WorldWideScience

Sample records for chord splice joints

  1. Effect of Chord Splice Joints on Force Distribution and Deformations in Trusses with Punched Metal Plate Fasteners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Peter

    2007-01-01

    the influence of splice joints on section forces and displacements are discussed considering the results from finite element calculations for a fink truss. It seems that the guidelines for treating splice joints as rotationally stiff do not necessarily lead to more realistic truss models.......The span of roof trusses with punched metal plate fasteners (nail plates) makes it often necessary to use splice joints in the top and bottom chords. In the finite element models used for design of the trusses these splice joints are normally assumed to be either rotationally stiff or pinned...... - their real behaviour is semi-rigid. The influence of splice joints on the distribution of member forces and rotations in the splice joints is investigated in this paper. A finite element program, TrussLab, where the splice joints are given semi-rigid properties is used to analyse the effect of splice...

  2. Effect of chord can length on strength of T joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madros, M.S.Z.; Zettlemoyer, N.; Healy, B.E.

    1995-12-01

    A study has been conducted to examine the influence of can length on the static strength of compression loaded T-joints. Finite Element models of the T-joints are developed and analyzed using the SESAM/Pretube, PATRAN{reg_sign}, and ABAQUS{trademark} computer programs. The ultimate loads from the analyses are compared with recommended values in API (1993) and other codes. In general, it appears that the API recommended ultimate strength values for T joints with low {beta} should be modified. Also, the API derating equation for X joints with short cans is conservative for T joints. However, a derating equation is required for T joints.

  3. Implementation Approach for Plug-in Electric Vehicles at Joint Base Lewis McChord. Task 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schey, Stephen [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Francfort, Jim [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This study focused on Joint Base Lewis McChord (JBLM), which is located in Washington State. Task 1 consisted of a survey of the non-tactical fleet of vehicles at JBLM to begin the review of vehicle mission assignments and the types of vehicles in service. In Task 2, daily operational characteristics of select vehicles were identified and vehicle movements were recorded in data loggers in order to characterize the vehicles’ missions. In Task 3, the results of the data analysis and observations were provided. Individual observations of the selected vehicles provided the basis for recommendations related to PEV adoption (i.e., whether a battery electric vehicle or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle [collectively referred to as PEVs] can fulfill the mission requirements0, as well as the basis for recommendations related to placement of PEV charging infrastructure. This report focuses on an implementation plan for the near-term adoption of PEVs into the JBLM fleet.

  4. Design and Evaluation of joint resistance in SSC Rutherford type cable splices for Torus magnet for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghoshal, Probir K. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Fair, Ruben J. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Kashy, David H. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Legg, Robert A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Rajput-Ghoshal, Renuka [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Hampshire, Damian; Tsui, Yeekin; Haden-Gates, Virginia

    2016-06-01

    The Hall B 3.6-T superconducting torus magnet is being designed and built as part of the Jefferson Lab 12-GeV upgrade. The magnet consists of six trapezoidal coils connected in series, with an operating current of 3770 A. The magnet and the joints (or splices) connecting the coils are all conduction cooled by supercritical 4.6-K helium. This paper studies the design and manufacturing process of the splices made between two SSC Rutherford-type cables and discusses the tests performed to evaluate the performance of the splices under varying incident magnetic fields.

  5. PIC Detector for Piano Chords

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbancho AnaM

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a piano chords detector based on parallel interference cancellation (PIC is presented. The proposed system makes use of the novel idea of modeling a segment of music as a third generation mobile communications signal, specifically, as a CDMA (Code Division Multiple Access signal. The proposed model considers each piano note as a CDMA user in which the spreading code is replaced by a representative note pattern. The lack of orthogonality between the note patterns will make necessary to design a specific thresholding matrix to decide whether the PIC outputs correspond to the actual notes composing the chord or not. An additional stage that performs an octave test and a fifth test has been included that improves the error rate in the detection of these intervals that are specially difficult to detect. The proposed system attains very good results in both the detection of the notes that compose a chord and the estimation of the polyphony number.

  6. PIC Detector for Piano Chords

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbancho, Ana M.; Tardón, Lorenzo J.; Barbancho, Isabel

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, a piano chords detector based on parallel interference cancellation (PIC) is presented. The proposed system makes use of the novel idea of modeling a segment of music as a third generation mobile communications signal, specifically, as a CDMA (Code Division Multiple Access) signal. The proposed model considers each piano note as a CDMA user in which the spreading code is replaced by a representative note pattern. The lack of orthogonality between the note patterns will make necessary to design a specific thresholding matrix to decide whether the PIC outputs correspond to the actual notes composing the chord or not. An additional stage that performs an octave test and a fifth test has been included that improves the error rate in the detection of these intervals that are specially difficult to detect. The proposed system attains very good results in both the detection of the notes that compose a chord and the estimation of the polyphony number.

  7. Enumeration of linear chord diagrams

    CERN Document Server

    Andersen, J E; Reidys, C M; Waterman, M S

    2010-01-01

    A linear chord diagram canonically determines a fatgraph and hence has an associated genus $g$. We compute the natural generating function ${\\bf C}_g(z)=\\sum_{n\\geq 0} {\\bf c}_g(n)z^n$ for the number ${\\bf c}_g(n)$ of linear chord diagrams of fixed genus $g\\geq 1$ with a given number $n\\geq 0$ of chords and find the remarkably simple formula ${\\bf C}_g(z)=z^{2g}R_g(z) (1-4z)^{{1\\over 2}-3g}$, where $R_g(z)$ is a polynomial of degree at most $g-1$ with integral coefficients satisfying $R_g({1\\over 4})\

  8. Linear chord diagrams on two intervals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jørgen Ellegaard; Penner, Robert; Reidys, Christian; Wang, Rita

    Consider all possible ways of attaching disjoint chords to two ordered and oriented disjoint intervals so as to produce a connected graph. Taking the intervals to lie in the real axis with the induced orientation and the chords to lie in the upper half plane canonically determines a corresponding...

  9. Testing on Welding for Splice Joint of $32205 Duplex Steel Heat Exchanger Tubes%平衡管道三通开裂失效分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    奚蔚

    2011-01-01

    通过对开裂的不锈钢三通材料进行了化学成分分析、断口宏微观形貌观察、硬度测试及金相检验,并结合该三通的工作环境进行了失效分析。分析结果表明:该三通材料为321不锈钢,开裂原因为硫化物引起的应力腐蚀开裂。由于材料固溶处理不符合要求,在晶界和晶内析出了大量弥散的碳化物,造成材料耐腐蚀性能下降。%Duplex steel is extensively applied in the corrosive locations in petroleum refining and petrochemical services. The welding is one of major factors affecting its corrosion resistance performance. Here described are the welding techniques for splice joint

  10. PolyChord: nested sampling for cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Handley, W J; Lasenby, A N

    2015-01-01

    PolyChord is a novel nested sampling algorithm tailored for high dimensional parameter spaces. In addition, it can fully exploit a hierarchy of parameter speeds such as is found in CosmoMC and CAMB. It utilises slice sampling at each iteration to sample within the hard likelihood constraint of nested sampling. It can identify and evolve separate modes of a posterior semi-independently and is parallelised using openMPI. PolyChord is available for download at: http://ccpforge.cse.rl.ac.uk/gf/project/polychord/

  11. The guitar chord-generating algorithm based on complex network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Tao; Wang, Yi-fan; Du, Dan; Liu, Miao-miao; Siddiqi, Awais

    2016-02-01

    This paper aims to generate chords for popular songs automatically based on complex network. Firstly, according to the characteristics of guitar tablature, six chord networks of popular songs by six pop singers are constructed and the properties of all networks are concluded. By analyzing the diverse chord networks, the accompaniment regulations and features are shown, with which the chords can be generated automatically. Secondly, in terms of the characteristics of popular songs, a two-tiered network containing a verse network and a chorus network is constructed. With this network, the verse and chorus can be composed respectively with the random walk algorithm. Thirdly, the musical motif is considered for generating chords, with which the bad chord progressions can be revised. This method can make the accompaniments sound more melodious. Finally, a popular song is chosen for generating chords and the new generated accompaniment sounds better than those done by the composers.

  12. PolyChord: next-generation nested sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Handley, W J; Lasenby, A N

    2015-01-01

    PolyChord is a novel nested sampling algorithm tailored for high-dimensional parameter spaces. This paper coincides with the release of PolyChord v1.3, and provides an extensive account of the algorithm. PolyChord utilises slice sampling at each iteration to sample within the hard likelihood constraint of nested sampling. It can identify and evolve separate modes of a posterior semi-independently, and is parallelised using openMPI. It is capable of exploiting a hierarchy of parameter speeds such as those present in CosmoMC and CAMB, and is now in use in the CosmoChord and ModeChord codes. PolyChord is available for download at: http://ccpforge.cse.rl.ac.uk/gf/project/polychord/

  13. Transesophageal echocardiography in NeoChord procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pittarello Demetrio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Transapical off-pump mitral valve intervention with neochord implantation for degenerative mitral valve disease have been recently introduced in the surgical practice. The procedure is performed under 2D-3D transesophageal echocardiography guidance. Methods: The use of 3D real-time transesophageal echocardiography provides more accurate information than 2D echocardiography only in all the steps of the procedure. In particular 3D echocardiography is mandatory for preoperative assessment of the morphology of the valve, for correct positioning of the neochord on the diseased segment , for the final tensioning of the chordae and for the final evaluation of the surgical result. Result and Conclusion: This article is to outline the technical aspects of the transesophageal echocardiography guidance of the NeoChord procedure showing that the procedure can be performed only with a close and continuous interaction between the anesthesiologist and the cardiac surgeon.

  14. To speak in chords about sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermant, G

    1995-01-01

    Sexuality emerges from the interdependencies of biology, awareness, and the facts and artifacts of public life. A useful metaphor is that correct accountings of sexuality are not one-finger melodies--they are chords. Unfortunately, the physical vs. mental and nature vs. nurture controversies remain alive, well, and mischievous in regard to the correct understanding of human sexuality. Active political and legal disputes about homosexuality exemplify a continuing reliance on reductionistic models of the causes of conduct. Discourse relying on public misapprehension about biological causality can alter the course of subsequent science and public opinion and thus affect personal experience as well. Both dualistic and reductionistic models are traps and bar progress; the models should not be smuggled into accounts of sexuality. PMID:7630588

  15. Splicing Programs and Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Sophie Germann; Lise Gratadou; Martin Dutertre; Didier Auboeuf

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies report splicing alterations in a multitude of cancers by using gene-by-gene analysis. However, understanding of the role of alternative splicing in cancer is now reaching a new level, thanks to the use of novel technologies allowing the analysis of splicing at a large-scale level. Genome-wide analyses of alternative splicing...

  16. Three Layer Hierarchical Model for Chord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waqas A. Imtiaz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Increasing popularity of decentralized Peer-to-Peer (P2P architecture emphasizes on the need to come across an overlay structure that can provide efficient content discovery mechanism, accommodate high churn rate and adapt to failures in the presence of heterogeneity among the peers. Traditional p2p systems incorporate distributed client-server communication, which finds the peer efficiently that store a desires data item, with minimum delay and reduced overhead. However traditional models are not able to solve the problems relating scalability and high churn rates. Hierarchical model were introduced to provide better fault isolation, effective bandwidth utilization, a superior adaptation to the underlying physical network and a reduction of the lookup path length as additional advantages. It is more efficient and easier to manage than traditional p2p networks. This paper discusses a further step in p2p hierarchy via 3-layers hierarchical model with distributed database architecture in different layer, each of which is connected through its root. The peers are divided into three categories according to their physical stability and strength. They are Ultra Super-peer, Super-peer and Ordinary Peer and we assign these peers to first, second and third level of hierarchy respectively. Peers in a group in lower layer have their own local database which hold as associated super-peer in middle layer and access the database among the peers through user queries. In our 3-layer hierarchical model for DHT algorithms, we used an advanced Chord algorithm with optimized finger table which can remove the redundant entry in the finger table in upper layer that influences the system to reduce the lookup latency. Our research work finally resulted that our model really provides faster search since the network lookup latency is decreased by reducing the number of hops. The peers in such network then can contribute with improve functionality and can perform well in

  17. Random chords and point distances in regular polygons

    CERN Document Server

    Bäsel, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we obtain the chord length distribution function for any regular polygon. From this function we conclude the density function for the distance between two uniformly and independently distributed random points in the regular polygon. The method to calculate the chord length distribution function is quite different from those of Harutyunyan and Ohanyan, uses only elementary methods and provides the result with only a few natural case distinctions.

  18. Techniques for ensuring the correct length of new mitral chords.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Carlos M G; Pekar, Filip

    2003-03-01

    Repair of degenerative mitral insufficiency has extensively been shown to be superior to replacement. In the majority of cases, the culprit lesion is limited to the posterior mitral leaflet (PML), which is treated with quadrangular resection of the prolapsing PML, annular plication of the corresponding segment of the annulus, and prosthetic annuloplasty. Anterior mitral leaflet (AML) prolapse is less common and is not always considered an indication for repair despite availability of a variety of surgical maneuvers specifically designed for its treatment. Although reliable if properly performed, chordal shortening at the papillary muscle level is technically demanding. Chordal transfer from the PML with the 'flip-over' technique is highly reproducible, but limited by the very frequent presence of an abnormal PML. Although feasible, transfer of an anterior basal chord to the prolapsing free edge assumes that the basal chords can be sectioned with impunity. More recently, chord replacement with expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) sutures has become increasingly popular because of its availability, theoretical simplicity, and demonstrated long-term durability. Although papillary and leaflet anchoring of the neo-chord has not been shown to be a problem, the determination of its appropriate length remains intuitive and based on personal experience. Here, simple surgical maneuvers designed to ensure safe and reproducible results of single or multiple chord replacement with PTFE sutures are described. PMID:12701786

  19. Chord Recognition Based on Temporal Correlation Support Vector Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongyang Rao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a method called temporal correlation support vector machine (TCSVM for automatic major-minor chord recognition in audio music. We first use robust principal component analysis to separate the singing voice from the music to reduce the influence of the singing voice and consider the temporal correlations of the chord features. Using robust principal component analysis, we expect the low-rank component of the spectrogram matrix to contain the musical accompaniment and the sparse component to contain the vocal signals. Then, we extract a new logarithmic pitch class profile (LPCP feature called enhanced LPCP from the low-rank part. To exploit the temporal correlation among the LPCP features of chords, we propose an improved support vector machine algorithm called TCSVM. We perform this study using the MIREX’09 (Music Information Retrieval Evaluation eXchange Audio Chord Estimation dataset. Furthermore, we conduct comprehensive experiments using different pitch class profile feature vectors to examine the performance of TCSVM. The results of our method are comparable to the state-of-the-art methods that entered the MIREX in 2013 and 2014 for the MIREX’09 Audio Chord Estimation task dataset.

  20. Complex Alternative Splicing

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Jung Woo; Graveley, Brenton R.

    2007-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a powerful means of controlling gene expression and increasing protein diversity. Most genes express a limited number of mRNA isoforms, but there are several examples of genes that use alternative splicing to generate hundreds, thousands, and even tens of thousands of isoforms. Collectively such genes are considered to undergo complex alternative splicing. The best example is the Drosophila Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule (Dscam) gene, which can generate 38,016 is...

  1. Where splicing joins chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Hnilicová, Jarmila; Staněk, David

    2011-01-01

    There are numerous data suggesting that two key steps in gene expression—transcription and splicing influence each other closely. For a long time it was known that chromatin modifications regulate transcription, but only recently it was shown that chromatin and histone modifications play a significant role in pre-mRNA splicing. Here we summarize interactions between splicing machinery and chromatin and discuss their potential functional significance. We focus mainly on histone acetylation and...

  2. Retrofitting damaged walls with glass chords and epoxy resins

    OpenAIRE

    Božič, Luka

    2014-01-01

    For the purpose of my thesis I have used a glass chords for retrofitting stone masonry wall already damaged through previous testing campaigns. The wall had typical shear damages, which were first restored by linear grouting with cement mixture. In the first part of the diploma thesis I have studied appropriate test set-up for testing bond strength between glass chords and substrate. Later on I have tested two types of stone in combination with three types of mortar and determined different f...

  3. Chord distribution along a line in the local Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Zaninetti, L

    2013-01-01

    A method is developed to compute the chord length distribution along a line which intersects a cellular Universe. The cellular Universe is here modeled by the Poissonian Voronoi Tessellation (PVT) and by a non-Poissonian Voronoi Tessellation (NPVT). The distribution of the spheres is obtained from common approximations used in modeling the volumes of Voronoi Diagrams. We give analytical formulas for the distributions of the lengths of chords in both the PVT and NPVT. The astrophysical applications are made to the real Eso Slice Project and to an artificial slice of galaxies which simulates the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey.

  4. spliceR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitting-Seerup, Kristoffer; Porse, Bo Torben; Sandelin, Albin;

    2014-01-01

    RNA-seq data is currently underutilized, in part because it is difficult to predict the functional impact of alternate transcription events. Recent software improvements in full-length transcript deconvolution prompted us to develop spliceR, an R package for classification of alternative splicing...

  5. Consonance perception of complex-tone dyads and chords

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Marc; Santurette, Sébastien; MacDonald, Ewen

    2014-01-01

    Sensory consonance and dissonance are perceptual attributes of musical intervals conveying pleasant- ness, tension, and harmony in musical phrases. For complex-tone dyads, corresponding to two musical notes played simultaneously, consonance is known to vary with the ratio in fundamental frequency...... for a potential role of frequency selectivity for consonance perception of dyads, might not hold for chords...

  6. Cross-kingdom patterns of alternative splicing and splice recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Pearson, Matthew D.; McGuire, Abigail M; Neafsey, Daniel Edward; Galagan, James E.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Variations in transcript splicing can reveal how eukaryotes recognize intronic splice sites. Retained introns (RIs) commonly appear when the intron definition (ID) mechanism of splice site recognition inconsistently identifies intron-exon boundaries, and cassette exons (CEs) are often caused by variable recognition of splice junctions by the exon definition (ED) mechanism. We have performed a comprehensive survey of alternative splicing across 42 eukaryotes to gain ins...

  7. SpliceDisease database: linking RNA splicing and disease

    OpenAIRE

    WANG, Juan; Jie ZHANG; Li, Kaibo; Zhao, Wei; Cui, Qinghua

    2011-01-01

    RNA splicing is an important aspect of gene regulation in many organisms. Splicing of RNA is regulated by complicated mechanisms involving numerous RNA-binding proteins and the intricate network of interactions among them. Mutations in cis-acting splicing elements or its regulatory proteins have been shown to be involved in human diseases. Defects in pre-mRNA splicing process have emerged as a common disease-causing mechanism. Therefore, a database integrating RNA splicing and disease associa...

  8. Splicing regulators: targets and drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Yeo, Gene Wei-Ming

    2005-01-01

    Silencing of splicing regulators by RNA interference, combined with splicing-specific microarrays, has revealed a complex network of distinct alternative splicing events in Drosophila, while a high-throughput screen of more than 6,000 compounds has identified drugs that interfere specifically and directly with one class of splicing regulators in human cells.

  9. Chord-wise Tip Actuation on Flexible Flapping Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nathan; Gharib, Morteza

    2015-11-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of low aspect ratio flapping plates are strongly influenced by the interaction between tip and edge vortices. This has led to the development of tip actuation mechanisms which bend the tip towards the root of the plate in the span-wise direction during oscillation to investigate its impact. In our current work, a tip actuation mechanism to bend a flat plate's two free corners towards one another in the chord-wise direction is developed using a shape memory alloy. The aerodynamic forces and resulting flow field are investigated from dynamically altering the tip chord-wise curvature while flapping. The frequency of oscillation, stroke angle, flexibility, and tip actuation timing are independently varied to determine their individual effects. These results will further the fundamental understanding of flapping wing aerodynamics. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE 1144469.

  10. Chords and harmonies in mixed optical and acoustical stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahlweg, Cornelius; Dannenberg, Florian; Dörfler, Joachim; Weber, Bernhard; Weyer, Cornelia; Gercke-Hahn, Harald; Freimuth, Steffen; Heucke, Sören; Gutzmann, Holger Ludwig

    2014-09-01

    The paper is a follow up of the work presented in last year's Optics and Music session on the perception of coherence between low frequency power modulated light and periodical acoustic stimuli. The composition of chords and harmonies from power modulated light sources and their effect as stand-alone stimulus and in conjunction with the equivalent acoustic signal is discussed. Of special interest here is the modulation near perceptible flicker frequency. The substitution of acoustical chord components by their optical counterpart and vice versa is investigated. Further, concepts of a training application for trombone players and other instrumentalists are presented: since the mean slide of the trombone does not have fixed positions, the note must be found and two players might influence each other. The possibility of helping them to synchronize by optical stimuli derived from their playing is investigated. Beside possible applications in emotional reinforcing multimedia oriented entertainment and training support for musicians, again implications for occupational medicine are discussed.

  11. Optical Fiber Fusion Splicing

    CERN Document Server

    Yablon, Andrew D

    2005-01-01

    This book is an up-to-date treatment of optical fiber fusion splicing incorporating all the recent innovations in the field. It provides a toolbox of general strategies and specific techniques that the reader can apply when optimizing fusion splices between novel fibers. It specifically addresses considerations important for fusion splicing of contemporary specialty fibers including dispersion compensating fiber, erbium-doped gain fiber, polarization maintaining fiber, and microstructured fiber. Finally, it discusses the future of optical fiber fusion splicing including silica and non-silica based optical fibers as well as the trend toward increasing automation. Whilst serving as a self-contained reference work, abundant citations from the technical literature will enable readers to readily locate primary sources.

  12. Dysfunction of vocal chords as cause of dyspnoea and sibilance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From the years 80 have been identified the dysfunction and the paralysis of vocal chords (DPVC), like cause of dyspnoea, sibilance and in many occasions truly critical clinical squares that simulate asthmatic crisis. Patients' reports that have required orotracheal intubations and stay in intensive care, when this illness is presented; they improve in a remarkable way when the correct diagnosis of DPVC settles down. The paper include the presentation of the case and discussion

  13. Introducing Modified Degree 4 Chordal Rings with Two Chord Lengths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Myrup

    2007-01-01

    In this paper an analysis of modified degree 4 Chordal Rings with two chord lengths named CHRm is presented and compared to similar topologies: Chordal Rings, N2R and modified N2R. Formulas for approximating diameters and average path lengths are provided and verified, and it is shown that the...... to its easy mapping onto the ring. It seems to be superior also to the traditional Chordal Rings, but it is not node symmetric....

  14. Analytic combinatorics of chord and hyperchord diagrams with k crossings

    OpenAIRE

    Pilaud, Vincent; Rué Perna, Juan José

    2014-01-01

    Using methods from Analytic Combinatorics, we study the families of perfect matchings, partitions, chord diagrams, and hyperchord diagrams on a disk with a prescribed number of crossings. For each family, we express the generating function of the configurations with exactly $k$ crossings as a rational function of the generating function of crossing-free configurations. Using these expressions, we study the singular behavior of these generating functions and derive asymptotic results on the co...

  15. A bistable mechanism for chord extension morphing rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Terrence; Frecker, Mary; Gandhi, Farhan

    2009-03-01

    Research efforts have shown that helicopter rotor blade morphing is an effective means to improve flight performance. Previous example of rotor blade morphing include using smart-materials for trailing deflection and rotor blade twist and tip twist, the development of a comfortable airfoil using compliant mechanisms, the use of a Gurney flap for air-flow deflection and centrifugal force actuated device to increase the span of the blade. In this paper we explore the use of a bistable mechanism for rotor morphing, specifically, blade chord extension using a bistable arc. Increasing the chord of the rotor blade is expected to generate more lift-load and improve helicopter performance. Bistable or "snap through" mechanisms have multiple stable equilibrium states and are a novel way to achieve large actuation output stroke. Bistable mechanisms do not require energy input to maintain a stable equilibrium state as both states do not require locking. In this work, we introduce a methodology for the design of bistable arcs for chord morphing using the finite element analysis and pseudo-rigid body model, to study the effect of different arc types, applied loads and rigidity on arc performance.

  16. Guitar Chords Classification Using Uncertainty Measurements of Frequency Bins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Guerrero-Turrubiates

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method to perform chord classification from recorded audio. The signal harmonics are obtained by using the Fast Fourier Transform, and timbral information is suppressed by spectral whitening. A multiple fundamental frequency estimation of whitened data is achieved by adding attenuated harmonics by a weighting function. This paper proposes a method that performs feature selection by using a thresholding of the uncertainty of all frequency bins. Those measurements under the threshold are removed from the signal in the frequency domain. This allows a reduction of 95.53% of the signal characteristics, and the other 4.47% of frequency bins are used as enhanced information for the classifier. An Artificial Neural Network was utilized to classify four types of chords: major, minor, major 7th, and minor 7th. Those, played in the twelve musical notes, give a total of 48 different chords. Two reference methods (based on Hidden Markov Models were compared with the method proposed in this paper by having the same database for the evaluation test. In most of the performed tests, the proposed method achieved a reasonably high performance, with an accuracy of 93%.

  17. Emotional connotations of major and minor musical chords in musically untrained listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, KJ; Brattico, E; Carlson, S

    2003-01-01

    Musically untrained listeners were presented with musical major and minor chords in different octaves and with different timbres, with or without simultaneously presented functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) noise, and were asked to judge the chords according to their emotional connotations...... during the trials, only affected emotional responses to the low pitched chords, which encourages to investigate the neural basis of emotional responses to musical sound elements by means of fMRI....... Results showed that major chords were judged as happier than minor chords. Moreover, harmonically rich chords were judged as more positive than sine chords, suggesting the relevance of familiarity of the natural harmonic spectrum for evoking positive emotional responses. fMRI scanner noise, presented...

  18. Newborn infants’ auditory system is sensitive to Western music chord categories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula eVirtala

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Neural encoding of abstract rules in the audition of newborn infants has been recently demonstrated in several studies using event-related potentials (ERPs. In the present study the neural encoding of Western music chords was investigated in newborn infants. Using ERPs, we examined whether the categorizations of major versus minor and consonance versus dissonance are present at the level of the change-related mismatch response (MMR. Using an oddball paradigm, root minor, dissonant and inverted major chords were presented in a context of consonant root major chords. The chords were transposed to several different frequency levels, so that the deviant chords did not include a physically deviant frequency that could result in an MMR without categorization. The results show that the newborn infants were sensitive to both dissonant and minor chords but not to inverted major chords in the context of consonant root major chords. While the dissonant chords elicited a large positive MMR, the minor chords elicited a negative MMR. This indicates that the two categories were processed differently. The results suggest newborn infants are sensitive to Western music categorizations, which is consistent with the authors’ previous studies in adults and school-aged children.

  19. A new characterization of chord-arc domains

    OpenAIRE

    Azzam, Jonas; Hofmann, Steve; Martell, José María; Nyström, Kaj; Toro, Tatiana

    2014-01-01

    We show that if $\\Omega \\subset \\mathbb{R}^{n+1}$, $n\\geq 1$, is a uniform domain (aka 1-sided NTA domain), i.e., a domain which enjoys interior Corkscrew and Harnack Chain conditions, then uniform rectifiability of the boundary of $\\Omega$ implies the existence of exterior Corkscrew points at all scales, so that in fact, $\\Omega$ is a chord-arc domain, i.e., a domain with an Ahlfors-David regular boundary which satisfies both interior and exterior Corkscrew conditions, and an interior Harnac...

  20. Alternative splicing and muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Pistoni, Mariaelena; Ghigna, Claudia; Gabellini, Davide

    2010-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs is a major contributor to proteomic diversity and to the control of gene expression in higher eukaryotic cells. For this reasons, alternative splicing is tightly regulated in different tissues and developmental stages and its disruption can lead to a wide range of human disorders. The aim of this review is to focus on the relevance of alternative splicing for muscle function and muscle disease. We begin by giving a brief overview of alternative splicing, musc...

  1. Where splicing joins chromatin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hnilicová, Jarmila; Staněk, David

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 3 (2011), s. 182-188. ISSN 1949-1034 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/10/0424; GA AV ČR KAN200520801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : chromatin * exon * alternative splicing * transcription * snRNP Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  2. Spliced leader trans-splicing in the nematode Trichinella spiralis uses highly polymorphic, noncanonical spliced leaders

    OpenAIRE

    Pettitt, Jonathan; Müller, Berndt; Stansfield, Ian; Connolly, Bernadette

    2008-01-01

    The trans-splicing of short spliced leader (SL) RNAs onto the 5′ ends of mRNAs occurs in a diverse range of taxa. In nematodes, all species so far characterized utilize a characteristic, conserved spliced leader, SL1, as well as variants that are employed in the resolution of operons. Here we report the identification of spliced leader trans-splicing in the basal nematode Trichinella spiralis, and show that this nematode does not possess a canonical SL1, but rather has at least 15 distinct sp...

  3. Dynamic Chord-wise Tip Curvature on Flexible Flapping Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nathan; Gharib, Morteza

    2014-11-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of long rectangular flapping plates are strongly influenced by the interaction between tip and edge vortices. This has led to the development of many tip actuation mechanisms to independently bend or rotate the tip towards the root of the plate in the span-wise direction. In our current work, the influence of dynamically altering the chord-wise curvature of the tip on the generation of aerodynamic forces is investigated; for this case, the two free corners of the flat plate bend towards each other. The parameters of actuation timing, maximum curvature, Reynolds number, flexibility, and tip speed are independently varied to determine their influence. These results will further the fundamental understanding of unsteady aerodynamics. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship and the Gordon and Betty Moore foundation.

  4. The Tonal Function of a Task-Irrelevant Chord Modulates Speed of Visual Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escoffier, N.; Tillmann, B.

    2008-01-01

    Harmonic priming studies have provided evidence that musical expectations influence sung phoneme monitoring, with facilitated processing for phonemes sung on tonally related (expected) chords in comparison to less-related (less-expected) chords [Bigand, Tillmann, Poulin, D'Adamo, and Madurell (2001). "The effect of harmonic context on phoneme…

  5. Measurement of Plasma Ion Temperature and Flow Velocity from Chord-Averaged Emission Line Profile

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xu Wei

    2011-03-01

    The distinction between Doppler broadening and Doppler shift has been analysed, the differences between Gaussian fitting and the distribution of chord-integral line shape have also been discussed. Local ion temperature and flow velocity have been derived from the chord-averaged emission line profile by a chosen-point Gaussian fitting technique.

  6. Amygdala activity can be modulated by unexpected chord functions during music listening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelsch, Stefan; Fritz, Thomas; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2008-12-01

    Numerous earlier studies have investigated the cognitive processing of musical syntax with regular and irregular chord sequences. However, irregular sequences may also be perceived as unexpected, and therefore have a different emotional valence than regular sequences. We provide behavioral data showing that irregular chord functions presented in chord sequence paradigms are perceived as less pleasant than regular sequences. A reanalysis of functional MRI data showed increased blood oxygen level-dependent signal changes bilaterally in the amygdala in response to music-syntactically irregular (compared with regular) chord functions. The combined data indicate that music-syntactically irregular events elicit brain activity related to emotional processes, and that, in addition to intensely pleasurable music or highly unpleasant music, single chord functions can also modulate amygdala activity. PMID:19050462

  7. The neurogenetics of alternative splicing

    OpenAIRE

    Vuong, CK; Black, DL; S. Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Alternative precursor-mRNA splicing is a key mechanism for regulating gene expression in mammals and is controlled by specialized RNA-binding proteins. The misregulation of splicing is implicated in multiple neurological disorders. We describe recent mouse genetic studies of alternative splicing that reveal its critical role in both neuronal development and the function of mature neurons. We discuss the challenges in understanding the extensive genetic programmes controlled by proteins that r...

  8. Fusion splicing of silicon optical fibres

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, L.M.; Healy, N; Gibson, U.; Hawkins, T.; Jones, M.; Ballato, J; A. C. Peacock

    2015-01-01

    The first splicing experiments between silicon optical fibres (SOFs) and conventional fibres are investigated. An optimized fusion splicing approach for a polycrystalline SOF is demonstrated and the material properties after splicing are characterized.

  9. Inverse splicing of a group II intron.

    OpenAIRE

    Jarrell, K A

    1993-01-01

    I describe the self-splicing of an RNA that consists of exon sequences flanked by group II intron sequences. I find that this RNA undergoes accurate splicing in vitro, yielding an excised exon circle. This splicing reaction involves the joining of the 5' splice site at the end of an exon to the 3' splice site at the beginning of the same exon; thus, I term it inverse splicing. Inverse splicing provides a potential mechanism for exon scrambling, for exon deletion in alternative splicing pathwa...

  10. Distinct neural responses to chord violations: a multiple source analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza Villarreal, Eduardo A; Brattico, Elvira; Leino, Sakari; Ostergaard, Leif; Vuust, Peter

    2011-05-10

    The human brain is constantly predicting the auditory environment by representing sequential similarities and extracting temporal regularities. It has been proposed that simple auditory regularities are extracted at lower stations of the auditory cortex and more complex ones at other brain regions, such as the prefrontal cortex. Deviations from auditory regularities elicit a family of early negative electric potentials distributed over the frontal regions of the scalp. In this study, we wished to disentangle the brain processes associated with sequential vs. hierarchical auditory regularities in a musical context by studying the event-related potentials (ERPs), the behavioral responses to violations of these regularities, and the localization of the underlying ERP generators using two different source analysis algorithms. To this aim, participants listened to musical cadences constituted by seven chords, each containing either harmonically congruous chords, harmonically incongruous chords, or harmonically congruous but mistuned chords. EEG was recorded and multiple source analysis was performed. Incongruous chords violating the rules of harmony elicited a bilateral ERAN, whereas mistuned chords within chord sequences elicited a right-lateralized MMN. We found that the dominant cortical sources for the ERAN were localized around Broca's area and its right homolog, whereas the MMN generators were localized around the primary auditory cortex. These findings suggest a predominant role of the auditory cortices in detecting sequential scale regularities and the posterior prefrontal cortex in parsing hierarchical regularities in music. PMID:21382359

  11. Statistical error in a chord estimator of correlation dimension: The ''rule of five''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The statistical precision of a chord method for estimating dimension from a correlation integral is derived. The optimal chord length is determined, and a comparison is made to other estimators. The simple chord estimator is only 25% less precise than the optimal estimator which uses the full resolution and full range of the correlation integral. The analytic calculations are based on the hypothesis that all pairwise distances between the points in the embedding space are statistically independent. The adequacy of this approximation is assessed numerically, and a surprising result is observed in which dimension estimators can be anomalously precise for sets with reasonably uniform (nonfractal) distributions

  12. Strength of tubular welded joints of roof trusses in Shanghai Qizhong Tennis Center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lewei TONG; Min GU; Yiyi CHEN; Liying ZHOU; Jiandong SUN; Yangji CHEN; Yingru LIN; Gao LIN

    2008-01-01

    Static strength of multi-planar welded joints with seven brace members and one chord member made of circular hollow sections is investigated in the paper, based on the engineering practice of moveable roof trusses of Shanghai Qizhong Tennis Center. Firstly, comparative experiments were carried out on two model joints with a scale of 1:3. One joint was not reinforced, whereas the other was reinforced with ring stiffeners inside the chord member. Failure mode, stress distribution, plastic-zone development and ultimate load capacity of the joints were investigated, and effects of the ring stiffeners on the joint behavior were observed through the experiments. Secondly, finite element analysis of both the tested model joints was performed. The calculation results are in a good agreement with the experimental results, which indicated that the numerical analysis was quite effective. Finally, the strategy for enhancing strength of the complicated joint is discussed. Parameters study on the constructional details of ring stiffeners was carried out using FE method. The present research shows the multi-planar circular hollow section joint with high ratio of diameter to thickness of the chord and multiple braces is liable to chord plasticity under axial tension and compression on the braces. For the design of the joint, it is suggested that the ring stiffeners are installed insider the chord to meet needs of enough stiffness and strength. Both position and number of the stiffeners should be carefully determined based on the axial forces on the braces and their diameters. The stiffener thickness should not be less than the chord thickness, and the diameter of the hole at the center of the stiffener should not be greater than half of the chord diameter.

  13. Intronic Alus influence alternative splicing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galit Lev-Maor

    Full Text Available Examination of the human transcriptome reveals higher levels of RNA editing than in any other organism tested to date. This is indicative of extensive double-stranded RNA (dsRNA formation within the human transcriptome. Most of the editing sites are located in the primate-specific retrotransposed element called Alu. A large fraction of Alus are found in intronic sequences, implying extensive Alu-Alu dsRNA formation in mRNA precursors. Yet, the effect of these intronic Alus on splicing of the flanking exons is largely unknown. Here, we show that more Alus flank alternatively spliced exons than constitutively spliced ones; this is especially notable for those exons that have changed their mode of splicing from constitutive to alternative during human evolution. This implies that Alu insertions may change the mode of splicing of the flanking exons. Indeed, we demonstrate experimentally that two Alu elements that were inserted into an intron in opposite orientation undergo base-pairing, as evident by RNA editing, and affect the splicing patterns of a downstream exon, shifting it from constitutive to alternative. Our results indicate the importance of intronic Alus in influencing the splicing of flanking exons, further emphasizing the role of Alus in shaping of the human transcriptome.

  14. On the application of Newton's and Chord methods to bifurcation problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. M. Elgindi

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the applications of Newton's and chord methods in the computations of the bifurcation solutions in a neighborhood of a simple bifurcation point for prescribed values of the bifurcation parameter.

  15. MapSplice: Accurate mapping of RNA-seq reads for splice junction discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Kai WANG; Singh, Darshan; Zeng, Zheng; Coleman, Stephen J.; Huang, Yan; Savich, Gleb L.; He, Xiaping; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Grimm, Sara A; Perou, Charles M; MacLeod, James N; Chiang, Derek Y.; Prins, Jan F.; Liu, Jinze

    2010-01-01

    The accurate mapping of reads that span splice junctions is a critical component of all analytic techniques that work with RNA-seq data. We introduce a second generation splice detection algorithm, MapSplice, whose focus is high sensitivity and specificity in the detection of splices as well as CPU and memory efficiency. MapSplice can be applied to both short (

  16. Measurement of Resistance and Strength of Conductor Splices in the MICE Coupling Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The superconducting magnets for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment [1] (MICE) use a copper based Nb-Ti conductor with un-insulated dimensions of 0.95 by 1.60 mm. There may be as many as twelve splices in one MICE superconducting coupling coil. These splices are to be wound in the coil. The conductor splices produce Joule heating, which may cause the magnet to quench. A technique of making conductor splices was developed by ICST. Two types of 1-meter long of soldered lap-joints have been tested. Side-by-side splices and up-down one splices were studied theoretically and experimentally using two types of soft solder made of eutectic tin-lead solder and tin-silver solder. The resistances of the splices made by ICST were tested at LBNL at liquid helium temperatures over a range of magnetic fields up to 5 T. The breaking strength of 250 mm long splices was also measured at room temperature and liquid nitrogen temperature.

  17. Conserved RNA secondary structures promote alternative splicing

    OpenAIRE

    Shepard, PJ; Hertel, KJ

    2008-01-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing is carried out by the spliceosome, which identifies exons and removes intervening introns. Alternative splicing in higher eukaryotes results in the generation of multiple protein isoforms from gene transcripts. The extensive alternative splicing observed implies a flexibility of the spliceosome to identify exons within a given pre-mRNA. To reach this flexibility, splice-site selection in higher eukaryotes has evolved to depend on multiple parameters such as splice-site stren...

  18. Engineering splicing factors with designed specificities

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yang; Cheong, Cheom-Gil; Hall, Traci M Tanaka; Wang, Zefeng

    2009-01-01

    Alternative splicing is generally regulated by trans-acting factors that specifically bind pre-mRNA to activate or inhibit the splicing reaction. This regulation is critical for normal gene expression, and dysregulation of splicing is closely associated with human diseases. Here we engineer artificial splicing factors by combining sequence-specific RNA-binding domains of human Pumilio1 with functional domains that regulate splicing. We applied these factors to modulate different types of alte...

  19. Integrating many co-splicing networks to reconstruct splicing regulatory modules

    OpenAIRE

    Dai Chao; Li Wenyuan; Liu Juan; Zhou Xianghong

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Alternative splicing is a ubiquitous gene regulatory mechanism that dramatically increases the complexity of the proteome. However, the mechanism for regulating alternative splicing is poorly understood, and study of coordinated splicing regulation has been limited to individual cases. To study genome-wide splicing regulation, we integrate many human RNA-seq datasets to identify splicing module, which we define as a set of cassette exons co-regulated by the same splicing f...

  20. Alternative Splicing Regulation During C. elegans Development: Splicing Factors as Regulated Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Sergio Barberan-Soler; Zahler, Alan M.

    2008-01-01

    Alternative splicing generates protein diversity and allows for post-transcriptional gene regulation. Estimates suggest that 10% of the genes in Caenorhabditis elegans undergo alternative splicing. We constructed a splicing-sensitive microarray to detect alternative splicing for 352 cassette exons and tested for changes in alternative splicing of these genes during development. We found that the microarray data predicted that 62/352 (approximately 18%) of the alternative splicing events studi...

  1. Effects of unexpected chords and of performer's expression on brain responses and electrodermal activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Koelsch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is lack of neuroscientific studies investigating music processing with naturalistic stimuli, and brain responses to real music are, thus, largely unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study investigates event-related brain potentials (ERPs, skin conductance responses (SCRs and heart rate (HR elicited by unexpected chords of piano sonatas as they were originally arranged by composers, and as they were played by professional pianists. From the musical excerpts played by the pianists (with emotional expression, we also created versions without variations in tempo and loudness (without musical expression to investigate effects of musical expression on ERPs and SCRs. Compared to expected chords, unexpected chords elicited an early right anterior negativity (ERAN, reflecting music-syntactic processing and an N5 (reflecting processing of meaning information in the ERPs, as well as clear changes in the SCRs (reflecting that unexpected chords also elicited emotional responses. The ERAN was not influenced by emotional expression, whereas N5 potentials elicited by chords in general (regardless of their chord function differed between the expressive and the non-expressive condition. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results show that the neural mechanisms of music-syntactic processing operate independently of the emotional qualities of a stimulus, justifying the use of stimuli without emotional expression to investigate the cognitive processing of musical structure. Moreover, the data indicate that musical expression affects the neural mechanisms underlying the processing of musical meaning. Our data are the first to reveal influences of musical performance on ERPs and SCRs, and to show physiological responses to unexpected chords in naturalistic music.

  2. Spliced-leader trans-splicing in freshwater planarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayas, Ricardo M; Bold, Tyler D; Newmark, Phillip A

    2005-10-01

    trans-Splicing, in which a spliced-leader (SL) RNA is appended to the most 5' exon of independently transcribed pre-mRNAs, has been described in a wide range of eukaryotes, from protozoans to chordates. Here we describe trans-splicing in the freshwater planarian Schmidtea mediterranea, a free-living member of the phylum Platyhelminthes. Analysis of an expressed sequence tag (EST) collection from this organism showed that over 300 transcripts shared one of two approximately 35-base sequences (Smed SL-1 and SL-2) at their 5' ends. Examination of genomic sequences encoding representatives of these transcripts revealed that these shared sequences were transcribed elsewhere in the genome. RNA blot analysis, 5' and 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends, as well as genomic sequence data showed that 42-nt SL sequences were derived from small RNAs of approximately 110 nt. Similar sequences were also found at the 5' ends of ESTs from the planarian Dugesia japonica. trans-Splicing has already been described in numerous representatives of the phylum Platyhelminthes (trematodes, cestodes, and polyclads); its presence in two representatives of the triclads supports the hypothesis that this mode of RNA processing is ancestral within this group. The upcoming complete genome sequence of S. mediterranea, combined with this animal's experimental accessibility and susceptibility to RNAi, provide another model organism in which to study the function of the still-enigmatic trans-splicing. PMID:15972844

  3. MapSplice: accurate mapping of RNA-seq reads for splice junction discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Singh, Darshan; Zeng, Zheng; Coleman, Stephen J; Huang, Yan; Savich, Gleb L; He, Xiaping; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Grimm, Sara A; Perou, Charles M; MacLeod, James N; Chiang, Derek Y; Prins, Jan F; Liu, Jinze

    2010-10-01

    The accurate mapping of reads that span splice junctions is a critical component of all analytic techniques that work with RNA-seq data. We introduce a second generation splice detection algorithm, MapSplice, whose focus is high sensitivity and specificity in the detection of splices as well as CPU and memory efficiency. MapSplice can be applied to both short (<75 bp) and long reads (≥ 75 bp). MapSplice is not dependent on splice site features or intron length, consequently it can detect novel canonical as well as non-canonical splices. MapSplice leverages the quality and diversity of read alignments of a given splice to increase accuracy. We demonstrate that MapSplice achieves higher sensitivity and specificity than TopHat and SpliceMap on a set of simulated RNA-seq data. Experimental studies also support the accuracy of the algorithm. Splice junctions derived from eight breast cancer RNA-seq datasets recapitulated the extensiveness of alternative splicing on a global level as well as the differences between molecular subtypes of breast cancer. These combined results indicate that MapSplice is a highly accurate algorithm for the alignment of RNA-seq reads to splice junctions. Software download URL: http://www.netlab.uky.edu/p/bioinfo/MapSplice. PMID:20802226

  4. The Size, Shape, Albedo, Density, and Atmospheric Limit of Transneptunian Object (50000) Quaoar from Multi-chord Stellar Occultations

    OpenAIRE

    Braga-Ribas, F.; Sicardy, B.; Ortiz, J. L.; Lellouch, E.; G. Tancredi; Lecacheux, J.; Vieira-Martins, R.; Camargo, J. I. B.; Assafin, M.; Behrend, R.; Vachier, F.; Colas, F.; Morales, N.; Maury, A.; Emilio, M.

    2013-01-01

    We present results derived from the first multi-chord stellar occultations by the transneptunian object (50000) Quaoar, observed on 2011 May 4 and 2012 February 17, and from a single-chord occultation observed on 2012 October 15. If the timing of the five chords obtained in 2011 were correct, then Quaoar would possess topographic features (crater or mountain) that would be too large for a body of this mass. An alternative model consists in applying time shifts to some chords to account for po...

  5. Topological recursion for chord diagrams, RNA complexes, and cells in moduli spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Andersen, Jørgen E; Penner, R C; Reidys, Christian M; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    We introduce and study the Hermitian matrix model with potential V(x)=x^2/2-stx/(1-tx), which enumerates the number of linear chord diagrams of fixed genus with specified numbers of backbones generated by s and chords generated by t. For the one-cut solution, the partition function, correlators and free energies are convergent for small t and all s as a perturbation of the Gaussian potential, which arises for st=0. This perturbation is computed using the formalism of the topological recursion. The corresponding enumeration of chord diagrams gives at once the number of RNA complexes of a given topology as well as the number of cells in Riemann's moduli spaces for bordered surfaces. The free energies are computed here in principle for all genera and explicitly for genera less than four.

  6. Topological recursion for chord diagrams, RNA complexes, and cells in moduli spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We introduce and study the Hermitian matrix model with potential Vs,t(x)=x2/2−stx/(1−tx), which enumerates the number of linear chord diagrams with no isolated vertices of fixed genus with specified numbers of backbones generated by s and chords generated by t. For the one-cut solution, the partition function, correlators and free energies are convergent for small t and all s as a perturbation of the Gaussian potential, which arises for st=0. This perturbation is computed using the formalism of the topological recursion. The corresponding enumeration of chord diagrams gives at once the number of RNA complexes of a given topology as well as the number of cells in Riemann's moduli spaces for bordered surfaces. The free energies are computed here in principle for all genera and explicitly in genus less than four.

  7. The Integrity of ACSR Full Tension Single-Stage Splice Connector at Higher Operation Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL; King Jr, Thomas J [ORNL

    2008-10-01

    Due to increases in power demand and limited investment in new infrastructure, existing overhead power transmission lines often need to operate at temperatures higher than those used for the original design criteria. This has led to the accelerated aging and degradation of splice connectors. It is manifested by the formation of hot-spots that have been revealed by infrared imaging during inspection. The implications of connector aging is two-fold: (1) significant increases in resistivity of the splice connector (i.e., less efficient transmission of electricity) and (2) significant reductions in the connector clamping strength, which could ultimately result in separation of the power transmission line at the joint. Therefore, the splice connector appears to be the weakest link in electric power transmission lines. This report presents a protocol for integrating analytical and experimental approaches to evaluate the integrity of full tension single-stage splice connector assemblies and the associated effective lifetime at high operating temperature.

  8. Cloud-Hosted Real-time Data Services for the Geosciences (CHORDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, M. D.; Graves, S. J.; Kerkez, B.; Chandrasekar, V.; Vernon, F.; Martin, C. L.; Maskey, M.; Keiser, K.; Dye, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Cloud-Hosted Real-time Data Services for the Geosciences (CHORDS) project, funded as part of NSF's EarthCube initiative, addresses the ever-increasing importance of real-time scientific data, particularly in mission critical scenarios, where informed decisions must be made rapidly. Advances in the distribution of real-time data are leading many new transient phenomena in space-time to be observed, however, real-time decision-making is infeasible in many cases as these streaming data are either completely inaccessible or only available to proprietary in-house tools or displays. This lack of accessibility prohibits advanced algorithm and workflow development that could be initiated or enhanced by these data streams. Small research teams do not have resources to develop tools for the broad dissemination of their valuable real-time data and could benefit from an easy to use, scalable, cloud-based solution to facilitate access. CHORDS proposes to make a very diverse suite of real-time data available to the broader geosciences community in order to allow innovative new science in these areas to thrive. This presentation will highlight recently developed CHORDS portal tools and processing systems aimed at addressing some of the gaps in handling real-time data, particularly in the provisioning of data from the "long-tail" scientific community through a simple interface deployed in the cloud. The CHORDS system will connect these real-time streams via standard services from the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) and does so in a way that is simple and transparent to the data provider. Broad use of the CHORDS framework will expand the role of real-time data within the geosciences, and enhance the potential of streaming data sources to enable adaptive experimentation and real-time hypothesis testing. Adherence to community data and metadata standards will promote the integration of CHORDS real-time data with existing standards-compliant analysis, visualization and modeling

  9. The effect of conditional probability of chord progression on brain response: an MEG study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Goo Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent electrophysiological and neuroimaging studies have explored how and where musical syntax in Western music is processed in the human brain. An inappropriate chord progression elicits an event-related potential (ERP component called an early right anterior negativity (ERAN or simply an early anterior negativity (EAN in an early stage of processing the musical syntax. Though the possible underlying mechanism of the EAN is assumed to be probabilistic learning, the effect of the probability of chord progressions on the EAN response has not been previously explored explicitly. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study, the empirical conditional probabilities in a Western music corpus were employed as an approximation of the frequencies in previous exposure of participants. Three types of chord progression were presented to musicians and non-musicians in order to examine the correlation between the probability of chord progression and the neuromagnetic response using magnetoencephalography (MEG. Chord progressions were found to elicit early responses in a negatively correlating fashion with the conditional probability. Observed EANm (as a magnetic counterpart of the EAN component responses were consistent with the previously reported EAN responses in terms of latency and location. The effect of conditional probability interacted with the effect of musical training. In addition, the neural response also correlated with the behavioral measures in the non-musicians. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study is the first to reveal the correlation between the probability of chord progression and the corresponding neuromagnetic response. The current results suggest that the physiological response is a reflection of the probabilistic representations of the musical syntax. Moreover, the results indicate that the probabilistic representation is related to the musical training as well as the sensitivity of an individual.

  10. An examination of faying surface fretting in single lap splices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Adam

    While fretting damage in mechanically fastened joints is widely acknowledged as a common source of crack nucleation, little work is available in the open literature on the role that fretting damage plays in the fatigue life of a riveted joint. To expand on the limited knowledge available, a study was undertaken on fretting fatigue in thin-sheet riveted fuselage lap joints. In joints constructed out of 1 mm thick 2024-T3 aluminum sheet the rivet forming load was found to have a significant effect on the location of fretting damage and crack nucleation. This effect was observed for splices riveted with machine countersunk and with universal rivets. The shift in the location of peak fretting damage and crack nucleation with changing rivet forming loads was investigated through numerical and experimental methods. A predictive model based on the critical plane Smith-Watson-Topper strain life equation was applied to the complex geometry of the single lap splice and was shown to be effective in predicting the fretting fatigue life as well as the location of fretting-induced crack nucleation. Basing this model on an explicit finite element simulation allowed for the inclusion of compressive residual stresses generated during rivet forming. Key to the proper functionality of the predictive model was to have a validated finite element model from which results for the stress and strain field in the loaded component could be obtained. In addition to the predictive model, a series of splice coupon and simplified geometry fretting fatigue tests were performed. The tests showed that, at higher rivet forming loads, crack nucleation is on the faying surface away from the hole edge and that the type of surface condition is important to the fretting fatigue life of the splice. The discovery of this variation with surface treatment at high rivet forming loads is important as more research is showing the benefit of using load-controlled rivet forming and higher rivet forming loads in

  11. EASI—enrichment of alternatively spliced isoforms

    OpenAIRE

    Julian P Venables; Burn, John

    2006-01-01

    Alternative splicing produces more than one protein from the majority of genes and the rarer forms can have dominant functions. Instability of alternative transcripts can also hinder the study of regulation of gene expression by alternative splicing. To investigate the true extent of alternative splicing we have developed a simple method of enriching alternatively spliced isoforms (EASI) from PCRs using beads charged with Thermus aquaticus single-stranded DNA-binding protein (T.Aq ssb). This ...

  12. Mechano-Regulation of Alternative Splicing

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Huan; Tang, Liling

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing contributes to the complexity of proteome by producing multiple mRNAs from a single gene. Affymetrix exon arrays and experiments in vivo or in vitro demonstrated that alternative splicing was regulated by mechanical stress. Expression of mechano-growth factor (MGF) which is the splicing isoform of insulin-like growth factor 1(IGF-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) splicing variants such as VEGF121, VEGF165, VEGF206, VEGF189, VEGF165 and VEGF145 are regulated...

  13. ASD: a bioinformatics resource on alternative splicing

    OpenAIRE

    Stamm, Stefan; Riethoven, Jean-Jack; Le Texier, Vincent; Gopalakrishnan, Chellappa; Kumanduri, Vasudev; Tang, Yesheng; Barbosa-Morais, Nuno L.; Thanaraj, Thangavel Alphonse

    2005-01-01

    Alternative splicing is an important regulatory mechanism of mammalian gene expression. The alternative splicing database (ASD) consortium is systematically collecting and annotating data on alternative splicing. We present the continuation and upgrade of the ASD [T. A. Thanaraj, S. Stamm, F. Clark, J. J. Riethoven, V. Le Texier, J. Muilu (2004) Nucleic Acids Res. 32, D64–D69] that consists of computationally and manually generated data. Its largest parts are AltSplice, a value-added database...

  14. Targeting RNA Splicing for Disease Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Havens, Mallory A.; Duelli, Dominik M.; Hastings, Michelle L.

    2013-01-01

    Splicing of pre-messenger RNA into mature messenger RNA is an essential step for expression of most genes in higher eukaryotes. Defects in this process typically affect cellular function and can have pathological consequences. Many human genetic diseases are caused by mutations that cause splicing defects. Furthermore, a number of diseases are associated with splicing defects that are not attributed to overt mutations. Targeting splicing directly to correct disease-associated aberrant splicin...

  15. Evolution of alternative splicing after gene duplication

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Zhixi; Wang, Jianmin; Yu, Jun; Huang, Xiaoqiu; Gu, Xun

    2006-01-01

    Alternative splicing and gene duplication are two major sources of proteomic function diversity. Here, we study the evolutionary trend of alternative splicing after gene duplication by analyzing the alternative splicing differences between duplicate genes. We observed that duplicate genes have fewer alternative splice (AS) forms than single-copy genes, and that a negative correlation exists between the mean number of AS forms and the gene family size. Interestingly, we found that the loss of ...

  16. SAW: A Method to Identify Splicing Events from RNA-Seq Data Based on Splicing Fingerprints

    OpenAIRE

    Kang Ning; Damian Fermin

    2010-01-01

    Splicing event identification is one of the most important issues in the comprehensive analysis of transcription profile. Recent development of next-generation sequencing technology has generated an extensive profile of alternative splicing. However, while many of these splicing events are between exons that are relatively close on genome sequences, reads generated by RNA-Seq are not limited to alternative splicing between close exons but occur in virtually all splicing events. In this work, ...

  17. Alternative splicing and trans-splicing events revealed by analysis of the Bombyx mori transcriptome

    OpenAIRE

    Shao, Wei; Zhao, Qiong-Yi; Wang, Xiu-Ye; Xu, Xin-Yan; Tang, Qing; Li, Muwang; Li, Xuan; Xu, Yong-Zhen

    2012-01-01

    Alternative splicing and trans-splicing events have not been systematically studied in the silkworm Bombyx mori. Here, the silkworm transcriptome was analyzed by RNA-seq. The authors identified 320 novel genes, modified 1140 gene models, and found thousands of alternative splicing and 58 trans-splicing events. Studies of three SR proteins show that both their alternative splicing patterns and mRNA products are conserved from insect to human, and one isoform of Srsf6 with a retained intron is ...

  18. COMMUNICATION: Alternative splicing and genomic stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Kevin

    2004-06-01

    Alternative splicing allows an organism to make different proteins in different cells at different times, all from the same gene. In a cell that uses alternative splicing, the total length of all the exons is much shorter than in a cell that encodes the same set of proteins without alternative splicing. This economical use of exons makes genes more stable during reproduction and development because a genome with a shorter exon length is more resistant to harmful mutations. Genomic stability may be the reason why higher vertebrates splice alternatively. For a broad class of alternatively spliced genes, a formula is given for the increase in their stability.

  19. GC content around splice sites affects splicing through pre-mRNA secondary structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Liang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative splicing increases protein diversity by generating multiple transcript isoforms from a single gene through different combinations of exons or through different selections of splice sites. It has been reported that RNA secondary structures are involved in alternative splicing. Here we perform a genomic study of RNA secondary structures around splice sites in humans (Homo sapiens, mice (Mus musculus, fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster, and nematodes (Caenorhabditis elegans to further investigate this phenomenon. Results We observe that GC content around splice sites is closely associated with the splice site usage in multiple species. RNA secondary structure is the possible explanation, because the structural stability difference among alternative splice sites, constitutive splice sites, and skipped splice sites can be explained by the GC content difference. Alternative splice sites tend to be GC-enriched and exhibit more stable RNA secondary structures in all of the considered species. In humans and mice, splice sites of first exons and long exons tend to be GC-enriched and hence form more stable structures, indicating the special role of RNA secondary structures in promoter proximal splicing events and the splicing of long exons. In addition, GC-enriched exon-intron junctions tend to be overrepresented in tissue-specific alternative splice sites, indicating the functional consequence of the GC effect. Compared with regions far from splice sites and decoy splice sites, real splice sites are GC-enriched. We also found that the GC-content effect is much stronger than the nucleotide-order effect to form stable secondary structures. Conclusion All of these results indicate that GC content is related to splice site usage and it may mediate the splicing process through RNA secondary structures.

  20. Recognition of Chord Changes by 4- and 5-Year-Old American and Argentine Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Giomi, Eugenia

    1994-01-01

    Reports on a study of young children's abilities to discriminate between two chords played as the accompaniment of a melody and played alone with no melody. Finds that age, type of stimulus, and the interaction of these two variables affected children's performance significantly. (CFR)

  1. Effect of Timbre and Register Modifications of Musical Stimuli on Young Children's Identification of Chord Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Giomi, Eugenia

    1994-01-01

    Reviews research related to children's musical development. Reports on a study of 125 kindergarten and first-grade students on the impact of modification of timbre and register of musical stimuli. Finds that timbre modification helped children recognize chord changes with first graders identifying more changes than did kindergartners. (CFR)

  2. ChordMR: A P2P-based Job Management Scheme in Cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiagao Wu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available MapReduce is a programming model and an associated implementation for processing parallel data, which is widely used in Cloud computing environments. However, the traditional MapReduce system is based on a centralized master-slave structure. While, along with the increase of the number of MapReduce jobs submitted and system scale, the master node will become the bottleneck of the system. To improve this problem, we have proposed a new MapReduce system named ChordMR, which is designed to use a peer-to-peer Chord network to manage master node churn and failure in a decentralized way. More importantly, we propose a job management scheme which contains the aspects of job assignment, job backup, job recovery, etc. In addition, in ChordMR, the job backup scheme makes a number of  identical copies for each job and classifies the jobs into K2 classes to achieve the goals of fault tolerance and load balance. The theoretical and simulation results show that our ChordMR is effective

  3. Stochastic and Chaotic Sub- and Superharmonic Response of Shallow Cables due to Chord Elongations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren R.K.; Sichani, Mahdi Teimouri

    2011-01-01

    responsible for significant internal subharmonic and superharmonic resonances. Under harmonically varying support motions coupled ordered or chaotic in-plane and out-of-plane subharmonic and superharmonic periodic motions may take place. If the harmonically varying chord elongation is replaced by a zero...

  4. Titin Diversity—Alternative Splicing Gone Wild

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Guo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Titin is an extremely large protein found in highest concentrations in heart and skeletal muscle. The single mammalian gene is expressed in multiple isoforms as a result of alternative splicing. Although titin isoform expression is controlled developmentally and in a tissue specific manner, the vast number of potential splicing pathways far exceeds those described in any other alternatively spliced gene. Over 1 million human splice pathways for a single individual can be potentially derived from the PEVK region alone. A new splicing pattern for the human cardiac N2BA isoform type has been found in which the PEVK region includes only the N2B type exons. The alterations in splicing and titin isoform expression in human heart disease provide impetus for future detailed study of the splicing mechanisms for this giant protein.

  5. The Calculated and Measured Resistance for Splices between Conductors in a MICE Superconducting Coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The resistance of superconducting joints within MICE coils is an important issue particularly for the coupling coils. The MICE tracker solenoids have only two superconducting joints in the three spectrometer set (end coil 1, the center coil and end coil 2). The AFC magnets may have only a single joint within the coil. The coupling coils may have as many as fifteen joints within the coil, due to relatively short piece lengths of the superconductor. LBNL and ICST looked at three types of coil joints. They are: (1) cold fusion butt joints, (2) side-by-side lap joints, and (3) up-down lap joints. A theoretical calculation of the joint resistance was done at LBNL and checked by ICST. After looking at the theoretical resistance of the three types of joints, it was decided that the cold welded butt joint was not an attractive alternative for joints within a MICE superconducting magnet coil. Side-by-side and up-down lap joints were fabricated at ICST using two types of soft solder between the conductors. These conductor joints were tested at LBNL at liquid helium temperatures over a range of magnetic fields. The joint resistance was compared with the theoretical calculations. Measurements of splice strength were also made at 300 K and 77 K.

  6. Joint swelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swelling of a joint ... Joint swelling may occur along with joint pain . The swelling may cause the joint to appear larger or abnormally shaped. Joint swelling can cause pain or stiffness. After an ...

  7. Spliced leader RNA trans-splicing discovered in copepods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feifei; Xu, Donghui; Zhuang, Yunyun; Yi, Xiaoyan; Huang, Yousong; Chen, Hongju; Lin, Senjie; Campbell, David A.; Sturm, Nancy R.; Liu, Guangxing; Zhang, Huan

    2015-12-01

    Copepods are one of the most abundant metazoans in the marine ecosystem, constituting a critical link in aquatic food webs and contributing significantly to the global carbon budget, yet molecular mechanisms of their gene expression are not well understood. Here we report the detection of spliced leader (SL) trans-splicing in calanoid copepods. We have examined nine species of wild-caught copepods from Jiaozhou Bay, China that represent the major families of the calanoids. All these species contained a common 46-nt SL (CopepodSL). We further determined the size of CopepodSL precursor RNA (slRNA; 108-158 nt) through genomic analysis and 3‧-RACE technique, which was confirmed by RNA blot analysis. Structure modeling showed that the copepod slRNA folded into typical slRNA secondary structures. Using a CopepodSL-based primer set, we selectively enriched and sequenced copepod full-length cDNAs, which led to the characterization of copepod transcripts and the cataloging of the complete set of 79 eukaryotic cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins (cRPs) for a single copepod species. We uncovered the SL trans-splicing in copepod natural populations, and demonstrated that CopepodSL was a sensitive and specific tool for copepod transcriptomic studies at both the individual and population levels and that it would be useful for metatranscriptomic analysis of copepods.

  8. SpliceProt: a protein sequence repository of predicted human splice variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Raphael; de Miranda Scherer, Nicole; Pauletti, Bianca Alves; Araújo, Elói; Folador, Edson Luiz; Espindola, Gabriel; Ferreira, Carlos Gil; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; de Oliveira, Paulo Sergio Lopes; Passetti, Fabio

    2014-02-01

    The mechanism of alternative splicing in the transcriptome may increase the proteome diversity in eukaryotes. In proteomics, several studies aim to use protein sequence repositories to annotate MS experiments or to detect differentially expressed proteins. However, the available protein sequence repositories are not designed to fully detect protein isoforms derived from mRNA splice variants. To foster knowledge for the field, here we introduce SpliceProt, a new protein sequence repository of transcriptome experimental data used to investigate for putative splice variants in human proteomes. Current version of SpliceProt contains 159 719 non-redundant putative polypeptide sequences. The assessment of the potential of SpliceProt in detecting new protein isoforms resulting from alternative splicing was performed by using publicly available proteomics data. We detected 173 peptides hypothetically derived from splice variants, which 54 of them are not present in UniprotKB/TrEMBL sequence repository. In comparison to other protein sequence repositories, SpliceProt contains a greater number of unique peptides and is able to detect more splice variants. Therefore, SpliceProt provides a solution for the annotation of proteomics experiments regarding splice isofoms. The repository files containing the translated sequences of the predicted splice variants and a visualization tool are freely available at http://lbbc.inca.gov.br/spliceprot. PMID:24273012

  9. Stress determination along the intersection curve of pipe joints using the finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The calculation of the stress distribution along the intersection curve of T- and Y-joint connections based on an analytical approach using non-shallow shell theory for the chord and branch pipes, is extremely cumber some because of the mathematical difficulties involved. Approximations which lead to the shallow thin shell theory cannot give reliable results, especially for large values of branch/chord-diameter ratios, because of the localised character of the three-dimensional state of stress. On the other hand, the finite element descretisation of the joint structure is a reliable method for predicting the stress gradients at the intersection. (orig./DG)

  10. Linking splicing to Pol II transcription stabilizes pre-mRNAs and influences splicing patterns.

    OpenAIRE

    Hicks, Martin J; Chin-Rang Yang; Matthew V Kotlajich; Hertel, Klemens J.

    2006-01-01

    RNA processing is carried out in close proximity to the site of transcription, suggesting a regulatory link between transcription and pre-mRNA splicing. Using an in vitro transcription/splicing assay, we demonstrate that an association of RNA polymerase II ( Pol II) transcription and pre-mRNA splicing is required for efficient gene expression. Pol II-synthesized RNAs containing functional splice sites are protected from nuclear degradation, presumably because the local concentration of the sp...

  11. Control of Alternative Splicing by Signal-dependent Degradation of Splicing-regulatory Proteins*S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Katzenberger, Rebeccah J.; Marengo, Matthew S.; Wassarman, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing is a major gene expression regulatory mechanism in metazoan organisms. Proteins that bind pre-mRNA elements and control assembly of splicing complexes regulate utilization of pre-mRNA alternative splice sites. To understand how signaling pathways impact this mechanism, an RNA interference screen in Drosophila S2 cells was used to identify proteins that regulate TAF1 (TBP-associated factor 1) alternative splicing in response to activation o...

  12. Competition between Pre-mRNAs for the splicing machinery drives global regulation of splicing

    OpenAIRE

    Munding, EM; Shiue, L; Katzman, S.; Donohue, J; Ares, M

    2013-01-01

    During meiosis in yeast, global splicing efficiency increases and then decreases. Here we provide evidence that splicing improves due to reduced competition for the splicing machinery. The timing of this regulation corresponds to repression and reactivation of ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) during meiosis. In vegetative cells, RPG repression by rapamycin treatment also increases splicing efficiency. Downregulation of the RPG-dedicated transcription factor gene IFH1 genetically suppresses two ...

  13. Regulation of Splicing Factors by Alternative Splicing and NMD Is Conserved between Kingdoms Yet Evolutionarily Flexible

    OpenAIRE

    Liana F Lareau; Brenner, Steven E.

    2015-01-01

    Ultraconserved elements, unusually long regions of perfect sequence identity, are found in genes encoding numerous RNA-binding proteins including arginine-serine rich (SR) splicing factors. Expression of these genes is regulated via alternative splicing of the ultraconserved regions to yield mRNAs that are degraded by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), a process termed unproductive splicing (Lareau et al. 2007; Ni et al. 2007). As all human SR genes are affected by alternative splicing and N...

  14. Evolutionary conservation of alternative splicing in chicken

    OpenAIRE

    Katyal, S.; Gao, Z.; Liu, R.-Z.; R Godbout

    2007-01-01

    Alternative splicing represents a source of great diversity for regulating protein expression and function. It has been estimated that one-third to two-thirds of mammalian genes are alternatively spliced. With the sequencing of the chicken genome and analysis of transcripts expressed in chicken tissues, we are now in a position to address evolutionary conservation of alternative splicing events in chicken and mammals. Here, we compare chicken and mammalian transcript sequences of 41 alternati...

  15. SPA: a probabilistic algorithm for spliced alignment.

    OpenAIRE

    Erik van Nimwegen; Nicodeme Paul; Robert Sheridan; Mihaela Zavolan

    2006-01-01

    Recent large-scale cDNA sequencing efforts show that elaborate patterns of splice variation are responsible for much of the proteome diversity in higher eukaryotes. To obtain an accurate account of the repertoire of splice variants, and to gain insight into the mechanisms of alternative splicing, it is essential that cDNAs are very accurately mapped to their respective genomes. Currently available algorithms for cDNA-to-genome alignment do not reach the necessary level of accuracy because the...

  16. Results of two multi-chord stellar occultations by dwarf planet (1) Ceres

    CERN Document Server

    Gomes-Júnior, A R; Braga-Ribas, F; Assafin, M; Vieira-Martins, R; Camargo, J I B; Sicardy, B; Timerson, B; George, T; Broughton, J; Blank, T; Benedetti-Rossi, G; Brooks, J; Dantowitz, R F; Dunham, D W; Dunham, J B; Ellington, C K; Emilio, M; Herpich, F R; Jacques, C; Maley, P D; Mehret, L; Mello, A J T; Milone, A C; Pimentel, E; Schoenell, W; Weber, N S

    2015-01-01

    We report the results of two multi-chord stellar occultations by the dwarf planet (1) Ceres that were observed from Brazil on 2010 August 17, and from the USA on 2013 October 25. Four positive detections were obtained for the 2010 occultation, and nine for the 2013 occultation. Elliptical models were adjusted to the observed chords to obtain Ceres' size and shape. Two limb fitting solutions were studied for each event. The first one is a nominal solution with an indeterminate polar aspect angle. The second one was constrained by the pole coordinates as given by Drummond et al. Assuming a Maclaurin spheroid, we determine an equatorial diameter of 972 $\\pm$ 6 km and an apparent oblateness of 0.08 $\\pm$ 0.03 as our best solution. These results are compared to all available size and shape determinations for Ceres made so far, and shall be confirmed by the NASA's Dawn space mission.

  17. An old-fashioned connectionist approach to a Cajun chord change problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkeley, I.; Raine, R.

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, the problem of changing chords when playing Cajun music is introduced. A number of connectionist network simulations are then described, in which the networks attempted to learn to predict chord changes correctly in a particular Cajun song, 'Bayou Pompon'. In the various sets of simulations, the amount of information provided to the network was varied. While the network had difficulty in solving the problem with six one-eighths of a bar of melody information, performance radically improved when the network was provided with seven one-eighths of a bar of melody information. A post-training analysis of a trained network revealed a 'rule' for solving the problem. In addition to providing useful insight for scholars interested in traditional Cajun music, the results described here also illustrate how a traditional connectionist network, trained with the familiar backpropagation learning algorithm, can be used to generate a theory of the task.

  18. Recursive splicing in long vertebrate genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibley, Christopher R; Emmett, Warren; Blazquez, Lorea; Faro, Ana; Haberman, Nejc; Briese, Michael; Trabzuni, Daniah; Ryten, Mina; Weale, Michael E; Hardy, John; Modic, Miha; Curk, Tomaž; Wilson, Stephen W; Plagnol, Vincent; Ule, Jernej

    2015-05-21

    It is generally believed that splicing removes introns as single units from precursor messenger RNA transcripts. However, some long Drosophila melanogaster introns contain a cryptic site, known as a recursive splice site (RS-site), that enables a multi-step process of intron removal termed recursive splicing. The extent to which recursive splicing occurs in other species and its mechanistic basis have not been examined. Here we identify highly conserved RS-sites in genes expressed in the mammalian brain that encode proteins functioning in neuronal development. Moreover, the RS-sites are found in some of the longest introns across vertebrates. We find that vertebrate recursive splicing requires initial definition of an 'RS-exon' that follows the RS-site. The RS-exon is then excluded from the dominant mRNA isoform owing to competition with a reconstituted 5' splice site formed at the RS-site after the first splicing step. Conversely, the RS-exon is included when preceded by cryptic promoters or exons that fail to reconstitute an efficient 5' splice site. Most RS-exons contain a premature stop codon such that their inclusion can decrease mRNA stability. Thus, by establishing a binary splicing switch, RS-sites demarcate different mRNA isoforms emerging from long genes by coupling cryptic elements with inclusion of RS-exons. PMID:25970246

  19. Effects of unexpected chords and of performer's expression on brain responses and electrodermal activity

    OpenAIRE

    Koelsch, S.; Kilches, S.; Steinbeis, N.; Schelinski, S.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is lack of neuroscientific studies investigating music processing with naturalistic stimuli, and brain responses to real music are, thus, largely unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study investigates event-related brain potentials (ERPs), skin conductance responses (SCRs) and heart rate (HR) elicited by unexpected chords of piano sonatas as they were originally arranged by composers, and as they were played by professional pianists. From the musical excerpts pl...

  20. Newborn infants' auditory system is sensitive to Western music chord categories

    OpenAIRE

    PaulaVirtala; MinnaHuotilainen; VinetaFellman

    2013-01-01

    Neural encoding of abstract rules in the audition of newborn infants has been recently demonstrated in several studies using event-related potentials (ERPs). In the present study the neural encoding of Western music chords was investigated in newborn infants. Using ERPs, we examined whether the categorizations of major versus minor and consonance versus dissonance are present at the level of the change-related mismatch response (MMR). Using an oddball paradigm, root minor, dissonant and inver...

  1. Alternative mRNA Splicing: Control by Combination

    OpenAIRE

    Mabon, Stephen A; Tom Misteli

    2005-01-01

    Alternative splicing in mammalian cells has been suggested to be largely controlled by combinatorial binding of basal splicing factors to pre-mRNA templates. This model predicts that distinct sets of pre-mRNA splicing factors are associated with alternatively spliced transcripts. However, no experimental evidence for differential recruitment of splicing factors to transcripts with distinct splicing fates is available. Here we have used quantitative single-cell imaging to test this key predict...

  2. SplicingTypesAnno: annotating and quantifying alternative splicing events for RNA-Seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoyong; Zuo, Fenghua; Ru, Yuanbin; Guo, Jiqiang; Yan, Xiaoyan; Sablok, Gaurav

    2015-04-01

    Alternative splicing plays a key role in the regulation of the central dogma. Four major types of alternative splicing have been classified as intron retention, exon skipping, alternative 5 splice sites or alternative donor sites, and alternative 3 splice sites or alternative acceptor sites. A few algorithms have been developed to detect splice junctions from RNA-Seq reads. However, there are few tools targeting at the major alternative splicing types at the exon/intron level. This type of analysis may reveal subtle, yet important events of alternative splicing, and thus help gain deeper understanding of the mechanism of alternative splicing. This paper describes a user-friendly R package, extracting, annotating and analyzing alternative splicing types for sequence alignment files from RNA-Seq. SplicingTypesAnno can: (1) provide annotation for major alternative splicing at exon/intron level. By comparing the annotation from GTF/GFF file, it identifies the novel alternative splicing sites; (2) offer a convenient two-level analysis: genome-scale annotation for users with high performance computing environment, and gene-scale annotation for users with personal computers; (3) generate a user-friendly web report and additional BED files for IGV visualization. SplicingTypesAnno is a user-friendly R package for extracting, annotating and analyzing alternative splicing types at exon/intron level for sequence alignment files from RNA-Seq. It is publically available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/splicingtypes/files/ or http://genome.sdau.edu.cn/research/software/SplicingTypesAnno.html. PMID:25720307

  3. A novel extension of chord length sampling method for TRISO-type fueled reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A new chord length distribution model is derived and developed for CLS methods. • The new model is specifically for MC analyses of reactors with TRISO-type fuel. • Fuel kernels can be sampled on the fly using the new model in MC simulations. • The model is verified to be accurate in analyzing simple and realistic systems. • The new model shows a higher efficiency than the old model in MC simulations. - Abstract: A new chord length distribution model is proposed to characterize the stochastic distribution of TRISO fuel particles in nuclear reactor systems and is used in the chord length sampling (CLS) method to analyze the neutronic behavior of TRISO fuel systems. In this model, the coating layers of fuel particles are homogenized with the background matrix region. The probability density function (PDF) of the chord length between fuel kernels, instead of fuel particles, is developed and is used in the CLS method. We first apply the new CLS model to solving one-group eigenvalue problems in a simplified 3-D stochastic medium system. Good accuracy is obtained in predicting the multiplication factor and fission density distribution. The relative differences are within 1.0% for both the multiplication factor and the total fission density in all the studied scenarios. We then apply the new CLS model to analyzing three realistic reactor designs: two Very High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor unit cells and one fuel pin unit cell of an innovative light water reactor design with accident tolerant fuel. Infinite multiplication factor and intra-Dancoff factor are evaluated for the three unit cells respectively. Compared with the reference results, predictions from CLS simulations show a relative difference of less than 0.26% for infinite multiplication factors and less than 1.0% for intra-Dancoff factors in all the studied cases. Meanwhile, a significant improvement in the computational efficiency has been observed for the CLS new model compared with the

  4. Measurement of a density profile of a hot-electron plasma in RT-1 with three-chord interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electron density profile of a plasma in a magnetospheric dipole field configuration was measured with a multi-chord interferometry including a relativistic correction. In order to improve the accuracy of density reconstruction, a 75 GHz interferometer was installed at a vertical chord of the Ring Trap 1 (RT-1) device in addition to previously installed ones at tangential and another vertical chords. The density profile was calculated by using the data of three-chord interferometry including relativistic effects for a plasma consisting of hot and cold electrons generated by electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECH). The results clearly showed the effects of density peaking and magnetic mirror trapping in a strongly inhomogeneous dipole magnetic field

  5. Measurement of a density profile of a hot-electron plasma in RT-1 with three-chord interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitoh, H.; Yano, Y.; Yoshida, Z.; Nishiura, M.; Morikawa, J.; Kawazura, Y.; Nogami, T.; Yamasaki, M. [Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan)

    2015-02-15

    The electron density profile of a plasma in a magnetospheric dipole field configuration was measured with a multi-chord interferometry including a relativistic correction. In order to improve the accuracy of density reconstruction, a 75 GHz interferometer was installed at a vertical chord of the Ring Trap 1 (RT-1) device in addition to previously installed ones at tangential and another vertical chords. The density profile was calculated by using the data of three-chord interferometry including relativistic effects for a plasma consisting of hot and cold electrons generated by electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECH). The results clearly showed the effects of density peaking and magnetic mirror trapping in a strongly inhomogeneous dipole magnetic field.

  6. Large-scale comparative analysis of splicing signals and their corresponding splicing factors in eukaryotes

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartz, Schraga; Silva, João(CFTP, Departamento de Física, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049, Lisboa, Portugal); Burstein, David; Pupko, Tal; Eyras, Eduardo; Ast, Gil

    2008-01-01

    Introns are among the hallmarks of eukaryotic genes. Splicing of introns is directed by three main splicing signals: the 5′ splice site (5′ss), the branch site (BS), and the polypyrimdine tract/3′splice site (PPT-3′ss). To study the evolution of these splicing signals, we have conducted a systematic comparative analysis of these signals in over 1.2 million introns from 22 eukaryotes. Our analyses suggest that all these signals have dramatically evolved: The PPT is weak among most fungi, inter...

  7. Spliced

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Addison, Courtney Page

    2016-01-01

    Human gene therapy (HGT) aims to cure disease by inserting or editing the DNA of patients with genetic conditions. Since foundational genetic techniques came into use in the 1970s, the field has developed to the point that now three therapies have market approval, and over 1800 clinical trials have......-work stretches out from science to enlist diverse publics, social formations and the natural world in the pursuit of legitimacy....

  8. Alternative splicing regulation during C. elegans development: splicing factors as regulated targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Barberan-Soler

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing generates protein diversity and allows for post-transcriptional gene regulation. Estimates suggest that 10% of the genes in Caenorhabditis elegans undergo alternative splicing. We constructed a splicing-sensitive microarray to detect alternative splicing for 352 cassette exons and tested for changes in alternative splicing of these genes during development. We found that the microarray data predicted that 62/352 (approximately 18% of the alternative splicing events studied show a strong change in the relative levels of the spliced isoforms (>4-fold during development. Confirmation of the microarray data by RT-PCR was obtained for 70% of randomly selected genes tested. Among the genes with the most developmentally regulated alternatively splicing was the hnRNP F/H splicing factor homolog, W02D3.11 - now named hrpf-1. For the cassette exon of hrpf-1, the inclusion isoform comprises 65% of hrpf-1 steady state messages in embryos but only 0.1% in the first larval stage. This dramatic change in the alternative splicing of an alternative splicing factor suggests a complex cascade of splicing regulation during development. We analyzed splicing in embryos from a strain with a mutation in the splicing factor sym-2, another hnRNP F/H homolog. We found that approximately half of the genes with large alternative splicing changes between the embryo and L1 stages are regulated by sym-2 in embryos. An analysis of the role of nonsense-mediated decay in regulating steady-state alternative mRNA isoforms was performed. We found that 8% of the 352 events studied have alternative isoforms whose relative steady-state levels in embryos change more than 4-fold in a nonsense-mediated decay mutant, including hrpf-1. Strikingly, 53% of these alternative splicing events that are affected by NMD in our experiment are not obvious substrates for NMD based on the presence of premature termination codons. This suggests that the targeting of splicing factors

  9. Position dependence of the rous sarcoma virus negative regulator of splicing element reflects proximity to a 5' splice site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) requires incomplete splicing of its viral transcripts to maintain efficient replication. A splicing inhibitor element, the negative regulator of splicing (NRS), is located near the 5' end of the RNA but the significance of this positioning is not known. In a heterologous intron the NRS functions optimally when positioned close to the authentic 5' splice site. This observation led us to investigate the basis of the position dependence. Four explanations were put forth and stressed the role of three major elements involved in splicing, the 3' splice site, the 5' splice site, and the 5' end cap structure. NRS function was unrelated to its position relative to the 3' splice site or the cap structure and appeared to depend on its position relative to the authentic 5' splice site. We conclude that position dependence may reflect distance constraints necessary for competition of the NRS with the authentic 5' splice site for pairing with the 3' splice sites

  10. High-Current Bus Splice Resistances and Implications for the Operating Energy of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Koratzinos, M; Charifoulline, Z; Dahlerup-Petersen, K; Denz, R; Flora, R H; Pfeffer, H; Scheuerlein, C; Schmidt, R; Siemko, A; Strait, J; Verweij, A

    2010-01-01

    At each interconnection between LHC main magnets a low-resistance solder joint must be made between superconducting cables in order to provide a continuous current path through the superconductor and also to the surrounding copper stabilizer in case the cable quenches [1]. About 10,000 such joints exist in the LHC. An extensive campaign has been undertaken to characterize and map the resistances of these joints. All of the superconducting cable splices were measured at 1.9 K and no splices were found with a resistance larger than 3 nW. Non-invasive measurements of the stabilizer joints were made at 300 K in 5 of the 8 sectors, and at 80 K in 3 sectors. More precise local measurements were made on suspect interconnects that were opened up, and poor joints were repaired. However, it is likely that additional imperfect stabilizer joints still exist in the LHC. A statistical analysis is used to place bounds on the remaining worst-case resistances. This sets limits on the maximum operating energy of the LHC, prior...

  11. Aberrant splicing and drug resistance in AML.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Necochea-Campion, Rosalia; Shouse, Geoffrey P; Zhou, Qi; Mirshahidi, Saied; Chen, Chien-Shing

    2016-01-01

    The advent of next-generation sequencing technologies has unveiled a new window into the heterogeneity of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In particular, recurrent mutations in spliceosome machinery and genome-wide aberrant splicing events have been recognized as a prominent component of this disease. This review will focus on how these factors influence drug resistance through altered splicing of tumor suppressor and oncogenes and dysregulation of the apoptotic signaling network. A better understanding of these factors in disease progression is necessary to design appropriate therapeutic strategies recognizing specific alternatively spliced or mutated oncogenic targets. PMID:27613060

  12. ASDB: database of alternatively spliced genes

    OpenAIRE

    Dralyuk, I; Brudno, M.; Gelfand, M S; Zorn, M.; Dubchak, I.

    2000-01-01

    Version 2.1 of ASDB (Alternative Splicing Data Base) contains 1922 protein and 2486 DNA sequences. The protein entries from SWISS-PROT are joined into clusters corresponding to alternatively spliced variants of one gene. The DNA division consists of complete genes with alternative splicing mentioned or annotated in GenBank. The search engine allows one to search over SWISS-PROT and GenBank fields and then follow the links to all variants. The database can be assessed at the URL http://cbcg.ne...

  13. Regulation of Alternative Splicing in Vivo by Overexpression of Antagonistic Splicing Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caceres, Javier F.; Stamm, Stefan; Helfman, David M.; Krainer, Adrian R.

    1994-09-01

    The opposing effects of SF2/ASF and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A1 influence alternative splicing in vitro. SF2/ASF or hnRNP A1 complementary DNAs were transiently overexpressed in HeLa cells, and the effect on alternative splicing of several cotransfected reporter genes was measured. Increased expression of SF2/ASF activated proximal 5' splice sites, promoted inclusion of a neuron-specific exon, and prevented abnormal exon skipping. Increased expression of hnRNP A1 activated distal 5' splice sites. Therefore, variations in the intracellular levels of antagonistic splicing factors influence different modes of alternative splicing in vivo and may be a natural mechanism for tissue-specific or developmental regulation of gene expression.

  14. Analysis of differential splicing suggests different modes of short-term splicing regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Topa, Hande; Honkela, Antti

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Alternative splicing is an important mechanism in which the regions of pre-mRNAs are differentially joined in order to form different transcript isoforms. Alternative splicing is involved in the regulation of normal physiological functions but also linked to the development of diseases such as cancer. We analyse differential expression and splicing using RNA-sequencing time series in three different settings: overall gene expression levels, absolute transcript expression levels an...

  15. Hollywood: a comparative relational database of alternative splicing

    OpenAIRE

    Holste, Dirk; Huo, George; Tung, Vivian; Burge, Christopher B.

    2005-01-01

    RNA splicing is an essential step in gene expression, and is often variable, giving rise to multiple alternatively spliced mRNA and protein isoforms from a single gene locus. The design of effective databases to support experimental and computational investigations of alternative splicing (AS) is a significant challenge. In an effort to integrate accurate exon and splice site annotation with current knowledge about splicing regulatory elements and predicted AS events, and to link information ...

  16. HIV-1 Vpr: A Novel Role in Regulating RNA Splicing

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xianfeng; Aida, Yoko

    2009-01-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing is a critical step in gene expression for metazoans. Several viral proteins regulate the splicing of pre-mRNAs through complex interactions between the virus and the host cell RNA splicing machinery. Here, we focus on a novel function of HIV-1 Vpr, that selectively inhibit cellular and viral pre-mRNA splicing, via interactions with components of functional spliceosomal complexes. This review discusses our current knowledge of how RNA splicing regulation is accomplished by Vp...

  17. The CHORDS Portal: Lowering the Barrier for Internet Collection, Archival and Distribution of Real-Time Geophysical Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, C.; Dye, M. J.; Daniels, M. D.; Keiser, K.; Maskey, M.; Graves, S. J.; Kerkez, B.; Chandrasekar, V.; Vernon, F.

    2015-12-01

    The Cloud-Hosted Real-time Data Services for the Geosciences (CHORDS) project tackles the challenges of collecting and disseminating geophysical observational data in real-time, especially for researchers with limited IT budgets and expertise. The CHORDS Portal is a component that allows research teams to easily configure and operate a cloud-based service which can receive data from dispersed instruments, manage a rolling archive of the observations, and serve these data to any client on the Internet. The research group (user) creates a CHORDS portal simply by running a prepackaged "CHORDS appliance" on Amazon Web Services. The user has complete ownership and management of the portal. Computing expenses are typically very small. RESTful protocols are employed for delivering and fetching data from the portal, which means that any system capable of sending an HTTP GET message is capable of accessing the portal. A simple API is defined, making it straightforward for non-experts to integrate a diverse collection of field instruments. Languages with network access libraries, such as Python, sh, Matlab, R, IDL, Ruby and JavaScript (and most others) can retrieve structured data from the portal with just a few lines of code. The user's private portal provides a browser-based system for configuring, managing and monitoring the health of the integrated real-time system. This talk will highlight the design goals, architecture and agile development of the CHORDS Portal. A running portal, with operational data feeds from across the country, will be presented.

  18. THE SIZE, SHAPE, ALBEDO, DENSITY, AND ATMOSPHERIC LIMIT OF TRANSNEPTUNIAN OBJECT (50000) QUAOAR FROM MULTI-CHORD STELLAR OCCULTATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present results derived from the first multi-chord stellar occultations by the transneptunian object (50000) Quaoar, observed on 2011 May 4 and 2012 February 17, and from a single-chord occultation observed on 2012 October 15. If the timing of the five chords obtained in 2011 were correct, then Quaoar would possess topographic features (crater or mountain) that would be too large for a body of this mass. An alternative model consists in applying time shifts to some chords to account for possible timing errors. Satisfactory elliptical fits to the chords are then possible, yielding an equivalent radius Requiv = 555 ± 2.5 km and geometric visual albedo pV = 0.109 ± 0.007. Assuming that Quaoar is a Maclaurin spheroid with an indeterminate polar aspect angle, we derive a true oblateness of ε= 0.087+0.0268-0.0175, an equatorial radius of 569+24-17 km, and a density of 1.99 ± 0.46 g cm–3. The orientation of our preferred solution in the plane of the sky implies that Quaoar's satellite Weywot cannot have an equatorial orbit. Finally, we detect no global atmosphere around Quaoar, considering a pressure upper limit of about 20 nbar for a pure methane atmosphere

  19. THE SIZE, SHAPE, ALBEDO, DENSITY, AND ATMOSPHERIC LIMIT OF TRANSNEPTUNIAN OBJECT (50000) QUAOAR FROM MULTI-CHORD STELLAR OCCULTATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga-Ribas, F.; Vieira-Martins, R.; Camargo, J. I. B. [Observatorio Nacional, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Sicardy, B.; Lellouch, E.; Lecacheux, J. [Observatoire de Paris, LESIA, F-92195 Meudon (France); Ortiz, J. L.; Morales, N. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia-CSIC, E-18080 Granada (Spain); Tancredi, G.; Roland, S.; Bruzzone, S. [Observatorio Astronomico Los Molinos, Montevideo U-12400 (Uruguay); Assafin, M. [Observatorio do Valongo/UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Behrend, R. [Observatoire de Geneve, Sauverny (Switzerland); Vachier, F.; Colas, F. [Observatoire de Paris, IMCCE, F-75014 Paris (France); Maury, A. [San Pedro de Atacama Celestial Explorations, San Pedro de Atacama (Chile); Emilio, M. [Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, Ponta Grossa (Brazil); Amorim, A. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis (Brazil); Unda-Sanzana, E. [Unidad de Astronomia, Universidad de Antofagasta, Antofagasta (Chile); Almeida, L. A., E-mail: ribas@on.br [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, DAS, Sao Jose dos Campos (Brazil); and others

    2013-08-10

    We present results derived from the first multi-chord stellar occultations by the transneptunian object (50000) Quaoar, observed on 2011 May 4 and 2012 February 17, and from a single-chord occultation observed on 2012 October 15. If the timing of the five chords obtained in 2011 were correct, then Quaoar would possess topographic features (crater or mountain) that would be too large for a body of this mass. An alternative model consists in applying time shifts to some chords to account for possible timing errors. Satisfactory elliptical fits to the chords are then possible, yielding an equivalent radius R{sub equiv} = 555 {+-} 2.5 km and geometric visual albedo p{sub V} = 0.109 {+-} 0.007. Assuming that Quaoar is a Maclaurin spheroid with an indeterminate polar aspect angle, we derive a true oblateness of {epsilon}= 0.087{sup +0.0268}{sub -0.0175}, an equatorial radius of 569{sup +24}{sub -17} km, and a density of 1.99 {+-} 0.46 g cm{sup -3}. The orientation of our preferred solution in the plane of the sky implies that Quaoar's satellite Weywot cannot have an equatorial orbit. Finally, we detect no global atmosphere around Quaoar, considering a pressure upper limit of about 20 nbar for a pure methane atmosphere.

  20. Electric Vehicle Preparedness Task 3: Detailed Assessment of Target Electrification Vehicles at Joint Base Lewis McChord Utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen Schey; Jim Francfort

    2014-08-01

    Task 2 involved identifying daily operational characteristics of select vehicles and initiating data logging of vehicle movements in order to characterize the vehicle’s mission. Individual observations of these selected vehicles provide the basis for recommendations related to PEV adoption and whether a battery electric vehicle (BEV) or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) (collectively PEVs) can fulfill the mission requirements and provides observations related to placement of PEV charging infrastructure. This report provides the results of the data analysis and observations related to the replacement of current vehicles with PEVs. This fulfills part of the Task 3 requirements. Task 3 also includes an assessment of charging infrastructure required to support this replacement. That is the subject of a separate report.

  1. Control of Pre-mRNA Splicing by the General Splicing Factors PUF60 and U2AF65

    OpenAIRE

    Hastings, Michelle L.; Eric Allemand; Duelli, Dominik M.; Michael P Myers; Krainer, Adrian R.

    2007-01-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing is a crucial step in gene expression, and accurate recognition of splice sites is an essential part of this process. Splice sites with weak matches to the consensus sequences are common, though it is not clear how such sites are efficiently utilized. Using an in vitro splicing-complementation approach, we identified PUF60 as a factor that promotes splicing of an intron with a weak 3' splice-site. PUF60 has homology to U2AF(65), a general splicing factor that facilitates 3' s...

  2. A Novel Type of Splicing Enhancer Regulating Adenovirus Pre-mRNA Splicing

    OpenAIRE

    Mühlemann, Oliver; Yue, Bai-Gong; Petersen-Mahrt, Svend; Akusjärvi, Göran

    2000-01-01

    Splicing of the adenovirus IIIa pre-mRNA is subjected to a temporal regulation, such that efficient IIIa 3′ splice site usage is confined to the late phase of the infectious cycle. Here we show that IIIa pre-mRNA splicing is activated more than 200-fold in nuclear extracts prepared from late adenovirus-infected cells (Ad-NE) compared to uninfected HeLa cell nuclear extracts (HeLa-NE). In contrast, splicing of the β-globin pre-mRNA is repressed in Ad-NE. We constructed hybrid pre-mRNAs between...

  3. Competition between pre-mRNAs for the splicing machinery drives global regulation of splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munding, Elizabeth M; Shiue, Lily; Katzman, Sol; Donohue, John Paul; Ares, Manuel

    2013-08-01

    During meiosis in yeast, global splicing efficiency increases and then decreases. Here we provide evidence that splicing improves due to reduced competition for the splicing machinery. The timing of this regulation corresponds to repression and reactivation of ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) during meiosis. In vegetative cells, RPG repression by rapamycin treatment also increases splicing efficiency. Downregulation of the RPG-dedicated transcription factor gene IFH1 genetically suppresses two spliceosome mutations, prp11-1 and prp4-1, and globally restores splicing efficiency in prp4-1 cells. We conclude that the splicing apparatus is limiting and that pre-messenger RNAs compete. Splicing efficiency of a pre-mRNA therefore depends not just on its own concentration and affinity for limiting splicing factor(s), but also on those of competing pre-mRNAs. Competition between RNAs for limiting processing factors appears to be a general condition in eukaryotes for a variety of posttranscriptional control mechanisms including microRNA (miRNA) repression, polyadenylation, and splicing. PMID:23891561

  4. The Splice of Fiber Optic Cable for Communications%浅谈通信光缆的接续

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李庆红

    2013-01-01

    通信光缆接续是光缆应用领域中最基本的操作,介绍了通信光缆接头的结构、通信光缆接续的过程和要求,具体包括接续准备和接续位置的确定、光缆护层的开剥处理、加强芯和金属护层的接续、光纤的接续、光纤连接损耗的现场监测和评价、余留光纤的收容处理、光缆接头的护套密封处理和安装固定.%The splice of fiber optic cable for communications is the most basic operation in the application field; the joint structure, the splice process and requirements of fiber optic cables for communications are introduced, including the preparation of splicing, the determination of splicing position, the stripping of cable sheath, the splicing of strength member and metallic sheath, the splice of optical fiber, the in-situ monitoring and evaluation of optical fiber connection loss, the accommodation of redundant optical fiber, the seal processing and installation fixing, etc.

  5. Group II Intron Self-Splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, Anna Marie

    2016-07-01

    Group II introns are large, autocatalytic ribozymes that catalyze RNA splicing and retrotransposition. Splicing by group II introns plays a major role in the metabolism of plants, fungi, and yeast and contributes to genetic variation in many bacteria. Group II introns have played a major role in genome evolution, as they are likely progenitors of spliceosomal introns, retroelements, and other machinery that controls genetic variation and stability. The structure and catalytic mechanism of group II introns have recently been elucidated through a combination of genetics, chemical biology, solution biochemistry, and crystallography. These studies reveal a dynamic machine that cycles progressively through multiple conformations as it stimulates the various stages of splicing. A central active site, containing a reactive metal ion cluster, catalyzes both steps of self-splicing. These studies provide insights into RNA structure, folding, and catalysis, as they raise new questions about the behavior of RNA machines. PMID:27391926

  6. Faster exon assembly by sparse spliced alignment

    CERN Document Server

    Tiskin, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Assembling a gene from candidate exons is an important problem in computational biology. Among the most successful approaches to this problem is \\emph{spliced alignment}, proposed by Gelfand et al., which scores different candidate exon chains within a DNA sequence of length $m$ by comparing them to a known related gene sequence of length n, $m = \\Theta(n)$. Gelfand et al.\\ gave an algorithm for spliced alignment running in time O(n^3). Kent et al.\\ considered sparse spliced alignment, where the number of candidate exons is O(n), and proposed an algorithm for this problem running in time O(n^{2.5}). We improve on this result, by proposing an algorithm for sparse spliced alignment running in time O(n^{2.25}). Our approach is based on a new framework of \\emph{quasi-local string comparison}.

  7. Protein splicing and its evolution in eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Starokadomskyy P. L.

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Inteins, or protein introns, are parts of protein sequences that are post-translationally excised, their flanking regions (exteins being spliced together. This process was called protein splicing. Originally inteins were found in prokaryotic or unicellular eukaryotic organisms. But the general principles of post-translation protein rearrangement are evolving yielding different post-translation modification of proteins in multicellular organisms. For clarity, these non-intein mediated events call either protein rearrangements or protein editing. The most intriguing example of protein editing is proteasome-mediated splicing of antigens in vertebrates that may play important role in antigen presentation. Other examples of protein rearrangements are maturation of Hg-proteins (critical receptors in embryogenesis as well as maturation of several metabolic enzymes. Despite a lack of experimental data we try to analyze some intriguing examples of protein splicing evolution.

  8. Tau exon 10 alternative splicing and tauopathies

    OpenAIRE

    Liu Fei; Gong Cheng-Xin

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Abnormalities of microtubule-associated protein tau play a central role in neurofibrillary degeneration in several neurodegenerative disorders that collectively called tauopathies. Six isoforms of tau are expressed in adult human brain, which result from alternative splicing of pre-mRNA generated from a single tau gene. Alternative splicing of tau exon 10 results in tau isoforms containing either three or four microtubule-binding repeats (3R-tau and 4R-tau, respectively). Approximate...

  9. Splice Junction Map of Simian Parvovirus Transcripts

    OpenAIRE

    Vashisht, Kapil; Faaberg, Kay S.; Aber, Amanda L.; Brown, Kevin E.; O’Sullivan, M. Gerard

    2004-01-01

    The transcription map of simian parvovirus (SPV), an Erythrovirus similar to Parvovirus B19, was investigated. RNA was extracted from tissues of experimentally infected cynomolgus macaques and subjected to reverse transcription-PCR with SPV-specific primers. The PCR products were cloned and sequenced to identify splice junctions. A total of 14 distinct sequences were identified as putative partial transcripts. Of these, 13 were spliced; a single unspliced transcript putatively encoded NS1. Se...

  10. Alcoholism and Alternative Splicing of Candidate Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Toshikazu Sasabe; Shoichi Ishiura

    2010-01-01

    Gene expression studies have shown that expression patterns of several genes have changed during the development of alcoholism. Gene expression is regulated not only at the level of transcription but also through alternative splicing of pre-mRNA. In this review, we discuss some of the evidence suggesting that alternative splicing of candidate genes such as DRD2 (encoding dopamine D2 receptor) may form the basis of the mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of alcoholism. These reports sugg...

  11. Eddy current quality control of soldered current-carrying busbar splices of superconducting magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Kogan, L; Savary, F; Principe, R; Datskov, V; Rozenfel'd, E; Khudjakov, B

    2015-01-01

    The eddy current technique associated with a U-shaped transducer is studied for the quality control of soldered joints between superconducting busbars ('splices'). Two other quality control techniques, based on X-rays and direct measurement of the electrical resistance, are also studied for comparison. A comparative analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of these three methods in relation to the quality control of soldered superconducting busbar cables enclosed in copper shells is used for benchmarking. The results of inspections with the U-shaped eddy current transducer carried out on several sample joints presenting different types of soldering defects show the potential of this type of nondestructive (ND) quality control technique.

  12. Evolution of alternative splicing regulation: changes in predicted exonic splicing regulators are not associated with changes in alternative splicing levels in primates

    OpenAIRE

    Manuel Irimia; Jakob Lewin Rukov; Scott William Roy

    2009-01-01

    Alternative splicing is tightly regulated in a spatio-temporal and quantitative manner. This regulation is achieved by a complex interplay between spliceosomal (trans) factors that bind to different sequence (cis) elements. cis-elements reside in both introns and exons and may either enhance or silence splicing. Differential combinations of cis-elements allows for a huge diversity of overall splicing signals, together comprising a complex ‘splicing code’. Many cis-elements have been identifie...

  13. Splicing therapy for neuromuscular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Andrew G L; Wood, Matthew J A

    2013-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) are two of the most common inherited neuromuscular diseases in humans. Both conditions are fatal and no clinically available treatments are able to significantly alter disease course in either case. However, by manipulation of pre-mRNA splicing using antisense oligonucleotides, defective transcripts from the DMD gene and from the SMN2 gene in SMA can be modified to once again produce protein and restore function. A large number of in vitro and in vivo studies have validated the applicability of this approach and an increasing number of preliminary clinical trials have either been completed or are under way. Several different oligonucleotide chemistries can be used for this purpose and various strategies are being developed to facilitate increased delivery efficiency and prolonged therapeutic effect. As these novel therapeutic compounds start to enter the clinical arena, attention must also be drawn to the question of how best to facilitate the clinical development of such personalised genetic therapies and how best to implement their provision. PMID:23631896

  14. Alternative Splice in Alternative Lice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar-Corona, Jaime M; Castillo-Morales, Atahualpa; Chen, Lu; Olds, Brett P; Clark, John M; Reynolds, Stuart E; Pittendrigh, Barry R; Feil, Edward J; Urrutia, Araxi O

    2015-10-01

    Genomic and transcriptomics analyses have revealed human head and body lice to be almost genetically identical; although con-specific, they nevertheless occupy distinct ecological niches and have differing feeding patterns. Most importantly, while head lice are not known to be vector competent, body lice can transmit three serious bacterial diseases; epidemictyphus, trench fever, and relapsing fever. In order to gain insights into the molecular bases for these differences, we analyzed alternative splicing (AS) using next-generation sequencing data for one strain of head lice and one strain of body lice. We identified a total of 3,598 AS events which were head or body lice specific. Exon skipping AS events were overrepresented among both head and body lice, whereas intron retention events were underrepresented in both. However, both the enrichment of exon skipping and the underrepresentation of intron retention are significantly stronger in body lice compared with head lice. Genes containing body louse-specific AS events were found to be significantly enriched for functions associated with development of the nervous system, salivary gland, trachea, and ovarian follicle cells, as well as regulation of transcription. In contrast, no functional categories were overrepresented among genes with head louse-specific AS events. Together, our results constitute the first evidence for transcript pool differences in head and body lice, providing insights into molecular adaptations that enabled human lice to adapt to clothing, and representing a powerful illustration of the pivotal role AS can play in functional adaptation. PMID:26169943

  15. Spliced leader trapping reveals widespread alternative splicing patterns in the highly dynamic transcriptome of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Nilsson

    Full Text Available Trans-splicing of leader sequences onto the 5'ends of mRNAs is a widespread phenomenon in protozoa, nematodes and some chordates. Using parallel sequencing we have developed a method to simultaneously map 5'splice sites and analyze the corresponding gene expression profile, that we term spliced leader trapping (SLT. The method can be applied to any organism with a sequenced genome and trans-splicing of a conserved leader sequence. We analyzed the expression profiles and splicing patterns of bloodstream and insect forms of the parasite Trypanosoma brucei. We detected the 5' splice sites of 85% of the annotated protein-coding genes and, contrary to previous reports, found up to 40% of transcripts to be differentially expressed. Furthermore, we discovered more than 2500 alternative splicing events, many of which appear to be stage-regulated. Based on our findings we hypothesize that alternatively spliced transcripts present a new means of regulating gene expression and could potentially contribute to protein diversity in the parasite. The entire dataset can be accessed online at TriTrypDB or through: http://splicer.unibe.ch/.

  16. Effect of Guide Vanes on the Performance of a Variable Chord Self—Rectifying Air Turbine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.Govardhan; T.S.Dhanasekaran

    1998-01-01

    Wells turbine is a self rectifying air flow turbine capable of converting pneumatic power of the periodically reversing air stream in Oscillating Water Column into mechanical energy,One of the principal reasons for the low effciency of the Wells turbine is its lower tangential force compared to its axial force.Guide vanes before and after the rotor suggest a means to improve the tangential force,hence its efficiency .Experimental investigations are carried out on the Wells turbine with a varible chord (VACR) blade rotor fitted with inlet and outlet guide vanes to understand the aerodynamics especially improvement in efficiency and starting characteristics,Numerical simulaton has been made to clarify the unsteady characteristics of the turbine with guide vanes.Studies are done at various flow coefficients covering the entire range of flow coefficients over which the turbine is operable,The efficiency,Starting characteristics of the Wells turbine has improved when compared with the turbine without guide vanes.

  17. Chord length sampling method for analyzing stochastic distribution of fuel particles in continuous energy simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Accuracy of chord length sampling in continuous energy simulations is analyzed. ► Boundary effect is shown to be a major factor affecting the CLS accuracy. ► Three strategies that mitigate the boundary effect are investigated. ► The best strategy is identified and assures high confidence in the application of CLS. ► CLS can analyze the stochastic distribution of fuel particles in VHTR with high fidelity. - Abstract: The Chord Length Sampling method (CLS) is studied in continuous energy simulations by analyzing two types of Very High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (VHTR) unit cells: the fuel compact cell in the prismatic type VHTR and the fuel pebble cell in the pebble-bed type VHTR. Infinite multiplication factors of the unit cells are calculated by the CLS and compared to benchmark simulations at different volume packing fractions from 5% to 30%. It is shown that the accuracy of the CLS is affected by the boundary effect, which is induced by the CLS procedure itself and results in a reduction in the total volume packing fraction of the fuel particles. To mitigate the boundary effect, three correction schemes based on the research of (1) Murata et al., (2) Ji and Martin and (3) Griesheimer et al. are used to improve the accuracy by applying a corrected value of the volume packing fraction to the CLS. These corrected values are calculated based on (1) a simple linear relationship, (2) an iterative self-consistent simulation correction method and (3) a theoretically derived non-linear relationship, respectively. The CLS simulation using the corrected volume packing fraction shows excellent improvements in the infinite multiplication factors for the VHTR unit cells. Ji and Martin’s self-consistent correction method shows the best improvement

  18. A global analysis of C. elegans trans-splicing

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Mary Ann; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Waterston, Robert H.; Blumenthal, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Trans-splicing of one of two short leader RNAs, SL1 or SL2, occurs at the 5′ ends of pre-mRNAs of many C. elegans genes. We have exploited RNA-sequencing data from the modENCODE project to analyze the transcriptome of C. elegans for patterns of trans-splicing. Transcripts of ∼70% of genes are trans-spliced, similar to earlier estimates based on analysis of far fewer genes. The mRNAs of most trans-spliced genes are spliced to either SL1 or SL2, but most genes are not trans-spliced to both, ind...

  19. Modulation of 5' splice site selection using tailed oligonucleotides carrying splicing signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elela Sherif

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously described the use of tailed oligonucleotides as a means of reprogramming alternative pre-mRNA splicing in vitro and in vivo. The tailed oligonucleotides that were used interfere with splicing because they contain a portion complementary to sequences immediately upstream of the target 5' splice site combined with a non-hybridizing 5' tail carrying binding sites for the hnRNP A1/A2 proteins. In the present study, we have tested the inhibitory activity of RNA oligonucleotides carrying different tail structures. Results We show that an oligonucleotide with a 5' tail containing the human β-globin branch site sequence inhibits the use of the 5' splice site of Bcl-xL, albeit less efficiently than a tail containing binding sites for the hnRNP A1/A2 proteins. A branch site-containing tail positioned at the 3' end of the oligonucleotide also elicited splicing inhibition but not as efficiently as a 5' tail. The interfering activity of a 3' tail was improved by adding a 5' splice site sequence next to the branch site sequence. A 3' tail carrying a Y-shaped branch structure promoted similar splicing interference. The inclusion of branch site or 5' splice site sequences in the Y-shaped 3' tail further improved splicing inhibition. Conclusion Our in vitro results indicate that a variety of tail architectures can be used to elicit splicing interference at low nanomolar concentrations, thereby broadening the scope and the potential impact of this antisense technology.

  20. Timber joints under long-term loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldborg, T.; Johansen, M.

    This report describes tests and results from stiffness and strength testing of splice joints under long-term loading. During two years of loading the spicimens were exposed to cyclically changing relative humidity. After the loading period the specimens were short-term tested. The connectors were...... integral nail-plates and nailed steel and plywood gussets. The report is intended for designers and researchers in timber engineering....

  1. Functional and evolutionary analysis of alternatively spliced genes is consistent with an early eukaryotic origin of alternative splicing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penny David

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative splicing has been reported in various eukaryotic groups including plants, apicomplexans, diatoms, amoebae, animals and fungi. However, whether widespread alternative splicing has evolved independently in the different eukaryotic groups or was inherited from their last common ancestor, and may therefore predate multicellularity, is still unknown. To better understand the origin and evolution of alternative splicing and its usage in diverse organisms, we studied alternative splicing in 12 eukaryotic species, comparing rates of alternative splicing across genes of different functional classes, cellular locations, intron/exon structures and evolutionary origins. Results For each species, we find that genes from most functional categories are alternatively spliced. Ancient genes (shared between animals, fungi and plants show high levels of alternative splicing. Genes with products expressed in the nucleus or plasma membrane are generally more alternatively spliced while those expressed in extracellular location show less alternative splicing. We find a clear correspondence between incidence of alternative splicing and intron number per gene both within and between genomes. In general, we find several similarities in patterns of alternative splicing across these diverse eukaryotes. Conclusion Along with previous studies indicating intron-rich genes with weak intron boundary consensus and complex spliceosomes in ancestral organisms, our results suggest that at least a simple form of alternative splicing may already have been present in the unicellular ancestor of plants, fungi and animals. A role for alternative splicing in the evolution of multicellularity then would largely have arisen by co-opting the preexisting process.

  2. Regulation of mammalian pre-mRNA splicing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUI JingYi

    2009-01-01

    In eukaryotes, most protein-coding genes contain introns which are removed by precursor messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) splicing. Alternative splicing is a process by which multiple messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are generated from a single pre-mRNA, resulting in functionally distinct proteins. Recent genome-wide analyses of alternative splicing indicated that in higher eukaryotes alternative splicing is an important mechanism that generates proteomic complexity and regulates gene expression. Mis-regulation of splicing causes a wide range of human diseases. This review describes the current understanding of pre-mRNA splicing and the mechanisms that regulate mammalian pre-mRNA splicing. It also discusses emerging directions in the field of alternative splicing.

  3. Altered PLP1 splicing causes hypomyelination of early myelinating structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kevelam, Sietske H; Taube, Jennifer R; van Spaendonk, Rosalina M L;

    2015-01-01

    causal mutations. In silico analysis of effects of the mutations on splicing and RNA folding was performed. In vitro gene splicing was examined in RNA from patients' fibroblasts and an immortalized immature oligodendrocyte cell line after transfection with mutant minigene splicing constructs. RESULTS......: All patients had unusual hemizygous mutations of PLP1 located in exon 3B (one deletion, one missense and two silent), which is spliced out in isoform DM20, or in intron 3 (five mutations). The deletion led to truncation of PLP1, but not DM20. Four mutations were predicted to affect PLP1/DM20...... alternative splicing by creating exonic splicing silencer motifs or new splice donor sites or by affecting the local RNA structure of the PLP1 splice donor site. Four deep intronic mutations were predicted to destabilize a long-distance interaction structure in the secondary PLP1 RNA fragment involved in...

  4. Regulation of mammalian pre-mRNA splicing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In eukaryotes,most protein-coding genes contain introns which are removed by precursor messenger RNA(pre-mRNA) splicing.Alternative splicing is a process by which multiple messenger RNAs(mRNAs) are generated from a single pre-mRNA,resulting in functionally distinct proteins.Recent genome-wide analyses of alternative splicing indicated that in higher eukaryotes alternative splicing is an important mechanism that generates proteomic complexity and regulates gene expression.Mis-regulation of splicing causes a wide range of human diseases.This review describes the current understanding of pre-mRNA splicing and the mechanisms that regulate mammalian pre-mRNA splicing.It also discusses emerging directions in the field of alternative splicing.

  5. Joint ventures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Karsten Engsig

    Afhandlingen analysere de konkurrenceretlige og selskabsretlige regler som er bestemmende for hvordan et joint venture samarbejde er struktureret......Afhandlingen analysere de konkurrenceretlige og selskabsretlige regler som er bestemmende for hvordan et joint venture samarbejde er struktureret...

  6. Quality control of cadweld (mechanical) splices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Test data for cadweld splicing of reinforcing steel collected during a study of quality assurance practices on nine nuclear power plant construction projects are presented and evaluated. These data lead to an important hypothesis that the visual inspection identifies procedural deficiencies, and the tensile test identifies material defects. It is also suggested that a material testing program and the visual inspection will detect essentially all substandard cadwell splices. This would permit the deletion of the expensive tensile testing program. Accordingly, most quality control programs require overtesting and overdocumentation of cadweld splices; and furthermore, these programs fail to recognize material defects. The project specifications and quality control requirements for the nine projects are compared. Where possible, these are evaluated against the industry standards and Federal regulations. It is shown that there are a number of deficiencies in these standards, and that in most cases, the testing requirements are not commensurate with the quality that is being achieved in the field

  7. Splicing variants of porcine synphilin-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Knud Erik; Madsen, Lone Bruhn; Farajzadeh, Leila;

    2015-01-01

    (90%) and to mouse (84%) synphilin-1. Three shorter transcript variants of the synphilin-1 gene were identified, all lacking one or more exons. SNCAIP transcripts were detected in most examined organs and tissues and the highest expression was found in brain tissues and lung. Conserved splicing......RNA was investigated by RNAseq. The presented work reports the molecular cloning and characterization of the porcine (Sus scrofa) synphilin-1 cDNA (SNCAIP) and three splice variants hereof. The porcine SNCAIP cDNA codes for a protein (synphilin-1) of 919 amino acids which shows a high similarity to human...... variants and a novel splice form of synhilin-1 were found in this study. All synphilin-1 isoforms encoded by the identified transcript variants lack functional domains important for protein degradation....

  8. Regulation of alternative splice site selection by reversible protein phosphorylation

    OpenAIRE

    Novoyatleva, Tatyana

    2007-01-01

    Splicing is the process that removes introns and joins exons from pre-mesenger RNA (pre-mRNA). It is an essential step in pre-mRNA processing that form the mature RNA. Microarray data indicates that approximately 75% of human genes produce transcripts that are alternatively spliced. Alternative splicing is one of the major mechanisms that ultimately generate high number of protein isoforms from a limited number of genes. The proper catalysis and regulation of alternative splice site selection...

  9. Progress toward therapy with antisense-mediated splicing modulation

    OpenAIRE

    Du, Liutao; Gatti, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (AO) or antisense RNA can complementarily bind to a target site in pre-mRNA and regulate gene splicing, either to restore gene function by reprogramming gene splicing or to inhibit gene expression by disrupting splicing. These two applications represent novel therapeutic strategies for several types of diseases such as genetic disorders, cancers and infectious diseases. In this review, the recent developments and applications of antisense-mediated splicing modulatio...

  10. Cotranscriptional splicing efficiency differs dramatically between Drosophila and mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Khodor, Yevgenia L.; Menet, Jerome S; Tolan, Michael; Rosbash, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Spliceosome assembly and/or splicing of a nascent transcript may be crucial for proper isoform expression and gene regulation in higher eukaryotes. It has been shown that cotranscriptional splicing occurs efficiently in Drosophila, but there are not comparable genome-wide nascent splicing data from mammals. To provide this comparison, the authors analyzed a recently generated, high-throughput sequencing data set of mouse liver nascent RNA. Cotranscriptional splicing is approximately twofold l...

  11. Alternative splicing of DNA damage response genes and gastrointestinal cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Rahmutulla, Bahityar; Matsushita, Kazuyuki; Nomura, Fumio

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing, which is a common phenomenon in mammalian genomes, is a fundamental process of gene regulation and contributes to great protein diversity. Alternative splicing events not only occur in the normal gene regulation process but are also closely related to certain diseases including cancer. In this review, we briefly demonstrate the concept of alternative splicing and DNA damage and describe the association of alternative splicing and cancer pathogenesis, focusing on the pote...

  12. RNA structure and the mechanisms of alternative splicing

    OpenAIRE

    McManus, C. Joel; Graveley, Brenton R.

    2011-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a widespread means of increasing protein diversity and regulating gene expression in eukaryotes. Much progress has been made in understanding the proteins involved in regulating alternative splicing, the sequences they bind to, and how these interactions lead to changes in splicing patterns. However, several recent studies have identified other players involved in regulating alternative splicing. A major theme emerging from these studies is that RNA secondary structure...

  13. Evolution of alternative splicing in primate brain transcriptomes

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Lan; Shen, Shihao; Jiang, Peng; Sato, Seiko; Davidson, Beverly L.; Xing, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a predominant form of gene regulation in higher eukaryotes. The evolution of alternative splicing provides an important mechanism for the acquisition of novel gene functions. In this work, we carried out a genome-wide phylogenetic survey of lineage-specific splicing patterns in the primate brain, via high-density exon junction array profiling of brain transcriptomes of humans, chimpanzees and rhesus macaques. We identified 509 genes showing splicing differences among t...

  14. Joint Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    A joint is where two or more bones come together, like the knee, hip, elbow, or shoulder. Joints can be damaged by many types of injuries or diseases, including Arthritis - inflammation of a joint. It causes pain, stiffness, and swelling. Over time, ...

  15. Coracoclavicular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coracoclvicular joint, a rear abnormality which may be the cause of pain in the shoulder and limitation of motion of the shoulder joint, is discussed. A case of coracoclvicular joint with shoulder pain was observed in 65 yrs old Korean male

  16. SPA: a probabilistic algorithm for spliced alignment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik van Nimwegen

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent large-scale cDNA sequencing efforts show that elaborate patterns of splice variation are responsible for much of the proteome diversity in higher eukaryotes. To obtain an accurate account of the repertoire of splice variants, and to gain insight into the mechanisms of alternative splicing, it is essential that cDNAs are very accurately mapped to their respective genomes. Currently available algorithms for cDNA-to-genome alignment do not reach the necessary level of accuracy because they use ad hoc scoring models that cannot correctly trade off the likelihoods of various sequencing errors against the probabilities of different gene structures. Here we develop a Bayesian probabilistic approach to cDNA-to-genome alignment. Gene structures are assigned prior probabilities based on the lengths of their introns and exons, and based on the sequences at their splice boundaries. A likelihood model for sequencing errors takes into account the rates at which misincorporation, as well as insertions and deletions of different lengths, occurs during sequencing. The parameters of both the prior and likelihood model can be automatically estimated from a set of cDNAs, thus enabling our method to adapt itself to different organisms and experimental procedures. We implemented our method in a fast cDNA-to-genome alignment program, SPA, and applied it to the FANTOM3 dataset of over 100,000 full-length mouse cDNAs and a dataset of over 20,000 full-length human cDNAs. Comparison with the results of four other mapping programs shows that SPA produces alignments of significantly higher quality. In particular, the quality of the SPA alignments near splice boundaries and SPA's mapping of the 5' and 3' ends of the cDNAs are highly improved, allowing for more accurate identification of transcript starts and ends, and accurate identification of subtle splice variations. Finally, our splice boundary analysis on the human dataset suggests the existence of a novel non

  17. SPA: A Probabilistic Algorithm for Spliced Alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nimwegen, Erik; Paul, Nicodeme; Sheridan, Robert; Zavolan, Mihaela

    2006-01-01

    Recent large-scale cDNA sequencing efforts show that elaborate patterns of splice variation are responsible for much of the proteome diversity in higher eukaryotes. To obtain an accurate account of the repertoire of splice variants, and to gain insight into the mechanisms of alternative splicing, it is essential that cDNAs are very accurately mapped to their respective genomes. Currently available algorithms for cDNA-to-genome alignment do not reach the necessary level of accuracy because they use ad hoc scoring models that cannot correctly trade off the likelihoods of various sequencing errors against the probabilities of different gene structures. Here we develop a Bayesian probabilistic approach to cDNA-to-genome alignment. Gene structures are assigned prior probabilities based on the lengths of their introns and exons, and based on the sequences at their splice boundaries. A likelihood model for sequencing errors takes into account the rates at which misincorporation, as well as insertions and deletions of different lengths, occurs during sequencing. The parameters of both the prior and likelihood model can be automatically estimated from a set of cDNAs, thus enabling our method to adapt itself to different organisms and experimental procedures. We implemented our method in a fast cDNA-to-genome alignment program, SPA, and applied it to the FANTOM3 dataset of over 100,000 full-length mouse cDNAs and a dataset of over 20,000 full-length human cDNAs. Comparison with the results of four other mapping programs shows that SPA produces alignments of significantly higher quality. In particular, the quality of the SPA alignments near splice boundaries and SPA's mapping of the 5′ and 3′ ends of the cDNAs are highly improved, allowing for more accurate identification of transcript starts and ends, and accurate identification of subtle splice variations. Finally, our splice boundary analysis on the human dataset suggests the existence of a novel non-canonical splice

  18. Functional and evolutionary analysis of alternatively spliced genes is consistent with an early eukaryotic origin of alternative splicing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irimia, Manuel; Rukov, Jakob Lewin; Penny, David;

    2007-01-01

    , and may therefore predate multicellularity, is still unknown. To better understand the origin and evolution of alternative splicing and its usage in diverse organisms, we studied alternative splicing in 12 eukaryotic species, comparing rates of alternative splicing across genes of different functional...... classes, cellular locations, intron/exon structures and evolutionary origins. RESULTS: For each species, we find that genes from most functional categories are alternatively spliced. Ancient genes (shared between animals, fungi and plants) show high levels of alternative splicing. Genes with products...... expressed in the nucleus or plasma membrane are generally more alternatively spliced while those expressed in extracellular location show less alternative splicing. We find a clear correspondence between incidence of alternative splicing and intron number per gene both within and between genomes. In general...

  19. Highly stable, monolithic, single-mode mid-infrared supercontinuum source based on low-loss fusion spliced silica and fluoride fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ke; Zhang, Bin; Yao, Jinmei; Yang, Linyong; Chen, Shengping; Hou, Jing

    2016-03-01

    A 0.8 to 4.5 μm highly stable all-fiber spliced mid-infrared supercontinuum (SC) source was presented. The joint between the single-mode (SM) pump silica fiber and the ZBLAN fiber (ZrF4 - BaF2 - LaF3 - AlF3 - NaF, a type of fluoride fiber) was fusion spliced, which greatly improved the SC's stability. The low-loss splicing was guaranteed by the similar mode field areas of the fundamental mode LP(01) of the silica and ZBLAN fibers. At the splicing joint the ZBLAN fiber enveloped the silica fiber, thus increasing the robustness of the splice. A low splicing loss of less than 0.1 dB was calculated, which ensured that the whole SC source was very reliable. The SC had a maximal average power of 550.8 mW with a 1.5 dB spectral bandwidth ranging from 2642 to 4065 nm. In particular, the SC power for λ>3.8  μm was measured to be 116.1 mW with a power ratio of ∼21.1% of the total SC power. Perfect Gaussian beam profiles of the SC source demonstrated its SM operation. Over 12 h of continuous operation of this SC source showed its outstanding power stability with a root mean square variation of 0.59%, which also demonstrated the high quality of the fusion spliced joint. PMID:26974087

  20. SpliceMiner: a high-throughput database implementation of the NCBI Evidence Viewer for microarray splice variant analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Liu Hongfang; Ryan Michael C; Kahn Ari B; Zeeberg Barry R; Jamison D Curtis; Weinstein John N

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background There are many fewer genes in the human genome than there are expressed transcripts. Alternative splicing is the reason. Alternatively spliced transcripts are often specific to tissue type, developmental stage, environmental condition, or disease state. Accurate analysis of microarray expression data and design of new arrays for alternative splicing require assessment of probes at the sequence and exon levels. Description SpliceMiner is a web interface for querying Evidenc...

  1. The epithelial splicing factors ESRP1 and ESRP2 positively and negatively regulate diverse types of alternative splicing events

    OpenAIRE

    Warzecha, Claude C.; Shen, Shihao; Xing, Yi; Carstens, Russ P.

    2009-01-01

    Cell-type and tissue-specific alternative splicing events are regulated by combinatorial control involving both abundant RNA binding proteins as well as those with more discrete expression and specialized functions. Epithelial Splicing Regulatory Proteins 1 and 2 (ESRP1 and ESRP2) are recently discovered epithelial-specific RNA binding proteins that promote splicing of the epithelial variant of the FGFR2, ENAH, CD44 and CTNND1 transcripts. To catalogue a larger set of splicing events under th...

  2. Transition joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A transition joint is disclosed for joining together tubular pieces formed respectively from a low alloy or carbon steel and a high temperature alloy composition having substantially different characteristics such as coefficient of thermal expansion, the transition joint including a plurality of tubular parts interconnected with each other by means of friction weld joints formed at an angle of 900 to the axis of the transition joint, the tubular parts at opposite ends of the transition joint being selected to facilitate in situ welding to the low alloy or carbon steel and high temperature alloy respectively. This friction welded transition joint can be used whenever different tubular pieces need to be joined together so that the joint can withstand high temperatures, for instance in heat exchangers and the such like. (Auth.)

  3. Auxiliary splice factor U2AF26 and transcription factor Gfi1 cooperate directly in regulating CD45 alternative splicing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heyd, F.; Dam, G.B. ten; Moroy, T.

    2006-01-01

    By alternative splicing, different isoforms of the transmembrane tyrosine phosphatase CD45 are generated that either enhance or limit T cell receptor signaling. We report here that CD45 alternative splicing is regulated by cooperative action of the splice factor U2AF26 and the transcription factor G

  4. Capillary Electrophoresis Analysis of Conventional Splicing Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Garibay, Gorka Ruiz; Acedo, Alberto; García-Casado, Zaida;

    2014-01-01

    Rare sequence variants in "high-risk" disease genes, often referred as unclassified variants (UVs), pose a serious challenge to genetic testing. However, UVs resulting in splicing alterations can be readily assessed by in vitro assays. Unfortunately, analytical and clinical interpretation of thes...

  5. Alternative-splicing-mediated gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qianliang; Zhou, Tianshou

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a fundamental process during gene expression and has been found to be ubiquitous in eukaryotes. However, how AS impacts gene expression levels both quantitatively and qualitatively remains to be fully explored. Here, we analyze two common models of gene expression, each incorporating a simple splice mechanism that a pre-mRNA is spliced into two mature mRNA isoforms in a probabilistic manner. In the constitutive expression case, we show that the steady-state molecular numbers of two mature mRNA isoforms follow mutually independent Poisson distributions. In the bursting expression case, we demonstrate that the tail decay of the steady-state distribution for both mature mRNA isoforms that in general are not mutually independent can be characterized by the product of mean burst size and splicing probability. In both cases, we find that AS can efficiently modulate both the variability (measured by variance) and the noise level of the total mature mRNA, and in particular, the latter is always lower than the noise level of the pre-mRNA, implying that AS always reduces the noise. These results altogether reveal that AS is a mechanism of efficiently controlling the gene expression noise.

  6. Design, development, and hover testing of a helicopter rotor blade chord extension morphing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Farhan; Hayden, Eric

    2015-03-01

    A rotor blade chord extension system was designed, fabricated and hover tested, using electromechanical and pneumatic actuation. A 1.5 in actuator stroke output in the spanwise direction was converted into chordwise motion of a trailing-edge plate (TEP), via a rigid link. On the hover stand, with a 20 V dc input, the electromechanical actuator was shown to fully extend and retract the plate at rotational speeds up to 385 RPM (which put the system at a centrifugal loading of 209.5 g, or 47.2% of that on a Black Hawk helicopter at 73% span). The configuration was changed to reduce the actuator force requirement for the pneumatic actuator. The rotor test facility allowed a maximum of 105 psi pressure input through the rotary union (significantly lower than the rating of the actuator). At these moderate pressure inputs, full TEP deployment was observed at 315 RPM (140.2 g, or 31.6% of that on a Black Hawk helicopter at 73% span). The model prediction of TEP displacement versus pressure showed good correlation with test results.

  7. A Chord-based resource scheduling approach in drug discovery grid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Shudong; Zhang Wenju; Zhang Jun; Ma Fanyuan; Shen Jianhua

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a resource scheduling approach in grid computing environment. Using P2P technology, this novel approach call schedule dynamic grid computing resources efficiently. Grid computing resources in different domains are organized into a structured P2P overlay network. Available resource information is published in type of grid services. Task requests for computational resources are also presented aS grid services. Problem of resources scheduling is translated into services discovery. Different from central scheduling approaches that collect available resources information, this Chord-based approach forwards task requests in the overlay network and discovers satisfied resources for these tasks. Using this approach, the computational resources of a grid system can be scheduled dynamically according to the real-time workload on each peer. Furthermore, the application of this approach is introduced into DDG, a grid system for drug discovery and design, to evaluate the performance. Experimental results show that computational resources of a grid system can be managed efficiently, and the system can hold a perfect load balance state and robustness.

  8. Approaches to link RNA secondary structures with splicing regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plass, Mireya; Eyras, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    facilitating or hindering the interaction with factors and small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) that regulate splicing. Moreover, the secondary structure could play a fundamental role in the splicing of yeast species, which lack many of the regulatory splicing factors present in metazoans. This chapter......In higher eukaryotes, alternative splicing is usually regulated by protein factors, which bind to the pre-mRNA and affect the recognition of splicing signals. There is recent evidence that the secondary structure of the pre-mRNA may also play an important role in this process, either by...

  9. Single Mode Fiber Optic Connectors And Splices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, John G.

    1984-08-01

    There is a trend toward increasing use of single mode transmission, particularly in telecommunications where high data bit rates are transmitted for long distances. Inter-connections of multimode fibers can be made in a number of ways, using ferrules, v-grooves, elastomeric splices, etc. However, the connection of single mode fibers, which have core diameters of 4 to 13 μm, requires more precise alignment than do the multimode fibers having core diameters of 50 μm or more. At TRW, we have adapted the four rod alignment guide concept for single mode fiber inter-connections. The principle of this OPTAGUIDE* alignment guide is presented. The single mode connectors and splices use the four rod scheme with an index matching material to eliminate or reduce the losses incurred through fiber end roughness or angularity. We are able to produce demountable connectors for 80/4.4 pm fibers having typical insertion losses of 1.0dB. The main factors in obtaining this result are the naturally precise fiber alignment provided by the alignment guide, and the ability of several manufacturers to maintain tight diametral and core offset tolerances. The single mode OPTALIGN* SM Connectors have been subjected to performance and environmental tests including repeated matings, temperature cycle and vibration. The results of these tests are described in this paper. A feature of the OPTALIGN* SM Connectors is the relative ease and speed of attachment to fiber optic cable in the field, without the use of epoxy or polishing procedures. The alignment guide concept has also been applied to permanent single mode splices. The splicing procedure is simple to perform in the field without expensive or delicate equipment. Construction and assembly procedures of the demountable connectors and permanent splices will be described with the aid of diagrams and photographs.

  10. Results from the 2014 November 15th multi-chord stellar occultation by the TNO (229762) 2007 UK$_{126}$

    CERN Document Server

    Benedetti-Rossi, Gustavo; Buie, Marc W; Ortiz, Jose L; Vieira-Martins, Roberto; Keller, John M; Braga-Ribas, Felipe; Camargo, Julio I B; Assafin, Marcelo; Morales, Nicolas; Duffard, Rene; Dias-Oliveira, Alex; Santos-Sanz, Pablo; Desmars, Josselin; Gomes-Junior, Altair R; Leiva, Rodrigo; Bardecker, Jerry; Bean, Jim K Jr; Olsen, Aart M; Ruby, Daniel W; Sumner, Red; Thirouin, Audrey; Gomez-Munoz, Marco A; Gutierrez, Leonel; Wasserman, Larry; Charbonneau, David; Irwin, Jonathan; Levine, Stephen; Skiff, Brian

    2016-01-01

    We present results derived from the first multi-chord stellar occultation by the trans-Neptunian object (229762) 2007 UK$_{126}$, observed on 2014 November 15. The event was observed by the Research and Education Collaborative Occultation Network (RECON) project and International Occultation Timing Association (IOTA) collaborators throughout the United States. Use of two different data analysis methods obtain a satisfactory fit to seven chords, yelding an elliptical fit to the chords with an equatorial radius of $R=338_{-10} ^{+15}$ km and equivalent radius of $R_{eq}=319_{-7} ^{+14}$ km. A circular fit also gives a radius of $R=324_{-23} ^{+30}$ km. Assuming that the object is a Maclaurin spheroid with indeterminate aspect angle, and using two published absolute magnitudes for the body, we derive possible ranges for geometric albedo between $p_{V}=0.159_{-0.013} ^{+0.007}$ and $p_{R}=0.189_{-0.015}^{+0.009}$, and for the body oblateness between $\\epsilon=0.105_{-0.040} ^{+0.050}$ and $\\epsilon=0.118_{-0.048}...

  11. A simulation code to estimate / deduce local toroidal rotation profiles in TJ-II plasmas from chord-integrated measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An absolute calibrated spectroscopic system has been developed to measure chord-averaged toroidal rotation of protons and impurity ions from a single view; at present that system has been upgraded to measure profiles on a shot to shot basis. The interpretation of the chord-averaged measurements is difficult because of the strong three-dimensional structure of TJ-II stellarator. A local model capable of reconstructing the averaged emission of spectral lines has been developed to infer the local information. The procedure, similar to the one used in a previous work in the TJ-I tokamak, was implemented on a numerical code, that starting from given analytical profiles of local emissivity, ion temperature (estimated with charge- exchange neutral analyzer) and toroidal rotation simulates the chord-averaged emission spectra along a selected line of sight. In addition, the code is able to separate the toroidal and poloidal velocity contribution taking into account the TJ-II magnetic topology. Simulations of actual cases and its comparison with experimental results obtained in toroidal scans performed in TJ-II plasmas will be presented. (author)

  12. SpliceMiner: a high-throughput database implementation of the NCBI Evidence Viewer for microarray splice variant analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Hongfang

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are many fewer genes in the human genome than there are expressed transcripts. Alternative splicing is the reason. Alternatively spliced transcripts are often specific to tissue type, developmental stage, environmental condition, or disease state. Accurate analysis of microarray expression data and design of new arrays for alternative splicing require assessment of probes at the sequence and exon levels. Description SpliceMiner is a web interface for querying Evidence Viewer Database (EVDB. EVDB is a comprehensive, non-redundant compendium of splice variant data for human genes. We constructed EVDB as a queryable implementation of the NCBI Evidence Viewer (EV. EVDB is based on data obtained from NCBI Entrez Gene and EV. The automated EVDB build process uses only complete coding sequences, which may or may not include partial or complete 5' and 3' UTRs, and filters redundant splice variants. Unlike EV, which supports only one-at-a-time queries, SpliceMiner supports high-throughput batch queries and provides results in an easily parsable format. SpliceMiner maps probes to splice variants, effectively delineating the variants identified by a probe. Conclusion EVDB can be queried by gene symbol, genomic coordinates, or probe sequence via a user-friendly web-based tool we call SpliceMiner (http://discover.nci.nih.gov/spliceminer. The EVDB/SpliceMiner combination provides an interface with human splice variant information and, going beyond the very valuable NCBI Evidence Viewer, supports fluent, high-throughput analysis. Integration of EVDB information into microarray analysis and design pipelines has the potential to improve the analysis and bioinformatic interpretation of gene expression data, for both batch and interactive processing. For example, whenever a gene expression value is recognized as important or appears anomalous in a microarray experiment, the interactive mode of SpliceMiner can be used quickly and easily to

  13. Evolution of alternative splicing regulation: changes in predicted exonic splicing regulators are not associated with changes in alternative splicing levels in primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Irimia

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing is tightly regulated in a spatio-temporal and quantitative manner. This regulation is achieved by a complex interplay between spliceosomal (trans factors that bind to different sequence (cis elements. cis-elements reside in both introns and exons and may either enhance or silence splicing. Differential combinations of cis-elements allows for a huge diversity of overall splicing signals, together comprising a complex 'splicing code'. Many cis-elements have been identified, and their effects on exon inclusion levels demonstrated in reporter systems. However, the impact of interspecific differences in these elements on the evolution of alternative splicing levels has not yet been investigated at genomic level. Here we study the effect of interspecific differences in predicted exonic splicing regulators (ESRs on exon inclusion levels in human and chimpanzee. For this purpose, we compiled and studied comprehensive datasets of predicted ESRs, identified by several computational and experimental approaches, as well as microarray data for changes in alternative splicing levels between human and chimpanzee. Surprisingly, we found no association between changes in predicted ESRs and changes in alternative splicing levels. This observation holds across different ESR exon positions, exon lengths, and 5' splice site strengths. We suggest that this lack of association is mainly due to the great importance of context for ESR functionality: many ESR-like motifs in primates may have little or no effect on splicing, and thus interspecific changes at short-time scales may primarily occur in these effectively neutral ESRs. These results underscore the difficulties of using current computational ESR prediction algorithms to identify truly functionally important motifs, and provide a cautionary tale for studies of the effect of SNPs on splicing in human disease.

  14. Evolution of alternative splicing regulation: changes in predicted exonic splicing regulators are not associated with changes in alternative splicing levels in primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irimia, Manuel; Rukov, Jakob Lewin; Roy, Scott William

    2009-01-01

    Alternative splicing is tightly regulated in a spatio-temporal and quantitative manner. This regulation is achieved by a complex interplay between spliceosomal (trans) factors that bind to different sequence (cis) elements. cis-elements reside in both introns and exons and may either enhance or silence splicing. Differential combinations of cis-elements allows for a huge diversity of overall splicing signals, together comprising a complex 'splicing code'. Many cis-elements have been identified, and their effects on exon inclusion levels demonstrated in reporter systems. However, the impact of interspecific differences in these elements on the evolution of alternative splicing levels has not yet been investigated at genomic level. Here we study the effect of interspecific differences in predicted exonic splicing regulators (ESRs) on exon inclusion levels in human and chimpanzee. For this purpose, we compiled and studied comprehensive datasets of predicted ESRs, identified by several computational and experimental approaches, as well as microarray data for changes in alternative splicing levels between human and chimpanzee. Surprisingly, we found no association between changes in predicted ESRs and changes in alternative splicing levels. This observation holds across different ESR exon positions, exon lengths, and 5' splice site strengths. We suggest that this lack of association is mainly due to the great importance of context for ESR functionality: many ESR-like motifs in primates may have little or no effect on splicing, and thus interspecific changes at short-time scales may primarily occur in these effectively neutral ESRs. These results underscore the difficulties of using current computational ESR prediction algorithms to identify truly functionally important motifs, and provide a cautionary tale for studies of the effect of SNPs on splicing in human disease. PMID:19495418

  15. Entropic contributions to the splicing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been recently argued that depletion attraction may play an important role in different aspects of cellular organization, ranging from the organization of transcriptional activity in transcription factories to the formation of nuclear bodies. In this paper, we suggest a new application of these ideas in the context of the splicing process, a crucial step of messenger RNA maturation in eukaryotes. We shall show that entropy effects and the resulting depletion attraction may explain the relevance of the aspecific intron length variable in the choice of splice-site recognition modality. On top of that, some qualitative features of the genome architecture of higher eukaryotes can find evolutionary realistic motivation in the light of our model

  16. Exploratory investigation of the effectiveness of biplane wings with large-chord double slotted flaps in redirecting a propeller slipstream downward for vertical take-off

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Robert H

    1956-01-01

    Results are presented from static-force tests on biplane wings with large-chord double slotted flaps which turn the slipstream of a single counter rotating propeller downward for vertical take-off. The investigation provided information on the effect of chord length, flap deflection, propeller position, end plates, fuselage, and ground proximity on the efficiency of the wing system in turning the propeller slipstream.

  17. Splicing therapy for neuromuscular disease ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew G. L. Douglas; Wood, Matthew J. A.

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) are two of the most common inherited neuromuscular diseases in humans. Both conditions are fatal and no clinically available treatments are able to significantly alter disease course in either case. However, by manipulation of pre-mRNA splicing using antisense oligonucleotides, defective transcripts from the DMD gene and from the SMN2 gene in SMA can be modified to once again produce protein and restore function. A large numb...

  18. Resolving deconvolution ambiguity in gene alternative splicing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubbell Earl

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For many gene structures it is impossible to resolve intensity data uniquely to establish abundances of splice variants. This was empirically noted by Wang et al. in which it was called a "degeneracy problem". The ambiguity results from an ill-posed problem where additional information is needed in order to obtain an unique answer in splice variant deconvolution. Results In this paper, we analyze the situations under which the problem occurs and perform a rigorous mathematical study which gives necessary and sufficient conditions on how many and what type of constraints are needed to resolve all ambiguity. This analysis is generally applicable to matrix models of splice variants. We explore the proposal that probe sequence information may provide sufficient additional constraints to resolve real-world instances. However, probe behavior cannot be predicted with sufficient accuracy by any existing probe sequence model, and so we present a Bayesian framework for estimating variant abundances by incorporating the prediction uncertainty from the micro-model of probe responsiveness into the macro-model of probe intensities. Conclusion The matrix analysis of constraints provides a tool for detecting real-world instances in which additional constraints may be necessary to resolve splice variants. While purely mathematical constraints can be stated without error, real-world constraints may themselves be poorly resolved. Our Bayesian framework provides a generic solution to the problem of uniquely estimating transcript abundances given additional constraints that themselves may be uncertain, such as regression fit to probe sequence models. We demonstrate the efficacy of it by extensive simulations as well as various biological data.

  19. Alternative Splicing Programs in Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Claudio Sette

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) remains one of the most frequent causes of death for cancer in the male population. Although the initial antiandrogenic therapies are efficacious, PCa often evolves into a hormone-resistant, incurable disease. The genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity of this type of cancer renders its diagnosis and cure particularly challenging. Mounting evidence indicates that alternative splicing, the process that allows production of multiple mRNA variants from each gene, contributes ...

  20. Axial compression physical testing of traditional and bird beak SHS T-joints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈誉; 王江

    2015-01-01

    The static tests of nine traditional and bird beak square hollow structure (SHS) T-joints with differentβ values and connection types under axial compression at brace end were carried out. Experimental test schemes, failure modes of specimens, jack load−vertical displacement curves, jack load−deformation of chord and strain intensity distribution curves of joints were presented. The effects ofβ and connection types on axial compression property of joints were studied. The results show that the ultimate axial compression capacity of common bird beak SHS T-joints and diamond bird beak SHS T-joints is larger than that of traditional SHS T-joint specimens with big values ofβ. The ultimate axial compression capacity of diamond bird beak SHS T-joints is larger than that of common bird beak SHS T-joints. Asβ increases, the increase of the ultimate axial compression capacity of diamond bird beak SHS T-joints over that of common bird beak joints grows. The ultimate axial compression capacity and the initial axial stiffness of all kinds of joints increase asβincreases, and the initial axial stiffness of the diamond bird beak SHS T-joints is the largest. The ductilities of common bird beak and diamond bird beak SHS T-joints increase asβ increases, but the ductility of the traditional SHS T-joints decreases asβ increases.

  1. Splicing variants of porcine synphilin-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knud Larsen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD, idiopathic and familial, is characterized by degradation of dopaminergic neurons and the presence of Lewy bodies (LB in the substantia nigra. LBs contain aggregated proteins of which α-synuclein is the major component. The protein synphilin-1 interacts and colocalizes with α-synuclein in LBs. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize porcine synphilin-1 and isoforms hereof with the future perspective to use the pig as a model for Parkinson's disease. The porcine SNCAIP cDNA was cloned by reverse transcriptase PCR. The spatial expression of SNCAIP mRNA was investigated by RNAseq. The presented work reports the molecular cloning and characterization of the porcine (Sus scrofa synphilin-1 cDNA (SNCAIP and three splice variants hereof. The porcine SNCAIP cDNA codes for a protein (synphilin-1 of 919 amino acids which shows a high similarity to human (90% and to mouse (84% synphilin-1. Three shorter transcript variants of the synphilin-1 gene were identified, all lacking one or more exons. SNCAIP transcripts were detected in most examined organs and tissues and the highest expression was found in brain tissues and lung. Conserved splicing variants and a novel splice form of synhilin-1 were found in this study. All synphilin-1 isoforms encoded by the identified transcript variants lack functional domains important for protein degradation.

  2. A new method for splice site prediction based on the sequence patterns of splicing signals and regulatory elements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN ZongXiao; SANG LingJie; JU LiNing; ZHU HuaiQiu

    2008-01-01

    It is of significance for splice site prediction to develop novel algorithms that combine the sequence patterns of regulatory elements such as enhancers and silencers with the patterns of splicing signals. In this paper, a statistical model of splicing signals was built based on the entropy density profile (EDP) method, weight array method (WAM) and κ test; moreover, the model of splicing regulatory elements was developed by an unsupervised self-learning method to detect motifs associated with regulatory elements. With two models incorporated, a multi-level support vector machine (SVM) system was de-vised to perform ab initio prediction for splice sites originating from DNA sequence in eukaryotic ge-home. Results of large scale tests on human genomic splice sites show that the new method achieves a comparative high performance in splice site prediction. The method is demonstrated to be with at least the same level of performance and usually better performance than the existing SpliceScan method based on modeling regulatory elements, and shown to have higher accuracies than the traditional methods with modeling splicing signals such as the GeneSplicer. In particular, the method has evident advantage over splice site prediction for the genes with lower GC content.

  3. A study of alternative splicing in the pig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jørgensen Claus B

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since at least half of the genes in mammalian genomes are subjected to alternative splicing, alternative pre-mRNA splicing plays an important contribution to the complexity of the mammalian proteome. Expressed sequence tags (ESTs provide evidence of a great number of possible alternative isoforms. With the EST resource for the domestic pig now containing more than one million porcine ESTs, it is possible to identify alternative splice forms of the individual transcripts in this species from the EST data with some confidence. Results The pig EST data generated by the Sino-Danish Pig Genome project has been assembled with publicly available ESTs and made available in the PigEST database. Using the Distiller package 2,515 EST clusters with candidate alternative isoforms were identified in the EST data with high confidence. In agreement with general observations in human and mouse, we find putative splice variants in about 30% of the contigs with more than 50 ESTs. Based on the criteria that a minimum of two EST sequences confirmed each splice event, a list of 100 genes with the most distinct tissue-specific alternative splice events was generated from the list of candidates. To confirm the tissue specificity of the splice events, 10 genes with functional annotation were randomly selected from which 16 individual splice events were chosen for experimental verification by quantitative PCR (qPCR. Six genes were shown to have tissue specific alternatively spliced transcripts with expression patterns matching those of the EST data. The remaining four genes had tissue-restricted expression of alternative spliced transcripts. Five out of the 16 splice events that were experimentally verified were found to be putative pig specific. Conclusions In accordance with human and rodent studies we estimate that approximately 30% of the porcine genes undergo alternative splicing. We found a good correlation between EST predicted tissue

  4. Splicing modulation therapy in the treatment of genetic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arechavala-Gomeza V

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Virginia Arechavala-Gomeza,1 Bernard Khoo,2 Annemieke Aartsma-Rus3 1Neuromuscular Disorders Group, BioCruces Health Research Institute, Barakaldo, Bizkaia, Spain; 2Endocrinology, Division of Medicine, University College London, London, UK; 3Department of Human Genetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands All authors contributed equally to this manuscript Abstract: Antisense-mediated splicing modulation is a tool that can be exploited in several ways to provide a potential therapy for rare genetic diseases. This approach is currently being tested in clinical trials for Duchenne muscular dystrophy and spinal muscular atrophy. The present review outlines the versatility of the approach to correct cryptic splicing, modulate alternative splicing, restore the open reading frame, and induce protein knockdown, providing examples of each. Finally, we outline a possible path forward toward the clinical application of this approach for a wide variety of inherited rare diseases. Keywords: splicing, therapy, antisense oligonucleotides, cryptic splicing, alternative splicing

  5. Accumulation of GC donor splice signals in mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koonin Eugene V

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The GT dinucleotide in the first two intron positions is the most conserved element of the U2 donor splice signals. However, in a small fraction of donor sites, GT is replaced by GC. A substantial enrichment of GC in donor sites of alternatively spliced genes has been observed previously in human, nematode and Arabidopsis, suggesting that GC signals are important for regulation of alternative splicing. We used parsimony analysis to reconstruct evolution of donor splice sites and inferred 298 GT > GC conversion events compared to 40 GC > GT conversion events in primate and rodent genomes. Thus, there was substantive accumulation of GC donor splice sites during the evolution of mammals. Accumulation of GC sites might have been driven by selection for alternative splicing. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Jerzy Jurka and Anton Nekrutenko. For the full reviews, please go to the Reviewers' Reports section.

  6. The implications of alternative splicing in the ENCODE protein complement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tress, Michael L.; Martelli, Pier Luigi; Frankish, Adam;

    2007-01-01

    Alternative premessenger RNA splicing enables genes to generate more than one gene product. Splicing events that occur within protein coding regions have the potential to alter the biological function of the expressed protein and even to create new protein functions. Alternative splicing has been...... suggested as one explanation for the discrepancy between the number of human genes and functional complexity. Here, we carry out a detailed study of the alternatively spliced gene products annotated in the ENCODE pilot project. We find that alternative splicing in human genes is more frequent than has...... commonly been suggested, and we demonstrate that many of the potential alternative gene products will have markedly different structure and function from their constitutively spliced counterparts. For the vast majority of these alternative isoforms, little evidence exists to suggest they have a role as...

  7. Tissue-specific splicing factor gene expression signatures

    OpenAIRE

    Grosso, A. R.; Gomes, Anita; Barbosa-Morais, Nuno; Caldeira, Sandra; Thorne, Natalie; Grech, Godfrey; Lindern, Marieke; Carmo-Fonseca, Maria

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe alternative splicing code that controls and coordinates the transcriptome in complex multicellular organisms remains poorly understood. It has long been argued that regulation of alternative splicing relies on combinatorial interactions between multiple proteins, and that tissue-specific splicing decisions most likely result from differences in the concentration and/or activity of these proteins. However, large-scale data to systematically address this issue have just recently...

  8. Alternative Splicing and Its Impact as a Cancer Diagnostic Marker

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yun-Ji; Kim, Heui-Soo

    2012-01-01

    Most genes are processed by alternative splicing for gene expression, resulting in the complexity of the transcriptome in eukaryotes. It allows a limited number of genes to encode various proteins with intricate functions. Alternative splicing is regulated by genetic mutations in cis-regulatory factors and epigenetic events. Furthermore, splicing events occur differently according to cell type, developmental stage, and various diseases, including cancer. Genome instability and flexible proteo...

  9. Pre-mRNA splicing in disease and therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Ravi K.; Cooper, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    In metazoans, alternative splicing of genes is essential for regulating gene expression and contributing to functional complexity. Computational predictions, comparative genomics, and transcriptome profiling of normal and diseased tissues indicate an unexpectedly high fraction of diseases are caused by mutations that alter splicing. Mutations in cis elements cause mis-splicing of genes that alter gene function and contribute to disease pathology. Mutations of core spliceosomal factors are ass...

  10. Phosphorylation-Mediated Regulation of Alternative Splicing in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Chiara Naro; Claudio Sette

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is one of the key processes involved in the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotic cells. AS catalyzes the removal of intronic sequences and the joining of selected exons, thus ensuring the correct processing of the primary transcript into the mature mRNA. The combinatorial nature of AS allows a great expansion of the genome coding potential, as multiple splice-variants encoding for different proteins may arise from a single gene. Splicing is mediated by a large...

  11. Embracing the complexity of pre-mRNA splicing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter J Shepard; Klemens J Hertel

    2010-01-01

    @@ Pre-mRNA splicing is a fundamental process required for the expression of most metazoan genes. It is carried out by the spliceosome, which catalyzes the removal of non-coding intronic sequences to assemble exons into mature mRNAs prior to export and translation.Defects in splicing lead to many human genetic diseases [1], and splicing mutations in a number of genes involved in growth control have been implicated in multiple types of cancer.

  12. A novel splice variant in the N-propeptide of COL5A1 causes an EDS phenotype with severe kyphoscoliosis and eye involvement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofie Symoens

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS is a heritable connective tissue disorder characterized by hyperextensible skin, joint hypermobility and soft tissue fragility. The classic subtype of EDS is caused by mutations in one of the type V collagen genes (COL5A1 and COL5A2. Most mutations affect the type V collagen helical domain and lead to a diminished or structurally abnormal type V collagen protein. Remarkably, only two mutations were reported to affect the extended, highly conserved N-propeptide domain, which plays an important role in the regulation of the heterotypic collagen fibril diameter. We identified a novel COL5A1 N-propeptide mutation, resulting in an unusual but severe classic EDS phenotype and a remarkable splicing outcome. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified a novel COL5A1 N-propeptide acceptor-splice site mutation (IVS6-2A>G, NM_000093.3_c.925-2A>G in a patient with cutaneous features of EDS, severe progressive scoliosis and eye involvement. Two mutant transcripts were identified, one with an exon 7 skip and one in which exon 7 and the upstream exon 6 are deleted. Both transcripts are expressed and secreted into the extracellular matrix, where they can participate in and perturb collagen fibrillogenesis, as illustrated by the presence of dermal collagen cauliflowers. Determination of the order of intron removal and computational analysis showed that simultaneous skipping of exons 6 and 7 is due to the combined effect of delayed splicing of intron 7, altered pre-mRNA secondary structure, low splice site strength and possibly disturbed binding of splicing factors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We report a novel COL5A1 N-propeptide acceptor-splice site mutation in intron 6, which not only affects splicing of the adjacent exon 7, but also causes a splicing error of the upstream exon 6. Our findings add further insights into the COL5A1 splicing order and show for the first time that a single COL5A1 acceptor-splice site

  13. Progressive Damage Analysis of Bonded Composite Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Frank A., Jr.; Girolamo, Donato; Davila, Carlos G.

    2012-01-01

    The present work is related to the development and application of progressive damage modeling techniques to bonded joint technology. The joint designs studied in this work include a conventional composite splice joint and a NASA-patented durable redundant joint. Both designs involve honeycomb sandwich structures with carbon/epoxy facesheets joined using adhesively bonded doublers.Progressive damage modeling allows for the prediction of the initiation and evolution of damage within a structure. For structures that include multiple material systems, such as the joint designs under consideration, the number of potential failure mechanisms that must be accounted for drastically increases the complexity of the analyses. Potential failure mechanisms include fiber fracture, intraply matrix cracking, delamination, core crushing, adhesive failure, and their interactions. The bonded joints were modeled using highly parametric, explicitly solved finite element models, with damage modeling implemented via custom user-written subroutines. Each ply was discretely meshed using three-dimensional solid elements. Layers of cohesive elements were included between each ply to account for the possibility of delaminations and were used to model the adhesive layers forming the joint. Good correlation with experimental results was achieved both in terms of load-displacement history and the predicted failure mechanism(s).

  14. Joint pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or conditions. It may be linked to arthritis , bursitis , and muscle pain . No matter what causes it, ... Autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus Bursitis Chondromalacia patellae Crystals in the joint: gout (especially ...

  15. DNA splice site sequences clustering method for conservativeness analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quanwei Zhang; Qinke Peng; Tao Xu

    2009-01-01

    DNA sequences that are near to splice sites have remarkable conservativeness,and many researchers have contributed to the prediction of splice site.In order to mine the underlying biological knowledge,we analyze the conservativeness of DNA splice site adjacent sequences by clustering.Firstly,we propose a kind of DNA splice site sequences clustering method which is based on DBSCAN,and use four kinds of dissimilarity calculating methods.Then,we analyze the conservative feature of the clustering results and the experimental data set.

  16. Genome-wide analysis of alternative splicing in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Julie

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-wide computational analysis of alternative splicing (AS in several flowering plants has revealed that pre-mRNAs from about 30% of genes undergo AS. Chlamydomonas, a simple unicellular green alga, is part of the lineage that includes land plants. However, it diverged from land plants about one billion years ago. Hence, it serves as a good model system to study alternative splicing in early photosynthetic eukaryotes, to obtain insights into the evolution of this process in plants, and to compare splicing in simple unicellular photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic eukaryotes. We performed a global analysis of alternative splicing in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using its recently completed genome sequence and all available ESTs and cDNAs. Results Our analysis of AS using BLAT and a modified version of the Sircah tool revealed AS of 498 transcriptional units with 611 events, representing about 3% of the total number of genes. As in land plants, intron retention is the most prevalent form of AS. Retained introns and skipped exons tend to be shorter than their counterparts in constitutively spliced genes. The splice site signals in all types of AS events are weaker than those in constitutively spliced genes. Furthermore, in alternatively spliced genes, the prevalent splice form has a stronger splice site signal than the non-prevalent form. Analysis of constitutively spliced introns revealed an over-abundance of motifs with simple repetitive elements in comparison to introns involved in intron retention. In almost all cases, AS results in a truncated ORF, leading to a coding sequence that is around 50% shorter than the prevalent splice form. Using RT-PCR we verified AS of two genes and show that they produce more isoforms than indicated by EST data. All cDNA/EST alignments and splice graphs are provided in a website at http://combi.cs.colostate.edu/as/chlamy. Conclusions The extent of AS in Chlamydomonas that we observed is much

  17. Adenosine to Inosine editing frequency controlled by splicing efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licht, Konstantin; Kapoor, Utkarsh; Mayrhofer, Elisa; Jantsch, Michael F

    2016-07-27

    Alternative splicing and adenosine to inosine (A to I) RNA-editing are major factors leading to co- and post-transcriptional modification of genetic information. Both, A to I editing and splicing occur in the nucleus. As editing sites are frequently defined by exon-intron basepairing, mRNA splicing efficiency should affect editing levels. Moreover, splicing rates affect nuclear retention and will therefore also influence the exposure of pre-mRNAs to the editing-competent nuclear environment. Here, we systematically test the influence of splice rates on RNA-editing using reporter genes but also endogenous substrates. We demonstrate for the first time that the extent of editing is controlled by splicing kinetics when editing is guided by intronic elements. In contrast, editing sites that are exclusively defined by exonic structures are almost unaffected by the splicing efficiency of nearby introns. In addition, we show that editing levels in pre- and mature mRNAs do not match. This phenomenon can in part be explained by the editing state of an RNA influencing its splicing rate but also by the binding of the editing enzyme ADAR that interferes with splicing. PMID:27112566

  18. Functional roles of alternative splicing factors in human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieply, Benjamin; Carstens, Russ P

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is an important mechanism used to generate greater transcriptomic and proteomic diversity from a finite genome. Nearly all human gene transcripts are alternatively spliced and can produce protein isoforms with divergent and even antagonistic properties that impact cell functions. Many AS events are tightly regulated in a cell-type or tissue-specific manner, and at different developmental stages. AS is regulated by RNA-binding proteins, including cell- or tissue-specific splicing factors. In the past few years, technological advances have defined genome-wide programs of AS regulated by increasing numbers of splicing factors. These splicing regulatory networks (SRNs) consist of transcripts that encode proteins that function in coordinated and related processes that impact the development and phenotypes of different cell types. As such, it is increasingly recognized that disruption of normal programs of splicing regulated by different splicing factors can lead to human diseases. We will summarize examples of diseases in which altered expression or function of splicing regulatory proteins has been implicated in human disease pathophysiology. As the role of AS continues to be unveiled in human disease and disease risk, it is hoped that further investigations into the functions of numerous splicing factors and their regulated targets will enable the development of novel therapies that are directed at specific AS events as well as the biological pathways they impact. PMID:25630614

  19. Ultraconserved elements are associated with homeostatic control of splicing regulators by alternative splicing and nonsense-mediated decay

    OpenAIRE

    Ni, Julie Z.; Grate, Leslie; Donohue, John Paul; Preston, Christine; Nobida, Naomi; O’Brien, Georgeann; Shiue, Lily; Clark, Tyson A.; Blume, John E; Ares, Manuel

    2007-01-01

    Many alternative splicing events create RNAs with premature stop codons, suggesting that alternative splicing coupled with nonsense-mediated decay (AS-NMD) may regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. We tested this idea in mice by blocking NMD and measuring changes in isoform representation using splicing-sensitive microarrays. We found a striking class of highly conserved stop codon-containing exons whose inclusion renders the transcript sensitive to NMD. A genomic search for additi...

  20. Pre-mRNA Splicing in Plants: In Vivo Functions of RNA-Binding Proteins Implicated in the Splicing Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Meyer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Alternative pre-messenger RNA splicing in higher plants emerges as an important layer of regulation upon exposure to exogenous and endogenous cues. Accordingly, mutants defective in RNA-binding proteins predicted to function in the splicing process show severe phenotypic alterations. Among those are developmental defects, impaired responses to pathogen threat or abiotic stress factors, and misregulation of the circadian timing system. A suite of splicing factors has been identified in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Here we summarize recent insights on how defects in these splicing factors impair plant performance.

  1. Shear Lag in a Plywood Sheet-stringer Combination Used for the Chord Member of a Box Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsari, Palamede; Yu, Ai-Ting

    1948-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations were made of the distribution of strains in a plywood sheet-stringer combination used as the chord member of a box beam acted upon by bending loads. The theoretical solution was obtained with the help of the principle of minimum potential energy and certain simplifying assumptions. Strain measurements were made on a build-up box beam by means of electrical-resistance strain gages connected with strain indicators. A very satisfactory agreement between the theoretical and experimental strains was obtained.

  2. Genetic Variation of Pre-mRNA Alternative Splicing in Human Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Zhi-xiang; Jiang, Peng; Xing, Yi

    2011-01-01

    The precise splicing outcome of a transcribed gene is controlled by complex interactions between cis regulatory splicing signals and trans-acting regulators. In higher eukaryotes, alternative splicing is a prevalent mechanism for generating transcriptome and proteome diversity. Alternative splicing can modulate gene function, affect organismal phenotype and cause disease. Common genetic variation that affects splicing regulation can lead to differences in alternative splicing between human in...

  3. The Caenorhabditis elegans Gene mfap-1 Encodes a Nuclear Protein That Affects Alternative Splicing

    OpenAIRE

    Long Ma; Xiaoyang Gao; Jintao Luo; Liange Huang; Yanling Teng; H Robert Horvitz

    2012-01-01

    RNA splicing is a major regulatory mechanism for controlling eukaryotic gene expression. By generating various splice isoforms from a single pre-mRNA, alternative splicing plays a key role in promoting the evolving complexity of metazoans. Numerous splicing factors have been identified. However, the in vivo functions of many splicing factors remain to be understood. In vivo studies are essential for understanding the molecular mechanisms of RNA splicing and the biology of numerous RNA splicin...

  4. Altered PLP1 splicing causes hypomyelination of early myelinating structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevelam, Sietske H; Taube, Jennifer R; van Spaendonk, Rosalina M L; Bertini, Enrico; Sperle, Karen; Tarnopolsky, Mark; Tonduti, Davide; Valente, Enza Maria; Travaglini, Lorena; Sistermans, Erik A; Bernard, Geneviève; Catsman-Berrevoets, Coriene E; van Karnebeek, Clara D M; Østergaard, John R; Friederich, Richard L; Fawzi Elsaid, Mahmoud; Schieving, Jolanda H; Tarailo-Graovac, Maja; Orcesi, Simona; Steenweg, Marjan E; van Berkel, Carola G M; Waisfisz, Quinten; Abbink, Truus E M; van der Knaap, Marjo S; Hobson, Grace M; Wolf, Nicole I

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the genetic etiology of the X-linked disorder “Hypomyelination of Early Myelinating Structures” (HEMS). Methods We included 16 patients from 10 families diagnosed with HEMS by brain MRI criteria. Exome sequencing was used to search for causal mutations. In silico analysis of effects of the mutations on splicing and RNA folding was performed. In vitro gene splicing was examined in RNA from patients’ fibroblasts and an immortalized immature oligodendrocyte cell line after transfection with mutant minigene splicing constructs. Results All patients had unusual hemizygous mutations of PLP1 located in exon 3B (one deletion, one missense and two silent), which is spliced out in isoform DM20, or in intron 3 (five mutations). The deletion led to truncation of PLP1, but not DM20. Four mutations were predicted to affect PLP1/DM20 alternative splicing by creating exonic splicing silencer motifs or new splice donor sites or by affecting the local RNA structure of the PLP1 splice donor site. Four deep intronic mutations were predicted to destabilize a long-distance interaction structure in the secondary PLP1 RNA fragment involved in regulating PLP1/DM20 alternative splicing. Splicing studies in fibroblasts and transfected cells confirmed a decreased PLP1/DM20 ratio. Interpretation Brain structures that normally myelinate early are poorly myelinated in HEMS, while they are the best myelinated structures in Pelizaeus–Merzbacher disease, also caused by PLP1 alterations. Our data extend the phenotypic spectrum of PLP1-related disorders indicating that normal PLP1/DM20 alternative splicing is essential for early myelination and support the need to include intron 3 in diagnostic sequencing. PMID:26125040

  5. The conserved splicing factor SUA controls alternative splicing of the developmental regulator ABI3 in Arabidopsis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sugliani, M.; Brambilla, V.; Clerkx, E.J.M.; Koornneef, M.; Soppe, W.J.J.

    2010-01-01

    ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE3 (ABI3) is a major regulator of seed maturation in Arabidopsis thaliana. We detected two ABI3 transcripts, ABI3- and ABI3-ß, which encode full-length and truncated proteins, respectively. Alternative splicing of ABI3 is developmentally regulated, and the ABI3-ß transcript a

  6. Splice connector with internal heat transfer jacket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Frank A.; Mayer, Robert W.

    1977-01-01

    A heat transfer jacket is placed over the terminal portions of the conductors of a pair of high voltage cables which are connected in a splice connection wherein a housing surrounds the connected conductor portions, the heat transfer jacket extending longitudinally between the confronting ends of a pair of adaptor sleeves placed upon the insulation of the cables to engage and locate the adaptor sleeves relative to one another, and laterally between the conductors and the housing to provide a path of relatively high thermal conductivity between the connected conductor portions and the housing.

  7. Exon Expression and Alternatively Spliced Genes in Tourette Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tian, Yingfang; Liao, Isaac H.; Zhan, Xinhua; Gunther, Joan R.; Ander, Bradley P.; Liu, Dazhi; Lit, Lisa; Jickling, Glen C.; Corbett, Blythe A.; Bos-Veneman, Netty G. P.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Sharp, Frank R.

    2011-01-01

    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is diagnosed based upon clinical criteria including motor and vocal tics. We hypothesized that differences in exon expression and splicing might be useful for pathophysiology and diagnosis. To demonstrate exon expression and alternatively spliced gene differences in blood of i

  8. A study of alternative splicing in the pig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillig, Ann-Britt Nygaard; Cirera Salicio, Susanna; Gilchrist, Michael J.;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since at least half of the genes in mammalian genomes are subjected to alternative splicing, alternative pre-mRNA splicing plays an important contribution to the complexity of the mammalian proteome. Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) provide evidence of a great number of possible alterna...

  9. Synaptic signaling and aberrant RNA splicing in autism spectrum disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan M Smith; Wolfgang eSadee

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between presynaptic and postsynaptic cellular adhesion molecules drive synapse maturation during development. These trans-synaptic interactions are regulated by alternative splicing of cellular adhesion molecule RNAs, which ultimately determines neurotransmitter phenotype. The diverse assortment of RNAs produced by alternative splicing generates countless protein isoforms necessary for guiding specialized cell-to-cell connectivity. Failure to generate the appropriate synaptic ...

  10. Minor class splicing shapes the zebrafish transcriptome during development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markmiller, Sebastian; Cloonan, Nicole; Lardelli, Rea M;

    2014-01-01

    Minor class or U12-type splicing is a highly conserved process required to remove a minute fraction of introns from human pre-mRNAs. Defects in this splicing pathway have recently been linked to human disease, including a severe developmental disorder encompassing brain and skeletal abnormalities...

  11. Synaptic Signaling and Aberrant RNA Splicing in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Ryan M; Sadee, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between presynaptic and postsynaptic cellular adhesion molecules (CAMs) drive synapse maturation during development. These trans-synaptic interactions are regulated by alternative splicing of CAM RNAs, which ultimately determines neurotransmitter phenotype. The diverse assortment of RNAs produced by alternative splicing generates countless protein isoforms necessary for guiding specialized cell-to-cell connectivity. Failure to generate the appropriate synaptic adhesion proteins i...

  12. Quantitative regulation of alternative splicing in evolution and development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irimia, Manuel; Rukov, Jakob L; Roy, Scott W;

    2009-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a widespread mechanism with an important role in increasing transcriptome and proteome diversity by generating multiple different products from the same gene. Evolutionary studies of AS have focused primarily on the conservation of alternatively spliced sequences or of...... additional layer in complex gene regulatory networks and in the emergence of genetic novelties....

  13. Tissue-specific splicing factor gene expression signatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.R. Grosso; A.Q. Gomes (Anita); N.L. Barbosa-Morais (Nuno); S. Caldeira (Sandra); N.P. Thorne (Natalie); G. Grech (Godfrey); M.M. von Lindern (Marieke); M. Carmo-Fonseca (Maria)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe alternative splicing code that controls and coordinates the transcriptome in complex multicellular organisms remains poorly understood. It has long been argued that regulation of alternative splicing relies on combinatorial interactions between multiple proteins, and that tissue-spec

  14. Kluyveromyces lactis maintains Saccharomyces cerevisiae intron-encoded splicing signals.

    OpenAIRE

    Deshler, J O; Larson, G P; Rossi, J J

    1989-01-01

    The actin (ACT) gene from the budding yeast Kluyveromyces lactis was cloned, and the nucleotide sequence was determined. The gene had a single intron 778 nucleotides in length which possessed the highly conserved splicing signals found in Saccharomyces cerevisiae introns. We demonstrated splicing of heterologous ACT transcripts in both K. lactis and S. cerevisiae.

  15. Multi-chord fiber-coupled interferometer with a long coherence length laser for the Plasma Liner Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Merritt, Elizabeth C; Gilmore, Mark A; Hsu, Scott C

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a 561 nm laser heterodyne interferometer that provides time-resolved measurements of line-integrated plasma electron density within the range of 10^15-10^18 cm^(-2). Such plasmas are produced by railguns on the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX), which aims to produce $\\mu$s-, cm-, and Mbar-scale plasmas through the merging of thirty plasma jets in a spherically convergent geometry. A long coherence length, 320 mW laser allows for a strong, sub-fringe phase-shift signal without the need for closely-matched probe and reference path lengths. Thus only one reference path is required for all eight probe paths, and an individual probe chord can be altered without altering the reference or other probe path lengths. Fiber-optic decoupling of the probe chord optics on the vacuum chamber from the rest of the system allows the probe paths to be easily altered to focus on different spatial regions of the plasma. We demonstrate that sub-fringe resolution capability allows the interferometer to operate dow...

  16. Analysis of the SPERT-III E-core using ANCK code with the chord weighting method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ANCK/MIDAC is a three-dimensional (3D) code system that has been developed, which couples the 3D nodal kinetic code ANCK and the 3D drift flux thermal-and-hydraulics (T/H) code MIDAC. The adequacy of the ANCK feedback model was confirmed by analysis of the SPERT-III E-core reactivity accident tests. The chord weighting method was adopted in the effective fuel temperature (Teff) calculation model of ANCK and ANCK/MIDAC since it provides results that are in good agreement with those of a Monte Carlo calculation. The adequacy of the Teff model was also confirmed. The calculation results for hot startup and hot standby conditions using the ANCK code showed excellent agreement for the main parameters such as peak power, peak time, and behavior of reactor power. It was also confirmed that the ANCK feedback model with the chord weighting method was applicable to the reactivity-initiated accident (RIA) calculation for the case of 4.8 wt% UO2 core. (author)

  17. Splice Site Mutations in the ATP7A Gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjørringe, Tina; Tümer, Zeynep; Møller, Lisbeth Birk

    2011-01-01

    Menkes disease (MD) is caused by mutations in the ATP7A gene. We describe 33 novel splice site mutations detected in patients with MD or the milder phenotypic form, Occipital Horn Syndrome. We review these 33 mutations together with 28 previously published splice site mutations. We investigate 12...... mutations for their effect on the mRNA transcript in vivo. Transcriptional data from another 16 mutations were collected from the literature. The theoretical consequences of splice site mutations, predicted with the bioinformatics tool Human Splice Finder, were investigated and evaluated in relation to in...... vivo results. Ninety-six percent of the mutations identified in 45 patients with classical MD were predicted to have a significant effect on splicing, which concurs with the absence of any detectable wild-type transcript in all 19 patients investigated in vivo. Sixty-seven percent of the mutations...

  18. Comparative Analysis of Splice Site Regions by Information Content

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T. Shashi Rekha; Chanchal K. Mitra

    2006-01-01

    We have applied concepts from information theory for a comparative analysis of donor (gt) and acceptor (ag) splice site regions in the genes of five different organisms by calculating their mutual information content (relative entropy) over a selected block of nucleotides. A similar pattern that the information content decreases as the block size increases was observed for both regions in all the organisms studied. This result suggests that the information required for splicing might be contained in the consensus of ~6-8 nt at both regions. We assume from our study that even though the nucleotides are showing some degrees of conservation in the flanking regions of the splice sites, certain level of variability is still tolerated,which leads the splicing process to occur normally even if the extent of base pairing is not fully satisfied. We also suggest that this variability can be compensated by recognizing different splice sites with different spliceosomal factors.

  19. Study on crack propagation in tubular joints under compressive fatigue loadings

    OpenAIRE

    Acevedo, Claire; NUSSBAUMER, Alain

    2009-01-01

    Large scale tubular truss beams, approximately of 9 m long and 2 m high, were tested under constant amplitude fatigue loading. The beams were made out of circular hollow sections of steel S355, welded to form a uni-planar truss with K-joints, in a shape common to bridge construction. The main goal of these tests was to focus on the fatigue behavior of the joints loaded in compression that is with chord in compression, one diagonal in compression and the remaining diagonal in tension. The test...

  20. Evolution of alternative splicing regulation: changes in predicted exonic splicing regulators are not associated with changes in alternative splicing levels in primates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irimia, Manuel; Rukov, Jakob Lewin; Roy, Scott William

    2009-01-01

    interspecific differences in these elements on the evolution of alternative splicing levels has not yet been investigated at genomic level. Here we study the effect of interspecific differences in predicted exonic splicing regulators (ESRs) on exon inclusion levels in human and chimpanzee. For this purpose, we...... compiled and studied comprehensive datasets of predicted ESRs, identified by several computational and experimental approaches, as well as microarray data for changes in alternative splicing levels between human and chimpanzee. Surprisingly, we found no association between changes in predicted ESRs and...... or no effect on splicing, and thus interspecific changes at short-time scales may primarily occur in these effectively neutral ESRs. These results underscore the difficulties of using current computational ESR prediction algorithms to identify truly functionally important motifs, and provide a...

  1. Joint imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joint imaging is a proven diagnostic procedure which has become indispensable to the detection and treatment of different joint diseases in almost all disciplines. The method is suited for early diagnosis of joint affections both in soft tissue and bone which cannot be detected by X-ray or other procedures. The local activity accumulation depends on the rate of metabolism and is visualized in the scan, which in turn enables the extension and floridity of focal lesions to be evaluated and followed-up. Although joint scans may often give hints to probabilities relevant to differential diagnosis, the method is non-specific and only useful if based on the underlying clinical picture and X-ray finding, if possible. The radiation exposure is very low and does not represent a hazard in cases of adequate assessment of indication. In pregnant women and children the assessment of indication has to be based on very strict principles. The method is suited for out-patient diagnosis and can be applied in all installations equipped with a gamma camera and a technetium generator. (orig.)

  2. Comprehensive splicing graph analysis of alternative splicing patterns in chicken, compared to human and mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranganathan Shoba

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative transcript diversity manifests itself as a prime cause of complexity in higher eukaryotes. Recently, transcript diversity studies have suggested that 60–80% of human genes are alternatively spliced. We have used a splicing pattern approach for the bioinformatics analysis of Alternative Splicing (AS in chicken, human and mouse. Exons involved in splicing are subdivided into distinct and variant exons, based on the prevalence of the exons across the transcripts. Four possible permutations of these two different groups of exons were categorised as class I (distinct-variant, class II (distinct-variant, class III (variant-distinct and class IV (variant-variant. This classification quantifies the variation in transcript diversity in the three species. Results In all, 3901 chicken AS genes have been compared with 16,715 human and 16,491 mouse AS genes, with 23% of chicken genes being alternatively spliced, compared to 68% in humans and 57% in mice. To minimize any gene structure bias in the input data, comparative genome analysis has been carried out on the orthologous subset of AS genes for the three species. Gene-level analysis suggested that chicken genes show fewer AS events compared to human and mouse. An event-level analysis showed that the percentage of AS events in chicken is similar to that of human, which implies that a smaller number of chicken genes show greater transcript diversity. Overall, chicken genes were found to have fewer transcripts per gene and shorter introns than human and mouse genes. Conclusion In chicken, the majority of genes generate only two or three isoforms, compared to almost eight in human and six in mouse. We observed that intron definition is expressed strongly when compared to exon definition for chicken genome, based on 3% intron retention in chicken, compared to 2% in human and mouse. Splicing patterns with variant exons account for 33% of AS chicken orthologous genes compared to

  3. WT1 interacts with the splicing protein RBM4 and regulates its ability to modulate alternative splicing in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilm's tumor protein 1 (WT1), a protein implicated in various cancers and developmental disorders, consists of two major isoforms: WT1(-KTS), a transcription factor, and WT1(+KTS), a post-transcriptional regulator that binds to RNA and can interact with splicing components. Here we show that WT1 interacts with the novel splicing regulator RBM4. Each protein was found to colocalize in nuclear speckles and to cosediment with supraspliceosomes in glycerol gradients. RBM4 conferred dose-dependent and cell-specific regulation of alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs transcribed from several reporter genes. We found that overexpressed WT1(+KTS) abrogated this effect of RBM4 on splice-site selection, whereas WT1(-KTS) did not. We conclude that the (+KTS) form of WT1 is able to inhibit the effect of RBM4 on alternative splicing

  4. Connecting real-time data to algorithms and databases: EarthCube's Cloud-Hosted Real-time Data Services for the Geosciences (CHORDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, M. D.; Graves, S. J.; Kerkez, B.; Chandrasekar, V.; Vernon, F.; Martin, C. L.; Maskey, M.; Keiser, K.; Dye, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Cloud-Hosted Real-time Data Services for the Geosciences (CHORDS) project was funded under the National Science Foundation's EarthCube initiative. CHORDS addresses the ever-increasing importance of real-time scientific data in the geosciences, particularly in mission critical scenarios, where informed decisions must be made rapidly. Access to constant streams of real-time data also allow many new transient phenomena in space-time to be observed, however, much of these streaming data are either completely inaccessible or only available to proprietary in-house tools or displays. Small research teams do not have the resources to develop tools for the broad dissemination of their unique real-time data and require an easy to use, scalable, cloud-based solution to facilitate this access. CHORDS will make these diverse streams of real-time data available to the broader geosciences community. This talk will highlight a recently developed CHORDS portal tools and processing systems which address some of the gaps in handling real-time data, particularly in the provisioning of data from the "long-tail" scientific community through a simple interface that is deployed in the cloud, is scalable and is able to be customized by research teams. A running portal, with operational data feeds from across the nation, will be presented. The processing within the CHORDS system will expose these real-time streams via standard services from the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) in a way that is simple and transparent to the data provider, while maximizing the usage of these investments. The ingestion of high velocity, high volume and diverse data has allowed the project to explore a NoSQL database implementation. Broad use of the CHORDS framework by geoscientists will help to facilitate adaptive experimentation, model assimilation and real-time hypothesis testing.

  5. In vitro Splicing of Influenza Viral NS1 mRNA and NS1-β -globin Chimeras: Possible Mechanisms for the Control of Viral mRNA Splicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotch, Stephen J.; Krug, Robert M.

    1986-08-01

    In influenza virus-infected cells, the splicing of the viral NS1 mRNA catalyzed by host nuclear enzymes is controlled so that the steady-state amount of the spliced NS2 mRNA is only 5-10% of that of the unspliced NS1 mRNA. Here we examine the splicing of NS1 mRNA in vitro, using nuclear extracts from HeLa cells. We show that in addition to its consensus 5' and 3' splice sites, NS1 mRNA has an intron branch-point adenosine residue that was functional in lariat formation. Nonetheless, this RNA was not detectably spliced in vitro under conditions in which a human β -globin precursor was efficiently spliced. Using chimeric RNA precursors containing both NS1 and β -globin sequences, we show that the NS1 5' splice site was effectively utilized by the β -globin branch-point sequence and 3' splice site to form a spliced RNA, whereas the NS1 3' splice site did not function in detectable splicing in vitro, even in the presence of the β -globin branch-point sequence or in the presence of both the branch-point sequence and 5' exon and splice site from β -globin With the chimeric precursors that were not detectably spliced, as with NS1 mRNA itself, a low level of a lariat structure containing only intron and not 3' exon sequences was formed. The inability of the consensus 3' splice site of NS1 mRNA to function effectively in in vitro splicing suggests that this site is structurally inaccessible to components of the splicing machinery. Based on these results, we propose two mechanisms whereby NS1 mRNA splicing in infected cells is controlled via the accessibility of its 3' splice site.

  6. Splicing Express: a software suite for alternative splicing analysis using next-generation sequencing data

    OpenAIRE

    Kroll, Jose E.; Kim, JiHoon; Ohno-Machado, Lucila; de Souza, Sandro J.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation. Alternative splicing events (ASEs) are prevalent in the transcriptome of eukaryotic species and are known to influence many biological phenomena. The identification and quantification of these events are crucial for a better understanding of biological processes. Next-generation DNA sequencing technologies have allowed deep characterization of transcriptomes and made it possible to address these issues. ASEs analysis, however, represents a challenging task especially when many dif...

  7. Genome-wide survey of Alternative Splicing in Sorghum Bicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panahi, Bahman; Abbaszadeh, Bahram; Taghizadeghan, Mehdi; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil

    2014-07-01

    Sorghum bicolor is a member of grass family which is an attractive model plant for genome study due to interesting genome features like low genome size. In this research, we performed comprehensive investigation of Alternative Splicing and ontology aspects of genes those have undergone these events in sorghum bicolor. We used homology based alignments between gene rich transcripts, represented by tentative consensus (TC) transcript sequences, and genomic scaffolds to deduce the structure of genes and identify alternatively spliced transcripts in sorghum. Using homology mapping of assembled expressed sequence tags with genomics data, we identified 2,137 Alternative Splicing events in S. bicolor. Our study showed that complex events and intron retention are the main types of Alternative Splicing events in S. bicolor and highlights the prevalence of splicing site recognition for definition of introns in this plant. Annotations of the alternatively spliced genes revealed that they represent diverse biological process and molecular functions, suggesting a fundamental role for Alternative Splicing in affecting the development and physiology of S. bicolor. PMID:25049459

  8. Joint purpose?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pristed Nielsen, Helene

    2013-01-01

    Starting from Crenshaw´s point that antiracism often fails to interrogate patriarchy and that feminism often reproduces racist practices (1991: 1252), this paper asks: What are the theoretical reasons for believing that feminism and anti-racism can be regarded as fighting for the joint purpose of...... anti-discrimination in Europe today? And what empirical evidence may be found for such a joint approach? The paper discusses how the contemporary EU context differs from the American context which prompted Crenshaw to raise the point about intersectionality, and it analyses documents and interviews...... from each of the two European umbrella organisations the European Women´s Lobby and the European Network against Racism, as well as a number of their national member organisations from across Europe, both within EU and non-EU member states....

  9. Proximity-dependent and proximity-independent trans-splicing in mammalian cells

    OpenAIRE

    Viles, Kristi D.; Sullenger, Bruce A

    2008-01-01

    Most human pre-mRNAs are cis-spliced, removing introns and joining flanking exons of the same RNA molecule. However, splicing of exons present on separate pre-mRNA molecules can also occur. This trans-splicing reaction can be exploited by pre-trans-splicing molecules (PTMs), which are incapable of cis-splicing. PTM-mediated trans-splicing has been utilized to repair mutant RNAs as a novel approach to gene therapy. Herein we explore how the site of PTM expression influences trans-splicing acti...

  10. Alternative splicing of SMPD1 in human sepsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Kramer

    Full Text Available Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM or sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase, SMPD activity engages a critical role for regulation of immune response and development of organ failure in critically ill patients. Beside genetic variation in the human gene encoding ASM (SMPD1, alternative splicing of the mRNA is involved in regulation of enzymatic activity. Here we show that the patterns of alternatively spliced SMPD1 transcripts are significantly different in patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome and severe sepsis/septic shock compared to control subjects allowing discrimination of respective disease entity. The different splicing patterns might contribute to the better understanding of the pathophysiology of human sepsis.

  11. The chording effect on core losses of three-phase induction motor under sinusoidal and PWM voltage supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The core losses and the lower-order voltage harmonics of four different chorded motors fed from sinusoidal supply and inverter voltage supply were invigilated at no-load condition. All the four motors were tested with 4, 8 and 16 kHz switching frequencies and 30, 40, 50 and 60 Hz modulation frequencies The motor with 120 deg. coil pitch has the least core losses and the lower-order voltage harmonics under sinusoidal and pulse width modulation (PWM) voltage supplies at all switching and modulation frequencies. The drop in the core losses for this motor was 46% and 53% under sinusoidal and PWM voltage supplies, respectively. The motor with 120 deg. coil pitch is recommended to be used under sinusoidal and PWM voltage supplies

  12. Wind-tunnel investigation of an NACA 23012 airfoil with 30 percent-chord venetian-blind flaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogallo, F M; Spano, Bartholomew S

    1942-01-01

    Report presents the results of an investigation made in the NACA 7 by 10-foot wind tunnel of a NACA 23012 airfoil with 30-percent-chord venetian-blind flaps having one, two, three, and four slats of Clark y section. The three-slat arrangements was aerodynamically the best of those tested but showed practically no improvement over the comparable arrangement used in the preliminary tests published in NACA Technical Report No. 689. The multiple-slat flaps gave slightly higher lift coefficients than the one-slat (Fowler) flap but gave considerably greater pitching-moment coefficients. An analysis of test data indicates that substitution of a thicker and more cambered section for the Clark y slats should improve the aerodynamic and the structural characteristics of the venetian-blind flap.

  13. The chording effect on core losses of three-phase induction motor under sinusoidal and PWM voltage supplies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Ram; Moses, A. J.; Anayi, F.

    The core losses and the lower-order voltage harmonics of four different chorded motors fed from sinusoidal supply and inverter voltage supply were invigilated at no-load condition. All the four motors were tested with 4, 8 and 16 kHz switching frequencies and 30, 40, 50 and 60 Hz modulation frequencies The motor with 120° coil pitch has the least core losses and the lower-order voltage harmonics under sinusoidal and pulse width modulation (PWM) voltage supplies at all switching and modulation frequencies. The drop in the core losses for this motor was 46% and 53% under sinusoidal and PWM voltage supplies, respectively. The motor with 120° coil pitch is recommended to be used under sinusoidal and PWM voltage supplies.

  14. Integration of in situ Imaging and Chord Length Distribution Measurements for Estimation of Particle Size and Shape

    CERN Document Server

    Agimelen, Okpeafoh S; McGinty, John; Tachtatzis, Christos; Dziewierz, Jerzy; Haley, Ian; Sefcik, Jan; Mulholland, Anthony J

    2015-01-01

    Efficient processing of particulate products across various manufacturing steps requires that particles possess desired attributes such as size and shape. Controlling the particle production process to obtain required attributes will be greatly facilitated using robust algorithms providing the size and shape information of the particles from in situ measurements. However, obtaining particle size and shape information in situ during manufacturing has been a big challenge. This is because the problem of estimating particle size and shape (aspect ratio) from signals provided by in-line measuring tools is often ill posed, and therefore it calls for appropriate constraints to be imposed on the problem. One way to constrain uncertainty in estimation of particle size and shape from in-line measurements is to combine data from different measurements such as chord length distribution (CLD) and imaging. This paper presents two different methods for combining imaging and CLD data obtained with in-line tools in order to ...

  15. Estimation of Particle Size Distribution and Aspect Ratio of Non-Spherical Particles From Chord Length Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Agimelen, Okpeafoh S; Vasile, Massimiliano; Nordon, Alison; Haley, Ian; Mulholland, Anthony J

    2014-01-01

    Information about size and shape of particles produced in various manufacturing processes is very important for process and product development because design of downstream processes as well as final product properties strongly depend on these geometrical particle attributes. However, recovery of particle size and shape information in situ during crystallisation processes has been a major challenge. The focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM) provides the chord length distribution (CLD) of a population of particles in a suspension flowing close to the sensor window. Recovery of size and shape information from the CLD requires a model relating particle size and shape to its CLD as well as solving the corresponding inverse problem. This paper presents a comprehensive algorithm which produces estimates of particle size distribution and particle aspect ratio from measured CLD data. While the algorithm searches for a global best solution to the inverse problem without requiring further a priori information on ...

  16. Intragenic alternative splicing coordination is essential for Caenorhabditis elegans slo-1 gene function

    OpenAIRE

    Glauser, Dominique A; Johnson, Brandon E.; Aldrich, Richard W; Goodman, Miriam B.

    2012-01-01

    Alternative splicing is critical for diversifying eukaryotic proteomes, but the rules governing and coordinating splicing events among multiple alternate splice sites within individual genes are not well understood. We developed a quantitative PCR-based strategy to quantify the expression of the 12 transcripts encoded by the Caenorhabditis elegans slo-1 gene, containing three alternate splice sites. Using conditional probability-based models, we show that splicing events are coordinated acros...

  17. EVOLUTION OF SR PROTEIN AND HnRNP SPLICING REGULATORY FACTORS

    OpenAIRE

    Busch, A.; Hertel, KJ

    2011-01-01

    The splicing of pre-mRNAs is an essential step of gene expression in eukaryotes. Introns are removed from split genes through the activities of the spliceosome, a large ribonuclear machine that is conserved throughout the eukaryotic lineage. While unicellular eukaryotes are characterized by less complex splicing, pre-mRNA splicing of multicellular organisms is often associated with extensive alternative splicing that significantly enriches their proteome. The alternative selection of splice s...

  18. Editing efficiency of a Drosophila gene correlates with a distant splice site selection

    OpenAIRE

    AGRAWAL, RITESH; Stormo, Gary D.

    2005-01-01

    RNA editing and alternative splicing are two processes that increase protein diversity. The relationship between the two processes is not well understood. There are a few examples of correlations between editing and alternative splicing, but these are all nearby effects. A search for alternative splicing among 16 edited genes in Drosophila reveals two novel instances of alternative splicing. In one example where alternative splicing occurs downstream of editing, a strong correlation between e...

  19. Nascent-seq indicates widespread cotranscriptional pre-mRNA splicing in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Khodor, Yevgenia L.; Rodriguez, Joseph; Abruzzi, Katharine C.; Tang, Chih-Hang Anthony; Marr, Michael T.; Rosbash, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Cotranscriptional splicing, in which mRNA is spliced as it is being transcribed, is thought to be necessary for proper gene regulation of many genes in eukaryotic cells. While studies have shown that splicing takes place cotranscriptionally in yeast, in higher eukaryotes, where genes contain multiple introns with widespread alternative splicing, the question of whether cotranscriptional splicing is a general phenomenon remains. Khodor et al. investigated what fractions of genes are cotranscri...

  20. Epstein-Barr Virus SM Protein Functions as an Alternative Splicing Factor ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Verma, Dinesh; Swaminathan, Sankar

    2008-01-01

    Alternative splicing of RNA increases the coding potential of the genome and allows for additional regulatory control over gene expression. The full extent of alternative splicing remains to be defined but is likely to significantly expand the size of the human transcriptome. There are several examples of mammalian viruses regulating viral splicing or inhibiting cellular splicing in order to facilitate viral replication. Here, we describe a viral protein that induces alternative splicing of a...

  1. Correction of tau mis-splicing caused by FTDP-17 MAPT mutations by spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez-Martin, Teresa; Anthony, Karen; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A.; Mansfield, S. Gary; Anderton, Brian H.; Gallo, Jean-Marc

    2009-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17) is caused by mutations in the MAPT gene, encoding the tau protein that accumulates in intraneuronal lesions in a number of neurodegenerative diseases. Several FTDP-17 mutations affect alternative splicing and result in excess exon 10 (E10) inclusion in tau mRNA. RNA reprogramming using spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing (SMaRT) could be a method of choice to correct aberrant E10 splicing resulting from FTDP-17 mu...

  2. Network of evolutionary processors with splicing rules and permitting context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Ashish; Krithivasan, Kamala

    2007-02-01

    In this paper we consider networks of evolutionary processors with splicing rules and permitting context (NEPPS) as language generating and computational devices. Such a network consists of several processors placed on the nodes of a virtual graph and are able to perform splicing (which is a biologically motivated operation) on the words present in that node, according to the splicing rules present there. Before applying the splicing operation on words, we check for the presence of certain symbols (permitting context) in the strings on which the rule is applied. Each node is associated with an input and output filter. When the filters are based on random context conditions, one gets the computational power of Turing machines with networks of size two. We also show how these networks can be used to solve NP-complete problems in linear time. PMID:17045388

  3. Synaptic signaling and aberrant RNA splicing in autism spectrum disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan M Smith

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between presynaptic and postsynaptic cellular adhesion molecules drive synapse maturation during development. These trans-synaptic interactions are regulated by alternative splicing of cellular adhesion molecule RNAs, which ultimately determines neurotransmitter phenotype. The diverse assortment of RNAs produced by alternative splicing generates countless protein isoforms necessary for guiding specialized cell-to-cell connectivity. Failure to generate the appropriate synaptic adhesion proteins is associated with disrupted glutamatergic and gamma-aminobutyric acid signaling, resulting in loss of activity-dependent neuronal plasticity, and risk for developmental disorders, including autism. While the majority of genetic mutations currently linked to autism are rare variants that change the protein coding sequence of synaptic candidate genes, regulatory polymorphisms affecting constitutive and alternative splicing have emerged as risk factors in numerous other diseases, accounting for an estimated 40-60% of general disease risk. Here, we review the relationship between aberrant RNA splicing of synapse-related genes and autism spectrum disorders.

  4. Designing oligo libraries taking alternative splicing into account

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoshan, Avi; Grebinskiy, Vladimir; Magen, Avner; Scolnicov, Ariel; Fink, Eyal; Lehavi, David; Wasserman, Alon

    2001-06-01

    We have designed sequences for DNA microarrays and oligo libraries, taking alternative splicing into account. Alternative splicing is a common phenomenon, occurring in more than 25% of the human genes. In many cases, different splice variants have different functions, are expressed in different tissues or may indicate different stages of disease. When designing sequences for DNA microarrays or oligo libraries, it is very important to take into account the sequence information of all the mRNA transcripts. Therefore, when a gene has more than one transcript (as a result of alternative splicing, alternative promoter sites or alternative poly-adenylation sites), it is very important to take all of them into account in the design. We have used the LEADS transcriptome prediction system to cluster and assemble the human sequences in GenBank and design optimal oligonucleotides for all the human genes with a known mRNA sequence based on the LEADS predictions.

  5. Abnormalities in Alternative Splicing of Apoptotic Genes and Cardiovascular Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Zodwa Dlamini; Tshidino, Shonisani C.; Rodney Hull

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is required for normal heart development in the embryo, but has also been shown to be an important factor in the occurrence of heart disease. Alternative splicing of apoptotic genes is currently emerging as a diagnostic and therapeutic target for heart disease. This review addresses the involvement of abnormalities in alternative splicing of apoptotic genes in cardiac disorders including cardiomyopathy, myocardial ischemia and heart failure. Many pro-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 f...

  6. Alternative Splicing of Type II Procollagen: IIB or not IIB?

    OpenAIRE

    McAlinden, Audrey

    2014-01-01

    Over two decades ago, two isoforms of the type II procollagen gene (COL2A1) were discovered. These isoforms, named IIA and IIB, are generated in a developmentally-regulated manner by alternative splicing of exon 2. Chondroprogenitor cells synthesize predominantly IIA isoforms (containing exon 2) while differentiated chondrocytes produce mainly IIB transcripts (devoid of exon 2). Importantly, this IIA-to-IIB alternative splicing switch occurs only during chondrogenesis. More recently, two othe...

  7. Diagnosis of trypanosomatid infections : targeting the spliced leader RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez-Andrade, P.; M. Camara; Ilboudo, H.; Buheton, B.; Jamonneau, Vincent; Deborggraeve, S

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosomatids transcribe their genes in Large polycistronic clusters that are further processed into mature mRNA molecules by trans-splicing. During this maturation process, a conserved spliced leader RNA (SL-RNA) sequence of 39 bp is physically linked to the 5' end of the pre-mRNA molecules. Trypanosomatid infections cause a series of devastating diseases in man (sleeping sickness, leishmaniasis, Chagas disease) and animals (nagana, surra, dourine). Here, we investigated the SL-RNA molecul...

  8. RBM20, a gene for hereditary cardiomyopathy, regulates titin splicing

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Wei; Schafer, Sebastian; Greaser, Marion L.; Radke, Michael H.; Liss, Martin; Govindarajan, Thirupugal; Maatz, Henrike; Schulz, Herbert; Li, Shijun; Parrish, Amanda M.; Dauksaite, Vita; Vakeel, Padmanabhan; Klaassen, Sabine; Gerull, Brenda; Thierfelder, Ludwig

    2012-01-01

    Alternative splicing plays a major role in the adaptation of cardiac function exemplified by the isoform switch of titin, which adjusts ventricular filling. We previously identified a rat strain deficient in titin splicing. Using genetic mapping, we found a loss-of-function mutation in RBM20 as the underlying cause for the pathological titin isoform expression. Mutations in human RBM20 have previously been shown to cause dilated cardiomyopathy. We showed that the phenotype of Rbm20 deficient ...

  9. Functional roles of alternative splicing factors in human disease

    OpenAIRE

    Cieply, Benjamin; Carstens, Russ P.

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is an important mechanism used to generate greater transcriptomic and proteomic diversity from a finite genome. Nearly all human gene transcripts are alternatively spliced and can produce protein isoforms with divergent and even antagonistic properties that impact cell functions. Many AS events are tightly regulated in a cell-type or tissue-specific manner, and at different developmental stages. AS is regulated by RNA-binding proteins, including cell- or tissue-speci...

  10. Altered PLP1 splicing causes hypomyelination of early myelinating structures

    OpenAIRE

    Kevelam, Sietske H.; Taube, Jennifer R.; van Spaendonk, Rosalina M. L.; Bertini, Enrico; Sperle, Karen; Tarnopolsky, Mark; Tonduti, Davide; Valente, Enza Maria; Travaglini, Lorena; Sistermans, Erik A.; Bernard, Geneviève; Catsman-Berrevoets, Coriene E.; van Karnebeek, Clara D M; Østergaard, John R.; Friederich, Richard L

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the genetic etiology of the X-linked disorder “Hypomyelination of Early Myelinating Structures” (HEMS). Methods We included 16 patients from 10 families diagnosed with HEMS by brain MRI criteria. Exome sequencing was used to search for causal mutations. In silico analysis of effects of the mutations on splicing and RNA folding was performed. In vitro gene splicing was examined in RNA from patients’ fibroblasts and an immortalized immatu...

  11. A Unique, Consistent Identifier for Alternatively Spliced Transcript Variants

    OpenAIRE

    Riva, Alberto; Pesole, Graziano

    2009-01-01

    Background As research into alternative splicing reveals the fundamental importance of this phenomenon in the genome expression of higher organisms, there is an increasing need for a standardized, consistent and unique identifier for alternatively spliced isoforms. Such an identifier would be useful to eliminate ambiguities in references to gene isoforms, and would allow for the reliable comparison of isoforms from different sources (e.g., known genes vs. computational predictions). Commonly ...

  12. Interrogation of alternative splicing events in duplicated genes during evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Ting-Wen; Wu Timothy H; Ng Wailap V; Lin Wen-Chang

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Gene duplication provides resources for developing novel genes and new functions while retaining the original functions. In addition, alternative splicing could increase the complexity of expression at the transcriptome and proteome level without increasing the number of gene copy in the genome. Duplication and alternative splicing are thought to work together to provide the diverse functions or expression patterns for eukaryotes. Previously, it was believed that duplicati...

  13. Purifying Selection on Exonic Splice Enhancers in Intronless Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savisaar, Rosina; Hurst, Laurence D

    2016-06-01

    Exonic splice enhancers (ESEs) are short nucleotide motifs, enriched near exon ends, that enhance the recognition of the splice site and thus promote splicing. Are intronless genes under selection to avoid these motifs so as not to attract the splicing machinery to an mRNA that should not be spliced, thereby preventing the production of an aberrant transcript? Consistent with this possibility, we find that ESEs in putative recent retrocopies are at a higher density and evolving faster than those in other intronless genes, suggesting that they are being lost. Moreover, intronless genes are less dense in putative ESEs than intron-containing ones. However, this latter difference is likely due to the skewed base composition of intronless sequences, a skew that is in line with the general GC richness of few exon genes. Indeed, after controlling for such biases, we find that both intronless and intron-containing genes are denser in ESEs than expected by chance. Importantly, nucleotide-controlled analysis of evolutionary rates at synonymous sites in ESEs indicates that the ESEs in intronless genes are under purifying selection in both human and mouse. We conclude that on the loss of introns, some but not all, ESE motifs are lost, the remainder having functions beyond a role in splice promotion. These results have implications for the design of intronless transgenes and for understanding the causes of selection on synonymous sites. PMID:26802218

  14. The functional modulation of epigenetic regulators by alternative splicing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Balbás Marian

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epigenetic regulators (histone acetyltransferases, methyltransferases, chromatin-remodelling enzymes, etc play a fundamental role in the control of gene expression by modifying the local state of chromatin. However, due to their recent discovery, little is yet known about their own regulation. This paper addresses this point, focusing on alternative splicing regulation, a mechanism already known to play an important role in other protein families, e.g. transcription factors, membrane receptors, etc. Results To this end, we compiled the data available on the presence/absence of alternative splicing for a set of 160 different epigenetic regulators, taking advantage of the relatively large amount of unexplored data on alternative splicing available in public databases. We found that 49 % (70 % in human of these genes express more than one transcript. We then studied their alternative splicing patterns, focusing on those changes affecting the enzyme's domain composition. In general, we found that these sequence changes correspond to different mechanisms, either repressing the enzyme's function (e.g. by creating dominant-negative inhibitors of the functional isoform or creating isoforms with new functions. Conclusion We conclude that alternative splicing of epigenetic regulators can be an important tool for the function modulation of these enzymes. Considering that the latter control the transcriptional state of large sets of genes, we propose that epigenetic regulation of gene expression is itself strongly regulated by alternative splicing.

  15. SF3B1 Association with Chromatin Determines Splicing Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nir Kfir

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Much remains unknown concerning the mechanism by which the splicing machinery pinpoints short exons within intronic sequences and how splicing factors are directed to their pre-mRNA targets. One probable explanation lies in differences in chromatin organization between exons and introns. Proteomic, co-immunoprecipitation, and sedimentation analyses described here indicate that SF3B1, an essential splicing component of the U2 snRNP complex, is strongly associated with nucleosomes. ChIP-seq and RNA-seq analyses reveal that SF3B1 specifically binds nucleosomes located at exonic positions. SF3B1 binding is enriched at nucleosomes positioned over short exons flanked by long introns that are also characterized by differential GC content between exons and introns. Disruption of SF3B1 binding to such nucleosomes affects splicing of these exons similarly to SF3B1 knockdown. Our findings suggest that the association of SF3B1 with nucleosomes is functionally important for splice-site recognition and that SF3B1 conveys splicing-relevant information embedded in chromatin structure.

  16. Abnormalities in Alternative Splicing of Apoptotic Genes and Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zodwa Dlamini

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is required for normal heart development in the embryo, but has also been shown to be an important factor in the occurrence of heart disease. Alternative splicing of apoptotic genes is currently emerging as a diagnostic and therapeutic target for heart disease. This review addresses the involvement of abnormalities in alternative splicing of apoptotic genes in cardiac disorders including cardiomyopathy, myocardial ischemia and heart failure. Many pro-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family have alternatively spliced isoforms that lack important active domains. These isoforms can play a negative regulatory role by binding to and inhibiting the pro-apoptotic forms. Alternative splicing is observed to be increased in various cardiovascular diseases with the level of alternate transcripts increasing elevated in diseased hearts compared to healthy subjects. In many cases these isoforms appear to be the underlying cause of the disease, while in others they may be induced in response to cardiovascular pathologies. Regardless of this, the detection of alternate splicing events in the heart can serve as useful diagnostic or prognostic tools, while those splicing events that seem to play a causative role in cardiovascular disease make attractive future drug targets.

  17. Tafazzin splice variants and mutations in Barth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwin, Susan M; Manolakos, Athena; Barnett, Sarah Swain; Gonzalez, Iris L

    2014-01-01

    Barth syndrome is caused by mutations in the TAZ (tafazzin) gene on human chromosome Xq28. The human tafazzin gene produces four major mRNA splice variants; two of which have been shown to be functional (TAZ lacking exon 5 and full-length) in complementation studies with yeast and Drosophila. This study characterizes the multiple alternative splice variants of TAZ mRNA and their proportions in blood samples from a cohort of individuals with Barth syndrome (BTHS). Because it has been reported that collection and processing methods can affect the expression of various genes, we tested and chose a stabilizing medium for collecting, shipping and processing of the blood samples of these individuals. In both healthy controls and in BTHS individuals, we found a greater variety of alternatively spliced forms than previously described, with a sizeable proportion of minor splice variants besides the four dominant isoforms. Individuals with certain exonic and intronic splice mutations produce additional mutant mRNAs that could be translated into two or more proteins with different amino acid substitutions in a single individual. A fraction of the minor splice variants is predicted to be non-productive. PMID:24342716

  18. Modulation of Splicing by Single-Stranded Silencing RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Hu, Jiaxin; Hicks, Jessica A; Prakash, Thazha P; Corey, David R

    2015-06-01

    Single-stranded silencing RNAs (ss-siRNAs) are chemically modified single-stranded oligonucleotides that can function through the cellular RNA interference (RNAi) machinery to modulate gene expression. Because their invention is recent, few studies have appeared describing their use and the potential of ss-siRNAs as a platform for controlling gene expression remains largely unknown. Using oligonucleotides to modulate splicing is an important area for therapeutic development and we tested the hypothesis that ss-siRNAs targeting splice sites might also be capable of directing increased production of therapeutically promising protein isoforms. Here we observe that ss-siRNAs alter splicing of dystrophin. Altered splicing requires a seed sequence complementarity to the target and expression of the RNAi factor argonaute 2. These results demonstrate that ss-siRNAs can be used to modulate splicing, providing another option for therapeutic development programs that aim to increase production of key protein isoforms. Splicing is a classical nuclear process and our data showing that it can be modulated through the action of RNA and RNAi factors offers further evidence that RNAi can take place in mammalian cell nuclei. PMID:25757055

  19. Width of gene expression profile drives alternative splicing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Wegmann

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing generates an enormous amount of functional and proteomic diversity in metazoan organisms. This process is probably central to the macromolecular and cellular complexity of higher eukaryotes. While most studies have focused on the molecular mechanism triggering and controlling alternative splicing, as well as on its incidence in different species, its maintenance and evolution within populations has been little investigated. Here, we propose to address these questions by comparing the structural characteristics as well as the functional and transcriptional profiles of genes with monomorphic or polymorphic splicing, referred to as MS and PS genes, respectively. We find that MS and PS genes differ particularly in the number of tissues and cell types where they are expressed.We find a striking deficit of PS genes on the sex chromosomes, particularly on the Y chromosome where it is shown not to be due to the observed lower breadth of expression of genes on that chromosome. The development of a simple model of evolution of cis-regulated alternative splicing leads to predictions in agreement with these observations. It further predicts the conditions for the emergence and the maintenance of cis-regulated alternative splicing, which are both favored by the tissue specific expression of splicing variants. We finally propose that the width of the gene expression profile is an essential factor for the acquisition of new transcript isoforms that could later be maintained by a new form of balancing selection.

  20. On the use of area-averaged void fraction and local bubble chord length entropies as two-phase flow regime indicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, Leonor; Julia, J.E. [Universitat Jaume I, Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica y Construccion Campus de Riu Sec, Castellon (Spain); Paranjape, Sidharth; Hibiki, Takashi; Ishii, Mamoru [Purdue University, Nuclear Engineering Department, West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2010-11-15

    In this work, the use of the area-averaged void fraction and bubble chord length entropies is introduced as flow regime indicators in two-phase flow systems. The entropy provides quantitative information about the disorder in the area-averaged void fraction or bubble chord length distributions. The CPDF (cumulative probability distribution function) of void fractions and bubble chord lengths obtained by means of impedance meters and conductivity probes are used to calculate both entropies. Entropy values for 242 flow conditions in upward two-phase flows in 25.4 and 50.8-mm pipes have been calculated. The measured conditions cover ranges from 0.13 to 5 m/s in the superficial liquid velocity j{sub f} and ranges from 0.01 to 25 m/s in the superficial gas velocity j{sub g}. The physical meaning of both entropies has been interpreted using the visual flow regime map information. The area-averaged void fraction and bubble chord length entropies capability as flow regime indicators have been checked with other statistical parameters and also with different input signals durations. The area-averaged void fraction and the bubble chord length entropies provide better or at least similar results than those obtained with other indicators that include more than one parameter. The entropy is capable to reduce the relevant information of the flow regimes in only one significant and useful parameter. In addition, the entropy computation time is shorter than the majority of the other indicators. The use of one parameter as input also represents faster predictions. (orig.)

  1. Identification of cis-Acting Elements and Splicing Factors Involved in the Regulation of BIM Pre-mRNA Splicing

    OpenAIRE

    Juan, Wen Chun; Roca, Xavier; Ong, S. Tiong

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant changes in the expression of the pro-apoptotic protein, BCL-2-like 11 (BIM), can result in either impaired or excessive apoptosis, which can contribute to tumorigenesis and degenerative disorders, respectively. Altering BIM pre-mRNA splicing is an attractive approach to modulate apoptosis because BIM activity is partly determined by the alternative splicing of exons 3 or 4, whereby exon 3-containing transcripts are not apoptotic. Here we identified several cis-acting elements and spl...

  2. A 5' splice site enhances the recruitment of basal transcription initiation factors in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Christian Kroun; Kahns, Søren; Lykke-Andersen, Søren;

    2008-01-01

    promoter docking of transcription initiation factors TFIID, TFIIB, and TFIIH on a gene containing a functional 5′ splice site. In addition to their promoter association, the TFIID and TFIIH components, TBP and p89, are specifically recruited to the 5′ splice site region. Our data suggest a model in which a......Transcription and pre-mRNA splicing are interdependent events. Although mechanisms governing the effects of transcription on splicing are becoming increasingly clear, the means by which splicing affects transcription remain elusive. Using cell lines stably expressing HIV-1 or β-globin m......RNAs, harboring wild-type or various 5′ splice site mutations, we demonstrate a strong positive correlation between splicing efficiency and transcription activity. Interestingly, a 5′ splice site can stimulate transcription even in the absence of splicing. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments show enhanced...

  3. The splicing activator DAZAP1 integrates splicing control into MEK/Erk-regulated cell proliferation and migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Rajarshi; Roy, Sreerupa Ghose; Tsai, Yihsuan S.; Tripathy, Ashutosh; Graves, Lee M.; Wang, Zefeng

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-messenger RNA (mRNA) is a critical stage of gene regulation in response to environmental stimuli. Here we show that DAZAP1, an RNA-binding protein involved in mammalian development and spermatogenesis, promotes inclusion of weak exons through specific recognition of diverse cis-elements. The carboxy-terminal proline-rich domain of DAZAP1 interacts with and neutralizes general splicing inhibitors, and is sufficient to activate splicing when recruited to pre-mRNA. This domain is phosphorylated by the MEK/Erk (extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase) pathway and this modification is essential for the splicing regulatory activity and the nuclear/cytoplasmic translocation of DAZAP1. Using mRNA-seq, we identify endogenous splicing events regulated by DAZAP1, many of which are involved in maintaining cell growth. Knockdown or over-expression of DAZAP1 causes a cell proliferation defect. Taken together, these studies reveal a molecular mechanism that integrates splicing control into MEK/Erk-regulated cell proliferation.

  4. Method of predicting Splice Sites based on signal interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deogun Jitender S

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Predicting and proper ranking of canonical splice sites (SSs is a challenging problem in bioinformatics and machine learning communities. Any progress in SSs recognition will lead to better understanding of splicing mechanism. We introduce several new approaches of combining a priori knowledge for improved SS detection. First, we design our new Bayesian SS sensor based on oligonucleotide counting. To further enhance prediction quality, we applied our new de novo motif detection tool MHMMotif to intronic ends and exons. We combine elements found with sensor information using Naive Bayesian Network, as implemented in our new tool SpliceScan. Results According to our tests, the Bayesian sensor outperforms the contemporary Maximum Entropy sensor for 5' SS detection. We report a number of putative Exonic (ESE and Intronic (ISE Splicing Enhancers found by MHMMotif tool. T-test statistics on mouse/rat intronic alignments indicates, that detected elements are on average more conserved as compared to other oligos, which supports our assumption of their functional importance. The tool has been shown to outperform the SpliceView, GeneSplicer, NNSplice, Genio and NetUTR tools for the test set of human genes. SpliceScan outperforms all contemporary ab initio gene structural prediction tools on the set of 5' UTR gene fragments. Conclusion Designed methods have many attractive properties, compared to existing approaches. Bayesian sensor, MHMMotif program and SpliceScan tools are freely available on our web site. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Manyuan Long, Arcady Mushegian and Mikhail Gelfand.

  5. mRNA 5′-leader trans-splicing in the chordates

    OpenAIRE

    Vandenberghe, Amanda E.; Meedel, Thomas H.; Hastings, Kenneth E.M.

    2001-01-01

    We report the discovery of mRNA 5′-leader trans-splicing (SL trans-splicing) in the chordates. In the ascidian protochordate Ciona intestinalis, the mRNAs of at least seven genes undergo trans-splicing of a 16-nucleotide 5′-leader apparently derived from a 46-nucleotide RNA that shares features with previously characterized splice donor SL RNAs. SL trans-splicing was known previously to occur in several protist and metazoan phyla, however, this is the first report of SL trans-splicing within ...

  6. Knee joint replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knee joint replacement is a surgery to replace a knee joint with a man-made joint. The artificial joint is called a prosthesis . ... cartilage and bone are removed from the knee joint. Man-made pieces are then placed in the ...

  7. Reliability of Tubular Joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    In this paper the preliminary results obtained by tests on tubular joints are presented. The joints are T-joints and the loading is static. It is the intention in continuation of these tests to perform tests on other types of joints (e.g. Y-joints) and also with dynamic loading. The purpose of th...

  8. Analysis of a splice array experiment elucidates roles of chromatin elongation factor Spt4-5 in splicing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Xiao

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Splicing is an important process for regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes, and it has important functional links to other steps of gene expression. Two examples of these linkages include Ceg1, a component of the mRNA capping enzyme, and the chromatin elongation factors Spt4-5, both of which have recently been shown to play a role in the normal splicing of several genes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using a genomic approach to characterize the roles of Spt4-5 in splicing, we used splicing-sensitive DNA microarrays to identify specific sets of genes that are mis-spliced in ceg1, spt4, and spt5 mutants. In the context of a complex, nested, experimental design featuring 22 dye-swap array hybridizations, comprising both biological and technical replicates, we applied five appropriate statistical models for assessing differential expression between wild-type and the mutants. To refine selection of differential expression genes, we then used a robust model-synthesizing approach, Differential Expression via Distance Synthesis, to integrate all five models. The resultant list of differentially expressed genes was then further analyzed with regard to select attributes: we found that highly transcribed genes with long introns were most sensitive to spt mutations. QPCR confirmation of differential expression was established for the limited number of genes evaluated. In this paper, we showcase splicing array technology, as well as powerful, yet general, statistical methodology for assessing differential expression, in the context of a real, complex experimental design. Our results suggest that the Spt4-Spt5 complex may help coordinate splicing with transcription under conditions that present kinetic challenges to spliceosome assembly or function.

  9. Oncogenes and RNA splicing of human tumor viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajiro, Masahiko; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2014-09-01

    Approximately 10.8% of human cancers are associated with infection by an oncogenic virus. These viruses include human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV), human T-cell leukemia virus 1 (HTLV-1), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). These oncogenic viruses, with the exception of HCV, require the host RNA splicing machinery in order to exercise their oncogenic activities, a strategy that allows the viruses to efficiently export and stabilize viral RNA and to produce spliced RNA isoforms from a bicistronic or polycistronic RNA transcript for efficient protein translation. Infection with a tumor virus affects the expression of host genes, including host RNA splicing factors, which play a key role in regulating viral RNA splicing of oncogene transcripts. A current prospective focus is to explore how alternative RNA splicing and the expression of viral oncogenes take place in a cell- or tissue-specific manner in virus-induced human carcinogenesis. PMID:26038756

  10. Two new splice variants in porcine PPARGC1A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peelman Luc J

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PPARGC1A is a coactivator with a vital and central role in fat and energy metabolism. It is considered to be a candidate gene for meat quality in pigs and is involved in the development of obesity and diabetes in humans. How its many functions are regulated, is however still largely unclear. Therefore a transcription profile of PPARGC1A in 32 tissues and 4 embryonic developmental stages in the pig was constructed by screening its cDNA for possible splice variants with exon-spanning primers. Findings This led to the discovery of 2 new splice variants in the pig, which were subsequently also detected in human tissues. In these variants, exon 8 was either completely or partly (the last 66 bp were conserved spliced out, potentially coding for a much shorter protein of respectively 337 and 359 amino acids (aa, of which the first 291 aa would be the same compared to the complete protein (796 aa. Conclusion Considering the functional domains of the PPARGC1A protein, it is very likely these splice variants considerably affect the function of the protein and alternative splicing could be one of the mechanisms by which the diverse functions of PPARGC1A are regulated.

  11. LHC dipole magnet splice resistance from SM18 data mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The splice incident which happened during commissioning of the LHC on the 19. of September 2008 caused damage to several magnets and adjacent equipment. This raised not only the question of how it happened, but also about the state of all other splices. The inter magnet splices were immediately studied and new measurements recorded, but the internal magnet splices were still a concern. At the Chamonix meeting in January 2009, the CERN management decided to create a working group to analyse quench data of the magnet acceptance tests in an attempt to find indications for bad splices in the main dipoles. This resulted in a data-mining project that took about one year to complete. This presentation describes how the data was stored, extracted and analysed reusing existing 'LabVIEW' based tools, during this campaign more than 23000 magnet performance measurements were scrutinized. We also present the encountered difficulties and the importance of combining measured data with operator notes in the logbook. (authors)

  12. BRR2a Affects Flowering Time via FLC Splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahrez, Walid; Shin, Juhyun; Muñoz-Viana, Rafael; Figueiredo, Duarte D; Trejo-Arellano, Minerva S; Exner, Vivien; Siretskiy, Alexey; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Köhler, Claudia; Hennig, Lars

    2016-04-01

    Several pathways control time to flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana through transcriptional and posttranscriptional gene regulation. In recent years, mRNA processing has gained interest as a critical regulator of flowering time control in plants. However, the molecular mechanisms linking RNA splicing to flowering time are not well understood. In a screen for Arabidopsis early flowering mutants we identified an allele of BRR2a. BRR2 proteins are components of the spliceosome and highly conserved in eukaryotes. Arabidopsis BRR2a is ubiquitously expressed in all analyzed tissues and involved in the processing of flowering time gene transcripts, most notably FLC. A missense mutation of threonine 895 in BRR2a caused defects in FLC splicing and greatly reduced FLC transcript levels. Reduced FLC expression increased transcription of FT and SOC1 leading to early flowering in both short and long days. Genome-wide experiments established that only a small set of introns was not correctly spliced in the brr2a mutant. Compared to control introns, retained introns were often shorter and GC-poor, had low H3K4me1 and CG methylation levels, and were often derived from genes with a high-H3K27me3-low-H3K36me3 signature. We propose that BRR2a is specifically needed for efficient splicing of a subset of introns characterized by a combination of factors including intron size, sequence and chromatin, and that FLC is most sensitive to splicing defects. PMID:27100965

  13. Joint Replacement Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Clinical Trial Journal Articles Arthritis July 2014 Joint Replacement Surgery: Health Information Basics for You and Your Family What Is Joint Replacement Surgery? Joint replacement surgery is removing a ...

  14. Joint x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - joint; Arthrography; Arthrogram ... x-ray technologist will help you position the joint to be x-rayed on the table. Once in place, pictures are taken. The joint may be moved into other positions for more ...

  15. Joint instability and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blalock, Darryl; Miller, Andrew; Tilley, Michael; Wang, Jinxi

    2015-01-01

    Joint instability creates a clinical and economic burden in the health care system. Injuries and disorders that directly damage the joint structure or lead to joint instability are highly associated with osteoarthritis (OA). Thus, understanding the physiology of joint stability and the mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA is of clinical significance. The first section of this review discusses the structure and function of major joint tissues, including periarticular muscles, which play a significant role in joint stability. Because the knee, ankle, and shoulder joints demonstrate a high incidence of ligament injury and joint instability, the second section summarizes the mechanisms of ligament injury-associated joint instability of these joints. The final section highlights the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanical and biological mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA. These advances may lead to new opportunities for clinical intervention in the prevention and early treatment of OA. PMID:25741184

  16. Spacesuit mobility knee joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vykukal, H. C. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Pressure suit mobility joints are for use in interconnecting adjacent segments of an hermetically sealed spacesuit in which low torques, low leakage and a high degree of reliability are required. Each of the joints is a special purpose joint characterized by substantially constant volume and low torque characteristics and includes linkages which restrain the joint from longitudinal distension and includes a flexible, substantially impermeable diaphragm of tubular configuration spanning the distance between pivotally supported annuli. The diaphragms of selected joints include rolling convolutions for balancing the joints, while various joints include wedge-shaped sections which enhance the range of motion for the joints.

  17. Cloning, expression and alternative splicing of the novel isoform of hTCP11 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Yong-xin; Zhang, Si-zhong; Wu, Qia-qing;

    2003-01-01

    To identify a novel isoform of hTCP11 gene and investigate its expression and alternative splicing.......To identify a novel isoform of hTCP11 gene and investigate its expression and alternative splicing....

  18. Functional Characterization of NIPBL Physiological Splice Variants and Eight Splicing Mutations in Patients with Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María E. Teresa-Rodrigo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS is a congenital developmental disorder characterized by distinctive craniofacial features, growth retardation, cognitive impairment, limb defects, hirsutism, and multisystem involvement. Mutations in five genes encoding structural components (SMC1A, SMC3, RAD21 or functionally associated factors (NIPBL, HDAC8 of the cohesin complex have been found in patients with CdLS. In about 60% of the patients, mutations in NIPBL could be identified. Interestingly, 17% of them are predicted to change normal splicing, however, detailed molecular investigations are often missing. Here, we report the first systematic study of the physiological splicing of the NIPBL gene, that would reveal the identification of four new splicing isoforms ΔE10, ΔE12, ΔE33,34, and B’. Furthermore, we have investigated nine mutations affecting splice-sites in the NIPBL gene identified in twelve CdLS patients. All mutations have been examined on the DNA and RNA level, as well as by in silico analyses. Although patients with mutations affecting NIPBL splicing show a broad clinical variability, the more severe phenotypes seem to be associated with aberrant transcripts resulting in a shift of the reading frame.

  19. The hnRNP 2H9 gene, which is involved in the splicing reaction, is a multiply spliced gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B

    2000-01-01

    The hnRNP 2H9 gene products are involved in the splicing process and participate in early heat shock-induced splicing arrest. By combining low/high stringency hybridisation, database search, Northern and Western blotting it is shown that the gene is alternatively spliced into at least six...... transcripts: hnRNPs 2H9, 2H9A, 2H9B, 2H9C, 2H9D and 2H9E predicting proteins containing 346, 331, 297, 215, 145 and 139 amino acids, respectively. The hnRNP 2H9A cDNA sequence was used to obtain a genomic BAC clone and the structure of the hnRNP 2H9 gene was revealed by sequencing two subclones together...... indicates that the alternatively spliced transcripts give rise to different sets and levels of proteins expressed among various human cells and tissues. Due to their great structural variations the different proteins may thus possess different functions in the splicing reaction. Udgivelsesdato: 2000-Jun-21...

  20. RBM20, a gene for hereditary cardiomyopathy, regulates titin splicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; Schafer, Sebastian; Greaser, Marion L.; Radke, Michael H.; Liss, Martin; Govindarajan, Thirupugal; Maatz, Henrike; Schulz, Herbert; Li, Shijun; Parrish, Amanda M.; Dauksaite, Vita; Vakeel, Padmanabhan; Klaassen, Sabine; Gerull, Brenda; Thierfelder, Ludwig; Regitz-Zagrosek, Vera; Hacker, Timothy A.; Saupe, Kurt W.; Dec, G. William; Ellinor, Patrick T.; MacRae, Calum A.; Spallek, Bastian; Fischer, Robert; Perrot, Andreas; Özcelik, Cemil; Saar, Kathrin; Hubner, Norbert; Gotthardt, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing plays a major role in the adaptation of cardiac function exemplified by the isoform switch of titin, which adjusts ventricular filling. We previously identified a rat strain deficient in titin splicing. Using genetic mapping, we found a loss-of-function mutation in RBM20 as the underlying cause for the pathological titin isoform expression. Mutations in human RBM20 have previously been shown to cause dilated cardiomyopathy. We showed that the phenotype of Rbm20 deficient rats resembles the human pathology. Deep sequencing of the human and rat cardiac transcriptome revealed an RBM20 dependent regulation of alternative splicing. Additionally to titin we identified a set of 30 genes with conserved regulation between human and rat. This network is enriched for genes previously linked to cardiomyopathy, ion-homeostasis, and sarcomere biology. Our studies emphasize the importance of posttranscriptional regulation in cardiac function and provide mechanistic insights into the pathogenesis of human heart failure. PMID:22466703

  1. Widespread Expansion of Protein Interaction Capabilities by Alternative Splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinping; Coulombe-Huntington, Jasmin; Kang, Shuli; Sheynkman, Gloria M; Hao, Tong; Richardson, Aaron; Sun, Song; Yang, Fan; Shen, Yun A; Murray, Ryan R; Spirohn, Kerstin; Begg, Bridget E; Duran-Frigola, Miquel; MacWilliams, Andrew; Pevzner, Samuel J; Zhong, Quan; Trigg, Shelly A; Tam, Stanley; Ghamsari, Lila; Sahni, Nidhi; Yi, Song; Rodriguez, Maria D; Balcha, Dawit; Tan, Guihong; Costanzo, Michael; Andrews, Brenda; Boone, Charles; Zhou, Xianghong J; Salehi-Ashtiani, Kourosh; Charloteaux, Benoit; Chen, Alyce A; Calderwood, Michael A; Aloy, Patrick; Roth, Frederick P; Hill, David E; Iakoucheva, Lilia M; Xia, Yu; Vidal, Marc

    2016-02-11

    While alternative splicing is known to diversify the functional characteristics of some genes, the extent to which protein isoforms globally contribute to functional complexity on a proteomic scale remains unknown. To address this systematically, we cloned full-length open reading frames of alternatively spliced transcripts for a large number of human genes and used protein-protein interaction profiling to functionally compare hundreds of protein isoform pairs. The majority of isoform pairs share less than 50% of their interactions. In the global context of interactome network maps, alternative isoforms tend to behave like distinct proteins rather than minor variants of each other. Interaction partners specific to alternative isoforms tend to be expressed in a highly tissue-specific manner and belong to distinct functional modules. Our strategy, applicable to other functional characteristics, reveals a widespread expansion of protein interaction capabilities through alternative splicing and suggests that many alternative "isoforms" are functionally divergent (i.e., "functional alloforms"). PMID:26871637

  2. Alternative splice variants of the human PD-1 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian; Ohm-Laursen, Line; Barington, Torben;

    2005-01-01

    PD-1 is an immunoregulatory receptor expressed on the surface of activated T cells, B cells, and monocytes. We describe four alternatively spliced PD-1 mRNA transcripts (PD-1Deltaex2, PD-1Deltaex3, PD-1Deltaex2,3, and PD-1Deltaex2,3,4) in addition to the full length isoform. PD-1Deltaex2 and PD-1......Deltaex3 are generated by alternative splicing where exon 2 (extracellular IgV-like domain) and exon 3 (transmembrane domain) respectively are spliced out. PD-1Deltaex3 is therefore likely to encode a soluble form of PD-1. PD-1Deltaex2,3 lacks exon 2 and 3. These three variants have unaffected open...

  3. Widespread evolutionary conservation of alternatively spliced exons in caenorhabditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irimia, Manuel; Rukov, Jakob L; Penny, David;

    2007-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) contributes to increased transcriptome and proteome diversity in various eukaryotic lineages. Previous studies showed low levels of conservation of alternatively spliced (cassette) exons within mammals and within dipterans. We report a strikingly different pattern in...... patterns of splicing. The functionality of the vast majority of cassette exons is underscored by various other features. We suggest that differences in conservation between lineages reflect differences in levels of functionality and further suggest that these differences are due to differences in intron...... length and the strength of consensus boundaries across lineages. Finally, we demonstrate an inverse relationship between AS and gene duplication, suggesting that the latter may be primarily responsible for the emergence of new functional transcripts in nematodes. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Feb...

  4. Adhesive Characterization and Progressive Damage Analysis of Bonded Composite Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girolamo, Donato; Davila, Carlos G.; Leone, Frank A.; Lin, Shih-Yung

    2014-01-01

    The results of an experimental/numerical campaign aimed to develop progressive damage analysis (PDA) tools for predicting the strength of a composite bonded joint under tensile loads are presented. The PDA is based on continuum damage mechanics (CDM) to account for intralaminar damage, and cohesive laws to account for interlaminar and adhesive damage. The adhesive response is characterized using standard fracture specimens and digital image correlation (DIC). The displacement fields measured by DIC are used to calculate the J-integrals, from which the associated cohesive laws of the structural adhesive can be derived. A finite element model of a sandwich conventional splice joint (CSJ) under tensile loads was developed. The simulations indicate that the model is capable of predicting the interactions of damage modes that lead to the failure of the joint.

  5. Strengthening of defected beam–column joints using CFRP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed H. Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental study for the structural performance of reinforced concrete (RC exterior beam–column joints rehabilitated using carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP. The present experimental program consists of testing 10 half-scale specimens divided into three groups covering three possible defects in addition to an adequately detailed control specimen. The considered defects include the absence of the transverse reinforcement within the joint core, insufficient bond length for the beam main reinforcement and inadequate spliced implanted column on the joint. Three different strengthening schemes were used to rehabilitate the defected beam–column joints including externally bonded CFRP strips and sheets in addition to near surface mounted (NSM CFRP strips. The failure criteria including ultimate capacity, mode of failure, initial stiffness, ductility and the developed ultimate strain in the reinforcing steel and CFRP were considered and compared for each group for the control and the CFRP-strengthened specimens. The test results showed that the proposed CFRP strengthening configurations represented the best choice for strengthening the first two defects from the viewpoint of the studied failure criteria. On the other hand, the results of the third group showed that strengthening the joint using NSM strip technique enabled the specimen to outperform the structural performance of the control specimen while strengthening the joints using externally bonded CFRP strips and sheets failed to restore the strengthened joints capacity.

  6. Strengthening of defected beam-column joints using CFRP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Mohamed H; Afefy, Hamdy M; Kassem, Nesreen M; Fawzy, Tarek M

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study for the structural performance of reinforced concrete (RC) exterior beam-column joints rehabilitated using carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP). The present experimental program consists of testing 10 half-scale specimens divided into three groups covering three possible defects in addition to an adequately detailed control specimen. The considered defects include the absence of the transverse reinforcement within the joint core, insufficient bond length for the beam main reinforcement and inadequate spliced implanted column on the joint. Three different strengthening schemes were used to rehabilitate the defected beam-column joints including externally bonded CFRP strips and sheets in addition to near surface mounted (NSM) CFRP strips. The failure criteria including ultimate capacity, mode of failure, initial stiffness, ductility and the developed ultimate strain in the reinforcing steel and CFRP were considered and compared for each group for the control and the CFRP-strengthened specimens. The test results showed that the proposed CFRP strengthening configurations represented the best choice for strengthening the first two defects from the viewpoint of the studied failure criteria. On the other hand, the results of the third group showed that strengthening the joint using NSM strip technique enabled the specimen to outperform the structural performance of the control specimen while strengthening the joints using externally bonded CFRP strips and sheets failed to restore the strengthened joints capacity. PMID:25685473

  7. Strengthening of defected beam–column joints using CFRP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Mohamed H.; Afefy, Hamdy M.; Kassem, Nesreen M.; Fawzy, Tarek M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study for the structural performance of reinforced concrete (RC) exterior beam–column joints rehabilitated using carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP). The present experimental program consists of testing 10 half-scale specimens divided into three groups covering three possible defects in addition to an adequately detailed control specimen. The considered defects include the absence of the transverse reinforcement within the joint core, insufficient bond length for the beam main reinforcement and inadequate spliced implanted column on the joint. Three different strengthening schemes were used to rehabilitate the defected beam–column joints including externally bonded CFRP strips and sheets in addition to near surface mounted (NSM) CFRP strips. The failure criteria including ultimate capacity, mode of failure, initial stiffness, ductility and the developed ultimate strain in the reinforcing steel and CFRP were considered and compared for each group for the control and the CFRP-strengthened specimens. The test results showed that the proposed CFRP strengthening configurations represented the best choice for strengthening the first two defects from the viewpoint of the studied failure criteria. On the other hand, the results of the third group showed that strengthening the joint using NSM strip technique enabled the specimen to outperform the structural performance of the control specimen while strengthening the joints using externally bonded CFRP strips and sheets failed to restore the strengthened joints capacity. PMID:25685473

  8. 进入研发新里程的Solstice系列访The Chord company英国代理商DNA Marketing老板Mr.David Amey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    本刊记者

    2010-01-01

    英国著名线材品牌The Chord Company即将推出全新Solstice系列,该Solstice属于目前最高档次的系列。当中包括平衡讯号线、单端RCA线、喇叭线及电源线。该厂代表专程飞到香港为一众传媒解构Solstice内里的奥秘。

  9. Oncogenic Alternative Splicing Switches: Role in Cancer Progression and Prospects for Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Serena Bonomi; Stefania Gallo; Morena Catillo; Daniela Pignataro; Giuseppe Biamonti; Claudia Ghigna

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in the abundance or activities of alternative splicing regulators generate alternatively spliced variants that contribute to multiple aspects of tumor establishment, progression and resistance to therapeutic treatments. Notably, many cancer-associated genes are regulated through alternative splicing suggesting a significant role of this post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism in the production of oncogenes and tumor suppressors. Thus, the study of alternative splicing in cancer ...

  10. DEDB: a database of Drosophila melanogaster exons in splicing graph form

    OpenAIRE

    Tan Tin; Lee Bernett TK; Ranganathan Shoba

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background A wealth of quality genomic and mRNA/EST sequences in recent years has provided the data required for large-scale genome-wide analysis of alternative splicing. We have capitalized on this by constructing a database that contains alternative splicing information organized as splicing graphs, where all transcripts arising from a single gene are collected, organized and classified. The splicing graph then serves as the basis for the classification of the various types of alte...

  11. A reliable method for quantification of splice variants using RT-qPCR

    OpenAIRE

    Camacho Londoño, Julia; Philipp, Stephan E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The majority of protein isoforms arise from alternative splicing of the encoding primary RNA transcripts. To understand the significance of single splicing events, reliable techniques are needed to determine their incidence. However, existing methods are labour-intensive, error-prone or of limited use. Results Here, we present an improved method to determine the relative incidence of transcripts that arise from alternative splicing at a single site. Splice variants were quantified ...

  12. Normal and abnormal mechanisms of gene splicing and relevance to inherited skin diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Wessagowit, Vesarat; Nalla, Vijay K.; Rogan, Peter K; McGrath, John A

    2005-01-01

    The process of excising introns from pre-mRNA complexes is directed by specific genomic DNA sequences at intron—exon borders known as splice sites. These regions contain well-conserved motifs which allow the splicing process to proceed in a regulated and structured manner. However, as well as conventional splicing, several genes have the inherent capacity to undergo alternative splicing, thus allowing synthesis of multiple gene transcripts, perhaps with different functional properties. Within...

  13. SASD: the Synthetic Alternative Splicing Database for identifying novel isoform from proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Fan; Drabier, Renee

    2013-01-01

    Background Alternative splicing is an important and widespread mechanism for generating protein diversity and regulating protein expression. High-throughput identification and analysis of alternative splicing in the protein level has more advantages than in the mRNA level. The combination of alternative splicing database and tandem mass spectrometry provides a powerful technique for identification, analysis and characterization of potential novel alternative splicing protein isoforms from pro...

  14. Genome-wide survey of allele-specific splicing in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Nembaware, Victoria; Lupindo, Bukiwe; Schouest, Katherine; Spillane, Charles; Scheffler, Konrad; Seoighe, Cathal

    2008-01-01

    Background Accurate mRNA splicing depends on multiple regulatory signals encoded in the transcribed RNA sequence. Many examples of mutations within human splice regulatory regions that alter splicing qualitatively or quantitatively have been reported and allelic differences in mRNA splicing are likely to be a common and important source of phenotypic diversity at the molecular level, in addition to their contribution to genetic disease susceptibility. However, because the effect of a mutation...

  15. Genome-wide survey of allele-specific splicing in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Scheffler Konrad; Spillane Charles; Schouest Katherine; Lupindo Bukiwe; Nembaware Victoria; Seoighe Cathal

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Accurate mRNA splicing depends on multiple regulatory signals encoded in the transcribed RNA sequence. Many examples of mutations within human splice regulatory regions that alter splicing qualitatively or quantitatively have been reported and allelic differences in mRNA splicing are likely to be a common and important source of phenotypic diversity at the molecular level, in addition to their contribution to genetic disease susceptibility. However, because the effect of a...

  16. Quantification of stochastic noise of splicing and polyadenylation in Entamoeba histolytica

    OpenAIRE

    Hon, Chung-Chau; Weber, Christian; Sismeiro, Odile; Proux, Caroline; Koutero, Mikael; Deloger, Marc; Das, Sarbashis; Agrahari, Mridula; Dillies, Marie-Agnes; JAGLA, BERND; Coppee, Jean-Yves; Bhattacharya, Alok; Guillen, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Alternative splicing and polyadenylation were observed pervasively in eukaryotic messenger RNAs. These alternative isoforms could either be consequences of physiological regulation or stochastic noise of RNA processing. To quantify the extent of stochastic noise in splicing and polyadenylation, we analyzed the alternative usage of splicing and polyadenylation sites in Entamoeba histolytica using RNA-Seq. First, we identified a large number of rarely spliced alternative junctions and then show...

  17. The Alternative Splicing Gallery (ASG): bridging the gap between genome and transcriptome

    OpenAIRE

    Leipzig, Jeremy; Pevzner, Pavel; Heber, Steffen

    2004-01-01

    Alternative splicing essentially increases the diversity of the transcriptome and has important implications for physiology, development and the genesis of diseases. Conventionally, alternative splicing is investigated in a case-by-case fashion, but this becomes cumbersome and error prone if genes show a huge abundance of different splice variants. We use a different approach and integrate all transcripts derived from a gene into a single splicing graph. Each transcript corresponds to a path ...

  18. Context-dependent splicing regulation: Exon definition, co-occurring motif pairs and tissue specificity

    OpenAIRE

    Ke, Shengdong; CHASIN, LAWRENCE A.

    2011-01-01

    Splicing is a crucial process in gene expression in higher organisms because: (1) most vertebrate genes contain introns; and (2) alternative splicing is primarily responsible for increasing proteomic complexity and functional diversity. Intron definition, the coordination across an intron, is a mandatory step in the splicing process. However, exon definition, the coordination across an exon, is also thought to be required for the splicing of most vertebrate exons. Recent investigations of exo...

  19. Pre-mRNA splicing during transcription in the mammalian system

    OpenAIRE

    Pandya-Jones, Amy

    2011-01-01

    Splicing of RNA polymerase II (polII) transcripts is a crucial step in gene expression and a key generator of mRNA diversity. Splicing and transcription have been generally been studied in isolation, although in vivo pre-mRNA splicing occurs in concert with transcription. The two processes appear to be functionally connected because a number of variables that regulate transcription have been identified as also influencing splicing. However, the mechanisms that couple the two processes are lar...

  20. Rectifier of aberrant mRNA splicing recovers tRNA modification in familial dysautonomia

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshida, Mayumi; Kataoka, Naoyuki; Miyauchi, Kenjyo; Ohe, Kenji; Iida, Kei; Yoshida, Suguru; Nojima, Takayuki; Okuno, Yukiko; Onogi, Hiroshi; Usui, Tomomi; Takeuchi, Akihide; Hosoya, Takamitsu; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Hagiwara, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) is caused by missplicing of the IκB kinase complex-associated protein (IKAP) gene, which results in the skipping of exon 20, especially in neurons. FD would be treatable if exon 20 inclusion were increased correctly to reestablish correct splicing. Here, we have established a dual-color splicing reporter that recapitulates FD-type splicing. By using this reporter, we have identified a small chemical compound, named rectifier of aberrant splicing (RECTAS), that recti...

  1. Assembly of splicing complexes on exon 11 of the human insulin receptor gene does not correlate with splicing efficiency in-vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caples Matt

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Incorporation of exon 11 of the insulin receptor gene is both developmentally and hormonally-regulated. Previously, we have shown the presence of enhancer and silencer elements that modulate the incorporation of the small 36-nucleotide exon. In this study, we investigated the role of inherent splice site strength in the alternative splicing decision and whether recognition of the splice sites is the major determinant of exon incorporation. Results We found that mutation of the flanking sub-optimal splice sites to consensus sequences caused the exon to be constitutively spliced in-vivo. These findings are consistent with the exon-definition model for splicing. In-vitro splicing of RNA templates containing exon 11 and portions of the upstream intron recapitulated the regulation seen in-vivo. Unexpectedly, we found that the splice sites are occupied and spliceosomal complex A was assembled on all templates in-vitro irrespective of splicing efficiency. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that the exon-definition model explains alternative splicing of exon 11 in the IR gene in-vivo but not in-vitro. The in-vitro results suggest that the regulation occurs at a later step in spliceosome assembly on this exon.

  2. Interplay between DMD point mutations and splicing signals in Dystrophinopathy phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonàs Juan-Mateu

    Full Text Available DMD nonsense and frameshift mutations lead to severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy while in-frame mutations lead to milder Becker muscular dystrophy. Exceptions are found in 10% of cases and the production of alternatively spliced transcripts is considered a key modifier of disease severity. Several exonic mutations have been shown to induce exon-skipping, while splice site mutations result in exon-skipping or activation of cryptic splice sites. However, factors determining the splicing pathway are still unclear. Point mutations provide valuable information regarding the regulation of pre-mRNA splicing and elements defining exon identity in the DMD gene. Here we provide a comprehensive analysis of 98 point mutations related to clinical phenotype and their effect on muscle mRNA and dystrophin expression. Aberrant splicing was found in 27 mutations due to alteration of splice sites or splicing regulatory elements. Bioinformatics analysis was performed to test the ability of the available algorithms to predict consequences on mRNA and to investigate the major factors that determine the splicing pathway in mutations affecting splicing signals. Our findings suggest that the splicing pathway is highly dependent on the interplay between splice site strength and density of regulatory elements.

  3. DEDB: a database of Drosophila melanogaster exons in splicing graph form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Tin

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A wealth of quality genomic and mRNA/EST sequences in recent years has provided the data required for large-scale genome-wide analysis of alternative splicing. We have capitalized on this by constructing a database that contains alternative splicing information organized as splicing graphs, where all transcripts arising from a single gene are collected, organized and classified. The splicing graph then serves as the basis for the classification of the various types of alternative splicing events. Description DEDB http://proline.bic.nus.edu.sg/dedb/index.html is a database of Drosophila melanogaster exons obtained from FlyBase arranged in a splicing graph form that permits the creation of simple rules allowing for the classification of alternative splicing events. Pfam domains were also mapped onto the protein sequences allowing users to access the impact of alternative splicing events on domain organization. Conclusions DEDB's catalogue of splicing graphs facilitates genome-wide classification of alternative splicing events for genome analysis. The splicing graph viewer brings together genome, transcript, protein and domain information to facilitate biologists in understanding the implications of alternative splicing.

  4. Joint fluid Gram stain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gram stain of joint fluid ... A sample of joint fluid is needed. The fluid sample is sent to a lab where a small drop is placed in a ... on how to prepare for the removal of joint fluid, see joint fluid aspiration .

  5. The reciprocal regulation between splicing and 3'-end processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaida, Daisuke

    2016-07-01

    Most eukaryotic precursor mRNAs are subjected to RNA processing events, including 5'-end capping, splicing and 3'-end processing. These processing events were historically studied independently; however, since the early 1990s tremendous efforts by many research groups have revealed that these processing factors interact with each other to control each other's functions. U1 snRNP and its components negatively regulate polyadenylation of precursor mRNAs. Importantly, this function is necessary for protecting the integrity of the transcriptome and for regulating gene length and the direction of transcription. In addition, physical and functional interactions occur between splicing factors and 3'-end processing factors across the last exon. These interactions activate or inhibit splicing and 3'-end processing depending on the context. Therefore, splicing and 3'-end processing are reciprocally regulated in many ways through the complex protein-protein interaction network. Although interesting questions remain, future studies will illuminate the molecular mechanisms underlying the reciprocal regulation. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:499-511. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1348 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27019070

  6. SmD1 is required for spliced leader biogenesis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zeiner, G. M.; Foldynová, Silvie; Sturm, N. R.; Lukeš, Julius; Campbell, D. A.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 1 (2004), s. 241-244. ISSN 1535-9778 Grant ostatní: NIH(US) AI34536; NIH(US) AI054496 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6022909 Keywords : Kinetoplastida * Trypanosoma * spliced leader RNA Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.954, year: 2004

  7. Leveraging transcript quantification for fast computation of alternative splicing profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamancos, Gael P; Pagès, Amadís; Trincado, Juan L; Bellora, Nicolás; Eyras, Eduardo

    2015-09-01

    Alternative splicing plays an essential role in many cellular processes and bears major relevance in the understanding of multiple diseases, including cancer. High-throughput RNA sequencing allows genome-wide analyses of splicing across multiple conditions. However, the increasing number of available data sets represents a major challenge in terms of computation time and storage requirements. We describe SUPPA, a computational tool to calculate relative inclusion values of alternative splicing events, exploiting fast transcript quantification. SUPPA accuracy is comparable and sometimes superior to standard methods using simulated as well as real RNA-sequencing data compared with experimentally validated events. We assess the variability in terms of the choice of annotation and provide evidence that using complete transcripts rather than more transcripts per gene provides better estimates. Moreover, SUPPA coupled with de novo transcript reconstruction methods does not achieve accuracies as high as using quantification of known transcripts, but remains comparable to existing methods. Finally, we show that SUPPA is more than 1000 times faster than standard methods. Coupled with fast transcript quantification, SUPPA provides inclusion values at a much higher speed than existing methods without compromising accuracy, thereby facilitating the systematic splicing analysis of large data sets with limited computational resources. The software is implemented in Python 2.7 and is available under the MIT license at https://bitbucket.org/regulatorygenomicsupf/suppa. PMID:26179515

  8. Assembly of splicing complexes on exon 11 of the human insulin receptor gene does not correlate with splicing efficiency in-vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Caples Matt; Evans Lui-Guojing; Webster Nicholas JG; Erker Laura; Chew Shern L

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Incorporation of exon 11 of the insulin receptor gene is both developmentally and hormonally-regulated. Previously, we have shown the presence of enhancer and silencer elements that modulate the incorporation of the small 36-nucleotide exon. In this study, we investigated the role of inherent splice site strength in the alternative splicing decision and whether recognition of the splice sites is the major determinant of exon incorporation. Results We found that mutation of...

  9. Electromechanical behaviour of REBCO tape lap splices under transverse compressive loading

    CERN Document Server

    Grether, A; Ballarino, A.; Bottura, L.

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the influence of transverse compressive stress on the resistance and critical current (Ic) of soldered REBCO tape lap splices. Internal contact resistances dominate the overall REBCO lap splice resistances. Application of transverse compressive stress up to 250 MPa during the resistance measurements does not alter the resistance and Ic of the soldered REBCO splices that were studied. The resistance of unsoldered REBCO tape lap splices depends strongly on the contact pressure. At a transverse compressive stress of 100 MPa to which Roebel cables are typically exposed in high field magnets, the crossover splice contact resistance is comparable to the internal tape resistances.

  10. Sip1, a Novel RS Domain-Containing Protein Essential for Pre-mRNA Splicing

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Wan-jiang; Jane Y Wu

    1998-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that protein-protein interactions among splicing factors may play an important role in pre-mRNA splicing. We report here identification and functional characterization of a new splicing factor, Sip1 (SC35-interacting protein 1). Sip1 was initially identified by virtue of its interaction with SC35, a splicing factor of the SR family. Sip1 interacts with not only several SR proteins but also with U1-70K and U2AF65, proteins associated with 5′ and 3′ splice sites, res...

  11. Protein Trans-Splicing as a Means for Viral Vector-Mediated In Vivo Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Juan; Sun, Wenchang; Wang, Bing; Xiao, Xiao; Liu, Xiang-Qin

    2008-01-01

    Inteins catalyze protein splicing in a fashion similar to how self-splicing introns catalyze RNA splicing. Split-inteins catalyze precise ligation of two separate polypeptides through trans-splicing in a highly specific manner. Here we report a method of using protein trans-splicing to circumvent the packaging size limit of gene therapy vectors. To demonstrate this method, we chose a large dystrophin gene and an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector, which has a small packaging size. A highly f...

  12. Electromechanical behaviour of REBCO tape lap splices under transverse compressive loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grether, A.; Scheuerlein, C.; Ballarino, A.; Bottura, L.

    2016-07-01

    We have studied the influence of transverse compressive stress on the resistance and critical current (I c ) of soldered REBCO tape lap splices. Internal contact resistances dominate the overall REBCO lap splice resistances. Application of transverse compressive stress up to 250 MPa during the resistance measurements does not alter the resistance and I c of the soldered REBCO splices that were studied. The resistance of unsoldered REBCO tape lap splices depends strongly on the contact pressure. At a transverse compressive stress of 100 MPa, to which Roebel cables are typically exposed in high field magnets, the crossover splice contact resistance is comparable to the internal tape resistances.

  13. Methods for Using Durable Adhesively Bonded Joints for Sandwich Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeltzer, Stanley S., III (Inventor); Lundgren, Eric C. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Systems, methods, and apparatus for increasing durability of adhesively bonded joints in a sandwich structure. Such systems, methods, and apparatus includes an first face sheet and an second face sheet as well as an insert structure, the insert structure having a first insert face sheet, a second insert face sheet, and an insert core material. In addition, sandwich core material is arranged between the first face sheet and the second face sheet. A primary bondline may be coupled to the face sheet(s) and the splice. Further, systems, methods, and apparatus of the present disclosure advantageously reduce the load, provide a redundant path, reduce structural fatigue, and/or increase fatigue life.

  14. The splicing fate of plant SPO11 genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorben eSprink

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Towards the global understanding of plant meiosis, it seems to be essential to decipher why all as yet sequenced plants need or at least encode for two different meiotic SPO11 genes. This is in contrast to mammals and fungi, where only one SPO11 is present. Both SPO11 in plants are essential for the initiation of double strand breaks (DSBs during the meiotic prophase. In nearly all eukaryotic organisms DSB induction by SPO11 leads to meiotic DSB repair, thereby ensuring the formation of a necessary number of crossovers (CO as physical connections between the allelic chromosomes. We aim to investigate the specific functions and evolution of both SPO11 genes in land plants. Therefore, we identified and cloned the respective orthologous genes from Brassica rapa, Carica papaya, Oryza sativa and Physcomitrella patens. In parallel we determined the full length cDNA sequences of SPO11-1 and -2 from all of these plants by RT-PCR. During these experiments we observed that the analyzed plants exhibit a pattern of aberrant splicing products of both SPO11 mRNAs. Such an aberrant splicing has previously been described for Arabidopsis and therefore seems to be conserved throughout evolution. Most of the splicing forms of SPO11-1 and -2 seem to be non functional as they either showed intron retention or shortened exons accompanied by a frameshift leading to premature termination codons (PTCs in most cases. Nevertheless, we could detect one putative functional alternatively spliced mRNA for SPO11-1 and -2 each, indicating that splicing of SPO11 does not depend only on the gene sequence but also on the plant species and that it might play a regulatory role.

  15. NMR studies of two spliced leader RNAs using isotope labeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapham, J.; Crothers, D.M. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Spliced leader RNAs are a class of RNA molecules (<200 nts) involved in the trans splicing of messenger RNA found in trypanosomes, nematodes, and other lower eukaryotes. The spliced leader RNA from the trypanosome Leptomonas Collosoma exists in two alternate structural forms with similar thermal stabilities. The 54 nucleotides on the 5{prime} end of the SL molecule is structurally independent from the 3{prime} half of the RNA, and displays the two structural forms. Furthermore, the favored of the two structures was shown to contain anomalous nuclease sensitivity and thermal stability features, which suggests that there may be tertiary interactions between the splice site and other nucleotides in the 5{prime} end. Multidimensional NMR studies are underway to elucidate the structural elements present in the SL RNAs that give rise to their physical properties. Two spliced leader sequences have been studied. The first, the 54 nucleotides on the 5{prime} end of the L. Collosoma sequence, was selected because of earlier studies in our laboratory. The second sequence is the 5{prime} end of the trypanosome Crithidia Fasciculata, which was chosen because of its greater sequence homology to other SL sequences. Given the complexity of the NMR spectra for RNA molecules of this size, we have incorporated {sup 15}N/{sup 13}C-labeled nucleotides into the RNA. One of the techniques we have developed to simplify the spectra of these RNA molecules is isotope labeling of specific regions of the RNA. This has been especially helpful in assigning the secondary structure of molecules that may be able to adopt multiple conformations. Using this technique one can examine a part of the molecule without spectral interference from the unlabeled portion. We hope this approach will promote an avenue for studying the structure of larger RNAs in their native surroundings.

  16. A general definition and nomenclature for alternative splicing events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Sammeth

    Full Text Available Understanding the molecular mechanisms responsible for the regulation of the transcriptome present in eukaryotic cells is one of the most challenging tasks in the postgenomic era. In this regard, alternative splicing (AS is a key phenomenon contributing to the production of different mature transcripts from the same primary RNA sequence. As a plethora of different transcript forms is available in databases, a first step to uncover the biology that drives AS is to identify the different types of reflected splicing variation. In this work, we present a general definition of the AS event along with a notation system that involves the relative positions of the splice sites. This nomenclature univocally and dynamically assigns a specific "AS code" to every possible pattern of splicing variation. On the basis of this definition and the corresponding codes, we have developed a computational tool (AStalavista that automatically characterizes the complete landscape of AS events in a given transcript annotation of a genome, thus providing a platform to investigate the transcriptome diversity across genes, chromosomes, and species. Our analysis reveals that a substantial part--in human more than a quarter-of the observed splicing variations are ignored in common classification pipelines. We have used AStalavista to investigate and to compare the AS landscape of different reference annotation sets in human and in other metazoan species and found that proportions of AS events change substantially depending on the annotation protocol, species-specific attributes, and coding constraints acting on the transcripts. The AStalavista system therefore provides a general framework to conduct specific studies investigating the occurrence, impact, and regulation of AS.

  17. A unique, consistent identifier for alternatively spliced transcript variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Riva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As research into alternative splicing reveals the fundamental importance of this phenomenon in the genome expression of higher organisms, there is an increasing need for a standardized, consistent and unique identifier for alternatively spliced isoforms. Such an identifier would be useful to eliminate ambiguities in references to gene isoforms, and would allow for the reliable comparison of isoforms from different sources (e.g., known genes vs. computational predictions. Commonly used identifiers for gene transcripts prove to be unsuitable for this purpose. METHODOLOGY: We propose an algorithm to compute an isoform signature based on the arrangement of exons and introns in a primary transcript. The isoform signature uniquely identifies a transcript structure, and can therefore be used as a key in databases of alternatively spliced isoforms, or to compare alternative splicing predictions produced by different methods. In this paper we present the algorithm to generate isoform signatures, we provide some examples of its application, and we describe a web-based resource to generate isoform signatures and use them in database searches. CONCLUSIONS: Isoform signatures are simple, so that they can be easily generated and included in publications and databases, but flexible enough to unambiguously represent all possible isoform structures, including information about coding sequence position and variable transcription start and end sites. We believe that the adoption of isoform signatures can help establish a consistent, unambiguous nomenclature for alternative splicing isoforms. The system described in this paper is freely available at http://genome.ufl.edu/genesig/, and supplementary materials can be found at http://genome.ufl.edu/genesig-files/.

  18. Transcriptome analysis reveals differential splicing events in IPF lung tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy Nance

    Full Text Available Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF is a complex disease in which a multitude of proteins and networks are disrupted. Interrogation of the transcriptome through RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq enables the determination of genes whose differential expression is most significant in IPF, as well as the detection of alternative splicing events which are not easily observed with traditional microarray experiments. We sequenced messenger RNA from 8 IPF lung samples and 7 healthy controls on an Illumina HiSeq 2000, and found evidence for substantial differential gene expression and differential splicing. 873 genes were differentially expressed in IPF (FDR<5%, and 440 unique genes had significant differential splicing events in at least one exonic region (FDR<5%. We used qPCR to validate the differential exon usage in the second and third most significant exonic regions, in the genes COL6A3 (RNA-Seq adjusted pval = 7.18e-10 and POSTN (RNA-Seq adjusted pval = 2.06e-09, which encode the extracellular matrix proteins collagen alpha-3(VI and periostin. The increased gene-level expression of periostin has been associated with IPF and its clinical progression, but its differential splicing has not been studied in the context of this disease. Our results suggest that alternative splicing of these and other genes may be involved in the pathogenesis of IPF. We have developed an interactive web application which allows users to explore the results of our RNA-Seq experiment, as well as those of two previously published microarray experiments, and we hope that this will serve as a resource for future investigations of gene regulation in IPF.

  19. Characterization of a novel splicing variant in the RAPTOR gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays an essential role in the regulation of cell growth, proliferation and apoptosis. Raptor, the regulatory associated protein of mTOR, is an important member in this signaling pathway. In the present report, we identified and characterized a novel splicing variant of this gene, RAPTORv2, in which exons 14-17, 474 bp in total, are omitted from the mRNA. This deletion does not change the open reading frame, but causes a nearly complete absence of HEAT repeats, which were shown to be involved in the binding of mTOR substrates. Real time PCR performed on 48 different human tissues demonstrated the ubiquitous presence of this splice variant. Quantification of mRNA levels in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) from 56 unrelated HapMap individuals revealed that the expression of this splicing form is quite variable. One synonymous SNP, rs2289759 in exon 14, was predicted by ESEfinder to cause a significant gain/loss of SRp55 and/or SF2/ASF binding sites, and thus potentially influence splicing. This prediction was confirmed by linear regression analysis between the ratio of RAPTORv2 to total RAPTOR mRNA levels and the SNP genotype in the above 56 individuals (r = 0.281 and P = 0.036). Moreover, the functional evaluation indicated that this splicing isoform is expected to retain the ability to bind mTOR, but is unlikely to bind mTOR substrates, hence affecting signal transduction and further cell proliferation

  20. The optimization of steelcord belt splices; Optimierung von Stahlseilgurtverbindungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hager, M. [Hannover Univ. (Germany); Keller, M. [ContiTech Transportbandsysteme GmbH, Northeim (Germany)

    2002-03-01

    Belt-conveyors have proven themselves for the continuous bulk conveying under technical and economic points of view for a long time. For long belt conveyors and big mass flows, steelcord conveyor belts technologically represent the state of the art. In a steelcord belt splice, the tensile force between the spliced belt ends is transmitted almost completely by locally differing shear forces in the rubber of the elastomer composite construction. Under the dynamically swelling load, to which the belt is exposed in operation, the splices represent the weakest part of a conveyor belt. In experimental examinations of this paper it was found, that the characteristic behavior of the material of the elastomer and the constructive design influences distortion behavior under force of steelcord belt test samples. As most important parameter of the compound design, the filler proves itself as the strongest influence on the dynamic shear modulus, which characterizes the non linear dynamic stiffness of the elastomer. The filling degree and the filler composition influence the degree of non linearity of the dynamic shear modulus and its complex components. On the basis of the results of the experimental examinations, an approximation model of the non linear dynamic shear modulus was employed, with which it is possible, to characterize the non linear, amplitude dependent material behavior of the examined elastomer. In the scope of this paper, a program system was developed on basis of the finite element method, that allows the arithmetical simulation of the force flow in steelcord belt splices and in highly stressed areas of the splices. (orig.)

  1. Splicing of phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) exon 11 is vulnerable - Molecular pathology of mutations in PAH exon 11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heintz, Caroline; Dobrowolski, Steven F.; Andersen, Henriette Skovgaard;

    2012-01-01

    molecular pathology is important. Mutations that disturb the splicing of exons (e.g. interplay between splice site strength and regulatory sequences like exon splicing enhancers (ESEs)/exon splicing silencers (ESSs)) may cause different severity of PKU. In this study, we identified PAH exon 11 as a...

  2. A study of lapped splices in reinforced concrete columns under severe cyclic loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukose, K.; Gergely, P.; White, R. N.

    1981-07-01

    In an investigation of the behavior of overlapped reinforcing rods under high level, inelastic, reversing cyclic loads, 14 tests were conducted on column specimens with No. 6 spliced bars at the corners of surrounding No. 3 stirrups, subjected to combined bending and shear. The relationship between the splice length and the stirrup spacing was studied in detail. The most significant result is that a reasonable level of ductility in splices under combined bending and shear was achieved by providing uniformly spaced stirrups along the splice, and closely spaced stirrups just outside the high moment splice end. An equation for splice design was developed for specimens of the type tested. Experimental results are discussed in terms of load versus displacement, energy absorption, stiffness reduction, main bar strain variation, compression splice behavior and bond-shear interaction.

  3. Increased dosage of Dyrk1A alters alternative splicing factor (ASF)-regulated alternative splicing of tau in Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jianhua; Zhang, Tianyi; Zhou, Chunlei; Chohan, Muhammad Omar; Gu, Xiaosong; Wegiel, Jerzy; Zhou, Jianhua; Hwang, Yu-Wen; Iqbal, Khalid; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Liu, Fei

    2008-10-17

    Two groups of tau, 3R- and 4R-tau, are generated by alternative splicing of tau exon 10. Normal adult human brain expresses equal levels of them. Disruption of the physiological balance is a common feature of several tauopathies. Very early in their life, individuals with Down syndrome (DS) develop Alzheimer-type tau pathology, the molecular basis for which is not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that Dyrk1A, a kinase encoded by a gene in the DS critical region, phosphorylates alternative splicing factor (ASF) at Ser-227, Ser-234, and Ser-238, driving it into nuclear speckles and preventing it from facilitating tau exon 10 inclusion. The increased dosage of Dyrk1A in DS brain due to trisomy of chromosome 21 correlates to an increase in 3R-tau level, which on abnormal hyperphosphorylation and aggregation of tau results in neurofibrillary degeneration. Imbalance of 3R- and 4R-tau in DS brain by Dyrk1A-induced dysregulation of alternative splicing factor-mediated alternative splicing of tau exon 10 represents a novel mechanism of neurofibrillary degeneration and may help explain early onset tauopathy in individuals with DS. PMID:18658135

  4. Butt Joint Tool Commissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martovetsky, N N

    2007-12-06

    ITER Central Solenoid uses butt joints for connecting the pancakes in the CS module. The principles of the butt joining of the CICC were developed by the JAPT during CSMC project. The difference between the CSMC butt joint and the CS butt joint is that the CS butt joint is an in-line joint, while the CSMC is a double joint through a hairpin jumper. The CS butt joint has to carry the hoop load. The straight length of the joint is only 320 mm, and the vacuum chamber around the joint has to have a split in the clamp shell. These requirements are challenging. Fig.1 presents a CSMC joint, and Fig.2 shows a CS butt joint. The butt joint procedure was verified and demonstrated. The tool is capable of achieving all specified parameters. The vacuum in the end was a little higher than the target, which is not critical and readily correctable. We consider, tentatively that the procedure is established. Unexpectedly, we discover significant temperature nonuniformity in the joint cross section, which is not formally a violation of the specs, but is a point of concern. All testing parameters are recorded for QA purposes. We plan to modify the butt joining tool to improve its convenience of operation and provide all features necessary for production of butt joints by qualified personnel.

  5. 基于Chord的语义Web服务匹配算法研究%Matching Algorithm for Semantic Web Services Based on Chord

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李小林; 张力娜; 李卫斌; 唐高峰

    2011-01-01

    To solve the problems of UDDI registry such as query bottleneck and lack of semantic description of services, distributed registration and search pattern based on Chord is put forward in this paper. Qos extension is adopted in OWL - S to meet the customers' requirements of both service semantics and service quality. Service publishers register and service under the Chord protocol, while the service requesters locate the service protocol community based on Chord and then realize matching by service functional semantics and service Qos. It is validated that the algorithm enjoys better precision and query efficiency, which solves the bottleneck problem in the traditional centralized UDDI service.%针对UDDI注册中心存在查询瓶颈以及缺乏对服务的语义描述,提出了基于Chord的分布式注册、查找服务模式,并对OWL-S进行了QoS的扩展以满足客户对于服务语义和服务质量的需求.服务发布者根据Chord协议注册服务,服务需求者根据Chord协议进行服务社区定位后,采用基于服务功能的语义匹配和服务QoS的匹配.通过验证,本算法有较好的查准率以及查询效率,克服了传统集中式UDDI存在服务瓶颈的问题.

  6. Culture - joint fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joint fluid culture ... fungi, or viruses grow. This is called a culture. If these germs are detected, other tests may ... is no special preparation needed for the lab culture. How to prepare for the removal of joint ...

  7. Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) connects your jaw to the side of your head. When it works well, it enables you to ... For people with TMJ dysfunction, problems with the joint and muscles around it may cause Pain that ...

  8. Knee joint replacement - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100088.htm Knee joint replacement - series To use the sharing features ... 4 out of 4 Normal anatomy Overview The knee is a complex joint. It contains the distal ...

  9. Shoulder Joint Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... en because of implant loosening, wear, infection, and dislocation. When this occurs, a second joint replacement surgery — called a revision surgery — may be necessary. Is Shoulder Joint Replacement for You? The decision to have ...

  10. Les hormones thyroïdiennes, leurs récepteurs et l'évolution de la métamorphose chez les Chordés.

    OpenAIRE

    Paris, Mathilde

    2008-01-01

    DANS L'ETUDE DES PROCESSI D'EVOLUTION DU DEVELOPPEMENT, LES FACTEURS DE TRANSCRIPTION SONT IMPORTANTS CAR ILS REGULENT L'EXPRESSION GENIQUE AU COURS DU DEVELOPPEMENT. PARMI CES FACTEURS, LES RECEPTEURS NUCLEAIRES (RNS) ONT UN STATUT PARTICULIER CAR LEUR ACTIVITE EST REGULEE PAR UN LIGAND. DURANT MA THESE, JE ME SUIS INTERESSEE A L'EVOLUTION DES RNS CHEZ LES CHORDES (TELS QUE LES VERTEBRES, LES TUNICIES ET L'AMPHIOXUS) EN ETUDIANT DEUX RNS PARTICULIERS : LES RECEPTEURS AUX OESTROGENES (ER) ET ...

  11. Functional Cross-Talking between Differentially Expressed and Alternatively Spliced Genes in Human Liver Cancer Cells Treated with Berberine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Sheng

    Full Text Available Berberine has been identified with anti-proliferative effects on various cancer cells. Many researchers have been trying to elucidate the anti-cancer mechanisms of berberine based on differentially expressed genes. However, differentially alternative splicing genes induced by berberine might also contribute to its pharmacological actions and have not been reported yet. Moreover, the potential functional cross-talking between the two sets of genes deserves further exploration. In this study, RNA-seq technology was used to detect the differentially expressed genes and differentially alternative spliced genes in BEL-7402 cancer cells induced by berberine. Functional enrichment analysis indicated that these genes were mainly enriched in the p53 and cell cycle signalling pathway. In addition, it was statistically proven that the two sets of genes were locally co-enriched along chromosomes, closely connected to each other based on protein-protein interaction and functionally similar on Gene Ontology tree. These results suggested that the two sets of genes regulated by berberine might be functionally cross-talked and jointly contribute to its cell cycle arresting effect. It has provided new clues for further researches on the pharmacological mechanisms of berberine as well as the other botanical drugs.

  12. Towards understanding pre-mRNA splicing mechanisms and the role of SR proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahebi, Mahbod; Hanafi, Mohamed M; van Wijnen, Andre J; Azizi, Parisa; Abiri, Rambod; Ashkani, Sadegh; Taheri, Sima

    2016-08-10

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing provides a source of vast protein diversity by removing non-coding sequences (introns) and accurately linking different exonic regions in the correct reading frame. The regulation of alternative splicing is essential for various cellular functions in both pathological and physiological conditions. In eukaryotic cells, this process is commonly used to increase proteomic diversity and to control gene expression either co- or post-transcriptionally. Alternative splicing occurs within a megadalton-sized, multi-component machine consisting of RNA and proteins; during the splicing process, this complex undergoes dynamic changes via RNA-RNA, protein-protein and RNA-protein interactions. Co-transcriptional splicing functionally integrates the transcriptional machinery, thereby enabling the two processes to influence one another, whereas post-transcriptional splicing facilitates the coupling of RNA splicing with post-splicing events. This review addresses the structural aspects of spliceosomes and the mechanistic implications of their stepwise assembly on the regulation of pre-mRNA splicing. Moreover, the role of phosphorylation-based, signal-induced changes in the regulation of the splicing process is demonstrated. PMID:27154819

  13. Characterization of aberrant splicing of von Willebrand factor in von Willebrand disease: an underrecognized mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawke, Lindsey; Bowman, Mackenzie L; Poon, Man-Chiu; Scully, Mary-Frances; Rivard, Georges-Etienne; James, Paula D

    2016-07-28

    Approximately 10% of von Willebrand factor (VWF) gene mutations are thought to alter messenger RNA (mRNA) splicing through disruption of consensus splice sites. This mechanism is likely underrecognized and affected by mutations outside consensus splice sites. During VWF synthesis, splicing abnormalities lead to qualitative defects or quantitative deficiencies in VWF. This study investigated the pathologic mechanism acting in 3 von Willebrand disease (VWD) families with putative splicing mutations using patient-derived blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs) and a heterologous human embryonic kidney (HEK 293(T)) cell model. The exonic mutation c.3538G>A causes 3 in-frame splicing variants (23del, 26del, and 23/26del) which cannot bind platelets, blood coagulation factor VIII, or collagen, causing VWD through dominant-negative intracellular retention of coexpressed wild-type (WT) VWF, and increased trafficking to lysosomes. Individuals heterozygous for the c.5842+1G>C mutation produce exon 33 skipping, exons 33-34 skipping, and WT VWF transcripts. Pathogenic intracellular retention of VWF lacking exons 33-34 causes their VWD. The branch site mutation c.6599-20A>T causes type 1 VWD through mRNA degradation of exon 38 skipping transcripts. Splicing ratios of aberrant transcripts and coexpressed WT were altered in the BOECs with exposure to shear stress. This study provides evidence of mutations outside consensus splice sites disrupting splicing and introduces the concept that VWF splicing is affected by shear stress on endothelial cells. PMID:27317792

  14. No statistical support for correlation between the positions of protein interaction sites and alternatively spliced regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gelfand Mikhail S

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative splicing is an efficient mechanism for increasing the variety of functions fulfilled by proteins in a living cell. It has been previously demonstrated that alternatively spliced regions often comprise functionally important and conserved sequence motifs. The objective of this work was to test the hypothesis that alternative splicing is correlated with contact regions of protein-protein interactions. Results Protein sequence spans involved in contacts with an interaction partner were delineated from atomic structures of transient interaction complexes and juxtaposed with the location of alternatively spliced regions detected by comparative genome analysis and spliced alignment. The total of 42 alternatively spliced isoforms were identified in 21 amino acid chains involved in biomolecular interactions. Using this limited dataset and a variety of sophisticated counting procedures we were not able to establish a statistically significant correlation between the positions of protein interaction sites and alternatively spliced regions. Conclusions This finding contradicts a naïve hypothesis that alternatively spliced regions would correlate with points of contact. One possible explanation for that could be that all alternative splicing events change the spatial structure of the interacting domain to a sufficient degree to preclude interaction. This is indirectly supported by the observed lack of difference in the behaviour of relatively short regions affected by alternative splicing and cases when large portions of proteins are removed. More structural data on complexes of interacting proteins, including structures of alternative isoforms, are needed to test this conjecture.

  15. Nanoplasmonic probes of RNA folding and assembly during pre-mRNA splicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Anh H.; Lee, Jong Uk; Sim, Sang Jun

    2016-02-01

    RNA splicing plays important roles in transcriptome and proteome diversity. Herein, we describe the use of a nanoplasmonic system that unveils RNA folding and assembly during pre-mRNA splicing wherein the quantification of mRNA splice variants is not taken into account. With a couple of SERS-probes and plasmonic probes binding at the boundary sites of exon-2/intron-2 and intron-2/exon-3 of the pre-mature RNA of the β-globin gene, the splicing process brings the probes into the plasmonic bands. For plasmonic probes, a plasmon shift increase of ~29 nm, corresponding to intron removal and exon-2 and exon-3 connection to form the mRNA molecule, is measured by plasmonic coupling. The increased scattering intensity and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) fingerprinting reveal the clear dynamics of pre-mRNA splicing. Moreover, a time-resolved experiment of individual RNA molecules exhibited a successful splicing and an inhibited splicing event by 33 μM biflavonoid isoginkgetin, a general inhibitor of RNA splicing. The results suggest that the RNA splicing is successfully monitored with the nanoplasmonic system. Thus, this platform can be useful for studying RNA nanotechnology, biomolecular folding, alternative splicing, and maturation of microRNA.

  16. Footprints of a trypanosomatid RNA world: pre-small subunit rRNA processing by spliced leader addition trans-splicing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Gustavo Mayer

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The addition of a capped mini-exon [spliced leader (SL] through trans-splicing is essential for the maturation of RNA polymerase (pol II-transcribed polycistronic pre-mRNAs in all members of the Trypanosomatidae family. This process is an inter-molecular splicing reaction that follows the same basic rules of cis-splicing reactions. In this study, we demonstrated that mini-exons were added to precursor ribosomal RNA (pre-rRNA are transcribed by RNA pol I, including the 5' external transcribed spacer (ETS region. Additionally, we detected the SL-5'ETS molecule using three distinct methods and located the acceptor site between two known 5'ETS rRNA processing sites (A' and A1 in four different trypanosomatids. Moreover, we detected a polyadenylated 5'ETS upstream of the trans-splicing acceptor site, which also occurs in pre-mRNA trans-splicing. After treatment with an indirect trans-splicing inhibitor (sinefungin, we observed SL-5'ETS decay. However, treatment with 5-fluorouracil (a precursor of RNA synthesis that inhibits the degradation of pre-rRNA led to the accumulation of SL-5'ETS, suggesting that the molecule may play a role in rRNA degradation. The detection of trans-splicing in these molecules may indicate broad RNA-joining properties, regardless of the polymerase used for transcription.

  17. FineSplice, enhanced splice junction detection and quantification: a novel pipeline based on the assessment of diverse RNA-Seq alignment solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatto, Alberto; Torroja-Fungairiño, Carlos; Mazzarotto, Francesco; Cook, Stuart A; Barton, Paul J R; Sánchez-Cabo, Fátima; Lara-Pezzi, Enrique

    2014-04-01

    Alternative splicing is the main mechanism governing protein diversity. The recent developments in RNA-Seq technology have enabled the study of the global impact and regulation of this biological process. However, the lack of standardized protocols constitutes a major bottleneck in the analysis of alternative splicing. This is particularly important for the identification of exon-exon junctions, which is a critical step in any analysis workflow. Here we performed a systematic benchmarking of alignment tools to dissect the impact of design and method on the mapping, detection and quantification of splice junctions from multi-exon reads. Accordingly, we devised a novel pipeline based on TopHat2 combined with a splice junction detection algorithm, which we have named FineSplice. FineSplice allows effective elimination of spurious junction hits arising from artefactual alignments, achieving up to 99% precision in both real and simulated data sets and yielding superior F1 scores under most tested conditions. The proposed strategy conjugates an efficient mapping solution with a semi-supervised anomaly detection scheme to filter out false positives and allows reliable estimation of expressed junctions from the alignment output. Ultimately this provides more accurate information to identify meaningful splicing patterns. FineSplice is freely available at https://sourceforge.net/p/finesplice/. PMID:24574529

  18. Incorporating evolutionary information and functional domains for identifying RNA splicing factors in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Bo-Kai Hsu

    Full Text Available Regulation of pre-mRNA splicing is achieved through the interaction of RNA sequence elements and a variety of RNA-splicing related proteins (splicing factors. The splicing machinery in humans is not yet fully elucidated, partly because splicing factors in humans have not been exhaustively identified. Furthermore, experimental methods for splicing factor identification are time-consuming and lab-intensive. Although many computational methods have been proposed for the identification of RNA-binding proteins, there exists no development that focuses on the identification of RNA-splicing related proteins so far. Therefore, we are motivated to design a method that focuses on the identification of human splicing factors using experimentally verified splicing factors. The investigation of amino acid composition reveals that there are remarkable differences between splicing factors and non-splicing proteins. A support vector machine (SVM is utilized to construct a predictive model, and the five-fold cross-validation evaluation indicates that the SVM model trained with amino acid composition could provide a promising accuracy (80.22%. Another basic feature, amino acid dipeptide composition, is also examined to yield a similar predictive performance to amino acid composition. In addition, this work presents that the incorporation of evolutionary information and domain information could improve the predictive performance. The constructed models have been demonstrated to effectively classify (73.65% accuracy an independent data set of human splicing factors. The result of independent testing indicates that in silico identification could be a feasible means of conducting preliminary analyses of splicing factors and significantly reducing the number of potential targets that require further in vivo or in vitro confirmation.

  19. International joint ventures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Karsten Engsig

    2001-01-01

    The article analysis problems connected with corporate joint ventures. Among others the possible conflicts between the joint venture agreement and the statutes of the companies is examined, as well as certain problems connected to the fact that the joint venture partners have created commen control...

  20. Alternative Splicing of G9a Regulates Neuronal Differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Fiszbein; Luciana E. Giono; Ana Quaglino; Bruno G. Berardino; Lorena Sigaut; Catalina von Bilderling; Ignacio E. Schor; Juliana H. Enriqué Steinberg; Mario Rossi; Lía I. Pietrasanta; Julio J. Caramelo; Anabella Srebrow; Alberto R. Kornblihtt

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin modifications are critical for the establishment and maintenance of differentiation programs. G9a, the enzyme responsible for histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation in mammalian euchromatin, exists as two isoforms with differential inclusion of exon 10 (E10) through alternative splicing. We find that the G9a methyltransferase is required for differentiation of the mouse neuronal cell line N2a and that E10 inclusion increases during neuronal differentiation of cultured cells, as well as i...

  1. A General Definition and Nomenclature for Alternative Splicing Events

    OpenAIRE

    Guigó Serra, Roderic; Sammeth, Michael; Foissac, Sylvain

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms responsible for the regulation of the transcriptome present in eukaryotic cells is one of the most challenging tasks in the postgenomic era. In this regard, alternative splicing (AS) is a key phenomenon contributing to the production of different mature transcripts from the same primary RNA sequence. As a plethora of different transcript forms is available in databases, a first step to uncover the biology that drives AS is to identify the dif...

  2. Oncogenes and RNA splicing of human tumor viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Ajiro, Masahiko; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 10.8% of human cancers are associated with infection by an oncogenic virus. These viruses include human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein–Barr virus (EBV), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV), human T-cell leukemia virus 1 (HTLV-1), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). These oncogenic viruses, with the exception of HCV, require the host RNA splicing machinery in order to exercise their oncogenic activities, a strategy that a...

  3. BRR2a Affects Flowering Time via FLC Splicing

    OpenAIRE

    Mahrez, Walid; Shin, Juhyun; Muñoz-Viana, Rafael; Figueiredo, Duarte D.; Trejo-Arellano, Minerva S.; Exner, Vivien; Siretskiy, Alexey; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Köhler, Claudia; Hennig, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Several pathways control time to flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana through transcriptional and posttranscriptional gene regulation. In recent years, mRNA processing has gained interest as a critical regulator of flowering time control in plants. However, the molecular mechanisms linking RNA splicing to flowering time are not well understood. In a screen for Arabidopsis early flowering mutants we identified an allele of BRR2a. BRR2 proteins are components of the spliceosome and highly conserve...

  4. Security controls in the Stockpoint Logistics Integrated Communications Environment (SPLICE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arseneault, D. S.

    1985-03-01

    This thesis examines security controls specified and implemented in the Stock Point Logistics Integrated Communications Environment (SPLICE) project. Controls provided by the Defense Data Network and the Tandem operating system are reviewed. Alternatives from current literature in areas of authentication, encryption, and dial-port protection are reviewed for the purpose of suggesting enhancements. Issues discussed apply to most interactive/decentralized systems in operation today and include administrative as well as technical recommendations.

  5. Estimation of alternative splicing variability in human populations

    OpenAIRE

    Gonz??lez-Porta, Mar; Calvo, Miquel; Sammeth, Michael; Guig?? Serra, Roderic

    2012-01-01

    DNA arrays have been widely used to perform transcriptome-wide analysis of gene expression, and many methods have been developed to measure gene expression variability and to compare gene expression between conditions. Because RNA-seq is also becoming increasingly popular for transcriptome characterization, the possibility exists for further quantification of individual alternative transcript isoforms, and therefore for estimating the relative ratios of alternative splice forms within a given...

  6. Experimental characterization of resistive joints for use inside ATLAS toroids

    CERN Document Server

    Volpini, G; Pojer, M

    2001-01-01

    The authors have investigated, both experimentally and theoretically, the thermo-electrical behavior of the ATLAS magnets resistive joints. These magnets exploit an Al-clad NbTi Rutherford superconducting cable, and the splices between different sections are performed by TIG-welding the Al matrices of the two cables to be connected. This technique is simple from a construction point of view, and we have shown that its performance is adequate for a safe operation of the magnets. The two main concerns during the design of these joints are the temperature rise due to Joule dissipation and the eddy currents induced under nonstationary conditions. We have devised a reliable model of these joints, that allows estimating their resistances and the induced eddy currents; later we have built and measured several sample joints to give experimental confirmation. The model requires, along with the joint geometry, the knowledge of the Rutherford-matrix interface resistance as well as the RRR of the aluminum matrix. In this...

  7. Involvement of Alternative Splicing in Barley Seed Germination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qisen Zhang

    Full Text Available Seed germination activates many new biological processes including DNA, membrane and mitochondrial repairs and requires active protein synthesis and sufficient energy supply. Alternative splicing (AS regulates many cellular processes including cell differentiation and environmental adaptations. However, limited information is available on the regulation of seed germination at post-transcriptional levels. We have conducted RNA-sequencing experiments to dissect AS events in barley seed germination. We identified between 552 and 669 common AS transcripts in germinating barley embryos from four barley varieties (Hordeum vulgare L. Bass, Baudin, Harrington and Stirling. Alternative 3' splicing (34%-45%, intron retention (32%-34% and alternative 5' splicing (16%-21% were three major AS events in germinating embryos. The AS transcripts were predominantly mapped onto ribosome, RNA transport machineries, spliceosome, plant hormone signal transduction, glycolysis, sugar and carbon metabolism pathways. Transcripts of these genes were also very abundant in the early stage of seed germination. Correlation analysis of gene expression showed that AS hormone responsive transcripts could also be co-expressed with genes responsible for protein biosynthesis and sugar metabolisms. Our RNA-sequencing data revealed that AS could play important roles in barley seed germination.

  8. Design of a Split Intein with Exceptional Protein Splicing Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Adam J; Brown, Zachary Z; Shah, Neel H; Sekar, Giridhar; Cowburn, David; Muir, Tom W

    2016-02-24

    Protein trans-splicing (PTS) by split inteins has found widespread use in chemical biology and biotechnology. Herein, we describe the use of a consensus design approach to engineer a split intein with enhanced stability and activity that make it more robust than any known PTS system. Using batch mutagenesis, we first conduct a detailed analysis of the difference in splicing rates between the Npu (fast) and Ssp (slow) split inteins of the DnaE family and find that most impactful residues lie on the second shell of the protein, directly adjacent to the active site. These residues are then used to generate an alignment of 73 naturally occurring DnaE inteins that are predicted to be fast. The consensus sequence from this alignment (Cfa) demonstrates both rapid protein splicing and unprecedented thermal and chaotropic stability. Moreover, when fused to various proteins including antibody heavy chains, the N-terminal fragment of Cfa exhibits increased expression levels relative to other N-intein fusions. The durability and efficiency of Cfa should improve current intein based technologies and may provide a platform for the development of new protein chemistry techniques. PMID:26854538

  9. APPRIS: annotation of principal and alternative splice isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; Maietta, Paolo; Ezkurdia, Iakes; Pietrelli, Alessandro; Wesselink, Jan-Jaap; Lopez, Gonzalo; Valencia, Alfonso; Tress, Michael L

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present APPRIS (http://appris.bioinfo.cnio.es), a database that houses annotations of human splice isoforms. APPRIS has been designed to provide value to manual annotations of the human genome by adding reliable protein structural and functional data and information from cross-species conservation. The visual representation of the annotations provided by APPRIS for each gene allows annotators and researchers alike to easily identify functional changes brought about by splicing events. In addition to collecting, integrating and analyzing reliable predictions of the effect of splicing events, APPRIS also selects a single reference sequence for each gene, here termed the principal isoform, based on the annotations of structure, function and conservation for each transcript. APPRIS identifies a principal isoform for 85% of the protein-coding genes in the GENCODE 7 release for ENSEMBL. Analysis of the APPRIS data shows that at least 70% of the alternative (non-principal) variants would lose important functional or structural information relative to the principal isoform. PMID:23161672

  10. Alternative Splicing of G9a Regulates Neuronal Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiszbein, Ana; Giono, Luciana E; Quaglino, Ana; Berardino, Bruno G; Sigaut, Lorena; von Bilderling, Catalina; Schor, Ignacio E; Steinberg, Juliana H Enriqué; Rossi, Mario; Pietrasanta, Lía I; Caramelo, Julio J; Srebrow, Anabella; Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2016-03-29

    Chromatin modifications are critical for the establishment and maintenance of differentiation programs. G9a, the enzyme responsible for histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation in mammalian euchromatin, exists as two isoforms with differential inclusion of exon 10 (E10) through alternative splicing. We find that the G9a methyltransferase is required for differentiation of the mouse neuronal cell line N2a and that E10 inclusion increases during neuronal differentiation of cultured cells, as well as in the developing mouse brain. Although E10 inclusion greatly stimulates overall H3K9me2 levels, it does not affect G9a catalytic activity. Instead, E10 increases G9a nuclear localization. We show that the G9a E10(+) isoform is necessary for neuron differentiation and regulates the alternative splicing pattern of its own pre-mRNA, enhancing E10 inclusion. Overall, our findings indicate that by regulating its own alternative splicing, G9a promotes neuron differentiation and creates a positive feedback loop that reinforces cellular commitment to differentiation. PMID:26997278

  11. Alternative Splicing of G9a Regulates Neuronal Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Fiszbein

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin modifications are critical for the establishment and maintenance of differentiation programs. G9a, the enzyme responsible for histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation in mammalian euchromatin, exists as two isoforms with differential inclusion of exon 10 (E10 through alternative splicing. We find that the G9a methyltransferase is required for differentiation of the mouse neuronal cell line N2a and that E10 inclusion increases during neuronal differentiation of cultured cells, as well as in the developing mouse brain. Although E10 inclusion greatly stimulates overall H3K9me2 levels, it does not affect G9a catalytic activity. Instead, E10 increases G9a nuclear localization. We show that the G9a E10+ isoform is necessary for neuron differentiation and regulates the alternative splicing pattern of its own pre-mRNA, enhancing E10 inclusion. Overall, our findings indicate that by regulating its own alternative splicing, G9a promotes neuron differentiation and creates a positive feedback loop that reinforces cellular commitment to differentiation.

  12. A Network of Splice Isoforms for the Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-Dong; Menon, Rajasree; Eksi, Ridvan; Guerler, Aysam; Zhang, Yang; Omenn, Gilbert S; Guan, Yuanfang

    2016-01-01

    The laboratory mouse is the primary mammalian species used for studying alternative splicing events. Recent studies have generated computational models to predict functions for splice isoforms in the mouse. However, the functional relationship network, describing the probability of splice isoforms participating in the same biological process or pathway, has not yet been studied in the mouse. Here we describe a rich genome-wide resource of mouse networks at the isoform level, which was generated using a unique framework that was originally developed to infer isoform functions. This network was built through integrating heterogeneous genomic and protein data, including RNA-seq, exon array, protein docking and pseudo-amino acid composition. Through simulation and cross-validation studies, we demonstrated the accuracy of the algorithm in predicting isoform-level functional relationships. We showed that this network enables the users to reveal functional differences of the isoforms of the same gene, as illustrated by literature evidence with Anxa6 (annexin a6) as an example. We expect this work will become a useful resource for the mouse genetics community to understand gene functions. The network is publicly available at: http://guanlab.ccmb.med.umich.edu/isoformnetwork. PMID:27079421

  13. Diverse splicing patterns of exonized Alu elements in human tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Lin

    Full Text Available Exonization of Alu elements is a major mechanism for birth of new exons in primate genomes. Prior analyses of expressed sequence tags show that almost all Alu-derived exons are alternatively spliced, and the vast majority of these exons have low transcript inclusion levels. In this work, we provide genomic and experimental evidence for diverse splicing patterns of exonized Alu elements in human tissues. Using Exon array data of 330 Alu-derived exons in 11 human tissues and detailed RT-PCR analyses of 38 exons, we show that some Alu-derived exons are constitutively spliced in a broad range of human tissues, and some display strong tissue-specific switch in their transcript inclusion levels. Most of such exons are derived from ancient Alu elements in the genome. In SEPN1, mutations of which are linked to a form of congenital muscular dystrophy, the muscle-specific inclusion of an Alu-derived exon may be important for regulating SEPN1 activity in muscle. Realtime qPCR analysis of this SEPN1 exon in macaque and chimpanzee tissues indicates human-specific increase in its transcript inclusion level and muscle specificity after the divergence of humans and chimpanzees. Our results imply that some Alu exonization events may have acquired adaptive benefits during the evolution of primate transcriptomes.

  14. Detection of Splice Sites Using Support Vector Machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadwaj, Pritish; Purohit, Neetesh; Arora, Bhumika

    Automatic identification and annotation of exon and intron region of gene, from DNA sequences has been an important research area in field of computational biology. Several approaches viz. Hidden Markov Model (HMM), Artificial Intelligence (AI) based machine learning and Digital Signal Processing (DSP) techniques have extensively and independently been used by various researchers to cater this challenging task. In this work, we propose a Support Vector Machine based kernel learning approach for detection of splice sites (the exon-intron boundary) in a gene. Electron-Ion Interaction Potential (EIIP) values of nucleotides have been used for mapping character sequences to corresponding numeric sequences. Radial Basis Function (RBF) SVM kernel is trained using EIIP numeric sequences. Furthermore this was tested on test gene dataset for detection of splice site by window (of 12 residues) shifting. Optimum values of window size, various important parameters of SVM kernel have been optimized for a better accuracy. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves have been utilized for displaying the sensitivity rate of the classifier and results showed 94.82% accuracy for splice site detection on test dataset.

  15. Design of a fully-fiber multi-chord interferometer and a new phase-shift demodulation method for field-reversed configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Dongfan, E-mail: fangdongfan1208@126.com; Sun, Qizhi; Zhao, Xiaoming; Jia, Yuesong [Key Laboratory of Pulsed Power, Institute of Fluid Physics, CAEP, P. O. Box 919-108, Mianyang, Sichuan 621999 (China)

    2014-05-15

    A 633 nm laser interferometer has been designed based on a novel concept, which, without the acousto-optic modulator or the demodulator circuit, adopts the fibers to connect all elements except photodetectors and oscilloscope in this system to make it more compact, portable, and efficient. The noteworthy feature is to mathematically compare the two divided interference signals, which have the same phase-shift caused by the electron density but possess the different initial phase and low angular frequencies. It is possible to read the plasma density directly on the oscilloscope by our original mathematic demodulation method without a camera. Based on the Abel inversion algorithm, the radial electron density profiles versus time can be obtained by using the multi-chord system. The designed measurable phase shift ranges from 0 to 2π rad corresponding to the maximum line integral of electron density less than 3.5 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup −2}, and the phase accuracy is about 0.017 rad corresponding to the line integral of electron density accuracy of 1 × 10{sup 15} cm{sup −2}. After the construction of eight-chord interferometer, it will provide the detailed time resolved information of the spatial distribution of the electron density in the field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma target produced by the “Yingguang-1” programmed-discharge device, which is being constructed in the Key Laboratory of Pulsed Power, China Academy of Engineering Physics.

  16. Design of a fully-fiber multi-chord interferometer and a new phase-shift demodulation method for field-reversed configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 633 nm laser interferometer has been designed based on a novel concept, which, without the acousto-optic modulator or the demodulator circuit, adopts the fibers to connect all elements except photodetectors and oscilloscope in this system to make it more compact, portable, and efficient. The noteworthy feature is to mathematically compare the two divided interference signals, which have the same phase-shift caused by the electron density but possess the different initial phase and low angular frequencies. It is possible to read the plasma density directly on the oscilloscope by our original mathematic demodulation method without a camera. Based on the Abel inversion algorithm, the radial electron density profiles versus time can be obtained by using the multi-chord system. The designed measurable phase shift ranges from 0 to 2π rad corresponding to the maximum line integral of electron density less than 3.5 × 1017 cm−2, and the phase accuracy is about 0.017 rad corresponding to the line integral of electron density accuracy of 1 × 1015 cm−2. After the construction of eight-chord interferometer, it will provide the detailed time resolved information of the spatial distribution of the electron density in the field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma target produced by the “Yingguang-1” programmed-discharge device, which is being constructed in the Key Laboratory of Pulsed Power, China Academy of Engineering Physics

  17. Behavior and design of reinforced concrete column-type lapped splices subjected to high-intensity cyclic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, B.; White, R. N.; Gergely, P.

    1982-10-01

    The behavior and design of lapped splices in reinforced concrete column type specimens under high intensity flexural cyclic loads was studied. Special attention is focused on the transverse steel requirements of specimens with more than two splices in a layer; the use of offsets in spliced bars; the effect of concrete strength on splice strength and behavior; and the strength of epoxy-repaired splices. Procedures are provided for the design of reinforced lapped splices to sustain at least twenty reversing load cycles beyond yield and a maximum rebar strain at the splice of at least 2.5 times the yield strain. The key aspect of the design is the provision of closely spaced uniformly distributed stirrup ties in the splice region. Equations are developed for the spacing of stirrups and the minimum splice length requirement.

  18. Detecting chimeric 5′/3′UTRs with cross-chromosomal splicing by bioinformatics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhihua; ZHANG Yong; SHI Baochen; DENG Wei; ZHAO Yi; CHEN Runsheng

    2004-01-01

    The 5′/3′ UTRs of mRNA are crucial in translational regulation, and several serious diseases are believed to be associated with abnormal splicing of these parts of the mRNA sequence. In this work a novel method which uses sequence alignment database searching for detecting chimeric 5′3′ UTRs with cross-chromosomal splicing is reported. Eight highly credible instances of cross-chromosomal splicing have been found using this method, representing additional confirmation of the existence of cross-chromosomal splicing events provided by bioinformatics tools. Since no conserved motif has been found in any of the eight instances, and at the same time current prediction algorithms produce only trivial secondary structures at the "splicing sites", it is not possible to identify any specific signal leading to the splicing.

  19. Inducible Expression and Splicing of Candida Group Ⅰ Ribozyme in E.coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHANG Yuan; WANG Chen; ZHANG Yi

    2005-01-01

    The Ca. LSU intron flanking a 129 bp exon upstream and a 100 bp exon downstream was inserted into the lacZ gene on pRS426 to transform E. coli. Northern blot analysis and RT-PCR showed that splicing of Ca. LSU in E.coli is efficient upon inducible expression of the precursor RNA. In contrast, co-transcriptional self-splicing of the intron in vitro is much less active. Therefore, this E. coli splicing system can be used as a better model to investigate the effect of the ribozyme inhibitors on Ca. LSU splicing in living cell. We examined the effects of neomycin sulfate and pentamidine on Ca. LSU splicing in E. coli, and found that these drugs does-dependently inhibit the intron splicing.However, heomycin is more potent than pentamidine in this action.

  20. Mammalian tissues defective in nonsense-mediated mRNA decay display highly aberrant splicing patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weischenfeldt, Joachim Lütken; Waage, Johannes Eichler; Tian, Geng;

    2012-01-01

    bioinformatic pipeline that maps RNA-seq data to a combinatorial exon database, predicts NMD-susceptibility for mRNA isoforms and calculates the distribution of major splice isoform classes. We present a catalog of NMD-regulated alternative splicing events, showing that isoforms of 30% of all expressed genes......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) affects the outcome of alternative splicing by degrading mRNA isoforms with premature termination codons. Splicing regulators constitute important NMD targets; however, the extent to which loss of NMD causes extensive deregulation of...... alternative splicing has not previously been assayed in a global, unbiased manner. Here, we combine mouse genetics and RNA-seq to provide the first in vivo analysis of the global impact of NMD on splicing patterns in two primary mouse tissues ablated for the NMD factor UPF2. RESULTS: We developed a...

  1. Genome-wide analysis of SRSF10-regulated alternative splicing by deep sequencing of chicken transcriptome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuexia Zhou

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Splicing factor SRSF10 is known to function as a sequence-specific splicing activator that is capable of regulating alternative splicing both in vitro and in vivo. We recently used an RNA-seq approach coupled with bioinformatics analysis to identify the extensive splicing network regulated by SRSF10 in chicken cells. We found that SRSF10 promoted both exon inclusion and exclusion. Functionally, many of the SRSF10-verified alternative exons are linked to pathways of response to external stimulus. Here we describe in detail the experimental design, bioinformatics analysis and GO/pathway enrichment analysis of SRSF10-regulated genes to correspond with our data in the Gene Expression Omnibus with accession number GSE53354. Our data thus provide a resource for studying regulation of alternative splicing in vivo that underlines biological functions of splicing regulatory proteins in cells.

  2. Splicing changes in SMA mouse motoneurons and SMN-depleted neuroblastoma cells: evidence for involvement of splicing regulatory proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Huo, Qing; Kayikci, Melis; Odermatt, Philipp; Meyer, Kathrin; Michels, Olivia; Saxena, Smita; Ule, Jernej; Schümperli, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is caused by deletions or mutations in the Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. The second gene copy, SMN2, produces some, but not enough, functional SMN protein. SMN is essential to assemble small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) that form the spliceosome. However, it is not clear whether SMA is caused by defects in this function that could lead to splicing changes in all tissues, or by the impairment of an additional, less well characterized, but motoneuron-...

  3. Thousands of exon skipping events differentiate among splicing patterns in sixteen human tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Liliana Florea; Li Song; Salzberg, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing is widely recognized for its roles in regulating genes and creating gene diversity. However, despite many efforts, the repertoire of gene splicing variation is still incompletely characterized, even in humans. Here we describe a new computational system, ASprofile, and its application to RNA-seq data from Illumina’s Human Body Map project (>2.5 billion reads).  Using the system, we identified putative alternative splicing events in 16 different human tissues, which provid...

  4. An EMT-driven alternative splicing program occurs in human breast cancer and modulates cellular phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina M Shapiro

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT, a mechanism important for embryonic development, plays a critical role during malignant transformation. While much is known about transcriptional regulation of EMT, alternative splicing of several genes has also been correlated with EMT progression, but the extent of splicing changes and their contributions to the morphological conversion accompanying EMT have not been investigated comprehensively. Using an established cell culture model and RNA-Seq analyses, we determined an alternative splicing signature for EMT. Genes encoding key drivers of EMT-dependent changes in cell phenotype, such as actin cytoskeleton remodeling, regulation of cell-cell junction formation, and regulation of cell migration, were enriched among EMT-associated alternatively splicing events. Our analysis suggested that most EMT-associated alternative splicing events are regulated by one or more members of the RBFOX, MBNL, CELF, hnRNP, or ESRP classes of splicing factors. The EMT alternative splicing signature was confirmed in human breast cancer cell lines, which could be classified into basal and luminal subtypes based exclusively on their EMT-associated splicing pattern. Expression of EMT-associated alternative mRNA transcripts was also observed in primary breast cancer samples, indicating that EMT-dependent splicing changes occur commonly in human tumors. The functional significance of EMT-associated alternative splicing was tested by expression of the epithelial-specific splicing factor ESRP1 or by depletion of RBFOX2 in mesenchymal cells, both of which elicited significant changes in cell morphology and motility towards an epithelial phenotype, suggesting that splicing regulation alone can drive critical aspects of EMT-associated phenotypic changes. The molecular description obtained here may aid in the development of new diagnostic and prognostic markers for analysis of breast cancer progression.

  5. Alternatively Spliced Homologous Exons Have Ancient Origins and Are Highly Expressed at the Protein Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abascal, Federico; Ezkurdia, Iakes; Rodriguez-Rivas, Juan; Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; del Pozo, Angela; Vázquez, Jesús; Valencia, Alfonso; Tress, Michael L

    2015-06-01

    Alternative splicing of messenger RNA can generate a wide variety of mature RNA transcripts, and these transcripts may produce protein isoforms with diverse cellular functions. While there is much supporting evidence for the expression of alternative transcripts, the same is not true for the alternatively spliced protein products. Large-scale mass spectroscopy experiments have identified evidence of alternative splicing at the protein level, but with conflicting results. Here we carried out a rigorous analysis of the peptide evidence from eight large-scale proteomics experiments to assess the scale of alternative splicing that is detectable by high-resolution mass spectroscopy. We find fewer splice events than would be expected: we identified peptides for almost 64% of human protein coding genes, but detected just 282 splice events. This data suggests that most genes have a single dominant isoform at the protein level. Many of the alternative isoforms that we could identify were only subtly different from the main splice isoform. Very few of the splice events identified at the protein level disrupted functional domains, in stark contrast to the two thirds of splice events annotated in the human genome that would lead to the loss or damage of functional domains. The most striking result was that more than 20% of the splice isoforms we identified were generated by substituting one homologous exon for another. This is significantly more than would be expected from the frequency of these events in the genome. These homologous exon substitution events were remarkably conserved--all the homologous exons we identified evolved over 460 million years ago--and eight of the fourteen tissue-specific splice isoforms we identified were generated from homologous exons. The combination of proteomics evidence, ancient origin and tissue-specific splicing indicates that isoforms generated from homologous exons may have important cellular roles. PMID:26061177

  6. Identification of a Novel Splicing Form of Amelogenin Gene in a Reptile, Ctenosaura similis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xinping; Deng, Xuliang; Zhang, Xichen

    2012-01-01

    Amelogenin, the major enamel matrix protein in tooth development, has been demonstrated to play a significant role in tooth enamel formation. Previous studies have identified the alternative splicing of amelogenin in many mammalian vertebrates as one mechanism for amelogenin heterogeneous expression in teeth. While amelogenin and its splicing forms in mammalian vertebrates have been cloned and sequenced, the amelogenin gene, especially its splicing forms in non-mammalian species, remains larg...

  7. Superconducting current transformer for testing Nb3Sn cable splicing technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To provide a quick feedback on different approaches to superconducting cable splicing design and assembly techniques, a superconducting current transformer that can deliver more than 20 kA for testing splice samples has been designed and fabricated. The existing infrastructure of the Short Sample Test Facility at Fermilab, including its cryostat, power supply, and data acquisition system, was used for housing and operating the transformer. This report presents the design features of the transformer and the main results of cable splice tests

  8. Alternatively Spliced Homologous Exons Have Ancient Origins and Are Highly Expressed at the Protein Level.

    OpenAIRE

    Federico Abascal; Iakes Ezkurdia; Juan Rodriguez-Rivas; Jose Manuel Rodriguez; Angela del Pozo; Jesús Vázquez; Alfonso Valencia; Tress, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing of messenger RNA can generate a wide variety of mature RNA transcripts, and these transcripts may produce protein isoforms with diverse cellular functions. While there is much supporting evidence for the expression of alternative transcripts, the same is not true for the alternatively spliced protein products. Large-scale mass spectroscopy experiments have identified evidence of alternative splicing at the protein level, but with conflicting results. Here we carried out a...

  9. Smooth muscle alternative splicing induced in fibroblasts by heterologous expression of a regulatory gene.

    OpenAIRE

    G. C. Roberts; Gooding, C; Smith, C W

    1996-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a common mechanism for regulating gene expression in different cell types. In order to understand this important process, the trans-acting factors that enforce the choice of particular splicing pathways in different environments must be identified. We have used the rat alpha-tropomyosin gene as a model system of tissue-specific alternative splicing. Exon 3 of alpha-tropomyosin is specifically inhibited in smooth muscle cells allowing the alternative inclusion of exon 2...

  10. Mammary gland selective excision of c-jun identifies its role in mRNA splicing

    OpenAIRE

    Katiyar, Sanjay; Jiao, Xuanmao; Addya, Sankar; Ertel, Adam; Rose, Vanessa; Casimiro, Mathew C.; Zhou, Jie; Lisanti, Michael P; Nasim, Talat; Fortina, Paolo; Pestell, Richard G.

    2011-01-01

    The c-jun gene regulates cellular proliferation and apoptosis via direct regulation of cellular gene expression. Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA increases the diversity of protein functions and alternate splicing events occur in tumors. Here, by targeting the excision of the endogenous c-jun gene within the mouse mammary epithelium, we have identified its selective role as an inhibitor of RNA splicing. Microarray-based assessment of gene expression, on laser capture micro-dissected c-jun−/− ...

  11. Coupling and Coordination in Gene Expression Processes with Pre-mRNA Splicing

    OpenAIRE

    Kewu Pan; Jimmy Tsz Hang Lee; Zhe Huang; Chi-Ming Wong

    2015-01-01

    RNA processing is a tightly regulated and highly complex pathway which includes transcription, splicing, editing, transportation, translation and degradation. It has been well-documented that splicing of RNA polymerase II medicated nascent transcripts occurs co-transcriptionally and is functionally coupled to other RNA processing. Recently, increasing experimental evidence indicated that pre-mRNA splicing influences RNA degradation and vice versa. In this review, we summarized the recent find...

  12. Alternative splicing of human and mouse NPFF2 receptor genes: Implications to receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankö, Minna-Liisa; Ostergård, Maria; Lintunen, Minnamaija; Panula, Pertti

    2006-12-22

    Alternative splicing has an important role in the tissue-specific regulation of gene expression. Here we report that similar to the human NPFF2 receptor, the mouse NPFF2 receptor is alternatively spliced. In human the presence of three alternatively spliced receptor variants were verified, whereas two NPFF2 receptor variants were identified in mouse. The alternative splicing affected the 5' untranslated region of the mouse receptor and the variants in mouse were differently distributed. The mouse NPFF system may also have species-specific features since the NPFF2 receptor mRNA expression differs from that reported for rat. PMID:17157836

  13. Operon Conservation and the Evolution of trans-Splicing in the Phylum Nematoda

    OpenAIRE

    Guiliano, David B.; Blaxter, Mark L.

    2006-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is unique among model animals in that many of its genes are cotranscribed as polycistronic pre-mRNAs from operons. The mechanism by which these operonic transcripts are resolved into mature mRNAs includes trans-splicing to a family of SL2-like spliced leader exons. SL2-like spliced leaders are distinct from SL1, the major spliced leader in C. elegans and other nematode species. We surveyed five additional nematode species, representing three of the five maj...

  14. A second trans-spliced RNA leader sequence in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, X Y; Hirsh, D

    1989-01-01

    In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the 22-nucleotide RNA sequence called the spliced leader (SL) is trans-spliced from the 100-nucleotide-long SL RNA to some mRNAs. We have identified a trans-spliced leader (SL2) whose sequence differs from that of the original spliced leader (SL1), although both are 22 nucleotides long. By primer-extension sequencing, SL2 but not SL1 was shown to be present at the 5' end of the mRNA encoded by one of the four glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gen...

  15. C. elegans sequences that control trans-splicing and operon pre-mRNA processing

    OpenAIRE

    Graber, Joel H; Salisbury, Jesse; Hutchins, Lucie N; Blumenthal, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Many mRNAs in Caenorhabditis elegans are generated through a trans-splicing reaction that adds one of two classes of spliced leader RNA to an independently transcribed pre-mRNA. SL1 leaders are spliced mostly to pre-mRNAs from genes with outrons, intron-like sequences at the 5′-ends of the pre-mRNAs. In contrast, SL2 leaders are nearly exclusively trans-spliced to genes that occur downstream in polycistronic pre-mRNAs produced from operons. Operon pre-mRNA processing requires separation into ...

  16. Operon conservation and the evolution of trans-splicing in the phylum Nematoda

    OpenAIRE

    Guiliano, David B.; Blaxter, Mark L.

    2006-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is unique among model animals in that many of its genes are cotranscribed as polycistronic pre-mRNAs from operons. The mechanism by which these operonic transcripts are resolved into mature mRNAs includes trans-splicing to a family of SL2-like spliced leader exons. SL2-like spliced leaders are distinct from SL1, the major spliced leader in C. elegans and other nematode species. We surveyed five additional nematode species, representing three of the five maj...

  17. A novel family of C. elegans snRNPs contains proteins associated with trans-splicing

    OpenAIRE

    MACMORRIS, MARGARET; Kumar, Madhur; Lasda, Erika; Larsen, Alison; Kraemer, Brian; Blumenthal, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    In many Caenorhabditis elegans pre-mRNAs, the RNA sequence between the 5′ cap and the first 3′ splice site is replaced by trans-splicing a short spliced leader (SL) from the Sm snRNP, SL1. C. elegans also utilizes a similar Sm snRNP, SL2, to trans-splice at sites between genes in polycistronic pre-mRNAs from operons. How do SL1 and SL2 snRNPs function in different contexts? Here we show that the SL1 snRNP contains a complex of SL75p and SL21p, which are homologs of novel proteins previously r...

  18. Fractionation and characterization of a yeast mRNA splicing extract.

    OpenAIRE

    S. C. Cheng; Abelson, J

    1986-01-01

    We have fractionated a yeast whole cell extract that can accurately splice synthetic actin and CYH2 pre-mRNAs. Three fractions, designated I, II, and III, have been separated by use of ammonium sulfate fractionation and chromatography on heparin agarose. Each fraction alone has no splicing activity. Fractions I and II allow the first step of the splicing reaction to proceed, giving rise to the splicing intermediates, free exon 1, and intron-exon 2. Addition of fraction III completes the react...

  19. The proper splicing of RNAi factors is critical for pericentric heterochromatin assembly in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott P Kallgren

    Full Text Available Heterochromatin preferentially assembles at repetitive DNA elements, playing roles in transcriptional silencing, recombination suppression, and chromosome segregation. The RNAi machinery is required for heterochromatin assembly in a diverse range of organisms. In fission yeast, RNA splicing factors are also required for pericentric heterochromatin assembly, and a prevailing model is that splicing factors provide a platform for siRNA generation independently of their splicing activity. Here, by screening the fission yeast deletion library, we discovered four novel splicing factors that are required for pericentric heterochromatin assembly. Sequencing total cellular RNAs from the strongest of these mutants, cwf14Δ, showed intron retention in mRNAs of several RNAi factors. Moreover, introducing cDNA versions of RNAi factors significantly restored pericentric heterochromatin in splicing mutants. We also found that mutations of splicing factors resulted in defective telomeric heterochromatin assembly and mis-splicing the mRNA of shelterin component Tpz1, and that replacement of tpz1+ with its cDNA partially rescued heterochromatin defects at telomeres in splicing mutants. Thus, proper splicing of RNAi and shelterin factors contributes to heterochromatin assembly at pericentric regions and telomeres.

  20. Trans-Splicing Improvement by the Combined Application of Antisense Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Koller

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing has become an emergent tool for the repair of mutated pre-mRNAs in the treatment of genetic diseases. RNA trans-splicing molecules (RTMs are designed to induce a specific trans-splicing reaction via a binding domain for a respective target pre-mRNA region. A previously established reporter-based screening system allows us to analyze the impact of various factors on the RTM trans-splicing efficiency in vitro. Using this system, we are further able to investigate the potential of antisense RNAs (AS RNAs, presuming to improve the trans-splicing efficiency of a selected RTM, specific for intron 102 of COL7A1. Mutations in the COL7A1 gene underlie the dystrophic subtype of the skin blistering disease epidermolysis bullosa (DEB. We have shown that co-transfections of the RTM and a selected AS RNA, interfering with competitive splicing elements on a COL7A1-minigene (COL7A1-MG, lead to a significant increase of the RNA trans-splicing efficiency. Thereby, accurate trans-splicing between the RTM and the COL7A1-MG is represented by the restoration of full-length green fluorescent protein GFP on mRNA and protein level. This mechanism can be crucial for the improvement of an RTM-mediated correction, especially in cases where a high trans-splicing efficiency is required.

  1. Achieving targeted and quantifiable alteration of mRNA splicing with Morpholino oligos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work represents the first guide for using steric-block antisense oligos as tools for effective and targeted modification of RNA splicing. Comparison of several steric-block oligo types shows the properties of Morpholinos provide significant advantages over other potential splice-blocking oligos. The procedures and complications of designing effective splice-blocking Morpholino oligos are described. The design process requires complete pre-mRNA sequence for defining suitable targets, which usually generate specific predictable messengers. To validate the targeting procedure, the level and nature of transcript alteration is characterized by RT-PCR analysis of splice modification in a β-globin splice model system. An oligo-walking study reveals that while U1 and U2 small nuclear RiboNucleoProtein (snRNP) binding sites are the most effective targets for blocking splicing, inclusion of these sites is not required to achieve effective splice modifications. The most effective targeting strategy employs simultaneously blocking snRNP binding sites and splice-junctions. The work presented here continues to be the basis for most of the successful Morpholino oligos designed for the worldwide research community to block RNA splicing

  2. Mechanism of protein splicing of the Pyrococcus abyssi lon protease intein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → The Pyrococcus abyssi lon protease intein promotes efficient protein splicing. → Inteins with mutations that interfere with individual steps of splicing do not promote unproductive side reactions. → The intein splices with Lys in place of the highly conserved penultimate His. → The intein is flanked by a Gly-rich region at its C terminus that may increase the efficiency of the third step of splicing, Asn cyclization coupled to peptide bond cleavage. -- Abstract: Protein splicing is a post-translational process by which an intervening polypeptide, the intein, excises itself from the flanking polypeptides, the exteins, coupled to ligation of the exteins. The lon protease of Pyrococcus abyssi (Pab) is interrupted by an intein. When over-expressed as a fusion protein in Escherichia coli, the Pab lon protease intein can promote efficient protein splicing. Mutations that block individual steps of splicing generally do not lead to unproductive side reactions, suggesting that the intein tightly coordinates the splicing process. The intein can splice, although it has Lys in place of the highly conserved penultimate His, and mutants of the intein in the C-terminal region lead to the accumulation of stable branched-ester intermediate.

  3. Mechanism of protein splicing of the Pyrococcus abyssi lon protease intein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Kevin M.; Schufreider, Ann K.; McGill, Melissa A.; O' Brien, Kathryn M.; Reitter, Julie N. [Department of Chemistry, College of the Holy Cross, Worcester, MA 01610 (United States); Mills, Kenneth V., E-mail: kmills@holycross.edu [Department of Chemistry, College of the Holy Cross, Worcester, MA 01610 (United States)

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} The Pyrococcus abyssi lon protease intein promotes efficient protein splicing. {yields} Inteins with mutations that interfere with individual steps of splicing do not promote unproductive side reactions. {yields} The intein splices with Lys in place of the highly conserved penultimate His. {yields} The intein is flanked by a Gly-rich region at its C terminus that may increase the efficiency of the third step of splicing, Asn cyclization coupled to peptide bond cleavage. -- Abstract: Protein splicing is a post-translational process by which an intervening polypeptide, the intein, excises itself from the flanking polypeptides, the exteins, coupled to ligation of the exteins. The lon protease of Pyrococcus abyssi (Pab) is interrupted by an intein. When over-expressed as a fusion protein in Escherichia coli, the Pab lon protease intein can promote efficient protein splicing. Mutations that block individual steps of splicing generally do not lead to unproductive side reactions, suggesting that the intein tightly coordinates the splicing process. The intein can splice, although it has Lys in place of the highly conserved penultimate His, and mutants of the intein in the C-terminal region lead to the accumulation of stable branched-ester intermediate.

  4. Analysis and prediction of gene splice sites in four Aspergillus genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Kai; Ussery, David; Brunak, Søren

    2009-01-01

    , splice site prediction program called NetAspGene, for the genus Aspergillus. Gene sequences from Aspergillus fumigatus, the most common mould pathogen, were used to build and test our model. Compared to many animals and plants, Aspergillus contains smaller introns; thus we have applied a larger window...... better splice site prediction than other available tools. NetAspGene will be very helpful for the study in Aspergillus splice sites and especially in alternative splicing. A webpage for NetAspGene is publicly available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetAspGene....

  5. Interactome for Auxiliary Splicing Factor U2AF65 Suggests Diverse Roles

    OpenAIRE

    Justin R Prigge; Iverson, Sonya V.; Siders, Ashley M.; Schmidt, Edward E.

    2009-01-01

    U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein auxiliary factor (U2AF) is an essential component of the splicing machinery that is composed of two protein subunits, the 35 kD U2AF35 (U2AF1) and the 65 kD U2AF65 (U2AF2). U2AF interacts with various splicing factors within this machinery. Here we expand the list of mammalian splicing factors that are known to interact with U2AF65 as well as the list of nuclear proteins not known to participate in splicing that interact with U2AF65. Using a yeast two-hybrid...

  6. Sequences necessary for trans-splicing in transiently transfected Brugia malayi

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Canhui; Oliveira, Ana; Higazi, Tarig B.; Ghedin, Elodie; DePasse, Jay; Thomas R Unnasch

    2007-01-01

    Many genes in parasitic nematodes are both cis- and trans-spliced. Previous studies have demonstrated that a 7nt element encoded in the first intron of the B. malayi 70 kDa heat shock protein (BmHSP70) gene was necessary to permit trans-splicing of transgenic mRNAs in embryos transfected with constructs encoding portions of the BmHSP70 gene. Here we demonstrate that this element (the B. malayi HSP70 trans-splicing motif, or BmHSP70 TSM) is necessary and sufficient to direct trans-splicing of ...

  7. The identification and characterization of a novel splicing protein, Isy1p, of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Dix, I.; Russell, C; Yehuda, S B; Kupiec, M.; Beggs, J D

    1999-01-01

    We have identified a novel splicing factor, Isy1p, through two-hybrid screens for interacting proteins involved in nuclear pre-mRNA splicing. Isy1p was tagged and demonstrated to be part of the splicing machinery, associated with spliceosomes throughout the splicing reactions. At least a portion of the Isy1 protein population is associated with snRNAs; low levels of U5 and U6 snRNAs are coimmunoprecipitated specifically with Isy1p. When the ISY1 gene was knocked out, no defect in vegetative g...

  8. Distinct mechanisms of splicing regulation in vivo by the Drosophila protein Sex-lethal

    OpenAIRE

    Granadino, Begoña; Luiz O. F. Penalva; Green, Michael R.; Valcárcel, Juán; Sánchez, Lucas

    1997-01-01

    The protein Sex-lethal (SXL) controls pre-mRNA splicing of two genes involved in Drosophila sex determination: transformer (tra) and the Sxl gene itself. Previous in vitro results indicated that SXL antagonizes the general splicing factor U2AF65 to regulate splicing of tra. In this report, we have used transgenic flies expressing chimeric proteins between SXL and the effector domain of U2AF65 to study the mechanisms of splicing regulation by SXL in vivo. Conferring U2AF activity to SXL reliev...

  9. Two novel splicing mutations in the SLC45A2 gene cause Oculocutaneous Albinism Type IV by unmasking cryptic splice sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straniero, Letizia; Rimoldi, Valeria; Soldà, Giulia; Mauri, Lucia; Manfredini, Emanuela; Andreucci, Elena; Bargiacchi, Sara; Penco, Silvana; Gesu, Giovanni P; Del Longo, Alessandra; Piozzi, Elena; Asselta, Rosanna; Primignani, Paola

    2015-09-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is characterized by hypopigmentation of the skin, hair and eye, and by ophthalmologic abnormalities caused by a deficiency in melanin biosynthesis. OCA type IV (OCA4) is one of the four commonly recognized forms of albinism, and is determined by mutation in the SLC45A2 gene. Here, we investigated the genetic basis of OCA4 in an Italian child. The mutational screening of the SLC45A2 gene identified two novel potentially pathogenic splicing mutations: a synonymous transition (c.888G>A) involving the last nucleotide of exon 3 and a single-nucleotide insertion (c.1156+2dupT) within the consensus sequence of the donor splice site of intron 5. As computer-assisted analysis for mutant splice-site prediction was not conclusive, we investigated the effects on pre-mRNA splicing of these two variants by using an in vitro minigene approach. Production of mutant transcripts in HeLa cells demonstrated that both mutations cause the almost complete abolishment of the physiologic donor splice site, with the concomitant unmasking of cryptic donor splice sites. To our knowledge, this work represents the first in-depth molecular characterization of splicing defects in a OCA4 patient. PMID:26016411

  10. Managing Joint Production Motivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindenberg, Siegwart; Foss, Nicolai Juul

    2011-01-01

    We contribute to the microfoundations of organizational performance by proffering the construct of joint production motivation. Under such motivational conditions individuals see themselves as part of a joint endeavor, each with his or her own roles and responsibilities; generate shared represent......We contribute to the microfoundations of organizational performance by proffering the construct of joint production motivation. Under such motivational conditions individuals see themselves as part of a joint endeavor, each with his or her own roles and responsibilities; generate shared...... representations of actions and tasks; cognitively coordinate cooperation; and choose their own behaviors in terms of joint goals. Using goal-framing theory, we explain how motivation for joint production can be managed by cognitive/symbolic management and organizational design....

  11. Regulation of tissue-specific alternative splicing: exon-specific cis-elements govern the splicing of leukocyte common antigen pre-mRNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Streuli, M; Saito, H

    1989-01-01

    Tissue-specific alternative splicing is an important mechanism for controlling gene expression. Exons 4, 5 and 6 of the human leukocyte common antigen (LCA) gene are included in B cell mRNA but excluded from thymocyte mRNA by differential splicing. In order to study this tissue-specific alternative splicing, we constructed mini-genes that contain only a few of the LCA exons and the SV40 promoter. Mouse B cells and thymocytes were transfected with these mini-gene constructs and the structures ...

  12. Comprehensive analysis of alternative splicing in rice and comparative analyses with Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mount Stephen M

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, genomic sequencing efforts were finished for Oryza sativa (cultivated rice and Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis. Additionally, these two plant species have extensive cDNA and expressed sequence tag (EST libraries. We employed the Program to Assemble Spliced Alignments (PASA to identify and analyze alternatively spliced isoforms in both species. Results A comprehensive analysis of alternative splicing was performed in rice that started with >1.1 million publicly available spliced ESTs and over 30,000 full length cDNAs in conjunction with the newly enhanced PASA software. A parallel analysis was performed with Arabidopsis to compare and ascertain potential differences between monocots and dicots. Alternative splicing is a widespread phenomenon (observed in greater than 30% of the loci with transcript support and we have described nine alternative splicing variations. While alternative splicing has the potential to create many RNA isoforms from a single locus, the majority of loci generate only two or three isoforms and transcript support indicates that these isoforms are generally not rare events. For the alternate donor (AD and acceptor (AA classes, the distance between the splice sites for the majority of events was found to be less than 50 basepairs (bp. In both species, the most frequent distance between AA is 3 bp, consistent with reports in mammalian systems. Conversely, the most frequent distance between AD is 4 bp in both plant species, as previously observed in mouse. Most alternative splicing variations are localized to the protein coding sequence and are predicted to significantly alter the coding sequence. Conclusion Alternative splicing is widespread in both rice and Arabidopsis and these species share many common features. Interestingly, alternative splicing may play a role beyond creating novel combinations of transcripts that expand the proteome. Many isoforms will presumably have negative

  13. Classifying MLH1 and MSH2 variants using bioinformatic prediction, splicing assays, segregation, and tumor characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Sven; Buchanan, Daniel D; Barker, Melissa; Jaskowski, Lesley; Walsh, Michael D; Birney, Genevieve; Woods, Michael O; Hopper, John L; Jenkins, Mark A; Brown, Melissa A; Tavtigian, Sean V; Goldgar, David E; Young, Joanne P; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2009-05-01

    Reliable methods for predicting functional consequences of variants in disease genes would be beneficial in the clinical setting. This study was undertaken to predict, and confirm in vitro, splicing aberrations associated with mismatch repair (MMR) variants identified in familial colon cancer patients. Six programs were used to predict the effect of 13 MLH1 and 6 MSH2 gene variants on pre-mRNA splicing. mRNA from cycloheximide-treated lymphoblastoid cell lines of variant carriers was screened for splicing aberrations. Tumors of variant carriers were tested for microsatellite instability and MMR protein expression. Variant segregation in families was assessed using Bayes factor causality analysis. Amino acid alterations were examined for evolutionary conservation and physicochemical properties. Splicing aberrations were detected for 10 variants, including a frameshift as a minor cDNA product, and altered ratio of known alternate splice products. Loss of splice sites was well predicted by splice-site prediction programs SpliceSiteFinder (90%) and NNSPLICE (90%), but consequence of splice site loss was less accurately predicted. No aberrations correlated with ESE predictions for the nine exonic variants studied. Seven of eight missense variants had normal splicing (88%), but only one was a substitution considered neutral from evolutionary/physicochemical analysis. Combined with information from tumor and segregation analysis, and literature review, 16 of 19 variants were considered clinically relevant. Bioinformatic tools for prediction of splicing aberrations need improvement before use without supporting studies to assess variant pathogenicity. Classification of mismatch repair gene variants is assisted by a comprehensive approach that includes in vitro, tumor pathology, clinical, and evolutionary conservation data. PMID:19267393

  14. Performance of Grouted Splice Sleeve Connector under Tensile Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Alias

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The grouted splice sleeve connector system takes advantage of the bond-slip resistance of the grout and the mechanical gripping of reinforcement bars to provide resistance to tensile force. In this system, grout acts as a load-transferring medium and bonding material between the bars and sleeve. This study adopted the end-to-end rebars connection method to investigate the effect of development length and sleeve diameter on the bonding performance of the sleeve connector. The end-to-end method refers to the condition where reinforcement bars are inserted into the sleeve from both ends and meet at the centre before grout is filled. Eight specimens of grouted splice sleeve connector were tested under tensile load to determine their performance. The sleeve connector was designed using 5 mm thick circular hollow section (CHS steel pipe and consisted of one external and two internal sleeves. The tensile test results show that connectors with a smaller external and internal sleeve diameter appear to provide better bonding performance. Three types of failure were observed in this research, which are bar fracture (outside the sleeve, bar pullout, and internal sleeve pullout. With reference to these failure types, the development length of 200 mm is the optimum value due to its bar fracture type, which indicates that the tensile capacity of the connector is higher than the reinforcement bar. It is found that the performance of the grouted splice sleeve connector is influenced by the development length of the reinforcement bar and the diameter of the sleeve.

  15. Characterization of a splicing mutation in group A xeroderma pigmentosum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The molecular basis of group A xeroderma pigmentosum (WP) was investigated by comparison of the nucleotide sequences of multiple clones of the XP group A complementing gene (XPAC) from a patient with group A XP with that of a normal gene. The clones showed a G → C substitution at the 3' splice acceptor site of intron 3, which altered the obligatory AG acceptor dinucleotide to AC. Nucleotide sequencing of cDNAs amplified by the polymerase chain reaction revealed that this single base substitution abolishes the canonical 3' splice site, thus creating two abnormally spliced mRNA forms. The larger form is identical with normal mRNA except for a dinucleotide deletion at the 5' end of exon 4. This deletion results in a frameshift with premature translation termination in exon 4. The smaller form has a deletion of the entire exon 3 and the dinucleotide at the 5' end of exon 4. The result of a transfection study provided additional evidence that this single base substitution is the disease-causing mutation. This single base substitution creates a new cleavage site for the restriction nuclease AlwNI. Analysis of AlwNI restriction fragment length polymorphism showed a high frequency of this mutation in Japanese patients with group A XP: 16 of 21 unrelated Japanese patients were homozygous and 4 were heterozygous for this mutation. However, 11 Caucasians and 2 Blacks with group A XP did not have this mutant allele. The polymorphic AlwNI restriction fragments are concluded to be useful for diagnosis of group A XP in Japanese subjects, including prenatal cases and carriers

  16. CTCF:from insulators to alternative splicing regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alberto R Kornblihtt

    2012-01-01

    The zinc-finger DNA-binding protein CTCF has been known for being a constituent of insulators.A recent paper in Nature reports an unforeseen intragenic role for CTCF that links DNA methylation with alternative splicing.By binding to its target DNA site placed within an alternative exon,CTCF creates a roadblock to transcriptional elongation that favors inclusion of the exon into mature mRNA.DNA methylation prevents CTCF binding,which releases pol Ⅱ transient blockage and promotes exon exclusion.

  17. A novel splicing mutation in the V2 vasopressin receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamperis, Konstantinos; Siggaard, C; Herlin, Troels;

    2000-01-01

    In order to elucidate the molecular basis and the clinical characteristics of X-linked recessive nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (CNDI) in a kindred of Danish descent, we performed direct sequencing of the arginine vasopressin receptor 2 (AVPR2) gene in five members of the family, as well as...... clinical investigations comprising a fluid deprivation test and a 1-deamino-8-D-arginine-vasopressin (dDAVP) infusion test in the study subject and his mother. We found a highly unusual, novel, de novo 1447A-->C point mutation (gDNA), involving the invariable splice acceptor of the second intron of the...

  18. Alternatively spliced neuronal nitric oxide synthase mediates penile erection

    OpenAIRE

    Hurt, K. Joseph; Sezen, Sena F.; Champion, Hunter C.; Crone, Julie K.; Palese, Michael A.; Huang, Paul L; Sawa, Akira; Luo, Xiaojiang; Musicki, Biljana; Snyder, Solomon H.; Burnett, Arthur L.

    2006-01-01

    A key role for nitric oxide (NO) in penile erection is well established, but the relative roles of the neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) versus endothelial forms of NOS are not clear. nNOS- and endothelial NOS-deficient mice maintain erectile function and reproductive capacity, questioning the importance of NO. Alternatively, residual NO produced by shorter transcripts in the nNOS−/− animals might suffice for normal physiologic function. We show that the β splice variant of nNOS elicits normal erec...

  19. SEQassembly: A Practical Tools Program for Coding Sequences Splicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hongbin; Yang, Hang; Fu, Lei; Qin, Long; Li, Huili; He, Feng; Wang, Bo; Wu, Xiaoming

    CDS (Coding Sequences) is a portion of mRNA sequences, which are composed by a number of exon sequence segments. The construction of CDS sequence is important for profound genetic analysis such as genotyping. A program in MATLAB environment is presented, which can process batch of samples sequences into code segments under the guide of reference exon models, and splice these code segments of same sample source into CDS according to the exon order in queue file. This program is useful in transcriptional polymorphism detection and gene function study.

  20. Reconstruction of local emissivity profile from chord-integrated soft x-ray data in heliotron/torsatron plasmas by singular-value decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reconstruction method for a local soft X-ray (SX) emissivity profile based on singular-value decomposition (SVD) was applied to the chord-integrated SX data obtained in the compact helical system (CHS) heliotron/torsatron. The numerical procedure for this method was simplified by introducing the data of equilibrium magnetic surfaces to analyze the experimental data efficiently. The applicability of the Akaide information criterion (AIC) was investigated for the determination of the optimal number of parameters characterizing a local emissivity profile. This method was applied to SX data for sawtoothing plasmas of the CHS. For these CHS data, the optimal number of parameters is determined from the spatial resolution of an SX detector array rather than the AIC. A characteristic feature of the off-axis or annular sawtooth crash was clearly derived with this technique. (author)

  1. An exact, closed-form expression of the integral chord-length distribution for the calculation of single-event upsets induced by cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Keung L.; Buehler, Martin G.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a derivation of an exact closed-form expression of the integral chord-length distribution for the calculation of single-event upsets (SEUs) in an electronic memory cell, caused by cosmic rays. Results computed for two rectangular parallelepipeds using this exact expression are compared with those computed with Bradford's (1979) semiexact expression of C(x). It is found that the values of C(x) are identical for x equal or smaller than b but are vastly different for x greater than b. Moreover, while C(x) of Bradford gives reasonably accurate values of SEU rate for certain sets of computational parameters, it gives values more than 10 times larger than the correct values for other sets of parameters.

  2. 49 CFR 236.74 - Protection of insulated wire; splice in underground wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... underground wire. 236.74 Section 236.74 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued... wire; splice in underground wire. Insulated wire shall be protected from mechanical injury. The insulation shall not be punctured for test purposes. Splice in underground wire shall have...

  3. 49 CFR 234.241 - Protection of insulated wire; splice in underground wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... underground wire. 234.241 Section 234.241 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... of insulated wire; splice in underground wire. Insulated wire shall be protected from mechanical injury. The insulation shall not be punctured for test purposes. A splice in underground wire shall...

  4. Investigation of tissue-specific human orthologous alternative splice events in pig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillig, Ann-Britt Nygaard; Jørgensen, Claus Bøttcher; Salicio, Susanna Cirera;

    2010-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA can contribute to differences between tissues or cells either by regulating gene expression or creating proteins with various functions encoded by one gene. The number of investigated alternative splice events in pig has so far been limited. In this study we have ...

  5. 7 CFR 1755.200 - RUS standard for splicing copper and fiber optic cables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false RUS standard for splicing copper and fiber optic..., ACCEPTABLE MATERIALS, AND STANDARD CONTRACT FORMS § 1755.200 RUS standard for splicing copper and fiber optic... fiber optic cables. Typical applications of these methods include aerial, buried, and...

  6. Identification of a novel function of CX-4945 as a splicing regulator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeongki Kim

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing is a nearly ubiquitous versatile process that controls gene expression and creates numerous protein isoforms with different functions from a single gene. The significance of alternative splicing has been confirmed by the increasing number of human diseases that are caused by misregulation of splicing events. Very few compounds, however, have been reported to act as inhibitors of alternative splicing, and their potential clinical use needs to be evaluated. Here, we report that CX-4945, a previously well-characterized inhibitor of casein kinase 2 (CK2 and a molecule currently in clinical trials (Phase II for cancer treatment, regulates splicing in mammalian cells in a CK2-independent manner. Transcriptome-wide analysis using exon array also showed a widespread alteration in alternative splicing of numerous genes. We found that CX-4945 potently inhibits the Cdc2-like kinases (Clks in vitro and in turn, leads to suppression of the phosphorylation of serine/arginine-rich (SR proteins in mammalian cells. Surprisingly, the overall efficacy of CX-4945 on Clks (IC50 = 3-90 nM was stronger than that of TG-003, the strongest inhibitor reported to date. Of the Clks, Clk2 was most strongly inhibited by CX-4945 in an ATP-competitive manner. Our research revealed an unexpected activity of the drug candidate CX-4945 as a potent splicing modulator and also suggested a potential application for therapy of diseases caused by abnormal splicing.

  7. Splicing-Mediated Autoregulation Modulates Rpl22p Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabunilas, Jason; Chanfreau, Guillaume

    2016-04-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, splicing is critical for expression of ribosomal protein genes (RPGs), which are among the most highly expressed genes and are tightly regulated according to growth and environmental conditions. However, knowledge of the precise mechanisms by which RPG pre-mRNA splicing is regulated on a gene-by-gene basis is lacking. Here we show that Rpl22p has an extraribosomal role in the inhibition of splicing of the RPL22B pre-mRNA transcript. A stem loop secondary structure within the intron is necessary for pre-mRNA binding by Rpl22p in vivo and splicing inhibition in vivo and in vitro and can rescue splicing inhibition in vitro when added in trans to splicing reactions. Splicing inhibition by Rpl22p may be partly attributed to the reduction of co-transcriptional U1 snRNP recruitment to the pre-mRNA at the RPL22B locus. We further demonstrate that the inhibition of RPL22B pre-mRNA splicing contributes to the down-regulation of mature transcript during specific stress conditions, and provide evidence hinting at a regulatory role for this mechanism in conditions of suppressed ribosome biogenesis. These results demonstrate an autoregulatory mechanism that fine-tunes the expression of the Rpl22 protein and by extension Rpl22p paralog composition according to the cellular demands for ribosome biogenesis. PMID:27097027

  8. Alternative splicing in colon, bladder, and prostate cancer identified by exon-array analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Kasper; Sørensen, Karina D.; Brems-Eskildsen, Anne Sofie;

    2008-01-01

    Alternative splicing enhances proteome diversity and modulates cancer-associated proteins. To identify tissue- and tumor-specific alternative splicing, we used the GeneChip Human Exon 1.0 ST Array to measure whole-genome exon expression in 102 normal and cancer tissue samples of different stages ...

  9. Environmental qualification of heat shrinkable splices using the degradation factor method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The environmental qualification of heat shrinkable splices is investigated with respect to abnormal installation and its effect on insulation resistance. An analytical method is developed to assess the installed splice insulation resistance during a design basis accident at a nuclear facility. Once the insulation resistance is established a system's performance capabilities can also be verified analytically

  10. HP1 Is Involved in Regulating the Global Impact of DNA Methylation on Alternative Splicing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahuvi Yearim

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The global impact of DNA methylation on alternative splicing is largely unknown. Using a genome-wide approach in wild-type and methylation-deficient embryonic stem cells, we found that DNA methylation can either enhance or silence exon recognition and affects the splicing of more than 20% of alternative exons. These exons are characterized by distinct genetic and epigenetic signatures. Alternative splicing regulation of a subset of these exons can be explained by heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1, which silences or enhances exon recognition in a position-dependent manner. We constructed an experimental system using site-specific targeting of a methylated/unmethylated gene and demonstrate a direct causal relationship between DNA methylation and alternative splicing. HP1 regulates this gene’s alternative splicing in a methylation-dependent manner by recruiting splicing factors to its methylated form. Our results demonstrate DNA methylation’s significant global influence on mRNA splicing and identify a specific mechanism of splicing regulation mediated by HP1.

  11. Widespread Inhibition of Posttranscriptional Splicing Shapes the Cellular Transcriptome following Heat Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reut Shalgi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available During heat shock and other proteotoxic stresses, cells regulate multiple steps in gene expression in order to globally repress protein synthesis and selectively upregulate stress response proteins. Splicing of several mRNAs is known to be inhibited during heat stress, often meditated by SRp38, but the extent and specificity of this effect have remained unclear. Here, we examined splicing regulation genome-wide during heat shock in mouse fibroblasts. We observed widespread retention of introns in transcripts from ∼1,700 genes, which were enriched for tRNA synthetase, nuclear pore, and spliceosome functions. Transcripts with retained introns were largely nuclear and untranslated. However, a group of 580+ genes biased for oxidation reduction and protein folding functions continued to be efficiently spliced. Interestingly, these unaffected transcripts are mostly cotranscriptionally spliced under both normal and stress conditions, whereas splicing-inhibited transcripts are mostly spliced posttranscriptionally. Altogether, our data demonstrate widespread repression of splicing in the mammalian heat stress response, disproportionately affecting posttranscriptionally spliced genes.

  12. Intrasplicing coordinates alternative first exons with alternative splicing in the protein 4.1R gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conboy, John G.; Parra, Marilyn K.; Tan, Jeff S.; Mohandas, Narla; Conboy, John G.

    2008-11-07

    In the protein 4.1R gene, alternative first exons splice differentially to alternative 3' splice sites far downstream in exon 2'/2 (E2'/2). We describe a novel intrasplicing mechanism by which exon 1A (E1A) splices exclusively to the distal E2'/2 acceptor via two nested splicing reactions regulated by novel properties of exon 1B (E1B). E1B behaves as an exon in the first step, using its consensus 5' donor to splice to the proximal E2'/2 acceptor. A long region of downstream intron is excised, juxtaposing E1B with E2'/2 to generate a new composite acceptor containing the E1B branchpoint/pyrimidine tract and E2 distal 3' AG-dinucleotide. Next, the upstream E1A splices over E1B to this distal acceptor, excising the remaining intron plus E1B and E2' to form mature E1A/E2 product. We mapped branch points for both intrasplicing reactions and demonstrated that mutation of the E1B 5' splice site or branchpoint abrogates intrasplicing. In the 4.1R gene, intrasplicing ultimately determines N-terminal protein structure and function. More generally, intrasplicing represents a new mechanism whereby alternative promoters can be coordinated with downstream alternative splicing.

  13. Alternative splicing, a new target to block cellular gene expression by poliovirus 2A protease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Novel role for poliovirus 2A protease as splicing modulator. → Poliovirus 2A protease inhibits the alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs. → Poliovirus 2A protease blocks the second catalytic step of splicing. -- Abstract: Viruses have developed multiple strategies to interfere with the gene expression of host cells at different stages to ensure their own survival. Here we report a new role for poliovirus 2Apro modulating the alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs. Expression of 2Apro potently inhibits splicing of reporter genes in HeLa cells. Low amounts of 2Apro abrogate Fas exon 6 skipping, whereas higher levels of protease fully abolish Fas and FGFR2 splicing. In vitro splicing of MINX mRNA using nuclear extracts is also strongly inhibited by 2Apro, leading to accumulation of the first exon and the lariat product containing the unspliced second exon. These findings reveal that the mechanism of action of 2Apro on splicing is to selectively block the second catalytic step.

  14. Features of 5'-splice-site efficiency derived from disease-causing mutations and comparative genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roca, Xavier; Olson, Andrew J; Rao, Atmakuri R;

    2007-01-01

    Many human diseases, including Fanconi anemia, hemophilia B, neurofibromatosis, and phenylketonuria, can be caused by 5'-splice-site (5'ss) mutations that are not predicted to disrupt splicing, according to position weight matrices. By using comparative genomics, we identify pairwise dependencies...

  15. Suppression of an atypically spliced rice CACTA transposon transcript in transgenic plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greco, R.; Ouwerkerk, P.B.F.; Pereira, A.B.

    2005-01-01

    OsES1, a rice homolog of the maize En/Spm transposon, is transcribed to produce TnpA-like and TnpD-like transcripts. However, an alternatively spliced form of the TnpA-like transcript., which was found to be suppressed in transgenic plants, was revealed to be clue to atypical splicing of a Hipa-like

  16. Dynamic regulation of alternative splicing and chromatin structure in Drosophila gonads revealed by RNA-seq

    OpenAIRE

    Gan, Qiang; Chepelev, Iouri; Wei, Gang; Tarayrah, Lama; Cui, Kairong; Zhao, Keji; Chen, Xin

    2010-01-01

    Both transcription and post-transcriptional processes, such as alternative splicing, play crucial roles in controlling developmental programs in metazoans. Recently emerged RNA-seq method has brought our understandings of eukaryotic transcriptomes to a new level, because it can resolve both gene expression level and alternative splicing events simultaneously.

  17. Autogenous Regulation of Splicing of the Transcript of a Yeast Ribosomal Protein Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabeva, Mariana D.; Post-Beittenmiller, Martha A.; Warner, Jonathan R.

    1986-08-01

    The gene for a yeast ribosomal protein, RPL32, contains a single intron. The product of this gene appears to participate in feedback control of the splicing of the intron from the transcript. This autogenous regulation of splicing provides a striking analogy to the autogenous regulation of translation of ribosomal proteins in Escherichia coli.

  18. Assessing the impact of alternative splicing on the diversity and evolution of the proteome in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Severing, E.I.

    2011-01-01

    Splicing is one of the key processing steps during the maturation of a gene’s primary transcript into the mRNA molecule used as a template for protein production. Splicing involves the removal of segments called introns and re-joining of the remaining segments called exons. It is by now well e

  19. Alternative Splicing and Expression Profile Analysis of Expressed Sequence Tags in Domestic Pig

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang Zhang; Lin Tao; Lin Ye; Ling He; Yuan-Zhong Zhu; Yue-Dong Zhu; Yan Zhou

    2007-01-01

    Domestic pig (Sus scrofa domestica) is one of the most important mammals to humans. Alternative splicing is a cellular mechanism in eukaryotes that greatly increases the diversity of gene products. Expression sequence tags (ESTs) have been widely used for gene discovery, expression profile analysis, and alternative splicing detection. In this study, a total of 712,905 ESTs extracted from 101 different nonnormalized EST libraries of the domestic pig were analyzed. These EST libraries cover the nervous system, digestive system, immune system, and meat production related tissues from embryo, newborn, and adult pigs, making contributions to the analysis of alternative splicing variants as well as expression profiles in various stages of tissues. A modified approach was designed to cluster and assemble large EST datasets, aiming to detect alternative splicing together with EST abundance of each splicing variant. Much efforts were made to classify alternative splicing into different types and apply different filters to each type to get more reliable results. Finally, a total of 1,223 genes with average 2.8 splicing variants were detected among 16,540 unique genes. The overview of expression profiles would change when we take alternative splicing into account.

  20. Autogenous regulation of splicing of the transcript of a yeast ribosomal protein gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Dabeva, M. D.; Post-Beittenmiller, M A; Warner, J R

    1986-01-01

    The gene for a yeast ribosomal protein, RPL32, contains a single intron. The product of this gene appears to participate in feedback control of the splicing of the intron from the transcript. This autogenous regulation of splicing provides a striking analogy to the autogenous regulation of translation of ribosomal proteins in Escherichia coli.

  1. Alternative splicing, a new target to block cellular gene expression by poliovirus 2A protease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, Enrique, E-mail: ealvarez@cbm.uam.es [Centro de Biologia Molecular Severo Ochoa (CSIC-UAM), Nicolas Cabrera, 1 Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Castello, Alfredo; Carrasco, Luis; Izquierdo, Jose M. [Centro de Biologia Molecular Severo Ochoa (CSIC-UAM), Nicolas Cabrera, 1 Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} Novel role for poliovirus 2A protease as splicing modulator. {yields} Poliovirus 2A protease inhibits the alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs. {yields} Poliovirus 2A protease blocks the second catalytic step of splicing. -- Abstract: Viruses have developed multiple strategies to interfere with the gene expression of host cells at different stages to ensure their own survival. Here we report a new role for poliovirus 2A{sup pro} modulating the alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs. Expression of 2A{sup pro} potently inhibits splicing of reporter genes in HeLa cells. Low amounts of 2A{sup pro} abrogate Fas exon 6 skipping, whereas higher levels of protease fully abolish Fas and FGFR2 splicing. In vitro splicing of MINX mRNA using nuclear extracts is also strongly inhibited by 2A{sup pro}, leading to accumulation of the first exon and the lariat product containing the unspliced second exon. These findings reveal that the mechanism of action of 2A{sup pro} on splicing is to selectively block the second catalytic step.

  2. FULL-GENOME ANALYSIS OF ALTERNATIVE SPLICING IN MOUSE LIVER AFTER HEPATOTOXICANT EXPOSURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alternative splicing plays a role in determining gene function and protein diversity. We have employed whole genome exon profiling using Affymetrix Mouse Exon 1.0 ST arrays to understand the significance of alternative splicing on a genome-wide scale in response to multiple toxic...

  3. Histone H3K36 methylation regulates pre-mRNA splicing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorenson, Matthew R; Jha, Deepak K; Ucles, Stefanie A; Flood, Danielle M; Strahl, Brian D; Stevens, Scott W; Kress, Tracy L

    2016-04-01

    Co-transcriptional splicing takes place in the context of a highly dynamic chromatin architecture, yet the role of chromatin restructuring in coordinating transcription with RNA splicing has not been fully resolved. To further define the contribution of histone modifications to pre-mRNA splicing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we probed a library of histone point mutants using a reporter to monitor pre-mRNA splicing. We found that mutation of H3 lysine 36 (H3K36) - a residue methylated by Set2 during transcription elongation - exhibited phenotypes similar to those of pre-mRNA splicing mutants. We identified genetic interactions between genes encoding RNA splicing factors and genes encoding the H3K36 methyltransferase Set2 and the demethylase Jhd1 as well as point mutations of H3K36 that block methylation. Consistent with the genetic interactions, deletion of SET2, mutations modifying the catalytic activity of Set2 or H3K36 point mutations significantly altered expression of our reporter and reduced splicing of endogenous introns. These effects were dependent on the association of Set2 with RNA polymerase II and H3K36 dimethylation. Additionally, we found that deletion of SET2 reduces the association of the U2 and U5 snRNPs with chromatin. Thus, our study provides the first evidence that H3K36 methylation plays a role in co-transcriptional RNA splicing in yeast. PMID:26821844

  4. Sacroiliac joint pain - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    The sacroiliac joint (SIJ) is a term used to describe the place where the sacrum and the iliac bones join. The ... The main purpose of the joint is to connect the spine and the pelvis. As a result, there is very little movement at the SIJ. Major reasons ...

  5. JET Joint Undertaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents the progress report of the Joint European Torus (JET) Joint Undertaking, 1986. The report contains a survey of the scientific and technical achievements on JET during 1986; the more important articles referred to in this survey are reproduced as appendices to this Report. The last section discusses developments which might improve the overall performance of the machine. (U.K.)

  6. "Nonfloating" universal joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleberry, W. T.

    1978-01-01

    Modified crowned-spline joint is lightweight, durable, and requires minimum of parts. It does not use rubber cushions to limit play and is useful over wide temperature range. It has inner ball and socket to provide rigid connection with no axial play. Joint can be adapted to form pinned connection between segmented torque tubes.

  7. Characterization of Neuronal-Specific Tra2b Knock-Out Mice and Identification of Tra2b Splicing Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Storbeck, Markus

    2013-01-01

    TRA2B is a serine-arginine-rich splicing factor that contributes to the alternative splicing of exons and depletion of Tra2b in the mouse causes early embryonic lethality. It modulates splice site selection in a concentration dependent fashion and associates to target exons either directly via GAA binding motifs or indirectly via interactions with other splice factors. TRA2B is highest expressed in neuronal tissue and testis and its expression and activation are controlled via an autoregulato...

  8. MR diagnosis of temporomandibular joint. A study of joint effusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneda, Takashi; Yamashiro, Mitsuaki; Ozawa, Kaoru; Suzuki, Hiromi; Okada, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu [Nihon Univ., Matsudo, Chiba (Japan). School of Dentistry

    1998-03-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the relationship between correlation of MR joint effusion of the temporomandibular joint and disk position, to evaluate the relationship between joint effusion and aging, and to assess the frequency of MR joint effusion of bilateral temporomandibular joints. The temporomandibular joints of 192 patients with clinical symptoms of temporomandibular joint disorders were imaged bilaterally using high field, surface-coil MR imaging. Oblique sagittal and coronal proton density-weighted and T2-weighted images were obtained. Imaging findings of joint effusion were correlated with disk position, aging, and bilateral temporomandibular joints. MR showed effusion in 4% of the joints with normal superior disk position, 36% of the joints with disk displacement with reduction, and 45% of the joints with disk displacement without reduction. There were significant differences in the incidence of joint effusion between normal disk position and anterior disk displacement with or without reduction. Younger patients less than 40 years were significant higher the incidence of joint effusion than those of older patients. A significant association was seen between joint effusion and aging. MR showed effusion in 17% of the unilateral temporomandibular joint, 24% of the bilateral temporomandibular joints. There was no significant difference between unilateral and bilateral case. These results indicated that joint effusion using MR imaging was associated with varied temporomandibular joint pathologic states. (author)

  9. MR diagnosis of temporomandibular joint. A study of joint effusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the relationship between correlation of MR joint effusion of the temporomandibular joint and disk position, to evaluate the relationship between joint effusion and aging, and to assess the frequency of MR joint effusion of bilateral temporomandibular joints. The temporomandibular joints of 192 patients with clinical symptoms of temporomandibular joint disorders were imaged bilaterally using high field, surface-coil MR imaging. Oblique sagittal and coronal proton density-weighted and T2-weighted images were obtained. Imaging findings of joint effusion were correlated with disk position, aging, and bilateral temporomandibular joints. MR showed effusion in 4% of the joints with normal superior disk position, 36% of the joints with disk displacement with reduction, and 45% of the joints with disk displacement without reduction. There were significant differences in the incidence of joint effusion between normal disk position and anterior disk displacement with or without reduction. Younger patients less than 40 years were significant higher the incidence of joint effusion than those of older patients. A significant association was seen between joint effusion and aging. MR showed effusion in 17% of the unilateral temporomandibular joint, 24% of the bilateral temporomandibular joints. There was no significant difference between unilateral and bilateral case. These results indicated that joint effusion using MR imaging was associated with varied temporomandibular joint pathologic states. (author)

  10. cis-Acting and trans-acting modulation of equine infectious anemia virus alternative RNA splicing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), a lentivirus distantly related to HIV-1, encodes regulatory proteins, EIAV Tat (ETat) and Rev (ERev), from a four-exon mRNA. Exon 3 of the tat/rev mRNA contains a 30-nucleotide purine-rich element (PRE) which binds both ERev and SF2/ASF, a member of the SR family of RNA splicing factors. To better understand the role of this element in the regulation of EIAV pre-mRNA splicing, we quantified the effects of mutation or deletion of the PRE on exon 3 splicing in vitro and on alternative splicing in vivo. We also determined the branch point elements upstream of exons 3 and 4. In vitro splicing of exon 3 to exon 4 was not affected by mutation of the PRE, and addition of purified SR proteins enhanced splicing independently of the PRE. In vitro splicing of exon 2 to exon 3 was dependent on the PRE; under conditions of excess SR proteins, either the PRE or the 5' splice site of exon 3 was sufficient to activate splicing. We applied isoform-specific primers in real-time RT-PCR reactions to quantitatively analyze alternative splicing in cells transfected with rev-minus EIAV provirus constructs. In the context of provirus with wild-type exon 3, greater than 80% of the viral mRNAs were multiply spliced, and of these, less than 1% excluded exon 3. Deletion of the PRE resulted in a decrease in the relative amount of multiply spliced mRNA to about 40% of the total and approximately 39% of the viral mRNA excluded exon 3. Ectopic expression of ERev caused a decrease in the relative amount of multiply spliced mRNA to approximately 50% of the total and increased mRNAs that excluded exon 3 to about 4%. Over-expression of SF2/ASF in cells transfected with wild-type provirus constructs inhibited splicing but did not significantly alter exon 3 skipping

  11. A directed approach for the identification of transcripts harbouring the spliced leader sequence and the effect of trans-splicing knockdown in Schistosoma mansoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina de Moraes Mourao

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is a major neglected tropical disease caused by trematodes from the genus Schistosoma. Because schistosomes exhibit a complex life cycle and numerous mechanisms for regulating gene expression, it is believed that spliced leader (SL trans-splicing could play an important role in the biology of these parasites. The purpose of this study was to investigate the function of trans-splicing in Schistosoma mansoni through analysis of genes that may be regulated by this mechanism and via silencing SL-containing transcripts through RNA interference. Here, we report our analysis of SL transcript-enriched cDNA libraries from different S. mansoni life stages. Our results show that the trans-splicing mechanism is apparently not associated with specific genes, subcellular localisations or life stages. In cross-species comparisons, even though the sets of genes that are subject to SL trans-splicing regulation appear to differ between organisms, several commonly shared orthologues were observed. Knockdown of trans-spliced transcripts in sporocysts resulted in a systemic reduction of the expression levels of all tested trans-spliced transcripts; however, the only phenotypic effect observed was diminished larval size. Further studies involving the findings from this work will provide new insights into the role of trans-splicing in the biology of S. mansoni and other organisms. All Expressed Sequence Tags generated in this study were submitted to dbEST as five different libraries. The accessions for each library and for the individual sequences are as follows: (i adult worms of mixed sexes (LIBEST_027999: JZ139310 - JZ139779, (ii female adult worms (LIBEST_028000: JZ139780 - JZ140379, (iii male adult worms (LIBEST_028001: JZ140380 - JZ141002, (iv eggs (LIBEST_028002: JZ141003 - JZ141497 and (v schistosomula (LIBEST_028003: JZ141498 - JZ141974.

  12. Towards a Consolidation of LHC Superconducting Splices for 7 TeV Operation

    CERN Document Server

    Bertinelli, F; Fessia, P; Garion, C; Mathot, S; Perin, A; Scheuerlein, C; Sgobba, S; ten Kat, H; Tock, J P; Verweij, A; Willering, G

    2010-01-01

    Following the analysis of the September 2008 LHC incident, the assembly process and the quality assurance of the main 13 kA interconnection splices were improved, with new measurement and diagnostics methods introduced. During the 2008-2009 shutdown ~5% of these 10 000 splices were newly assembled with these improvements implemented, but essentially maintaining the original design. It is known today that a limiting factor towards 7 TeV operation is the normal conducting resistance of ~15% of the original main 13 kA interconnection splices, associated to the electrical continuity of the copper stabiliser. A “Splices Task Force” has been set up at CERN to evaluate the need for, develop and test design improvements and prepare the implementation of a consolidation campaign. Important issues of splice design, process choice, resources and time requirements are considered.

  13. On splice site prediction using weight array models: a comparison of smoothing techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In most eukaryotic genes, protein-coding exons are separated by non-coding introns which are removed from the primary transcript by a process called 'splicing'. The positions where introns are cut and exons are spliced together are called 'splice sites'. Thus, computational prediction of splice sites is crucial for gene finding in eukaryotes. Weight array models are a powerful probabilistic approach to splice site detection. Parameters for these models are usually derived from m-tuple frequencies in trusted training data and subsequently smoothed to avoid zero probabilities. In this study we compare three different ways of parameter estimation for m-tuple frequencies, namely (a) non-smoothed probability estimation, (b) standard pseudo counts and (c) a Gaussian smoothing procedure that we recently developed

  14. Genetic variations and alternative splicing. The Glioma associated oncogene 1, GLI1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eZaphiropoulos

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing is a post-transcriptional regulatory process that is attaining stronger recognition as a modulator of gene expression. Alternative splicing occurs when the primary RNA transcript is differentially processed into more than one mature RNAs. This is the result of a variable definition/inclusion of the exons, the sequences that are excised from the primary RNA to form the mature RNAs. Consequently, RNA expression can generate a collection of differentially spliced RNAs, which may distinctly influence subsequent biological events, such as protein synthesis or other biomolecular interactions. Still the mechanisms that control exon definition and exon inclusion are not fully clarified. This mini-review highlights advances in this field as well as the impact of single nucleotide polymorphisms in affecting splicing decisions. The Glioma associated oncogene 1, GLI1, is taken as an example in addressing the role of nucleotide substitutions for splicing regulation.

  15. The splicing factor SRSF6 is amplified and is an oncoprotein in lung and colon cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cohen-Eliav, Michal; Golan-Gerstl, Regina; Siegfried, Zahava;

    2013-01-01

    An increasing body of evidence connects alterations in the process of alternative splicing with cancer development and progression. However, a direct role of splicing factors as drivers of cancer development is mostly unknown. We analyzed the gene copy number of several splicing factors in colon...... and lung tumors and found that the gene encoding for the splicing factor SRSF6 is amplified and overexpressed in these cancers. Moreover, overexpression of SRSF6 in immortal lung epithelial cells enhanced proliferation, protected them from chemotherapy-induced cell death and converted them to be...... tumorigenic in mice. In contrast, knockdown of SRSF6 in lung and colon cancer cell lines inhibited their tumorigenic abilities. SRSF6 up- or down regulation altered the splicing of several tumor suppressors and oncogenes to generate the oncogenic isoforms and reduce the tumor suppressive isoforms. Our data...

  16. On splice site prediction using weight array models: a comparison of smoothing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taher, Leila; Meinicke, Peter; Morgenstern, Burkhard

    2007-11-01

    In most eukaryotic genes, protein-coding exons are separated by non-coding introns which are removed from the primary transcript by a process called "splicing". The positions where introns are cut and exons are spliced together are called "splice sites". Thus, computational prediction of splice sites is crucial for gene finding in eukaryotes. Weight array models are a powerful probabilistic approach to splice site detection. Parameters for these models are usually derived from m-tuple frequencies in trusted training data and subsequently smoothed to avoid zero probabilities. In this study we compare three different ways of parameter estimation for m-tuple frequencies, namely (a) non-smoothed probability estimation, (b) standard pseudo counts and (c) a Gaussian smoothing procedure that we recently developed.

  17. Diagnosis of trypanosomatid infections: targeting the spliced leader RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Andrade, Pablo; Camara, Mamady; Ilboudo, Hamidou; Bucheton, Bruno; Jamonneau, Vincent; Deborggraeve, Stijn

    2014-07-01

    Trypanosomatids transcribe their genes in large polycistronic clusters that are further processed into mature mRNA molecules by trans-splicing. During this maturation process, a conserved spliced leader RNA (SL-RNA) sequence of 39 bp is physically linked to the 5' end of the pre-mRNA molecules. Trypanosomatid infections cause a series of devastating diseases in man (sleeping sickness, leishmaniasis, Chagas disease) and animals (nagana, surra, dourine). Here, we investigated the SL-RNA molecule for its diagnostic potential using reverse transcription followed by real-time PCR. As a model, we used Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, which causes sleeping sickness in west and central Africa. We showed that the copy number of the SL-RNA molecule in one single parasitic cell is at least 8600. We observed a lower detection limit of the SL-RNA assay in spiked blood samples of 100 trypanosomes per milliliter of blood. We also proved that we can detect the trypanosome's SL-RNA in the blood of sleeping sickness patients with a sensitivity of 92% (95% CI, 78%-97%) and a specificity of 96% (95% CI, 86%-99%). The SL-RNA is thus an attractive new molecular target for next-generation diagnostics in diseases caused by trypanosomatids. PMID:24814957

  18. Splice Site, Frameshift and Chimeric GFAP Mutations in Alexander Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Daniel; Li, Rong; Webster, Lital S.; Naidu, Sakkubai; Kolodny, Edwin; Percy, Alan; van der Knaap, Marjo; Powers, James M.; Mantovani, John F.; Ekstein, Josef; Goldman, James E.; Messing, Albee; Brenner, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Alexander disease (AxD) is a usually fatal astrogliopathy primarily caused by mutations in the gene encoding GFAP, an intermediate filament protein expressed in astrocytes. We describe three patients with unique characteristics, and whose mutations have implications for AxD diagnosis and studies of intermediate filaments. Patient 1 is the first reported case with a non-coding mutation. The patient has a splice site change producing an in-frame deletion of exon 4 in about 10% of the transcripts. Patient 2 has an insertion and deletion at the extreme end of the coding region, resulting in a short frameshift. In addition, the mutation was found in buccal DNA but not in blood DNA, making this patient the first reported chimera. Patient 3 has a single base deletion near the C-terminal end of the protein, producing a short frameshift. These findings recommend inclusion of intronic splice site regions in genetic testing for AxD, indicate that alteration of only a small fraction of GFAP can produce disease, and provide caution against tagging intermediate filaments at their C-terminal end for cell biological investigations. PMID:22488673

  19. Coding potential of the products of alternative splicing in human.

    KAUST Repository

    Leoni, Guido

    2011-01-20

    BACKGROUND: Analysis of the human genome has revealed that as much as an order of magnitude more of the genomic sequence is transcribed than accounted for by the predicted and characterized genes. A number of these transcripts are alternatively spliced forms of known protein coding genes; however, it is becoming clear that many of them do not necessarily correspond to a functional protein. RESULTS: In this study we analyze alternative splicing isoforms of human gene products that are unambiguously identified by mass spectrometry and compare their properties with those of isoforms of the same genes for which no peptide was found in publicly available mass spectrometry datasets. We analyze them in detail for the presence of uninterrupted functional domains, active sites as well as the plausibility of their predicted structure. We report how well each of these strategies and their combination can correctly identify translated isoforms and derive a lower limit for their specificity, that is, their ability to correctly identify non-translated products. CONCLUSIONS: The most effective strategy for correctly identifying translated products relies on the conservation of active sites, but it can only be applied to a small fraction of isoforms, while a reasonably high coverage, sensitivity and specificity can be achieved by analyzing the presence of non-truncated functional domains. Combining the latter with an assessment of the plausibility of the modeled structure of the isoform increases both coverage and specificity with a moderate cost in terms of sensitivity.

  20. Splicing of Friend Murine Leukemia Virus env-mRNA Enhances Its Ability to Form Polysomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machinaga, Akihito; Ishihara, Syuhei; Shirai, Akiko; Takase-Yoden, Sayaka

    2016-01-01

    Friend murine leukemia virus (MLV) belongs to the gamma retroviruses of the Retroviridae family. The positive-sense RNA of its genome contains a 5' long terminal repeat (LTR), 5' leader sequence, gag, pol, env, and 3' LTR. Transcription from proviral DNA begins from the R region of the 5' LTR and ends at the polyadenylation signal located at the R region of the other end of the 3' LTR. There is a 5' splice site in the 5' leader sequence and a 3' splice site at the 3' end of the pol region. Both full-length unspliced mRNAs and a singly spliced mRNA (env-mRNA) are produced in MLV-infected cells. The MLV Env protein plays important roles both in viral adsorption to host cells and in neuropathogenic disease in MLV-infected mice and rats. Understanding the regulatory mechanisms controlling Env expression is important for determining the functions of the Env protein. We have previously shown that splicing increases env-mRNA stability and translation efficiency. Generally, mRNA polysome formation correlates with translation efficiency. Therefore, here we investigated the effects of env-mRNA splicing on polysome formation to identify mechanisms for Env up-regulation due to splicing. We performed polysome profile analyses using Env-expression plasmids producing spliced or unspliced env-mRNA and showed that the former formed polysomes more efficiently than the latter. Thus, splicing of env-mRNA facilitated polysome formation, suggesting that this contributes to up-regulation of Env expression. We replaced the env region of the expression plasmids with a luciferase (luc) gene, and found that in this case both unspliced and spliced luc-mRNA formed polysomes to a similar extent. Thus, we conclude that whether mRNA polysome formation is affected by splicing depends on the structure of gene in question. PMID:26909075

  1. Probabilistic Assessment of Degree of Bending in Tubular X-Joints of Offshore Structures Subjected to Bending Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Ahmadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue life of tubular joints in offshore structures is significantly influenced by the degree of bending (DoB. The DoB exhibits considerable scatter calling for greater emphasis in accurate determination of its governing probability distribution which is a key input for the fatigue reliability analysis of a tubular joint. Although the tubular X-joints are commonly found in offshore jacket structures, as far as the authors are aware, no comprehensive research has been carried out on the probability distribution of the DoB in tubular X-joints. In the present paper, results of parametric equations available for the calculation of the DoB have been used to develop probability distribution models for the DoB in the chord member of tubular X-joints subjected to four types of bending loads. Based on a parametric study, a set of samples was prepared and density histograms were generated for these samples using Freedman-Diaconis method. Twelve different probability density functions (PDFs were fitted to these histograms. In each case, Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used to evaluate the goodness of fit. Finally, after substituting the values of estimated parameters for each distribution, a set of fully defined PDFs have been proposed for the DoB in tubular X-joints subjected to bending loads.

  2. Liquid State Machine Based Music Chord Sequence Recognition Algorithm%一种基于液体状态机的音乐和弦序列识别方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张冠元; 王斌

    2013-01-01

    A chord sequence recognition algorithm based on Liquid State Machine ( LSM) is presented. Firstly, the music signal is segmented and Pitch Class Profile feature is extracted for every frame. Then, a LSM model is achieved after training. Two kinds of Bizarre Chord, chord appears probability vector and chord transformation matrix, are presented to post-process the chord sequence outputted by LSM. 8 sets of experimental data from neural network model, hidden Markov mode, echo state network model and LSM model show that the LSM gets a good performance, and the post-processing method also effectively improves the recognition accuracy.%  文中提出一种基于液体状态机的音乐和弦序列识别方法。该方法首先将音乐信号进行切分采样并对每帧提取音级轮廓(PCP),经训练后得到一个液体状态机模型。方法提出两类奇异矩阵、和弦出现概率向量、和弦变换矩阵,它们可用在和弦序列后处理阶段。在神经网络模型、隐马尔科夫模型、回声状态网络模型、液体状态机模型上进行的初步实验得到8组实验数据。数据表明液体状态机模型对音乐和弦序列具有较好的识别效果,文中提出的后处理算法也能显著提高识别准确率。

  3. Cohesive Laws and Progressive Damage Analysis of Composite Bonded Joints, a Combined Numerical/Experimental Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girolamo, Donato; Davila, Carlos G.; Leone, Frank A.; Lin, Shih-Yung

    2015-01-01

    The results of an experimental/numerical campaign aimed to develop progressive damage analysis (PDA) tools for predicting the strength of a composite bonded joint under tensile loads are presented. The PDA is based on continuum damage mechanics (CDM) to account for intralaminar damage, and cohesive laws to account for interlaminar and adhesive damage. The adhesive response is characterized using standard fracture specimens and digital image correlation (DIC). The displacement fields measured by DIC are used to calculate the J-integrals, from which the associated cohesive laws of the structural adhesive can be derived. A finite element model of a sandwich conventional splice joint (CSJ) under tensile loads was developed. The simulations, in agreement with experimental tests, indicate that the model is capable of predicting the interactions of damage modes that lead to the failure of the joint.

  4. Joint Quantum Institute

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Joint Quantum Institute (JQI) is pursuing that goal through the work of leading quantum scientists from the Department of Physics of the University of Maryland...

  5. Joint Injection/Aspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Working It Out: Common Techniques for Conflict Resolution Workplace Diversity & Team Performance CME & MOC Understanding MOC ACR's MOC ... infection is suspected, aspirating the joint to gather cultures is ... Communications and Marketing. This patient information is provided for ...

  6. MP Joint Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon MP Joint Arthritis Email to a friend * required fields From * To * ... in to name and customize your collection. DESCRIPTION Arthritis is the wearing away of the cartilage at ...

  7. Hip joint replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may have problems with infection, loosening, or even dislocation of the new hip joint. Over time the artificial ... Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, ...

  8. Temporomandibular Joint Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2008 Previous Next Related Articles: Temporomandibular Joint Disorder (TMD) Are You Biting Off More Than You Can Chew? Equilibration May Lessen TMD Pain Fender-benders: Source of TMD? First Comes ...

  9. Healthy Joints Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dietary supplements, such as green tea and various vitamins, to see if they can keep your joints ... body, such as your ears, nose, and windpipe. Fibromyalgia (fi-bro-my-AL-juh). A condition that ...

  10. Alternative splicing of the maize Ac transposase transcript in transgenic sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisson, Ralph; Hellert, Jan; Ringleb, Malte; Machens, Fabian; Kraus, Josef; Hehl, Reinhard

    2010-09-01

    The maize Activator/Dissociation (Ac/Ds) transposable element system was introduced into sugar beet. The autonomous Ac and non-autonomous Ds element excise from the T-DNA vector and integrate at novel positions in the sugar beet genome. Ac and Ds excisions generate footprints in the donor T-DNA that support the hairpin model for transposon excision. Two complete integration events into genomic sugar beet DNA were obtained by IPCR. Integration of Ac leads to an eight bp duplication, while integration of Ds in a homologue of a sugar beet flowering locus gene did not induce a duplication. The molecular structure of the target site indicates Ds integration into a double strand break. Analyses of transposase transcription using RT-PCR revealed low amounts of alternatively spliced mRNAs. The fourth intron of the transposase was found to be partially misspliced. Four different splice products were identified. In addition, the second and third exon were found to harbour two and three novel introns, respectively. These utilize each the same splice donor but several alternative splice acceptor sites. Using the SplicePredictor online tool, one of the two introns within exon two is predicted to be efficiently spliced in maize. Most interestingly, splicing of this intron together with the four major introns of Ac would generate a transposase that lacks the DNA binding domain and two of its three nuclear localization signals, but still harbours the dimerization domain. PMID:20512402

  11. Misregulation of Alternative Splicing in a Mouse Model of Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ronghui; Dong, Qiping; Yuan, Xinni; Zeng, Xin; Gao, Yu; Chiao, Cassandra; Li, Hongda; Zhao, Xinyu; Keles, Sunduz; Wang, Zefeng; Chang, Qiang

    2016-06-01

    Mutations in the human MECP2 gene cause Rett syndrome (RTT), a severe neurodevelopmental disorder that predominantly affects girls. Despite decades of work, the molecular function of MeCP2 is not fully understood. Here we report a systematic identification of MeCP2-interacting proteins in the mouse brain. In addition to transcription regulators, we found that MeCP2 physically interacts with several modulators of RNA splicing, including LEDGF and DHX9. These interactions are disrupted by RTT causing mutations, suggesting that they may play a role in RTT pathogenesis. Consistent with the idea, deep RNA sequencing revealed misregulation of hundreds of splicing events in the cortex of Mecp2 knockout mice. To reveal the functional consequence of altered RNA splicing due to the loss of MeCP2, we focused on the regulation of the splicing of the flip/flop exon of Gria2 and other AMPAR genes. We found a significant splicing shift in the flip/flop exon toward the flop inclusion, leading to a faster decay in the AMPAR gated current and altered synaptic transmission. In summary, our study identified direct physical interaction between MeCP2 and splicing factors, a novel MeCP2 target gene, and established functional connection between a specific RNA splicing change and synaptic phenotypes in RTT mice. These results not only help our understanding of the molecular function of MeCP2, but also reveal potential drug targets for future therapies. PMID:27352031

  12. Misregulation of Alternative Splicing in a Mouse Model of Rett Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronghui Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the human MECP2 gene cause Rett syndrome (RTT, a severe neurodevelopmental disorder that predominantly affects girls. Despite decades of work, the molecular function of MeCP2 is not fully understood. Here we report a systematic identification of MeCP2-interacting proteins in the mouse brain. In addition to transcription regulators, we found that MeCP2 physically interacts with several modulators of RNA splicing, including LEDGF and DHX9. These interactions are disrupted by RTT causing mutations, suggesting that they may play a role in RTT pathogenesis. Consistent with the idea, deep RNA sequencing revealed misregulation of hundreds of splicing events in the cortex of Mecp2 knockout mice. To reveal the functional consequence of altered RNA splicing due to the loss of MeCP2, we focused on the regulation of the splicing of the flip/flop exon of Gria2 and other AMPAR genes. We found a significant splicing shift in the flip/flop exon toward the flop inclusion, leading to a faster decay in the AMPAR gated current and altered synaptic transmission. In summary, our study identified direct physical interaction between MeCP2 and splicing factors, a novel MeCP2 target gene, and established functional connection between a specific RNA splicing change and synaptic phenotypes in RTT mice. These results not only help our understanding of the molecular function of MeCP2, but also reveal potential drug targets for future therapies.

  13. Functional correction by antisense therapy of a splicing mutation in the GALT gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Ana I; Lourenço, Sílvia; Trabuco, Matilde; Silva, Maria João; Oliveira, Anabela; Gaspar, Ana; Diogo, Luísa; Tavares de Almeida, Isabel; Vicente, João B; Rivera, Isabel

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, antisense therapy has emerged as an increasingly important therapeutic approach to tackle several genetic disorders, including inborn errors of metabolism. Intronic mutations activating cryptic splice sites are particularly amenable to antisense therapy, as the canonical splice sites remain intact, thus retaining the potential for restoring constitutive splicing. Mutational analysis of Portuguese galactosemic patients revealed the intronic variation c.820+13A>G as the second most prevalent mutation, strongly suggesting its pathogenicity. The aim of this study was to functionally characterize this intronic variation, to elucidate its pathogenic molecular mechanism(s) and, ultimately, to correct it by antisense therapy. Minigene splicing assays in two distinct cell lines and patients' transcript analyses showed that the mutation activates a cryptic donor splice site, inducing an aberrant splicing of the GALT pre-mRNA, which in turn leads to a frameshift with inclusion of a premature stop codon (p.D274Gfs*17). Functional-structural studies of the recombinant wild-type and truncated GALT showed that the latter is devoid of enzymatic activity and prone to aggregation. Finally, two locked nucleic acid oligonucleotides, designed to specifically recognize the mutation, successfully restored the constitutive splicing, thus establishing a proof of concept for the application of antisense therapy as an alternative strategy for the clearly insufficient dietary treatment in classic galactosemia. PMID:25052314

  14. Arc fusion splicing of photonic crystal fibers to standard single mode fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borzycki, Krzysztof; Kobelke, Jens; Schuster, Kay; Wójcik, Jan

    2010-04-01

    Coupling a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) to measuring instruments or optical subsystems is often done by splicing it to short lengths of single mode fiber (SMF) used for interconnections, as SMF is standardized, widely available and compatible with most fiber optic components and measuring instruments. This paper presents procedures and results of loss measurements during fusion splicing of five PCFs tested at NIT laboratory within activities of COST Action 299 "FIDES". Investigated silica-based fibers had 80-200 μm cladding diameter and were designed as single mode. A standard splicing machine designed for telecom fibers was used, but splicing procedure and arc power were tailored to each PCF. Splice loss varied between 0.7 and 2.8 dB at 1550 nm. Splices protected with heat-shrinkable sleeves served well for gripping fibers during mechanical tests and survived temperature cycling from -30°C to +70°C with stable loss. Collapse of holes in the PCF was limited by reducing fusion time to 0.2-0.5 s; additional measures included reduction of discharge power and shifting SMF-PCF contact point away from the axis of electrodes. Unfortunately, short fusion time sometimes precluded proper smoothing of glass surface, leading to a trade-off between splice loss and strength.

  15. The evolutionary fate of alternatively spliced homologous exons after gene duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abascal, Federico; Tress, Michael L; Valencia, Alfonso

    2015-06-01

    Alternative splicing and gene duplication are the two main processes responsible for expanding protein functional diversity. Although gene duplication can generate new genes and alternative splicing can introduce variation through alternative gene products, the interplay between the two processes is complex and poorly understood. Here, we have carried out a study of the evolution of alternatively spliced exons after gene duplication to better understand the interaction between the two processes. We created a manually curated set of 97 human genes with mutually exclusively spliced homologous exons and analyzed the evolution of these exons across five distantly related vertebrates (lamprey, spotted gar, zebrafish, fugu, and coelacanth). Most of these exons had an ancient origin (more than 400 Ma). We found examples supporting two extreme evolutionary models for the behaviour of homologous axons after gene duplication. We observed 11 events in which gene duplication was accompanied by splice isoform separation, that is, each paralog specifically conserved just one distinct ancestral homologous exon. At other extreme, we identified genes in which the homologous exons were always conserved within paralogs, suggesting that the alternative splicing event cannot easily be separated from the function in these genes. That many homologous exons fall in between these two extremes highlights the diversity of biological systems and suggests that the subtle balance between alternative splicing and gene duplication is adjusted to the specific cellular context of each gene. PMID:25931610

  16. Resistance of LHC main bus bar splices at room temperature and at 77.4 K

    CERN Document Server

    Heck, S; Scheuerlein, Chr; CERN. Geneva. TE Department

    2009-01-01

    As part of the quality control the resistance of newly produced LHC main bus bar splices is now routinely measured at room temperature (RT) in order to conclude on the electrical continuity of the bus bar stabiliser across the splice under operating conditions. In this note we present splice resistance measurements that have been performed at RT and in liquid nitrogen (LN) in the CERN Cryolab with “ideal” splices (represented by continuous dipole and quadrupole bus bars), and with dipole and quadrupole splices with different defects, which cause an additional RT splice resistance of up to 60 µΩ. The RT resistance (RRT) results obtained with the Cryolab set-up are compared to the calculated resistance values and with the so-called R-8 and R-16 resistance results, as they are measured in the LHC tunnel with a Digital Low Resistance Ohmmeter with a voltage tap distance of 8 cm or 16 cm. The RT to LN resistance ratio has been determined for all splices in order to study the influence of the resistance of th...

  17. Modification of Alternative Splicing of Bcl-x Pre-mRNA in Bladder Cancer Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Zhaohui; XING Shi'an; CHENG Ping; ZENG Fuqing; LU Gongcheng

    2006-01-01

    To modify the splicing pattern of Bcl-x and compare the effect of this approach with that of the antisense gene therapy in BIU-87 cell line of bladder cancer, by using 5'-Bcl-x AS to target downstream alternative 5'-Bcl-x splice site to shift splicing from Bcl-xL to Bcl-xS and 3'-Bcl-x AS antisense to the 3'-splice site of exon Ⅲ in Bcl-x pre- mRNA to down regulation of Bcl-xL expression,the inhibitory effects on cancer cells by modification of alternative splicing and antisense gene therapy were observed and compared by microscopy, MTT Assay, RT-PCR, FACS, Westhern bloting and clone formation. The growth of cells BIU-87 was inhibited in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Its inhibitory effect began 12 h after the exposure, reaching a maximum value after 72h. The number of cells decreased in S phase and the number increased in G1 phase. The ability to form foci was reduced and the antisense gene therapy was approximately half as efficient as modification of alternative splicing in inducing apoptosis. It is concluded that modification of splicing pattern of Bcl-x pre-mRNA in bladder cancer cell BIU-87 is better than antisense gene therapy in terms of tumor inhibition.

  18. Joint contingency contracting

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Ellsworth K.; Paton, Bryan H.; Threat, Edward W.; Haptonstall, Lisa A.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this Master of Business Administration (MBA) Professional Report is to investigate and analyze the means by which Contingency Contracting Officers (CCO) can effectively operate in a Joint contingency environment and to validate the Defense Contract Management Agency's (DCMA) entry and exit criteria for contingency contracting missions. Joint contingencies encompass regional conflicts, humanitarian and peacekeeping missions, and international or domestic disaster relief missions...

  19. Joint Aspiration: Arthrocentesis

    OpenAIRE

    Mackie, John William

    1987-01-01

    Joint aspiration is an easily mastered procedure used to confirm or rule out joint sepsis and crystal-induced arthrosis. It is routinely performed with or without local anaesthetic, or with cooling spray. The time spent obtaining the fluid is short. The procedure is safe, requiring no hospitalization, except in the case of diagnosed sepsis. Arthrocentesis is a necessary procedure to prove beyond reasonable doubt that infection is not the cause of the arthritis. The family physician must be fa...

  20. Joint Venture Contracts

    OpenAIRE

    Pimentel, Dinarco

    2015-01-01

    Joint Venture contracts are contracting models typically designed to reach international markets. In spite of being used at the national level, a joint venture is based on single or multiple contracts between two individuals, two institutions, two organizations or two different entrepreneurial entities joining forces, meeting synergies to reach a common goal.Initially, these types of contracts were justifiable based on the need of different economic agents penetrating the most inaccessible ma...

  1. A symptomatic coracoclavicular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, T F S; Boerboom, A L; Wolf, R F E; Diercks, R L

    2006-11-01

    Bilateral coracoclavicular joints were found in a 44-year-old male patient following a fall. He had an Indonesian mother and a Dutch father. Prior to the injury he was asymptomatic and had full range of movement in both shoulders but the trauma resulted in pain and limitation of movement in the left shoulder which required resection of the anomalous joint, after which full pain-free movement was restored. PMID:17075101

  2. Alternative splicing modulated by genetic variants demonstrates accelerated evolution regulated by highly conserved proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Yun-Hua Esther; Bahn, Jae Hoon; Lin, Xianzhi; Chan, Tak-Ming; Wang, Rena; Xiao, Xinshu

    2016-04-01

    Identification of functional genetic variants and elucidation of their regulatory mechanisms represent significant challenges of the post-genomic era. A poorly understood topic is the involvement of genetic variants in mediating post-transcriptional RNA processing, including alternative splicing. Thus far, little is known about the genomic, evolutionary, and regulatory features of genetically modulated alternative splicing (GMAS). Here, we systematically identified intronic tag variants for genetic modulation of alternative splicing using RNA-seq data specific to cellular compartments. Combined with our previous method that identifies exonic tags for GMAS, this study yielded 622 GMAS exons. We observed that GMAS events are highly cell type independent, indicating that splicing-altering genetic variants could have widespread function across cell types. Interestingly, GMAS genes, exons, and single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) all demonstrated positive selection or accelerated evolution in primates. We predicted that GMAS SNVs often alter binding of splicing factors, with SRSF1 affecting the most GMAS events and demonstrating global allelic binding bias. However, in contrast to their GMAS targets, the predicted splicing factors are more conserved than expected, suggesting thatcis-regulatory variation is the major driving force of splicing evolution. Moreover, GMAS-related splicing factors had stronger consensus motifs than expected, consistent with their susceptibility to SNV disruption. Intriguingly, GMAS SNVs in general do not alter the strongest consensus position of the splicing factor motif, except the more than 100 GMAS SNVs in linkage disequilibrium with polymorphisms reported by genome-wide association studies. Our study reports many GMAS events and enables a better understanding of the evolutionary and regulatory features of this phenomenon. PMID:26888265

  3. Diffusion MR imaging with PSIF and SPLICE. Experiences in phantom studies and the central nervous system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchikoshi, Masato; Ueda, Takashi [Tenri Hospital, Nara (Japan); Kaji, Yasushi (and others)

    2001-06-01

    Studies have shown that diffusion MR imaging is a reliable method for the diagnosis of central nervous system diseases, especially acute cerebral infarction. Although echo planar imaging (EPI) is a promising tool for that purpose, it is vulnerable to susceptibility artifacts that are responsible for image distortion or signal loss. Our purpose in this study was to evaluate the usefulness of diffusion MR imaging with PSIF (reversed fast imaging SSFP) and split acquisition of fast-spin-echo signals for diffusion imaging (SPLICE) in the central nervous system (CNS). First, PSIF and SPLICE were applied to the phantoms. Each phantom, including acetone, acetic acid, and water, was analyzed for apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) based on SPLICE and for diffusion-related coefficient (DRC) based on PSIF. The ADCs based on SPLICE were 4.36{+-}0.89 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/sec, 1.25{+-}0.04 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/sec, and 2.35{+-}0.04 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/sec, and the DRCs based on PSIF were 0.353{+-}0.25, 0.178{+-}0.07, and 0.273{+-}0.018 for acetone, acetic acid, and water, respectively. These calculated ADCs based on SPLICE were well correlated with known diffusion coefficients, showing a correlation coefficient of 0.995. Second, PSIF and SPLICE were applied to the CNS. The advantage of PSIF and SPLICE was that susceptibility artifacts were reduced in the images of spinal cord and brain stem. PSIF was especially useful for diffusion MR imaging in the spinal cord. The disadvantage of SPLICE was the decreased SN ratio. We conclude that PSIF or SPLICE may be helpful when EPI diffusion MR imaging is insufficient. (author)

  4. Identification and characterization of naturally occurring splice variants of SAMHD1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Welbourn Sarah

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sterile Alpha Motif and HD domain-containing protein 1 (SAMHD1 is a recently identified host factor that restricts HIV-1 replication in dendritic and myeloid cells. SAMHD1 is a dNTPase that presumably reduces the cellular dNTP levels to levels too low for retroviral reverse transcription to occur. However, HIV-2 and SIV encoded Vpx counteracts the antiviral effects of SAMHD1 by targeting the protein for proteasomal degradation. SAMHD1 is encoded by a multiply spliced mRNA and consists of 16 coding exons. Results Here, we identified two naturally occurring splice variants lacking exons 8–9 and 14, respectively. Like wildtype SAMHD1, both splice variants localize primarily to the nucleus, interact with Vpx, and retain some sensitivity to Vpx-dependent degradation. However, the splice variants differ from full-length SAMHD1 in their metabolic stability and catalytic activity. While full-length SAMHD1 is metabolically stable in uninfected cells, both splice variants were inherently metabolically unstable and were rapidly degraded even in the absence of Vpx. Vpx strongly increased the rate of degradation of full-length SAMHD1 and further accelerated the degradation of the splice variants. However, the effect of Vpx on the splice variants was more modest due to the inherent instability of these proteins. Analysis of dNTPase activity indicates that neither splice variant is catalytically active. Conclusions The identification of SAMHD1 splice variants exposes a potential regulatory mechanism that could enable the cell to control its dNTPase activity on a post-transcriptional level.

  5. Fine-scale variation and genetic determinants of alternative splicing across individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin Coulombe-Huntington

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, thanks to the increasing throughput of new technologies, we have begun to explore the full extent of alternative pre-mRNA splicing (AS in the human transcriptome. This is unveiling a vast layer of complexity in isoform-level expression differences between individuals. We used previously published splicing sensitive microarray data from lymphoblastoid cell lines to conduct an in-depth analysis on splicing efficiency of known and predicted exons. By combining publicly available AS annotation with a novel algorithm designed to search for AS, we show that many real AS events can be detected within the usually unexploited, speculative majority of the array and at significance levels much below standard multiple-testing thresholds, demonstrating that the extent of cis-regulated differential splicing between individuals is potentially far greater than previously reported. Specifically, many genes show subtle but significant genetically controlled differences in splice-site usage. PCR validation shows that 42 out of 58 (72% candidate gene regions undergo detectable AS, amounting to the largest scale validation of isoform eQTLs to date. Targeted sequencing revealed a likely causative SNP in most validated cases. In all 17 incidences where a SNP affected a splice-site region, in silico splice-site strength modeling correctly predicted the direction of the micro-array and PCR results. In 13 other cases, we identified likely causative SNPs disrupting predicted splicing enhancers. Using Fst and REHH analysis, we uncovered significant evidence that 2 putative causative SNPs have undergone recent positive selection. We verified the effect of five SNPs using in vivo minigene assays. This study shows that splicing differences between individuals, including quantitative differences in isoform ratios, are frequent in human populations and that causative SNPs can be identified using in silico predictions. Several cases affected disease-relevant genes and

  6. Regulatory mechanisms for 3'-end alternative splicing and polyadenylation of the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein, GFAP, transcript

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blechingberg, Jenny; Lykke-Andersen, Søren; Jensen, Torben Heick;

    2007-01-01

    molecular mechanisms participating in alternative GFAP expression. Usage of a polyadenylation signal within the alternatively spliced exon 7a is essential to generate the GFAP kappa and GFAP kappa transcripts. The GFAP kappa mRNA is distinct from GFAP epsilon mRNA given that it also includes intron 7a....... Polyadenylation at the exon 7a site is stimulated by the upstream splice site. Moreover, exon 7a splice enhancer motifs supported both exon 7a splicing and polyadenylation. SR proteins increased the usage of the exon 7a polyadenylation signal but not the exon 7a splicing, whereas the polypyrimidine tract binding...... (PTB) protein enhanced both exon 7a polyadenylation and exon 7a splicing. Finally, increasing transcription by the VP16 trans-activator did not affect the frequency of use of the exon 7a polyadenylation signal whereas the exon 7a splicing frequency was decreased. Our data suggest a model with the...

  7. Novel Alternative Splice Variants of Mouse Cdk5rap2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Kraemer

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by a pronounced reduction of brain volume and intellectual disability. A current model for the microcephaly phenotype invokes a stem cell proliferation and differentiation defect, which has moved the disease into the spotlight of stem cell biology and neurodevelopmental science. Homozygous mutations of the Cyclin-dependent kinase-5 regulatory subunit-associated protein 2 gene CDK5RAP2 are one genetic cause of MCPH. To further characterize the pathomechanism underlying MCPH, we generated a conditional Cdk5rap2 LoxP/hCMV Cre mutant mouse. Further analysis, initiated on account of a lack of a microcephaly phenotype in these mutant mice, revealed the presence of previously unknown splice variants of the Cdk5rap2 gene that are at least in part accountable for the lack of microcephaly in the mice.

  8. m(6)A: Signaling for mRNA splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Samir; Xiao, Wen; Zhao, Yong-Liang; Yang, Yun-Gui

    2016-09-01

    Among myriads of distinct chemical modifications in RNAs, dynamic N6-methyladenosine (m(6)A) is one of the most prevalent modifications in eukaryotic mRNAs and non-coding RNAs. Similar to the critical role of chemical modifications in regulation of DNA and protein activities, RNA m(6)A modification is also observed to be involved in the regulation of diverse functions of RNAs including meiosis, fertility, development, cell reprogramming and circadian period. The RNA m(6)A modification is recognized by YTH domain containing family proteins comprising of YTHDC1-2 and YTHDF1-3. Here we focus on the nuclear m(6)A reader YTHDC1 and its regulatory role in alternative splicing and other RNA metabolic processes. PMID:27351695

  9. BBMap: A Fast, Accurate, Splice-Aware Aligner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bushnell, Brian

    2014-03-17

    Alignment of reads is one of the primary computational tasks in bioinformatics. Of paramount importance to resequencing, alignment is also crucial to other areas - quality control, scaffolding, string-graph assembly, homology detection, assembly evaluation, error-correction, expression quantification, and even as a tool to evaluate other tools. An optimal aligner would greatly improve virtually any sequencing process, but optimal alignment is prohibitively expensive for gigabases of data. Here, we will present BBMap [1], a fast splice-aware aligner for short and long reads. We will demonstrate that BBMap has superior speed, sensitivity, and specificity to alternative high-throughput aligners bowtie2 [2], bwa [3], smalt, [4] GSNAP [5], and BLASR [6].

  10. Tissue-specific splicing mutation in acute intermittent porphyria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An inherited deficiency of porphobilinogen deaminase in humans is responsible for the autosomal dominant disease acute intermittent porphyria. Different classes of mutations have been described at the protein level suggesting that this is a heterogeneous disease. It was previously demonstrated that porphobilinogen deaminase is encoded by two distinct mRNA species expressed in a tissue-specific manner. Analysis of the genomic sequences indicated that these two mRNAs are transcribed from two promoters and only differ in their first exon. The first mutation identified in the human porphobilinogen deaminase gene is a single-base substitution (G → A) in the canonical 5' splice donor site of intron 1. This mutation leads to a particular subtype of acute intermittent porphyria characterized by the restriction of the enzymatic defect to nonerythropoietic tissues. Hybridization analysis using olignonucleotide probes after in vitro amplification of genomic DNA offers another possibility of detecting asymptomatic carriers of the mutation in affected families

  11. Tissue-specific splicing mutation in acute intermittent porphyria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandchamp, B.; Picat, C. (Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire, Paris (France)); Mignotte, V.; Romeo, P.H.; Goossens, M. (Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, Creteil (France)); Wilson, J.H.P.; Sandkuyl, L. (Erasmus Univ., Rotterdam (Netherlands)); Te Velde, K. (Saint Geertruiden Hospital, Deventer (Netherlands)); Nordmann, Y. (Hopital Louis Mourier, Colombes (France))

    1989-01-01

    An inherited deficiency of porphobilinogen deaminase in humans is responsible for the autosomal dominant disease acute intermittent porphyria. Different classes of mutations have been described at the protein level suggesting that this is a heterogeneous disease. It was previously demonstrated that porphobilinogen deaminase is encoded by two distinct mRNA species expressed in a tissue-specific manner. Analysis of the genomic sequences indicated that these two mRNAs are transcribed from two promoters and only differ in their first exon. The first mutation identified in the human porphobilinogen deaminase gene is a single-base substitution (G {yields} A) in the canonical 5{prime} splice donor site of intron 1. This mutation leads to a particular subtype of acute intermittent porphyria characterized by the restriction of the enzymatic defect to nonerythropoietic tissues. Hybridization analysis using olignonucleotide probes after in vitro amplification of genomic DNA offers another possibility of detecting asymptomatic carriers of the mutation in affected families.

  12. Copy number variations in alternative splicing gene networks impact lifespan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph T Glessner

    Full Text Available Longevity has a strong genetic component evidenced by family-based studies. Lipoprotein metabolism, FOXO proteins, and insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathways in model systems have shown polygenic variations predisposing to shorter lifespan. To test the hypothesis that rare variants could influence lifespan, we compared the rates of CNVs in healthy children (0-18 years of age with individuals 67 years or older. CNVs at a significantly higher frequency in the pediatric cohort were considered risk variants impacting lifespan, while those enriched in the geriatric cohort were considered longevity protective variants. We performed a whole-genome CNV analysis on 7,313 children and 2,701 adults of European ancestry genotyped with 302,108 SNP probes. Positive findings were evaluated in an independent cohort of 2,079 pediatric and 4,692 geriatric subjects. We detected 8 deletions and 10 duplications that were enriched in the pediatric group (P=3.33×10(-8-1.6×10(-2 unadjusted, while only one duplication was enriched in the geriatric cohort (P=6.3×10(-4. Population stratification correction resulted in 5 deletions and 3 duplications remaining significant (P=5.16×10(-5-4.26×10(-2 in the replication cohort. Three deletions and four duplications were significant combined (combined P=3.7×10(-4-3.9×10(-2. All associated loci were experimentally validated using qPCR. Evaluation of these genes for pathway enrichment demonstrated ~50% are involved in alternative splicing (P=0.0077 Benjamini and Hochberg corrected. We conclude that genetic variations disrupting RNA splicing could have long-term biological effects impacting lifespan.

  13. Discovery of a Splicing Regulator Required for Cell Cycle Progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suvorova, Elena S.; Croken, Matthew; Kratzer, Stella; Ting, Li-Min; Conde de Felipe, Magnolia; Balu, Bharath; Markillie, Lye Meng; Weiss, Louis M.; Kim, Kami; White, Michael W.

    2013-02-01

    In the G1 phase of the cell division cycle, eukaryotic cells prepare many of the resources necessary for a new round of growth including renewal of the transcriptional and protein synthetic capacities and building the machinery for chromosome replication. The function of G1 has an early evolutionary origin and is preserved in single and multicellular organisms, although the regulatory mechanisms conducting G1 specific functions are only understood in a few model eukaryotes. Here we describe a new G1 mutant from an ancient family of apicomplexan protozoans. Toxoplasma gondii temperature-sensitive mutant 12-109C6 conditionally arrests in the G1 phase due to a single point mutation in a novel protein containing a single RNA-recognition-motif (TgRRM1). The resulting tyrosine to asparagine amino acid change in TgRRM1 causes severe temperature instability that generates an effective null phenotype for this protein when the mutant is shifted to the restrictive temperature. Orthologs of TgRRM1 are widely conserved in diverse eukaryote lineages, and the human counterpart (RBM42) can functionally replace the missing Toxoplasma factor. Transcriptome studies demonstrate that gene expression is downregulated in the mutant at the restrictive temperature due to a severe defect in splicing that affects both cell cycle and constitutively expressed mRNAs. The interaction of TgRRM1 with factors of the tri-SNP complex (U4/U6 & U5 snRNPs) indicate this factor may be required to assemble an active spliceosome. Thus, the TgRRM1 family of proteins is an unrecognized and evolutionarily conserved class of splicing regulators. This study demonstrates investigations into diverse unicellular eukaryotes, like the Apicomplexa, have the potential to yield new insights into important mechanisms conserved across modern eukaryotic kingdoms.

  14. Informational structure of genetic sequences and nature of gene splicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifonov, E. N.

    1991-10-01

    Only about 1/20 of DNA of higher organisms codes for proteins, by means of classical triplet code. The rest of DNA sequences is largely silent, with unclear functions, if any. The triplet code is not the only code (message) carried by the sequences. There are three levels of molecular communication, where the same sequence ``talks'' to various bimolecules, while having, respectively, three different appearances: DNA, RNA and protein. Since the molecular structures and, hence, sequence specific preferences of these are substantially different, the original DNA sequence has to carry simultaneously three types of sequence patterns (codes, messages), thus, being a composite structure in which one had the same letter (nucleotide) is frequently involved in several overlapping codes of different nature. This multiplicity and overlapping of the codes is a unique feature of the Gnomic, language of genetic sequences. The coexisting codes have to be degenerate in various degrees to allow an optimal and concerted performance of all the encoded functions. There is an obvious conflict between the best possible performance of a given function and necessity to compromise the quality of a given sequence pattern in favor of other patterns. It appears that the major role of various changes in the sequences on their ``ontogenetic'' way from DNA to RNA to protein, like RNA editing and splicing, or protein post-translational modifications is to resolve such conflicts. New data are presented strongly indicating that the gene splicing is such a device to resolve the conflict between the code of DNA folding in chromatin and the triplet code for protein synthesis.

  15. Sequence requirements for self-splicing of the Tetrahymena thermophila pre-ribosomal RNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Price, J V; Kieft, G L; Kent, J R; Sievers, E L; Cech, T R

    1985-01-01

    The sequence requirements for splicing of the Tetrahymena pre-rRNA have been examined by altering the rRNA gene to produce versions that contain insertions and deletions within the intervening sequence (IVS). The altered genes were transcribed and the RNA tested for self-splicing in vitro. A number of insertions (8-54 nucleotides) at three locations had no effect on self-splicing activity. Two of these insertions, located at a site 5 nucleotides preceding the 3'-end of the IVS, did not alter ...

  16. The Effectiveness of Splicing Notched Pallet Stringer Segments With Metal Connector Plates

    OpenAIRE

    Tong, Chao

    1997-01-01

    Notched stringer segments spliced with metal connector plates (MCPs) and pallets with spliced stringer(s) were tested in static bending in order to determine the relative effectiveness of different stringer splicing methods and under what conditions the process is or is not effective. The species tested were oak, southern yellow pine, yellow-poplar, and two combined species - oak and yellow-poplar, and oak and southern yellow pine. The metal connector plates used were 3 x 4-inch, 3 x 6-inch ...

  17. Efficient in vivo gene expression by trans-splicing adeno-associated viral vectors

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Yi; Yue, Yongping; LIU, MINGJU; Ghosh, Arkasubhra; Engelhardt, John F.; Jeffrey S. Chamberlain; Duan, Dongsheng

    2005-01-01

    Although adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene therapy has been hindered by the small viral packaging capacity of the vector, trans-splicing AAV vectors are able to package twice the size of the vector genome. Unfortunately, the efficiency of current trans-splicing vectors is very low. Here we show that rational design of the gene splitting site has a profound influence on trans-splicing vector-mediated gene expression. Using mRNA accumulation as a guide, we generated a set of efficient ...

  18. Exon definition may facilitate splice site selection in RNAs with multiple exons.

    OpenAIRE

    Robberson, B L; Cote, G J; Berget, S M

    1990-01-01

    Interactions at the 3' end of the intron initiate spliceosome assembly and splice site selection in vertebrate pre-mRNAs. Multiple factors, including U1 small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs), are involved in initial recognition at the 3' end of the intron. Experiments were designed to test the possibility that U1 snRNP interaction at the 3' end of the intron during early assembly functions to recognize and define the downstream exon and its resident 5' splice site. Splicing precursor RNAs...

  19. Exon size affects competition between splicing and cleavage-polyadenylation in the immunoglobulin mu gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, M L; Bryman, M B; Peiter, M; Cowan, C

    1994-01-01

    The alternative RNA processing of microseconds and microns mRNAs from a single primary transcript depends on competition between a cleavage-polyadenylation reaction to produce microseconds mRNA and a splicing reaction to produce microns mRNA. The ratio of microseconds to microns mRNA is regulated during B-cell maturation; relatively more spliced microns mRNA is made in B cells than in plasma cells. The balance between the efficiencies of splicing and cleavage-polyadenylation is critical to th...

  20. U2AF1 Mutations Alter Sequence Specificity of pre-mRNA Binding and Splicing

    OpenAIRE

    Okeyo-Owuor, Theresa; White, Brian S.; Chatrikhi, Rakesh; Mohan, Dipika R.; Kim, Sanghyun; Griffith, Malachi; Ding, Li; Ketkar-Kulkarni, Shamika; Hundal, Jasreet; Laird, Kholiswa M.; Kielkopf, Clara L.; Timothy J Ley; Walter, Matthew J.; Graubert, Timothy A.

    2014-01-01

    We previously identified missense mutations in the U2AF1 splicing factor affecting codons S34 (S34F and S34Y) or Q157 (Q157R and Q157P) in 11% of patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Although the role of U2AF1 as an accessory factor in the U2 snRNP is well established, it is not yet clear how mutations affect splicing or contribute to MDS pathophysiology. We analyzed splice junctions in RNA-seq data generated from transfected CD34+ hematopoietic cells and found significant d...

  1. An exonic splicing silencer in the testes-specific DNA ligase III β exon

    OpenAIRE

    Chew, Shern L; Baginsky, Lysa; Eperon, Ian C.

    2000-01-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing of two terminal exons (α and β) regulates the expression of the human DNA ligase III gene. In most tissues, the α exon is expressed. In testes and during spermatogenesis, the β exon is used instead. The α exon encodes the interaction domain with a scaffold DNA repair protein, XRCC1, while the β exon-encoded C-terminal does not. Sequence elements regulating the alternative splicing pattern were mapped by in vitro splicing assays in HeLa nuclear extracts. Deletion ...

  2. The polypyrimidine tract binding protein regulates desaturase alternative splicing and PUFA composition

    OpenAIRE

    Reardon, Holly T; Park, Woo Jung; Zhang, Jimmy; Lawrence, Peter; Kothapalli, Kumar S. D.; Brenna, J. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The Δ6 desaturase, encoded by FADS2, plays a crucial role in omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid synthesis. These fatty acids are essential components of the central nervous system, and they act as precursors for eicosanoid signaling molecules and as direct modulators of gene expression. The polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB or hnRNP I) is a splicing factor that regulates alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Here, PTB is shown to bind an exonic splicing silencer element and repress alternative s...

  3. Kinetin improves IKBKAP mRNA splicing in patients with familial dysautonomia

    OpenAIRE

    Axelrod, Felicia B.; Liebes, Leonard; Gold-von Simson, Gabrielle; Mendoza, Sandra; Mull, James; Leyne, Maire; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Kaufmann, Horacio; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A.

    2011-01-01

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) is caused by an intronic splice mutation in the IKBKAP gene that leads to partial skipping of exon 20 and tissue-specific reduction in I-κ-B kinase complex associated protein/ elongation protein 1 (IKAP/ELP-1) expression. Kinetin (6-furfurylaminopurine) has been shown to improve splicing and increase wild-type IKBKAP mRNA and IKAP protein expression in FD cell lines and carriers. To determine if oral kinetin treatment could alter mRNA splicing in FD subjects and was...

  4. Control of HIV-1 env RNA splicing and transport: investigating the role of hnRNP A1 in exon splicing silencer (ESS3a) function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The control of HIV-1 viral RNA splicing and transport plays an important role in the successful replication of the virus. Previous studies have identified both an exon splicing enhancer (ESE) and a bipartite exon splicing silencer (ESS3a and ESS3b) within the terminal exon of HIV-1 that are involved in modulating both splicing and Rev-mediated export of viral RNA. To define the mechanism of ESS3a function, experiments were carried out to better define the cis and trans components required for ESS3a activity. Mutations throughout the 30-nt element resulted in partial loss of ESS function. Combining mutations was found to have an additive effect, suggesting the presence of multiple binding sites. Analysis of interacting factors identified hnRNP A1 as one component of the complex that modulates ESS3a activity. However, subsequent binding analyses determined that hnRNP A1 interacts with only one portion of ESS3a, suggesting the involvement of another host factor. Parallel analysis of the effect of the mutations on Rev-mediated export determined that there is not a direct correlation between the effect of the mutations on splicing and RNA transport. Consistent with this hypothesis, replacement of ESS3a with consensus hnRNP A1 binding sites was found to be insufficient to block Rev-mediated RNA export

  5. Forming a multinational joint venture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the basis and mechanics for forming a multinational joint venture. The topics of the paper include the motivations for a joint venture, selection of the appropriate co-venturer, management of the multinational joint venture, and the joint venture agreement. The authors state that a joint venture is not applicable or desirable in all instances and to be successful, must be carefully planned

  6. The temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whilst the temporomandibular joint is in many ways unique, it is subject to all the diseases and disorders found in joints in other parts of the human skeleton. By far the most common disorder is injury, followed by arthropathy, acute and chronic dislocations, ankylosis, and in rare instances, neoplasms. The diagnosis and management of the temporomandibular joint are the primary responsibility of the oral surgeon. Nevertheless, this anatomical region is an area in which the cooperation of medical and dental disciplines may be required for the satisfactory conclusion of treatment. The more so when the disease process involves either associated psychosomatic illness or malignancy. The mainstay of the diagnosis is a careful radiological examination of the joint. There exists a delicate relationship between the dentition, the muscles of mastication, and the temporomandibular articulation, which is controlled by arthrokinetic reflex activity of the branches of the 5th cranial nerve. Imbalance between one or more of the components of this integrated system frequently leads to disturbances in function. Pain-dysfunction disorders constitute the larger part of temporomandibular joint disturbances generally encountered

  7. Periprosthetic Joint Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lucia L. Lima

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Implantation of joint prostheses is becoming increasingly common, especially for the hip and knee. Infection is considered to be the most devastating of prosthesis-related complications, leading to prolonged hospitalization, repeated surgical intervention, and even definitive loss of the implant. The main risk factors to periprosthetic joint infections (PJIs are advanced age, malnutrition, obesity, diabetes mellitus, HIV infection at an advanced stage, presence of distant infectious foci, and antecedents of arthroscopy or infection in previous arthroplasty. Joint prostheses can become infected through three different routes: direct implantation, hematogenic infection, and reactivation of latent infection. Gram-positive bacteria predominate in cases of PJI, mainly Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. PJIs present characteristic signs that can be divided into acute and chronic manifestations. The main imaging method used in diagnosing joint prosthesis infections is X-ray. Computed tomography (CT scan may assist in distinguishing between septic and aseptic loosening. Three-phase bone scintigraphy using technetium has high sensitivity, but low specificity. Positron emission tomography using fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET presents very divergent results in the literature. Definitive diagnosis of infection should be made by isolating the microorganism through cultures on material obtained from joint fluid puncturing, surgical wound secretions, surgical debridement procedures, or sonication fluid. Success in treating PJI depends on extensive surgical debridement and adequate and effective antibiotic therapy. Treatment in two stages using a spacer is recommended for most chronic infections in arthroplasty cases. Treatment in a single procedure is appropriate in carefully selected cases.

  8. Distal radioulnar joint injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Binu P; Sreekanth, Raveendran

    2012-09-01

    Distal radioulnar joint is a trochoid joint relatively new in evolution. Along with proximal radioulnar joint, forearm bones and interosseous membrane, it allows pronosupination and load transmission across the wrist. Injuries around distal radioulnar joint are not uncommon, and are usually associated with distal radius fractures,fractures of the ulnar styloid and with the eponymous Galeazzi or Essex_Lopresti fractures. The injury can be purely involving the soft tissue especially the triangular fibrocartilage or the radioulnar ligaments. The patients usually present with ulnar sided wrist pain, features of instability, or restriction of rotation. Difficulty in carrying loads in the hand is a major constraint for these patients. Thorough clinical examination to localize point of tenderness and appropriate provocative tests help in diagnosis. Radiology and MRI are extremely useful, while arthroscopy is the gold standard for evaluation. The treatment protocols are continuously evolving and range from conservative, arthroscopic to open surgical methods. Isolated dislocation are uncommon. Basal fractures of the ulnar styloid tend to make the joint unstable and may require operative intervention. Chronic instability requires reconstruction of the stabilizing ligaments to avoid onset of arthritis. Prosthetic replacement in arthritis is gaining acceptance in the management of arthritis. PMID:23162140

  9. Distal radioulnar joint injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binu P Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Distal radioulnar joint is a trochoid joint relatively new in evolution. Along with proximal radioulnar joint , forearm bones and interosseous membrane, it allows pronosupination and load transmission across the wrist. Injuries around distal radioulnar joint are not uncommon, and are usually associated with distal radius fractures,fractures of the ulnar styloid and with the eponymous Galeazzi or Essex_Lopresti fractures. The injury can be purely involving the soft tissue especially the triangular fibrocartilage or the radioulnar ligaments.The patients usually present with ulnar sided wrist pain, features of instability, or restriction of rotation. Difficulty in carrying loads in the hand is a major constraint for these patients. Thorough clinical examination to localize point of tenderness and appropriate provocative tests help in diagnosis. Radiology and MRI are extremely useful, while arthroscopy is the gold standard for evaluation. The treatment protocols are continuously evolving and range from conservative, arthroscopic to open surgical methods. Isolated dislocation are uncommon. Basal fractures of the ulnar styloid tend to make the joint unstable and may require operative intervention. Chronic instability requires reconstruction of the stabilizing ligaments to avoid onset of arthritis. Prosthetic replacement in arthritis is gaining acceptance in the management of arthritis.

  10. 平行弦钢桁架过街人行天桥设计%The Design of a Parallel Chord Steel Truss Pedestrian Bridge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董震

    2016-01-01

    分析北京某平行弦桁架人行过街天桥设计,该天桥主体结构由上部两榀钢桁架和下部混凝土柱组成,总长52.5m,单跨最大跨径30m。设计考虑竖向地震、温度效应等荷载作用,并计算结构竖向第一振动频率,避免人群行走时桥身产生共振。设计方法和结构选型可供技术人员作同类设计参考。%The paper describes the design of a parallel chord steel truss pedestrian bridge in Beijing. The main structure of the bridge is composed of above two steel trusses and concrete columns bottom. The most span of the bridge is 30m, and the whole length is 50m. The structure calculation includes of the vertical earthquake, temperature effect and the first natural frequency of vertical vibration for avoiding the resonance of the bridge caused by human walking. The design method and selection of the structure provide reference for similar design.

  11. The RRR of the Cu components of the LHC main bus bar splices

    CERN Document Server

    Heck, S; Fessia, P; Principe, R; CERN. Geneva. TE Department

    2010-01-01

    The different LHC main bus bar splice components (bus bar cable, splice U-piece and wedge and bus bar stabilizer) are subjected to different heat treatments (HTs) during bus bar assembly and splice soldering. The influence of soldering HTs on the RRR of the LHC main bus bar cable strands has been determined. The RRR of several splice U-pieces and wedges dismounted from the LHC has been measured. A correlation between the Vickers hardness and the RRR of the high purity Cu profiles has been established. All U-pieces tested that were produced before 2009 have a RRR>200, while the RRR of all wedges and of U-pieces of 2009 production have a much lower RRR. All tests of LHC main bus bar samples performed so far in the laboratory indicate a RRR of approximately 200 or higher.

  12. High qualitative and quantitative conservation of alternative splicing in Caenorhabditis elegans and Caenorhabditis briggsae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rukov, Jakob Lewin; Irimia, Manuel; Mørk, Søren;

    2007-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is an important contributor to proteome diversity and is regarded as an explanatory factor for the relatively low number of human genes compared with less complex animals. To assess the evolutionary conservation of AS and its developmental regulation, we have investigated...... the qualitative and quantitative expression of 21 orthologous alternative splice events through the development of 2 nematode species separated by 85-110 Myr of evolutionary time. We demonstrate that most of these alternative splice events present in Caenorhabditis elegans are conserved in...... the regulatory mechanisms controlling AS are to a large extent conserved during the evolution of Caenorhabditis. This strong conservation indicates that both major and minor splice forms have important functional roles and that the relative quantities in which they are expressed are crucial. Our...

  13. The RNA splicing factor ASF/SF2 inhibits human topoisomerase I mediated DNA relaxation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Félicie Faucon; Tange, Thomas Ø.; Sinnathamby, Thayaline;

    2002-01-01

    Human topoisomerase I interacts with and phosphorylates the SR-family of RNA splicing factors, including ASF/SF2, and has been suggested to play an important role in the regulation of RNA splicing. Here we present evidence to support the theory that the regulation can go the other way around with...... the SR-proteins controlling topoisomerase I DNA activity. We demonstrate that the splicing factor ASF/SF2 inhibits relaxation by interfering with the DNA cleavage and/or DNA binding steps of human topoisomerase I catalysis. The inhibition of relaxation correlated with the ability of various deletion...... extract reduced the inhibition of relaxation activity. Taken together with the previously published studies of the topoisomerase I kinase activity, these observations suggest that topoisomerase I activity is shifted from relaxation to kinasing by specific interaction with SR-splicing factors....

  14. The strength of intron donor splice sites in human genes displays a bell-shaped pattern

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Kai; Wernersson, Rasmus; Brunak, Søren

    2011-01-01

    MOTIVATION: The gene concept has recently changed from the classical one protein notion into a much more diverse picture, where overlapping or fused transcripts, alternative transcription initiation, and genes within genes, add to the complexity generated by alternative splicing. Increased...... understanding of the mechanisms controlling pre-mRNA splicing is thus important for a wide range of aspects relating to gene expression. RESULTS: We have discovered a convex gene delineating pattern in the strength of 5' intron splice sites. When comparing the strengths of >18 000 intron containing Human genes......, we found that when analysing them separately according to the number of introns they contain, initial splice sites were always stronger on average than subsequent ones, and that a similar reversed trend exist towards the terminal gene part. The convex pattern is strongest for genes with up to 10...

  15. A cryptic BAP1 splice mutation in a family with uveal and cutaneous melanoma, and paraganglioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadt, K.; Choi, J.; Chung, J.Y.;

    2012-01-01

    line BAP1 mutations has yet to be established. Here, we report a novel germ line BAP1 splice mutation, c.1708C>G (p.Leu570fs*40), in a multiple-case Danish UMM family with a spectrum of other tumors. Whole-exome sequencing identified an apparent missense mutation of BAP1 in UMM, CMM, as well as...... paraganglioma, breast cancer, and suspected mesothelioma cases in the family. Bioinformatic analysis and splicing assays demonstrated that this mutation creates a strong cryptic splice donor, resulting in aberrant splicing and a truncating frameshift of the BAP1 transcript. Somatic loss of the wild-type allele...... was also confirmed in the UMM and paraganglioma tumors. Our findings further support BAP1 as a melanoma susceptibility gene and extend the potential predisposition spectrum to paraganglioma....

  16. DBIRD complex integrates alternative mRNA splicing with RNA polymerase II transcript elongation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Close, Pierre; East, Philip; Dirac-Svejstrup, A Barbara;

    2012-01-01

    Alternative messenger RNA splicing is the main reason that vast mammalian proteomic complexity can be achieved with a limited number of genes. Splicing is physically and functionally coupled to transcription, and is greatly affected by the rate of transcript elongation. As the nascent pre...... and help to integrate transcript elongation with mRNA splicing remain unclear. Here we characterize the human interactome of chromatin-associated mRNP particles. This led us to identify deleted in breast cancer 1 (DBC1) and ZNF326 (which we call ZNF-protein interacting with nuclear mRNPs and DBC1...... (ZIRD)) as subunits of a novel protein complex--named DBIRD--that binds directly to RNAPII. DBIRD regulates alternative splicing of a large set of exons embedded in (A + T)-rich DNA, and is present at the affected exons. RNA-interference-mediated DBIRD depletion results in region-specific decreases in...

  17. Total ankle joint replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Ankle arthritis results in a stiff and painful ankle and can be a major cause of disability. For people with end-stage ankle arthritis, arthrodesis (ankle fusion) is effective at reducing pain in the shorter term, but results in a fixed joint, and over time the loss of mobility places stress on other joints in the foot that may lead to arthritis, pain and dysfunction. Another option is to perform a total ankle joint replacement, with the aim of giving the patient a mobile and pain-free ankle. In this article we review the efficacy of this procedure, including how it compares to ankle arthrodesis, and consider the indications and complications. PMID:26868932

  18. Differential HFE Gene Expression is Regulated by Alternative Splicing in Human Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, Rute; Silva, Bruno; Proença, Daniela; Faustino, Paula

    2011-01-01

    Background - The pathophysiology of HFE-derived Hereditary Hemochromatosis and the function of HFE protein in iron homeostasis remain uncertain. Also, the role of alternative splicing in HFE gene expression regulation and the possible function of the corresponding protein isoforms are still unknown. The aim of this study was to gain insights into the physiological significance of these alternative HFE variants. Methodology/Principal Findings - Alternatively spliced HFE transcripts in dive...

  19. Expression of Two Novel Alternatively Spliced COL2A1 Isoforms During Chondrocyte Differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    McAlinden, Audrey; Johnstone, Brian; Kollar, John; Kazmi, Najam; Hering, Thomas M.

    2007-01-01

    Alternative splicing of the type II procollagen gene (COL2A1) is developmentally-regulated during chondrogenesis. Type IIA procollagen (+ exon 2) is synthesized by chondroprogenitor cells while type IIB procollagen (- exon 2) is synthesized by differentiated chondrocytes. Here, we report expression of two additional alternatively spliced COL2A1 isoforms during chondrocyte differentiation of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). One isoform, named IIC, contains only the first 34 n...

  20. Coupling of RNA Polymerase II Transcription Elongation with Pre-mRNA Splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldi, Tassa; Cortazar, Michael A; Sheridan, Ryan M; Bentley, David L

    2016-06-19

    Pre-mRNA maturation frequently occurs at the same time and place as transcription by RNA polymerase II. The co-transcriptionality of mRNA processing has permitted the evolution of mechanisms that functionally couple transcription elongation with diverse events that occur on the nascent RNA. This review summarizes the current understanding of the relationship between transcriptional elongation through a chromatin template and co-transcriptional splicing including alternative splicing decisions that affect the expression of most human genes. PMID:27107644