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Sample records for chondrodysplasias molecular physiopathology

  1. New insight on FGFR3-related chondrodysplasias molecular physiopathology revealed by human chondrocyte gene expression profiling.

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    Laurent Schibler

    Full Text Available Endochondral ossification is the process by which the appendicular skeleton, facial bones, vertebrae and medial clavicles are formed and relies on the tight control of chondrocyte maturation. Fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR3 plays a role in bone development and maintenance and belongs to a family of proteins which differ in their ligand affinities and tissue distribution. Activating mutations of the FGFR3 gene lead to craniosynostosis and multiple types of skeletal dysplasia with varying degrees of severity: thanatophoric dysplasia (TD, achondroplasia and hypochondroplasia. Despite progress in the characterization of FGFR3-mediated regulation of cartilage development, many aspects remain unclear. The aim and the novelty of our study was to examine whole gene expression differences occurring in primary human chondrocytes isolated from normal cartilage or pathological cartilage from TD-affected fetuses, using Affymetrix technology. The phenotype of the primary cells was confirmed by the high expression of chondrocytic markers. Altered expression of genes associated with many cellular processes was observed, including cell growth and proliferation, cell cycle, cell adhesion, cell motility, metabolic pathways, signal transduction, cell cycle process and cell signaling. Most of the cell cycle process genes were down-regulated and consisted of genes involved in cell cycle progression, DNA biosynthesis, spindle dynamics and cytokinesis. About eight percent of all modulated genes were found to impact extracellular matrix (ECM structure and turnover, especially glycosaminoglycan (GAG and proteoglycan biosynthesis and sulfation. Altogether, the gene expression analyses provide new insight into the consequences of FGFR3 mutations in cell cycle regulation, onset of pre-hypertrophic differentiation and concomitant metabolism changes. Moreover, impaired motility and ECM properties may also provide clues about growth plate disorganization. These results also suggest that many signaling pathways may be directly or indirectly altered by FGFR3 and confirm the crucial role of FGFR3 in the control of growth plate development.

  2. Clinical genetics and pathobiology of ciliary chondrodysplasias

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    Schmidts, M.

    2014-01-01

    Ciliary chondrodysplasias represent a heterogenous group of rare, nearly exclusively autosomal recessively inherited developmental conditions. While the skeletal phenotype, mainly affecting limbs, ribs and sometimes the craniofacial skeleton, is predominant, extraskeletal disease affecting the kidneys, liver, heart, eyes and other organs and tissues is observed inconsistently. Significant lethality, resulting from cardiorespiratory failure due to thoracic constriction as well as from renal an...

  3. The neurology of rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata

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    Bams-Mengerink, Annemieke M; Koelman, Johannes HTM; Waterham, Hans; Barth, Peter G; Poll-The, Bwee Tien

    2013-01-01

    Background To describe the neurologic profiles of Rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata (RCDP); a peroxisomal disorder clinically characterized by skeletal abnormalities, congenital cataracts, severe growth and developmental impairments and immobility of joints. Defective plasmalogen biosynthesis is the main biochemical feature. Methods Observational study including review of clinical and biochemical abnormalities, genotype, presence of seizures and neurophysiological studies of a cohort of 16...

  4. Clinical physiopathology of hypernatremia

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    F. Sgambato

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The maintenance of sodium levels at normal ranges has to be considered one of the most important and crucial physiological balance in order to preserve life. The increase of natremia determines the leakage of H2O from the inside of cells and the consequent brain cells withering, that causes encephalopathy at different stages and in some cases it can even lead to death. AIM OF THE STUDY The fundamentals of general physiopathology are analysed together with systems of compensation and brain adaptation in the three different aetiopathogenetic forms: primary increase of sodium (hypervolemic and haedematose form; missed introduction of pure water (mainly euvolemic form, with no aedema; loss of hypotonic fluids (hypovolemic form with dehydration. The three different clinical entities with their relative clinical approaches have been described.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 1

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    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 1 ...

  6. Brachytelephalangic chondrodysplasia punctata: prenatal diagnosis and postnatal outcome.

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    Boulet, Stéphanie; Dieterich, Klaus; Althuser, Marc; Nugues, Frédérique; Durand, Claudia; Charra, Catherine; Schaal, Jean-Patrick; Jouk, Pierre-Simon

    2010-01-01

    International audience We report the prenatal management of a brachytelephalangic chondrodysplasia punctata (CDPX1) case and how postnatal findings confirmed the diagnosis. The mother was initially referred after ultrasound revealed an abnormal fetal mid-face and punctuation of upper femoral epiphyses. Chondrodysplasia punctata (CP) with Binder anomaly was suspected. 3D-HCT revealed brachytelephalangy suggesting CDPX1. At birth, mid-face hypoplasia was marked. Postnatal imaging and genetic...

  7. Physiology and physiopathology at CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although CT is essentially a morphological technique, it should theoretically enable investigation of certain physiological and physiopathological phenomena to be made, for example by the study of (i) CT numbers and (ii) the nature and evolution of enhancements. Intravenous injection of iodine contrast agent increases the attenuation coefficients of cerebral parenchyma, which is theoretically due only to the enhancement of the vascular compartment and in direct correlation with the cerebral blood volume (CBV). The authors have measured the attenuation coefficients of the blood and the parenchyma at varying times after contrast injection. Two contrast agents with differing osmolarities were studied. Two scanners were used - an ACTA scanner and an ND 8000. Twenty CTs were performed on five patients after a bolus injection of a solution of 38% iodine: sodium ioxithalamate 25.69 g; methylglucamine oxithalamate 51.3 osmolarity 1800 mosmol/12 ml/kg were injected. Leakage of the iodine contrast agent, however, considerably increases the density coefficient of cerebral parenchyma and rules out any accurate measurement of the CBV. CT study of cerebral physiopathology is also discussed. This is dependent on two techniques - measurement of attenuation coefficients and observation of enhancements - neither of which are shown to give results characteristic of any one physiopathology. The application of CT in physiological and physiopathological cerebral phenomena is currently extremely limited. (Auth.)

  8. Rare Case of Rhizomelic Chondrodysplasia Punctata

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    Mahale, Yashwant; Kadu, Vikram V.; Chaudhari, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata (RCDP) is a very rare disease. It impairs the normal development of many parts of the body. The features of this disorder include bony abnormalities, severe mental retardation, joint contractures, cataract and recurrent respiratory infections and breathing problems. Seizures and Distinctive facial features including prominent forehead, depressed nasal bridge and small nose is also associated with this pathology. Being rare, this is very difficult to diagnose when presented at OPD. Proper history and meticulous examination is extremely necessary. Our aim is to discuss current knowledge on etiopathogenesis as well as radiological and clinical symptoms of diseases associated with RCDP. Case Report: 5 yrs old male child presented with chest infection and periarticular swelling of all the small and large joints. The patient was walking with limp. History elicited that the child was born of a consanguineous marriage. The child was delivered at home. Birth weight was 2.4 kgs. He repeatedly had upper respiratory tract infections and was taking treatment for the same. He was further investigated in the form of clinical, biochemical and radiological assessment which stated that the patient was suffering from RCDP. Conclusion: This is a rare presentation. Though this is not curable, management of RCDP is symptomatic and supportive and may include physiotherapy and orthopedic procedures (in later stages) to improve function. The child may also undergo cataract surgery to improve vision. PMID:27299065

  9. Physiopathology of pain in rheumatology

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    M. Cazzola

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pain is the main manifestation of many rheumatic diseases (be they overtly inflammatory such as rheumatoid arthritis or dysfunctional such as fibromyalgia but, at least initially, the mechanisms involved in the genesis, amplification and chronicisation of the persistent pain characterising the various conditions can be very different. The main peripheral mechanism underlying acute nociceptive pain is a change in the activity of the nociceptors located in the affected anatomical structures (joints, tendons and ligaments, which makes them more sensitive to normally painful stimuli (hyperalgesia or normally non-painful stimuli (allodynia. This physiopathological mechanism of peripheral sensitisation plays a primary role in rheumatic diseases characterised by acute inflammation, such as the arthritides due to microcrystals. In the case of chronic rheumatic diseases that do not regress spontaneously, functional and structural central nervous system changes cause a generalised reduction in the pain threshold that is not limited to the anatomical structures involved, thus leading to the appearance of hyperalgesia and allodynia in many, if not all body districts. This is the physiopathological basis of chronic, widespread musculoskeletal pain.

  10. [Symptomatic calcification in the newborn. Phenocopies of chondrodysplasia punctata].

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    Leicher-Düber, A; Schumacher, R; Spranger, J

    1990-04-01

    Stippled epiphyses occur in the new-born and young infant in the different hereditary forms of chondrodysplasia punctata. Symptomatic stippling has been described also in association with chromosomal anomalies, gangliosidosis and drug induced embryopathies. We present patients with Cumarin-embryopathy (2), fetal alcohol syndrome (1), Zellweger-syndrome (2) and chromosomal anomaly 16 (1) and discuss the typical roentgenographic features, distribution and differential diagnosis of epiphyseal stippling. PMID:2160110

  11. Severe tracheobronchial stenosis and cervical vertebral subluxation in X-linked recessive chondrodysplasia punctata

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    Mundinger, Gerhard S. [Johns Hopkins Hospital, Division of Plastic, Reconstructive, and Maxillofacial Surgery, Baltimore, MD (United States); Weiss, Clifford; Fishman, Elliot K. [Johns Hopkins Hospital, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Radiologic manifestations of X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata (CDPX1) typically include chondrodysplasia, epiphyseal stippling, punctate calcification of cartilage, distal phalangeal hypoplasia, and nasal/midface hypoplasia. We present an infant with CDPX1 demonstrating calcification and stenosis of the entire trachea and mainstem bronchi, as well as possible anterior C1 subluxation due to progression of congenital vertebral dysplasia. (orig.)

  12. Alzheimer’s disease: relevant molecular and physiopathological events affecting amyloid-β brain balance and the putative role of PPARs

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    Zolezzi, Juan M.; Bastías-Candia, Sussy; Santos, Manuel J.; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of age-related dementia. With the expected aging of the human population, the estimated morbidity of AD suggests a critical upcoming health problem. Several lines of research are focused on understanding AD pathophysiology, and although the etiology of the disease remains a matter of intense debate, increased brain levels of amyloid-β (Aβ) appear to be a critical event in triggering a wide range of molecular alterations leading to AD. It has become evident in recent years that an altered balance between production and clearance is responsible for the accumulation of brain Aβ. Moreover, Aβ clearance is a complex event that involves more than neurons and microglia. The status of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and choroid plexus, along with hepatic functionality, should be considered when Aβ balance is addressed. Furthermore, it has been proposed that exposure to sub-toxic concentrations of metals, such as copper, could both directly affect these secondary structures and act as a seeding or nucleation core that facilitates Aβ aggregation. Recently, we have addressed peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs)-related mechanisms, including the direct modulation of mitochondrial dynamics through the PPARγ-coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) axis and the crosstalk with critical aging- and neurodegenerative-related cellular pathways. In the present review, we revise the current knowledge regarding the molecular aspects of Aβ production and clearance and provide a physiological context that gives a more complete view of this issue. Additionally, we consider the different structures involved in AD-altered Aβ brain balance, which could be directly or indirectly affected by a nuclear receptor (NR)/PPAR-related mechanism. PMID:25120477

  13. Physio-pathological roles of transglutaminase-catalyzed reactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mariangela; Ricotta; Maura; Iannuzzi; Giulia; De; Vivo; Vittorio; Gentile

    2010-01-01

    Transglutaminases(TGs) are a large family of related and ubiquitous enzymes that catalyze post-translational modifications of proteins.The main activity of these enzymes is the cross-linking of a glutaminyl residue of a protein/peptide substrate to a lysyl residue of a protein/peptide co-substrate.In addition to lysyl residues,other second nucleophilic co-substrates may include monoamines or polyamines(to form mono-or bi-substituted/crosslinked adducts) or-OH groups(to form ester linkages) .In the absence of co-substrates,the nucleophile may be water,resulting in the net deamidation of the glutaminyl residue.The TG enzymes are also capable of catalyzing other reactions important for cell viability.The distribution and the physiological roles of TG enzymes have been widely studied in numerous cell types and tissues and their roles in several diseases have begun to be identified."Tissue" TG(TG2) ,a member of the TG family of enzymes,has definitely been shown to be involved in the molecular mechanisms responsible for a very widespread human pathology:i.e.celiac disease(CD) .TG activity has alsobeen hypothesized to be directly involved in the pathogenetic mechanisms responsible for several other human diseases,including neurodegenerative diseases,which are often associated with CD.Neurodegenerative diseases,such as Alzheimer’s disease,Parkinson’s disease,supranuclear palsy,Huntington’s disease and other recently identified polyglutamine diseases,are characterized,in part,by aberrant cerebral TG activity and by increased cross-linked proteins in affected brains.In this review,we discuss the physio-pathological role of TG-catalyzed reactions,with particular interest in the molecular mechanisms that could involve these enzymes in the physio-pathological processes responsible for human neurodegenerative diseases.

  14. What's new in the physiopathology of acne?

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    Suh, D H; Kwon, H H

    2015-07-01

    There are four central factors that contribute to acne physiopathology: the inflammatory response, colonization with Propionibacterium acnes, increased sebum production and hypercornification of the pilosebaceous duct. In addition, research in the areas of diet and nutrition, genetics and oxidative stress is also yielding some interesting insights into the development of acne. In this paper we review some of the most recent research and novel concepts revealed in this work, which has been published by researchers from diverse academic disciplines including dermatology, immunology, microbiology and endocrinology. We discuss the implications of their findings (particularly in terms of opportunities to develop new therapies), highlight interrelationships between these novel factors that could contribute to the pathology of acne, and indicate where gaps in our understanding still exist. PMID:25645151

  15. [Megacolon and sigmoid volvulus: incidence and physiopathology].

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    Saravia Burgos, Jaime; Acosta Canedo, Abel

    2015-01-01

    The etiology of Megacolon is multiple. One of these causes and the most frequent is Chagas disease. Its complication: sigmoid volvulus was de main diagnosis in the admitted patients at the Bolivian and Japanese Gastroenterological Institute of Cochabamba Bolivia. It usually affects people of a low economic income. In this Gastroenterological Hospital a transversal and prospective study has been done, in order to know the real incidence and the physiopathology of this disease. In a six year period, from 2000 to 2006, 8.954 patients were admitted to the Hospital: of these, 814 (9.09%), where diagnosticated as lower intestinal obstruction. In 608 (74.7%) the final diagnosis was sigmoid torsion. Radiological diagnosis was made in 84% of the patients and endoscopic decompression was successful in 88.7%. As reported in the medical literature, the main cause of megacolon in this part of the world is Chagas disease. In our investigation 22% (98 patients), were serology positive to Chagas disease, and another 21.44% (95 patients) were serology negative. They were coca leaf chewers. One of coca leaf compounds is cocaine which blocks the adrenaline and noradrenaline degradation by mean of monoamine oxidase inactivation. These two hormones stay a long term of time in the target organ: the large bowel. By this mean chronic and persistent vessel constriction develops intestinal wall atrophy and lower resistance to the intraintestinal pressure. PMID:25875517

  16. Takayasu's arteritis: An update on physiopathology.

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    Arnaud, Laurent; Kahn, Jean-Emmanuel; Girszyn, Nicolas; Piette, Anne-Marie; Bletry, Olivier

    2006-07-01

    Takayasu's arteritis (TA) is a chronic large vessel vasculitis. The physiopathology of TA has not been completely elucidated, but it appears to be multifactorial and to mainly involve cellular immunity. The pathologic sequence could implicate stimulation from an antigen that triggers heat shock protein (HSP)-65 expression in aortic tissue which, in turn, induces MHC class I-related chain A (MICA). T-cells and natural killer (NK) cells expressing NKG2D receptors could recognize MICA, resulting in acute inflammation. Pro-inflammatory cytokines released from these infiltrating cells induce matrix metalloproteinases and amplify the inflammatory response, inducing more MHC antigen and costimulatory molecule expression on vascular cells and, thus, recruiting more mononuclear cells. Alpha-beta T-cells then infiltrate and specifically recognize one or a few autoantigens presented by a shared epitope associated with specific MHC on the dendritic cells (DC). These DC simultaneously cooperate to some extent with B-cells and determine a humoral immunity mainly constituted by anti-endothelial cell autoantibodies that could trigger complement-dependent cytotoxicity against endothelial cells. The use of corticosteroids and of other immunosuppressive agents can bring TA into remission in most patients. A better understanding of the immunological mechanisms responsible for the vascular injury has led to trials of anti-TNF-alpha agents with encouraging results. In the near future, new drugs specifically designed to target some of the mechanisms described above may be able to expand the physician's therapeutic arsenal in TA. PMID:16762772

  17. Systemic lupus erythematosus in pregnancy with rare anomaly of rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata in baby

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    Alakananda

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Rhizomelic means shortening of the bones closest to the body's trunk. Chondrodysplasia refers to malformation (the dysplasia part of the word of the cartilage (the chondro part of the word. Punctata refers to an unusual stippling on the end of the bones that join the shoulders and elbows (the humerus and the top of the leg and the hip (femur. On X-ray an infant's bones look spotty at the ends. Here, we report a case of rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctate (RCDP in newborn of a known systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE patient. Consent for publication of this rare case for academic benefit has been taken from the patient. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(6.000: 2461-2463

  18. Neonatal lupus syndrome: a case with chondrodysplasia punctata and other unusual manifestations.

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    Austin-Ward, E; Castillo, S.; Cuchacovich, M; Espinoza, A; Cofré-Beca, J; González, S; Solivelles, X; Bloomfield, J.

    1998-01-01

    We report a case of a newborn infant whose mother had systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) diagnosed before pregnancy. The child had clinical manifestations of neonatal lupus as well as chondrodysplasia punctata and other findings that resemble the congenital anomalies associated with the use of oral anticoagulants, with no history of exposure. We speculate that the combined action of the different maternal autoantibodies may produce the whole spectrum of manifestations.

  19. Physiopathologic mechanisms involved in mare endometrosis.

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    Rebordão, M R; Galvão, A; Szóstek, A; Amaral, A; Mateus, L; Skarzynski, D J; Ferreira-Dias, G

    2014-10-01

    Endometrosis is a degenerative chronic process, characterized by paramount fibrosis development in mare endometrium. This condition is one of the major causes of subfertility/infertility in mares. As in other organs, fibrosis might be a pathologic sequel of many chronic inflammatory diseases. However, aetiology and physiopathologic mechanisms involved in endometrial fibrosis are still controversial. This review presents new hypotheses based on our newest data. As the first line of innate immune defence, systemic neutrophils arrive in the uterus at mating or in the presence of pathogens. A novel paradigm is that neutrophils cast out their DNA in response to infectious stimuli and form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). We have shown that bacterial strains of Streptococcus zooepidemicus, Escherichia coli or Staphylococcus capitis, known to cause endometritis in mares were able to induce NETs release in vitro by equine PMN to different extents. An intriguing dilemma is the dual action of NETs. While NETs play a desirable role fighting micro-organisms in mare uterus, they may also contribute to endometrial fibrosis. A long-term in vitro exposure of mare endometrium explants to NETs components (myeloperoxidase, elastase and cathepsin G) up-regulated fibrosis markers TGFβ and Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP-1). Also, pro-fibrotic cytokines regulated collagen deposition and fibrosis. Changes in expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), interleukins (IL)1-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and receptors in endometrium with different degrees of fibrosis and/or inflammation were observed. A putative role of CTGF, IL and NETs components in endometrosis development should be considered. Additionally, we speculate that in sustained endometritis in mares, prostaglandins may not only cause early luteolysis or early pregnancy loss, but may also be related to endometrial fibrosis pathogenesis by stimulating collagen deposition. PMID:25277436

  20. Detection of Gene Deletions in Children with Chondrodysplasia Punctata, Ichthyosis, Kallmann Syndrome, and Ocular Albinism by FISH Studies

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    Jia-Woei Hou

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Contiguous gene syndrome (CGS is characterized by a series of clinical featuresresulting from interstitial or terminal deletions of various adjacentgenes. Several important genes have been identified in the Xp22.3 region tobe responsible for genetically heterogeneous diseases. In this study, fluorescencein situ hybridization (FISH methods were used to detect the extent ofgene deletion related to the phenotypes of patients with Xp-CGS.Methods: The molecular cytogenetic statuses of 23 boys with at least 1 apparent featureof chondrodysplasia punctata (CDP, ichthyosis, Kallmann syndrome, ortype 1 ocular albinism and those of their family members were investigated.High-resolution banding and FISH studies were performed using the probesof steroid sulfatase (STS, KAL1 and OA1, to detect the deleted status onXp22.3 in these patients along with their mothers and/or sisters or maternalgrandmothers.Results: All of these boys had normal karyotypes. FISH study showed nullisomy in 9of the 23 male patients and hemizygosity in all female carriers in the geneson Xp22.3. The existence of 2 or more diseases in the same individual indicatesa CGS. In addition, a putative mental retardation-related gene onXp22.3 locus was considered to be located between X-linked CDP and STS.Conclusions: The use of FISH probes for the Xp22.3 region allowed us to identify XlinkedCGSs, especially in those patients with 2 or more distinct clinical entitiesor an obvious X-linked disorder.

  1. Alternative mitochondrial functions in cell physiopathology: beyond ATP production

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    Kowaltowski A.J.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that mitochondria are the main site for ATP generation within most tissues. However, mitochondria also participate in a surprising number of alternative activities, including intracellular Ca2+ regulation, thermogenesis and the control of apoptosis. In addition, mitochondria are the main cellular generators of reactive oxygen species, and may trigger necrotic cell death under conditions of oxidative stress. This review concentrates on these alternative mitochondrial functions, and their role in cell physiopathology.

  2. Oral mucositis induced by anticancer treatments: physiopathology and treatments

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    Lionel, D'Hondt; Christophe, Lonchay; Marc, André; Jean-Luc, Canon

    2006-01-01

    Oral mucositis is a frequent and devastating side effect of anticancer treatments. It impairs the patient's quality of life and also can be life threatening because severe infections and delayed or incomplete anticancer treatments may result. This problem has been largely overlooked and underestimated in the past. However, recently studies have been performed to precisely identify the epidemiology, cost, consequences, physiopathology, and treatments of oral mucositis. Clinical guidelines have...

  3. Clinical and radiological pictures of two newborn babies with manifestations of chondrodysplasia punctata and review of available literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chondrodysplasia punctata (CDP) is a rare, heterogeneous congenital skeletal dysplasia, characterized by punctate or dot-like calcium deposits in cartilage observed on neonatal radiograms. A number of inborn metabolic diseases are associated with CDP, including peroxisomal and cholesterol biosynthesis dysfunction and other inborn errors of metabolism such as: mucolipidosis type II, mucopolysacharidosis type III, GM1 gangliosidosis. CDP is also related to disruption of vitamin K-dependent metabolism, causing secondary effects on the embryo, as well as fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), chromosomal abnormalities that include trisomies 18 and 21, Turner syndrome. This article presents clinical data and diagnostic imaging findings of two newborn babies with chondrodysplasia punctata. Children presented with skeletal and cartilage anomalies, dysmorphic facial feature, muscles tone abnormalities, skin changes and breathing difficulties. One of the patients demonstrated critical stenosis of spinal canal with anterior subluxation of C1 vertebra relative to C2. The aim of this article is to present cases and briefly describe current knowledge on etiopathogenesis as well as radiological and clinical symptoms of diseases coexisting with CDP. Radiological diagnostic imaging allows for visualization of punctate focal mineralization in bone epiphyses during neonatal age and infancy. Determining the etiology of chondrodysplasia punctata requires performing various basic as well as additional examinations, including genetic studies

  4. Cardiac cachexia and muscle wasting: definition, physiopathology, and clinical consequences

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    Okoshi MP

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Marina P Okoshi,1 Fernando G Romeiro,1 Paula F Martinez,1,2 Silvio A Oliveira Jr,1,2 Bertha F Polegato,1 Katashi Okoshi11Internal Medicine Department, Botucatu Medical School, Sao Paulo State University, UNESP, Sao Paulo, Brazil; 2School of Physiotherapy, Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, BrazilAbstract: Cachexia and muscle wasting are frequently observed in heart failure patients. Cachexia is a predictor of reduced survival, independent of important parameters such as age, heart failure functional class, and functional capacity. Muscle and fat wasting can also predict adverse outcome during cardiac failure. Only more recently were these conditions defined in International Consensus. Considering that heart failure is an inflammatory disease, cardiac cachexia has been diagnosed by finding a body weight loss >5%, in the absence of other diseases and independent of other criteria. Muscle wasting has been defined as lean appendicular mass corrected for height squared of 2 standard deviations or more below the mean for healthy individuals between 20 years and 30 years old from the same ethnic group. The etiology of heart failure-associated cachexia and muscle wasting is multifactorial, and the underlying physiopathological mechanisms are not completely understood. The most important factors are reduced food intake, gastrointestinal alterations, immunological activation, neurohormonal abnormalities, and an imbalance between anabolic and catabolic processes. Cachexia and muscle wasting have clinical consequences in several organs and systems including the gastrointestinal and erythropoietic systems, and the heart, previously affected by the primary disease. We hope that a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in their physiopathology will allow the development of pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapies to effectively prevent and treat heart failure-induced cachexia and muscle wasting before significant body

  5. Some psychosocial aspects of nonlethal chondrodysplasias: I. Assessment using a Life-Styles Questionnaire.

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    Hunter, A G

    1998-06-16

    Studies concerning the psychosocial aspects of skeletal dysplasias that cause disproportionate short stature have been few and have usually involved small numbers of patients. As part of a study involving patients with chondrodysplasias and their families, an assessment battery of standardised instruments designed to measure depression, anxiety, self-esteem, personal support networks, marital adjustment, and family structure were completed by patients and, in many cases, their sibs, spouses, and/or parents. This first in a series of six papers reports the results of a Life-Styles Questionnaire which provides some insights into the levels of satisfaction with various aspects of life, including friendships, employment, the use of some substances and services, and the impact of the skeletal dysplasia on career, marriage, and childbearing. Results are presented for patients and the unaffected parents of patients. Overall, the study has shown a high level of satisfaction with many aspects of life. However, there are important differences in attitudes between the married and unmarried patients, and in some cases the unaffected parents, in a number of areas including health, overall satisfaction with life, and concerns surrounding child bearing and employment. PMID:9637414

  6. Structural and segregation analysis of the type II collagen gene (COL2A1) in some heritable chondrodysplasias.

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    Wordsworth, P; Ogilvie, D.; Priestley, L; Smith, R.; Wynne-Davies, R; Sykes, B

    1988-01-01

    Seventy-seven persons with a variety of heritable chondrodysplasias were screened for gross rearrangements of the structural gene encoding the major cartilage collagen, collagen II. None was found. Segregation of the locus (COL2A1) was studied in 19 pedigrees using three restriction site dimorphisms (shown by PvuII, HindIII, and BamHI) and a length polymorphism as linkage markers. Discordant segregation between COL2A1 and the mutant locus was seen in pedigrees with multiple epiphyseal dysplas...

  7. Fisiopatologia da esquizofrenia: aspectos atuais Physiopathology of schizophrenia: current aspects

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    Ary Gadelha de Alencar Araripe Neto

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: A esquizofrenia é uma das mais intrigantes doenças psiquiátricas e, talvez por isso, a mais pesquisada, com grandes avanços sobre sua fisiopatologia no último século. OBJETIVO: Revisar os principais avanços na compreensão fisiopatológica da esquizofrenia. MÉTODO: Revisão da literatura para cada tópico proposto a partir de artigos levantados no Medline e/ou considerados importantes a partir da experiência dos autores. RESULTADOS: A hipótese dopaminérgica representa uma das primeiras teorias etiológicas e permanece até os dias atuais como uma das que apresenta evidências mais consistentes. No entanto, essa teoria falha em explicar a história natural, os prejuízos cognitivos e as alterações estruturais encontradas na esquizofrenia. A demonstração de estudos epidemiológicos de fatores de risco genéticos e ambientais, somados aos estudos neuropatológicos e de neuroimagem, sugerem um modelo interativo em que inúmeros fatores atuam conjuntamente para alterações mais globais do desenvolvimento cerebral. CONCLUSÃO: A compreensão fisiopatológica da esquizofrenia avançou bastante no último século, evoluindo de teorias etiológicas unicausais para modelos mais complexos que consideram a interação de inúmeros fatores genéticos e ambientais.BACKGROUND: Schizophrenia is one of the most intriguing and studied psychiatric diseases and its physiopathology has advanced a lot in the last century. OBJECTIVE: To review the most important advances in the physiopathology of schizophrenia. METHOD: Review of the literature of each proposed topic by articles searched in Medline and/or chosen accordingly the authors’ experience. RESULTS: The dopaminergic hypothesis was one of the first ethiological theories and until today is among the ones that presents the most consistent evidences. However, it fails to explain important features found in schizophrenia, such as the natural history, the cognitive impairments and the

  8. Skin disorders in diabetes mellitus: an epidemiology and physiopathology review.

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    de Macedo, Geisa Maria Campos; Nunes, Samanta; Barreto, Tania

    2016-01-01

    Skin disorders, usually neglected and frequently underdiagnosed among diabetic patients, are common complications and encounter a broad spectrum of disorders in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM)-e.g. cutaneous infection, dry skin, pruritus. Skin disorders are highly associated with increased risk of important outcomes, such as skin lesions, ulcerations and diabetic foot, which can lead to major complications and revolve around multifactorial factors besides hyperglycemia and advanced glycation end products. Although diabetic's skin disorders are consistent in the literature, there is limited data regarding early-stage skin disorders in DM patients. Disease control, early-stage treatment (e.g. skin hydration, orthotic devices) and awareness can reduce morbidity of DM patients. Thus, better understanding of the burden of skin disorders in DM patients may raise awareness on prevention and management. Therefore, the aim of this study is to perform a literature review to evaluate the main clinical characteristics and complications of skin disorders in diabetic's patients. Additionally, physiopathology early-stage skin disorders and dermocosmetic management were also reviewed. PMID:27583022

  9. Hepatocytes Polyploidization and Cell Cycle Control in Liver Physiopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Géraldine Gentric

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Most cells in mammalian tissues usually contain a diploid complement of chromosomes. However, numerous studies have demonstrated a major role of “diploid-polyploid conversion” during physiopathological processes in several tissues. In the liver parenchyma, progressive polyploidization of hepatocytes takes place during postnatal growth. Indeed, at the suckling-weaning transition, cytokinesis failure events induce the genesis of binucleated tetraploid liver cells. Insulin signalling, through regulation of the PI3K/Akt signalling pathway, is essential in the establishment of liver tetraploidization by controlling cytoskeletal organisation and consequently mitosis progression. Liver cell polyploidy is generally considered to indicate terminal differentiation and senescence, and both lead to a progressive loss of cell pluripotency associated to a markedly decreased replication capacity. Although adult liver is a quiescent organ, it retains a capacity to proliferate and to modulate its ploidy in response to various stimuli or aggression (partial hepatectomy, metabolic overload (i.e., high copper and iron hepatic levels, oxidative stress, toxic insult, and chronic hepatitis etc.. Here we review the mechanisms and functional consequences of hepatocytes polyploidization during normal and pathological liver growth.

  10. Emission tomography: quantitative aspects in metabolic and physiopathologic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis presents instrumental and data processing studies developped in emission tomography in man, using gamma and positron emitting tracers. High contrast visualisation of volume distribution of tracers in the organs, kinetic studies and measurements of radioactive concentration or of other clinical parameters necessitate a detailed analysis of all physical factors limiting the accuracy of the measure; therefore, development of adapted imaging devices and data processing techniques, together with models describing correctly the phenomena under study are to be carried out. Thus, in single photon (gamma) emission tomography an image reconstruction strategy is elaborated, based on an analytical model for the ill-posed problem including the attenuation effect. In positron emission tomography, the time-of-flight information combined with the reconstruction technique is used in the design of a first prototype imaging device which performance is presented and evaluated in a clinical environment. Moreover, a priori or a posteriori techniques correcting for Compton diffusion events, limited statistics and limited resolutions, are proposed and discussed for the improvement of regional measurement accuracy, in metabolic and physiopathologic studies

  11. NAFLD and Increased Aortic Stiffness: Parallel or Common Physiopathological Mechanisms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane A. Villela-Nogueira

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD has become the leading cause of chronic liver diseases worldwide. Liver inflammation and fibrosis related to NAFLD contribute to disease progression and increasing liver-related mortality and morbidity. Increasing data suggest that NAFLD may be linked to atherosclerotic vascular disease independent of other established cardiovascular risk factors. Central arterial stiffness has been recognized as a measure of cumulative cardiovascular risk marker load, and the measure of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV is regarded as the gold standard assessment of aortic stiffness. It has been shown that increased aortic stiffness predicts cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in several clinical settings, including type 2 diabetes mellitus, a well-known condition associated with advanced stages of NAFLD. Furthermore, recently-published studies reported a strong association between NAFLD and increased arterial stiffness, suggesting a possible link in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and NAFLD. We sought to review the published data on the associations between NAFLD and aortic stiffness, in order to better understand the interplay between these two conditions and identify possible common physiopathological mechanisms.

  12. Diabetes Mellitus as a Risk Factor in Glaucoma's Physiopathology and Surgical Survival Time: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Lívio; Cunha, João Paulo; Amado, Duarte; Pinto, Luís Abegão; Ferreira, Joana

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is a multifactorial condition under serious influence of many risk factors. The role of diabetes mellitus (DM) in glaucoma etiology or progression remains inconclusive. Although, the diabetic patients have different healing mechanism comparing to the general population and it has a possible-negative role on surgical outcomes. This review article attempts to analyze the association of both diseases, glaucoma and DM, before and after the surgery. The epidemiological studies, based mainly in population prevalence analyzes, have shown opposite outcomes in time and even in the most recent articles also the association remains inconclusive. On the contrary, the experimental models based on animal induced chronic hyperglycemia have shown an important association of both diseases, explained by common neurodegenerative mechanisms. Diabetic patients have a different wound healing process in the eye viz-a-viz other organs. The healing process is more and it results in lower surgical survival time, higher intraocular pressure (IOP) levels and, therefore, these patients usually need more medication to lower the IOP. Both randomized and nonrandomized retrospective and experimental molecular studies have shown the association between DM and glaucoma. Further studies are needed to get better explanations about outcomes on more recent surgical procedures and with the exponential use of antifibrotics. How to cite this article: Costa L, Cunha JP, Amado D, Pinto LA, Ferreira J. Diabetes Mellitus as a Risk Factor in Glaucoma's Physiopathology and Surgical Survival Time: A Literature Review. J Curr Glaucoma Pract 2015;9(3):81-85. PMID:26997842

  13. SSCP and segregation analysis of the human type X collagen gene (COL10A1) in heritable forms of chondrodysplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweetman, W.A.; Rash, B.; Thomas, J.T.; Boot-Handford, R.; Grant, M.E.; Wallis, G.A. (Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom)); Sykes, B. (Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)); Beighton, P. (Univ. of Cape Town (South Africa)); Hecht, J.T. (Univ. of Texas, Houston, TX (United States)); Zabell, B. (Johannes Gutenburg Universitaet, Mainz (Germany))

    1992-10-01

    Type X collagen is a homotrimeric, short chain, nonfibrillar collagen that is expressed exclusively by hypertrophic chondrocytes at the sites of endochondral ossification. The distribution and pattern of expression of the type X collagen gene (COL10A1) suggests that mutations altering the structure and synthesis of the protein may be responsible for causing heritable forms of chondrodysplasia. The authors investigated whether mutations within the human COL10A1 gene were responsible for causing the disorders achondroplasia, hypochondroplasia, pseudoachondroplasia, and thanatophoric dysplasia, by analyzing the coding regions of the gene by using PCR and the single-stranded conformational polymorphism technique. By this approach, seven sequence changes were identified within and flanking the coding regions of the gene of the affected persons. The authors demonstrated that six of these sequence changes were not responsible for causing these forms of chondrodysplasia but were polymorphic in nature. The sequence changes were used to demonstrate discordant segregation between the COL10A1 locus and achondroplasia and pseudoachondroplasia, in nuclear families. This lack of segregation suggests that mutations within or near the COL101A1 locus are not responsible for these disorders. The seventh sequence change resulted in a valine-to-methionine substitution in the carboxyl-terminal domain of the molecule and was identified in only two hypochondroplasic individuals from a single family. Segregation analysis in this family was inconclusive, and the significance of this substitution remains uncertain. 47 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Internal targeted radiotherapy for bone metastasis: what about underlying physiopathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Once tumours metastasize to bone, they are usually incurable and responsible for several devastating consequences: severe pain, pathologic fractures, life-threatening hypercalcemia, spinal cord compression and other nerve-compression syndromes. Understanding of physiopathological mechanisms responsible for these symptoms is critical for therapeutic approach, especially pain treatments. Three types of pain occur in tumour bone involvement: tonic or background pain, which are deep non-specific ache rising in intensity as the disease progresses; incident pain on movement (allodynia); and spontaneous pain which can be severe. Bone metastases could be osteolytic or osteoblastic. However, this classification actually represents two extremes of a continuum characterized by dys-regulation of the normal bone remodeling process. Biochemical mediators production is crucial as a part of this process. The bone microenvironment plays a critical role in the formation of osteoclasts through the production of macrophage colony-stimulating factor, receptor activator of nuclear factor kB ligand (RANKL)... Many of these mediators of osteolysis also have been shown to activate nociceptors: prostaglandins A and E, IL-1, IL-6, TNF. Thus there is a link between osteolytic destruction, inflammation and pain. It explains that severe pain could occur independently from fractures and in absence of any bone structure alteration and nervous compression. Also, pain is often disproportionate to tumour size or degree of bone involvement. Inflammatory and osteolytic processes depend on number, localization and organization of tumour cells inside bone and bone marrow tissues. All these parameters are crucial to take into account for a good understanding of treatments mechanisms of action, especially anti-inflammatory drugs (corticosteroid and others), bi-phosphonates, internal radiotherapy (strontium 89 or radiolabelled bi-phosphonates), external radiotherapy and chemotherapy or hormonotherapy

  15. Anatomic and physiopathologic changes affecting the airway of the elderly patient: implications for geriatric-focused airway management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson KN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Kathleen N Johnson,1 Daniel B Botros,1 Leanne Groban,1–4 Yvon F Bryan11Department of Anesthesiology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA; 2Section on Molecular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA; 3Sticht Center on Aging, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA; 4Hypertension and Vascular Research Center, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USAAbstract: There are many anatomical, physiopathological, and cognitive changes that occur in the elderly that affect different components of airway management: intubation, ventilation, oxygenation, and risk of aspiration. Anatomical changes occur in different areas of the airway from the oral cavity to the larynx. Common changes to the airway include tooth decay, oropharyngeal tumors, and significant decreases in neck range of motion. These changes may make intubation challenging by making it difficult to visualize the vocal cords and/or place the endotracheal tube. Also, some of these changes, including but not limited to, atrophy of the muscles around the lips and an edentulous mouth, affect bag mask ventilation due to a difficult face-mask seal. Physiopathologic changes may impact airway management as well. Common pulmonary issues in the elderly (eg, obstructive sleep apnea and COPD increase the risk of an oxygen desaturation event, while gastrointestinal issues (eg, achalasia and gastroesophageal reflux disease increase the risk of aspiration. Finally, cognitive changes (eg, dementia not often seen as related to airway management may affect patient cooperation, especially if an awake intubation is required. Overall, degradation of the airway along with other physiopathologic and cognitive changes makes the elderly population more prone to complications related to airway management. When deciding which airway devices and techniques to use for intubation, the clinician should also consider the

  16. Fisiopatología del síndrome de Guillain Barré axonal Physiopathology of axonal acute Guillain Barré syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Guillermo Montoya Ch.; Diana P. Martínez T.; Jaime Carrizosa Moog; Beatriz Aguirre L.

    2002-01-01

    Se describe la fisiopatología del síndrome de Guillain Barré axonal. Se consideran especialmente cinco aspectos: 1) Agentes etiológicos, específicamente el Campylobacter jejuni. 2) Susceptibilidad genética humana. 3) Mimetismo molecular entre lipopolisacáridos y lipoproteínas. 4) Mecanismo de acción de los anticuerpos antigangliósidos y 5) Hallazgos patológicos. The physiopathology of axonal acute Guillain Barré syndrome is described. Five aspects are considered, namely: 1) Etiologic agents e...

  17. Prenatal diagnosis of chondrodysplasia punctata tibia-metacarpal type using multidetector CT and three-dimensional reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazaki, Osamu [National Centre for Child Health and Development, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Nishimura, Gen [Tokyo Metropolitan Kiyose Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Sago, Haruhiko; Watanabe, Noriyoshi; Ebina, Shunsuke [National Centre for Child Health and Development, Department of Perinatal Medicine and Maternal Care, Tokyo (Japan)

    2007-11-15

    We report a case of chondrodysplasia punctata tibia-metacarpal type (CDP-TM) that was diagnosed prenatally using multidetector CT (MDCT) with three-dimensional (3-D) CT reconstructions. Prenatal US had shown severe thoracic hypoplasia and rhizomelic shortening of the limbs, raising the suspicion of thanatophoric dysplasia. However, MDCT showed punctate calcifications in the epiphyseal cartilage of the humeri and femora, carpal bones, and paravertebral region. On 3-D CT, the tibiae were much shorter than the fibulae, the humeri were very short and bowed, and severe platyspondyly was evident. These findings led to the diagnosis of CDP-TM. The diagnosis was confirmed on postnatal radiographs. Prenatal MDCT with 3-D images may make a useful contribution to prenatal diagnosis in selected fetuses with severe skeletal dysplasia. (orig.)

  18. Effects of adult exposure to bisphenol a on genes involved in the physiopathology of rat prefrontal cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Castro

    Full Text Available Several neurological and behavioral dysfunctions have been reported in animals exposed to bisphenol A (BPA. However, little is known about the impact of adult exposure to BPA on brain physiopathology. Here, we focused on prefrontal cortex (PFC of rats, because it is an important area for cognitive control, complex behaviors and is altered in many psychopathologies. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA and serotonin (5-HT systems are essential for PFC function. Therefore, we examined the effects of adult exposure to BPA on 5α-Reductase (5α-R and cytochrome P450 aromatase (P450arom, enzymes that synthesize GABAA receptor modulators, and tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph, the rate-limiting enzyme in 5-HT biosynthesis. To gain better understanding of BPA's action in the adult PFC, 84 genes involved in neurotoxicity were also analysed. Adult male and female rats were subcutaneously injected for 4 days with 50 µg/kg/day, the current reference safe dose for BPA. mRNA and protein levels of 5α-R, P450arom and Tph were quantified by real-time RT-PCR and Western blot. Genes linked to neurotoxicity were analyzed by PCR-Array technology. Adult exposure to BPA increased both P450arom and Tph2 expression in PFC of male and female, but decreased 5α-R1 expression in female. Moreover, we identified 17 genes related to PFC functions such as synaptic plasticity and memory, as potential targets of BPA. Our results provided new insights on the molecular mechanisms underlying BPA action in the physiopathology of PFC, but also raise the question about the safety of short-term exposure to it in the adulthood.

  19. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Unfolding Protein Response-Apoptosis Cascade Causes Chondrodysplasia in a col2a1 p.Gly1170Ser Mutated Mouse Model

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Guoyan; Lian, Chengjie; Huang, Di; Gao, Wenjie; Liang, Anjing; Peng, Yan; Ye, Wei; Wu, Zizhao; Su, Peiqiang; Huang, Dongsheng

    2014-01-01

    The collagen type II alpha 1 (COL2A1) mutation causes severe skeletal malformations, but the pathogenic mechanisms of how this occurs are unclear. To understand how this may happen, a col2a1 p.Gly1170Ser mutated mouse model was constructed and in homozygotes, the chondrodysplasia phenotype was observed. Misfolded procollagen was largely synthesized and retained in dilated endoplasmic reticulum and the endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS)-unfolded protein response (UPR)-apoptosis cascade was act...

  20. Whole Exome Sequencing Reveals Compound Heterozygosity for Ethnically Distinct PEX7 Mutations Responsible for Rhizomelic Chondrodysplasia Punctata, Type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessie C. Jacobsen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe two brothers who presented at birth with bone growth abnormalities, followed by development of increasingly severe intellectual and physical disability, growth restriction, epilepsy, and cerebellar and brain stem atrophy, but normal ocular phenotypes. Case 1 died at 19 years of age due to chronic respiratory illnesses without a unifying diagnosis. The brother remains alive but severely disabled at 19 years of age. Whole exome sequencing identified compound heterozygous stop mutations in the peroxisome biogenesis factor 7 gene in both individuals. Mutations in this gene cause rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata, type 1 (RCDP1. One mutation, p.Arg232∗, has only been documented once before in a Japanese family, which is of interest given these two boys are of European descent. The other mutation, p.Leu292∗, is found in approximately 50% of RCDP1 patients. These are the first cases of RCDP1 that describe the coinheritance of the p.Arg232∗ and p.Leu292∗ mutations and demonstrate the utility of WES in cases with unclear diagnoses.

  1. Fisiopatología del síndrome de Guillain Barré axonal Physiopathology of axonal acute Guillain Barré syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Guillermo Montoya Ch.

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Se describe la fisiopatología del síndrome de Guillain Barré axonal. Se consideran especialmente cinco aspectos: 1 Agentes etiológicos, específicamente el Campylobacter jejuni. 2 Susceptibilidad genética humana. 3 Mimetismo molecular entre lipopolisacáridos y lipoproteínas. 4 Mecanismo de acción de los anticuerpos antigangliósidos y 5 Hallazgos patológicos. The physiopathology of axonal acute Guillain Barré syndrome is described. Five aspects are considered, namely: 1 Etiologic agents emphasizing on Campylobacter jejuni. 2 Human genetic predisposition. 3 Molecular mimicry between lipopolysaccharides and gangliosides. 4 Mechanisms of action of antiganglioside antibodies and, 5 Pathologic findings.

  2. Enamel Protein Regulation and Dental and Periodontal Physiopathology in Msx2 Mutant Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Molla, Muriel; Descroix, Vianney; Aïoub, Muhanad; Simon, Stéphane; Castañeda, Beatriz; Hotton, Dominique; Bolaños, Alba; Simon, Yohann; Lezot, Frédéric; Goubin, Gérard; Berdal, Ariane

    2010-01-01

    Signaling pathways that underlie postnatal dental and periodontal physiopathology are less studied than those of early tooth development. Members of the muscle segment homeobox gene (Msx) family encode homeoproteins that show functional redundancy during development and are known to be involved in epithelial-mesenchymal interactions that lead to crown morphogenesis and ameloblast cell differentiation. This study analyzed the MSX2 protein during mouse postnatal growth as well as in the adult. ...

  3. A rare case of suprasellar arachnoid cyst with giant perimesencephalic and mesial temporal extension - physiopathological mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turliuc Dana Mihaela

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The arachnoid cyst is a lesion commonly encountered in neurosurgery, especially in pediatric pathology. We are presenting the case of an adult patient with a suprasellar arachnoid cyst with giant perimesencephalic and mesial temporal extension discovered incidentally, where there is a discrepancy between the spectacular neuroimaging and the non-specific symptomatology. Some of the physiopathological mechanisms which led to the evolution of the cyst will also be presented.

  4. Central serous chorioretinopathy: Recent findings and new physiopathology hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daruich, Alejandra; Matet, Alexandre; Dirani, Ali; Bousquet, Elodie; Zhao, Min; Farman, Nicolette; Jaisser, Frédéric; Behar-Cohen, Francine

    2015-09-01

    Central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR) is a major cause of vision threat among middle-aged male individuals. Multimodal imaging led to the description of a wide range of CSCR manifestations, and highlighted the contribution of the choroid and pigment epithelium in CSCR pathogenesis. However, the exact molecular mechanisms of CSCR have remained uncertain. The aim of this review is to recapitulate the clinical understanding of CSCR, with an emphasis on the most recent findings on epidemiology, risk factors, clinical and imaging diagnosis, and treatments options. It also gives an overview of the novel mineralocorticoid pathway hypothesis, from animal data to clinical evidences of the biological efficacy of oral mineralocorticoid antagonists in acute and chronic CSCR patients. In rodents, activation of the mineralocorticoid pathway in ocular cells either by intravitreous injection of its specific ligand, aldosterone, or by over-expression of the receptor specifically in the vascular endothelium, induced ocular phenotypes carrying many features of acute CSCR. Molecular mechanisms include expression of the calcium-dependent potassium channel (KCa2.3) in the endothelium of choroidal vessels, inducing subsequent vasodilation. Inappropriate or over-activation of the mineralocorticoid receptor in ocular cells and other tissues (such as brain, vessels) could link CSCR with the known co-morbidities observed in CSCR patients, including hypertension, coronary disease and psychological stress. PMID:26026923

  5. Shwachman-Diamond syndrome: first molecular diagnosis in a Brazilian child

    OpenAIRE

    Cresio Alves; Julia Constanca Fernandes; Silvana Sampaio; Raquel de Melo Alves Paiva; Rodrigo Tocantins Calado

    2013-01-01

    Herein the first molecular diagnosis of a Brazilian child with Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome is reported. A 6-year-old boy was diagnosed with cystic fibrosis at the age of 15 months due to recurrent respiratory infections, diarrhea and therapeutic response to pancreatic enzymes. Three sweat tests were negative. At the age of 5 years, he began to experience pain in the lower limbs, laxity of joints, lameness and frequent falls. A radiological study revealed metaphyseal chondrodysplasia. A complet...

  6. Lethal chondrodysplasia in a family of Holstein cattle is associated with a de novo splice site variant of COL2A1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerholm, Jørgen Steen; Menzi, Fiona; McEvoy, Fintan;

    2016-01-01

    variant as candidate causal mutation of a severe lethal chondrodysplasia phenotype. Germline mosaicism is a relatively frequent mechanism in the origin of genetic disorders and explains the prevalence of a certain fraction of affected offspring. Paternal dominant de novo mutations are a risk in cattle...

  7. Study of physiopathological phenomena in dental enamel by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An epithermal neutron activation method is used to determine the concentration of mineral elements in human dental enamel. A large number (252) of samples from ancient and modern origins are analyzed. The analytical results are mathematically processed using a statistical multivariant method. This allows to differentiate deciduous from permanent teeth and decayed from sound enamel. It is also possible to distinguish the teeth coming from two different necropoles. The origin and the localization of determined elements in the mineralized part, or in the aqueous-organic part, of enamel is suggested. Their role, as witnessed in the physiopathological phenomena of dental enamel, is discussed

  8. Bone loss and fractures in multiple sclerosis: focus on epidemiologic and physiopathological features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dionyssiotis Y

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Yannis DionyssiotisRehabilitation Department, Physical and Social Rehabilitation Center, Amyntæo, Florina, GreeceAbstract: Multiple sclerosis (MS affects the central nervous system leading to disability and is complicated by bone loss and fractures. Despite the acceptance of osteoporosis and fractures as two major public health problems, in people with MS the mechanisms have not been investigated adequately. Physicians and patients usually focus on the major cause of disability and neglect the multiple risk factors for osteoporosis and fractures in this specific population. This review updates the epidemiology and physiopathological mechanisms in MS.Keywords: multiple sclerosis, bone, fractures, osteoporosis, osteopenia

  9. Physiopathological modulators of amyloid aggregation and novel pharmacological approaches in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DEFELICE FERNANDA G.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The biological mechanisms underlying the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD are complex, as several factors likely contribute to the development of the disease. Therefore, it is not surprising that a number of different possible therapeutic approaches addressing distinct aspects of this disease are currently being investigated. Among these are ways to prevent amyloid aggregation and/or deposition, to prevent neuronal degeneration, and to increase brain neurotransmitter levels. Here, we discuss possible roles of endogenous modulators of Abeta aggregation in the physiopathology of AD and some of the strategies currently under consideration to interfere with brain levels of beta-amyloid, its aggregation and neurotoxicity.

  10. Calcium signaling in the cochlea – Molecular mechanisms and physiopathological implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceriani Federico

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Calcium ions (Ca2+ regulate numerous and diverse aspects of cochlear and vestibular physiology. This review focuses on the Ca2+ control of mechanotransduction and synaptic transmission in sensory hair cells, as well as on Ca2+ signalling in non-sensory cells of the developing cochlea.

  11. Condrodisplasia punctata rizomélica: relato de caso e breve revisão da literatura Rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata: a case report and brief literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sizenildo da Silva Figueirêdo

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Apresentamos um caso de uma lactente de dois meses de idade acometida pela forma recessiva da condrodisplasia punctata, doença caracterizada, radiologicamente, por acentuado encurtamento proximal e distúrbio de ossificação (epífises puntiformes dos membros. São enfatizados os achados clínico-radiológicos, bem como seus principais diagnósticos diferenciais, baseados em dados de breve revisão da literatura.The authors present a case of a 2-month-old infant affected by the recessive form of chondrodysplasia punctata, a rare condition radiologically characterized by severe proximal shortening and anomalous ossification (epiphyseal stippling of the limbs. Clinical and radiological findings as well as main differential diagnoses are emphasized on the basis of data originating from a brief literature review.

  12. Physiopathology, prevention and treatment of the oral mucositis induced by chemotherapy and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oral mucositis is a frequent and potentially severe complication of the antineoplasic therapy; it is considered that approximately 400.000 new patients per year in United States will develop acute or chronic complications in oral cavity after the beginning of its treatment. Some of the basic manifestations that are inside the clinical descriptions understand the erythema, the desquamation, formation of ulcers, the bled, and exudation. The epithelial oropharynge surface has a quick replication rate, and for this reason it is highly exposed to the direct insult due to the cytotoxic effects of the chemotherapy, the radiotherapy, and indirectly the infectious agents. The paper includes topics like physiopathology, risk factors, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, the patient's evaluation and conclusions

  13. An evaluation of the elements of internal medicine physiopathology curriculum in general practice based on the perspectives of faculty members of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    JAMSHID ESLAMI; MOHSEN KHADEMI

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: An evaluation of the curriculum elements can be recognized as a necessity in curriculum dynamic and improvement. This study aimed at evaluating five main elements of a physiopathology curriculum in internal medicine (objectives, content, methods, evaluation, and management). Method: The present study is of a descriptive-analytical type, and the study population consisted of a total of 48 faculty members of internal medicine physiopathology department at Shir...

  14. Physiopathology of beta-adrenergic dysfunction and role of MRP4 during aging, diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrom

    OpenAIRE

    Carillion, Aude

    2015-01-01

    The studies presented in this report looked for a better understanding of the altered response to stimulation of the β-adrenergic receptors in several physiopathological contexts. The first study confirms the alteration of the β-adrenergic response at the cardiomyocyte level in the senescent cardiomyopathy. The role of MRP4 (multidrug resistance associated protein 4) in the reduced inotropic response to isoproterenol is emphasized. The second study evaluates the response to β-adrenoceptors st...

  15. Treatment of cellulite based on the hypothesis of a novel physiopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira de Godoy JM

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available José Maria Pereira de Godoy1, Maria de Fátima Guerreiro de Godoy21Department of Cardiology and Cardiovascular Surgery, 2Lymphovenous Rehabilitation, FAMERP, São José do Rio Preto, BrazilBackground: The aim of the current study is to report on a new form of treatment for cellulite based on a novel physiological hypothesis.Methods: A novel treatment for cellulite was evaluated in 14 patients aged 19–36 (mean 27.5 years. The only inclusion criterion was clinically diagnosed cellulite, and the exclusion criteria were history of edema, obesity, or any other disease diagnosed during the physical examination. Perimetry was performed at the gluteal fold, at 5 cm and 10 cm below the gluteal fold for both legs, and 5 cm and 10 cm below the navel. Additionally, standard photographs were taken and a questionnaire of satisfaction was applied. The patients were submitted to a treatment regimen of 1.5 hours per day adapted for the treatment of cellulite, consisting of manual and mechanical lymph drainage and cervical stimulation using the Godoy and Godoy technique. After 10 sessions over two weeks, the patients were evaluated again.Results: Reductions were identified at both points below the navel, the points on the thighs, and at the gluteal fold (P < 0.0001.Conclusion: This technique of lymphatic system stimulation is efficacious in the treatment of cellulite.Keywords: cellulite, treatment, physiopathology

  16. Emission tomography: quantitative aspects in metabolic and physio-pathologic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis presents instrumental and data processing studies developed in emission tomography in man, using gamma and positron emitting tracers. High contrast visualisation of volume distribution of tracers in the organs, kinetic studies and measurements of radioactive concentration or of other clinical parameters necessitate a detailed analysis of all physical factors limiting the accuracy of the measure; therefore, development of adapted imaging devices and data processing techniques, together with models describing correctly the phenomena under study are to be carried out. Thus, in single photon (gamma) emission tomography an image reconstruction strategy is elaborated, based on an analytical model for the ill-posed problem including the attenuation effect. In positron emission tomography, the time-of-flight information combined with the reconstruction technique is used in the design of a first prototype imaging device which performance is presented and evaluated in a clinical environment. Moreover, a priori or a posteriori techniques correcting for Compton diffusion events, limited statistics and limited resolution, are proposed and discussed for the improvement of regional measurement accuracy, in metabolic and physio-pathologic studies. (author)

  17. Determination of catecholamines and their metabolites by radioisotopic techniques, value in pharmacology and physiopathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present the only way to estimate catecholamines and similar compounds at concentrations between 10 and 100 femtomoles is by the use of radioenzymatic techniques. Such methods are all based in practice on the enzymatic transformation of these substrates, in the presence of labelled S-adenosylmethionine, under the action of catechol-O-methyltrans-ferase (COMT) or phenylethanol-amine-N-methyltransferase (PNMT), which means that molecules suitable for such determinations must possess either a catechol group (catecholamines, dihydroxyphenylalanine, dihydroxyphenylacetic acid) or a phenylethanolamine group (noradrenaline, methoxynoradrenaline). At present the largest number of molecules may be estimated by methods based on the principle of O-methylation by COMT. The main processes described in the literature are examined, with special reference to the proposed means of solving problems which arise at various stages of the determination, mention is made of the many difficulties inherent in this kind of manipulation and of the limits to be expected of these tests. The immunological aspect of quantitative research on catecholamines and their derivatives is mentioned, work in this direction at present being based on radioimmunology. As a practical illustration of the many methodological studies mentioned, the application of radioisotopic techniques to in vitro exploration of the catecholamine metabolism is discussed; the contribution of these new techniques is shown particularly in the physiopathological study of certain metabolic disorders observed in man, in the pharmacodynamic study of certain molecules and in experimental studies on the central nervous system

  18. The internal consistency of medical students′ scores in their physiopathology and clinical courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmaeili Aryan

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: To quantify the internal consistency of medical students′ scores. Aim: We assessed the associations between medical students′ scores in physiopathology and clinical courses and compared these scores with their scores in their comprehensive exams. Settings and Design: We collected medical students′ scores in their courses and also in their comprehensive exam in six consecutive years. Materials and Methods: We assessed the associations between students′ scores and their personal characteristics, and the consistency between theoretical and practical courses. Statistical Analysis: We used Pearson correlation coefficient and linear regression. In addition, we computed difficulty and discrimination indices of students′ scores in their courses by comparing these scores with comprehensive clinical exam (CCE. Results: Generally, females and younger students were more successful. CCE were predicted by students′ scores and their characteristics relatively accurate (the adjusted R2 of the model was 0.59. Students′ scores in the pathology and in thesis had the maximum and minimum discrimination indices, while the difficulties of these two courses were in reverse order. The strongest association was observed between theoretical and practical scores in internal medicine while the associations between theoretical and practical scores in the other courses were not strong although all of them were statistically significant. Conclusions: Using this approach to explore the students′ score, might highlight the weak points of the current educational system. For example we found that the students′ score in thesis had the minimum accuracy; although students obtained very high score in this course. Hence, for better comparison of the accuracy students′ scores in colleges around the world, we recommend similar quantitative approach

  19. Anatomic and physiopathologic changes affecting the airway of the elderly patient: implications for geriatric-focused airway management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kathleen N; Botros, Daniel B; Groban, Leanne; Bryan, Yvon F

    2015-01-01

    There are many anatomical, physiopathological, and cognitive changes that occur in the elderly that affect different components of airway management: intubation, ventilation, oxygenation, and risk of aspiration. Anatomical changes occur in different areas of the airway from the oral cavity to the larynx. Common changes to the airway include tooth decay, oropharyngeal tumors, and significant decreases in neck range of motion. These changes may make intubation challenging by making it difficult to visualize the vocal cords and/or place the endotracheal tube. Also, some of these changes, including but not limited to, atrophy of the muscles around the lips and an edentulous mouth, affect bag mask ventilation due to a difficult face-mask seal. Physiopathologic changes may impact airway management as well. Common pulmonary issues in the elderly (eg, obstructive sleep apnea and COPD) increase the risk of an oxygen desaturation event, while gastrointestinal issues (eg, achalasia and gastroesophageal reflux disease) increase the risk of aspiration. Finally, cognitive changes (eg, dementia) not often seen as related to airway management may affect patient cooperation, especially if an awake intubation is required. Overall, degradation of the airway along with other physiopathologic and cognitive changes makes the elderly population more prone to complications related to airway management. When deciding which airway devices and techniques to use for intubation, the clinician should also consider the difficulty associated with ventilating the patient, the patient’s risk of oxygen desaturation, and/or aspiration. For patients who may be difficult to bag mask ventilate or who have a risk of aspiration, a specialized supralaryngeal device may be preferable over bag mask for ventilation. Patients with tumors or decreased neck range of motion may require a device with more finesse and maneuverability, such as a flexible fiberoptic broncho-scope. Overall, geriatric-focused airway

  20. Aspectos atuais na fisiopatologia do edema macular diabético Recent aspects on physiopathology of diabetic macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Martins dos Santos Motta

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available O edema macular é a principal causa de baixa visual em pacientes diabéticos. Seu mecanismo de formação é complexo e envolve alterações bioquímicas e estruturais. Os autores fazem uma revisão e atualização dos conceitos fisiopatológicos envolvidos na maculopatia diabética.Macular edema is the leading cause of poor vision in diabetic patients.The mechanism of edema formation is complex and involves biochemical and structural changes. The authors review and update the physiopathologic concepts related to diabetic maculopathy.

  1. Fisiología y fisiopatología ósea Physiology and bone physiopathology

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    J. Lafita

    2003-01-01

    mineralisation, a quantifiable aspect, understanding as osteoporosis a fall in bone mass greater than 2.5 standard deviations below that of young healthy patients. This article reviews the physiopathological aspects that influence the development of this frequent clinical picture.

  2. Spinal cord transection-induced allodynia in rats--behavioral, physiopathological and pharmacological characterization.

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    Saïd M'Dahoma

    Full Text Available In humans, spinal cord lesions induce not only major motor and neurovegetative deficits but also severe neuropathic pain which is mostly resistant to classical analgesics. Better treatments can be expected from precise characterization of underlying physiopathological mechanisms. This led us to thoroughly investigate (i mechanical and thermal sensory alterations, (ii responses to acute treatments with drugs having patent or potential anti-allodynic properties and (iii the spinal/ganglion expression of transcripts encoding markers of neuronal injury, microglia and astrocyte activation in rats that underwent complete spinal cord transection (SCT. SCT was performed at thoracic T8-T9 level under deep isoflurane anaesthesia, and SCT rats were examined for up to two months post surgery. SCT induced a marked hyper-reflexia at hindpaws and strong mechanical and cold allodynia in a limited (6 cm2 cutaneous territory just rostral to the lesion site. At this level, pressure threshold value to trigger nocifensive reactions to locally applied von Frey filaments was 100-fold lower in SCT- versus sham-operated rats. A marked up-regulation of mRNAs encoding ATF3 (neuronal injury and glial activation markers (OX-42, GFAP, P2×4, P2×7, TLR4 was observed in spinal cord and/or dorsal root ganglia at T6-T11 levels from day 2 up to day 60 post surgery. Transcripts encoding the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α were also markedly but differentially up-regulated at T6-T11 levels in SCT rats. Acute treatment with ketamine (50 mg/kg i.p., morphine (3-10 mg/kg s.c. and tapentadol (10-20 mg/kg i.p. significantly increased pressure threshold to trigger nocifensive reaction in the von Frey filaments test, whereas amitriptyline, pregabalin, gabapentin and clonazepam were ineffective. Because all SCT rats developed long lasting, reproducible and stable allodynia, which could be alleviated by drugs effective in humans, thoracic cord transection might be a

  3. Frequency of the allelic variant c.1150T > C in exon 10 of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3 gene is not increased in patients with pathogenic mutations and related chondrodysplasia phenotypes

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    Thatiane Yoshie Kanazawa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the FGFR3 gene cause the phenotypic spectrum of FGFR3 chondrodysplasias ranging from lethal forms to the milder phenotype seen in hypochondroplasia (Hch. The p.N540K mutation in the FGFR3 gene occurs in ~70% of individuals with Hch, and nearly 30% of individuals with the Hch phenotype have no mutations in the FGFR3, which suggests genetic heterogeneity. The identification of a severe case of Hch associated with the typical mutation c.1620C > A and the occurrence of a c.1150T > C change that resulted in a p.F384L in exon 10, together with the suspicion that this second change could be a modulator of the phenotype, prompted us to investigate this hypothesis in a cohort of patients. An analysis of 48 patients with FGFR3 chondrodysplasia phenotypes and 330 healthy (control individuals revealed no significant difference in the frequency of the C allele at the c.1150 position (p = 0.34. One patient carrying the combination `pathogenic mutation plus the allelic variant c.1150T > C' had a typical achondroplasia (Ach phenotype. In addition, three other patients with atypical phenotypes showed no association with the allelic variant. Together, these results do not support the hypothesis of a modulatory role for the c.1150T > C change in the FGFR3 gene.

  4. Complex I and the sAMP Cascade in Human Physiopathology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Papa, S.; Scacco, S.; Sardanelli, A. M.; Petruzzella, V.; Vergari, R.; Signorile, A.; Dobrová, Zuzana

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 1 (2002), s. 3-16. ISSN 0144-8463 Grant ostatní: IT(XC) National Project on Bioenergetics and Biomembranes Minisry for Uneversity Scientific and Technological Research; IT Project on Molecular; IT Diagnostic and Epidemio logical Analysis of Pediatric and Neurologic Diseases Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : Complex * protein * kinase a Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.728, year: 2002

  5. Molecular aspects of tumor cell migration and invasion

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    Giuseppina Bozzuto

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Cell migration and invasion are crucial steps in many physiological events. However, they are also implicated in the physiopathology of many diseases, such as cancer. To spread through the tissues, tumor cells use mechanisms that involve several molecular actors: adhesion receptor families, receptor tyrosine kinases, cytoskeleton proteins, adapter and signalling proteins interplay in a complex scenario. The balance of cellular signals for proliferation and survival responses also regulates migratory behaviours of tumor cells. To complicate the scene of crime drug resistance players can interfere thus worsening this delicate situation. The complete understanding of this molecular jungle is an impossible mission: some molecular aspects are reviewed in this paper.

  6. An evaluation of the elements of internal medicine physiopathology curriculum in general practice based on the perspectives of faculty members of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

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    JAMSHID ESLAMI

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: An evaluation of the curriculum elements can be recognized as a necessity in curriculum dynamic and improvement. This study aimed at evaluating five main elements of a physiopathology curriculum in internal medicine (objectives, content, methods, evaluation, and management. Method: The present study is of a descriptive-analytical type, and the study population consisted of a total of 48 faculty members of internal medicine physiopathology department at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Participants were selected using Cochran’s sample size formula and through simple random sampling. The data were collected using a 58-item questionnaire devised by the researcher, using curriculum planning experts. Face and content validity of the scale were obtained through expert views and modifications provided by 10 professors and experts in medical curriculum evaluation. Also, research reliability was calculated using Alpha Cronbachto be 0.99. Reliability value and coefficient was acceptable. Moreover, One-sample t-test, Independent t-test and One-way ANOVA were used for data analysis. Results: Based on the faculty members’ views, of the five curriculum elements, objectives and content were in relatively good conditions (at an average level while other elements including method, evaluation and management were in poor conditions (lower than average. According to results of two-way ANOVA, there was a significant relationship between faculty members with various work experience in terms of curriculum evaluation. Conclusion: According to research findings, a comparative examination of the curriculum elements and their characteristics in physiopathology course can be conducted, resulting in identification of curriculum weaknesses and their pitfalls. Also, with regard to teaching, evaluation, management methods, weak and strong points of the course, efficiency, and effectiveness of the elements were identified.

  7. A case of acute retinal pigment epithelitis: spectral domain optical coherence tomography time course and physiopathologic hypothesis

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    Nathalie Puche

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Nathalie Puche1, Olivier Offret1, Jean-Antoine Bernard1, Francine Behar-Cohen1,21Department of Ophthalmology, Hotel Dieu de Paris, AP-HP, Université Paris Descartes; 2Inserm UMRS872, Physiopathology of Ocular Diseases: Therapeutic Innovations, Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers, Université Paris Descartes, Paris, FrancePurpose: To report the time course of retinal morphologic changes in a patient with acute retinal pigment epithelitis (ARPE using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT.Methods: A 30-year old man was referred for blurred vision of his right eye after five days that appeared suddenly 15 days after recovery from a flu-like syndrome. SD-OCT was performed immediately, followed by fluorescein and infracyanine angiography at eight days and then at three weeks.Results: At presentation, a bubble of sub-macular deposit was observed on the right macula with central golden micronodules in a honeycomb pattern. SD-OCT showed an “anterior dislocation” of all the retinal layers up to the inner/outer segment (IS/OS line and irregular deposits at the OS level together with thickening of the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE layer. As visual acuity increased, eight days later, the OCT showed reduction of the sub-retinal deposits and an abnormal hyperflectivity of the sub-retinal and RPE layers was observed. The patient showed a positive serology for picornavirus.Discussion: The acute SD-OCT sections of this patient with ARPE were compared with histological sections of a 35 day old Royal College of Surgeons rat. Similar findings could be observed, with preservation of the IS/OS line and accumulation of debris at the OS level, suggesting that ARPE symptoms could result from a transient phagocytic dysfunction of the RPE at the fovea, inducing reversible accumulation of undigested OS. Picornaviruses comprising enterovirus and coxsachievirus described as being associated with acute chorioretinitis. In this case, it was responsible for

  8. Tromboflebite superficial: epidemiologia, fisiopatologia, diagnóstico e tratamento Superficial thrombophlebitis: epidemiology, physiopathology, diagnosis and treatment

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    Marcone Lima Sobreira

    2008-06-01

    interferes with evaluation and influences therapeutic conduct, which may be clinical, surgical or combined. However, due to a lack of controlled clinical assays as well as to a series of uncertainties regarding its natural history, the diagnosis and treatment of superficial thrombophlebitis remain undefined. A literature review was performed analyzing the epidemiology, physiopathology and current status of the diagnosis and treatment of superficial thrombophlebitis.

  9. Physiopathology of severe asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Todo-Bom, Ana; Mota-Pinto, Anabela

    2006-01-01

    A história natural da asma e as condições determinantes de evolução para formas moderadas ou graves não estão completamente estabelecidas. Contudo, quer os fatores genéticos quer os fatores ambientais serão determinantes na fisiopatologia e no prognóstico da doença. Nesta revisão são apresentados os mecanismos envolvidos na fisiopatologia da asma grave

  10. OBSTRUCTIVE NEPHROPATHY: ITS PHYSIOPATHOLOGY

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    Musso C

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive nephropathy is the functional and /or parenchymal renal damage secondary to the urinary tract occlusion at any part of it. The inducing urinary obstruction diseases can vary depending on the patient´s age and gender. There are many renal dysfunction inducing mechanisms involved in this entity: increase in the intra-luminal pressure, ureteral dilatation with ineffective ureteral peristalsis, glomerular ultrafiltration net pressure reduction, intra-renal glomerular blood flux reduction due to vasoconstriction, and local disease of chemotactic substances. Obstructive nephropathy can also lead to hypertension (vasoconstriction-hypervolemia, hyperkalemia, metabolic acidosis (aldosterone resistance, diabetes insipidus (vasopressine resistance. In conclusion, since obstructive nephropathy is a potentially reversible cause of renal dysfunction, it should always be taken into account among the differential diagnosis of renal failure inducing mechanisms.

  11. Hemoglobinúria paroxística noturna: da fisiopatologia ao tratamento Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria: from physiopathology to treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Mariana de Almeida Santos Arruda

    2010-01-01

    , recurrent infections, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, and episodes of venous thrombosis. Its clinical course is highly variable. It frequently arises in association with bone marrow failure, particularly aplastic anemia and myelodysplastic syndrome. It is also an acquired thrombophilia, presenting with a variety of venous thrombosis, mainly manifested with intra-abdominal thrombosis, here the major cause of mortality. The triad of hemolytic anemia, pancytopenia, and thrombosis makes a truly unique clinical syndrome of PNH, which was reclassified from a purely acquired hemolytic anemia to a hematopoietic stem cell mutation defect of the phosphatidyl inositol glycanclass-A gene. This mutation results in an early block in the synthesis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI anchors, responsible for binding membrane functional proteins. Among these proteins are the complement inhibitors, especially CD55 and CD59, that play a key role in protecting blood cells from complement cascade attack. Therefore, in PNH occurs an increased susceptibility of red cells to complement, and consequently, hemolysis. We here review PNH physiopathology, clinical course, and treatment options, especially eculizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody that blocks the activation of terminal complement at C5 and prevents formation of the terminal complement complex, the first effective drug therapy for PNH.

  12. Methodology of lung scintigraphy in thrombo-embolic disease. Physiopathological basis; Methodologie des explorations pulmonaires isotopiques dans le cadre de la pathologie thrombo-embolique (T.E.). Rappels physiopathologiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munsch, R.C. [Centre Hospitalier de Valence, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, 26 - Valence (France)

    2001-08-01

    Following a review of physiopathology in pulmonary embolism, the author analyses the basis of pulmonary functional assessment at the membrane, ventilation and perfusion levels. The practical consequences are presented for the choice of the most appropriate methods as a function of the objectives and of the evolution of the thrombo-embolic disease. (authors)

  13. Body mass index and other anthropometric parameters in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: physiopathological significance and predictive value in the immunochemotherapy era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkozy, Clémentine; Camus, Vincent; Tilly, Hervé; Salles, Gilles; Jardin, Fabrice

    2015-07-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common form of aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma, accounting for 30-40% of newly diagnosed cases. Obesity is a well-defined risk factor for DLBCL. However, the impact of body mass index (BMI) on DLBCL prognosis is controversial. Recent studies suggest that skeletal muscle wasting (sarcopenia) or loss of fat mass can be detected by computed tomography (CT) images and is useful for predicting the clinical outcome in several types of cancer including DLBCL. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the differences in DLBCL outcome according to BMI or weight that include tolerance to treatment, inflammatory background and chemotherapy or rituximab metabolism. In this review, we summarize the available literature, addressing the impact and physiopathological relevance of simple anthropometric tools including BMI and tissue distribution measurements. We also discuss their relationship with other nutritional parameters and their potential role in the management of patients with DLBCL. PMID:25363401

  14. Cellular and molecular specificity of pituitary gland physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Castro, Carolina; Renner, Ulrich; Haedo, Mariana R; Stalla, Gunter K; Arzt, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    The anterior pituitary gland has the ability to respond to complex signals derived from central and peripheral systems. Perception of these signals and their integration are mediated by cell interactions and cross-talk of multiple signaling transduction pathways and transcriptional regulatory networks that cooperate for hormone secretion, cell plasticity, and ultimately specific pituitary responses that are essential for an appropriate physiological response. We discuss the physiopathological and molecular mechanisms related to this integrative regulatory system of the anterior pituitary gland and how it contributes to modulate the gland functions and impacts on body homeostasis. PMID:22298650

  15. Síndrome da apnéia-hipopnéia obstrutiva do sono. Fisiopatologia Physiopathology of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Barral Martins

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available A fisiopatogenia da apnéia obstrutiva do sono é multifatorial. O sexo, a obesidade, os fatores genéticos, anatômicos e hormonais e o controle da ventilação interagem diversamente na fisiopatogenia e expressão clínica da doença. A obesidade é o principal fator de risco, sendo a elevação do índice de massa corpórea, da gordura visceral e da circunferência do pescoço, fortes preditores de sua ocorrência. A progesterona, por aumentar a atividade dos músculos dilatadores das vias aéreas superiores, tem papel protetor nas mulheres antes da menopausa, justificando a maior prevalência da doença na pós-menopausa, no sexo masculino e na síndrome dos ovários policísticos. Evidências apontam para o fato de que o aumento da idade promove diminuição do tônus muscular, com redução da luz das vias aéreas superiores. O dismorfismo crânio-facial, como na retrognatia ou micrognatia, está associado ao posicionamento posterior da língua, e pode resultar em estreitamento da luz das vias aéreas superiores. Finalmente, comando ventilatório reduzido tem sido detectado em pacientes com síndrome de apnéia obstrutiva do sono e hipercapnia.The physiopathology of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is multifactorial. Gender and obesity status, as well as genetic, anatomic, and hormonal factors, together with ventilatory drive, interact in a diverse manner in the physiopathology and clinical expression of the disease. Obesity is the main risk factor, since increases in body mass index, visceral fat, and neck circumference are strong predictors of the disease. Progesterone increases the activity of the upper airway dilator muscles and therefore plays a protective role in premenopausal women. This explains the fact that the prevalence of the disease is higher in postmenopausal patients, in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome, as well as in males. Evidence supports the fact that, as individuals grow older, there is a decrease in muscle

  16. Significado clínico y fisiopatológico del eosinófilo Clinical and physiopathological significance of the eosinophil

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    José Domingo Torres Hernández

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available

    El eosinófilo es una célula con funciones protectoras y beneficiosas especificas pero que en algunas circunstancias Interviene como mediador en diferentes procesos fisiopatológicos. Un recuento aumentado en la sangre periférica (mayor de 500 células/mm cúbico siempre debe investigarse porque puede ser el Indicador precoz de una enfermedad o la guía para llegar a un diagnóstico.

    The eosinophil is a cell with specific protective and beneficial functions but In some circumstances It acts as a mediator in different physiopathologic processes. Increased periphery blood counts (more than 500 cells/cubic mm should always be investigated since they may be the earliest indication of a disease or represent an important diagnostic guide.

  17. Relationship between Homesickness and Test Anxiety in Non-Native Students of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences International Branch in the Clinical and Physiopathology Course In 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Saman

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Anxiety is an emotional and physiological response to the internal felling of overall danger that is easily resolved. The aim of this study has been to determine the relationship between exam anxiety and the feeling of homesickness among non-native students. Methodology: The present study is cross-sectional and the subjects in this study are 80 non-native male and female PhD candidates in clinical and physiopathology majors in 2013 academic year that have been evaluated with the help of Persian homesickness questionnaire and Sarason’s test anxiety questionnaire and the data was analyzed using Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Results: With regard to the Pearson’s correlation coefficient there is a significant and reverse relationship between the desire to return to home and exam anxiety (r=0.0344, p=0.004) and there is a significant and reverse relationship between the Compatibility and exam anxiety (r=0.428, p<0.0001) and there is a significant and direct relationship between the feeling of alone and exam anxiety (r=0.888, p<0.0001). Discussion & Conclusion: There is a significant relationship between the feeling of homesickness and exam anxiety and the mental health of non-native students will be deteriorated by the feeling of homesickness and anxiety. PMID:26925920

  18. Interplay between pro-inflammatory cytokines and brain oxidative stress biomarkers: evidence of parallels between butyl paraben intoxication and the valproic acid brain physiopathology in autism rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegazy, Hoda G; Ali, Elham H A; Elgoly, Amany H Mahmoud

    2015-02-01

    Butyl paraben is a preservative used in food, drugs and cosmetics. Neurotoxic effect was reported recently beside the potential estrogenic activity of parabens. There is controversy as to the potential harmful effects of butyl parabens, which are suspected to contribute to autism and learning disabilities. The purpose of this study was to examine the similarities between paraben intoxication signs in the rat brain and brain markers in an autistic like rat model. This study provides evidence of many parallels between the two, including (1) oxidative stress, (2) decreased reduced glutathione levels and elevated oxidised glutathione, (3) mitochondrial dysfunction, and (4) neuroinflammation and increased pro-inflammatory cytokine levels in the brain (tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1-beta, and interleukin-6). (5) Increased protein oxidation reported by a significant increase in 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT)/tyrosine ratio. (6) A marked disturbance was found in the production of energy carriers (AMP, ATP and AMP/ATP ratio) in comparison with the control. The evidence suggests that paraben may, to some extent, either cause or contribute to the brain physiopathology in ASDs or pathogens that produce the brain pathology observed in the diagnosed rat model of ASD. PMID:25461396

  19. Dmdmdx/Largemyd: a new mouse model of neuromuscular diseases useful for studying physiopathological mechanisms and testing therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poliana C. M. Martins

    2013-09-01

    Although muscular dystrophies are among the most common human genetic disorders, there are few treatment options available. Animal models have become increasingly important for testing new therapies prior to entering human clinical trials. The Dmdmdx mouse is the most widely used animal model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, presenting the same molecular and protein defect as seen in humans with the disease. However, this mouse is not useful for clinical trials because of its very mild phenotype. The mouse model for congenital myodystrophy type 1D, Largemyd, harbors a mutation in the glycosyltransferase Large gene and displays a severe phenotype. To help elucidate the role of the proteins dystrophin and LARGE in the organization of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex in muscle sarcolemma, we generated double-mutant mice for the dystrophin and LARGE proteins. The new Dmdmdx/Largemyd mouse model is viable and shows a severe phenotype that is associated with the lack of dystrophin in muscle. We tested the usefulness of our new mouse model for cell therapy by systemically injecting them with normal murine mesenchymal adipose stem cells (mASCs. We verified that the mASCs were hosted in the dystrophic muscle. The new mouse model has proven to be very useful for the study of several other therapies, because injected cells can be screened both through DNA and protein analysis. Study of its substantial muscle weakness will also be very informative in the evaluation of functional benefits of these therapies.

  20. Internal targeted radiotherapy for bone metastasis: what about underlying physiopathology; Radiotherapie interne vectorisee (metabolique) des metastases osseuses: quid de la physiopathologie sous-jacente?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuillez, J.Ph. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Hopital Michallon, Service de Biophysique et Medecine Nucleaire, 38 - Grenoble (France); Laval, G. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Hopital Michallon, Unite de Recherche et de Soutien en Soins Palliatifs, 38 - Grenoble (France)

    2006-03-15

    Once tumours metastasize to bone, they are usually incurable and responsible for several devastating consequences: severe pain, pathologic fractures, life-threatening hypercalcemia, spinal cord compression and other nerve-compression syndromes. Understanding of physiopathological mechanisms responsible for these symptoms is critical for therapeutic approach, especially pain treatments. Three types of pain occur in tumour bone involvement: tonic or background pain, which are deep non-specific ache rising in intensity as the disease progresses; incident pain on movement (allodynia); and spontaneous pain which can be severe. Bone metastases could be osteolytic or osteoblastic. However, this classification actually represents two extremes of a continuum characterized by dys-regulation of the normal bone remodeling process. Biochemical mediators production is crucial as a part of this process. The bone microenvironment plays a critical role in the formation of osteoclasts through the production of macrophage colony-stimulating factor, receptor activator of nuclear factor kB ligand (RANKL)... Many of these mediators of osteolysis also have been shown to activate nociceptors: prostaglandins A and E, IL-1, IL-6, TNF. Thus there is a link between osteolytic destruction, inflammation and pain. It explains that severe pain could occur independently from fractures and in absence of any bone structure alteration and nervous compression. Also, pain is often disproportionate to tumour size or degree of bone involvement. Inflammatory and osteolytic processes depend on number, localization and organization of tumour cells inside bone and bone marrow tissues. All these parameters are crucial to take into account for a good understanding of treatments mechanisms of action, especially anti-inflammatory drugs (corticosteroid and others), bi-phosphonates, internal radiotherapy (strontium 89 or radiolabelled bi-phosphonates), external radiotherapy and chemotherapy or hormonotherapy

  1. Congenital ureteropelvic junction obstruction: physiopathology, decoupling of tout court pelvic dilatation-obstruction semantic connection, biomarkers to predict renal damage evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, C

    2012-02-01

    The widespread use of fetal ultrasonography results in a frequent antenatally observation of hydronephrosis, ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO) accounting for the greatest fraction of congenital obstructive nephropathy. UPJO may be considered, in most cases, as a functional obstructive condition, depending on defective fetal smooth muscle/nerve development at this level, with lack of peristaltic wave propagation--aperistaltic segment--and, therefore, poor urine ejection from the renal pelvis into the ureter. The UPJO-related physiopathologic events are, at first, the compliant dilatation of renal pelvis that, acting as hydraulic buffer, protects the renal parenchyma from the rising intrapelvic pressure-related potential damages, and, subsequently, beyond such phase of dynamic balance, the tubular cell stretch-stress induced by increased intratubular pressure and following parenchymal inflammatory lesions: inflammatory infiltrates, fibroblast proliferation, activation of myofibroblasts, tubulo-interstitial fibrosis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO), several chemo- and cytokines, growth factors, prostaglandins and eicosanoids, angiotensin-II are the main pathogenetic mediators of the obstructive nephropathy. Apoptosis of tubular cells is the major cause of the tubular atrophy, together with epithelial-mesenchymal transdifferentiation. Some criticisms on tout court semantic renal pelvis dilatation-obstruction connection have been raised considering that the renal pelvis expansion isn't, in any case, linked to an ostructive condition, as it may be verified by diuretic (furosemide) renogram together with scintiscan-based evaluation of differential renal function. In this regard, rather than repetitive invasive nuclear procedures that expose the children to ionizing radiations, an intriguing noninvasive strategy, based on the evaluation of urinary biomarkers and urinary proteome, can define the UPJO-related possible progress of parenchymal lesions

  2. Fisiopatología y técnicas de registro de los movimientos oculares Physiopathology and recording techniques of ocular movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Gila

    2009-01-01

    neuronal systems can be altered by many neurological processes of different kinds and localizations, causing a broad variety of oculomotor disturbances. The most salient aspects of the physiopathology and the recording systems of eye movements are reviewed.

  3. FGF21 and cardiac physiopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna ePlanavila

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The heart is not traditionally considered either a target or a site of fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF21 production. However, recent findings indicate that FGF21 can act as a cardiomyokine; that is, it is produced by cardiac cells at significant levels and acts in an autocrine manner on the heart itself. The heart is sensitive to the effects of FGF21, both systemic and locally generated, owing to the expression in cardiomyocytes of β-Klotho, the key co-receptor known to confer specific responsiveness to FGF21 action. FGF21 has been demonstrated to protect against cardiac hypertrophy, cardiac inflammation, and oxidative stress. FGF21 expression in the heart is induced in response to cardiac insults, such as experimental cardiac hypertrophy and myocardial infarction in rodents, as well as in failing human hearts. Intracellular mechanisms involving PPARα and Sirt1 mediate transcriptional regulation of the FGF21 gene in response to exogenous stimuli. In humans, circulating FGF21 levels are elevated in coronary heart disease and atherosclerosis, and are associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes. These findings provide new insights into the role of FGF21 in the heart and may offer potential therapeutic strategies for cardiac disease.

  4. [Physiopathology of ALS: therapeutic approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruneteau, G; Demeret, S; Meininger, V

    2004-02-01

    The finding in 1993 of a mutation of the copper zinc super oxyde dismutase (SOD1) provides a major breakthrough in the understanding of the etiopathogenic mechanism of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Various mechanisms are commonly implied in the motor neurons degeneration. Excitotoxicity and calcium metabolism abnormalities are one of the most frequently confirmed hypotheses. It allowed proposing riluzole which remains the only one drug proved to be active in the disease. The role of growth factors remains controversial and all therapeutic trials performed with these molecules remained negative. Oxidative stress abnormalities are demonstrated by number of studies but their direct therapeutic application remains to be demonstrated. Apoptosis and the role of mitochondria has been definitely confirmed and open a new therapeutic avenue for the next few years. PMID:15034483

  5. [Genetics and physiopathology of hemochromatosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissot, P; Lainé, F; Moirand, R; Loréal, O

    2000-05-01

    Thanks to the discovery of the HFE gene and of its mutations, it is now established that the most frequent form of hemochromatosis is related to homozygosity for the mutation C282Y, and that other types of hemochromatosis, unrelated to HFE mutations, do exist such as the juvenile hemochromatosis. From a pathophysiological standpoint, the C282Y mutation impairs HFE protein expression at the surface of the membrane and disturbs the cellular entry of iron (carried by circulating transferrin) into the cryptic duodenal cell. This, in turn, is likely to lead to an aberrant programmation of the degree of iron influx from the digestive lumen into the apical duodenal cells. The resulting hyperabsorption, which forms the basis of iron overload in hemochromatosis, is likely to implicate an overexpression of the transmembrane iron carrier DMT1. It is remarkable to observe that these major improvements in the knowledge of hemochomatosis have been accompanied by similar improvements in the understanding of normal iron metabolism. PMID:10865496

  6. [Physiology and physiopathology of sexuality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuzin, Béatrice

    2016-01-01

    From desire to orgasm, sexuality, in women and men, is underpinned by a complex organic, psychological and emotional function. Sexual dysfunction encompasses diverse aetiologies, including chronic diseases and iatrogenesis resulting from medication or surgery. The effects of a chronic disease can have an impact on all phases of the sexual response. PMID:27317816

  7. Steroid receptors in human ejaculated sperm as molecular markers of the detrimental effects related to the pathophysiology of testicular varicocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrotta, Ida; Aquila, Saveria

    2016-08-01

    The exact physiopathologic effect of testicular varicocele on male fertility is not defined yet. The detrimental role of the varicocele in fertility is supported by the presence of a higher frequency of affected men among the infertile population. However, the mechanism/s by which a varicocele impairs sperm production, structure and function, is not known. In spite of active interest, our understanding of the human male gamete ultrastructural molecular organisation is still incomplete and therefore our knowledge of the sperm molecular anatomy is very limited. The presence of steroid binding sites on human spermatozoa has been evidenced since the 1970s, and afterwards, spermatozoa physiology was linked to the action of different steroids. The presence of steroid/steroid receptor systems was demonstrated in mature spermatozoa as membrane but also as nuclear conventional receptors, suggesting that both systemic and local steroids, through sperm receptors, may influence male fertility. From new data, it emerges that varicocele may induce damage in the male gamete at molecular level, opening a new chapter in the already multifactorial pathophysiology of the varicocele, complicating this issue. In sperm from varicocele, a decreased expression of steroid receptors and a consequent reduced responsiveness to steroids may represent a mechanism involved in the physiopathology of varicocele. Therefore, the modulation of these nuclear receptors pave the way for novel therapeutic opportunities in the treatment of the male pathologies related to human reproduction. The purpose of this review is to gain new insight into the physiopathology of varicocele and to study its impact on human sperm molecular anatomy. PMID:27031584

  8. Ascitis en los pacientes oncológicos: Fisiopatogenia y opciones de tratamiento Ascites in cancer patients: Physiopathology and therapeutic options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Plancarte

    2004-04-01

    ía comprende diversas alteraciones fisiopatológicas que han provocado la implementación de diversas modalidades de manejo tanto farmacológico como invasivas para el tratamiento eficaz de la misma.Ascites, defined as the presence of fluid in the peritoneal cavity, is a finding associated to several pathologies, mainly hepatic and cancer diseases. Between 15 and 50 per cent of patients with cancer develop ascites. Its incidence is high in ovary, breast, endometrium, colon, stomach, pancreas and bronchus cancer. Several factors are involved in its pathogenesis, included high hydrostatic pressure, low colloid-osmotic pressure, increased capillary permeability and fluid leakage to the peritoneal cavity. The ascitic fluid is analyzed for diagnostic (serum-ascitic albumin gradient, amylase and triglyceride levels; cell count, culture and Gram staining; pH, cytology, glucose and fibronectine determination and therapeutic purposes. A physical examination is essential for the diagnosis, with particular attention to classical signs such as convex flanks, wave sign, pleural effusion sign, limb, pelvic and genital edema, etc. Other specific studies are sometimes required in order to verify the presence of fluid in the abdominal cavity. Its treatment will depend on the etiology. In non-cancer patients, diet salt restriction and diuretics regimes obtain satisfactory results. In cancer patients, intra-peritoneal chemotherapy may be required. Patients with poor or null response are candidates for drainage of the ascitic fluid. This can be done using several techniques such as classical paracentesis, total paracentesis, placement of a semi-permanent or permanent drainage with or without image help, shunts, etc. In order to obtain the maximum benefit with the minimum risk, patient global status must be assessed prior to the procedure. It is concluded that ascites of any etiology encompass diverse physiopathological disorders that require both pharmacological and invasive therapies for their

  9. Fisiopatologia da deficiência de vitamina B12 e seu diagnóstico laboratorial Physiopathology of vitamin B12 deficiency and its laboratorial diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clóvis Paniz

    2005-10-01

    synthetized by humans organisms, found in foods of animal origin. Its deficiency is very frequent among old people, vegetarians, subjects who use a low protein diet, or who present gastrointestinal absorption failure. PHYSIOPATHOLOGY: The vitamin B12 deficiency leads to hematologic, neurophatologic and cardiovascular disorders, mainly by interfering in the homocysteine (Hcy metabolism and in the methylation reactions of organism. Often, the deficiency can remain without symptoms for long time, leading to a chronic deficiency that, if not treated, may yield irreversible neurologic manifestations. METHODOLOGY: Efficient methodologies that allow the early diagnosis are essential. However, a gold standard method is not consensus yet. The vitamin B12 serum measurement presents some restrictions for problems of sensitivity and specificity, being able to occur deficiency’s symptoms even the serum vitamin B12 being in normal range or, in another way, occurring low levels of serum vitamin B12 without, however, showing low levels of vitamin B12 fraction really available for the cells and without showing symptoms. New alternatives come appearing, as the transcobalamin II measurement, the only vitamin B12 fraction available for the cells or the methylmalonic acid and Hcy measurement, metabolites that increase when intracellular vitamin B12 decreases. These tests present some advantages, but also important limitations for use in the routine. CONCLUSION: In the sub clinical cases, a correct and early diagnosis represents still a challenge and further studies are needed to define the best method for routine laboratorial diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency.

  10. Molecular physics

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Dudley

    2013-01-01

    Methods of Experimental Physics, Volume 3: Molecular Physics focuses on molecular theory, spectroscopy, resonance, molecular beams, and electric and thermodynamic properties. The manuscript first considers the origins of molecular theory, molecular physics, and molecular spectroscopy, as well as microwave spectroscopy, electronic spectra, and Raman effect. The text then ponders on diffraction methods of molecular structure determination and resonance studies. Topics include techniques of electron, neutron, and x-ray diffraction and nuclear magnetic, nuclear quadropole, and electron spin reson

  11. Whole transcriptome analysis of the hippocampus: toward a molecular portrait of epileptogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scorza Fúlvio A

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uncovering the molecular mechanisms involved in epileptogenesis is critical to better understand the physiopathology of epilepsies and to help develop new therapeutic strategies for this prevalent and severe neurological condition that affects millions of people worldwide. Results Changes in the transcriptome of hippocampal cells from rats subjected to the pilocarpine model of epilepsy were evaluated by microarrays covering 34,000 transcripts representing all annotated rat genes to date. Using such genome-wide approach, differential expression of nearly 1,400 genes was detected during the course of epileptogenesis, from the early events post status epilepticus (SE to the onset of recurrent spontaneous seizures. Most of these genes are novel and displayed an up-regulation after SE. Noteworthy, a group of 128 genes was found consistently hyper-expressed throughout epileptogenesis, indicating stable modulation of the p38MAPK, Jak-STAT, PI3K, and mTOR signaling pathways. In particular, up-regulation of genes from the TGF-beta and IGF-1 signaling pathways, with opposite effects on neurogenesis, correlate with the physiopathological changes reported in humans. Conclusions A consistent regulation of genes functioning in intracellular signal transduction regulating neurogenesis have been identified during epileptogenesis, some of which with parallel expression patterns reported in patients with epilepsy, strengthening the link between these processes and development of epilepsy. These findings reveal dynamic molecular changes occurring in the hippocampus that may serve as a starting point for designing alternative therapeutic strategies to prevent the development of epilepsy after acquired brain insults.

  12. Magnetismo Molecular (Molecular Magentism)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, Mario S [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Brasil; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F [ORNL

    2010-07-01

    The new synthesis processes in chemistry open a new world of research, new and surprising materials never before found in nature can now be synthesized and, as a wonderful result, observed a series of physical phenomena never before imagined. Among these are many new materials the molecular magnets, the subject of this book and magnetic properties that are often reflections of the quantum behavior of these materials. Aside from the wonderful experience of exploring something new, the theoretical models that describe the behavior these magnetic materials are, in most cases, soluble analytically, which allows us to know in detail the physical mechanisms governing these materials. Still, the academic interest in parallel this subject, these materials have a number of properties that are promising to be used in technological devices, such as in computers quantum magnetic recording, magnetocaloric effect, spintronics and many other devices. This volume will journey through the world of molecular magnets, from the structural description of these materials to state of the art research.

  13. Actualización en los mecanismos fisiopatológicos de la insuficiencia cardiaca Update in physiopathological mechanisms in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Ulate-Montero

    2008-03-01

    fibrosis y de arritmias cardiacas, para lo cual es indispensable el manejo apropiado de los niveles intracelulares de Ca2+.Heart failure is one of the most frequent clinical syndromes in medical practice;it appears when the heart is unable to pump enough volume of blood to supply the tissue ’s requirements.This article reviews the most recent information regarding the mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of heart failure,the main goal is to offer the knowledge necessary to understand and manage properly this condition.In heart failure,as a response to the low cardiac output,a series of neuroendocrine systemic mechanisms are activated,but they contribute to deteriorate the clinical status;this happens with the sympathetic and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone systems,which end up producing endothelial damage,increase of oxidative radicals,apoptosis, cardiac fibrosis and generation of arrhythmias.Also there is an increase in the secretion of natriuretic peptides,which tend to regulate some of the exacerbated neuroendocrine responses, but with time their effect tend to diminish.At the cellular and molecular level a series of alterations occur in the regulation of intracellular Ca2+, as well as in some of the ionic currents that play a role in the generation of action potentials in cardiac myocytes.Cardiac remodeling precedes the clinical manifestations of heart failure and contributes to its deterioration.Chemical messengers like endothelin-1,norepinephrine and angiotensin II,activate the MAP kinases cascade and provoke cardiac hypertrophy favoring the development of ischemia and the appearance of arrhythmias.Pharmacological management of heart failure must aim the mechanisms affected,it must block the deleterious actions of the neuroendocrine systems,avoiding the loss of myocytes, the generation of fibrosis and the production of cardiac arrhythmias,in order to achieve this goal an appropriate management of intracellular levels of Ca2+ is required.

  14. Molecular Electronics

    OpenAIRE

    Heath, James R.

    2009-01-01

    Molecular electronics describes the field in which molecules are utilized as the active (switching, sensing, etc.) or passive (current rectifiers, surface passivants) elements in electronic devices. This review focuses on experimental aspects of molecular electronics that researchers have elucidated over the past decade or so and that relate to the fabrication of molecular electronic devices in which the molecular components are readily distinguished within the electronic properties of the de...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... come from animals (particularly egg yolks, meat, poultry, fish, and dairy products). Although too much cholesterol is a risk factor for heart disease, this molecule is necessary for normal embryonic development and has important functions both before and after ...

  16. Fisiopatologia do melasma Physiopathology of melasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane Donida Bartoli Miot

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Melasma é uma dermatose comum que cursa com alteração da cor da pele normal, resultante da hiperatividade melanocítica focal epidérmica de clones de melanócitos hiperfuncionantes, com consequente hiperpigmentação melânica induzida, principalmente, pela radiação ultravioleta. Clinicamente, caracteriza-se por manchas acastanhadas, localizadas preferencialmente na face, embora possa acometer também região cervical, torácica anterior e membros superiores.Mulheres em período fértil e de fototipos intermediários representam as populações mais acometidas. Grande parte de sua fisiopatogenia permanece desconhecida, havendo relação com fatores genéticos, hormonais, uso de medicamentos, cosméticos, endocrinopatias e fotoexposição. Os autores discutem os principais elementos relacionados à pigmentação da pele e ao desenvolvimento do melasma.Melasma is a common dermatosis that involves changes in normal skin pigmentation, resulting from the hyperactivity of epidermal melanocytes. The consequent hyperpigmentation is mostly induced by ultraviolet radiation. Clinically, melasma is characterized by light to dark brown macules that usually occur on the face, although they can also affect the cervical and anterior thoracic regions and upper members.Fertile age women and those with intermediate skin phototypes are most likely to develop melasma. Most of its physiopathogenics is not yet fully understood, but there is a relation with genetic and hormonal factors, drugs and cosmetics use, endocrinopathies and sun exposure. The authors discuss the main aspects associated with skin pigmentation and the development of melasma.

  17. Diabetic neuropathic pain: Physiopathology and treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anne K Schreiber; Carina FM Nones; Renata C Reis; Juliana G Chichorro; Joice M Cunha

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a common complication of bothtype 1 and type 2 diabetes, which affects over 90% ofthe diabetic patients. Although pain is one of the mainsymptoms of diabetic neuropathy, its pathophysiologicalmechanisms are not yet fully known. It is widelyaccepted that the toxic effects of hyperglycemia play animportant role in the development of this complication,but several other hypotheses have been postulated.The management of diabetic neuropathic pain consistsbasically in excluding other causes of painful peripheral neuropathy, improving glycemic control as a prophylactic therapy and using medications to alleviate pain. First line drugs for pain relief include anticonvulsants, such as pregabalin and gabapentin and antidepressants, especially those that act to inhibit the reuptake of serotonin and noradrenaline. In addition, there is experimental and clinical evidence that opioids can be helpful in pain control, mainly if associated with first line drugs. Other agents, including for topical application, such as capsaicin cream and lidocaine patches, have also been proposed to be useful as adjuvants in the control of diabetic neuropathic pain, but the clinical evidence is insufficient to support their use. In conclusion, a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying diabetic neuropathic pain will contribute to the search of new therapies, but also to the improvement of the guidelines to optimize pain control with the drugs currently available.

  18. Postperfusion lung syndrome: physiopathology and therapeutic options

    OpenAIRE

    Shi-Min Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Postperfusion lung syndrome is rare but can be lethal. The underlying mechanism remains uncertain but triggering inflammatory cascades have become an accepted etiology. A better understanding of the pathophysiology and the roles of inflammatory mediators in the development of the syndrome is imperative in the determination of therapeutic options and promotion of patients' prognosis and survival. Postperfusion lung syndrome is similar to adult respiratory distress syndrome in clinical features...

  19. Postperfusion lung syndrome: physiopathology and therapeutic options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Min Yuan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Postperfusion lung syndrome is rare but can be lethal. The underlying mechanism remains uncertain but triggering inflammatory cascades have become an accepted etiology. A better understanding of the pathophysiology and the roles of inflammatory mediators in the development of the syndrome is imperative in the determination of therapeutic options and promotion of patients' prognosis and survival. Postperfusion lung syndrome is similar to adult respiratory distress syndrome in clinical features, diagnostic approaches and management strategies. However, the etiologies and predisposing risk factors may differ between each other. The prognosis of the postperfusion lung syndrome can be poorer in comparison to acute respiratory distress syndrome due to the secondary multiple organ failure and triple acid-base imbalance. Current management strategies are focusing on attenuating inflammatory responses and preventing from pulmonary ischemia-reperfusion injury. Choices of cardiopulmonary bypass circuit and apparatus, innovative cardiopulmonary bypass techniques, modified surgical maneuvers and several pharmaceutical agents can be potential preventive strategies for acute lung injury during cardiopulmonary bypass.

  20. Paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia: physiopathology and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Neroni

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT is the most frequent arrhythmia in newborns and infants. Most supraventricular tachycardias affect structurally healthy hearts. Apart from occasional detection by parents, most tachycardias in this age group are revealed by heart failure signs, such as poor feeding, sweating and shortness of breath. The main symptom reported by school-age children is palpitations. The chronic tachycardia causes a secondary form of dilative cardiomyopathy. Treatment of acute episode usually has an excellent outcome. Vagal manoeuvres are effective in patients with atrioventricular reentrant tachycardia. Adenosine is the drug of choice at all ages for tachycardias involving the atrioventricular node. Its key advantage is its short half life and minimum or no negative inotropic effects. Verapamil is not indicated in newborns and children as it poses a high risk of electromechanical dissociation. Antiarrhythmic prophylaxis of PSVT recurrence is usually recommended in the first year of life, because the diagnosis of tachycardia may be delayed up to the appearance of symptoms. Digoxin can be administered in all forms of PSVT involving the atrioventricular node, except for patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome below one year of age. Patients with atrioventricular reentrant PSVT can be treated effectively by class Ic drugs, such as propaphenone and flecainide. Amiodarone has the greatest antiarrhythmic effect, but should be used with caution owing to the high incidence of side effects. Proceedings of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology · Cagliari (Italy · October 22nd-25th, 2014 · The last ten years, the next ten years in Neonatology Guest Editors: Vassilios Fanos, Michele Mussap, Gavino Faa, Apostolos Papageorgiou

  1. Behaviour of telocytes during physiopathological activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Flores, Lucio; Gutiérrez, Ricardo; Díaz-Flores, Lucio; Goméz, Miriam González; Sáez, Francisco J; Madrid, Juan F

    2016-07-01

    We consider CD34+ stromal cells/telocytes (CD34+ SC/TCs) in normal and pathological conditions. These cells are involved in organisation and control of the extracellular matrix, structural support, creation of microenvironments, intercellular communication, neurotransmission, immunomodulation and immunosurveillance, inhibition of apoptosis, and control, regulation and source of other cell types. CD34+ SC/TCs are widely reported in the origin of interstitial cells of Cajal and in regeneration in the heart, skeletal muscle, skin, respiratory tree, liver, urinary system and the eye. In addition, we contribute CD34+ SC/TC hyperplasia associated with several processes, including neurogenous hyperplasia (neuroma of the appendix), hyperplasia of Leydig cells in undescended testes (Cryptorchidism), peripheral areas of inflammatory/repair processes (pericicatricial tissue and transitional zones between diseased segments in Crohn's disease and normal bowel), benign tumours (neurofibromas, Antoni-B zones of neurilemmomas, granular cell tumours, and melanocytic nevi) and in some lesions with myxoid, oedematous and degenerative changes (Reinke's oedema, myxomatous mitral valve degeneration, thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy and basophilic degenerative changes of the collagen in the dermis). We pay particular attention to the role of CD34+ SC/TCs during repair through granulation tissue, including morphologic changes, loss of CD34 expression and gain of αSMA expression with myofibroblast transformation, and interactions with pericytes, endothelial and inflammatory cells. Finally, we consider CD34 or αSMA expression in stromal cells of malignant epithelial tumours, and the role of CD34+ SC/TCs in the origin of carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and myofibroblasts. In conclusion, CD34+ SC/TCs play an important role in the maintenance and modulation of tissue homeostasis and in morphogenesis/renewal/repair. PMID:26826526

  2. Physiopathology and recording techniques of ocular movements

    OpenAIRE

    L. Gila; Villanueva, A.; Cabeza, R.

    2009-01-01

    En el control de la motilidad ocular intervienen varios sistemas funcionales. Los reflejos vestíbulo-oculares y optocinéticos son respuestas automáticas para compensar los movimientos de la cabeza y del entorno visual y poder estabilizar la imagen retiniana sobre un determinado punto de fijación. Los movimientos sacádicos son rápidos desplazamientos de la fijación de un punto a otro del campo visual. Los movimientos de persecución lenta consisten en el seguimiento de estímulos móviles con la ...

  3. 中医脾脏病理生理状态下唾液的代谢组研究%Metabonomics Research of Saliva in the Physiopathological State of Chinese Medicine Spleen Based on NMR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵晓山; 余克强; 孙晓敏; 罗云坚; 杨洪玲; 聂晓莉; 李玉萍; 刘艳艳; 罗仁

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Metabonomics research of saliva in the physiopathological state of Chinese medicine spleen. Methods: With the method of combining disease identification and differentiation of symptom-complex, people suffered from the syndrome of deficiency of spleen-Qi and the syndrome of damp-heat stagnating in the spleen of chronic gastritis or peptic ulcer disease and sub-health, accepted as the experimental group. Normal people were as a normal control group. Saliva samples were collected by standardized methods. The biochemical indicator of saliva were detected by the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) instrument. Results: The principal component value of saliva 1H NMR of experiment Showed that every group distributes on three without overlapping and crossing regions in the ellipse scatterplot. Further analysis for the two principal components PC1 and PC2, the content of glucose, N-acetylglycoproteins (2.02ppm), proline (2. 06ppm), ethanol (1.18ppm), sorbtitol (3.66ppm) and hydroxyproline (2. 34ppm) were relatively high in saliva of control group. The content of acetic acid (1.9ppm), propionate (1.06ppm, 2. 18ppm) and taurochorate (3.42ppm) were relatively high in saliva of damp-heat stagnating in the spleen group. The content of glutamine (2. 14ppm), sucrose (4.22ppm), lactate (4. 1ppm, 4. 14ppm) and phenylalanine (3.26ppm) were relatively high in saliva of deficiency of spleen-Qi group. Conclusion: In the physiopathological state of spleen, there are remarkably differerce of metabolite profiles of saliva. It reveals the scientific connotation of “the spleen controlling saliva” theory.%目的:研究中医脾脏病理生理状态下唾液的代谢组变化.方法:采用病证结合的方法,选择慢性胃炎、消化性溃疡病以及亚健康状态等脾气虚证、湿热蕴脾证患者为实验组(即"脾病"组),以正常人作为正常对照组(即"脾未病"组).采用标准化方法收集全唾液,应用核磁共振仪(NMR)测定唾液中的代谢物组.

  4. Research progress of the relations between the different ultrasonic types of gallbladder wall thickening or change in patients with LC and its physiopathologic mechanism%肝硬化不同胆囊壁增厚或改变超声分型与病理生理机制的关系研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋如昕; 唐碧秋(综述); 杨东红; 马苏美(审校)

    2014-01-01

    肝硬化患者胆囊壁增厚常在灰阶超声检查时不同个体表现出具有不同特征的增厚类型。门静脉高压,低蛋白血症,腹水,炎性反应等都是导致肝硬化病人胆囊壁增厚的主要病因,但关于不同类型增厚的病理生理机制研究目前尚不明确。该文将肝硬化时胆囊壁增厚根据灰阶超声表现进行分型,并就其与增厚机制之间的关系研究进展进行综述。%Gallbladder wall thickening of patients with liver cirrhosis was commonly observed by gray -scale ultrasound .Its characteristic of performance varies for individuals .The main reasons leading to gallbladder wall thick-ening of cirrhotic patients include portal hypertension ,hypomagnesemia,inflammatory reaction,etc.However,the phys-iopathologic mechanism of different types of thickening is not clear in current research .In this review,the gallbladder wall thickening with cirrhosis was classified and the relationship between the performance and the physiopathologic mechanism was summarized .

  5. Molecular Gastronomy

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, Roisin; This, Herve; Kelly, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Molecular gastronomy may be defined as the scientific discipline that explores the phenomena occurring during culinary transformations. In contrast with traditional approaches of food science and technology, which considered mostly the chemistry, physics, or biology of food ingredients and industrial transformations, the focus is on phenomena occurring during the preparation of dishes. Applications building on the principles of molecular gastronomy, such as ‘Molecular Cooking’ and ‘Note-by-No...

  6. Molecular beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is a timeless and rather complete theoretical and experimental treatment of electric and magnetic resonance molecular-beam experiments for studying the radio frequency spectra of atoms and molecules. The theory of interactions of the nucleus with atomic and molecular fields is extensively presented. Measurements of atomic and nuclear magnetic moments, electric multipole moments, and atomic fine and hyperfine structure are detailed. Useful but somewhat outdated chapters on gas kinetics, molecular beam design, and experimental techniques are also included

  7. Molecular Spintronics

    OpenAIRE

    Shiraishi, Masashi; Ikoma, Tadaaki

    2011-01-01

    Molecular spintronics is recognized to as an attractive new research direction in a field of spintronics, following to metallic spintronics and inorganic semiconductor spintronics, and attracts many people in recent decades. The purpose of this manuscript is to describe the history of molecular spintronics by introducing important achievements and to show the current status of this field. In addition, the authors briefly introduce several theories for implementing studies in molecular spintro...

  8. Molecular Magnetocapacitance

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Yu-ning; Zhang, Xiao-Guang; Cheng, Hai-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Capacitance of a nanoscale system is usually thought of having two contributions, a classical electrostatic contribution and a quantum contribution dependent on the density of states and/or molecular orbitals close to the Fermi energy. In this letter we demonstrate that in molecular nano-magnets and other magnetic nanoscale systems, the quantum part of the capacitance becomes spin-dependent, and is tunable by an external magnetic field. This molecular magnetocapacitance can be realized using ...

  9. Molecular pharmacognosy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    This article analyzes the background and significance of molecular pharmacognosy,including the molecular identification of medicinal raw materials,phylogenetic evolution of medicinal plants and animals,evaluation and preservation of germplasm resources for medicinal plants and animals,etiology of endangerment and protection of endangered medicinal plants and animals,biosynthesis and bioregulation of active components in medicinal plants,and characteristics and the molecular bases of top-geoherbs.

  10. Molecular Diagnostics

    OpenAIRE

    Choe, Hyonmin; Deirmengian, Carl A; Hickok, Noreen J.; Morrison, Tiffany N.; Tuan, Rocky S.

    2015-01-01

    Orthopaedic infections are complex conditions that require immediate diagnosis and accurate identification of the causative organisms to facilitate appropriate management. Conventional methodologies for diagnosis of these infections sometimes lack accuracy or sufficient rapidity. Current molecular diagnostics are an emerging area of bench-to-bedside research in orthopaedic infections. Examples of promising molecular diagnostics include measurement of a specific biomarker in the synovial fluid...

  11. O papel da imunofluorescência direta na fisiopatologia e no diagnóstico diferencial da estomatite aftóide recorrente The role of immunoflorescence in the physiopathology and differential diagnosis of recurrent aphthous stomatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Salles Willo Wilhelmsen

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A estomatite aftóide recorrente é doença caracterizada por aparecimento periódico de aftas na mucosa oral, cuja etiologia e fisiopatologia não estão bem explicadas. Estudos recentes com imunofluorescência direta mostram resultados controversos. Alguns revelam que o distúrbio básico está relacionado à imunidade humoral, enquanto outros apontam alterações da imunidade celular. Formas atípicas de estomatite aftóide podem fazer diagnóstico diferencial com doenças vésico-bolhosas como pênfigo vulgar. OBJETIVO: Verificar a presença de imunecomplexos na mucosa de pacientes com estomatite aftóide e utilidade do método no diagnóstico diferencial com dermatopatias bolhosas. CASUÍSTICA E MÉTODO: 23 pacientes portadores de estomatite aftóide, de modo prospectivo, foram incluídos no estudo. Todos foram submetidos à biópsia de mucosa sob anestesia local para retirada de dois fragmentos. Um deles foi enviado para exame histológico e, outro, para ser realizada a imunofluorescência direta. RESULTADOS: As 23 amostras no exame histológico revelaram processo inflamatório inespecífico ulcerado. As amostras enviadas para imunofluorescência resultaram negativas e apenas uma revelou presença de complemento em membrana basal. CONCLUSÃO: Baseado em nossos resultados, concluímos que pacientes portadores de EAR não apresentam depósitos de imunecomplexos na mucosa da cavidade bucal e a imunofluorescência é útil no diagnóstico diferencial entre a doença e dermatopatias bolhosas.Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS is a disease characterized by the periodic appearance of aphthous lesions on the oral mucosa, of which etiology and physiopathology are not well explained. Recent studies with direct immunofluorescence show controversial results. Some reveal that the basic disorder is associated with humoral immunity, while others point to changes in cellular immunity. Atypical forms of aphthous stomatitis may have its differential

  12. Molecular geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Rodger, Alison

    1995-01-01

    Molecular Geometry discusses topics relevant to the arrangement of atoms. The book is comprised of seven chapters that tackle several areas of molecular geometry. Chapter 1 reviews the definition and determination of molecular geometry, while Chapter 2 discusses the unified view of stereochemistry and stereochemical changes. Chapter 3 covers the geometry of molecules of second row atoms, and Chapter 4 deals with the main group elements beyond the second row. The book also talks about the complexes of transition metals and f-block elements, and then covers the organometallic compounds and trans

  13. Molecular sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research in molecular sciences summarized includes photochemistry, radiation chemistry, geophysics, electromechanics, heavy-element oxidizers , heavy element chemistry collisions, atoms, organic solids. A list of publications is included

  14. Molecular Electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Karsten Stein

    This thesis includes the synthesis and characterisation of organic compounds designed for molecular electronics. The synthesised organic molecules are mainly based on two motifs, the obigo(phenyleneethynylenes) (OPE)s and tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) as shown below. These two scaffolds (OPE and TTF......) are chemically merged together to form cruciform-like structures that are an essential part of the thesis. The cruciform molecules were subjected to molecular conductance measurements to explore their capability towards single-crystal field-effect transistors (Part 1), molecular wires, and single electron......, however, was obtained by a study of a single molecular transistor. The investigated OPE5-TTF compound was captured in a three-terminal experiment, whereby manipulation of the molecule’s electronic spin was possible in different charge states. Thus, we demonstrated how the cruciform molecules could...

  15. Molecular farming

    OpenAIRE

    Merck, K.B.; Vereijken, J M

    2006-01-01

    Molecular Farming is a new and emerging technology that promises relatively cheap and flexible production of large quantities of pharmaceuticals in genetically modified plants. Many stakeholders are involved in the production of pharmaceuticals in plants, which complicates the discussion on the possible benefits and disadvantages to a great extent. Discussions about Molecular Farming are often about technical and economic aspects, but other aspects like safety and ethical and societal aspects...

  16. Molecular printing

    OpenAIRE

    Braunschweig, Adam B.; Huo, Fengwei; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2009-01-01

    Molecular printing techniques, which involve the direct transfer of molecules to a substrate with submicrometre resolution, have been extensively developed over the past decade and have enabled many applications. Arrays of features on this scale have been used to direct materials assembly, in nanoelectronics, and as tools for genetic analysis and disease detection. The past decade has witnessed the maturation of molecular printing led by two synergistic technologies: dip-pen nanolithography a...

  17. Molecular Nanoelectronics

    OpenAIRE

    Vuillaume, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    Molecular electronics is envisioned as a promising candidate for the nanoelectronics of the future. More than a possible answer to ultimate miniaturization problem in nanoelectronics, molecular electronics is foreseen as a possible way to assemble a large numbers of nanoscale objects (molecules, nanoparticules, nanotubes and nanowires) to form new devices and circuit architectures. It is also an interesting approach to significantly reduce the fabrication costs, as well as the energetical cos...

  18. Molecular Spintronics using Molecular Nanomagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang

    2009-03-01

    A revolution in electronics is in view, with the contemporary evolution of two novel disciplines, spintronics and molecular electronics. A fundamental link between these two fields can be established using molecular magnetic materials and, in particular, single-molecule magnets [1], which combine the classic macroscale properties of a magnet with the quantum properties of a nanoscale entity. The resulting field, molecular spintronics aims at manipulating spins and charges in electronic devices containing one or more molecules. In this context, we want to fabricate, characterize and study molecular devices (molecular spin-transistor, molecular spin-valve and spin filter, molecular double-dot devices, carbon nanotube nano-SQUIDs, etc.) in order to read and manipulate the spin states of the molecule and to perform basic quantum operations. The talk will discuss this--still largely unexplored--field and present our the first important results [2,3].[4pt] [1] L. Bogani & W. Wernsdorfer, Nature Mat. 7, 179 (2008).[0pt] [2] J.-P. Cleuziou, W. Wernsdorfer, V. Bouchiat, T. Ondarcuhu, M. Monthioux, Nature Nanotech. 1, 53-59 (2006).[0pt] [3] N. Roch, S. Florens, V. Bouchiat, W. Wernsdorfer, F. Balestro, Nature 453, 633 (2008).

  19. Molecular modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarti Sharma

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of computational chemistry in the development of novel pharmaceuticals is becoming an increasingly important tool. In the past, drugs were simply screened for effectiveness. The recent advances in computing power and the exponential growth of the knowledge of protein structures have made it possible for organic compounds to be tailored to decrease the harmful side effects and increase the potency. This article provides a detailed description of the techniques employed in molecular modeling. Molecular modeling is a rapidly developing discipline, and has been supported by the dramatic improvements in computer hardware and software in recent years.

  20. Molecular physics

    CERN Document Server

    Demtröder, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    The richly illustrated book comprehensively explains the important principles of diatomic and polyatomic molecules and their spectra in two separate, distinct parts. The first part concentrates on the theoretical aspects of molecular physics, such as the vibration, rotation, electronic states, potential curves, and spectra of molecules. The different methods of approximation for the calculation of electronic wave functions and their energy are also covered. The introduction of basics terms used in group theory and their meaning in molecular physics enables an elegant description of polyatomic

  1. Molecular pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Thomas R; Erler, Janine Terra

    2014-01-01

    45% of deaths in the developed world are linked to fibrotic disease. Fibrosis and cancer are known to be inextricably linked; however, we are only just beginning to understand the common and overlapping molecular pathways between the two. Here, we discuss what is known about the intersection of...... fibrosis and cancer, with a focus on cancer metastasis, and highlight some of the exciting new potential clinical targets that are emerging from analysis of the molecular pathways associated with these two devastating diseases. Clin Cancer Res; 20(14); 3637-43. ©2014 AACR....

  2. Molecular Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, John D.

    1995-02-01

    This book describes the chemical and physical structure of molecular crystals, their optical and electronic properties, and the reactions between neighboring molecules in crystals. In the second edition, the author has taken into account research that has undergone extremely rapid development since the first edition was published in 1987. For instance, he gives extensive coverage to the applications of molecular materials in high-technology devices (e.g. optical communications, laser printers, photocopiers, liquid crystal displays, solar cells, and more). There is also an entirely new chapter on the recently discovered Buckminsterfullerene carbon molecule (C60) and organic non-linear optic materials.

  3. Alternative Radioligands for Investigating the Molecular Pharmacology of Melatonin Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legros, Céline; Brasseur, Chantal; Delagrange, Philippe; Ducrot, Pierre; Nosjean, Olivier; Boutin, Jean A

    2016-03-01

    Melatonin exerts a variety of physiologic activities that are mainly relayed through the melatonin receptors MT1 and MT2 Low expressions of these receptors in tissues have led to widespread experimental use of the agonist 2-[(125)I]-iodomelatonin as a substitute for melatonin. We describe three iodinated ligands: 2-(2-[(2-iodo-4,5-dimethoxyphenyl)methyl]-4,5-dimethoxy phenyl) (DIV880) and (2-iodo-N-2-[5-methoxy-2-(naphthalen-1-yl)-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-b]pyridine-3-yl])acetamide (S70254), which are specific ligands at MT2 receptors, and N-[2-(5-methoxy-1H-indol-3-yl)ethyl]iodoacetamide (SD6), an analog of 2-[(125)I]-iodomelatonin with slightly different characteristics. Here, we further characterized these new ligands with regards to their molecular pharmacology. We performed binding experiments, saturation assays, association/dissociation rate measurements, and autoradiography using sheep and rat tissues and recombinant cell lines. Our results showed that [(125)I]-S70254 is receptor, and can be used with both cells and tissue. This radioligand can be used in autoradiography. Similarly, DIV880, a partial agonist [43% of melatonin on guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate binding assay], selective for MT2, can be used as a tool to selectively describe the pharmacology of this receptor in tissue samples. The molecular pharmacology of both human melatonin receptors MT1 and MT2, using a series of 24 ligands at these receptors and the new radioligands, did not lead to noticeable variations in the profiles. For the first time, we described radiolabeled tools that are specific for one of the melatonin receptors (MT2). These tools are amenable to binding experiments and to autoradiography using sheep or rat tissues. These specific tools will permit better understanding of the role and implication in physiopathologic processes of the melatonin receptors. PMID:26759496

  4. Molecular photobiology.

    OpenAIRE

    Nikkels, Arjen; Pierard, Claudine; Pierard, Gérald

    2005-01-01

    Photochemical reactions are numerous in the skin. They generate reactive oxygen species and other biochemical alterations as well. According to their nature, the molecular components of the skin which have been altered by these mechanisms can be repaired with various degrees of efficacy. Peer reviewed

  5. Molecular photovoltaics

    OpenAIRE

    Moser, Jacques E.; Bonnôte, Pierre; Grätzel, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Photoinduced charge transfer processes involving molecules adsorbed at interfaces are a fascinating topic which is presently attracting wide attention. Our investigations have focused on the identification of the factors that control the dynamics of such processes. The goal is to design molecular electronic devices that achieve efficient light-induced charge separation. Applications of similar systems in photochromic and electrochromic devices also appear feasible.

  6. Molecular gastronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    This, Hervé

    2005-01-01

    For centuries, cooks have been applying recipes without looking for the mechanisms of the culinary transformations. A scientific discipline that explores these changes from raw ingredients to eating the final dish, is developing into its own field, termed molecular gastronomy. Here, one of the founders of the discipline discusses its aims and importance.

  7. Computer-aided Molecular Design of Compounds Targeting Histone Modifying Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Andreoli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Growing evidences show that epigenetic mechanisms play crucial roles in the genesis and progression of many physiopathological processes. As a result, research in epigenetic grew at a fast pace in the last decade. In particular, the study of histone post-translational modifications encountered an extraordinary progression and many modifications have been characterized and associated to fundamental biological processes and pathological conditions. Histone modifications are the catalytic result of a large set of enzyme families that operate covalent modifications on specific residues at the histone tails. Taken together, these modifications elicit a complex and concerted processing that greatly contribute to the chromatin remodeling and may drive different pathological conditions, especially cancer. For this reason, several epigenetic targets are currently under validation for drug discovery purposes and different academic and industrial programs have been already launched to produce the first pre-clinical and clinical outcomes. In this scenario, computer-aided molecular design techniques are offering important tools, mainly as a consequence of the increasing structural information available for these targets. In this mini-review we will briefly discuss the most common types of known histone modifications and the corresponding operating enzymes by emphasizing the computer-aided molecular design approaches that can be of use to speed-up the efforts to generate new pharmaceutically relevant compounds.

  8. Molecular Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarti Sharma

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available

    The use of computational chemistry in the development of novel pharmaceuticals is becoming an increasingly important
    tool. In the past, drugs were simply screened for effectiveness. The recent advances in computing power and
    the exponential growth of the knowledge of protein structures have made it possible for organic compounds to tailored to
    decrease harmful side effects and increase the potency. This article provides a detailed description of the techniques
    employed in molecular modeling. Molecular modelling is a rapidly developing discipline, and has been supported from
    the dramatic improvements in computer hardware and software in recent years.

  9. Molecular modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Aarti Sharma; Himanshu Gupta

    2009-01-01

    The use of computational chemistry in the development of novel pharmaceuticals is becoming an increasingly important tool. In the past, drugs were simply screened for effectiveness. The recent advances in computing power and the exponential growth of the knowledge of protein structures have made it possible for organic compounds to be tailored to decrease the harmful side effects and increase the potency. This article provides a detailed description of the techniques employed in molecular mod...

  10. Molecular Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Vanommeslaeghe, Kenno; Guvench, Olgun; Alexander D MacKerell

    2014-01-01

    Molecular Mechanics (MM) force fields are the methods of choice for protein simulations, which are essential in the study of conformational flexibility. Given the importance of protein flexibility in drug binding, MM is involved in most if not all Computational Structure-Based Drug Discovery (CSBDD) projects. This section introduces the reader to the fundamentals of MM, with a special emphasis on how the target data used in the parametrization of force fields determine their strengths and wea...

  11. Molecular Quarkonium

    OpenAIRE

    Voloshin, M. B.

    2006-01-01

    I discuss topics related to four-quark states of the `molecular quarkonium' type, i.e. resonances that could be considered as (dominantly) made from a heavy meson and antimeson. Of the so far observed resonances such picture is very likely applicable to the state X(3872), and I also discuss its possible relevance to the peak near the $D^* {\\bar D}^*$ threshold in $e^+e^-$ annihilation.

  12. Molecular Morphology

    OpenAIRE

    Donath, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    A fundamental problem in biology is the reconstruction of the relatedness of all (extant) species. Traditionally, systematists employ visually recognizable characters of organisms for classification and evolutionary analysis. Recent developments in molecular and computational biology, however, lead to a whole different perspective on how to address the problem of inferring relatedness. The discovery of molecules, carrying genetic information, and the comparison of their primary structure h...

  13. Molecular Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Hoar, David I.

    1987-01-01

    Recombinant DNA technology, one of the major controversial areas of biological research in the late 1970s, is now rapidly providing new avenues for diagnosis and treatment. With the early recognition that extensive DNA variation exists in human populations, molecular genetic diagnosis of a variety of common hereditary diseases has become a reality. Recent identification of the location of the gene (or genes) for cystic fibrosis and adult polycystic kidney disease, and characterization of the ...

  14. Molecular Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    1999-06-01

    Molecular modeling has trickled down from the realm of pharmaceutical and research laboratories into the realm of undergraduate chemistry instruction. It has opened avenues for the visualization of chemical concepts that previously were difficult or impossible to convey. I am sure that many of you have developed exercises using the various molecular modeling tools. It is the desire of this Journal to become an avenue for you to share these exercises among your colleagues. It is to this end that Ron Starkey has agreed to edit such a column and to publish not only the description of such exercises, but also the software documents they use. The WWW is the obvious medium to distribute this combination and so accepted submissions will appear online as a feature of JCE Internet. Typical molecular modeling exercise: finding conformation energies. Molecular Modeling Exercises and Experiments is the latest feature column of JCE Internet, joining Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems, Hal's Picks, and Mathcad in the Chemistry Curriculum. JCE Internet continues to seek submissions in these areas of interest and submissions of general interest. If you have developed materials and would like to submit them, please see our Guide to Submissions for more information. The Chemical Education Resource Shelf, Equipment Buyers Guide, and WWW Site Review would also like to hear about chemistry textbooks and software, equipment, and WWW sites, respectively. Please consult JCE Internet Features to learn more about these resources at JCE Online. Email Announcements Would you like to be informed by email when the latest issue of the Journal is available online? when a new JCE Software title is shipping? when a new JCE Internet article has been published or is available for Open Review? when your subscription is about to expire? A new feature of JCE Online makes this possible. Visit our Guestbook to learn how. When you submit the form on this page, which includes your email address

  15. Behavioral and molecular exploration of the AR-CMT2A mouse model Lmna (R298C/R298C).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poitelon, Yannick; Kozlov, Serguei; Devaux, Jerôme; Vallat, Jean-Michel; Jamon, Marc; Roubertoux, Pierre; Rabarimeriarijaona, Sitraka; Baudot, Cécile; Hamadouche, Tarik; Stewart, Colin L; Levy, Nicolas; Delague, Valérie

    2012-03-01

    In 2002, we identified LMNA as the first gene responsible for an autosomal recessive axonal form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, AR-CMT2A. All patients were found to be homozygous for the same mutation in the LMNA gene, p.Arg298Cys. In order to investigate the physiopathological mechanisms underlying AR-CMT2A, we have generated a knock-in mouse model for the Lmna p.Arg298Cys mutation. We have explored these mice through an exhaustive series of behavioral tests and histopathological analyses, but were not able to find any peripheral nerve phenotype, even at 18 months of age. Interestingly at the molecular level, however, we detect a downregulation of the Lmna gene in all tissues tested from the homozygous knock-in mouse Lmna (R298C/R298C) (skeletal muscle, heart, peripheral nerve, spinal cord and cerebral trunk). Importantly, we further reveal a significant upregulation of Pmp22, specifically in the sciatic nerves of Lmna (R298C/R298C) mice. These results indicate that, despite the absence of a perceptible phenotype, abnormalities exist in the peripheral nerves of Lmna (R298C/R298C) mice that are absent from other tissues. Although the mechanisms leading to deregulation of Pmp22 in Lmna (R298C/R298C) mice are still unclear, our results support a relation between Lmna and Pmp22 and constitute a first step toward understanding AR-CMT2A physiopathology. PMID:22331516

  16. Esôfago de Barrett: aspectos fisiopatológicos e moleculares da seqüência metaplasia-displasia-adenocarcinoma - artigo de revisão Barrett's esophagus: physiopathological and molecular aspects of metaplasia-dysplasia-adenocarcinoma sequence - review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Silveira Volkweis

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The Barrett's esophagus (BE is defined as endoscopically visible columnar mucosa at the distal esophagus, of any extension, proved to harbor intestinal metaplasia on biopsy, highlighted by the presence of goblet cells. BE denotes long-standing gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD and is an important risk factor for the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC. Therefore, these patients must be on follow-up, in order to diagnose cancer early. BE patients have frequent alterations in esophageal physiologyc studies. Alkaline duodenogastroesophageal reflux seems to have important role. The development BE occurs in steps, initially with formation of cardiac type mucosa subsequent intestinalization. Futher progression can follow a sequence, from low grade dysplasia, to high grade dysplasia and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Current follow-up is based on the presence of dysplasia. It has limitations, grouping patients heterogeneously. Different steps of carcinogenesis have been studied looking for an ideal prognostic marker. Uncontrolled proliferative activity, apoptosis inhibition, angiogenesis, tissue invasion and metastases formation are all implicated in cancer origin. Some cycle cell molecules have been studied in BE, such as retinoblastoma protein, ciclins, kinase dependent ciclins and cell cycle inhibitors. The P53 protein is one of the most investigated in the metaplasia-adenocarcinoma progression. Growth Factors, apoptotic proteins, telomers and DNA ploidy have also been searched. Increased proliferative activity has been implicated in Barrett's carcinogenesis and the Ki-67 antigen, through imunohistochemical analysis, has become the the method of choice. Present in the nucleus, it is found in proliferative cells only. Some studies suport association between Ki-67 activity and the metaplasia-dysplasia-adenocarcinoma sequence.The results, however, are inconclusive and research should follow this way.

  17. Correlated Flexible Molecular Coding and Molecular Evolvability

    OpenAIRE

    Husimi, Y; Aita, T.; Tabuchi, I.

    2002-01-01

    Evolvability of biopolymers is based on molecular coding. The molecular coding is represented by biopolymer function vs monomeric sequence relationship, that is, a proper fitness landscape on the sequence space. On the other hand, molecular coding is mostly realized by monomeric sequence vs biopolymer structure relationship. We suggest the evolution of evolvability based on flexible or multiplex coding originating from flexible or polymorphic conformation of evolving biopolymers. We report a ...

  18. Adaptive molecular convergence: Molecular evolution versus molecular phylogenetics

    OpenAIRE

    Castoe, Todd A.; de Koning, A. P. Jason; Pollock, David D.

    2010-01-01

    Definitive identification of convergent evolution, the acquisition of the same biological trait in unrelated lineages, provides one of the most compelling sources of evidence for natural selection. Although numerous examples of convergent morphological evolution are well known (such as the independent development of wings in birds and mammals), cases of convergent evolution at the molecular-genetic level appear to be quite rare. We recently discovered a remarkable case of convergent molecular...

  19. Molecular sensors and molecular logic gates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The rapid grow of nanotechnology field extended the concept of a macroscopic device to the molecular level. Because of this reason the design and synthesis of (supra)-molecular species capable of mimicking the functions of macroscopic devices are currently of great interest. Molecular devices operate via electronic and/or nuclear rearrangements and, like macroscopic devices, need energy to operate and communicate between their elements. The energy needed to make a device work can be supplied as chemical energy, electrical energy, or light. Luminescence is one of the most useful techniques to monitor the operation of molecular-level devices. This fact determinates the synthesis of novel fluorescence compounds as a considerable and inseparable part of nanoscience development. Further miniaturization of semiconductors in electronic field reaches their limit. Therefore the design and construction of molecular systems capable of performing complex logic functions is of great scientific interest now. In semiconductor devices the logic gates work using binary logic, where the signals are encoded as 0 and 1 (low and high current). This process is executable on molecular level by several ways, but the most common are based on the optical properties of the molecule switches encoding the low and high concentrations of the input guest molecules and the output fluorescent intensities with binary 0 and 1 respectively. The first proposal to execute logic operations at the molecular level was made in 1988, but the field developed only five years later when the analogy between molecular switches and logic gates was experimentally demonstrated by de Silva. There are seven basic logic gates: AND, OR, XOR, NOT, NAND, NOR and XNOR and all of them were achieved by molecules, the fluorescence switching as well. key words: fluorescence, molecular sensors, molecular logic gates

  20. Advancement of Molecular Morphology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾江

    2004-01-01

    @@ Molecular morphology is a new discipline of medical science that studies morphology at the molecular level. This includes the investigation of occurrence and distribution of proteins, peptides, DNA and RNA sequences at the tissue, cellular, and ultrastructural levels.

  1. Basic molecular spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Gorry, PA

    1985-01-01

    BASIC Molecular Spectroscopy discusses the utilization of the Beginner's All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code (BASIC) programming language in molecular spectroscopy. The book is comprised of five chapters that provide an introduction to molecular spectroscopy through programs written in BASIC. The coverage of the text includes rotational spectra, vibrational spectra, and Raman and electronic spectra. The book will be of great use to students who are currently taking a course in molecular spectroscopy.

  2. Polymer friction Molecular Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, Vladimir N.; Persson, Bo N. J.

    2010-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate, and b) polymer sliding on polymer. In the first setup the shear stresses are relatively independent of molecular length. For polymer sliding on polymer the friction is significantly larger, and dependent on the molecular chain length. In both cases, the shear stresses are proportional to ...

  3. Cardiovascular molecular MR imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Lamb, H J; van der Meer, R. W.; Roos, A. (Anna); Bax, J J

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Cardiovascular molecular imaging is a rapidly evolving field of research, aiming to image and quantify molecular and cellular targets in vivo. MR imaging has some inherent properties that make it very suitable for cardiovascular molecular imaging. Until now, only a limited number of studies have been published on cardiovascular molecular imaging using MR imaging. Review In the current review, MR techniques that have already shown potential are discussed. Metabolic MR imaging can ...

  4. Physical Chemistry of Molecular

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ Established in 2009, the group consists of six researchers and more than 70 research assistants and graduate students from the CAS Key Laboratory of Molecular Nanostructures and Nanotechnologies at the CAS Institute of Chemistry.Its research focuses on the physical chemistry involved in molecular assembly, molecular nanostructures, functional nanomaterials and conceptual nano-devices.

  5. Molecular Graphics and Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Jacques; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Explains molecular graphics, i.e., the application of computer graphics techniques to investigate molecular structure, function, and interaction. Structural models and molecular surfaces are discussed, and a theoretical model that can be used for the evaluation of intermolecular interaction energies for organometallics is described. (45…

  6. Behçet's disease physiopathology: a contemporary review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidan, Mohamad J; Saadoun, David; Garrido, Marlene; Klatzmann, David; Six, Adrien; Cacoub, Patrice

    2016-12-01

    Behçet's disease, also known as the Silk Road Disease, is a rare systemic vasculitis disorder of unknown etiology. Recurrent attacks of acute inflammation characterize Behçet's disease. Frequent oral aphthous ulcers, genital ulcers, skin lesions and ocular lesions are the most common manifestations. Inflammation is typically self-limiting in time and relapsing episodes of clinical manifestations represent a hallmark of Behçet's disease. Other less frequent yet severe manifestations that have a major prognostic impact involve the eyes, the central nervous system, the main large vessels and the gastrointestinal tract. Behçet's disease has a heterogeneous onset and is associated with significant morbidity and premature mortality. This study presents a current immunological review of the disease and provides a synopsis of clinical aspects and treatment options. PMID:26868128

  7. Action of plant proteinase inhibitors on enzymes of physiopathological importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Maria Luiza V; Sampaio, Misako U

    2009-09-01

    Obtained from leguminous seeds, various plant proteins inhibit animal proteinases, including human, and can be considered for the development of compounds with biological activity. Inhibitors from the Bowman-Birk and plant Kunitz-type family have been characterized by proteinase specificity, primary structure and reactive site. Our group mostly studies the genus Bauhinia, mainly the species bauhinioides, rufa, ungulata and variegata. In some species, more than one inhibitor was characterized, exhibiting different properties. Although proteins from this group share high structural similarity, they present differences in proteinase inhibition, explored in studies using diverse biological models. PMID:19722028

  8. Action of plant proteinase inhibitors on enzymes of physiopathological importance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luiza V. Oliva

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Obtained from leguminous seeds, various plant proteins inhibit animal proteinases, including human, and can be considered for the development of compounds with biological activity. Inhibitors from the Bowman-Birk and plant Kunitz-type family have been characterized by proteinase specificity, primary structure and reactive site. Our group mostly studies the genus Bauhinia, mainly the species bauhinioides, rufa, ungulata and variegata. In some species, more than one inhibitor was characterized, exhibiting different properties. Although proteins from this group share high structural similarity, they present differences in proteinase inhibition, explored in studies using diverse biological models.Obtidas de sementes leguminosas, várias proteínas inibem proteinases de origem animal, incluindo humanas, e podem ser consideradas para o desenvolvimento de compostos com atividade biológica. Inibidores da família Bowman-Birk e da família Kunitz vegetal tem sido caracterizados em relação a especificidade para proteinase, estrutura primária e sitio reativo. O nosso grupo majoritariamente vem estudando o gênero Bauhinia, principalmente as espécies bauhinioides, rufa, ungulatae variegata. Em algumas espécies, mais de um inibidor com propriedades diferentes foi caracterizado. Embora tais proteínas apresentem alta similaridade estrutural, diferem quanto à inibição de proteinases, e foram exploradas em estudos utilizando diversos modelos biológicos.

  9. Action of plant proteinase inhibitors on enzymes of physiopathological importance

    OpenAIRE

    Oliva, Maria Luiza V.; Sampaio, Misako U.

    2009-01-01

    Obtained from leguminous seeds, various plant proteins inhibit animal proteinases, including human, and can be considered for the development of compounds with biological activity. Inhibitors from the Bowman-Birk and plant Kunitz-type family have been characterized by proteinase specificity, primary structure and reactive site. Our group mostly studies the genus Bauhinia, mainly the species bauhinioides, rufa, ungulata and variegata. In some species, more than one inhibitor was characterized,...

  10. Burn Injuries: Burn Depth, Physiopathology and Type of Burns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemalettin Koltka

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A significant burn injury is a serious and mortal event. The most important threat to life is hypovolemic shock with complex pathophysiologic mechanisms. Burn depth is classified as first, second, or third degree. Local inflammatory response results a vasodilatation and an increase in vascular permeability. A burn injury is a three dimensional ischemic wound. Zone of coagulation is the zone with maximum damage. Zone of stasis consists of damaged but viable tissues, the tissue is salvageable. In zone of hyperemia tissue perfusion is increased. At the beginning, cardiac output falls and systemic vascular resistance increases; cardiac performance improves as hypovolemia is corrected with fluid resuscitation. While cardiac output increases systemic vascular resistance falls below normal values and a hypermetabolic state develops. Pulmonary vascular resistance increases immediately after thermal injury and this is more prolonged. To avoid secondary pulmonary complications, the smallest resuscitation volume of fluids that maintains adequate tissue perfusion should be given. Changes parallel to the cardiovascular response develop in other organ systems. The reasons of burn injury can be thermal, electrical, chemical or radiation. It is important to know the exact mechanism of burn injury because of different therapies for a specific cause. In this review information about burn depth, local and systemic responses to burn injury and major causes of burn injury are presented. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2011; 9 Suppl:1-6

  11. Burn Injuries: Burn Depth, Physiopathology and Type of Burns

    OpenAIRE

    Kemalettin Koltka

    2011-01-01

    A significant burn injury is a serious and mortal event. The most important threat to life is hypovolemic shock with complex pathophysiologic mechanisms. Burn depth is classified as first, second, or third degree. Local inflammatory response results a vasodilatation and an increase in vascular permeability. A burn injury is a three dimensional ischemic wound. Zone of coagulation is the zone with maximum damage. Zone of stasis consists of damaged but viable tissues, the tissue is salvageable. ...

  12. OXCARBAZEPINE INDUCED HYPONATREMIA: A POTENTIAL EXPLANATION OF ITS PHYSIOPATHOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musso CG

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine are antiepileptic drugs which can induce hyponatremia, being this disorder more frequent with the latter.In this report we present a clinical case regarding an oxcarbazepine induced hyponatremia, and we hypothesized that oxcarbazepine could induce hyponatremia as a consequence of its influence on distal nephron where it could promote free water retention, urinary sodium loss, or both of them.Besides, we proposed that a greater tubular sesitivity to oxcarbazepine than to carbamazepine could explain the different hyponatremia inducing capability between these two drugs

  13. Physiopathology of ischemic strokes: the input of positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tomography by positrons emissions has brought essential physiological and pathological knowledge relative to cerebral vascular accidents in the acute phase, because it is possible to measure the cerebral blood flow, the oxygen extraction rate and the local oxygen consumption. (N.C.)

  14. Diffuse Pulmonary Hemorrhage: Classification, physiopathology and Radiologic Manifestations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage is a syndrome characterized by hemoptysis, anemia and alveolar opacities in the chest radiograph (Fig. 1). Differential diagnoses include all entities with focal or diffuse alveolar opacities. In this article we review the most important causes of diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage.

  15. [Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors: from biology to physiopathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuvillier, Olivier

    2012-11-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) mediates critical physiological responses by its binding to G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) subtypes, known as S1P receptors. Five distinct mammalian S1P receptors, designated S1P1-5 have been identified, each with a different cellular pattern of expression which influences the responses to S1P. In this review, we briefly outline our understanding of the modes of action and the roles of S1P receptors in the regulation of physiological and pathological functions in the cardiovascular, immune and central nervous system. PMID:23171898

  16. Automatic comparison of images and scintigraphy: physiopathological applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The autors describe a method of treating scintigraphic data with which they can correctly compare images of a structure that were obtained in different conditons. This method comprises two steps which are fully automatised. During the first one known as the ''registration'' step and intended to make a comparison possible they maximise a new similarity criterion by a series of random trials in a five parameter space. During the second, which is the actual comparison, they use an appropriate statistiscal test to recognise those homologous pixels with a significantly different contents which will be the only ones retained to build up the final image. They give then two examples of what the method brings in the medical field which are the detection of adenomatous parathyroid glands and the follow-up of lung perfusion in case of embolism

  17. Adiposity in childhood cancer survivors: insights into obesity physiopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siviero-Miachon, Adriana Aparecida; Spinola-Castro, Angela Maria; Guerra-Junior, Gil

    2009-03-01

    As childhood cancer treatment has become more effective, survival rates have improved, and a number of complications have been described while many of these patients reach adulthood. Obesity is a well-recognized late effect, and its metabolic effects may lead to cardiovascular disease. Currently, studies concerning overweight have focused on acute lymphocytic leukemia and brain tumors, since they are at risk for hypothalamic-pituitary axis damage secondary to cancer therapies (cranial irradiation, chemotherapy, and brain surgery) or to primary tumor location. Obesity and cancer have metabolic syndrome features in common. Thus, it remains controversial if overweight is a cause or consequence of cancer, and to date additional mechanisms involving adipose tissue and hypothalamic derangements have been considered, comprising premature adiposity rebound, hyperinsulinemia, leptin regulation, and the role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma. Overall, further research is still necessary to better understand the relationship between adipogenesis and hypothalamic control deregulation following cancer therapy. PMID:19466212

  18. Intensive Treatment of Cellulite Based on Physiopathological Principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Maria Pereira de Godoy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of this paper is to report a novel intensive therapy of gynoid lipodystrophy (cellulite based on a new hypothesis. Methods. Were evaluated in 10 patients with ages ranging between 25 and 59 years (mean 35.6 years grade IV cellulite identified by clinical evaluation. Before initiating treatment, perimetry was performed at 5 cm intervals along both thighs, at the gluteal fold, 5, 10, and 15 cm above the gluteal fold, at the navel, and 5 cm above the navel. The patients were submitted to a 4-hour daily treatment session that consisted of manual and mechanical lymph drainage and cervical stimulation by the Godoy & Godoy technique adapted for the treatment of cellulite. After 10 sessions over two weeks, the patients were again evaluated. The paired t-test was utilized for statistical analysis with an alpha error of 5% (P value < 0.05. A reduction was identified at all of the measurement points (paired t-test; P value < 0.0001. Results. The mean reductions varied between 4.0 and 5.7 cm at the measurement points but reductions of more than 10 cm in perimeter were achieved in some patients. Conclusion. This technique involving lymphatic system stimulation is efficacious in the treatment of cellulite.

  19. Hepatic portal venous gas: Physiopathology, etiology, prognosis and treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bassam Abboud; Jad El Hachem; Thierry Yazbeck; Corinne Doumit

    2009-01-01

    Hepatic portal venous gas (HPVG), an ominous radiologic sign, is associated in some cases with a severe underlying abdominal disease requiring urgent operative intervention. HPVG has been reported with increasing frequency in medical literature and usually accompanies severe or lethal conditions. The diagnosis of HPVG is usually made by plain abdominal radiography, sonography, color Doppler flow imaging or computed tomography (CT) scan. Currently, the increased use of CT scan and ultrasound in the inpatient setting allows early and highly sensitive detection of such severe illnesses and also the recognition of an increasing number of benign and non-life threatening causes of HPVG. HPVG is not by itself a surgical indication and the treatment depends mainly on the underlying disease. The prognosis is related to the pathology itself and is not influenced by the presence of HPVG. Based on a review of the literature, we discuss in this paper the pathophysiology, risk factors, radiographic findings,management, and prognosis of pathologies associated with HPVG.

  20. The mitochondrial carnitine/acylcarnitine carrier: function, structure and physiopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indiveri, Cesare; Iacobazzi, Vito; Tonazzi, Annamaria; Giangregorio, Nicola; Infantino, Vittoria; Convertini, Paolo; Console, Lara; Palmieri, Ferdinando

    2011-08-01

    The carnitine/acylcarnitine carrier (CAC) is a transport protein of the inner mitochondrial membrane that belongs to the mitochondrial carrier protein family. In its cytosolic conformation the carrier consists of a bundle of six transmembrane α-helices, which delimit a water filled cavity opened towards the cytosol and closed towards the matrix by a network of interacting charged residues. Most of the functional data on this transporter come from studies performed with the protein purified from rat liver mitochondria or recombinant proteins from different sources incorporated into phospholipid vesicles (liposomes). The carnitine/acylcarnitine carrier transports carnitine and acylcarnitines with acyl chains of various lengths from 2 to 18 carbon atoms. The mammalian transporter exhibits higher affinity for acylcarnitines with longer carbon chains. The functional data indicate that CAC plays the important function of catalyzing transport of acylcarnitines into the mitochondria in exchange for intramitochondrial free carnitine. This results in net transport of fatty acyl units into the mitochondrial matrix where they are oxidized by the β-oxidation enzymes. The essential role of the transporter in cell metabolism is demonstrated by the fact that alterations of the human gene SLC25A20 coding for CAC are associated with a severe disease known as carnitine carrier deficiency. This autosomal recessive disorder is characterized by life-threatening episodes of coma induced by fasting, cardiomyopathy, liver dysfunction, muscle weakness, respiratory distress and seizures. Until now 35 different mutations of CAC gene have been identified in carnitine carrier deficient patients. Some missense mutations concern residues of the signature motif present in all mitochondrial carriers. Diagnosis of carnitine carrier deficiency requires biochemical and genetic tests; treatment is essentially limited to important dietetic measures. Recently, a pharmacological approach based on the use of statins and/or fibrates for the treatment of CAC-deficient patients with mild phenotype has been proposed. PMID:22020112

  1. Paroxysmal tonic upgaze: physiopathological considerations in three additional cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalice, A; Parisi, P; Iannetti, P

    2000-01-01

    Paroxysmal tonic upgaze of childhood has been described as a benign distinctive syndrome of abnormal ocular movement, with or without concomitant ataxia. After the first observation of four children, a further 29 patients have been reported with a wide spectrum of neurologic abnormalities such as ataxia, unsteady of gait, learning disabilities and mental retardation at follow-up. Electroencephalograms were normal in all the subjects and magnetic resonance imaging showed deficient myelination in only one patient. Recently it has been suggested that paroxysmal tonic upgaze could be a heterogeneous syndrome, ranging from a simply age-dependent manifestation to a clinical appearance of a variety of disorders affecting the corticomesencephalic loop of vertical eye movement. Moreover, it also could be an early sign of more widespread neurologic dysfunction. We describe three patients who presented paroxysmal tonic upgaze; in one, ataxia was present; in the second child, ataxia and language disorder also were observed; and in the third patient paroxysmal tonic upgaze was associated with loss of muscle tone (drop-attack-like events). On magnetic resonance imaging, a pinealoma compressing the dorsal mesencephalic region was detected. On the basis of our observations, we suggest that any insult with periaqueductal mesencephalic gray-matter involvement could be considered the basic condition for this peculiar clinical manifestation. PMID:10641603

  2. Role of Autoantibodies in the Physiopathology of Chagas’ Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Medei, Emiliano Horacio; Nascimento, José Hamilton Matheus; Pedrosa, Roberto Coury; de Carvalho, Antônio Carlos Campos

    2008-01-01

    Chagas’ disease is a serious health problem in Latin America. Between 25 to 30% of the infected patients develop the chronic form of the disease, with progressive myocardial damage and often, sudden death.

  3. Engineering molecular machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erman, Burak

    2016-04-01

    Biological molecular motors use chemical energy, mostly in the form of ATP hydrolysis, and convert it to mechanical energy. Correlated thermal fluctuations are essential for the function of a molecular machine and it is the hydrolysis of ATP that modifies the correlated fluctuations of the system. Correlations are consequences of the molecular architecture of the protein. The idea that synthetic molecular machines may be constructed by designing the proper molecular architecture is challenging. In their paper, Sarkar et al (2016 New J. Phys. 18 043006) propose a synthetic molecular motor based on the coarse grained elastic network model of proteins and show by numerical simulations that motor function is realized, ranging from deterministic to thermal, depending on temperature. This work opens up a new range of possibilities of molecular architecture based engine design.

  4. Standardized molecular typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, F M; Lischewski, A; Harmsen, D; Hacker, J

    1999-01-01

    Molecular typing methods are useful tools in molecular mycology. The results of these biotyping procedures may help to identify pathogenic strains in order to detect sources of nosocomial infection and for the investigation of epidemiological relationships. With respect to the facultative pathogen, Candida albicans, various methods such as pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), DNA fingerprinting methods and hybridization with repetitive DNA elements have been described as useful tools in molecular epidemiology. The previously described hybridization method with the Candida albicans specific CARE-2 probe and subsequent rehybridization with a molecular size marker is a standardized reproducible typing method for comparison of results obtained in different laboratories. In a larger epidemiological study conducted at the University Hospital of Würzburg analysing clinical C. albicans isolates, we were able to describe relationships between sequential patient isolates. These findings demonstrate that standardized molecular typing methods are a powerful tool in molecular mycology studies. PMID:10865907

  5. Sober Topological Molecular Lattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张德学; 李永明

    2003-01-01

    A topological molecular lattice (TML) is a pair (L, T), where L is a completely distributive lattice and r is a subframe of L. There is an obvious forgetful functor from the category TML of TML's to the category Loc of locales. In this note,it is showed that this forgetful functor has a right adjoint. Then, by this adjunction,a special kind of topological molecular lattices called sober topological molecular lattices is introduced and investigated.

  6. Molecular imaging in oncology

    OpenAIRE

    Dzik-Jurasz, A S K

    2004-01-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease that manifests in loss of normal cellular homeostatic mechanisms. The biology and therapeutic modulation of neoplasia occurs at the molecular level. An understanding of these molecular processes is therefore required to develop novel prognostic and early biomarkers of response. In addition to clinical applications, increased impetus for the development of such technologies has been catalysed by pharmaceutical companies investing in the development of molecular ther...

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Tarmyshov, Konstantin B.

    2007-01-01

    Molecular simulations can provide a detailed picture of a desired chemical, physical, or biological process. It has been developed over last 50 years and is being used now to solve a large variety of problems in many different fields. In particular, quantum calculations are very helpful to study small systems at a high resolution where electronic structure of compounds is accounted for. Molecular dynamics simulations, in turn, are employed to study development of a certain molecular ensemble ...

  8. Molecular Epidemiology of Rotaviruses

    OpenAIRE

    Nakagomi, Osamu

    2004-01-01

    Molecular epidemiology of rotaviruses emerged a little over 25 years ago as a fascinating branch of science that utilized then cutting-edge technology of RNA polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Molecular epidemiology, as I have observed it closely almost since its dawn, is an ever-evolving discipline which has incorporated the advances of the related sciences including molecular evolutionary biology and ecology, while it is firmly and deeply rooted in the edifice of epidemiology of infectious...

  9. Polymer friction Molecular Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, Vladimir N.; Persson, Bo N. J.

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate, and b) polymer sliding on polymer. In the first setup the shear stresses are relatively...... independent of molecular length. For polymer sliding on polymer the friction is significantly larger, and dependent on the molecular chain length. In both cases, the shear stresses are proportional to the squeezing pressure and finite at zero load, indicating an adhesional contribution to the friction force....

  10. Dense molecular thermodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.D.; Shaw, M.S.; Holian, B.L.

    1983-01-01

    We are examining the thermodynamics of dense molecular fluids from the theoretical view. Our interests range from modeling single-species, spherically symmetric, atomic systems, through adding the complication of nonspherical molecular potentials, to mixing various molecular species with the inclusion of chemistry. We discuss what has been accomplished and evaluate the directions to be taken in attacking the unsolved problems. The various theoretical approaches, both analytic and numerical, are presented. We finish with a discussion of the recent advance in treating nonspherical molecular potentials with effective spherical potentials in the calculation of thermodynamics.

  11. A novel cell-permeable, selective, and noncompetitive inhibitor of KAT3 histone acetyltransferases from a combined molecular pruning/classical isosterism approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milite, Ciro; Feoli, Alessandra; Sasaki, Kazuki; La Pietra, Valeria; Balzano, Amodio Luca; Marinelli, Luciana; Mai, Antonello; Novellino, Ettore; Castellano, Sabrina; Tosco, Alessandra; Sbardella, Gianluca

    2015-03-26

    Selective inhibitors of the two paralogue KAT3 acetyltransferases (CBP and p300) may serve not only as precious chemical tools to investigate the role of these enzymes in physiopathological mechanisms but also as lead structures for the development of further antitumor agents. After the application of a molecular pruning approach to the hardly optimizable and not very cell-permeable garcinol core structure, we prepared many analogues that were screened for their inhibitory effects using biochemical and biophysical (SPR) assays. Further optimization led to the discovery of the benzylidenebarbituric acid derivative 7h (EML425) as a potent and selective reversible inhibitor of CBP/p300, noncompetitive versus both acetyl-CoA and a histone H3 peptide, and endowed with good cell permeability. Furthermore, in human leukemia U937 cells, it induced a marked and time-dependent reduction in the acetylation of lysine H4K5 and H3K9, a marked arrest in the G0/G1 phase and a significant increase in the hypodiploid nuclei percentage. PMID:25730130

  12. From the anatomoclinical school to the physiopathological one at the medical faculty, University of Antioquia, in Medellin, Colombia De la escuela anatomoclínica a la fisiología moderna en la Facultad de Medicina de la Universidad de Antioquia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Guillermo Gutiérrez Trujillo

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to present the "school concept" from its etymological origin and to link it to the dynamics of history as an ever changing concept; also, to relate it to the history of knowledge, with its characteristic changes and ruptures. The "school concept" advances from the mechanistic space to Newton´s formulations, whose model of the universe dominated scientific thought between the middle of the XVII century and the end of the XIX century; then with Einstein´s modern physics and the relativity and quantic theories. Einstein broke up with the mechanistic Newtonian vision of the XIX century physics, but biomedical science, through education, remains anchored to the fragmentary vision of reality offered by symptoms and organs. The change from the anatomoclinical school to the physiopathological one at the Medical Faculty, University of Antioquia, is described. This Faculty dates back to 1871 and started under the influence of the anatomoclinical French model. It did not change until 1940; then there was a significant change to scientific medicine with the pathology laboratory (1943 and the clinicopathological conference (1944, both founded by doctor Alfredo Correa Henao. Also, with the development of modern physiology with doctor Alberto Saldarriaga, a surgeon from the school of Bernard and Leriche, and doctor Antonio Ramírez González, a physiologist from Louisville University (USA and a chest surgeon from the United Kingdom. Some work carried out at the physiology and experimental surgery laboratories are described, in which both German and American methodologies were employed. Le pretende mostrar el concepto "escuela" desde su origen etimológico y vincularlo a la dinámica de la historia como un concepto cambiante; relacionarlo con la historia del conocimiento y los cambios y rupturas que le son propios. Se avanza al concepto de escuela desde el espacio conceptual del mecanicismo, que pasa por las formulaciones de Newton, cuyo

  13. Advancement of Molecular Morphology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾江

    2004-01-01

    Molecular morphology is a new discipline of medical science that studies morphology at the molecular level. This includes the investigation of occurrence and distribution of proteins, peptides, DNA and RNA sequences at the tissue, cellular, and uhrastructural levels. Morphology is defined as a field of science investigating the shape,

  14. Accelerating Fermionic Molecular Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, M. A.; Kennedy, A. D.

    2004-01-01

    We consider how to accelerate fermionic molecular dynamics algorithms by introducing n pseudofermion fields coupled with the nth root of the fermionic kernel. This reduces the maximum pseudofermionic force, and thus allows a larger molecular dynamics integration step size without hitting an instability in the integrator.

  15. Hydrops associated with chondrodysplasia of the fetus in a miniature Scottish Highland cow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalina Cabrera, L; McNabb, Bret R; Woods, Sarah E; Cartoceti, Andrew N; Busch, Rosie C

    2016-03-01

    CASE DESCRIPTION A 2-year-old primiparous miniature Scottish Highland cow with an unknown breeding date was evaluated for suspected hydrops. CLINICAL FINDINGS Transabdominal and transrectal ultrasonographic examination identified a large amount of hypoechoic fluid within an enlarged uterus; the fetus could not be identified. Presence of a severely distended uterus and concerns regarding associated health risks to the cow led to the decision to induce labor. Although fluids were expelled, parturition did not progress further over the following 48 hours. Vaginal examination revealed a partially dilated cervix and an abnormally shaped fetus that was too large to pass vaginally. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME Supportive care was provided to the cow, and a stillborn bull calf was delivered by cesarean section. Grossly evident chondrodystrophic dwarfism with hydrocephalus, compatible with so-called bulldog calf malformations, was confirmed by diagnostic imaging and histopathologic evaluation. The cow recovered from surgery uneventfully and was discharged from the hospital the following day. Genetic analysis of DNA from hair roots collected from the sire and dam confirmed both were carriers of an aggrecan-1 gene mutation (bulldog dwarfism1) previously associated with dwarfism and bulldog calf malformations in Dexter cattle. CLINICAL RELEVANCE To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of bulldog calf malformations associated with an aggrecan-1 gene mutation in miniature Scottish Highland cattle, confirming that at least 1 genetic mutation associated with this condition is found in cattle breeds other than Dexter. The findings highlighted the clinical importance of testing for known genetic diseases in breeding cattle, particularly among miniature breeds. PMID:26885599

  16. Fragment oriented molecular shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hain, Ethan; Camacho, Carlos J; Koes, David Ryan

    2016-05-01

    Molecular shape is an important concept in drug design and virtual screening. Shape similarity typically uses either alignment methods, which dynamically optimize molecular poses with respect to the query molecular shape, or feature vector methods, which are computationally less demanding but less accurate. The computational cost of alignment can be reduced by pre-aligning shapes, as is done with the Volumetric-Aligned Molecular Shapes (VAMS) method. Here, we introduce and evaluate fragment oriented molecular shapes (FOMS), where shapes are aligned based on molecular fragments. FOMS enables the use of shape constraints, a novel method for precisely specifying molecular shape queries that provides the ability to perform partial shape matching and supports search algorithms that function on an interactive time scale. When evaluated using the challenging Maximum Unbiased Validation dataset, shape constraints were able to extract significantly enriched subsets of compounds for the majority of targets, and FOMS matched or exceeded the performance of both VAMS and an optimizing alignment method of shape similarity search. PMID:27085751

  17. Molecular Engineering of DNA: Molecular Beacons

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Kemin; Tang, Zhiwen; Yang, Chaoyong James; Kim, Youngmi; Fang, Xiaohong; Li, Wei; Wu, Yanrong; Medley, Colin D.; Cao, Zehui; Jun LI; Colon, Patrick; Lin, Hui; Tan, Weihong

    2009-01-01

    Molecular beacons (MBs) are specifically designed DNA hairpin structures that are widely used as fluorescent probes. Applications of MBs range from genetic screening, biosensor development, biochip construction, and the detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms to mRNA monitoring in living cells. The inherent signal-transduction mechanism of MBs enables the analysis of target oligonucleotides without the separation of unbound probes. The MB stem–loop structure holds the fluorescence-donor ...

  18. Modeling of molecular properties

    CERN Document Server

    Comba, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Molecular modeling encompasses applied theoretical approaches and computational techniques to model structures and properties of molecular compounds and materials in order to predict and / or interpret their properties. The modeling covered in this book ranges from methods for small chemical to large biological molecules and materials. With its comprehensive coverage of important research fields in molecular and materials science, this is a must-have for all organic, inorganic and biochemists as well as materials scientists interested in applied theoretical and computational chemistry. The 28

  19. Energetics of molecular interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Cahen

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Transport of charge carriers through interfaces is crucial to all electronic and optoelectronic devices, in particular devices based on organic molecular films and, especially, monomolecular layers and single molecules. The energetics of molecular interfaces are exceedingly important, therefore, and must be understood in detail so that we can model and control their behavior. This knowledge, however, is not always sufficient, as the very physics of charge carrier transport through molecular interfaces remains, at times, unclear. This article provides an overview of the main issues being researched actively in the field of interfaces involving organic molecules, and points out areas where progress has been made and where basic questions remain unanswered.

  20. Atomic and Molecular Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Atomic and Molecular Interactions was held at Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field

  1. Are there molecular signatures?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, W.P.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes molecular signatures and mutational spectrum analysis. The mutation spectrum is defined as the type and location of DNA base change. There are currently about five well documented cases. Mutations and radon-associated tumors are discussed.

  2. Molecular Mechanisms of Preeclampsia

    OpenAIRE

    Vitoratos, N.; Hassiakos, D.; C. Iavazzo

    2012-01-01

    Preeclampsia is one of the leading causes of maternal morbidity/mortality. The pathogenesis of preeclampsia is still under investigation. The aim of this paper is to present the molecular mechanisms implicating in the pathway leading to preeclampsia.

  3. Molecular Gastronomy: An Introduction

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, Roisin; Kelly, Alan L.; This, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In the world of food science, Molecular Gastronomy is a term which is relatively new, but describes the convergence of the two long-established core food disciplines, i.e., food science and the art of the chef.

  4. Appendix II. Molecular Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The study of crop evolution, origins, and conservation entails the assessment of genetic variability with and between populations and species at different genetic, evolutionary, and taxonomic hierarchical levels. Molecular biology has greatly increased the amount of data and computational intensity...

  5. Molecular ion photofragment spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new molecular ion photofragment spectrometer is described which features a supersonic molecular beam ion source and a radio frequency octapole ion trap interaction region. This unique combination allows several techniques to be applied to the problem of detecting a photon absorption event of a molecular ion. In particular, it may be possible to obtain low resolution survey spectra of exotic molecular ions by using a direct vibrational predissociation process, or by using other more indirect detection methods. The use of the spectrometer is demonstrated by measuring the lifetime of the O2+(4π/sub u/) metastable state which is found to consist of two main components: the 4π/sub 5/2/ and 4π/sub -1/2/ spin components having a long lifetime (approx. 129 ms) and the 4π/sub 3/2/ and 4π/sub 1/2/ spin components having a short lifetime (approx. 6 ms)

  6. Ontologies for molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze-Kremer, S

    1998-01-01

    Molecular biology has a communication problem. There are many databases using their own labels and categories for storing data objects and some using identical labels and categories but with a different meaning. A prominent example is the concept "gene" which is used with different semantics by major international genomic databases. Ontologies are one means to provide a semantic repository to systematically order relevant concepts in molecular biology and to bridge the different notions in various databases by explicitly specifying the meaning of and relation between the fundamental concepts in an application domain. Here, the upper level and a database branch of a prospective ontology for molecular biology (OMB) is presented and compared to other ontologies with respect to suitability for molecular biology (http:/(/)igd.rz-berlin.mpg.de/approximately www/oe/mbo.html). PMID:9697223

  7. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoover, W.G. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA). Dept. of Applied Science Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

    1990-11-01

    The development of nonequilibrium molecular dynamics is described, with emphasis on massively-parallel simulations involving the motion of millions, soon to be billions, of atoms. Corresponding continuum simulations are also discussed. 14 refs., 8 figs.

  8. Molecular electronic junction transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, Gemma C.; Herrmann, Carmen; Ratner, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Whenasinglemolecule,oracollectionofmolecules,isplacedbetween two electrodes and voltage is applied, one has a molecular transport junction. We discuss such junctions, their properties, their description, and some of their applications. The discussion is qualitative rather than quantitative......, and focuses on mechanism, structure/function relations, regimes and mechanisms of transport, some molecular regularities, and some substantial challenges facing the field. Because there are many regimes and mechanisms in transport junctions, we will discuss time scales, geometries, and inelastic scattering...

  9. Phylogenetic molecular function annotation

    OpenAIRE

    Barbara E Engelhardt; Jordan, Michael I.; Repo, Susanna T; Brenner, Steven E

    2009-01-01

    It is now easier to discover thousands of protein sequences in a new microbial genome than it is to biochemically characterize the specific activity of a single protein of unknown function. The molecular functions of protein sequences have typically been predicted using homology-based computational methods, which rely on the principle that homologous proteins share a similar function. However, some protein families include groups of proteins with different molecular functions. A phylogenetic ...

  10. Cardiovascular Molecular Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Khanicheh, Elham

    2009-01-01

    Although there have been significant improvements in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases they still remain the main cause of morbidity and mortality globally. Currently available diagnostic approaches may not be adequate to detect pathologic changes during the early disease stages, which may be valuable for risk stratification and also to assess a response to a therapy. Therefore molecular imaging techniques such as Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound (CEU) molecular imaging to noninvasively i...

  11. MOLECULAR REPLICATOR DYNAMICS

    OpenAIRE

    BÄRBEL M. R. STADLER; Stadler, Peter F

    2003-01-01

    Template-dependent replication at the molecular level is the basis of reproduction in nature. A detailed understanding of the peculiarities of the chemical reaction kinetics associated with replication processes is therefore an indispensible prerequisite for any understanding of evolution at the molecular level. Networks of interacting self-replicating species can give rise to a wealth of different dynamical phenomena, from competitive exclusion to permanent coexistence, from global stability...

  12. Nearby Molecular Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrun, F.

    1984-01-01

    If the gas-to-dust ratio is sufficiently uniform throughout the local interstellar medium, galaxy counts may provide a useful probe of the large scale structure of the interstellar gas. This idea substantiated by gamma ray observations led to the discovery of nearby molecular cloud complexes. The reddening studies indicate that one of them lies between 80 and 140 pc from the Sun. From CO observations, its molecular mass is estimated to be a few 1000 stellar mass units.

  13. Towards molecular photochemionics

    OpenAIRE

    Margherita Venturi; Vincenzo Balzani; Roberto Ballardini; Alberto Credi; M. Teresa Gandolfi

    2004-01-01

    In the last few years there has been a great interest in developing electronics at a molecular level (molecular electronics), e.g. to construct miniaturized electric circuits that would be much smaller than the corresponding micron-scale digital logic circuits fabricated on conventional solid-state semiconductor chips. An alternative possibility to the use of electron fluxes as a means for information processing (electronics) is that of using optical beams (photonics), but up until now scarce...

  14. Molecular imaging in oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schober, Otmar; Riemann, Burkhard (eds.) [Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2013-02-01

    Considers in detail all aspects of molecular imaging in oncology, ranging from basic research to clinical applications in the era of evidence-based medicine. Examines technological issues and probe design. Discusses preclinical studies in detail, with particular attention to multimodality imaging. Presents current clinical use of PET/CT, SPECT/CT, and optical imagingWritten by acknowledged experts. The impact of molecular imaging on diagnostics, therapy, and follow-up in oncology is increasing significantly. The process of molecular imaging includes key biotarget identification, design of specific molecular imaging probes, and their preclinical evaluation, e.g., in vivo using small animal studies. A multitude of such innovative molecular imaging probes have already entered clinical diagnostics in oncology. There is no doubt that in future the emphasis will be on multimodality imaging in which morphological, functional, and molecular imaging techniques are combined in a single clinical investigation that will optimize diagnostic processes. This handbook addresses all aspects of molecular imaging in oncology, ranging from basic research to clinical applications in the era of evidence-based medicine. The first section is devoted to technology and probe design, and examines a variety of PET and SPECT tracers as well as multimodality probes. Preclinical studies are then discussed in detail, with particular attention to multimodality imaging. In the third section, diverse clinical applications are presented, and the book closes by looking at future challenges. This handbook will be of value to all who are interested in the revolution in diagnostic oncology that is being brought about by molecular imaging.

  15. Molecular Programming Pseudo-code Representation to Molecular Electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Pradhan, Manas Ranjan

    2010-01-01

    This research paper is proposing the idea of pseudo code representation to molecular programming used in designing molecular electronics devices. Already the schematic representation of logical gates like AND, OR, NOT etc.from molecular diodes or resonant tunneling diode are available. This paper is setting a generic pseudo code model so that various logic gates can be formulated. These molecular diodes have designed from organic molecules or Bio-molecules. Our focus is on to give a scenario of molecular computation through molecular programming. We have restricted our study to molecular rectifying diode and logic device as AND gate from organic molecules only.

  16. Quantum Molecular Magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brechet, Sylvain; Reuse, Francois; Maschke, Klaus; Ansermet, Jean-Philippe

    2015-03-01

    Our theoretical description of quantum molecular magnetism is based on the quantum master equations, where the system consists of the electronic spin degrees of freedom and the bath consists of the remaining degrees of freedom. The system is weakly coupled and weakly correlated to the bath, which is at equilibrium on an appropriate time scale. The electrons satisfy the exclusion principle, which requires the tensorial product of the spin and orbital parts of the state to be antisymmetric under permutation. However, the symmetries of the parts of the state taken separately are determined by the irreducible unitary representations of the permutation group. The structure of the quantum master equations is also determined by these representations. The coupling between different isotypic components of the permutation group appearing in the quantum master equations leads to a description of magnetic dissipation at the molecular level and defines molecular spin selection rules. Thus, this theoretical description is expected to bring new and fundamental insight for molecular magnetism. In particular, it is expected to predict the non-trivial deflection of molecular clusters in a field gradient.

  17. Molecular MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic medicobiological research in recent years has made rapid advances in the functional understanding of normal and pathological processes down to the molecular level. At the same time, various imaging modalities have developed from the depiction of organs to approaching the depiction of the cellular level and are about to make the visualization of molecular processes an established procedure. Besides other modalities like PET and near-infrared fluorescence, MR imaging offers some promising options for molecular imaging as well as some applications that have already been tested such as the visualization of enzyme activity, the depiction of the expression of certain genes, the visualization of surface receptors, or the specific demonstration of cells involved in the body's immune response. A major advantage of molecular magnetic resonance imaging (mMRI) over other more sensitive modalities is its high spatial resolution. However, the establishment of mMRI crucially relies on further improvements in resolution and the development of molecular markers for improving its sensitivity and specificity. The state of the art of mMRI is presented by giving a survey of the literature on experimental studies and reporting the results our study group obtained during investigation on gliomas. (orig.)

  18. Molecularly targeted therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: It is generally agreed that current focus of nuclear medicine development should be on molecular imaging and therapy. Though, the widespread use of the terminology 'molecular imaging' is quite recent, nuclear medicine has used molecular imaging techniques for more than 20 years ago. A variety of radiopharmaceuticals have been introduced for the internal therapy of malignant and inflammatory lesions in nuclear medicine. In the field of bio/medical imaging, nuclear medicine is one of the disciplines which has the privilege of organized and well developed chemistry/ pharmacy section; radio-chemistry/radiopharmacy. Fundamental principles have been developed more than 40 years ago and advanced research is going well into postgenomic era. The genomic revolution and dramatically increased insight in the molecular mechanisms underlying pathology have led to paradigm shift in drug development. Likewise does in the nuclear medicine. Here, the author will present current clinical and pre-clinical therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals based on molecular targets such as membrane-bound receptors, enzymes, nucleic acids, sodium iodide symporter, etc, in correlation with fundamentals of radiopharmacy. (author)

  19. Theoretical Molecular Biophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Scherer, Philipp

    2010-01-01

    "Theoretical Molecular Biophysics" is an advanced study book for students, shortly before or after completing undergraduate studies, in physics, chemistry or biology. It provides the tools for an understanding of elementary processes in biology, such as photosynthesis on a molecular level. A basic knowledge in mechanics, electrostatics, quantum theory and statistical physics is desirable. The reader will be exposed to basic concepts in modern biophysics such as entropic forces, phase separation, potentials of mean force, proton and electron transfer, heterogeneous reactions coherent and incoherent energy transfer as well as molecular motors. Basic concepts such as phase transitions of biopolymers, electrostatics, protonation equilibria, ion transport, radiationless transitions as well as energy- and electron transfer are discussed within the frame of simple models.

  20. Molecular pathogenesis of cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fava, G; Lorenzini, I

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological data from the last years show an increasing trend of incidence and mortality of cholangiocarcinoma (CC) worldwide. Many pathophysiologic aspects of this neoplasia are still unknown and need to be fully discovered. However, several progresses were recently made in order to establish the molecular mechanisms involved in the transformation and growth of malignant cholangiocytes. The principal concept that at least seems to be established is that cholangiocarcinogenesis is a multistep cellular process evolving from a normal condition of the epithelial biliary cells through a chronic inflammation status ending with malignant transformation. The bad prognosis related to CC justifies why a better identification of the molecular mechanisms involved in the growth and progression of this cancer is required for the development of effective preventive measures and valid treatment regimens. This Paper describes the scientific progresses made in the last years in defining the molecular pathways implicated in the generation of this devastating disease. PMID:21994887

  1. Molecular mechanisms of cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fava, Giammarco

    2010-04-15

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CC), the malignant tumor of the epithelial cells lining the biliary ducts, has undergone a worldwide increase in incidence and mortality. The malignant transformation of the biliary cells originates from a multistep process evolving through chronic inflammation of the biliary tract to CC. In the last few years several advances have been towards understanding and clarifying the molecular mechanisms implicated in the cholangiocarcinogenesis process. However, many pathophysiologic aspects governing the growth of CC are still undefined. The poor prognosis of this tumor underlines the urgent need to codify the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in the growth and progression of CC in order to design effective preventive measures and valid treatment regimens. This review reports on progresses made in the last few years in clarifying the molecular pathways involved in the process of cholangiocarcinogenesis. PMID:21607138

  2. Engines at molecular scales

    CERN Document Server

    Krishnan, R; Krishnan, Raishma

    2004-01-01

    In recent literature there has been a lot of interest in the phenomena of noise induced transport in the absence of an average bias occurring in spatially periodic systems far from equilibrium. One of the main motivations in this area is to understand the mechanism behind the operation of biological motors at molecular scale. These molecular motors convert chemical energy available during the hydrolysis of ATP into mechanical motion to transport cargo and vesicles in living cells with very high reliability, adaptability and efficiency in a very noisy environment. The basic principle behind such a motion, namely the Brownian ratchet principle, has applications in nanotechnology as novel nanoparticle separation devices. Also, the mechanism of ratchet operation finds applications in game theory. Here, we briefly focus on the physical concepts underlying the constructive role of noise in assisting transport at a molecular level. The nature of particle currents, the energetic efficiency of these motors, the entrop...

  3. Molecular effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basis of radiobiology based on the effects of radiation in cells and tissues. Though the primary constituents of tissues are DNA and chromosomes, thus we need to know the effects of radiation in its molecular level before going for its effect in tissue level. The most abundant molecule inside the body is water molecule, and any type of radiation effect to water molecule might affect the whole body functionality. Brief knowledge about the effect of radiation in molecular level on the basis of hydrolysis of water; and radiation damage to DNA and chromosome will be helpful to understand the basics of radiobiology. (author)

  4. Molecular cardiovascular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although huge and long-lasting research efforts have been spent on the development of new diagnostic techniques investigating cardiovascular diseases, still fundamental challenges exist; the main challenge being the diagnosis of a suspected or known coronary artery disease or its consequences (myocardial infarction, heart failure etc.). Beside morphological techniques, functional imaging modalities are available in clinical diagnostic algorithms, whereas molecular cardiovascular imaging techniques are still under development. This review summarizes clinical-diagnostical challenges of modern cardiovascular medicine as well as the potential of new molecular imaging techniques to face these. (orig.)

  5. Molecular Rotors as Switches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang L. Wang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of a functional molecular unit acting as a state variable provides an attractive alternative for the next generations of nanoscale electronics. It may help overcome the limits of conventional MOSFETd due to their potential scalability, low-cost, low variability, and highly integratable characteristics as well as the capability to exploit bottom-up self-assembly processes. This bottom-up construction and the operation of nanoscale machines/devices, in which the molecular motion can be controlled to perform functions, have been studied for their functionalities. Being triggered by external stimuli such as light, electricity or chemical reagents, these devices have shown various functions including those of diodes, rectifiers, memories, resonant tunnel junctions and single settable molecular switches that can be electronically configured for logic gates. Molecule-specific electronic switching has also been reported for several of these device structures, including nanopores containing oligo(phenylene ethynylene monolayers, and planar junctions incorporating rotaxane and catenane monolayers for the construction and operation of complex molecular machines. A specific electrically driven surface mounted molecular rotor is described in detail in this review. The rotor is comprised of a monolayer of redox-active ligated copper compounds sandwiched between a gold electrode and a highly-doped P+ Si. This electrically driven sandwich-type monolayer molecular rotor device showed an on/off ratio of approximately 104, a read window of about 2.5 V, and a retention time of greater than 104 s. The rotation speed of this type of molecular rotor has been reported to be in the picosecond timescale, which provides a potential of high switching speed applications. Current-voltage spectroscopy (I-V revealed a temperature-dependent negative differential resistance (NDR associated with the device. The analysis of the device

  6. Valency and molecular structure

    CERN Document Server

    Cartmell, E

    1977-01-01

    Valency and Molecular Structure, Fourth Edition provides a comprehensive historical background and experimental foundations of theories and methods relating to valency and molecular structures. In this edition, the chapter on Bohr theory has been removed while some sections, such as structures of crystalline solids, have been expanded. Details of structures have also been revised and extended using the best available values for bond lengths and bond angles. Recent developments are mostly noted in the chapter on complex compounds, while a new chapter has been added to serve as an introduction t

  7. Substructured multibody molecular dynamics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grest, Gary Stephen; Stevens, Mark Jackson; Plimpton, Steven James; Woolf, Thomas B. (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD); Lehoucq, Richard B.; Crozier, Paul Stewart; Ismail, Ahmed E.; Mukherjee, Rudranarayan M. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY); Draganescu, Andrei I.

    2006-11-01

    We have enhanced our parallel molecular dynamics (MD) simulation software LAMMPS (Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator, lammps.sandia.gov) to include many new features for accelerated simulation including articulated rigid body dynamics via coupling to the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute code POEMS (Parallelizable Open-source Efficient Multibody Software). We use new features of the LAMMPS software package to investigate rhodopsin photoisomerization, and water model surface tension and capillary waves at the vapor-liquid interface. Finally, we motivate the recipes of MD for practitioners and researchers in numerical analysis and computational mechanics.

  8. Molecular beam epitaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Pamplin, Brian R

    1980-01-01

    Molecular Beam Epitaxy introduces the reader to the use of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) in the generation of III-V and IV-VI compounds and alloys and describes the semiconductor and integrated optics reasons for using the technique. Topics covered include semiconductor superlattices by MBE; design considerations for MBE systems; periodic doping structure in gallium arsenide (GaAs); nonstoichiometry and carrier concentration control in MBE of compound semiconductors; and MBE techniques for IV-VI optoelectronic devices. The use of MBE to fabricate integrated optical devices and to study semicond

  9. Synthetic Mechanochemical Molecular Swimmer

    CERN Document Server

    Golestanian, Ramin

    2010-01-01

    A minimal design for a molecular swimmer is proposed that is a based on a mechanochemical propulsion mechanism. Conformational changes are induced by electrostatic actuation when specific parts of the molecule temporarily acquire net charges through catalyzed chemical reactions involving ionic components. The mechanochemical cycle is designed such that the resulting conformational changes would be sufficient for achieving low Reynolds number propulsion. The system is analyzed within the recently developed framework of stochastic swimmers to take account of the noisy environment at the molecular scale. The swimming velocity of the device is found to depend on the concentration of the fuel molecule according to the Michaelis-Menten rule in enzymatic reactions.

  10. SOYBEAN - MOLECULAR ASPECTS OF BREEDING

    OpenAIRE

    Aleksandra Sudarić

    2012-01-01

    The book Soybean: Molecular Aspects of Breedingfocuses recent progress in our understanding of thegenetics and molecular biology of soybean. This book isdivided into four parts and contains 22 chapters. Part I,Molecular Biology and Biotechnology focuses advancesin molecular biology and laboratory procedures thathave been developed recently to manipulate DNA.Part II, Breeding for abiotic stress covers proteomicsapproaches form as a powerful tool for investigatingthe molecular mechanisms of the...

  11. Molecular gastronomy in Spain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    García-Segovia, P.; Garrido, M. D.; Vercet, A.;

    2014-01-01

    Beyond the overwhelming international success of Ferrán Adria, Spain has been one of the countries with a more active implication in molecular gastronomy as a scientific discipline but also in the use of ingredients, technologies, and equipment from the scientific and technological universe in th...... scientists for facing the future of Spanish gastronomy. © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC....

  12. Molecular theory of capillarity

    CERN Document Server

    Rowlinson, J S

    2002-01-01

    History of thought on molecular origins of surface phenomena offers a critical and detailed examination and assessment of modern theories, focusing on statistical mechanics and application of results in mean-field approximation to model systems. Emphasis on liquid-gas surface, with a focus on liquid-liquid surfaces in the final chapters. 1989 edition.

  13. Molecular dynamics for fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The time-dependent variational principle for many-body trial states is used to discuss the relation between the approaches of different molecular dynamics models to describe indistinguishable fermions. Early attempts to include effects of the Pauli principle by means of nonlocal potentials as well as more recent models which work with antisymmetrized many-body states are reviewed under these premises. (orig.)

  14. Molecular and macromolecular gastronomy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Raab, Miroslav

    Praha : Ústav makromolekulární chemie AV ČR, 2010. CL_1. ISBN 978-80-85009-62-0. [Workshop "Career in Polymers" /2./. 23.07.2010-24.07.2010, Praha] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : molecular and macromolecular gastronomy Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  15. Gymnastics of molecular chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Matthias P

    2010-08-13

    Molecular chaperones assist folding processes and conformational changes in many proteins. In order to do so, they progress through complex conformational cycles themselves. In this review, I discuss the diverse conformational dynamics of the ATP-dependent chaperones of the Hsp60, Hsp70, Hsp90, and Hsp100 families. PMID:20705236

  16. Molecular Adsorber Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straka, Sharon; Peters, Wanda; Hasegawa, Mark; Hedgeland, Randy; Petro, John; Novo-Gradac, Kevin; Wong, Alfred; Triolo, Jack; Miller, Cory

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a zeolite-based sprayable molecular adsorber coating that has been developed to alleviate the size and weight issues of current ceramic puck-based technology, while providing a configuration that more projects can use to protect against degradation from outgassed materials within a spacecraft, particularly contamination-sensitive instruments. This coating system demonstrates five times the adsorption capacity of previously developed adsorber coating slurries. The molecular adsorber formulation was developed and refined, and a procedure for spray application was developed. Samples were spray-coated and tested for capacity, thermal optical/radiative properties, coating adhesion, and thermal cycling. Work performed during this study indicates that the molecular adsorber formulation can be applied to aluminum, stainless steel, or other metal substrates that can accept silicate-based coatings. The coating can also function as a thermal- control coating. This adsorber will dramatically reduce the mass and volume restrictions, and is less expensive than the currently used molecular adsorber puck design.

  17. Molecular epidemiology of ascariasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betson, Martha; Halstead, Fennella; Nejsum, Peter;

      We are using molecular epidemiology techniques to study the population structure of Ascaris obtained from humans and pigs. Worms were obtained from human hosts on Zanzibar and in Uganda, Bangladesh, Guatemala and Nepal and Ascaris from pigs were collected from in Uganda, Tanzania, Denmark...

  18. Biophysics of molecular gastronomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Michael P; Sörensen, Pia M

    2015-03-26

    Chefs and scientists exploring biophysical processes have given rise to molecular gastronomy. In this Commentary, we describe how a scientific understanding of recipes and techniques facilitates the development of new textures and expands the flavor palette. The new dishes that result engage our senses in unexpected ways. PAPERCLIP. PMID:25815978

  19. Molecular cluster magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Winpenny, Richard

    2011-01-01

    This work covers new developments in the field of molecular nanomagnetism, complementing previous books in this area (for example the volume by Gatteschi, Sessoli and Villain on Single Molecule Magnets). The book is written by experts in the field and is intended as a compilation of critical reviews of new areas rather than a comprehensive text.

  20. Molecular studies of achondroplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahar Risha

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Achondroplasia (ACH is the most frequent form of short-limbed dwarfi sm, caused by mutations in the FGFR3 gene. It follows an autosomal dominant inheritance, though most cases are sporadic. The molecular techniques are the only available methods to confi rm the diagnosis of a skeletal dysplasia. Clinical and radiological features are only suggestive and not confi rmatory. The present study was conducted to fi nd out how often the clinical diagnosis of achondroplasia is verifi ed on molecular studies. Materials and Methods: From 1998 through 2007, we carried out molecular analysis for the two common mutations in the FGFR3 gene in 130 cases clinically suspected to have ACH. Results: A diagnostic mutation was identifi ed in 53 (40.8% cases. The common mutation (1138G>A was present in 50 (94.7% of the positive cases, while the rare 1138 G>C substitution was found in three (5.3%. Conclusion: This study shows that confi rmation of clinical diagnosis of ACH by molecular genetic testing is essential to distinguish it from other skeletal dysplasias, to plan therapeutic options, and to offer genetic counseling. Management (medical and surgical in patients confi rmed to have ACH, is briefl y discussed.

  1. 星形胶质细胞功能异常诱发癫痫机制的研究进展%Progress on molecular basis of astrocyte dysfunction in epilepsy pathogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷慧; 李海涛

    2011-01-01

    癫痫是一种由于大脑神经元异常同步放电引起的脑功能障碍综合征,发病机制迄今尚未完全阐明.近年来越来越多的实验与临床研究显示,星形胶质细胞在癫痫的病理过程中起到了重要作用,有可能成为药物干预癫痫的新靶点.该文综述了星形胶质细胞由于功能以及与神经元之间信号调控异常从而诱发癫痫的分子机制的研究进展.%Epilepsy is defined as a cerebral disorder induced by abnormal synchronous discharge of neurons.The physiopathological basis controlling this neurological disease has not been fully understood.More recently, increasing evidence has suggested a critical role of astrocyte dysfunction in epilepsy pathogenesis.Astrocytes are emerging as a potential target for pharmacological intervention of epilepsy.This review focuses on the mechanisms underlying the cellular and molecular abnormalities of astrocytes that are cmrently thought to be associated with human or experi mental epilepsy.

  2. Molecular Programming Pseudo-code Representation to Molecular Electronics

    OpenAIRE

    Pradhan, Manas Ranjan; E G Rajan

    2010-01-01

    This research paper is proposing the idea of pseudo code representation to molecular programming used in designing molecular electronics devices. Already the schematic representation of logical gates like AND, OR, NOT etc.from molecular diodes or resonant tunneling diode are available. This paper is setting a generic pseudo code model so that various logic gates can be formulated. These molecular diodes have designed from organic molecules or Bio-molecules. Our focus is on to give a scenario ...

  3. Molecular and Cellular Signaling

    CERN Document Server

    Beckerman, Martin

    2005-01-01

    A small number of signaling pathways, no more than a dozen or so, form a control layer that is responsible for all signaling in and between cells of the human body. The signaling proteins belonging to the control layer determine what kinds of cells are made during development and how they function during adult life. Malfunctions in the proteins belonging to the control layer are responsible for a host of human diseases ranging from neurological disorders to cancers. Most drugs target components in the control layer, and difficulties in drug design are intimately related to the architecture of the control layer. Molecular and Cellular Signaling provides an introduction to molecular and cellular signaling in biological systems with an emphasis on the underlying physical principles. The text is aimed at upper-level undergraduates, graduate students and individuals in medicine and pharmacology interested in broadening their understanding of how cells regulate and coordinate their core activities and how diseases ...

  4. Molecular mechanisms in gliomagenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulleman, Esther; Helin, Kristian

    2005-01-01

    , in order to design novel therapies and treatments for GBM, research has recently intensified to identify the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to GBM formation. Modeling of astrocytomas by genetic manipulation of mice suggests that deregulation of the pathways that control gliogenesis during...... pathways. The expression of several of the components of these signaling cascades has been found altered in GBM, and recent data indicate that combinations of mutations in these pathways may contribute to GBM formation, although the exact mechanisms are still to be uncovered. Use of novel techniques...... including large-scale genomics and proteomics in combination with relevant mouse models will most likely provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying glioma formation and will hopefully lead to development of treatment modalities for GBM....

  5. Wholly Synthetic Molecular Machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chuyang; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2016-06-17

    The past quarter of a century has witnessed an increasing engagement on the part of physicists and chemists in the design and synthesis of molecular machines de novo. This minireview traces the development of artificial molecular machines from their prototypes in the form of shuttles and switches to their emergence as motors and pumps where supplies of energy in the form of chemical fuel, electrochemical potential and light activation become a minimum requirement for them to function away from equilibrium. The challenge facing this rapidly growing community of scientists and engineers today is one of putting wholly synthetic molecules to work, both individually and as collections. Here, we highlight some of the recent conceptual and practical advances relating to the operation of wholly synthetic rotary and linear motors. PMID:26833859

  6. FORT Molecular Ecology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Stevens, P.D.

    2011-01-01

    The mission of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) at the Fort Collins Science Center Molecular Ecology Laboratory is to use the tools and concepts of molecular genetics to address a variety of complex management questions and conservation issues facing the management of the Nation's fish and wildlife resources. Together with our partners, we design and implement studies to document genetic diversity and the distribution of genetic variation among individuals, populations, and species. Information from these studies is used to support wildlife-management planning and conservation actions. Current and past studies have provided information to assess taxonomic boundaries, inform listing decisions made under the Endangered Species Act, identify unique or genetically depauperate populations, estimate population size or survival rates, develop management or recovery plans, breed wildlife in captivity, relocate wildlife from one location to another, and assess the effects of environmental change.

  7. Interactive molecular dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Schroeder, Daniel V

    2015-01-01

    Physics students now have access to interactive molecular dynamics simulations that can model and animate the motions of hundreds of particles, such as noble gas atoms, that attract each other weakly at short distances but repel strongly when pressed together. Using these simulations, students can develop an understanding of forces and motions at the molecular scale, nonideal fluids, phases of matter, thermal equilibrium, nonequilibrium states, the Boltzmann distribution, the arrow of time, and much more. This article summarizes the basic features and capabilities of such a simulation, presents a variety of student exercises using it at the introductory and intermediate levels, and describes some enhancements that can further extend its uses. A working simulation code, in HTML5 and JavaScript for running within any modern Web browser, is provided as an online supplement.

  8. Interactive molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Daniel V.

    2015-03-01

    Physics students now have access to interactive molecular dynamics simulations that can model and animate the motions of hundreds of particles, such as noble gas atoms, that attract each other weakly at short distances but repel strongly when pressed together. Using these simulations, students can develop an understanding of forces and motions at the molecular scale, nonideal fluids, phases of matter, thermal equilibrium, nonequilibrium states, the Boltzmann distribution, the arrow of time, and much more. This article summarizes the basic features and capabilities of such a simulation, presents a variety of student exercises using it at the introductory and intermediate levels, and describes some enhancements that can further extend its uses. A working simulation code, in html5 and javascript for running within any modern Web browser, is provided as an online supplement.

  9. Welding Molecular Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolf, Cyril R R; Ferlay, Sylvie; Kyritsakas, Nathalie; Hosseini, Mir Wais

    2015-12-16

    Both for fundamental and applied sciences, the design of complex molecular systems in the crystalline phase with strict control of order and periodicity at both microscopic and macroscopic levels is of prime importance for development of new solid-state materials and devices. The design and fabrication of complex crystalline systems as networks of crystals displaying task-specific properties is a step toward smart materials. Here we report on isostructural and almost isometric molecular crystals of different colors, their use for fabrication of core-shell crystals, and their welding by 3D epitaxial growth into networks of crystals as single-crystalline entities. Welding of crystals by self-assembly processes into macroscopic networks of crystals is a powerful strategy for the design of hierarchically organized periodic complex architectures composed of different subdomains displaying targeted characteristics. Crystal welding may be regarded as a first step toward the design of new hierarchically organized complex crystalline systems. PMID:26581391

  10. Mesoporous molecular sieve catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højholt, Karen Thrane

    the micropores. Furthermore, preliminary work was done using mesoporous ZSM-5 zeolites as support material for anchoring molecular CoMo6 species for the application as potential bi-functional catalyst in simultaneous hydrodesulfurisation (HDS) and hydrocracking. HDS activity tests revealed that the...... of different catalytic applications. Primarily the zeolites were modified regarding the porosity and the introduction of metals to the framework. The obtained materials were used as solid acid catalysts, as an inert matrix for stabilising metal nanoparticles and as an anchoring material for molecular...... only be used as solid acid catalysts but can also be used as a size-selective matrix. It was shown that it is possible to encapsulate 1-2 nm sized gold nanoparticles by silicalite-1 or ZSM-5 zeolite crystals thereby forming a sintering-stable and substrate size-selective oxidation catalyst. After...

  11. Topology in Molecular Biology

    CERN Document Server

    Monastyrsky, Michail Ilych

    2007-01-01

    The book presents a class of new results in molecular biology for which topological methods and ideas are important. These include: the large-scale conformation properties of DNA; computational methods (Monte Carlo) allowing the simulation of large-scale properties of DNA; the tangle model of DNA recombination and other applications of Knot theory; dynamics of supercoiled DNA and biocatalitic properties of DNA; the structure of proteins; and other very recent problems in molecular biology. The text also provides a short course of modern topology intended for the broad audience of biologists and physicists. The authors are renowned specialists in their fields and some of the new results presented here are documented for the first time in monographic form.

  12. Communication: Molecular gears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnell, E Elliott; de Lange, Cornelis A; Meerts, W Leo

    2016-09-01

    The (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of hexamethylbenzene orientationally ordered in the nematic liquid crystal ZLI-1132 is analysed using covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy. The spectrum contains over 350 000 lines with many overlapping transitions, from which four independent direct dipolar couplings are obtained. The rotations of the six methyl groups appear to be correlated due to mutual steric hindrance. Adjacent methyl groups show counter-rotating or geared motion. Hexamethylbenzene thus behaves as a molecular hexagonal gear. PMID:27608981

  13. Molecular-beam scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernon, M.F.

    1983-07-01

    The molecular-beam technique has been used in three different experimental arrangements to study a wide range of inter-atomic and molecular forces. Chapter 1 reports results of a low-energy (0.2 kcal/mole) elastic-scattering study of the He-Ar pair potential. The purpose of the study was to accurately characterize the shape of the potential in the well region, by scattering slow He atoms produced by expanding a mixture of He in N/sub 2/ from a cooled nozzle. Chapter 2 contains measurements of the vibrational predissociation spectra and product translational energy for clusters of water, benzene, and ammonia. The experiments show that most of the product energy remains in the internal molecular motions. Chapter 3 presents measurements of the reaction Na + HCl ..-->.. NaCl + H at collision energies of 5.38 and 19.4 kcal/mole. This is the first study to resolve both scattering angle and velocity for the reaction of a short lived (16 nsec) electronic excited state. Descriptions are given of computer programs written to analyze molecular-beam expansions to extract information characterizing their velocity distributions, and to calculate accurate laboratory elastic-scattering differential cross sections accounting for the finite apparatus resolution. Experimental results which attempted to determine the efficiency of optically pumping the Li(2/sup 2/P/sub 3/2/) and Na(3/sup 2/P/sub 3/2/) excited states are given. A simple three-level model for predicting the steady-state fraction of atoms in the excited state is included.

  14. Genetic and molecular epidemiology

    OpenAIRE

    John P A Ioannidis

    2007-01-01

    Genetic and molecular epidemiology covers a vast area of research. Given the rapid changes in this field, discussing a research agenda is a precarious and ambitious task. A representative set of high‐priority concepts will be presented here, each of which alone could be the topic of a long series of essays. The wish list includes issues of full transparency and integration of information, dealing efficiently with complex multidimensional biology, juxtaposing the genome and environmental expos...

  15. Molecular Information Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Zauner, Klaus-Peter

    2005-01-01

    Molecular materials are endowed with unique properties of unrivaled potential for high density integration of computing systems. Present applications of molecules range from organic semiconductor materials for low-cost circuits to genetically modified proteins for commercial imaging equipment. To fully realize the potential of molecules in computation, information processing concepts that relinquish narrow prescriptive control over elementary structures and functions are needed, and self-orga...

  16. Switching in molecular systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nešpůrek, Stanislav; Wang, Geng; Sworakowski, J.

    Lanškroun : IMAPS, Brno University of Technology, 2004 - (Šikula, J.), s. 215-220 ISBN 80-239-2835-X. [European Microelectronics and Packaging Symposium /3./. Prague (CZ), 16.06.2004-18.06.2004] R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC D14.30 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : poly[3,4-(ethylenedioxy)thiophene] * electrical conductivity * charge carrier transport Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders

  17. Molecular Dynamics of Acetylcholinesterase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, T Y.; Tai, Kaihsu; Henchman, Richard H.; Mccammon, Andy

    2002-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are leading to a deeper understanding of the activity of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase. Simulations have shown how breathing motions in the enzyme facilitate the displacement of substrate from the surface of the enzyme to the buried active site. The most recent work points to the complex and spatially extensive nature of such motions and suggests possible modes of regulation of the activity of the enzyme.

  18. Glycobiology Current Molecular Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Sabire KARAÇALI

    2003-01-01

    Carbohydrate chemistry evolved into carbohydrate biochemistry and gradually into the biology of carbohydrates, or glycobiology, at the end of the last century. Glycobiology is the new research area of modern molecular biology, and it investigates the structure, biosynthesis and biological functions of glycans. The numbers, linkage types (a or b), positions, binding points and functional group differences of monosaccharides create microheterogeneity. Thus, numerous glycoforms with precise stru...

  19. Molecular opacities for exoplanets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernath, Peter F

    2014-04-28

    Spectroscopic observations of exoplanets are now possible by transit methods and direct emission. Spectroscopic requirements for exoplanets are reviewed based on existing measurements and model predictions for hot Jupiters and super-Earths. Molecular opacities needed to simulate astronomical observations can be obtained from laboratory measurements, ab initio calculations or a combination of the two approaches. This discussion article focuses mainly on laboratory measurements of hot molecules as needed for exoplanet spectroscopy. PMID:24664921

  20. Atomic and molecular theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inokuti, Mitio.

    1990-01-01

    The multifaceted role of theoretical physics in understanding the earliest stages of radiation action is discussed. Scientific topics chosen for the present discourse include photoabsorption, electron collisions, and ionic collisions, and electron transport theory, Connections of atomic and molecular physics with condensed-matter physics are also discussed. The present article includes some historical perspective and an outlook for the future. 114 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Molecular opacities for exoplanets

    OpenAIRE

    Bernath, Peter F.

    2014-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations of exoplanets are now possible by transit methods and direct emission. Spectroscopic requirements for exoplanets are reviewed based on existing measurements and model predictions for hot Jupiters and super-Earths. Molecular opacities needed to simulate astronomical observations can be obtained from laboratory measurements, ab initio calculations or a combination of the two approaches. This discussion article focuses mainly on laboratory measurements of hot molecules...

  2. Exploring guanidinoglycoside molecular transporters

    OpenAIRE

    Dix, Andrew Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Guanidinium-rich molecular transporters have been shown to deliver otherwise non-permeable biologically relevant cargo into cells. While many such transporters have been reported, the studies reported here focus on guanidinoglycosides, which have been shown to permeate the cell-membrane in a heparan sulfate-dependent manner. In attempt to promote a cooperative interaction with cell- surface heparan sulfate, dimeric guanidinoglycosides were synthesized and studied for their cellular uptake pro...

  3. Molecular Aspects of Capacitation

    OpenAIRE

    Gulfidan Zulfikaroglu; Hulya Ozgur; Sait Polaturkey

    2010-01-01

    Male and female gamets are derived from the primordial germ cells, which migrate from the wall of the yolk sac toward the developing gonads. Following a series of mitotic divisions these cells increase in number at the gonads. The primordial germ cells differentiate into spermatogonia and take the form of mature spermatozoa after spermotogensis and spermotogenesis at puberty. Capacitation is the reaction, which includes all of the molecular and physiological events of mature sperm to gain the...

  4. Molecular Pathogenesis of Cholangiocarcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Fava, G.; Lorenzini, I.

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological data from the last years show an increasing trend of incidence and mortality of cholangiocarcinoma (CC) worldwide. Many pathophysiologic aspects of this neoplasia are still unknown and need to be fully discovered. However, several progresses were recently made in order to establish the molecular mechanisms involved in the transformation and growth of malignant cholangiocytes. The principal concept that at least seems to be established is that cholangiocarcinogenesis is a multi...

  5. Molecular mechanisms of cholangiocarcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Fava, Giammarco

    2010-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CC), the malignant tumor of the epithelial cells lining the biliary ducts, has undergone a worldwide increase in incidence and mortality. The malignant transformation of the biliary cells originates from a multistep process evolving through chronic inflammation of the biliary tract to CC. In the last few years several advances have been towards understanding and clarifying the molecular mechanisms implicated in the cholangiocarcinogenesis process. However, many pathophysio...

  6. Primer on molecular genetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    This report is taken from the April 1992 draft of the DOE Human Genome 1991--1992 Program Report, which is expected to be published in May 1992. The primer is intended to be an introduction to basic principles of molecular genetics pertaining to the genome project. The material contained herein is not final and may be incomplete. Techniques of genetic mapping and DNA sequencing are described.

  7. MOLECULARLY IMPRINTED POLYMERS

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    The present invention refers to new classes of polymerisable monomers targeting biotin, a biotin derivative, a biotin analogue or a biotinylated molecule and related structures, as well as molecularly imprinted polymers obtainable by polymerisation of at least one of these monomers and at least one cross-linking monomer in the presence of a suitable template molecule. The obtained polymers may be used for separation of biotin and related small molecules, together with larger biotinylated mole...

  8. Molecular studies of achondroplasia

    OpenAIRE

    Nahar Risha; Saxena Renu; Kohli Sudha; Puri Ratna; Verma Ishwar

    2009-01-01

    Background: Achondroplasia (ACH) is the most frequent form of short-limbed dwarfi sm, caused by mutations in the FGFR3 gene. It follows an autosomal dominant inheritance, though most cases are sporadic. The molecular techniques are the only available methods to confi rm the diagnosis of a skeletal dysplasia. Clinical and radiological features are only suggestive and not confi rmatory. The present study was conducted to fi nd out how often the clinical diagnosis of achondroplasia is verifi ed ...

  9. Molecular Simulations of Dewetting

    OpenAIRE

    Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1999-01-01

    We have studied the breakup and subsequent fluid flow in very thin films of partially wetting liquid on solid substrates, using molecular dynamics simulations. The liquid is made of short chain molecules interacting with Lennard-Jones interactions, and the solid is modeled as a clean crystal lattice whose atoms have thermal oscillations. Films below a critical thickness are found to exhibit a spontaneous spinodal-like instability leading to dry patches, as predicted theoretically and observed...

  10. Untying molecular friction knots

    OpenAIRE

    Kirmizialtin, Serdal; Makarov, Dmitrii E.

    2006-01-01

    Motivated by recent advances in single molecule manipulation techniques that enabled several groups to tie knots in individual polymer strands and to monitor their dynamics, we have used computer simulations to study "friction knots" joining a pair of polymer strands. The key property of a friction knot splicing two ropes is that it becomes jammed when the ropes are pulled apart. In contrast, molecular friction knots eventually become undone by thermal motion. We show that depending on the kn...

  11. Molecular diagnostics in endodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Rechenberg, Dan-Krister; Zehnder, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Recent systematic reviews have substantiated the fact that current testing methods to assess the inflammatory state of the pulp and the periapical tissues are of limited value. Consequently, it may be time to search for alternative routes in endodontic diagnostics. Molecular assessment methods could be the future. However, in the field of endodontics, the research in that direction is only about to evolve. Because pulpal and periradicular diseases are related to opportunistic infections, diag...

  12. Atomic and molecular theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The multifaceted role of theoretical physics in understanding the earliest stages of radiation action is discussed. Scientific topics chosen for the present discourse include photoabsorption, electron collisions, and ionic collisions, and electron transport theory, Connections of atomic and molecular physics with condensed-matter physics are also discussed. The present article includes some historical perspective and an outlook for the future. 114 refs., 3 figs

  13. Open boundary molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Buscalioni, R.; Sablić, J.; Praprotnik, M.

    2015-09-01

    This contribution analyzes several strategies and combination of methodologies to perform molecular dynamic simulations in open systems. Here, the term open indicates that the total system has boundaries where transfer of mass, momentum and energy can take place. This formalism, which we call Open Boundary Molecular Dynamics (OBMD), can act as interface of different schemes, such as Adaptive Resolution Scheme (AdResS) and Hybrid continuum-particle dynamics to link atomistic, coarse-grained (CG) and continuum (Eulerian) fluid dynamics in the general framework of fluctuating Navier-Stokes equations. The core domain of the simulation box is solved using all-atom descriptions. The CG layer introduced using AdResS is located at the outer part of the open box to make feasible the insertion of large molecules into the system. Communications between the molecular system and the outer world are carried out in the outer layers, called buffers. These coupling preserve momentum and mass conservation laws and can thus be linked with Eulerian hydro- dynamic solvers. In its simpler form, OBMD allows, however, to impose a local pressure tensor and a heat flux across the system's boundaries. For a one component molecular system, the external normal pressure and temperature determine the external chemical potential and thus the independent parameters of a grand-canonical ensemble simulation. Extended ensembles under non-equilibrium stationary states can also be simulated as well as time dependent forcings (e.g. oscillatory rheology). To illustrate the robustness of the combined OBMD-AdResS method, we present simulations of star-polymer melts at equilibrium and in sheared flow.

  14. Molecular-beam scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The molecular-beam technique has been used in three different experimental arrangements to study a wide range of inter-atomic and molecular forces. Chapter 1 reports results of a low-energy (0.2 kcal/mole) elastic-scattering study of the He-Ar pair potential. The purpose of the study was to accurately characterize the shape of the potential in the well region, by scattering slow He atoms produced by expanding a mixture of He in N2 from a cooled nozzle. Chapter 2 contains measurements of the vibrational predissociation spectra and product translational energy for clusters of water, benzene, and ammonia. The experiments show that most of the product energy remains in the internal molecular motions. Chapter 3 presents measurements of the reaction Na + HCl → NaCl + H at collision energies of 5.38 and 19.4 kcal/mole. This is the first study to resolve both scattering angle and velocity for the reaction of a short lived (16 nsec) electronic excited state. Descriptions are given of computer programs written to analyze molecular-beam expansions to extract information characterizing their velocity distributions, and to calculate accurate laboratory elastic-scattering differential cross sections accounting for the finite apparatus resolution. Experimental results which attempted to determine the efficiency of optically pumping the Li(22P/sub 3/2/) and Na(32P/sub 3/2/) excited states are given. A simple three-level model for predicting the steady-state fraction of atoms in the excited state is included

  15. Molecular Gastronomy in Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, Roisin; Traynor, Mark; Valverde, Juan

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes the activities of molecular gastronomy (MG) in Ireland since the scientific discipline was first introduced in the country. MG has been developing over the last five years,however, the authors of this article have been trying to establish a strong MG infrastructure in Ireland. Indeed, a lot of work still needs to be done, but public interest and positive perceptions of“chemistry” have increased very quickly; consequently, there is great potential for further developmen...

  16. Molecular current switch

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nešpůrek, Stanislav; Sworakowski, J.

    Brno : Faculty of Chemistry, Brno University of Technology, 2002 - (Schauer, F.), s. 89-96 ISBN 80-214-2265-3. [Seminar on Physics and Chemistry of Molecular Systems /7./. Brno (CZ), 13.12.2001] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1050901; GA ČR GA202/01/0518 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : current switch * local states * dipolar species Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  17. Molecular adsorption on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingmei; Enders, Axel; Rahman, Talat S.; Dowben, Peter A.

    2014-11-01

    Current studies addressing the engineering of charge carrier concentration and the electronic band gap in epitaxial graphene using molecular adsorbates are reviewed. The focus here is on interactions between the graphene surface and the adsorbed molecules, including small gas molecules (H2O, H2, O2, CO, NO2, NO, and NH3), aromatic, and non-aromatic molecules (F4-TCNQ, PTCDA, TPA, Na-NH2, An-CH3, An-Br, Poly (ethylene imine) (PEI), and diazonium salts), and various biomolecules such as peptides, DNA fragments, and other derivatives. This is followed by a discussion on graphene-based gas sensor concepts. In reviewing the studies of the effects of molecular adsorption on graphene, it is evident that the strong manipulation of graphene’s electronic structure, including p- and n-doping, is not only possible with molecular adsorbates, but that this approach appears to be superior compared to these exploiting edge effects, local defects, or strain. However, graphene-based gas sensors, albeit feasible because huge adsorbate-induced variations in the relative conductivity are possible, generally suffer from the lack of chemical selectivity.

  18. Molecular biology of hearing [

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diensthuber, Marc

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available [english] The inner ear is our most sensitive sensory organ and can be subdivided into three functional units: organ of Corti, stria vascularis and spiral ganglion. The appropriate stimulus for the organ of hearing is sound, which travels through the external auditory canal to the middle ear where it is transmitted to the inner ear. The inner ear houses the hair cells, the sensory cells of hearing. The inner hair cells are capable of mechanotransduction, the transformation of mechanical force into an electrical signal, which is the basic principle of hearing. The stria vascularis generates the endocochlear potential and maintains the ionic homeostasis of the endolymph. The dendrites of the spiral ganglion form synaptic contacts with the hair cells. The spiral ganglion is composed of neurons that transmit the electrical signals from the cochlea to the central nervous system. In recent years there has been significant progress in research on the molecular basis of hearing. An increasing number of genes and proteins related to hearing are being identified and characterized. The growing knowledge of these genes contributes not only to greater appreciation of the mechanism of hearing but also to a deeper understanding of the molecular basis of hereditary hearing loss. This basic research is a prerequisite for the development of molecular diagnostics and novel therapies for hearing loss.

  19. Orbital free molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microscopic properties of hot and dense plasmas stay a field essentially studied thanks to classical theories like the One Component Plasma, models which rely on free parameters, particularly ionization. In order to investigate these systems, we have used, in this PhD work, a semi-classical model, without free parameters, that is based on coupling consistently classical molecular dynamics for the nuclei and orbital free density functional theory for the electrons. The electronic fluid is represented by a free energy entirely determined by the local density. This approximation was validated by a comparison with an ab initio technique, quantum molecular dynamics. This one is identical to the previous except for the description of the free energy that depends on a quantum-independent-particle model. Orbital free molecular dynamics was then used to compute equation of state of boron and iron plasmas in the hot and dense regime. Furthermore, comparisons with classical theories were performed on structural and dynamical properties. Finally, equation of state and transport coefficients mixing laws were studied by direct simulation of a plasma composed of deuterium and copper. (author)

  20. Thermoelectric properties of molecular nanostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Ermakov, Vladimir N.; Kruchinin, Sergei P.; Kim, Hyun Taki; Pruschke, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    We use the concept of resonant tunneling to calculate the thermopower of molecular nanosystems. It turns out that the sign of the thermovoltage under resonant tunneling conditions depends sensitively on the participating molecular orbital, and one finds a sign change when the transport channel switches from the highest occupied molecular orbital to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital. Comparing our results to recent experimental data obtained for a BDT molecule contacted with an STM tip, ...

  1. An improved molecular connectivity index

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李新华; 俞庆森; 朱龙观

    2000-01-01

    Through modification of the delta values of the molecular connectivity indexes, and connecting the quantum chemistry with topology method effectively, the molecular connectivity indexes are converted into quantum-topology indexes. The modified indexes not only keep all information obtained from the original molecular connectivity method but also have their own virtue in application, and at the same time make up some disadvantages of the quantum and molecular connectivity methods.

  2. SOYBEAN - MOLECULAR ASPECTS OF BREEDING

    OpenAIRE

    Aleksandra Sudarić

    2012-01-01

    The book Soybean: Molecular Aspects of Breeding focuses recent progress in our understanding of the genetics and molecular biology of soybean. This book is divided into four parts and contains 22 chapters. Part I, Molecular Biology and Biotechnology focuses advances in molecular biology and laboratory procedures that have been developed recently to manipulate DNA. Part II, Breeding for abiotic stress covers proteomics approaches form as a powerful tool for investigatin...

  3. A Molecular Biology Database Digest

    OpenAIRE

    Bry, François; Kröger, Peer

    2000-01-01

    Computational Biology or Bioinformatics has been defined as the application of mathematical and Computer Science methods to solving problems in Molecular Biology that require large scale data, computation, and analysis [18]. As expected, Molecular Biology databases play an essential role in Computational Biology research and development. This paper introduces into current Molecular Biology databases, stressing data modeling, data acquisition, data retrieval, and the integration...

  4. Chaos Behaviour of Molecular Orbit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Shu-Tang; SUN Fu-Yan; SHEN Shu-Lan

    2007-01-01

    Based on H(u)ckel's molecular orbit theory,the chaos and;bifurcation behaviour of a molecular orbit modelled by a nonlinear dynamic system is studied.The relationship between molecular orbit and its energy level in the nonlinear dynamic system is obtained.

  5. Computational methods for molecular imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Kuangyu; Li, Shuo

    2015-01-01

    This volume contains original submissions on the development and application of molecular imaging computing. The editors invited authors to submit high-quality contributions on a wide range of topics including, but not limited to: • Image Synthesis & Reconstruction of Emission Tomography (PET, SPECT) and other Molecular Imaging Modalities • Molecular Imaging Enhancement • Data Analysis of Clinical & Pre-clinical Molecular Imaging • Multi-Modal Image Processing (PET/CT, PET/MR, SPECT/CT, etc.) • Machine Learning and Data Mining in Molecular Imaging. Molecular imaging is an evolving clinical and research discipline enabling the visualization, characterization and quantification of biological processes taking place at the cellular and subcellular levels within intact living subjects. Computational methods play an important role in the development of molecular imaging, from image synthesis to data analysis and from clinical diagnosis to therapy individualization. This work will bring readers fro...

  6. Molecular collision theory

    CERN Document Server

    Child, M S

    2010-01-01

    This high-level monograph offers an excellent introduction to the theory required for interpretation of an increasingly sophisticated range of molecular scattering experiments. There are five helpful appendixes dealing with continuum wavefunctions, Green's functions, semi-classical connection formulae, curve-crossing in the momentum representation, and elements of classical mechanics.The contents of this volume have been chosen to emphasize the quantum mechanical and semi-classical nature of collision events, with little attention given to purely classical behavior. The treatment is essentiall

  7. NMR molecular photography

    OpenAIRE

    Khitrin, Anatoly K.; Ermakov, Vladimir L.; Fung, B M

    2002-01-01

    A procedure is described for storing a 2D pattern consisting of 32x32 = 1024 bits in a spin state of a molecular system and then retrieving the stored information as a stack of NMR spectra. The system used is a nematic liquid crystal, the protons of which act as spin clusters with strong intramolecular interactions. The technique used is a programmable multi-frequency irradiation with low amplitude. When it is applied to the liquid crystal, a large number of coherent long-lived 1H response si...

  8. Handbook of molecular plasmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Sala, Fabio Della

    2013-01-01

    While several reviews and books on surface nanophotonics and fluorescence spectroscopy are available, an updated focus on molecular plasmonics, including both theoretical methods and experimental aspects, is still lacking. This handbook is a comprehensive overview on the physics of the plasmon-emitter interaction, ranging from electromagnetism to quantum mechanics, from metal-enhanced fluorescence to surface-enhanced Raman scattering, from optical microscopy to synthesis of metal nanoparticles, filling the gap in the literature of this merging field. It allows experimentalists to have a solid

  9. Bienvenida la Medicina Molecular

    OpenAIRE

    Orlando R. Serrano-Barrera

    2015-01-01

    No ha cambiado la medicina, sino que ha avanzado. Los métodos clínico-epidemiológicos  incluyen hoy y se benefician del conocimiento de las bases moleculares del proceso salud-enfermedad, tanto las variaciones individuales, como los caracteres compartidos por comunidades y poblaciones, que las hacen resistentes o vulnerables a una enfermedad. La estimación presintomática e, incluso, prenatal del riesgo de enfermar, el diagnóstico, el pronóstico, la elección del tratamiento más ajustado al pac...

  10. The nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MOLECULAR DYNAMICS has been generalized in order to simulate a variety of NONEQUILIBRIUM systems. This generalization has been achieved by adopting microscopic mechanical definitions of macroscopic thermodynamic and hydrodynamic variables, such as temperature and stress. Some of the problems already treated include rapid plastic deformation, intense heat conduction, strong shockwaves simulation, and far-from-equilibrium phase transformations. Continuing advances in technique and in the modeling of interatomic forces, coupled with qualitative improvements in computer hardware, are enabling such simulations to approximate real-world microscale and nanoscale experiments

  11. Molecular water oxidation catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Llobet, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Photocatalytic water splitting is a promising strategy for capturing energy from the sun by coupling light harvesting and the oxidation of water, in order to create clean hydrogen fuel. Thus a deep knowledge of the water oxidation catalysis field is essential to be able to come up with useful energy conversion devices based on sunlight and water splitting. Molecular Water Oxidation Catalysis: A Key Topic for New Sustainable Energy Conversion Schemes presents a comprehensive and state-of-the-art overview of water oxidation catalysis in homogeneous phase, describing in detail the most importan

  12. Nuclear molecular states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of polarization on the stability of α-cluster structures in 8Be and 12C nuclei are studied in the intrinsic states. The extent of the polarization of α-clusters is investigated by employing a molecular-orbital model. Two α-cluster structure of 8Be is shown to be extremely stable, and a triangular configuration of three α-clusters is also shown to be stable, but the polarizations of α-clusters are found rather large. Gruemmer--Faessler's method is discussed and their results are shown to be trivial

  13. Medical physics: molecular aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Actual problems in medical physics have been considered. Features in the cell membrane structure promoting the action of anticancer drugs are studied. The mechanism of an invasive method for measuring the blood pressure is analyzed. The tension distribution in the left ventricle wall was calculated. Conditions that prevent magnetic particles, nanodiamonds, and fullerene molecules, which are used to transport drugs in human body, to aggregate in liquid systems are determined. A molecular mechanism of electric welding of biological tissues has been proposed, as well as a method to study the surface of biological structures, by using ultrasound. The origin of structural changes in human hair under the influence of chemicals is determined

  14. Molecular Pathogenesis of Spondyloarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Thomas Gelsing

    This dissertation includes a presentation of knowledge on the molecular pathogenesis of spondyloarthritis achieved through a PhD programme at Aalborg University from 1.12.2011 - 1.12.2014. Work was carried out in the Laboratory of Medical Mass Spectrometry, headed by: Professor Svend Birkelund...... Associate Professor Allan Stensballe The output of this PhD programme, besides from this dissertation, includes 5 published papers, 30 ECTS PhD courses, oral presentations of posters in national and international research environment and a short-term scholarship at the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and...

  15. Massive molecular outflows

    OpenAIRE

    Beuther, H.; Schilke, P.; Menten, K. M.; Walmsley, C. M.; Sridharan, T. K.; Wyrowski, F.

    2001-01-01

    We present a mapping study of massive molecular outflows in 26 high-mass star-forming regions at 11'' spatial resolution. Bipolar morpholgy is found in 80% of the sources and the collimation is higher than previously thought. Additionally, we find that well known low-mass correlations continue up to the high-mass regime, and accretion rates are around 10^(-4) Msun/yr rising as high as 10^(-3) Msun/yr. A tight correlation between the outflow and the core mass is established, implying that the ...

  16. Molecular origin of friction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Hui; ZHANG; Tao; HU; Yuanzhong

    2004-01-01

    The wearless friction originating from molecular interactions has been discussed in this paper. We find that the frictional properties are closely related to the structural match of two surfaces in relative motion. For the surfaces with incommensurate structure and week inter-surface interaction, zero static and kinetic friction can be achieved. In a sliding considered as in a quasi-static state, the energy dissipation initiates when interfacial particles move in a discontinuous fashion, which gives rise to a finite kinetic friction. The state of superlubricity is a result of computer simulations, but the prediction will encourage people to look for a technical approach to realizing the state of super low friction.

  17. The California Molecular Cloud

    OpenAIRE

    Lada, Charles J.; Lombardi, Marco; Alves, Joao F.

    2009-01-01

    We present an analysis of wide-field infrared extinction maps of a region in Perseus just north of the Taurus-Auriga dark cloud complex. From this analysis we have identified a massive, nearby, but previously unrecognized, giant molecular cloud (GMC). From comparison of foreground star counts with Galactic models we derive a distance of 450 +/- 23 parsecs to the cloud. At this distance the cloud extends over roughly 80 pc and has a mass of approximately 10^5 solar masses, rivaling the Orion (...

  18. Molecular Urban Revolutions?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, Kristine

    capitalism today? How can we identify the modes of spatial production in global cities today, and in what degree can we see spatial singularity in the three cases? Are they at the same time part of mass culture and spatial means of rejecting capitalist modes of established urban encoding?...... created by means of affective and assembled spaces. Finally, the paper will discuss notions of (spatial) singularization by elaborating on Suely Rolnik and Félix Guattari’s travel book, Molecular Revolutions in Brazil (2007). How, for instance, does spatial interventions relate to and transform global...

  19. Do paradigma molecular ao impacto no prognóstico: uma visão da leucemia promielocítica aguda From the molecular model to the impact on prognosis: an overview on acute promyelocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Henriques Jácomo

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available A leucemia promielocítica aguda (LPA é um modelo da aplicabilidade clínica dos conhecimentos moleculares fisiopatológicos. Caracteriza-se por alterações genéticas recorrentes que envolvem o gene do receptor alfa do ácido retinóico. A conseqüência é uma proteína com sensibilidade reduzida ao ligante, com bloqueio da diferenciação mielóide. Entretanto, doses suprafisiológicas do ácido all-trans-retinóico (ATRA são capazes de suplantar esta deficiência, e este é o princípio fundamental do tratamento da LPA, permitindo uma sobrevida livre de doença acima de 80% quando adequadamente tratada. Epidemiologicamente, difere dos demais subtipos de leucemia mielóide aguda por apresentar incidência predominante em adultos jovens e, aparentemente, maior incidência em países de colonização "latina". Contrastando com os excelentes resultados observados em países desenvolvidos, a mortalidade por LPA no Brasil ainda é alta, apesar da ampla disponibilidade das medicações no país.Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL is a model of clinical applicability of the knowledge of molecular physiopathology. It is characterized by recurrent genetic involvement of the retinoic acid alpha receptor. The consequence is a protein with low sensibility to its ligand and a myeloid maturation arrest. However, higher doses of all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA are able to supersede this deficiency and this is the mainstay of APL treatment leading to over 80% disease free survival, when adequately treated. Epidemiologically, it differs from other acute myeloid leukemia due to a higher incidence in young adults and in countries of "Latin" colonization. Differing from excellent results observed in developed countries, APL mortality in Brazil is still high, despite the wide availability of drugs.

  20. Molecular Comb Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrell, T.L.; Thundat, G.T.; Witkowski, C.E., III (Protein Discovery, Inc.)

    2007-07-17

    This CRADA was developed to enable ORNL to assist Protein Discovery, Inc. to develop a novel biomolecular separation system based on an ORNL patent application 'Photoelectrochemical Molecular Comb' by Thundat, Ferrell, and Brown. The Molecular Comb concept is based on creating light-induced charge carriers at a semiconductor-liquid interface, which is kept at a potential control such that a depletion layer is formed in the semiconductor. Focusing light from a low-power illumination source creates electron-hole pairs, which get separated in the depletion layer. The light-induced charge carriers reaching the surface attract oppositely charged biomolecules present in the solution. The solution is a buffer solution with very small concentrations of biomolecules. As the focused light is moved across the surface of the semiconductor-liquid interface, the accumulated biomolecules follow the light beam. A thin layer of gel or other similar material on the surface of the semiconductor can act as a sieving medium for separating the biomolecules according to their sizes.

  1. Towards graphyne molecular electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhihai; Smeu, Manuel; Rives, Arnaud; Maraval, Valérie; Chauvin, Remi; Ratner, Mark A; Borguet, Eric

    2015-01-01

    α-Graphyne, a carbon-expanded version of graphene ('carbo-graphene') that was recently evidenced as an alternative zero-gap semiconductor, remains a theoretical material. Nevertheless, using specific synthesis methods, molecular units of α-graphyne ('carbo-benzene' macrocycles) can be inserted between two anilinyl (4-NH2-C6H4)-anchoring groups that allow these fragments to form molecular junctions between gold electrodes. Here, electrical measurements by the scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) break junction technique and electron transport calculations are carried out on such a carbo-benzene, providing unprecedented single molecule conductance values: 106 nS through a 1.94-nm N-N distance, essentially 10 times the conductance of a shorter nanographenic hexabenzocoronene analogue. Deleting a C4 edge of the rigid C18 carbo-benzene circuit results in a flexible 'carbo-butadiene' molecule that has a conductance 40 times lower. Furthermore, carbo-benzene junctions exhibit field-effect transistor behaviour when an electrochemical gate potential is applied, opening the way for device applications. All the results are interpreted on the basis of theoretical calculations. PMID:25699991

  2. Assessment of Molecular Modeling & Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-01-03

    This report reviews the development and applications of molecular and materials modeling in Europe and Japan in comparison to those in the United States. Topics covered include computational quantum chemistry, molecular simulations by molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo methods, mesoscale modeling of material domains, molecular-structure/macroscale property correlations like QSARs and QSPRs, and related information technologies like informatics and special-purpose molecular-modeling computers. The panel's findings include the following: The United States leads this field in many scientific areas. However, Canada has particular strengths in DFT methods and homogeneous catalysis; Europe in heterogeneous catalysis, mesoscale, and materials modeling; and Japan in materials modeling and special-purpose computing. Major government-industry initiatives are underway in Europe and Japan, notably in multi-scale materials modeling and in development of chemistry-capable ab-initio molecular dynamics codes.

  3. Multiphotochromic molecular systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fihey, Arnaud; Perrier, Aurélie; Browne, Wesley R; Jacquemin, Denis

    2015-06-01

    Molecular systems encompassing more than one photochromic entity can be used to build highly functional materials, thanks to their potential multi-addressability and/or multi-response properties. Over the last decade, the synthesis and spectroscopic and kinetic characterisation as well as the modeling of a wide range of multiphotochromes have been achieved in a field that is emerging as a distinct branch of photochemistry. In this review, we provide an overview of the available multiphotochromic compounds which use a variety of photoactive building blocks, e.g., diarylethene, azobenzene, spiropyran, naphthopyran or fulgimide derivatives. Their efficiency in terms of multi-responsiveness is discussed and several strategies to circumvent the most common limitation (i.e., the loss of photochromism of one part) are described. PMID:25921433

  4. Atomic and molecular manipulation

    CERN Document Server

    Mayne, Andrew J

    2011-01-01

    Work with individual atoms and molecules aims to demonstrate that miniaturized electronic, optical, magnetic, and mechanical devices can operate ultimately even at the level of a single atom or molecule. As such, atomic and molecular manipulation has played an emblematic role in the development of the field of nanoscience. New methods based on the use of the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) have been developed to characterize and manipulate all the degrees of freedom of individual atoms and molecules with an unprecedented precision. In the meantime, new concepts have emerged to design molecules and substrates having specific optical, mechanical and electronic functions, thus opening the way to the fabrication of real nano-machines. Manipulation of individual atoms and molecules has also opened up completely new areas of research and knowledge, raising fundamental questions of "Optics at the atomic scale", "Mechanics at the atomic scale", Electronics at the atomic scale", "Quantum physics at the atomic sca...

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The molecular dynamics computer simulation discovery of the slow decay of the velocity autocorrelation function in fluids is briefly reviewed in order to contrast that long time tail with those observed for the stress autocorrelation function in fluids and the velocity autocorrelation function in the Lorentz gas. For a non-localized particle in the Lorentz gas it is made plausible that even if it behaved quantum mechanically its long time tail would be the same as the classical one. The generalization of Fick's law for diffusion for the Lorentz gas, necessary to avoid divergences due to the slow decay of correlations, is presented. For fluids, that generalization has not yet been established, but the region of validity of generalized hydrodynamics is discussed. 20 refs., 5 figs

  6. Interstellar molecular hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shull, J. M.; Beckwith, S.

    1982-01-01

    Recent progress in the detection of H2 in the interstellar medium is reviewed. The hydrogen molecule is discussed in terms of properties, and collisional excitation and dissociation rates. Molecular hydrogen formation and cooling and heating by H2 are also discussed. Ultraviolet studies provided information for the study of the formation-destruction equilibrium of H2, the kinetic temperature of the cloud, the hydrogen particle density, and the ultraviolet radiation field. Infrared observations in Orion and the planetary nebula NGC 7027 reveal two detections of vibrationally excited H2. In addition, thermal and nonthermal excitation mechanisms are discussed. Finally, it is noted that increased ultraviolet sensitivity is necessary for thorough H2 studies.

  7. Molecular Dynamics Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The development of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics is very important in the history of physics, and it underlines the difficulty in dealing with systems involving many bodies, even if those bodies are identical. Macroscopic systems of atoms typically contain so many particles that it would be virtually impossible to follow the behavior of all of the particles involved. Therefore, the behavior of a complete system can only be described or predicted in statistical ways. Under a grant to the NASA Lewis Research Center, scientists at the Case Western Reserve University have been examining the use of modern computing techniques that may be able to investigate and find the behavior of complete systems that have a large number of particles by tracking each particle individually. This is the study of molecular dynamics. In contrast to Monte Carlo techniques, which incorporate uncertainty from the outset, molecular dynamics calculations are fully deterministic. Although it is still impossible to track, even on high-speed computers, each particle in a system of a trillion trillion particles, it has been found that such systems can be well simulated by calculating the trajectories of a few thousand particles. Modern computers and efficient computing strategies have been used to calculate the behavior of a few physical systems and are now being employed to study important problems such as supersonic flows in the laboratory and in space. In particular, an animated video (available in mpeg format--4.4 MB) was produced by Dr. M.J. Woo, now a National Research Council fellow at Lewis, and the G-VIS laboratory at Lewis. This video shows the behavior of supersonic shocks produced by pistons in enclosed cylinders by following exactly the behavior of thousands of particles. The major assumptions made were that the particles involved were hard spheres and that all collisions with the walls and with other particles were fully elastic. The animated video was voted one of two

  8. Gas Phase Molecular Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, G.E.; Prrese, J.M.; Sears, T.J.; Weston, R.E.

    1999-05-21

    The goal of this research is the understanding of elementary chemical and physical processes important in the combustion of fossil fuels. Interest centers on reactions involving short-lived chemical intermediates and their properties. High-resolution high-sensitivity laser absorption methods are augmented by high temperature flow-tube reaction kinetics studies with mass spectrometric sampling. These experiments provide information on the energy levels, structures and reactivity of molecular flee radical species and, in turn, provide new tools for the study of energy flow and chemical bond cleavage in the radicals in chemical systems. The experimental work is supported by theoretical and computational work using time-dependent quantum wavepacket calculations that provide insights into energy flow between the vibrational modes of the molecule.

  9. Molecular conduction: paradigms and possibilities

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, A. W.; Datta, S

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the factors that determine the overall shape and magnitude of the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of a variety of molecular conductors sandwiched between two metallic contacts. We analyze the individual influences of the contact geometry, the molecular chemistry, the electrostatics of the environment, and charging on molecular conduction. Current conduction depends sensitively on the experimental geometry, as well as on the theoretical model for the molecule and the contacts....

  10. Time-resolved molecular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junliang; Blaga, Cosmin I.; Agostini, Pierre; DiMauro, Louis F.

    2016-06-01

    Time-resolved molecular imaging is a frontier of ultrafast optical science and physical chemistry. In this article, we review present and future key spectroscopic and microscopic techniques for ultrafast imaging of molecular dynamics and show their differences and connections. The advent of femtosecond lasers and free electron x-ray lasers bring us closer to this goal, which eventually will extend our knowledge about molecular dynamics to the attosecond time domain.

  11. POPULAR MOLECULAR MARKERS IN BACTERIA

    OpenAIRE

    Weilong, Liu; Lv, Li; MD. ASADUZZAMAN KHAN AND FEIZHOU ZHU

    2012-01-01

    Molecular markers are defined as the fragments of DNA sequence associated with a genome, which are used to identify a particular DNA sequence. Nowadays, with the explosive growth of genetic research and bacterial classification, molecular marker is an important tool to identify bacterial species. Taking account to its significant roles in clinic, medicine and food industry, in this review article, we summarize the traditional research and new development about molecular markers (also called g...

  12. Metal-mediated molecular machines

    OpenAIRE

    Howgego, David Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Nature abounds with ingenious nanoscopic machines employed to carry out all of the requisite tasks that collectively contribute to the molecular basis of life. This thesis focuses primarily on a sub-set known as "molecular walkers" which can perambulate along intracellular molecular motorways carrying out such essential tasks as vesicle transport and muscle contraction. A summary of these incredible natural motors is presented in Chapter I along with a review of the artificial ...

  13. Electrical properties of molecular crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This literature survey summarizes the electrical properties of molecular crystals: molecular crystal structure, transport and excitation mechanisms of charge-carriers, and differences compared to inorganic semi-conductors. The main results concerning the electrical conductivity of the most-studied molecular crystals are presented, together with the optical and photo-electrical properties of these crystals. Finally the different types of electrical measurements used are reviewed, as well as the limits of each method. (author)

  14. Information engineering for molecular diagnostics.

    OpenAIRE

    Sorace, J. M.; Ritondo, M.; Canfield, K.

    1994-01-01

    Clinical laboratories are beginning to apply the recent advances in molecular biology to the testing of patient samples. The emerging field of Molecular Diagnostics will require a new Molecular Diagnostics Laboratory Information System which handles the data types, samples and test methods found in this field. The system must be very flexible in regards to supporting ad-hoc queries. The requirements which are shaping the developments in this field are reviewed and a data model developed. Seve...

  15. Interface-assisted molecular spintronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular spintronics, a field that utilizes the spin state of organic molecules to develop magneto-electronic devices, has shown an enormous scientific activity for more than a decade. But, in the last couple of years, new insights in understanding the fundamental phenomena of molecular interaction on magnetic surfaces, forming a hybrid interface, are presenting a new pathway for developing the subfield of interface-assisted molecular spintronics. The recent exploration of such hybrid interfaces involving carbon based aromatic molecules shows a significant excitement and promise over the previously studied single molecular magnets. In the above new scenario, hybridization of the molecular orbitals with the spin-polarized bands of the surface creates new interface states with unique electronic and magnetic character. This study opens up a molecular-genome initiative in designing new handles to functionalize the spin dependent electronic properties of the hybrid interface to construct spin-functional tailor-made devices. Through this article, we review this subject by presenting a fundamental understanding of the interface spin-chemistry and spin-physics by taking support of advanced computational and spectroscopy tools to investigate molecular spin responses with demonstration of new interface phenomena. Spin-polarized scanning tunneling spectroscopy is favorably considered to be an important tool to investigate these hybrid interfaces with intra-molecular spatial resolution. Finally, by addressing some of the recent findings, we propose novel device schemes towards building interface tailored molecular spintronic devices for applications in sensor, memory, and quantum computing

  16. Thermally driven molecular linear motors - A molecular dynamics study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zambrano, Harvey A; Walther, Jens Honore; Jaffe, Richard Lawrence

    2009-01-01

    We conduct molecular dynamics simulations of a molecular linear motor consisting of coaxial carbon nanotubes with a long outer carbon nanotube confining and guiding the motion of an inner short, capsule-like nanotube. The simulations indicate that the motion of the capsule can be controlled by th...

  17. Bienvenida la Medicina Molecular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando R. Serrano-Barrera

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available No ha cambiado la medicina, sino que ha avanzado. Los métodos clínico-epidemiológicos  incluyen hoy y se benefician del conocimiento de las bases moleculares del proceso salud-enfermedad, tanto las variaciones individuales, como los caracteres compartidos por comunidades y poblaciones, que las hacen resistentes o vulnerables a una enfermedad. La estimación presintomática e, incluso, prenatal del riesgo de enfermar, el diagnóstico, el pronóstico, la elección del tratamiento más ajustado al paciente, las posibilidades de rehabilitación y reinserción social, la educación y promoción sanitarias son todos momentos del proceso de toma de decisiones, que el médico debe asumir en el nuevo escenario de una ciencia que ha logrado discernir las implicaciones de un número creciente de moléculas, sus variantes, sus formas mutadas y sus interacciones con otras moléculas y con factores ambientales. (1 ¿Cuán lejos está tal panorama de nuestra práctica clínica? También en nuestros escenarios se hace medicina molecular. Así ha sido desde que en 1949 Pauling catalogara la primera enfermedad molecular: la anemia drepanocítica. (2 La más temprana acción de prevención, la vacunación, se realiza a diario en las áreas de salud e incluye preparados conformados por moléculas obtenidas por vía recombinante o síntesis química, como el antígeno de superficie del virus de la hepatitis B y el polisacárido de membrana del Haemophilus influenzae, respectivamente. (3 La pesquisa poblacional de cáncer de próstata, enfocado hacia los hombres mayores de 50 años o con síntomas sugestivos, se auxilia de la cuantificación en sangre del antígeno prostático específico. (4 El tratamiento del infarto agudo del miocardio, ahora la segunda causa de muerte en Cuba, incluye la trombolisis con estreptocinasa, otra biomolécula recombinante. (5 En desarrollo, en etapa de ensayos clínicos o ya como productos registrados algunas vacunas terap

  18. Molecular digital pathology: progress and potential of exchanging molecular data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Somak; Pfeifer, John D; LaFramboise, William A; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2016-09-01

    Many of the demands to perform next generation sequencing (NGS) in the clinical laboratory can be resolved using the principles of telepathology. Molecular telepathology can allow facilities to outsource all or a portion of their NGS operation such as cloud computing, bioinformatics pipelines, variant data management, and knowledge curation. Clinical pathology laboratories can electronically share diverse types of molecular data with reference laboratories, technology service providers, and/or regulatory agencies. Exchange of electronic molecular data allows laboratories to perform validation of rare diseases using foreign data, check the accuracy of their test results against benchmarks, and leverage in silico proficiency testing. This review covers the emerging subject of molecular telepathology, describes clinical use cases for the appropriate exchange of molecular data, and highlights key issues such as data integrity, interoperable formats for massive genomic datasets, security, malpractice and emerging regulations involved with this novel practice. PMID:27471996

  19. Molecular sensors for MEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chih-Yung

    Molecular sensors, known as pressure-sensitive paint and temperature-sensitive paint, are applied inside MEMS devices to obtain the internal and external flow fields. The spatial resolution for the PSP and TSP measurements has improved to 5 mum. The low-pressure PSP sensor has been investigated for use in MEMS measurements, with an application range from continuum flow to transition flow. PSP and TSP measurements in different micro devices have been obtained with the flow fields covering steady and unsteady, subsonic and supersonic flow. In microchannel measurements, the pressure distributions inside the microchannel have been obtained for Knudsen number from 0.006 to 0.8. Compressibility and rarefaction effects can be observed in the PSP data. Detailed information at the channel inlet was also collected to discuss the entrance effect for different flow regimes. For micronozzle experiments, four different micronozzles have been fabricated to study geometry effects at the micro scale. The pressure maps inside the micronozzle devices have been obtained with PSP sensors. A modified schlieren technique is used to compare the PSP results and investigate the shock wave behavior at high- and low-pressure conditions. Thick viscous layers in the micronozzle have been observed in the low-pressure measurements. For microjet impingements, heat transfer measurements have been collected with different microjet devices by using TSP sensors. For supersonic impinging microjet measurements, both pressure and temperature data have been obtained at different pressure ratios, impingement angles and impingement distances. Measurements reveal that the magnitude and number of shock cells decreases in the micro scale due to strong viscous effects. For microturbine measurements, averaged results of PSP and TSP measurements have been obtained for a rotation speed from 1300 to 4000 rpm. Phase-averaged results have been collected by using a laser triggering system at rotation speed of 1400 rpm

  20. HIV Molecular Immunology 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yusim, Karina [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Korber, Bette Tina [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Brander, Christian [Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA), Barcelona (Spain); Barouch, Dan [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States). Division of Vaccine Research; de Boer, Rob [Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands). Faculty of Biology; Haynes, Barton F. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Duke Human Vaccine Institute and Departments of Medicine, Surgery and Immunology; Koup, Richard [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States). Vaccine Research Center; Moore, John P. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Weill Medical College; Walker, Bruce D. [Ragon Institute, Cambridge, MA (United States); Watkins, David [Wisconsin Regional Primate Research Center, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-04-05

    The scope and purpose of the HIV molecular immunology database: HIV Molecular Immunology is a companion volume to HIV Sequence Compendium. This publication, the 2015 edition, is the PDF version of the web-based HIV Immunology Database (http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/ content/immunology/). The web interface for this relational database has many search options, as well as interactive tools to help immunologists design reagents and interpret their results. In the HIV Immunology Database, HIV-specific B-cell and T-cell responses are summarized and annotated. Immunological responses are divided into three parts, CTL, T helper, and antibody. Within these parts, defined epitopes are organized by protein and binding sites within each protein, moving from left to right through the coding regions spanning the HIV genome. We include human responses to natural HIV infections, as well as vaccine studies in a range of animal models and human trials. Responses that are not specifically defined, such as responses to whole proteins or monoclonal antibody responses to discontinuous epitopes, are summarized at the end of each protein section. Studies describing general HIV responses to the virus, but not to any specific protein, are included at the end of each part. The annotation includes information such as cross-reactivity, escape mutations, antibody sequence, TCR usage, functional domains that overlap with an epitope, immune response associations with rates of progression and therapy, and how specific epitopes were experimentally defined. Basic information such as HLA specificities for T-cell epitopes, isotypes of monoclonal antibodies, and epitope sequences are included whenever possible. All studies that we can find that incorporate the use of a specific monoclonal antibody are included in the entry for that antibody. A single T-cell epitope can have multiple entries, generally one entry per study. Finally, maps of all defined linear epitopes relative to the HXB2 reference proteins

  1. Optically controllable molecular logic circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular logic circuits represent a promising technology for observation and manipulation of biological systems at the molecular level. However, the implementation of molecular logic circuits for temporal and programmable operation remains challenging. In this paper, we demonstrate an optically controllable logic circuit that uses fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) for signaling. The FRET-based signaling process is modulated by both molecular and optical inputs. Based on the distance dependence of FRET, the FRET pathways required to execute molecular logic operations are formed on a DNA nanostructure as a circuit based on its molecular inputs. In addition, the FRET pathways on the DNA nanostructure are controlled optically, using photoswitching fluorescent molecules to instruct the execution of the desired operation and the related timings. The behavior of the circuit can thus be controlled using external optical signals. As an example, a molecular logic circuit capable of executing two different logic operations was studied. The circuit contains functional DNAs and a DNA scaffold to construct two FRET routes for executing Input 1 AND Input 2 and Input 1 AND NOT Input 3 operations on molecular inputs. The circuit produced the correct outputs with all possible combinations of the inputs by following the light signals. Moreover, the operation execution timings were controlled based on light irradiation and the circuit responded to time-dependent inputs. The experimental results demonstrate that the circuit changes the output for the required operations following the input of temporal light signals

  2. Optically controllable molecular logic circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Takahiro, E-mail: t-nishimura@ist.osaka-u.ac.jp; Fujii, Ryo; Ogura, Yusuke; Tanida, Jun [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Osaka University, 1-5 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2015-07-06

    Molecular logic circuits represent a promising technology for observation and manipulation of biological systems at the molecular level. However, the implementation of molecular logic circuits for temporal and programmable operation remains challenging. In this paper, we demonstrate an optically controllable logic circuit that uses fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) for signaling. The FRET-based signaling process is modulated by both molecular and optical inputs. Based on the distance dependence of FRET, the FRET pathways required to execute molecular logic operations are formed on a DNA nanostructure as a circuit based on its molecular inputs. In addition, the FRET pathways on the DNA nanostructure are controlled optically, using photoswitching fluorescent molecules to instruct the execution of the desired operation and the related timings. The behavior of the circuit can thus be controlled using external optical signals. As an example, a molecular logic circuit capable of executing two different logic operations was studied. The circuit contains functional DNAs and a DNA scaffold to construct two FRET routes for executing Input 1 AND Input 2 and Input 1 AND NOT Input 3 operations on molecular inputs. The circuit produced the correct outputs with all possible combinations of the inputs by following the light signals. Moreover, the operation execution timings were controlled based on light irradiation and the circuit responded to time-dependent inputs. The experimental results demonstrate that the circuit changes the output for the required operations following the input of temporal light signals.

  3. Cardiovascular molecular imaging of apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolters, S.L.; Reutelingsperger, C.P.M. [Maastricht University, Department of Biochemistry, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Corsten, M.F.; Hofstra, L. [Maastricht University, Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, P.O. Box 616, Maastricht (Netherlands); Narula, J. [University of California Irvine, Department of Cardiology, Irvine (United States)

    2007-06-15

    Molecular imaging strives to visualise processes at the molecular and cellular level in vivo. Understanding these processes supports diagnosis and evaluation of therapeutic efficacy on an individual basis and thereby makes personalised medicine possible. Apoptosis is a well-organised mode of cell suicide that plays a role in cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Apoptosis is associated with loss of cardiomyocytes following myocardial infarction, atherosclerotic plaque instability, congestive heart failure and allograft rejection of the transplanted heart. Thus, apoptosis constitutes an attractive target for molecular imaging of CVD. Our current knowledge about the molecular players and mechanisms underlying apoptosis offers a rich palette of potential molecular targets for molecular imaging. However, only a few have been successfully developed so far. This review highlights aspects of the molecular machinery and biochemistry of apoptosis relevant to the development of molecular imaging probes. It surveys the role of apoptosis in four major areas of CVD and portrays the importance and future perspectives of apoptosis imaging. The annexin A5 imaging protocol is emphasised since it is the most advanced protocol to measure apoptosis in both preclinical and clinical studies. (orig.)

  4. Chemical evolution of molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sheo S.; Tarafdar, Sankar P.; Villere, Karen R.; Huntress, Wesley T., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The principles behind the coupled chemical-dynamical evolution of molecular clouds are described. Particular attention is given to current problems involving the simplest species (i.e., C. CO, O2, and H2) in quiescent clouds. The results of a comparison made between the molecular abundances in the Orion ridge and the hot core (Blake, 1986) are presented.

  5. From Molecular Biology to Biomedicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From Molecular Biology to Biomedicine. The well known molecular biologist Margarita Salas offered an informative conference at the CSN on progress in these areas since the discovery, more than half a century ago, of the structure of the molecule carrying genetic information, DNA, work that is having an enormous impact in areas such as biomedicine and foodstuff production. (Author)

  6. Teaching Molecular Biology with Microcomputers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Rebecca; Jameson, David

    1984-01-01

    Describes a series of computer programs that use simulation and gaming techniques to present the basic principles of the central dogma of molecular genetics, mutation, and the genetic code. A history of discoveries in molecular biology is presented and the evolution of these computer assisted instructional programs is described. (MBR)

  7. Molecular ecology of aquatic microbes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    Abstracts of reports are presented from a meeting on Molecular Ecology of Aquatic Microbes. Topics included: opportunities offered to aquatic ecology by molecular biology; the role of aquatic microbes in biogeochemical cycles; characterization of the microbial community; the effect of the environment on aquatic microbes; and the targeting of specific biological processes.

  8. Molecular imaging in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyners, A K L; Broekman, K E; Glaudemans, A W J M; Brouwers, A H; Arts, H J G; van der Zee, A G J; de Vries, E G E; Jalving, M

    2016-04-01

    Ovarian cancer has a high mortality and novel-targeted treatment strategies have not resulted in breakthroughs for this disease. Insight into the molecular characteristics of ovarian tumors may improve diagnosis and selection of patients for treatment with targeted therapies. A potential way to achieve this is by means of molecular imaging. Generic tumor processes, such as glucose metabolism ((18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose) and DNA synthesis ((18)F-fluorodeoxythymidine), can be visualized non-invasively. More specific targets, such as hormone receptors, growth factor receptors, growth factors and targets of immunotherapy, can also be visualized. Molecular imaging can capture data on intra-patient tumor heterogeneity and is of potential value for individualized, target-guided treatment selection. Early changes in molecular characteristics during therapy may serve as early predictors of response. In this review, we describe the current knowledge on molecular imaging in the diagnosis and as an upfront or early predictive biomarker in patients with ovarian cancer. PMID:27141066

  9. Molecular path for ligand search

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Lu; Yuan Yuan Qiao; Pan Wen Shen

    2011-01-01

    A ligand is a small molecule bind to several residues of a receptor. We adapt the concept of molecular path for effective ligand search with its contacting residues. Additionally, we allow wild type definitions on atoms and bonds of molecular paths for fuzzy algorithms on structural match. We choose hydrogen bond interactions to characterize the binding mode of a ligand by several proper molecular paths and use them to query the deposited ligands in PDBe that interact with their residues in the same way. Expression of molecular path and format of database entries are described with examples. Our molecular path provides a new approach to explore the ligand-receptor interactions and to provide structural framework reference on new ligand design.

  10. Handbook of Molecular Force Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Noy, Aleksandr

    2008-01-01

    "...Noy's Handbook of Molecular Force Spectroscopy is both a timely and useful summary of fundamental aspects of molecular force spectroscopy, and I believe it would make a worthwhile addition to any good scientific library. New research groups that are entering this field would be well advisedto study this handbook in detail before venturing into the exciting and challenging world of molecular force spectroscopy." Matthew F. Paige, University of Saskatchewan, Journal of the American Chemical Society Modern materials science and biophysics are increasingly focused on studying and controlling intermolecular interactions on the single-molecule level. Molecular force spectroscopy was developed in the past decade as the result of several unprecedented advances in the capabilities of modern scientific instrumentation, and defines a number of techniques that use mechanical force measurements to study interactions between single molecules and molecular assemblies in chemical and biological systems. Examples of these...

  11. Similarity of molecular shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, A Y; Richards, W G

    1991-10-01

    The similarity of one molecule to another has usually been defined in terms of electron densities or electrostatic potentials or fields. Here it is expressed as a function of the molecular shape. Formulations of similarity (S) reduce to very simple forms, thus rendering the computerised calculation straightforward and fast. 'Elements of similarity' are identified, in the same spirit as 'elements of chirality', except that the former are understood to be variable rather than present-or-absent. Methods are presented which bypass the time-consuming mathematical optimisation of the relative orientation of the molecules. Numerical results are presented and examined, with emphasis on the similarity of isomers. At the extreme, enantiomeric pairs are considered, where it is the dissimilarity (D = 1 - S) that is of consequence. We argue that chiral molecules can be graded by dissimilarity, and show that D is the shape-analog of the 'chirality coefficient', with the simple form of the former opening up numerical access to the latter. PMID:1770379

  12. Molecular genetics of ependymoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Yao; Stephen C.Mack; Michael D.Taylor

    2011-01-01

    Brain tumors are the leading cause of cancer death in children,with ependymoma being the third most common and posing a significant clinical burden.Its mechanism of pathogenesis,reliable prognostic indicators,and effective treatments other than surgical resection have all remained elusive.Until recently,cytogenetic techniques,and lack of cell lines and animal models.Ependymoma heterogeneity,which manifests as variations in tumor location,patient age,histological grade,and clinical behavior,together with the observation of a balanced genomic profile in up to 50% of cases,presents additional challenges in understanding the development and progression of this disease.Despite these difficulties,we have made significant headway in the past decade in identifying the genetic alterations and pathways involved in ependymoma tumorigenesis through collaborative efforts and the application of microarray-based genetic (copy number) and transcriptome profiling platforms.Genetic characterization of ependymoma unraveled distinct mRNA-defined subclasses and led to the identification of radial glial cells as its cell type of origin.This review summarizes our current knowledge in the molecular genetics of ependymoma and proposesfuture research directions necessary to further advance this field.

  13. Molecular screening in galactosemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsas, L.J.; Singh, R.; Fernhoff, P.M. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Classical galactosemia (G/G) is caused by the absence of galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT) activity while the Duarte allele produces partial impairment and a specific biochemical phenotype. Cloning and sequencing of the human GALT gene has enabled the identification of prevalent mutations for both Classical and Duarte alleles. The G allele is caused by a Q188R codon mutation in exon 6 in 70% of a Caucasian population while the D allele is caused by an N134D codon mutation in exon 10. Since the Q188R sequence creates a new Hpa II site and the N314D sequence creates a new Sin I site, it is relatively easy to screen for both mutations by multiplex PCR and restriction digest. Here we describe a method for detection of new mutations producing impaired GALT. Patient DNAs are subjected to SSCP (single strand conformational polymorphism) analysis of their 11 GALT exons. Direct sequencing of the exons targeted by SSCP has revealed many codon changes: IVSC 956 (a splice acceptor site loss), S135L, V151A, E203K, A320T, and Y323D. Two of these codon changes, V151A and S135L, have been confirmed as mutations by finding impaired GALT activity in a yeast expression system. We conclude that molecular screening of GALT DNA will clarify the structural biology of GALT and the pathophysiology of galactosemia.

  14. [Advances in Molecular Cloning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwini, M; Murugan, S B; Balamurugan, S; Sathishkumar, R

    2016-01-01

    "Molecular cloning" meaning creation of recombinant DNA molecules has impelled advancement throughout life sciences. DNA manipulation has become easy due to powerful tools showing exponential growth in applications and sophistication of recombinant DNA technology. Cloning genes has become simple what led to an explosion in the understanding of gene function by seamlessly stitching together multiple DNA fragments or by the use of swappable gene cassettes, maximizing swiftness and litheness. A novel archetype might materialize in the near future with synthetic biology techniques that will facilitate quicker assembly and iteration of DNA clones, accelerating the progress of gene therapy vectors, recombinant protein production processes and new vaccines by in vitro chemical synthesis of any in silico-specified DNA construct. The advent of innovative cloning techniques has opened the door to more refined applications such as identification and mapping of epigenetic modifications and high-throughput assembly of combinatorial libraries. In this review, we will examine the major breakthroughs in cloning techniques and their applications in various areas of biological research that have evolved mainly due to easy construction of novel expression systems. PMID:27028806

  15. Radically enhanced molecular recognition

    KAUST Repository

    Trabolsi, Ali

    2009-12-17

    The tendency for viologen radical cations to dimerize has been harnessed to establish a recognition motif based on their ability to form extremely strong inclusion complexes with cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) in its diradical dicationic redox state. This previously unreported complex involving three bipyridinium cation radicals increases the versatility of host-guest chemistry, extending its practice beyond the traditional reliance on neutral and charged guests and hosts. In particular, transporting the concept of radical dimerization into the field of mechanically interlocked molecules introduces a higher level of control within molecular switches and machines. Herein, we report that bistable and tristable [2]rotaxanes can be switched by altering electrochemical potentials. In a tristable [2]rotaxane composed of a cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) ring and a dumbbell with tetrathiafulvalene, dioxynaphthalene and bipyridinium recognition sites, the position of the ring can be switched. On oxidation, it moves from the tetrathiafulvalene to the dioxynaphthalene, and on reduction, to the bipyridinium radical cation, provided the ring is also reduced simultaneously to the diradical dication. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  16. HIV Molecular Immunology 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yusim, Karina [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Korber, Bette Tina Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Barouch, Dan [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Koup, Richard [Vaccine Research Center National Institutes of Health (United States); de Boer, Rob [Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Biology; Moore, John P. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Weill Medical College; Brander, Christian [Institucioi Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA), Barcelona (Spain); Haynes, Barton F. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Duke Human Vaccine Institute and Departments of Medicine, Surgery and Immunology; Walker, Bruce D. [Ragon Institute of Massachusetts General Hospital, Cambridge, MA (United States); Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2015-02-03

    HIV Molecular Immunology is a companion volume to HIV Sequence Compendium. This publication, the 2014 edition, is the PDF version of the web-based HIV Immunology Database (http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/content/immunology/). The web interface for this relational database has many search options, as well as interactive tools to help immunologists design reagents and interpret their results. In the HIV Immunology Database, HIV-specific B-cell and T-cell responses are summarized and annotated. Immunological responses are divided into three parts, CTL, T helper, and antibody. Within these parts, defined epitopes are organized by protein and binding sites within each protein, moving from left to right through the coding regions spanning the HIV genome. We include human responses to natural HIV infections, as well as vaccine studies in a range of animal models and human trials. Responses that are not specifically defined, such as responses to whole proteins or monoclonal antibody responses to discontinuous epitopes, are summarized at the end of each protein section. Studies describing general HIV responses to the virus, but not to any specific protein, are included at the end of each part. The annotation includes information such as crossreactivity, escape mutations, antibody sequence, TCR usage, functional domains that overlap with an epitope, immune response associations with rates of progression and therapy, and how specific epitopes were experimentally defined. Basic information such as HLA specificities for T-cell epitopes, isotypes of monoclonal antibodies, and epitope sequences are included whenever possible. All studies that we can find that incorporate the use of a specific monoclonal antibody are included in the entry for that antibody. A single T-cell epitope can have multiple entries, generally one entry per study. Finally, maps of all defined linear epitopes relative to the HXB2 reference proteins are provided.

  17. Molecular imaging in atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atherosclerosis is the major cause of cardiovascular disease, which still has the leading position in morbidity and mortality in the Western world. Many risk factors and pathobiological processes are acting together in the development of atherosclerosis. This leads to different remodelling stages (positive and negative) which are both associated with plaque physiology and clinical presentation. The different remodelling stages of atherosclerosis are explained with their clinical relevance. Recent advances in basic science have established that atherosclerosis is not only a lipid storage disease, but that also inflammation has a fundamental role in all stages of the disease. The molecular events leading to atherosclerosis will be extensively reviewed and described. Further on in this review different modalities and their role in the different stages of atherosclerosis will be discussed. Non-nuclear invasive imaging techniques (intravascular ultrasound, intravascular MRI, intracoronary angioscopy and intravascular optical coherence tomography) and non-nuclear non-invasive imaging techniques (ultrasound with Doppler flow, electron-bean computed tomography, coronary computed tomography angiography, MRI and coronary artery MR angiography) will be reviewed. After that we focus on nuclear imaging techniques for detecting atherosclerotic plaques, divided into three groups: atherosclerotic lesion components, inflammation and thrombosis. This emerging area of nuclear imaging techniques can provide measures of biological activity of atherosclerotic plaques, thereby improving the prediction of clinical events. As we will see in the future perspectives, at present, there is no special tracer that can be called the diagnostic tool to diagnose prospective stroke or infarction in patients. Nevertheless, we expect such a tracer to be developed in the next few years and maybe, theoretically, it could even be used for targeted therapy (in the form of a beta-emitter) to combat

  18. Department of Molecular Biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text. The majority of our studies are centered on (i) mechanisms of mutagenesis and DNA repair (including MFD) in Escherichia coli, M13, and lambda phages; (ii) inhibitory and miscoding properties of modified bases in DNA; (iii) synthesis and properties of pyrimidine nucleosides and nucleotide analogues with potential anti-tumor, anti-virus and anti-parasite activities, including their conformation and substrate/inhibitor properties in some enzyme systems of relevance to chemotherapy; (iv) molecular mechanisms of PUVA (psoralen + UVA) treatment in psoriasis photo-chemotherapy in particular its action on cell membrane; (v) specificity and methods for assays of N-alkyl-purine DNA glycosylase. The spectrum of mutagens tested includes: MMS, DMS, ultraviolet or halogen light and hydroxyl radicals. The enzymes and repair systems investigated include: DNA polymerases and the proofreading activity of DNA pol III, UvrABC-endonuclease, mismatch repair system, and methyl DNA glycosylases. Much attention is focussed on the role of UmuDC proteins in mutagenesis (dependent and independent on DNA replication) and DNA repair, and on the effect of the Tn10 transposon on the survival and mutation frequency of halogen light irradiated bacteria. A new class of nucleosides containing C(2)-hydroxymethyl-ribose (hamamelose) was synthesized, and it was found that uracil and 5-fluorouracil derivatives show a significant antitumor activity. It was found that 2CDA (2-deoxy-2-chloro-adenosine) an anti-lymphoid drug does not induce mutations, when incorporated into DNA, but significantly inhibits DNA replication. In studies with oxidized M13 DNA it was found that Fapy- (formamidopyrimidine)-residues in DNA selectively inhibits DNA synthesis, and the effect depends on the neighboring sequences and the DNA polymerase tested. Highly unstable derivatives of lecithin-psoralen adducts were characterized and their role in PUVA photochemotherapy is being studied. (author)

  19. SOYBEAN - MOLECULAR ASPECTS OF BREEDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Sudarić

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The book Soybean: Molecular Aspects of Breeding focuses recent progress in our understanding of the genetics and molecular biology of soybean. This book is divided into four parts and contains 22 chapters. Part I, Molecular Biology and Biotechnology focuses advances in molecular biology and laboratory procedures that have been developed recently to manipulate DNA. Part II, Breeding for abiotic stress covers proteomics approaches form as a powerful tool for investigating the molecular mechanisms of the plant responses to various types of abiotic stresses. Part III, Breeding for biotic stress addresses issues related to application of molecular based strategies in order to increase soybean resistance to various biotic factors. Part IV, Recent Technology reviews recent technologies into the realm of soybean monitoring, processing and product use. While the information accumulated in this book is of primary interest for plant breeders, valuable insights are also offered to agronomists, molecular biologists, physiologists, plant pathologists, food scientists and students. The book is a result of efforts made by many experts from different countries (USA, Japan, Croatia, Serbia, China, Canada, Malawi, Iran, Hong Kong, Brasil, Mexico.

  20. [Molecular Subtypes of Gastric Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatogai, Ken; Doi, Toshihiko

    2016-03-01

    Gastric cancer has been classified based on the pathological characteristics including microscopic configuration and growth pattern. Although these classifications have been used in studies investigating prognosis and recurrence pattern, they are not considered for decisions regarding the therapeutic strategy. In the ToGA study, trastuzumab, an anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody, demonstrated clinical efficacy for gastric cancer with HER2 overexpression or HER2 gene amplification. Based on these findings of the ToGA study, the definition of HER2-positive gastric cancer was established. Thereafter, several molecular targeted agents, including agents targeting other receptor tyrosine kinases, have been investigated in gastric cancer. However, to date no biomarker, except HER2, has been established. Based on the recent technological development in the field of gene analysis, a comprehensive molecular evaluation of gastric cancer was performed as part of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA)project, and a new molecular classification was proposed that divided gastric cancer into the following 4 subtypes: tumors positive for Epstein-Barr virus, microsatellite instability tumors, genomically stable tumors, and tumors with chromosomal instability. Each subtype has specific molecular alterations including gene mutation and amplification, DNA methylation, and protein overexpression. Additionally, some subtypes were suggested to be correlated with the clinicopathological characteristics or as targets of some molecular targeted agents that are currently under development. The new molecular classification is expected to be a roadmap for patient stratification and clinical trials on molecular targeted therapies in gastric cancer. PMID:27067842

  1. Molecular breast imaging. An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of molecular imaging is to visualize and quantify biological, physiological and pathological processes at cellular and molecular levels. Molecular imaging using various techniques has recently become established in breast imaging. Currently molecular imaging techniques comprise multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), proton MR spectroscopy (1H-MRSI), nuclear imaging by breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI), positron emission tomography (PET) and positron emission mammography (PEM) and combinations of techniques (e.g. PET-CT and multiparametric PET-MRI). Recently, novel techniques for molecular imaging of breast tumors, such as sodium imaging (23Na-MRI), phosphorus spectroscopy (31P-MRSI) and hyperpolarized MRI as well as specific radiotracers have been developed and are currently under investigation. It can be expected that molecular imaging of breast tumors will enable a simultaneous assessment of the multiple metabolic and molecular processes involved in cancer development and thus an improved detection, characterization, staging and monitoring of response to treatment will become possible. (orig.)

  2. Molecular-Coherent-States and Molecular-Fundamental-States

    OpenAIRE

    Irac-Astaud, Michele

    2000-01-01

    New families of Molecular-Coherent-States are constructed by the Perelomov group-method. Each family is generated by a Molecular-Fundamental-State that depends on an arbitrary sequence of complex numbers cj. Two of these families were already obtained by D.Janssen and by J. A. Morales, E. Deumens and Y. Ohrn. The properties of these families are investigated and we show that most of them are independent on the cj.

  3. Molecular electronic-structure theory

    CERN Document Server

    Helgaker, Trygve; Olsen, Jeppe

    2014-01-01

    Ab initio quantum chemistry has emerged as an important tool in chemical research and is appliced to a wide variety of problems in chemistry and molecular physics. Recent developments of computational methods have enabled previously intractable chemical problems to be solved using rigorous quantum-mechanical methods. This is the first comprehensive, up-to-date and technical work to cover all the important aspects of modern molecular electronic-structure theory. Topics covered in the book include: * Second quantization with spin adaptation * Gaussian basis sets and molecular-integral evaluati

  4. Molecular thermodynamics of nonideal fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Lloyd L

    2013-01-01

    Molecular Thermodynamics of Nonideal Fluids serves as an introductory presentation for engineers to the concepts and principles behind and the advances in molecular thermodynamics of nonideal fluids. The book covers related topics such as the laws of thermodynamics; entropy; its ensembles; the different properties of the ideal gas; and the structure of liquids. Also covered in the book are topics such as integral equation theories; theories for polar fluids; solution thermodynamics; and molecular dynamics. The text is recommended for engineers who would like to be familiarized with the concept

  5. Molecular Hydrodynamics from Memory Kernels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesnicki, Dominika; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Carof, Antoine; Rotenberg, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    The memory kernel for a tagged particle in a fluid, computed from molecular dynamics simulations, decays algebraically as t-3 /2 . We show how the hydrodynamic Basset-Boussinesq force naturally emerges from this long-time tail and generalize the concept of hydrodynamic added mass. This mass term is negative in the present case of a molecular solute, which is at odds with incompressible hydrodynamics predictions. Lastly, we discuss the various contributions to the friction, the associated time scales, and the crossover between the molecular and hydrodynamic regimes upon increasing the solute radius.

  6. Photoelectron photoion molecular beam spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of supersonic molecular beams in photoionization mass spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy to assist in the understanding of photoexcitation in the vacuum ultraviolet is described. Rotational relaxation and condensation due to supersonic expansion were shown to offer new possibilities for molecular photoionization studies. Molecular beam photoionization mass spectroscopy has been extended above 21 eV photon energy by the use of Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) facilities. Design considerations are discussed that have advanced the state-of-the-art in high resolution vuv photoelectron spectroscopy. To extend gas-phase studies to 160 eV photon energy, a windowless vuv-xuv beam line design is proposed

  7. An introduction to molecular spintronics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG ShangDa; GOβ Karin; CERVETTI Christian; BOGANI Lapo

    2012-01-01

    We review the progress and future possibilities in the emerging area of molecular spintronics,we nrst provide an overview of the different transport regimes in which electronic nanodevices can operate,then briefly overview the important characteristics of molecular magnetic materials that can be useful for application in spintronics and we eventually present several schemes to include such systems into spintronic nanodevices.We hightlight the importance of a chemical approach to the area,and in the last section we showcase some approaches to the creation of hybrids made of carbon nanostructures and molecular magnets,which are gaining increasing attention.

  8. Introduction to Accelerated Molecular Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, Danny [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-10

    Molecular Dynamics is the numerical solution of the equations of motion of a set of atoms, given an interatomic potential V and some boundary and initial conditions. Molecular Dynamics is the largest scale model that gives unbiased dynamics [x(t),p(t)] in full atomistic detail. Molecular Dynamics: is simple; is 'exact' for classical dynamics (with respect to a given V); can be used to compute any (atomistic) thermodynamical or dynamical properties; naturally handles complexity -- the system does the right thing at the right time. The physics derives only from the interatomic potential.

  9. Time Delay in Molecular Photoionization

    CERN Document Server

    Hockett, P; Villeneuve, D M; Corkum, P B

    2015-01-01

    Time-delays in the photoionization of molecules are investigated. As compared to atomic ionization, the time-delays expected from molecular ionization present a much richer phenomenon, with a strong spatial dependence due to the anisotropic nature of the molecular scattering potential. We investigate this from a scattering theory perspective, and make use of molecular photoionization calculations to examine this effect in representative homonuclear and hetronuclear diatomic molecules, nitrogen and carbon monoxide. We present energy and angle-resolved maps of the Wigner delay time for single-photon valence ionization, and discuss the possibilities for experimental measurements.

  10. Bilingual teaching of molecular biology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Recently bilingual teaching in China's universities has been widely carried out and become a popular subject for study. In this paper, the reasons for bilingual teaching of molecular biology are pointed out, the textbook of molecular biology and teaching method in bilingual teaching classes are determined after investigation and the practice of bilingually teaching molecular biology use both English and Chinese in a class. The effect has proved good. The bilingual teaching methods, the problem of bilingual teaching, the importance of understanding its significance and the possibilities of improving such teaching of the subject are also discussed.

  11. Molecular hydrodynamics from memory kernels

    CERN Document Server

    Lesnicki, Dominika; Carof, Antoine; Rotenberg, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The memory kernel for a tagged particle in a fluid, computed from molecular dynamics simulations, decays algebraically as $t^{-3/2}$. We show how the hydrodynamic Basset-Boussinesq force naturally emerges from this long-time tail and generalize the concept of hydrodynamic added mass. This mass term is negative in the present case of a molecular solute, at odds with incompressible hydrodynamics predictions. We finally discuss the various contributions to the friction, the associated time scales and the cross-over between the molecular and hydrodynamic regimes upon increasing the solute radius.

  12. NASA Applications of Molecular Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globus, Al; Bailey, David; Han, Jie; Jaffe, Richard; Levit, Creon; Merkle, Ralph; Srivastava, Deepak

    1998-01-01

    Laboratories throughout the world are rapidly gaining atomically precise control over matter. As this control extends to an ever wider variety of materials, processes and devices, opportunities for applications relevant to NASA's missions will be created. This document surveys a number of future molecular nanotechnology capabilities of aerospace interest. Computer applications, launch vehicle improvements, and active materials appear to be of particular interest. We also list a number of applications for each of NASA's enterprises. If advanced molecular nanotechnology can be developed, almost all of NASA's endeavors will be radically improved. In particular, a sufficiently advanced molecular nanotechnology can arguably bring large scale space colonization within our grasp.

  13. Molecular Aggregation in Disodium Cromoglycate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gautam; Agra-Kooijman, D.; Collings, P. J.; Kumar, Satyendra

    2012-02-01

    Details of molecular aggregation in the mesophases of the anti-asthmatic drug disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) have been studied using x-ray synchrotron scattering. The results show two reflections, one at wide angles corresponding to π-π stacking (3.32 å) of molecules, and the other at small angles which is perpendicular to the direction of molecular stacking and corresponds to the distance between the molecular aggregates. The latter varies from 35 - 41 å in the nematic (N) phase and 27 -- 32 å in the columnar (M) phase. The temperature evolution of the stack height, positional order correlations in the lateral direction, and orientation order parameter were determined in the N, M, and biphasic regions. The structure of the N and M phases and the nature of the molecular aggregation, together with their dependence on temperature and concentration, will be presented.

  14. Electron microscopy at molecular dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumeister, W.; Vogell, W.

    1980-01-01

    This book gives a survey of recent trends and activities in molcular microscopy . This branch of electron microscopy which is aimed at determining the structure of biological macromolecules and supramolecular assemblies has made significant progress during the past few years and promises to play a major role in the future of molecular biology. The thirty nine chapters fall into two general groups: The first group discusses the state-of-the-art illustrated by a wide range of molecular specimens containing new material. The second group reviews recent developments in image recording, low dose microscopy and image processing which are of potential interest to those seeking to overcome present limitations in obtaining more detailed structural information. The final five chapters deal with a subject which will surely emerge as a major area of practical interest in molecular microscopy: the artifical assembly of ordered molecular arrays.

  15. Molecular motion in restricted geometries

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Siddharth Gautam; S Mitra; R Mukhopadhyay

    2008-10-01

    Molecular dynamics in restricted geometries is known to exhibit anomalous behaviour. Diffusion, translational or rotational, of molecules is altered significantly on confinement in restricted geometries. Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) offers a unique possibility of studying molecular motion in such systems. Both time scales involved in the motion and the geometry of motion can be studied using QENS. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation not only provides insight into the details of the different types of motion possible but also does not suffer limitations of the experimental set-up. Here we report the effect of confinement on molecular dynamics in various restricted geometries as studied by QENS and MD simulations: An example where the QENS technique provided direct evidence of phase transition associated with change in the dynamical behaviour of the molecules is also discussed.

  16. Physical adsorption and molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some aspects of noble gases adsorption (except He) on graphite substracts are reviewed. Experimental results from this adsorption are analyzed and compared with molecular dynamics calculations. (L.C.)

  17. Molecular imaging in myocardial fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the development of life science and medical technology, myocardial fibrosis is being increasingly recognized as a new therapeutic target for heart diseases. However, traditional methods for detection of myocardial fibrosis, such as myocardial biopsy and laboratory assay of serum metabolites or enzymes, are not satisfactory in meeting the clinical demands because of their intrinsic limitations. Molecular imaging may non-invasively and quantitatively evaluate the presence/absence, degree and turnover of myocardial fibrosis in vivo with good specificity, thus being useful for clinical assessment and intervention. Currently, the commonly used molecular imaging modalities for evaluation of myocardial fibrosis include SPECT, PET and MRI. It is hopeful that the molecular probe for targeted ultrasound technology may also be developed in the near future. This review highlights the current status and future trends of molecular imaging in myocardial fibrosis. (authors)

  18. Transport properties of molecular junctions

    CERN Document Server

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive overview of the physical mechanisms that control electron transport and the characteristics of metal-molecule-metal (MMM) junctions is presented. As far as possible, methods and formalisms presented elsewhere to analyze electron transport through molecules are avoided. This title introduces basic concepts—a description of the electron transport through molecular junctions—and briefly describes relevant experimental methods. Theoretical methods commonly used to analyze the electron transport through molecules are presented. Various effects that manifest in the electron transport through MMMs, as well as the basics of density-functional theory and its applications to electronic structure calculations in molecules are presented. Nanoelectronic applications of molecular junctions and similar systems are discussed as well. Molecular electronics is a diverse and rapidly growing field. Transport Properties of Molecular Junctions presents an up-to-date survey of the field suitable for researchers ...

  19. Quantum logic with molecular ions

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Fabian; Heip, Jan C; Gebert, Florian; Shi, Chunyan; Schmidt, Piet O

    2015-01-01

    Laser spectroscopy of cold and trapped molecular ions is a powerful tool for fundamental physics, including the determination of fundamental constants, the laboratory test for their possible variation, and the search for a possible electric dipole moment of the electron. Optical clocks based on molecular ions sensitive to some of these effects are expected to achieve uncertainties approaching the $10^{-18}$ level. While the complexity of molecular structure facilitates these applications, the absence of cycling transitions poses a challenge for direct laser cooling, quantum state control, and detection. Previously employed state detection techniques based on photo-dissociation or chemical reactions are destructive and therefore inefficient. Here we experimentally demonstrate non-destructive state detection of a single trapped molecular ion through its strong Coulomb coupling to a well-controlled co-trapped atomic ion. An algorithm based on a state-dependent optical dipole force(ODF) changes the internal state...

  20. Emerging molecular phenotypes of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Anuradha; Oriss, Timothy B; Wenzel, Sally E

    2015-01-15

    Although asthma has long been considered a heterogeneous disease, attempts to define subgroups of asthma have been limited. In recent years, both clinical and statistical approaches have been utilized to better merge clinical characteristics, biology, and genetics. These combined characteristics have been used to define phenotypes of asthma, the observable characteristics of a patient determined by the interaction of genes and environment. Identification of consistent clinical phenotypes has now been reported across studies. Now the addition of various 'omics and identification of specific molecular pathways have moved the concept of clinical phenotypes toward the concept of molecular phenotypes. The importance of these molecular phenotypes is being confirmed through the integration of molecularly targeted biological therapies. Thus the global term asthma is poised to become obsolete, being replaced by terms that more specifically identify the pathology associated with the disease. PMID:25326577

  1. AN OVERVIEW ON MOLECULAR DOCKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaba Monika

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Molecular Docking is the computational modeling of the structure of complexes formed by two or more interacting molecules. The goal of molecular docking is the prediction of the three dimensional structures of interest. Docking itself only produces plausible candidate structures. These candidates are ranked using methods such as scoring functions to identify structures that are most likely to occur in nature. The state of the art of various computational aspects of molecular docking based virtual screening of database of small molecules is presented. This review encompasses molecular docking approaches, different search algorithms and the scoring functions used in docking methods and their applications to protein and nucleic acid drug targets. Limitations of current technologies as well as future prospects are also presented

  2. Computer representation of molecular surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review article surveys recent work on computer representation of molecular surfaces. Several different algorithms are discussed for producing vector or raster drawings of space-filling models formed as the union of spheres. Other smoother surfaces are also considered

  3. Molecular Biomedical Imaging Laboratory (MBIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Molecular Biomedical Imaging Laboratory (MBIL) is adjacent-a nd has access-to the Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences clinical imaging facilities. MBIL...

  4. Molecular orbital excitations in cuprates

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Young-June; Hill, J. P.; Gu, G. D.; Chou, F. C.; Wakimoto, S.; Birgeneau, R. J.; Komiya, Seiki; Ando, Yoichi; Motoyama, N.; Kojima, K. M.; Uchida, S; Casa, D.; Gog, T.

    2004-01-01

    We report resonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies of electronic excitations in a wide variety of cuprate compounds. Specifically, we focus on the charge-transfer type excitation of an electron from a bonding molecular orbital to an antibonding molecular orbital in a copper oxygen plaquette. Both the excitation energy and the amount of dispersion are found to increase significantly as the copper oxygen bond-length is reduced. We also find that the estimated bond-length dependence of the ho...

  5. Biological communication via molecular surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Tim; Byler, K; de Groot, M

    2006-01-01

    The use and characteristics of local properties designed to describe intermolecular interactions projected onto molecular surfaces and based on semiempirical molecular orbital theory are described. After a discussion of the local properties themselves and their relationship to intermolecular interactions and chemical reactivity, two applications are described. The first, surface-integral models for physical properties, involve integrating a functional of the local properties over the molecula...

  6. Molecular Imaging in Genetic Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Ayden; Van Gestel, Frederick; Yaghoubi, Shahriar

    2016-01-01

    The field of biomedical imaging has made significant advances in recent times. This includes extremely high-resolution anatomic imaging and functional imaging of physiologic and pathologic processes as well as novel modalities in optical imaging to evaluate molecular features within the cellular environment. The latter has made it possible to image phenotypic markers of various genotypes that are implicated in human development, behavior, and disease. This article discusses the role of molecular imaging in genetic and precision medicine. 

  7. Theoretical Aspects of Molecular Recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Harmat, Veronika; Náray-Szabó, Gábor

    2009-01-01

    Molecular recognition is a key process in non-covalent interactions, which determines, among others, host-guest complexation, drug action and protein-protein interaction. A simple and attractive formulation is the lock-and-key analogy defining the host as a lock accommodating the guest as a key. We stress three major aspects of molecular recognition, determining both complementarity between host and guest and similarity within a group of guest molecules. These aspects are: steric, i.e. maximi...

  8. MINT: the Molecular INTeraction database

    OpenAIRE

    Chatr-aryamontri, Andrew; Ceol, Arnaud; Palazzi, Luisa Montecchi; Nardelli, Giuliano; Schneider, Maria Victoria; Castagnoli, Luisa; Cesareni, Gianni

    2006-01-01

    The Molecular INTeraction database (MINT, ) aims at storing, in a structured format, information about molecular interactions (MIs) by extracting experimental details from work published in peer-reviewed journals. At present the MINT team focuses the curation work on physical interactions between proteins. Genetic or computationally inferred interactions are not included in the database. Over the past four years MINT has undergone extensive revision. The new version of MINT is based on a comp...

  9. Variable molecular clocks in hominoids

    OpenAIRE

    Elango, Navin; Thomas, James W.; Yi, Soojin V.

    2006-01-01

    Generation time is an important determinant of a neutral molecular clock. There are several human-specific life history traits that led to a substantially longer generation time in humans than in other hominoids. Indeed, a long generation time is considered an important trait that distinguishes humans from their closest relatives. Therefore, humans may exhibit a significantly slower molecular clock as compared to other hominoids. To investigate this hypothesis, we performed a large-scale anal...

  10. Molecular theory of graphene oxide

    OpenAIRE

    Sheka, Elena F.; Popova, Nadezhda A

    2012-01-01

    Applying to graphene oxides, molecular theory of graphene is based on the oxide molecular origin when it is considered as a final product in the succession of a graphene molecule polyderivatives related to a particular oxidation reaction. The graphene oxide structure is created in due course of calculations following the algorithms that take into account the graphene molecules natural radicalization, correlation of odd electrons, an extremely strong influence of structure on properties, a sha...

  11. [Knowledgebases in postgenomic molecular biology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisitsa, A V; Shilov, B V; Evdokimov, P A; Gusev, S A

    2010-01-01

    Knowledgebases can become an effective tool essentially raising quality of information retrieval in molecular biology, promoting the development of new methods of education and forecasting of the biomedical R&D. Knowledge-based technologies should induce "paradigm shift" in the life science due to integrative focusing of research groups towards the challenges of postgenomic era. This paper debates concept of the knowledgebase, which exploits web usage mining to personalize the access of molecular biologist to the Internet resources. PMID:21328913

  12. Molecular Epidemiology and Air Pollution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rössner ml., Pavel; Binková, B.; Rössnerová, Andrea; Šrám, Radim

    Rieka: InTech, 2015 - (Nejadkoorki, F.), s. 609-643 ISBN 978-953-51-2180-0 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-13458S Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : molecular epidemiology * biomarkers * human populations * in vitro studies Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality http://www.intechopen.com/books/current-air-quality-issues/molecular-epidemiology-and-air- pollution

  13. Molecular mechanisms of rosacea pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davydova A.M.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents possible molecular mechanisms for rosacea pathogenesis from current domestic and foreign clinical observations and laboratory research: regulation and expression defects of antimicrobial peptides, vascular endothelial growth factor, the effect of serine proteases, oxidative stress, reactive oxygen species and ferritin on the occurrence and course of rosacea. New developments in molecular biology and genetics are advanced for researching the interaction of multiple factors involved in rosacea pathogenesis, as well as providing the bases for potentially new therapies.

  14. Molecular epidemiology in environmental carcinogenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Perera, F P; Mooney, L A; Dickey, C P; Santella, R. M.; Bell, D.; Blaner, W; Tang, D; Whyatt, R M

    1996-01-01

    Molecular epidemiology has significant potential in preventing cancer and other diseases caused by environmental exposures (related to lifestyle, occupation, or ambient pollution). This approach attempts to prevent cancer by incorporating laboratory methods to document the molecular dose and preclinical effects of carcinogens, as well as factors that increases individual susceptibility to carcinogens. Recently we have carried out validation studies of biologic markers such as carcinogen--DNA ...

  15. Visualization Software for Molecular Assemblies

    OpenAIRE

    Goddard, Thomas D; Ferrin, Thomas E.

    2007-01-01

    Software for viewing three-dimensional models and maps of viruses, ribosomes, filaments and other molecular assemblies is advancing on many fronts. New developments include molecular representations that offer better control over level of detail, lighting that improves the perception of depth, and two-dimensional projections that simplify data interpretation. Programmable graphics processors offer quality, speed and visual effects not previously possible, while 3D printers, haptic interaction...

  16. Molecular deformation mechanisms in polyethylene.

    OpenAIRE

    Coutry, Sandry

    2001-01-01

    This work is concerned with details of the molecular changes caused by deformation and also establishes any conformational differences between linear and branched polyethylene before, during and after deformation. Four blends of isotopically labelled polymers of different types, rapidly quenched from the melt, have been studied by Mixed Crystal Infra-red Spectroscopy and Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS), in order to clarify any differences in the molecular basis of drawing...

  17. Molecular analysis of Sarcoptes scabiei

    OpenAIRE

    Ljunggren, Erland L.

    2005-01-01

    The mite Sarcoptes scabiei (Acari), causes sarcoptic mange or scabies that globally affects animals and humans. Although scabies and mange are recognised as important diseases in human and veterinary medicine the amount of molecular studies of S. scabiei have been limited, which has been attributed to a shortage of parasitic material. This thesis is based on four studies that make use of molecular techniques with the aims to overcome the problems associated with a scarcity of mites, gain insi...

  18. Molecular diagnostics of neurodegenerative disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, Megha; Biswas, Abhijit

    2015-01-01

    Molecular diagnostics provide a powerful method to detect and diagnose various neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. The confirmation of such diagnosis allows early detection and subsequent medical counseling that help specific patients to undergo clinically important drug trials. This provides a medical pathway to have better insight of neurogenesis and eventual cure of the neurodegenerative diseases. In this short review, we present recent advances in molecular ...

  19. Molecular Tweezers Targeting Transthyretin Amyloidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, N; Pereira-Henriques, A; Attar, A.; Klärner, FG; Schrader, T; Bitan, G.; L. Gales; Saraiva, MJ; Almeida, de, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) amyloidoses comprise a wide spectrum of acquired and hereditary diseases triggered by extracellular deposition of toxic TTR aggregates in various organs. Despite recent advances regarding the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying TTR misfolding and pathogenic self-assembly, there is still no effective therapy for treatment of these fatal disorders. Recently, the “molecular tweezers”, CLR01, has been reported to inhibit self-assembly and toxicity of different a...

  20. Electron transport through molecular junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present, metal–molecular tunnel junctions are recognized as important active elements in molecular electronics. This gives a strong motivation to explore physical mechanisms controlling electron transport through molecules. In the last two decades, an unceasing progress in both experimental and theoretical studies of molecular conductance has been demonstrated. In the present work we give an overview of theoretical methods used to analyze the transport properties of metal–molecular junctions as well as some relevant experiments and applications. After a brief general description of the electron transport through molecules we introduce a Hamiltonian which can be used to analyze electron–electron, electron–phonon and spin–orbit interactions. Then we turn to description of the commonly used transport theory formalisms including the nonequilibrium Green’s functions based approach and the approach based on the “master” equations. We discuss the most important effects which could be manifested through molecules in electron transport phenomena such as Coulomb, spin and Frank–Condon blockades, Kondo peak in the molecular conductance, negative differential resistance and some others. Bearing in mind that first principles electronic structure calculations are recognized as the indispensable basis of the theory of electron transport through molecules, we briefly discuss the main equations and some relevant applications of the density functional theory which presently is often used to analyze important characteristics of molecules and molecular clusters. Finally, we discuss some kinds of nanoelectronic devices built using molecules and similar systems such as carbon nanotubes, various nanowires and quantum dots.

  1. SOYBEAN - MOLECULAR ASPECTS OF BREEDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Sudarić

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The book Soybean: Molecular Aspects of Breedingfocuses recent progress in our understanding of thegenetics and molecular biology of soybean. This book isdivided into four parts and contains 22 chapters. Part I,Molecular Biology and Biotechnology focuses advancesin molecular biology and laboratory procedures thathave been developed recently to manipulate DNA.Part II, Breeding for abiotic stress covers proteomicsapproaches form as a powerful tool for investigatingthe molecular mechanisms of the plant responses tovarious types of abiotic stresses. Part III, Breeding forbiotic stress addresses issues related to application ofmolecular based strategies in order to increase soybeanresistance to various biotic factors. Part IV, RecentTechnology reviews recent technologies into the realmof soybean monitoring, processing and product use.While the information accumulated in this book is ofprimary interest for plant breeders, valuable insightsare also offered to agronomists, molecular biologists,physiologists, plant pathologists, food scientists andstudents. The book is a result of efforts made by manyexperts from different countries (USA, Japan, Croatia,Serbia, China, Canada, Malawi, Iran, Hong Kong, Brasil,Mexico.

  2. Targeted overexpression of parathyroid hormone-related peptide in chondrocytes causes chondrodysplasia and delayed endochondral bone formation.

    OpenAIRE

    Weir, E C; Philbrick, W M; Amling, M.; Neff, L A; Baron, R; Broadus, A E

    1996-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) was initially identified as a product of malignant tumors that mediates paraneoplastic hypercalcemia. It is now known that the parathyroid hormone (PTH) and PTHrP genes are evolutionarily related and that the products of these two genes share a common receptor, the PTH/PTHrP receptor. PTHrP and the PTH/PTHrP receptor are widely expressed in both adult and fetal tissues, and recent gene-targeting and disruption experiments have implicated PTHrP as a ...

  3. Molecular Simulations in Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael A.; Schweighofer, Karl; Chipot, Christophe; New, Michael H.; Vincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    One of the main goals of astrobiology is to understand the origin of cellular life. In the absence of any record of the earliest ancestors of contemporary cells, protocells, the most direct way to test our understanding of their characteristics is to construct laboratory models of protocells. Such efforts, currently underway in the NASA Astrobiology Program, are accompanied by computational studies aimed at explaining self-organization of simple molecules into ordered structures and developing designs of molecules that are capable of performing protocellular functions. Many of these functions, such as importing nutrients, capturing and storing energy, and responding to changes in the environment, are carried out by proteins bound to membranes. We use computer simulations to address the following, questions about these proteins: (1) How do small proteins (peptides) organize themselves into ordered structures at water-membrane interfaces and insert into membranes? (2) How do peptides aggregate to form membrane-spannin(y structures (e.g., channels)? (3) By what mechanisms do such aggregates perform their functions? The simulations are performed using the molecular dynamics (MD) method. In this method, Newton's equations of motion for each atom in the system are solved iteratively. At each time step, the forces exerted on each atom by the remaining atoms are evaluated by dividing them into two parts. Short-range forces are calculated directly in real space while long-range forces are evaluated in reciprocal space, usually using a particle-mesh algorithm which is of order O(NlnN). Currently, a time step of 2 femtoseconds is typically used, thereby making studies of problems occurring on multi-nanosecond time scales (10(exp 6) - 10(exp 8) time steps) accessible. To address a broader range of problems, simulations need to be extended by three orders of magnitude. Such an extension requires both algorithmic improvements and codes scalable to a large number of parallel

  4. Molecular structure by Coulomb explosion imaging of stored molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental scheme, which combines Coulomb explosion imaging (CEI) with storage of fast molecular ions, has been introduced recently at the TSR heavy ion storage ring facility in Heidelberg. CEI is an experimental technique that provides direct observation of the nuclear conformations within small molecules. The combination of CEI with the storage ring technique enables the control of the internal excitation of the measured molecules, which is an essential condition to the interpretation of CEI results in terms of ''structure'' assigned to specific molecular states. This structure is measured as a function of storage time, thus enabling one to study processes of slow intramolecular dynamics such as isomerization, metastable states, etc. Moreover in this scheme, CEI can be used as a diagnostic tool for the intramolecular excitation, while other molecular interactions (e.g. with electrons or photons) are investigated. In this report, the CEI principle and the new experimental setup are described with an emphasis on the new prospects for studies in molecular physics. CEI measurements of stored CH2+ and NH2+ molecular ions are presented. The study of the angular distribution in these molecules as a function of their vibrational relaxation to the ground state, reveals unexpected behavior near the linear conformation which is inconsistent with the current adiabatic theories

  5. Molecular modeling of inelastic electron transport in molecular junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A quantum chemical approach for the modeling of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy of molecular junctions based on scattering theory is presented. Within a harmonic approximation, the proposed method allows us to calculate the electron-vibration coupling strength analytically, which makes it applicable to many different systems. The calculated inelastic electron transport spectra are often in very good agreement with their experimental counterparts, allowing the revelation of detailed information about molecular conformations inside the junction, molecule-metal contact structures, and intermolecular interaction that is largely inaccessible experimentally

  6. Molecular imaging of tumour hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By allowing an earlier diagnosis and a more exhaustive assessment of extension of the disease, the tomography by emission of positrons (PET) transforms the care of numerous cancers. At present, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]-F.D.G.) imaging appears as the only one available but new molecular markers are being developed. In the next future they would modify the approach of cancers. In this context, the molecular imaging of the hypoxia and especially the 18Fluoromisonidazole PET ([18F]-MISO PET) can give supplementary information allowing the mapping of hypoxic regions within the tumour. Because of the links, which exist between tumour hypoxia and treatment resistance of very numerous cancers, this information can have an interest, for determination of prognosis as well as for the delineation, volumes to be irradiated. Head and neck tumours are doubtless those for which the literature gives the most elements on the therapeutic impact of tumour hypoxia. Targeted therapies, based on hypoxia, already exist and the contribution of the molecular imaging could be decisive in the evaluation of the impact of such treatment. Molecular imaging of brain tumours remains to be developed. The potential contributions of the [18F]-MISO PET for the care of these patients need to be confirmed. In this context, we propose a review of hypoxia molecular imaging taking as examples head and neck tumours and glioblastomas (GB), two tumours for which hypoxia is one of the key factors to overcome in order to increase therapeutics results

  7. Molecular classification of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, N-Y; Tan, P

    2016-05-01

    Gastric cancer (GC), a heterogeneous disease characterized by epidemiologic and histopathologic differences across countries, is a leading cause of cancer-related death. Treatment of GC patients is currently suboptimal due to patients being commonly treated in a uniform fashion irrespective of disease subtype. With the advent of next-generation sequencing and other genomic technologies, GCs are now being investigated in great detail at the molecular level. High-throughput technologies now allow a comprehensive study of genomic and epigenomic alterations associated with GC. Gene mutations, chromosomal aberrations, differential gene expression and epigenetic alterations are some of the genetic/epigenetic influences on GC pathogenesis. In addition, integrative analyses of molecular profiling data have led to the identification of key dysregulated pathways and importantly, the establishment of GC molecular classifiers. Recently, The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) network proposed a four subtype classification scheme for GC based on the underlying tumor molecular biology of each subtype. This landmark study, together with other studies, has expanded our understanding on the characteristics of GC at the molecular level. Such knowledge may improve the medical management of GC in the future. PMID:26861606

  8. Molecular modelling of betalactamic antibiotic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elso Manuel Cruz Cruz

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The antibacterial properties of a compound are the result of its molecular structure. To establish the structural and electronic characteristics makes possible to understand the mechanisms of its action and becomes paramount for the rational design new drugs. Objective: To model some of the molecular properties of betalactamic antibiotics and inhibitors of the betalactamases and to relate them with their pharmacological actions. Method: The molecular structures were optimized with PM3• semiempiric calculus. The structure of the betalactamic ring in the different compounds was compared. The molecular properties were calculated according to the Density Functional Theory at a B3LYP/6-31G(d level. The density of the atomic charges and the frontier orbitals were analyzed. Results There are variations in the calculated properties that make possible to define two groups of compounds: one for the monobactams and the inhibitors of the betalactamases, with less planarity in the ring and less reactivity and another one with the penicillins, cephalosporins and carbapenems, planer, more structurally stable and reactive. Conclusions: The modelled molecular properties of the betalactamic antibiotics and inhibitors of the betalactamases show agreement with its pharmacological action.

  9. Laser ionization of molecular clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multiphoton ionization coupled with mass spectrometry was used to investigate molecular cluster distributions. Three examples will be discussed in this presentation. First, in studies of neat nitric oxide clusters, (NO)m, an interesting odd-even intensity alternation was observed and will be discussed in terms of electron-pairing considerations. In a separate study, the binary clusters comprising nitric oxide and methane preferentially form a stoichiometric cluster made up of repeating units of (NO)2CH4. These presumably represent a particularly strongly bound open-quotes van der Waalsclose quotes subunit. Finally, in similar studies of neat carbon disulfide clusters, (CS2)m, additional photon absorption after the two-photon ionization step stimulates a series of intracluster ion-molecular reactions leading to formation of Sm+ and (CS)m+ polymers, as well as intermediate species such as Sm+ (CS2). This molecular cluster analogue of open-quotes laser snowclose quotes will be described in detail

  10. Ab-Initio Molecular Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kühne, Thomas D

    2012-01-01

    Computer simulations and molecular dynamics in particular, is a very powerful method to provide detailed and essentially exact informations of classical many-body problems. With the advent of \\textit{ab-initio} molecular dynamics, where the forces are computed on-the-fly by accurate electronic structure calculations, the scope of either method has been greatly extended. This new approach, which unifies Newton's and Schr\\"odinger's equations, allows for complex simulations without relying on any adjustable parameter. This review is intended to outline the basic principles as well as a survey of the field. Beginning with the derivation of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, the Car-Parrinello method as well as novel hybrid scheme that unifies best of either approach are discussed. The predictive power is demonstrated by a series of applications ranging from insulators to semiconductors and even metals in condensed phases.

  11. State-Dependent Molecular Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciann-Dong Yang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new mixed quantum mechanics (QM—molecular mechanics (MM approach, where MM is replaced by quantum Hamilton mechanics (QHM, which inherits the modeling capability of MM, while preserving the state-dependent nature of QM. QHM, a single mechanics playing the roles of QM and MM simultaneously, will be employed here to derive the three-dimensional quantum dynamics of diatomic molecules. The resulting state-dependent molecular dynamics including vibration, rotation and spin are shown to completely agree with the QM description and well match the experimental vibration-rotation spectrum. QHM can be incorporated into the framework of a mixed quantum-classical Bohmian method to enable a trajectory interpretation of orbital-spin interaction and spin entanglement in molecular dynamics.

  12. Microwave regeneration of molecular sieves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular sieve driers have been included in the design of tritium handling systems for fusion reactors. In these systems there is a need to maintain extremely low exit dew points from the driers as well as a capability to rapidly reduce tritium concentrations following an accident. The required capacity of the driers is very high. The conventional method of regenerating these sieves after a water adsorption cycle is with hot air. However, because water is rapidly heated by microwave energy, this technology may be suitable for decreasing the bed regeneration time and hence may allow reduced capital and operating costs associated with a smaller bed. The present study was conducted to obtain preliminary information on the technical feasibility of regenerating molecular sieves with microwave energy. The study concentrated on Type 4A molecular sieve with a few tests on Type 13X sieve and also a silica gel adsorbent

  13. Molecular Architectonic on Metal Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Johannes V.

    2007-05-01

    The engineering of highly organized systems from instructed molecular building blocks opens up new vistas for the control of matter and the exploration of nanodevice concepts. Recent investigations demonstrate that well-defined surfaces provide versatile platforms for steering and monitoring the assembly of molecular nanoarchitectures in exquisite detail. This review delineates the principles of noncovalent synthesis on metal substrates under ultrahigh vacuum conditions and briefly assesses the pertaining terminology—self-assembly, self-organization, and self-organized growth. It presents exemplary scanning-tunneling-microscopy observations, providing atomistic insight into the self-assembly of organic clusters, chains, and superlattices, and the metal-directed assembly of low-dimensional coordination architectures. This review also describes hierarchic-assembly protocols leading to intricate multilevel order. Molecular architectonic on metal surfaces represents a versatile rationale to realize structurally complex nanosystems with specific shape, composition, and functional properties, which bear promise for technological applications.

  14. Molecular imaging in cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The success of cancer therapy can be difficult to predict, as its efficacy is often predicated upon characteristics of the cancer, treatment, and individual that are not fully understood or are difficult to ascertain. Monitoring the response of disease to treatment is therefore essential and has traditionally been characterized by changes in tumor volume. However, in many instances, this singular measure is insufficient for predicting treatment effects on patient survival. Molecular imaging allows repeated in vivo measurement of many critical molecular features of neoplasm, such as metabolism, proliferation, angiogenesis, hypoxia, and apoptosis, which can be employed for monitoring therapeutic response. In this review, we examine the current methods for evaluating response to treatment and provide an overview of emerging PET molecular imaging methods that will help guide future cancer therapies. (orig.)

  15. Electron transport in molecular junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Chengjun

    charge position are in quantitative agreement with the experiments, while pure DFT is not. This is the consequence of the accurate energy level alignment, where the DFT+∑ method corrects the self-interaction error in the standard DFT functional and uses a static image charge model to include the image......This thesis addresses the electron transport in molecular junctions, focusing on the energy level alignment and correlation effects. Various levels of theory have been applied to study the structural and electronic effects in different molecular junctions, starting from the single particle density...... the lowest unoccupied molecular level (LUMO) of the 44BP molecule hybridizes strongly with Ni 3d orbitals, the gating is auxiliary by the so-called spinterface. Finally, the correlation effect of the image charge beyond the energy level renormalization has been studied. It is shown that the finite response...

  16. Molecular diagnostics of foodborne pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Trine

    of pathogens are needed. The introduction of the molecular diagnostics methods based on detection of the organisms nucleic acids have made detection, identification and characterization of foodborne pathogens faster and with greater specificity and sensitivity. The objectives of research in this thesis were...... to investigate the use of different nucleic acid based methods for molecular diagnostics of foodborne pathogens focusing on Salmonellaand Bacillus cereuswith respect to improve food safety. The work represents two parts of molecular diagnostics; the characterization Salmonellafor better understanding of its...... for screening of unknown bacteria in bottled water without prior cultivation. B. cereusartificially inoculated in bottled water was used as a model. The results revealed that the method was able to detect B. cereusat levels of 105-106 CFU/L, a detection level low enough for detection in outbreaks situations...

  17. Molecular morphology of cyanobacterial phycobilisomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegelman, H.W.; Kycia, J.H.

    1982-09-01

    Phycobilisomes were isolated from several cyanobacteria following cell lysis with Triton X-100. They were purified by phosphate precipitation and hydrophobic-interaction chromatography. Their phycobiliprotein compositions were quantitatively determined by application of sets of simultaneous absorbance equations to gel chromatographic separations of the chromoproteins. Phycobilisomes purified from several cyanobacteria had characteristic elution times on agarose gel chromatography. Combining electron microscope observations of phycobilisome structure, phycobiliprotein composition, and agarose gel chromatography estimates of molecular weight permitted the calculation of many details of phycobilisome molecular structure. Complementary chromatic adaptation resulted in a change of phycobilisome composition and structure. The polypeptide compositions of phycobilisomes were examined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-agarose gel chromatography and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The phycobilisomes were composed of phycobilipeptides derived from the constituent phycobiliproteins. Higher molecular-weight phycobilipeptide aggregates were also observed. The dominant forces responsible for the maintenance of phycobilisome structure are concluded to be hydropohobic interactions.

  18. Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, Richard E., E-mail: rerusso@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Applied Spectra, Inc., 46661 Fremont Boulevard, Fremont, CA 94538 (United States); Bol' shakov, Alexander A. [Applied Spectra, Inc., 46661 Fremont Boulevard, Fremont, CA 94538 (United States); Mao Xianglei [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); McKay, Christopher P. [NASA-Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Perry, Dale L.; Sorkhabi, Osman [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    A new method of performing optical isotopic analysis of condensed samples in ambient air and at ambient pressure has been developed: Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS). The technique uses radiative transitions from molecular species either directly vaporized from a sample or formed by associative mechanisms of atoms or ions in a laser ablation plume. This method is an advanced modification of a known atomic emission technique called laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The new method - LAMIS - can determine not only chemical composition but also isotopic ratios of elements in the sample. Isotopic measurements are enabled by significantly larger isotopic shifts found in molecular spectra relative to atomic spectra. Analysis can be performed from a distance and in real time. No sample preparation or pre-treatment is required. Detection of the isotopes of hydrogen, boron, carbon, and oxygen are discussed to illustrate the technique.

  19. Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Richard E.; Bol'shakov, Alexander A.; Mao, Xianglei; McKay, Christopher P.; Perry, Dale L.; Sorkhabi, Osman

    2011-02-01

    A new method of performing optical isotopic analysis of condensed samples in ambient air and at ambient pressure has been developed: Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS). The technique uses radiative transitions from molecular species either directly vaporized from a sample or formed by associative mechanisms of atoms or ions in a laser ablation plume. This method is an advanced modification of a known atomic emission technique called laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The new method — LAMIS — can determine not only chemical composition but also isotopic ratios of elements in the sample. Isotopic measurements are enabled by significantly larger isotopic shifts found in molecular spectra relative to atomic spectra. Analysis can be performed from a distance and in real time. No sample preparation or pre-treatment is required. Detection of the isotopes of hydrogen, boron, carbon, and oxygen are discussed to illustrate the technique.

  20. OH+ in Diffuse Molecular Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Porras, A J; Welty, D E; Ritchey, A M

    2013-01-01

    Near ultraviolet observations of OH+ and OH in diffuse molecular clouds reveal a preference for different environments. The dominant absorption feature in OH+ arises from a main component seen in CH+ (that with the highest CH+/CH column density ratio), while OH follows CN absorption. This distinction provides new constraints on OH chemistry in these clouds. Since CH+ detections favor low-density gas with small fractions of molecular hydrogen, this must be true for OH+ as well, confirming OH+ and H2O+ observations with the Herschel Space Telescope. Our observed correspondence indicates that the cosmic ray ionization rate derived from these measurements pertains to mainly atomic gas. The association of OH absorption with gas rich in CN is attributed to the need for high enough density and molecular fraction before detectable amounts are seen. Thus, while OH+ leads to OH production, chemical arguments suggest that their abundances are controlled by different sets of conditions and that they coexist with differen...

  1. Nanofriction properties of molecular deposition films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王强斌; 高芒来; 张嗣伟

    2000-01-01

    The nanofriction properties of Au substrate and monolayer molecular deposition film and multilayer molecular deposition films on Au substrate and the molecular deposition films modified with alkyl-terminal molecule have been investigated by using an atomic force microscope. It is concluded that ( i ) the deposition of molecular deposition films on Au substrate and the modification of alkyl-terminal molecule to the molecular deposition films can reduce the frictional force; (ii) the molecular deposition films with the same terminal exhibit similar nanofriction properties, which has nothing to do with the molecular chain-length and the layer number; (iii) the unstable nanofriction properties of molecular deposition films are contributed to the active terminal of the molecular deposition film, which can be eliminated by decorating the active molecular deposition film with alkyl-terminal molecule, moreover, the decoration of alkyl-terminal molecule can lower the frictional force conspicuously; (iv) the relat

  2. Molecular replacement: tricks and treats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To be successful, molecular replacement relies on the quality of the model and of the crystallographic data. Some tricks that could be applied to the models or to the crystal to increase the success rate of MR are discussed here. Molecular replacement is the method of choice for X-ray crystallographic structure determination provided that suitable structural homologues are available in the PDB. Presently, there are ∼80 000 structures in the PDB (8074 were deposited in the year 2012 alone), of which ∼70% have been solved by molecular replacement. For successful molecular replacement the model must cover at least 50% of the total structure and the Cα r.m.s.d. between the core model and the structure to be solved must be less than 2 Å. Here, an approach originally implemented in the CaspR server (http://www.igs.cnrs-mrs.fr/Caspr2/index.cgi) based on homology modelling to search for a molecular-replacement solution is discussed. How the use of as much information as possible from different sources can improve the model(s) is briefly described. The combination of structural information with distantly related sequences is crucial to optimize the multiple alignment that will define the boundaries of the core domains. PDB clusters (sequences with ≥30% identical residues) can also provide information on the eventual changes in conformation and will help to explore the relative orientations assumed by protein subdomains. Normal-mode analysis can also help in generating series of conformational models in the search for a molecular-replacement solution. Of course, finding a correct solution is only the first step and the accuracy of the identified solution is as important as the data quality to proceed through refinement. Here, some possible reasons for failure are discussed and solutions are proposed using a set of successful examples

  3. Molecular transport junctions: vibrational effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transport of electrons in a single molecule junction is the simplest problem in the general subject area of molecular electronics. In the past few years, this area has been extended to probe beyond the simple tunnelling associated with large energy gaps between electrode Fermi level and molecular levels, to deal with smaller gaps, with near-resonance tunnelling and, particularly, with effects due to interaction of electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom. This overview is devoted to the theoretical and computational approaches that have been taken to understanding transport in molecular junctions when these vibronic interactions are involved. After a short experimental overview, and discussion of different test beds and measurements, we define a particular microscopic model Hamiltonian. That overall Hamiltonian can be used to discuss all of the phenomena dealt with subsequently. These include transition from coherent to incoherent transport as electron/vibration interaction increases in strength, inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy and its interpretation and measurement, affects of interelectronic repulsion treated at the Hubbard level, noise in molecular transport junctions, non-linear conductance phenomena, heating and heat conduction in molecular transport junctions and current-induced chemical reactions. In each of these areas, we use the same simple model Hamiltonian to analyse energetics and dynamics. While this overview does not attempt survey the literature exhaustively, it does provide appropriate references to the current literature (both experimental and theoretical). We also attempt to point out directions in which further research is required to answer cardinal questions concerning the behaviour and understanding of vibrational effects in molecular transport junctions. (topical review)

  4. Molecular clouds near supernova remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physical properties of molecular clouds near supernova remnants were investigated. Various properties of the structure and kinematics of these clouds are used to establish their physical association with well-known remmnants. An infrared survey of the most massive clouds revealed embedded objects, probably stars whose formation was induced by the supernova blast wave. In order to understand the relationship between these and other molecular clouds, a control group of clouds was also observed. Excitation models for dense regions of all the clouds are constructed to evaluate molecular abundances in these regions. Those clouds that have embedded stars have lower molecular abundances than the clouds that do not. A cloud near the W28 supernova remnant also has low abundances. Molecular abundances are used to measure an important parameter, the electron density, which is not directly observable. In some clouds extensive deuterium fractionation is observed which confirms electron density measurements in those clouds. Where large deuterium fractionation is observed, the ionization rate in the cloud interior can also be measured. The electron density and ionization rate in the cloud near W28 are higher than in most clouds. The molecular abundances and electron densities are functions of the chemical and dynamical state of evolution of the cloud. Those clouds with lowest abundances are probably the youngest clouds. As low-abundance clouds, some clouds near supernova remnants may have been recently swept from the local interstellar material. Supernova remnants provide sites for star formation in ambient clouds by compressing them, and they sweep new clouds from more diffuse local matter

  5. Light and Redox Switchable Molecular Components for Molecular Electronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Browne, Wesley R.; Feringa, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    The field of molecular and organic electronics has seen rapid progress in recent years, developing from concept and design to actual demonstration devices in which both single molecules and self-assembled monolayers are employed as light-responsive components. Research in this field has seen numerou

  6. Molecular Modeling of Estrogen Receptor Using Molecular Operating Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Urmi; Luck, Linda A.

    2007-01-01

    Molecular modeling is pervasive in the pharmaceutical industry that employs many of our students from Biology, Chemistry and the interdisciplinary majors. To expose our students to this important aspect of their education we have incorporated a set of tutorials in our Biochemistry class. The present article describes one of our tutorials where…

  7. A sampling of molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindhikara, Daniel Jon

    The sheer vastness of the number of computations required to simulate a biological molecule puts incredible pressure on algorithms to be efficient while maintaining sufficient accuracy. This dissertation summarizes various projects whose purposes address the large span of types of problems in molecular dynamics simulations of biological systems including: increasing efficiency, measuring convergence, avoiding pitfalls, and an application and analysis of a biological system. Chapters 3 and 4 deal with an enhanced sampling algorithm called "replica exchange molecular dynamics" which is designed to speed-up molecular dynamics simulations. The optimization of a key parameter of these simulations is analyzed. In these successive projects, it was found conclusively that maximizing "exchange attempt frequency" is the most efficient way to run a replica exchange molecular dynamics simulation. Chapter 5 describes an enhanced metric for convergence in parallel simulations called the normalized ergodic measure. The metric is applied to several properties for several replica exchange simulations. Advantages of this metric over other methods are described. Chapter 6 describes the implementation and optimization of an enhanced sampling algorithm similar to replica exchange molecular dynamics called multicanonical algorithm replica exchange molecular dynamics. The algorithm was implemented into a biomolecular simulation suite called AMBER. Additionally several parameters were analyzed and optimized. In Chapter 7, a pitfall in molecular dynamics is observed in biological systems that is caused by negligent use of a simulation's "thermostat". It was found that if the same pseudorandom number seed were used for multiple systems, they eventually synchronize. In this project, synchronization was observed in biological molecules. Various negative effects including corruption of data are pointed out. Chapter 8 describes molecular dynamics simulation of NikR, a homotetrameric nickel

  8. Industrial Applications of Molecular Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Meunier, Marc

    2011-01-01

    The field of quantum and molecular simulations has experienced strong growth since the time of the early software packages. A recent study, showed a large increase in the number of people publishing papers based on ab initio methods from about 3,000 in 1991 to roughly 20,000 in 2009, with particularly strong growth in East Asia. Looking to the future, the question remains as to how these methods can be further integrated into the R&D value chain, bridging the gap from engineering to manufacturing. Using successful case studies as a framework, Industrial Applications of Molecular Simulations de

  9. Asymmetric interference in molecular photoprocesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the first time, the Coulomb continuum effects in asymmetric molecular interference have been studied analytically in photoionization, photorecombination, bremsstrahlung and Compton ionization. Simple, closed-form factors describe the interference not only in monochromatic photoprocesses, but also in the continuous photoelectron spectra generated by attosecond x-ray pulses with a frequency-dependent phase and broad bandwidth. Using HeH2+ molecular ion as an example, we show how the plane wave interference pattern is strongly modified by the two-centre Coulomb continuum. Asymmetric Coulomb continuum introduces qualitative changes in a photoionization process

  10. Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stock, L.M.; Yang, Shiyong [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This research, which is relevant to the development of new catalytic systems for the improvement of the quality of coal liquids by the addition of dihydrogen, is divided into two tasks. Task 1 centers on the activation of dihydrogen by molecular basic reagents such as hydroxide ion to convert it into a reactive adduct (OH{center_dot}H{sub 2}){sup {minus}} that can reduce organic molecules. Such species should be robust withstanding severe conditions and chemical poisons. Task 2 is focused on an entirely different approach that exploits molecular catalysts, derived from organometallic compounds that are capable of reducing monocyclic aromatic compounds under very mild conditions. Accomplishments and conclusions are discussed.

  11. Inverse strategies for molecular design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An 'inverse' molecular design strategy is described to assist in the development of new molecules with optimized properties. This approach is based on a molecular orbital view and can be used to tailor ground state or excited state properties subject to particular constrains. In this scheme, wave functions are sought that optimize a chemical or electronic property, and then a Hamiltonian is constructed that generates these optimized wave functions. Analysis of the chemical properties in the optimized systems may suggest new synthetic targets. Examples are presented that optimize the transition dipole moment in some simple structures. 15 refs., 6 figs

  12. Hydrogen storage in molecular compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, Wendy L.; Mao, Ho-kwang

    2004-01-01

    At low temperature (T) and high pressure (P), gas molecules can be held in ice cages to form crystalline molecular compounds that may have application for energy storage. We synthesized a hydrogen clathrate hydrate, H2(H2O)2, that holds 50 g/liter hydrogen by volume or 5.3 wt %. The clathrate, synthesized at 200–300 MPa and 240–249 K, can be preserved to ambient P at 77 K. The stored hydrogen is released when the clathrate is warmed to 140 K at ambient P. Low T also stabilizes other molecular...

  13. Oscillations in molecular motor assemblies

    CERN Document Server

    Vilfan, A; Vilfan, Andrej; Frey, Erwin

    2005-01-01

    Autonomous oscillations in biological systems may have a biochemical origin or result from an interplay between force-generating and visco-elastic elements. In molecular motor assemblies the force-generating elements are molecular engines and the visco-elastic elements are stiff cytoskeletal polymers. The physical mechanism leading to oscillations depends on the particular architecture of the assembly. Existing models can be grouped into two distinct categories: systems with a {\\em delayed force activation} and {\\em anomalous force-velocity relations}. We discuss these systems within phase plane analysis known from the theory of dynamic systems and by adopting methods from control theory, the Nyquist criterion.

  14. Molecular calculations with B functions

    CERN Document Server

    Steinborn, E O; Ema, I; López, R; Ramírez, G

    1998-01-01

    A program for molecular calculations with B functions is reported and its performance is analyzed. All the one- and two-center integrals, and the three-center nuclear attraction integrals are computed by direct procedures, using previously developed algorithms. The three- and four-center electron repulsion integrals are computed by means of Gaussian expansions of the B functions. A new procedure for obtaining these expansions is also reported. Some results on full molecular calculations are included to show the capabilities of the program and the quality of the B functions to represent the electronic functions in molecules.

  15. [Opportunity and challenge on molecular epidemiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, G C; Chen, S Y

    2016-08-10

    Molecular epidemiology, a branch of epidemiology, combines the theories and methods, both in epidemiology and molecular biology. Molecular epidemiology mainly focuses on biological markers, describing the distribution, occurrence, development and prognosis of diseases at the molecular level. The completion of Human Genome Project and rapid development of Precision Medicine and Big Data not only offer the new development opportunities but also bring about a higher demand and new challenge for molecular epidemiology. PMID:27539332

  16. Molecular outflows in starburst nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Arpita; Sharma, Prateek; Shchekinov, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Recent observations have detected molecular outflows in a few nearby starburst nuclei. We discuss the physical processes at work in such an environment in order to outline a scenario that can explain the observed parameters of the phenomenon, such as the molecular mass, speed and size of the outflows. We show that outflows triggered by OB associations, with $N_{OB}\\ge 10^5$ (corresponding to a star formation rate (SFR)$\\ge 1$ M$_{\\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ in the nuclear region), in a stratified disk with mid-plane density $n_0\\sim 200\\hbox{--}1000$ cm$^{-3}$ and scale height $z_0\\ge 200 (n_0/10^2 \\, {\\rm cm}^{-3})^{-3/5}$ pc, can form molecules in a cool dense and expanding shell. The associated molecular mass is $\\ge 10^7$ M$_\\odot$ at a distance of a few hundred pc, with a speed of several tens of km s$^{-1}$. We show that a SFR surface density of $10 \\le \\Sigma_{SFR} \\le 50$ M$_\\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ kpc$^{-2}$ favours the production of molecular outflows, consistent with observed values.

  17. Light-Powered Molecular Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neves Petersen, Teresa; Crookshanks, Meg; Skovsen, Esben;

    2007-01-01

    We present a new photonic technology and demonstrate that it allows for precise immobilisation of biomolecules to sensor surfaces. The technology secures spatially controlled molecular immobilisation since immobilisation of each molecule to a support surface can be limited to the focal point of t...

  18. Electron scattering on molecular hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author considers scattering phenomena which occur when a beam of electrons interacts with a molecular hydrogen gas of low density. Depending on the energy loss of the scattered electrons one can distinguish elastic scattering, excitation and (auto)ionization of the H2-molecule. The latter processes may also lead to dissociation. These processes are investigated in four experiments in increasing detail. (Auth.)

  19. Ordered structures of molecular bottlebrushes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Brinke, G.; Ikkala, O.

    1997-01-01

    In this review 'molecular bottlebrushes' are flexible polymers densely loaded with equally flexible side chains. Interest in these structures arises from the possibility of lyotropic behaviour in dilute solution in a good solvent, as well as the possibility, of highly, ordered microphase-separated s

  20. Ordered Structures of Molecular Bottlebrushes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinke, Gerrit ten; Ikkala, Olli

    1997-01-01

    In this review 'molecular bottlebrushes' are flexible polymers densely loaded with equally flexible side chains. Interest in these structures arises from the possibility of lyotropic behaviour in dilute solution in a good solvent, as well as the possibility of highly ordered microphase-separated sta

  1. Molecular imaging in cardiovascular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiovascular diseases remain the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in industrialized and developing countries. In clinical practice, the in-vivo identification of atherosclerotic lesions, which can lead to complications such as heart attack or stroke, remains difficult. Imaging techniques provide the reference standard for the detection of clinically significant atherosclerotic changes in the coronary and carotid arteries. The assessment of the luminal narrowing is feasible, while the differentiation of stable and potentially unstable or vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques is currently not possible using non-invasive imaging. With high spatial resolution and high soft tissue contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a suitable method for the evaluation of the thin arterial wall. In clinical practice, native MRI of the vessel wall already allows the differentiation and characterization of components of atherosclerotic plaques in the carotid arteries and the aorta. Additional diagnostic information can be gained by the use of non-specific MRI contrast agents. With the development of targeted molecular probes, that highlight specific molecules or cells, pathological processes can be visualized at a molecular level with high spatial resolution. In this review article, the development of pathophysiological changes leading to the development of the arterial wall are introduced and discussed. Additionally, principles of contrast enhanced imaging with non-specific contrast agents and molecular probes will be discussed and latest developments in the field of molecular imaging of the vascular wall will be introduced.

  2. Coherently Controlled Nanoscale Molecular Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Dey, Bijoy K.; Shapiro, Moshe; Brumer, Paul

    2000-01-01

    Quantum interference effects are shown to provide a means of controlling and enhancing the focusing a collimated neutral molecular beam onto a surface. The nature of the aperiodic pattern formed can be altered by varying laser field characteristics and the system geometry.

  3. Molecular Mobility in Sugar Glasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dries, van den I.J.

    2000-01-01

    Glasses are liquids that exhibit solid state behavior as a result of their extremely high viscosity. Regarding their application to foods, glasses play a role in the preservation of foods, due to their high viscosity and the concomitant low molecular mobility. This thesis focuses on sugar glasses. S

  4. Alligator clips to molecular dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Techniques for fabricating nanospaced electrodes suitable for studying electron tunneling through metal-molecule-metal junctions are described. In one approach, top contacts are deposited/placed on a self-assembled monolayer or Langmuir-Blodgett film resting on a conducting substrate, the bottom contact. The molecular component serves as a permanent spacer that controls and limits the electrode separations. The top contact can be a thermally deposited metal film, liquid mercury drop, scanning probe tip, metallic wire or particle. Introduction of the top contact can greatly affect the electrical conductance of the intervening molecular film by chemical reaction, exerting pressure, or simply migrating through the organic layer. Alternatively, vacant nanogaps can be fabricated and the molecular component subsequently inserted. Strategies for constructing vacant nanogaps include mechanical break junction, electromigration, shadow mask lithography, focused ion beam deposition, chemical and electrochemical plating techniques, electron-beam lithography, and molecular and atomic rulers. The size of the nanogaps must be small enough to allow the molecule to connect both leads and large enough to keep the molecules in a relaxed and undistorted state. A significant advantage of using vacant nanogaps in the construction of metal-molecule-metal devices is that the junction can be characterized with and without the molecule in place. Any electrical artifacts introduced by the electrode fabrication process are more easily deconvoluted from the intrinsic properties of the molecule

  5. Molecular outflows in starburst nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Arpita; Nath, Biman B.; Sharma, Prateek; Shchekinov, Yuri

    2016-08-01

    Recent observations have detected molecular outflows in a few nearby starburst nuclei. We discuss the physical processes at work in such an environment in order to outline a scenario that can explain the observed parameters of the phenomenon, such as the molecular mass, speed and size of the outflows. We show that outflows triggered by OB associations, with NOB ≥ 105 (corresponding to a star formation rate (SFR)≥1 M⊙ yr-1 in the nuclear region), in a stratified disk with mid-plane density n0 ˜ 200-1000 cm-3 and scale height z0 ≥ 200(n0/102 cm-3)-3/5 pc, can form molecules in a cool dense and expanding shell. The associated molecular mass is ≥107 M⊙ at a distance of a few hundred pc, with a speed of several tens of km s-1. We show that a SFR surface density of 10 ≤ ΣSFR ≤ 50 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2 favours the production of molecular outflows, consistent with observed values.

  6. Molecular diagnosis of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haga, Hiroaki; Patel, Tushar

    2015-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas (iCCA) are primary intrahepatic malignancies originating from biliary epithelia. While both hepatocellular cancer and iCCA can present as mass lesions within the liver, these cancers are distinct in their morphology, etiology, pathology, natural history and response to therapy. There is a need for accurate and sensitive molecular markers for the diagnosis of iCCA. Recent advances in elucidating molecular and genetic characteristics of iCCA offer the potential of molecular-based diagnosis of iCCA. Specific genetic mutations of IDH1/2, BAP1, p53, and KRAS, FGFR gene fusions and alterations in microRNA have all been described in iCCA. Although there are no accurate serum or biliary biomarkers currently available for diagnosis of iCCA, several potential candidates have been identified. Knowledge of specific genetic or molecular abnormalities offers potential for individualized approaches for the treatment of patients with iCCA in the future. PMID:25267595

  7. Molecular biology of Plasmodiophora brassicae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siemens, Johannes; Bulman, Simon; Rehn, Frank;

    2009-01-01

    of several genes have been revealed, and the expression of those genes has been linked to development of clubroot to some extent. In addition, the sequence data have reinforced the inclusion of the plasmodiophorids within the Cercozoa. The recent successes in molecular biology have produced new approaches...

  8. Insect symbionts and molecular phylogenetics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hypša, Václav; Nováková, Eva

    Vol. 3. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 2008 - (Bourtzis, K.; Miller, T.), s. 1-32. (Contemporary Topics in Entomology. 4). ISBN 1-4200-6410-X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA601410708; GA MŠk LC06073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : symbiosis * molecular phylogeny * insect symbionts * coevolution Subject RIV: EG - Zoology

  9. Rethinking a Mysterious Molecular Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Imara, Nia

    2015-01-01

    I present high-resolution column density maps of two molecular clouds having strikingly different star formation rates. To better understand the unusual, massive G216-2.5, a molecular cloud with no massive star formation, the distribution of its molecular gas is compared to that of the Rosette Molecular Cloud. Far-infrared data from Herschel are used to derive $N(\\mathrm{H}_2)$ maps of each cloud and are combined with $I_{\\mathrm{CO}}$ data to determine the CO-to-H$_2$ ratio, $X_{\\mathrm{CO}}$. In addition, the probability distribution functions (PDFs) and cumulative mass fractions of the clouds are compared. For G216-2.5, $=7.8\\times 10^{20} cm^{-2}$ and $ =2.2\\times 10^{20} (K km s^{-1})^{-1}$; for the Rosette, $ =1.8\\times 10^{21} cm^{-2}$ and $ =2.8\\times 10^{20} (K km s^{-1})^{-1}$. The PDFs of both clouds are log-normal for extinctions below $\\sim 2$ mag and both show departures from log-normality at high extinctions. Although it is the less-massive cloud, the Rosette has a higher fraction of its mass ...

  10. OH+ IN DIFFUSE MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Near ultraviolet observations of OH+ and OH in diffuse molecular clouds reveal a preference for different environments. The dominant absorption feature in OH+ arises from a main component seen in CH+ (that with the highest CH+/CH column density ratio), while OH follows CN absorption. This distinction provides new constraints on OH chemistry in these clouds. Since CH+ detections favor low-density gas with small fractions of molecular hydrogen, this must be true for OH+ as well, confirming OH+ and H2O+ observations with the Herschel Space Telescope. Our observed correspondence indicates that the cosmic ray ionization rate derived from these measurements pertains to mainly atomic gas. The association of OH absorption with gas rich in CN is attributed to the need for a high enough density and molecular fraction before detectable amounts are seen. Thus, while OH+ leads to OH production, chemical arguments suggest that their abundances are controlled by different sets of conditions and that they coexist with different sets of observed species. Of particular note is that non-thermal chemistry appears to play a limited role in the synthesis of OH in diffuse molecular clouds

  11. Cancer Stratification by Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justus Weber

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The lack of specificity of traditional cytotoxic drugs has triggered the development of anticancer agents that selectively address specific molecular targets. An intrinsic property of these specialized drugs is their limited applicability for specific patient subgroups. Consequently, the generation of information about tumor characteristics is the key to exploit the potential of these drugs. Currently, cancer stratification relies on three approaches: Gene expression analysis and cancer proteomics, immunohistochemistry and molecular imaging. In order to enable the precise localization of functionally expressed targets, molecular imaging combines highly selective biomarkers and intense signal sources. Thus, cancer stratification and localization are performed simultaneously. Many cancer types are characterized by altered receptor expression, such as somatostatin receptors, folate receptors or Her2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. Similar correlations are also known for a multitude of transporters, such as glucose transporters, amino acid transporters or hNIS (human sodium iodide symporter, as well as cell specific proteins, such as the prostate specific membrane antigen, integrins, and CD20. This review provides a comprehensive description of the methods, targets and agents used in molecular imaging, to outline their application for cancer stratification. Emphasis is placed on radiotracers which are used to identify altered expression patterns of cancer associated markers.

  12. Low-dimensional molecular metals

    CERN Document Server

    Toyota, Naoki; Muller, Jens

    2007-01-01

    Assimilating research in the field of low-dimensional metals, this monograph provides an overview of the status of research on quasi-one- and two-dimensional molecular metals, describing normal-state properties, magnetic field effects, superconductivity, and the phenomena of interacting p and d electrons.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulation of diffusivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juanfang LIU; Danling ZENG; Qin LI; Hong GAO

    2008-01-01

    Equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation was performed on water to calculate its diffusivity by adopting different potential models. The results show that the potential models have great influence on the simulated results. In addition, the diffusivities obtained by the SPCE model conform well to the experimental values.

  14. Molecular chaperones and neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the accumulation of intracellular or extracellular protein aggregates that result from conformational changes in proteins. These diseases may result from an imbalance between the production of misfolded proteins and normal chaperone capacity. Molecular chaperones provide a first line of defence against misfolded, aggregation-prone proteins and are, therefore, promising therapeutic targets for neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Molecular Properties through Polarizable Embedding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Kongsted, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    We review the theory related to the calculation of electric and magnetic molecular properties through polarizable embedding. In particular, we derive the expressions for the response functions up to the level of cubic response within the density functional theory-based polarizable embedding (PE...

  16. Molecularly imprinted polymers for mycotoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are a class of synthetic receptors capable of selective recognition of analytes. Recent developments in imprinting technology have made it possible to apply this technology in a range of applications, including mycotoxin detection. Structure-activity relations...

  17. Molecular Foundry, Berkeley, California (Revised)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlisle, N.

    2008-03-01

    This case study provides information on the Molecular Foundry, which incorporates Labs21 principles in its design and construction. The design includes many of the strategies researched at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for energy efficient cleanroom and data centers. The result is an energy efficient high-performing sustainable laboratory.

  18. A synthetic molecular pentafoil knot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayme, Jean-François; Beves, Jonathon E.; Leigh, David A.; McBurney, Roy T.; Rissanen, Kari; Schultz, David

    2012-01-01

    Knots are being discovered with increasing frequency in both biological and synthetic macromolecules and have been fundamental topological targets for chemical synthesis for the past two decades. Here, we report on the synthesis of the most complex non-DNA molecular knot prepared to date: the self-assembly of five bis-aldehyde and five bis-amine building blocks about five metal cations and one chloride anion to form a 160-atom-loop molecular pentafoil knot (five crossing points). The structure and topology of the knot is established by NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography, revealing a symmetrical closed-loop double helicate with the chloride anion held at the centre of the pentafoil knot by ten CH···Cl- hydrogen bonds. The one-pot self-assembly reaction features an exceptional number of different design elements—some well precedented and others less well known within the context of directing the formation of (supra)molecular species. We anticipate that the strategies and tactics used here can be applied to the rational synthesis of other higher-order interlocked molecular architectures.

  19. Molecular pathogenesis of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jesper Bøje

    2014-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is an orphan cancer of the hepatobiliary tract, the incidence of which has increased in the past decade. The molecular pathogenesis of this treatment-refractory disease is poorly understood. Desmoplasia is a key causal feature of CCA; however, a majority of tumors develop...

  20. Progress in quantum molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper a microscopic simulation method of the quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) and its extensions to high- and low-energy regions are reported. Combined with the statistical decay calculation, QMD can reproduce experimental data with fixed and very few parameters. (J.P.N.)

  1. Thermoelectric efficiency of molecular junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perroni, C A; Ninno, D; Cataudella, V

    2016-09-21

    Focus of the review is on experimental set-ups and theoretical proposals aimed to enhance thermoelectric performances of molecular junctions. In addition to charge conductance, the thermoelectric parameter commonly measured in these systems is the thermopower, which is typically rather low. We review recent experimental outcomes relative to several junction configurations used to optimize the thermopower. On the other hand, theoretical calculations provide estimations of all the thermoelectric parameters in the linear and non-linear regime, in particular of the thermoelectric figure of merit and efficiency, completing our knowledge of molecular thermoelectricity. For this reason, the review will mainly focus on theoretical studies analyzing the role of not only electronic, but also of the vibrational degrees of freedom. Theoretical results about thermoelectric phenomena in the coherent regime are reviewed focusing on interference effects which play a significant role in enhancing the figure of merit. Moreover, we review theoretical studies including the effects of molecular many-body interactions, such as electron-vibration couplings, which typically tend to reduce the efficiency. Since a fine tuning of many parameters and coupling strengths is required to optimize the thermoelectric conversion in molecular junctions, new theoretically proposed set-ups are discussed in the conclusions. PMID:27420149

  2. Molecular detection technologies for arboviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthropod-borne animal viruses (arboviruses) cause significant livestock and economic losses to world agriculture. This paper discusses the current and potential impact of these viruses, as well as the current and developing molecular diagnostic tools for these emerging and re-emerging insect transm...

  3. An invitation to molecular magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkowicz, Dawid; Chorazy, Szymon; Stefańczyk, Olaf

    2011-01-01

    Molecular magnetism is a new and extremely fascinating field on the borders of chemistry, physics and materials science. The design and synthesis of molecule-based magnets requires the chemist to exert considerable control over the molecules to arrange them appropriately. It also demands the development of new theories to explain the complex magneto-structural behaviour of these intriguing solids. Molecular magnetism is still at a very early stage of development. The main challenge is to increase the strength of the magnetic interactions between spin carriers so the resulting materials can be usable at room temperature. However molecular magnets exhibit true potential to become multifunctional materials. They show some considerable advantages over conventional magnets: optical transparency, chemical sensitivity and low weight to name just a few. The following article is not a complete review of the field. Its aim is rather to show how beautiful and versatile magnetic molecular solids can be, and to encourage the in-depth study of the subject. PMID:21805910

  4. A Comparison of Molecular Vibrational Theory to Huckel Molecular Orbital Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeports, David

    1986-01-01

    Compares the similar mathematical problems of molecular vibrational calculations (at any intermediate level of sophistication) and molecular orbital calculations (at the Huckel level). Discusses how the generalizations of Huckel treatment of molecular orbitals apply to vibrational theory. (TW)

  5. Nonlinear conductance in molecular devices: Molecular length dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crljen, Ž.; Grigoriev, A.; Wendin, G.; Stokbro, K.

    2005-04-01

    We theoretically study the electronic transport in the monolayer of dithiolated phenylene vinylene oligomeres coupled to the (111) surfaces of gold electrodes. We use nonequilibrium Green’s functions and density-functional theory implemented in the TranSIESTA package to obtain a full ab initio self-consistent description of the transport current through the molecular nanostructure with different electrochemical bias potentials. The calculated current-voltage characteristics of the systems for the same contact geometry have shown a systematic decrease of the conductivity with the increased length of the molecules. We analyze the results in terms of transmission eigenchannels and find that besides the delocalization of molecular orbitals the distance between gold electrodes also determines the transport properties.

  6. HTMD: High-Throughput Molecular Dynamics for Molecular Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerr, S; Harvey, M J; Noé, Frank; De Fabritiis, G

    2016-04-12

    Recent advances in molecular simulations have allowed scientists to investigate slower biological processes than ever before. Together with these advances came an explosion of data that has transformed a traditionally computing-bound into a data-bound problem. Here, we present HTMD, a programmable, extensible platform written in Python that aims to solve the data generation and analysis problem as well as increase reproducibility by providing a complete workspace for simulation-based discovery. So far, HTMD includes system building for CHARMM and AMBER force fields, projection methods, clustering, molecular simulation production, adaptive sampling, an Amazon cloud interface, Markov state models, and visualization. As a result, a single, short HTMD script can lead from a PDB structure to useful quantities such as relaxation time scales, equilibrium populations, metastable conformations, and kinetic rates. In this paper, we focus on the adaptive sampling and Markov state modeling features. PMID:26949976

  7. Advances in molecular vibrations and collision dynamics molecular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Bacic, Zatko

    1998-01-01

    This volume focuses on molecular clusters, bound by van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonds. Twelve chapters review a wide range of recent theoretical and experimental advances in the areas of cluster vibrations, spectroscopy, and reaction dynamics. The authors are leading experts, who have made significant contributions to these topics.The first chapter describes exciting results and new insights in the solvent effects on the short-time photo fragmentation dynamics of small molecules, obtained by combining heteroclusters with femtosecond laser excitation. The second is on theoretical work on effects of single solvent (argon) atom on the photodissociation dynamics of the solute H2O molecule. The next two chapters cover experimental and theoretical aspects of the energetics and vibrations of small clusters. Chapter 5 describes diffusion quantum Monte Carlo calculations and non additive three-body potential terms in molecular clusters. The next six chapters deal with hydrogen-bonded clusters, refle...

  8. Research Status of Molecular Biology in Flax

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Jian-zhong

    2016-01-01

    Flax is a kind of worldwide fiber and oil crops, and it has a very important role in economic crop production in the world. With the development of molecular biology techniques, the research of flax molecular level has a very big breakthrough. But, flax molecular biology researches are less reported due to the later starting. This paper summarized the latest research progress of molecular biology of flax, including molecular marker technology, construction of genetic map, gene engineering and omics researches, in order to provide the reference to understand the development and research status for flax molecular breeding researchers.

  9. Nonlinear conductance in molecular devices: molecular length dependence

    OpenAIRE

    Crljen, Z.; Grigoriev, A.; Wendin, G.; Stokbro, K.

    2004-01-01

    We theoretically study the electronic transport in the monolayer of dithiolated phenylene vinylene oligomeres coupled to the (111) surfaces of gold electrodes. We use non-equilibrium Green functions (NEGF) and density functional theory(DFT) implemented in the TranSIESTA package to obtain a full ab initio self-consistent description ofthe transport current through the molecular nanostructure with different electrochemical bias potentials. The calculated current-voltage characteristics (IVC) of...

  10. Molecular Engineering of dosimetric materials; Ingenieria Molecular de materiales dosimetricos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salas, P.; Castano, V.M. [Instituto de Fisica, UNAM, A.P. 1-1010, Queretaro (Mexico); Mendoza, D.; Gonzalez, P. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    It was studied the thermoluminescent response to the gamma radiation of a new family of solid materials of zircon-silica. In this study some materials have been prepared by the sol-gel method with different stoichiometric relations, finding that it is possible to control, at least, partially, the thermoluminescent behavior starting from the Molecular Engineering of those materials, since the mixture of both ceramics allows to produce materials with different spatial structures. (Author)

  11. Viscosity kernel of molecular fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puscasu, Ruslan; Todd, Billy; Daivis, Peter;

    2010-01-01

    The wave-vector dependent shear viscosities for butane and freely jointed chains have been determined. The transverse momentum density and stress autocorrelation functions have been determined by equilibrium molecular dynamics in both atomic and molecular hydrodynamic formalisms. The density......, temperature, and chain length dependencies of the reciprocal and real-space viscosity kernels are presented. We find that the density has a major effect on the shape of the kernel. The temperature range and chain lengths considered here have by contrast less impact on the overall normalized shape. Functional...... forms that fit the wave-vector-dependent kernel data over a large density and wave-vector range have also been tested. Finally, a structural normalization of the kernels in physical space is considered. Overall, the real-space viscosity kernel has a width of roughly 3–6 atomic diameters, which means...

  12. Laser Controlled Molecular Orientation Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular orientation is a challenging control issue covering a wide range of applications from reactive collisions, high order harmonic generation, surface processing and catalysis, to nanotechnologies. The laser control scenario rests on the following three steps: (i) depict some basic mechanisms producing dynamical orientation; (ii) use them both as computational and interpretative tools in optimal control schemes involving genetic algorithms; (iii) apply what is learnt from optimal control to improve the basic mechanisms. The existence of a target molecular rotational state combining the advantages of efficient and post-pulse long duration orientation is shown. A strategy is developed for reaching such a target in terms of a train of successive short laser pulses applied at predicted time intervals. Each individual pulse imparts a kick to the molecule which orients. Transposition of such strategies to generic systems is now under investigation

  13. Superconducting currents from molecular theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gauge-invariant method of London is used to solve the molecular orbital (MO) equations in a square planar slab, with one electron per site, in a perpendicular magnetic field. Pair currents appear because of the degeneracy and incomplete filling of highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO). This type of electronic structure may alternatively result in an antiferromagnetic (AF) state of a charge density wave (CDW) state. The CDW state has alternating oxidation states which are different in two units, for example, in BaBiO3, where the valence state of Bi is alternating between +3 and +5, depending on whether the Bi6s2 electron pair is present at the site. The AF state, on the other hand, appears if only the middle valence state is stable. It is shown here that appearance of electron pair currents requires that all three oxidation states are at about the same total energy

  14. Laser Cooling of Molecular Anions

    CERN Document Server

    Yzombard, Pauline; Gerber, Sebastian; Doser, Michael; Comparat, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    We propose a scheme for laser cooling of negatively charged molecules. We briefly summarise the requirements for such laser cooling and we identify a number of potential candidates. A detailed computation study with C$\\_2^-$, the most studied molecular anion, is carried out. Simulations of 3D laser cooling in a gas phase show that this molecule could be cooled down to below 1 mK in only a few tens of milliseconds, using standard lasers. Sisyphus cooling, where no photo-detachment process is present, as well as Doppler laser cooling of trapped C$\\_2^-$, are also simulated. This cooling scheme has an impact on the study of cold molecules, molecular anions, charged particle sources and antimatter physics.

  15. Seebeck effect in molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A.

    2016-05-01

    Advances in the fabrication and characterization of nanoscale systems presently allow for a better understanding of their thermoelectric properties. As is known, the building blocks of thermoelectricity are the Peltier and Seebeck effects. In the present work we review results of theoretical studies of the Seebeck effect in single-molecule junctions and similar systems. The behavior of thermovoltage and thermopower in these systems is controlled by several factors including the geometry of molecular bridges, the characteristics of contacts between the bridge and the electrodes, the strength of the Coulomb interactions between electrons on the bridge, and of electron–phonon interactions. We describe the impact of these factors on the thermopower. Also, we discuss a nonlinear Seebeck effect in molecular junctions.

  16. Simulation of complex molecular systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combined evolution of the electronic structure softwares and computational capabilities makes quantum molecular dynamics simulations available for increasingly complex systems, up to several hundred atoms. Among the various ab initio techniques, Density Functional Theory (DFT) is very successful due to its important computational efficiency with respect to Hartree-Fock type approaches. Its combination with empirical treatments of the weak van der Waals interactions allows the simulation of equilibrium or dynamics properties of numerous systems of interest for the nuclear and defense industry. We present 3 direct applications of quantum molecular dynamics: the determination of the structure of the complex Pu(DTPA) ion where DTPA means diethylen-triamine-penta-acid, the calculation of the equation of state and the Hugoniot curve of TATB monocrystal. (authors)

  17. Metallic, magnetic and molecular nanocontacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requist, Ryan; Baruselli, Pier Paolo; Smogunov, Alexander; Fabrizio, Michele; Modesti, Silvio; Tosatti, Erio

    2016-06-01

    Scanning tunnelling microscopy and break-junction experiments realize metallic and molecular nanocontacts that act as ideal one-dimensional channels between macroscopic electrodes. Emergent nanoscale phenomena typical of these systems encompass structural, mechanical, electronic, transport, and magnetic properties. This Review focuses on the theoretical explanation of some of these properties obtained with the help of first-principles methods. By tracing parallel theoretical and experimental developments from the discovery of nanowire formation and conductance quantization in gold nanowires to recent observations of emergent magnetism and Kondo correlations, we exemplify the main concepts and ingredients needed to bring together ab initio calculations and physical observations. It can be anticipated that diode, sensor, spin-valve and spin-filter functionalities relevant for spintronics and molecular electronics applications will benefit from the physical understanding thus obtained.

  18. Molecular dissociation in dilute gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The charge state distributions (CSD) produced during molecular dissociation are important to both Trace Element Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (TEAMS) and the ion implantation industry. The CSD of 1.3 - 1.7 MeV SiN+, SiMg+, SiMn+, and SiZn+ molecules have been measured for elements that do not form atomic negative ions (N, Mg, Mn, and Zn) using a NEC Tandem Pelletron accelerator. The molecules were produced in a Cs sputter negative ion source, accelerated, magnetically analyzed, and then passed through an N2 gas cell. The neutral and charged breakups where analyzed using an electrostatic deflector and measured with particle detectors. Equilibrium CSD were determined and comparisons made between molecular and atomic ion data. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  19. Molecular imaging. Fundamentals and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Jie (ed.) [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Intelligent Medical Research Center

    2013-07-01

    Covers a wide range of new theory, new techniques and new applications. Contributed by many experts in China. The editor has obtained the National Science and Technology Progress Award twice. ''Molecular Imaging: Fundamentals and Applications'' is a comprehensive monograph which describes not only the theory of the underlying algorithms and key technologies but also introduces a prototype system and its applications, bringing together theory, technology and applications. By explaining the basic concepts and principles of molecular imaging, imaging techniques, as well as research and applications in detail, the book provides both detailed theoretical background information and technical methods for researchers working in medical imaging and the life sciences. Clinical doctors and graduate students will also benefit from this book.

  20. Molecular imaging. Fundamentals and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Covers a wide range of new theory, new techniques and new applications. Contributed by many experts in China. The editor has obtained the National Science and Technology Progress Award twice. ''Molecular Imaging: Fundamentals and Applications'' is a comprehensive monograph which describes not only the theory of the underlying algorithms and key technologies but also introduces a prototype system and its applications, bringing together theory, technology and applications. By explaining the basic concepts and principles of molecular imaging, imaging techniques, as well as research and applications in detail, the book provides both detailed theoretical background information and technical methods for researchers working in medical imaging and the life sciences. Clinical doctors and graduate students will also benefit from this book.

  1. Seebeck effect in molecular junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advances in the fabrication and characterization of nanoscale systems presently allow for a better understanding of their thermoelectric properties. As is known, the building blocks of thermoelectricity are the Peltier and Seebeck effects. In the present work we review results of theoretical studies of the Seebeck effect in single-molecule junctions and similar systems. The behavior of thermovoltage and thermopower in these systems is controlled by several factors including the geometry of molecular bridges, the characteristics of contacts between the bridge and the electrodes, the strength of the Coulomb interactions between electrons on the bridge, and of electron–phonon interactions. We describe the impact of these factors on the thermopower. Also, we discuss a nonlinear Seebeck effect in molecular junctions. (topical review)

  2. Fragmentation in filamentary molecular clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Contreras, Yanett; Rathborne, Jill M; Sanhueza, Patricio

    2015-01-01

    Recent surveys of dust continuum emission at sub-mm wavelengths have shown that filamentary molecular clouds are ubiquitous along the Galactic plane. These structures are inhomogeneous, with over-densities that are sometimes associated with infrared emission and active of star formation. To investigate the connection between filaments and star formation, requires an understanding of the processes that lead to the fragmentation of filaments and a determination of the physical properties of the over-densities (clumps). In this paper, we present a multi-wavelength study of five filamentary molecular clouds, containing several clumps in different evolutionary stages of star formation. We analyse the fragmentation of the filaments and derive the physical properties of their clumps. We find that the clumps in all filaments have a characteristic spacing consistent with the prediction of the `sausage' instability theory, regardless of the complex morphology of the filaments or their evolutionary stage. We also find t...

  3. Molecular detection technologies for arboviruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthropod-borne animal viruses (arboviruses) cause significant livestock and economic losses to world agriculture. This paper discusses the current and potential impact of these viruses, as well as the current and developing molecular diagnostic tools for those emerging and re-emerging insect transmitted viruses affecting livestock and wildlife. The emphasis is on viruses for which there have been significant recent outbreaks in livestock including: bluetongue virus (BTV), epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV), vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), and Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV). The current readiness for rapid detection of arboviruses is fairly high, but there is a need for global harmonisation and continued evaluation due to the genetic variation of these unique pathogens. The tool chest for molecular detection contains a range of assays from low technology to high-throughput sophisticated devices. (author)

  4. Molecular-specific urokinase antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atassi, M. Zouhair (Inventor); Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies have been developed against the different molecular forms of urokinase using synthetic peptides as immunogens. The peptides were synthesized specifically to represent those regions of the urokinase molecules which are exposed in the three-dimensional configuration of the molecule and are uniquely homologous to urokinase. Antibodies are directed against the lysine 158-isoleucine 159 peptide bond which is cleaved during activation from the single-chain (ScuPA) form to the bioactive double chain (54 KDa and 33 KDa) forms of urokinase and against the lysine 135 lysine 136 bond that is cleaved in the process of removing the alpha-chain from the 54 KDa form to produce the 33 KDa form of urokinase. These antibodies enable the direct measurement of the different molecular forms of urokinase from small samples of conditioned medium harvested from cell cultures.

  5. Molecular imaging in cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sairah R; Rockall, Andrea G; Barwick, Tara D

    2016-06-01

    Despite the development of screening and of a vaccine, cervix cancer is a major cause of cancer death in young women worldwide. A third of women treated for the disease will recur, almost inevitably leading to death. Functional imaging has the potential to stratify patients at higher risk of poor response or relapse by improved delineation of disease extent and tumor characteristics. A number of molecular imaging biomarkers have been shown to predict outcome at baseline and/or early during therapy in cervical cancer. In future this could help tailor the treatment plan which could include selection of patients for close follow up, adjuvant therapy or trial entry for novel agents or adaptive clinical trials. The use of molecular imaging techniques, FDG PET/CT and functional MRI, in staging and response assessment of cervical cancer is reviewed. PMID:26859085

  6. Aspectos moleculares da anemia falciforme

    OpenAIRE

    Galiza Neto Gentil Claudino de; Pitombeira Maria da Silva

    2003-01-01

    No presente artigo abordaram-se vários aspectos relacionados à natureza molecular da anemia falciforme, desordem hematológica de caráter hereditário que acomete expressivo número de indivíduos em várias regiões do mundo. As pesquisas realizadas em torno desta patologia da hemácia, ao longo de quase um século, a partir de 1910, cooperaram para a criação de um novo e importante segmento da ciência, denominado biologia molecular. A descoberta dos polimorfismos da mutação (GAT->GTG) no gene que c...

  7. Molecular Recognition within Synaptic Scaffolds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlendsson, Simon

    function. At the molecular level PICK1 contains both a BAR and a PDZ domain making it quite unique. Especially the specificity and promiscuity of the PICK1 PDZ domain seems to be more complicated than normally seen for PDZ domains. Also, the ability of PICK1 to form dimeric structures via its central BAR...... by the spatial architecture of the synapse itself. In this thesis, the molecular scaffolding mechanisms of PICK1 have been investigated in both isolated and near native conditions. Our findings have significantly benefitted the general understanding of how PICK1 and PDZ domain scaffolding works. In the first...... later in evolution to accommodate increasingly diverse PDZ domain ligands. Our findings provide basis for development of new and more specific peptide inhibitors. In the second study, we utilized SAXS, NMR spectroscopy, MD simulations and various other biochemical methods, to construct a full...

  8. Molecular approaches for bacterial azoreductases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montira Leelakriangsak

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Azo dyes are the dominant types of synthetic dyes, widely used in textiles, foods, leather, printing, tattooing, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries. Many microorganisms are able to decolorize azo dyes, and there is increasing interest in biological waste treatment methods. Bacterial azoreductases can cleave azo linkages (-N=N- in azo dyes, forming aromatic amines. This review mainly focuses on employing molecular approaches, including gene manipulation and recombinant strains, to study bacterial azoreductases. The construction of the recombinant protein by cloning and the overexpression of azoreductase is described. The mechanisms and function of bacterial azoreductases can be studied by other molecular techniques discussed in this review, such as RT-PCR, southern blot analysis, western blot analysis, zymography, and muta-genesis in order to understand bacterial azoreductase properties, function and application. In addition, understanding the regulation of azoreductase gene expression will lead to the systematic use of gene manipulation in bacterial strains for new strategies in future waste remediation technologies.

  9. Molecular deformation mechanisms in polyethylene

    CERN Document Server

    Coutry, S

    2001-01-01

    adjacent labelled stems is significantly larger when the DPE guest is a copolymer molecule. Our comparative studies on various types of polyethylene lead to the conclusion that their deformation behaviour under drawing has the same basis, with additional effects imputed to the presence of tie-molecules and branches. Three major points were identified in this thesis. The changes produced by drawing imply (1) the crystallisation of some of the amorphous polymer and the subsequent orientation of the newly formed crystals, (2) the re-orientation of the crystalline ribbons and (3) the beginning of crystallite break-up. However, additional effects were observed for the high molecular weight linear sample and the copolymer sample and were attributed, respectively, to the presence of tie-molecules and of branches. It was concluded that both the tie-molecules and the branches are restricting the molecular movement during deformation, and that the branches may be acting as 'anchors'. This work is concerned with details...

  10. Molecular tailoring of solid surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Evenson, S A

    1997-01-01

    The overall performance of a material can be dramatically improved by tailoring its surface at the molecular level. The aim of this project was to develop a universal technique for attaching dendrimers (well-defined, nanoscale, functional polymers) and Jeffamines (high molecular weight polymer chains) to the surface of any shaped solid substrate. This desire for controlled functionalization is ultimately driven by the need to improve material compatibility in various biomedical applications. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used initially to study the packing and structure of Langmuir-Blodgett films on surfaces, and subsequently resulted in the first visualization of individual, spherically shaped, nanoscopic polyamidoamine dendrimers. The next goal was to develop a methodology for attaching such macromolecules to inert surfaces. Thin copolymer films were deposited onto solid substrates to produce materials with a fixed concentration of surface anhydride groups. Vapor-phase functionalization reactions were t...

  11. A molecular dawn for biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, D.R.; Blackwood, C.B.; Waldrop, M.P.

    2006-01-01

    Biogeochemistry is at the dawn of an era in which molecular advances enable the discovery of novel microorganisms having unforeseen metabolic capabilities, revealing new insight into the underlying processes regulating elemental cycles at local to global scales. Traditionally, biogeochemical inquiry began by studying a process of interest, and then focusing downward to uncover the microorganisms and metabolic pathways mediating that process. With the ability to sequence functional genes from the environment, molecular approaches now enable the flow of inquiry in the opposite direction. Here, we argue that a focus on functional genes, the microorganisms in which they reside, and the interaction of those organisms with the broader microbial community could transform our understanding of many globally important biogeochemical processes. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular mimicry and multiple sclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael Namaka; Michael R. Mulvey; Sabina Kapoor; Leann Simms; Christine Leong; Amy Grossberndt; Michael Prouta; Emma Frost; Farid Esfahani; Andrew Gomori

    2011-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Although the exact underlying mechanism leading to myelin destruction is unknown, the molecular mimicry theory is the most commonly acknowledged elucidation of MS pathology. Although various antigens have been associated with MS induction, this review presents studies focused on key bacterial and viral antigens that lead to the development of MS. The research specific to a molecular mimicry theory of MS via each implicated agent is weak; however, collectively the reports provide credible support for this theory. Given that homologous sequences are not required to lead to antigenic cross-reactivity, it is reasonable to conclude that certain viral and bacterial antigens with 5-10 similar amino acids in sequence can lead to self destruction of similar myelin sequences. Thus, this literature review has provided insight to further the understanding of the etiology of multiple sclerosis.

  13. Symmetry breaking in molecular ferroelectrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ping-Ping; Tang, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Peng-Fei; Liao, Wei-Qiang; Wang, Zhong-Xia; Ye, Qiong; Xiong, Ren-Gen

    2016-07-11

    Ferroelectrics are inseparable from symmetry breaking. Accompanying the paraelectric-to-ferroelectric phase transition, the paraelectric phase adopting one of the 32 crystallographic point groups is broken into subgroups belonging to one of the 10 ferroelectric point groups, i.e. C1, C2, C1h, C2v, C4, C4v, C3, C3v, C6 and C6v. The symmetry breaking is captured by the order parameter known as spontaneous polarization, whose switching under an external electric field results in a typical ferroelectric hysteresis loop. In addition, the responses of spontaneous polarization to other external excitations are related to a number of physical effects such as second-harmonic generation, piezoelectricity, pyroelectricity and dielectric properties. Based on these, this review summarizes recent developments in molecular ferroelectrics since 2011 and focuses on the relationship between symmetry breaking and ferroelectricity, offering ideas for exploring high-performance molecular ferroelectrics. PMID:27051889

  14. Prediction of molecular crystal structures

    CERN Document Server

    Beyer, T

    2001-01-01

    The ab initio prediction of molecular crystal structures is a scientific challenge. Reliability of first-principle prediction calculations would show a fundamental understanding of crystallisation. Crystal structure prediction is also of considerable practical importance as different crystalline arrangements of the same molecule in the solid state (polymorphs)are likely to have different physical properties. A method of crystal structure prediction based on lattice energy minimisation has been developed in this work. The choice of the intermolecular potential and of the molecular model is crucial for the results of such studies and both of these criteria have been investigated. An empirical atom-atom repulsion-dispersion potential for carboxylic acids has been derived and applied in a crystal structure prediction study of formic, benzoic and the polymorphic system of tetrolic acid. As many experimental crystal structure determinations at different temperatures are available for the polymorphic system of parac...

  15. Articular cartilage collagen: an irreplaceable framework?

    OpenAIRE

    Eyre, D. R.; Weis, M A; J-J Wu

    2006-01-01

    Adult articular cartilage by dry weight is two-thirds collagen. The collagen has a unique molecular phenotype. The nascent type II collagen fibril is a heteropolymer, with collagen IX molecules covalently linked to the surface and collagen XI forming the filamentous template of the fibril as a whole. The functions of collagens IX and XI in the heteropolymer are far from clear but, evidently, they are critically important since mutations in COLIX and COLXI genes can result in chondrodysplasia ...

  16. Gastronomic botany and molecular gastronomy

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-Urria Carril, Elena; Gómez Garay, Aranzazu; Ávalos García, Adolfo; Martín Calvarro, Luisa; Pintos López, Beatriz; Saco Sierra, M. Dolores; Martín Gómez, M. Soledad; Pérez Alonso, M. José; Puelles Gallo, María; Palá Paúl, Jesús; Cifuentes Cuencas, Blanca; Llamas Ramos, José Eugenio

    2011-01-01

    Complutense University of Madrid through the "Vicerrectorado de Calidad" develops projects to innovate and improve teaching quality. Among these projects is "Gastronomic Botany and Molecular Gastronomy" which aims to develop new materials and tools for the Virtual Campus and consequently offer new possibilities for teaching and training. Also this project organize and structure a new teaching matter for post-graduate education that will be an example of approach, relationship and cooper...

  17. Harmful molecular mechanisms in sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    Rittirsch, Daniel; Flierl, Michael A; Ward, Peter A.

    2008-01-01

    Sepsis and sepsis-associated multi-organ failure are major challenges for scientists and clinicians and are a tremendous burden for health-care systems. Despite extensive basic research and clinical studies, the pathophysiology of sepsis is still poorly understood. We are now beginning to understand that sepsis is a heterogeneous, dynamic syndrome caused by imbalances in the ‘inflammatory network’. In this Review, we highlight recent insights into the molecular interactions that occur during ...

  18. EVOLUTIONARY FOUNDATIONS FOR MOLECULAR MEDICINE

    OpenAIRE

    Nesse, Randolph M.; Ganten, Detlev; Gregory, T. Ryan; Omenn, Gilbert S.

    2012-01-01

    Evolution has long provided a foundation for population genetics, but many major advances in evolutionary biology from the 20th century are only now being applied in molecular medicine. They include the distinction between proximate and evolutionary explanations, kin selection, evolutionary models for cooperation, and new strategies for tracing phylogenies and identifying signals of selection. Recent advances in genomics are further transforming evolutionary biology and creating yet more oppo...

  19. Molecular diagnostics and parasitic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasoo, Shawn; Pritt, Bobbi S

    2013-09-01

    Molecular parasitology represents an emerging field in microbiology diagnostics. Although most assays use nonstandardized, laboratory-developed methods, a few commercial systems have recently become available and are slowly being introduced into larger laboratories. In addition, a few methodologies show promise for use in field settings in which parasitic infections are endemic. This article reviews the available techniques and their applications to major parasitic diseases such as malaria, leishmaniasis, and trichomoniasis. PMID:23931835

  20. Molecular Determinants of Lung Development

    OpenAIRE

    Morrisey, Edward E.; Cardoso, Wellington V.; Lane, Robert H.; Rabinovitch, Marlene; Abman, Steven H.; Ai, Xingbin; Albertine, Kurt H; Bland, Richard D.; Chapman, Harold A.; Checkley, William; Epstein, Jonathan A.; Kintner, Christopher R.; Kumar, Maya; Minoo, Parviz; Mariani, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Development of the pulmonary system is essential for terrestrial life. The molecular pathways that regulate this complex process are beginning to be defined, and such knowledge is critical to our understanding of congenital and acquired lung diseases. A recent workshop was convened by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute to discuss the developmental principles that regulate the formation of the pulmonary system. Emerging evidence suggests that key developmental pathways not only regu...

  1. Controlling molecular transport through nanopores

    OpenAIRE

    Keyser, Ulrich F.

    2011-01-01

    Nanopores are emerging as powerful tools for the detection and identification of macromolecules in aqueous solution. In this review, we discuss the recent development of active and passive controls over molecular transport through nanopores with emphasis on biosensing applications. We give an overview of the solutions developed to enhance the sensitivity and specificity of the resistive-pulse technique based on biological and solid-state nanopores.

  2. The Molecular Neurobiology of Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Shelton, Richard C.

    2007-01-01

    The molecular neurobiology of depression begins with an idea: depressive disorders represent a family of related but distinct conditions. Different points of vulnerability in the brain may predispose to depressive disorders. For example, it is likely that the core pathophysiology of depression associated with early life adversity is different from non-trauma related disorders. In particular, the pathophysiology of trauma-related depression involves the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axi...

  3. Molecular Science Computing: 2010 Greenbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Jong, Wibe A.; Cowley, David E.; Dunning, Thom H.; Vorpagel, Erich R.

    2010-04-02

    This 2010 Greenbook outlines the science drivers for performing integrated computational environmental molecular research at EMSL and defines the next-generation HPC capabilities that must be developed at the MSC to address this critical research. The EMSL MSC Science Panel used EMSL’s vision and science focus and white papers from current and potential future EMSL scientific user communities to define the scientific direction and resulting HPC resource requirements presented in this 2010 Greenbook.

  4. Polymer-solvent molecular compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Guenet, Jean-Michel

    2010-01-01

    Crystallisable polymers represent a large share of the polymers used for manufacturing a wide variety of objects, and consequently have received continuous attention from scientists these past 60 years. Molecular compounds from crystallisable polymers, particularly from synthetic polymers, are receiving growing interest due to their potential application in the making of new materials such as multiporous membranes capable of capturing large particles as well as small pollutant molecules. The present book gives a detailed description of these promising systems. The first chapter

  5. Molecular markers for thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of the study of the thyroid nodule lies in excluding the possibility of a malignant lesion because the majority of lesions are benign but there is a malignancy risk of 5 to 10%. Most of them are well differentiated carcinomas originating in the follicular epithelium. In spite of the fact that the majority are benign lesions, distinguishing them from carcinomas is crucial to treatment and adequate follow-up. Fine-needle biopsy allows making the diagnosis in most of cases. However, this method is restricted, particularly when diagnosing follicular lesions. In an effort to improve the diagnostic accuracy of biopsy and to provide new diagnosing criteria, a number of molecular markers have been put forward, some of which has wide range of approval whereas others still awaits to be validated for further implementation. This article presented an updated review of molecular markers with higher number of evidence, more accessible and potentially usable from a methodological viewpoint for diagnosis of the thyroid nodule before surgery. The importance of the study of the thyroid nodule lies in excluding the possibility of a malignant lesion because the majority of lesions are benign but there is a malignancy risk of 5 to 10%. Most of them are well differentiated carcinomas originating in the follicular epithelium. In spite of the fact that the majority are benign lesions, distinguishing them from carcinomas is crucial to treatment and adequate follow-up. Fine-needle biopsy allows making the diagnosis in most of cases. However, this method is restricted, particularly when diagnosing follicular lesions. In an effort to improve the diagnostic accuracy of biopsy and to provide new diagnosing criteria, a number of molecular markers have been put forward, some of which has wide range of approval whereas others still awaits to be validated for further implementation. This article presented an updated review of molecular markers with higher number of evidence, more

  6. Ideally Efficient Irreversible Molecular Gears

    OpenAIRE

    Sokolov, I. M.

    2000-01-01

    Typical man-made locomotive devices use reversible gears, as cranks, for transforming reciprocating motion into directed one. Such gears are holonomic and have the transduction efficiency of unity. On the other hand, a typical gear of molecular motors is a ratchet rectifier, which is irreversible. We discuss what properties of rectifier mostly influence the transduction efficiency and show that an apliance which locks under backwards force can achieve the energetic efficiency of unity, withou...

  7. Interactive Modelling of Molecular Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustad, J. R.; Kreylos, O.; Hamann, B.

    2004-12-01

    The "Nanotech Construction Kit" (NCK) [1] is a new project aimed at improving the understanding of molecular structures at a nanometer-scale level by visualization and interactive manipulation. Our very first prototype is a virtual-reality program allowing the construction of silica and carbon structures from scratch by assembling them one atom at a time. In silica crystals or glasses, the basic building block is an SiO4 unit, with the four oxygen atoms arranged around the central silicon atom in the shape of a regular tetrahedron. Two silicate units can connect to each other by their silicon atoms covalently bonding to one shared oxygen atom. Geometrically, this means that two tetrahedra can link at their vertices. Our program is based on geometric representations and uses simple force fields to simulate the interaction of building blocks, such as forming/breaking of bonds and repulsion. Together with stereoscopic visualization and direct manipulation of building blocks using wands or data gloves, this enables users to create realistic and complex molecular models in short amounts of time. The NCK can either be used as a standalone tool, to analyze or experiment with molecular structures, or it can be used in combination with "traditional" molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In a first step, the NCK can create initial configurations for subsequent MD simulation. In a more evolved setup, the NCK can serve as a visual front-end for an ongoing MD simulation, visualizing changes in simulation state in real time. Additionally, the NCK can be used to change simulation state on-the-fly, to experiment with different simulation conditions, or force certain events, e.g., the forming of a bond, and observe the simulation's reaction. [1] http://graphics.cs.ucdavis.edu/~okreylos/ResDev/NanoTech

  8. The molecular underpinnings of totipotency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgani, Sophie Maria Christina; Brickman, Joshua Mark

    2014-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are characterized by their functional potency and capacity to self-renew in culture. Historically, ES cells have been defined as pluripotent, able to make the embryonic but not the extraembryonic lineages (such as the yolk sac and the placenta). The functional capacity o...... lineages and, therefore, can be said to be totipotent. Here, we consider the molecular basis for this totipotent state, its transcriptional signature and the signalling pathways that define it....

  9. Molecular Pathways Controlling Pancreas induction

    OpenAIRE

    McCracken, Kyle W.; Wells, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in generating pancreatic cell types from human pluripotent stem cells has depended on our knowledge of the developmental processes that regulate pancreas development in vivo. The developmental events between gastrulation and formation of the embryonic pancreatic primordia are both rapid and dynamic and studies in frog, fish, chick, and mouse have identified the molecular basis of how the pancreas develops from multipotent endoderm progenitors. Here, we review the current statu...

  10. Molecular invariants: atomic group valence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular invariants may be deduced in a very compact way through Grassman algebra. In this work, a generalized valence is defined for an atomic group; it reduces to the Known expressions for the case of an atom in a molecule. It is the same of the correlations between the fluctions of the atomic charges qc and qd (C belongs to the group and D does not) around their average values. Numerical results agree with chemical expectation. (author)

  11. Molecular Organization of Vomeronasal Chemoreception

    OpenAIRE

    Isogai, Yoh; Si, Sheng; Pont-Lezica, Lorena; Tan, Taralyn Marie; Kapoor, Vikrant; Murthy, Venkatesh N.; Dulac, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    The vomeronasal organ (VNO) has a key role in mediating the social and defensive responses of many terrestrial vertebrates to species- and sex-specific chemosignals. More than 250 putative pheromone receptors have been identified in the mouse VNO, but the nature of the signals detected by individual VNO receptors has not yet been elucidated. To gain insight into the molecular logic of VNO detection leading to mating, aggression or defensive responses, we sought to uncover the response profile...

  12. EAACI Molecular Allergology User's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matricardi, P M; Kleine-Tebbe, J; Hoffmann, H J; Valenta, R; Hilger, C; Hofmaier, S; Aalberse, R C; Agache, I; Asero, R; Ballmer-Weber, B; Barber, D; Beyer, K; Biedermann, T; Bilò, M B; Blank, S; Bohle, B; Bosshard, P P; Breiteneder, H; Brough, H A; Caraballo, L; Caubet, J C; Crameri, R; Davies, J M; Douladiris, N; Ebisawa, M; EIgenmann, P A; Fernandez-Rivas, M; Ferreira, F; Gadermaier, G; Glatz, M; Hamilton, R G; Hawranek, T; Hellings, P; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, K; Jakob, T; Jappe, U; Jutel, M; Kamath, S D; Knol, E F; Korosec, P; Kuehn, A; Lack, G; Lopata, A L; Mäkelä, M; Morisset, M; Niederberger, V; Nowak-Węgrzyn, A H; Papadopoulos, N G; Pastorello, E A; Pauli, G; Platts-Mills, T; Posa, D; Poulsen, L K; Raulf, M; Sastre, J; Scala, E; Schmid, J M; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P; van Hage, M; van Ree, R; Vieths, S; Weber, R; Wickman, M; Muraro, A; Ollert, M

    2016-05-01

    The availability of allergen molecules ('components') from several protein families has advanced our understanding of immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated responses and enabled 'component-resolved diagnosis' (CRD). The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) Molecular Allergology User's Guide (MAUG) provides comprehensive information on important allergens and describes the diagnostic options using CRD. Part A of the EAACI MAUG introduces allergen molecules, families, composition of extracts, databases, and diagnostic IgE, skin, and basophil tests. Singleplex and multiplex IgE assays with components improve both sensitivity for low-abundance allergens and analytical specificity; IgE to individual allergens can yield information on clinical risks and distinguish cross-reactivity from true primary sensitization. Part B discusses the clinical and molecular aspects of IgE-mediated allergies to foods (including nuts, seeds, legumes, fruits, vegetables, cereal grains, milk, egg, meat, fish, and shellfish), inhalants (pollen, mold spores, mites, and animal dander), and Hymenoptera venom. Diagnostic algorithms and short case histories provide useful information for the clinical workup of allergic individuals targeted for CRD. Part C covers protein families containing ubiquitous, highly cross-reactive panallergens from plant (lipid transfer proteins, polcalcins, PR-10, profilins) and animal sources (lipocalins, parvalbumins, serum albumins, tropomyosins) and explains their diagnostic and clinical utility. Part D lists 100 important allergen molecules. In conclusion, IgE-mediated reactions and allergic diseases, including allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, asthma, food reactions, and insect sting reactions, are discussed from a novel molecular perspective. The EAACI MAUG documents the rapid progression of molecular allergology from basic research to its integration into clinical practice, a quantum leap in the management of allergic patients. PMID:27288833

  13. Molecular Control of Macromolecular Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, Thomas Wesley, III

    Molecular level control over macromolecules has been at the heart of human advancement, long before Hermann Staudinger coined the term Makromolekule. From the development of primitive pharmaceuticals to the advanced materials that sent Man into outer-space, We have been tinkering with God's paint since our inception. The work described herein primarily involves advances concerning poly-aromatic macromolecules for use in future electronic applications, particularly that of organic photovoltaics. There is a final chapter, however, that gives the reader a taste of how some molecular level changes can be directly visualized with modern microscopy techniques. Chapter 1 provides a very brief introduction to conjugated polymers and molecular level control over macromolecular properties. Chapters 2--4 introduces the concept of polymer substitution as a means by which to control and improve charge generation in organic photovoltaic devices. Chapters 5 and 6 show how these polymers can take on larger, defined structures, yet are still beholden to intrinsic molecular properties---such as regioregularity, a fancy word for the regularity of the position in which two aromatic rings are joined together. Chapter 7 re-examines the role of polymer substitution on photovoltaic performance, this time with an emphasis on homo-polymer packing rather than electron transfer at the donor/acceptor interface. Finally, Chapter 8 visualizes how controlling the environment about a single metal atom can lead directly to a cyclic polyolefin. Individually, these advances do not yield any breakthroughs noticeable to a general audience; collectively, they sit atop a mountain of human knowledge, waiting to provide a stepping stone for the next generation.

  14. Molecular Engineering of dosimetric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was studied the thermoluminescent response to the gamma radiation of a new family of solid materials of zircon-silica. In this study some materials have been prepared by the sol-gel method with different stoichiometric relations, finding that it is possible to control, at least, partially, the thermoluminescent behavior starting from the Molecular Engineering of those materials, since the mixture of both ceramics allows to produce materials with different spatial structures. (Author)

  15. Molecular similarity of MDR inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Simon Gibbons; Mire Zloh

    2004-01-01

    Abstract: The molecular similarity of multidrug resistance (MDR) inhibitors was evaluated using the point centred atom charge approach in an attempt to find some common features of structurally unrelated inhibitors. A series of inhibitors of bacterial MDR were studied and there is a high similarity between these in terms of their shape, presence and orientation of aromatic ring moieties. A comparison of the lipophilic properties of these molecules has also been conducted suggesting that this ...

  16. Molecular fluorescence principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Valeur, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    This second edition of the well-established bestseller is completely updated and revised with approximately 30 % additional material, including two new chapters on applications, which has seen the most significant developments. The comprehensive overview written at an introductory level covers fundamental aspects, principles of instrumentation and practical applications, while providing many valuable tips. For photochemists and photophysicists, physical chemists, molecular physicists, biophysicists, biochemists and biologists, lecturers and students of chemistry, physic

  17. Molecular approaches for bacterial azoreductases

    OpenAIRE

    Montira Leelakriangsak

    2013-01-01

    Azo dyes are the dominant types of synthetic dyes, widely used in textiles, foods, leather, printing, tattooing, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries. Many microorganisms are able to decolorize azo dyes, and there is increasing interest in biological waste treatment methods. Bacterial azoreductases can cleave azo linkages (-N=N-) in azo dyes, forming aromatic amines. This review mainly focuses on employing molecular approaches, including gene manipulation and recombinant strains, to study...

  18. Benchmarking Sets for Molecular Docking

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Niu; Shoichet, Brian K.; Irwin, John J.

    2006-01-01

    Ligand enrichment among top-ranking hits is a key metric of molecular docking. To avoid bias, decoys should resemble ligands physically, so that enrichment is not simply a separation of gross features, yet be chemically distinct from them, so that they are unlikely to be binders. We have assembled a directory of useful decoys (DUD), with 2950 ligands for 40 different targets. Every ligand has 36 decoy molecules that are physically similar but topologically distinct, leading to a database of 9...

  19. Better, Cheaper, Faster Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recent, revolutionary progress in genomics and structural, molecular and cellular biology has created new opportunities for molecular-level computer simulations of biological systems by providing vast amounts of data that require interpretation. These opportunities are further enhanced by the increasing availability of massively parallel computers. For many problems, the method of choice is classical molecular dynamics (iterative solving of Newton's equations of motion). It focuses on two main objectives. One is to calculate the relative stability of different states of the system. A typical problem that has' such an objective is computer-aided drug design. Another common objective is to describe evolution of the system towards a low energy (possibly the global minimum energy), "native" state. Perhaps the best example of such a problem is protein folding. Both types of problems share the same difficulty. Often, different states of the system are separated by high energy barriers, which implies that transitions between these states are rare events. This, in turn, can greatly impede exploration of phase space. In some instances this can lead to "quasi non-ergodicity", whereby a part of phase space is inaccessible on time scales of the simulation. To overcome this difficulty and to extend molecular dynamics to "biological" time scales (millisecond or longer) new physical formulations and new algorithmic developments are required. To be efficient they should account for natural limitations of multi-processor computer architecture. I will present work along these lines done in my group. In particular, I will focus on a new approach to calculating the free energies (stability) of different states and to overcoming "the curse of rare events". I will also discuss algorithmic improvements to multiple time step methods and to the treatment of slowly decaying, log-ranged, electrostatic effects.

  20. How to Calculate Molecular Column Density

    CERN Document Server

    Mangum, Jeffrey G

    2015-01-01

    The calculation of the molecular column density from molecular spectral (rotational or ro-vibrational) transition measurements is one of the most basic quantities derived from molecular spectroscopy. Starting from first principles where we describe the basic physics behind the radiative and collisional excitation of molecules and the radiative transfer of their emission, we derive a general expression for the molecular column density. As the calculation of the molecular column density involves a knowledge of the molecular energy level degeneracies, rotational partition functions, dipole moment matrix elements, and line strengths, we include generalized derivations of these molecule-specific quantities. Given that approximations to the column density equation are often useful, we explore the optically thin, optically thick, and low-frequency limits to our derived general molecular column density relation. We also evaluate the limitations of the common assumption that the molecular excitation temperature is con...

  1. 14th international symposium on molecular beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses research being conducted with molecular beams. The general topic areas are as follows: Clusters I; reaction dynamics; atomic and molecular spectroscopy; clusters II; new techniques; photodissociation dynamics; and surfaces.

  2. 14th international symposium on molecular beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    This report discusses research being conducted with molecular beams. The general topic areas are as follows: Clusters I; reaction dynamics; atomic and molecular spectroscopy; clusters II; new techniques; photodissociation & dynamics; and surfaces.

  3. Engaging with Molecular Form to Understand Function

    OpenAIRE

    Barber, Nicola C.; Stark, Louisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between form and function is critical for appreciating biology at the molecular level. This feature explores online materials that connect molecular structures with their functional relevance.

  4. Molecular markers: tools to improve genebank efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hintum, van T.J.L.; Treuren, van R.

    2002-01-01

    Possibilities for using molecular markers to improve genebank efficiency are increasingly present thanks to developments in genebanks and developments in molecular genetics. These possibilities relate to all aspects of genebank management: acquisition, maintenance, characterisation and utilisation.

  5. 14th international symposium on molecular beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses research being conducted with molecular beams. The general topic areas are as follows: Clusters I; reaction dynamics; atomic and molecular spectroscopy; clusters II; new techniques; photodissociation ampersand dynamics; and surfaces

  6. The Molecular Weight Distribution of Polymer Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horta, Arturo; Pastoriza, M. Alejandra

    2007-01-01

    Various methods for the determination of the molecular weight distribution (MWD) of different polymer samples are presented. The study shows that the molecular weight averages and distribution of a polymerization completely depend on the characteristics of the reaction itself.

  7. Black Sprayable Molecular Adsorber Coating Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This novel molecular adsorber coating would alleviate the size, weight, and complexity issues of traditional molecular adsorber puck.  A flexible tape version...

  8. Laboratory Information Systems in Molecular Diagnostics: Why Molecular Diagnostics Data are Different.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Roy E; Henricks, Walter H; Sirintrapun, Sahussapont J

    2016-03-01

    Molecular diagnostic testing presents new challenges to information management that are yet to be sufficiently addressed by currently available information systems for the molecular laboratory. These challenges relate to unique aspects of molecular genetic testing: molecular test ordering, informed consent issues, diverse specimen types that encompass the full breadth of specimens handled by traditional anatomic and clinical pathology information systems, data structures and data elements specific to molecular testing, varied testing workflows and protocols, diverse instrument outputs, unique needs and requirements of molecular test reporting, and nuances related to the dissemination of molecular pathology test reports. By satisfactorily addressing these needs in molecular test data management, a laboratory information system designed for the unique needs of molecular diagnostics presents a compelling reason to migrate away from the current paper and spreadsheet information management that many molecular laboratories currently use. This paper reviews the issues and challenges of information management in the molecular diagnostics laboratory. PMID:26849819

  9. NATO Conference on Molecular Metals

    CERN Document Server

    1979-01-01

    During the past few years there has been intense research activity in the design, synthesis, and characterization of materials which are formed from molecular precursors, and which have high or metal-like electrical conductivities, i.e. dcr/dT < O. It has been widely supposed that these new materials, which are commonly called molecular metals, would be pressed into service, for example as devices. Up to now, widespread, practical applications of these sub­ stances have not developed. The NATO Advanced Research Institute on Molecular Metals at Les Arcs, France, September 10-16, 1978 was organized to discuss the scientific and technological potential of research and development in this field. The proceedings of the Institute constitute this book. Several lectures were devoted to the assessment of the present status of research on systems which serve to define major components of the field. The systems which were discussed included TTF-TCNQ, platinum chain compounds, (SN)x, polyacetylene, polydiacetylene, g...

  10. Shape resonances in molecular fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A shape resonance is a quasibound state in which a particle is temporarily trapped by a potential barrier (i.e., the shape of the potential), through which it may eventually tunnel and escape. This simple mechanism plays a prominent role in a variety of excitation processes in molecules, ranging from vibrational excitation by slow electrons to ionization of deep core levels by x-rays. Moreover, their localized nature makes shape resonances a unifying link between otherwise dissimilar circumstances. One example is the close connection between shape resonances in electron-molecule scattering and in molecular photoionization. Another is the frequent persistence of free-molecule shape resonant behavior upon adsorption on a surface or condensation into a molecular solid. The main focus of this article is a discussion of the basic properties of shape resonances in molecular fields, illustrated by the more transparent examples studied over the last ten years. Other aspects to be discussed are vibrational effects of shape resonances, connections between shape resonances in different physical settings, and examples of shape resonant behavior in more complex cases, which form current challenges in this field

  11. Molecular oncology of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyooka, Shinichi; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Soh, Junichi; Aokage, Keiju; Yamane, Masaomi; Oto, Takahiro; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Miyoshi, Shinichiro

    2011-08-01

    Progress in genetic engineering has made it possible to elucidate the molecular biological abnormalities in lung cancer. Mutations in KRAS and P53 genes, loss of specific alleles, and DNA methylation of the tumor suppressor genes were the major abnormalities investigated between 1980 and the 2000s. In 2004, mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene that cause oncogene addiction were discovered in non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLCs), especially in adenocarcinomas. Because they are strongly associated with sensitivity to EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs), a great deal of knowledge has been acquired in regard to both EGFR and other genes in the EGFR family and their downstream genes. Moreover, in 2007 the existence of the echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion gene was discovered in NSCLC; and the same as EGFR-TKIs, ALK inhibitors are being found to be highly effective in lung cancers that have this translocation. These discoveries graphically illustrate that molecular biological findings are directly linked to the development of clinical oncology and to improving the survival rates of lung cancer patients. Here, we review the remarkable progress in molecular biological knowledge acquired thus far in regard to lung cancer, especially NSCLC, and the future possibilities. PMID:21850578

  12. Molecular Diagnosis of Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Movahedian A

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH is anautosomal disorder characterized by increased levels of total cholesterol andlow density lipoprotein cholesterol. The FH clinical phenotype has beenassociated with increased risk of coronary heart disease and premature death.The mutation in LDLR gene in most cases is responsible for FH phenotype.Furthermore, other gene mutations such as apolipoprotein B- gene may causesimilar results. Preliminary research indicates that the FH phenotype is alsoinfluenced by other genetic and environmental Factors; therefore, routineclinical analysis such as total cholesterol and LDL-C levels in serum, for earlydiagnosis and treatment, are not sufficient. Molecular diagnosticinvestigations, because of high specifity and sensitivity near %100,administered for determining the prevalent mutations in LDLR (and probablyother genes are needed for exact diagnosis and accurate therapy. Currently,PCR-SSCP and southern blotting techniques are among the commontechniques that could detect major mutations in gene.Because of wide diversity in kinds of mutations in LDLR gene, werecommend, first, determining the proband's mutation and kinds of mutation,then, performing routine test based on type of mutation.Key words: Familial hyperlipoproteinemia, LDL-R gene molecular diagnosis,mutation, Molecular Diagnostic Method

  13. Rheology via nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The equilibrium molecular dynamics formulated by Newton, Lagrange, and Hamilton has been modified in order to simulate rheologial molecular flows with fast computers. This modified Nonequilibrium Molecular Dynamics (NEMD) has been applied to fluid and solid deformations, under both homogeneous and shock conditions, as well as to the transport of heat. The irreversible heating associated with dissipation could be controlled by carrying out isothermal NEMD calculations. The new isothermal NEMD equations of motion are consistent with Gauss' 1829 Least-Constraint principle as well as certain microscopic equilibrium and nonequilibrium statistical formulations due to Gibbs and Boltzmann. Application of isothermal NEMD revealed high-frequency and high-strain-rate behavior for simple fluids which resembled the behavior of polymer solutions and melts at lower frequencies and strain rates. For solids NEMD produces plastic flows consistent with experimental observations at much lower strain rates. The new nonequilibrium methods also suggest novel formulations of thermodynamics in nonequilibrium systems and shed light on the failure of the Principle of Material Frame Indifference

  14. Attosecond delays in molecular photoionization

    CERN Document Server

    Huppert, Martin; Baykusheva, Denitsa; von Conta, Aaron; Wörner, Hans Jakob

    2016-01-01

    We report measurements of energy-dependent attosecond photoionization delays between the two outer-most valence shells of N$_2$O and H$_2$O. The combination of single-shot signal referencing with the use of different metal foils to filter the attosecond pulse train enables us to extract delays from congested spectra. Remarkably large delays up to 160 as are observed in N$_2$O, whereas the delays in H$_2$O are all smaller than 50 as in the photon-energy range of 20-40 eV. These results are interpreted by developing a theory of molecular photoionization delays. The long delays measured in N$_2$O are shown to reflect the population of molecular shape resonances that trap the photoelectron for a duration of up to $\\sim$110 as. The unstructured continua of H$_2$O result in much smaller delays at the same photon energies. Our experimental and theoretical methods make the study of molecular attosecond photoionization dynamics accessible.

  15. Evolving Molecular Genetics of Glioblastoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiu-Ju Li; Jin-Quan Cai; Cheng-Yin Liu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To summary the recent advances in molecular research of glioblastoma (GBM) and current trends in personalized therapy of this disease.Data Sources: Data cited in this review were obtained mainly from PubMed in English up to 2015, with keywords "molecular", "genetics", "GBM", "isocitrate dehydrogenase", "telomerase reverse transcriptase", "epidermal growth factor receptor", "PTPRZ1-MET", and "clinical treatment".Study Selection: Articles regarding the morphological pathology of GBM, the epidemiology of GBM, genetic alteration of GBM, and the development of treatment for GBM patients were identified, retrieved, and reviewed.Results: There is a large amount of data supporting the view that these recurrent genetic aberrations occur in a specific context of cellular origin, co-oncogenic hits and are present in distinct patient populations.Primary and secondary GBMs are distinct disease entities that affect different age groups of patients and develop through distinct genetic aberrations.These differences are important, especially because they may affect sensitivity to radio-and chemo-therapy and should thus be considered in the identification of targets for novel therapeutic approaches.Conclusion: This review highlights the molecular and genetic alterations of GBM, indicating that they are of potential value in the diagnosis and treatment for patients with GBM.

  16. Shape resonances in molecular fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehmer, Joseph L.

    1984-01-01

    A shape resonance is a quasibound state in which a particle is temporarily trapped by a potential barrier (i.e., the shape of the potential), through which it may eventually tunnel and escape. This simple mechanism plays a prominent role in a variety of excitation processes in molecules, ranging from vibrational excitation by slow electrons to ionization of deep core levels by x-rays. Moreover, their localized nature makes shape resonances a unifying link between otherwise dissimilar circumstances. One example is the close connection between shape resonances in electron-molecule scattering and in molecular photoionization. Another is the frequent persistence of free-molecule shape resonant behavior upon adsorption on a surface or condensation into a molecular solid. The main focus of this article is a discussion of the basic properties of shape resonances in molecular fields, illustrated by the more transparent examples studied over the last ten years. Other aspects to be discussed are vibrational effects of shape resonances, connections between shape resonances in different physical settings, and examples of shape resonant behavior in more complex cases, which form current challenges in this field.

  17. MOLECULAR DIAGNOSTICS OF YERSINIA RUCKERI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. Rud

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The analysis of nucleotide sequences of the 16S rDNA gene of virulent strains of Yersinia ruckeri and to develop the method of molecular diagnostic of enteric redmouth disease. Methodology. By the method of CLUSTALW algorithm in MEGA software version 6.0 the nucleotide sequences of the 16S rDNA gene of virulent strains of Yersinia ruckeri were analysed. For development of molecular diagnostic of Y. ruckeri the method of polymerase chain reaction (PCR was used. Primer selection was carried out in software VectorNTI11 and on-line-service BLAST. The PCR products were investigated by the methods of sequencing and nucleotide analysis. Findings. Based on PCR assay the method of molecular diagnostic of enteric redmouth disease agent, bacterium Y. ruckeri was developed. It was shown that specific oligonucleotide primers generated PCR products in size of 600 base pairs. PCR products were investigated by the sequencing that showed right targeting of primers in reaction. Originality. Among high-conservative gene of 16S rDNA of Y. ruckeri the fragment of DNA was determined to which the specific primers for rapid diagnostic of virulent strains were selected. Practical Value. Rapid diagnostic of yersiniosis will allow to identify an agent of this infectious disease, bacterium Y. ruckeri, and to provide the prophylactic or medical measures in the fish farming of Ukraine.

  18. Molecular Gas in Compact Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Israel, F P

    2005-01-01

    New observations of 11 compact galaxies in the 12CO J=2-1 and J=3-2 transitions and literature data have been used to construct accurate line ratios in matched beams allowing LVG modelling of physical parameters. Fitting a single gas component to observed line ratios tends to produce physically unrealistic results, and is often not possible at all. Much better results are obtained by modelling two distinct gas components. The molecular gas is usually warm (T(kin)=50-150 K) and at least partially dense (n(H2)>3000 cm3). Most of the gas-phase carbon in these galaxies is in atomic form; only a small fraction (5%) is in carbon monoxide. Beam-averaged CO column densities are low, typically 10(16) cm2 but molecular hydrogen column densities are high, of the order of 10(22) cm2 and confirm large CO-to-H2 conversion factors, typically X = 10(21)-10(22) cm2(K kms-1) found in low-metallicity environments by other methods. From CO spectroscopy, three different types of molecular environment are distinguished in compact ...

  19. Molecular genetics of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogaert, Julie; Prenen, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 90% of colorectal cancer cases are sporadic without family history or genetic predisposition, while in less than 10% a causative genetic event has been identified. Historically, colorectal cancer classification was only based on clinical and pathological features. Many efforts have been made to discover the genetic and molecular features of colorectal cancer, and there is more and more evidence that these features determine the prognosis and response to (targeted) treatment. Colorectal cancer is a heterogeneous disease, with three known major molecular groups. The most common is the chromosomal instable group, characterized by an accumulation of mutations in specific oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. The second is the microsatellite instable group, caused by dysfunction of DNA mismatch repair genes leading to genetic hypermutability. The CpG Island Methylation phenotype is the third group, distinguished by hypermethylation. Colorectal cancer subtyping has also been addressed using genome-wide gene expression profiling in large patient cohorts and recently several molecular classification systems have been proposed. In this review we would like to provide an up-to-date overview of the genetic aspects of colorectal cancer. PMID:24714764

  20. Rheology via nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoover, W.G.

    1982-10-01

    The equilibrium molecular dynamics formulated by Newton, Lagrange, and Hamilton has been modified in order to simulate rheologial molecular flows with fast computers. This modified Nonequilibrium Molecular Dynamics (NEMD) has been applied to fluid and solid deformations, under both homogeneous and shock conditions, as well as to the transport of heat. The irreversible heating associated with dissipation could be controlled by carrying out isothermal NEMD calculations. The new isothermal NEMD equations of motion are consistent with Gauss' 1829 Least-Constraint principle as well as certain microscopic equilibrium and nonequilibrium statistical formulations due to Gibbs and Boltzmann. Application of isothermal NEMD revealed high-frequency and high-strain-rate behavior for simple fluids which resembled the behavior of polymer solutions and melts at lower frequencies and strain rates. For solids NEMD produces plastic flows consistent with experimental observations at much lower strain rates. The new nonequilibrium methods also suggest novel formulations of thermodynamics in nonequilibrium systems and shed light on the failure of the Principle of Material Frame Indifference.