluorescence microscopy was used before and after the insertions to identify any remaining fibroblasts. Additionally, three Contour Advance electrodes were inserted into an artificial model, filled with alginate/barium chloride solution at different concentrations, while insertion forces were recorded. Modification of the scala tympani environment with 50% to 75% alginate gel resulted in a significant decrease in the insertion forces. The fibroblast-coated arrays also led to decreased forces comparable to those recorded with Healon. Fluorescence microscopy revealed fully cell-covered arrays before and partially covered arrays after the insertion; the fibroblasts on the arrays' modiolar surface remained intact. Modifications of the scala tympani's environment with 50% to 75% alginate/barium chloride and of the cochlear implant electrode surface with neurotrophic factor-producing fibroblasts drastically reduce the insertion forces. As both modifications may serve future intracochlear therapies, it is expected that these might additionally reduce possible insertion trauma. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  6. Perilymph composition in scala tympani of the cochlea: influence of cerebrospinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, A; Salt, A N; Thalmann, R

    1989-11-01

    A commonly used technique to obtain cochlear perilymph for analysis has been the aspiration of samples through the round window membrane. The present study has investigated the influence of the volume withdrawn on sample composition in the guinea pig. Samples of less than 200 nl in volume taken through the round window showed relatively high glycine content, comparable to the level found in samples taken from scala vestibuli. If larger volumes are withdrawn, lower glycine levels are observed. This is consistent with cerebrospinal fluid (having a low glycine content) being drawn into scala tympani through the cochlear aqueduct and contaminating the sample. The existence of a concentration difference for glycine between scala tympani perilymph and cerebrospinal fluid suggests the physiologic communication across the cochlear aqueduct is relatively small in this species. The observation of considerable exchange between cerebrospinal fluid and perilymph, as reported in some studies, is more likely to be an artifact of the experimental procedures, rather than of physiologic significance. Alternative sampling procedures have been evaluated which allow larger volumes of uncontaminated scala tympani perilymph to be collected.

  7. High concentrations of thiosulfate in scala tympani perilymph after systemic administration in the guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Pernilla Videhult; Engmér, Cecilia; Wallin, Inger; Laurell, Göran; Ehrsson, Hans

    2009-02-01

    High concentrations of the antioxidant thiosulfate reach scala tympani perilymph after i.v. administration in the guinea pig. Thiosulfate concentrations in perilymph remain elevated longer than in blood. This warrants further studies on the possibility of obtaining otoprotection by thiosulfate administration several hours before that of cisplatin without compromising the anticancer effect caused by cisplatin inactivation in the blood compartment. Thiosulfate may reduce cisplatin-induced ototoxicity, presumably by oxidative stress relief and formation of inactivate platinum complexes. This study aimed to explore to what extent thiosulfate reaches scala tympani perilymph after systemic administration in the guinea pig. Scala tympani perilymph (1 microl) was aspirated from the basal turn of each cochlea up to 3 h after thiosulfate administration (103 mg/kg b.w., i.v.). Blood samples were also taken. Thiosulfate was quantified by HPLC and fluorescence detection. Substantial thiosulfate concentrations were found in perilymph. The area under the concentration-time curve for thiosulfate in perilymph and blood was 3100 microMxmin and 6300 microMxmin, respectively. The highest thiosulfate concentrations in perilymph were found at the first sampling at about 10 min. Due to a more rapid elimination from blood, perilymph concentrations exceeded those of blood towards the end of the experiment.

  8. ATP-gamma-S shifts the operating point of outer hair cell transduction towards scala tympani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbin, Richard P; Salt, Alec N

    2005-07-01

    ATP receptor agonists and antagonists alter cochlear mechanics as measured by changes in distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE). Some of the effects on DPOAEs are consistent with the hypothesis that ATP affects mechano-electrical transduction and the operating point of the outer hair cells (OHCs). This hypothesis was tested by monitoring the effect of ATP-gamma-S on the operating point of the OHCs. Guinea pigs anesthetized with urethane and with sectioned middle ear muscles were used. The cochlear microphonic (CM) was recorded differentially (scala vestibuli referenced to scala tympani) across the basal turn before and after perfusion (20 min) of the perilymph compartment with artificial perilymph (AP) and ATP-gamma-S dissolved in AP. The operating point was derived from the cochlear microphonics (CM) recorded in response low frequency (200 Hz) tones at high level (106, 112 and 118 dB SPL). The analysis procedure used a Boltzmann function to simulate the CM waveform and the Boltzmann parameters were adjusted to best-fit the calculated waveform to the CM. Compared to the initial perfusion with AP, ATP-gamma-S (333 microM) enhanced peak clipping of the positive peak of the CM (that occurs during organ of Corti displacements towards scala tympani), which was in keeping with ATP-induced displacement of the transducer towards scala tympani. CM waveform analysis quantified the degree of displacement and showed that the changes were consistent with the stimulus being centered on a different region of the transducer curve. The change of operating point meant that the stimulus was applied to a region of the transducer curve where there was greater saturation of the output on excursions towards scala tympani and less saturation towards scala vestibuli. A significant degree of recovery of the operating point was observed after washing with AP. Dose response curves generated by perfusing ATP-gamma-S (333 microM) in a cumulative manner yielded an EC(50) of 19.8 micro

  9. Anizotropy characteristics of the left ventricle false chordae tendineae as one of varieties of myoendocardial formations of the human heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrylyak, M. S.; Malyk, Yu. Yu.; Tsyhykalo, O. V.; Semeniuk, T. O.; Penteleichuk, N. P.; Burkovets, D. N.; Yermolenko, S. B.

    2018-01-01

    The morphological and anizotropy characteristics of the left ventricle false chordae tendineae of human heart in the aspect of their anisotropic properties using spectroscopic-polarization methods was studied. There are given the results of statistical correlation structure of the spectral dependence of the two-dimensional Mueller matrix elements and phase shifts of histological sections of different morphological structure and physiological state. The relationship between the distribution of orientations of the optical axes birefringent miozyn fibrils with a set of statistical moments that characterize the distributions of Mueller matrix elements in different spectral ranges and half-width corresponding autocorrelation functions are established.

  10. Animal model of cochlear third window in the scala vestibuli or scala tympani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attias, Joseph; Preis, Michal; Shemesh, Rafi; Hadar, Tuvia; Nageris, Ben I

    2010-08-01

    The auditory impact of a cochlear third window differs by its location in the scala vestibuli or scala tympani. Pathologic third window has been investigated primarily in the vestibular apparatus of animals and humans. Dehiscence of the superior semicircular canal is the clinical model. Fat sand rats (n = 11) have a unique inner-ear anatomy that allows easy surgical access. A window was drilled in the bony labyrinth over the scala vestibuli in 1 group (12 ears) and over the scala tympani in another (7 ears) while preserving the membranous labyrinth. Auditory brain stem responses to high- and low-frequency stimuli delivered by air and bone conduction were recorded before and after the procedure. Scala vestibuli group: preoperative air-conduction thresholds to clicks and tone-bursts averaged 8.3 and 9.6 dB, respectively, and bone-conduction thresholds, 4.6 and 3.3 dB, respectively; after fenestration, air-conduction thresholds averaged 40.4 and 41.8 dB, respectively, and bone-conduction thresholds, -1 and 5.6 dB, respectively. Scala tympani group: preoperative air-conduction thresholds to clicks and tone-bursts averaged 8.6 dB each, and bone-conduction thresholds, 7.9 dB and 7.1 dB, respectively; after fenestration, air-conduction thresholds averaged 11.4 and 9.3 dB, respectively, and bone-conduction thresholds, 9.3 and 4.2 dB, respectively. The changes in air- (p = 0.0001) and bone-conduction (p = 0.04) thresholds were statistically significant only in the scala vestibuli group. The presence of a cochlear third window over the scala vestibuli, but not over the scala tympani, causes a significant increase in air-conduction auditory thresholds. These results agree with the theoretic model and clinical findings and contribute to our understanding of vestibular dehiscence.

  11. Concentration gradient along the scala tympani after local application of gentamicin to the round window membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plontke, Stefan K; Mynatt, Robert; Gill, Ruth M; Borgmann, Stefan; Salt, Alec N

    2007-07-01

    The distribution of gentamicin along the fluid spaces of the cochlea after local applications has never previously been demonstrated. Computer simulations have predicted that significant basal-apical concentration gradients might be expected, and histologic studies indicate that hair cell damage is greater at the base than at the apex after local gentamicin application. In the present study, gradients of gentamicin along the cochlea were measured. A recently developed method of sampling perilymph from the cochlear apex of guinea pigs was used in which the samples represent fluid originating from different regions along the scala tympani. Gentamicin concentration was determined in sequential apical samples that were taken after up to 3 hours of local application to the round window niche. Substantial gradients of gentamicin along the length of the scala tympani were demonstrated and quantified, averaging more than 4,000 times greater concentration at the base compared with the apex at the time of sampling. Peak concentrations and gradients for gentamicin varied considerably between animals, likely resulting from variations in round window membrane permeability and rates of perilymph flow. The large gradients for gentamicin demonstrated here in guinea pigs account for how it is possible to suppress vestibular function in some patients with a local application of gentamicin without damaging auditory function. Variations in round window membrane permeability and in perilymph flow could account for why hearing losses are observed in some patients.

  12. Concentration gradient along scala tympani following the local application of gentamicin to the round window membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plontke, Stefan K.; Mynatt, Robert; Gill, Ruth M.; Borgmann, Stefan; Salt, Alec N.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives The distribution of gentamicin along the fluid spaces of the cochlea following local applications has never previously been demonstrated. Computer simulations have predicted that significant basal-apical concentration gradients might be expected and histological studies indicate that hair cell damage is greater at the base than at the apex following local gentamicin application. In the present study, gradients of gentamicin along the cochlea were measured. Methods A recently-developed method of sampling perilymph from the cochlear apex of guinea pigs was used, in which the samples represent fluid originating from different regions along scala tympani. Gentamicin concentration was determined in sequential apical samples which were taken following up to three hours of local application to the round window niche. Results Substantial gradients of gentamicin along the length of scala tympani were demonstrated and quantified, averaging more than 4000 times greater concentration at the base compared to the apex at the time of sampling. Peak concentrations and gradients for gentamicin varied considerably between animals, likely resulting from variations in round window membrane permeability and rates of perilymph flow. Conclusions The large gradients for gentamicin demonstrated here in guinea pigs account for how it is possible to suppress vestibular function in some patients with a local application of gentamicin without damaging auditory function. Variations in round window membrane permeability and in perilymph flow could account for why hearing losses are observed in some patients. PMID:17603318

  13. Tonic tensor tympani syndrome in tinnitus and hyperacusis patients: A multi-clinic prevalence study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Westcott

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tonic tensor tympani syndrome (TTTS is an involuntary, anxiety-based condition where the reflex threshold for tensor tympani muscle activity is reduced, causing a frequent spasm. This can trigger aural symptoms from tympanic membrane tension, middle ear ventilation alterations and trigeminal nerve irritability. TTTS is considered to cause the distinctive symptoms of acoustic shock (AS, which can develop after exposure to an unexpected loud sound perceived as highly threatening. Hyperacusis is a dominant AS symptom. Aural pain/blockage without underlying pathology has been noted in tinnitus and hyperacusis patients, without wide acknowledgment. This multiclinic study investigated the prevalence of TTTS symptoms and AS in tinnitus and hyperacusis patients. This study included consecutive patients with tinnitus and/or hyperacusis seen in multiple clinics. Data collected: Symptoms consistent with TTTS (pain/numbness/burning in and around the ear; aural "blockage"; mild vertigo/nausea; "muffled" hearing; tympanic flutter; headache; onset or exacerbation from exposure to loud/intolerable sounds; tinnitus/hyperacusis severity. All patients were medically cleared of underlying pathology, which could cause these symptoms. 60.0% of the total sample (345 patients, 40.6% of tinnitus only patients, 81.1% of hyperacusis patients had ≥1 symptoms (P < 0.001. 68% of severe tinnitus patients, 91.3% of severe hyperacusis patients had ≥1 symptoms (P < 0.001. 19.7% (68/345 of patients in the total sample had AS. 83.8% of AS patients had hyperacusis, 41.2% of non-AS patients had hyperacusis (P < 0.001. The high prevalence of TTTS symptoms suggests they readily develop in tinnitus patients, more particularly with hyperacusis. Along with AS, they should be routinely investigated in history-taking.

  14. Preservation of auditory brainstem response thresholds after cochleostomy and titanium microactuator implantation in the lateral wall of cat scala tympani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesinski, S George; Prewitt, Jessica; Bray, Victor; Aravamudhan, Radhika; Bermeo Blanco, Oscar A; Farmer-Fedor, Brenda L; Ward, Jonette A

    2014-04-01

    The safety of implanting a titanium microactuator into the lateral wall of cat scala tympani was assessed by comparing preoperative and postoperative auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds for 1 to 3 months. The safety of directly stimulating cochlear perilymph with an implantable hearing system requires maintaining preoperative hearing levels. This cat study is an essential step in the development of the next generation of fully implantable hearing devices for humans. Following GLP surgical standards, a 1-mm cochleostomy was drilled into the lateral wall of the scala tympani, and a nonfunctioning titanium anchor/microactuator assembly was inserted in 8 cats. The scala media was damaged in the 1 cat. ABR thresholds with click and 4- and 8-kHz stimuli were measured preoperatively and compared with postoperative thresholds at 1, 2, and 3 months. Nonimplanted ear thresholds were also measured to establish statistical significance for threshold shifts (>28.4 dB). Two audiologists independently interpreted thresholds. Postoperatively, 7 cats implanted in the scala tympani demonstrated no significant ABR threshold shift for click stimulus; one shifted ABR thresholds to 4- and 8-kHz stimuli. The eighth cat, with surgical damage to the scala media, maintained stable click threshold but had a significant shift to 4- and 8-kHz stimuli. This cat study provides no evidence of worsening hearing thresholds after fenestration of the scala tympani and insertion of a titanium anchor/microactuator, provided there is no surgical trauma to the scala media and the implanted device is securely anchored in the cochleostomy. These 2 issues have been resolved in the development of a fully implantable hearing system for humans. The long-term hearing stability (combined with histologic studies) reaffirm that the microactuator is well tolerated by the cat cochlea.

  15. Comparative Impacts of Scala Vestibuli Versus Scala Tympani Cochlear Implantation on Auditory Performances and Programming Parameters in Partially Ossified Cochleae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudel, Mathieu; Côté, Mathieu; Philippon, Daniel; Simonyan, David; Villemure-Poliquin, Noémie; Bussières, Richard

    2018-07-01

    To compare scala vestibuli versus scala tympani cochlear implantation in terms of postoperative auditory performances and programming parameters in patients with severe scala tympani ossification. Retrospective case-control study. Tertiary referral center. One hundred three pediatric and adult patients who underwent cochlear implant surgery between 2000 and 2016. Three groups were formed: a scala vestibuli group, a scala tympani with ossification group, and a scala tympani without ossification group. Patients were matched based on their age, sex, duration of deafness, and side of implantation (ratio of 1:2:2). Postoperative evaluation of auditory performances and programming parameters following intensive functional rehabilitation program completion. Multimedia adaptive test (MAT), hearing in noise test (HINT SNR +10 dB, HINT SNR +5 dB, and HINT SNR +0 dB), impedances, neural response telemetry thresholds (NRT), neural response imaging thresholds (NRI), comfortable levels (C-levels), and threshold levels (T-levels) were compared between groups. Twenty-one patients underwent scala vestibuli cochlear implantation: 19 adults and two children. Auditory performances were similar between groups, although sentence recognition in a noisy environment was slightly higher in the scala vestibuli group. Impedance values were also higher in the scala vestibuli group, but all other programming parameters were similar between groups. We present the largest series of patients with scala vestibuli cochlear implantation. This approach provides at least comparable auditory performances without having any deleterious effects on programming parameters. This viable and useful insertion route might be the primary surgical alternative when facing partial cochlear ossification.

  16. Regional pulmonary edema caused by acute mitral insufficiency after rupture of chordae tendinae with prolaps of the posterior mitral valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauser, M.; Wiedemer, B.; Fleischmann, D.; Billmann, P.; Ennker, J.

    2003-01-01

    An unilateral or predominantly lobar pulmonary edema is an unusual clinical or radiological finding, often misdiagnosed as one of the more common causes of focal lung disease. We report 2 cases of a regional pulmonary edema caused by the acute onset of a severe mitral insufficiency after the rupture of chordae tendinae resulting in a prolaps of the posterior mitral leaflet. In both cases the regional pulmonary edema was initially misdiagnosed as a pneumonic infiltration, which delayed the cardiological diagnostical procedures and the surgical intervention. The mechanism of the regional edema is an excentric regurgitation jet into the left atrium, which is usually directed to the orifice of the right upper lobe pulmonary vein which increases the hydrostatic vascular pressure in the corresponding lung segment. For the confirmation of the diagnosis, transesophageal echogradiographye is helpful in documenting the direction of the regurgitant flow and detecting differential gradients between the right and left pulmonary venous systems. The pulmonary infiltrations, which persisted for several weeks, dissappeared within a few days after surgical mitral-valve-reconstruction in both cases. (orig.) [de

  17. [A physiological investigation of chronic electrical stimulation with scala tympani electrodes in kittens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, D

    1992-12-01

    A physiological investigation of cochlear electrical stimulation was undertaken in six two-month-old kittens. The scala tympani electrodes were implanted and electrically stimulated using biphasic balanced electrical pulses for periods of 1000-1500h in four ears. Four ears received implants for same period but without electrical stimulation. The other two ears served as normal control. The results indicated: 1) Chronic electrical stimulation of the cochlea within electrochemically safe limits did not influence the hearing of kittens and the normal delivery of impulses evoked by acoustic and electrical signals on the auditory brainstem pathway. 2) The wave shapes of EABRs were similar to those of ABRs. The amplitudes of EABRs showed a significant increase following chronic electrical stimulation, resulting in a leftward shift in the input/output function. The absolute latencies and interwave latencies of waves II-III, III-IV and II-IV were significantly shorter than those of ABRs. These results imply that there was no adverse effect of chronic electrical stimulation on the maturing auditory systems of kittens using these electrical parameters and the mechanism of electrical hearing should be further studied.

  18. The Effect of Scala Tympani Morphology on Basilar Membrane Contact With a Straight Electrode Array: A Human Temporal Bone Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verberne, Juul; Risi, Frank; Campbell, Luke; Chambers, Scott; O'Leary, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Scala tympani morphology influences the insertion dynamics and intra-scalar position of straight electrode arrays. Hearing preservation is the goal of cochlear implantation with current thin straight electrode arrays. These hug the lateral wall, facilitating full, atraumatic insertions. However, most studies still report some postoperative hearing loss. This study explores the influence of scala tympani morphology on array position relative to the basilar membrane and its possible contribution to postoperative hearing loss. Twenty-six fresh-frozen human temporal bones implanted with a straight electrode array were three-dimensionally reconstructed from micro-photographic histological sections. Insertion depth and the proximity between the array and basilar membrane were recorded. Lateral wall shape was quantified as a curvature ratio. Insertion depths ranged from 233 to 470 degrees. The mean first point of contact between the array and basilar membrane was 185 degrees; arrays tended to remain in contact with the membrane after first contacting it. Eighty-nine and 93% of arrays that reached the upper basal (>240-360 degrees) and second (>360-720 degrees) turns respectively contacted the basilar membrane in these regions. Scalar wall curvature ratio decreased significantly (the wall became steeper) from the basal to second turns. This shift correlated with a reduced distance between the array and basilar membrane. Scala tympani morphology influences the insertion dynamics and intra-scalar position of a straight electrode array. In addition to gross trauma of cochlear structures, contact between the array and basilar membrane and how this impacts membrane function should be considered in hearing preservation cases.

  19. Comparison of three-dimensional visualization techniques for depicting the scala vestibuli and scala tympani of the cochlea by using high-resolution MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans, P; Grant, A J; Laitt, R D; Ramsden, R T; Kassner, A; Jackson, A

    1999-08-01

    Cochlear implantation requires introduction of a stimulating electrode array into the scala vestibuli or scala tympani. Although these structures can be separately identified on many high-resolution scans, it is often difficult to ascertain whether these channels are patent throughout their length. The aim of this study was to determine whether an optimized combination of an imaging protocol and a visualization technique allows routine 3D rendering of the scala vestibuli and scala tympani. A submillimeter T2 fast spin-echo imaging sequence was designed to optimize the performance of 3D visualization methods. The spatial resolution was determined experimentally using primary images and 3D surface and volume renderings from eight healthy subjects. These data were used to develop the imaging sequence and to compare the quality and signal-to-noise dependency of four data visualization algorithms: maximum intensity projection, ray casting with transparent voxels, ray casting with opaque voxels, and isosurface rendering. The ability of these methods to produce 3D renderings of the scala tympani and scala vestibuli was also examined. The imaging technique was used in five patients with sensorineural deafness. Visualization techniques produced optimal results in combination with an isotropic volume imaging sequence. Clinicians preferred the isosurface-rendered images to other 3D visualizations. Both isosurface and ray casting displayed the scala vestibuli and scala tympani throughout their length. Abnormalities were shown in three patients, and in one of these, a focal occlusion of the scala tympani was confirmed at surgery. Three-dimensional images of the scala vestibuli and scala tympani can be routinely produced. The combination of an MR sequence optimized for use with isosurface rendering or ray-casting algorithms can produce 3D images with greater spatial resolution and anatomic detail than has been possible previously.

  20. The accuracy of echocardiography versus surgical and pathological classification of patients with ruptured mitral chordae tendineae: a large study in a Chinese cardiovascular center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The accuracy of echocardiography versus surgical and pathological classification of patients with ruptured mitral chordae tendineae (RMCT) has not yet been investigated with a large study. Methods Clinical, hemodynamic, surgical, and pathological findings were reviewed for 242 patients with a preoperative diagnosis of RMCT that required mitral valvular surgery. Subjects were consecutive in-patients at Fuwai Hospital in 2002-2008. Patients were evaluated by thoracic echocardiography (TTE) and transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). RMCT cases were classified by location as anterior or posterior, and classified by degree as partial or complete RMCT, according to surgical findings. RMCT cases were also classified by pathology into four groups: myxomatous degeneration, chronic rheumatic valvulitis (CRV), infective endocarditis and others. Results Echocardiography showed that most patients had a flail mitral valve, moderate to severe mitral regurgitation, a dilated heart chamber, mild to moderate pulmonary artery hypertension and good heart function. The diagnostic accuracy for RMCT was 96.7% for TTE and 100% for TEE compared with surgical findings. Preliminary experiments demonstrated that the sensitivity and specificity of diagnosing anterior, posterior and partial RMCT were high, but the sensitivity of diagnosing complete RMCT was low. Surgical procedures for RMCT depended on the location of ruptured chordae tendineae, with no relationship between surgical procedure and complete or partial RMCT. The echocardiographic characteristics of RMCT included valvular thickening, extended subvalvular chordae, echo enhancement, abnormal echo or vegetation, combined with aortic valve damage in the four groups classified by pathology. The incidence of extended subvalvular chordae in the myxomatous group was higher than that in the other groups, and valve thickening in combination with AV damage in the CRV group was higher than that in the other groups. Infective

  1. Dexamethasone concentration gradients along scala tympani after application to the round window membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plontke, Stefan K; Biegner, Thorsten; Kammerer, Bernd; Delabar, Ursular; Salt, Alec N

    2008-04-01

    Local application of dexamethasone-21-dihydrogen-phosphate (Dex-P) to the round window (RW) membrane of guinea pigs produces a substantial basal-apical concentration gradient in scala tympani (ST) perilymph. In recent years, intratympanically applied glucocorticoids are increasingly being used for the treatment of inner ear disease. Although measurements of intracochlear concentrations after RW application exist, there is limited information on the distribution of these drugs in the inner ear fluids. It has been predicted from computer simulations that substantial concentration gradients will occur after RW application, with lower concentrations expected in apical turns. Concentration gradients of other substances along the cochlea have recently been confirmed using a sequential apical sampling method to obtain perilymph. Dexamethasone-21-dihydrogen-phosphate (10 mg/ml) was administered to the RW membrane of guinea pigs (n = 9) in vivo for 2 to 3 hours. Perilymph was then collected using a protocol in which 10 samples, each of approximately 1 mul, were taken sequentially from the cochlear apex into capillary tubes. Dexamethasone-21-dihydrogen-phosphate concentration of the samples was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Interpretation of sample data using a finite element model allowed the longitudinal gradients of Dex-P in ST to be quantified. The Dex-P content of the first sample in each experiment (dominated by perilymph from apical regions) was substantially lower than that of the third and fourth sample (dominated by basal turn perilymph). These findings qualitatively demonstrated the existence of a concentration gradient along ST. After detailed analysis of the measured sample concentrations using an established finite element computer model, the mean basal-apical concentration gradient was estimated to be 17,000. Both absolute concentrations of Dex-P in ST and the basal-apical gradients were found to vary substantially. The existence of

  2. Cochlear microdialysis for quantification of dexamethasone and fluorescein entry into scala tympani during round window administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Hartmut; Kammerer, Bernd; DiMauro, Andre; Salt, Alec N; Plontke, Stefan K

    2006-02-01

    Before new drugs for the treatment of inner ear disorders can be studied in controlled clinical trials, it is important that their pharmacokinetics be established in inner ear fluids. Microdialysis allows drug levels to be measured in perilymph without the volume disturbances and potential cerebrospinal fluid contamination associated with fluid sampling. The aims of this study were to show: (i) that despite low recovery rates from miniature dialysis probes, significant amounts of drug are removed from small fluid compartments, (ii) that dialysis sampling artifacts can be accounted for using computer simulations and (iii) that microdialysis allows quantification of the entry rates through the round window membrane (RWM) into scala tympani (ST). Initial experiments used microdialysis probes in small compartments in vitro containing sodium fluorescein. Stable concentrations were observed in large compartments (1000 microl) but significant concentration declines were observed in smaller compartments (100, 10 and 5.6 microl) comparable to the size of the inner ear. Computer simulations of these experiments closely approximated the experimental data. In in vivo experiments, sodium fluorescein 10 mg/ml and dexamethasone-dihydrogen-phosphate disodium salt 8 mg/ml were simultaneously applied to the RWM of guinea pigs. Perilymph concentration in the basal turn of ST was monitored using microdialysis. The fluorescein concentration reached after 200 min application (585+/-527 microg/ml) was approximately twice that of dexamethasone phosphate (291+/-369 microg/ml). Substantial variation in concentrations was found between animals by approximately a factor of 34 for fluorescein and at least 41 for dexamethasone phosphate. This is, to a large extent, thought to be the result of the RWM permeability varying in different animals. It was not caused by substance analysis variations, because two different analytic methods were used and the concentration ratio between the two

  3. Fetal development of the pulley for muscle insertion tendons: A review and new findings related to the tensor tympani tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, Jose Francisco; Honkura, Yohei; Katori, Yukio; Murakami, Gen; Abe, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    The existence of hard tissue pulleys that act to change the direction of a muscle insertion tendon is well known in the human body. These include (1) the trochlea for the extraocular obliquus superior muscle, (2) the pterygoid hamulus for the tensor veli palatini muscle, (3) the deep sulcus on the plantar aspect of the cuboid bone for the peroneus longus tendon, (4) the lesser sciatic notch for the obturator internus muscle, and (5) the bony trochleariformis process for the tensor tympani muscle tendon. In addition, (6) the stapedius muscle tendon shows a lesser or greater angulation at the pyramidal eminence of the temporal bone. Our recent studies have shown that the development of pulleys Nos. 1 and 2 can be explained by a change in the topographical relationship between the pulley and the tendon, that of pulley No. 3 by the rapidly growing calcaneus pushing the tendon, and that of pulley No. 4 by migration of the insertion along the sciatic nerve and gluteus medius tendon. Therefore, in Nos. 1-4, an initially direct tendon curves secondarily and obtains an attachment to the pulley. In case No. 6, the terminal part of the stapedius tendon originates secondarily from the interzone mesenchymal tissue of the incudostapedial joint. In the case of pulley No. 5, we newly demonstrated that its initial phase of development was similar to No. 6, but the tensor tympani tendon achieved a right-angled turn under guidance by a specific fibrous tissue and it migrated along the growing malleus manubrium. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. The Crista Fenestra and Its Impact on the Surgical Approach to the Scala Tympani during Cochlear Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeli, Roberto D; Lavinsky, Joel; Setogutti, Enio T; Lavinsky, Luiz

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work was to describe the dimensions of the crista fenestra and determine its presence by means of high-resolution computed tomography (CT) for the purpose of cochlear implantation via the round window approach. A series of 10 adult human temporal bones underwent high-resolution CT scanning and were further dissected for microscopic study of the round window niche. In all of the specimens, the round window membrane was fully visualized after the complete removal of bony overhangs. The crista fenestra was identified as a sharp bony crest located in the anterior and inferior borders of the niche; its area ranged from 0.28 to 0.80 mm2 (mean 0.51 ± 0.18). The proportion of the area occupied by the crista fenestra in the whole circumference of the round window ranged from 23 to 50% (mean 36%). We found a moderate positive correlation between the area of the niche and the dimensions of the crista fenestra (Spearman rho: 0.491). In every case, high-resolution CT scanning was unable to determine the presence of the crista fenestra. The crista fenestra occupies a variable but expressive area within the bony round window niche. Narrower round window niches tended to house smaller crests. The presence of the crista fenestra is an important obstacle to adequate access to the scala tympani. Nevertheless, a high-resolution CT scan provides no additional preoperative information with regard to its presence for the purpose of surgical access to the scala tympani via the round window niche. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Dexamethasone levels and base to apex concentration gradients in scala tympani perilymph following intracochlear delivery in the guinea pig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Hartmut; Salt, Alec N.; Biegner, Thorsten; Kammerer, Bernd; Delabar, Ursular; Hartsock, Jared; Plontke, Stefan K.

    2012-01-01

    Hypothesis To determine whether intracochlearly applied dexamethasone will lead to better control of drug levels, higher peak concentrations and lower base-to apex concentration gradients in scala tympani (ST) of the guinea pig than after intratympanic (round window, RW) application. Background Local application of drugs to the RW results in substantial variation of intracochlear drug levels and significant base-to apex concentration gradients in ST. Methods Two μL of dexamethasone-phosphate (10 mg/mL) were injected into ST either through the RW membrane which was covered with 1% sodium hyaluronate gel or through a cochleostomy with a fluid tight seal of the micropipette. Perilymph was sequentially sampled from the apex at a single time point for each animal, at 20, 80, or 200 min after the injection ended. Results were mathematically interpreted by the means of an established computer model and compared with prior experiments performed by our group with the same experimental techniques but using intratympanic applications. Results Single intracochlear injections over 20 min resulted in approximately ten times higher peak concentrations (on average) than 2-3 hours of intratympanic application to the round window niche. Intracochlear drug levels were less variable and could be measured for at least up to 220 min. Concentration gradients along scala tympani were less pronounced. The remaining variability in intracochlear drug levels was attributable to perilymph and drug leak from the injection site. Conclusion With significantly higher, less variable drug levels and smaller base-to apex concentration gradients, intracochlear applications have advantages to intratympanic injections. For further development of this technique, it is of importance to control leaks of perilymph and drug from the injection site and to evaluate its clinical feasibility and associated risks. PMID:22588238

  6. Clinical and Surgical Findings and Outcome Following Rumenotomy in Adult Dairy Cattle Affected with Recurrent Rumen Tympany Associated with Non-Metallic Foreign Bodies

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Bani Ismail; A. Al-Majali; K. Al-Qudah

    2007-01-01

    Medical records of 31 adult dairy cows suffering from recurrent rumen tympany for at least 1 month duration that underwent exploratory laparotomy and rumenotomy were reviewed and information was obtained on signalment, history, physical examination findings, laboratory findings and surgical findings. Cases were categorized according to surgical findings into 3 groups. Group 1 (n = 10) included cattle with reticuloruminal, metallic foreign bodies and perireticular adhesions/inflammation, group...

  7. [Therapeutic effect of insulin-like growth factor-1 injection into the inner ears through scala tympani fenestration on gentamicin-induced hearing loss in guinea pigs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong-he; Chen, Hao; Guo, Meng-he

    2008-02-01

    To study the therapeutic effect of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) injection into the inner ears through a scala tympani fenestration on sensorineural deafness in a guinea pig model of gentamicin-induced hearing loss. Twenty guinea pigs with gentamicin-induced hearing loss were randomized equally into IGF-1 group and control group. In both groups, scala tympani fenestration was performed for injection of IGF-1 (10 microl) or artificial perilymphatic fluid (10 microl). Auditory brainstem responses (ABR) test was performed before and 7 and 14 days after surgery, respectively, and the cochlea was removed by decollation of 3 guinea pigs from each group after ABR test for observing the changes in the hair cells using scanning electron microscope. Significant reduction in the ABR response threshold (RT) occurred in IGF-1 group 7 and 14 days after the surgery, and on day 14, ABR RT showed significant difference between IGF-1 group and the control group. Scanning electron microscopy revealed severer damages of the hair cells in the control group, and in the IGF-1 group, finger-like microvilli was detected on the surface of the damaged hair cells. IGF-1 injection in the inner ear through the scala tympani fenestration may ameliorate the damages of the auditory function and relieve sustained toxicity of gentamicin in guinea pigs possibly by protection and partial repair of the damaged cochlea hair cells as well as protection of the afferent nerves.

  8. Fiber webs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger M. Rowell; James S. Han; Von L. Byrd

    2005-01-01

    Wood fibers can be used to produce a wide variety of low-density three-dimensional webs, mats, and fiber-molded products. Short wood fibers blended with long fibers can be formed into flexible fiber mats, which can be made by physical entanglement, nonwoven needling, or thermoplastic fiber melt matrix technologies. The most common types of flexible mats are carded, air...

  9. Elastic fiber-mediated enthesis in the human middle ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Tetsuaki; Shibata, Shunichi; Katori, Yukio; Ohtsuka, Aiji; Murakami, Gen; Fujimiya, Mineko

    2012-10-01

    Adaptation to constant vibration (acoustic oscillation) is likely to confer a specific morphology at the bone-tendon and bone-ligament interfaces at the ear ossicles, which therefore represent an exciting target of enthesis research. We histologically examined (i) the bone attachments of the tensor tympani and stapedius muscles and (ii) the annular ligament of the incudostapedial joint obtained from seven elderly donated cadavers. Notably, both aldehyde-fuchsin and elastic-Masson staining demonstrated that the major fibrous component of the entheses was not collagen fibers but mature elastic fibers. The positive controls for elastic fiber staining were the arterial wall elastic laminae included in the temporal bone materials. The elastic fibers were inserted deeply into the type II collagen-poor fibrocartilage covering the ear ossicles. The muscle tendons were composed of an outer thin layer of collagen fibers and an inner thick core of elastic fibers near the malleus or stapes. In the unique elastic fiber-mediated entheses, hyaluronan, versican and fibronectin were expressed strongly along the elastic fibers. The hyaluronan seemed to act as a friction-reducing lubricant for the elastic fibers. Aggrecan was labeled strongly in a disk- or plica-like fibrous mass on the inner side of the elastic fiber-rich ligament, possibly due to compression stress from the ligament. Tenascin-c was not evident in the entheses. The elastic fiber-mediated entheses appeared resistant to tissue destruction in an environment exposed to constant vibration. The morphology was unlikely to be the result of age-related degeneration. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Anatomy © 2012 Anatomical Society.

  10. Experimental induction of abdominal tympany, abomasitis, and abomasal ulceration by intraruminal inoculation of Clostridium perfringens type A in neonatal calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeder, B L; Chengappa, M M; Nagaraja, T G; Avery, T B; Kennedy, G A

    1988-02-01

    The etiologic role of Clostridum perfringens type A in the acute abdominal syndrome characterized by abomasal and rumen tympany, abomasitis, and abomasal ulceration was investigated in neonatal calves. Eight calves, 4 to 12 days old, were inoculated intraruminally with toxigenic C perfringens type A. Before and after C perfringens inoculation, blood samples were collected from all calves for blood gas and serum biochemical analysis and for determination of serum copper concentration; ruminal fluid was obtained for isolation of C perfringens. Calves were monitored daily for clinical signs of the syndrome and, depending on the severity of clinical signs, they were either euthanatized or redosed within 4 to 7 days. After necropsy, specimens obtained from the abomasum and rumen for macroscopic and microscopic examination and for anaerobic bacteriologic culture were processed in routine manner. Intraruminal inoculation of C perfringens type A into healthy calves induced anorexia, depression, bloat, diarrhea, and in some calves, death. Serum copper concentration was within normal range. Necropsy revealed variable degrees of abomasitis, petechial and ecchymotic hemorrhages, and ulcers (ranging from pinpoint to nearly perforate) in the abomasum. Seven of those calves also had multiple trichobezoars in the rumen. These necropsy findings were not seen in calves (controls) given distilled H2O only. In affected calves, acute abdominal syndrome was unrelated to copper deficiency, and C perfringens type A given intraruminally was able to induce clinical signs similar to those of the naturally acquired disease.

  11. Adeno-associated virus transformation into the normal miniature pig and the normal guinea pigs cochlea via scala tympani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xunbei; Wu, Nan; Zhang, Yue; Guo, Weiwei; Lin, Chang; Yang, Shiming

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the expression of the miniature pig cochlea after AAV1 transfect into the cochlea via round window membrane (RWM). Twenty miniature pigs are equally divided into four experimental groups. Twelve miniature pigs are equally divided into four control groups. Each pig was transfected with the AAV1 in the experimental group via RWM and each pig was transduced with the artificial perilymph in the control group. The expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) was observed at 2 weeks, 3 weeks and 4 weeks, respectively. Likewise, AAV1 was delivered into the guinea pigs cochleas using the same method, and the results were compared with that of the miniature pigs. The expression was mainly in the inner hair cells of the miniature pig. The expression of GFP began to appear at 2 weeks, reached the peak at 3 weeks. It also expressed in Hensen's cells, inner pillar cells, outer pillar cells, spiral limbus, and spiral ligament. In the meanwhile, AAV1 was delivered into guinea pig cochlea via the same method, and AAV1 was also expressed in the inner hair cells. But the expression peaked at 2 weeks, and the efficiency of the inner hair cell transfection was higher than that of the pig. AAV1 can be transformed into miniature pig cochlea via scala tympani by the RWM method efficiently.

  12. Role of the ectonucleotidase NTPDase2 in taste bud function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbeuch, Aurelie; Anderson, Catherine B; Parnes, Jason; Enjyoji, Keiichi; Robson, Simon C; Finger, Thomas E; Kinnamon, Sue C

    2013-09-03

    Taste buds are unusual in requiring ATP as a transmitter to activate sensory nerve fibers. In response to taste stimuli, taste cells release ATP, activating purinergic receptors containing the P2X2 and P2X3 subunits on taste nerves. In turn, the released ATP is hydrolyzed to ADP by a plasma membrane nucleoside triphosphate previously identified as nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase-2 (NTPDase2). In this paper we investigate the role of this ectonucleotidase in the function of taste buds by examining gene-targeted Entpd2-null mice globally lacking NTPDase2. RT-PCR confirmed the absence of NTPDase2, and ATPase enzyme histochemistry reveals no reaction product in taste buds of knockout mice, suggesting that NTPDase2 is the dominant form in taste buds. RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry demonstrated that in knockout mice all cell types are present in taste buds, even those cells normally expressing NTPDase2. In addition, the overall number and size of taste buds are normal in Entpd2-null mice. Luciferin/luciferase assays of circumvallate tissue of knockout mice detected elevated levels of extracellular ATP. Electrophysiological recordings from two taste nerves, the chorda tympani and glossopharyngeal, revealed depressed responses to all taste stimuli in Entpd2-null mice. Responses were more depressed in the glossopharyngeal nerve than in the chorda tympani nerve and involved all taste qualities; responses in the chorda tympani were more depressed to sweet and umami stimuli than to other qualities. We suggest that the excessive levels of extracellular ATP in the Entpd2-knockout animals desensitize the P2X receptors associated with nerve fibers, thereby depressing taste responses.

  13. Photorefractive Fibers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kuzyk, Mark G

    2003-01-01

    ... scope of the project. In addition to our work in optical limiting fibers, spillover results included making fiber-based light-sources, writing holograms in fibers, and developing the theory of the limits of the nonlinear...

  14. [Simultaneous determinations of oxygen partial pressure in the scala tympani, electrocochleography and blood pressure measurements in noise stress in guinea pigs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamm, K; Lamm, C; Lamm, H; Schumann, K

    1988-09-01

    In 14 guinea pigs the pO2 in the perilymph of the scala tympani fell to 50%-80% of the original value during exposure to noise consisting of 4,000 Hz clicks with a repetition rate of 20/s, 100 dB CHL = 120 dB SPL p.e., repeated twice over a period of 24 minutes each time. For the measurements of the pO2 we used the thin 0.5 micron micro-coaxial needle electrode described by Baumgärtl and Luebbers, which was placed through the round-window membrane in the scala tympani to a depth of 600 micron. The simultaneously recorded CAP latency times were prolonged by 0.8 ms at a test loudness of 60 and 80 dB CHL. The amplitudes of the CM had declined by 60%-70% of the original values at a test loudness of 80 dB SPL p.e. The intra-arterial blood pressure in the common carotid artery of all animals remained constant. As the cortilymph spaces communicate with the perilymph of the scala tympani, our measured decline of pO2 in the perilymph could indicate a cortilymph hypoxia. During exposure to noise the oxygen-dependent Na+ and K+ pumps, which maintain the ion balance and function of the organ of Corti, can decompensate due to lack of oxygen. That would lead to a K+ contamination of the cortilymph and to an intracellular Na+ accumulation, which can cause microstructural damage (hair cell-cilia fusion, hair cell, synaptic and dendritic swelling, hair cell contraction and sustained depolarization), which would be reflected in the CMs and CAPs.

  15. Factors Affecting Outcomes in Cochlear Implant Recipients Implanted With a Perimodiolar Electrode Array Located in Scala Tympani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Laura K; Firszt, Jill B; Reeder, Ruth M; Uchanski, Rosalie M; Dwyer, Noël Y; Holden, Timothy A

    2016-12-01

    To identify primary biographic and audiologic factors contributing to cochlear implant (CI) performance variability in quiet and noise by controlling electrode array type and electrode position within the cochlea. Although CI outcomes have improved over time, considerable outcome variability still exists. Biographic, audiologic, and device-related factors have been shown to influence performance. Examining CI recipients with consistent array type and electrode position may allow focused investigation into outcome variability resulting from biographic and audiologic factors. Thirty-nine adults (40 ears) implanted for at least 6 months with a perimodiolar electrode array known (via computed tomography [CT] imaging) to be in scala tympani participated. Test materials, administered CI only, included monosyllabic words, sentences in quiet and noise, and spectral ripple discrimination. In quiet, scores were high with mean word and sentence scores of 76 and 87%, respectively; however, sentence scores decreased by an average of 35 percentage points when noise was added. A principal components (PC) analysis of biographic and audiologic factors found three distinct factors, PC1 Age, PC2 Duration, and PC3 Pre-op Hearing. PC1 Age was the only factor that correlated, albeit modestly, with speech recognition in quiet and noise. Spectral ripple discrimination strongly correlated with speech measures. For these recipients with consistent electrode position, PC1 Age was related to speech recognition performance. Consistent electrode position may have contributed to high speech understanding in quiet. Inter-subject variability in noise may have been influenced by auditory/cognitive processing, known to decline with age, and mechanisms that underlie spectral resolution ability.

  16. Effect of embedded dexamethasone in cochlear implant array on insertion forces in an artificial model of scala tympani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Yann; Bernardeschi, Daniele; Kazmitcheff, Guillaume; Miroir, Mathieu; Vauchel, Thomas; Ferrary, Evelyne; Sterkers, Olivier

    2015-02-01

    Loading otoprotective drug into cochlear implant might change its mechanical properties, thus compromising atraumatic insertion. This study evaluated the effect of incorporation of dexamethasone (DXM) in the silicone of cochlear implant arrays on insertion forces. Local administration of DXM with embedded array can potentially reduce inflammation and fibrosis after cochlear implantation procedure to improve hearing preservation and reduce long-term impedances. Four models of arrays have been tested: 0.5-mm distal diameter array (n = 5) used as a control, drug-free 0.4-mm distal diameter array (n = 5), 0.4-mm distal diameter array with 1% eluded DXM silicone (n = 5), and 0.4-mm distal diameter array with 10% eluded DXM silicone (n = 5). Via a motorized insertion bench, each array has been inserted into an artificial scala tympani model. The forces were recorded by a 6-axis force sensor. Each array was tested seven times for a total number of 140 insertions. During the first 10-mm insertion, no difference between the four models was observed. From 10- to 24-mm insertion, the 0.5-mm distal diameter array presented higher insertion forces than the drug-free 0.4-mm distal diameter arrays, with or without DXM. Friction forces for drug-free 0.4-mm distal diameter array and 0.4-mm distal diameter DXM eluded arrays were similar on all insertion lengths. Incorporation of DXM in silicone for cochlear implant design does not change electrode array insertion forces. It does not raise the risk of trauma during array insertion, making it suitable for long-term in situ administration to the cochlea.

  17. Demonstration of a longitudinal concentration gradient along scala tympani by sequential sampling of perilymph from the cochlear apex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mynatt, Robert; Hale, Shane A; Gill, Ruth M; Plontke, Stefan K; Salt, Alec N

    2006-06-01

    Local applications of drugs to the inner ear are increasingly being used to treat patients' inner ear disorders. Knowledge of the pharmacokinetics of drugs in the inner ear fluids is essential for a scientific basis for such treatments. When auditory function is of primary interest, the drug's kinetics in scala tympani (ST) must be established. Measurement of drug levels in ST is technically difficult because of the known contamination of perilymph samples taken from the basal cochlear turn with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Recently, we reported a technique in which perilymph was sampled from the cochlear apex to minimize the influence of CSF contamination (J. Neurosci. Methods, doi: 10.1016/j.jneumeth.2005.10.008 ). This technique has now been extended by taking smaller fluid samples sequentially from the cochlear apex, which can be used to quantify drug gradients along ST. The sampling and analysis methods were evaluated using an ionic marker, trimethylphenylammonium (TMPA), that was applied to the round window membrane. After loading perilymph with TMPA, 10 1-muL samples were taken from the cochlear apex. The TMPA content of the samples was consistent with the first sample containing perilymph from apical regions and the fourth or fifth sample containing perilymph from the basal turn. TMPA concentration decreased in subsequent samples, as they increasingly contained CSF that had passed through ST. Sample concentration curves were interpreted quantitatively by simulation of the experiment with a finite element model and by an automated curve-fitting method by which the apical-basal gradient was estimated. The study demonstrates that sequential apical sampling provides drug gradient data for ST perilymph while avoiding the major distortions of sample composition associated with basal turn sampling. The method can be used for any substance for which a sensitive assay is available and is therefore of high relevance for the development of preclinical and clinical

  18. [Simultaneous determination of oxygen partial pressure in the scala tympani, electrocochleography and blood pressure values in the guinea pig].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamm, K; Lamm, C; Lamm, H; Schumann, K

    1989-02-01

    Nineteen guinea pigs were exposed to impulse noise from gunfire (G3 of the Federal German Army, 156 dB peak SPL), 6+6 shots or 12+6 shots, with a 3-s pulse interval. For simultaneous measurements of pO2, cochlea microphonics (CM) and compound action potentials of the auditory nerve (CAP), we used the thin 0.5 microns microcoaxial needle electrode described by Baumgaertl and Luebbers, which was placed through the roundwindow membrane into the scala tympani to a depth of 1000 microns. After exposure to the first 6 or 12 gunshots, the pO2 increased by about 20% of the original values in 12 guinea pigs (63%). In the following 30 min of recovery time the pO2 decreased, stabilized or showed a further decline. There were only 3 animals with a pO2 loss of 70% of the original values. Most animals showed a decline of 25% at the end of the recovery period. In all animals after 6 additional shots, the pO2 only decreased by another 5% of the original values. Amplitudes of CM and CAP were reduced by about 40% of the original values after 6 or 12 shots and by another 20%-24% (CM) and 5%-15% (CAP) after 6 additional shots. The intra-arterial blood pressure in the common carotid artery remained constant. The results are discussed with respect to the well-known morphological damage, subsequent ion imbalance and hypoxia within the cortilymph after exposure to gunfire. These changes are reflected in the loss of CMs and CAPs.

  19. [Serial change of perilymphatic potassium ion concentration in the scala tympani after introducing KCl-solution into the guinea pigs' tympanic cavity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeno, K

    1990-09-01

    Characteristic nystagmus similar to the Meniere's attack could be observed after introducing KCl solution into the tympanic cavity of guinea pigs. To confirm the fact that this nystagmus was provoked by the high perilymphatic potassium ion concentration, the K+ activity of perilymph was recorded serially through the K+ specific microelectrode inserted into the scala tympani. The rapid increment of K+ activity reached maximum at 120 minutes after introducing KCl solution, and then it decreased gradually to a half of the maximum activity. However, such change of perilymphatic potassium ion concentration was not observed by introducing sucrose solution as control.

  20. Distribution of elastic fibers in the head and neck: a histological study using late-stage human fetuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Hideaki; Umezawa, Takashi; Omine, Yuya; Kasahara, Masaaki; Rodríguez-Vázquez, José Francisco; Murakami, Gen

    2013-01-01

    There is little or no information about the distribution of elastic fibers in the human fetal head. We examined this issue in 15 late-stage fetuses (crown-rump length, 220-320 mm) using aldehyde-fuchsin and elastica-Masson staining, and we used the arterial wall elastic laminae and external ear cartilages as positive staining controls. The posterior pharyngeal wall, as well as the ligaments connecting the laryngeal cartilages, contained abundant elastic fibers. In contrast with the sphenomandibular ligament and the temporomandibular joint disk, in which elastic fibers were partly present, the discomalleolar ligament and the fascial structures around the pterygoid muscles did not have any elastic fibers. In addition, the posterior marginal fascia of the prestyloid space did contain such fibers. Notably, in the middle ear, elastic fibers accumulated along the tendons of the tensor tympani and stapedius muscles and in the joint capsules of the ear ossicle articulations. Elastic fibers were not seen in any other muscle tendons or vertebral facet capsules in the head and neck. Despite being composed of smooth muscle, the orbitalis muscle did not contain any elastic fibers. The elastic fibers in the sphenomandibular ligament seemed to correspond to an intermediate step of development between Meckel's cartilage and the final ligament. Overall, there seemed to be a mini-version of elastic fiber distribution compared to that in adults and a different specific developmental pattern of connective tissues. The latter morphology might be a result of an adaptation to hypoxic conditions during development. PMID:23560235

  1. Distribution of elastic fibers in the head and neck: a histological study using late-stage human fetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Hideaki; Umezawa, Takashi; Omine, Yuya; Kasahara, Masaaki; Rodríguez-Vázquez, José Francisco; Murakami, Gen; Abe, Shinichi

    2013-03-01

    There is little or no information about the distribution of elastic fibers in the human fetal head. We examined this issue in 15 late-stage fetuses (crown-rump length, 220-320 mm) using aldehyde-fuchsin and elastica-Masson staining, and we used the arterial wall elastic laminae and external ear cartilages as positive staining controls. The posterior pharyngeal wall, as well as the ligaments connecting the laryngeal cartilages, contained abundant elastic fibers. In contrast with the sphenomandibular ligament and the temporomandibular joint disk, in which elastic fibers were partly present, the discomalleolar ligament and the fascial structures around the pterygoid muscles did not have any elastic fibers. In addition, the posterior marginal fascia of the prestyloid space did contain such fibers. Notably, in the middle ear, elastic fibers accumulated along the tendons of the tensor tympani and stapedius muscles and in the joint capsules of the ear ossicle articulations. Elastic fibers were not seen in any other muscle tendons or vertebral facet capsules in the head and neck. Despite being composed of smooth muscle, the orbitalis muscle did not contain any elastic fibers. The elastic fibers in the sphenomandibular ligament seemed to correspond to an intermediate step of development between Meckel's cartilage and the final ligament. Overall, there seemed to be a mini-version of elastic fiber distribution compared to that in adults and a different specific developmental pattern of connective tissues. The latter morphology might be a result of an adaptation to hypoxic conditions during development.

  2. Fiber dielectrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipowicz, P.J.; Yeh, H.C.

    1988-01-01

    Dielectrophoresis is the motion of uncharged particles in nonuniform electric fields. We find that the theoretical dielectrophoretic velocity of a conducting fiber in an insulating medium is proportional to the square of the fiber length, and is virtually independent of fiber diameter. This prediction has been verified experimentally. The results point to the development of a fiber length classifier based on dielectrophoresis. (author)

  3. Fiber Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottwitt, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    The chapter provides a discussion of optical fiber amplifiers and through three sections provides a detailed treatment of three types of optical fiber amplifiers, erbium doped fiber amplifiers (EDFA), Raman amplifiers, and parametric amplifiers. Each section comprises the fundamentals including...... the basic physics and relevant in-depth theoretical modeling, amplifiers characteristics and performance data as a function of specific operation parameters. Typical applications in fiber optic communication systems and the improvement achievable through the use of fiber amplifiers are illustrated....

  4. Perilymph sampling from the cochlear apex: a reliable method to obtain higher purity perilymph samples from scala tympani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salt, Alec N; Hale, Shane A; Plonkte, Stefan K R

    2006-05-15

    Measurements of drug levels in the fluids of the inner ear are required to establish kinetic parameters and to determine the influence of specific local delivery protocols. For most substances, this requires cochlear fluids samples to be obtained for analysis. When auditory function is of primary interest, the drug level in the perilymph of scala tympani (ST) is most relevant, since drug in this scala has ready access to the auditory sensory cells. In many prior studies, ST perilymph samples have been obtained from the basal turn, either by aspiration through the round window membrane (RWM) or through an opening in the bony wall. A number of studies have demonstrated that such samples are likely to be contaminated with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). CSF enters the basal turn of ST through the cochlear aqueduct when the bony capsule is perforated or when fluid is aspirated. The degree of sample contamination has, however, not been widely appreciated. Recent studies have shown that perilymph samples taken through the round window membrane are highly contaminated with CSF, with samples greater than 2microL in volume containing more CSF than perilymph. In spite of this knowledge, many groups continue to sample from the base of the cochlea, as it is a well-established method. We have developed an alternative, technically simple method to increase the proportion of ST perilymph in a fluid sample. The sample is taken from the apex of the cochlea, a site that is distant from the cochlear aqueduct. A previous problem with sampling through a perforation in the bone was that the native perilymph rapidly leaked out driven by CSF pressure and was lost to the middle ear space. We therefore developed a procedure to collect all the fluid that emerged from the perforated apex after perforation. We evaluated the method using a marker ion trimethylphenylammonium (TMPA). TMPA was applied to the perilymph of guinea pigs either by RW irrigation or by microinjection into the apical turn. The

  5. Dexamethasone levels and base-to-apex concentration gradients in the scala tympani perilymph after intracochlear delivery in the guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Hartmut; Salt, Alec N; Biegner, Thorsten; Kammerer, Bernd; Delabar, Ursular; Hartsock, Jared J; Plontke, Stefan K

    2012-06-01

    To determine whether intracochlearly applied dexamethasone will lead to better control of drug levels, higher peak concentrations, and lower base-to-apex concentration gradients in the scala tympani (ST) of the guinea pig than after intratympanic (round window [RW]) application. Local application of drugs to the RW results in substantial variation of intracochlear drug levels and significant base-to-apex concentration gradients in ST. Two microliters of dexamethasone-phosphate (10 mg/ml) were injected into ST either through the RW membrane, which was covered with 1% sodium hyaluronate gel or through a cochleostomy with a fluid tight seal of the micropipette. Perilymph was sequentially sampled from the apex at a single time point for each animal, at 20, 80, or 200 min after the injection ended. Results were mathematically interpreted by means of an established computer model and compared with previous experiments performed by our group with the same experimental techniques but using intratympanic applications. Single intracochlear injections of 20 minutes resulted in approximately 10 times higher peak concentrations (on average) than 2 to 3 hours of intratympanic application to the RW niche. Intracochlear drug levels were less variable and could be measured for over 220 minutes. Concentration gradients along the scala tympani were less pronounced. The remaining variability in intracochlear drug levels was attributable to perilymph and drug leak from the injection site. With significantly higher, less variable drug levels and smaller base-to-apex concentration gradients, intracochlear applications have advantages to intratympanic injections. For further development of this technique, it is of importance to control leaks of perilymph and drug from the injection site and to evaluate its clinical feasibility and associated risks.

  6. Two Fiber Optical Fiber Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Mathew R.; Farmer, Jeffery T.; Breeding, Shawn P.

    2000-01-01

    An optical fiber thermometer consists of an optical fiber whose sensing tip is given a metallic coating. The sensing tip of the fiber is essentially an isothermal cavity, so the emission from this cavity will be approximately equal to the emission from a blackbody. Temperature readings are obtained by measuring the spectral radiative heat flux at the end of the fiber at two wavelengths. The ratio of these measurements and Planck's Law are used to infer the temperature at the sensing tip. Optical fiber thermometers have high accuracy, excellent long-term stability and are immune to electromagnetic interference. In addition, they can be operated for extended periods without requiring re-calibration. For these reasons. it is desirable to use optical fiber thermometers in environments such as the International Space Station. However, it has recently been shown that temperature readings are corrupted by emission from the fiber when extended portions of the probe are exposed to elevated temperatures. This paper will describe several ways in which the reading from a second fiber can be used to correct the corrupted temperature measurements. The accuracy and sensitivity to measurement uncertainty will be presented for each method.

  7. Genome-Wide Linkage and Association Analysis Identifies Major Gene Loci for Guttural Pouch Tympany in Arabian and German Warmblood Horses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Julia; Ohnesorge, Bernhard; Distl, Ottmar

    2012-01-01

    Equine guttural pouch tympany (GPT) is a hereditary condition affecting foals in their first months of life. Complex segregation analyses in Arabian and German warmblood horses showed the involvement of a major gene as very likely. Genome-wide linkage and association analyses including a high density marker set of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were performed to map the genomic region harbouring the potential major gene for GPT. A total of 85 Arabian and 373 German warmblood horses were genotyped on the Illumina equine SNP50 beadchip. Non-parametric multipoint linkage analyses showed genome-wide significance on horse chromosomes (ECA) 3 for German warmblood at 16–26 Mb and 34–55 Mb and for Arabian on ECA15 at 64–65 Mb. Genome-wide association analyses confirmed the linked regions for both breeds. In Arabian, genome-wide association was detected at 64 Mb within the region with the highest linkage peak on ECA15. For German warmblood, signals for genome-wide association were close to the peak region of linkage at 52 Mb on ECA3. The odds ratio for the SNP with the highest genome-wide association was 0.12 for the Arabian. In conclusion, the refinement of the regions with the Illumina equine SNP50 beadchip is an important step to unravel the responsible mutations for GPT. PMID:22848553

  8. Application of a TNF-alpha-inhibitor into the scala tympany after cochlear electrode insertion trauma in guinea pigs: preliminary audiologic results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihler, Friedrich; Pelz, Sabrina; Coors, Melanie; Matthias, Christoph; Canis, Martin

    2014-11-01

    Cochlear implantation trauma causes both macroscopic and inflammatory trauma. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the TNF-alpha inhibitor etanercept applied after cochlear implantation trauma on the preservation of acoustic hearing. Guinea pigs were randomly assigned to three groups receiving cochlear implantation trauma by cochleostomy. In one group, the site was sealed by bone cement with no further treatment. A second group was additionally implanted with an osmotic minipump delivering artificial perilymph into the scala tympani for seven days. In the third group, etanercept 1 mg/ml was added to artificial perilymph. Hearing was assessed by auditory brainstem responses at 2, 4, 6, and 8 kHz prior to and after surgery and on days 3, 5, 7, 14, 28. Fifteen healthy guinea pigs. The trauma led to threshold shifts from 50.3 dB ± 16.3 dB to 68.0 dB ± 19.3 dB. Hearing thresholds were significantly lower in etanercept-treated animals compared to controls on day 28 at 8 kHz and from day 3 onwards at 4 and 2 kHz (p < 0.01; two-way RM ANOVA / Bonferroni t-test). The application of etanercept led to preservation of acoustic hearing after cochlear implantation trauma.

  9. Low-fiber diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... residue; Low-fiber diet; Fiber restricted diet; Crohn disease - low fiber diet; Ulcerative colitis - low fiber diet; ... them if they do not contain seeds or pulp: Yellow squash (without seeds) Spinach Pumpkin Eggplant Potatoes, ...

  10. Photovoltaic fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudiana, Russell; Eckert, Robert; Cardone, John; Ryan, James; Montello, Alan

    2006-08-01

    It was realized early in the history of Konarka that the ability to produce fibers that generate power from solar energy could be applied to a wide variety of applications where fabrics are utilized currently. These applications include personal items such as jackets, shirts and hats, to architectural uses such as awnings, tents, large covers for cars, trucks and even doomed stadiums, to indoor furnishings such as window blinds, shades and drapes. They may also be used as small fabric patches or fiber bundles for powering or recharging batteries in small sensors. Power generating fabrics for clothing is of particular interest to the military where they would be used in uniforms and body armor where portable power is vital to field operations. In strong sunlight these power generating fabrics could be used as a primary source of energy, or they can be used in either direct sunlight or low light conditions to recharge batteries. Early in 2002, Konarka performed a series of proof-of-concept experiments to demonstrate the feasibility of building a photovoltaic cell using dye-sensitized titania and electrolyte on a metal wire core. The approach taken was based on the sequential coating processes used in making fiber optics, namely, a fiber core, e.g., a metal wire serving as the primary electrode, is passed through a series of vertically aligned coating cups. Each of the cups contains a coating fluid that has a specific function in the photocell. A second wire, used as the counter electrode, is brought into the process prior to entering the final coating cup. The latter contains a photopolymerizable, transparent cladding which hardens when passed through a UV chamber. Upon exiting the UV chamber, the finished PV fiber is spooled. Two hundred of foot lengths of PV fiber have been made using this process. When the fiber is exposed to visible radiation, it generates electrical power. The best efficiency exhibited by these fibers is 6% with an average value in the 4

  11. Fetal Tendinous Connection Between the Tensor Tympani and Tensor Veli Palatini Muscles: A Single Digastric Muscle Acting for Morphogenesis of the Cranial Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, José Francisco; Sakiyama, Koji; Abe, Hiroshi; Amano, Osamu; Murakami, Gen

    2016-04-01

    Some researchers contend that in adults the tensor tympani muscle (TT) connects with the tensor veli palatini muscle (TVP) by an intermediate tendon, in disagreement with the other researchers. To resolve this controversy, we examined serial sections of 50 human embryos and fetuses at 6-17 weeks of development. At 6 weeks, in the first pharyngeal arch, a mesenchymal connection was found first to divide a single anlage into the TT and TVP. At and after 7 weeks, the TT was connected continuously with the TVP by a definite tendinous tissue mediolaterally crossing the pharyngotympanic tube. At 11 weeks another fascia was visible covering the cranial and lateral sides of the tube. This "gonial fascia" had two thickened borders: the superior one corresponded to a part of the connecting tendon between the TT and TVP; the inferior one was a fibrous band ending at the os goniale near the lateral end of the TVP. In association with the gonial fascia, the fetal TT and TVP seemed to provide a functional complex. The TT-TVP complex might first help elevate the palatal shelves in association with the developing tongue. Next, the tubal passage, maintained by contraction of the muscle complex, seems to facilitate the removal of loose mesenchymal tissues from the tympanic cavity. Third, the muscle complex most likely determined the final morphology of the pterygoid process. Consequently, despite the controversial morphologies in adults, the TT and TVP seemed to make a single digastric muscle acting for the morphogenesis of the cranial base. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Endolymphatic sac surgery versus tenotomy of the stapedius and tensor tympani muscles in the management of patients with unilateral definite Meniere's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albu, Silviu; Babighian, Gregorio; Amadori, Maurizio; Trabalzini, Franco

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to compare the outcomes of patients with Meniere's disease submitted to either endolymphatic mastoid shunt (ES) or tenotomy of the stapedius and tensor tympani muscles (TSTM). This is a retrospective chart review of patients treated with ES or TSTM between 2000 and 2010 and followed up for at least 12 months. The main outcomes were represented by: (1) vertigo class, hearing stage and functional level according to the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery criteria; (2) adjustment of dizziness handicap inventory (DHI) and (3) complete and substantial vertigo control using the Kaplan-Meier survival method. Sixty-three patients met the inclusion criteria: 34 underwent ES and 29 TSTM. The baseline demographic characteristics, the hearing stage, the functional level, the DHI and hearing levels were not different between the two groups. No significant difference in vertigo class was demonstrated: 66 % of TSTM patients attained class A compared to 44 % in the ES group (p = 0.14). Kaplan-Meier survival curves specific to class A showed significant differences, favoring TSTM (log-rank test, p = 0.022). TSTM patients demonstrated significantly improved functional level (p = 0.0004) and improved DHI scores (p = 0.001). Eight ES patients (25 %) demanded a second surgical attempt compared to none in the TSTM. Aural fullness was significantly improved in TSTM group (p = 0.01), while the difference in tinnitus improvement was non-significant. Hearing preservation was significantly better in TSTM group (p = 0.001). TSTM is a safe surgical procedure, with significant vertigo control rates, and important hearing preservation rates. More patients and longer follow-up are needed to support our preliminary findings.

  13. Application Specific Optical Fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Pal, Bishnu P.

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter we have attempted to provide a unified summary description of the most important propagation characteristics of an optical fiber followed by discussion on several variety of special fibers for realizing fiber amplifiers, dispersion compensating fibers, microstructured optical fibers, and so on. Even though huge progress has been made on development of optical fibers for telecom application, a need for developing special fibers, not necessarily for telecom alone, has arisen. Th...

  14. Fibered F-Algebra

    OpenAIRE

    Kleyn, Aleks

    2007-01-01

    The concept of F-algebra and its representation can be extended to an arbitrary bundle. We define operations of fibered F-algebra in fiber. The paper presents the representation theory of of fibered F-algebra as well as a comparison of representation of F-algebra and of representation of fibered F-algebra.

  15. Photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper; Hansen, K P; Nielsen, M D

    2003-01-01

    Photonic crystal fibers having a complex microstructure in the transverse plane constitute a new and promising class of optical fibers. Such fibers can either guide light through total internal reflection or the photonic bandgap effect, In this paper, we review the different types and applications...... of photonic crystal fibers with particular emphasis on recent advances in the field....

  16. Photonic crystal fibers -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Libori, Stig E. Barkou

    2002-01-01

    . Such micro-structured fibers are the ones most often trated in literature concerning micro-structured fibers. These micro-structured fibers offer a whole range of novel wave guiding characteristics, including the possibility of fibers that guide only one mode irrespective of the frequency of light...

  17. Autotransplante de cordas tendíneas: nova técnica para o tratamento cirúrgico da insuficiência mitral por rotura de cordas tendíneas da cúspide anterior Allotransplantation of chordae tendineae: new technique for the surgical approach of mitral insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Gregori Jr

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available Uma das causas mais freqüentes de prolapso valvar mitral, com conseqüente regurgitação, é a rotura de cordas tendíneas. Várias técnicas têm sido empregadas em tal situação. Entretanto, a substituição valvar mitral tem sido o procedimento mais utilizado. E apresentada uma nova técnica cirúrgica empregada em 4 pacientes com insuficiência valvar mitral severa devido a rotura de cordas tendíneas da cúspide anterior da valva mitral. Um autotransplante de cordas da valva tricúspide para a valva mitral é realizado. Em 2 casos, um retalho é retirado da cúspide anterior da valva tricúspide com cordas tendíneas e parte do músculo papilar correspondente. Nos outros 2 casos a cúspide posterior da valva tricúspide foi retirada, inteiramente, com cordas e músculo papilar. Na primeira variante técnica, a cúspide anterior da valva tricúspide foi reparada e, na segunda, através, da plicatura do anel, a valva tricúspide foi transformada em bicúspide. A peça retirada é transplantada para a valva mitral, sendo suturada a cúspide doadora com a cúspide anterior da valva mitral e o músculo papilar doador com o topo do músculo papilar posterior da valva mitral em 3 casos e com o músculo papilar anterior e 1 caso. Os 4 pacientes foram reestudados clínica e laboratorialmente aos 15, 11, 2 e 1 mês de pós-operatório, respectivamente, com execelente evolução. Apesar da limitada experiência, acreditamos ser esta nova técnica uma boa alternativa para o tratamento cirúrgico da insuficiência mitral por rotura de cordas tendíneas da cúspide anterior.One of the most frequent causes of mitral valve prolapse is rupture of the chordae tendineae. Several techniques have been used to correct severe mitral regurgitation. However, mitral valve replacement is the principal surgical approach to it. We describe a technique used in four patients with marked mitral regurgitation due to ruptured chordae tendineae of the anterior leaflet. We

  18. Fiber optic connector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajic, Slobodan; Muhs, Jeffrey D.

    1996-01-01

    A fiber optic connector and method for connecting composite materials within which optical fibers are imbedded. The fiber optic connector includes a capillary tube for receiving optical fibers at opposing ends. The method involves inserting a first optical fiber into the capillary tube and imbedding the unit in the end of a softened composite material. The capillary tube is injected with a coupling medium which subsequently solidifies. The composite material is machined to a desired configuration. An external optical fiber is then inserted into the capillary tube after fluidizing the coupling medium, whereby the optical fibers are coupled.

  19. Substituição da valva mitral com tração dos músculos papilares em pacientes com miocardiopatia dilatada Mitral valve replacement with chordae tendineae preservation, traction and fixation in end-stage dilated cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Antonio Gaiotto

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a geometria e a função do ventrículo esquerdo (VE após a troca mitral com tração e fixação dos papilares, em portadores de insuficiência cardíaca terminal com insuficiência mitral secundária. MÉTODO: Dos 20 pacientes avaliados, 70% eram homens, com idade média de 50,2 anos e 55% recebiam inotrópicos. A fração de ejeção (FEVE foi menor que 30% em todos; 85% estavam em classe funcional (CF IV. Dezoito receberam próteses de pericárdio bovino e dois, mecânicas. Os períodos considerados foram: 3, 6, 12 e 18 meses. As variáveis consideradas: volume sistólico do VE (VS, a FEVE, os diâmetros sistólico e diastólico finais (DSF e DDF e os volumes sistólico e diastólico finais (VSF e VDF. No estudo estatístico, empregou-se da análise de variância (AV e o teste de Friedmann (F. A sobrevida foi aferida pelo método de Kaplan-Meyer. RESULTADOS: Dois (10% faleceram no período imediato. A sobrevida no primeiro ano foi de 85%, no segundo, 44%, no terceiro, 44%, no quarto, 44% e no quinto, 44%. A comparação entre pré e 3 meses, empregando-se a AV, não revelou alteração significativa para o VS (p=0,086. Houve acréscimo da FEVE (p=0,008 e decréscimo do DDF (p=0,038; do DSF (p=0,008; do VDF (p=0,029 e do VSF (p=0,009. Os momentos pré, 3 e 6 meses, com o teste F, não revelaram alterações. Entre os momentos pré, 3 meses e final, empregando-se a AV, não houve significância. CONCLUSÃO: Há melhora da FEVE, dos VDF, VSF, DDF e DSF; até o terceiro mês. A partir de então, as variáveis permanecem estáveis.OBJECTIVE: This study aimed at evaluating results of mitral valve replacement using a new technique of complete chordae tendineae adjustment for left ventricular remodeling. METHODS: Twenty end-stage idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy patients with severe functional mitral valve regurgitation underwent mitral valve replacement. Seventeen (85% were in functional class IV. Both anterior and posterior

  20. Nonlinear Photonic Crystal Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Per

    2004-01-01

    Despite the general recession in the global economy and the collapse of the optical telecommunication market, research within specialty fibers is thriving. This is, more than anything else, due to the technology transition from standard all-glass fibers to photonic crystal fibers, which, instead....... The freedom to design the dispersion profile of the fibers is much larger and it is possible to create fibers, which support only a single spatial mode, regardless of wavelength. In comparison, the standard dispersion-shifted fibers are limited by a much lower index-contrast between the core and the cladding...... in 1996, and are today on their way to become the dominating technology within the specialty fiber field. Whether they will replace the standard fiber in the more traditional areas like telecommunication transmission, is not yet clear, but the nonlinear photonic crystal fibers are here to stay....

  1. Optical Fiber Fusion Splicing

    CERN Document Server

    Yablon, Andrew D

    2005-01-01

    This book is an up-to-date treatment of optical fiber fusion splicing incorporating all the recent innovations in the field. It provides a toolbox of general strategies and specific techniques that the reader can apply when optimizing fusion splices between novel fibers. It specifically addresses considerations important for fusion splicing of contemporary specialty fibers including dispersion compensating fiber, erbium-doped gain fiber, polarization maintaining fiber, and microstructured fiber. Finally, it discusses the future of optical fiber fusion splicing including silica and non-silica based optical fibers as well as the trend toward increasing automation. Whilst serving as a self-contained reference work, abundant citations from the technical literature will enable readers to readily locate primary sources.

  2. Amplitude-modulated fiber-ring laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caputo, J. G.; Clausen, Carl A. Balslev; Sørensen, Mads Peter

    2000-01-01

    Soliton pulses generated by a fiber-ring laser are investigated by numerical simulation and perturbation methods. The mathematical modeling is based on the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with perturbative terms. We show that active mode locking with an amplitude modulator leads to a self......-starting of stable solitonic pulses from small random noise, provided the modulation depth is small. The perturbative analysis leads to a nonlinear coupled return map for the amplitude, phase, and position of the soliton pulses circulating in the fiber-ring laser. We established the validity of this approach...

  3. Ceramic fiber reinforced filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinton, David P.; McLaughlin, Jerry C.; Lowden, Richard A.

    1991-01-01

    A filter for removing particulate matter from high temperature flowing fluids, and in particular gases, that is reinforced with ceramic fibers. The filter has a ceramic base fiber material in the form of a fabric, felt, paper of the like, with the refractory fibers thereof coated with a thin layer of a protective and bonding refractory applied by chemical vapor deposition techniques. This coating causes each fiber to be physically joined to adjoining fibers so as to prevent movement of the fibers during use and to increase the strength and toughness of the composite filter. Further, the coating can be selected to minimize any reactions between the constituents of the fluids and the fibers. A description is given of the formation of a composite filter using a felt preform of commercial silicon carbide fibers together with the coating of these fibers with pure silicon carbide. Filter efficiency approaching 100% has been demonstrated with these filters. The fiber base material is alternately made from aluminosilicate fibers, zirconia fibers and alumina fibers. Coating with Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 is also described. Advanced configurations for the composite filter are suggested.

  4. Steel fiber reinforced concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baloch, S.U.

    2005-01-01

    Steel-Fiber Reinforced Concrete is constructed by adding short fibers of small cross-sectional size .to the fresh concrete. These fibers reinforce the concrete in all directions, as they are randomly oriented. The improved mechanical properties of concrete include ductility, impact-resistance, compressive, tensile and flexural strength and abrasion-resistance. These uniqlte properties of the fiber- reinforcement can be exploited to great advantage in concrete structural members containing both conventional bar-reinforcement and steel fibers. The improvements in mechanical properties of cementitious materials resulting from steel-fiber reinforcement depend on the type, geometry, volume fraction and material-properties of fibers, the matrix mix proportions and the fiber-matrix interfacial bond characteristics. Effects of steel fibers on the mechanical properties of concrete have been investigated in this paper through a comprehensive testing-programme, by varying the fiber volume fraction and the aspect-ratio (Lid) of fibers. Significant improvements are observed in compressive, tensile, flexural strength and impact-resistance of concrete, accompanied by marked improvement in ductility. optimum fiber-volume fraction and aspect-ratio of steel fibers is identified. Test results are analyzed in details and relevant conclusions drawn. The research is finally concluded with future research needs. (author)

  5. Fiber optics in adverse environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyous, P.B.

    1982-01-01

    Radiation effects in optical fibers are considered, taking into account recent progress in the investigation of radiation resistant optical fibers, radiation damage in optical fibers, radiation-induced transient absorption in optical fibers, X-ray-induced transient attenuation at low temperatures in polymer clad silica (PCS) fibers, optical fiber composition and radiation hardness, the response of irradiated optical waveguides at low temperatures, and the effect of ionizing radiation on fiber-optic waveguides. Other topics explored are related to environmental effects on components of fiber optic systems, and radiation detection systems using optical fibers. Fiber optic systems in adverse environments are also discussed, giving attention to the survivability of Army fiber optics systems, space application of fiber optics systems, fiber optic wavelength multiplexing for civil aviation applications, a new fiber optic data bus topology, fiber optics for aircraft engine/inlet control, and application of fiber optics in high voltage substations

  6. Fiber Optics Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, William E.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses various applications of fiber optics technology: information systems, industrial robots, medicine, television, transportation, and training. Types of jobs that will be available with fiber optics training (such as electricians and telephone cable installers and splicers) are examined. (CT)

  7. Fiber Optics Instrumentation Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Patrick Hon Man; Parker, Allen R., Jr.; Richards, W. Lance

    2010-01-01

    This is a general presentation of fiber optics instrumentation development work being conducted at NASA Dryden for the past 10 years and recent achievements in the field of fiber optics strain sensors.

  8. Shaped fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnan, Mark K.; Roach, Dennis P.

    2017-12-05

    A composite article is disclosed that has non-circular fibers embedded in a polymer matrix. The composite article has improved damage tolerance, toughness, bending, and impact resistance compared to composites having traditional round fibers.

  9. Advances in Fiber Lasers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morse, T

    1999-01-01

    Most of the time of this contract has been devoted toward improvements in optical fiber lasers and toward gathering experience to improve our program in high power, cladding pumped optical fiber lasers...

  10. Hierarchically Structured Electrospun Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-07

    in the natural lotus and silver ragwort leaves. Figure 4. Examples of electrospun bio-mimics of natural hierarchical structures. (A) Lotus leaf...B) pillared poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) electrospun fiber mimic; (C) silver ragwort leaf; (D) electrospun fiber mimic made from nylon 6 and...domains containing the protein in the surrounding EVA fibers [115]. A wide variety of core-shell fibers have been generated, including PCL/ gelatin

  11. Superlattice Microstructured Optical Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Ming-Leung Vincent; Liu, Zhengyong; Cho, Lok-Hin; Lu, Chao; Wai, Ping-Kong Alex; Tam, Hwa-Yaw

    2014-01-01

    A generic three-stage stack-and-draw method is demonstrated for the fabrication of complex-microstructured optical fibers. We report the fabrication and characterization of a silica superlattice microstructured fiber with more than 800 rhomboidally arranged air-holes. A polarization-maintaining fiber with a birefringence of 8.5 × 10−4 is demonstrated. The birefringent property of the fiber is found to be highly insensitive to external environmental effects, such as pressure. PMID:28788693

  12. High-fiber foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000193.htm High-fiber foods To use the sharing features on this page, ... Read food labels carefully to see how much fiber they have. Choose foods that have higher amounts of fiber, such as ...

  13. Resonant filtered fiber amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Laurila, Marko; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present our recent result on utilizing resonant/bandgap fiber designs to achieve high performance ytterbium doped fiber amplifers for achieving diffraction limited beam quality in large mode area fibers, robust bending performance and gain shaping for long wavelength operation...

  14. Fiber Singular Optics

    OpenAIRE

    A. V. Volyar

    2002-01-01

    The present review is devoted to the optical vortex behavior both in free space and optical fibers. The processes of the vortex transformations in perturbed optical fibers are analyzed on the base of the operator of the spin – orbit interaction in order to forecast the possible ways of manufacturing the vortex preserving fibers and their applications in supersensitive optical devices.

  15. Superconducting tin core fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homa, Daniel; Liang, Yongxuan; Hill, Cary; Kaur, Gurbinder; Pickrell, Gary

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrated superconductivity in a fiber with a tin core and fused silica cladding. The fibers were fabricated via a modified melt-draw technique and maintained core diameters ranging from 50-300 microns and overall diameters of 125-800 microns. Superconductivity of this fiber design was validated via the traditional four-probe test method in a bath of liquid helium at temperatures on the order of 3.8 K. The synthesis route and fiber design are perquisites to ongoing research dedicated all-fiber optoelectronics and the relationships between superconductivity and the material structures, as well as corresponding fabrication techniques. (orig.)

  16. Airclad fiber laser technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim P.; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Broeng, Jes

    2011-01-01

    High-power fiber lasers and amplifiers have gained tremendous momentum in the last 5 years. Many of the traditional manufacturers of gas and solid-state lasers are now pursuing the fiber-based systems, which are displacing the conventional technology in many areas. High-power fiber laser systems...... require reliable fibers with large cores, stable mode quality, and good power handling capabilities-requirements that are all met by the airclad fiber technology. In the present paper we go through many of the building blocks needed to build high-power systems and we show an example of a complete airclad...... laser system. We present the latest advancements within airclad fiber technology including a new 100 m single-mode polarization-maintaining rod-type fiber capable of amplifying to megawatt power levels. Furthermore, we describe the novel airclad-based pump combiners and their use in a completely...

  17. Airclad fiber laser technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim P.; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Broeng, Jes

    2008-01-01

    High-power fiber lasers and amplifiers have gained tremendous momentum in the last five years, and many of the traditional manufactures of gas and solid-state lasers are pursuing the attractive fiber-based systems, which are now displacing the old technology in many areas. High-power fiber laser...... systems require specially designed fibers with large cores and good power handling capabilities - requirements that are all met by the airclad fiber technology. In the present paper we go through many of the building blocks needed to build high-power systems and we show an example of a complete airclad...... laser system. We present the latest advancements within airclad fiber technology including a new 70 μm single-mode polarization-maintaining rod-type fiber capable of amplifying to MW power levels. Furthermore we describe the novel airclad based pump combiners and their use in a completely monolithic 350...

  18. Hierarchically Structured Electrospun Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole E. Zander

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional electrospun nanofibers have a myriad of applications ranging from scaffolds for tissue engineering to components of biosensors and energy harvesting devices. The generally smooth one-dimensional structure of the fibers has stood as a limitation to several interesting novel applications. Control of fiber diameter, porosity and collector geometry will be briefly discussed, as will more traditional methods for controlling fiber morphology and fiber mat architecture. The remainder of the review will focus on new techniques to prepare hierarchically structured fibers. Fibers with hierarchical primary structures—including helical, buckled, and beads-on-a-string fibers, as well as fibers with secondary structures, such as nanopores, nanopillars, nanorods, and internally structured fibers and their applications—will be discussed. These new materials with helical/buckled morphology are expected to possess unique optical and mechanical properties with possible applications for negative refractive index materials, highly stretchable/high-tensile-strength materials, and components in microelectromechanical devices. Core-shell type fibers enable a much wider variety of materials to be electrospun and are expected to be widely applied in the sensing, drug delivery/controlled release fields, and in the encapsulation of live cells for biological applications. Materials with a hierarchical secondary structure are expected to provide new superhydrophobic and self-cleaning materials.

  19. Fiber optics in SHIVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severyn, J.; Parker, J.

    1978-01-01

    SHIVA is a twenty arm laser which is controlled with a network of fifty computers, interconnected with digital fiber optic links. Three different fiber optic systems employed on the Shiva laser will be described. Two of the systems are for digital communications, one at 9600 baud and the other at 1 megabaud. The third system uses fiber optics to distribute diagnostic triggers with subnanosecond jitter

  20. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fareed, Ali [Honeywell Advanced Composites Inc. (HACI), Newark, DE (United States); Craig, Phillip A. [Honeywell Advanced Composites Inc. (HACI), Newark, DE (United States)

    2002-09-01

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites demonstrate the high-temperature stability of ceramics--with an increased fracture toughness resulting from the fiber reinforcement of the composite. The material optimization performed under the continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) included a series of systematic optimizations. The overall goals were to define the processing window, to increase the robustinous of the process, to increase process yield while reducing costs, and to define the complexity of parts that could be fabricated.

  1. Agave Americana Leaf Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Hulle

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The growing environmental problems, the problem of waste disposal and the depletion of non-renewable resources have stimulated the use of green materials compatible with the environment to reduce environmental impacts. Therefore, there is a need to design products by using natural resources. Natural fibers seem to be a good alternative since they are abundantly available and there are a number of possibilities to use all the components of a fiber-yielding crop; one such fiber-yielding plant is Agave Americana. The leaves of this plant yield fibers and all the parts of this plant can be utilized in many applications. The “zero-waste” utilization of the plant would enable its production and processing to be translated into a viable and sustainable industry. Agave Americana fibers are characterized by low density, high tenacity and high moisture absorbency in comparison with other leaf fibers. These fibers are long and biodegradable. Therefore, we can look this fiber as a sustainable resource for manufacturing and technical applications. Detailed discussion is carried out on extraction, characterization and applications of Agave Americana fiber in this paper.

  2. USDA Flax fiber utilization research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The United States is pursuing natural fibers as sustainable, environmentally friendly sources for a variety of industrial applications. Flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) fiber offers many possibilities towards this goal. Research on flax fiber production, processing, and standards development is urgen...

  3. Ultrafine PBI fibers and yarns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, J. R.; Tan, M.

    1979-01-01

    Gentle precisely controlled process is used to draw polybenzimidazole (PBI) fibers to denier as low as 0.17 per fiber. Yarns of lightweight fibers could be useful in applications where lightweight textiles must withstand high temperatures, corrosion, or radiation.

  4. Applications of nonlinear fiber optics

    CERN Document Server

    Agrawal, Govind

    2008-01-01

    * The only book describing applications of nonlinear fiber optics * Two new chapters on the latest developments: highly nonlinear fibers and quantum applications* Coverage of biomedical applications* Problems provided at the end of each chapterThe development of new highly nonlinear fibers - referred to as microstructured fibers, holey fibers and photonic crystal fibers - is the next generation technology for all-optical signal processing and biomedical applications. This new edition has been thoroughly updated to incorporate these key technology developments.The bo

  5. Multimode optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigot-Astruc, Marianne; Molin, Denis; Sillard, Pierre

    2014-11-04

    A depressed graded-index multimode optical fiber includes a central core, an inner depressed cladding, a depressed trench, an outer depressed cladding, and an outer cladding. The central core has an alpha-index profile. The depressed claddings limit the impact of leaky modes on optical-fiber performance characteristics (e.g., bandwidth, core size, and/or numerical aperture).

  6. Fiber Lasers V

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim P.; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Broeng, Jes

    2008-01-01

    laser system. We present the latest advancements within airclad fiber technology including a new 70 μm single-mode polarization-maintaining rod-type fiber capable of amplifying to MW power levels. Furthermore we describe the novel airclad based pump combiners and their use in a completely monolithic 350...

  7. Fiber Sensor Technology Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotate, Kazuo

    2006-08-01

    Fiber sensor technologies are overviewed. Since the early 1970s, this field has been developed, on the basis of the same devices and photonic principles as fiber communication technologies. Besides simple configurations, in which the fiber acts only as a data transmission line, sophisticated configurations have also been developed, in which the fiber is used as a device to realize unique sensing mechanisms. The fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) is a good example, and has been developed as an absolute rotation sensor used, for example, for navigation and/or attitude control applications. Compared with traditional spinning-mass gyroscopes, the FOG has advantages, such as a short warming-up time, a light weight, and easy handling. A Japanese satellite, which was launched in August 2005 with a mission to observe the aurora, is controlled with a FOG. The FOG has also been used in consumer applications, such as the camera stabilizer, radio-controlled (RC) helicopter navigation, and the control of humanoid robots. Recently, distributed and multiplexed sensing schemes, in particular, have been studied and developed, in which a long fiber acts like a “nerve” for feeling the strain and/or the temperature distribution along the fiber. Performances of artificial nerve systems have markedly improved within the last couple of years, in spatial resolution and measurement speed. By embedding the “fiber-optic nerve system” in aircraft wings, bridges and tall buildings, these materials and structures can sense damage to prevent disasters.

  8. Ways to Boost Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can help to lower cholesterol. Third, it helps prevent constipation and diverticulosis. And fourth, adequate fiber from food ... is similar to a new sponge; it needs water to plump up pass smoothly. If you ... or constipation. Before you reach for the fiber supplements, consider ...

  9. Quartz fiber calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akchurin, N.; Doulas, S.; Ganel, O.; Gershtein, Y.; Gavrilov, V.; Kolosov, V.; Kuleshov, S.; Litvinsev, D.; Merlo, J.-P.; Onel, Y.; Osborne, D.; Rosowsky, A.; Stolin, V.; Sulak, L.; Sullivan, J.; Ulyanov, A.; Wigmans, R.; Winn, D.

    1996-01-01

    A calorimeter with optical quartz fibers embedded into an absorber matrix was proposed for the small angle region of the CMS detector at LHC (CERN). This type of calorimeter is expected to be radiation hard and to produce extremely fast signal. Some results from beam tests of the quartz fiber calorimeter prototype are presented. (orig.)

  10. High-density multicore fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takenaga, K.; Matsuo, S.; Saitoh, K.

    2016-01-01

    High-density single-mode multicore fibers were designed and fabricated. A heterogeneous 30-core fiber realized a low crosstalk of −55 dB. A quasi-single-mode homogeneous 31-core fiber attained the highest core count as a single-mode multicore fiber.......High-density single-mode multicore fibers were designed and fabricated. A heterogeneous 30-core fiber realized a low crosstalk of −55 dB. A quasi-single-mode homogeneous 31-core fiber attained the highest core count as a single-mode multicore fiber....

  11. Green insulation: hemp fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon,

    2011-09-15

    Indian hemp (Cannabis indica) is known for its psychotropic values and it is banned in most countries. However, industrial hemp (Cannabis sativa) is known for its tough fibers. Several manufactures in Europe including, small niche players, have been marketing hemp insulation products for several years. Hemp is a low environmental impact material. Neither herbicide nor pesticide is used during the growth of hemp. The fibers are extracted in a waste-free and chemical-free mechanical process. Hemp can consume CO2 during its growth. In addition, hemp fiber can be disposed of harmlessly by composting or incineration at the end of its life. Hemp fibers are processed and treated only minimally to resist rot and fungal activity. There is little health risk when producing and installing the insulation, thanks to the absence of toxic additive. Its thermal resistance is comparable to mineral wool. But the development and marketing of hemp fibers may be restricted in North America.

  12. Raman fiber lasers

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book serves as a comprehensive, up-to-date reference about this cutting-edge laser technology and its many new and interesting developments. Various aspects and trends of Raman fiber lasers are described in detail by experts in their fields. Raman fiber lasers have progressed quickly in the past decade, and have emerged as a versatile laser technology for generating high power light sources covering a spectral range from visible to mid-infrared. The technology is already being applied in the fields of telecommunication, astronomy, cold atom physics, laser spectroscopy, environmental sensing, and laser medicine. This book covers various topics relating to Raman fiber laser research, including power scaling, cladding and diode pumping, cascade Raman shifting, single frequency operation and power amplification, mid-infrared laser generation, specialty optical fibers, and random distributed feedback Raman fiber lasers. The book will appeal to scientists, students, and technicians seeking to understand the re...

  13. Birefringent hollow core fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roberts, John

    2007-01-01

    Hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF), fabricated according to a nominally non-birefringent design, shows a degree of un-controlled birefringence or polarization mode dispersion far in excess of conventional non polarization maintaining fibers. This can degrade the output pulse in many...... applications, and places emphasis on the development of polarization maintaining (PM) HC-PCF. The polarization cross-coupling characteristics of PM HC-PCF are very different from those of conventional PM fibers. The former fibers have the advantage of suffering far less from stress-field fluctuations...... and an increased overlap between the polarization modes at the glass interfaces. The interplay between these effects leads to a wavelength for optimum polarization maintenance, lambda(PM), which is detuned from the wavelength of highest birefringence. By a suitable fiber design involving antiresonance of the core...

  14. Fiber optic hydrophone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmenko, Paul J.; Davis, Donald T.

    1994-01-01

    A miniature fiber optic hydrophone based on the principles of a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The hydrophone, in one embodiment, includes a body having a shaped flexible bladder at one end which defines a volume containing air or suitable gas, and including a membrane disposed adjacent a vent. An optic fiber extends into the body with one end terminating in spaced relation to the membrane. Acoustic waves in the water that impinge on the bladder cause the pressure of the volume therein to vary causing the membrane to deflect and modulate the reflectivity of the Fabry-Perot cavity formed by the membrane surface and the cleaved end of the optical fiber disposed adjacent to the membrane. When the light is transmitted down the optical fiber, the reflected signal is amplitude modulated by the incident acoustic wave. Another embodiment utilizes a fluid filled volume within which the fiber optic extends.

  15. Method for the preparation of carbon fiber from polyolefin fiber precursor, and carbon fibers made thereby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naskar, Amit Kumar; Hunt, Marcus Andrew; Saito, Tomonori

    2015-08-04

    Methods for the preparation of carbon fiber from polyolefin fiber precursor, wherein the polyolefin fiber precursor is partially sulfonated and then carbonized to produce carbon fiber. Methods for producing hollow carbon fibers, wherein the hollow core is circular- or complex-shaped, are also described. Methods for producing carbon fibers possessing a circular- or complex-shaped outer surface, which may be solid or hollow, are also described.

  16. Fiber Pulling Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Gary L.; Smith, Guy A.; OBrien, Sue; Adcock, Leonard

    1998-01-01

    The fiber optics industry has grown into a multi-billion marketplace that will continue to grow into the 21st century. Optical fiber communications is currently dominated by silica glass technology. Successful efforts to improve upon the low loss transmission characteristics of silica fibers have propelled the technology into the forefront of the communications industry. However, reaching the theoretical transmission capability of silica fiber through improved processing has still left a few application areas in which other fiber systems can provide an influential role due to specific characteristics of high theoretical transmission in the 2 - 3 micron wavelength region. One of the other major materials used for optical fibers is the systems based upon Heavy Metal Fluoride Glass (HMFG). Commercial interest is driven primarily by the potential for low loss repeaterless infrared fibers. An example of the major communications marketplace which would benefit from the long distance repeaterless capability of infrared fibers is the submarine cables which link the continents. When considering commercial interests, optical fiber systems provide a healthy industrial position which continues to expand. Major investments in the systems used for optical fiber communications have continued to increase each year and are predicted to continue well into the next century. Estimates of 8.5% compounded annually are predicted through 1999 for the North American market and 1 1 % worldwide. The growth for the optical fiber cable itself is expected to continue between 44 and 50 per cent of the optical fiber communications budget through 1999. The total budget in 1999 world-wide is expected to be in the neighborhood of $9 billion. Another survey predicts that long haul telecommunications represents 15% of a world-wide fiber optics market in 1998. The actual amount allotted to cable was not specified. However, another market research had predicted that the cable costs alone represents more

  17. Fiber Optic Microphone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Y. C.; George, Thomas; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Research into advanced pressure sensors using fiber-optic technology is aimed at developing compact size microphones. Fiber optic sensors are inherently immune to electromagnetic noise, and are very sensitive, light weight, and highly flexible. In FY 98, NASA researchers successfully designed and assembled a prototype fiber-optic microphone. The sensing technique employed was fiber optic Fabry-Perot interferometry. The sensing head is composed of an optical fiber terminated in a miniature ferrule with a thin, silicon-microfabricated diaphragm mounted on it. The optical fiber is a single mode fiber with a core diameter of 8 micron, with the cleaved end positioned 50 micron from the diaphragm surface. The diaphragm is made up of a 0.2 micron thick silicon nitride membrane whose inner surface is metallized with layers of 30 nm titanium, 30 nm platinum, and 0.2 micron gold for efficient reflection. The active sensing area is approximately 1.5 mm in diameter. The measured differential pressure tolerance of this diaphragm is more than 1 bar, yielding a dynamic range of more than 100 dB.

  18. Optical fiber spectrophotometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang Weixin; Tian Guocheng; Ye Guoan; Zhou Zhihong; Cheng Weiwei; Huang Lifeng; Liu Suying; Tang Yanji; Hu Jingxin; Zhao Yonggang

    1998-12-01

    A method called 'Two Arm's Photo out and Electricity Send-back' is introduced. UV-365 UV/VIS/NIR spectrophotometer has been reequipped by this way with 5 meters long optical fiber. Another method called 'One Arm's Photo out and Photo Send-back' is also introduced. λ 19 UV/VIS/NIR spectrophotometer has been reequipped by this way with 10 meters long optical fiber. Optical fiber spectrophotometer can work as its main set. So it is particularly applicable to radio activity work

  19. Chemistry Research of Optical Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-27

    BROADENING IN OPTICAL FIBERS Herbert B. Rosenstock* Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375 ABSTRACT A light pulse transmitted through a fiber...Marcatili, Marcuse , and Personick, "Dispersion Properties of Fibers" (Ch. 4 in "Optical Fiber Telecommunications," S. E. Miller and A. C. Chynoweth, eds

  20. Robust fiber clustering of cerebral fiber bundles in white matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xufeng; Wang, Yongxiong; Zhuang, Songlin

    2014-11-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging fiber tracking (DTI-FT) has been widely accepted in the diagnosis and treatment of brain diseases. During the rendering pipeline of specific fiber tracts, the image noise and low resolution of DTI would lead to false propagations. In this paper, we propose a robust fiber clustering (FC) approach to diminish false fibers from one fiber tract. Our algorithm consists of three steps. Firstly, the optimized fiber assignment continuous tracking (FACT) is implemented to reconstruct one fiber tract; and then each curved fiber in the fiber tract is mapped to a point by kernel principal component analysis (KPCA); finally, the point clouds of fiber tract are clustered by hierarchical clustering which could distinguish false fibers from true fibers in one tract. In our experiment, the corticospinal tract (CST) in one case of human data in vivo was used to validate our method. Our method showed reliable capability in decreasing the false fibers in one tract. In conclusion, our method could effectively optimize the visualization of fiber bundles and would help a lot in the field of fiber evaluation.

  1. Fiber optics standard dictionary

    CERN Document Server

    Weik, Martin H

    1997-01-01

    Fiber Optics Vocabulary Development In 1979, the National Communications System published Technical InfonnationBulle­ tin TB 79-1, Vocabulary for Fiber Optics and Lightwave Communications, written by this author. Based on a draft prepared by this author, the National Communications System published Federal Standard FED-STD-1037, Glossary of Telecommunications Terms, in 1980 with no fiber optics tenns. In 1981, the first edition of this dictionary was published under the title Fiber Optics and Lightwave Communications Standard Dictionary. In 1982, the then National Bureau of Standards, now the National Institute of Standards and Technology, published NBS Handbook 140, Optical Waveguide Communications Glossary, which was also published by the General Services Admin­ istration as PB82-166257 under the same title. Also in 1982, Dynamic Systems, Inc. , Fiberoptic Sensor Technology Handbook, co-authored and edited by published the this author, with an extensive Fiberoptic Sensors Glossary. In 1989, the handbook w...

  2. Fiber Optics: No Illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American School and University, 1983

    1983-01-01

    A campus computer center at Hofstra University (New York) that holds 70 terminals for student use was first a gymnasium, then a language laboratory. Strands of fiber optics are used for the necessary wiring. (MLF)

  3. Fiber optic gas sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng (Inventor); Buric, Michael P. (Inventor); Swinehart, Philip R. (Inventor); Maklad, Mokhtar S. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A gas sensor includes an in-fiber resonant wavelength device provided in a fiber core at a first location. The fiber propagates a sensing light and a power light. A layer of a material is attached to the fiber at the first location. The material is able to absorb the gas at a temperature dependent gas absorption rate. The power light is used to heat the material and increases the gas absorption rate, thereby increasing sensor performance, especially at low temperatures. Further, a method is described of flash heating the gas sensor to absorb more of the gas, allowing the sensor to cool, thereby locking in the gas content of the sensor material, and taking the difference between the starting and ending resonant wavelengths as an indication of the concentration of the gas in the ambient atmosphere.

  4. Photonic Crystal Fibers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kristiansen, Rene E

    2005-01-01

    This report results from a contract tasking Crystal Fibre A/S as follows: Crystal Fibre will conduct research and development of large mode area, dual clad multi-core Yb-doped photonic crystal fiber...

  5. Fiber Laser Array

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Simpson, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    ...., field-dependent, loss within the coupled laser array. During this program, Jaycor focused on the construction and use of an experimental apparatus that can be used to investigate the coherent combination of an array of fiber lasers...

  6. Robust Fiber Coatings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goettler, Richard

    2002-01-01

    The highly desired ceramic matrix composite is the one in which the high strength and strain-to-failure is achieved through judicious selection of a fiber coating that can survive the high-temperature...

  7. Fiber Optic Bragg Gratings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Battiato, James

    1998-01-01

    Coupled mode theory was used to model reflection fiber gratings. The effects of experimental parameters on grating characteristics were modeled for both uniform and non-uniform grating profiles using this approach...

  8. Cerenkov fiber sampling calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrington, K.; Kefford, D.; Kennedy, J.; Pisani, R.; Sanzeni, C.; Segall, K.; Wall, D.; Winn, D.R.; Carey, R.; Dye, S.; Miller, J.; Sulak, L.; Worstell, W.; Efremenko, Y.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Savin, A.; Shmakov, K.; Tarkovsky, E.

    1994-01-01

    Clear optical fibers were used as a Cerenkov sampling media in Pb (electromagnetic) and Cu (hadron) absorbers in spaghetti calorimeters, for high rate and high radiation dose experiments, such as the forward region of high energy colliders. The fiber axes were aligned close to the direction of the incident particles (1 degree--7 degree). The 7 λ deep hadron tower contained 2.8% by volume 1.5 mm diameter core clear plastic fibers. The 27 radiation length deep electromagnetic towers had packing fractions of 6.8% and 7.2% of 1 mm diameter core quartz fibers as the active Cerenkov sampling medium. The energy resolution on electrons and pions, energy response, pulse shapes and angular studies are presented

  9. Fiber optics welder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, R.W.; Robichaud, R.E.

    A system is described for welding fiber optic waveguides together. The ends of the two fibers to be joined together are accurately, collinearly aligned in a vertical orientation and subjected to a controlled, diffuse arc to effect welding and thermal conditioning. A front-surfaced mirror mounted at a 45/sup 0/ angle to the optical axis of a stereomicroscope mounted for viewing the junction of the ends provides two orthogonal views of the interface during the alignment operation.

  10. FIBER OPTIC LIGHTING SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munir BATUR

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently there have been many important and valuable developments in the communication industry. The huge increase in the sound, data and visual communications has caused a parallel increase in the demand for systems with wider capacity, higher speed and higher quality. Communication systems that use light to transfer data are immensely increased. There have recently many systems in which glass or plastic fiber cables were developed for light wave to be transmitted from a source to a target place. Fiber optic systems, are nowadays widely used in energy transmission control systems, medicine, industry and lighting. The basics of the system is, movement of light from one point to another point in fiber cable with reflections. Fiber optic lighting systems are quite secure than other lighting systems and have flexibility for realizing many different designs. This situation makes fiber optics an alternative for other lighting systems. Fiber optic lighting systems usage is increasing day-by-day in our life. In this article, these systems are discussed in detail.

  11. Electrospun amplified fiber optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morello, Giovanni; Camposeo, Andrea; Moffa, Maria; Pisignano, Dario

    2015-03-11

    All-optical signal processing is the focus of much research aiming to obtain effective alternatives to existing data transmission platforms. Amplification of light in fiber optics, such as in Erbium-doped fiber amplifiers, is especially important for efficient signal transmission. However, the complex fabrication methods involving high-temperature processes performed in a highly pure environment slow the fabrication process and make amplified components expensive with respect to an ideal, high-throughput, room temperature production. Here, we report on near-infrared polymer fiber amplifiers working over a band of ∼20 nm. The fibers are cheap, spun with a process entirely carried out at room temperature, and shown to have amplified spontaneous emission with good gain coefficients and low levels of optical losses (a few cm(-1)). The amplification process is favored by high fiber quality and low self-absorption. The found performance metrics appear to be suitable for short-distance operations, and the large variety of commercially available doping dyes might allow for effective multiwavelength operations by electrospun amplified fiber optics.

  12. Continuous Natural Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastic Composites by Fiber Surface Modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patcharat Wongsriraksa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuous natural fiber reinforced thermoplastic materials are expected to replace inorganic fiber reinforced thermosetting materials. However, in the process of fabricating the composite, it is difficult to impregnate the thermoplastic resin into reinforcement fiber because of the high melt viscosity. Therefore, intermediate material, which allows high impregnation during molding, has been investigated for fabricating continuous fiber reinforced thermoplastic composite by aligning resin fiber alongside reinforcing fiber with braiding technique. This intermediate material has been called “microbraid yarn (MBY.” Moreover, it is well known that the interfacial properties between natural fiber and resin are low; therefore, surface treatment on continuous natural fiber was performed by using polyurethane (PU and flexible epoxy (FLEX to improve the interfacial properties. The effect of surface treatment on the mechanical properties of continuous natural fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites was examined. From these results, it was suggested that surface treatment by PU with low content could produce composites with better mechanical properties.

  13. Thulium fiber laser lithotripsy using a muzzle brake fiber tip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchens, Thomas C.; Gonzalez, David A.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2017-02-01

    The Thulium fiber laser (TFL) is being explored as an alternative to Holmium:YAG laser for lithotripsy. TFL beam profile allows coupling of higher power into smaller fibers than multimode Holmium laser beam, without proximal fiber tip degradation. A smaller fiber provides more space in ureteroscope working channel for increased saline irrigation and allows maximum ureteroscope flexion. However, distal fiber tip burnback increases as fiber diameter decreases. Previous studies utilizing hollow steel sheaths around recessed distal fiber tips reduced fiber burnback, but increased retropulsion. In this study, a "fiber muzzle brake" was tested for reducing fiber burnback and stone retropulsion. TFL lithotripsy studies were performed at 1908 nm, 35 mJ, 500 μs, and 300 Hz using a 100-μm-core fiber. The optimal stainless steel muzzle brake tip tested consisted of a 1-cm-long, 560-μm-OD, 360-μm-ID tube with 275-μm thru hole located 250-μm from the distal end. The fiber tip was recessed a distance of 500 μm. Stone phantom retropulsion, fiber tip burnback, and calcium oxalate stone ablation studies were performed, ex vivo. Small stones with a mass of 40 +/- 4 mg and 4-mm-diameter were ablated over a 1.5-mm sieve in 25 +/- 4 s (n=10), without distal fiber tip burnback. Reduction in stone phantom retropulsion distance by 50% and 85% was observed when using muzzle brake tips versus 100-μm-core bare fibers and hollow steel tip fibers. The muzzle brake fiber tip provided efficient stone ablation, reduced stone retropulsion, and minimal fiber degradation during TFL lithotripsy.

  14. Cellulosic Fibers: Effect of Processing on Fiber Bundle Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Anders; Madsen, Bo; Thomsen, Anne Belinda

    2011-01-01

    A range of differently processed cellulosic fibers from flax and hemp plants were investigated to study the relation between processing of cellulosic fibers and fiber bundle strength. The studied processing methods are applied for yarn production and include retting, scutching, carding, and cotto......A range of differently processed cellulosic fibers from flax and hemp plants were investigated to study the relation between processing of cellulosic fibers and fiber bundle strength. The studied processing methods are applied for yarn production and include retting, scutching, carding...

  15. Study on basalt fiber parameters affecting fiber-reinforced mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, A. A.; Chernykh, T. N.; Sashina, A. V.; Bogusevich, D. V.

    2015-01-01

    This article considers the effect of different dosages and diameters of basalt fibers on tensile strength increase during bending of fiberboard-reinforced mortar samples. The optimal dosages of fiber, providing maximum strength in bending are revealed. The durability of basalt fiber in an environment of cement, by means of microscopic analysis of samples of fibers and fiberboard-reinforced mortar long-term tests is examined. The article also compares the behavior of basalt fiber in the cement stone environment to a glass one and reveals that the basalt fiber is not subject to destruction.

  16. Optical fiber stripper positioning apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyfe, Richard W.; Sanchez, Jr., Amadeo

    1990-01-01

    An optical fiber positioning apparatus for an optical fiber stripping device is disclosed which is capable of providing precise axial alignment between an optical fiber to be stripped of its outer jacket and the cutting blades of a stripping device. The apparatus includes a first bore having a width approximately equal to the diameter of an unstripped optical fiber and a counter bore axially aligned with the first bore and dimensioned to precisely receive a portion of the stripping device in axial alignment with notched cutting blades within the stripping device to thereby axially align the notched cutting blades of the stripping device with the axis of the optical fiber to permit the notched cutting blades to sever the jacket on the optical fiber without damaging the cladding on the optical fiber. In a preferred embodiment, the apparatus further includes a fiber stop which permits determination of the length of jacket to be removed from the optical fiber.

  17. Natural Fiber Composites: A Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westman, Matthew P.; Fifield, Leonard S.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Laddha, Sachin; Kafentzis, Tyler A.

    2010-03-07

    The need for renewable fiber reinforced composites has never been as prevalent as it currently is. Natural fibers offer both cost savings and a reduction in density when compared to glass fibers. Though the strength of natural fibers is not as great as glass, the specific properties are comparable. Currently natural fiber composites have two issues that need to be addressed: resin compatibility and water absorption. The following preliminary research has investigated the use of Kenaf, Hibiscus cannabinus, as a possible glass replacement in fiber reinforced composites.

  18. Enhanced radiation resistant fiber optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyons, P.B.; Looney, L.D.

    1993-01-01

    A process for producing an optical fiber having enhanced radiation resistance is provided, the process including maintaining an optical fiber within a hydrogen-containing atmosphere for sufficient time to yield a hydrogen-permeated optical fiber having an elevated internal hydrogen concentration, and irradiating the hydrogen-permeated optical fiber at a time while the optical fiber has an elevated internal hydrogen concentration with a source of ionizing radiation. The radiation source is typically a cobalt-60 source and the fiber is pre-irradiated with a dose level up to about 1000 kilorads of radiation. 4 figures

  19. Fiber-optic technology review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyons, P.B.

    1980-01-01

    A history of fiber technology is presented. The advantages of fiber optics are discussed (bandwidth, cost, weight and size, nonmetallic construction and isolation). Some aspects of the disadvantages of fiber systems briefly discussed are fiber and cable availability, fiber components, radiation effects, receivers and transmitters, and material dispersion. Particular emphasis over the next several years will involve development of fibers and systems optimized for use at wavelengths near 1.3 μm and development of wavelengths multiplexers for simultaneous system operation at several wavelengths

  20. Enhanced radiation resistant fiber optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, P.B.; Looney, L.D.

    1993-11-30

    A process for producing an optical fiber having enhanced radiation resistance is provided, the process including maintaining an optical fiber within a hydrogen-containing atmosphere for sufficient time to yield a hydrogen-permeated optical fiber having an elevated internal hydrogen concentration, and irradiating the hydrogen-permeated optical fiber at a time while the optical fiber has an elevated internal hydrogen concentration with a source of ionizing radiation. The radiation source is typically a cobalt-60 source and the fiber is pre-irradiated with a dose level up to about 1000 kilorads of radiation. 4 figures.

  1. Anisotropic elliptic optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Soon Ahm

    1991-05-01

    The exact characteristic equation for an anisotropic elliptic optical fiber is obtained for odd and even hybrid modes in terms of infinite determinants utilizing Mathieu and modified Mathieu functions. A simplified characteristic equation is obtained by applying the weakly guiding approximation such that the difference in the refractive indices of the core and the cladding is small. The simplified characteristic equation is used to compute the normalized guide wavelength for an elliptical fiber. When the anisotropic parameter is equal to unity, the results are compared with the previous research and they are in close agreement. For a fixed value normalized cross-section area or major axis, the normalized guide wavelength lambda/lambda(sub 0) for an anisotropic elliptic fiber is small for the larger value of anisotropy. This condition indicates that more energy is carried inside of the fiber. However, the geometry and anisotropy of the fiber have a smaller effect when the normalized cross-section area is very small or very large.

  2. Hybrid Fiber Layup and Fiber-Reinforced Polymeric Composites Produced Therefrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnell, Thomas J. (Inventor); Garrigan, Sean P. (Inventor); Rauscher, Michael D. (Inventor); Dietsch, Benjamin A. (Inventor); Cupp, Gary N. (Inventor)

    2018-01-01

    Embodiments of a hybrid fiber layup used to form a fiber-reinforced polymeric composite, and a fiber-reinforced polymeric composite produced therefrom are disclosed. The hybrid fiber layup comprises one or more dry fiber strips and one or more prepreg fiber strips arranged side by side within each layer, wherein the prepreg fiber strips comprise fiber material impregnated with polymer resin and the dry fiber strips comprise fiber material without impregnated polymer resin.

  3. Graphene fiber: a new trend in carbon fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Zhen Xu; Chao Gao

    2015-01-01

    New fibers with increased strength and rich functionalities have been untiringly pursued by materials researchers. In recent years, graphene fiber has arisen as a new carbonaceous fiber with high expectations in terms of mechanical and functional performance. In this review, we elucidated the concept of sprouted graphene fibers, including strategies for their fabrication and their basic structural attributes. We examine the rapid advances in the promotion of mechanical/functional properties o...

  4. Optical fiber switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2002-01-01

    Optical fiber switches operated by electrical activation of at least one laser light modulator through which laser light is directed into at least one polarizer are used for the sequential transport of laser light from a single laser into a plurality of optical fibers. In one embodiment of the invention, laser light from a single excitation laser is sequentially transported to a plurality of optical fibers which in turn transport the laser light to separate individual remotely located laser fuel ignitors. The invention can be operated electro-optically with no need for any mechanical or moving parts, or, alternatively, can be operated electro-mechanically. The invention can be used to switch either pulsed or continuous wave laser light.

  5. Fiber Optic Calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudy, C.; Bayliss, S.; Bracken, D.; Bush, J.; Davis, P.

    1997-01-01

    A twin-bridge calorimeter using optical fiber as the sensor element was constructed and tested. This system demonstrates the principle and capability of using optical fibers for heat-flow measurements of special nuclear material. This calorimeter uses piezoelectric-generated phase-carrier modulation with subsequent electronic signal processes to allow phase shifts as small as 1 microradian (microrad) to be measured. The sensing element consists of 21-m lengths of single-mode optical fiber wrapped around sample and reference chambers. The sensitivity of the calorimeter was determined to be 74 radians (rad) of phase shift per milliwatt of thermal power. One milliwatt of thermal power is equivalent to 400 mg of plutonium (6% 240 Pu). The system noise base was about 0.2 rad, equivalent to about 1 mg of plutonium

  6. Femtosecond Fiber Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Katherine J.

    This thesis focuses on research I have done on ytterbium-doped femtosecond fiber lasers. These lasers operate in the near infrared region, lasing at 1030 nm. This wavelength is particularly important in biomedical applications, which includes but is not limited to confocal microscopy and ablation for surgical incisions. Furthermore, fiber lasers are advantageous compared to solid state lasers in terms of their cost, form factor, and ease of use. Solid state lasers still dominate the market due to their comparatively high energy pulses. High energy pulse generation in fiber lasers is hindered by either optical wave breaking or by multipulsing. One of the main challenges for fiber lasers is to overcome these limitations to achieve high energy pulses. The motivation for the work done in this thesis is increasing the output pulse peak power and energy. The main idea of the work is that decreasing the nonlinearity that acts on the pulse inside the cavity will prevent optical wave breaking, and thus will generate higher energy pulses. By increasing the output energy, ytterbium-doped femtosecond fiber lasers can be competitive with solid state lasers which are used commonly in research. Although fiber lasers tend to lack the wavelength tuning ability of solid state lasers, many biomedical applications take advantage of the 1030 microm central wavelength of ytterbium-doped fiber lasers, so the major limiting factor of fiber lasers in this field is simply the output power. By increasing the output energy without resorting to external amplification, the cavity is optimized and cost can remain low and economical. During verification of the main idea, the cavity was examined for possible back-reflections and for components with narrow spectral bandwidths which may have contributed to the presence of multipulsing. Distinct cases of multipulsing, bound pulse and harmonic mode-locking, were observed and recorded as they may be of more interest in the future. The third

  7. Higher Order Mode Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Israelsen, Stine Møller

    This PhD thesis considers higher order modes (HOMs) in optical fibers. That includes their excitation and characteristics. Within the last decades, HOMs have been applied both for space multiplexing in optical communications, group velocity dispersion management and sensing among others......-radial polarization as opposed to the linear polarization of the LP0X modes. The effect is investigated numerically in a double cladding fiber with an outer aircladding using a full vectorial modesolver. Experimentally, the bowtie modes are excited using a long period grating and their free space characteristics...... and polarization state are investigated. For this fiber, the onset of the bowtie effect is shown numerically to be LP011. The characteristics usually associated with Bessel-likes modes such as long diffraction free length and selfhealing are shown to be conserved despite the lack of azimuthal symmetry...

  8. Fiber optic calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudy, C.R.; Bayliss, S.C.; Bracken, D.S.; Bush, I.J.; Davis, P.G.

    1998-01-01

    A twin-bridge calorimeter using optical fiber as the sensor element was constructed and tested. This system demonstrates the principle and capability of using optical fibers for heat-flow measurements of special nuclear material. This calorimeter uses piezoelectric-generated phase-carrier modulation with subsequent electronic signal processing to allow phase shifts as small as 1 microrad to be measured. The sensing element consists of 21-m lengths of single-mode optical fiber wrapped around sample and reference chambers. The sensitivity of the calorimeter was determined to be 74 rad of phase shift per mW of thermal power. One milliwatt of thermal power is equivalent to 400 mg of plutonium (6% 240 Pu). The system noise base was about 0.2 rad, equivalent to about 1 mg of plutonium

  9. Fiber optic calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudy, C.; Bayliss, S.; Bracken, D.; Bush, J.; Davis, P.

    1998-01-01

    A twin-bridge calorimeter using optical fiber as the sensor element was constructed and tested. This system demonstrates the principle and capability of using fiber for heat-flow measurements of special nuclear material. This calorimeter uses piezoelectric-generated phase-carrier modulation with subsequent electronic signal processing to allow phase shifts as small as 1 microradian (μrad) to be measured. The sensing element consists of 21-m lengths of single-mode optical fiber wrapped around sample and reference chambers. The sensitivity of the calorimeter was determined to be 74 radians (rad) of phase shift per milliwatt of thermal power. One milliwatt of thermal power is equivalent to 400 mg of plutonium (6% 240 Pu). The system noise base was about 0.2 rad, equivalent to about 1 mg of plutonium

  10. Multibeam fiber laser cutting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemming Ove; Hansen, Klaus Schütt; Nielsen, Jakob Skov

    2009-01-01

    The appearance of the high power high brilliance fiber laser has opened for new possibilities in laser materials processing. In laser cutting this laser has demonstrated high cutting performance compared to the dominating Cutting laser, the CO2 laser. However, quality problems in fiber......-laser cutting have until now limited its application to metal cutting. In this paper the first results of proof-of-principle Studies applying a new approach (patent pending) for laser cutting with high brightness and short wavelength lasers will be presented. In the approach, multibeam patterns are applied...... to control the melt flow out of the cut kerf resulting in improved cut quality in metal cutting. The beam patterns in this study are created by splitting up beams from two single mode fiber lasers and combining these beams into a pattern in the cut kerf. The results are obtained with a total of 550 W...

  11. Monolithic Yb-fiber femtosecond laser using photonic crystal fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiaomin; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Turchinovich, Dmitry

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate, both experimentally and theoretically, an environmentally stable monolithic all-PM modelocked femtosecond Yb-fiber laser, with laser output pulse compressed in a spliced-on low-loss hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. Our laser provides direct fiber-end delivery of 4 nJ pulses...

  12. K3-fibered Calabi-Yau threefolds II, singular fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Hunt, Bruce

    1999-01-01

    In part I of this paper we constructed certain fibered Calabi-Yaus by a quotient construction in the context of weighted hypersurfaces. In this paper look at the case of K3 fibrations more closely and study the singular fibers which occur. This differs from previous work since the fibrations we discuss have constant modulus, and the singular fibers have torsion monodromy.

  13. Single fiber pullout from hybrid fiber reinforced concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Markovich, I.; Van Mier, J.G.M.; Walraven, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    Hybrid fiber reinforcement can be very efficient for improving the tensile response of the composite. In such materials, fibers of different geometries can act as bridging mechanisms over cracks of different widths. The fiber bridging efficiency depends on the interface properties, which makes

  14. Fluoride glass fiber optics

    CERN Document Server

    Aggarwal, Ishwar D

    1991-01-01

    Fluoride Glass Fiber Optics reviews the fundamental aspects of fluoride glasses. This book is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1 discusses the wide range of fluoride glasses with an emphasis on fluorozirconate-based compositions. The structure of simple fluoride systems, such as BaF2 binary glass is elaborated in Chapter 2. The third chapter covers the intrinsic transparency of fluoride glasses from the UV to the IR, with particular emphasis on the multiphonon edge and electronic edge. The next three chapters are devoted to ultra-low loss optical fibers, reviewing methods for purifying and

  15. Nonlinear fiber optics

    CERN Document Server

    Agrawal, Govind

    2012-01-01

    Since the 4e appeared, a fast evolution of the field has occurred. The 5e of this classic work provides an up-to-date account of the nonlinear phenomena occurring inside optical fibers, the basis of all our telecommunications infastructure as well as being used in the medical field. Reflecting the big developments in research, this new edition includes major new content: slow light effects, which offers a reduction in noise and power consumption and more ordered network traffic-stimulated Brillouin scattering; vectorial treatment of highly nonlinear fibers; and a brand new chapter o

  16. Silicon photonics for multicore fiber communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Yunhong; Kamchevska, Valerija; Dalgaard, Kjeld

    2016-01-01

    We review our recent work on silicon photonics for multicore fiber communication, including multicore fiber fan-in/fan-out, multicore fiber switches towards reconfigurable optical add/drop multiplexers. We also present multicore fiber based quantum communication using silicon devices.......We review our recent work on silicon photonics for multicore fiber communication, including multicore fiber fan-in/fan-out, multicore fiber switches towards reconfigurable optical add/drop multiplexers. We also present multicore fiber based quantum communication using silicon devices....

  17. Fiber-optic seismic sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, G. W.; Udd, E.

    1985-01-01

    A vibration sensor is constructed by providing two preferably matched coils of fiber-optic material. When the sensor experiences vibration, a differential pressure is exerted on the two fiber coils. The differential pressure results in a variation in the relative optical path lengths between the two fibers so that light beams transmitted through the two fibers are differently delayed, the phase difference therebetween being a detectable indication of the vibration applied to the sensor

  18. Tunable femtosecond Cherenkov fiber laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiaomin; Svane, Ask Sebastian; Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate electrically-tunable femtosecond Cherenkov fiber laser output at the visible range. Using an all-fiber, self-starting femtosecond Yb-doped fiber laser as the pump source and nonlinear photonic crystal fiber link as the wave-conversion medium, ultrafast, milliwatt-level, tunable...... and spectral isolated Cherenkov radiation at visible wavelengths are reported. Such a femtosecond Cherenkov laser source is promising for practical biophotonics applications....

  19. In-fiber integrated Michelson interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Libo; Yang, Jun; Liu, Zhihai; Sun, Jiaxing

    2006-09-15

    A novel fiber-optic in-fiber integrated Michelson interferometer has been proposed and demonstrated. It consists of a segment of two-core fiber with a mirrored fiber end. The sensing characteristics based on the two-core fiber bending, corresponding to the shift of the phase of the two-core in-fiber integrated Michelson interferometer, are investigated.

  20. Transient attenuation in optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopkins, A.A.; Kelly, R.E.; Looney, L.D.; Lyons, P.B.

    1984-01-01

    Low and high energy pulsed electron beams were used to generate radiation-induced transient attenuation in high-OH, Suprasil core, PCS fibers, demonstrating the energy dependence of the radiation damage and recovery mechanisms. A radiation resistant low-OH fiber was studied and its performance contrasted to that of high-OH materials. Several fibers with differing core compositions were also studied

  1. Fiber Optics and Library Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Michael

    1984-01-01

    This article examines fiber optic technology, explains some of the key terminology, and speculates about the way fiber optics will change our world. Applications of fiber optics to library systems in three major areas--linkage of a number of mainframe computers, local area networks, and main trunk communications--are highlighted. (EJS)

  2. Water-core Fresnel fiber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martelli, C.; Canning, J.; Lyytikainen, K.; Groothoff, N.

    2005-01-01

    A water core photonic crystal Fresnel fiber exploiting a hole distribution on zone plates of a cylindrical waveguide was developed and characterized. This fiber has similar guiding properties as the pristine air-hole guiding fiber although a large loss edge ~900nm is observed indicating that the

  3. Optical fibers for FTTH application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzowski, Bartlomiej; Tosik, Grzegorz; Lisik, Zbigniew; Bedyk, Michal; Kubiak, Andrzej

    2013-07-01

    In this paper the specifics of FTTH (Fiber To The Home) networks in terms of requirements for optical fibers has been presented. Optical fiber samples used in FTTH applications acquired from the worldwide leading manufacturers were subjected to small diameter mandrel wraps tests. The detailed procedures of performed tests and the measurement results has been presented.

  4. Photonic-crystal fibers gyroscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Muse Haider

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we proposed to use of a photonic crystal fiber with an inner hollow defect. The use of such fibers is not affected by a material medium on the propagation of optical radiation. Photonic crystal fibers present special properties and capabilities that lead to an outstanding potential for sensing applications

  5. Thermal properties of Fiber ropes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bossolini, Elena; Nielsen, Ole Wennerberg; Oland, Espen

    There is a trend within the oil and gas market to shift from steel wire ropes to fiber ropes for lifting, hoisting and mooring applications. The cost of fiber ropes is about 2-3 times that of steel wire ropes, but the natural buoyancy of fiber ropes reduces the overall weight resulting in smaller...

  6. Shedding Light on Fiber Optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunch, Robert M.

    1994-01-01

    Explains the principles of fiber optics as a medium for light-wave communication. Current uses of fiber systems on college campuses include voice, video, and local area network applications. A group of seven school districts in Minnesota are linked via fiber-optic cables. Other uses are discussed. (MLF)

  7. Fabrication of Optical Fiber Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, Miguel V.

    In this paper we present the main research activities of the Laboratorio de Fibras Opticas del Instituto de Ciencia de los Materiales de la Universidad de Valencia. We show some of the main results obtained for devices based on tapered fibers, fiber Bragg gratings, acousto-optic effects and photonic crystal fibers.

  8. Microstructured Fibers: Design and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard; Broeng, Jes

    2006-01-01

    Holey fibers, in which airholes are introduced in the cladding region and extended in the axial direction of the fiber, have been known since the early days of silica waveguide research. Early work demonstrated the first low-loss fibers, which featured very small silica cores held in air by thin...

  9. Illustrative white matter fiber bundles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otten, R.J.G.; Vilanova, A.; Wetering, van de H.M.M.

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) has made feasible the visualization of the fibrous structure of the brain whitematter. In the last decades, several fiber-tracking methods have been developed to reconstruct the fiber tracts fromDTI data. Usually these fiber tracts are shown individually based on some

  10. Bluebonnet Fiber Collages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Joan

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a lesson that uses stitching and applique techniques to create a fiber collage in which every child is successful with high-quality work. This lesson was inspired by Tomie dePaola's "The Legend of the Bluebonnet." The back cover had a lovely illustration of the bluebonnet flower the author thought would translate easily to a…

  11. The dentate mossy fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Morten; Zimmer, Jens

    2007-01-01

    Hippocampal mossy fibers are the axons of the dentate granule cells and project to hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells and mossy cells of the dentate hilus (CA4) as well as a number of interneurons in the two areas. Besides their role in hippocampal function, studies of which are still evolving...

  12. Optical Fiber Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    F&S Inc. developed and commercialized fiber optic and microelectromechanical systems- (MEMS) based instrumentation for harsh environments encountered in the aerospace industry. The NASA SBIR programs have provided F&S the funds and the technology to develop ruggedized coatings and coating techniques that are applied during the optical fiber draw process. The F&S optical fiber fabrication facility and developed coating methods enable F&S to manufacture specialty optical fiber with custom designed refractive index profiles and protective or active coatings. F&S has demonstrated sputtered coatings using metals and ceramics and combinations of each, and has also developed techniques to apply thin coatings of specialized polyimides formulated at NASA Langley Research Center. With these capabilities, F&S has produced cost-effective, reliable instrumentation and sensors capable of withstanding temperatures up to 800? C and continues building commercial sales with corporate partners and private funding. More recently, F&S has adapted the same sensing platforms to provide the rapid detection and identification of chemical and biological agents

  13. Optical Fiber Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1999-01-01

    This is the final report of work done on NASA Grant NAG-1-443. The work covers the period from July 1, 1992 to December 1, 1998. During this period several distinct but related research studies and work tasks were undertaken. These different subjects are enumerated below with a description of the work done on each of them. The focus of the research was the development of optical fibers for use as distributed temperature and stress sensors. The initial concept was to utilize the utilize the temperature and stress dependence of emission from rare earth and transition metal ions substitutionally doped into crystalline or glass fibers. During the course of investigating this it became clear that fiber Bragg gratings provided a alternative for making the desired measurements and there was a shift of research focus on to include the photo-refractive properties of germano-silicate glasses used for most gratings and to the possibility of developing fiber laser sources for an integrated optical sensor in the research effort. During the course of this work several students from Christopher Newport University and other universities participated in this effort. Their names are listed below. Their participation was an important part of their education.

  14. Fiber and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... meals instead of white rice. Add beans (kidney, black, navy, and pinto) to rice dishes for even more fiber. Spice up salads with berries and almonds, chickpeas, artichoke hearts, and beans (kidney, black, navy, or pinto). Use whole-grain (corn or ...

  15. Polymer-Derived Ceramic Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    SiC-based ceramic fibers are derived from polycarbosilane or polymetallocarbosilane precursors and are classified into three groups according to their chemical composition, oxygen content, and C/Si atomic ratio. The first-generation fibers are Si-C-O (Nicalon) fibers and Si-Ti-C-O (Tyranno Lox M) fibers. Both fibers contain more than 10-wt% oxygen owing to oxidation during curing and lead to degradation in strength at temperatures exceeding 1,300°C. The maximum use temperature is 1,100°C. The second-generation fibers are SiC (Hi-Nicalon) fibers and Si-Zr-C-O (Tyranno ZMI) fibers. The oxygen content of these fibers is reduced to less than 1 wt% by electron beam irradiation curing in He. The thermal stability of these fibers is improved (they are stable up to 1,500°C), but their creep resistance is limited to a maximum of 1,150°C because their C/Si atomic ratio results in excess carbon. The third-generation fibers are stoichiometric SiC fibers, i.e., Hi-Nicalon Type S (hereafter Type S), Tyranno SA, and Sylramic™ fibers. They exhibit improved thermal stability and creep resistance up to 1,400°C. Stoichiometric SiC fibers meet many of the requirements for the use of ceramic matrix composites for high-temperature structural application. SiBN3C fibers derived from polyborosilazane also show promise for structural applications, remain in the amorphous state up to 1,800°C, and have good high-temperature creep resistance.

  16. Improved Optical Fiber Chemical Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egalon, Claudio O.; Rogowski, Robert S.

    1994-01-01

    Calculations, based on exact theory of optical fiber, have shown how to increase optical efficiency sensitivity of active-core, step-index-profile optical-fiber fluorosensor. Calculations result of efforts to improve efficiency of optical-fiber chemical sensor of previous concept described in "Making Optical-Fiber Chemical Sensors More Sensitive" (LAR-14525). Optical fiber chemical detector of enhanced sensitivity made in several configurations. Portion of fluorescence or chemiluminescence generated in core, and launched directly into bound electromagnetic modes that propagate along core to photodetector.

  17. Solid fiber Z-pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindemuth, I.R.

    1989-01-01

    One- and two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic computations have been performed to study the behavior of solid deuterium fiber Z-pinch experiments performed at Los Alamos and the Naval Research Laboratory. The computations use a tabulated atomic data base and ''cold-start'' initial conditions. The computations predict that the solid fiber persists longer in existing experiments than previously expected and that the discharge actually consists of a relatively low-density, hot plasma which has been ablated from the fiber. The computations exhibit m = 0 behavior in the hot, exterior plasma prior to complete ablation of the solid fiber. The m = 0 behavior enhances the fiber ablation rate. 10 refs., 5 figs

  18. Introduction to optical fiber sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moukdad, S.

    1991-01-01

    Optical fiber sensors have many advantages over other types of sensors, for example: Low weight, immunity from EMI, electrical isolation, chemical passivity, and high sensitivity. In this seminar, a brief explanation of the optical fiber sensors, their use, and their advantages will be given. After, a description of the main optical fiber sensor components will be presented. Principles of some kinds of optical fiber sensors will be presented, and the principle of the fiber-optic rotation sensor and its realization will be discussed in some details, as well as its main applications. (author). 5 refs, 8 figs, 2 tabs

  19. Bonding Properties of Basalt Fiber and Strength Reduction According to Fiber Orientation

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Jeong-Il; Lee, Bang

    2015-01-01

    The basalt fiber is a promising reinforcing fiber because it has a relatively higher tensile strength and a density similar to that of a concrete matrix as well as no corrosion possibility. This study investigated experimentally the bonding properties of basalt fiber with cementitious material as well as the effect of fiber orientation on the tensile strength of basalt fiber for evaluating basalt fiber?s suitability as a reinforcing fiber. Single fiber pullout tests were performed and then th...

  20. Fiber optics: A brief introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruchalla, M.E.

    1989-01-01

    A basic introduction into the principles of fiber optics is presented. A review of both the underlying physical principles and the individual elements of typical fiber-optic systems are presented. The optical phenomenon of total internal reflection is reviewed. The basic construction of the optical fiber is presented. Both step-index and graded-index fiber designs are reviewed. Multimode and single-mode fiber constructions are considered and typical performance parameters given. Typical optical-fiber bandwidth and loss characteristics are compared to various common coaxial cables, waveguides, and air transmission. The constructions of optical-fiber cables are reviewed. Both loose-tube and tightly-buffered designs are considered. Several optical connection approaches are presented. Photographs of several representative optical connectors are included. Light Emitting Diode and Laser Diode emitters for fiber-optic applications are reviewed, and some advantages and shortcomings of each are considered. The phenomenon of modal noise is briefly explained. Both PIN and Avalanche photodetectors are reviewed and their performance parameters compared. Methods of data transmission over optical fiber are introduced. Principles of Wavelength, Frequency, and Time Division Multiplexing are briefly presented. The technology of fiber-optic sensors is briefly reviewed with basic principles introduced. The performance of a fiber-optic strain sensor is included as a practical example. 7 refs., 10 figs

  1. All-Fiber Raman Probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunetti, Anna Chiara

    by means of fiber components. Assuming the possibility to use a fiber laser with a fundamental radiation at 1064nm, in-fiber efficient second harmonic generation is achieved by optically poling the core of the waveguide delivering the excitation light to the sample. In this way, Raman spectroscopy...... in the visible range can be performed. The simultaneous delivery of the excitation light and collection of the Raman signal from the sample are achieved by means of a doubleclad fiber, whose core and inner cladding act as \\independent" transmission channels. A double-clad fiber coupler allows for the recovery...... of the collected Raman scattering from the inner-cladding region of the double-clad fiber, thus replacing the bulk dichroic component normally used to demultiplex the pump and Raman signal. A tunable Rayleigh-rejection filter based on a liquid filled-photonic bandgap fiber is also demonstrated in this work...

  2. Chronic Oral Capsaicin Exposure During Development Leads to Adult Rats with Reduced Taste Bud Volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omelian, Jacquelyn M; Samson, Kaeli K; Sollars, Suzanne I

    2016-09-01

    Cross-sensory interaction between gustatory and trigeminal nerves occurs in the anterior tongue. Surgical manipulations have demonstrated that the strength of this relationship varies across development. Capsaicin is a neurotoxin that affects fibers of the somatosensory lingual nerve surrounding taste buds, but not fibers of the gustatory chorda tympani nerve which synapse with taste receptor cells. Since capsaicin is commonly consumed by many species, including humans, experimental use of this neurotoxin provides a naturalistic perturbation of the lingual trigeminal system. Neonatal or adults rats consumed oral capsaicin for 40 days and we examined the cross-sensory effect on the morphology of taste buds across development. Rats received moderate doses of oral capsaicin, with chronic treatments occurring either before or after taste system maturation. Tongue morphology was examined either 2 or 50 days after treatment cessation. Edema, which has been previously suggested as a cause of changes in capsaicin-related gustatory function, was also assessed. Reductions in taste bud volume occurred 50 days, but not 2 days post-treatment for rats treated as neonates. Adult rats at either time post-treatment were unaffected. Edema was not found to occur with the 5 ppm concentration of capsaicin we used. Results further elucidate the cooperative relationship between these discrete sensory systems and highlight the developmentally mediated aspect of this interaction. Chronic exposure to even moderate levels of noxious stimuli during development has the ability to impact the orosensory environment, and these changes may not be evident until long after exposure has ceased.

  3. Chemically modified carbon fibers and their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermolenko, I.N.; Lyubliner, I.P.; Gulko, N.V.

    1990-01-01

    This book gives a comprehensive review about chemically modified carbon fibers (e.g. by incorporation of other elements) and is structured as follows: 1. Types of carbon fibers, 2. Structure of carbon fibers, 3. Properties of carbon fibers, 4. The cellulose carbonization process, 5. Formation of element-carbon fiber materials, 6. Surface modification of carbon fibers, and 7. Applications of carbon fibers (e.g. adsorbents, catalysts, constituents of composites). (MM)

  4. Multispot fiber laser welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schutt Hansen, Klaus

    This dissertation presents work and results achieved in the field of multi beam fiber laser welding. The project has had a practical approach, in which simulations and modelling have been kept at a minimum. Different methods to produce spot patterns with high power single mode fiber lasers have...... been examined and evaluated. It is found that both diamond turned DOE’s in zinc sulphide and multilevel etched DOE’s (Diffractive Optical Elements) in fused silica have a good performance. Welding with multiple beams in a butt joint configuration has been tested. Results are presented, showing it has...... been possible to control the welding width in incremental steps by adding more beams in a row. The laser power was used to independently control the keyhole and consequently the depth of fusion. An example of inline repair of a laser weld in butt joint configuration was examined. Zinc powder was placed...

  5. Fiber optic fluid detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, S.M.

    1987-02-27

    Particular gases or liquids are detected with a fiber optic element having a cladding or coating of a material which absorbs the fluid or fluids and which exhibits a change of an optical property, such as index of refraction, light transmissiveness or fluoresence emission, for example, in response to absorption of the fluid. The fluid is sensed by directing light into the fiber optic element and detecting changes in the light, such as exit angle changes for example, that result from the changed optical property of the coating material. The fluid detector may be used for such purposes as sensing toxic or explosive gases in the atmosphere, measuring ground water contamination or monitoring fluid flows in industrial processes, among other uses. 10 figs.

  6. Fiber optic fluid detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, S. Michael

    1989-01-01

    Particular gases or liquids are detected with a fiber optic element (11, 11a to 11j) having a cladding or coating of a material (23, 23a to 23j) which absorbs the fluid or fluids and which exhibits a change of an optical property, such as index of refraction, light transmissiveness or fluoresence emission, for example, in response to absorption of the fluid. The fluid is sensed by directing light into the fiber optic element and detecting changes in the light, such as exit angle changes for example, that result from the changed optical property of the coating material. The fluid detector (24, 24a to 24j) may be used for such purposes as sensing toxic or explosive gases in the atmosphere, measuring ground water contamination or monitoring fluid flows in industrial processes, among other uses.

  7. Optical fiber communications

    CERN Document Server

    Keiser, Gerd

    2008-01-01

    The fourth edition of this popular text and reference book presents the fundamental principles for understanding and applying optical fiber technology to sophisticated modern telecommunication systems. Optical-fiber-based telecommunication networks have become a major information-transmission-system, with high capacity links encircling the globe in both terrestrial and undersea installations. Numerous passive and active optical devices within these links perform complex transmission and networking functions in the optical domain, such as signal amplification, restoration, routing, and switching. Along with the need to understand the functions of these devices comes the necessity to measure both component and network performance, and to model and stimulate the complex behavior of reliable high-capacity networks.

  8. Stable fiber interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izmajlov, G.N.; Nikolaev, F.A.; Ozolin, V.V.; Grigor'yants, V.V.; Chamorovskij, Yu.K.

    1989-01-01

    The problem of construction the long-base Michelson interferometer for gravitational wave detection is discussed. Possible sources of noise and instability are considered. It is shown that evacuation of fiber interferometer, the winding of its arms on the glass ceramic bases, stabilization of radiation source frequency and seismic isolation of the base allow one to reduce its instability to the level, typical of mirror interferometer with the comparable optical base. 10 refs.; 2 figs

  9. Deriving muscle fiber diameter from recorded single fiber potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalewska, Ewa

    2017-12-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate muscle fiber diameters through analysis of single muscle fiber potentials (SFPs) recorded in the frontalis muscle of a healthy subject. Our previously developed analytical and graphic method to derive fiber diameter from the analysis of the negative peak duration and the amplitude of SFP, was applied to a sample of ten SFPs recorded in vivo. Muscle fiber diameters derived from the simulation method for the sample of frontalis muscle SFPs are consistent with anatomical data for this muscle. The results confirm the utility of proposed simulation method. Outlying data could be considered as the result of a contribution of other fibers to the potential recorded using an SFEMG electrode. Our graphic tool provides a rapid estimation of muscle fiber diameter. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Carbon fiber reinforced asphalt concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahromi, Saeed G.

    2008-01-01

    Fibers are often used in the manufacture of other materials. For many years, they have been utilized extensively in numerous applications in civil engineering. Fiber-reinforcement refers to incorporating materials with desired properties within some other materials lacking those properties. Use of fibers is not a new phenomenon, as the technique of fiber-reinforced bitumen began early as 1950. In all industrialized countries today, nearly all concretes used in construction are reinforced. A multitude of fibers and fiber materials are being introduced in the market regularly. The present paper presents characteristics and properties of carbon fiber-reinforced asphalt mixtures, which improve the performance of pavements. To evaluate the effect of fiber contents on bituminous mixtures, laboratory investigations were carried out on the samples with and without fibers. During the course of this study, various tests were undertaken, applying Marshall Test indirect tensile test, creep test and resistance to fatigue cracking by using repeated load indirect tensile test. Carbon fiber exhibited consistency in results and as such it was observed that the addition of fiber does affect the properties of bituminous mixtures, i.e. an increase in its stability and decrease in the flow value as well as an increase in voids in the mix. Results indicate that fibers have the potential to resist structural distress in pavement, in the wake of growing traffic loads and thus improve fatigue by increasing resistance to cracks or permanent deformation. On the whole, the results show that the addition of carbon fiber will improve some of the mechanical properties like fatigue and deformation in the flexible pavement. (author)

  11. Monolithic femtosecond Yb-fiber laser with photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiaomin; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Turchinovich, Dmitry

    We demonstrate a monolithic stable SESAM-modelocked self-starting Yb-fiber laser. A novel PM all-solid photonic bandgap fiber is used for intra-cavity of dispersion management. The ex-cavity final pulse compression is performed in a spliced-on PM hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. The laser...... directly delivers 9 nJ pulses of 275 fs duration with pulse repetition of 26.7MHz....

  12. Homogenization of long fiber reinforced composites including fiber bending effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulios, Konstantinos; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a homogenization method, which accounts for intrinsic size effects related to the fiber diameter in long fiber reinforced composite materials with two independent constitutive models for the matrix and fiber materials. A new choice of internal kinematic variables allows...... of the reinforcing fibers is captured by higher order strain terms, resulting in an accurate representation of the micro-mechanical behavior of the composite. Numerical examples show that the accuracy of the proposed model is very close to a non-homogenized finite-element model with an explicit discretization...

  13. Raman fiber distributed feedback lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, Paul S; Abedin, Kazi S; Nicholson, Jeffrey W; Kremp, Tristan; Porque, Jerome

    2011-08-01

    We demonstrate fiber distributed feedback (DFB) lasers using Raman gain in two germanosilicate fibers. Our DFB cavities were 124 mm uniform fiber Bragg gratings with a π phase shift offset from the grating center. Our pump was at 1480 nm and the DFB lasers operated on a single longitudinal mode near 1584 nm. In a commercial Raman gain fiber, the maximum output power, linewidth, and threshold were 150 mW, 7.5 MHz, and 39 W, respectively. In a commercial highly nonlinear fiber, these figures improved to 350 mW, 4 MHz, and 4.3 W, respectively. In both lasers, more than 75% of pump power was transmitted, allowing for the possibility of substantial amplification in subsequent Raman gain fiber. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  14. Flexible optical fiber sensor based on polyurethane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaysir, Md Rejvi; Stefani, Alessio; Lwin, Richard

    Polyurethane (PU) based hollow core fibers are investigated as optical sensors. The flexibility of PU fibers makes it suitable for sensing mechanical perturbations. We fabricated a PU fiber using the fiber drawing method, characterized the fiber and experimentally demonstrated a simple way...... to measure deformation, in the form of applied pressure....

  15. A fiber-optic polarimetric demonstration kit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eftimov, T; Dimitrova, T L; Ivanov, G

    2012-01-01

    A simple and multifunctional fiber-optic polarimetric kit on the basis of highly birefringent single-mode fibers is presented. The fiber-optic polarimetric kit allows us to perform the following laboratory exercises: (i) fiber excitation and the measurement of numerical aperture, (ii) polarization preservation and (iii) obtain polarization-sensitive fiberized interferometers.

  16. Dynamic drainage of froth with wood fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.Y. Zhu; Freya Tan

    2005-01-01

    Understanding froth drainage with fibers (or simply called fiber drainage in froth) is important for improving fiber yield in the flotation deinking operation. In this study, the data of water and fiber mass in foams collected at different froth heights were used to reconstruct the time dependent and spatially resolved froth density and fiber volumetric concentration...

  17. Fiber optic sensor and method for making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartuli, James Scott; Bousman, Kenneth Sherwood; Deng, Kung-Li; McEvoy, Kevin Paul; Xia, Hua

    2010-05-18

    A fiber optic sensor including a fiber having a modified surface integral with the fiber wherein the modified surface includes an open pore network with optical agents dispersed within the open pores of the open pore network. Methods for preparing the fiber optic sensor are also provided. The fiber optic sensors can withstand high temperatures and harsh environments.

  18. Electrochromic fiber-shaped supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuli; Lin, Huijuan; Deng, Jue; Zhang, Ye; Sun, Xuemei; Chen, Peining; Fang, Xin; Zhang, Zhitao; Guan, Guozhen; Peng, Huisheng

    2014-12-23

    An electrochromic fiber-shaped super-capacitor is developed by winding aligned carbon nanotube/polyaniline composite sheets on an elastic fiber. The fiber-shaped supercapacitors demonstrate rapid and reversible chromatic transitions under different working states, which can be directly observed by the naked eye. They are also stretchable and flexible, and are woven into textiles to display designed signals in addition to storing energy. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. System for testing optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golob, John E. [Olathe, KS; Looney, Larry D. [Los Alamos, NM; Lyons, Peter B. [Los Alamos, NM; Nelson, Melvin A. [Santa Barbara, CA; Davies, Terence J. [Santa Barbara, CA

    1980-07-15

    A system for measuring a combination of optical transmission properties of fiber optic waveguides. A polarized light pulse probe is injected into one end of the optical fiber. Reflections from discontinuities within the fiber are unpolarized whereas reflections of the probe pulse incident to its injection remain polarized. The polarized reflections are prevented from reaching a light detector whereas reflections from the discontinuities reaches the detector.

  20. Fiber-Optic Sensor Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Constructs and evaluates fiber-optic sensors for a variety of measurands. These measurands include acoustic, pressure, magnetic, and electric field as well...

  1. Development of scintillating fiber tracker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Shuzo; Kawai, Toshihide; Kozaki, Tetsuo

    1995-01-01

    In order to use thin scintillating fiber (diameter 500 micron) as a particle tracking detector, we have developed a method to construct precise multi-layer scintillating fiber sheets. We have also developed dedicated machines for this purpose. This paper presents the details of the method and the machines. Using these machines, we have produced fiber sheets for CERN WA95/CHORUS, which intend to detect a neutrino oscillation in the νμ-ντ channel using Hybrid Emulsion Set-up. Fiber Trackers are used as a vertex detector which support the neutrino event location in the nuclear emulsion target. (author)

  2. Fiber Tracking Cylinder Nesting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stredde, H.

    1999-01-01

    The fiber tracker consists of 8 concentric carbon fiber cylinders of varying diameters, from 399mm to 1032.2mm and two different lengths. 1.66 and 2.52 meters. Each completed cylinder is covered over the entire o.d. with scintillating fiber ribbons with a connector on each ribbon. These ribbons are axial (parallel to the beam line) at one end and stereo (at 3 deg. to the beam line) at the other. The ribbon connectors have dowel pins which are used to match with the connectors on the wave guide ribbons. These dowel pins are also used during the nesting operation, locating and positioning measurements. The nesting operation is the insertion of one cylinder into another, aligning them with one another and fastening them together into a homogeneous assembly. For ease of assembly. the nesting operation is accomplished working from largest diameter to smallest. Although the completed assembly of all 8 cylinders glued and bolted together is very stiff. individual cylinders are relatively flexible. Therefore. during this operation, No.8 must be supported in a manner which maintains its integrity and yet allows the insertion of No.7. This is accomplished by essentially building a set of dummy end plates which replicate a No.9 cylinder. These end plates are mounted on a wheeled cart that becomes the nesting cart. Provisions for a protective cover fastened to these rings has been made and will be incorporated in finished product. These covers can be easily removed for access to No.8 and/or the connection of No.8 to No.9. Another wheeled cart, transfer cart, is used to push a completed cylinder into the cylinder(s) already mounted in the nesting cart.

  3. Surgical complications following cochlear implantation in adults based on a proposed reporting consensus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Jonas; Faber, Christian Emil

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Conclusion: The rate of severe complications was low and cochlear implantation is a relatively safe procedure. Standardization is crucial when reporting on cochlear implant complications to ensure comparability between studies. A consensus on the reporting of complications proposed by a ...... occurred following one implantation (0.3%). Transient chorda tympani syndrome (30.8%), vertigo/dizziness (29.5%) and tinnitus (4.9%) were the most frequent minor complications....

  4. Fiber sample presentation system for spectrophotometer cotton fiber color measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Uster® High Volume Instrument (HVI) is used to class U.S. cotton for fiber color, yielding the industry accepted, cotton-specific color parameters Rd and +b. The HVI examines a 9 square inch fiber sample, and it is also used to test large AMS standard cotton “biscuits” or rectangles. Much inte...

  5. Random fiber laser based on artificially controlled backscattering fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoliang; Chen, Daru; Li, Haitao; She, Lijuan; Wu, Qiong

    2018-01-10

    The random fiber laser (RFL), which is a milestone in laser physics and nonlinear optics, has attracted considerable attention recently. Most previously reported RFLs are based on distributed feedback of Rayleigh scattering amplified through the stimulated Raman-Brillouin scattering effect in single-mode fibers, which require long-distance (tens of kilometers) single-mode fibers and high threshold, up to watt level, due to the extremely small Rayleigh scattering coefficient of the fiber. We proposed and demonstrated a half-open-cavity RFL based on a segment of an artificially controlled backscattering single-mode fiber with a length of 210 m, 310 m, or 390 m. A fiber Bragg grating with a central wavelength of 1530 nm and a segment of artificially controlled backscattering single-mode fiber fabricated by using a femtosecond laser form the half-open cavity. The proposed RFL achieves thresholds of 25 mW, 30 mW, and 30 mW, respectively. Random lasing at a wavelength of 1530 nm and extinction ratio of 50 dB is achieved when a segment of 5 m erbium-doped fiber is pumped by a 980 nm laser diode in the RFL. A novel RFL with many short cavities has been achieved with low threshold.

  6. Carbon Fiber Biocompatibility for Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Petersen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fibers have multiple potential advantages in developing high-strength biomaterials with a density close to bone for better stress transfer and electrical properties that enhance tissue formation. As a breakthrough example in biomaterials, a 1.5 mm diameter bisphenol-epoxy/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite rod was compared for two weeks in a rat tibia model with a similar 1.5 mm diameter titanium-6-4 alloy screw manufactured to retain bone implants. Results showed that carbon-fiber-reinforced composite stimulated osseointegration inside the tibia bone marrow measured as percent bone area (PBA to a great extent when compared to the titanium-6-4 alloy at statistically significant levels. PBA increased significantly with the carbon-fiber composite over the titanium-6-4 alloy for distances from the implant surfaces of 0.1 mm at 77.7% vs. 19.3% (p < 10−8 and 0.8 mm at 41.6% vs. 19.5% (p < 10−4, respectively. The review focuses on carbon fiber properties that increased PBA for enhanced implant osseointegration. Carbon fibers acting as polymer coated electrically conducting micro-biocircuits appear to provide a biocompatible semi-antioxidant property to remove damaging electron free radicals from the surrounding implant surface. Further, carbon fibers by removing excess electrons produced from the cellular mitochondrial electron transport chain during periods of hypoxia perhaps stimulate bone cell recruitment by free-radical chemotactic influences. In addition, well-studied bioorganic cell actin carbon fiber growth would appear to interface in close contact with the carbon-fiber-reinforced composite implant. Resulting subsequent actin carbon fiber/implant carbon fiber contacts then could help in discharging the electron biological overloads through electrochemical gradients to lower negative charges and lower concentration.

  7. Polymer optical fiber bragg grating sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefani, Alessio; Yuan, Scott Wu; Andresen, Søren

    2010-01-01

    Fiber-optical accelerometers based on polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings are reported. We have written fiber Bragg gratings for 1550 nm and 850 nm operations, characterized their temperature and strain response, and tested their performance in a prototype accelerometer....

  8. Extraction and characterization of Retama monosperma fibers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    XPERT

    monosperma leaves and their mechanical, physical and chemical characteristics. The fibers .... The hook was removed gently, and the behavior of the fiber was observed ..... fibers reinforced cement mortar slabs: a comparative study. Cement.

  9. Actively doped solid core Photonic Bandgap Fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broeng, Jes; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Lyngsøe, Jens Kristian

    2010-01-01

    Solid photonic bandgap fibers offer distributed spectral filtering with extraordinary high suppression. This opens new possibilities of artificially tailoring the gain spectrum of fibers. We present record-performance of such fibers and outline their future applications....

  10. Fiber breakage phenomena in long fiber reinforced plastic preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Chao-Tsai; Tseng, Huan-Chang; Chang, Rong-Yeu; Vlcek, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Due to the high demand of smart green, the lightweight technologies have become the driving force for the development of automotives and other industries in recent years. Among those technologies, using short and long fiber-reinforced plastics (FRP) to replace some metal components can reduce the weight of an automotive significantly. However, the microstructures of fibers inside plastic matrix are too complicated to manage and control during the injection molding through the screw, the runner, the gate, and then into the cavity. This study focuses on the fiber breakage phenomena during the screw plastification. Results show that fiber breakage is strongly dependent on screw design and operation. When the screw geometry changes, the fiber breakage could be larger even with lower compression ratio. (paper)

  11. High-birefringent photonic crystal fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Libori, Stig E. Barkou; Broeng, Jes; Knudsen, Erik

    2001-01-01

    A highly birefringent photonic crystal fiber design is analysed. Birefringence up to 10-3 is found. Random fluctuations in the cladding design are analysed, and the fiber is found to be a feasible polarization maintaining fiber.......A highly birefringent photonic crystal fiber design is analysed. Birefringence up to 10-3 is found. Random fluctuations in the cladding design are analysed, and the fiber is found to be a feasible polarization maintaining fiber....

  12. Quantitive DNA Fiber Mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Chun-Mei; Wang, Mei; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Weier, Jingly F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.

    2008-01-28

    Several hybridization-based methods used to delineate single copy or repeated DNA sequences in larger genomic intervals take advantage of the increased resolution and sensitivity of free chromatin, i.e., chromatin released from interphase cell nuclei. Quantitative DNA fiber mapping (QDFM) differs from the majority of these methods in that it applies FISH to purified, clonal DNA molecules which have been bound with at least one end to a solid substrate. The DNA molecules are then stretched by the action of a receding meniscus at the water-air interface resulting in DNA molecules stretched homogeneously to about 2.3 kb/{micro}m. When non-isotopically, multicolor-labeled probes are hybridized to these stretched DNA fibers, their respective binding sites are visualized in the fluorescence microscope, their relative distance can be measured and converted into kilobase pairs (kb). The QDFM technique has found useful applications ranging from the detection and delineation of deletions or overlap between linked clones to the construction of high-resolution physical maps to studies of stalled DNA replication and transcription.

  13. Optical fiber powered pressure sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweizer, P.; Neveux, L.; Ostrowsky, D.B.

    1987-01-01

    In the system described, a pressure sensor and its associated electronics are optically powered by a 20 mw laser and a photovoltaic cell via an optical fiber. The sensor is periodically interrogated and sends the measures obtained back to the central unit using an LED and a second fiber. The results obtained as well as the expected evolution will be described

  14. Microstructured hollow fibers for ultrafiltration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Culfaz, Pmar Zeynep; Culfaz, P.Z.; Rolevink, Hendrikus H.M.; van Rijn, C.J.M.; Lammertink, Rob G.H.; Wessling, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Hollow fiber ultrafiltration membranes with a corrugated outer microstructure were prepared from a PES/PVP blend. The effect of spinning parameters such as air gap, take-up speed, polymer dope viscosity and coagulation value on the microstructure and membrane characteristics was investigated. Fibers

  15. Fiber optic-based biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligler, Frances S.

    1991-01-01

    The NRL fiber optic biosensor is a device which measures the formation of a fluorescent complex at the surface of an optical fiber. Antibodies and DNA binding proteins provide the mechanism for recognizing an analyze and immobilizing a fluorescent complex on the fiber surface. The fiber optic biosensor is fast, sensitive, and permits analysis of hazardous materials remote from the instrumentation. The fiber optic biosensor is described in terms of the device configuration, chemistry for protein immobilization, and assay development. A lab version is being used for assay development and performance characterization while a portable device is under development. Antibodies coated on the fiber are stable for up to two years of storage prior to use. The fiber optic biosensor was used to measure concentration of toxins in the parts per billion (ng/ml) range in under a minute. Immunoassays for small molecules and whole bacteria are under development. Assays using DNA probes as the detection element can also be used with the fiber optic sensor, which is currently being developed to detect biological warfare agents, explosives, pathogens, and toxic materials which pollute the environment.

  16. Handbook of fiber optics theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Yeh, Chai

    2013-01-01

    Dr. Yeh supplies a firm theoretical foundation in such topics as propagation of light through fibers, fiber fabrication, loss mechanisms, and dispersion properties. He then expands from this into such practical areas as fiber splicing, measuring loss in fibers, fiber-based communications networks, remote fiber sensors, and integrated optics. Whether involved in fiber optics research, design, or practical implementation of systems, this handbook will be extremely useful.Key Features* Here is a comprehensive, ""one-stop"" reference with state-of-the-art information on fiber optics Included is da

  17. Radiation damage in optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyons, P.B.; Looney, L.D.; Ogle, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    Optical fibers provide important advantages over coaxial cables for many data transmission applications. Some of these applications require that the fibers transmit data during a radiation pulse. Other applications utilize the fiber as a radiation-to-light transducer. In either case, radiation-induced luminescence and absorption must be understood. Most studies of radiation effects in fibers have emphasized time scales of interest in telecommunication systems, from the msec to hour range. Few studies have concentrated on response at times below 1 + s. At Los Alamos, both laboratory electron accelerators and nuclear tests have been used as radiation sources to probe this early time region. The use of a fiber (or any optical medium) as a Cerenkov radiation-to-light transducer is discussed. Since the radiation induces attenuation in the medium, the light output is not proportional to the radiation input. The nonlinearity introduced by this attenuation is calculated

  18. Photometric device using optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boisde, Gilbert; Perez, J.-J.

    1981-02-01

    Remote measurements in radioactive environment are now possible with optical fibers. Measurement instruments developed by CEA are constitued of: - an optical probe (5 mm to 1 meter optical path length), - a photometric measurement device, - optical fiber links. 'TELEPHOT' is a photometric device for industrial installations. It is uses interferentiel filters for 2 to 5 simultaneous wave lengths. 'CRUDMETER' measures the muddiness of water. It can be equipped with a high sensitivity cell of 50 cm optical path length tested up to 250 bars. Coupling a double beam spectrophotometer to a remote optical probe, up to 1 meter optical path length, is carried out by means of an optical device using optical fibers links, eventually several hundred meter long. For these equipments special step index large core fibers, 1 to 1.5 mm in diameter, have been developed as well connectors. For industrial control and research these instruments offer new prospect thanks to optical fibers use [fr

  19. Benefits of glass fibers in solar fiber optic lighting systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volotinen, Tarja T; Lingfors, David H S

    2013-09-20

    The transmission properties and coupling of solar light have been studied for glass core multimode fibers in order to verify their benefits for a solar fiber optic lighting system. The light transportation distance can be extended from 20 m with plastic fibers to over 100 m with the kind of glass fibers studied here. A high luminous flux, full visible spectrum, as well as an outstanding color rendering index (98) and correlated color temperature similar to the direct sun light outside have been obtained. Thus the outstanding quality of solar light transmitted through these fibers would improve the visibility of all kinds of objects compared to fluorescent and other artificial lighting. Annual relative lighting energy savings of 36% in Uppsala, Sweden, and 76% in Dubai were estimated in an office environment. The absolute savings can be doubled by using glass optical fibers, and are estimated to be in the order of 550 kWh/year in Sweden and 1160 kWh/year in Dubai for one system of only 0.159 m(2) total light collecting area. The savings are dependent on the fiber length, the daily usage time of the interior, the type of artificial lighting substituted, the system light output flux, and the available time of sunny weather at the geographic location.

  20. Green Fiber Bottle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Didone, Mattia; Tosello, Guido

    has to have an inner coating barrier. The most reliable solution proposed is to coat the inner walls with silicon dioxide, which is not biodegradable but rather environmentally inert. To enhance the environmental footprint and sustainability of the bottle, and to be competitive with the existing...... technologies, the manufacturing technology for the production of the bottle has to offer the possibility of significant energy savings. Molded pulp products are made from wood fibers dispersed in water, and then they are formed, drained and dried. A relatively large quantity of resources (i.e. energy and time......) is consumed during the drying process. It is in this process stage that an innovative way of drying the products can be exploited by using the concept of impulse drying. Impulse drying is an advance drying technique in which water is removed from a wet paper pulp by the combination of mechanical pressure...

  1. Carbon Fiber from Biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milbrandt, Anelia [Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center, Godlen, CO (United States); Booth, Samuel [Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center, Godlen, CO (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Carbon fiber (CF), known also as graphite fiber, is a lightweight, strong, and flexible material used in both structural (load-bearing) and non-structural applications (e.g., thermal insulation). The high cost of precursors (the starting material used to make CF, which comes predominately from fossil sources) and manufacturing have kept CF a niche market with applications limited mostly to high-performance structural materials (e.g., aerospace). Alternative precursors to reduce CF cost and dependence on fossil sources have been investigated over the years, including biomass-derived precursors such as rayon, lignin, glycerol, and lignocellulosic sugars. The purpose of this study is to provide a comprehensive overview of CF precursors from biomass and their market potential. We examine the potential CF production from these precursors, the state of technology and applications, and the production cost (when data are available). We discuss their advantages and limitations. We also discuss the physical properties of biomass-based CF, and we compare them to those of polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based CF. We also discuss manufacturing and end-product considerations for bio-based CF, as well as considerations for plant siting and biomass feedstock logistics, feedstock competition, and risk mitigation strategies. The main contribution of this study is that it provides detailed technical and market information about each bio-based CF precursor in one document while other studies focus on one precursor at a time or a particular topic (e.g., processing). Thus, this publication allows for a comprehensive view of the CF potential from all biomass sources and serves as a reference for both novice and experienced professionals interested in CF production from alternative sources.

  2. Fabrication of elastomeric silk fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradner, Sarah A; Partlow, Benjamin P; Cebe, Peggy; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G; Kaplan, David L

    2017-09-01

    Methods to generate fibers from hydrogels, with control over mechanical properties, fiber diameter, and crystallinity, while retaining cytocompatibility and degradability, would expand options for biomaterials. Here, we exploited features of silk fibroin protein for the formation of tunable silk hydrogel fibers. The biological, chemical, and morphological features inherent to silk were combined with elastomeric properties gained through enzymatic crosslinking of the protein. Postprocessing via methanol and autoclaving provided tunable control of fiber features. Mechanical, optical, and chemical analyses demonstrated control of fiber properties by exploiting the physical cross-links, and generating double network hydrogels consisting of chemical and physical cross-links. Structure and chemical analyses revealed crystallinity from 30 to 50%, modulus from 0.5 to 4 MPa, and ultimate strength 1-5 MPa depending on the processing method. Fabrication and postprocessing combined provided fibers with extensibility from 100 to 400% ultimate strain. Fibers strained to 100% exhibited fourth order birefringence, revealing macroscopic orientation driven by chain mobility. The physical cross-links were influenced in part by the drying rate of fabricated materials, where bound water, packing density, and microstructural homogeneity influenced cross-linking efficiency. The ability to generate robust and versatile hydrogel microfibers is desirable for bottom-up assembly of biological tissues and for broader biomaterial applications. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. New all-fiber velocimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng Jidong; Tan Hua; Hu Shaolou; Ma Yun; Wan Xiang

    2005-01-01

    A new all-fiber velocity interferometer system for any reflector (AFVISAR) was developed. It was conceived and realized with the purpose of using it as the basic measuring element of a complete system for multiple point velocity measurements. Its main features are that it works at 532 nm and partly adopts the multimode optical fiber. The velocimeter consists of only fibers or fiber coupled components and has no optic elements such as optic lenses or reflectors. It is therefore very compact and easy to operate. Unlike the conventional AFVISAR, which uses single-mode optic fiber components, the laser beam in this new interferometer system arrives at and reflects from the target surface through a multimode optical fiber component, and then enters and interferes in a [3x3] single-mode fiber coupler. Its working principle is elaborated on in this article. Preliminary experiments using a split Hopkins pressure bar (SHPB) device show that the new interferometer can successfully measure the velocity profiles of the metal specimen along the axial or radial direction. Further experiments on a one-stage gas gun are under consideration

  4. Dimensional stability of natural fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driscoll, Mark S. [Ultraviolet Light/Electron Beam (UV/EB) Technology Center, State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry (SUNY-ESF), 1 Forestry Drive, Syracuse, NY 13210 (United States); Smith, Jennifer L.; Woods, Sean; Tiss, Kenneth J. [Ultraviolet Light/Electron Beam (UV/EB) Technology Center, State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry (SUNY-ESF), 1 Forestry Drive, Syracuse, NY 13210 and Sustainable Construction Management and Engineering, SUNY-ESF (United States); Larsen, L. Scott [New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA), 17 Columbia Circle, Albany, NY 12203 (United States)

    2013-04-19

    One of the main problems associated with the use of natural fibers as reinforcing agents in composites is their uptake of moisture. Many natural fibers are lignocellulosic, which causes them to swell and shrink as the amount of available moisture changes. Swelling and shrinking can cause composites to prematurely fail. This paper presents the results of a preliminary study that considers the use of two different low molecular weight monomers, hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and hydroxyethyl acrylate (HEA), polymerized by electron beam ionizing radiation, to dimensionally stabilize natural fibers. Eight different treatments consisting of varying amounts of monomer, encapsulating agent, and cross-linkers, were evaluated for their ability to dimensionally stabilize sisal fiber. Results indicate that both polymerized HEA and HEMA can reduce the swelling of sisal fiber. The effectiveness of HEA and HEMA can be further enhanced with the use of a cross-linker (SR 454). The use of hydroxylated monomers to dimensionally stabilize natural fibers may play an important role in reducing delamination and improving fiber-resin adhesion in composites.

  5. Dimensional stability of natural fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Driscoll, Mark S.; Smith, Jennifer L.; Woods, Sean; Tiss, Kenneth J.; Larsen, L. Scott

    2013-01-01

    One of the main problems associated with the use of natural fibers as reinforcing agents in composites is their uptake of moisture. Many natural fibers are lignocellulosic, which causes them to swell and shrink as the amount of available moisture changes. Swelling and shrinking can cause composites to prematurely fail. This paper presents the results of a preliminary study that considers the use of two different low molecular weight monomers, hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and hydroxyethyl acrylate (HEA), polymerized by electron beam ionizing radiation, to dimensionally stabilize natural fibers. Eight different treatments consisting of varying amounts of monomer, encapsulating agent, and cross-linkers, were evaluated for their ability to dimensionally stabilize sisal fiber. Results indicate that both polymerized HEA and HEMA can reduce the swelling of sisal fiber. The effectiveness of HEA and HEMA can be further enhanced with the use of a cross-linker (SR 454). The use of hydroxylated monomers to dimensionally stabilize natural fibers may play an important role in reducing delamination and improving fiber-resin adhesion in composites.

  6. Optical Fiber Sensors Based on Fiber Ring Laser Demodulation Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wen-Ge; Zhang, Ya-Nan; Wang, Peng-Zhao; Wang, Jian-Zhang

    2018-02-08

    A review for optical fiber sensors based on fiber ring laser (FRL) demodulation technology is presented. The review focuses on the principles, main structures, and the sensing performances of different kinds of optical fiber sensors based on FRLs. First of all, the theory background of the sensors has been discussed. Secondly, four different types of sensors are described and compared, which includes Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) typed sensors, Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) typed sensors, Sagnac typed sensors, and fiber Bragg grating (FBG) typed sensors. Typical studies and main properties of each type of sensors are presented. Thirdly, a comparison of different types of sensors are made. Finally, the existing problems and future research directions are pointed out and analyzed.

  7. Multiplexed displacement fiber sensor using thin core fiber exciter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhen; Hefferman, Gerald; Wei, Tao

    2015-06-01

    This letter reports a multiplexed optical displacement sensor using a thin core fiber (TCF) exciter. The TCF exciter is followed by a stripped single mode optical fiber. A small section of buffer is used as the movable component along the single mode fiber. Ultra-weak cladding mode reflection (< - 75 dB) was employed to probe the refractive index discontinuity between the air and buffer coating boundary. The position change of the movable buffer segment results in a delay change of the cladding mode reflection. Thus, it is a measure of the displacement of the buffer segment with respect to the glass fiber. The insertion loss of one sensor was measured to be less than 3 dB. A linear relationship was evaluated between the measurement position and absolute position of the moving actuator. Multiplexed capability was demonstrated and no cross talk was found between the sensors.

  8. SBIR-Long fluoride fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Raymond E.; Vacha, Lubos J.

    1987-08-01

    This report summarizes results obtained under a program aimed at developing new techniques for fabricating long lengths of heavy metal fluoride glass (HMFG) optical fiber. A new method for overcladding conventional HMFG preforms with a low melting oxide glass was developed, and improvements in the rotational casting method were made to increase preform length. The resulting composite glass canes consist of a fluoride glass overcoat layer to enhance strength and chemical durability. To show feasibility, prototype optical fiber preforms up to 1.6 cm in diameter with lengths of 22 cm were fabricated. These were drawn into optical fibers with lengths up to 900 meters.

  9. All-fiber polarization switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knape, Harald; Margulis, Walter

    2007-03-01

    We report an all-fiber polarization switch made out of silica-based microstructured fiber suitable for Q-switching all-fiber lasers. Nanosecond high-voltage pulses are used to heat and expand an internal electrode to cause λ/2-polarization rotation in less than 10 ns for 1.5 μm light. The 10 cm long component has an experimentally measured optical insertion loss of 0.2 dB and a 0-10 kHz repetition frequency capacity and has been durability tested for more than 109 pulses.

  10. Use of optical fibers in spectrophotometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Lawrence W.

    1988-01-01

    The use of single or small numbers of fiber optic fibers in astronomical spectroscopy with the goal of greater spectrophotometric and radial velocity accuracy is discussed. The properties of multimode step index fibers which are most important for this application are outlined, as are laboratory tests of currently available fibers.

  11. Optical fiber communication — An overview

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fabrication of single mode fibers is very difficult and so the fiber is .... of waveguide dispersion depends on the fiber design like core radius, since the .... production reducing the water content in the fiber to below 10 parts per billion. 5. ..... Connectors of the same type must be compatible from one manufacturer to another. 3.

  12. Optical Fiber Thermometer Based on Fiber Bragg Gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosli, Ekbal Bin; Mohd. Noor, Uzer

    2018-03-01

    Fiber Bragg grating has generated much interest in use as sensors to measure strain, temperature, and other physical parameters. It also the most common component used to develop this sensor with the advantages of simple, intrinsic sensing elements, electrically passive operation, EMI immunity, high sensitivity, compact size and potentially low cost [6]. This paper reports the design of an optical fiber thermometer based on fiber Bragg gratings. The system was developed for detecting temperature and strain by monitoring the shift of Bragg wavelength. The shifting of Bragg wavelength is used to indicate the temperature and strain due to the change in the surrounding temperature and strain. When the temperature and strain reach the exact wavelength level of the system, the temperature and strain value will display on the Arduino liquid crystal display (LCD). The optical fiber will provide the broadband light source and after passing the FBG the Bragg wavelength into the optical spectrum analyzer (OSA). The system is based on FBG as a physical quantity sensor. The temperatures measured is taken from the water bath and that of the strain is provided by amount of slotted mass used. The outcome of this project is to characterize the Bragg wavelength shifting from the fiber Bragg grating output. As the conclusion, this project provides an efficient optical fiber thermometer in measuring temperature and strain in order to replace the use of conventional electrical instruments.

  13. Enhancing Optical Communications with Brand New Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morioka, Toshio; Awaji, Yoshinari; Ryf, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Optical fibers have often been considered to offer effectively infinite capacity to support the rapid traffic growth essential to our information society. However, as demand has grown and technology has developed, we have begun to realize that there is a fundamental limit to fiber capacity of ~ 100...... Tb/s per fiber for systems based on conventional single-core single-mode optical fiber as the transmission medium. This limit arises from the interplay of a number of factors including the Shannon limit, optical fiber nonlinearities, the fiber fuse effect, as well as optical amplifier bandwidth...... new fibers for space-division multiplexing and mode-division multiplexing....

  14. Ethanol extraction of phytosterols from corn fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Charles; Beery, Kyle E.; Binder, Thomas P.; Rammelsberg, Anne M.

    2010-11-16

    The present invention provides a process for extracting sterols from a high solids, thermochemically hydrolyzed corn fiber using ethanol as the extractant. The process includes obtaining a corn fiber slurry having a moisture content from about 20 weight percent to about 50 weight percent solids (high solids content), thermochemically processing the corn fiber slurry having high solids content of 20 to 50% to produce a hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry, dewatering the hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry to achieve a residual corn fiber having a moisture content from about 30 to 80 weight percent solids, washing the residual corn fiber, dewatering the washed, hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry to achieve a residual corn fiber having a moisture content from about 30 to 80 weight percent solids, and extracting the residual corn fiber with ethanol and separating at least one sterol.

  15. Direct writing of fiber optic components in photonic crystal fibers and other specialty fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Luis Andre; Sezerman, Omur; Best, Garland; Ng, Mi Li; Kane, Saidou

    2016-04-01

    Femtosecond direct laser writing has recently shown great potential for the fabrication of complex integrated devices in the cladding of optical fibers. Such devices have the advantage of requiring no bulk optical components and no breaks in the fiber path, thus reducing the need for complicated alignment, eliminating contamination, and increasing stability. This technology has already found applications using combinations of Bragg gratings, interferometers, and couplers for the fabrication of optical filters, sensors, and power monitors. The femtosecond laser writing method produces a local modification of refractive index through non-linear absorption of the ultrafast laser pulses inside the dielectric material of both the core and cladding of the fiber. However, fiber geometries that incorporate air or hollow structures, such as photonic crystal fibers (PCFs), still present a challenge since the index modification regions created by the writing process cannot be generated in the hollow regions of the fiber. In this work, the femtosecond laser method is used together with a pre-modification method that consists of partially collapsing the hollow holes using an electrical arc discharge. The partial collapse of the photonic band gap structure provides a path for femtosecond laser written waveguides to couple light from the core to the edge of the fiber for in-line power monitoring. This novel approach is expected to have applications in other specialty fibers such as suspended core fibers and can open the way for the integration of complex devices and facilitate miniaturization of optical circuits to take advantage of the particular characteristics of the PCFs.

  16. Carbon Fiber Technology Facility (CFTF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Functionally within the MDF, ORNL operates DOE’s unique Carbon Fiber Technology Facility (CFTF)—a 42,000 ft2 innovative technology facility and works with leading...

  17. Nanomechanics of electrospun phospholipid fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, Ana C., E-mail: anac@food.dtu.dk, E-mail: ioach@food.dtu.dk; Chronakis, Ioannis S., E-mail: anac@food.dtu.dk, E-mail: ioach@food.dtu.dk [Technical University of Denmark, DTU-Food, Søltofts Plads B227, DK-2800, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Nikogeorgos, Nikolaos; Lee, Seunghwan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2015-06-01

    Electrospun asolectin phospholipid fibers were prepared using isooctane as a solvent and had an average diameter of 6.1 ± 2.7 μm. Their mechanical properties were evaluated by nanoindentation using Atomic Force Microscopy, and their elastic modulus was found to be approximately 17.2 ± 1 MPa. At a cycle of piezo expansion-retraction (loading-unloading) of a silicon tip on a fiber, relatively high adhesion was observed during unloading. It is proposed that this was primarily due to molecular rearrangements at the utmost layers of the fiber caused by the indentation of the hydrophilic tip. The phospholipid fibers were shown to be stable in ambient conditions, preserving the modulus of elasticity up to 24 h.

  18. Nanomechanics of electrospun phospholipid fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mendes, Ana Carina Loureiro; Nikogeorgos, Nikolaos; Lee, Seunghwan

    2015-01-01

    Electrospun asolectin phospholipid fibers were prepared using isooctane as a solvent and had an average diameter of 6.1 +/- 2.7 mu m. Their mechanical properties were evaluated by nanoindentation using Atomic Force Microscopy, and their elastic modulus was found to be approximately 17.2 +/- 1MPa....... At a cycle of piezo expansion-retraction (loading-unloading) of a silicon tip on a fiber, relatively high adhesion was observed during unloading. It is proposed that this was primarily due to molecular rearrangements at the utmost layers of the fiber caused by the indentation of the hydrophilic tip....... The phospholipid fibers were shown to be stable in ambient conditions, preserving the modulus of elasticity up to 24 h. (c) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC....

  19. Fiber Optics: A Bright Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, James, Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Presents an overview of the impact of fiber optics on telecommunications and its application to information processing and library services, including information retrieval, news services, remote transmission of library services, and library networking. (RAA)

  20. Application of Fiber Optic Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, William Lance; Parker, Allen R., Jr.; Ko, William L.; Piazza, Anthony; Chan, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Fiber optic sensing technology has emerged in recent years offering tremendous advantages over conventional aircraft instrumentation systems. The advantages of fiber optic sensors over their conventional counterparts are well established; they are lighter, smaller, and can provide enormous numbers of measurements at a fraction of the total sensor weight. After a brief overview of conventional and fiber-optic sensing technology, this paper presents an overview of the research that has been conducted at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center in recent years to advance this promising new technology. Research and development areas include system and algorithm development, sensor characterization and attachment, and real-time experimentally-derived parameter monitoring for ground- and flight-based applications. The vision of fiber optic smart structure technology is presented and its potential benefits to aerospace vehicles throughout the lifecycle, from preliminary design to final retirement, are presented.

  1. High performance polyethylene nanocomposite fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dorigato

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A high density polyethylene (HDPE matrix was melt compounded with 2 vol% of dimethyldichlorosilane treated fumed silica nanoparticles. Nanocomposite fibers were prepared by melt spinning through a co-rotating twin screw extruder and drawing at 125°C in air. Thermo-mechanical and morphological properties of the resulting fibers were then investigated. The introduction of nanosilica improved the drawability of the fibers, allowing the achievement of higher draw ratios with respect to the neat matrix. The elastic modulus and creep stability of the fibers were remarkably improved upon nanofiller addition, with a retention of the pristine tensile properties at break. Transmission electronic microscope (TEM images evidenced that the original morphology of the silica aggregates was disrupted by the applied drawing.

  2. All-optical fiber compressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, Luben M.

    2015-01-01

    A simple all-optical fiber compressor, based on an idea of dispersion management using a fiber of positive dispersion in the first part and of negative dispersion in the second one at the working wavelength, is investigated. The method allows a combination of the advantages of the classic fiber-grating and of the multisoliton compression. It is possible to improve substantially the quality of the compressed pulse compared to the multisoliton compression. The compression factor could be increased up to 2-2.5 times when the fraction of the input pulse energy appearing within the compressed pulse enhances more than 2 times. Thus, the peak power of the compressed pulse is able to increase about 5 times and the quality of the obtained pulses should be comparable with those obtained by the fiber-grating compressor

  3. Influence of forming conditions on fiber tilt

    Science.gov (United States)

    David W. Vahey; John M. Considine; Michael A. and MacGregor

    2013-01-01

    Fiber tilt describes the projection of fiber length in the thickness direction of paper. The projection is described by the tilt angle of fibers with respect to the plane of the sheet. A simple model for fiber tilt is based on jet-to-wire velocity differential in combination with cross-flows on the wire. The tilt angle of a fiber is found to vary as the sine of its in-...

  4. Engineering modes in optical fibers with metamaterial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Min; Mortensen, Asger; Qiu, Min

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we report a preliminary theoretical study on optical fibers with fine material inclusions whose geometrical inhomogeneity is almost indistinguishable by the operating wavelength.We refer to such fibers as metamaterial optical fibers, which can conceptually be considered...... as an extension from the previously much publicized microstructured optical fibers. Metamaterials can have optical properties not obtainable in naturally existing materials, including artificial anisotropy as well as graded material properties. Therefore, incorporation of metamaterial in optical fiber designs can...

  5. Fundamentals of plastic optical fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Koike, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Polymer photonics is an interdisciplinary field which demands excellence both in optics (photonics) and materials science (polymer). However, theses disciplines have developed independently, and therefore the demand for a comprehensive work featuring the fundamentals of photonic polymers is greater than ever.This volume focuses on Polymer Optical Fiber and their applications. The first part of the book introduces typical optical fibers according to their classifications of material, propagating mode, and structure. Optical properties, the high bandwidth POF and transmission loss are discussed,

  6. Fiber Arts and Generative Justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Kuhn

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The fiber arts, because they are practiced in different forms around the globe, have the potential to teach us much about generative justice that unites labor, ecological, and expressive values. The ecological mutualism documented in Navajo corrals supports traditional weaving, dyeing, food, and medicinal practices in a sustainable and generative cycle that survives despite disruption and exploitation. The network of fiber craftspeople, retailers, ranchers, teachers, spinners, and dyers and their organizations supports the social mutualism of fiber communities. Fiber arts practices can benefit individuals, communities, the environment, and public health, among other things. Conscious fiber activism and critical making can also be used to explicitly draw attention to problems such as overconsumption, waste, industrial “fast fashion,” labor exploitation, environmental degradation, toxic risks, intolerance, and the devaluing of women and their work. Fiber arts have the potential to support environmental and social mutualism and catalyze a new aesthetic of long-term attachment to meaningful objects and communities, reinforcing the creation and conservation of expressive, ecological, and labor value. 

  7. Advanced specialty fiber designs for high power fiber lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Guancheng

    The output power of fiber lasers has increased rapidly over the last decade. There are two major limiting factors, namely nonlinear effects and transverse mode instability, prohibiting the power scaling capability of fiber lasers. The nonlinear effects, originating from high optical intensity, primarily limit the peak power scaling. The mode instability, on the other hand, arises from quantum-defect driven heating, causing undesired mode coupling once the power exceeds the threshold and degradation of beam quality. The mode instability has now become the bottleneck for average output power scaling of fiber lasers. Mode area scaling is the most effective way to mitigate nonlinear effects. However, the use of large mode area may increase the tendency to support multiple modes in the core, resulting in lower mode instability threshold. Therefore, it is critical to maintain single mode operation in a large mode area fiber. Sufficient higher order mode suppression can lead to effective single-transverse-mode propagation. In this dissertation, we explore the feasibility of using specialty fiber to construct high power fiber lasers with robust single-mode output. The first type of fiber discussed is the resonantly-enhanced leakage channel fiber. Coherent reflection at the fiber outer boundary can lead to additional confinement especially for highly leaky HOM, leading to lower HOM losses than what are predicted by conventional finite element mothod mode solver considering infinite cladding. In this work, we conducted careful measurements of HOM losses in two leakage channel fibers (LCF) with circular and rounded hexagonal boundary shapes respectively. Impact on HOM losses from coiling, fiber boundary shapes and coating indexes were studied in comparison to simulations. This work demonstrates the limit of the simulation method commonly used in the large-mode-area fiber designs and the need for an improved approach. More importantly, this work also demonstrates that a

  8. Optical fiber inspection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Francis W.

    1987-01-01

    A remote optical inspection system including an inspection head. The inspection head has a passageway through which pellets or other objects are passed. A window is provided along the passageway through which light is beamed against the objects being inspected. A plurality of lens assemblies are arranged about the window so that reflected light can be gathered and transferred to a plurality of coherent optical fiber light guides. The light guides transfer the light images to a television or other image transducer which converts the optical images into a representative electronic signal. The electronic signal can then be displayed on a signal viewer such as a television monitor for inspection by a person. A staging means can be used to support the objects for viewing through the window. Routing means can be used to direct inspected objects into appropriate exit passages for accepted or rejected objects. The inspected objects are advantageously fed in a singular manner to the staging means and routing means. The inspection system is advantageously used in an enclosure when toxic or hazardous materials are being inspected.

  9. Photonic bandgap fiber lasers and multicore fiber lasers for next generation high power lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shirakawa, A.; Chen, M.; Suzuki, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Photonic bandgap fiber lasers are realizing new laser spectra and nonlinearity mitigation that a conventional fiber laser cannot. Multicore fiber lasers are a promising tool for power scaling by coherent beam combination. © 2014 OSA....

  10. Nova técnica de transferência de cordas para sustentação das cúspides da valva mitral, após abertura completa de suas comissuras New technique for transference of chordae tendinae following mitral commissurotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alberto Caliani

    1988-08-01

    Full Text Available Desde 1983, 40 pacientes consecutivos, portadores de estenose mitral com alterações subvalvares, tais como: fusão e encurtamento das cordas, associadas a sinéquia dos músculos papilares, foram submetidos a comissurotomia mitral a "céu aberto". Com o intuito de ganhar área efetiva maior de abertura da valva mitral (sem restrições, as comissuras foram abertas, amplamente, às vezes não respeitando as cordas que sustentam as cúspides. A insuficiência mitral provocada, em 4 casos, como conseqüência, foi corrigida mediante a transferência de 2 a 6 cordas, ao nível da borda livre da cúspide anterior, ou posterior, da valva, na região das comissuras. A presença de uma regurgitação central por falha na coaptação das cúspides valvares, foi tratada, em 12 casos, com o implante de anel profético de Carpentier. As anomalias do aparelho subvalvar foram abordadas pelas técnicas convencionais: desbridamento, ressecção e abertura dos músculos papilares. Dos 38 sobreviventes, 32 não apresentam sopro de regurgitação mitral e os 6 restantes, apenas sopro sistólico de +/+ +. A avaliação pós-operatória, mediante ecocardiografia bidemensional, demonstrou abertura valvar satisfatória e ausência de estenose residual. Os pacientes que apresentam sopro sistólico mitral residual foram estudados com Doppler, concluindo que se trata de regurgitação bem localizada e sem repercussão hemodinâmica. Esta nova técnica operatória pode ser "extensível" ao tratamento do prolapso da valva mitral.Since 1983, 40 consecutive patients with mitral stenosis and significant disease of the subvalvular apparatus underwent open heart mitral commissurotomy. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of an unrestricted dilatation of the two commissures followed by repair of the subsequent mitral regurgitation. The mitral regurgitation created by this procedure in 24 cases was corrected by transferring 2 to 6 chordae tendinae to the free border

  11. Hybrid Effect Evaluation of Steel Fiber and Carbon Fiber on the Performance of the Fiber Reinforced Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Weimin; Yin, Jian

    2016-08-18

    Fiber reinforcement is an important method to enhance the performance of concrete. In this study, the compressive test and impact test were conducted, and then the hybrid effect between steel fiber (SF) and carbon fiber (CF) was evaluated by employing the hybrid effect index. Compressive toughness and impact toughness of steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC), carbon fiber reinforced concrete (CFRC) and hybrid fiber reinforced concrete (HFRC) were explored at steel fiber volume fraction 0.5%, 1%, 1.5% and carbon fiber 0.1%, 0.2%, 0.3%. Results showed that the addition of steel fiber and carbon fiber can increase the compressive strength. SF, CF and the hybridization between them could increase the compressive toughness significantly. The impact test results showed that as the volume of fiber increased, the impact number of the first visible crack and the ultimate failure also increased. The improvement of toughness mainly lay in improving the crack resistance after the first crack. Based on the test results, the positive hybrid effect of steel fiber and carbon fiber existed in hybrid fiber reinforced concrete. The relationship between the compressive toughness and impact toughness was also explored.

  12. Fiber optic muzzle brake tip for reducing fiber burnback and stone retropulsion during thulium fiber laser lithotripsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchens, Thomas C.; Gonzalez, David A.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2017-01-01

    The experimental thulium fiber laser (TFL) is being explored as an alternative to the current clinical gold standard Holmium:YAG laser for lithotripsy. The near single-mode TFL beam allows coupling of higher power into smaller optical fibers than the multimode Holmium laser beam profile, without proximal fiber tip degradation. A smaller fiber is desirable because it provides more space in the ureteroscope working channel for increased saline irrigation rates and allows maximum ureteroscope deflection. However, distal fiber tip burnback increases as fiber diameter decreases. Previous studies utilizing hollow steel sheaths around recessed distal fiber tips reduced fiber burnback but increased stone retropulsion. A "fiber muzzle brake" was tested for reducing both fiber burnback and stone retropulsion by manipulating vapor bubble expansion. TFL lithotripsy studies were performed at 1908 nm, 35 mJ, 500 μs, and 300 Hz using a 100-μm-core fiber. The optimal stainless steel muzzle brake tip tested consisted of a 1-cm-long, 560-μm-outer-diameter, 360-μm-inner-diameter tube with a 275-μm-diameter through hole located 250 μm from the distal end. The fiber tip was recessed a distance of 500 μm. Stone phantom retropulsion, fiber tip burnback, and calcium oxalate stone ablation studies were performed ex vivo. Small stones with a mass of 40±4 mg and 4-mm-diameter were ablated over a 1.5-mm sieve in 25±4 s (n=10) without visible distal fiber tip burnback. Reduction in stone phantom retropulsion distance by 50% and 85% was observed when using muzzle brake tips versus 100-μm-core bare fibers and hollow steel tip fibers, respectively. The muzzle brake fiber tip simultaneously provided efficient stone ablation, reduced stone retropulsion, and minimal fiber degradation during TFL lithotripsy.

  13. Method for the preparation of carbon fiber from polyolefin fiber precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naskar, Amit Kumar; Hunt, Marcus Andrew; Saito, Tomonori

    2017-11-28

    Methods for the preparation of carbon fiber from polyolefin fiber precursor, wherein the polyolefin fiber precursor is partially sulfonated and then carbonized to produce carbon fiber. Methods for producing hollow carbon fibers, wherein the hollow core is circular- or complex-shaped, are also described. Methods for producing carbon fibers possessing a circular- or complex-shaped outer surface, which may be solid or hollow, are also described.

  14. Advanced ultrafast fiber laser sources enabled by fiber nonlinearities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wei

    2017-05-15

    Development of high power/energy ultrafast fiber lasers for scientific research and industrial applications is one of the most exciting fields in ultrafast optics. This thesis demonstrated new means to improve two essential properties - which are indispensable for novel applications such as high-harmonic generation (HHG) and multiphoton microscopy (MPM) - of an ultrafast fiber laser system: energy scaling capability and wavelength tunability. High photon-flux extreme ultraviolet sources enabled by HHG desire high power (>100 W), high repetition-rate (>1 MHz) ultrafast driving laser sources. We have constructed from scratch a high-power Yb-fiber laser system using the well-known chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) technique. Such a CPA system capable of producing ∝200-W average power consists of a monolithic Yb-fiber oscillator, an all-fiber stretcher, a pre-amplifier chain, a main amplifier constructed from rode-type large pitch fiber, and a diffraction-grating based compressor. To increase the HHG efficiency, ultrafast pulses with duration <60 fs are highly desired. We proposed and demonstrated a novel amplification technique, named as pre-chirp managed amplification (PCMA). We successfully constructed an Yb-fiber based PCMA system that outputs 75-MHz spectrally broadened pulses with >130-W average power. The amplified pulses are compressed to 60-fs pulses with 100-W average power, constituting a suitable HHG driving source. MPM is a powerful biomedical imaging tool, featuring larger penetration depth while providing the capability of optical sectioning. Although femtosecond solid-state lasers have been widely accepted as the standard option as MPM driving sources, fiber-based sources have received growing research efforts due to their superior performance. In the second part of this thesis, we both theoretically and experimentally demonstrated a new method of producing wavelength widely tunable femtosecond pulses for driving MPM. We employed self-phase modulation

  15. NaCl responsive taste cells in the mouse fungiform taste buds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, R; Horio, N; Murata, Y; Yasumatsu, K; Shigemura, N; Ninomiya, Y

    2009-03-17

    Previous studies have demonstrated that rodents' chorda tympani (CT) nerve fibers responding to NaCl can be classified according to their sensitivities to the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) blocker amiloride into two groups: amiloride-sensitive (AS) and -insensitive (AI). The AS fibers were shown to respond specifically to NaCl, whereas AI fibers broadly respond to various electrolytes, including NaCl. These data suggest that salt taste transduction in taste cells may be composed of at least two different systems; AS and AI ones. To further address this issue, we investigated the responses to NaCl, KCl and HCl and the amiloride sensitivity of mouse fungiform papilla taste bud cells which are innervated by the CT nerve. Comparable with the CT data, the results indicated that 56 NaCl-responsive cells tested were classified into two groups; 25 cells ( approximately 44%) narrowly responded to NaCl and their NaCl response were inhibited by amiloride (AS cells), whereas the remaining 31 cells ( approximately 56%) responded not only to NaCl, but to KCl and/or HCl and showed no amiloride inhibition of NaCl responses (AI cells). Amiloride applied to the basolateral side of taste cells had no effect on NaCl responses in the AS and AI cells. Single cell reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) experiments indicated that ENaC subunit mRNA was expressed in a subset of AS cells. These findings suggest that the mouse fungiform taste bud is composed of AS and AI cells that can transmit taste information differently to their corresponding types of CT fibers, and apical ENaCs may be involved in the NaCl responses of AS cells.

  16. Brillouin lasing in single-mode tapered optical fiber with inscribed fiber Bragg grating array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Popov

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available A tapered optical fiber has been manufactured with an array of fiber Bragg gratings (FBG inscribed during the drawing process. The total fiber peak reflectivity is 5% and the reflection bandwidth is ∼3.5 nm. A coherent frequency domain reflectometry has been applied for precise profiling of the fiber core diameter and grating reflectivity both distributed along the whole fiber length. These measurements are in a good agreement with the specific features of Brillouin lasing achieved in the semi-open fiber cavity configuration. Keywords: Tapered optical fibers, Fiber Bragg gratings, Random lasers

  17. Bonding Properties of Basalt Fiber and Strength Reduction According to Fiber Orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeong-Il; Lee, Bang Yeon

    2015-09-30

    The basalt fiber is a promising reinforcing fiber because it has a relatively higher tensile strength and a density similar to that of a concrete matrix as well as no corrosion possibility. This study investigated experimentally the bonding properties of basalt fiber with cementitious material as well as the effect of fiber orientation on the tensile strength of basalt fiber for evaluating basalt fiber's suitability as a reinforcing fiber. Single fiber pullout tests were performed and then the tensile strength of fiber was measured according to fiber orientation. The test results showed that basalt fiber has a strong chemical bond with the cementitious matrix, 1.88 times higher than that of polyvinyl alcohol fibers with it. However, other properties of basalt fiber such as slip-hardening coefficient and strength reduction coefficient were worse than PVA and polyethylene fibers in terms of fiber bridging capacity. Theoretical fiber-bridging curves showed that the basalt fiber reinforcing system has a higher cracking strength than the PVA fiber reinforcing system, but the reinforcing system showed softening behavior after cracking.

  18. Toward a compact fibered squeezing parametric source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brieussel, Alexandre; Ott, Konstantin; Joos, Maxime; Treps, Nicolas; Fabre, Claude

    2018-03-15

    In this work, we investigate three different compact fibered systems generating vacuum squeezing that involve optical cavities limited by the end surface of a fiber and by a curved mirror and containing a thin parametric crystal. These systems have the advantage to couple squeezed states directly to a fiber, allowing the user to benefit from the flexibility of fibers in the use of squeezing. Three types of fibers are investigated: standard single-mode fibers, photonic-crystal large-mode-area single-mode fibers, and short multimode fibers taped to a single-mode fiber. The observed squeezing is modest (-0.56  dB, -0.9  dB, -1  dB), but these experiments open the way for miniaturized squeezing devices that could be a very interesting advantage in scaling up quantum systems for quantum processing, opening new perspectives in the domain of integrated quantum optics.

  19. Fiber optic fire detection technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hering, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    Electrostatic application of paint was, and still is, the most technically feasible method of reducing VOC (volatile organic compounds) emissions, while reducing the cost to apply the coatings. Prior to the use of electrostatics, only two sides of the traditional fire triangle were normally present in the booth, fuel (solvent), and oxygen (air). Now the third leg (the ignition source) was present at virtually all times during the production operation in the form of the electrostatic charge and the resulting energy in the system. The introduction of fiber optics into the field of fire detection was for specific application to the electrostatic painting industry, but specifically, robots used in the application of electrostatic painting in the automotive industry. The use of fiber optics in this hazard provided detection for locations that have been previously prohibited or inaccessible with the traditional fire detection systems. The fiber optic technology that has been adapted to the field of fire detection operates on the principle of transmission of photons through a light guide (optic fiber). When the light guide is subjected to heat, the cladding on the light guide melts away from the core and allows the light (photons) to escape. The controller, which contains the emitter and receiver is set-up to distinguish between partial loss of light and a total loss of light. Glass optical fibers carrying light offer distinct advantages over wires or coaxial cables carrying electricity as a transmission media. The uses of fiber optic detection will be expanded in the near future into such areas as aircraft, cable trays and long conveyor runs because fiber optics can carry more information and deliver it with greater clarity over longer distances with total immunity to all kinds of electrical interference

  20. Fiber-Optic Vibration Sensor Based on Multimode Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Lujo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present a fiberoptic vibration sensor based on the monitoring of the mode distribution in a multimode optical fiber. Detection of vibrations and their parameters is possible through observation of the output speckle pattern from the multimode optical fiber. A working experimental model has been built in which all used components are widely available and cheap: a CCD camera (a simple web-cam, a multimode laser in visible range as a light source, a length of multimode optical fiber, and a computer for signal processing. Measurements have shown good agreement with the actual frequency of vibrations, and promising results were achieved with the amplitude measurements although they require some adaptation of the experimental model. Proposed sensor is cheap and lightweight and therefore presents an interesting alternative for monitoring large smart structures.

  1. Preliminary characterization of glass fiber sizing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Helga Nørgaard; Kusano, Yukihiro; Brøndsted, Povl

    2013-01-01

    Glass fiber surfaces are treated with sizing during manufacturing. Sizing consists of several components, including a film former and a silane coupling agent that is important for adhesion between glass fibers and a matrix. Although the sizing highly affects the composite interface and thus...... the strength of the composites, little is known about the structure and chemistry of the sizing. A part of sizing was extracted by soxhlet extraction. The fibers were subsequently burned and some fibers were merely burned for analysis of glass fiber and sizing. The results showed that the analyzed fibers had...

  2. Generation of non-overlapping fiber architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chapelle, Lucie; Lévesque, M.; Brøndsted, Povl

    2015-01-01

    and polymer networks. The model takes into account the complex geometry of the fiber arrangement in which a fiber can be modeled with a certain degree of bending while keeping a main fiber orientation. The model is built in two steps. First, fibers are generated as a chain of overlapping spheres or as a chain......: a repulsion force to suppress the overlap between two fibers and a bending and stretching force to ensure that the fiber structure is kept unchanged. The model can be used as the geometrical basis for further finite-element modelling....

  3. Carbon nanotube fiber spun from wetted ribbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuntian T; Arendt, Paul; Zhang, Xiefei; Li, Qingwen; Fu, Lei; Zheng, Lianxi

    2014-04-29

    A fiber of carbon nanotubes was prepared by a wet-spinning method involving drawing carbon nanotubes away from a substantially aligned, supported array of carbon nanotubes to form a ribbon, wetting the ribbon with a liquid, and spinning a fiber from the wetted ribbon. The liquid can be a polymer solution and after forming the fiber, the polymer can be cured. The resulting fiber has a higher tensile strength and higher conductivity compared to dry-spun fibers and to wet-spun fibers prepared by other methods.

  4. Simulation of Compressive Failure in Fiber Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veluri, Badrinath; Jensen, Henrik Myhre

    Kinkband formation is a non-linear phenomenon involving interacting effects of non-linear material behavior of the matrix materials and fiber buckling including fiber misalignment in fiber composites under compressive loading. Taking into account the non-linearties of the constituents a constitut......Kinkband formation is a non-linear phenomenon involving interacting effects of non-linear material behavior of the matrix materials and fiber buckling including fiber misalignment in fiber composites under compressive loading. Taking into account the non-linearties of the constituents...

  5. Photonic Crystal Fibers for Sensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. R. Pinto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Photonic crystal fibers are a kind of fiber optics that present a diversity of new and improved features beyond what conventional optical fibers can offer. Due to their unique geometric structure, photonic crystal fibers present special properties and capabilities that lead to an outstanding potential for sensing applications. A review of photonic crystal fiber sensors is presented. Two different groups of sensors are detailed separately: physical and biochemical sensors, based on the sensor measured parameter. Several sensors have been reported until the date, and more are expected to be developed due to the remarkable characteristics such fibers can offer.

  6. Fiber optic evanescent wave biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duveneck, Gert L.; Ehrat, Markus; Widmer, H. M.

    1991-09-01

    The role of modern analytical chemistry is not restricted to quality control and environmental surveillance, but has been extended to process control using on-line analytical techniques. Besides industrial applications, highly specific, ultra-sensitive biochemical analysis becomes increasingly important as a diagnostic tool, both in central clinical laboratories and in the doctor's office. Fiber optic sensor technology can fulfill many of the requirements for both types of applications. As an example, the experimental arrangement of a fiber optic sensor for biochemical affinity assays is presented. The evanescent electromagnetic field, associated with a light ray guided in an optical fiber, is used for the excitation of luminescence labels attached to the biomolecules in solution to be analyzed. Due to the small penetration depth of the evanescent field into the medium, the generation of luminescence is restricted to the close proximity of the fiber, where, e.g., the luminescent analyte molecules combine with their affinity partners, which are immobilized on the fiber. Both cw- and pulsed light excitation can be used in evanescent wave sensor technology, enabling the on-line observation of an affinity assay on a macroscopic time scale (seconds and minutes), as well as on a microscopic, molecular time scale (nanoseconds or microseconds).

  7. Advanced ultrafast fiber laser sources enabled by fiber nonlinearities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Wei

    2017-05-01

    Development of high power/energy ultrafast fiber lasers for scientific research and industrial applications is one of the most exciting fields in ultrafast optics. This thesis demonstrated new means to improve two essential properties - which are indispensable for novel applications such as high-harmonic generation (HHG) and multiphoton microscopy (MPM) - of an ultrafast fiber laser system: energy scaling capability and wavelength tunability. High photon-flux extreme ultraviolet sources enabled by HHG desire high power (>100 W), high repetition-rate (>1 MHz) ultrafast driving laser sources. We have constructed from scratch a high-power Yb-fiber laser system using the well-known chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) technique. Such a CPA system capable of producing ∝200-W average power consists of a monolithic Yb-fiber oscillator, an all-fiber stretcher, a pre-amplifier chain, a main amplifier constructed from rode-type large pitch fiber, and a diffraction-grating based compressor. To increase the HHG efficiency, ultrafast pulses with duration 130-W average power. The amplified pulses are compressed to 60-fs pulses with 100-W average power, constituting a suitable HHG driving source. MPM is a powerful biomedical imaging tool, featuring larger penetration depth while providing the capability of optical sectioning. Although femtosecond solid-state lasers have been widely accepted as the standard option as MPM driving sources, fiber-based sources have received growing research efforts due to their superior performance. In the second part of this thesis, we both theoretically and experimentally demonstrated a new method of producing wavelength widely tunable femtosecond pulses for driving MPM. We employed self-phase modulation to broaden a narrowband spectrum followed by bandpass filters to select the rightmost/leftmost spectral lobes. Widely tunable in 820-1225 nm, the resulting sources generated nearly transform-limited, ∝100 fs pulses. Using short fibers with large

  8. Modal noise impact in radio over fiber multimode fiber links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasulla, I; Capmany, J

    2008-01-07

    A novel analysis is given on the statistics of modal noise for a graded-index multimode fiber (MMF) link excited by an analog intensity modulated laser diode. We present the speckle contrast as a function of the power spectrum of the modulated source and the transfer function of the MMF which behaves as an imperfect transversal microwave photonic filter. The theoretical results confirm that the modal noise is directly connected with the coherence properties of the optical source and show that the performance of high-frequency Radio Over Fiber (ROF) transmission through MMF links for short and middle reach distances is not substantially degraded by modal noise.

  9. Bonding Properties of Basalt Fiber and Strength Reduction According to Fiber Orientation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Il Choi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The basalt fiber is a promising reinforcing fiber because it has a relatively higher tensile strength and a density similar to that of a concrete matrix as well as no corrosion possibility. This study investigated experimentally the bonding properties of basalt fiber with cementitious material as well as the effect of fiber orientation on the tensile strength of basalt fiber for evaluating basalt fiber’s suitability as a reinforcing fiber. Single fiber pullout tests were performed and then the tensile strength of fiber was measured according to fiber orientation. The test results showed that basalt fiber has a strong chemical bond with the cementitious matrix, 1.88 times higher than that of polyvinyl alcohol fibers with it. However, other properties of basalt fiber such as slip-hardening coefficient and strength reduction coefficient were worse than PVA and polyethylene fibers in terms of fiber bridging capacity. Theoretical fiber-bridging curves showed that the basalt fiber reinforcing system has a higher cracking strength than the PVA fiber reinforcing system, but the reinforcing system showed softening behavior after cracking.

  10. Hybrid photonic-crystal fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markos, Christos; Travers, John C.; Abdolvand, Amir

    2017-01-01

    This article offers an extensive survey of results obtained using hybrid photonic-crystal fibers (PCFs) which constitute one of the most active research fields in contemporary fiber optics. The ability to integrate novel and functional materials in solid- and hollow-core PCFs through various...... is reviewed from scientific and technological perspectives, focusing on how different fluids, solids, and gases can significantly extend the functionality of PCFs. The first part of this review discusses the efforts to develop tunable linear and nonlinear fiber-optic devices using PCFs infiltrated...... with various liquids, glasses, semiconductors, and metals. The second part concentrates on recent and state-of-the-art advances in the field of gas-filled hollow-core PCFs. Extreme ultrafast gas-based nonlinear optics toward light generation in the extreme wavelength regions of vacuum ultraviolet, pulse...

  11. A helical scintillating fiber hodoscope

    CERN Document Server

    Altmeier, M; Bisplinghoff, J; Bissel, T; Bollmann, R; Busch, M; Büsser, K; Colberg, T; Demiroers, L; Diehl, O; Dohrmann, F; Engelhardt, H P; Eversheim, P D; Felden, O; Gebel, R; Glende, M; Greiff, J; Gross, A; Gross-Hardt, R; Hinterberger, F; Jahn, R; Jeske, M; Jonas, E; Krause, H; Lahr, U; Langkau, R; Lindemann, T; Lindlein, J; Maier, R; Maschuw, R; Mayer-Kuckuck, T; Meinerzhagen, A; Naehle, O; Pfuff, M; Prasuhn, D; Rohdjess, H; Rosendaal, D; Von Rossen, P; Sanz, B; Schirm, N; Schulz-Rojahn, M; Schwarz, V; Scobel, W; Thomas, S; Trelle, H J; Weise, E; Wellinghausen, A; Wiedmann, W; Woller, K; Ziegler, R

    1999-01-01

    A novel scintillating fiber hodoscope in helically cylindric geometry has been developed for detection of low multiplicity events of fast protons and other light charged particles in the internal target experiment EDDA at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY. The hodoscope consists of 640 scintillating fibers (2.5 mm diameter), arranged in four layers surrounding the COSY beam pipe. The fibers are helically wound in opposing directions and read out individually using 16-channel photomultipliers connected to a modified commercial encoding system. The detector covers an angular range of 9 deg. <= THETA<=72 deg. and 0 deg. <=phi (cursive,open) Greek<=360 deg. in the lab frame. The detector length is 590 mm, the inner diameter 161 mm. Geometry and granularity of the hodoscope afford a position resolution of about 1.3 mm. The detector design took into consideration a maximum of reliability and a minimum of maintenance. An LED array may be used for monitoring purposes. (author)

  12. Diffraction by disordered polycrystalline fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroud, W.J.; Millane, R.P.

    1995-01-01

    X-ray diffraction patterns from some polycrystalline fibers show that the constituent microcrystallites are disordered. The relationship between the crystal structure and the diffracted intensities is then quite complicated and depends on the precise kind and degree of disorder present. The effects of disorder on diffracted intensities must be included in structure determinations using diffraction data from such specimens. Theory and algorithms are developed here that allow the full diffraction pattern to be calculated for a disordered polycrystalline fiber made up of helical molecules. The model accommodates various kinds of disorder and includes the effects of finite crystallite size and cylindrical averaging of the diffracted intensities from a fiber. Simulations using these methods show how different kinds, or components, of disorder produce particular diffraction effects. General properties of disordered arrays of helical molecules and their effects on diffraction patterns are described. Implications for structure determination are discussed. (orig.)

  13. Optical Fiber Grating based Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Susanne

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis differenct optical fiber gratings are used for sensor purposes. If a fiber with a core concentricity error (CCE) is used, a directional dependent bend sensor can be produced. The CCE direction can be determined by means of diffraction. This makes it possible to produce long......-period gratings in a fiber with a CCE direction parallel or perpendicular to the writing direction. The maximal bending sensitivity is independent on the writing direction, but the detailed bending response is different in the two cases. A temperature and strain sensor, based on a long-period grating and two...... sampled gratings, was produced and investigated. It is based on the different temperature and strain response of these gratings. Both a transfer matrix method and an overlap calculation is performed to explain the sensor response. Another type of sensor is based on tuning and modulation of a laser...

  14. Fiber tests on a radiotelescope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connes, P.; Reynaud, F.

    In order to demonstrate use of fibers in a future radio-dish-mounted interferometric array or optical telescopes, two 100-m SM fibers were installed on the Nançay radiotelescope, used in a serendipitous mode. They formed the two arms of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, illuminated by a 6328 Å laser. Thermal and interferometric servo-control were simultaneously applied. Even under severe conditions, path difference was maintained stable to within a few Å.This is considerably better than needed for any ground-based application, and still more than adequate for a roughly-similar proposed space-borne device. Some more fiber problems remain to be solved.

  15. Optical fiber meta-tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Principe, Maria; Micco, Alberto; Crescitelli, Alessio; Castaldi, Giuseppe; Consales, Marco; Esposito, Emanuela; La Ferrara, Vera; Galdi, Vincenzo; Cusano, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    We report on the first example of a "meta-tip" configuration that integrates a metasurface on the tip of an optical fiber. Our proposed design is based on an inverted-Babinet plasmonic metasurface obtained by patterning (via focused ion beam) a thin gold film deposited on the tip of an optical fiber, so as to realize an array of rectangular aperture nanoantennas with spatially modulated sizes. By properly tuning the resonances of the aperture nanoantennas, abrupt variations can be impressed in the field wavefront and polarization. We fabricated and characterized several proof-of-principle prototypes operating an near-infrared wavelengths, and implementing the beam-steering (with various angles) of the cross-polarized component, as well as the excitation of surface waves. Our results pave the way to the integration of the exceptional field-manipulation capabilities enabled by metasurfaces with the versatility and ubiquity of fiber-optics technological platforms.

  16. Comparison of fiber lasers based on distributed side-coupled cladding-pumped fibers and double-cladding fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhihe; Cao, Jianqiu; Guo, Shaofeng; Chen, Jinbao; Xu, Xiaojun

    2014-04-01

    We compare both analytically and numerically the distributed side-coupled cladding-pumped (DSCCP) fiber lasers and double cladding fiber (DCF) lasers. We show that, through optimization of the coupling and absorbing coefficients, the optical-to-optical efficiency of DSCCP fiber lasers can be made as high as that of DCF lasers. At the same time, DSCCP fiber lasers are better than the DCF lasers in terms of thermal management.

  17. Study on Mechanical Properties of Hybrid Fiber Reinforced Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Dongqing; Wu, Min; Jie, Pengyu

    2017-12-01

    Several common high elastic modulus fibers (steel fibers, basalt fibers, polyvinyl alcohol fibers) and low elastic modulus fibers (polypropylene fiber) are incorporated into the concrete, and its cube compressive strength, splitting tensile strength and flexural strength are studied. The test result and analysis demonstrate that single fiber and hybrid fiber will improve the integrity of the concrete at failure. The mechanical properties of hybrid steel fiber-polypropylene fiber reinforced concrete are excellent, and the cube compressive strength, splitting tensile strength and flexural strength respectively increase than plain concrete by 6.4%, 3.7%, 11.4%. Doped single basalt fiber or polypropylene fiber and basalt fibers hybrid has little effect on the mechanical properties of concrete. Polyvinyl alcohol fiber and polypropylene fiber hybrid exhibit ‘negative confounding effect’ on concrete, its splitting tensile and flexural strength respectively are reduced by 17.8% and 12.9% than the single-doped polyvinyl alcohol fiber concrete.

  18. Fiber optics principles and practices

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Azzawi, Abdul

    2007-01-01

    Since the invention of the laser, our fascination with the photon has led to one of the most dynamic and rapidly growing fields of technology. New advances in fiber optic devices, components, and materials make it more important than ever to stay current. Comprising chapters drawn from the author's highly anticipated book Photonics: Principles and Practices, Fiber Optics: Principles and Practices offers a detailed and focused treatment for anyone in need of authoritative information on this critical area underlying photonics.Using a consistent approach, the author leads you step-by-step throug

  19. Hollow fiber liquid supported membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Violante, V.

    1987-01-01

    The hollow fiber system are well known and developed in the scientific literature because of their applicability in the process separation units. The authors approach to a mathematical model for a particular hollow fiber system, usin liquid membranes. The model has been developed in order to obtain a suitable tool for a sensitivy analysis and for a scaling-up. This kind of investigation is very usefull from an engineering point of view, to get a spread range of information to build up a pilot plant from the laboratory scale

  20. Ring mirror fiber laser gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalaby, Mohamed Y.; Khalil, Kamal; Afifi, Abdelrahman E.; Khalil, Diaa

    2017-02-01

    In this work we present a new architecture for a laser gyroscope based on the use of a Sagnac fiber loop mirror. The proposed system has the unique property that its scale factor can be increased by increasing the gain of the optical amplifier used in the system as demonstrated experimentally using standard single mode fiber and explained physically by the system operation. The proposed gyroscope system is also capable of identifying the direction of rotation. This new structure opens the door for a new category of low cost optical gyroscopes.

  1. Electrically controlled liquid crystal fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corella-Madueño, A.; Reyes, J. Adrián

    2006-08-01

    We consider a cylindrical fiber whose core is a liquid crystal (LC) subject to the action of a low frequency field applied parallel to the axis of the cylinder and having initially the escaped configuration. We find the distorted textures of the nematic inside the cylinder by assuming arbitrary anchoring boundary conditions. In the optical limit we calculate the ray trajectories followed by a low intensity beam along the fiber parametrized by a low frequency electric field. Finally, we calculate exactly the spatial dependence of the transverse magnetic modes distribution in the guide, on the electric field, by using a numerical scheme. We summarize our paper and discuss our results.

  2. Coupling to photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Kristian G.; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard; Knudsen, Erik

    2002-01-01

    In this work we have analyzed the correspondence between the fundamental mode of PCFs and Gaussian modes as a function of frequency, pitch, and air hole size. Such analysis provides insight into design space regions of PCFs, where low-loss coupling to standard fibers may be obtained.......In this work we have analyzed the correspondence between the fundamental mode of PCFs and Gaussian modes as a function of frequency, pitch, and air hole size. Such analysis provides insight into design space regions of PCFs, where low-loss coupling to standard fibers may be obtained....

  3. Polarization-preserving holey fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broeng, Jes; Mogilevtsev, Dmitri; Libori, Stig E. Barkou

    2001-01-01

    In this work we suggest and discuss a microstructure of air capillaries with elliptical cross-section in a tread of glass that gives opportunity for Creation of polarization-preserving fiber with very small beat length between the fundamental modes of different polarization......In this work we suggest and discuss a microstructure of air capillaries with elliptical cross-section in a tread of glass that gives opportunity for Creation of polarization-preserving fiber with very small beat length between the fundamental modes of different polarization...

  4. Mechanochromic Fibers with Structural Color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Houpu; Sun, Xuemei; Peng, Huisheng

    2015-12-21

    Responsive photonic crystals have been widely developed to realize tunable structural colors by manipulating the flow of light. Among them, mechanochromic photonic crystals attract increasing attention due to the easy operation, high safety and broad applications. Recently, mechanochromic photonic crystal fibers were proposed to satisfy the booming wearable smart textile market. In this Concept, the fundamental mechanism, fabrication, and recent progress on mechanochromic photonic crystals, especially in fiber shape, are summarized to represent a new direction in sensing and displaying. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Lab-on-fiber technology

    CERN Document Server

    Cusano, Andrea; Crescitelli, Alessio; Ricciardi, Armando

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on a research field that is rapidly emerging as one of the most promising ones for the global optics and photonics community: the "lab-on-fiber" technology. Inspired by the well-established 'lab on-a-chip' concept, this new technology essentially envisages novel and highly functionalized devices completely integrated into a single optical fiber for both communication and sensing applications.Based on the R&D experience of some of the world's leading authorities in the fields of optics, photonics, nanotechnology, and material science, this book provides a broad and accurate de

  6. Photonics and Fiber Optics Processor Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Photonics and Fiber Optics Processor Lab develops, tests and evaluates high speed fiber optic network components as well as network protocols. In addition, this...

  7. Compression Behavior of High Performance Polymeric Fibers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kumar, Satish

    2003-01-01

    Hydrogen bonding has proven to be effective in improving the compressive strength of rigid-rod polymeric fibers without resulting in a decrease in tensile strength while covalent crosslinking results in brittle fibers...

  8. Fiber MOPA for Ascends, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — CO2 sensing using absorption bands near 1570nm is very attractive by taking advantage of the mature fiber-amplifier technology derived from fiber-optic telecom...

  9. TENSILE RESPONSES OF TREATED CISSUS POPULNEA FIBERS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    2 DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING, NNAMDI AZIKIWE ... (RSM) with central composite design. ... synthetic fibers for industrial applications partly ..... Cellulosic Fibers Using Eco-Friendly Compounds .... 1078 – 1097, 2017.

  10. Oriented collagen fibers direct tumor cell intravasation

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Weijing; Chen, Shaohua; Yuan, Wei; Fan, Qihui; Tian, Jianxiang; Wang, Xiaochen; Chen, Longqing; Zhang, Xixiang; Wei, Weili; Liu, Ruchuan; Qu, Junle; Jiao, Yang; Austin, Robert H.; Liu, Liyu

    2016-01-01

    that the local fiber alignment enhanced cell-ECM interactions. Specifically, metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells followed the local fiber alignment direction during the intravasation into rigid Matrigel (∼10 mg/mL protein concentration).

  11. Dynamics of long ring Raman fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhanov, Sergey V.; Melnikov, Leonid A.; Mazhirina, Yulia A.

    2016-04-01

    The numerical model for dynamics of long fiber ring Raman laser is proposed. The model is based on the transport equations and Courant-Isaacson-Rees numerical method. Different regimes of a long ring fiber Raman laser are investigated.

  12. Fiber Optic Augmented Reality System (FOARS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Innovation: Fiber Optics Augmented Reality System. This system in form of a mobile app interacts real time with the actual FOSS(Fiber Optics Sensing System) data and...

  13. Fiber MOPA for Ascends, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — CO2 sensing using absorption bands near 1570nm is very attractive by taking advantage of the mature fiber-amplifier technology derived from fiber-optic telecom...

  14. IMPROVED SPECTROPHOTOMETER FIBER SAMPLING SYSTEM FOR COTTON FIBER COLOR MEASUREMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton in the U.S. is classified for color using the Uster® High Volume Instrument (HVI), and the parameters Rd and +b are used to designate color grades for cotton fiber. However, Rd and +b are cotton-specific color parameters, and the need existed to demonstrate the relationships of Rd and +b to...

  15. Fiber facet gratings for high power fiber lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanek, Martin; Vanis, Jan; Baravets, Yauhen; Todorov, Filip; Ctyroky, Jiri; Honzatko, Pavel

    2017-12-01

    We numerically investigated the properties of diffraction gratings designated for fabrication on the facet of an optical fiber. The gratings are intended to be used in high-power fiber lasers as mirrors either with a low or high reflectivity. The modal reflectance of low reflectivity polarizing grating has a value close to 3% for TE mode while it is significantly suppressed for TM mode. Such a grating can be fabricated on laser output fiber facet. The polarizing grating with high modal reflectance is designed as a leaky-mode resonant diffraction grating. The grating can be etched in a thin layer of high index dielectric which is sputtered on fiber facet. We used refractive index of Ta2O5 for such a layer. We found that modal reflectance can be close to 0.95 for TE polarization and polarization extinction ratio achieves 18 dB. Rigorous coupled wave analysis was used for fast optimization of grating parameters while aperiodic rigorous coupled wave analysis, Fourier modal method and finite difference time domain method were compared and used to compute modal reflectance of designed gratings.

  16. Identifying Practical Solutions to Meet America’s Fiber Needs: Proceedings from the Food & Fiber Summit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy R. Mobley

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Fiber continues to be singled out as a nutrient of public health concern. Adequate intakes of fiber are associated with reduced risk for cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, certain gastrointestinal disorders and obesity. Despite ongoing efforts to promote adequate fiber through increased vegetable, fruit and whole-grain intakes, average fiber consumption has remained flat at approximately half of the recommended daily amounts. Research indicates that consumers report increasingly attempting to add fiber-containing foods, but there is confusion around fiber in whole grains. The persistent and alarmingly low intakes of fiber prompted the “Food & Fiber Summit,” which assembled nutrition researchers, educators and communicators to explore fiber’s role in public health, current fiber consumption trends and consumer awareness data with the objective of generating opportunities and solutions to help close the fiber gap. The summit outcomes highlight the need to address consumer confusion and improve the understanding of sources of fiber, to recognize the benefits of various types of fibers and to influence future dietary guidance to provide prominence and clarity around meeting daily fiber recommendations through a variety of foods and fiber types. Potential opportunities to increase fiber intake were identified, with emphasis on meal occasions and food categories that offer practical solutions for closing the fiber gap.

  17. Identifying Practical Solutions to Meet America’s Fiber Needs: Proceedings from the Food & Fiber Summit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Amy R.; Jones, Julie Miller; Rodriguez, Judith; Slavin, Joanne; Zelman, Kathleen M.

    2014-01-01

    Fiber continues to be singled out as a nutrient of public health concern. Adequate intakes of fiber are associated with reduced risk for cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, certain gastrointestinal disorders and obesity. Despite ongoing efforts to promote adequate fiber through increased vegetable, fruit and whole-grain intakes, average fiber consumption has remained flat at approximately half of the recommended daily amounts. Research indicates that consumers report increasingly attempting to add fiber-containing foods, but there is confusion around fiber in whole grains. The persistent and alarmingly low intakes of fiber prompted the “Food & Fiber Summit,” which assembled nutrition researchers, educators and communicators to explore fiber’s role in public health, current fiber consumption trends and consumer awareness data with the objective of generating opportunities and solutions to help close the fiber gap. The summit outcomes highlight the need to address consumer confusion and improve the understanding of sources of fiber, to recognize the benefits of various types of fibers and to influence future dietary guidance to provide prominence and clarity around meeting daily fiber recommendations through a variety of foods and fiber types. Potential opportunities to increase fiber intake were identified, with emphasis on meal occasions and food categories that offer practical solutions for closing the fiber gap. PMID:25006857

  18. Applications of fiber optics in physical protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckle, T.H.

    1994-03-01

    The purpose of this NUREG is to provide technical information useful for the development of fiber-optic communications and intrusion detection subsystems relevant to physical protection. There are major sections on fiber-optic technology and applications. Other topics include fiber-optic system components and systems engineering. This document also contains a glossary, a list of standards and specifications, and a list of fiber-optic equipment vendors

  19. Textile composites based on natural fibers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Li, Yan

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available . The two kinds of fiber surface treatment methods were permanganate treatment and silane treatment. Vinyl ester was used as the matrix. The permeability values of sisal textile before and after fiber surface treatments are listed in Table 3. Comparisons... and more liquid resin flow through inter-bundles. Figure 4. Intra-bundle and inter-bundle flows As reported, permanganate, as an oxidant, can etch sisal fiber surface [20]. Scanning electronic micrograph of a permanganate treated sisal fiber...

  20. Pulsed laser damage to optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, S.W.; Gillies, G.T.; Magnuson, D.W.; Pagano, T.S.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes some observations of pulsed laser damage to optical fibers with emphasis on a damage mode characterized as a linear fracture along the outer core of a fiber. Damage threshold data are presented which illustrate the effects of the focusing lens, end-surface preparation, and type of fiber. An explanation based on fiber-beam misalignment is given and is illustrated by a simple experiment and ray trace

  1. STUDY JARINGAN FIBER-OPTIK dan SONET

    OpenAIRE

    Syarif, Syafruddin; Katu, Umar; Suyuti, Saidah

    2006-01-01

    Optical Fiber communication system is a communication system using fiber optic as a transmission media. This communication system is able to transmit information in high capacity and high fidelity. Fiber optic consist of cylinder glass, the inside part of the cylinder is called core surrounded a cladding. The outside part of this cylinder made by elastic plastic called coating. ?? Based on the bias index and the waves mode in light propagation, optic fiber can be elassified into...

  2. Adsorption characteristics of activated carbon hollow fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. V. Kaludjerović

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon hollow fibers were prepared with regenerated cellulose or polysulfone hollow fibers by chemical activation using sodium phosphate dibasic followed by the carbonization process. The activation process increases the adsorption properties of fibers which is more prominent for active carbone fibers obtained from the cellulose precursor. Chemical activation with sodium phosphate dibasic produces an active carbon material with both mesopores and micropores.

  3. Multi-core fiber undersea transmission systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nooruzzaman, Md; Morioka, Toshio

    2017-01-01

    Various potential architectures of branching units for multi-core fiber undersea transmission systems are presented. It is also investigated how different architectures of branching unit influence the number of fibers and those of inline components.......Various potential architectures of branching units for multi-core fiber undersea transmission systems are presented. It is also investigated how different architectures of branching unit influence the number of fibers and those of inline components....

  4. High pressure fiber optic sensor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guida, Renato; Xia, Hua; Lee, Boon K; Dekate, Sachin N

    2013-11-26

    The present application provides a fiber optic sensor system. The fiber optic sensor system may include a small diameter bellows, a large diameter bellows, and a fiber optic pressure sensor attached to the small diameter bellows. Contraction of the large diameter bellows under an applied pressure may cause the small diameter bellows to expand such that the fiber optic pressure sensor may measure the applied pressure.

  5. Catching Attention in Fiber Optics Class

    OpenAIRE

    Kezerashvili, R. Ya.; Leng, L.

    2004-01-01

    Following a brief review on the history and the current development of fiber optics, the significance of teaching fiber optics for science and non-science major college students is addressed. Several experimental demonstrations designed to aid the teaching and learning process in fiber optics lectures are presented. Sample laboratory projects are also proposed to help the students to understand the physical principles of fiber optics.

  6. Photonic crystal fiber technology for compact fiber-delivered high-power ultrafast fiber lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triches, Marco; Michieletto, Mattia; Johansen, Mette M.; Jakobsen, Christian; Olesen, Anders S.; Papior, Sidsel R.; Kristensen, Torben; Bondue, Magalie; Weirich, Johannes; Alkeskjold, Thomas T.

    2018-02-01

    Photonic crystal fiber (PCF) technology has radically impacted the scientific and industrial ultrafast laser market. Reducing platform dimensions are important to decrease cost and footprint while maintaining high optical efficiency. We present our recent work on short 85 μm core ROD-type fiber amplifiers that maintain single-mode performance and excellent beam quality. Robust long-term performance at 100 W average power and 250 kW peak power in 20 ps pulses at 1030 nm wavelength is presented, exceeding 500 h with stable performance in terms of both polarization and power. In addition, we present our recent results on hollow-core ultrafast fiber delivery maintaining high beam quality and polarization purity.

  7. Random fiber lasers based on artificially controlled backscattering fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Daru; Wang, Xiaoliang; She, Lijuan; Qiang, Zexuan; Yu, Zhangwei

    2017-10-01

    The random fiber laser (RFL) which is a milestone in laser physics and nonlinear optics, has attracted considerable attention recently. Most previous RFLs are based on distributed feedback of Rayleigh scattering amplified through stimulated Raman/Brillouin scattering effect in single mode fibers, which required long-distance (tens of kilometers) single mode fibers and high threshold up to watt-level due to the extremely small Rayleigh scattering coefficient of the fiber. We proposed and demonstrated a half-open cavity RFL based on a segment of a artificially controlled backscattering SMF(ACB-SMF) with a length of 210m, 310m or 390m. A fiber Bragg grating with the central wavelength of 1530nm and a segment of ACB-SMF forms the half-open cavity. The proposed RFL achieves the threshold of 25mW, 30mW and 30mW, respectively. Random lasing at the wavelength of 1530nm and the extinction ratio of 50dB is achieved when a segment of 5m EDF is pumped by a 980nm LD in the RFL. Another half-open cavity RFL based on a segment of a artificially controlled backscattering EDF(ACBS-EDF) is also demonstrated without an ACB-SMF. The 3m ACB-EDF is fabricated by using the femtosecond laser with pulse energy of 0.34mJ which introduces about 50 reflectors in the EDF. Random lasing at the wavelength of 1530nm is achieved with the output power of 7.5mW and the efficiency of 1.88%. Two novel RFLs with much short cavities have been achieved with low threshold and high efficiency.

  8. High force measurement sensitivity with fiber Bragg gratings fabricated in uniform-waist fiber tapers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieduwilt, Torsten; Brückner, Sven; Bartelt, Hartmut

    2011-01-01

    Fiber Bragg gratings inscribed in the waist of tapered photosensitive fibers offer specific attractive properties for sensing applications. A small-diameter fiber reduces structural influences for imbedded fiber sensing elements. In the case of application as a force-sensing element for tensile forces, sensitivity scales inversely with the fiber cross-sectional area. It is therefore possible to increase force sensitivity by several orders of magnitude compared to Bragg grating sensors in conventionally sized fibers. Special requirements for such Bragg grating arrangements are discussed and experimental measurements for different fiber taper diameters down to 4 µm are presented

  9. Dynamic Characterization of Polymer Optical Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefani, Alessio; Andresen, Søren; Yuan, Wu

    2012-01-01

    With the increasing interest in fiber sensors based on polymer optical fibers, it becomes fundamental to determine the real applicability and reliability of this type of sensor. The viscoelastic nature of polymers gives rise to questions about the mechanical behavior of the fibers. In particular...

  10. Blood glucose response to pea fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamberg, O; Rumessen, J J; Gudmand-Høyer, E

    1989-01-01

    Two new fiber types, pea fiber (PF) and sugar beet fiber (BF), were compared with wheat bran (WB) to investigate the effect on postprandial blood glucose and serum insulin responses in normal subjects. The control meal consisted of 150 g ground beef mixed with 50 g glucose and 20 g lactulose. Onl...

  11. Study of fiber optic sugar sensor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    is connected. By varying the concentration of sugar solution, the output power is noted. ... and Lin [3] and Ghatak et al [4] have studied the use of optical fibers as sensing elements. ... at the interface, an evanescent wave propagates parallel to the interface. .... the ends of the fiber are fixed with fiber holders on either side.

  12. Career Directions--Fiber Optic Installer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tech Directions, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Fiber-optic communication is a method of transmitting information from one place to another by sending pulses of light through an optical fiber that is roughly the diameter of a human hair. The light forms an electromagnetic carrier wave that is modulated to carry information. Each optical fiber is capable of carrying an enormous amount of…

  13. Low Cost Carbon Fiber From Renewable Resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compere, A.L.

    2001-01-01

    The Department of Energy Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles has shown that, by lowering overall weight, the use of carbon fiber composites could dramatically decrease domestic vehicle fuel consumption. For the automotive industry to benefit from carbon fiber technology, fiber production will need to be substantially increased and fiber price decreased to$7/kg. To achieve this cost objective, alternate precursors to pitch and polyacrylonitrile (PAN) are being investigated as possible carbon fiber feedstocks. Additionally, sufficient fiber to provide 10 to 100 kg for each of the 13 million cars and light trucks produced annually in the U.S. will require an increase of 5 to 50-fold in worldwide carbon fiber production. High-volume, renewable or recycled materials, including lignin, cellulosic fibers, routinely recycled petrochemical fibers, and blends of these components, appear attractive because the cost of these materials is inherently both low and insensitive to changes in petroleum price. Current studies have shown that a number of recycled and renewable polymers can be incorporated into melt-spun fibers attractive as carbon fiber feedstocks. Highly extrudable lignin blends have attractive yields and can be readily carbonized and graphitized. Examination of the physical structure and properties of carbonized and graphitized fibers indicates the feasibility of use in transportation composite applications

  14. Functional Nano fibers: Production and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khatri, Z.; Kim, I.S.; Kim, S.H.

    2016-01-01

    Nano fibers are lighter material with higher surface area in comparison to polymeric film. The ease of producing functional nano fiber is another advantage over many nano materials. Functional nano fiber in particular has attained a greater interest in recent years. The applications of functional nano fibers are increasing in various technical fields such as water filter membranes, tissue engineering, biosensors, drug delivery systems, wound dressings, catalysis, antibacterial. This special issue is comprised of well-selective articles that discuss production of functional nano fibers their applications in different emerging fields. M. Zhang et al. have presented exciting work on drug delivery using nano fibers. They used collagen that was extracted from abandoned Rana chensinensis skin in northeastern China via an acid enzymatic extraction method. They demonstrated two different nano fiber-vancomycin (VCM) systems, that is, VCM blended nano fibers and core-shell nano fibers with VCM in the core, and both systems sustained control release for a period of 80 hours. Another work was presented by R. Takai et al. on blood purification using composite nano fibers. About 10% of the population worldwide is affected by chronic kidney disease (CKD). The authors developed nano fiber meshes zeolite-polymer composite nano fibers for efficient adsorption of creatinine, which is a simpler and more accessible method for hemodialysis (HD) patients.

  15. Overview of Fiber-Optical Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depaula, Ramon P.; Moore, Emery L.

    1987-01-01

    Design, development, and sensitivity of sensors using fiber optics reviewed. State-of-the-art and probable future developments of sensors using fiber optics described in report including references to work in field. Serves to update previously published surveys. Systems incorporating fiber-optic sensors used in medical diagnosis, navigation, robotics, sonar, power industry, and industrial controls.

  16. Cartan frames for heart wall fiber motion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samari, Babak; Aumentado-Armstrong, Tristan; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Froeling, Martijn; Siddiqi, Kaleem

    2017-01-01

    Current understanding of heart wall fiber geometry is based on ex vivo static data obtained through diffusion imaging or histology. Thus, little is known about the manner in which fibers rotate as the heart beats. Yet, the geometric organization of moving fibers in the heart wall is key to its

  17. Multifunctional Next Generation Carbon Nanotube Super Fibers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ait-Haddou, Hassan

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this program was to produce continuous strong CNT-based fibers. The production of continuous fibers was met and we have matched 2/3 of the strength of what has been previously reported with CNT-PAN fibers...

  18. Highly Stretchable, Strain Sensing Hydrogel Optical Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jingjing; Liu, Xinyue; Jiang, Nan; Yetisen, Ali K; Yuk, Hyunwoo; Yang, Changxi; Khademhosseini, Ali; Zhao, Xuanhe; Yun, Seok-Hyun

    2016-12-01

    A core-clad fiber made of elastic, tough hydrogels is highly stretchable while guiding light. Fluorescent dyes are easily doped into the hydrogel fiber by diffusion. When stretched, the transmission spectrum of the fiber is altered, enabling the strain to be measured and also its location. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Radiation damage in commercial optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolotti, M.; Franceschini, F.A.; Serra, A.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental results obtained by exposure of commercial optical fibers to 60 Co γ-ray irradiation, are reported. The possibility of utilizing these fibers as far as a total dose of 6000 rad in the light spectrum is shown. It is also shown that it is possible to obtain total recovery of irradiated fibers by annealing at 500 0 C. (author)

  20. Experimental Study of Fiber Length and Orientation in Injection Molded Natural Fiber/Starch Acetate Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peltola, Heidi; Madsen, Bo; Joffe, Roberts

    2011-01-01

    Composite compounds based on triethyl citrate plasticized starch acetate and hemp and flax fibers were prepared by melt processing. Plasticizer contents from 20 to 35 wt% and fiber contents of 10 and 40 wt% were used. The compounded composites were injection molded to tensile test specimens...... was noticed. A reduction of fiber length along the increasing fiber content and the decreasing plasticizer content was also detected. This reduction originated from the increasing shear forces during compounding, which again depended on the increased viscosity of the material. Hemp fibers were shown to remain...... longer and fibrillate more than flax fibers, leading to higher aspect ratio. Thus, the reinforcement efficiency of hemp fibers by the processing was improved, in contrast with flax fibers. In addition, the analysis of fiber dispersion and orientation showed a good dispersion of fibers in the matrix...

  1. Influence of fiber upon the radiation degradation of fiber-reinforced plastics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udagawa, Akira

    1992-01-01

    Influences of fiber upon the radiation degradation of fiber-reinforced plastics were investigated by using 2 MeV electrons. Radiation resistances were evaluated from the three-point bending strength of the fiber laminates which used bisphenol A-type epoxy resin as a matrix. Carbon fiber laminates had higher radiation resistance values than the laminates made of glass fiber. Model laminates using polyethylene as a matrix were prepared in order to examine the differences between carbon fiber and glass fiber filler, the relation between gel fraction and absorbed dose was established. When the polyethylene was filled in the carbon fiber, forming the gel was strikingly delayed. This result suggests that radiation protective action existing in carbon fiber to matrix resin is the main cause of the higher radiation resistance of carbon fiber reinforced plastics. (author)

  2. Experimental research on continuous basalt fiber and basalt-fibers-reinforced polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xueyi; Zou, Guangping; Shen, Zhiqiang

    2008-11-01

    The interest for continuous basalt fibers and reinforced polymers has recently grown because of its low price and rich natural resource. Basalt fiber was one type of high performance inorganic fibers which were made from natural basalt by the method of melt extraction. This paper discusses basic mechanical properties of basalt fiber. The other work in this paper was to conduct tensile testing of continuous basalt fiber-reinforced polymer rod. Tensile strength and stress-strain curve were obtained in this testing. The strength of rod was fairly equal to rod of E-glass fibers and weaker than rod of carbon fibers. Surface of crack of rod was studied. An investigation of fracture mechanism between matrix and fiber was analyzed by SEM (Scanning electron microscopy) method. A poor adhesion between the matrix and fibers was also shown for composites analyzing SEM photos. The promising tensile properties of the presented basalt fibers composites have shown their great potential as alternative classical composites.

  3. Cylindrical Piezoelectric Fiber Composite Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    The use of piezoelectric devices has become widespread since Pierre and Jacques Curie discovered the piezoelectric effect in 1880. Examples of current applications of piezoelectric devices include ultrasonic transducers, micro-positioning devices, buzzers, strain sensors, and clocks. The invention of such lightweight, relatively inexpensive piezoceramic-fiber-composite actuators as macro fiber composite (MFC) actuators has made it possible to obtain strains and displacements greater than those that could be generated by prior actuators based on monolithic piezoceramic sheet materials. MFC actuators are flat, flexible actuators designed for bonding to structures to apply or detect strains. Bonding multiple layers of MFC actuators together could increase force capability, but not strain or displacement capability. Cylindrical piezoelectric fiber composite (CPFC) actuators have been invented as alternatives to MFC actuators for applications in which greater forces and/or strains or displacements may be required. In essence, a CPFC actuator is an MFC or other piezoceramic fiber composite actuator fabricated in a cylindrical instead of its conventional flat shape. Cylindrical is used here in the general sense, encompassing shapes that can have circular, elliptical, rectangular or other cross-sectional shapes in the planes perpendicular to their longitudinal axes.

  4. Photobleaching effect in image fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Shotaro; Wada, Yukio; Chigusa, Yoshiki; Fujiwara, Kunio; Hattori, Yasuji.

    1985-01-01

    The photobleaching effect in two types of image fibers is investigated using various light sources, light intensities, radiation dose rates and environmental temperatures. It is shown that the use of a xenon lamp, He-Cd laser or deuterium lamp can cause the photobleaching effect on the induced loss in an image fiber in the ultraviolet region. Of these light sources, a xenon lamp is found to have the greatest effect. This effectiveness appears to arise from the fact that this light source possesses a spectrum over the range from 0.3 to 0.36 μm. It is also revealed that when an image fiber is used for spectroscopic analysis under irradiation of gamma rays at a dose rate of 300 R/h, the available period of the fiber can be increase by 4 - 8 times with the aid of the photobleaching effect caused by a xenon lamp. In addition, the photobleaching effect is found to be dependent on temperature. It is inferred that this temperature dependence occur because electrons first excited to a level by the light energy tend to be further excited more easily at higher temperatures. (Nogami, K.)

  5. Fiber tracking for brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Kei; Nakamura, Hisao; Ito, Hirotoshi; Tanaka, Osamu; Kubota, Takao; Yuen, Sachiko; Kizu, Osamu; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate an innovative scanning method for patients diagnosed with brain tumors. Using a 1.5 Tesla whole body magnetic resonance (MR) imager, 23 patients with brain tumors were scanned. The recorded data points of the diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI) sequences were 128 x 37 with the parallel imaging technique. The parallel imaging technique was equivalent to a true resolution of 128 x 74. The scan parameters were repetition time (TR)=6000, echo time (TE)=88, 6 averaging with a b-value of 800 s/mm 2 . The total scan time for DTI was 4 minutes and 24 seconds. DTI scans and subsequent fiber tracking were successfully applied in all cases. All fiber tracts on the contralesional side were visualized in the expected locations. Fiber tracts on the lesional side had varying degrees of displacement, disruption, or a combination of displacement and disruption due to the tumor. Tract disruption resulted from direct tumor involvement, compression upon the tract, and vasogenic edema surrounding the tumor. This DTI method using a parallel imaging technique allows for clinically feasible fiber tracking that can be incorporated into a routine MR examination. (author)

  6. Harvesting to optimize fiber quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Production conditions typical to the Texas High Plains region can produce cotton crops with high short fiber and nep content, both of which have a detrimental impact on ring spinning performance. Since Texas now produces over 50% of the U.S. cotton crop annually, it is critical that production and p...

  7. Hollow-Core Fiber Lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Lin (Inventor); Tjoelker, Robert L. (Inventor); Burt, Eric A. (Inventor); Huang, Shouhua (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Hollow-core capillary discharge lamps on the millimeter or sub-millimeter scale are provided. The hollow-core capillary discharge lamps achieve an increased light intensity ratio between 194 millimeters (useful) and 254 millimeters (useless) light than conventional lamps. The capillary discharge lamps may include a cone to increase light output. Hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) may also be used.

  8. Monolithic fiber optic sensor assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Scott

    2015-02-10

    A remote sensor element for spectrographic measurements employs a monolithic assembly of one or two fiber optics to two optical elements separated by a supporting structure to allow the flow of gases or particulates therebetween. In a preferred embodiment, the sensor element components are fused ceramic to resist high temperatures and failure from large temperature changes.

  9. Fiber Optics: Deregulate and Deploy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwinski, Jan H.

    1993-01-01

    Describes fiber optic technology, explains its use in education and commercial settings, and recommends regulations and legislation that will speed its use to create broadband information networks. Topics discussed include distance learning; interactive video; costs; and the roles of policy makers, lawmakers, public advocacy groups, and consumers.…

  10. Fiber optics physics and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Mitschke, Fedor

    2016-01-01

    This book tells you all you want to know about optical fibers: Their structure, their light-guiding mechanism, their material and manufacture, their use. It began with telephone, then came telefax and email. Today we use search engines, music downloads and internet videos, all of which require shuffling of bits and bytes by the zillions. The key to all this is the conduit: the line which is designed to carry massive amounts of data at breakneck speed. In their data carrying capacity optical fiber lines beat all other technologies (copper cable, microwave beacons, satellite links) hands down, at least in the long haul; wireless devices rely on fibers, too. Several effects tend to degrade the signal as it travels down the fiber: they are spelled out in detail. Nonlinear processes are given due consideration for a twofold reason: On the one hand they are fundamentally different from the more familiar processes in electrical cable. On the other hand, they form the basis of particularly interesting and innovative ...

  11. Review of natural fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohan, T.; Tushar, B.; T, Mahesha G.

    2018-02-01

    Development of new alternative materials to the existing traditional metals, alloys and synthetic materials is the new buzz in recent research activities at the academic and industrial level taking place all over the world. Earning carbon credits by minimizing the atmospheric pollution is getting an increase in attention by industries. One small step to conserve the atmosphere around us is to use natural resources in making fully bio degradable or partially bio degradable composite materials. Such prepared alternative materials can find applications in interior housing, automotive, marine, domestic, and other applications. Composites made by using appropriate natural fibers as reinforcements is a possibility that ensures such a reality as they can be well received in multiple disciplines of engineering. Results published from various research activities illustrates that natural fiber composites can successfully be adapted for non-structural, moderate load bearing indoor applications. Further, the few deficiencies in the natural fibers can be overcome by subjecting them to morphological changes by various physical or chemical treatment methods. The overall objective of this paper is to provide a comprehensive overview of the property profiles of Natural Fiber Composites.

  12. FIBER LASER CONSTRUCTION AND THEORY INCLUDING FIBER BRAGG GRATINGS Photonic Crystal Fibers (PCFs) and applications of gas filled PCFs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutton, Jacob O. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-08

    The principles used in fiber lasers have been around for a while but it is only within the past few years that fiber lasers have become commercially available and used in high power laser applications. This paper will focus on the basic design principles of fiber lasers, including fiber Bragg gratings, principles of operation, and forms of non-linear effects. It will describe the type and associated doping of the fiber used and difficult designs used to guide energy from the pump to the active medium. Topics covered include fiber laser design, fiber Bragg gratings, materials used, differences in quantum energy loss, thermo-optical effects, stimulated Raman scattering, Brillouin scattering, photonic crystal fibers and applications of gas filled Photonic Crystal Fibers (PCFs). Thanks to fiber lasers, the energy required to produce high power lasers has greatly dropped and as such we can now produce kW power using a standard 120V 15A circuit. High power laser applications are always requiring more power. The fiber laser can now deliver the greater power that these applications demand. Future applications requiring more power than can be combined using standard materials or configurations will need to be developed to overcome the high energy density and high non-linear optical scattering effects present during high power operations.

  13. In-fiber modal interferometer based on multimode and double cladding fiber segments for tunable fiber laser applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto-Cortés, P.; Álvarez-Tamayo, R. I.; Durán-Sánchez, M.; Castillo-Guzmán, A.; Salceda-Delgado, G.; Ibarra-Escamilla, B.; Kuzin, E. A.; Barcelata-Pinzón, A.; Selvas-Aguilar, R.

    2018-02-01

    We report an in-fiber structure based on the use of a multimode fiber segment and a double cladding fiber segment, and its application as spectral filter in an erbium-doped fiber laser for selection and tuning of the laser line wavelength. The output transmission of the proposed device exhibit spectrum modulation of the input signal with free spectral range of 21 nm and maximum visibility enhanced to more than 20 dB. The output spectrum of the in-fiber filter is wavelength displaced by bending application which allows a wavelength tuning of the generated laser line in a range of 12 nm. The use of the proposed in-fiber structure is demonstrated as a reliable, simple, and low-cost wavelength filter for tunable fiber lasers design and optical instrumentation applications.

  14. Stretching single fibrin fibers hampers their lysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Lucioni, Tomas; Li, Rongzhong; Bonin, Keith; Cho, Samuel S; Guthold, Martin

    2017-09-15

    Blood clots, whose main structural component is a mesh of microscopic fibrin fibers, experience mechanical strain from blood flow, clot retraction and interactions with platelets and other cells. We developed a transparent, striated and highly stretchable substrate made from fugitive glue (a styrenic block copolymer) to investigate how mechanical strain affects lysis of single, suspended fibrin fibers. In this suspended fiber assay, lysis manifested itself by fiber elongation, thickening (disassembly), fraying and collapse. Stretching single fibrin fibers significantly hampered their lysis. This effect was seen in uncrosslinked and crosslinked fibers. Crosslinking (without stretching) also hampered single fiber lysis. Our data suggest that strain is a novel mechanosensitive factor that regulates blood clot dissolution (fibrinolysis) at the single fiber level. At the molecular level of single fibrin molecules, strain may distort, or hinder access to, plasmin cleavage sites and thereby hamper lysis. Fibrin fibers are the major structural component of a blood clot. We developed a highly stretchable substrate made from fugitive glue and a suspended fibrin fiber lysis assay to investigate the effect of stretching on single fibrin fibers lysis. The key findings from our experiments are: 1) Fibers thicken and elongate upon lysis; 2) stretching strongly reduces lysis; 3) this effect is more pronounced for uncrosslinked fibers; and 4) stretching fibers has a similar effect on reducing lysis as crosslinking fibers. At the molecular level, strain may distort plasmin cleavage sites, or restrict access to those sites. Our results suggest that strain may be a novel mechanobiological factor that regulates fibrinolysis. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Orange fiber laser for ophthalmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, M.; Kojima, K.; Hayashi, K.

    2007-02-01

    For the light source of photocoagulators for ophthalmology, orange laser is more suitable than green laser because of low scattering loss by the crystalline lens, and low absorption by xanthophylls in the retina. We developed two orange fiber lasers (580 nm and 590 nm) to investigate the effect depending on the difference in the range of orange. The 580nm laser is composed of a 1160 nm fiber laser and a Periodically Polled Lithium Niobate (PPLN) crystal for second harmonic generation. The 1160 nm fiber laser beam is focused into the MgO-doped PPLN crystal whose length is 30 mm with 3-pass configuration. Continuous-wave 1.3 W output power of 580 nm was obtained with 5.8 W input power of 1160nm for the first time. The conversion efficiency was 22%. The band width of the second harmonic was 0.006 nm (FWHM). The 590 nm laser is almost the same as 580 nm laser source. In this case we used a Raman shift fiber to generate 1180 nm, and the output power of 590 nm was 1.4 W. We developed an evaluation model of photocoagulator system using these two laser sources. A 700 mW coagulation output power was obtained with this orange fiber laser photocoagulator system. This is enough power for the eye surgery. We have the prospect of the maintenance-free, long-life system that is completely air-cooled. We are planning to evaluate this photocoagulator system in order to investigate the difference between the two wavelengths at the field test.

  16. Biosensing with optical fiber gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiavaioli, Francesco; Baldini, Francesco; Tombelli, Sara; Trono, Cosimo; Giannetti, Ambra

    2017-06-01

    Optical fiber gratings (OFGs), especially long-period gratings (LPGs) and etched or tilted fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs), are playing an increasing role in the chemical and biochemical sensing based on the measurement of a surface refractive index (RI) change through a label-free configuration. In these devices, the electric field evanescent wave at the fiber/surrounding medium interface changes its optical properties (i.e. intensity and wavelength) as a result of the RI variation due to the interaction between a biological recognition layer deposited over the fiber and the analyte under investigation. The use of OFG-based technology platforms takes the advantages of optical fiber peculiarities, which are hardly offered by the other sensing systems, such as compactness, lightness, high compatibility with optoelectronic devices (both sources and detectors), and multiplexing and remote measurement capability as the signal is spectrally modulated. During the last decade, the growing request in practical applications pushed the technology behind the OFG-based sensors over its limits by means of the deposition of thin film overlays, nanocoatings, and nanostructures, in general. Here, we review efforts toward utilizing these nanomaterials as coatings for high-performance and low-detection limit devices. Moreover, we review the recent development in OFG-based biosensing and identify some of the key challenges for practical applications. While high-performance metrics are starting to be achieved experimentally, there are still open questions pertaining to an effective and reliable detection of small molecules, possibly up to single molecule, sensing in vivo and multi-target detection using OFG-based technology platforms.

  17. Biosensing with optical fiber gratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiavaioli Francesco

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Optical fiber gratings (OFGs, especially long-period gratings (LPGs and etched or tilted fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs, are playing an increasing role in the chemical and biochemical sensing based on the measurement of a surface refractive index (RI change through a label-free configuration. In these devices, the electric field evanescent wave at the fiber/surrounding medium interface changes its optical properties (i.e. intensity and wavelength as a result of the RI variation due to the interaction between a biological recognition layer deposited over the fiber and the analyte under investigation. The use of OFG-based technology platforms takes the advantages of optical fiber peculiarities, which are hardly offered by the other sensing systems, such as compactness, lightness, high compatibility with optoelectronic devices (both sources and detectors, and multiplexing and remote measurement capability as the signal is spectrally modulated. During the last decade, the growing request in practical applications pushed the technology behind the OFG-based sensors over its limits by means of the deposition of thin film overlays, nanocoatings, and nanostructures, in general. Here, we review efforts toward utilizing these nanomaterials as coatings for high-performance and low-detection limit devices. Moreover, we review the recent development in OFG-based biosensing and identify some of the key challenges for practical applications. While high-performance metrics are starting to be achieved experimentally, there are still open questions pertaining to an effective and reliable detection of small molecules, possibly up to single molecule, sensing in vivo and multi-target detection using OFG-based technology platforms.

  18. Fiber optic neutron imaging system: calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malone, R.M.; Gow, C.E.; Thayer, D.R.

    1981-01-01

    Two neutron imaging experiments using fiber optics have been performed at the Nevada Test Site. In each experiment, an array of scintillator fluor tubes is exposed to neutrons. Light is coupled out through radiation resistant PCS fibers (8-m long) into high-bandwidth, graded index fibers. For image reconstruction to be accurate, common timing differences and transmission variations between fiber optic channels are needed. The calibration system featured a scanning pulsed dye laser, a specially designed fiber optic star coupler, a tektronix 7912AD transient digitizer, and a DEC PDP 11/34 computing system

  19. Characterization of polymer concrete with natural fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbuta, M.; Serbanoiu, A. A.; Teodorescu, R.; Rosca, B.; Mitroi, R.; Bejan, G.

    2017-09-01

    In the study are presented the experimental results obtained for polymer concrete prepared with epoxy resin, aggregates, fly ash as filler and two types of fibers: wool and hemp. The influence of type and dosage of fibers were studied. The density and mechanical characteristics were determined: compressive strength, flexural strength and split tensile strength. For both types of fibers, with increasing the fiber dosage the density decreases. The studied dosages had not an important influence on mechanical strengths. The fibers improved especially the tensile strength and the compressive strength presented generally smaller values than the control mix.

  20. Optical Fiber Grating Hydrogen Sensors: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jixiang; Zhu, Li; Wang, Gaopeng; Xiang, Feng; Qin, Yuhuan; Wang, Min; Yang, Minghong

    2017-03-12

    In terms of hydrogen sensing and detection, optical fiber hydrogen sensors have been a research issue due to their intrinsic safety and good anti-electromagnetic interference. Among these sensors, hydrogen sensors consisting of fiber grating coated with sensitive materials have attracted intensive research interests due to their good reliability and distributed measurements. This review paper mainly focuses on optical fiber hydrogen sensors associated with fiber gratings and various materials. Their configurations and sensing performances proposed by different groups worldwide are reviewed, compared and discussed in this paper. Meanwhile, the challenges for fiber grating hydrogen sensors are also addressed.

  1. Properties of textile grade ceramic fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pudnos, E.

    1992-01-01

    The availability of textile grade ceramic fibers has sparked great interest for applications in composite reinforcement and high temperature insulation. This paper summarizes the properties of various small diameter textile grade ceramic fibers currently available. Room temperature mechanical and electrical properties of the fibers are discussed for three cases: ambient conditions, after heat aging in argon, and after heat aging in wet air. Dow Corning (R) HPZ Ceramic Fiber, a silicon nitride type fiber, is shown to have improved retention of mechanical and electrical properties above 1200 C

  2. Aligned Layers of Silver Nano-Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrii B. Golovin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe a new dichroic polarizers made by ordering silver nano-fibers to aligned layers. The aligned layers consist of nano-fibers and self-assembled molecular aggregates of lyotropic liquid crystals. Unidirectional alignment of the layers is achieved by means of mechanical shearing. Aligned layers of silver nano-fibers are partially transparent to a linearly polarized electromagnetic radiation. The unidirectional alignment and density of the silver nano-fibers determine degree of polarization of transmitted light. The aligned layers of silver nano-fibers might be used in optics, microwave applications, and organic electronics.

  3. Properties of Fiber Reinforced Polymer Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinela Bărbuţă

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymer concrete is a composite material realized with resin and aggregates. In the present study the epoxy resin was used for binding the aggregates. In the composition were introduced near the fly ash, used as filler, the cellulose fibers. The mechanical characteristics such as compressive strength, flexural strength and split tensile strength of polymer concrete with fibers were investigated. The fiber percentage was constant, the epoxy resin and the filler dosages were varied. The cellulose fiber had not improved the mechanical characteristics of the polymer concrete in comparison to that of polymer concrete without cellulose fibers.

  4. Nonlinear fiber optics formerly quantum electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Agrawal, Govind

    1995-01-01

    The field of nonlinear fiber optics has grown substantially since the First Edition of Nonlinear Fiber Optics, published in 1989. Like the First Edition, this Second Edition is a comprehensive, tutorial, and up-to-date account of nonlinear optical phenomena in fiber optics. It synthesizes widely scattered research material and presents it in an accessible manner for students and researchers already engaged in or wishing to enter the field of nonlinear fiber optics. Particular attention is paid to the importance of nonlinear effects in the design of optical fiber communication systems. This is

  5. Optical fibers and RF a natural combination

    CERN Document Server

    Romeiser, Malcolm

    2004-01-01

    The optical fiber industry has experienced a period of consolidation and reorganization and is now poised for a new surge in growth. To take advantage of that growth, and to respond to the demand to use fiber more efficiently, designers need a better understanding of fiber optics. Taking the approach that optical fibers are an extension of RF-based communications, the author explains basic optical concepts, applications, and systems; the nature and performance characteristics of optical fibers; and optical sources, connectors and splices. Subsequent chapters explore current applications of fib

  6. Natural fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taj, S.; Khan, S.; Munawar, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Natural fibers have been used to reinforce materials for over 3,000 years. More recently they have been employed in combination with plastics. Many types of natural fi fibers have been investigated for use in plastics including Flax, hemp, jute, straw, wood fiber, rice husks, wheat, barley, oats, rye, cane (sugar and bamboo), grass reeds, kenaf, ramie, oil palm empty fruit bunch, sisal, coir, water hyacinth, pennywort, kapok, paper-mulberry, raphia, banana fiber, pineapple leaf fiber and papyrus. Natural fibers have the advantage that they are renewable resources and have marketing appeal. The Asian markets have been using natural fibers for many years e.g., jute is a common reinforcement in India. Natural fibers are increasingly used in automotive and packaging materials. Pakistan is an agricultural country and it is the main stay of Pakistan's economy. Thousands of tons of different crops are produced but most of their wastes do not have any useful utilization. Agricultural wastes include wheat husk, rice husk, and their straw, hemp fiber and shells of various dry fruits. These agricultural wastes can be used to prepare fiber reinforced polymer composites for commercial use. This report examines the different types of fibers available and the current status of research. Many references to the latest work on properties, processing and application have been cited in this review. (author)

  7. Interfacial Studies of Sized Carbon Fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahrul, S. N.; Hartini, M. N.; Hilmi, E. A.; Nizam, A.

    2010-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the influence of sizing treatment on carbon fiber in respect of interfacial adhesion in composite materials, Epolam registered 2025. Fortafil unsized carbon fiber was used to performed the experiment. The fiber was commercially surface treated and it was a polyacrylonitrile based carbon fiber with 3000 filament per strand. Epicure registered 3370 was used as basic sizing chemical and dissolved in two types of solvent, ethanol and acetone for the comparison purpose. The single pull out test has been used to determine the influence of sizing on carbon fiber. The morphology of carbon fiber was observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The apparent interfacial strength IFSS values determined by pull out test for the Epicure registered 3370/ethanol sized carbon fiber pointed to a good interfacial behaviour compared to the Epicure registered 3370/acetone sized carbon fiber. The Epicure registered 3370/ethanol sizing agent was found to be effective in promoting adhesion because of the chemical reactions between the sizing and Epolam registered 2025 during the curing process. From this work, it showed that sized carbon fiber using Epicure registered 3370 with addition of ethanol give higher mechanical properties of carbon fiber in terms of shear strength and also provided a good adhesion between fiber and matrix compared to the sizing chemical that contain acetone as a solvent.

  8. Thermal tuning On narrow linewidth fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Peiqi; Liu, Tianshan; Gao, Xincun; Ren, Shiwei

    2010-10-01

    At present, people have been dedicated to high-speed and large-capacity optical fiber communication system. Studies have been shown that optical wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) technology is an effective means of communication to increase the channel capacity. Tunable lasers have very important applications in high-speed, largecapacity optical communications, and distributed sensing, it can provide narrow linewidth and tunable laser for highspeed optical communication. As the erbium-doped fiber amplifier has a large gain bandwidth, the erbium-doped fiber laser can be achieved lasing wavelength tunable by adding a tunable filter components, so tunable filter device is the key components in tunable fiber laser.At present, fiber laser wavelength is tuned by PZT, if thermal wavelength tuning is combined with PZT, a broader range of wavelength tuning is appearance . Erbium-doped fiber laser is used in the experiments,the main research is the physical characteristics of fiber grating temperature-dependent relationship and the fiber grating laser wavelength effects. It is found that the fiber laser wavelength changes continuously with temperature, tracking several temperature points observed the self-heterodyne spectrum and found that the changes in spectra of the 3dB bandwidth of less than 1kHz, and therefore the fiber laser with election-mode fiber Bragg grating shows excellent spectral properties and wavelength stability.

  9. Side-emitting fiber optic position sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jonathan D [Albuquerque, NM

    2008-02-12

    A side-emitting fiber optic position sensor and method of determining an unknown position of an object by using the sensor. In one embodiment, a concentrated beam of light source illuminates the side of a side-emitting fiber optic at an unknown axial position along the fiber's length. Some of this side-illuminated light is in-scattered into the fiber and captured. As the captured light is guided down the fiber, its intensity decreases due to loss from side-emission away from the fiber and from bulk absorption within the fiber. By measuring the intensity of light emitted from one (or both) ends of the fiber with a photodetector(s), the axial position of the light source is determined by comparing the photodetector's signal to a calibrated response curve, look-up table, or by using a mathematical model. Alternatively, the side-emitting fiber is illuminated at one end, while a photodetector measures the intensity of light emitted from the side of the fiber, at an unknown position. As the photodetector moves further away from the illuminated end, the detector's signal strength decreases due to loss from side-emission and/or bulk absorption. As before, the detector's signal is correlated to a unique position along the fiber.

  10. Optical fiber sensors for harsh environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Juncheng; Wang, Anbo

    2007-02-06

    A diaphragm optic sensor comprises a ferrule including a bore having an optical fiber disposed therein and a diaphragm attached to the ferrule, the diaphragm being spaced apart from the ferrule to form a Fabry-Perot cavity. The cavity is formed by creating a pit in the ferrule or in the diaphragm. The components of the sensor are preferably welded together, preferably by laser welding. In some embodiments, the entire ferrule is bonded to the fiber along the entire length of the fiber within the ferrule; in other embodiments, only a portion of the ferrule is welded to the fiber. A partial vacuum is preferably formed in the pit. A small piece of optical fiber with a coefficient of thermal expansion chosen to compensate for mismatches between the main fiber and ferrule may be spliced to the end of the fiber.

  11. Mode conversion in hybrid optical fiber coupler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasiewicz, Karol A.; Marc, P.; Jaroszewicz, Leszek R.

    2012-04-01

    Designing of all in-line fiber optic systems with a supercontinuum light source gives some issues. The use of a standard single mode fiber (SMF) as an input do not secure single mode transmission in full wavelength range. In the paper, the experimental results of the tested hybrid fiber optic coupler were presented. It was manufactured by fusing a standard single mode fiber (SMF28) and a photonic crystal fiber (PCF). The fabrication process is based on the standard fused biconical taper technique. Two types of large mode area fibers (LMA8 and LAM10 NKT Photonics) with different air holes arrangements were used as the photonic crystal fiber. Spectral characteristics within the range of 800 nm - 1700 nm were presented. All process was optimized to obtain a mode conversion between SMF and PCF and to reach a single mode transmission in the PCF output of the coupler.

  12. Degradation Behavior of Thermal Stabilized Polyacrylonitrile Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEI Shuai

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In the temperature range of 300-800℃, 40%-50% of the mass lost during the processing of polyacrylonitrile based carbon fiber (PANCF. Understanding the degradation behavior will be valuable in understanding the formation mechanism of pseudo-graphite structure, and providing theoretic basis for producing high performance carbon fiber and increasing the carbonization yield. The simulation of the degradation progress was carried out on the thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA, the results show that there are two degradation steps for PAN fiber stabilized in air, and controlled by cyclization coefficient and oxygen content. The cyclization coefficient and oxygen content are effective to the density of carbon fiber by influencing the degradation behavior, which cause defects in the fiber. The higher cyclization coefficient leads to form less structural defects and higher density of the fiber; on the contrary, the higher oxygen content leads to form more structural defects and lower density of the fiber.

  13. Dietary fiber and blood pressure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleixandre, A; Miguel, M

    2016-04-01

    In the past few years, new strategies to control blood pressure levels are emerging by developing new bioactive components of foods. Fiber has been linked to the prevention of a number of cardiovascular diseases and disorders. β-Glucan, the main soluble fiber component in oat grains, was initially linked to a reduction in plasma cholesterol. Several studies have shown afterward that dietary fiber may also improve glycaemia, insulin resistance and weight loss. The effect of dietary fiber on arterial blood pressure has been the subject of far fewer studies than its effect on the above-mentioned variables, but research has already shown that fiber intake can decrease arterial blood pressure in hypertensive rats. Moreover, certain fibers can improve arterial blood pressure when administered to hypertensive and pre-hypertensive subjects. The present review summarizes all those studies which attempt to establish the antihypertensive effects of dietary fiber, as well as its effect on other cardiovascular risk factors.

  14. Fiber cavities with integrated mode matching optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Gurpreet Kaur; Takahashi, Hiroki; Podoliak, Nina; Horak, Peter; Keller, Matthias

    2017-07-17

    In fiber based Fabry-Pérot Cavities (FFPCs), limited spatial mode matching between the cavity mode and input/output modes has been the main hindrance for many applications. We have demonstrated a versatile mode matching method for FFPCs. Our novel design employs an assembly of a graded-index and large core multimode fiber directly spliced to a single mode fiber. This all-fiber assembly transforms the propagating mode of the single mode fiber to match with the mode of a FFPC. As a result, we have measured a mode matching of 90% for a cavity length of ~400 μm. This is a significant improvement compared to conventional FFPCs coupled with just a single mode fiber, especially at long cavity lengths. Adjusting the parameters of the assembly, the fundamental cavity mode can be matched with the mode of almost any single mode fiber, making this approach highly versatile and integrable.

  15. Physicochemical characterization of purple banana fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, A.P.B.; Guimaraes, D.H.; Miranda, C.S.; Oliveira, J.C.; Cruz, A.M.F.; Luporini, S.; Jose, N.M.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the environmental appeal that has grown in recent years, researches involving the use of renewable sources raw materials reaffirm this need. The vegetable fibers has excelled as promising materials with possibilities in different applications. The objective of this work is the evaluation of the physicochemical properties of banana fiber. These fibers were extracted from the banana pseudostem of a species not yet reported in the literature, Musa velutina, known as purple banana. For this experiment were used in natura fibers and processed fibers with NaOH 5% which were characterized by TGA, DSC, DRX and FTIR analysis. In the thermal analysis, both tested fibers showed good thermal properties. In DRX analysis, the processed fibers showed higher crystallinity. The use of these materials implies adding value to an agricultural waste in addition to being a more ecologically correct proposal. (author)

  16. Simulation of Glass Fiber Forming Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Von der Ohe, Renate

    Two glass fiber forming processes have been simulated using FEM, which are the drawing of continuous glass fibers for reinforcement purposes and the spinning of discontinuous glass fibers - stone wool for insulation. The aim of this work was to set up a numerical model for each process, and to use...... this model in finding relationships between the production conditions and the resulting fiber properties. For both processes, a free surface with large deformation and radiative and convective heat transfer must be taken into account. The continuous fiber drawing has been simulated successfully......, and parametric studies have been made. Several properties that characterize the process have been calculated, and the relationship between the fictive temperature and the cooling rate of the fibers has been found. The model for the discontinuous fiber spinning was brought to the limits of the commercial code...

  17. Prebiotics, Fermentable Dietary Fiber, and Health Claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delcour, Jan A; Aman, Per; Courtin, Christophe M; Hamaker, Bruce R; Verbeke, Kristin

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1970s, the positive effects of dietary fiber on health have increasingly been recognized. The collective term "dietary fiber" groups structures that have different physiologic effects. Since 1995, some dietary fibers have been denoted as prebiotics, implying a beneficial physiologic effect related to increasing numbers or activity of the gastrointestinal microbiota. Given the complex composition of the microbiota, the demonstration of such beneficial effects is difficult. In contrast, an exploration of the metabolites of dietary fiber formed as a result of its fermentation in the colon offers better perspectives for providing mechanistic links between fiber intake and health benefits. Positive outcomes of such studies hold the promise that claims describing specific health benefits can be granted. This would help bridge the "fiber gap"-that is, the considerable difference between recommended and actual fiber intakes by the average consumer. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  18. Liquid Crystal photonic Bandgap Fiber Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Lei

    In this Ph.D. thesis, an experimental investigation of liquid crystal photonic bandgap (LCPBG) fiber devices and applications is presented. Photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) consist of a cladding microstructure with periodic index variations and a core defined by a defect of the structure. The prese......In this Ph.D. thesis, an experimental investigation of liquid crystal photonic bandgap (LCPBG) fiber devices and applications is presented. Photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) consist of a cladding microstructure with periodic index variations and a core defined by a defect of the structure...... of each LCPBG fiber. Finally, the applications for LCPBG fiber devices based on the on-chip platform design have been demonstrated in realizing microwave true-time delay and creating an electrically tunable fiber laser. Referatet mailes...

  19. Wetting morphologies on randomly oriented fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauret, Alban; Boulogne, François; Soh, Beatrice; Dressaire, Emilie; Stone, Howard A

    2015-06-01

    We characterize the different morphologies adopted by a drop of liquid placed on two randomly oriented fibers, which is a first step toward understanding the wetting of fibrous networks. The present work reviews previous modeling for parallel and touching crossed fibers and extends it to an arbitrary orientation of the fibers characterized by the tilting angle and the minimum spacing distance. Depending on the volume of liquid, the spacing distance between fibers and the angle between the fibers, we highlight that the liquid can adopt three different equilibrium morphologies: 1) a column morphology in which the liquid spreads between the fibers, 2) a mixed morphology where a drop grows at one end of the column or 3) a single drop located at the node. We capture the different morphologies observed using an analytical model that predicts the equilibrium configuration of the liquid based on the geometry of the fibers and the volume of liquid.

  20. Fiber optic vibration sensor using bifurcated plastic optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, M.; Bidin, N.; Yasin, M.

    2016-11-01

    An extrinsic fiber optic vibration sensor is demonstrated for a fiber optic displacement sensor based on a bundled multimode fiber to measure a vibration frequency ranging from 100 until 3000 Hz. The front slope has a sensitivity of 0.1938mV/mm and linearity of 99.7% within a measurement range between 0.15-3.00 mm. By placing the diaphragm of the concave load-speaker within the linear range from the probe, the frequency of the vibration can be measured with error percentage of less than 1.54%. The graph of input against output frequency for low, medium and high frequency range show very high linearity up to 99%. Slope for low, medium, and high frequency range are calculated as 1.0026, 0.9934, and 1.0007 respectively. Simplicity, long term stability, low power consumption, wide dynamic and frequency ranges, noise reduction, ruggedness, linearity and light weight make it promising alternative to other well-establish methods for vibration frequency measurement.

  1. Interaction between carbon fibers and polymer sizing: Influence of fiber surface chemistry and sizing reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosburger-Will, Judith; Bauer, Matthias; Laukmanis, Eva; Horny, Robert; Wetjen, Denise; Manske, Tamara; Schmidt-Stein, Felix; Töpker, Jochen; Horn, Siegfried

    2018-05-01

    Different aspects of the interaction of carbon fibers and epoxy-based polymer sizings are investigated, e.g. the wetting behavior, the strength of adhesion between fiber and sizing, and the thermal stability of the sizing layer. The influence of carbon fiber surface chemistry and sizing reactivity is investigated using fibers of different degree of anodic oxidation and sizings with different number of reactive epoxy groups per molecule. Wetting of the carbon fibers by the sizing dispersion is found to be specified by both, the degree of fiber activation and the sizing reactivity. In contrast, adhesion strength between fibers and sizing is dominated by the surface chemistry of the carbon fibers. Here, the number of surface oxygen groups seems to be the limiting factor. We also find that the sizing and the additional functionalities induced by anodic oxidation are removed by thermal treatment at 600 °C, leaving the carbon fiber in its original state after carbonization.

  2. Numerical approach of the injection molding process of fiber-reinforced composite with considering fiber orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen Thi, T. B.; Yokoyama, A.; Ota, K.; Kodama, K.; Yamashita, K.; Isogai, Y.; Furuichi, K.; Nonomura, C.

    2014-05-01

    One of the most important challenges in the injection molding process of the short-glass fiber/thermoplastic composite parts is being able to predict the fiber orientation, since it controls the mechanical and the physical properties of the final parts. Folgar and Tucker included into the Jeffery equation a diffusive type of term, which introduces a phenomenological coefficient for modeling the randomizing effect of the mechanical interactions between the fibers, to predict the fiber orientation in concentrated suspensions. Their experiments indicated that this coefficient depends on the fiber volume fraction and aspect ratio. However, a definition of the fiber interaction coefficient, which is very necessary in the fiber orientation simulations, hasn't still been proven yet. Consequently, this study proposed a developed fiber interaction model that has been introduced a fiber dynamics simulation in order to obtain a global fiber interaction coefficient. This supposed that the coefficient is a sum function of the fiber concentration, aspect ratio, and angular velocity. The proposed model was incorporated into a computer aided engineering simulation package C-Mold. Short-glass fiber/polyamide-6 composites were produced in the injection molding with the fiber weight concentration of 30 wt.%, 50 wt.%, and 70 wt.%. The physical properties of these composites were examined, and their fiber orientation distributions were measured by micro-computed-tomography equipment μ-CT. The simulation results showed a good agreement with experiment results.

  3. Erbium Doped Fiber Optic Gravimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pérez-Sánchez, G G; Pérez-Torres, J R; Flores-Bravo, J A; Álvarez-Chávez, J A; Martínez-Piñón, F

    2017-01-01

    Gravimeters are devices that can be used in a wide range of applications, such as mining, seismology, geodesy, archeology, geophysics and many others. These devices have great sensibility, which makes them susceptible to external vibrations like electromagnetic waves. There are several technologies regarding gravimeters that are of use in industrial metrology. Optical fiber is immune to electromagnetic interference, and together with long period gratings can form high sensibility sensors of small size, offering advantages over other systems with different technologies. This paper shows the development of an optical fiber gravimeter doped with Erbium that was characterized optically for loads going from 1 to 10 kg in a bandwidth between 1590nm to 1960nm, displaying a weight linear response against power. Later on this paper, the experimental results show that the previous described behavior can be modeled as characteristic function of the sensor. (paper)

  4. Monolithic all-PM femtosecond Yb-doped fiber laser using photonic bandgap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiaomin; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Turchinovich, Dmitry

    2009-01-01

    We present a monolithic Yb fiber laser, dispersion managed by an all-solid photonic bandgap fiber, and pulse compressed in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. The laser delivers 9 nJ, 275-fs long pulses at 1035 nm.......We present a monolithic Yb fiber laser, dispersion managed by an all-solid photonic bandgap fiber, and pulse compressed in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. The laser delivers 9 nJ, 275-fs long pulses at 1035 nm....

  5. Brillouin lasing in single-mode tapered optical fiber with inscribed fiber Bragg grating array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, S. M.; Butov, O. V.; Chamorovskiy, Y. K.; Isaev, V. A.; Kolosovskiy, A. O.; Voloshin, V. V.; Vorob'ev, I. L.; Vyatkin, M. Yu.; Mégret, P.; Odnoblyudov, M.; Korobko, D. A.; Zolotovskii, I. O.; Fotiadi, A. A.

    2018-06-01

    A tapered optical fiber has been manufactured with an array of fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) inscribed during the drawing process. The total fiber peak reflectivity is 5% and the reflection bandwidth is ∼3.5 nm. A coherent frequency domain reflectometry has been applied for precise profiling of the fiber core diameter and grating reflectivity both distributed along the whole fiber length. These measurements are in a good agreement with the specific features of Brillouin lasing achieved in the semi-open fiber cavity configuration.

  6. Integrated fiber Michelson interferometer based on poled hollow twin-core fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhihai; Bo, Fusen; Wang, Lei; Tian, Fengjun; Yuan, Libo

    2011-07-01

    We propose an integrated fiber Michelson interferometer based on a poled hollow twin-core fiber. The Michelson interferometer can be used as an electro-optic modulator by thermal poling one core of the twin-core fiber and introducing second-order nonlinearity in the fiber. The proposed fiber Michelson interferometer is experimentally demonstrated under driving voltages at the frequency range of 149 to 1000 Hz. The half-wave voltage of the poled fiber is 135 V, and the effective second-order nonlinear coefficient χ² is 1.23 pm/V.

  7. The KLOE fiber electromagnetic calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incagli, Marco

    1998-01-01

    The construction and equipment of the KLOE electromagnetic calorimeter has ended in March 1997. In parallel to the construction, all modules have been tested at the Cosmic Ray Test Stand (CRTS) facility, in Frascati National Laboratories (Rome). The construction technique, based on scintillating fibers alternated to very thin (0.5 mm) grooved lead planes, is described and the main results both from the CRTS and from a preliminary Test Beam with low energy electrons and muons are reported in this note

  8. Electrospun Fibers for Composites Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    in traditional woven mat composites. Nanofibrous interlayers were used to increase the impact and shear performance of a prepregged carbon fiber...Nylon 66 Nanofibrilmat Interleaved Carbon/Epoxy Laminates . Polymer Composites 2011, 32, 1781–1789. 21 13. Chen, Q.; Zhang, L.; Rahman, A.; Zhou...Resistance in Laminated Composites With Electrospun Nano-Interlayers. Comp. Sci. Tech. 2008, 68, 673– 683. 15. Zhang, J.; Lin, T.; Wang, X. Electrospun

  9. Fiber and Prebiotics: Mechanisms and Health Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    The health benefits of dietary fiber have long been appreciated. Higher intakes of dietary fiber are linked to less cardiovascular disease and fiber plays a role in gut health, with many effective laxatives actually isolated fiber sources. Higher intakes of fiber are linked to lower body weights. Only polysaccharides were included in dietary fiber originally, but more recent definitions have included oligosaccharides as dietary fiber, not based on their chemical measurement as dietary fiber by the accepted total dietary fiber (TDF) method, but on their physiological effects. Inulin, fructo-oligosaccharides, and other oligosaccharides are included as fiber in food labels in the US. Additionally, oligosaccharides are the best known “prebiotics”, “a selectively fermented ingredient that allows specific changes, both in the composition and/or activity in the gastrointestinal microflora that confers benefits upon host well-bring and health.” To date, all known and suspected prebiotics are carbohydrate compounds, primarily oligosaccharides, known to resist digestion in the human small intestine and reach the colon where they are fermented by the gut microflora. Studies have provided evidence that inulin and oligofructose (OF), lactulose, and resistant starch (RS) meet all aspects of the definition, including the stimulation of Bifidobacterium, a beneficial bacterial genus. Other isolated carbohydrates and carbohydrate-containing foods, including galactooligosaccharides (GOS), transgalactooligosaccharides (TOS), polydextrose, wheat dextrin, acacia gum, psyllium, banana, whole grain wheat, and whole grain corn also have prebiotic effects. PMID:23609775

  10. Radiation shielding fiber and its manufacturing method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Koji; Ono, Hiroshi.

    1988-08-17

    Purpose: To manufacture radiation shielding fibers of excellent shielding effects. Method: Fibers containing more than 1 mmol/g of carboxyl groups are bonded with heavy metals, or they are impregnated with an aqueous solution containing water-soluble heavy metal salts dissolved therein. Fibers as the substrate may be any of forms such as short fibers, long fibers, fiber tows, webs, threads, knitting or woven products, non-woven fabrics, etc. It is however necessary that fibers contain more than 1 mmol/g, preferably, from 2 to 7 mmol/g of carboxylic groups. Since heavy metals having radiation shielding performance are bonded to the outer layer of the fibers and the inherent performance of the fibers per se is possessed, excellent radiation shielding performance can be obtained, as well as they can be applied with spinning, knitting or weaving, stitching, etc. thus can be used for secondary fiber products such as clothings, caps, masks, curtains, carpets, cloths, etc. for use in radiation shieldings. (Kamimura, M.).

  11. Optical fiber-applied radiation detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiura, Ryuichi; Uranaka, Yasuo; Izumi, Nobuyuki

    2001-01-01

    A technique to measure radiation by using plastic scintillation fibers doped radiation fluorescent (scintillator) to plastic optical fiber for a radiation sensor, was developed. The technique contains some superiority such as high flexibility due to using fibers, relatively easy large area due to detecting portion of whole of fibers, and no electromagnetic noise effect due to optical radiation detection and signal transmission. Measurable to wide range of and continuous radiation distribution along optical fiber cable at a testing portion using scintillation fiber and flight time method, the optical fiber-applied radiation sensing system can effectively monitor space radiation dose or apparatus operation condition monitoring. And, a portable type scintillation optical fiber body surface pollution monitor can measure pollution concentration of radioactive materials attached onto body surface by arranging scintillation fiber processed to a plate with small size and flexibility around a man to be tested. Here were described on outline and fundamental properties of various application products using these plastic scintillation fiber. (G.K.)

  12. Fiber and Prebiotics: Mechanisms and Health Benefits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Slavin

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The health benefits of dietary fiber have long been appreciated. Higher intakes of dietary fiber are linked to less cardiovascular disease and fiber plays a role in gut health, with many effective laxatives actually isolated fiber sources. Higher intakes of fiber are linked to lower body weights. Only polysaccharides were included in dietary fiber originally, but more recent definitions have included oligosaccharides as dietary fiber, not based on their chemical measurement as dietary fiber by the accepted total dietary fiber (TDF method, but on their physiological effects. Inulin, fructo-oligosaccharides, and other oligosaccharides are included as fiber in food labels in the US. Additionally, oligosaccharides are the best known “prebiotics”, “a selectively fermented ingredient that allows specific changes, both in the composition and/or activity in the gastrointestinal microflora that confers benefits upon host well-bring and health.” To date, all known and suspected prebiotics are carbohydrate compounds, primarily oligosaccharides, known to resist digestion in the human small intestine and reach the colon where they are fermented by the gut microflora. Studies have provided evidence that inulin and oligofructose (OF, lactulose, and resistant starch (RS meet all aspects of the definition, including the stimulation of Bifidobacterium, a beneficial bacterial genus. Other isolated carbohydrates and carbohydrate-containing foods, including galactooligosaccharides (GOS, transgalactooligosaccharides (TOS, polydextrose, wheat dextrin, acacia gum, psyllium, banana, whole grain wheat, and whole grain corn also have prebiotic effects.

  13. Supersymmetric Transformations in Optical Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macho, Andrés; Llorente, Roberto; García-Meca, Carlos

    2018-01-01

    Supersymmetry (SUSY) has recently emerged as a tool to design unique optical structures with degenerate spectra. Here, we study several fundamental aspects and variants of one-dimensional SUSY in axially symmetric optical media, including their basic spectral features and the conditions for degeneracy breaking. Surprisingly, we find that the SUSY degeneracy theorem is partially (totally) violated in optical systems connected by isospectral (broken) SUSY transformations due to a degradation of the paraxial approximation. In addition, we show that isospectral constructions provide a dimension-independent design control over the group delay in SUSY fibers. Moreover, we find that the studied unbroken and isospectral SUSY transformations allow us to generate refractive-index superpartners with an extremely large phase-matching bandwidth spanning the S +C +L optical bands. These singular features define a class of optical fibers with a number of potential applications. To illustrate this, we numerically demonstrate the possibility of building photonic lanterns supporting broadband heterogeneous supermodes with large effective area, a broadband all-fiber true-mode (de)multiplexer requiring no mode conversion, and different mode-filtering, mode-conversion, and pulse-shaping devices. Finally, we discuss the possibility of extrapolating our results to acoustics and quantum mechanics.

  14. Carbon nanotube fiber terahertz polarizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubair, Ahmed [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Tsentalovich, Dmitri E.; Young, Colin C. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Heimbeck, Martin S. [Charles M. Bowden Laboratory, Aviation & Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC), Redstone Arsenal, Alabama 35898 (United States); Everitt, Henry O. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Charles M. Bowden Laboratory, Aviation & Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC), Redstone Arsenal, Alabama 35898 (United States); Pasquali, Matteo [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Department of Materials Science and NanoEngineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Kono, Junichiro, E-mail: kono@rice.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Department of Materials Science and NanoEngineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States)

    2016-04-04

    Conventional, commercially available terahertz (THz) polarizers are made of uniformly and precisely spaced metallic wires. They are fragile and expensive, with performance characteristics highly reliant on wire diameters and spacings. Here, we report a simple and highly error-tolerant method for fabricating a freestanding THz polarizer with nearly ideal performance, reliant on the intrinsically one-dimensional character of conduction electrons in well-aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The polarizer was constructed on a mechanical frame over which we manually wound acid-doped CNT fibers with ultrahigh electrical conductivity. We demonstrated that the polarizer has an extinction ratio of ∼−30 dB with a low insertion loss (<0.5 dB) throughout a frequency range of 0.2–1.1 THz. In addition, we used a THz ellipsometer to measure the Müller matrix of the CNT-fiber polarizer and found comparable attenuation to a commercial metallic wire-grid polarizer. Furthermore, based on the classical theory of light transmission through an array of metallic wires, we demonstrated the most striking difference between the CNT-fiber and metallic wire-grid polarizers: the latter fails to work in the zero-spacing limit, where it acts as a simple mirror, while the former continues to work as an excellent polarizer even in that limit due to the one-dimensional conductivity of individual CNTs.

  15. Fiber Optics Physics and Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Mitschke, Fedor

    2010-01-01

    Telephone, telefax, email and internet -- the key ingredient of the inner workings is the conduit: the line which is designed to carry massive amounts of data at breakneck speed. In their data-carrying capacity optical fiber lines beat other technologies (copper cable, microwave beacons, satellite links) hands down, at least in the long haul. This book tells you all you want to know about optical fibers: Their structure, their light-guiding mechanism, their material and manufacture, their use. Several effects tend to degrade the signal as it travels down the fiber: they are spelled out in detail. Nonlinear processes are given due consideration for a twofold reason: On the one hand they are fundamentally different from the more familiar processes in electrical cable. On the other hand, they form the basis of particularly interesting and innovative applications, provided they are understood well enough. A case in point is the use of so-called solitons, i.e. special pulses of light which have the wonderful prope...

  16. Hybrid photonic-crystal fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markos, Christos; Travers, John C.; Abdolvand, Amir; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Bang, Ole

    2017-10-01

    This article offers an extensive survey of results obtained using hybrid photonic-crystal fibers (PCFs) which constitute one of the most active research fields in contemporary fiber optics. The ability to integrate novel and functional materials in solid- and hollow-core PCFs through various postprocessing methods has enabled new directions toward understanding fundamental linear and nonlinear phenomena as well as novel application aspects, within the fields of optoelectronics, material and laser science, remote sensing, and spectroscopy. Here the recent progress in the field of hybrid PCFs is reviewed from scientific and technological perspectives, focusing on how different fluids, solids, and gases can significantly extend the functionality of PCFs. The first part of this review discusses the efforts to develop tunable linear and nonlinear fiber-optic devices using PCFs infiltrated with various liquids, glasses, semiconductors, and metals. The second part concentrates on recent and state-of-the-art advances in the field of gas-filled hollow-core PCFs. Extreme ultrafast gas-based nonlinear optics toward light generation in the extreme wavelength regions of vacuum ultraviolet, pulse propagation, and compression dynamics in both atomic and molecular gases, and novel soliton-plasma interactions are reviewed. A discussion of future prospects and directions is also included.

  17. Patterned functional carbon fibers from polyethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, Marcus A [ORNL; Saito, Tomonori [ORNL; Brown, Rebecca H [ORNL; Kumbhar, Amar S [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Naskar, Amit K [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Patterned, continuous carbon fibers with controlled surface geometry were produced from a novel melt-processible carbon precursor. This portends the use of a unique technique to produce such technologically innovative fibers in large volume for important applications. The novelties of this technique include ease of designing and fabricating fibers with customized surface contour, the ability to manipulate filament diameter from submicron scale to a couple of orders of magnitude larger scale, and the amenable porosity gradient across the carbon wall by diffusion controlled functionalization of precursor. The geometry of fiber cross-section was tailored by using bicomponent melt-spinning with shaped dies and controlling the melt-processing of the precursor polymer. Circular, trilobal, gear-shaped hollow fibers, and solid star-shaped carbon fibers of 0.5 - 20 um diameters, either in self-assembled bundle form, or non-bonded loose filament form, were produced by carbonizing functionalized-polyethylene fibers. Prior to carbonization, melt-spun fibers were converted to a char-forming mass by optimizing the sulfonation on polyethylene macromolecules. The fibers exhibited distinctly ordered carbon morphologies at the outside skin compared to the inner surface or fiber core. Such order in carbon microstructure can be further tuned by altering processing parameters. Partially sulfonated polyethylene-derived hollow carbon fibers exhibit 2-10 fold surface area (50-500 m2/g) compared to the solid fibers (10-25 m2/g) with pore sizes closer to the inside diameter of the filaments larger than the sizes on the outer layer. These specially functionalized carbon fibers hold promise for extraordinary performance improvements when used, for example, as composite reinforcements, catalyst support media, membranes for gas separation, CO2 sorbents, and active electrodes and current collectors for energy storage applications.

  18. Radiation resistivity of quartz core fiber, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gozen, Toshikazu; Suzuki, Toshiya; Hayashi, Tokuji; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Shinichi.

    1985-01-01

    Radiation resistance characteristics were evaluated for a multi-mode quartz core fiber in low temperature region together with photobleaching effect depending on the incident light power and dependency on the wavelength of measuring rays. This report describes the results of the abovementioned items and the next step study of trial manufacturing of a pure-quartz single-mode fiber for the employment of longer wavelength rays and greater capacity in light transmission communication system. Quartz core fiber specimens were irradiated by 60 Co γ-ray source at -55 deg C to 80 deg C in a constant temperature bath and light transmission loss was determined under irradiation conditions. Low temperature characteristics were superior in an MRT (modified rod-in tube) pure quartz fiber prepared by the plasma method as compared to VAD quartz and Ge-GI fibers. The MRT fiber showed better quality than the Ge-GI fiber also in the photobleaching effect examination. As for the wavelength dependency, light transmission loss of the MRT fiber was less than that of the Ge-GI fiber. The MRT fiber also showed a superior quality in the wide range of irradiation temperatures. Based on the above-mentioned understandings, a pure-quartz single-mode fiber of both BF 3 -doped and F-doped cladding types were developed for longer wavelengths uses. The fibers could attain low light transmission loss of less than 1.0 dB/km at 1.30 μm of wavelength. At the standpoint of radiation resistivity, the BF 3 -doped fiber was found superior. (Takagi, S.)

  19. Status of fiber lasers study of on ytterbium doped fiber laser and laser spectroscopy of doped fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magne, S.

    1994-07-01

    This work shows all the advantages and drawbacks of the rare-earth-doped fiber lasers and fiber optical amplifiers, pointing out their potential use for instrumentation and optical fiber sensor technology. The theory of light propagation in optical fibers is presented in order to understand the manufacturing methods. A comparative study of preform surface and concentration analysis is performed. The gain behaviour is also thoroughly examined. A synthesis of all technological parameters of the fiber laser is then established and all technologies of the constituting integrated components are reviewed and compared. The experimental techniques mainly involve: site selective excitation tunability, cooperative luminescence, oxidation state changes induced by gamma irradiation, ytterbium-doped mono-mode continuous wave tunable three-level fiber laser. (TEC). 622 refs., 176 figs

  20. Influence of fiber type, fiber mat orientation, and process time on the properties of a wood fiber/polymer composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plackett, David; Torgilsson, R.; Løgstrup Andersen, T.

    2002-01-01

    involved pre-compression, contact heating to the process temperature under vacuum and then rapid transfer to the press for consolidation and cooling. Composites were tested to determine response to water or water vapor, porosity, fiber volume fraction and tensile properties. The composites absorbed water......A rapid press consolidation technique was used to produce composites from two types of air-laid wood fiber mat, incorporating either mechanically refined or bleached chemi-thermomechanically refined Norway Spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst] and a bicomponent polymer fiber. The manufacturing technique...... rapidly and showed changes in thickness with fluctuations in relative humidity. Porosity was higher in composites containing mechanically refined (MDF) fibers than in composites containing bleached chemi-thermomechanically refined (CTMP) fibers. Tensile test results suggessted that fiber wetting...

  1. Deposition of carbon nanotubes onto aramid fibers using as-received and chemically modified fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodríguez-Uicab, O.; Avilés, F.; Gonzalez-Chi, P.I; Canché-Escamilla, G.; Duarte-Aranda, S.; Yazdani-Pedram, M.; Toro, P.; Gamboa, F.; Mazo, M.A.; Nistal, A.; Rubio, J.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The surface of aramid fibers was functionalized by two acid treatments. • The treatment based on HNO_3/H_2SO_4 reduced the mechanical properties of the fibers. • CNTs were deposited on the aramid fibers, reaching electrical conductivity. • Homogeneous CNT distribution was achieved by using pristine fibers or chlorosulfonic acid. - Abstract: Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) oxidized by an acid treatment were deposited on the surface of as-received commercial aramid fibers containing a surface coating (“sizing”), and fibers modified by either a chlorosulfonic treatment or a mixture of nitric and sulfuric acids. The surface of the aramid fiber activated by the chemical treatments presents increasing density of CO, COOH and OH functional groups. However, these chemical treatments reduced the tensile mechanical properties of the fibers, especially when the nitric and sulfuric acid mixture was used. Characterization of the MWCNTs deposited on the fiber surface was conducted by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy mapping and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. These characterizations showed higher areal concentration and more homogeneous distribution of MWCNTs over the aramid fibers for as-received fibers and for those modified with chlorosulfonic acid, suggesting the existence of interaction between the oxidized MWCNTs and the fiber coating. The electrical resistance of the MWCNT-modified aramid yarns comprising ∼1000 individual fibers was in the order of MΩ/cm, which renders multifunctional properties.

  2. Deposition of carbon nanotubes onto aramid fibers using as-received and chemically modified fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez-Uicab, O. [Centro de Investigación Científica de Yucatán A.C., Unidad de Materiales, Calle 43 No.130, Col. Chuburna de Hidalgo, C.P. 97200 Mérida, Yucatán (Mexico); Avilés, F., E-mail: faviles@cicy.mx [Centro de Investigación Científica de Yucatán A.C., Unidad de Materiales, Calle 43 No.130, Col. Chuburna de Hidalgo, C.P. 97200 Mérida, Yucatán (Mexico); Gonzalez-Chi, P.I; Canché-Escamilla, G.; Duarte-Aranda, S. [Centro de Investigación Científica de Yucatán A.C., Unidad de Materiales, Calle 43 No.130, Col. Chuburna de Hidalgo, C.P. 97200 Mérida, Yucatán (Mexico); Yazdani-Pedram, M. [Facultad de Ciencias Químicas y Farmacéuticas, Universidad de Chile, S. Livingstone 1007, Independencia, Santiago (Chile); Toro, P. [Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Av. Beauchef 850, Santiago (Chile); Gamboa, F. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Unidad Mérida, Depto. de Física Aplicada, Km. 6 Antigua Carretera a Progreso, 97310 Mérida, Yucatán (Mexico); Mazo, M.A.; Nistal, A.; Rubio, J. [Instituto de Cerámica y Vidrio (ICV-CSIC), Kelsen 5, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The surface of aramid fibers was functionalized by two acid treatments. • The treatment based on HNO{sub 3}/H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} reduced the mechanical properties of the fibers. • CNTs were deposited on the aramid fibers, reaching electrical conductivity. • Homogeneous CNT distribution was achieved by using pristine fibers or chlorosulfonic acid. - Abstract: Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) oxidized by an acid treatment were deposited on the surface of as-received commercial aramid fibers containing a surface coating (“sizing”), and fibers modified by either a chlorosulfonic treatment or a mixture of nitric and sulfuric acids. The surface of the aramid fiber activated by the chemical treatments presents increasing density of CO, COOH and OH functional groups. However, these chemical treatments reduced the tensile mechanical properties of the fibers, especially when the nitric and sulfuric acid mixture was used. Characterization of the MWCNTs deposited on the fiber surface was conducted by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy mapping and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. These characterizations showed higher areal concentration and more homogeneous distribution of MWCNTs over the aramid fibers for as-received fibers and for those modified with chlorosulfonic acid, suggesting the existence of interaction between the oxidized MWCNTs and the fiber coating. The electrical resistance of the MWCNT-modified aramid yarns comprising ∼1000 individual fibers was in the order of MΩ/cm, which renders multifunctional properties.

  3. Manufacturing of Nanocomposite Carbon Fibers and Composite Cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Seng; Zhou, Jian-guo

    2013-01-01

    Pitch-based nanocomposite carbon fibers were prepared with various percentages of carbon nanofibers (CNFs), and the fibers were used for manufacturing composite structures. Experimental results show that these nanocomposite carbon fibers exhibit improved structural and electrical conductivity properties as compared to unreinforced carbon fibers. Composite panels fabricated from these nanocomposite carbon fibers and an epoxy system also show the same properties transformed from the fibers. Single-fiber testing per ASTM C1557 standard indicates that the nanocomposite carbon fiber has a tensile modulus of 110% higher, and a tensile strength 17.7% times higher, than the conventional carbon fiber manufactured from pitch. Also, the electrical resistance of the carbon fiber carbonized at 900 C was reduced from 4.8 to 2.2 ohm/cm. The manufacturing of the nanocomposite carbon fiber was based on an extrusion, non-solvent process. The precursor fibers were then carbonized and graphitized. The resultant fibers are continuous.

  4. Preliminary characterization of glass fiber sizing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noergaard Petersen, H.; Almdal, K. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. DTU Nanotech, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Kusano, Y.; Broendsted, P. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. DTU Wind Energy, Risoe Campus, Roskilde (Denmark)

    2013-09-01

    Glass fiber surfaces are treated with sizing during manufacturing. Sizing consists of several components, including a film former and a silane coupling agent that is important for adhesion between glass fibers and a matrix. Although the sizing highly affects the composite interface and thus the strength of the composites, little is known about the structure and chemistry of the sizing. A part of sizing was extracted by soxhlet extraction. The fibers were subsequently burned and some fibers were merely burned for analysis of glass fiber and sizing. The results showed that the analyzed fibers had amounts of bonded and physisorbed sizing similar to what has been presented in literature. An estimated sizing thickness was found to be approximately 100 nm. It is indicated that an epoxy-resin containing film former and a polyethylene oxide lubricant are present, yet no silanes or other sizing components were identified in the extractant. (Author)

  5. Optical fiber head for providing lateral viewing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Matthew J.; Colston, Billy W.; James, Dale L.; Brown, Steve; Da Silva, Luiz

    2002-01-01

    The head of an optical fiber comprising the sensing probe of an optical heterodyne sensing device includes a planar surface that intersects the perpendicular to axial centerline of the fiber at a polishing angle .theta.. The planar surface is coated with a reflective material so that light traveling axially through the fiber is reflected transverse to the fiber's axial centerline, and is emitted laterally through the side of the fiber. Alternatively, the planar surface can be left uncoated. The polishing angle .theta. must be no greater than 39.degree. or must be at least 51.degree.. The emitted light is reflected from adjacent biological tissue, collected by the head, and then processed to provide real-time images of the tissue. The method for forming the planar surface includes shearing the end of the optical fiber and applying the reflective material before removing the buffer that circumscribes the cladding and the core.

  6. Optical fiber composition and radiation hardness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, J.A.; Loretz, T.J.

    1982-01-01

    Germanium phosphosilicate and germanium borosilicate fibers doped with cerium were fabricated and tested for their responses to steady-state Co-60 radiation at -55 C, +20 C and +125 C. A fiber with germanium, boron and phosphorous in the silicate core and doped with antimony in the core and clad was similarly tested. All of the fibers showed significant improvements in radiation hardness at 20 C compared to undoped fibers of the same base composition. At -55 C, however, all except the cerium doped germanium phosphosilicate were very radiation sensitive and also showed increases in the rate of induced loss at +125 C. The cerium doped germanium phosphosilicate fiber showed virtually no change in radiation sensitivity at the temperature extremes and could prove useful in applications requiring relatively short lengths of fiber

  7. Adhesion of cellulose fibers in paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Bo N J; Ganser, Christian; Schmied, Franz; Teichert, Christian; Schennach, Robert; Gilli, Eduard; Hirn, Ulrich

    2013-01-30

    The surface topography of paper fibers is studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM), and thus the surface roughness power spectrum is obtained. Using AFM we have performed indentation experiments and measured the effective elastic modulus and the penetration hardness as a function of humidity. The influence of water capillary adhesion on the fiber-fiber binding strength is studied. Cellulose fibers can absorb a significant amount of water, resulting in swelling and a strong reduction in the elastic modulus and the penetration hardness. This will lead to closer contact between the fibers during the drying process (the capillary bridges pull the fibers into closer contact without storing up a lot of elastic energy at the contacting interface). In order for the contact to remain good in the dry state, plastic flow must occur (in the wet state) so that the dry surface profiles conform to each other (forming a key-and-lock type of contact).

  8. Uncladded sensing fiber for refractive index measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhardwaj, V.; Gangwar, R. K.; Pathak, A. K.; Singh, V. K.

    2016-01-01

    The formation of chemically etched optical fiber for use in refractive index sensor is addressed. This presented design of a refractive index (RI) sensor is based on recording the power loss exhibited by radiation propagating through an etched multimode fiber (MMF) immersed in the liquid under study. The decreasing diameters of fibers are found to be strongly dependent on the temperature and etchant composition. This experiment was performed for different unclad etched fibers for same sensing length and the RI changes from 1.33 RIU to 1.38 RIU. When the multimode fiber (MMF) is etched for 12 hours the sensitivity of the sensor is approximately 204.25dBm/RIU, which is larger than without etched fiber having sensitivity 127.2dBm/RIU.

  9. Uncladded sensing fiber for refractive index measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, V.; Gangwar, R. K.; Pathak, A. K.; Singh, V. K.

    2016-05-01

    The formation of chemically etched optical fiber for use in refractive index sensor is addressed. This presented design of a refractive index (RI) sensor is based on recording the power loss exhibited by radiation propagating through an etched multimode fiber (MMF) immersed in the liquid under study. The decreasing diameters of fibers are found to be strongly dependent on the temperature and etchant composition. This experiment was performed for different unclad etched fibers for same sensing length and the RI changes from 1.33 RIU to 1.38 RIU. When the multimode fiber (MMF) is etched for 12 hours the sensitivity of the sensor is approximately 204.25dBm/RIU, which is larger than without etched fiber having sensitivity 127.2dBm/RIU.

  10. Uncladded sensing fiber for refractive index measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhardwaj, V., E-mail: bhardwajphyism@gmail.com; Gangwar, R. K.; Pathak, A. K.; Singh, V. K. [Department of Applied Physics Indian School of Mines Dhanbad, Jharkhand (India)

    2016-05-06

    The formation of chemically etched optical fiber for use in refractive index sensor is addressed. This presented design of a refractive index (RI) sensor is based on recording the power loss exhibited by radiation propagating through an etched multimode fiber (MMF) immersed in the liquid under study. The decreasing diameters of fibers are found to be strongly dependent on the temperature and etchant composition. This experiment was performed for different unclad etched fibers for same sensing length and the RI changes from 1.33 RIU to 1.38 RIU. When the multimode fiber (MMF) is etched for 12 hours the sensitivity of the sensor is approximately 204.25dBm/RIU, which is larger than without etched fiber having sensitivity 127.2dBm/RIU.

  11. OptoCeramic-Based High Speed Fiber Multiplexer for Multimode Fiber, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A fiber-based fixed-array laser transmitter can be combined with a fiber-arrayed detector to create the next-generation NASA array LIDAR systems. High speed optical...

  12. Framework for replacing steel with aluminum fibers in bituminous mixes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavlatos, N.; Apostolidis, P.; Scarpas, Athanasios

    2018-01-01

    This research explores the incentives for replacing steel fibers with aluminum fibers in fiber modified bituminous mixes. In this work the focus is on fiber modified bituminous mixes especially designed for induction heating. Inductive fibers are heated up because eddy currents are generated -

  13. Fiber Scrambling for High Precision Spectrographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Zachary; Spronck, J. F. P.; Fischer, D.

    2011-05-01

    The detection of Earth-like exoplanets with the radial velocity method requires extreme Doppler precision and long-term stability in order to measure tiny reflex velocities in the host star. Recent planet searches have led to the detection of so called "super-Earths” (up to a few Earth masses) that induce radial velocity changes of about 1 m/s. However, the detection of true Earth analogs requires a precision of 10 cm/s. One of the largest factors limiting Doppler precision is variation in the Point Spread Function (PSF) from observation to observation due to changes in the illumination of the slit and spectrograph optics. Thus, this stability has become a focus of current instrumentation work. Fiber optics have been used since the 1980's to couple telescopes to high-precision spectrographs, initially for simpler mechanical design and control. However, fiber optics are also naturally efficient scramblers. Scrambling refers to a fiber's ability to produce an output beam independent of input. Our research is focused on characterizing the scrambling properties of several types of fibers, including circular, square and octagonal fibers. By measuring the intensity distribution after the fiber as a function of input beam position, we can simulate guiding errors that occur at an observatory. Through this, we can determine which fibers produce the most uniform outputs for the severest guiding errors, improving the PSF and allowing sub-m/s precision. However, extensive testing of fibers of supposedly identical core diameter, length and shape from the same manufacturer has revealed the "personality” of individual fibers. Personality describes differing intensity patterns for supposedly duplicate fibers illuminated identically. Here, we present our results on scrambling characterization as a function of fiber type, while studying individual fiber personality.

  14. Tribology of natural fiber polymer composites

    CERN Document Server

    Chand, N

    2008-01-01

    Environmental concerns are driving demand for bio-degradable materials such as plant-based natural fiber reinforced polymer composites. These composites are fast replacing conventional materials in many applications, especially in automobiles, where tribology (friction, lubrication and wear) is important. This book covers the availability and processing of natural fiber polymer composites and their structural, thermal, mechanical and, in particular, tribological properties.Chapter 1 discusses sources of natural fibers, their extraction and surface modification. It also reviews the ther

  15. Macro-Fiber Composite Based Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    substrate Material properties of single crystal macro fiber composite actuators for active twist rotor blades Park, Jae-Sang (Seoul National...Passive Smart Structures and Integrated Systems 2007 Material properties of single crystal macro fiber composite actuators for active twist rotor ...19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code) 10-03-20 16 Final Report 01 Jan 2013 - 31 Dec 2015 Macro-Fiber Composite Based Transduction N000-14-13-1-0212

  16. A novel fiber-based adsorbent technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, T.A. [Chemica Technologies, Inc., Bend, OR (United States)

    1997-10-01

    In this Phase I Small Business Innovation Research program, Chemica Technologies, Inc. is developing an economical, robust, fiber-based adsorbent technology for removal of heavy metals from contaminated water. The key innovation is the development of regenerable adsorbent fibers and adsorbent fiber cloths that have high capacity and selectivity for heavy metals and are chemically robust. The process has the potential for widespread use at DOE facilities, mining operations, and the chemical process industry.

  17. Oriented collagen fibers direct tumor cell intravasation

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Weijing

    2016-09-24

    In this work, we constructed a Collagen I-Matrigel composite extracellular matrix (ECM). The composite ECM was used to determine the influence of the local collagen fiber orientation on the collective intravasation ability of tumor cells. We found that the local fiber alignment enhanced cell-ECM interactions. Specifically, metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells followed the local fiber alignment direction during the intravasation into rigid Matrigel (∼10 mg/mL protein concentration).

  18. A Fermat's spiral multifilament-core fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartara, L.; Codemard, C.

    2013-02-01

    A multifilament-core optical fiber where the microstructure is arranged in a Fermat's spiral is presented. The properties of such a fiber to be exploited for laser light amplification are numerically investigated by means of a full-vectorial finite-element method. Thanks to this peculiar microstructure, the fiber is shown to have an increased Brillouin threshold power and very low bending losses, while preserving a very good beam spatial quality.

  19. Optical fiber pressure sensor based on fiber Bragg grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Dongcao

    In oil field, it is important to measure the high pressure and temperature for down-hole oil exploration and well-logging, the available traditional electronic sensor is challenged due to the harsh, flammable environment. Recently, applications based on fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor in the oil industry have become a popular research because of its distinguishing advantages such as electrically passive operation, immunity to electromagnetic interference, high resolution, insensitivity to optical power fluctuation etc. This thesis is divided into two main sections. In the first section, the design of high pressure sensor based on FBG is described. Several sensing elements based on FBG for high pressure measurements have been proposed, for example bulk-modulus or free elastic modulus. But the structure of bulk-modulus and free elastic modulus is relatively complex and not easy to fabricate. In addition, the pressure sensitivity is not high and the repeatability of the structure has not been investigated. In this thesis, a novel host material of carbon fiber laminated composite (CFLC) for high pressure sensing is proposed. The mechanical characteristics including principal moduli in three directions and the shape repeatability are investigated. Because of it's Young's modulus in one direction and anisotropic characteristics, the pressure sensor made by CFLC has excellent sensitivity. This said structure can be used in very high pressure measurement due to carbon fiber composite's excellent shape repetition even under high pressure. The experimental results show high pressure sensitivity of 0.101nm/MPa and high pressure measurement up to 70MPa. A pressure sensor based on CFLC and FBG with temperature compensation has been designed. In the second section, the design of low pressure sensor based on FBG is demonstrated. Due to the trade off between measurement range and sensitivity, a sensor for lower pressure range needs more sensitivity. A novel material of carbon

  20. Fiber-optical accelerometers based on polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Scott Wu; Stefani, Alessio; Bang, Ole

    2010-01-01

    Fiber-optical accelerometers based on polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) are reported. We have written 3mm FBGs for 1550nm operation, characterized their temperature and strain response, and tested their performance in a prototype accelerometer.......Fiber-optical accelerometers based on polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) are reported. We have written 3mm FBGs for 1550nm operation, characterized their temperature and strain response, and tested their performance in a prototype accelerometer....

  1. Identifying Practical Solutions to Meet America’s Fiber Needs: Proceedings from the Food & Fiber Summit

    OpenAIRE

    Mobley, Amy R.; Jones, Julie Miller; Rodriguez, Judith; Slavin, Joanne; Zelman, Kathleen M.

    2014-01-01

    Fiber continues to be singled out as a nutrient of public health concern. Adequate intakes of fiber are associated with reduced risk for cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, certain gastrointestinal disorders and obesity. Despite ongoing efforts to promote adequate fiber through increased vegetable, fruit and whole-grain intakes, average fiber consumption has remained flat at approximately half of the recommended daily amounts. Research indicates that consumers report increasingly attemp...

  2. A true minimally invasive approach for cochlear implantation: high accuracy in cranial base navigation through flat-panel-based volume computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdani, Omid; Bartling, Soenke H; Leinung, Martin; Stöver, Timo; Lenarz, Minoo; Dullin, Christian; Lenarz, Thomas

    2008-02-01

    High-precision intraoperative navigation using high-resolution flat-panel volume computed tomography makes feasible the possibility of minimally invasive cochlear implant surgery, including cochleostomy. Conventional cochlear implant surgery is typically performed via mastoidectomy with facial recess to identify and avoid damage to vital anatomic landmarks. To accomplish this procedure via a minimally invasive approach--without performing mastoidectomy--in a precise fashion, image-guided technology is necessary. With such an approach, surgical time and expertise may be reduced, and hearing preservation may be improved. Flat-panel volume computed tomography was used to scan 4 human temporal bones. A drilling channel was planned preoperatively from the mastoid surface to the round window niche, providing a margin of safety to all functional important structures (e.g., facial nerve, chorda tympani, incus). Postoperatively, computed tomographic imaging and conventional surgical exploration of the drilled route to the cochlea were performed. All 4 specimens showed a cochleostomy located at the scala tympani anterior inferior to the round window. The chorda tympani was damaged in 1 specimen--this was preoperatively planned as a narrow facial recess was encountered. Using flat-panel volume computed tomography for image-guided surgical navigation, we were able to perform minimally invasive cochlear implant surgery defined as a narrow, single-channel mastoidotomy with cochleostomy. Although this finding is preliminary, it is technologically achievable.

  3. Radiation resistance of optical fibers, (10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsunoda, Tsunemi; Ara, Katsuyuki; Morimoto, Naoki; Sanada, Kazuo; Inada, Koichi.

    1991-01-01

    Optical fibers have many excellent characteristics such as the light weight of the material, insulation, the noninductivity of electromagnetic interference noise, the wide band of signal transmission, and small loss. Also in the field of atomic energy, the utilization of optical fibers is positively expanded, and the research on the method of application and so on has been advanced. However in optical fibers, there is the problem that color centers are formed at the relatively low level of radiation, and they are colored. Accordingly, for effectively utilizing optical fibers in radiation environment, it is indispensable to improve their radiation resistance. For the purpose of solving this problem, the authors have carried out the basic research on the effect that radiation exerts to optical fibers and the development of the optical fibers having excellent radiation resistance. For the purpose of expanding the range of application of GeO 2 -doped silica core fibers including GI type in radiation regions, the transmission characteristics of the fibers during irradiation were examined by using the Cl content as the parameter. Therefore, the results are reported. The fibers put to the test, the testing method and the results are described. (K.I.)

  4. Biosoftening of coir fiber using selected microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Akhila; Senan, Resmi C; Pavithran, C; Abraham, T Emilia

    2005-12-01

    Coir fiber belongs to the group of hard structural fibers obtained from coconut husk. As lignin is the main constituent of coir responsible for its stiffness, microbes that selectively remove lignin without loss of appreciable amounts of cellulose are extremely attractive in biosoftening. Five isolated strains were compared with known strains of bacteria and fungi. The raw fiber treated with Pseudomonas putida and Phanerocheate chrysosporium produced better softened fiber at 30+/-2 degrees C and neutral pH. FeSO4 and humic acid were found to be the best inducers for P. chrysosporium and P. putida, respectively, while sucrose and dextrose were the best C-sources for both. Biosoftening of unretted coir fibers was more advantageous than the retted fibers. Unlike the weak chemically softened fiber, microbial treatment produced soft, whiter fibers having better tensile strength and elongation (44.6-44.8%) properties. Scanning electron microscopy photos showed the mycelia penetrating the pores of the fiber, removing the tylose plug and degrading lignin.

  5. Electron emission mechanism of carbon fiber cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Lie; Li Limin; Wen Jianchun; Wan Hong

    2005-01-01

    Models of electron emission mechanism are established concerning metal and carbon fiber cathodes. Correctness of the electron emission mechanism was proved according to micro-photos and electron scanning photos of cathodes respectively. The experimental results and analysis show that the surface flashover induces the electron emission of carbon fiber cathode and there are electron emission phenomena from the top of the carbon and also from its side surface. In addition, compared with the case of the stainless steel cathode, the plasma expansion velocity for the carbon fiber cathode is slower and the pulse duration of output microwave can be widened by using the carbon fiber cathode. (authors)

  6. Carbon Fiber Damage in Accelerator Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Sapinski, M; Guerrero, A; Koopman, J; Métral, E

    2009-01-01

    Carbon fibers are commonly used as moving targets in Beam Wire Scanners. Because of their thermomechanical properties they are very resistant to particle beams. Their strength deteriorates with time due to radiation damage and low-cycle thermal fatigue. In case of high intensity beams this process can accelerate and in extreme cases the fiber is damaged during a single scan. In this work a model describing the fiber temperature, thermionic emission and sublimation is discussed. Results are compared with fiber damage test performed on SPS beam in November 2008. In conclusions the limits of Wire Scanner operation on high intensity beams are drawn.

  7. Design and Construction of Large Amyloid Fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Ridgley, Devin M.; Rippner, Caitlin M. W.; Barone, Justin R.

    2015-01-01

    Mixtures of “template” and “adder” proteins self-assemble into large amyloid fibers of varying morphology and modulus. Fibers range from low modulus, rectangular cross-sectioned tapes to high modulus, circular cross-sectioned cylinders. Varying the proteins in the mixture can elicit “in-between” morphologies, such as elliptical cross-sectioned fibers and twisted tapes, both of which have moduli in-between rectangular tapes and cylindrical fibers. Experiments on mixtures of proteins of known a...

  8. Microring embedded hollow polymer fiber laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linslal, C. L., E-mail: linslal@gmail.com; Sebastian, S.; Mathew, S.; Radhakrishnan, P.; Nampoori, V. P. N.; Girijavallabhan, C. P.; Kailasnath, M. [International School of Photonics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin 22 (India)

    2015-03-30

    Strongly modulated laser emission has been observed from rhodamine B doped microring resonator embedded in a hollow polymer optical fiber by transverse optical pumping. The microring resonator is fabricated on the inner wall of a hollow polymer fiber. Highly sharp lasing lines, strong mode selection, and a collimated laser beam are observed from the fiber. Nearly single mode lasing with a side mode suppression ratio of up to 11.8 dB is obtained from the strongly modulated lasing spectrum. The microring embedded hollow polymer fiber laser has shown efficient lasing characteristics even at a propagation length of 1.5 m.

  9. Microstructured optical fibers - Fundamentals and applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2006-01-01

    In recent years optical fibers having a complex microstructure in the transverse plane have attracted much attention from both researchers and industry. Such fibers can either guide light through total internal reflection or the photonic bandgap effect. Among the many unique applications offered...... by these fibers are mode guidance in air, highly flexible dispersion engineering, and the use of very heterogeneous material combinations. In this paper, we review the different types and applications of microstructured optical fibers, with particular emphasis on recent advances in the field....

  10. Curved Piezoelectric Actuators for Stretching Optical Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Assemblies containing curved piezoceramic fiber composite actuators have been invented as means of stretching optical fibers by amounts that depend on applied drive voltages. Piezoceramic fiber composite actuators are conventionally manufactured as sheets or ribbons that are flat and flexible, but can be made curved to obtain load-carrying ability and displacement greater than those obtainable from the flat versions. In the primary embodiment of this invention, piezoceramic fibers are oriented parallel to the direction of longitudinal displacement of the actuators so that application of drive voltage causes the actuator to flatten, producing maximum motion. Actuator motion can be transmitted to the optical fiber by use of hinges and clamp blocks. In the original application of this invention, the optical fiber contains a Bragg grating and the purpose of the controlled stretching of the fiber is to tune the grating as part of a small, lightweight, mode-hop-free, rapidly tunable laser for demodulating strain in Bragg-grating strain-measurement optical fibers attached to structures. The invention could also be used to apply controllable tensile force or displacement to an object other than an optical fiber.

  11. Advances in photonic bandgap fiber functionality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngsøe, Jens Kristian

    In order to take advantage of the many intriguing optical properties of photonic bandgap fibers, there are some technological challenges that have to be addressed. Among other things this includes transmission loss and the fibers ability to maintain field polarization. The work presented in this ......In order to take advantage of the many intriguing optical properties of photonic bandgap fibers, there are some technological challenges that have to be addressed. Among other things this includes transmission loss and the fibers ability to maintain field polarization. The work presented...

  12. Improved Sectional Image Analysis Technique for Evaluating Fiber Orientations in Fiber-Reinforced Cement-Based Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bang Yeon; Kang, Su-Tae; Yun, Hae-Bum; Kim, Yun Yong

    2016-01-12

    The distribution of fiber orientation is an important factor in determining the mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced concrete. This study proposes a new image analysis technique for improving the evaluation accuracy of fiber orientation distribution in the sectional image of fiber-reinforced concrete. A series of tests on the accuracy of fiber detection and the estimation performance of fiber orientation was performed on artificial fiber images to assess the validity of the proposed technique. The validation test results showed that the proposed technique estimates the distribution of fiber orientation more accurately than the direct measurement of fiber orientation by image analysis.

  13. Nonlinear fiber-optic strain sensor based on four-wave mixing in microstructured optical fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gu, Bobo; Yuan, Scott Wu; Frosz, Michael H.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a nonlinear fiber-optic strain sensor, which uses the shifts of four-wave mixing Stokes and anti-Stokes peaks caused by the strain-induced changes in the structure and refractive index of a microstructured optical fiber. The sensor thus uses the inherent nonlinearity of the fiber a...

  14. Effect of Fiber Layers on the Fracture Resistance of Fiber Reinforced Composite Bridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Fazel

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this in vitro study was to introduce the fiber reinforced composite bridges and evaluate the most suitable site and position for placement of fibers in order to get maximum strength. Methods: The study included 20 second premolars and 20 second molars selected for fabricating twenty fiber reinforced composite bridges. Twenty specimens were selected for one fiber layer and the remaining teeth for two fiber layers. In the first group, fibers were placed in the inferior third and in the second group, fibers were placed in both the middle and inferior third region. After tooth preparation, the restorations were fabricated, thermocycled and then loaded with universal testing machine in the middle of the pontics with crosshead speed of 1mm/min. Data was analyzed by Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, Independent sample t test and Kaplan-Meier test. Mode of failure was evaluated using stereomicroscope. Results: Mean fracture resistance for the first and second groups was 1416±467N and 1349±397N, respectively. No significant differences were observed between the groups (P>0.05.In the first group, 5 specimens had delamintation and 5 specimens had detachment between fibers and resin composite. In the second group, there were 4 and 6 delaminations and detachments, respectively. There was no fracture within the fiber. Conclusion: In the fiber reinforced fixed partial dentures, fibers reinforce the tensile side of the connectors but placement of additional fibers at other sites does not increase the fracture resistance of the restoration.

  15. Polymer optical fiber with Rhodamine doped cladding for fiber light systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narro-García, R., E-mail: roberto.narro@gmail.com [Centro de Física Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Boulevard Juriquilla 3001, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico); Quintero-Torres, R. [Centro de Física Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Boulevard Juriquilla 3001, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico); Domínguez-Juárez, J.L. [Centro de Física Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Boulevard Juriquilla 3001, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico); Cátedras CONACyT, Centro de Física Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Boulevard Juriquilla 3001, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico); Ocampo, M.A. [Centro de Física Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Boulevard Juriquilla 3001, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico)

    2016-01-15

    Both preform and polymer optical fiber with a Poly(methyl methacrylate) core and THV–Rhodamine 6G cladding were characterized. UV–vis absorbance, photoluminescence spectra and lifetime of the preform were measured. Axial and lateral photoluminescence spectra of the polymer optical fiber were studied under 404 nm excitation in order to study the illumination performance of the fiber. It was observed that the peak wavelength from the fiber photoluminescence spectra is higher than the peak wavelength from the fiber preform and that the peak wavelength from the fiber photoluminescence spectra is red shifted with the fiber length in the case of axial emission. The obtained results suggest the influence of self-absorption on the photoluminescence shape. Strong lateral emission along the fiber was observed with the naked eyes in all the cases. The lateral photoluminescence spectra show that the lateral emission is a combination between the pump laser and the Rh6G molecule photoluminescence. The results suggest that this polymer optical fiber could be a potential candidate for the development of fiber lighting systems. - Highlights: • Axial and lateral emission along the fiber was studied. • Self-absorption effect was confirmed in the case of axial photoluminescence. • The lateral emission is a combination between the laser and the RhG6 emission. • This fiber could be a potential candidate for the development of lighting systems.

  16. Moiré phase-shifted fiber Bragg gratings in polymer optical fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Min, Rui; Marques, Carlos; Bang, Ole

    2018-01-01

    We demonstrate a simple way to fabricate phase-shifted fiber Bragg grating in polymer optical fibers as a narrowband transmission filter for a variety of applications at telecom wavelengths. The filters have been fabricated by overlapping two uniform fiber Bragg gratings with slightly different...

  17. Multi-kW single fiber laser based on an extra large mode area fiber design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langner, Andreas; Such, Mario; Schötz, Gerhard; Just, Florian; Leich, Martin; Schwuchow, Anka; Grimm, Stephan; Zimer, Hagen; Kozak, Marcin; Wedel, Björn; Rehmann, Georg; Bachert, Charley; Krause, Volker

    2012-02-01

    The quality of Yb-doped fused bulk silica produced by sintering of Yb-doped fused silica granulates has improved greatly in the past five years [1 - 4]. In particular, the refractive index and doping level homogeneity of such materials are excellent and we achieved excellent background fiber attenuation of the active core material down to about 20 dB/km at 1200 nm. The improvement of the Yb-doped fused bulk silica has enabled the development of multi-kW fiber laser systems based on a single extra large multimode laser fiber (XLMA fiber). When a single active fiber is used in combination with the XLMA multimode fiber of 1200 μm diameter simple and robust high power fiber laser setups without complex fiber coupling and fiber combiner systems become possible. In this papper, we will discuss in detail the development of the core material based on Yb-doped bulk silica and the characterization of Yb-doped fibers with different core compositions. We will also report on the excellent performance of a 4 kW fiber laser based on a single XLMA-fiber and show the first experimental welding results of steel sheets achieved with such a laser.

  18. A method for calculating equivalent diameter of fiber in self-compacting fiber reinforced concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, R.; Spiesz, P.R.; Brouwers, H.J.H.; Fischer, H.-B.; Bode, K.-A.; Beuthan, C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a method for calculating the equivalent diameter of fiber in self-compacting fiber reinforced concrete (SCFRC). The key idea is to utilize a small amount of particles with a narrow particle size distribution to replace the fibers by the same volume, without causing any obvious

  19. Optical fiber strain sensor using fiber resonator based on frequency comb Vernier spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Liang; Lu, Ping; Chen, Li

    2012-01-01

    A novel (to our best knowledge) optical fiber strain sensor using a fiber ring resonator based on frequency comb Vernier spectroscopy is proposed and demonstrated. A passively mode-locked optical fiber laser is employed to generate a phased-locked frequency comb. Strain applied to the optical fib...

  20. Geometric phases in singlemode fiber lightguides and fiber ring interferometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malykin, Grigorii B; Pozdnyakova, Vera I

    2004-01-01

    We consider various geometric phases (GPs) in singlemode fiber lightguides (SMFs) and in fiber ring interferometers (FRIs): the Pancharatnam phase stemming from the cyclic evolution of the polarization state of radiation (RP state) in SMF, the Rytov-Vladimirskii phase (RV phase) stemming from the Rytov effect (specifically, rotation of the polarization plane due to noncoplanar winding of SMFs), as well as the nonreciprocal phase difference of counterpropagating waves (NPDCW) and nonreciprocal geometric phase of counterpropagating waves (NGPCW), which are caused by polarization nonreciprocity (PN) in FRIs. We show that in the general case, the Pancharatnam phase for an arbitrary RP state is inconsistent with the real phase change of light fluctuations in media that possess not only circular but also linear birefringence. We show that the RV phase, having a geometric origin, can in principle be considered as a dynamic phase (DP). We also show that the NGPCW can be considered as an effect of the evolution of the RP state mapped on the Poincare sphere in Ginzburg's orthogonal screw polarization modes (GSPMs) of SMFs in the FRI contour. We analyze a number of experiments in which geometric phases were detected in FRIs: changing the RV phase and Rytov's angle (RA) in response to change of the pitch of helicoidal winding of SMFs. (methodological notes)

  1. Physical determinants of fibrinolysis in single fibrin fibers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igal Bucay

    Full Text Available Fibrin fibers form the structural backbone of blood clots; fibrinolysis is the process in which plasmin digests fibrin fibers, effectively regulating the size and duration of a clot. To understand blood clot dissolution, the influence of clot structure and fiber properties must be separated from the effects of enzyme kinetics and perfusion rates into clots. Using an inverted optical microscope and fluorescently-labeled fibers suspended between micropatterned ridges, we have directly measured the lysis of individual fibrin fibers. We found that during lysis 64 ± 6% of fibers were transected at one point, but 29 ± 3% of fibers increase in length rather than dissolving or being transected. Thrombin and plasmin dose-response experiments showed that the elongation behavior was independent of plasmin concentration, but was instead dependent on the concentration of thrombin used during fiber polymerization, which correlated inversely with fiber diameter. Thinner fibers were more likely to lyse, while fibers greater than 200 ± 30 nm in diameter were more likely to elongate. Because lysis rates were greatly reduced in elongated fibers, we hypothesize that plasmin activity depends on fiber strain. Using polymer physics- and continuum mechanics-based mathematical models, we show that fibers polymerize in a strained state and that thicker fibers lose their prestrain more rapidly than thinner fibers during lysis, which may explain why thick fibers elongate and thin fibers lyse. These results highlight how subtle differences in the diameter and prestrain of fibers could lead to dramatically different lytic susceptibilities.

  2. Soliton robustness in optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menyuk, C.R.

    1993-01-01

    Simulations and experiments indicate that solitons in optical fibers are robust in the presence of Hamiltonian deformations such as higher-order dispersion and birefringence but are destroyed in the presence of non-Hamiltonian deformations such as attenuation and the Raman effect. Two hypotheses are introduced that generalize these observations and give a recipe for when deformations will be Hamiltonian. Concepts from nonlinear dynamics are used to make these two hypotheses plausible. Soliton stabilization with frequency filtering is also briefly discussed from this point of view

  3. Fiber-optic communication systems

    CERN Document Server

    Agrawal, Govind P

    2010-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive account of fiber-optic communication systems. The 3rd edition of this book is used worldwide as a textbook in many universities. This 4th edition incorporates recent advances that have occurred, in particular two new chapters. One deals with the advanced modulation formats (such as DPSK, QPSK, and QAM) that are increasingly being used for improving spectral efficiency of WDM lightwave systems. The second chapter focuses on new techniques such as all-optical regeneration that are under development and likely to be used in future communication systems. All othe

  4. Rupture luminescence from natural fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W.; Haneman, D.

    1999-12-01

    Fibers of cotton and wool, and samples of paper, have been ruptured in tension in vacuum and in air, and give detectable luminescence in the visible range. All have a common emission peak at around 2.0 eV, which is ascribed to the deexcitation of states excited by the rupture of organic chain molecule bonds. Rubber bands give stronger emission in air, but no emission in vacuum, suggesting the material breaks only at weak interchain bonds. Mohair, cat, and horse hair also give emission in air. The phenomena reveal effects that would occur widely in nature.

  5. Development of new radiopaque glass fiber posts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furtos, Gabriel; Baldea, Bogdan; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the radiopacity and filler content of three experimental glass fiber posts (EGFP) in comparison with other glass/carbon fibers and metal posts from the dental market. Three EGFP were obtained by pultrusion of glass fibers in a polymer matrix based on 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloyloxypropoxy)-phenyl]propane (bis-GMA) and triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) monomers. Using intraoral sensor disks 27 posts, as well as mesiodistal sections of human molar and aluminum step wedges were radiographed for evaluation of radiopacity. The percentage compositions of fillers by weight and volume were investigated by combustion analysis. Two EGFP showed radiopacity higher than enamel. The commercial endodontic posts showed radiopacity as follows: higher than enamel, between enamel and dentin, and lower than dentin. The results showed statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) when evaluated with one-way ANOVA statistical analysis. According to combustion analyses, the filler content of the tested posts ranges between 58.84 wt.% and 86.02 wt.%. The filler content of the tested EGFP ranged between 68.91 wt.% and 79.04 wt.%. EGFP could be an alternative to commercial glass fiber posts. Future glass fiber posts are recommended to present higher radiopacity than dentin and perhaps ideally similar to or higher than that of enamel, for improved clinical detection. The posts with a lower radiopacity than dentin should be considered insufficiently radiopaque. The radiopacity of some glass fiber posts is not greatly influenced by the amount of filler. - Highlights: • AR glass fibers for dental applications • AR glass fibers have a great potential for obtaining radiopaque glass fiber posts. • Experimental AR glass fiber posts could be an alternative to commercial glass fiber posts for clinical application.

  6. Development of new radiopaque glass fiber posts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furtos, Gabriel, E-mail: gfurtos@yahoo.co.uk [Raluca Ripan Institute of Research in Chemistry, Babes-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Baldea, Bogdan [Dep. of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Dental Medicine, Timisoara (Romania); Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Laura [Raluca Ripan Institute of Research in Chemistry, Babes-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the radiopacity and filler content of three experimental glass fiber posts (EGFP) in comparison with other glass/carbon fibers and metal posts from the dental market. Three EGFP were obtained by pultrusion of glass fibers in a polymer matrix based on 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloyloxypropoxy)-phenyl]propane (bis-GMA) and triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) monomers. Using intraoral sensor disks 27 posts, as well as mesiodistal sections of human molar and aluminum step wedges were radiographed for evaluation of radiopacity. The percentage compositions of fillers by weight and volume were investigated by combustion analysis. Two EGFP showed radiopacity higher than enamel. The commercial endodontic posts showed radiopacity as follows: higher than enamel, between enamel and dentin, and lower than dentin. The results showed statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) when evaluated with one-way ANOVA statistical analysis. According to combustion analyses, the filler content of the tested posts ranges between 58.84 wt.% and 86.02 wt.%. The filler content of the tested EGFP ranged between 68.91 wt.% and 79.04 wt.%. EGFP could be an alternative to commercial glass fiber posts. Future glass fiber posts are recommended to present higher radiopacity than dentin and perhaps ideally similar to or higher than that of enamel, for improved clinical detection. The posts with a lower radiopacity than dentin should be considered insufficiently radiopaque. The radiopacity of some glass fiber posts is not greatly influenced by the amount of filler. - Highlights: • AR glass fibers for dental applications • AR glass fibers have a great potential for obtaining radiopaque glass fiber posts. • Experimental AR glass fiber posts could be an alternative to commercial glass fiber posts for clinical application.

  7. Effect of cellulase treatment of long fiber fraction on strength ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    fiber and unbeaten short-fiber fractions. The obtained test results have indicate that the application of enzyme on appropriate fiber fraction have positive effects on the strength properties of the corrugated medium. The short span compression ...

  8. Fiber glass reinforced structural materials for aerospace application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, D. H.

    1968-01-01

    Evaluation of fiber glass reinforced plastic materials concludes that fiber glass construction is lighter than aluminum alloy construction. Low thermal conductivity and strength makes the fiber glass material useful in cryogenic tank supports.

  9. Fiber Supplements: Are They Safe to Take Every Day?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... function and preventing constipation. It's best to get fiber from food, because supplements don't provide the vitamins, minerals and other nutrients that fiber-rich foods do. But fiber supplements can contribute to the ...

  10. Long fiber polymer composite property calculation in injection molding simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiaoshi; Wang, Jin; Han, Sejin

    2013-05-01

    Long fiber filled polymer composite materials have attracted a great attention and usage in recent years. However, the injection and compression molded long fiber composite materials possess complex microstructures that include spatial variations in fiber orientation and length. This paper presents the recent implemented anisotropic rotary diffusion - reduced strain closure (ARD-RSC) model for predicting fiber orientation distribution[1] and a newly developed fiber breakage model[2] for predicting fiber length distribution in injection and compression molding simulation, and Eshelby-Mori-Tanaka model[3,4] with fiber-matrix de-bonding model[5] have been implemented to calculate the long fiber composite property distribution with predicted fiber orientation and fiber length distributions. A validation study on fiber orientation, fiber breakage and mechanical property distributions are given with injection molding process simulation.

  11. Fiber Optics: A New World of Possibilities in Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, John

    1990-01-01

    The background and history of light and fiber optics are discussed. Applications for light passed either directly or indirectly through optical fibers are described. Suggestions for science activities that use fiber optics are provided. (KR)

  12. Characterizing visually objectionable and nonobjectionable medullated fibers in mohair

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hunter, L

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available medullated whole fibers overlapped significantly with that of visually nonobjectionable medullated fibers, confirming previous studies on fiber snippets, that Med Ratio on its own does not represent a reliable criterion for consistently and accurately...

  13. swelling characteristics and tensile properties of natural fiber rei

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    The swelling behavior and tensile strength of natural fiber-reinforced plastic in premium motor spirit (PMS), dual ... with fibers usually of glass fiber, Kevlar and carbon have gained ... NIGERIAN JOURNAL OF TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 27 NO.2 ...

  14. [The recent development of fiber-optic chemical sensor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Wei, Jian-ping; Yang, Bo; Gao, Zhi-yang; Zhang, Li-wei; Yang, Xue-feng

    2014-08-01

    The present article provides a brief review of recent research on fiber-optic chemical sensor technology and the future development trends. Especially, fiber-optic pH chemical sensor, fiber-optic ion chemicl sensor, and fiber-optic gas chemical sensor are introduced respectively. Sensing film preparation methods such as chemical bonding method and sol-gel method were briefly reviewed. The emergence of new type fiber-microstructured optical fiber opened up a new development direction for fiber-optic chemical sensor. Because of its large inner surface area, flexible design of structure, having internal sensing places in fibers, it has rapidly become an important development direction and research focus of the fiber-optic chemical sensors. The fiber-optic chemical sensor derived from microstructured optical fiber is also discussed in detail. Finally, we look to the future of the fiber-optic chemical sensor.

  15. Multiparameter fiber sensors: enabling new capabilities in production optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, L.K.; Boering, M.; Braal, F.M.

    2014-01-01

    Fiber optic data transmission already has led to revolutionary developments, and ongoing research in fiber optic sensing technology for applications in extreme operational conditions will boost the development of fiber optic multipleparameter sensing systems further. Such innovations will be of

  16. Assessment of different dietary fibers (tomato fiber, beet root fiber, and inulin) for the manufacture of chopped cooked chicken products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cava, Ramón; Ladero, Luis; Cantero, V; Rosario Ramírez, M

    2012-04-01

    Three dietary fibers (tomato fiber [TF], beet root fiber [BRF], and inulin) at 3 levels of addition (1%, 2%, and 3%) were assessed for the manufacture of chopped, cooked chicken products and compared with a control product without fiber added. The effect of fiber incorporation on (i) batters, (ii) cooked (30 min at 70 °C), and (iii) cooked and stored (for 10 d at 4 °C) chicken products were studied. The addition of the fiber to chicken meat products reduced the pH of chicken batters in proportional to the level of fiber addition. Fiber incorporation increased water-holding capacity but only the addition of TF reduced cook losses. The color of batters and cooked products was significantly modified by the type and level of fiber added. These changes were more noticeable when TF was added. Texture parameters were affected by the incorporation of TF and BRF; they increased the hardness in proportional to the level of addition. The addition of tomato and BRF to chicken meat products reduced lipid oxidation processes. These changes were dependent on the level of fiber added. The reduction of lipid oxidation processes was more marked in TF meat products than in products with other types of fibers. In contrast, the addition level of inulin increased TBA-RS numbers in chicken meat products. Although the addition of TF increased the redness of the meat products, the use of this fiber was more suitable as it reduced the extent of lipid oxidation processes. INDUSTRIAL APPLICATION: Nowadays, the reduction of fat and the increase of fiber content in meat products is one of the main goals of meat industry. Numerous sources of fiber can be added to the meat products; however, before that it is necessary to study their technological effect on raw and cooked meat products in order to evaluate their suitability for meat products manufacture. In addition, some of them could have beneficial effect on meat products conservation that could also increase their shelf life. © 2012

  17. Photonic crystal fibers for supercontinuum generation pumped by a gain-switched CW fiber laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Casper; Noordegraaf, Danny; Hansen, Kim P.

    2012-01-01

    Supercontinuum generation in photonics crystal fibers (PCFs) pumped by CW lasers yields high spectral power density and average power. However, such systems require very high pump power and long nonlinear fibers. By on/off modulating the pump diodes of the fiber laser, the relaxation oscillations...... of the laser can be exploited to enhance the broadening process. The physics behind the supercontinuum generation is investigated by sweeping the fiber length, the zero dispersion wavelength, and the fiber nonlinearity. We show that by applying gain-switching a high average output power of up to 30 W can...

  18. All-fiber hybrid photon-plasmon circuits: integrating nanowire plasmonics with fiber optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiyuan; Li, Wei; Guo, Xin; Lou, Jingyi; Tong, Limin

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrate all-fiber hybrid photon-plasmon circuits by integrating Ag nanowires with optical fibers. Relying on near-field coupling, we realize a photon-to-plasmon conversion efficiency up to 92% in a fiber-based nanowire plasmonic probe. Around optical communication band, we assemble an all-fiber resonator and a Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) with Q-factor of 6 × 10(6) and extinction ratio up to 30 dB, respectively. Using the MZI, we demonstrate fiber-compatible plasmonic sensing with high sensitivity and low optical power.

  19. Fiber break location technique utilizing stimulated Brillouin scattering effects in optical fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakar, A A A; Al-Mansoori, M H; Mahdi, M A; Mohd Azau, M A; Zainal Abidin, M S

    2009-01-01

    A new technique of fiber break detection system in optical communication networks is proposed and experimentally demonstrated in this paper. This technique is based-on continuous wave light source rather than pulsed source that is commonly deployed in existing techniques. The nonlinear effect of stimulated Brillouin scattering is manipulated to locate the fiber-break position in optical communication networks. This technique enables the utilization of a less-sensitive photodetector to detect the Brillouin Stokes line since its intensity increases with the fiber length in the detectable region. The fiber break location can be determined with accuracy of more than 98% for fiber length less than 50 km using this technique

  20. A comparison of tensile properties of polyester composites reinforced with pineapple leaf fiber and pineapple peduncle fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juraidi, J. M.; Shuhairul, N.; Syed Azuan, S. A.; Intan Saffinaz Anuar, Noor

    2013-12-01

    Pineapple fiber which is rich in cellulose, relatively inexpensive, and abundantly available has the potential for polymer reinforcement. This research presents a study of the tensile properties of pineapple leaf fiber and pineapple peduncle fiber reinforced polyester composites. Composites were fabricated using leaf fiber and peduncle fiber with varying fiber length and fiber loading. Both fibers were mixed with polyester composites the various fiber volume fractions of 4, 8 and 12% and with three different fiber lengths of 10, 20 and 30 mm. The composites panels were fabricated using hand lay-out technique. The tensile test was carried out in accordance to ASTM D638. The result showed that pineapple peduncle fiber with 4% fiber volume fraction and fiber length of 30 mm give highest tensile properties. From the overall results, pineapple peduncle fiber shown the higher tensile properties compared to pineapple leaf fiber. It is found that by increasing the fiber volume fraction the tensile properties has significantly decreased but by increasing the fiber length, the tensile properties will be increased proportionally. Minitab software is used to perform the two-way ANOVA analysis to measure the significant. From the analysis done, there is a significant effect of fiber volume fraction and fiber length on the tensile properties.

  1. Improved terbium-doped, lithium-loaded glass scintillator fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spector, G.B.; McCollum, T.; Spowart, A.R.

    1993-01-01

    An improved terbium-doped, 6 Li-loaded glass scintillator has been drawn into fibers. Tests indicate that the neutron detection response of the fibers is superior to the response with fibers drawn from the original terbium-doped glass. The new fibers offer less attenuation (1/e length of ∝40 cm) and improved gamma ray/neutron discrimination. The improved fibers will be incorporated in a scintillator fiber optic long counter for neutron detection. (orig.)

  2. Green fiber bottle: Towards a sustainable package

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Didone, Mattia; Tosello, Guido; Howard, Thomas J.

    The Green Fiber Bottle is a fully biodegradable bottle made from molded paper pulp.Its development depends on the establishment of the manufacturing technology. Impulse drying, an innovative way of drying, has the potential to improve significantly the manufacturing process of the Green Fiber Bot...... Bottle, towards a sustainable packaging...

  3. Illustrative uncertainty visualization of DTI fiber pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brecheisen, R.; Platel, B.; Haar Romeny, B.M. Ter; Vilanova, A.

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) and fiber tracking provide unique insight into the 3D structure of fibrous tissues in the brain. However, the output of fiber tracking contains a significant amount of uncertainty accumulated in the various steps of the processing pipeline. Existing DTI visualization

  4. Permeation Tests on Polypropylene Fiber Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-16

    Permeation Tests on Polypropylene Fiber Materials Brandy J. White Martin H. Moore Brian J. Melde Laboratory for the Study of Molecular Interfacial...ABSTRACT Permeation Tests on Polypropylene Fiber Materials Brandy J. White, Martin H. Moore, Brian J. Melde Center for Bio/Molecular Science

  5. Comparison of dietary fiber methods for foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckman, M M; Lane, S A

    1981-11-01

    In order to evaluate several proposed dietary fiber methods, 12 food samples, representing different food classes, were analyzed by (1) neutral and acid detergent fiber methods (NDF, ADF); (2) NDF with enzyme modification (ENDF); (3) a 2-fraction enzyme method for soluble, insoluble, and total dietary fiber, proposed by Furda (SDF, IDF, TDF); (+) a 1-fraction enzyme method for total dietary fiber proposed by Hellendoorn (TDF). Foods included cereals, fruits, vegetables, pectin, locust bean gum, and soybean polysaccharides. Results show that TDF by Furda and Hellendoorn methods agree reasonably well with literature values by the Southgate method, but ENDF is consistently lower; that ENDF and IDF (Furda method) agree reasonably well; that except for corn corn bran fiber (insoluble) and pectin and locus bean fiber (soluble), all materials have significant fractions of both soluble and insoluble fiber. The Furda method was used on numerous food and ingredient samples and was found to be practical and informative and to have acceptable precision (RSD values of 2.65-7.05%). It is suggested that the Furda (or similar) method be given consideration for the analysis of foods for dietary fiber.

  6. Fiber transport of spatially entangled photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löffler, W.; Eliel, E. R.; Woerdman, J. P.; Euser, T. G.; Scharrer, M.; Russell, P.

    2012-03-01

    High-dimensional entangled photons pairs are interesting for quantum information and cryptography: Compared to the well-known 2D polarization case, the stronger non-local quantum correlations could improve noise resistance or security, and the larger amount of information per photon increases the available bandwidth. One implementation is to use entanglement in the spatial degree of freedom of twin photons created by spontaneous parametric down-conversion, which is equivalent to orbital angular momentum entanglement, this has been proven to be an excellent model system. The use of optical fiber technology for distribution of such photons has only very recently been practically demonstrated and is of fundamental and applied interest. It poses a big challenge compared to the established time and frequency domain methods: For spatially entangled photons, fiber transport requires the use of multimode fibers, and mode coupling and intermodal dispersion therein must be minimized not to destroy the spatial quantum correlations. We demonstrate that these shortcomings of conventional multimode fibers can be overcome by using a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber, which follows the paradigm to mimic free-space transport as good as possible, and are able to confirm entanglement of the fiber-transported photons. Fiber transport of spatially entangled photons is largely unexplored yet, therefore we discuss the main complications, the interplay of intermodal dispersion and mode mixing, the influence of external stress and core deformations, and consider the pros and cons of various fiber types.

  7. Ephaptic coupling of myelinated nerve fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binczak, S.; Eilbeck, J. C.; Scott, Alwyn C.

    2001-01-01

    Numerical predictions of a simple myelinated nerve fiber model are compared with theoretical results in the continuum and discrete limits, clarifying the nature of the conduction process on an isolated nerve axon. Since myelinated nerve fibers are often arranged in bundles, this model is used...

  8. Multimode optical fibers: steady state mode exciter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, M; Sugimura, A; Ikegami, T

    1976-09-01

    The steady state mode power distribution of the multimode graded index fiber was measured. A simple and effective steady state mode exciter was fabricated by an etching technique. Its insertion loss was 0.5 dB for an injection laser. Deviation in transmission characteristics of multimode graded index fibers can be avoided by using the steady state mode exciter.

  9. Self-pulsation in Raman fiber amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Martin Erland Vestergaard; Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic behavior caused by Brillouin scattering in Raman fiber amplifiers is studied. Modes of self-pulsation steady state oscillations are found. Their dependence on amplification scheme is demonstrated.......Dynamic behavior caused by Brillouin scattering in Raman fiber amplifiers is studied. Modes of self-pulsation steady state oscillations are found. Their dependence on amplification scheme is demonstrated....

  10. Photonic crystal fiber based antibody detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duval, A; Lhoutellier, M; Jensen, J B

    2004-01-01

    An original approach for detecting labeled antibodies based on strong penetration photonic crystal fibers is introduced. The target antibody is immobilized inside the air-holes of a photonic crystal fiber and the detection is realized by the means of evanescent-wave fluorescence spectroscopy...

  11. Production of flax fibers for biocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natural fibers for many and varied industrial uses are a current area of intense interest. Production of these fibers, furthermore, can add to farmer incomes and promote agricultural sustainability. Flax (Linum usitatissimum L.), which has been used for thousands of years, is unparalleled in supplyi...

  12. Radiation cured coatings for fiber optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketley, A.D.; Morgan, C.R.

    1978-01-01

    A continuous protective coating is formed on a fiber optic by coating the fiber optic in a bath of a liquid radiation curable composition at a temperature up to 90 0 C and exposing the coated conductor to ultraviolet or high energy ionizing radiation to cure the coating

  13. Gamma ray irradiation characteristics of SM fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Ryuichi; Okano, Hiroaki; Hashiba, Keichi; Nakai, Hisanori

    1987-01-01

    1.3 μm range single mode (SM) optical fibers have been used for wide application of mainly long distance communication. At present, in order to realize the larger capacity and longer distance between relay points, the development of 1.5 μm range SM fibers of low dispersion and small loss has been actively promoted. As for the radiation withstanding property of SM fibers, report is scarce. The authors reported on the gamma ray irradiation characteristics of 1.3 μm range SM fibers, but since 1.5 μm range SM fibers are designed with the different structure from that of 1.3 μm fibers, it is necessary to evaluate from new viewpoint. In this report, mainly on the structure having triangular distribution, the effect that the manufacturing condition and the structural defects of glass exert on the gamma ray irradiation characteristics is described. The specimens were mainly dispersion shift type fibers (DSF), and for comparison, single window, double window and 1.3 μm SM fibers were examined. Co-60 gamma ray was irradiated, and the optical loss and electron spin resonance were measured. By low temperature and low speed drawing, the good result in the optical loss was obtained. The presence of oxygen at the time of sintering materials had no effect. The dependence of the ESR on the drawing condition was not very remarkable. (Kako, I.)

  14. Fiber Optic Communications Technology. A Status Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Joseph A.

    Fiber optic communications (communications over very pure glass transmission channels of diameter comparable to a human hair) is an emerging technology which promises most improvements in communications capacity at reasonable cost. The fiber transmission system offers many desirable characteristics representing improvements over conventional…

  15. Single muscle fiber adaptations with marathon training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trappe, Scott; Harber, Matthew; Creer, Andrew; Gallagher, Philip; Slivka, Dustin; Minchev, Kiril; Whitsett, David

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to characterize the effects of marathon training on single muscle fiber contractile function in a group of recreational runners. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the gastrocnemius muscle of seven individuals (22 +/- 1 yr, 177 +/- 3 cm, and 68 +/- 2 kg) before, after 13 wk of run training, and after 3 wk of taper. Slow-twitch myosin heavy chain [(MHC) I] and fast-twitch (MHC IIa) muscle fibers were analyzed for size, strength (P(o)), speed (V(o)), and power. The run training program led to the successful completion of a marathon (range 3 h 56 min to 5 h 35 min). Oxygen uptake during submaximal running and citrate synthase activity were improved (P training program. Muscle fiber size declined (P training. P(o) was maintained in both fiber types with training and increased (P 60% increase (P training and was unchanged in MHC IIa fibers. Peak power increased (P training with a further increase (P marathon training decreased slow-twitch and fast-twitch muscle fiber size but that it maintained or improved the functional profile of these fibers. A taper period before the marathon further improved the functional profile of the muscle, which was targeted to the fast-twitch muscle fibers.

  16. Energetic utilization of dietary fiber in pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnen, M.M.J.A.

    2003-01-01

    The energetic utilization of fermentable dietary fiber (fDF) of different fiber sources and its relation to physical activity and housing conditions was studied in three experiments. In all experiments the daily intake of digestible nutrients, nitrogen and energy balances, heat production, and

  17. Assessment of fiber optic pressure sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemian, H.M.; Black, C.L.; Farmer, J.P.

    1995-04-01

    This report presents the results of a six-month Phase 1 study to establish the state-of-the-art in fiber optic pressure sensing and describes the design and principle of operation of various fiber optic pressure sensors. This study involved a literature review, contact with experts in the field, an industrial survey, a site visit to a fiber optic sensor manufacturer, and laboratory testing of a fiber optic pressure sensor. The laboratory work involved both static and dynamic performance tests. In addition, current requirements for environmental and seismic qualification of sensors for nuclear power plants were reviewed to determine the extent of the qualification tests that fiber optic pressure sensors may have to meet before they can be used in nuclear power plants. This project has concluded that fiber optic pressure sensors are still in the research and development stage and only a few manufacturers exist in the US and abroad which supply suitable fiber optic pressure sensors for industrial applications. Presently, fiber optic pressure sensors are mostly used in special applications for which conventional sensors are not able to meet the requirements

  18. Photonic bandgap fibers: theory and experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard; Broeng, Jes; Libori, Stig E. Barkou

    2000-01-01

    We will in this presentation address, show how the fiber cladding structure influences the resulting waveguiding properties. The core may be introduced by breaking the periodicity of the air holes at the center of the fiber. It has been demonstrated experimentally that this makes it possible...

  19. Fiber optic sensing for telecommunication satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reutlinger, Arnd; Glier, Markus; Zuknik, Karl-Heinz; Hoffmann, Lars; Müller, Mathias; Rapp, Stephan; Kurvin, Charles; Ernst, Thomas; McKenzie, Iain; Karafolas, Nikos

    2017-11-01

    Modern telecommunication satellites can benefit from the features of fiber optic sensing wrt to mass savings, improved performance and lower costs. Within the course of a technology study, launched by the European Space Agency, a fiber optic sensing system has been designed and is to be tested on representative mockups of satellite sectors and environment.

  20. Optimum fiber distribution in singlewall corrugated fiberboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard W. Johnson; Thomas J. Urbanik; William E. Denniston

    1979-01-01

    Determining optimum distribution of fiber through rational design of corrugated fiberboard could result in significant reductions in fiber required to meet end-use conditions, with subsequent reductions in price pressure and extension of the softwood timber supply. A theory of thin plates under large deformations is developed that is both kinematically and physically...

  1. A microstructured Polymer Optical Fiber Biosensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emiliyanov, Grigoriy Andreev; Jensen, Jesper Bo; Hoiby, Poul E.

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate selective detection of fluorophore labeled antibodies from minute samples probed by a sensor layer of the complementary biomolecules immobilized inside the air holes of microstructured Polymer Optical Fibers.......We demonstrate selective detection of fluorophore labeled antibodies from minute samples probed by a sensor layer of the complementary biomolecules immobilized inside the air holes of microstructured Polymer Optical Fibers....

  2. Nonlinear soliton matching between optical fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Christian; Sørensen, Simon Toft; Thomsen, Carsten L.

    2011-01-01

    In this Letter, we propose a generic nonlinear coupling coefficient, η2 NL ¼ ηjγ=β2jfiber2=jγ=β2jfiber1, which gives a quantitative measure for the efficiency of nonlinear matching of optical fibers by describing how a fundamental soliton couples from one fiber into another. Specifically, we use η...

  3. 355-nm hypersensitization of optical fibers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Canagasabey, A.; Canning, J.; Groothoff, N.

    2003-01-01

    A study is presented on 355-nm hypersensitization of optical fibers. It is found that the intrinsic 244-nm photosensitivity of boron-codoped germanosilicate optical fibers is enhanced by 355-nm hypersensitization. Hypersensitization through standard polymer coating is also demonstrated.

  4. Preparation of radiolabeled bioactive asbestos fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tewson, T J; Francsechini, M P; Scheule, R K; Holian, A [Texas Univ., Houston, TX (USA). Health Science Center

    1991-01-01

    We have developed an efficient procedure to radiolabel asbestos fibers while retaining the bioactivity of the fibers. The fibers are labeled with {sup 68}Ge. The {sup 68}Ge decays into {sup 68}Ga, which then can be detected by its characteristic positron emission. Both chrysotile and crocidolite asbestos, a serpentine and an amphibole, respectively, were radiolabeled successfully. Mild reaction conditions and short reaction times were found under which {similar to}90% of the added {sup 68}Ge and {sup 68}Ga bound to the fibers. The radiolabel was retained even after washing the fibers extensively with physiologic buffers. The effects of the labeling on the bioactivity of the fibers were evaluated in an in vitro assay using guinea pig alveolar macrophages as a target cell. Labeled chrysotile fibers were found to retain >95% of their ability to stimulate these cells. The labeling procedure described in this study should be useful in preparing labeled fibers to investigate both in vitro and in vivo phenomena. (author).

  5. Moving frames for heart fiber geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piuze, Emmanuel; Sporring, Jon; Siddiqi, Kaleem

    2013-01-01

    fibers is central to our understanding of normal heart function. Motivated by a recent abstraction by Savadjiev et al. of heart wall fibers into generalized helicoid minimal surfaces, this paper develops an extension based on differential forms. The key idea is to use Maurer-Cartan’s method of moving...

  6. Optical fibers and sensors for chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, J.J.; Boisde, G.

    1988-01-01

    The idea of using optical fibers in nuclear environment occurs as soon as 1967, too soon for practical realizations. In 1973 the first glass fibers were made available in Switzerland. From 1973 to 1988 three periods show the development: conception from 1973 to 1978, technique strengthening from 1978 to 1983 and nuclear and non nuclear industrial development since 1983. 45 refs., 27 figs [fr

  7. A novel thermoset polymer optical fiber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flipsen, T.A C; Steendam, R; Pennings, A.J; Hadziioannou, G

    Polymer optical fibers are being investigated with a view to overcoming some of the disadvantages of glass optical fibers in communications applications. Dense cross-linked polymers, such as the polyisocyanurate discussed here (see figure), have been found to be superior in some respects to the

  8. A new approach for high performance fiber manufacturing via simultaneous fiber spinning and UV initiated polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Chris

    Synthetic fibers have been manufactured for decades using solvents or heat to reduce the viscosity of pre-formed polymers and promote drawing. However, nature has engineered spiders and silkworms with benign ways of making silk fibers with high strength and toughness. Conceptually, their approach of chemically linking small functional units (i.e., proteins) into long chain molecules and solid fibrillar structures ``on-demand'' is fundamentally different from current synthetic fiber manufacturing methods. Drawing inspiration from nature, a method will be described that uses light to trigger a thiol-ene photopolymerization to rapidly transform reactive liquid mixtures into solid thread-like structures as they are forced out of a capillary at high speeds. Besides being manufactured without using solvents/volatile components or heat, these fibers are mechanically robust and have excellent chemical and thermal stability due to their crosslinked nature. During processing, the balance between curing kinetics, fiber flight time, and monomer mixture viscoelasticity is essential for the formation of defect free fibers. This work focuses on developing a universal operating diagram to show how the intricate interplay of gel time, flight time, and fluid relaxation time leads to the formation of uniform fibers and other undesirable fiber morphologies such as beads-on-string, fused fibers, non-uniform fibers, and droplets. This predictive capability enables adaptation of this spinning concept to all existing fiber spinning platforms, and customization of monomer formulations to target desired properties.

  9. Neighborhood resolved fiber orientation distributions (NRFOD) in automatic labeling of white matter fiber pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugurlu, Devran; Firat, Zeynep; Türe, Uğur; Unal, Gozde

    2018-05-01

    Accurate digital representation of major white matter bundles in the brain is an important goal in neuroscience image computing since the representations can be used for surgical planning, intra-patient longitudinal analysis and inter-subject population connectivity studies. Reconstructing desired fiber bundles generally involves manual selection of regions of interest by an expert, which is subject to user bias and fatigue, hence an automation is desirable. To that end, we first present a novel anatomical representation based on Neighborhood Resolved Fiber Orientation Distributions (NRFOD) along the fibers. The resolved fiber orientations are obtained by generalized q-sampling imaging (GQI) and a subsequent diffusion decomposition method. A fiber-to-fiber distance measure between the proposed fiber representations is then used in a density-based clustering framework to select the clusters corresponding to the major pathways of interest. In addition, neuroanatomical priors are utilized to constrain the set of candidate fibers before density-based clustering. The proposed fiber clustering approach is exemplified on automation of the reconstruction of the major fiber pathways in the brainstem: corticospinal tract (CST); medial lemniscus (ML); middle cerebellar peduncle (MCP); inferior cerebellar peduncle (ICP); superior cerebellar peduncle (SCP). Experimental results on Human Connectome Project (HCP)'s publicly available "WU-Minn 500 Subjects + MEG2 dataset" and expert evaluations demonstrate the potential of the proposed fiber clustering method in brainstem white matter structure analysis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Influence of cellulose fibers on structure and properties of fiber reinforced foam concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedorov Valeriy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the promising means of foamed concrete quality improvement is micro-reinforcement by adding synthetic and mineral fibers to the base mix. This research is the first to investigate peculiarities of using recycled cellulose fiber extracted from waste paper for obtaining fiber reinforced foam concrete. The paper presents results of experimental research on the influence of cellulose fibers on structure and properties of fiber reinforced foam concrete by using methods of chemical analysis and scanning electron microscopy. The research determines peculiarities of new formations appearance and densification of binder hydration products in the contact zone between fiber and cement matrix, which boost mechanical strength of fiber reinforced foam concrete. Physico-mechanical properties of fiber reinforced foam concrete were defined depending on the amount of recycled cellulose fiber added to the base mix. It was found that the use of recycled cellulose fibers allows obtaining structural thermal insulating fiber reinforced foam concretes of non-autoclaved hardening of brand D600 with regard to mean density with the following improved properties: compressive strength increased by 35% compared to basic samples, higher stability of foamed concrete mix and decreased shrinkage deformation.

  11. Effect of epoxy coatings on carbon fibers during manufacture of carbon fiber reinforced resin matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Hui; Huang, Yudong; Liu, Li; Shi, Xiaohua

    2010-01-01

    The changes in oxygen and nitrogen during manufacture of the carbon fiber reinforced resin matrix composites were measured using the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy method. The effects of the change in oxygen and nitrogen on the strength of the carbon fibers were investigated and the results revealed that the change of the tensile strength with increasing heat curing temperature was attributed to the change in the surface flaws of the carbon fibers because the carbon fibers are sensitive to the surface flaws. The effect of the surface energy that was calculated using Kaelble's method on the strength of the carbon fibers was investigated. Furthermore, the surface roughness of the carbon fibers was measured using atom force microscopy. The change trend of roughness was reverse to that of the strength, which was because of the brittle fracture of the carbon fibers.

  12. Effect of PVA fiber content on creep property of fiber reinforced high-strength concrete columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zongnan; Wang, Tao; Wang, Weilun

    2018-04-01

    The effect of PVA (polyvinyl alcohol) fiber content on the creep property of fiber reinforced high-strength concrete columns was investigated. The correction factor of PVA fiber content was proposed and the creep prediction model of ACI209 was modified. Controlling the concrete strength as C80, changing the content of PVA fiber (volume fraction 0%, 0.25%, 0.5%, 1% respectively), the creep experiment of PVA fiber reinforced concrete columns was carried out, the creep coefficient of each specimen was calculated to characterize the creep property. The influence of PVA fiber content on the creep property was analyzed based on the creep coefficient and the calculation results of several frequently used creep prediction models. The correction factor of PVA fiber content was proposed to modify the ACI209 creep prediction model.

  13. Fiber Optic Temperature Sensors for Thermal Protection Systems, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Phase 1, Intelligent Fiber Optic Systems Corporation (IFOS), in collaboration with North Carolina State University, successfully demonstrated a Fiber Bragg...

  14. Durability of pulp fiber-cement composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Benjamin J.

    Wood pulp fibers are a unique reinforcing material as they are non-hazardous, renewable, and readily available at relatively low cost compared to other commercially available fibers. Today, pulp fiber-cement composites can be found in products such as extruded non-pressure pipes and non-structural building materials, mainly thin-sheet products. Although natural fibers have been used historically to reinforce various building materials, little scientific effort has been devoted to the examination of natural fibers to reinforce engineering materials until recently. The need for this type of fundamental research has been emphasized by widespread awareness of moisture-related failures of some engineered materials; these failures have led to the filing of national- and state-level class action lawsuits against several manufacturers. Thus, if pulp fiber-cement composites are to be used for exterior structural applications, the effects of cyclical wet/dry (rain/heat) exposure on performance must be known. Pulp fiber-cement composites have been tested in flexure to examine the progression of strength and toughness degradation. Based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM), environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), a three-part model describing the mechanisms of progressive degradation has been proposed: (1) initial fiber-cement/fiber interlayer debonding, (2) reprecipitation of crystalline and amorphous ettringite within the void space at the former fiber-cement interface, and (3) fiber embrittlement due to reprecipitation of calcium hydroxide filling the spaces within the fiber cell wall structure. Finally, as a means to mitigate kraft pulp fiber-cement composite degradation, the effects of partial portland cement replacement with various supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) has been investigated for their effect on mitigating kraft pulp fiber-cement composite mechanical property degradation (i.e., strength and toughness

  15. Fiber-tile optical studies at Argonne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underwood, D.G.; Morgan, D.J.; Proudfoot, J.

    1991-01-01

    In support of a fiber-tile calorimeter for SDC, we have done studies on a number of topics. The most basic problems were light output and uniformity of response. Using a small electron beam, we have studied fiber placement, tile preparation, wrapping and masking, fiber splicing, fiber routing, phototube response, and some degradation factors. We found two configurations which produced more light output than the others and reasonably uniform response. We have chosen one of these to go into production for the EM test module on the basis of fiber routing for ease of assembly of the calorimeter. We have also applied some of the tools we developed to CDF end plug tile uniformity, shower max testing and development for a couple of detectors, and development of better techniques for radiation damage studies. 18 figs

  16. Methods And Apparatus For Acoustic Fiber Fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodeur, Pierre

    1999-11-09

    Methods and apparatus for acoustic fiber fractionation using a plane ultrasonic wave field interacting with water suspended fibers circulating in a channel flow using acoustic radiation forces to separate fibers into two or more fractions based on fiber radius, with applications of the separation concept in the pulp and paper industry. The continuous process relies on the use of a wall-mounted, rectangular cross-section piezoelectric ceramic transducer to selectively deflect flowing fibers as they penetrate the ultrasonic field. The described embodiment uses a transducer frequency of approximately 150 kHz. Depending upon the amount of dissolved gas in water, separation is obtained using a standing or a traveling wave field.

  17. Comparative evaluation of fiber fuse models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, D.D.; Mettler, S.C.; DiGiovanni, D.J.

    1997-01-01

    A phenomenon which results in the catastrophic destruction of the guiding properties of an optical fiber has been observed at laser power densities on the order of 3 x 10 6 watts/cm 2 in the core. This phenomenon is characterized by the propagation of a bright visible light from the point of initiation toward the laser source. The term 'fiber fuse' has been used because of the similarity in appearance to a burning fuse. The fiber fuse has been shown to start when the end of the fiber is contacted. It has also been initiated spontaneously from mechanical splices. This paper reports experimental data gathered on the fiber fuse and discusses their relationship to proposed physical mechanisms

  18. Fiber optic applications in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collette, P.; Kwapien, D.

    1984-01-01

    Fiber optic technology possesses many desirable attributes for applications in commercial nuclear power plants. The non-electrical nature of fiber optics is an important factor in an industry governed by federal safety regulations such as Class 1E isolation and separation criteria. Immunity from Electromagnetic Interference (EMI), an increasing industry problem area, is another significant characteristic. Because of the extremely wide bandwidth offered, fiber optics better addresses the data acquistion and communication requirements of the complex processes of a nuclear power plant. Potential for fiber optic sensor applications exists within the nuclear industry because their small size and physical flexibility allows access into normally inaccessible areas. They possess high accuracy and allow environmentally sensitive electronics to be remotely located. The purpose of this paper is to explore current applications for fiber optic technology in modern nuclear plants, document examples of present day usage in C-E plants and suggest possible future application areas

  19. Evanescent field refractometry in planar optical fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Christopher; Jantzen, Alexander; Gray, Alan C; Gow, Paul C; Carpenter, Lewis G; Bannerman, Rex H S; Gates, James C; Smith, Peter G R

    2018-02-15

    This Letter demonstrates a refractometer in integrated optical fiber, a new optical platform that planarizes fiber using flame hydrolysis deposition (FHD). The unique advantage of the technology is survivability in harsh environments. The platform is mechanically robust, and can survive elevated temperatures approaching 1000°C and exposure to common solvents, including acetone, gasoline, and methanol. For the demonstrated refractometer, fabrication was achieved through wet etching an SMF-28 fiber to a diameter of 8 μm before FHD planarization. An external refractive index was monitored using fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs), written into the core of the planarized fiber. A direct comparison to alternative FBG refractometers is made, for which the developed platform is shown to have comparable sensitivity, with the added advantage of survivability in harsh environments.

  20. Use of metallic fibers in concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kherbache Souad

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The addition of a waste (fibers in construction materials, particularly, the concretes is a technique increasingly used, for several reasons, either ecological, or economic, or to improve some properties in a fresh or hardened state. In our work we studied the behavior of the concrete and the mortar containing metallic fibers resulting from the unit BCR which is in Bordj-Menaiel in Algeria (metallic fibers resulting from the rejection at the end of the domestic operation of silvering of the tools and which is stored in plastic bags which are preserved in metal containers. Our work consists to study the behavior of the concretes and the mortars containing these fibers of cement substitution. We noted that the use of these fibers in the concretes in substitution of cement decreases its of compressive strength and flexural strength but to 10% of waste these strength remain acceptable.